• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Frontispiece
 The Pretty Stars
 Justine and Her Mother
 Harry's Sum
 A Postman
 Little Rosa
 The Calf
 Pet's Bedtime
 One of the Life-Boat Crew
 Bertha and the Flowers
 Good to the Horses
 Florence and Philip
 A Happy Welcome Guest
 You Would Be Afraid
 Chairs to Mend
 "Come out, Little Mistress!"
 Carlo
 Back Cover






Group Title: Favorite nursery series
Title: The picture gift book
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00035180/00001
 Material Information
Title: The picture gift book
Series Title: Favorite nursery series
Physical Description: p. 192-224 + : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: S. W. Partridge & Co. (London, England) ( Publisher )
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: S.W. Partridge & Co.
T. Nelson & Sons
Place of Publication: London
New York
Publication Date: [1878?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1878   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1878
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Title page printed in colors.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy lacks all after p. 224.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00035180
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002235849
notis - ALH6313
oclc - 61463282

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover1
        Cover2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page 191
        Page 192
    Frontispiece
        Page 193
    The Pretty Stars
        Page 194
        Page 195
    Justine and Her Mother
        Page 196
        Page 197
    Harry's Sum
        Page 198
        Page 199
    A Postman
        Page 200
        Page 201
    Little Rosa
        Page 202
        Page 203
    The Calf
        Page 204
        Page 205
    Pet's Bedtime
        Page 206
        Page 207
    One of the Life-Boat Crew
        Page 208
        Page 209
    Bertha and the Flowers
        Page 210
        Page 211
    Good to the Horses
        Page 212
        Page 213
    Florence and Philip
        Page 214
        Page 215
    A Happy Welcome Guest
        Page 216
        Page 217
    You Would Be Afraid
        Page 218
        Page 219
    Chairs to Mend
        Page 220
        Page 221
    "Come out, Little Mistress!"
        Page 222
        Page 223
    Carlo
        Page 224
    Back Cover
        Cover3
        Cover4
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THE

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LONDON:
S. W. PARTRIDGE & Co., 9, PATERNOSTER Row.
NEW YORK:
T. NELSON & SONS. 42. BR.EECKER STREET.



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THE PRETTY STARS.



ON E warm night, when Walter's father went to
kiss him just as he was going to bed, the
little boy asked papa to let him look out at the
stars, and his father--who is very indulgent to the
children when they are good--carried him on to the
terrace and let him- gaze out. Walter said he
should like to have a star to hold in his hand and
look at close. His papa told him he could not
hold a star-that the stars are large worlds, and
only look so small to us because they are so far
away. Then Walter asked if he should be near
the stars in heaven, and what else he should see
there. His father answered that he could not tell
him that; we cannot yet know what heaven will
be like; but we are assured it will be very beautiful,
and that the good who go there will be very, very
happy always, and never have any more pain or
sorrow. Then Walter looked towards the garden,
and asked about the birds in their nests; but papa,
fearing he might take cold, wrapped him in the:
shawl that had fallen off, and carried him to bed.
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JUSTINE AND HER MOTHER.

JUSTINE is a little French girl, and a very
happy one, though her mother is a poor,
hardworking woman. Justine's father is a fisher-
man, and her mother and some of the neighbours
are carrying down to the boats the little store of
provisions that will be wanted for a fishing expe-
dition. The sun shines, as you see, on Justine
and her mother, and the latter being tired is
taking a little rest. But little Justine, who has
trotted by her side, seems never to grow weary,
until her early bedtime comes, when she drops
asleep quickly in her small crib. She is amusing
herself now peeping from side to side, round her
mother's shoulders. English people are too apt to
pride themselves on being wiser and better than
their neighbours; but there are some points in
which they might with advantage follow the ex-
ample of the French and other continental nations.
The French are more sober than the English. Few
French women or children know and suffer from
the misery of a drunkard's home.
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HARRY'S SUM.



" T H IS difficult sum won't come right!"
Cried poor little Harry one day;
I wish I might put it aside,
And go out with Alfy to play."

"No, no!" cried his master, who heard;
That won't do at all, my dear boy;
While Alfred was hard at his work
I saw you at play with a toy.

Your thoughts were not fixed on your sum-
No wonder that now it won't prove;
You must go through it over again,
And make it come right ere you move."

So Hall worked the sum through again-
This time really doing his best--
Found out his mistake, set it right,
Then ran out to play with the rest.
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A POSTMAN.



HERE is a postman with his bag; he has a
long way to go, and he must often be tired,
besides getting wet in bad weather; but I think I
would rather have a postman's walk than have to
work all day in a hot, close room. It is curious
to think how many people may be watching for
the postman, how much his bag may contain, and
what great pleasure or pain the letters in it may give.
It is a comfort that for one penny we may have
news of our absent friends; parents hearing of
their little boys and girls at school, and children
of all going on in their own dear homes. Some
letters are put into the post with very puzzling
addresses; but clever clerks are kept to make them
out if possible, and most of the letters reach the
people they are meant for, or are returned to the
senders. I advise you, my little reader, to take
pains with your writing. You must also try to ex-
press what you mean clearly and in few words. I
know somelittle folks who write very nice letters, that
give great pleasure to their parents and friends.
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LITTLE ROSA.



LITTLE Rosa has not any brothers and sisters;
but she has a kind, good mother, who talks
to and amuses her. Rosa and her mother are going
along the seashore, and Rosa is pretending to be a
little dog led by a string. Perhaps you would not
understand Rosa's chatter if you heard it, for she is
a little French child, who does not know a word of
any language but her native tongue. You see Rosa
trips along on her little bare feet. The mother wears
wooden shoes, which must be ratherhard to the feet,
but are strong, and excellent for keeping out wet; her
costume is a little different from that of our own
country-women, and is, I think, a pretty dress ; there
are not about it any of those pieces of cheap finery
that some people who cannot afford to buy hand-
some clothes are silly enough to wear, and which
look so very ugly and paltry as soon as they grow
a little worn and soiled; but her cap and neck-
handkerchief are beautifully neat and white.
Rosa says "Bow-wow" when her mother pulls
the thread she holds.
202
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THE CALF.



]_AST summer, when Alfred and Emmy were
staying at a farmhouse, they heard a calf
making a sad complaining noise; they asked what
it was crying for, and Janet, the milk-maid, told
them it wanted more milk than her mistress, the
farmer's wife, could allow for it, so much was
required for drinking and for making into butter
and cheese. The children asked Janet if they
might feed the calf with some apples that had been
given to them; she said yes, and took them to a
shed, where they coaxed the calf into eating two
or three pieces of apple. I do not think the calf
cared for it, but it was kind of the children to give
what they very much liked themselves. Every-
body in the house, and all the live creatures about
the farm, grew fond of Alfred and Emmy; "Ponto,"
the great yard dog, barked with delight whenever
he saw them; they used to have him let loose,
play with him, and laugh to see him enjoy a roll
in the grass. Alfred and Emmy are soon going
to stay at the farm again.
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PET'S BEDTIME.



DARLING, 'tis time you were ,in bed;
So kiss-bye, bye, my pet!
What-wanting still to laugh and play,
And not half ready yet ?

These little feet that trot so long-
This tongue that goes so fast-
Surely they must be tired out,
And glad to rest at last.

Now quietly, with folded hands,
Must the short verse be said,
In which you ask Our Falter's care-
And then, my pet, to bed!

And mother will kneel down beside
The little crib, and pray
The Lord Most High may watch, and guide,
And guard you night and day.



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ONE OF THE LIFE-BOAT CREW.

HERE is a picture of one of those brave men
who go out in life-boats when ships are in
danger within reach of our coasts, and try to rescue
the people on board, and bring them safe to shore.
And they do save many lives every year, but it is at
the risk of their own; for though they wear life-
belts, such as you see in the plate, made of cork
-which you know floats on water-stitched into
-cloth, and go out in life-boats (strong boats built
in a particular way, and much safer than those in
general use), still in very stormy weather even the
life-boats are sometimes upset, and the men are
,drowned in spite of their belts, or beaten by great
rough waves or dashed on rocks, so it is very noble
.and good of them to go out as they do to help their
fellow-creatures. The brave man before us has
heard signal guns out at sea, telling of some vessel
in distress, so he has put on his belt and left his
cottage, and stands waiting to step into the life-boat
when the rest of the crew are ready. All who can
.should help to maintain life-boats on our coas'-
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BERTHA AND THE FLOWERS.

"BERTHA is very fond of flowers, and she has
a little garden of her own, in which she worked
hard last year and early this spring; but poor
Bertha has been very ill lately, and is still so weak
the doctors say it will be a long time before there
can be any hope of her even walking again, so it
is of no use to think of stooping to garden. But
Bertha still enjoys the garden, though she cannot
dig and weed it as she would like to do; she is
often drawn out in a wheel-chair, and sits and
watches while her cousin Ellen, who often comes
to spend a few hours with her, ties up plants, cuts
off dead leaves and blossoms, and puts the whole
plot in nice order. Bertha's mamma thinks it too
sunny for her to go out until later in the day; but
Ellen and John, the gardener, are bringing pots of
flowers to the window for her to see, and talking
about them. John is glad to please Bertha, for he
has a sick daughter at home to whom the little
girl, when well, was very kind, taking her many
things bought with her own pocket-money.
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GOOD TO THE HORSES.

OWEN RANKS was a poor lad, who earned
his living by helping in any stable-yard where
he could find employment, and though not
naturally cruel, was accustomed to treat horses
with a harshness and want of consideration, of
which those older than himself too often set him
an example. One day when Owen was about
fourteen years old, as he was stepping into a cart
to go an errand for a coachman, the horse in the
shafts, dreading the sharp cut of the whip he often
felt on starting, sprang forward with a sudden jerk,
and Owen was thrown off the step with such
violence, that he received several severe injuries.
The lad was carried to a hospital, and there he
was not only cured of his hurts, but learned so.
much through the kindness of a visitor, who used.
to talk to and lend him books, that he became:
extremely humane and particularly clever in the:
treatment of horses. Though still young, he .has
the management of a fine stable; the horses are
tractable with him, and he trusted and valued..
212












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FLORENCE AND PHILIP.



FLORENCE and little Philip are the children of
wealthy people, who can give them nice clothes
and expensive toys; but their great pleasure and
amusement come from a source open to the poor
as well as the rich-they delight in making friends.
with live creatures, both beasts and birds. They
have their nice little dog Floss" in the house, and a
cat and her kitten, which she brings for them to
pet, being sure they will not tease it. Outside they
play with the great dog Ponto," and a pretty fawn
that lives in the park. The horses, the cows, and'
the -donkey follow them for notice, and receive-
apples or some other treat. Many wild creatures,.
too, about the place know them well. Squirrels,
instead of hiding quite away, will frisk round, or
watch from a branch to see if they scatter nuts or
fruit, and birds hover about them for crumbs. In,
the picture you see Florence has been dressing
the fawn with flowers, and Floss has picked up a
rose and tries to attract attention, thinking himself
not sufficiently noticed.
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A HAPPY WELCOME GUEST.

HERE is a pretty little visitor arrived to breakfast.
How pleased he seems, and how glad his
host looks to have his company! It is delightful
to have the society of a little bird free, and yet so
tame as to remain near enough for observation.
Robins often become very sociable; but other
small birds are more timid, and gain confidence
more slowly. In the summer-time it is generally
difficult to make acquaintance with birds; but in
the winter, many of them are glad to accept kind-
ness, and then we may induce London sparrows
and country robins to be on very sociable terms;
indeed I have known robins who have insisted on
taking up theirquarters in houses. Among the most
amusing of small birds are, I think, the swallows;
they are sensible and courageous, and soon learn
to trust those who do not harm them. I used one
summer to watch a swallow's nest in a conservatory,
the parents flying in and out, and feeding their
young, without any sign of alarm, while I stood
close at hand.
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"YOU WOULD



AUNT AMY, sitting at the window with little
Julia, remarked to the child, "I thought of
walking down the lane to see cousin Lucy, but
should not start before your mamma returns home,
and then I fancy it will be too late for to-night."
"Oh yes, auntie," said Julia; "it will be dark,.
and you would be afraid, wouldn't you ?" "The
road is not lonely, Ju," replied her aunt; "but
there is a rough place-I might stumble and hurt
myself." I didn't mean that. I thought you might
be afraid of-seeing-things." Now as Aunt Amy's.
road would lie past the churchyard, she rightly
guessed some silly person had been telling Julia
stories about ghosts. "I should not fear spirits,
my dear," she said; I do not believe those whose
souls have left this world are allowed to come back
to it; but if they could, what harm would' they do.
me ? I walk through the churchyard, as elsewhere,
believing that the lives of the living, and the souls of
those whose bodies lie buried in the earth, are
alike in our Heavenly Father's keeping."
218



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CHAIRS TO MEND.



A MACHINE having been invented to do the
kind of work by which James Barber used
to earn his bread, he was thrown out of employ;
but as he had when a boy learned to mend chairs,
he was able to maintain himself for some time
going about the country and putting in new cane
seats in place of old ones. James was glad to take
up any honest employment; but he found chair-
mending a poor prospect, and was thankful to
emigrate when a gentleman, who met with him
sitting at work near his gate, kindly assisted him to
go out to Australia. Being sober, honest, indus-
trious, and ready to turn his hand to any kind of
work, James prospers very well in the colony, and
sends money to poorer friends at home. He did
not forget, also, to write the gentleman a letter of
thanks. You see two little girls watching James at
his work: the little one asked, "What is it you use?"
and he told her it was cane split into thin slips, and
that canes grow in hot countries, and that sugar
comes out of the sugar-canes.
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"COME OUT, LITTLE MISTRESS!"



"DEAR little mistress, we can't think
What you have been about;
"Toby" and I are watching here,
And longing to go out.

We know you love the garden well;
But yet you have to stay,
And in the schoolroom quiet sit
For hours every day.

While you are at your books it seems
A long long time to wait,
And when you shut them up, we peep
And see you take your slate.

But now that Dolly's in your hand,
You'll come-we know you may!
Dear little mistress, pray make haste
Out on the lawn to play!








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CARLO.

A CLEVER artist chdisturbed whilewrit-
ing letters of importance by Carlo, who came
before his windows playing an organ. One of the
servants of the house had just told the organ-grinder
to go away, when the painter,,attracted by some-
thing in the expression of Carlo's face, himself stepped
out to speak to the Italian boy, and heard a sad tale
of his having been enticed to England by false pro-
mises after the death of his parents, and told how he
was ill-used and sometimes beaten when he did not
collect pence enough to satisfy the cruel master who
brought him aw' -om his native land. The kind-
hearted artist, after inquiring into the lad's story and
finding it quite true, managed to release him from his
hard service, and has taken him into his own emplov
Carlo maker himself very useful, grinding ..
colours, cleaning the studio, running errands, anc
fulfilling other offices, besides sometimes acting as
model, when he does his very best to keep still.
You see a, picture of Carlo taken not long ago by his
kind friend.
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