• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Chapter I: A nice time
 Chapter II: Up hill
 Chapter III: In the clouds, and...
 Chapter IV: In the valley once...
 Chapter V: David on the mounta...
 Chapter VI: Other heights
 Back Cover






Group Title: Books for bright eyes
Title: Mountain-tops
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00035171/00001
 Material Information
Title: Mountain-tops
Series Title: Books for bright eyes
Physical Description: 64 p., 4 leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 11 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Miller, M. E ( Mary Esther ), 1826-1896
American Tract Society ( Publisher )
Publisher: American Tract Society
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1878
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Camping -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Mountains -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1878
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Citation/Reference: American catalogue, 1876-1884,
Statement of Responsibility: Mrs. M.E. Miller.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00035171
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001544431
notis - AHF7939
oclc - 22399586

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover1
        Cover2
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Chapter I: A nice time
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Chapter II: Up hill
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Plate
        Page 25
    Chapter III: In the clouds, and out
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Plate
    Chapter IV: In the valley once more
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Plate
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Chapter V: David on the mountains
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Chapter VI: Other heights
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Cover3
        Cover4
Full Text




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The Baldwin Liorary
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MOUNTAIN-TOPS.



MRS. M. E. MILLER.











AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY,
150 NASSAU STREET, NEW YORK.























COPYRIGHT, 1878,
BY AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY.











MOUNTAIN-TOPS.


CHAPTER I.

A NICE TIME.
"MRS. SEYMOUR invites all
of us to come to Riverside
while the huckleberries are
plenty," said Mr. Millard to






6 MO UNTAIN-TOPS.
his family, after coming from
the village one day.
"Oh, that would be nice,"
said Ernie.
Nice! I do not know about
that," said Mr. Millard. Huck-
leberries stain linen clothes, and
discolor tongues, teeth, and fin-
gers.
Ernie saw that his father
was talking in earnest, so
he climbed upon his knee,
and the father's arms folded






A NICE TIME. 7
the .little fellow close to his
heart.
That is the way this father
holds the attention of his boys,
while he corrects their mistakes
and points out their faults. He
almost never scolds, but he can
talk sharply, as he rests in his
lounging chair with a boy on
each knee.
"What do you mean? can't
we go ?" asked Willie.
"I mean," said Mr. Millard,






8 MOUNTAIN-TOPS.
"that you have a fashion of
calling anything you like-
from a hat or a horse, to a
watermelon-nice. I knew a
learned man who was careful
about his children's choice of
words. Once he met a man
on the street, who, instead of
'Good-morning,' said, 'A nice
day, judge!' Nice for what?"
said he. Remember, nice means
dainty, neat, exact; and I think
a huckleberry-frolic will hardly






A NICE TIME. 9
be nice, though it may be pleas-
ant; and if mother says Yes, I
will take you to-morrow."
The next day was hot and
dusty, and nine dusty miles
seemed a good many to mam-
ma; but the boys and grandma
were willing to go through
heat and dust for huckleber-
ries; so away they went.
Willie had run cross lots, to
ask if Jessie might go with
them; so she was waiting with
2






Io MOUNTAIN-TOPS.
him under the big black wal-
nut-tree at her father's gate.
They scrambled up to their
seats; Jessie finding room be-
tween aunt and grandma, while
the boys, you might suppose,
were happy beside their father,
and behind the horses they
knew so well.
The happy wagon-load reach-
ed Riverside in time for the
little folks to join Beulah and
John, and some of their young






A NICE TIME. 11
neighbors in the huckleberry-
patch, before dinner-time.
On a square lot, that lay
above the river-bank, the trees
had been cut down. All about
the stumps berry-bushes had
sprung up, and large blueber-
ries were just ripe enough now,
to tempt even lazy folks to pick
them.
Beulah and Jessie picked for
one basket, while Johnny and
Willie told long stories over a






12 MOUNTAIN-TOPS.
three-quart pail they filled with
berries. Ernie ran about, with
old Caesar for his companion.;
he would rather eat huckleber-
ry-pie than pick the berries.






SUP HILL. 13



CHAPTER II.

UP HILL.
August went by, with its
busy days and frequent guests;
and when September came,
Papa Millard thought his fam-
ily deserved a journey-espe-
..lly mamma.
One evening he said to the
boys, "Suppose we run away






14 IMOUNTAIN-TOPS.
with your mother, where no
one can find us."
They thought it was a new
play, in which he was to be a
giant, and they were to be
ogres.
If grandma will promise to
keep house while we are gone,
we will take Joe and Shirley
and mamma, and go off on the
mountains, and stay there till
we are homesick."
Grandma was willing, so the






UP HILL. 15
next day, while it rained, they
made ready; and the day after
they started.
Where are we going first?"
asked Willie as they turned
out of the lane.
That is for your mother to
decide before noon. The old
Mountain-House we have vis-
ited, but if she wishes to go
there again-"
Oh, no," said she;. "let us
explore some mountain-passes;


IF .






16 MO UNTAIN-TOPS.
let us learn a new geography-
lesson."
There is the Summit-House,
which we may easily reach to-
day; shall we aim for that?"
The three said Yes, and the
horses agreed, so on and up
they went.
The rain has laid the dust,
and the sky is so clear, I think
this day is nice enough for
anything-even for that partic-
ular old gentleman," said Ernie,


j






'UP .HILL. 17
his eyes full of fun, twinkling
up in his father's face.
The first ten miles brought
them to Greenville, smiling in
the sunshine near the foot of
the mountains. There they
rested, and then began the long
twelve mile up-hill ride.
Mamma told the boys they
would soon lose the pretty,
shadowy look of the moun-
tains; and, indeed, they soon
found the Catskills were made
I~lll aII ril 3






18 MO UNTAIN-TOPS.
of real stuff, timber and rocks-
not of blue ribbon or sky. In-
deed, there was no blue about
them, but parti-colored cultiva-
ted fields were plainly seen;
houses and barns and wood-
ed hill-sides like those nearer
home.
They crossed the Catskill
creek on a great white bridge,
on top of which was a gilded
eagle, which gave it the name
of Eagle-bridge. Then they






UP HILL. 19
dashed down the Durham
pike," and up the hills again.
How wild and charming and
strange! Asking the way of
those they met, stopping to
water the horses at overflowing
springs, and every time the
boys were thirsty as they.
Going up one of the last long
hills, mamma was very tired,
and took from her bag a pow-
der of bitter medicine which
sometimes scared away a head-
I.






20 .MOUNTAIN-TOPS.
ache. She held it in her hand,
hoping they would come to a
spring or pump, and she could
get a drink-but no water came
in sight.
Just then the road was very
steep, and as the horses stop-
ped to rest, a good-natured
man came walking down.
How far is it to Barney
Butts' ?" asked papa.
The man, before he answer-
ed, stepped to mamma's side,






UP HILL. 21
and handed up to her a juicy,
large peach. Then he said,
laughing, It's two miles and
a half up, but only two miles
down. You can't miss the
road, and you '11 be there before
sun-down."
C'lk, c'lk, thank you !" said
papa.
Wait," said mamma. "What
made you give me that peach ?"
"You looked tired, ma'am;
and I knew it was a good peach."






22 MOUNTAIN-TOPS.
Then she told the man how
she was dreading the bitterness
of the powder in her hand, and
how welcome his gift was at
that moment.
Who do you think sent that
man to her side, and put it into
his kind heart to give the fruit ?
The same One, I think, who
sweetened the bitter waters of
Marah, and gave the quails and
manna to his children in the
wilderness.






UP HILL. 23
The last hard pulls up the
mountains, papa and the horses
know about; but the boys and
their mother were looking down
upon the country out of which
they had arisen. I wish you
might see all that they saw.
I cannot tell how far they saw,
or how happy they were, or a
fraction of what they thought
or said, before a turn in among
the woods shut out the picture,
and hushed the boys. Narrow,


'ii:'. .h .od htottepcue






24 MO UNTAIN-TOPS.
steep, and winding the road,
slow and sure the pony-pets,
skilful the reinsman, and God's
careful hand over all.
Suddenly white houses ap-
pear above their heads; they
turn a sharp corner, past a great
rock, standing, like a gigantic
tombstone beside the road,
which in a moment leads them
to the door of the Summit-
House.
Papa walked with the boys,
.4


























4. -


-'I ;







UP HILL. '25
following some children, around
a hill-top to another house,
which has a wider view of the
valley.
There Ernie wished for the
wings of an eagle, he said, for
an hour, to fly home to see
grandma for a minute. Then
they walked back to mamma,
and a good supper. After that,
how tired and how sleepy were
those boys, I leave you to guess.
4






26 MO UNTAIN-TOPS.



CHAPTER III.
IN THE CLOUDS, AND OUT.
THE next morning on wa-
king, the boys saw that they
were among the clouds. No
happy valley stretched below
their feet, no peaks towered
above them, no road went any-
where. There was only a
strip of ground before the door,






.IN THE CLOUDS, AND OUT. 27
where a little barefoot native
was running back and forth
with a toy-cart. If he went
a little way east or west, he
was fringed with fog. It
seemed as if the round world
had shrunk to the size of a
school globe, and only this tiny
spot, on which this house stood,
was above the fog-ocean, and
all the rest of the world and
"our folks" were lost in its
depths.

L:






28 MOUNTAIN-TOPS.
The boys had other queer
fancies. But the breakfast-
bell was a real thing; and after
that rang, they knew they were
cold, and put on their overcoats
to eat in! while mamma
wrapped herself, like a Mother-
Bunch, in two shawls.
Soon after breakfast they
rode away, and in half an hour
were out of the fog, in clear
sunshine. They had a friend"
on top of a mountain. Four






IN THE CLOUDS, AND OUT. 29
miles and a half of steep climb-
ing brought them to her door.
But a real friend, is worth
more than that trouble. In
that upper-country, whole
mountain-sides are partly
cleared of trees, and used for
dairy farms. Often there are
fifty cows together. Butter
and cheese; maple syrup and
"sugar from sweet-maple groves,
,are all that come down to New
York from these mountain-tops.






30 MOUNTAIN-TOPS.
Think of owning a whole
mountain! Think of making
twelve hundred pounds of ma-
ple-sugar from your own trees!
"Are you not lonesome and
cold in the winter?" we fool-
ishly asked.
Oh, we are used to the quiet
and the cold, and then we can
see so much!" Think of that,
discontented little people, im-
patient if a rainy day shuts
you in from the sights and






IN THE CL UDS, AND OUT. 3
noises of the streets. It is a
wonderful thing when we have
"learned in whatsoever state
we are, therewith to be con-
tent."
Up there, among flying clouds
and mountain-peaks, 2,800 feet
-above New York, are as happy
boys and girls as you ever
saw; and gray-headed people
who have never seen the river,
or rode behind a locomotive.
There, Willie and Ernie saw






32 MO UN TAIN-TOPS.
a big yellow dog churning. He
did not like his tramp very
well, and when he was allowed
to get down, he ran to the pan-
try and frisked about impatient
for a piece of bread and butter,
as he gets that after every
churning.
They saw milk-pans, that
held the milk of twenty-five
cows in one pan.
Then they rode on, down the
farther side of the Catskills
I






IN THE CLOUDS, AND OUT. 33
almost to the Delaware. They
found that the mountains did
not grow in one wavy line, as
they thought at Martin's-Nest.
Many a one did not touch
another.
If you will turn upside down
on the table half-a-dozen tea-
"cups and coffee-cups, and bowls,
and here and there between
them put a saucer, you may
get an idea of mountains as
"they are, to those who "wind
Mountain-Tops.






34 IMOUNTAIN-TOPS.
about, and in and out" among
them finding broad levels and
terraced lands between.
Or better yet, ask your father
or grandfather to take you on
the mountains next summer.
You will understand your Bible
better, after you come down.
SThe next day, the travellers
rode back; up, up, the many
mountains they had descended;:
though part of the distance
they chose a different road;-


-I






IN THE CLOUDS, AND OUT. 35
and there the moonlight found
them, under overhanging rocks.
Sometimes whole trees stood
out above their heads, and
seemed threatening to come
down, root and branch, to crush
them. Sometimes, while the
rocks rose straight from their
left hand, like a wall, the bank
fell steep, below their right
hand to the tumbling rocky-
bedded Schoharie creek below,
lighted by the moon.






36 MO UNTAIN- TOPS.
The boys were wild with
delight. But when the light
of our friend's lamp shone on
their faces, we found them
"nid-nid-nodding," almost too
sleepy to say Our Father," o
Good-night.









i" I

cip
''
: .a i b
;1


BZf r

I:;



1S1F Er















;,. :.






IN THE VALLEY. 37



CHAPTER IV.
IN THE VALLEY ONCE MORE.
THEY slept so late that when
they came to breakfast they
saw a boy and girl starting for
school. To be sure they had
a mile to walk, and started
early; stopping only a minute
to feed a lame cow a handful
of fresh grass.






33 MOUNTAIN-TOPS.
Tinkle tinkle, went the bell,
hung on her neck so that she
might be found on the moun-
tain; but she was too lame to
go out with the herd that day.
It was pleasant to see how
quickly Joe and Shirley knew
the voices of Mrs. Millard and
the boys when they went to
bid their pets Good-morning.
Joe whinnied and stepped
around so that he could see
"the mother's face, as soon as






IN THE VALLE Y 39
he heard her voice. She had
an apple in her hand, thinking
to eat it; but after that-salute
which do you suppose ate the
apple? Not the mother, cer-
tainly. She told Joe he was
going home, and besides the
load he carried up, he had now
to take down a great jug of
maple-syrup given to the little
boys for their winter pancakes,
and it must not be spilled on the
way home; and canes besides,






40 MO UNTAIN-TOPS.
cut for keepsakes on different
peaks, that must be gotten
home safely, down, down. And
Joe crunched the apple, and
pawed and neighed, and they
understood each other well.
When the boys were ready
to start, the horses were entire-
ly ready; they could hardly
stand before the gate while
Sfarewells were said. Then the
readiness with which they
picked out the proper turns,






IN THE VALLE Y. 41
whens "forks and "branches"
were met in the roads, was
funny to see. They hardly
wanted to stop at the Summit-
House to dine.
This day, there were no fogs
around, and if our party had
not been homesick, they would
have climbed High Peak.
But instead, they chose the
drive around Grand View, and
the long slope homeward of
the Windham "pike," then
6






42 MOUNTAIN-TOPS.
across to Freehold, back of
which the mountains lay in
purple light.
Did you ever sit in a wagon
while your horses forded a
creek? Shirley was not cer-
tain that there was any bottom
to the creek. She shivered,
and looked anxiously at Joe,
on the brink. He tossed his
head and stepped boldly in;
and after she was in the stream
knee-deep, and the water splash-






IN THE VALLE Y 43
ed over their backs, she did not
care. By the time she began
to like it, the farther shore was
reached, and they came up into
lovely woods, only a little sad
to leave the mountains behind.
On, on they went; through
toll-gates, through villages,
down among familiar farms,
the horses so glad they al-
most flew; until the home-lane
was reached, where mother
sang,






44 MOUNTAIN-TOPS.
"All journeys end in welcome to the
weary,
And heaven, the heart's true home, will
come at last."

They found all well at
home, and very glad to see
them.
It was nightfall. Crickets
were cricketing, katydids were
contradicting each other loudly,
and there were some other signs
that bedtime was near, when
supper was over; but Willie












4,-i

..






IN THE VALLEY 45
said, "I am going to see
Jessie, to tell her about the
jug"
Oh, wait till morning, dear,"
said his mother.
"Jessie is not there," said
grandma. She is eating
clams and lobsters at New-
port. The very day you went
away her brother came, and
took her to his home when he
went back, to see if salt air
would paint her pale cheeks;






46 MOUNTA[N-TOPS.
which it will, likely, if it do n't
blow her out to sea!"
Jessie gone away !" Willie
sat down, disgusted.
After all, how much pleasure
we take in telling over our
"good times." If Jessie, his
most patient listener, was miss-
ing, Will might as well go to
sleep.






DAVID ON THE MOUNTAINS. 47



CHAPTER V.
DAVID ON THE MOUNTAINS.
THE next morning there was
a Sunday stillness all around.
There was no service at church
that day, but the little boys
had an hour's lovely rest in-
stead.
They had been talking, till
they were tired, with the men,






48 MO UNTAIN-TOPS.
about their ride of a hundred
miles, and the sights they
saw.
When they found their moth-
er in her room, she had her
Bible in her lap, waiting to
show them some word-pictures
which had fresh color and life
this morning, because they
seemed like looking-glass re-
flections of things they had so
lately seen.
"See here, Willie; where,






DA VID ON IHE MO UNTTAINS. 49
do you think, when we were
riding, did these words come
into my mind? 'The Lord is
my shepherd; I shall not want.
He maketh me to lie down in
green pastures; he leadeth me
beside the still waters.' "
I know!" said the boy ea-
gerly. "Where we saw the
man leading sheep out of the
steep, stony road, through the
bars, to such nice green grass;
a stream was in the lot, and
Mountain-Tops.






50 MOUNTAIN-TOPS.
papa said that man was a good
shepherd."
"And where did I think of
this? The Lord looketh down
from heaven; he beholdeth all
the sons of men.' "
You might have thought
that in a good many places,
after we got on top of the
mountains; for I did, mamma,"
said Willie.
"And, Ernie, where did I
think of this? 'Every beast






DA VID ON THE MO UNTAINS. 5 1
of the mountain is mine, and
the cattle upon a thousand
hills. I know all the fowls of
the mountains.'"
Ernie's eyes brightened as
he said, That must have been
where we looked across a brook,
where the ducks were, you
know, up to the steep, awful
rough place where the long
cattle-sheds were; so high
above us, papa wondered how
they drew lumber and nails






52 MOUNTAIN-TOPS.
and carpenters up, to build
them."
The very place, dear! And
where was this in my mind?
' Lead me to the Rock that is
higher than I. For thou hast
been a shelter for me.' "
"Oh, that was where the
rocks reached over the road, so
far, that papa said horses, wag-
on, and all, could stay under
that shelter in a rain, and not
feel a sprinkle."






DA VID ON THE MOUNTAINS. 53
Mamma Millard turned over
the worn leaves of her Bible,
saying, It seems as if David
must have looked down upon
a country very much like our
own when he says, 'Thou
crownest the year with thy
goodness. The pastures are
clothed with flocks; the val-
leys are covered over with corn.
He sendeth the springs into
the valleys, which run among
the hills. He causeth grass






54 MOUNTAIN-TOPS.
to grow for the cattle, and herb
for the service of man. The
trees of the Lord are full of
sap. The high hills are a ref-
uge for the wild goats, and the
rocks for the conies. He ap-
pointeth the moon for seasons,
and prepareth rain for the earth.
If he do but touch the hills
they shall smoke.'"
"Ah!" cried Ernie. "We
know all about that now."
"Oh, read some more; it






DA VID ON THE MOUNTAINS. 55
seems as if David had surely
been up there before us !" said
Willie.
"'He shall drink of the
brook, in the way.' "
I should think we did, a
good many times," said Ernie
softly.
"' The sea is his, and he
made it; the strength of the
hills is his also.' "
"Yes; and Jessie was down
by the sea, while we were up






56 MOUNTAIN-TOPS.
on the mountains !" Willie
thought aloud.
"' He brought streams out
of the rock, and caused waters
to flow down like rivers.' "
Oh, I remember that place,"
said Ernie. "It was so cool,
where the water dripped down,
the rocks, where the horses
drank; and right on the other
side the water was so still and
looked so dark, papa guessed
it was very deep."






DA VID ON THE MO UNTAINS. 57
"You are getting tired, and
do not know it, my dear boys,"
said their mother. "Let us
end the story, as David him-
self ended his psalms, with

Before the boys were satis-
fied with singing, they were
called to dinner. So quiet,
humble, and happy they were,
when they came out with their
mother, that grandma and papa
knew they had come down from
8






58 .MOUNTAIN-TOPS.
the heights of Bible-song and
story.
Indeed, Ernie whispered to
his father, as he took his seat
at table beside him, "We've
been up the mountains again,
with David/"






OTHER HEIGHTS. 59

CHAPTER VI.
OTHER HEIGHTS.
AFTER dinner, Mr. Millard
and his two sons walked out on
the piazza to enjoy the sweet
September afternoon, and talk
about the lessons of the past
week.
"And so you and mamma
have been going over the
mountains with David !"
"Yes, papa," said Willie;






60 MOUNTAIN-TOPS.
" and really it seemed as if they
were his mountains !"
You mean the mountains
he wrote and sang about!
Well, my dear boys, there were
other heights of which David
sang, lofty aims and noble
acts-which I hope will be
as real to you in time, as these
grand mountains are to-day."
The boys beside him said
nothing, for they had not quite
understood him.






OITIER HEIGHTS. 61
"David said, 'Whoso slan-
dereth his neighbor, him will I
cut off; him that hath a high
look and a proud heart will not
I suffer. He that worketh
deceit shall not dwell in my
house; he that telleth lies
shall not tarry in my sight.'
Now you have already seen in
school, that the boy who re-
ports himself perfect when he
is not perfect, will cheat you
on the playground. The boy






62 MOUNVTAIN-TOPS.
who carries naughty stories
does not stop to find if they
are true or false, in his haste
to make you think evil of a
schoolmate. Let your friend
be the one who is truthful and
obedient and knows his les-
sons, though he may wear the
poorest clothes. Ernie, why
would you not walk over in
that ditch, where Frank has
heaped that brush for burn-
ing ?"






OTHER HEIGHTS. 63
"Why, papa!" said Ernie,
"we should be stung with net-
tles, and get our stockings
covered with thistles and bur-
docks; and it takes so long to
pick them off!"
"Just so, boys going into
bad company will feel some
taint upon them when they go
home to their mothers; some
foul word, some coarse story,
they will wish they had not
heard. Mother was telling you






64 MOUNTAIN-TOPS.
the other day, that the bloom
on the plum would not come
again after you had rubbed it
away. Remember then, as long
as you live, that, to keep your
lips pure for mother's kisses,
and your hearts clear for God's
searching eyes, you must be
as careful of the company you
choose as David was when he
vowed, Iwill not know a
wicked person.'"





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