• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 All Is Not Gold That Glitters
 He Who Sleeps Long in the Morning,...
 Evil Comes to Him Who Evil...
 He Who Rides Too Far Hurts His...
 Never Undertake More Than You Can...
 More By Good Fortune Than...
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Better than rubies : stories for the young ; illustrative of familiar proverbs
Title: Better than rubies
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00035183/00001
 Material Information
Title: Better than rubies stories for the young ; illustrative of familiar proverbs
Physical Description: 125 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Nimmo, William Philip, 1831-1883 ( Publisher )
Lorimer and Gillies ( Printer )
Publisher: William P. Nimmo
Place of Publication: London ;
Edinburgh
Manufacturer: Lorimer and Gillies
Publication Date: 1878
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1878   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1878   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1878
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with sixty-two illustrations.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy includes hand-colored gift illustration following text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00035183
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002222174
notis - ALG2411
oclc - 61463290

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Half Title
        Page ii
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    All Is Not Gold That Glitters
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    He Who Sleeps Long in the Morning, Trots All the Day
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Evil Comes to Him Who Evil Does
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    He Who Rides Too Far Hurts His Beast
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Never Undertake More Than You Can Perform Well
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    More By Good Fortune Than Merit
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text
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OUR FRONTISPIECE.



What a pretty picture Little Rosebud,
and her cousin, Little Poppy, are making
a chain of roses. Little Poppy has just
brought a lapful of lovely red roses in full
bloom, which Little Rosebud takes one by
one to make her chain with, as she kneels
on the floor.







LITTLE ROSEBUD'S PICTURE BOOK.


































Little Rosebud shows her Picture Book to her brother Ernie.
5








S6 YTHE STRAY KITIEi.










































Poor little Kitty meets with some kind friends.







AN UNEXPECTED SENSA TION." 7








































"Stay !-this is my little boy, who was stolen from home."







8 "WESTWARD HO/"





































Here is an emigrant ship just about to start. The passengers and
their families are already on board. What a busy scene!







THE POLAR BEAR AND HER CUBS. 9





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The crew of a vessel in the Northern Seas set fire to some walrus
blubber, when a hungry she-bear with her two cubs came up and
eagerly drew out some of the flesh. The sailors threw out some
more pieces, which the old bear took singly to the cubs. As she was
fetching the last piece, the men shot both cubs, and wounded the
mother. It was pitiful to see the poor animal, as she fell between
her two cubs, and died licking their wounds.







To A GREAT EMPEROR.

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Henry the First of Germany, called "The Fowler."








"TO THE RESCUE!" Ir





















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It is about sixty years ago. The ladies wear quaint fur-trimmed
dresses, and carry large muffs. They have come out to watch the
skating. Crack! goes the ice, and in pops an unlucky skater.









12 THE hAA Y QUEEN.



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Young Giles crown-, his sister Queen of the May.






THE SPANISH BRIDE. 13

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"Oh, saw you not fair Ines ? To dazzle when the sun is down,
She's gone into the west And rob the world of rest."
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" Oh, saw y~ou not fair Ines ? To dazzle when the sun is dowln,
She's gone into the west-- And rob the world of rest."






54 SCENES FROM SHAKESPEARE.





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Pistol captures a French gentleman.












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Fluellen makes Pistol eat the leek.








.1 MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM. 15













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Peter Quince allots the parts in the play to Bottom the Weaver
and his companions, who are to act before the Duke.







*16 A VISITOR TO THE FARM.








































The "gentleman from town" goes out in the wagon.







THE HORSE AND THE STAG. 17









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A Horse and a Stag quarrelled, when the Horse was beaten. So
the Horse asked a Man to help him, which the Man agreed to do, if
he would allow himself to be saddled and bridled. The Horse con-
sented, when the Man got on his back, and the Stag was defeated.
But when the Horse, thanking the Man, asked him to dismount, he
refused, and kept the Horse to ride on ever after.
Ii








38 THE FA VOURITE AUTHOR.







































A quiet hour in the old library.








HOME SCENES.









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-- .










"My old straw hat."



















A wedding at the old church.








20 A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM.












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Puck, or Robin Goodfellow, frightens the milkmaids-




















And, as Will-o'-the-Wisp, misleads night wanderers.







A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM. 21


















Puck plays tricks on the old gossips.


















A Fairy Concert.






22 A SEASIDE HOLIDAY.


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A FAIRY LEGEND. 23

































Do you see this funny little elf on the edge of the milkpail ? He
is a fairy, who takes care of good children. Anna and Lisa are
thirsty, but have no cups to drink out of. Never mind!" cries he,
popping up, "gather me two buttercups." The children bring the
flowers, when he turns them into excellent drinking-cups!








24 A LONG FAREWELL.

























Kate will see the last of her dear brother's shi.
.... .























Kate will see the last of her dear brother's ship.
Ka. .--_-": e th --s .f he _- de br__7._-- _y







THE HORSE AND HIS MASTER. 25
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A Farmer, riding home from a jovial meeting, could not resist
drowsiness, and fell from the saddle to the ground; but not being
hurt, he felt quite content to rest where he was. Meanwhile his faith-
ful steed kept a strict watch over his fallen master. Next morning
the Farmer was found by some men; but when they wished to raise
him and place him in the saddle, the Horse would not allow them to
come near, thinking that they meant to injure him.
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come near, thinking that they meant to injure him.







26 THE HERO OE CRESSY.


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SCENES FROM SHAKESPEARE. 27






















Murder of the Princes in the Tower.








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Execution of the Duke of Buckingham.






28 THE CONSCRIPT'S RETURN.










































Francois comes back safe and sound from the wars.








THE SHIPWRECKED ASS. 29








._' .......... .. -. "





















An ass belonging to an officer was shipped on board a frigate
bound from Gibraltar to Malta. The vessel struck on a sand-bank
"off Cape de Gat, and the ass was thrown overboard in the hope that
"it might swim to shore, of which, however, there seemed little chance,
as the sea was running very high. But a few days after, the ass
landed safely at Gibraltar, and quietly walked into its old stable,
having swum a distance of more than two hundred miles!







30 A PICTURE OF THE OLDEN TIME.



































This lady has fled for her life, with her little baby. The cruel
foe pursues; but hark-the convent bell tells that refuge is near.








MIDDLE-AGE SCENES. 31







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"A Council of Nobles.


















"Have you heard the news ? "







32 A.4 MIDSUMMER NIGh4T'S DREAM.



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Puck fixes an ass's head on Bottom the Weaver.






A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM. 33



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Puck and Oberon.














Bottom's companions flee in terror at the sight of his ass's head.
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34 THE OX AND THE SHEEP

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Sometimes a sheep will get thrown on the broad part of its back,
when, in spite of all its efforts, it cannot manage without help to get
on its legs again, seeing which the ravens will often settle on it, and
pluck out its eyes. One day a sheep had got thus thrown, when an
ox grazing near walked up and coolly turned it over on its side,
quietly resuming its feeding as if it felt quite sure that it had done
the right thing.
the right thing.






SWEET SUMMiER-TIMIE. 35
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.--Out in the fields on a summer holiday.
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36 A PRIZE.









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"Do look!" cries little Florrie ; "such lovely violets !"
"Do lok cris lttleFlor~e ;"suh loely loles !








OUT-OF-DOOR LIFE. 37






















A waif of the woods.
















A sea-urchin.






38 A POSER.


































". Try 'em with a question or two?" cries poor Mr. Whiffles; "I
don't know what to ask 'em-they seem to know everything !"
don't know what to ask 'em--they seem to know everything ["







A LEISURE HOUR. 39





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A summer evening on the lawn.







40 THE FAWN AND HER MOTHER.








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One day, as a Doe stood listening to the distant baying of the
hounds, and quaking in every limb, her little Fawn asked her why
this was, seeing that she was taller and swifter than a Dog, and so well
------

























able to defend herself ? The Mother said, I don't know, but so it
is; as soon as I hear a Dog bark, my heels carry me off as fast as
they can Instinct is stronger than reason.
-.


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One cay, as a Doe stood listening to the distant baying of the
hounds, and quaking in every limb, her little Fa.n asked her why
this was, seeing that she was taller and swifter than a Dog, and so well
able to defend herself? The Mother said, I don't know, but so it

they can! Instinct is stronger than reason.









CRICKET IN THE OLDEN TIME. 41






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The Vicar brings his pretty daughter to see the cricketers.








42 WEATHERING TilE STORM.


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Steady, boys, steady we'll pull her through, yet !"







SEA-BIRDS. 43















The Stormy Petrel is called by the sailors Mother Carey's Chicken,"
and is generally seen skimming along the waves in windy weather.



















The Frigate Bird flies very swiftly, but it cannot fish for itself, so it
robs the other birds as they are flying home with their prey.







44 A MIIDSUMMiER NIGHT'S DREAMk.





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Oberon, King of the Fairies, assisted by Puck, causes Queen Titania
to fall in love with Bottom the Weaver, in his ass's head.








A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM. 45







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in character, appear before the Duke. The man with lantern, dog,
and bush of thorn" represents Moonshine.







46 A FAMOUS SPANISH HERO.
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The Cid setting out against the Moors.
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HAPPY CHILDHOOD. 47

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The corn-field by the village.







48 WINTER PASTIME.

































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"A rolling stone gathers no moss," but a rolling snowball gathers
plenty of snow. So thinks little Ada, as she watches Fred make one.






AT THE BALL. 49



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A chat between the dances.
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50 AN INVOLUNTARY QUIXOTE.




































The horse has taken fright, and has almost brought his master
under the turning sails of the windmill!







AN UNLUCKY FALL. 51






































Here is a party of friends on a holiday tour, just setting out on an
excursion, when one of them meets with a serious accident.







52 OUT IN THE HAY-FIELD.



































please!" said little Kate. So Auntie went, but soon fell fast asleep.
please *" said little Kate. So Auntie went, but soon fell fast asleep.








THE POINTER AND THE BAD SHOT. 53












--- -



















A gentleman, who was a very bad shot, borrowed a pointer of a
friend; but the dog, seeing that he killed no birds, began to grow
careless. As if willing, however, to give the sportsman one more
chance, he made a dead stop, and moving steadily forward, started a
fine black cock. Bang! went the gun again, but the bird flew away
unhurt. At this the dog put his tail between his legs, and ran home
as fast as his legs would carry him, in disgust.







54 A "HEART OF OAK."









































The Captain "leaves a trifle" for a poor old shipmate.








THiE WIDOWV'S SON. 55









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Frank leaves home for his first start in the world.







56 BESIEGED BY THE LITTLE ONES.









































"Now, Papa, do put down that tiresome newspaper!







THE DOG AND THE FOWLS. 57

































nature, he allowed this for some time; but at last the fowls became
so tiresome that he warned them off by a growl or two. But as this,
after their first fright, did not keep them away, the dog one day sur-
prised them by taking the can in his teeth, and carrying it off into his
kennel, to enjoy his dinner at his ease.
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the fowls would crowd round him and share it Being very good-
natured, he allowed this for some time; but at last the fowls became
so tiresome that he warned them off by a growl or two. But as this,
after their first fright, did not keep them away, the dog one day sur-
prised them by taking the can in his teeth, and carrying it off into his
kennel, to enjoy his dinner at his ease.







58 GUSTAVUS ADOLPHUS 0P SWEDEN.


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A Patriot King Our God is a firm fortress'
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LITTLE MI1NIE'S TEXT. 59
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What is little Minnie writing on the sand ?
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6o NURSE'S FAVOURITE.

1


































Master Tom is always getting into scrapes and tearing his clothes,
but he is a great favourite with Nurse, who is always ready to mend
them for him, and save him from a scolding.
them for hhn, and save him from a scolding.







CHRISTMAS REVELS.
















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The Sirit of Pantomime calls u the motley characters.








62 TROUBLOUS TIMES.









































A father's farewell. May God be with you, my daughter."







SCENES FROM SHAKESPEARE. 63













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64 LOST ON THE ALPS.































Yes-found at last! After much danger and difficulty the brave
guide has reached the spot where the traveller lies buried in the
snow Perhaps it is not yet too late to revive him.
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guie as eahedth sot hee t ravllr iesbu iedi h
snow Perapsit i notyettoo ate o rvivehim







ON THE BEACH. 65



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A chat with an old acquaintance.
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A chat with an old acquaintance.







66 FOR SHAME! (FROM "THE ANi,1AL WORLD.")


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SEASIDE CHARACTERS. 67




































SThe coastguard and the fisherman.


The coastguard and the fisherman.








68 WHISPER R '



































Amy confides a secret" to her schoolfellow.
-1011













Amy confides a "secret" to her schoolfellow.







A FAIR TRESPASSER.







































"Who is this lady, I wonder ?" thinks the owner of the grounds.







;o 7HE HARE AND THE HOUNDS.




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One day a poor hunted hare passed under a gate which the dogs
were obliged to leap over. This taught the hare a lesson, for as soon
as the dogs had once more come up with her, she doubled and re-
turned under the gate as before. This clever trick she repeated
again and again, leading the dogs backwards and forwards over the
gate till they were fairly tired out, and then, taking advantage of
their fatigue, she quietly stole away.
their fatigue, s~he quietly stole away.






A MILITARY HERO. 71


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> ~ ~ ~ ~ :ii' =' "-''

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F red eri-..k G reat-,K ing of P russia ,.

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727


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exrs iIst. dxle I
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THE ROUGH SKETCH. 73









































Frank consults his sister about his new picture.






r

"74 "FAINT HEART NE'ER WON FAIR LADY."
















































The young Squire must try again another day.






RESCUED. 73:



































Hold fast, little girl, and don't look down Your brave deliverer
will not let go of the rope, and strong arms above will soon haul you
both up. But don't go too near the edge of the cliff again.








76 THE ASS AND HIS B URDEAS





I I


























to fetch some more, so when they came to the same place the Ass
stumbled and rolled into the water on purpose. Much vexed, the
Man next time loaded him with sponge, and when he tried to play
"his old trick, he found his load more than doubled.








WHAT DOES THE WATCH SAY? 77






,lli l'l!i !

I iiA ,. I 11
























-I-,- W








Little May is always ready to leave her doll if Uncle George will
take her on his knee, and show her his watch. Tick, tick, tick !"







78 7ESSIES CHOICE.





































Won't you stay with me, Jessie ?" Oh, yes, Auntie, if you wish
it; but I 'd rather go and help Aunt Milly in the garden."








SCENES FROM SHAKESPEARE. 79



















"A cup of sack."






SI "












A dish of Apple-Johns.







o LINVZEUS, THE GREAT NATURALIST.








































Linneus overcome at the sight of English gorse in Spring.
Linnocus overcome at the sight of English gorse in Spring.








OWLS. Sx



r-P














The Barn Owl is the best known of the British Owls. It is very
fond of mice, and is easily tamed when young.


























a native of the north of Europe and America.
F







82 A GREAT TRAVELLER.



































Captain Stewart is a great traveller, and has been all over the world.
His cousin Maud has come to see all the strange things he has brought
home-bows, clubs, spears, skins, and funny little Chinese figures.







A CRUSTY GUARDIAN. S3

I "

"I, So ,he I in i
$ t I am t

ti! : iB




SI P 4-
,, I ,



















"that But Ad will go all the same
do~ ~~ ~- the ?"gol nl alh ehp h etjdeo
that!" Bu d ilg, l h a e







84 THE MILLER, HIS SON, AND HIS ASS.









S,, J





















A Miller and his son were once driving an Ass, when a number of
girls jeered at them for letting the Ass go idle when they might ride.
So the father made his son mount the Ass, while he walked by his
side. But they soon met some old men, who reviled the son for riding
while his poor old father went on foot. On this the son jumped off
and set his father on.







THE MILLER, HIS SON, AND HIS ASS. 83




















so the Miller took his son up behind him. But even this did not















poor Ass than he was to carry them. No sooner said than done; on
str lintogetfree fell over a bridge and was drowned.


























But then some market-women accused the father of unkindness,
so the Miller took his son up behind him. But even this did not
suit, for they were soon told that they were better able to carry the
poor Ass than he was to carry them. No sooner said than done; on
which the folks made so much noise, that the Ass was frightened, and
struggling to get free, fell over a bridge and was drowned.








86 A FUTURE DISCOVERER.








































Master Dick is always among the boats, dreaming of Captain Cook.







THE HOUND AND THE HARE. 87


.-1.













"instead of at once putting an end to her life, the Hound at one time







puzzled to understand this conduct, said : "If you are a friend, why
.- - -L ,-


lickedoorPus, and at ant .Ti









do you bite me ? and if you are an enemy, why do you caress me ?"
A doubtful friend is worse than an open foe.
-. , -,' .,.,' ..'
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... .~~." \:-: .OLku ... _ -t _




A doubtfu rien isr worse than n oefe.-








88 A GREAT CONQUEROR.






































Naoleon the Great at Austerlitz.
Napoleon the Great at Austerlitz.







AFTER THE BATTLE. 8




































A young French officer lies wounded, with the cross of the Legion
of Honour on his breast, where it was placed by the Emperor himself.







90 TIiY OLDEST INHABITANT."




"'! -, ,.- "r.)-i - -












P,.,F_









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It's many and many a year ago, Miss, since I came here."
A










SAVED FROM THE SEA. 91









...... .









:r



-.:.. -'7. ,
























There has been a fearful shipwreck, but one boat has come ashore

with a gentleman and his little girl. The father is quite exhausted
with watching over his young charge, who is not much the worse.








92 THE VINE AND THE GOAT.



















attention to the complaint. Never mind," cried the Vine, in a few
.-

















attention to the complaint. "Never mind," cried the Vine, "in a few
days you will be brought as a sacrifice to the altar, when the juice of
my grapes will be sprinkled on your forehead."
came~ ~ ~ up, ._j gnawe "h akadbosdupntetne e
-.e .in reo.-rte __is hswatncnut bth a
attenion t the omplant. "Nevermind, crie -'- i -e,"i e
days ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ you wilb ruh sasciiet h la, :::_ jic o
m _rpe 7_l e --nle --- .,.._, --eea







AN AUTUMN RAMBLE. 93







































Nellie finds some nice ripe blackberries.








94 "GOOD DOG!"



?E-





>i:














I j . I.r -
"F to
Fetch.t otbo








A GREAT DAY ON THE RIVER. 95












vil,





- _- .-




















The Oxford and Cambridgce Boat-Race
* ..., '.


'1 ''' i







96 CEIRiSTMAS DAY.
-' 'B I'! .K 1 I
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A n o
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-_ A -- ie one :.::._._ the ol c--_=--






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pwi,
-,-7-77
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1 --FOR THE HOLIDAYS- 1879.

Lit tory.-Book for Little Childrsi .. New Volume for ltoo.
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