Young Rick

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Young Rick
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Eastman, Julia A ( Julia Arabella ), 1837-1911
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher:
D. Lothrop and Company
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Orphans -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Adopted children -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Pets -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1878
Genre:
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Julia A. Eastman ; illustrated.
General Note:
Text is in two columns a page.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002223342
notis - ALG3591
oclc - 15501705
System ID:
UF00035166:00001

Full Text











'a i

- --.J' -,i :-'":. .
j,.l- .. .



_i .~; -





.j... .











I W1
































A'0

































S The BIldwn LUbriry v
r
*1d
Vlllvmlr l1j





r































I

















































0u












J7






















' N' /
.~- .. .
. ,---
~~ b




, ,---








YOUNG RICK



BY
JULIA A. EASTMAN
















ILL USTRA TED





BOSTON
D. LOTHROP AND COMPANY
FRANKLIN AND HAWLEY STREETS































COPYRIGHT, 1878.

D. LOTHROP & COMPANY.







YOUNG RICK.

BY JULIA A. EASTMAN,
AUTHOR OF THE $1000 PRIZE STORY. "STRIKING FOR THE RIGHT."


i ,i
CHAPTER I. under the leafless lilacs unlocking her doo this par-
"[ '





cel gave out a shrill wail. It was a dull day the sky
W 'I .

























She had left on the twenty-fourth day of December. All abroad there reigned the stillness which one notes
Her visit just covered the holidays, you see, though, in the country in midwinter a hush as of a world
M ISS 'S, N m '






























in point of fact, I believe they were the last of all dead for a century, and buried fathoms deep in snow.
days in Miss Cranson's mind during the time. She Through the silence that wailing cry rang out strangely
had left in a blue and gray plaid shawl, and wearing a and woke up the echoes for a quarter of a mile rounCd
brown ribbon on her straw bonnet. She came back It woke up also the neighbors, and the neighbors
wearing a black shawl and a mourning ribbon. In dogs. Deacon Harkaway's Snap was heard to giv-
addition to the carpet-bag which had gone with her, three snarling barks, and directly a figure was seen to
her return was accompanied by a very plump parcel come stepping fast across Miss Lesbia's garden. It
wrapped in the plaid shawl aforesaid, a shawl as well w\as Mrs. Harkaway. She wore her shawl over her
known in the town as its much-respected wearer head, her thimble on her finger, and consternation on
As Miss Lesbia went down the walk, and stood her face. She found Miss Lesbia in a chair by the
,''Ii :,I ;'Jil',,!'hi





'7- =-- ---:": "



















As Miss Lesbia. went down the w-alk, and stood her face. She found Miss Lesbia in a chair by the








YOUNG RICK.

entry door, sitting up very straight, and holding on her hundred years old; and what upon earth does she
knees that mysterious parcel that had cried. The know about children ?" cried little Mrs. Tozer. One
house was quite still save the purring of two great baby was in her arms, two were clinging to her skirts,
cats who were rubbing against their mistress's skirts, and four older Tozers enriched with their names the
"I've warmed milk for 'em, and I've fed 'em three columns of the school-register. Cats she knows
times a day, as you asked me to," remarked Mrs. about; but children-!"
Harkaway; but she was not looking at the cats. Let As a wife and mother whose bedroom was furnished
me take off your bonnet," she added presently, with with a big bed, two cribs, and a cradle, Mrs. Tozer
great animation. To herself she was wondering felt competent to speak with authority concerning
"what under the canopy it all meant. Just to think babies.
of Miss Lesbia's coming home with a bundle that Dr. Watrous, the medical adviser of half the coun-
cried!" ty, solemnly trusted that "Miss Cranson appreci-
Mrs. Harkaway walked towards the bedroom with ated the magnitude of her undertaking;" while Tom
the straw bonnet, and her eyes fell on its fresh black Dorrance's wife took the opportunity to observe that
ribbon. Directly they lifted themselves to Miss Les- "Aunt Lesbia was a smart woman, but she'd got her
bia's face. hands full this time, if that boy's eyes meant any-
"Yes, it's for Kate, poor girl. She has got through thing, and if he was half as much of a witch as his
with all her troubles," said the bonnet's owner. "And father's son ought to be." This observation subse-
this," proceeding to unroll as many folds of plaid quent events led Mrs. Dorrance to exalt to the dignity
shawl as would have contented an Egyptian mummy of a prophecy.
of the most ambitious character, and setting upright "I think," remarked Deacon Harkaway, who was a
on the floor a curly-headed child of fourteen months, tall, sallow man, of severe aspect, "I do think, Les-
"this is young Richard." bia, that you might 'ave left the child to the care
"You don't mean it!" cried Mrs. Harkaway; and o' Providence. There is the promise to 'the father-
at the same instant "young Richard," following a sec- less,' you know."
ond Egyptian precedent, and the example of that "Yes, Deacon Harkaway, but it's harder to find
other baby adopted some twenty-five hundred years promises to the motherless. Besides, I think that the
ago, lifted up his voice and wept. Miss Lesbia started Bible promises concerning children, just like the
out of her chair with a scared look in her eyes ; Mrs. promises concerning seed-time and harvest, were made
Harkaway crooned, "There, there !" as though she counting on human instrumentality."
were putting on a poultice; and the cats- those two "The decrees- began the neighbor, only to be
Maltese cats, who had been purring like a pair of stopped by his wife's good-natured voice, Now, now,
coffee-mills in a duet stopped short, made their eyes deacon. I'm not going to have you and Lesbia arguing
black, and their two tails as big as Miss Lesbia's boa, about the decrees this morning. You've fought that
listened while one might count two, and then with a ground all over times enough and, besides, here's this
scratching and a skurrying they were gone. They had blessed infant waiting for his nap." And as Deacon
not stood upon the order of their going, but had Harkaway took his hat to go, Miss Lesbia said, ear-
seemed one continuous cat, as they fled away across nestly, -
the carpet, and covered their retreat with the sliding "If the Lord will only help me to bring up this
door of the cat-hole. Their voices, in a full and free child, I shall consider that the fulfilment of his prom-
expression of feline protest, were shortly heard in the ise to an orphan."
open chamber overhead. Miss Lesbia sighed. Castor But the minister came in, with his white hair
and Pollux were pussies after her own heart, and it shining, and his kindly old face all in a wrinkle of
was but too plain that they disapproved of that baby. smiles, with something moist in his eyes, however,
Nor was theirs the only disapproval. Graythorpe, in as he stooped over the baby.
its capacity of town, parish, and church, shook its wise "And this is Richard's boy? Well, well. Pretty
head. good material to work on, I should think, Miss Cran-
"Adopted a child? Miss Cranson! Why, she's a son. My child, you can't have a quicker head, or a








YOUNG RICK.

tenderer heart, than your father had. Poor Dick, "And the kitten crawled out of the pond and ran
poor Dick! These things are what make old men off. 0, yes, I remember. Dick adopted her, and
and women of us, Lesbia;" and he took baby on his she lived to be ten years old. He always called her
knee. Mrs. Moses, because he found her in the rushes."
The only answer was a sob. The gallant young Tom Dorrance still stands grasping the top of the
civil engineer, who, six months before, had gone down open door, and his eyes staring out the window to the
with his train in the ruin of a bridge which he had mountain-side, where the last night's snow lies soft on
himself invented, had been Miss Lesbia's youngest spruce and pine; but a strange quiet has crept into
and only remaining brother, his tanned face.
Hiu-lo, you young shaver! Of course this was "Well, I must be moving," he says, presently, and
Tom Dorrance. His brown curls just brushed the draws a long breath as he picks up his hat; "but I'm
ceiling overhead as he stood up and tossed the boy in glad you've took the child, Miss Lesbia; you'll do
his stalwart arms. Crow away, there. I say for't, if what's right by 'im; an' if ever you get where you
you ain't about the cutest little monkey I've come across want any help a' takin' care on 'im,--measles, you
since sugarin'-time. Father's boy all over hain't he? know, an' whoopin'-cough, an' such,- and a big,
See it in his eyes! There you go again, up, up. I hulkin' chap can do yeh any good, why, then you'll
tell you, Aunt Lesbia, Dick Cranson was the only know who to send for. Good-bye, ole fellow. Eat all
fellow 't ever I see 't would keep your courage up yeh can, an' make as much noise as yeh know how to,
right straight along to the end o' the row. I never an' I'll have yeh out huntin' woodchucks 'long a me
run against another chap 't would make hay, an' make 'fore yer aunt there can turn round : and Tom was
fun, too, all day long, with the thermometer up to any- gone, striding across country on the snow-crust, his
thing, an' the rest of the hands clean tuckered out, big, tawny dog at his heels; both minding as much
an' then, when sundown come,'ud dance a breakdown and as little about walls and fences as St. Nicholas
on the barn floor, just cause he was so full o' the tickle and his reindeer on the night before Christmas.
't he couldn't keep still, no how." So little Richard came to his new home. Up to
"Richard was always a pleasant boy," says Miss this time Castor and Pollux had had things all their
Lesbia, and fumbles at the corner of her handkerchief, own way in the cottage: the government of Miss Les-
then turns away to wipe her eyes. bia's household had been, to speak after the manner
Pleasant? I guess so. I tell you, Miss Cran- of geographies, an unlimited monarchy, whose supreme
son,"- and Tom straightened himself to the full gran- power was vested in two cats. We wish to state dis-
deur of his six feet three, stood up so tall that the tinctly here, that the mistress of the establishment was
little sitting-room seemed to grow littler all at once, a woman quite in her wits, and that they were very good
and grasped the top of an open door in his big, wits, too; but the way in which those two pampered
shapely hand--"I tell you what: Dick, that boy's despots tyrannized over her would be past believing,
father, was the jolliest mate 't ever I had, and their even if it were not past telling. Whether Miss Les-
wan't nothing wrong about him, either. You never bia owned the cats, or the cats owned Miss Lesbia,
ketched him a pitching' into a smaller boy, nor naggin' was an open question. Everything in that house,
an ole man, nor badgerin' a pup; but I say for 't, if from cellar to attic, was as the spoils of the Egyptians
he wasn't a rouser when he got hold of a chap about to them, and was used accordingly. If there was
his own bigness, or mtbbe a leetle grain heavier ; my anything specially tempting in the way of food, a bit
you m't as well have a catamount afoul of yeh. I of it was sure to be found in the saucer of Castor,
say, Miss Cranson, d'ye remember the fight him an' another in the saucer of Pollux. Each had quite a
me had one time 'bout drownin' a kitten ? It was the service of dishes devoted to his use, and these were
fust, and the last, and the only squabble 't ever we always to be found on triangular bits of oil-cloth, in
youngsters had with one another; an' good luck for me, diagonally-opposite corners of the kitchen. Castor pre-
too. I was the biggest, but I tell yeh, if he didn't give ferred his steak "a la raw," Pollux had his broiled.
me the tallest kind of a polishin' off! Makes me If either cat refused one thing he was offered another,
sore to this blessed day just to think on't. Whew!" and if from repletion he rejected the bill of fare all








YOUNG RICK.

through, Miss Lesbia was sure he must be in a rapid "I was sure there was something wrong in that man
decline, and rushed to her store of catnip, and steeped by the way Castor glowered at him."
some tea for him at once. The quantity of food which Castor and Pollux were believed to have strong in-
these two creatures devoured was something enormous. dividual peculiarities. The former had a placid face,
"I've been telling Lesbia," said Miss Charity not unlike the Sphinx, while the countenance of Pol-
White,'when she heard of the baby's advent, "any lux in repose had a certain leonine majesty, which
time these dozen years, that I believed it was her duty reminded you of the monument to the Swiss guard at
to kill those cats, and adopt an orphan. She might as Lucerne.
well be feeding a creature with an immortal soul, as One peculiarity of Miss Cranson's establishment,
to be gorging two quadrupeds that was intended by and then we will leave the cats. This was a feature
Providence to mouse round and pick up their own which it has never happened to the writer to see set
living. Why, what those cats have swallowed for six down in any architectural plan or treatise. I mean the
years would have supported a child in a foreign mis- system of cat-holes. These were small, circular aper_
sionary school, or boarded, I do believe, a poor stu- tures in the doors, the same being about twelve inches
dent a-fitting for the gospel ministry. No, I do not above the thresholds. Each hole had a loosely-hung,
want to see any beast abused, but there's reason in all valve-like cover, which swung in or out with equal
things;" in which utterance I think Miss Charity was ease, the motive power being a cat's head.
right. "It's quite an event in a fellow's life, let me tell you,"
But I must explain to you that Miss Lesbia had a said Bob. Duykinck,- Bob was the minister's nephew,
great respect for the judgment of Castor and Pollux. and a West Point cadet, "to see those creatures come
She really believed that they had some wonderful pitching through, a dozen, more or less, of 'em, tails
power of smelling out moral turpitude as they smelled and whiskers, heels over head, fast as they can jump.
out rats. If you went to the house and Castor jumped i First time I sat there and beheld it, do you know, I
on your knee and purred, his mistress would have thought there was a detachment of artillery out in the
staked her gold beads on your good name. Other- yard, firing wildcats at me through the side of the
wise, if a puss rounded his back and hissed at you, no house did, honest."
matter if you were as fair as the angels outside, Miss It was through one of these doors that Castor and
Cranson would have been sure that some leprosy Pollux had disappeared on that gray January day
lurked deep within, when our story begins. The baby with the big brown
"Those cats know," she said triumphantly, -it was eyes had come as his father's son, or as. a king to
when a tramp, to whom she had given a dinner, de- claim his own; but Miss Lesbia, listening to the ex-
parted with her best silver table-spoons as a memento, pression of cat opinion in the attic, had sighed.
[TO BE CONTINUED.]









r ,7 .

s,.". . .








YOUNG RICK.



YOUNG RICK.


BY JULIA A. EASTMAN,
AUTHOR OF THE $OOO1 PRIZE STORY. "STRIKING FOR THE RIGHT."


CHAPTER II. Dash came at last, though under protest. It was a
rat, he knew it was, that just went out of sight round
STARTS FOR THE MOON. the angle of the cellar door. But, then, what did his
little master care about rats ? And Dash was sure -
O NE house, gambrel-roofed, having ten dormer no dog was ever more so-where his line of duty lay.
windows and five outside doors; low, large I've got this boy to take charge of," every prick of
rooms, with a tall, silent woman stepping to and fro his ear and every wag of his tail seemed to say; I've
in them; a big yard, full of lilac bushes, and much got this boy to take charge of, though all the Cranson
frequented by a small dog, a big cat, several very cellar and the big town of Graythorpe were carried
saucy robins, also chirping birds and bumble-bees off and devoured by rats."
without number; the whole closed round by length Dash, you good boy," and down went the little
after length of picket fence, painted white, this straight legs on their knees, while the eager lips were
was what the world meant to Rick when he was four put close to the dog's ear, "you and I are going a
years old. long journey-to the moon, I guess. It's way, way
That fence was to him the end of the known and up in the steeple of the meeting-house. Now you
the beginning of the unknown. Beyond it were the just come right along; an' don't you talk, Dashy.
regions of space, dimly discerned by the child as a Little doggies," -this with a solemn imitation of
sort of chaos of meeting-house, horse-sheds,.saw- Mrs. Harkaway's manner,- "little doggies, you
mill, store, and village houses, know, should be seen, an' not heard."
I think it was in May, the fourth of his existence, Miss Lesbia, had she known what was going on
that something entered into Rick one day, and outside, would not have sat quite so composedly knit-
tempted him to go outside the known world, and ting, and shrieking into the mouth of Mrs. Ames's tin
take a tour into these regions of space. Aunt Lesbia trumpet, which looked like a fish-horn.
was, as he well knew, receiving a call in the east "I think I should try camomile tea," cried she;
room. It was old Mrs. Ames, who was as deaf as and that instant a small figure wriggled itself out
any old woman ever was, who contrived to hear a from under the fence, righted itself on two feet, and
disjointed sentence or two through her tin trumpet. set off down Main Street.
Rick paused one moment to listen a firm little figure, "H-m, calomel ?" ejaculated Mrs. Ames. "Don't
in a plaid tunic, standing very square on two straight know about calomel. Calomel, they used to say,
legs. would cure anything; but there's nothing that'll
"Yes," he said to himself, "I can hear her cure calomel."
screaming away. Dashy, come here!" "I said cam-o-mile," vociferated Miss Cranson, and
Let me say here that Miss Lesbia had never per- never dreamed that the child of her heart, with his
mitted herself to talk "baby-talk to Rick, and dog, was trotting off across the short green grass on
therefore that small individual at this age used his his way to the moon.
tongue and other vocal organs as well as you or I. "The moon is big and yellow, you know, Dashy;
Dash was a dog of the terrier breed, which had you've seen it lots of times. I've heard you a talking
been given, at the age of six weeks, to Rick, a year to it when I was in my crib some nights. It's a big,
before, by his friend Tom Dorrance. yellow moon, made o' gold, I guess and here, 0,
Dash, Dash, come here, I say," repeated Rick. here's a flower, made o' gold, too."







YOUNG RICK.

Dandelions, of course. Rick had just spied them. calling a dog; but she only achieved a small smack
Till then he had kept his eyes fixed on the steeple. of the lips.
There were beautiful white creatures flying in and Dash, Dash! Richard, Richard! she called in
out of the belfry-doves, his aunt had called them, alarm, and then started out round the house, standing
He would take one of those silver doves up with him ; under the windows, and crying out the name as anx-
better yet, he would harness a pair of them into a iously as did the much-mentioned troubadour of the
little wagon, and they would fly away with him up twelfth century, who smelled out Richard his king
into the soft clouds. Those clouds must be nicer to from the Austrian prison. But to Miss Lesbia no
tumble on than even his aunt's best feather-bed, Rick Richard from without or within made answer. Once
was sure. she fancied she heard the echo of a distant barking,
Christopher Columbus, when I was a child, then a crow cawed overhead, and all was still again.
this person was generally believed to have discovered "The mill," whispered Miss Lesbia, hoarsely ; and
America; and I cannot say that I am not a little she turned pale at a lightning glimpse before her
grieved to notice that the present race of scholars, so mind's eye of a plaid tunic swirled round under the
wise in their generation, are shearing the old explorer big water-wheel. Two seconds more and a tall wo-
of his laurels, worn so gracefully since October, 1492, man, in a black gown, was :1 ;,. wildly up the road
and are piling them upon the head of an Icelander, to the saw-mill; but the little plaid tunic, its belt
whose name I cannot remember, and in whose virtues stuck full of dandelions, was climbing the heights of
I have not the slightest interest. So, though my the belfry-stairs.
time-honored discoverer has been, and still is, left "Some steep -ain't they, Dash? Rick said, stop-
out in the cold, I shall take leave to bring him in, ping to take breath. "Guess we've got most to the
for purposes of illustration to this story, Christo- moon. Dash)y didn't think 'twas so high up--did
pher Columbus, when he left the port of Palos, in he ? Come right along; that's a good boy. O-o-o,
Spain, vide Peter Parley, and set sail for the In- d' you ever ?"
dies, which turned out to be the West, instead of the The last pull brought the pair, boy and dog, up
East, could not, I am certain, have been conscious of and out into the belfry. There hung the bell, big and
a warmer enthusiasm burning in his breast than that black; there, in the corners, were the nests of the
which fired my young friend in the plaid tunic. Dash l..i and pigeons, and down below lay the out-
had some scruples. You saw them in his tail. The spread village of Graythorpe. Rick, peering through
fat old robin, whose nest was in Miss Lesbia's Porter- the green shutters, described a something which looked
apple tree, went hopping along, just ahead of them, about as big as a fly, speeding away up the hill.
and said, as plainly as a robin with a big angle-worm He recognized that something.
in her mouth could say,- "Guess aunt Lesbia's some in a hurry," he re-
"You're running away-running away. I'll tell, marked to Dash ; and then the next minute Rick had
I'll tell, I'll tell." seated himself in a corner with a couple of young
"Tell, then, you bad old bird," cried Dashy-that pigeons in his lap, perfectly happy.
is, I suppose this was what he said; for he gave a Miss Cranson's lost her boy. Little Rick has
sharp bark and a snap that sent Mrs. Robin flying gone. Anybody seen that child ?"
and scolding away across two gardens and one mow- Ten minutes more, and these words were being
ing to her nest. flung from mouth to mouth all over Graythorpe.
I trust you'll find that camomile beneficial," cried Nobody had seen Rick, for no one had chanced, as it
Miss Lesbia. She was standing in her south door, happened, to meet him. Aunt Lesbia was like a
and Mrs. Ames was carrying herself, with her tin woman distracted ; Mrs. Harkaway was flying madly
trumpet and her green calbche sun-bonnet, down the up and down; and even the deacon, for the first time
south walk. Where is Rick, I wonder? Rick, within the memory of man, was seen to run, actually
Richard, Richard Why, where can the child be ? to run, from the lower cornfield up to the house.
I don't see Dash, either. Dash, Dash !" Miss "Where, under the canopy, can that child have
Lesbia tried to whistle, as the manner of most is in gone ?" wondered Mrs. Harkaway, anxiously.







YOUNG RICK.

"Indians !" shrieked old Mrs. Ames, quite for- the old fellow, bless him; and there's the dande-
getting that the last of his tribe had died converted lions I found on the belfry stairs as I went up. Knew
fifty years before. My grandmother was carried off I'd got my game sure that time."
by 'em." Miss Lesbia kept those dandelions.
"Grandmother!" exclaimed Tom Dorrance; I Graythorpe went home to its dinner, and talked
say, what in time are they ringing the church bells the matter over. Mrs. Tozer remarked, sapiently,-
for ? Hold on there." "I always knew something would happen to that
I don't know that I have told you that Tom's home child. Miss Lesbia hasn't had a particle of experi-
was two miles from Graythorpe a cleared place in ence with children, you see."
the woods, where he had a house and mill. His "Well," responded the father of the six small
time and talents were pretty equally divided between Tozers, and the -owner of that many-cribbed and
tending this mill and scouring the woods for game. much-cradled nursery, "I know one thing. If she
He had walked into town this morning solely to hasn't had experience, that boy has gone to work the
bring a pair of gray squirrels to Rick. right way to give it to her. Only let him go on as
Tom stood still an instant there on the green, in he's begun, and his aunt's education 'll be all right."
front of the meeting-house, where a group of people At that moment Rick was being rocked to sleep in
had gathered; stood listening, with his hat pushed his aunt's arms. Both he and Dash had been fright-
back, and his face upturned. All at once a sudden ened past all telling when the bell had begun to
light broke over his features, thunder in their ears. Dash was resting from his
"Cre-a-tion cried Tom, and dashed through the labors on the cat's bed, looking, even in sleep, an
crowd up the steps with a bound, and into the entry, humiliated dog, while his master, long after his eyes
where the sexton was ringing away with might and were fast shut, gave a little, sad sob, as of a baby-soul
main. Had all Graythorpe been in flames, he could in trouble. Aunt Lesbia did not lay the child down
not have done his duty better, in his crib that day. All the long two hours while
"Stop that noise, Green," spoke Tom; "hold on the clock ticked on, she sat in the hushed east room,
there- can't you ? and held little Rick in her arms.
The rope swung loose, the old wheel ceased to
creak, and the rusty bell stopped ringing. Then they
all heard it, everybody listening down below there, CHAPTER III.
a dismal howl, and a woful wail, a perfect duet of
misery coming down from aloft on the air of the May HE IS TAKEN TO THE WATER.
morning. And while men and women held their
breath to hear, while Miss Lesbia turned white, and "Now, my little boy."
dropped down on a near horse-block, while the sex- "Yes, 'm."
ton muttered that he "was a ringing for the little "You see this string Rick's eyes, very wide
chap that was lost," all at once a hearty voice rang open, took in the whole length, about six yards of
out from overhead, carpet-binding, which his aunt stood holding in her
"All right; I've treed him and Tom came to two hands; "I am going to put one end, so, around
the east window of the belfry, wrenched off a slat, your waist, and fasten it into your belt-buckle behind;
and showed Rick's curly head and plaid tunic raised and the other let us see I think I must tie the
on his shoulder. Miss Lesbia glanced once, and then other to this lilac bush."
covered her eyes. The sunshine turned suddenly "And I'll be aunty's horse, and I'm tied to a tree
black to her; but she bit her lip hard, and scolded to keep me from running away," cried Rick, in a
herself." state of great delight.
"Lesbia Cranson, you never fainted in your life," "Yes, to keep you from running away. That's
she said to the first person singular. "You're not what the string means, Richy," said Miss Lesbia.
going to begin now. No." She thought of the steeps of those belfry stairs;
Here he is," cried Tom, close at hand. Here's she remembered the wail that had come down through








YOUNG RICK.

the air of that May morning, come down from such over head. An oriole was fixing her hammock to the
a dizzy hight, and she grew cold and faint for a outermost twig of the big elm, twenty feet above the
minute. ground, quite out of reach, as the cute bird well
Now my little boy will remember," she said. knew, of the prowling Pollux. That ill-tempered
Yes, 'm. I wish for a string to harness my horse robin was puttering about in the Porter-apple tree,
into my wagon, Aunt Lesbia. Dash'll go with you, scolding, as usual, while a cat-bird was mewing, and
and bring it to me. Here, Dash." a king-bird was enacting delirium tremens in the gar-
Dash came back with two yards more of carpet- den, with the top of a bean-pole for his center of
binding, and a piece of clothes-line for a halter, operations. These and five hundred other things
Rick's horse was his aunt's saw-horse, and the wagon were going on while Rick was getting his team "
was a red wheelbarrow. It was a bright morning- under way. And now let me tell you, you small
June now-with the dandelions putting on white friends of mine who live in the country, and don't
caps under foot, and the lilacs flaunting purple ones have too many playthings, that a saw-horse, harnessed


/ ,^ ^<



t I



", '
t i \ "',-
, i "A i,'


















between the hills of a wheelbarrow, isn't bad fun at a language not known much in books.) Hadapp,
all. You can sit on the barrow, put your dog up there don't be all day about it. Dash, sit still.
beside you, and set your cap on his head, if you You'll tumble out, an' get-run over, an' break every
please, as Rick id. If you have dolls, or cats, or bone in your body. Sit still." Dash was sitting still,,
little sisters, you can pack them in on the back seat, and looking preternaturally solemn with his master's
and there you are as fine as possible. You may jerk cap cocked over his left eye.
your horse by the bits as hard as you choose; it "Now, Dash, we're going to going to I guess
won't make his mouth sore and then, no matter how we're going to Jericho. 0, yes; an' if you'll be a
high he rears, he can't throw you out of the carriage, good boy, I'll get you a ram's horn ; a ram's horn,
"Now, g'long! Hadapp, there! screamed Rick. Dashy. You remember that's what they blew up
(" Go along," and "get up," this is to be translated. Jericho with. You know, Dash, aunt Lesbia told
The child's driving terms had been received from his you and me all about that the other Sunday, when we
aunt's hired man in the cornfield, and belonged to had 'sparagus for dinner. Hold on tight there, Dash.
\ : ," ",'--" I T '
between~I th hlso hebrointbdfu talnug o nw mhi ok .) "Hadpp
all. ~~~~, You; ca si ontebroptyu o ptee o' ealdyaot it.Dsh i sil













aunt's hired man in the cornfield, and belonged to had 'sparagus for dinner. Hold on tight there, Dash.








YOUNG RICK.

We're fording the river Jordan now, an' there's con- You hold on," cried Paty. Indeed, Rick could
siderable many stones lying round loose here. Look do little else. "You hold on, an' I'll come over; "
out you don't tumble. Here's Jericho right here and over she came. No squirrel could have come
now. Who-o-oa !" quicker. What have you got that lilac tree hitched
Rick jumped off, and stood holding the reins in his on to you for ? "
hand, when a voice from the lower end of the yard I'm Aunt Lesbia's horse, and she's tied me to
sang out, keep me from running away."
"I know where their's a bird's nest." Paty, whose queenly name was Cleopatra, bobbed
Rick looked back over his shoulder. It was a her small chin sagely, and lifted her black eyebrows.
tanned face, with a mat of unkempt light hair, and a Paty's brows and lashes matched her eyes, and mis-
couple of wild black eyes. It was staring at him matched her hair.
between two pickets of the fence. Rick stood up Say," she whispered, "I do know where there's
there on his firm little feet. His head was flung a bird's nest, right down by the brook."
back, his cheeks were red, and his hair was tossed all So do I ; right up in my Porter-apple tree."
about. With his dainty neck-frill and his neat coat, Pooh you can't see into it. My nest has got
he looked, from topmost curl to the toe of his tidy four eggs in it-little-teeny-speckled eggs." Paty
shoes, the carefully-tended child that he was. The made her eyes as big as grandmamma's in "Red
small waif, hanging on to the fence with her unwashen Ridinghood." Don't you want to go down there and
hands, was bare as to her head, bare as to her feet, see 'em ?"
and wore no unnecessary garments between. Rick Rick began to twist Dash's collar, and dig one
looked at her, decided he did not approve of her, heel into the ground ; he said he didn't know as he
and drew his brows down straight accordingly. Dash could go." The truth was, he felt the tug of those
agreed with him. Dash always paid court to well- six yards of carpet-binding in the rear, and he had
dressed people, and scorned shabbiness. I mention his doubts. All at once his face lightened.
this with regret, and confess that, so far as his aristo- Can't you bring the bird's nest up here, and show
cratic tastes were concerned, Dash was a disgrace to it to me ? "
our glorious republic, and ought to have been born Shouldn't durst to," answered Paty. "The old
under the Grand Mogul. bird 'ud come, an' find 'em gone, an' then she'd fly
"I know who you are," cried the barefooted, bare- on to my head, an' peck my eyes out. Miss Grashel
headed guest. "You're the little boy 't run away the said so-she did. Come along. 'Tain't but just
other day." Rick felt that he disapproved of that down there in the meadow, your own meadow, too."
girl very much. Pooh! running away ain't anything. I'm tied up," said Rick, speaking very low. For a
I run away most all the time. Don't anybody care. great explorer, who had just forded the Jordan, and
I'm Paty Ray, an' I live 'long o' Miss Grasher, up to entered Jericho with a flourish of trumpets, -q who had
the town-farm." recently started for the moon, and got as near it as
The town-farm ? That altered the case. This, the church steeple, I do think it was rather hard
then, was the poor child Aunt Lesbia had told about; not to be able to visit "your own meadow."
the child who had too little to wear, and nobody at I'll untie you," said Paty; and down she went on
all to love her. Rick had turned his back, but he her knees, and began tugging away at the string.
wheeled round in an instant, and went running to- But Miss Lesbia had made a fast knot. Even Paty's.
ward the point where Paty stood. nimble fingers could not loosen it. "Well, there "
You poor little girl !" he said, with a certain air she exclaimed, and raised her eyes to the limb upon
of royal pity. "Are you hungry ? 0 which the other end had been fastened. That was
Running at full speed, Rick felt himself pulled up high out of reach. The lilac was too stiff to bend,
suddenly from behind in the region of his belt-buckle, too big to break, and too small to climb. Paty took
He had come to the end of his string, counsel with her own wits for an instant. They did
Think I'll just stand here and talk to you," he not fail her. Paty's wits, as we shall hereafter find,
remarked. were not of the kind to fail their proprietor.







YOUNG RICK.

"I say, I'll fetch it," she cried, and then "0, won't anybody come ? 0, dear! 0, dear "
Do you know what the Gordian knot was ? Do moaned Rick, whose head was out of the water.
you know how Alexander severed it ? Well, he took "Yes, there, somebody is coming. 0, it's only
a sword and cut it, and it has been somewhat fre- that dog. 0! and Paty shrieked anew.
quently mentioned as a very brilliant performance on Dash had heard, had come; and now he ran to and
his part. Therefore it is with sincere pleasure that I fro like a dog demented. He was resolved to do
tell you of something which Paty Ray did, which was something, and he did it. He barked. That was
.a great deal more remarkable. Now listen. In.three one more to make a noise, you see.
minutes she was leading Rick down through the "Wouldn't somebody else hear?" Paty asked her-
swampy lowland, where the cowslips grew, wetting her self. Yes, somebody heard.
own unshod feet, and his shod ones, -was heading "Well, I declare!" exclaimed a shrill voice; and
straight for the brook. Paty had bitten that carpet- there was a quick step close beside them.
binding in two. 0, Miss Charity," cried Paty.
Rick had run away. Dash wouldn't go. He knew "You little torment," answered that person, and
better. So, I'm afraid, did his master; but-that without another word plunged into the water, plucked
bird's nest, those four little teeny speckled out Rick, shook him soundly, and started up the
eggs"-here they were at the root of an alder, near meadow, leading him. Paty followed. She carried
the brook. Rick's shoes and stockings in her hand. They had
"Tell you what," exclaimed Paty, after a little, been taken off, and laid in the sun to dry before the
" I'm goin' to take this nest and carry it home, so children had declared war.
I'll have some little birds o' my own." "Lesbia!" Miss Charity's buxom figure nearly filled
You said the old bird would peck your eyes the passage of Miss Cranson's east hall, leaving only
out." room for a forlorn little figure, covered with mud
"I don't care. She won't. I ain't afraid. I'm and ignominy, beside her. Paty lurked behind, and
goin' to take 'em." Dash sniffed his master's dripping skirts. Lesbia,
No," cried Rick, struck with a memory all at here's your boy. Paty Ray, you may go home."
once. "My aunt says it's wicked to steal birds' Paty went strolling up the hill, and Miss Lesbia
nests. O, it's awfully bad. You better not." lost no time in getting Rick into the bath-tub. Not a
I will," answered Paty. word was spoken until the child was tucked into his
Rick put out his hand, and tried to cover the nest. crib, and his aunt had started for the door; then a
Paty flew upon him like a little fury, all the black of much-injured voice from the depths of the pillows
her big eyes shining, inquired, -
You let my bird's nest alone. Let it alone, I Can't Dash come and stay with me ?"
say. There No, my child."
The last word came with a blow. It struck Rick Mayn't Pollux come and lie on the bed ? "
full in the face, and pushed him backward. The next No, Richy," with calm decision.
he knew he was splashing and sputtering in the water. Then," like a boy reduced to great straits, -
The next Paty knew she was standing two feet up on "then, please will you leave the door open, and sit
the bank, and staring at him. The brook was narrow, where I can see you ?"
and swift, and deep. Aunt Lesbia left the door open, and wiped her eyes
He'll be drowndcd/ he'll be drownedd" shrieked as she stepped out into the east room, where Charity
Paty; and then she flung herself down on the ground, Giles sat by the open fire. Miss Charity had waited
clutched the boy's plaid tunic, and pulled. But Rick because she had something to say. She straightway
was a solid little fellow, and she could not lift him said it.
in his wet garments up those two feet of steep bank. "Lesbia, you'll have to whip that boy. Spare the
She still held on, however, and she screamed,- rod and spoil the child,' you know Solomon said."
screamed as she had never screamed before, while "I did not know that Solomon said it; but I
Rick roared in unison, believe it was Solomon's doctrine," answered Miss







YOUNG RICK.

Lesbia, smiling. "However, Solomon had a large Indeed, this was true. Had it been a choice be-
family." i tween a whipping with the all day's out-door sunshine
"Yes, and he knew about children, Lesbia." coming after it, and this long lying in bed there in
Perhaps; but I cannot say that his success with the stillness while the clock ticked and the shadows
Rehoboam was encouraging." grew tall, neither Rick nor any other wide-awake boy
Miss Charity, having no argument to oppose to this, would have hesitated a moment. Yes, the child was
flew back to her first position, punished. The next day was bright and clear, but
"I tell you I don't believe in moral suasion. It's there was no need of the six yards of carpet-binding
immoral. Children have to be punished." again. Rick understood.
"Yes; and my little boy here is being punished.,"
said Miss Lesbia.







..Y REV. S. W. DUFFIELD.

As he sits and sing, shame to mi

"ith many a uirk of his retty throat. And the little couple being their life.,
SI _t




BY REV. S. W. DUFFIELD).

"THE little bird sits and sings in the sun; The little bird sits and sings no more;
And the day runs by, For he works his best
And the clouds are high, At a little nest;
And he sits and sings till the day is done. And he goes and comes by the open door.

The little bird wears his bravest coat; The little bird kisses his little wife
And he tries his wings, With an airy kiss
As he sits and sings, It were shame to miss -
With many a quirk of his pretty throat. And the little couple begin their life!








YOUNG RICK.




YOUNG RICK.

BY JULIA A. EASTMAN,
AUTHOR OF THE $1000 PRIZE STORY, "STRIKING FOR THE RIGHT.'

CHAPTER IV. quarters in an unoccupied horse-shed, just beyond
Miss Lesbia's gate. Rick, being six years old, was
CONCERNING CASTOR AND POLLUX. allowed to wander more widely, even to the limit of
one fourth of a mile, at his own sweet will.
P ATY'S father was in an insane retreat, her I've brought my children to visit you," Paty an-
mother in the churchyard, and she herself in nounced one day, as she came to the entrance of the
the Graythorpe poorhouse. Mrs. Gracey -the Miss horse-shed.
Grasher" of Paty's frequent mention--said, "The "Ah," replied Rick, grandly, "I'm glad to see
child's a bad child, an' there's no doin' nothing' with them. How many have you, m'am ?"
her." Seven," answered Paty, demurely; and set in a
Grandmother Dunscomb, Paty's fellow-pauper, said, row seven corn-cobs, all 'dressed in capes, cut out of
"She's a neglected little thing, and wants some one an old pink calico apron. "My eldest is five years
to love her." of age. My youngest are twins." Then she added,
Miss Lesbia agreed with Mrs. Gracey, especially solemnly, Are your family well to-day ?"
since the casualty at the brook. Paty went walking No, ma'am ; my eldest child is attacked with mea-
up the hill that morning, and Rick saw her no more sles;" and Rick pointed to the little bedstead in the
for many days. Then--but I must tell you first corner, where Pollux lay sleeping in one of Miss
about that cat. It was Castor. He had never be- Lesbia's frilled nightcaps.
come reconciled to the new comer; he had been "Measles shrieked Paty. My children will
missed during Rick's second year with aunt Lesbia, catch 'em. Never have been exposed, one of them ;"
and though his sorrowing mistress had sought him and she hustled together her seven caped corn-cobs,
from one end of Graythorpe to the other, neither man, and ran outside in great haste with them. Now,"
woman, or child had seen him. The lost cat-pet was she remarked, coming back unattended, now I'll go
given up, and mourned for as one dead. When Rick in, and see Pollux."
was five years old, one stormy March night, at nine However much of "make believe there might be
o'clock, a knocking was heard at Miss Cranson's east in the other proceedings, Pollux's sickness was no
door. There, in the driving sleet, stood an eager joke. He had been ill for two days. He was a very
little figure, bareheaded, and with something in its old cat by this time. Paty put on a pair of grand-
arms, wrapped in an old shawl, mother Dunscomb's broken spectacles, and bent over
I guess this is your cat you lost. I found him in the invalid. W
Mr. Grasher's barn," cried Paty; and as she stepped I should consult a medical man," she said. There
inside, up mounted Castor, after his old fashion, on is no exaggerating the propriety of language with
Miss Lesbia's shoulders, which these children played grown-ups." Paty had
It was the puss who, three years before, had dis- gained new victories in this line since she had become
appeared from among men. Here he was, bigger intimate with grandmother Dunscomb.
than ever, and fatter, home once more, and Paty had I've sent for a doctor," said Rick; and directly he
brougl-t him. Paty became from that March night went out, and returned with his dog. "Dr. Dash-
an object of interest to Miss Lesbia. Paty from that away," he explained, and ushered in Dash, dressed in
hour was permitted to play with Rick. You might a full suit of his master's clothes.
have seen the two any day that summer at their head- Dash had been put through this performance a







YOUNG RICK.

great many times. No trained circus dog ever knew ber of its paupers seldom exceeded half a dozen. The
better what was expected of him. Walking on his farmers were none of them rich, but they had enough
hind legs, he allowed Rick to lead him to the bed- to eat and drink; their dress was plain, and it must
side, and to put the cat's paw in his own gloved one. go very hard with a family before any of its members,
"He's feeling the pulse, now," remarked Rick. young or old, were "put on the town." Grandmother
"I'm afraid it's a very bad case." had no one belonging to her, and Paty Ray belonged
"Dark-complexioned children always have measles to no one, and that was why they were here.
hardest; Miss Grasher said so," observed Paty, as "Dash, Dash!" cried Paty, one afternoon; and
she glanced at the dark-gray face inside the night-cap she cleared the door-steps with one jump, and whistled
frill. Then she added, "Saffron tea," bringing an the dog to her side. She had just seen Dash come
old bottle and a cracked bowl from the cupboard. racing up the hill, and guessed his master was not far
"0, aunt Lesbia," cried Rick, as a tall figure dark- behind. Paty dropped down on the grass, took the
ened their sunshine, and then glided in and stood dog's paws in her hands, and looked a great deal of
beside Dr. Dashaway; "we're playing, and Pollux love into his brown eyes. "You're a nice, good doggie,
has got the measles." Dash," she told him in a whisper, and that instant a
"Something else, I think," said Miss Lesbia. Then voice from the kitchen rang out shrill and sharp, -
she sent Paty and Rick to the post-office, and called Paty Ray, come into the house. Come right
her hired man. Pollux was dead. along to your work, I say. I can't have you chas-
ing dogs about all this afternoon."
Yes'm." And Paty came in.
CHAPTER V. It had not been a pleasant voice to hear, and it
was not a pleasant woman to see, the one who stood
PATY RAY AT HOME. there over the cooking-stove, with the tongs in her
hand. Mrs. Gracey was dressed in a dark print, a
AN old house, square, bare, and built of red bricks, little ragged, and more than a little soiled. She was
standing alone on a rocky hill-side, where the wind an unhealthy-looking woman, with a sallow face, and
"blew its bleakest in January, and the sun burned its two deep up-and-down Wrinkles between her eyes.
hottest in July; never a tree, a shrub, or a vine any- She had a sharp nose, a pointed chin, and her shoul-
where about, but only barren-faced fields, walled round ders and elbows were the squarest shoulders and
with stone, a place where nothing ever seemed to hap- elbows I ever saw. Her hair was dry and thin, and
pen, save what was always happening, this was the had quite given up growing in certain places.
Graythorpe poor-farm. Here Mrs. Gracey presided "She looks as though she had scolded the hair all
in-doors, and her husband without. Here old Ben off the top of her head," Tom Dorrance said. And,
Drake chopped wood, killed flies, and muttered his indeed, if there be any relation between scolding and
crazed fancies to himself all day long. Here, in a baldness, then Paty had reason to know why Mrs.
little room by herself, grandmother Dunscomb sat, Gracey was bald.
knitting hour after hour, with the smile of God's own Now, there's the dinner-dishes there in the sink,
peace on her wrinkled face; and here lived our little and here's the baking-dishes on the side-table. You've
Paty. Grandmother "had seen better days," they got 'em to do, and the quicker you set about it, the
said; and so she had, as far as this world was con- quicker you'll get through. You m' go an' fetch me
cerned; but the dear old woman was so good a Chris- my mop out o' the wood-shed, to begin with."
tian, and lived so near her Lord, that all days were Paty brought the mop, and then she began to pick
good days to her. up the knives and forks. It was Saturday, and there
She is the happiest person in this town," the was no school; but Paty's Saturdays were made a
minister told Miss Lesbia once; "and none of us burden to her by reason of much dish-washing. Now
can tell how many of our blessings may come in she drew a long breath, as she climbed up mn a chair
answer to her prayers." to reach the dish-pan. That instant there was a
Graythorpe had very few poor people. The num- sound of some one knocking at the door.


* *










I I i, I
'' Ii _' _'-_-'7 '__ -' -- ',, I i, i,'' 'li". i*. . .iIi "I.I;I: I
Jill i
I I I '' j I , ,I i Ii Ii'' ,
Al I, I' ''I i iI I i :











iii



iM MT,
S i I II,' : 'i i I I I '























If -
iiN: __

,, II _1 .- i i ,, _____ __ ,,
!i~~i''I''' ~ "If '''' ,"''r I '-II' I i ,,I~, ,,,,
1 1 1 I ,I I i, ll .


.... _-_i -,

I, ,._ ---- ____ -__ _
,~ ',, I" ',,',, !,, ,, -= - . ;.. ,





SI',



1~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~.. i;!!111~111 I il~l
.I .. . III I;I li -







YOUNG RICK.

"There," cried Mrs. Gracey, "now who's come, I got used to hearing herself referred to as one of the
wonder ? town's poor, although Mrs. Gracey gave her plenty of
May I go to the door ?" asked Paty, full up to opportunities to do so.
her very eyes of curiosity. It was so seldom, you "May I wear my pink dress ? As the child
see, that a visitor came to the poor-farm. poured out the dish-water, she asked this.
No. You go on about your work. I'll 'tend to Why, yes. I suppose you can ;" spoken slowly,
the door; and Mrs. Gracey started, putting up her and then, very briskly, these words were added: "but
hand as she went, and smoothing the spot where hair it ain't for you to be thinking' what you'll wear. You
had grown in the old days. sh'd ought to be thinking' how you'll behave down to.
Paty, lurking in ambush round the corner of the Miss Lesbia Cranson's. Now, then, you just mind
chimney, heard the front door open, and a voice ask, your dinner-dishes while you're about 'em."
civilly, Strawberries her new pink dress tea-table set
Is Paty Ray at home ? under the mountain-ash tree Rick Dash the
Yes. I believe she is. Do you want 'er ? Mrs. big Cranson house, with doors and windows wide, and
Gracey answered, in her usual high key. the afternoon sun and shadows falling on carpeted
"Well," responded Rick,-for it was that young floors, -these were what Paty saw, as she stood up
gentleman, my aunt said I might run up and ask on a three-legged stool, and washed dishes. Had the
you if you were willing Paty should come down to my child been bidden to pass the day in Paradise, she
house to tea. We're going to have strawberries, and would have considered it a hardship in comparison to
the table set out under the mountain-ash tree." this. Besides, she had never, in all her seven years,
Paty, who heard every word, turned quite white been invited out to tea before.
with anxiety and suspense at this point. There was Paty Ray washed and wiped plates and pans, and
a little hush, then Rick's voice again. scoured knives for an hour, all in a beautiful dream
She may come, mayn't she, Mrs. Gracey ? Five of bliss. Everything that she could have remembered
o'clock is our tea time." to tell you of the time was, that the sun shone; and
Well, I don't know; mebby she c'n come when she wherever she turned she saw a pretty little table laid
gets her work done up. She's got considerable to do, under a mountain-ash tree, and a small girl, in a pink
and she ain't any too spry ever. But" and the dress, sitting before a big saucer of strawberries, and
voice grew a trifle less sharp I'll see 'bout it." answering politely the questions of a stately lady in a
"She says she'll see about it. O, goody said white cap. But something happened, by and by, which
Paty to herself, as she stood there by the chimney- Paty did remember, something which she never in all
corner. Miss Grasher says she'll see 'bout it." her life forgot, something which I can scarcely bear to
If you had been looking at Paty then, you would tell you, it was so bad. This. You know big dinner-
have seen her fling the dish-towel on the kitchen floor plates are heavy. They are very, very heavy for small
and pick it up again, hop twice over the leaning hands. Paty's hands were only seven years old, and
handle of the mop, and then go back to the sink, there were eight dinner-plates, and she was tugging
where her mistress found her shortly, very demurely them across the kitchen to put them away in the
building a porcelain tower of the dining plates. pantry. The floor was moist and soapy from Mrs.
"Now, you just see how smart you'll be. It's the Gracey's mop; Paty's foot slipped, flew out from
first time in a hundred years, I'll be bound, that one under her, and then a little girl, with a face of
o' the town's poor has been invited down to Miss terror, and a great pile of broken crockery-such
Lesbia Cranson's big house to tea," said Mrs. Gracey, a heap of woe in the middle of the kitchen there.
twisting up her back hair, and thrusting into it a very O, me 1
old brass comb. And Mrs. Gracey? I will not tell you what she
Paty dipped a spoonful of soft soap into a tin basin, said. Scolding is bad enough once uttered. My
and looked very white in the face. She had a way time is too precious to write, even if yours were not
of turning white when anything hurt her, and where too precious to read, the record of that half hour's
you and I would have turned red. Paty hadn't yet loud talk. I think Mrs. Gracey must have grown







YOUNG RICK.

bald a great deal that June day. But the end of all her clothes were very far from what she wished them
was, that Paty was not to go to Miss Cranson's ; she to be ;-in short, she would pile up the causes for
was to stay at home all the afternoon, discontent, and then cry over the woeful accumula-
I couldn't trust you to go," said Mrs. Gracey. tion, cry till she was tired, and then she would feel
" I've no doubt you'd break every dish on the tea- better.
table before you got back." Not a single friend in all this big world, an' it's
Paty went and hung up the mop, and then she twenty-five thousand miles round, biddy." Suddenly
stopped a minute and looked at it. She was wonder- Paty stopped, and lifted up her tear-bathed face.
ing if she could be the same girl who, only a little Yes, I have, too. There's gramma," she cried,
while ago, jumped over that mop-handle for joy. starting up. The next minute a stormy little creature
A minute more and a small, barefooted figure was burst in on the calm of grandmother Dunscomb's
flying across the yard, past the old butternut tree, to room. Paty buried her face in the dear old woman's
the barn. lap, and sobbed out her sorrow.
0, biddy, biddy! sobbed the child ; and she Grandmother said nothing. She onlypatted Paty's
crouched down in the hay by the side of the nest tumbled hair, and whispered, "There, there, dear,"
where the old white hen was sitting on fourteen eggs. till the story was done. Then she said, -
" 0, I can't go, and I wish I wasn't alive. I wish I'd Suppose you run down by the brook, and see if
died when I was a little baby, and had the lungs- you can find a few cresses for my supper, Paty."
fever. 0, biddy, I was going to wear my pink dress, Then, when Paty was gone, the old soul took her
and eat strawberries, and now she says I shan't; and, cane, and hobbled out into the tidy kitchen, where
O, I do wish I could have the croup, an' be shut up Mrs. Gracey sat in a clean dress, reading the alma-
in a coffin-box, like Sophia Fenton. O, dear nac. A fresh gown and the almanac meant that work
Perhaps you think this wasn't real trouble. Chil- was done with Mrs. Gracey, rest was begun, and,
dren's sorrows are nothing, some persons will tell you. ordinarily, fair weather was to be expected.
But I say to you that, years afterward when Paty "Don't you think, my dear," asked Mrs. Duns-
was a woman, with her own children' about her, and comb, by and by, very quietly, this was after they
all the labors of a busy life, and all its cares, she used had talked over the weather, the corn, the church, and
to turn backward toward that little girl, curled up the cholera in New York, "don't you think you
there on the haymow, and remember her with a great could make up your mind to let Paty go down there
sob of pity welling up in her throat. Children, your this afternoon ? "
troubles are not little troubles, and there are those, No, I don't," replied the mistress of Graythorpe
both in heaven and on earth, who know this, and are poor-farm. She's broken half the dishes in this
sorry for you. house, and I feel it's my duty to punish the child, so 't
"0, biddy, biddy! moaned Paty. The hen said she won't forget it just yet."
nothing, but she was a good listener, and it's sur- Grandmother went on knitting, with a smile in her
prising the amount of comfort that is imparted to the tranquil blue eyes. Inside she was putting up a little
afflicted by good listening. 0, biddy, you hate Miss prayer that God would give her something to say
Grasher, an' I hate her, an' I suppose it's wicked ; next. Dear Lord, I feel 's if I must persuade her,"
but, 0, I did want to go to Rick's house so O, said the blessed old creature. She really believed,
biddy, I haven't got a single friend in the world, you see, what the Bible says about "praying without
My mother is dead, an' my papa he's crazy, and I ceasing." I shouldn't wonder if that was why, though
think they might use me better. I do." And Paty lame, and old, and poor, she "rejoiced evermore."
heaved a great sob. Do you remember how those two little verses are
When she was in a very low deep of trouble, my put together in the last chapter of First Thessa-
little girl always set about pitying herself, as though lonians ?
she had been some one else; always said to herself I don't think," said grandmother, presently, that
that she was an orphan, and she lived at the poor- Miss Cranson invites company very often."
house, and Mrs. Gracey scolded a great deal, and What the queen may be to one of her ladies in







"YOUNG RICK."

waiting was Miss Lesbia to Mrs. Gracey. The latter sunshine, looking so very bright and beautiful, her
would have done much to win her favor, more to avoid own new pink dress.
her blame. Now go and wash, then come and sit down on
I believe she might think strange of it if you kept the little stool at my knee, and I'll braid your hair.
Paty at home after you'd once said she might go. Mrs. Gracey says you may go. She is very good."
"Then Rick would be disappointed, and Miss Cran- Paty's face for a minute took on a look of fright.
son's heart is bound up in him." The joy was so big she couldn't grasp it. It scared
"Well, relented Mrs. Gracey, "I donno 's I care. her. Then a warm flush as pink as the dress on
I s'pose it's about time she was fixin', if she's goin' the bed, spread up into chin, cheeks, and forehead.
down there.' Then she fell upon grandmother like a wild creature,
"That's a good girl, Paty," grandmother Duns- sobbing, -
comb said, when the child came to the outside door "Good, good ? It's you are the good one."
with the cresses. "Now come into my room. I've "There, there; run and wash. You'll be late."
something to show you." Paty ran away to the sink. That gave her some-
Grandmother hobbled slowly across the entry, Paty thing to do, besides giving the dear old grandmother
followed, and saw, there on the bed, lying out in the time to wipe her spectacles.









F .






4 111 d-

















YOUNG RICK.




YOUNG RICK.


BY JULIA A. EASTMAN,
AUTHOR OF THE $1000 FRIZE STORY, "STRIKING FOR THE RIGHT."


CHAPTER VI. "Yes; and there are rough boys everywhere. The
world is a rough place, and neither you nor I can iron
MY HERO GOES TO SCHOOL. it smooth. Your boy and mine have got to be turned
in with the rest some time, and the longer you put it
AVE I said that all these things happened off the worse it will be. For my part I was taught
years ago ? When there was no Atlantic by private teachers till I went to college, and when I
7 Cable, when neither velocipedes, nor Pacific got there I didn't know what to make of them, nor
Railroad cars, nor croquet balls had been set rolling, they of me, and we never quite found out. No,. I
and years before you young people had begun to wish I'd been sent to public school at that boy's age."
make history for yourselves and your families ? That "That boy" was jumping off the gate-post, turning
was the "once on a time when Rick began to go to a neat somerset as he came down. My grown-up
school. readers, if I have them, will wonder he did not break
I don't know," Miss Lesbia said, "whether or not his neck every time; but the rest of you know how
I ought to send Richard to the public school." it was done.
Aunt Lesbia always called him Richard when she Miss Lesbia still stood studying the points of her
was very serious. She was so this morning, for it shears. Castor came down the walk, with his tail in
was the minister who was standing at the gate, and air and his yellow eyes blinking against the sun.
she was, as she said, counselling with him." Ah, Castor, how do you do ? inquired the min-
Public school ? Certainly you'll send him to ister, as feelingly as though he expected an answer.
the public school It's more democratic," cried Dr. Miss Lesbia smiled. She always smiled when any
Grant. "Our public schools are the main bulwark one addressed her cats with respect.
of our national prosperity," &c. It wasn't the fourth Come here, Rick," she said.
of July, whatever you may fancy from this oration. The child came and stood beside his aunt. She
It was only the fourth of May, but Dr. Grant was bent and fastened a pin which didn't need fastening.
quite in earnest. Then she took off his straw hat, pushed back his curls,
I don't know," said Miss Lesbia, slowly. She and observed, He is only six, you know."
had on a big sun-bonnet and a pair of gardening In her heart she was thinking what a fine little fel-
gloves. Miss Lesbia's gardening gloves were her 'low he was, and hoping the minister recognized a
Sunday gloves mustered out of service, and having handsome boy when he saw him.
their two thumbs and eight fingers cut off. Miss "Well, sir," asked Dr. Grant, what do you say?
Lesbia had been trimming the climbing rose over Will you go to school, or will you, like the boy in
her front door; she had a pair of old shears in her the old Primer, 'play with the cat at home' ? "
hand, and she gazed very hard at their points as she I'll go to school," answered Rick, holding his
remarked, head very straight. "May I go to-morrow, aunt
"I don't know; Mrs. Harkaway tells me they Lesbia ?"
always sent Abiel to private school, or taught him at "You may go next week," said his aunt; and the
home." minister added, as Rick ran off, -
"Humph !" "Make him as happy as you please, and as good
"And Deacon Harkaway tells me the Tozer boys as you can; then let him browse around with the
are very rough." rest. Good morning."







YOUNG RICK.

There came a tin peddler through Graythorpe that dated his active experience of life from that time.
day. He had a very white horse, a very red cart, He went home at night red-cheeked, and eager to tell
and, like Catherine in the German tale, he had all his aunt a hundred things.
sorts of tin dishes, pails, and pans, and dippers, and "The teacher made me hold a little stick between
cups, and skimmers, big and little, long handles and my teeth because I whispered once. Fred Tozer
short; in fact, that red cart was just breaking out gave me his pop-gun, and taught me how to play hop-
above, and below, and between the wheels, with the scotch, and Al Stacy's going to tell me where to ketch
shining tin. The next week two children went up the shiners in the brook."
hill to the school-house, each with a new, bright din- Catch, Rick."
ner-pail. On the lid of one was scratched with a pin, Yes'm, catch shiners; and, O, aunt Lesbia, Paty
and with flourishes indescribable, "Cleopatra Ray, Ray got awful mad at me, and she slammed her
from R. C." On the other, "Richard Wentworth dinner-pail round, and stamped her feet, and Fred
Cranson." For this marking, a certain youth home Tozer said he wouldn't care; she was nothing but
from college, with very long hair, very square-toed town's poor, any how. Wasn't that a wicked thing
boots, and a portentous cane -a youth, Abiel Hark- for him to say ? I tell you, aunty, I pounded him
away by name -was responsible. Those marvelous for it."
flourishes impressed Rick to such an extent that he "You! He's twice as big as you are;" and aunt
looked with pity on his aunt's silver spoons for weeks Lesbia, though she groaned in spirit, was still conscious
thereafter, and imagined the pail taking on airs with of a throb of admiration for her young belligerent.
the same by reason of its superior lettering. I believe "Yes 'm; but I got up on the wall, and just hopped
the boy had never in his whole life been happier than on to him. I guess a little more'n I should have
he was in presenting Paty with a dinner-pail; for up killed him; but I wouldn't do that, you know, 'cause
to that date she had always carried her luncheon in wouldd be," with solemnity, so wicked." Then, sud-
her pocket, wrapped in a bit of paper, denly waking up, O, aunt Lesbia, it's such fun to go
May, on its second week, never brought very warm to school!"
days to Graythorpe; but this was a fresh morning, There was no lack of variety in Rick's life that
with here and there a white fleece of cloud hanging summer. The history of his association with Paty, if
round a hill-top, and with the smell of fresh earth it could be written out, would read like the history of
coming down the wind from the field where Deacon England and Scotland in the days of border warfare-
Harkaway was plowing. Abiel sat on a rail-fence, one perpetual series of quarrels, or, as the children
with a book--a Philosophy, he told his father. The said, of "mads." It was quite in vain that aunt
lettering on the back of the volume proclaimed it of Lesbia cried, Let us have peace ;" all to no purpose
the species termed "Proverbial," and it was more that grandmother Dunscomb, with tears in her eyes,
popular just then with the youth of the sophomore class expostulated and enlarged on the sin of anger. In
of Z College than other branches of that study. spite of everything, Rick and Paty fell out, and raged
"Richard Wentworth Cranson, six years old, never like the heathen at one another every day of their
went to school before, had read to aunt Lesbia as far summer lives; or if by any marvel they kept the peace
as 'Xerxes the Great did die, and so must you and one day, they made it up in a double allowance of
I,' and knew the Arithmetic as far as the gills." mad the next. At the same time there was never
This was the report that Richard gave of himself a crisis in which they would not unite against any
that first day at school. He was a new scholar, and outside aggression.
the teacher was a new teacher. She had very small I wonder if it stormed harder than this in old
and very light-gray eyes, and they snapped unpleas- times, when Noah made the ark," said Rick. "I
antly when some one dropped a book. Rick was s'pose it must be it's the equinoctial storm. It rains
afraid he didn't like teachers; but he treated Miss right straight down."
Twitchel with great politeness, notwithstanding. Equinoctial storm !" cried Paty, in high disdain.
That first Monday of school was the beginning of Equinoctial storms don't happen along in July.
days to Rick in more senses than one. He always They don't come but twice in a whole year, I know;







YOUNG RICK.

because gran'ma Dunscomb told me about it once, ground, not a living creature seemed to be stirring.
ever 'n ever so long ago, when my black hen was You can think how dismal it all was.
setting." We can't play tag in this little tucked-up place;
Up at the old brown school-house the younger the cubby-house is running-over full of water, and
children were out at recess. There was a rough sort I'm sick of playing Queen of Sheba,' chorused
of wood-shed, and Paty and Rick, with several smaller Paty.
people, were hanging round inside it, watching the "0, see here. I know something," cried Rick,
weather, from his perch on the wood-pile. I know what we'll
I wish we could go down and sail sticks in the play. Le's play 'Prophets of Baal.'"
brook, under the bridge," sighed Rick. O, goody answered Paty.
"If we only could go out to the big mud-puddle, "What's that ? What's profits-a-bell ?" inquired
and play children of Israel going through the Red little Nan. She was seated on the ground in a corner,
Sea! whined Paty. where she had unearthed a small but courageous frog.
"Mith Twithell the thaid we muth not go out in "It's something about our lesson last Sunday.
the rain," remarked a small child with big blue eyes. You don't know. You don't go to our meeting-
Well, I guess we know that, you little Nan Tozer;" hosee" answered Paty, loftily; then she added, in a
snapped Paty. "We've got ears, and can hear, I half-whisper to Rick, "All that Tozer family 'tend
s'pose, as well as you." the Methodist."
Don't they learn Bible lessons ?"
"Pa ty Ra, vaty to-day. "I don't know. Like enough they do; but I s'pose
0, the 'th very croth to-day."
they haven't got's far as Elijah the Tishbite yet.
Nan's eyes shone wickedly as she sang this to the Now, where sh'll we play ?"
tune of "Lightly Row." Paty wheeled sharply round It rained as hard as ever outside, but Paty's sky
with, was beginning to clear. There was a general waking-
"Look here, now; you call that smart, perhaps. up as Rick came nimbly down from aloft, and ex-
That's some of Fred's making-up. I don't care if plained his new idea.
I am cross. Everybody's cross. It's such awful "Right there, in that corner, you know, that little
weather, this rain. I believe it has rained 'bout all hill," the shed had an earth-floor, -" we'll play
summer." that's Mount Carmel, and then, Paty, you shall be
Why, Paty! This was from Rick, who was climb- Jezebel."
ing the wood-pile, and who now looked down on the "Jezebel wasn't there."
top of their heads from the dizzy height of six feet. "Well, I guess she was. Catch her staying away.
" My aunt says there was never so pleasant a summer Any how, you shall be Jezebel, Paty, and sit on the
since she can remember anything. 0, look see that chopping-block. That'll be your throne, you see, and
great big crow." I'll be the prophets of Baal, and scream."
What's a crow? I hate 'em. Caw, caw, you Nan hopped up, the frog hopped off. Rick set
black old beast you. 0, dear me I do wish some- about piling wood for the altar, remarking, -
body would think of something nice to play." Aunt Lesbia says it would be wrong to play about
One whole side of the shed was open to the weather, things in the Bible; but she let me play Daniel in
Paty leaned against a post, stared out into the driv- the lions' den, and Joseph's coat of many colors.
ing rain, and sulked. It stormed faster and faster. Timmy Tozer can be Elijah-- can't he, Paty ? "
Rivers ran in the road, the brook down behind the "Yes; and he must just sit still, and look at the
school-house roared louder every minute; the gray rest. 0, Rick, I can wear my Queen-o'-Shebar
stones of the road-side wall were shining with wet; the crown."
raspberry bushes looked drenched and discouraged; Sheba," corrected Rick.
the grass was beaten flat along the sod; robins and Well, Shebah, then. What's the need of being
king-birds had gone home to their nests; and save so particular?"
here and there a slimy angle-worm writhing over the "Timmy, can't you come and help lift these








YOUNG RICK.

sticks ?" asked Rick. Then Paty started up in dis- had forgotten all about it. They were not in America
may, exclaiming, at all just then. They were thousands of miles off,
My Queen-o'-Sheba crown is in my desk in the on a certain mountain overlooking the Mediterranean
school-room. What shall I do ?" Sea, where a couple of altars had been built of sticks
I'll go and ask Miss Twitchell to let me get it;" of wood, laid "log-cabin-wise." Jezebel was dis-
and Rick danced off very good-naturedly. He tapped tinguished from the others by her tiara and her seat
at the door, and when the teacher came, requested, on the chopping-block. If one fell off and the other
most politely, to be allowed to go to Paty Ray's desk fell down, the queen righted them with great solem-
a minute. nity, while the prophets of Baal ran screaming round
"Well yes this one time you may," Miss their altars. They were Rick and Nan, of course,
Twitchell said. But I can't allow you children to only two; but they made noise enough for twenty.
be running in and out all recess." Nevertheless, their despotic sovereign kept goading
"No, ma'am," replied Rick, the picture of sub- them. on to fresh efforts.
mission, and tiptoed out of the room. "Here it is. "You must scream, Nan -you little prophet, I
I've got it, Paty! he screamed, as he leaped off the mean. Open your mouth wide. There, that'll do.
steps and into the shed. That's a good one, Rick. Timmy, you just keep still.
"It" was a circular piece of tin, with the upper edge That's all you've got to do," observed her majesty.
cut round in points. Paty and Rick had achieved "0, see this, Paty," cried Rick. The rain is
those points with very great labor, and a very dull coming right in here, through the roof, on to Timmy's
pair of shears. The crown was patterned after the I mean on to Elijah the Tishbite's altar. Le's
one worn by Her Majesty Queen Victoria, when she we dig a trench all round, and then the water'll run
sat for the portrait of herself, which was on Paty's into it."
pasteboard fan. No queen ever valued her crown "Look here, Rick," whispered Paty. They had
more highly than did this little girl her tin tiara. It dug the trench, and filled it with water brought from
was, to be sure, rather small; and when it was placed outside in their dinner-pails. "I've got a match or
upon the top of her head, Paty was obliged to sit very two here in my pocket." This didn't surprise Rick
still, and hold her little neck very stiffly, or it would at all. If Paty had brought forward from her pocket
fall. But to sit still and be stiff didn't matter, so long an entire set of gardening tools, he would have looked
as she was playing queen, you know. upon their appearance as quite in the natural order of
Paty, as Queen of Sheba, was great. To see her things. Now, wouldn't it be nice to set this bit of
come sailing up the school-house hill, that glitter of paper afire, and play it burnt up the altar ?"
shining'points on her head, trailing an old scarlet "Yes-but-"
shawl, and having red roses, white roses, pionies, and A little teeny tonty bit, you see," whispered
ox-eye daisies attached to all likely and unlikely por- the tempter with Paty's tongue.
tions of her apparel; to watch her pause before the No. Aunt Lesbia said I never must play with
stone wall, on whose biggest boulder Rick sat en- fire," answered Rick, sturdily. "She said-"
throned as Solomon, holding a stem of tiger-lilies for "Well, never mind what she said. You needn't
a scepter, and having various members of the Tozer be t' the trouble of telling me. She isn't my aunt,
family ranged round as his mighty men of valor; to and I'm going to light this piece of paper."
behold her amazed expression, as she cried out, "You better not."
Solomon, they never told me half of it -was not a Pooh there's water enough round here to put it
scene to forget. It never failed to bring down a tor- out, I guess." And Paty thrust her wad of paper under
rent of applause from all beholders, or this applause the wood.
to inflate Paty's heart with rapture. The poor child Rick stood behind her. There was a certain lofty
had little enough pleasure up at Miss Grasher's," calm on his small face which meant mischief. Timmy
and I think most people were glad of any crumb of had basely deserted his own colors, and gone over to
content that she picked up at school, join his sister, and the two were now shrieking madly
The rain rained harder and harder, but the children round Baal's altar. Paty drew a match across a stone.








YOUNG RICK.

There was a flicker, a thread of blue smoke, and then If you please, I don't wish to tell." And then he
only a splinter with a charred end in her fingers. She shut his lips as though he meant never to open them
tried a second, and a gust of wind blew that out. Her again.
third and last match she struck with caution, holding Timmy,"-Miss Twitchell looked across to where
her breath and shading the little flame with her he sat, what were you doing ?"
fingers. It grew bright and strong, and she had just Prophets-of-Baal," remarked Timmy, awe-stricken
touched it to the paper when some one's head came and open-mouthed.
from behind over her shoulder ; some one's breath Playing about prophets of Baal ? Playing about
blew out the match, the Bible ? 0, you wicked children !" said the
Rick teacher.
Paty screamed the name as she bounded to her "We didn't mean to be wicked," Paty upspoke.
feet. Rick was away like a squirrel to the top of Miss Lesbia 'lows Rick to play Dan'el and the lions.
the wood-pile. She said we mustn't play Little Samuel."
I'll come up there, too," she cried. But about that fire. Timmy and Nan had been
No, you won't. You're heavy, and the wood- screaming so hard that they couldn't tell who set it.
pile '11 fall down on you," answered Rick. Paty and Rick wouldn't. These two must be pun-
I don't care. I'll pull all the sticks out, and get ished.
you down. See if you'll blow my match out again." Miss Twitchell was wonderful in a single respect;
Your fire's burning," remarked Timmy at this to wit, the variety of punishments which she contrived
point; and then It was a great shadow that fell to invent for her pupils. She was, or she believed
across the light; it was an awful voice that said, herself to be, in feeble health, and she took perpetual
Children, what does this mean ? Fire doses of medicine. The array of little boxes and
The next instant a pail of water was dashed in vials on her desk gave it the look of a dispensary, and
upon them, upon log-cabin altars, screaming priests, these boxes or vials had much to do with the gov-
crowned Jezebel, and all. Come," was all Miss ernment of the school. Paty was once, for "laughing
Twitchell said; but her face was dark with dis- out loud," condemned to smell twice of a bottle of
pleasure, and it was a damp and crest-fallen crew assafcetida; and Fred Tozer had, on one occasion, as
who followed her in. Rick had, indeed, put out the penalty for sticking a pin into the seat of Al Stacy,
flame of the match, but not the little spark that lin- been made to swallow an innocent but very bitter
gered afterward, and a red tongue of fire had greeted pill. Miss Twitchell's punishments were safe, but
the teacher's eyes as she stood there at the door. sure to be unpleasant. Now Paty and Rick were to
Now, then, I want to know who set that fire." be dealt with.
Miss Twitchell sat in her chair behind her desk. You have played with fire, which you knew was
Paty and Rick were standing before her. Paty's wrong. You refuse to confess, and you are to be
cheeks were very red. Rick was trying not to be punished. You, Paty Ray, must stand on the stove
frightened. The little fellow would have liked to for half an hour, and eat one leaf of dried boneset;
cry, but he would have bitten his lip in two before he and you, Richard, must sit for the same length of
would have done it. Paty was thinking, Rick is time on the closet shelf." Paty was assisted to
provoked with me. I s'pose he'll tell." ascend to the top of the rusty old stove ; Rick was
Paty, you are the oldest. Tell me who set fire to set on the shelf, and shut up in the dark.
the paper." First class in geography," called Miss Twitchell;
Silence, save a deep sigh from Nan. She was and the educational course of the school was again
curled up on the little front seat, and she thought taken up.
things were getting serious. It rained hard. You could hear it against the
"Well, then, Rick, I suppose, as Paty refuses to windows; could hear also Timmy, in a loud whisper,
speak, she must be the one who did it. Was she ? studying "m-i-s-e-r, miser," and Dorry Miles, a girl
The teacher's voice was harsh and sharp; Rick's with red hair, was droning off, in a loud, sing-song
was very gentle as he answered, tone, -







YOUNG RICK.

Florida is noted for its salubrious climate and its as to give Rick only room to sit crouched over. He
luscicious fruits." did not like it. He had moved uneasily, and in the
Luscious, Dorothea, not luscicious," said Miss dark had slipped and come to the floor. With him
Twitchell. Don't waste your boneset, Paty. Re- had come a quart bottle of ink. This had broken
member it has saved the life of many a poor creature, in the descent, and when Miss Twitchell opened the
What is that ? closet door, it was a sorry little fellow who stood re-
A sound in the closet, a fall, a crash of breaking vealed. Rick wasn't hurt, save as to his feelings;
glass, the teacher springing to open the door, and but he was bespattered from foot to head with that
then such a sight The shelf was so near the ceiling vile black ink. Paty gave 'one glance at him, and








S ii i- I ,I



S__-

















"WHAT IS THATI"

then she flew off the stove with a bound, and fronted Cranson all that has happened; and Rick, my dear,"
the teacher with white face. she added, no one ever heard Miss Twitchell call
Miss Twitchell, it's an awful shame to punish any one my dear till then, I am very sorry I
Ricky so," she cried. I set that fire myself, I did. punished you. I think you meant to do right, and I
Rick tried to stop me, and I got put out, and ask your pardon."
and here a burst of contrite tears won't you Then the teacher washed Rick's face as tenderly and
please to whip me or something ? tidily as she could, and Paty led the little boy home.
"No," answered Miss Twitchell, slowly, as she I wish she'd made me eat some more boneset,"
looked from Rick to Paty, and from Paty to Rick. thought Paty. I'd a sight rather do it than to con-
" No, child, I won't whip you; but you may do this. fess to Miss Lesbia."
You may lead Richard home, and you may tell Miss But Paty did confess, and was forgiven







YOUNG RICK.



YOUNG RICK.


BY JULIA A. EASTMAN,
AUTHOR OF THE $1000 PRIZE STORY, "STRIKING FOR THE RIGHT."


CHAPTER VIII. didn't know why it was: I don't know. But she
never could breathe good long breaths in that pink
GOING TO THE MILLINER'S. dress and those shining shoes. It was so different
from going barefoot, in a frock with patched elbows,
" TTOW is Mrs. Dunscomb this morning, Paty ?" you know.
"H Miss Lesbia asked. How that clock did tick, and how Dash did claw
She's pretty well -yes 'm --I mean she isn't," the carpet! Paty at last ventured to take her slate-
stammered Paty; "she's got a very bad cold." pencil out of her pocket; then Miss Lesbia asked,
0, I am sorry." politely, -
Paty was sitting up very straight and stiff in one of Do you like your school, Paty ?"
Miss Cranson's cane-seated chairs. She was far from Yes'm ; tolerable well."
comfortable, for Aunt Lesbia was quite an awful per- "Miss Twitchell is an excellent teacher-isn't
son to her. I wish I was sitting out in the middle she ? "
of the road making mud-pies," she said to herself. "Yes'm. She punishes a good deal."
"I wonder if I might move one foot. There." Paty made this remark with animation, as though
Paty moved her foot, and felt easier. It was one the fact of being punished "a good deal was on the
morning when the sun was out, and there were woolly whole one to be rejoiced in. Miss Lesbia smiled,
white clouds hanging round the mountain-tops, and faintly, and observed, -
there was a smell of fresh hay, and a sound of whet- I suppose you need disciplining ?"
ting scythes in the air. It was in Miss Cranson's 0, dear, yes 'm. We act like fury, I mean very
big, shady east room that Paty was waiting for Rick. badly,"-- looking scared, and correcting herself.
They two were going down to Lower Graythorpe on Paty took her slate-pencil and proceeded to run it
an errand for Aunt Lesbia. Rick was lying on the through the hem of her apron, as though it had been
carpet while his aunt mended his tunic. Paty thought a tape-needle. At this her sense of relief was so
she never heard a clock tick so loud. The only sound great that she ventured the additional remark, -
beside was Rick whistling to Dash, who was jumping But Miss Twitchell keeps a good school. She
back and forth over his master. Paty wondered how has got good government, 'cause Mr. Gracey he said
Rick dared to stretch himself out on the floor right so, an' he's the prudential committee."
under the eyes of his solemn aunt. If this sounds like a very old speech for a little
I should just as quick think of jumping the rope girl, I can only say, that Paty was trying to suit her
in meeting right in the middle of the preach," she style to her listener. As Miss Lesbia couldn't get
thought, and sighed. down to her level, the child was trying to rise to hers.
Miss Lesbia Cranson was such a mystery to Paty! Of course Paty hadn't the remotest notion what
She had felt quite well acquainted with her last even- prudential" meant. If you had asked her, she
ing, but this morning she had to begin back at the would have answered that, "She didn't know, she
beginning, and learn her all over again, was sure. It was something about the committee-
That was the way all mornings. It was no worse man, and Mr. Gracey was It, and that was what
than common to-day, though Paty herself was a trifle they called him."
more solemn than usual, from the fact that she had "Deacon Harkaway,"--Rick rises to explain, at
her Sunday dress on and her shoes. Poor Paty, she this point, "came in to see the school the other








YOUNG RICK.

day, and he made some remarks. He said-he the world at this moment ever saw so large a band-
said What was it, Paty ? box. It was inclosed in a bag, or case, of green cam-
"He said," answered Paty, more proper than ever, bric, gathered up at the top with "a drawing-string."
and trying to look a hundred years old, "he said, Into the loops of this string Miss Lesbia ran a maple
'we were enjoying great privileges.' That's what he Itwig, and Paty took one end and Rick the other,
always says, only once he didn't. That time it was, and off they went like the spies with the grapes of
'we was exalted to heaven on a pint o' privilege.'" Eschol.
And Paty wrinkled her forehead in a mature manner. The sun had risen higher now; so had the woolly
"Aunt Lesbia mends my tunics with her own hair," white clouds. They were well away from the moun-
put in Rick. She says it's finer, and looks nicer tain-tops, and had started off for a slow sail round the
than sewing silk. I've got two brown linen tunics, blue of the sky.
one for this week, and one for next week, and they're Now, you just wait a minute, Rick," spoke Paty.
all over darns. See there, and there," and he pointed They had turned the corner of the yard, and were
to little three-cornered rents, beautifully mended with going past the meeting-house horse-sheds. I want
iron-gray hair. Miss Lesbia in those days had a very to get my sunshade that Mrs. Harkaway gave me.
extensive practice in darning. Miss Grashur won't let me carry it; so I keep it down
"Do you ever tear your clothes, Paty ?" here."
Miss Lesbia asked the question as though tearing An old green sunshade, the handle turning over
clothes were a newly-discovered process, just intro- with a hinge-joint, a thing much worn and faded, -
duced into Graythorpe. this was what the child brought out from its hiding-
"Yes'm, considerable much," Paty said. place in a manger of the horse-shed. It was the
Now we're all ready," cried Rick. "Come on, delight of poor little Paty's heart.
Dash. Come along, Clip." "Look here. Isn't that pretty? And see there;"
Have I said that Clip was the name that Paty went and she produced also a half yard of red ribbon,
by at school now ? There was a difference of opinion about two inches wide. Gra'ma Dunscomb gave
as to whether she got it from running so fast, as the me that; she colored it with beet juice.. It's my
children said, "just as fast as she could clip it," or scarf. There, I tie it round my neck, so. Now I'm
because Clip was short for Cleopatra. a young lady;" and she started off on the tips of her
"Here is the bandbox, Rick. Now don't forget ten toes. She had removed the shoes, and left them
your errand. What is it ?" in the manger.
O, I know, Aunt Lesbia. It's to say to Miss Let's us play something now," proposed Rick.
Miss -that person down there, 't this is your bonnet, Let's us hippoty-hop to the barber's shop.'"
and that the thing done up in the paper, that's the (When I find that the word hip-po-ty-hop isn't in
ribbon, and you want the bonnet -let me see what Webster's Unabridged, I am led to blush for that
do you want done to it, aunty? I forget. You excellent work. However, you and I know what it
tell Clip." means.)
Paty, can you recollect ? Now try. You are to So down the dewy sand of Graythorpe Main Street
tell Miss Ford that Miss Cranson wishes to have (there were no sidewalks then and there), Paty and
her bonnet sewed over into the new shape, and Rick hippoty-hopped; and hippoty-hop went that big
bleached, and pressed. Can you remember ? bandbox between them, and hippoty-hop went Paty's
Sewed over into the new shape," whispered Paty, parasol over all.
"and bleached, and pressed. Yes'm. I can re-
member that, I guess." "Hippoty-hop to the barber's shop
"Very well. Don't get into mischief, now; and To buy a stick of candy,
One for you, and one for me,
remember it's the little house with the hackmatack And one for Sister Amandy,"
tree in the yard. Carry the box carefully."
The box was so big that it would have carried they sang and screamed and Dash barked, and
either of the children. I suppose no child alive in kicked up his four heels, and pretended to find a rat








YOUNG RICK.

in the minister's front yard; and then he barked serenely; but Tom was the only one who could really"
louder, and the children screamed louder, and they come at them.
made such a noise that all the dogs on the way began It isn't a carriage," said Rick. It's my Aunt
to bark, and the geese to cackle, and the roosters to Lesbia's bandbox."
crow; and the only wonder was, that Miss Lesbia's 0, and she keeps house in it, I s'pose."
bonnet did not step out of its respectable bandbox, No, she keeps her bonnet in it, and we are going
and protest against traveling in such company. down to Lower Graythorpe to get it get it what,
Such experiences as that bandbox went through that Paty ? "
day Down to Lower Graythorpe the river road was Sewed over, and bleached, and pressed."
two miles long, and the children were precisely three Bonnet-box ? Well, I'm glad I know. I thought
hours in getting over it. Paty felt like a creature let maybe it was a big drum, and you and Paty was the
out of prison since she got away from Miss Lesbia. drum-major. A drum-major, you know, plays training
She hopped till she was tired of hopping; then she days, and wears a cap like a muff on his head. We'll
said, go and see it some time, Rick."
Le's play 'wash the lady's dishes.' Can't we go pretty soon ? I say, Tom, Aunt
We can't," said Rick. We've got this bandbox." Lesbia's going to New York."
Yes we can, too. We can't swing our hands, but No is she ? and Tom seemed to have a sudden
we can swing the bandbox, over our heads." idea.
"Well, there's a cent apiece for you. Run along,
"Wash the lady's dishes, and don't you get quarreling; and, look here, if you
Hang 'em on the bushes; are tired, I advise you to get into that bandbox, and
When the bushes begin to break, make Dash draw ou."
Hang 'em on the donkey's back;
When the donkey begins to run, Get into the bandbox? Ah, Tom, you builded
Shoot him with a loaded gun; better than you knew when you said that. For twenty
rods after he left them the children walked backward
and they kept time by swinging the bandbox as high very quietly, and watched Fanny's sleek coat glisten
as their arms would go, and at the end came in a in the sun as her master drove her up the street.
grand effort, and the box swung up over their heads. Then they walked a little further on, and Paty de-
"That's a splendid play. Le's do it again, Paty;" dared she was tired, and wanted to rest. They sat
and they did it again, and nearly laughed themselves down with their backs against a guide-post, and the
blind over the fun of it. And while they were laugh- box in front of them.
ing, and Dash was barking like a raving maniac of a Dash, see here. Clip, I'm going to make Dash
dog, a voice close by said, jump over the bandbox. Dash, come on." Dash
"Hullo How are you, captain ? came, and saw, and declined to conquer. He wagged
It was Tom Dorrance, driving his colt into town. his tail, and then walked off with it between his legs.
"Whoa, there, Fan," he said; and he sat up in his "You don't know much, Dash," said Rick. "I
sulky, with his hat on the back of his head, his eyes say, Paty, you jump over the bandbox."
full of mischief as he looked at the children. Shouldn't durst to," said Paty; all the fear of
O, Tom, mayn't we ride ? asked Rick, jumping Miss Lesbia rising up within her. She said we
up and down. must be careful."
"I was just going to ask you to let me ride," re- I know it, and we are being careful. I'm going
sponded Tom. S'pose I might hitch Fan into that to jump careful now. See -you look -just as care-
big carriage and we could all get in; only the colt ful.
ain't used to drawing much. She mightn't like it." "One for the market,
And two for the show,
Talking to children was an art little understood A to r te s,
k Three to make ready;
in Graythorpe. Deacon Harkaway could hold forth And f-o-u-r to go."
about "great privileges," and Miss Lesbia could con-
verse on public schools, and Dr. Grant could smile At the "four" Rick gave a great shout, swung his








YOUNG RICK.

'arms, and took a flying leap. There was a crash of "I think she's a little older than you are," Rick
pasteboard, and then all that Paty saw was a head replied.
and shoulders sticking up out of the box. The girl went on talking. "This was a cottage
0, dear, dear cried Paty; and Rick sat still a bonnet, and that was the old shape; but the 'flaring
minute, a very disgusted-looking Diogenes in a very gipsey,' that was the shape most worn in New York.
ruinous-looking tub. Then they held a council there She wore one herself. She didn't doubt Miss Cran-
by the guide-post, and Paty pulled Rick out, and son would wish a 'flaring gipsey.' "
picked up the pieces, and tied on the cover, and they Now, Rick, down in his deepest soul, did doubt;
persuaded themselves that things might not be so bad, but, also in his secret soul, he had always grieved that
after all. Then they went on. his aunt did not dress more fashionably. He himself
There's the house, and there's the hackmatack had tried to curl her hair for her, and she once wore
tree," said Rick. a red shawl to Mrs. Harkaway's because he asked her
They were met at the door by a plump girl, with to. Now, here was an opportunity to make another
a low-necked dress, and a great many very red stride. How proud he would be to sit in the pew in
curls, church under the shadow of so fine a bonnet!
Miss Ford, my Aunt Lesbia--" began Rick. Yes, that'll be what she'll want, I guess. She
It isn't Miss Ford. Miss Ford's gone to take said when can Clip and me come after it."
care of her mother. She's had a stroke explained This is Saturday. You can come- let me see -
the girl. Won't you come in, and sit down ?" can you come next Saturday ?" and she bowed the
It was a tidy room, not like a shop at all. There two children out of the room.
was a bright carpet, and a table with an astral lamp, She's going to do it in the new shape, Aunt
and a canary with a broken leg, but an unimpaired Lesbia, and we can go after it next Saturday."
voice, and there was another table with some bonnets Next Saturday it rained; but Deacon Harkaway
on it. Miss Ford was an old resident, of great re- was down at Lower Graythorpe, and brought the
spectability, and Miss Lesbia was accustomed to send bandbox up on his cart. He also brought it in, and
her bonnet to her, once in two or tree years, to be stood regarding Miss Lesbia while.she opened it. A
done over." Miss Ford knew all about Miss Cran- new bonnet was a thing of importance in those days,
son and her bonnets, they said. and the deacon, though not interested in such cele-
This girl never heard of Miss Cranson or her brations ordinarily, thought he would stay and see it
bonnets, tried on.
"That's the bonnet, and that's the ribbon," ex- Miss Lesbia untied the drawing-strings. Rick
plained Rick, civilly. "We dropped the bandbox in peered in and said, delightedly, "O-o-o !"
the river, and got the ribbon wet some, but we thought Miss Lesbia cried, "What ? Why, what foolishness
you could dry it." is this ? Miss Ford has sent the wrong bonnet."
Yes, the ribbon isn't wet, only the paper;" and "Miss Ford is away," said Deacon Harkaway;
she held up the bonnet, and looked at it. "there's a young, flyaway thing there, a stranger."
"What was to be done to it? "The wrong bonnet ? No ;" and Miss Lesbia
Paty, sitting up very straight, says her lesson about squinted at it. "This is my bonnet and my ribbon;
" sewed over into the new shape, and bleached, and but no mortal ever saw such a head-gear -as this.
pressed." Why, nothing but a painted Jezebel could wear it."
"The new shape ? Yes, 'a flaring gipsey,' I sup- Rick retired to the wood-house, but said nothing.
pose she means. Like this ;" and she took a bonnet Aunt Lesbia sat down, ripped the trimmings off,
up from the table -a pink silk bonnet, shaped like burnt up the "flaring gipsey," and went to X-, the
a wash-bowl, the shape of the old one was like a next Monday, and bought a cottage bonnet.
wash-pitcher, and set it jauntily on her red curls. Neither of the children ever referred to the matter,
Isn't it beautiful ? whispered Paty. "It's just and Miss Cranson thinks to this day, and will think
like that young lady from New York." till she reads this, that the whole was a mistake of
Is Miss Cranson a young lady ? Miss Ford's flyaway substitute."








YOUNG RICK.

But Rick mourned in secret over the failure of snarl, and she'll pull, and and, please, Aunt Lesbia,
his attempt to make a fashionable woman of Aunt mayn't I have my hair cut off ?"
Lesbia. When Rick went away, he carried with him a big
bran new pair of rubber-boots, the first of their race
CHAPTER IX. that had ever walked into Graythorpe, and he left be-
hind his enemy the curling-stick. There was a paper,
RICK'S OUTING AT THE MILLS. nicely folded and sealed, and marked with the date,
laid away in a secret drawer, which Miss Lesbia well
I THINK, Rick," said Aunt Lesbia, "that you are knew. Inside that paper were a child's curls, and
old enough to decide for yourself. Will you go to close by lay another paper, but the date on that was
New York with me, or will you go up to The Mill, of an August day, twenty-five years before.
and stay with Tom Dorrance ?" "What is it, aunty ? What makes you look sorry ?
0, may I go up to the Mill ?" Is that my papa's hair? O, show it to me-you said
My dear, you must stand still. I can't brush you would some day," cried Rick.
your hair when you are jumping up and down." "Some day I will, not to-day;" and the gray-
Rick was undergoing his afternoon hair-curling, haired woman, with the wrinkled forehead, sighed as
with one of his aunt's dressing-sacques on wrong side she turned the key of the drawer.
before over his tunic. It was his hour of special Aunt Lesbia was old, and silent, and some people
affliction. He hated that curling-stick so that he thought she was hard; but she never could think,
dreamed about it. without a tugging pain in her heart, of that bright
Yes. Mrs. Kitty has sent an invitation for you young brother gone so far away out of her sight.
to spend the month up there." She seemed to hear, often, his voice ringing through
"0, was that what Tom came for this morning? the twilight of the dim rooms of the old house,
O, I'm so glad!" and any time when she stopped to remember, she
But, my dear, if you go to the Mill, you must give could feel the touch of his firm, warm fingers on
up seeing Broadway, or the pictures, and going to the hers.
hippodrome, and riding in the street-cars." There was a fine time of preparation. You would
Yes'm; but I and Dash can hunt woodchucks, have thought Rick was going where he had once
and coons, and feed Mrs. Kitty's tame wild-cat, and started for, to wit, to the moon. I doubt not some
play with Dilsie. O, I'm so happy that I can go up of you have been to Europe with much less com-
to the mill! motion.
"Aunt Lesbia," began Rick, after a pause, in I'm going to-morrow morning, early," he said.
which he had traveled to Tom's and back, in im- Now I shall go to sleep, and sleep all night, and
agination, ten times, "Aunt Lesbia, who'll curl my that won't be any time at all; it's just as though I
hair when I go up there ? was going in two hours from now -isn't it ? "
Mrs. Kitty will attend to all those things." And then Rick went to bed, and tumbled until
Now, to Rick the idea of going off with his own midnight, until he was sure it was growing light, and
trunk, and none of Aunt Lesbia's "things" folded that Tom must be starting. But he went to sleep
in with his stockings and handkerchiefs, was bliss, at last.
Likewise the notion of that horrible curling-stick, And in the morning black Fan, who differed from
"like a girl's," alongside of his jackets and trowsers, other Graythorpe horses in that she wore a satin
was humiliation. Then and there, with that dressing- dress-coat every day, stood dancing in front of the
sacque on, and the damp curls tickling the nape of his gate. Rick went away placed in the sulky between
neck, Rick resolved to make a stand for his rights as Tom's knees.
a man. Aunt Lesbia and Deacon Harkaway watched him
"But, aunty, I don't want to be "attended to." go, and Paty Paty was in deep trouble, having seen
Mrs. Kitty don't know how to curl a fellow's hair, I'm her pet calf sold that morning. She heard Deacon
sure; and my curls make my head ache, and she'll Harkaway remark to Miss Cranson that "he thought







YOUNG RICK.

it was quite a risk to trust that boy with a rough fel- you, that's what I brought him up here for; and he's
low like Tom," and Miss Cranson answered, to keep you out of mischief; and you're to keep him
Tom is rough in some ways, but he has the warm- out of mischief and, Rick, you remember, if Roger
est heart in Graythorpe; and -he loved Dick, and breaks his neck, I shall hold you responsible."
Dick loved Tom." Breaking his neck was, in fact, the last thing 1Roger
Miss Lesbia went into the house. The deacon was likely to do, for he was a cautious boy, and never
walked across the garden, and told his wife that, "for appeared in a hurry about anything. But he seemed
his part, he never could give a certificate of moral to get on about as fast and as far as other boys, not-
character to a man that drove round the country on withstanding.
one of those jockey-gigs." Come on," said Roger. You get your traps, and
Deacon Harkaway had always considered Tom's we'll start."
sulky an immoral vehicle. "Yes, I saw a speckled trout waiting for you round
Graythorpe people spoke of The Mill as an "out- the big rock," said Tom. I guess you'll find him
of-the-way place," and it was. The mountain road there."
wound up the hills, and into the woods, and stopped Do they stop and wait for you ? asked Rick.
at Tom's house, and went no farther. There it stood, "Not much," answered Roger, dryly. "That's
a big, brown house, with quite a village of barns, and uncle Tom's fun. He talks that way, you know."
the queer old Mill across the stream, and with the I wish he was a little boy, and went with us,"
shadow of the mountains and the forest lying close exclaimed Rick.
all around. Some days he does, and takes Dilsie, and aunt
Mrs. Kitty was standing in the doorway, shading Kitty, too. I tell you we had fun one day, when we
her eyes with her hand, and the morning-glories hung went out on the pond in a boat. There's the pond,
out their pink and purple bells over her head. Dilsie, and there's the boat. It's a leaky old sieve, else
who was two years old, and a little white rose of a we'd get into it."
baby, so fair and fresh, trotted down the walk, and Roger was creeping along up the river-bank, among
Tom set her up on Fan's sleek back. the willows and alders, and Rick was plunging on
Leo, the great dog, lounged up to the sulky, and behind him. Rick took a look at Roger as he came
smelled of Rick's toes. A tame crow, with only half up and stood still a minute on a rock. He was a tall
as many legs as a crow ought to have, was hopping boy, several years older than Rick. His face didn't
about; and a cat and kittens were performing a small smile when he talked, and his lips told a story of a
circus on the piazza. A bay mare was conversing with boy with a pretty strong mind of his own; but he had
a white colt at the pasture bars, and a boy was stand- kind, honest eyes, and Rick concluded he liked him.
ing by the well curb, busy with fishing tackle. Ever go fishing before ? Roger asks, and takes
See here, Roger," said Tom, this is Rick; and an angleworm out of a little tin box.
now I've got to tell you." Tom walked Rick up to "Yes, catching shiners with a crooked pin, down
Roger, and stood between the two boys, a hand on in our brook."
the shoulder of each. "Roger 's come out here from Bah That's nothing. You'll have to learn all
Boston. He don't know much about our Yankee about it."
way of doing things don't know a maple tree from It's beginning to rain," said Rick.
a tamarack; so, Rick, you'll have to tell him." So much the better. Cloudy days are good for
Uncle Tom exclaimed Roger. fishing. The fish won't bite in fair weather."
Ah, but there's one thing he can do: he can Aren't they hungry ? "
catch fish. He's the greatest boy't ever I see for Suppose not. Then they can see you plainer."
trouting. Going to try your luck this morning, my Shouldn't think you'd make such a noise. Won't
son ? you scare them all away ? "
"Yes, sir," answered Roger, politely. "May Rick "They can't hear -they're as deaf as dummies;
go with me ? but I tell you they can see some. My! you can't stir
Of course he may. He's to go everywhere with a blade o' grass along here that one on 'eni won't see







YOUNG RICK.

it, and run and tell all the rest. Whew! there's a breathless, on the bank, and old Leo was standing,
big fellow scatting round that bowlder there." panting and dripping, over him.
Let's catch him," cried Rick, taking his rod from I wouldn't advise you fellows to try that over;
Roger. again," said Tom, after Rick had been gotten into'
"He might object. Fish, somehow, don't enjoy dry clothes. "To be sure the dam is only twelve feet,r
being hooked. I suppose they don't want to be and there ain't much water just now, but you may as.
eaten." well choose some other fun. It was lucky for you
"You eat 'em, and then they're boy. I should that Leo happened round."
rather be a boy than a fish. Say, Roger, may I put Roger had been nearest the shore, and had given
my line in there ? a great leap, and landed on a flat rock. Wet he was
It was an hour after this, and the boys were coming not; but he had sprained his wrist, and he was much
down towards home with a dozen trout. Rick had, hurt as to his feelings. Aunt Kitty looked rather
to his everlasting delight, caught one of them himself, grave over it, and Dilsie cooed round, and said,
and Roger let him carry them all. Sorry for 'oo," a great many times.
Suddenly there was a strange sound of flapping But, 0 that wild duck was a beauty," cried Rick.
wings overhead, then something plashed heavily in "Wild duck!" exclaimed Tom. "It was one of
the water near by. Ben Thayer's tame ducks. They're up on my pond
"What! said Roger. half the time. If it had been a wild duck, you
Then he peered through the alder boughs, put his couldn't have got within a mile of it."
finger on his lip, and drew Rick up beside him. This was the beginning of Rick's outing. It was a
There, on the still water of the pond, not twenty feet charming place, that old house up there in the very
off, floated a large bird. It had dark, sleek feathers, heart of the hills. There are such places, if you only
with a bright green tint across their brown, and the know where to find them, and I wish every boy who
boys could see its pink feet beating the water below, reads this could spend his next summer in one of
"It's a wild duck, I guess," Rick whispered. them. Rick never dreamed of anything half so happy.
"Harry Stacey had one once. Can't we catch it ?" There were such long, bright days, and the nights
I'll see about that. It's gone away behind the were no nights at all. Mrs. Kitty was a housekeeper
little, island. Look here. I'm going to get into the who seemed always to have her work done up. There
boat. It's right here." were green vines blowing in at open windows, such
So, stepping very cautiously, Roger unmoored the shining, uncarpeted floors, with squares of sunshine
boat, took the oars, and helped Rick in. The bird lying out on them. Then there were such good things
had floated down the current towards the dam. The to eat three times a day, and as many times between
boys followed, keeping in the shade of the alders on as you chose to look hungry.
the other side of the little island. Presently they And there was little Dilsie in a perpetual white
came round the island's lower corner, and saw the apron, toddling about, the freshest, fairest, sweetest
prize close to them. flower on the place.
I'm going to throw my fish-line and wind it round Rick never ceased to wonder at Dilsie's little,
his neck. Look, now. Sh-h-h!" dimpled hands. He was quite in bliss when she
Rick looked, and saw the bird sitting quite calm on patted his face with them, and after she had once
the water, saw the line flung out as Roger stood up- gone to sleep with her head on his shoulder, he felt
right, then he felt a strange lurch of the boat under- that somehow she belonged to him. Indeed, if Dil-
neath, saw Roger spring suddenly with a cry of terror, sie had been the first baby ever made, and if there
and then the boat, the fish-lines, the boys were all was never to be another, she could have been no more
going over the dam into the foaming stream below, of a sweet little wonder than she was to the boy.
Poor Rick. There was an awful moment of dark- There were some things about that visit that the
ness, and roaring noises, and water everywhere, and children never could forget- never will forget. One
air nowhere, and then he was jerked by the skirts, was how Mrs. Kitty used to sit down in the dusk, and
pulled over the stones, and landed, strangling and hear them say their prayers. She always sat in the







YOUNG RICK.

door which opened from her room into the one where breakfast, and they've gnawed the lettuce all off, and
the boys slept, the three children kneeling round her. eaten the bean tops, and now they're beginning on
Rick sees that picture now sometimes, when he shuts the cucumber vines. I say, Uncle Tom, why don't
his eyes -sees the twilight creeping up the hills, the they eat parsley and pigweed ? "
stars coming out above, hears the whippoorwill "Well, my boy, now you've got at the real question.
down the river, the sound of the falling water, and Here's an object in life for you and Rick. If you can
Dilsie's low Now I lay me." Roger used to recite raise a breed o' woodchucks that'll live on pigweed
the Apostles' Creed, saying very slowly, and parsley, and leave lettuce and beans alone, you
I believe in God, the Father Almighty, Maker of may make a fortune while you're alive, and have a
heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ his only Son, our monument after you're dead. I advise you to con-
Lord," and the Lord's Prayer, while Rick said,- sider the matter."
Roger," said Rick, in confidence, after breakfast,
"Jesus, tender Shepherd, hear me, don't they set traps for woodchucks ? "
Bless the little lamb to-night; Course they o."
Through the darkness be thou near me, Course they do.
Keep me safe till morning light." Can't we set one for these, then ?"
Aunt Kitty won't let us ; she says they're cruel
Mrs. Kitty always kissed them very softly after- things. I tell you what we can do, though. We can
wards, and Tom would stand out on the piazza, with go and call on the woodchucks, and stone up their
his broad-brimmed hat in his hand, and his head holes if we find them in, or set Leo and Dash on
bowed, as though he had been in church. Then, them if we find them out shopping."
when Dilsie came out in her long, white night-gown Rick did not exactly understand ; but he mused all
to kiss her father good night, he would lift the child that day and the next on the subject of that interest-
up, and fold her close in his arms, walk up and down ing animal, the woodchuck.
for a little with her, then carry her away, and lay her Tom and Aunt Kitty drove down to Graythorpe
down in her white bed. one evening, and took Dilsie with them.
Tom might be a rough fellow to Deacon Hark- Roger was playing his flute. Roger was the first
away. To Dilsie and Mrs. Kitty he was all gentleness. city boy Rick had ever known. The great difference
To Rick and Roger he was Mr. Greatheart, and between him and the country boys seemed to be, that
neither of the boys would have asked for any better his hands were smoother, he had very little appetite,
company than his all the way from the City of De- generally speaking, for his breakfast, all his clothes
struction to the journey's end. seemed to be Sunday clothes, and he played the flute.
Do you ever catch bears up here ? asked Rick 0, dear," groaned Rick, Roger is no good when
one day. he gets blowing into that thing. I wish Dilsie'd come
SThey were all round the breakfast-table, and Dilsie home. See here, Dash."
had a cup of morning-glories near her plate. Dash came, and the two strolled down the path
"Well, no; not many. Don't come round much toward the garden. It was between daylight and
nowadays. Mrs. Kitty here is the only person I dark, and the white mist was creeping up the valley.
know of who has ever caught a bear." Suddenly Dash gave a leap, and darted past Rick
Now, Tom came from behind the coffee-pot. through the grass and over the onion-bed across the
"She's tamed hers, and he walks on two legs; but garden. Rick followed, and there, creeping stealthily
he's a bear still. Cross as two sticks sometimes." about among the young cabbages, he saw a dark,
There was an odd twinkle in Tom's eyes, and the clumsy animal, rather larger than a cat. One instant,
boys began to suspect presently that he was talking and Dash was upon him. The creature rolled over,
about himself. and showed its white teeth in an ugly way. The dog
Honest, though,"'Tom went on, the biggest kind began to bark, gave another jump at the creature's
of game going just now is woodchucks. Let me tell neck, then slunk back with a whine. The woodchuck
you, Goody, they're eating up your garden, clean." had bitten him.
I know it," cried Roger. I was out there before Bite him, Dash, bite him," screamed Rick; and







YOUNG RICK.

then, before he knew what he was doing, the child the house. Fan was standing before the door, and
had caught up a hoe, and was in the battle, the very Tom was lifting Mrs. Kitty out.
thickest of it, himself. Hullo, what now, Dick ? Upon my word there's
Dash barked, Rick shrieked with excitement, and your woodchuck, Kitty; a big one too. Three cheers
the woodchuck fought right and left with all his might, for Dick."
Suddenly the mad creature gave a jump, and set his It was strange how Tom sometimes called the child
teeth into the leg of Rick's trousers. The little fel- Dick. I think he forgot, for the moment, that it was
low kicked furiously; Dash gave one more spring, not his father. Fortunately, the teeth of the wood-
caught the animal by the throat, held on as with a chuck had gone no farther than Rick's boot, so noth-
death grip, and then the woodchuck lay dead at their ing interfered with his delight.
feet. Rick took him by the tail, and walked up to Rick and Dash were heroes that night. Roger






..






















S"HULLO Ho ARE YOU, CAPTAIN?" Page 298.


at them, and every one was enthusiastic only Mrs. strange, strangling cough. Then a door closed, and
Kitty, who was bending over Dilsie. The child was there was a step outside, and then he heard a horse's
asleep, but her mother listened, with her ear down, to hoofs ring down the stony road, and grow less and less
her breathing, and Rick thought he heard her say to as they got farther away. Then he thought he was
her husband the word croup." very sleepy, and then thought no more.
And now I have something to tell you, which it is By and by he was waked by thunder. He sat up
hard to have to tell; but I can't give you the sunshine in his bed, and saw Roger standing at the door which
of Rick's life without the shade. It is about Dilsie, led into Mrs. Kitty's room.
dear little, soft-cheeked, blue-eyed, cooing Dilsie. "What's the matter? Come back to bed," said
It was this same night that Rick waked and heard Rick; but Roger did not move nor speak. Rick creDt






"YOUNG RICK."

down, and stole along through the dark, and stood Dead! What is it ?"
beside Roger in the open room. Dr. Watrous was in O, I don't know. Mamma said our baby had
the middle of the next room, and a woman, the wife 'gone to God.' "
of a neighbor. But what the boys saw was Mrs. But Dilsie isn't gone ; she's out there in the crib."
Kitty, sitting on the side of the bed, with little Dilsie 0, yes, but she isn't there. I can't tell you what
lying in her arms. Tom was kneeling beside them, it is, only I know she'll never run about, or play with
and holding one of the baby's hands in his. Rick us any more; and, 0," sobbed Roger, "I'm so sorry
looked into Tom's face, and crowded closer to Roger. for Uncle Tom and Aunt Kitty;" and he turned
What it was the child did not know; but a great awe away, and cried behind his pillow.
crept over him. Tom's hair was damp from the rain There, in the hush of the showery summer night,
in which he had been riding; the color had gone out standing awed and quiet in the shadows, the boys had
of his cheek and brow, and there was such trouble in looked out into the lighted room, and caught their
his eyes. All the love which Rick had in his soul for first glimpse of death. There, in a moment, before
Tom and it was a great deal seemed to flood up their eyes, had passed the mystery of all the ages.
into his throat as he looked. Little Dilsie was dead.
O," he cried, and that instant little Dilsie stirred, Rick lay hushed and still in the room where the
threw up her hands, and then all was still. The baby shadows were passing into light, lay and watched
was quiet in her mother's arms. Then the hushed one great red star go out in the yellow glow above
children saw Tom take her, and lay her in her little the mountain's top, felt the waking of the dawn, and
crib; saw him bend over Mrs. Kitty with a great sor- the gladness of the new day coming up the valley;
row, a tender pity, in his face; saw him fold his arms but through it all, the sweetness of the wet woods,
about her, and lead her away. the song of the early birds, the neighing of black Fan
O, Roger, what is it ? sobbed Rick, when they in her stall, through all, ran that strange mystery,
had crept back to bed, and were lying there in the that under-current of solemn awe, the one fact, the
dark with their heads on the same pillow, baby was dead!
"Dilsie is dead I know, because our baby died!"




WHO KNOWS?


BY MARGARET EYTINGE.


W HAT did the Humming Bird, But from the Humming Bird
The diamond Humming Bird, Never a note they heard,
Sing to the Rose? Sang he so low,
The Lily has asked her; Pressing his slender beak
The Tulip has asked her; Close to her damask cheek-
She will not disclose, With sunshine aglow-
But hangs her head, blushing, That only the Rose caught
The beautiful Rose! His murmur, I know!

When came the Humming Bird What did the Humming Bird,
The amethyst Humming Bird? The emerald Humming Bird,
One day in June. Sing to the Rose?
The flowers stopped swinging, The Buds say they know not;
The birds ceased their singing, The Leaves say they know not;
Believing that soon And she'll not disclose,
The wee one would trill them But hangs her head, blushing.
A dainty sweet tune. Who knows? Who knows?







YOUNG RICK.




"YOUNG RICK.


BY JULIA A. EASTMAN,
AUTHOR OF THE $1000 PRIZE STORY, "STRIKING FOR THE RIGHT!


CHAPTER X. unkempt, really was herself. Life began to seem a
very serious business to her about these days. She
PATY'S BEREAVEMENT. had times of feeling as though she were nearly a
hundred years old. You see it was the calf that be-
I HOPE some of you are wondering what had gan it, or, perhaps, Mr. Gracey, when he sold the calf.
become of Paty all these days. Great yellow Now, Paty loved the calf, and the calf, so far as in
plumes of golden rod, and branching asters with him lay, returned her affection. There were several
purple stars, were growing far and wide in the poor- secrets between the two, of which Mrs. Gracey never
farm fields, and Paty's hair was getting long, and her dreamed. One was the bit of brown bread which
dress was getting short. I s'pose it has shrunk," the little girl used to smuggle away from breakfast,
she said, and never dreamed that it wasn't the fault dinner, and supper, in her dress-pocket. She never
of the dress at all, but the fault, instead, of those slim failed to improve her first moment of leisure after a
feet and hands of hers that were growing every day meal to carry the crust out to Bossy, or to put her
further away out of it. apron over his head while he ate it.
Can you guess how this little poor-house child That's so 't they shan't any of 'em know 't you're
looked at that time ? She wasn't a marvel of beauty, eating it, Bossy," she would whisper in the calf's ear,
No one stopped 'her on the hilly roads of Graythorpe by way of apology. And Bossy would prick up his
to say, "What a lovely creature !" Nevertheless, if ears, and switch his tail, and munch away in sweet
she had lived in your home or mine, some of us would content behind the curtain of Paty's apron.
have noticed how large and dark her eyes were, and "I think you're the nicest calf in all the living,
how the lashes curled, and I am sure we could never breathing world," the little mistress would say to him
have been blind to those two dimples that were always in confidence. Your eyes are such nice ones, and
playing hide-and-seek round the corners of her mouth your coat is so red and white, and the red in it is so
when she smiled. But eyes, lashes, or dimples, no one red, and the white is so white; and then, Bossy, you
noticed either at the Graythorpe poor-farm. Mrs. always keep it brushed so clean and shiny. 0, you're
Gracey observed, "How that child does eat !" and twenty times as pretty as that brindled calf down at
grandmother Dunscomb said that was the way with Deacon Harkaway's. He's got a bad disposition
growing children, and that Paty was growing like a too, Bossy, that brindle calf has, and you're just as
weed. Once, when she had on a new print dress, amiable; but then that cross old bug-horn is the
Mr. Gracey remarked, brindled calf's mother, and what can you expect ? "
"You'll do for looks. You only just behave your- One thing Paty believed, and you might have talked
self;" and whatever this sounds like, I think it was all day, and she would have believed it at night quite
meant for a compliment. I am sure Paty received it as thoroughly as she did in the morning. It was,
as such, and went in the strength of it several days. that Dash, and Bossy, and the chickens, and other
But this was a hard, loveless life for a child to creatures who honored her with their friendship, un-
lead -wasn't it? Years afterward Paty, from the derstood her perfectly when she talked to them.
sunshine of a real home, used to look back at the When the calf, having been tethered to a stake, had
lonely little girl strolling over those sterile hills, gnawed the grass in a circle all round as far as his
trampling down the sweet fern on those upland levels, rope would let him, when he stood quiet, and gazed
and wonder if that lonely little girl, uncared-for and sleepily off down the hill, Paty believed his thoughts







YOUNG RICK.

to be busy upon the story she had told him that You must remember how very few things this little
morning, a story of a little girl in blue shoes, and girl had to love.
a wonderful pink sash, whom she had seen, and com- 0, there he comes, Old Pope-and-Pagan, Mr.
mitted to memory in church the day before. Indeed, Starks, I mean, sitting there in his den and in an
if she had been asked, at that time, who were her instant the child had rushed out, and was kneeling,
most intimate friends, her familiars as it were, I am with her arms about the calf's neck.
sure Paty would have answered, Gramma Dunscomb "Come, come," snarled Mr. Gracey. Out of
and Bossy. that there. Where's your rope, Starks ? Tie him
But there came a day--alas and alack that such behind, wouldn't you, to the X? There, so."
days will come -when the sun rose up in the east, Paty stepped aside, and stood quite still, as though
as he had had latterly a way of rising in the latitude frozen. Bossy didn't like the proceedings. He did
and longitude of Graythorpe, Mrs. Gracey heard the like Paty. He made one or two little disappointed
voice of her husband across the surface of a pan of noises, but Starks climbed to his arched seat, tickled
pork and beans. his fat horse, and the fat horse- started. Bossy did
I 'spect that Starks is a layin' out to come arter not start. He braced his fore feet as though feet and
that carf this morning. ground had all been solid rock; the next that was
Calf ? Starks Paty wasn't dead, but she thought known, the rope was snapped short off, and the calf
she was. Starks was the Graythorpe's meat-man, was rubbing his nose in Paty's hands. And Paty?
alias butcher. It was his wont to drive up and down She hugged him, very close, for a minute ; she urged
Main Street, and Paty never saw him without remem- upon his attention the crust of bread she had saved
being the Pope-and-Pagan chapter in that standard at breakfast before Mr. Starks had been mentioned.
work, The Pilgrim's Progress. The force of the simile She whispered in his ear, -
was made still greater by the arched entrance to "0, Bossy, Bossy, I never, never will forget you;"
Pagan's den, and by the strew of bones in the and then she ran in, and covered her eyes.
background. To this day, in memory of the friend who loved
"Yes; and Mr. Gracey's remark was made more her, Paty eats no veal.
forcible if less audible by the large piece of rye-and- And thus it came to pass that this day, the begin-
Indian bread and butter which he was masticating, ning of joys to Rick, proved the beginning of sorrows
"Yes, I didn't give the crettur no breakfast. Didn't to Paty. A little time ago, I told you how, standing
see no use in wastin' good feed on a beast that ain't in the depths of her woe, Paty had watched Rick
a goin' to need it." as he drove away erect between Tom's knees on the
Then upspoke Cleopatra, with a fury which the sulky. For weeks afterwards Paty remembered the
reader may imagine, sulky, Tom, Dash, and Leo, as a dark procession,
What is Mr. Starks going to do with our calf ? solemnly bearing peace and happiness out of her sight
Our calf," muttered Mrs. Gracey, and added forever.
something about "town's poor," and "a pretty pass." It is wonderful the power that trouble has to pro-
"Going to do?" replied Mr. Gracey; "make veal long time. There we're days during that vacation
of him, to be sure." which seemed months in length, and Paty was sure
"Veal shrieked Paty. Do they make veal that.no seven years of her after life would ever seem
on calf ?" as long as those seven weeks seemed.
She would as soon have thought of making veal of Look here, Rick," Tom Dorrance said one day,
Mrs. McKenzie's baby that she played with in the red when he had come up from the village, I saw your
house over the hill. comrade, Paty, down at the poor-house."
Gramma, is veal, calf? Do we eat just such little Rick hopes Paty was looking well.
pink-and-white bossies as mine ? "Well," cried Tom, "if I might be permitted to
Gramma is afraid they do; and thereupon she takes give an opinion in the matter, I should say that well
Paty away to her own room, and explains it all to her. was the very last thing our young lady was looking."
Bossy, Bossy, I do love you so !" sobs Paty. Scarlatina is prevailing," remarks Mrs. Kitty.







YOUNG RICK.

"Scare-latina. Nothin' but chicken-pox." Withington for nigh upon eight years, till Miss Marg'ret
Rick noticed that Tom, no matter how grave a face went an' talked to 'em, and showed 'em how wicked
he wears when away from Kitty, never fails to keep they'd acted. An' then they made up, an' they've
up a cheery smile in her presence. Tom doesn't staid made up ever sence."
know, never will know, how, last night, in the gloam- "Was she pretty ? A boy's curiosity in Rick's
ing, Rick, hunting for eggs, came across a tall figure, query.
lying prone, face downward never will know how, Not so very; though Thomas, my husband, will
through the dim light, the child saw a blue hair-rib- have it 't he hopes if he ever gets a sight of an angel,
bon, heard the low moan, O, my little girl! My it '11 look just like Miss Margaret; an' I donno 's I'm
little girl !" These are not things that we talk about. much different from him. I know when my little
But, here and there, now and then, in the busy street, Dilsie went-" Mrs. Kitty's voice waxes tearful
maybe, where there was no place to speak, there was here. "I thought if there was a face in this dark
a firm hand-clasp, there was an instant's eye-glance, world that might look sort o' light to me, 't was hers.
and two souls, by a common sorrow, knew each other An' she's lost her baby too, now. I'd go far to look
better for all time -yea, for all eternity, in her eyes, and to touch her hand."
But to return to Paty. Kitty hushed all sound into silence for a moment.
Now, look here, Rick. I want to ask you a ques- Then she added, -
tion, as though you were a man as old as I am." "And Miss Marg'ret has lost more. I have"-
Goliath was a large man, but Rick esteemed him a speaking low--" I have Tom still. She is a widow."
Lilliputian at that instant. Now, I want to ask you, Mrs. Kitty went away about her work. Rick stood
if Mrs. Gracey, down there I mean, do you think under the morning-glories. The vines were getting
Paty loves Mrs. Gracey much ?" yellow and seedy, but they reminded them of Dilsie
I know I should hate her, and I know Paty hates yet. Tom had had them, vine and leaf and flower,
her; and I think if she didn't hate her, she'd be awful carved in marble upon the white stone which bore
wicked, for she'd be lovin' wicked things." the words, -
"Tremenjous You'll be a lawyer only let 'em ELIZABETH,
just give you a chance." ONLY CHILD OF
Much obliged." KATHERINE AND THOMAS DORRANCE.
Now, first, you see, Paty there hain't had half a B t i n r i i
But to Rick and Roger this little snowdrop of a
chance. There ain't a woman in Graythorpe that
T a a w i G t child that went home so early to God would through
don't treat Paty as tho' her husband had to pay taxes all time be "Little Dilsie."
all time be Little Dilsie."
on 'er, an' the tax had to come off 'n her own Sunday- Rick stood for some time under the morning-glory
Rick stood for some time under the morning-glory
go-to-meeting bunnet. No, I won't say there want
g I w s t w trellis, speculating and wondering; but suddenly there
one. There was Marg'ret Ashtoner. I'd give my .
one. There was Marg'ret Ashtoner. I'd give my was brought a letter, and with it fresh matter for won-
ten-acre lot to have Marg'ret come back; but that- "
der and speculation.
Tom stopped folding his napkin, and gazed down the ,
Z O-, Tom," Rick cried, rushing in with the open
row of hemlocks that ruffled the mountain-side, gazed l in i won't you harness Fan
S. letter in his hand; "0, won't you harness Fan as
with the strange hush in his face which Rick had
quick as you possibly can? It's not a joke at all.
seen there only once or twice. That is too good to She'll do it, I do know she will."
She'll do it, I do know she will."
happen in this world." "Do what ? What's up now ?"
Yes," echoed Mrs. Kitty. Dear Miss Marg'ret."
"Yes," echoed Mrs. Kitty. Paty. She's going to kill herself, she says."
Who could she be ? Rick wondered--this marvel-
"Paty? Declare for't, I don't know's I much
ous Miss Margaret. He asked Mrs. Kitty afterward, blame 'er. Givin' up life 's a bad job, I suppose.
and learned that she wasn't Miss Marg'ret at all; s y l h
Z Where's your letter ? 0, here."
but, instead, a Mrs. Clancey, who had once staid for ,
And Tom read, -
a year in Graythorpe.
She was so lovely, and she made everybody love M DEAR FRIEND RICHARD :-
her, and everybody love everybody else. And Mrs. (Dignity of the occasion required use of full name,
Talbott, she hadn't shook hands with Miss Deacon thought he.)








YOUNG RICK.

"I thought best to tell you 't I am agoin to die poor-house. Do you," he asked, eagerly, "do you
tunight. Mebby you'll be surprised, but I've ben suppose she really has done it ?"
taking with grammer dunscome I hante said what I cannot tell."
I wus meenin to doo-but you see livin meens a "What will they do to her if she hasn't? Think
Havin such a orfool hard time ont. Miss Grasher 'll be very, very angry ? "
"I'm Drefful sorry I hante acted better to all "0, I wish Miss Marg'ret was here. She'd know
of you-grammer Dunscome she's ben orful good just what to do. I sometimes used to think for cer-
to me; if their' was more o' the Dunscome fambly I tain true, that God told her in words just as a man
shouldn't be doin' what I am. Mebby I'll find Some might tell his child."
o' my own fambly in other place. Don't see why he shouldn't," cried Rick, with a
"Wont yer ax Miss Lesby to forgive me gittin you child's matter-of-factness. "It says -and I've heard
in t' the creek, an' lemme fess 't I worried your Gramma Dunscomb say the same thing-Gramma
fishline, an' it's berred at the foot o' your barbry does say, too, that the very person God needs is sent
bush. right straight 'long when He needs him, and where
It's them chickens 'at done it. He's got a pile o' something' for him to do. I begin to
Your respectable friend, 'spect to see her widow's cap a-coming down Maple
"CLEOPATRA RHEA. Hill -Miss Marg'ret's cap, I mean."
P. S. I hope if I'm borned over again, as some Now, to return to Paty and the chickens, which had
folks say you will in the next world, I hope orfully been recorded as "all the matter." It is the conviction
I shant be born towns-poor." of the present writer, that chickens, alias hens, roosters,
and small scratchers, of both denominations, gener-
ally, are responsible for incalculable evil in this world.
CHAPTER XI. Now, then, there were the town-farm poultry, to
begin with ; pretty little things, with evening primrose-
PATY TIRES OF LIFE. colored coats, looking as though they had been dressed
out of a fresh invoice of the most exquisite import:
"DEAR aunty, what do you suppose is the mat- tion of Parisian gloves. How Paty did yearn after
ter ?" asked Rick. the dainty little things with the brightest and blackest
This was when they two were trotting along through of eyes. How the old hen had permitted -such a
the October twilight, driving, of all the horses in the condescension -her to put her hand all round under
world, Fan, with her black dress-coat on. her warm plumage, and to introduce each fledgling to
Rick found himself feeling very loving of late to- the great world, a world carpeted with straw, and
ward Uncle Tom and Aunt Kitty. Since little Dilsie shut in with shingles. Never was there a more tri-
went away, and since Roger had gone to New York, umphant debut. Mrs. Brown, the mother of twelve--
Rick had come to feel that the best hour of all the two only having died in infancy- Mrs. Brown, whose
twenty-four was the one when Dilsie's mother took distinguishing trait was anything but amiability,
him in her arms, and sang sweet little verses to him, allowed herself, for once, to be led, and did follow
when the dusk crept over the dark hills all abroad, Paty down to gramma's door, and strutted, and
and a dusk came creeping over the dark of Mrs. clucked, and made as great a hullabaloo as the most
Kitty's eyes, and when she sang the tender songs of exacting mistress could expect.
little children, and tried, 0, how hard, not to cry. "Old Mrs. Brown," said Mr. Gracey, "now I do say
The one hymn that Rick liked best, was, for 't, you've done well. You've done credit to your
bringing up. Paty, I'm goin' to give that brood o'
"There is a little lonely fold chickens to you. Brown, you never had no chickens
Whose one Shepherd keeps, afore, an' you never'd a had none now, if Paty hadn't
Through summer's heat and winter's cold,
With eye that never sleeps." a hild on t' yer, and fed yer every day o' the last three
weeks. Now, Mrs. Brown, I make you 'n' yer yairs
it is so dreadful," Rick thought, that Paty, a over to Cleopatra Rhea, her yairs an' assigns, forever."
poor little girl, should be trying to kill herself at the So Mrs. Brown and her children became Paty's by







YOUNG RICK.

legal form. Paty understood, Mr. Gracey under- A very simple programme, and Paty believed in it
:stood it, and Paty readily believed Mrs. Brown so to entirely. Fortunately Tom chanced to be taking
understand it. With all their perfections on her black Fan past the house, and Paty could send the
head, with all their imperfections about their feet, note at once. Hence Rick's alarm, the drive down
Paty quite comprehended that she was to be held re- from the Mill, and the finding at length of Paty.
sponsible. For every scratch in the garden, Paty The child had put her poor little room in good order;
shed tears. Graytop caught snakes, and killed them, also her features, which were quite serene, and her
and Paty felt victory in her every nerve, hands, which she had folded, after the manner of the
"Best brood o' chickens 'bout ever I see," re- coffined dead which she had seen.
marked Mr. Gracey, as he started for X. one day. Poor Paty. Mrs. Kitty wasn't long in finding out
Paty went down to Mrs. M'Kenzie's. Coming back, that She believed herself to have her life in her own
full of pride and fondness, she really loved the hands, both by power and right. Mrs. Gracey ap-
soft-feathered things, she saw coming down the hill peared on the scene, with a disagreeable expression,
Mr. Starks, and behind, not a scattering of bones, and a-
but, 0, me! a crate of chickens A sight to drive a And is it not enough to eat and drink that she
mother mad. has ? "
Golden Crown squeezed into a place too small by And straightway cleaving the shadows of the gloam-
half.for him; 'Creeper's neck tied in a knot, every one ing, came a sweet voice, -
of her beauties crowded and crushed, tumbled and "Ah, my good and dear friends, is it not that we
smothered, as no one with a heart would stow away a are unreasonable sometimes ? And is it not that the
brood of fowls, souls for which the Lord, in His love, has died, ask
Paty had a willow wand in her fist. She came to for a little love with their food and drink ?"
a halt by the roadside. Rick looked up. It was nearly dark, but he could
My chickens she said. still distinguish the fair, gracious face, the light cap,
"My chickens," replied Mr. Starks. whose floating streamers shone white against the
A hush, as though the world stood still. I wonder shadow of the purple night. I know who you are,"
it didn't. By and by things began to turn on their he thought. "I thought you would come." And
axes again, that instant Mrs. Kitty rose up, and from somewhere
Bought 'em o' Miss Gracey, up here." Tom stood in their midst. Then the voice of the
Did she sell you the meeting-house ? Might as stranger touching Tom's hand, touching, also, the
well; and Paty walked on up the hill. heavy crape of Mrs. Kitty's veil, said softly, -
Mrs. Gracey was mending a shirt on the kitchen Yes, they told me how the dear Lord loved you
porch. There were times and seasons for words, and so well that he took your treasure to his own throb-
ventilating opinions. This, as Paty believed, was not bing heart of love."
one of them. She simply asked, as she passed the Then they went home, seeing, as they drove away,
door on her way up stairs, only the stranger leading Paty down the path under
Mrs. Gracey ?" the maples.
Well, what ?"
Where do you expect to go to when you die ?" CHAPTER XII.
Paty said no more. She only went to her own
room, and fastened the door with a stick. Then she RICK'S PLAY.
said audibly to herself, -
Gramma once said, that when a person's time WHEN new chapters open in our lives, I wonder
came to die, he just died. My time has come. I if we recognize them as such. I do not think Paty
shall die. I've stood 't as long as I can. I'll tell recognized in Rick a playmate who was to give a
Rick one or two things; and I'll put on my clean new turn to her life. I am sure she did not in
night-cap, an' then I'll lie and shut my eyes, and fold "Gramma" Dunscomb. But I think both the chil-
my hands, and when to-morrow comes, I shall not be dren found something unlike other persons, and likely
livin' That's all." to change life for them, in Miss Marg'ret- I want to







YOUNG RICK.

call her by her pretty village name, instead of giving woman, who roamed about, a harmless and quite
her the more formal title city people know her by. ingenious maniac. Le6nie's father was a mechanic,
Miss Marg'ret is pleasanter than Mrs. Clancey. and one of her harmless fantasies had been to build
The next morning after Mrs. Kitty had been with little boats of curious fashion, and both enjoyed
Rick to the poor-farm, was to be an era in the boy's launching and navigation, with Dash and Leo as
life by reason of a new play. aider and abettor.
"You know, Richard, my son, I have invented a See here, Cap'n Richard," Le6nie said. The
new yoke for Gray." fact that Rick manned every species of craft which
Gray was a very stupid and obedient goose, and she had contrived for him, gave him in all cases the
the maker of Gray's yoke was Leonie, an insane title of "Cap'n." "Iv'e got a new play. Now that








*. .. y '\
S '





3 --












Dash will stand first-mate, I move that Old Gray be Dash standing with feet wide apart, a little bit afraid,
yoked in to the bow, and we'll tie her to Dash's but quite obedient, the gray goose quite in her ele-
collar, and off we'll go." ment, and Rick himself, his clothes well worn, a little
"But look here, Le6nie, Old Gray will off, and torn, and with the all-over look of a boy who has
she'll sail, an' she'll sail, and we'll lose 'em all." rusticated to some purpose.
Le6nie and Rick looked puzzled, when, all at once, Rick went home with Aunt Lesbia behind Deacon
upspoke Rick, Harkaway's, steed. He found Paty at Mrs. Hark-
0, I've got it I'll tie a cord to the stern, and I away's. He found there was going to be a private
can pull if they go too fast, or too far, or anything." school in Aunt Lesbia's east room, and he began to
This was the sight Miss Lesbia's eyes beheld that find though this finding was not all at once that,
morning when they came to bring Rick home. Was for Paty and himself, the very-little-boy-and-girl life
it not a droll picture ? Just see how they look, with had ended.







YOUNG RICK.



YOUNG RICK.

PART II.


BY JULIA A. EASTMAN.
AUTHOR OF THE $1000 PRIZE STORY, "STRIKING FOR THE RIGHT."

CHAPTER I. The sitting-room was dark but for the hall-lamp
which flung a rectangle of light across the carpet. A
AS BOUND WITH THEM." cat was asleep on the sofa, and there was a click of
knitting-needles from the big chair in the corner.
D OWN the hill from .the poor-farm into the "Don't. Let me beg of you."
deeper shadows of the Graythorpe valley, Mrs. "Yes, Aunt Lesbia, I know;" and Margaret, step-
Clancey had come leading Paty that October evening, ping down the shadowy room, seated herself on a
Behind them they left the dreary old place, with its stool at Miss Cranson's feet. "You think I'm going
sheds and barns, left behind Gran'ma Dunscomb, to adopt her, confer estates,' like Miss Flite, upon
Mrs. Gracey, the cross brown hen, and all the sur- her, smother her in luxury all my natural life, and
roundings of the child's previous life. Paty seemed make her my residuary.legatee in the end."
to herself to be in a kind of hushed dream. The lady Such a merry laugh as rang out through the wide
at her side scarcely spoke. She only kept Paty's old hall and up the stair, so that Paty, three fourths
hand close in her own till they came to Miss Cran- asleep, heard it, and laughed too. As for Miss Les-
son's gate. Then she led her in, down the path, bia, she smiled a little, and answered, -
through the wide hall, and on up the stairway to her I supposed you would do something of that sort."
own room. There were white curtains round the bed, There was a moment's silence between them.
the windows were wide open to the early stars, and Aunt Lesbia sat, stiff and straight, knitting faster
there was a faint perfume as of flowers in the chamber, than ever, and looking over her needles, and over
Then, in the dim light with a young moon shining her spectacles down at the gentle face upraised to
in through the elms, Paty, still in the same hushed, hers; a softly-tinted face, with large, blue eyes, and
dreamy state, knew that she was being undressed, put bands of fair hair, the face of the child who years
into a very-long, soft night-gown, and then she was ago had played with her dolls in this same room.
lying behind the curtains. There was a kneeling Only the shadow of the mourning dress, and the
figure beside her for a few moments. Then that whiteness of the widow's cap, reminded Mis Cranson
sweet face bent over and kissed her, and a voice, that it was the woman, and not the little girl, who
speaking low, said, Dear little girl." Only three looked up at her to-night. There was a sigh from
loving words, but it was long since the child had the big chair, then a voice of calm decision, -
heard as many before. "I've been thinking about it, Margaret. You know
I wonder if I did die, and go to heaven after all," I promised your mother that I would look after you,
Paty said, half aloud to herself, when Miss Margaret and now I've a piece of advice to give you."
had gone. But, no. There was the hall-lamp shining "Yes'm," answered Mrs. Clancey and there was
up from below; there, through the open door, she a twinkle of mischief in eyes and voice.
could see the six leather fire-buckets hanging in the I don't know what possessed, or prompted you to
stairway, the light glinting against their green sides, bring Paty Ray down here, and to put her into your
and from the room underneath she could hear a voice own bed to-night; but my advice to you is, to take
whose calm, precise tones she well knew. her back again to the town-farm as soon as con-
"Now, Margaret, don't." venient to-morrow mor.intg."








YOUNG RICK.

Aunt Lesbia paused for a reply, and Margaret sat hers to give up, and that if she willed to die, death
quite still. She was waiting for the supplementary would come. So she made her sad little prepara-
remarks which she knew would come. tions, and when I found her to-night, she was, as she
"You see," went on Miss Lesbia, nobody knows said, trying to be dead.' Ah, me."
where that child came from, or what she's going to "This life is full of sorrow," sighed the elder lady.
turn out. I think she's best left where she is, or "However, I sometimes think, Margaret, that you
where she was two hours ago," correcting herself as have it on your heart too much."
she remembered that Paty was at the then present "0, but I wish I could make you understand,
moment under the canopy of her own best bed. aunty, how these things come home to me now."
No one knows where she came from, or what she Now!" I think Aunt Lesbia knew how much
is going to turn out," repeated Mrs. Clancey, gently. that little word meant. She glanced up to where
"And those are two reasons why we should let her Margaret had stopped in her walk, and stood looking
alone? 0, aunty out at the stars. From the low moon a faint radiance
"Well -" a stitch was dropped in the knitting at streamed into the room. It touched the lifted eyes,
this point, dropped and passed over. "Well-no- the low brow, and fair hair, and recalled to Miss
I don't mean just that. Only this is it, Margaret. Cranson a very old picture, glory-crowned, which she
The child lives at the poor-farm ; it's her place ; and had seen somewhere long ago. She now stood still
no good will come from trying to raise her out of it. there for a moment, and the other, watching her, re-
Graythorpe has the reputation of providing well for membered the figure that only two summers since
her paupers. Paty has enough to eat, and drink, and had stood beside her there, and to-night Margaret
wear. She isn't abused." stood, as for all time she would stand, alone.
Aunt Lesbia, I'll tell you what it is like to me." "' Rernembering those in bonds as bound with
She spoke earnestly, not smiling now. Suppose I them.' That was Arthur's verse." She repeated it
had to live in a box six feet long and three feet wide very softly, 'as bound with them.' You know I
and never go outside it. People might say, It's used to think of those bound as meaning just colored
longer than her height. It's wider than her breadth, slaves, but I learned from the life he lived to find the
What more can she ask?' God's little ones come bound everywhere. In weak people, who have no
into the world with something beyond mere animal strength of mind or body, and in sinful people, who
needs. 0, it's a weary thing for any human soul, have no power against temptation; old people, whom
weariest of all for a child, to stretch out its hands for nobody helps, and little children, whom nobody re-
love and guidance, and to have them thrust back by members to love. 0, Aunt Lesbia, you can see- can
the hard selfishness all around." you not ? And she stepped across to the great chair
Margaret had risen, and was walking up and down, in the corner. "You can see that this is what is left
her black dress sweeping back and forth across that now for me to do on this earth. Just to make a little
rectangle of yellow light, lighter- ever so little the great burden of suffering
Ah, yes, it's a hard world," sighed Miss Lesbia. which the world is carrying night and day. That is
"But to come to the point, dear. What do you mean what life means to me now," she said cheerfully;
to do with that child up-stairs ? "taking up the work which he laid down- which
"Not to leave her with Mrs. Gracey. Why, aunty, fell out of his hands that day."
how would you feel if you went away to New York, "Yes, dear. I understand."
and left one of your pussies caught by its paw in a Aunt Lesbia took off her glasses, and wiped them
trap ? I should have something such a sensation if industriously. She could discuss the decrees," and
I were to send Paty back to the poor-farm. It would the doctrine of original sin, with Deacon Harkaway,
be a haunting trouble that would destroy the peace of warmly enough. When Margaret talked in this way,
every moment. Why, do you know that poor child she sympathized, but could only respond briefly. This
has had no taste of the sweet of life yet ? I don't bringing higher things down into our lower life, this
wonder she came to the conclusion that she had had making Sunday all the week," as Ton Dorrance
enough of this world. She imagined that life was said, was not just in the Graythorpe manner. We








YOUNG RICK.

may believe that there were those who tried to do it, "Those in bonds as bound with them." The words
but this talking about religion as the undercurrent were on Margaret's lips when the two said good night ;
of everything, as Margaret did, was new to them. I the words, and a smile with them. Lamp in hand,
think they were a little frightened at it, to begin with, she went up the old stairway. She turned on the
these strong, undemonstrative people; but we shall landing to kiss her hand to Aunt Lesbia, who was
see how all this was changed by and by; how they came watching her; then she was gone.
to find in Margaret Clancey not a woman whom a Ah, me," said Miss Cranson, "I remember her
great sorrow had frenzied, but one whom a love, standing just there one day and Arthur down here
stronger than death, had lifted to a higher plane, and laughing and flinging handfuls of apple-blossoms up
a holier life. to her. And that was only a year ago in June. It































is growing cold, I think," she added, shuddering with sufficient cause shown. But since the day when the
a sudden chill and closing a window. fatal news came home, there seemed to her a cold
It was not the night air however. Aunt Lesbia, wind blowing always across that warm southern sea
the austere woman that she was, had not learned yet where Margaret's loss had come to her. And here
to recall calmly the ending of that brave, beautiful was Margaret herself speaking of her dead, as though
life. Arthur Clancey had been drowned off the coast he was with her still, or had merely stepped into
of Italy-drowned before the eyes of his wife, while another room.
struggling to rescue a child who had fallen overboard. "I can't understand it," Miss Lesbia said to her-
Miss Lesbia was a self-poised character of the old self. She had stopped before the window that she
New England type. She neither laughed nor cried had closed, and was gazing out. The moon had just
at trifles, though she was prepared to do either on gone behind the pine ridge, and a great darkness was








YOUNG RICK.

brooding over the silent fields near and far. She to tell it even to her secret heart,- "I'm afraid he
was thinking of the bright smile with which Margaret is growing rough."
had said good night, thinking of the gentle mien with t' Mrs. Harkaway," Rick bursts out with sudden
which she went about all day long, doing interest. s Paty going to live at your house ? She
said she was."
Little kindnesses She will stay with me for the present," Mrs.
Which most would leave undone, or despise. Harkaway answers, with a sigh of great solemnity.
"Goody! remarks Rick, while the wife of the dea-
No, I confess I do not understand it," Miss con explains to Miss Cranson that,-
Lesbia said again, and then the next sound was the Margaret came over, and she talked to Mr. Hark-
closing and bolting of the front door. away,"-so she always mentions her husband,-
I have gone back a little to tell you these things, "and she said she thought it was our duty to open
* because I wish you to know something 'about this new our home to the child ; and, finally he said he didn't
friend of Paty and of Rick. She it was who opened her know as he had any particular objections if I was a
small class there in Miss Cranson's east room, and mind to have her come. So we're going to try it for
taught the school of which you shall hear presently. a while."
"It will be a good thing for Paty," Miss Lesbia
CHAPTER II. says, and sighs, also. Mrs. Harkaway punctuates her
observation with two or three sighs, as she answers, -
RICK AND DASH. Yes- but it is a great responsibility.' Then
with a cheery business air, However, the first thing
IT was the next morning, you remember, that Rick is to get her some new aprons; and I must go down
came home, -a warm October day, withthe hills in a to Sims's and buy the material. You would make
haze, the valleys shaded blue, all the doors and win- them of gingham wouldn't you ? "
dows of the old house wide open, and two or three Gingham or brown linen. Linen is more dura-
wasps flying about aloft, dangling their yellow legs, ble," Miss Lesbia says, and follows Mrs. Harkaway
and bumping against the ceiling, to the door.
"How that boy does grow cried Mrs. Harkaway. "Paty, you are goihg to live here," cried Rick,
Rick was standing by the dining-table, his hair tossed rushing across the garden, with Dash at his heels.
back and in his hand the long bow which his aunt And you're going to have some stunning new aprons.
had brought him from New York. Don't seem, They've just been talking about it,"
Lesbia, as though he could be the child you brought "I know it," said Paty. Deacon Harkaway told
home wrapped in your shawl." me. He said he should want to have me learn the
"When I cried, and the cats were scairt?" asks catechism, and recite it to him. Do you know the
Rick, becoming interested, catechism, Rick ? "
"Yes," and Mrs. Harkaway laughs; but aunt She was picking up apples and throwing them into
Lesbia says, gravely, a basket. She paused here to set her teeth [into one
"Scared, not 'scairt,' Richard, if you must use the that was particularly red and shining.
word. Frightened is better." Aunty began to teach it to me last winter, and
Scared is shorter," replies Rick, stoutly; and his she said it was too big for me. Guess I'll learn it
aunt replies nothing. with you. All I can remember is something about
The truth is, she was watching the boy lovingly, 'sin-ned in him and fell with him in the first trans-
but a little critically, taking him in like a new idea, as gression.' Look here, Paty. I've got a little boat.
it were, after her absence. I brought it home with me, and I'm going to sail it
"I had forgotten his eyes were so dark," she says in the brook. I make Dash get in, and ride, and
to herself. But his boots do make a great deal of the old goose up at the mill used to draw it for me.
noise. I must insist on slippers in the house. Then I wish somebody would give me a goose of my
he is so tanned. And I'm afraid--" She hesitates own."





L








YOUNG RICK.

This was the way, then, that the change in Paty's eyes with her hands, and saying to herself, Eo, ire,
life came about. Not at all as she had fancied ;- ivi, itum." Her face is a happy face now, with a
things good or bad never come in this world by the pretty color in the cheeks, and the dimples deeper
road we are looking out for them. Joy and sorrow than ever. There used to be a shadow all over her
both have a way of stealing up from behind some- features in the old days, you know--a dark, lower-
where, and falling upon us when we least expect ing look, as though every one was against her, and
them. She had thought, some one from a long way she was against every one.
off, would come for her, some of her unknown kindred, Rick's cider-mill has been the one idea of his life
perhaps, and she should go driving out of Gray- for the last week. He had thought, and dreamed, and
thorpe in a coach, as Cinderella went to the ball. talked about little else. That he did not go down
And now only to think, it was but yesterday her into the tool-house Sunday between services to in-
chickens were sold. It seemed a month ago. And spect it was a triumph of conscience over temptation,
now here she was in a new home. on which the boy values himself not a little. As for
Do you like to go to sleep in a story, and wake up Aunt Lesbia, her life has been made a burden to her
two or three years afterwards ? I hope you do, be- this last few days by reason of this invention. If, as
cause this is what I am going to ask you to do now, tradition has it, every sigh wastes a drop of blood,
to leave Paty, and her new linen aprons; to leave poor Miss Cranson must have lessened her life's cur-
Rick, and his fine bow and arrows, and not to see rent perceptibly during this time.
them again until one is eleven and the other is nine "The truth is, Dr. Grant," she remarked to the
years old; and Mrs. Clancey is teaching her little minister, confidentially, "I had intended the boy for
class for the third autumn there in Miss Lesbia's another profession for your own, in fact. Yes," -
east room. and then went another drop of blood,- I wished him
Please, Miss Margaret, won't you let us have a to be devoted to the ministry, and here I have him
whispering-recess, just a minute," Rick speaks up, giving his whole mind to cog-wheels, and turbines,
suddenly. I've got something I want to say to Paty and steam-engines, and what not. It's my belief that
Ray seems as if I must say it- I shall think about child could take the clock to pieces, or the piano, and
it till I do." put them together again "
It isn't a school like other schools, just as the "Very well, ver-y well," remarked the minister.
teacher isn't like other teachers. Mrs. Clancey is Clocks and pianos are required by the human race
sitting near the piano, in her black dress, with the no less than sermons. If he's a good boy, Miss
same little white cap she used to wear. She has a Cranson, and grows up a good man, his ingenuity
bunch of fringed gentians in her belt, and she is sew- may be made to serve God just as truly as a turn for
ing on a baby's apron. She smiles across into Rick's theology. 'Who sweeps a room as to Thy law.'
eager, asking face, and answers,- Remember old George Herbert. He was right."
"I don't think we need a whispering-recess, out we And the minister went off, murmuring, -
will all excuse you while you say what you wish. to
S ,, Who sweeps a room as to Thy Law
say to Paty. akes that and the action fine.
Now ?"
Yes." But Miss Lesbia still hoped that this itch for
"Well, it's nothing only that I've got my cider-mill invention," as she called it, might turn out only a
fixed, and I want Paty and Nan to come down when spasmodic attack, to be thrown off when the novelty
school is out, and see it work. Anybody else," Rick waspast. Therefore the miniature cider-press seemed
adds with a sudden impulse of hospitality, anybody to crush her hopes quite as successfully as it crushed
else can come that wants to. That's all." the green apples.
Very well. Now we'll study again. Do you find It's down there in the old tool-house. Come on,
the verb pretty hard, Paty? Nan. This way, Paty," Rick cried, the instant school
Pretty," answers Paty. was out. Nobody has seen it but Sam Farley. I
She sits with her elbows on the table, shading her kept it locked up. That's the way great inventors








YOUNG RICK.

always do, when they're up to anything in particular, You beast! cried Rick. We'll see about this ;"
you know, Clip." and he raised a stick.
"What a queer lock," said Paty. "0 Rick," cried Paty. Dash is so old. Do let
"One 'of my own composure,' as aunty says. him go."
Dash, here. Where are you ? Come here." Believe it or not, I tell you that crank does need
Dash came, but not readily. There was a protest, greasing," remarked Sam.
visible to all eyes, in the end of his tail, and the air He wasn't a great talker, and when he did speak,
with which he dragged himself to his master's feet. Rick was accustomed to pay attention to what he
He had been locked up in the tool-house, to be ready said. But he was in a rage now, and only knew that
for the exhibition. Dash was the cause. The stick in his hand was a
"Now, you see, Paty (Nan, you can make be- rod of soft wood, about the size of one's little finger.
lieve you see, if you don't; I don't suppose you'll Rick raised it, and down it came hard on Dash's
know much about it"). Rick had a great admiration back. There was a faint whine. I suppose the dog
for Nan's drooping, blue eyes, coupled with a great had never been struck before in all the eight years of
contempt for her lack of interest in his contrivances, his life. His master had never in all that time been
"You see, here's the vat where I put the apples, and so angry with him.
the straw; I can grind a peck at once. And here's Up went the stick a second time, and came down,
the cruncher that turns, and smashes, 'em, and this not on Dash -it struck full in Paty Ray's face. She
is the beam, and Dash here is my 'motive power.' had sprung to seize the rod, and caught the whole
Come along, Dash." force of the blow.
There was a little arrangement, like a harness, with O Paty," cried Rick, "I've put out your eye !"
a breast-collar, which was put on Dash's neck, and I dare say you have," groaned Paty ; but I hope
then he was fastened by two straps to the beam. you don't think I care anything about that,"--as
"These straps are my tugs, you know," the boy though her eyes were of very little consequence.
explained. "Now you shall see the thing work. "But you're not to strike that dog again. Do you
Go on, Dash ; there's a good fellow. Up with you." hear ? Dashy, you old dear and down went Paty,
But Dash, for some reason best 'known to himself, in abject misery, on the floor of the tool-house, sob-
did not choose to be a good fellow. Rick stood over bing, and hugging Dash.
him, flushed with excitement, eager, alert. Paty and What is it ?" asked a sweet, startled voice.
Nan, their arms round each other's waists, were watch- "What is it ?"
ing, and Sam Farley had just come in. Miss Margaret glided in at the open door, and
Crank needs oiling there," Sam said, briefly, stood over them.
when Dash still declined to start. "Why," said Rick,--he had cooled down con-
Don't, either; any such thing. The dog is get- siderably, but he tried to work himself into another
ting cantankerous. That's all. Come along, Dash. excitement by way of self-justification, "Dash was
Let's have a good pull, now." obstinate, and I beat him, and Paty is making a fuss
Dash turned his eyes up at Rick, with a pleading about it. I didn't mean to touch her though, and I
look the boy did not see. It was too provoking, you believe I have half killed her."
know, to have all his fine plans defeated by the fail- He didn't hurt me much," sobbed Paty.
ure of his "motive power." Rick began to look Then she lifted her face, which was beginning to
white round his lips, but he kept his temper a little swell frightfully.
longer. "That is, I didn't know that he did ;" for just then
Come, Dashy, there's a good dog. Harness all she caught a glimpse of her nose puffing itself out under
right ? Yes ; now up with you and he uttered a her eyes, and it came to her that she really was hurt.
shrill whistle. I think we will let Dash go now."
Dash gave one little pull, there was a creaking of That was all Miss Margaret said; but there was a
machinery, and then stolidly lay down between the frightened, grieved look in her eyes as she bent down
tugs. to release the dog.








"YOUNG RICK."

It was a sorry little procession that went back up "Strange. He wasn't here to his supper. Why,
the meadow-path. Mrs. Clancey said nothing, but there he comes from the cellar. I never knew him
she looked a great deal. Nan had wet her hand- go down there before. Here is your supper, Dash."
kerchief in the brook, and was bathing Paty's face, But Dash declined his supper, declined to be pet-
while Rick sauntered on, with his hands in his pock- ted, and slunk away to his basket.
ets, his eyes fixed on the hill-tops twenty miles off. I believe the dog is sick," Miss Lesbia said. She
"Well, I don't care," he muttered, setting his chin never knew, don't know to this hour, of the encounter
square, and biting his teeth together hard. You all in the tool-house. He is getting old."
know how much this sort of don't care is worth. Yes, Dash was getting old. Possibly, it was old
"It was the crank, I know it was," Sam Farley age ; possibly, it was disease. I cannot say. All I
said to himself, as he came out of the tool-house alone, know certainly to tell you is, that Dash never ate any
He had been investigating. "It is cold this after- more suppers. He crawled into his basket that
noon, and the grease had hardened, so 't the old dog night, and he never came out of it again. The sec-
couldn't start it. Too bad." ond morning after, when Olive went into the kitchen
Dash, Dash !" called Miss Lesbia, when she was to build her fire, she found the old dog curled up in
ready to close the house for the night. "I wonder his nest, dead !
where he can be! Dash, Dash!" she called again.









:",' ,- .' 1-










"-I7-




4 6 A







YOUNG RICK.




YOUNG RICK.

PART II.


By JULIA A. EASTMAN,
AUTHOR OF THE $1000 PRIZE STORY, "STRIKING FOR THE RIGHT."


CHAPTER III. generally wore a black lookout for her. Then Dash
and the old brown hen had been her greatest com-
WRITING POETRY. forts, and she used to pour her heart out in tearful
confidences into their listening ears. Paty thought of
"D'ASH was dead, and Dash was to be buried, those times, and brought out her pocket-handkerchief.
There was a grave to be dug in the corner of Rick began to be afraid he should need his ; so he
the garden under the crooked old apple-tree; there started briskly down across the garden, calling to
was a head-board to be set up; and, besides, there Paty to come on. School was just out, the teacher
was the epitaph to be written. The excitement of was going up to read an hour to gran'ma Dunscomb,
all these arrangements was a great comfort to Dash's and Aunt Lesbia was in her sitting-room.
bereaved master. He had no time to grieve when so "We'll go into the sitting-room, Paty. Nobody
much was to be done. there but aunty. Have you got your pencil ? 'Cause,
He is going to be buried in his basket, you you know, we're going to write that that-"
know, Seth," Rick said to Miss Lesbia's hired man, "Epitaph, Rick?"
who was digging the hole. It's got to be deeper Yes, that epitaph. It must be poetry, Paty, and
than that. Clear down ever so low. There! That's we'll write it together, you know."
about right ain't it, Paty ? "I'll help you all I can," Paty answers, good-
Paty nods. She is standing by, looking rather naturedly. She has quite a talent for rhyming, as
blue, what with her bruised cheek, and what with her Miss Margaret has discovered.
sorrow at Dash's death. When Paty loved her "Aunt Lesbia, we're going to write an epitaph for
friends she loved them all through and. through, Dash -Paty and I are. We're coming in here by
whether they happened to be friends who walked on this table to do it. There's a chair, Clip."
two feet or four. "Why, Paty Miss Lesbia cried. "What is the
The good of a dog is, that he's friends with you matter with your face ? "
all the time," she remarked to Rick, just as Seth was Paty has kept out of Miss Cranson's sight since the
giving the finishing strokes with his spade. afternoon of her quarrel with Rick. Now she drops
"Yes, and I suppose the bad of a dog is, that he's her eyes, and answers that she "hurt it."
got to die some time." I see you did ; but how did you do it ? "
That air's a failing' that ain't confined to dogs," Paty's cheek, which is blue, black, yellow, green,
observed Seth. Most critters has it more or less." and I don't know what other colors, overspreads them
"But Dashy was always so glad to see you and if all with a deep red blush, as she tells Miss Cran-
you were ever cross, and if you were crying, and feel- son,-
ing awfully bad about something, he'd seem to know I ran against a hard stick."
"it. Blessed old fellow," cried Paty, fervently. Then she shuts her lips together, and Aunt Lesbia
Paty could remember some of those dark days sees that she doesn't want to talk any more about it.
When she was up at the poor-farm, days when her What Aunt Lesbia does not see is the pinch which
mistress found fault, and she was so tired that her Paty gives Rick's hand under the border of the table-
toes and fingers ached, and when the world and life cover; for Rick has flushed burning red too, and by







YOUNG RICK.

the drawing-in of his breath Paty knows he will tell scratching of the two pencils. Then down came
if she doesn't stop him -will tell in whose hand that Rick's hand on the table with a thud.
hard stick was. I can't do it he exclaimed.
I won't have Rick telling," she says to herself, See here How's this ?" and Paty read,-
and then commences to talk fast. We must begin,
for it is getting late. Where's my paper ? O, here it Hi the b che o se, by h ck-log
IHe died in the kitchen, close by the back-log.'"
is. Now I'mgoing to put 'Hic jacet' at the top.
You know, Rick, Hic jacket means 'here lies.' "He didn't. He died over by the table," Rick
Yes, I know. I heard you recite it the other day answered.
in your Latin class. 'Here lies,' "-Rick sets his "Well, never mind. You'll have to write it so,
pencil going, also his head on one side and his lips 'cause it's poetry, Rick. I guess that's what Miss
in a screwing motion. Margaret calls 'poetic license.' "
Look here. You just hark a minute. 'Hicjacet The sun was down, and the daylight was dying
the body of Dashy, my dog.' away off the Graythope hills. Miss Lesbia went to
Now that sounds like poetry don't you think it sleep over her knitting, and the cat waked up,
does, Paty ? stretched, and began to think that her hunting-time
Yes, indeed," answered Paty, generously. "Now, was coming; and all this while the two at the table
we must get another line to match with 'dog,' you were hard at work over their epitaph. Serious work
know." it was, and made Rick's cheeks burning-crimson, and
"Well, what shall we say about him next ?" and Paty eyes shining-bright. At length, just as Miss
Rick wrinkles his forehead into hard knots. "Aunty, Margaret came in from her walk, Rick jumped up,
did you ever know any dogs that died, and had things and exclaimed, -
-poetry, I mean- written about 'em ? "There We've got it done. It's splendid, too.
"About them, you mean. Yes, a friend of mine Paty did most all of it. Aunty, you just listen."
lost a large Saint Bernard dog once, and wrote a long Miss Margaret stood in front of the Franklin stove,
epitaph for him. I remember it began, her shawl on her arm, and her white hood on her
shoulders. Paty sat listening with all her ears, to
'Every dog must have his day, find how it sounded; and Rick, as eager and in-
He had his, and passed away, tense as a Fourth of July orator, read:
Poor fellow !'"
Hic jacet the body of Dashy, my dog;
"That was grand -wasn't it ? Hicjacet the body He died in the kitchen, just by the back-log.
of Dashy, my dog.' Now, what do we want to tell He was born at Tom Dorrance's up at The Mill;
next ? Aunt Lesbia, what would you ? His joy was to sit on the west window-sill.
We mourn that he's not in the land of the living;
Oh, you might tell where he died." But rats throughout Graythorpe are keeping Thanksgiving.
"To be sure. That's what they always tell." And though we are sad, all the squirrels are glad,
In memory of Eldad Harkaway, who died in the And woodchucks on East Hill are dancing like mad."
schooner Melissa, off the cod banks of Newfound- broke in
Oh, Rick, that won't do, broke in Paty.
land.' That's what Deacon Harkaway's father had Ric, at wn d, ke in Paty.
"' Woodchucks dancing like mad,' in poetry "
on his headstone," remarks Paty, who is scribbling all "'Woodc dancg le md,' in petry i
down the margin of her paper. "Yes, 'twill do, too. If they ain't dancing, they
down the margin of her paper. b ae
Rick looks over her shoulder, and reads, Dog, log, ought'o be. I'm going ahead
sg, fog, bog, jog, folywog." And though we are sad, all the squirrels are glad,
"That's the way you do it-is it? Let me think." And woodchucks on East Hill are dancing like mad.
I'll tell you what," Paty breaks out, "you want Dashy's faults were -he had none his virtues were these:
Ss w h th y gt t e would stand on his hind legs as long as you please;
to say where he died, and then you've got to have a
Was a church-going dog, and right out in the meeting
word that'll rhyme with dog. Say we try log." Old Dashy once spoke in the midst of the preaching.
There was a hush, only the click of Miss Cranson's He's dead, and we'll cover him up out of sight,
knitting-needles, the purring of the cat, and the And then we'll all wish him a very good night."







YOUNG RICK.

"I suppose it ought to be good by," Rick re- Rick talked louder than usual, and very fast. His
marked at the end; only we couldn't make good by aunt was amazed that he ate scarcely any supper,
fadge with anything." after all.
"'Fadge?" repeated his aunt to herself. "Where That night, when the great house was still, and all
does that child get hold of such words ?" the land quiet, Miss Cranston, lying broad awake,
Good night will answer just as well," said Miss was aware of a creaking on the front stairs. Bur-
Margaret. "It is Dashy's night." glars! She had imagined she heard their approaching
"Yes; and he has gone to bed for good and all-- steps every night for the last twenty years; and now,
hasn't he ? added Paty. without a shadow of 'doubt, they had come. Aunt
"Now we must go and do it," said Rick. Lesbia sprang up, and took her curling-stick in her
The moon was just rising-a full moon, looking hand. She felt as though she was taking her life
twice as big as common peering over the shoulder also as she sallied into the front hall, ready to fight
Sof East Hill. Daylight was not quite gone, and there for her altars and her fires. She reached the outer
was a red glow in the west. Between the lights door just in time to see it closed gently; reached the
shining down upon them right and left, they buried window just in time to see a figure moving off down
Dash. Aunt Lesbia and Miss Margaret stood by, the walk. A small figure it was, in a dressing-gown,
and Seth, with his spade. Mrs. Harkaway came over and with white, bare feet stepping across the frosted
by invitation, with an amused look on her face. In leaves. It stole past the angle of the house, on to
fact, every one seemed to take the ceremony rather the crooked apple-tree. Then it flung itself down
lightly, except Miss Margaret and Paty. To the along the earth, and a tempest of sobs burst on the
former everything in this life was real earnest, and silence.
Paty, as I have said, loved Dash. So she threw a O, Dashy, Dashy, I'm so sorry I struck you!"
handful of bright maple leaves into the grave, and moaned Rick. If you only would come back, and
one of her own beloved white chrysanthemums. let me be good to you once more O, do please for-
He looks just as though he was asleep there in give me, Dashy, or I never, never shall be glad of
his basket," she said half to herself. "Poor old anything in this world again."
dog." Poor Rick. He had been lying up there in his
Seth's spade rang shrill against a stone, and the white bed looking at the moon, and thinking it all
same instant a sob burst from Paty. She turned, over; how Dash was dead, and what a good dog he
and flung herself down against the crooked old apple had always been, and how he had played with him
trunk, with her head mantled in her apron, like Judea ever since he could remember; and then to think
under her palm-tree. Rick pretended to be very busy that when his comrade was grown old and weak, he
about his headboard. should have struck him with his own hand. Rick
To-morrow I'm going to write it on the board, looked at that hand, and he said to himself, that he
I'll just tack the paper on to-night," he said, briskly, hated it. What must Dash have felt to be struck by
"Auntie, I'm going to have Dashy's photograph fas- the hand he had kissed a thousand times? Rick
tened on here, too, just.like that man's up in the thought about it until "he couldn't stand it," as he
cemetery, you know." told himself, a minute longer; and that was why he
The grave was filled in, and the earth leveled off, had come stealing down the stairs, and out into the
after Seth's best manner. The red had faded to gray chilly October night.
down the west, the hills had grown dark, and there The moon went wading on through the drifts of
was only moonlight now. They all went up the gar- snowy clouds; the sound of falling water came down
den-path, Paty wiping her eyes, and saying, He was the valley from the mill-dam above; and again that
such a dear old dog !" Rick remarked,- heart-broken sob was heard through the hush and
Tom says the woodchuck that Dash and I killed under the stars.
up there, was the biggest one he ever saw. Such an O, Dash! if you only would forgive me !"
ugly customer! Aunty, are we going to have baked And though no answer came from out the brown
Pound-Sweetings for tea ?" earth where his playmate was laid, still some comfort








YOUNG RICK.

crept into the boy's soul merely from listening to his Hicjacet was his jacket;" and that it meant the red-
own confession, trimmed blanket that Dash used to wear in cold
"Now I've told him I'm sorry," Rick sighed as he weather.
turned away. May be he's somewhere and knows."
May be." Ah, Rick, that may be has puzzled CHAPTER IV.
wiser heads, though not more loving hearts, than
yours." SAWNY AUSTEN.
Dash's last resting-place was visited by groups of
school-children the next day, and Tommy Tozer was RICK, child, please not to drum on the centre-
heard gravely explaining to little Bernie Austen that table with your fingers."


~ --



























-_ _ -


"0, DASH! IF. YOU ONLY WOULD FORGIVE ME."

No'm; and Rick snatched away his hands, and ball about the size of one of his marbles on one end.
clasped them between his knees. It held a long row of evenly-set blue stitches; but it
Aunt Lesbia had pulled down her brows, and tight- twitched with a little nervous jerk now and then. The
ened the two up-and-down wrinkles between her eyes. truth was, Aunt Lesbia's hands were not quite as
" That means she's getting tired," said Rick to him- steady as thev had been in her younger days. Miss
self. I suppose, now, if it was me, they'd say I was Cranson was beginning to show her age," the Gray-
- cross." thorpe people said, and they were not wrong. The
Aunt Lesbia was netting a scarf for her nephew. world was growing older, and so was Aunt Lesbia, and
It was of blue worsted, and the netting-bridle was so was Rick. As for the world, I don't know that
noosed round the toe of her slipper. Rick sat there any person saw much difference in that. When one
watching the netting-needle ply to and fro. It had a gets to be six thousand year old, a year or so, more








YOUNG RICK.

or less, doesn't signify. But the same length of time insist on the music at present. Rick has no special
did tell on the other two. Rick was getting to be a aptitude for it."
big boy. He seemed to take up so much room, some- No, but it is good for him to be made to practice.
how, and he didn't always take it up in the shape Nothing is more ruinous than the idea that a child is
most pleasing to his aunt. He sat with his feet on not to do anything except what he likes."
the round of his chair; he flung himself on the That is quite true; but, at the same time, I would
hearth-rug asprawl ; and once, when the minister not compel a boy to do a thing simply for the reason
called,- I sacrifice my own feelings to the truth as that he dislikes it."
I tell this,- Rick did turn a summerset out one "I wish Richard to learn music," decidedly. "A
door only an instant before Dr. Grant came in at the man's education should be developed in every direc-
other. Do you wonder that this dear Aunt Lesbia tion possible."
was, as she said, tired with her nephew ? Miss Margaret said nothing. She believed Aunt
Rick ceased to drum on the centre-table, and set Lesbia was making a mistake, but she was not going
himself to watch the clock, to tell her so when she was tired with a day's netting,
"You old thing," he said to it mentally, "you've not to mention her having been in bed with a sick
got a minute-hand, and an hour-hand, and a week- headache all the previous day.
hand, and a month-hand; and you creature up there, "There will come a crisis, presently, I imagine,"
with your red cheeks all puffed out like a trumpeter, said the young widow to herself. Then she put on
they say you stand for the moon." her hat, and went out. Passing down the walk, she
Aunt Lesbia, the old clock looks like an Egyptian could look in at the bay-window, and get a view of the
mummy up there in the corner. How old is it ? school-room. Rick was standing in the middle of the
I don't know. A great many years. My dear floor, his shoulders squared, and his fists doubled up
child, can't you remember not to tip your chair back ? in fighting attitude, and he was scowling fiercely at
And, Richard, that isn't your Tuesday's handkerchief, the piano.
The pink-bordered handkerchiefs are for the last of "You horrid old thing!" Miss Margaret heard
the week. I do think you are very forgetful." those words. You're a sight, standing up there.
"Well, a fellow can't remember everything," burst You look worse'n the pictures of Juggernaut, an' Baal,
out Rick, and took himself off to the window, an' Dagon, an' all the rest of the heathen gods. I
It is time for your practice now, dear," said his wish I could come in here to-morrow morning, an'
aunt, recently, and very gently. You'll not forget find you, like Dagon, with your four legs broken off,
to shut the piano when the hour is up." an' nothing but the stump of you left, all in a heap
"No, ma'am," Rick answered with emphasis. Then, there on the floor, I do." And Rick gave his fists a
after he had closed the door behind him, "I'd like to furious shake, and then sat down again, and began to
shut the piano so't I could never get it open again, belabor his enemy.
I wish the'man that invented 'em had died of croup "I am sorry," said the teacher to herself; and then
when he was just three months old. That's all." she heard Paty's voice close at hand, asking,-
The piano was in the school-room.; Rick went to O, Miss Margaret, may I walk with you ? I'm
the school-room by way of the barn, wi ;re he paused going up to take these peaches to Gra'ma Dunscomb.
and leaped off the highest haymow six several times, Daisy Austen sent them to her."
in order, I suppose, to get his muscles into a suitable What a pretty basket! and who twined that spray
state for musical execution. I am afraid the device of woodbine round it ?"
was not a success, however, for Aunt Lesbia said to O, I did that. The woodbine all over our porch
Miss Margaret, who sat in the bay-window recess is so red now -just as red as flames of fire and I
sewing,- think it's beautiful."
Just listen to that boy's playing. I think I never Miss Margaret was looking at the gold and pink of
knew a child with so little notion of time." the fruit, and the deep crimson of the leaves wreath-
Rick dislikes his practicing," answered Miss Mar- ing it with careless grace. She looked up now smiling
garet. I really think, if I were you, auntie, I wouldn't into Paty's eyes.








YOUNG RICK.

"Beautiful things really make you happier -don't brother, Sawny and Bernie, all three in a pony-cart,
they, Paty?" with their books, and their wraps, and their lunch-
"Why, yes'm. Don't they make everybody hap- baskets. Most days the dog came too. He was
pier ?" cried Paty, her cheeks aglow. Beppo, a snow-white Spitz, with a blue ribbon tied
They ought to," very gently. Then, as they went round his neck. His nose was of the sharpest, like-
on, she added, "Tell me some of the things you love wise his temper; but he loved Daisy very much, and
to see, Paty." always followed her as she went, on her little crutches,
"0, they're so many!" the young girl answered ; to her seat in the school-room close to the teacher's
then, speaking slowly, "I love to see the moon sail chair. Then Beppo betook himself to the pony-cart,
between the fluffy white clouds nights after I've gone and went to sleep -lay down to dreams which were
to bed; and I enjoy the pink sky, like to-night, you anything but pleasant, judging from the amount of
know. And I think the little teeny Paty kept her snapping and snarling which the dreamer did during
child words yet "little teeny pictures the frost the day.
makes on the window-panes in the winter are just Sawny was two years older than Rick. Sawny had
beautiful; and then, I guess you'll laugh, but the pic- a white face, black hair, wore a watch and chain, and
tures on Mrs. Harkaway's blue and white plates are had been to San Francisco by water. Just at present
pretty. I like to wash and wipe those dishes, just to he wielded a greater influence over Rick than the
see them. You know there are such odd boats sailing President of the United States, Dr. Grant, Aunt Les-
on the lake, and houses with towers, and low windows, bia, and all the other authorities of church, state, and
and little flights of stairs down to the water, and gen- family combined.
tlemen and ladies in rich clothes that come stepping "See here, Rick," said Sawny the day after Miss
down. And then there are trees, and flowers, and Margaret had overheard the address of .the former
wonderful birds, and a city a little way off, with domes, young gentleman to the piano; I want you to go off
and towers, and such slim, tall spires! 0, it's just on East Hill with me after school. I've found the
like fairyland. I wonder if there are such places in jolliest place there. I tell you we'll have fun such as
the world." you never had in your life."
"God has made the world a great deal more beau- Can't go. I've got to practice."
tiful than any picture can ever be. Let me tell you "Practice What's a boy to do with practicing ?
about one place I know across the sea, in Italy." I say, Rick, what makes you thrum that old piano an
I will not describe it here, but you can think how hour every day ? "
the two, Miss Margaret and Paty, went walking up My Aunt Lesbia makes me."
the hill to the poor-farm, Paty taking in every word "Well--what I've got to say is,"--Sawny thrust
of the bright story. his hands to the bottoms of his pockets, raised his
O, shall I ever see it, I wonder," she said at last, black eyebrows as high as they would go, and spoke
half breathless. very slowly, I'd like to see the Aunt Lesbia who'd
I hope so. I believe you will. Here we are, and make me sit at a piano all day if I didn't choose.
there is gran'mamma watching for us." That's all."
O, I forgot to tell you. I think gra'ma's eyes are It wasn't, for Sawny said a great deal more; and if
"beautiful, and little Daisy Austen's. I think the look you had been within hearing, you would have noticed
is the same, though one is old and one is such a that certain words were repeated many times-" East
little girl." Hill," "rock-house," "roof," "gun," "fish-hooks,"
"Yes, you are right," said Miss Margaret; and she potatoes baked in the ashes." These were hints of
looked into the gentle old eyes at the window, and at a plan which the city-bred boy had been making in
the same time recalled the patient little face that looked his head for the last week. You would have seen how
up at her every day from Daisy's seat in school. Rick listened as though he had had more ears than
Daisy was a lame child, whose father owned the two, how his eyes brightened, and his cheeks flushed,
iron-works down at Lower Graythorpe. She came to and you would have seen him turn sober at last, as he
the school every morning with a big brother and a little said, -







"YOUNG RICK."

"But. Sawny, they'll all be so sorry, Aunt Lesbia, strange with alarm. A white face showed in at Mrs.
and the rest -your mother, you know." Clancey's door, just as the breakfast-bell rang.
Mamma's gone to Albany, and as for the governor, Do you know anything about Rick ? "
he needn't make me do French when he knows how No, aunty."
I hate it. Sorry? Nonsense; we'll just give 'em a His bed hasn't been slept in. His room is all in
little scare, you see." order, and- he is gone."
Margaret!" Rick was gone, and Sawny Austen was gone.
It was Aunt Lesbia's voice, sharp, hoarse, and I Where, the next chapter shall tell us.






















J!,








I,,,~ ~ P~ .... .








YOUNG RICK.




YOUNG RICK.
PART II.


BY JULIA A. EASTMAN,
AUTHOR OF THE $1000 PRIZE STORY, "STRIKING FOR THE RIGHT.


CHAPTER V. and there was a strange twitching about one eyelid.
Miss Margaret came close up, and put her two arms
THE FLIGHT. about her, and said, -
"We will do this. We will find him. We will,
" T THAT can it mean ? cried poor Miss Lesbia. aunty. Now, come down stairs with me. It is warm
VV It had been a bright, still night. It was there ;" and as though Aunt Lesbia had been a child
a mild, sunny morning; but Miss Cranson shook learning to walk, Margaret guided her steps down the
from head to foot as though with a sudden ague old stairway, and into the breakfast-room, where an
chill. Even her voice had a tremble in it, though open fire burned on the hearth. "Now, then," she
she was trying with all the strength she had to seem said, brightly, I'm going to run across to Deacon
calm. Harkaway's. Paty may know something about this."
Perhaps he may have been up so early that Olive No. Paty knew nothing. Deacon Harkaway be-
has had time to regulate the room," suggested Mrs. came instantly a picture of Bunyan's individual who
Clancey. is "tossed up and down in his mind," while his wife
No. Olive had not been to Master Rick's room; rushed bareheaded into the street, possessed by some
had not seen Master Rick since tea-time last evening, frantic impulse to start after the fugitive.
The child has been carried off," cried his aunt. He went and lost himself once before," she mur-
"Some one has kidnapped him. I never will believe Inured. "T'was the belfry then I wonder -"
he went of himself." and she shaded her eyes with her hand, and gazed
I'm afraid," began Margaret. She had stepped off through the sunshine at the meeting-house steeple.
into the empty, orderly little room, and caught sight Margaret went stepping fast across the garden, and
of a card pinned to the toilet-cushion. The same in- down a side-path to the barn. The man was milk-
stant she read what was written on it in a big, round ing Seth, the same who had dug Dash's grave.
hand. I'm afraid we must believe he went of him- Seth, Master Rick is lost," she said. There was
self;" and she gave the card to his aunt. a great fear in her eyes, and there was a chord Seth
"Read it, please," gasped Miss Lesbia. "I can't;" had never heard before in her voice, though she spoke
and her spectacle-case fell out of her poor old trem- very low. Get the fleetest horse in the village, and
bling hands, and Miss Margaret's face was nearly as ride to the mill, and' bring Tom Dorrance back with
white as her cap, while she read, you."
Dear Aunty: Please don't you worry about me. A moment, and Seth was running down the street
I'll come back some day. Sure." and Margaret stood beside Miss Lesbia. The next
Some day!" echoed his aunt. 0, where has instant the bell of the front door rang an alarm
the child gone ? What shall we do ?" Such a hope- that waked up every corner-echo in the great, old
less, helpless woman she looked standing there! You house.
would never have believed it to be the same Miss what is it ?" whispered Miss Lesbia.
Cranson you had known. She had grown ten years Good news, perhaps," answered Margaret; and
older in five minutes. New wrinkles seemed to have she went out into the hall, coming back in a minute,
plowed into her cheeks; her lips were unsteady, followed by a gentleman.







YOUNG RICK.

Mr. Austen, do you know anything about Kind o' and sort o' were forbidden to him
Rick ? at home. Now it came over him with a sudden gush
Miss Cranson, has Sawny been here ?" that he might say, ain't, and ain't, kind o', sort o',
The two questions were asked together, and they and botheration, with no one to reprove him. No
answered each other. Rick and Sawny were both more "Rick, dear, you must not speak in that man
gone. ner;" no more Colburn, no more of that detestable
"I will drive to X., and telegraph," said Mr. Aus- Dagon of a piano-forte, no more any law save his
ten. Then he turned back, asking, "Have you any own sweet will--and Rick's will was very sweet to
picture of Rick, Mrs. Clancey ? If I get no trace of him, and he loved it dearly;-but every earthly bliss
them, I shall go on to New York by the afternoon has a bane somewhere. I don't think he was quite
express, and start detectives after them." as happy as he wanted to be. He thought it was, as
O, Sawny, if you could see your father's face at this he remarked to Sawny, rather dark, but Sawny said
minute, you would understand that it is no small thing, it was as light as day."
this going off, and giving the home people "a little Some dark up there, though. You only see the
:scare." But Mr. Austen tried to say a cheering word sun, a little strip of him toward noon, you know,
to Miss Cranson, and I think it did help her a little right overhead. But who cares ? Come on."
to hear, I am sure you think it time to know where "up
O, we shall find them before dinner, I dare say. there was. About a mile out of Graythorpe, close
It's some boys' freak. They'll be glad enough to to the base of East Hill, there rose a huge, gray pile
come home when they get hungry;" but to himself of stone, called the Rock House. Its top was as high
he said, I'm thankful Mary isn't at home," remem- as the church spire. Between the foot of East Hill
being the boy's invalid mother. I believe this and the Rock House there ran a little valley, long,
would kill her." and deep, and very narrow. It was something like
I said it had been a bright night. Rick had gone the long hall of a house, if it were unroofed and open
by way of the back roofs, and a ladder which was a at one end. This open end led out into the meadows,
grape-trellis. He had joined Sawny at the meadow and down to the river bank. The shut-up end it
bars, and they had started off just as the clock struck was like "a place" in a city, only much smaller -
eleven. The only individual who saw them go was was the spot Sawny had chosen for their camping out.
Mrs. Harkaway's cat. Being a discreet person, she Now, you just see here," he cried in triumph.
never mentioned it. "Ain't it complete ? I pulled down those cedars
Such times as I've had getting things up there overhead there for a roof, and I've got a lot of cedar-
exclaimed Sawny. "Carried 'em in an old boat." boughs for a bed. It's twice as big as the state-room
This was just as they crossed the brook, where papa and I had on the steamer coming home from
Rick, in old times, that is, in his young times, had San Francisco."
fallen in. Come on. Let's camp down, then. I say, Sawny,
Things ? What things ?" did you bring your night-cap ?" People wore them
0, no end of truck. Some potatoes, and a cod- in those days.
fish, and what do you think ? a piece of dried "Night-cap ? No. Never thought of it. Wish
beef, and some Indian meal. We'll make hoe-cakes, I had, though, on account of bugs, and such small
and bake 'em in the ashes. They're no end good." beasts."
Sawny, did you take your gun ? See here. I've got two. Didn't know but I
"Gun? No, sir. What good would a gun do a might want to change. I'll lend you one."
fellow? They'd find us out if we fired a gun once. Rick brought from his pocket two very remarkable
Got my fishing gear, though, and I tell you, Rick specimens of head-gear. If you were to take this
Cranson, you'll say it's just the gayest place you ever page of the Wide Awake, fold it in a three-cornered
got into." shape, and cut the crossways edge, you would have
Kind o' dark along here isn't it?" and Rick something like those night-caps. They were like
crowded close to Sawny. cocked hats, made of dimity. Each had a bow on







YOUNG RICK.

top, and strings to tie under the chin. The boys and set fire to them. There was a little blaze, a
put them on, Sawny over his black curls, Rick over great smoke, and in the midst of it Rick cried, -
his brown ones, laughed a little, each at the droll "There he is. There he goes, Sawny, down the
figure the other made there in the dim moonlight, hill. Why, he limps. He's lame."
then cuddled down to sleep. Some body has hurt him, some time, I suppose.
But Rick lay awake a good while, thinking. He Come on;" and on they went, leaping down through
told himself several times that "he didn't believe the underbrush, and across the stones a head-
aunty would care much;" but, somehow, the thought long race, rabbit ahead, and boys after, until Rick
of her wasn't a cheerful one. Then there was some- screamed, -
thing about the great night all around, and the stars, There he goes straight into our house."
and the sound of the river flowing down into the dark, They crept stealthily along, looked in, and there
and the far, shadowy mountains seen across the open- were the rabbit's shy, bright eyes glinting at them
ing of the valley, that was very solemn. However, from behind the cedar-boughs of their bed.
he was able, after a while, to fix his thoughts on the Now we'll kill him," said Sawny, and roast him
potatoes they were going to roast in the ashes for for supper."
breakfast, and the effect of this was to put him to The first two days had been spent by the children
sleep, in building a fireplace. It was of stones, with a chim-
ney and oven. It had been a great success. Pota-
CHAPTER VI. toes, chestnuts, salt pork, hoe-cakes, and even cod-
fish had been cooked there, and cooked very well,
THE FUGITIVES. too, as the eaters decided. Now, the rabbit.
"You better be the one to kill him, Rick," said
THAT was the mildest November ever known in Sawny. "You know about such game."
Graythorpe. With a soft sky and a hazy distance, "Dash and I killed a woodchuck once." Rick
day came after day and night after night, as though looked as though the memory was not a pleasing
the weather had forgotten itself, and put September one, or else the anticipation was not. "You're the
in the calendar after October, instead of before it. oldest," he remarked.
Three such days and nights passed after Sawny "What of that? I haven't lived in the country
Austen and Rick disappeared. Had the weather been all my days. I tell you I don't know how to kill a
colder, the anxiety of their friends would have been rabbit."
shortened. As it was, the boys were having a very Robinson Crusoe would not have hesitated. Rick
good time. Detectives in New York, and Boston, said to himself that he would not. He seized the
and Philadelphia were on the lookout for a couple of hammer, and crept inside. The rabbit only crouched
lost children. They found plenty of them, but the lower among the cedar-boughs. Rick stole closer,
two who were camping out up in the country they did and could see those bright eyes still watching him.
not find. Tom Dorrance followed a band of strolling One blow of the hammer, and it would be done. It
gypsies as far as Hartford, and came back to Gray- would only take a minute. He nearly did it; but the
thorpe discouraged. next instant he was outside, and the hammer was
"They say they haven't seen 'em," Tom told Miss flung on the ground, and a very excited voice was
Lesbia; "but you never can tell, they are such saying, -
scamps. The men had rather lie than to tell the "I tell you I won't. A poor little lame rabbit,
truth, and the women are as bad again as the men." that's gone and crawled into your bed to be safe 1
Could they have lured the children away with their I'd as soon kill a baby. There "
horrible smooth tongues ? Miss Lesbia wonders. "Then let's tame him," suggested Sawny. I'll
And at that instant, within a mile of Graythorpe go and get him some chestnuts."
church, up in the hills, where no one thought to look, The next day was Sunday. The boys kept it not
Sawny and Rick were smoking a rabbit out of his very badly, telling stories to each other, having a nap
hole. They had stuffed in a handful of dry leaves, or two, and cultivating Bunny. It was amazing how







YOUNG RICK.

naturally the rabbit took to chestnuts and civilization. Think we're dead, and going to have a funeral. We
They heard the church-bells ring morning and after- might go down and attend it."
noon, and then, just at sunset, there was the sound Wouldn't .they be surprised to see us come walk-
of tolling. It was a deep, rather awful sound, too, ing up the aisle to sit with the mourners ?" and Rick
borne along on the evening wind. tried to laugh. But it wasn't very good joking on
"Hark, Rick! Some one is dead," said Sawny. such matters, he thought; and then the wind blew, and
'They're tolling the bell." it was very cold to-night.
Sawny, what if it should be aunty ?" and a "I say, Sawny, how is it about going home, any
,eat terror made the boy faint, way ? "
"Nonsense More likely they are tolling it for us. Sawny stopped whistling, and answered, coolly,















"_"DR. HiD, Sw NY-KILLED-ORE-BED
















0, by and by. We must stay away long enough minute. Browsing round this way makes a fellow as
for 'em to be glad to see us back. What do you sup- hungry as a bear. Whew how the wind does blow! "
pose they'll say ?" They were seated on a board, just outside their
Aunty won't say much. She never does; but house, and their feet were close to the fireplace. A
she'll look a lot. I'd rather be whipped than to few coals smoldered there, showing red in the deep-
have her look white at me, and wrinkle her forehead. ening dark. Bunny had gone off to his own quarters,
iIINI






























But, then, I know," and Rick brightened, "I and a silence fell between the two there. Suddenly,
know she'll e so glad. I expect, Sawny, they'll kill directly over their heads, as it seemed, a strange,
the fatted calf for us." wild voice-a woman's voice-was heard. The boys
Don't eat veal at our house," answered Sawny. seized on each other, and each could feel the beating
Reckon it'll be a turkey. I wish we had some this of the other's heart.
,f,





il ,,,, I : IIII ., i
-.o .












"O, by and by. We must stay away long enough minute. Browsing round this way makes a fellow as
for'er to be glad to see us back. What do you sup- hungry as a bear. Whew how the wind does blow"
pose they'll say ?" They were seated on a board, just outside their
Aunty won't say much. She never does; but house, and their feet were close to the fireplace. A
she'll look a lot. I'd rather be whipped than to few coals smoldered there, showing red in the deep-
have her look white at me, and wrinkle her forehead. ening dark. Bunny had gone off to his own quarters,
But, then, I know," and Rick brightened, I and a silence fell between the two there. Suddenly,
know she'll be so glad. I expect, Sawny, they'll kill directly over their heads, as it seemed, a strange,
the fatted calf for us." wild voice a woman's voice was heard. The boys
"Don't eat veal at our house," answered Sawny. seized on each other, and each could feel the beating
"Reckon it'll be a turkey. I wish we had some this of the other's heart.







YOUNG RICK.

"The day of the Lord. The day of the Lord is at All at once she stopped, and looked sharply round.
hand. Blood, and fire, and vapor of smoke." Then she raised her lantern, and swept a half circle
The woods came down with the sound of a wail- with it. They heard her mutter a word or two to
ing cry. herself-not preaching, or singing, now-but talk-
O, what is it ? gasped Sawny. ing. Rick waited, breathless, expecting her to walk
It's nobody but Leonie. She's got away. She in upon them. Instead, she strolled up to the ire,
never hurts anything." gazed into it, and then turned away.
"Who is Leonie?" and Sawny shook like an Do you suppose she saw us, Rick ?"
aspen leaf, still. I believe she knows, some how, that we were round
"0, she's a crazy woman. She used to play with me here. I tell'you she's cute, if she is crazy." And
up at the mill. She's always worse moonlight nights, Rick was right.
and then she goes round in the woods, and preaches. Monday morning, when Tom Dorrance opened his
She thinks the end of the world is coming." door at sunrise, he found a woman seated on the
I declare, I thought it had come. Yes, you just steps.
see her up there." "'Good morning. You're an early caller, Leonie,"
A hundred feet above them, on the topmost peak he said.
of the Rock House, the figure of the insane woman Going hunting to-day ? she inquired, very quietly.
outlined itself against the evening sky. She carried "I was going into the mill."
a lighted lantern in her hand, and waved it in a slow, "Hunting boys, I mean." Tom started. Not a
measured time, as she talked, feature of Leonie's face changed as she added, "Be-
She thinks the valley is full of people down there, cause I'd advise you to go down to the Rock House
That's always the way with her. I've heard her hollow before you chase any more gypsies."
preach twenty times." Rock House hollow ? Tom said the words over
Look, she's coming down. You're sure she won't after her. Then he turned his face toward the gray
hurt us ?" rocks on his right. A cloud of blue smoke was burst-
No, I know she won't; but, Sawny, she'll find us, ing out down there. Save us all!" cried Tom.
if we don't look out. Her eyes are as sharp as a East Hill is on fire !"
wildcat's." Black Fan never made better time than when her
Let's go inside, then." master rode her into Graythorpe that morning. The
Sawny, to tell the truth, didn't wish to improve wind was blowing a gale; there had been no rain for
Leonie's acquaintance. "You never know," he rea- weeks; the leaves and undergrowth were like tinder,
soned, "what a mad woman might do;" and, cer- and the flames were leaping every instant higher and
tainly, this one must be very mad indeed, or she higher up the mountain-side. The flames? And
wouldn't be strolling round the country, and clamber- where were the boys ?
ing straight down the sides of the Rock House, this Sawny and Rick had been up very early, -they
way. couldn't keep warm lying there and had kindled
Sh-h Here she comes," whispered Rick. The their fire.
boys were crouching on their bed, peering out be- Now let's go up to the old chestnut tree, and get
tween the cedar-branches that formed the front of some nuts to roast for breakfast," Sawny had said;
their house. and five minutes afterward, as they were groping
Hark What is she singing ?" among the yellow leaves, they had heard a sound of a
Up the aisle of the little valley she came, very sudden roaring, and Rick had cried out, -
slowly, chanting to herself, not loud, but low; and the Fire The woods are on fire. Run."
boys caught the words, And they did run. The flames were below them,
"and their only way was to rush straight up the steep.
When, shriveling like a parched scroll,
The flaming heavens together roll, With mad leaps over stones and logs, tearing through
And louder yet, and yet more dread, bush and brier, the boys went; but those wild flames
'wells the high trump that wakes the dead." gained on them every instant. Cedar and balsam-fir








OUNG RICK."

caught, and burned like pitch, and the wind seemed to running or driving past, and the bells were beginning
blow from the four quarters of heaven to fan the fire. to ring.
The ore-bed," gasped Rick. In the agony of that "What's the trouble ?" he inquired, opening the
moment there flashed across his mind the memory of outside door into the small yard.
that pit, half-way up the mountain, which had been "Don't you see? We're all burning up yond:.,
dug years before, and left open. If they could only Going to East Hill, to fight fire."
reach that, they might crawl down, perhaps. The O!"
words were on his lips still, when he felt his feet The doctor stepped back for his hat. He was a
going down, down; knew that Sawny had dropped stalwart young fellow, who knew the life of California
out of his sight; thought, "I'm going to die now;" and the Sierras. His bright eyes grew brighter at
and then -he was sitting up in a cleft, between two the prospect of a bit of real work, and he strode to
rocks, strangled and blinded with smoke, and Sawny the open door, to be stopped there by a strange figure
was lying white and still by his side. stumbling across the threshold. It was Rick, bare-
The young doctor, who had recently come to the headed, singed, scratched, bleeding, out of breath,
village, stood in his office that Monday morning, when more dead than alive, and with only strength to gasp
he became aware of a great commotion outside. Men out, "Dr. Hyde, Sawny -killed-ore-bed."














... __:-. _7 -- __ -

-.-_--T-~- -- .. ._ -
IE



S: -. ---_-_ ---- =- -- R = -: :=-W =. .; _- -







YOUNG RICI-.



YOUNG RICK.


BY JULIA A. EASTMAN.
AUTHOR OF THE $1000 PRIZE STORY, STRI ING FOR THE RIGHT."

CHAPTER VII. don'tt know. I twisted it, I suppose, when I
came aown. Broken ? with a twinge.
RETURNS TO THE BOSOM OF HIS FAMILY. "Very neatly compound fracture, indeed!" and

N OW, then, my boy, what is it? the young man tried the shoulder-joint back and forth.
Doctor Hyde had set Rick in front of himself, "See here. Do you know anatomy enough to tell
and his strong horse had come up the hill at a canter. how many bones there are between elbow and
Behind them the Graythorpe bells were ringing a wild wrist ?"
peal. All about them men with hoes in their hands "Twenty-five, I should think, by the feeling,"
were hurrying toward the mountain. Rick thought answered Sawny; and Rick upspoke, Two, the ulna
of nothing but the ghastly glimpse he had had of and radius."
Sawny stretched out in that hole in the ground up "Right, good boy. Go to the head," laughed the
there. doctor. "Well, you, my young friend, have broken
It's there, sir, round by that big rock, where the 'em both squarely off, and the next thing is to get you
cedars are blazing." home. You've your next month's work laid out for
Wh-h! and the doctor drew his lips into a silent you. Come. Here's my arm."
whistle. "In all that smoke ? Well, come on." Over burning logs, across hot ashes, round blazing
He had dismounted, and flung the bridle over the brush, through smoke and the smell of resinous wood
rail of a fence. Now he took Rick by the hand an on fire, they picked their slow way. There was a
instant, then stopped, turned sharply, and looked groan from Sawny now and then, and a cheery word
down into the child's face. from the doctor at every step. Up above them the
Why, how you tremble he said. Look here, flames were leaping from tree to tree, and the voices
Rick, I don't believe it's half as bad as you think." of shouting men came down on the morning wind.
Sawny looked so white." The place where the boys had lost their footing and
"Of course; fainted away, probably. Up with fallen in was a'rift in the rocky side of the hill, a nar-
you and he helped Rick over the wall. "I dare row pit about five feet deep, It was in the fall that
say Sawny is fighting fire with the best of them by Sawny had broken his arm, and Rick had been
this time. Cheer up. -Remember Mistress Hub- bruised more than he yet knew.
bard's dog:-- "Now, then, Rick," said Doctor Hyde, when he
had helped Sawny Austen into the saddle and had
'And when she came back, the dog was dancing.'" taken the bridle in his hand, "I'm going home with
Sawny wasn't fighting fire, and he wasn't dancing; Sawny, so I shall take the lower Graythorpe road.
but neither was he dead. He was sitting up, his back You can get yourself home alone, I reckon."
against the big rock, and he appeared to be not a "Yes sir, of course ; and Rick started off.
little ashamed as the doctor stopped in front of him. Half-way down the hill-road he came upon a squad
Well, sir," said the latter, "taking a look at the of men fighting the fire there where it was trying to
situation ? What do you think of it ? cross the road.
I think it's rather smoky just now ;" and Sawny Hul-- lo cried a familiar voice, and Tom Dor-
rubbed his eyes with his left hand. rance stopped an instant, leaning on his hoe. "Well,
What ails your other arm there ? and the doctor I say for't if here ain't Young Rick. Rather banged
took Sawny's right hand in his own. up too, I sh'd think! "








YOUNG RICK.

Rick felt very small indeed just then. He felt Well -yes I do. I was just a-goin' to tell ye."
smaller still when Seth his aunt's hired man, who Fred had red hair, a thin skin-and-bones face, very
heretofore had treated him with great respect, snarled slanting eyebrows, and a most melancholy expression
out,- of countenance. He could tell the funniest things
"You'd better steer for home, sir. Nobody's wanted and never smile at all. Now he fixed his sad eyes on
there so much as you. Go ahead the remote landscape and added, They don't know
See here, Fred Tozer," cried Tom, you take this as she'll live."
chap down to the village, will you ? He'll drop before To himself he remarked, I don't know as I shall
he gets there if he tries to go alone ;" for Rick, what myself."
with his fall, his fright, his bruises, and his no break- Why, is she sick ?" cried the returning wanderer
fast, was just ready to drop." in agony.
Fred came hopping along on one foot across the "Sick ? I sh'd rather think so. Dangerous, too, I
roots of a scorching alder, gave a jump into the road, s'pose. My mother she -well, she see 'er last night.
and stared at Rick. She was a-livin' then. I hain't heerd from 'er this
"Hullo, Cinderella," he said, and not a feature of morning. "
his face changed its expression. Fred omitted to mention that it was at the prayer-
It may be remembered by you who are reading this meeting that Mrs. Tozer had seen Miss Lesbia.
story, that Rick had encountered Fred Tozer some "Oh, what is the matter ?" cried Rick with a sob.
years since that Fred, in fact, was the youth who "Matter enough, I sh'd say. Your goin' off is
had received the "pounding" at his hands in the old what's the matter. I b'leeve the doctors they call it
days for calling Paty "town's poor." Rick loved him rheumatiz, though."
no better now than then, and if he could have been !" Rick doesn't see the connection between
permitted to choose, would have selected any other his aunt's grief at his. departure and an attack of
comrade to escort him home that morning sooner than rheumatism. He only says, however, I didn't know
Fred Tozer. He knew himself to be powdered with people ever died of rheumatism."
ashes and charcoal, but he did not like being taunted You didn't ? "
as Cinderella. Fred stops short and stares at him, as though he
As for Fred himself, he had one or two old grudges could have believed any assertion of ignorance from
against our hero, and it struck him that here was a him sooner than that.
good chance to pay them. This, therefore, was the "You 'didn't know people ever died of rheuma-
state of mind in which the two started towards the tism?' Well, there! Why, they die just the worst
village. kind. All their joints and legyments they sort o' snarl
I s'posed you was dead," remarked Fred, just as up, you know, an' their ain't no more shape to 'em
the two passed the big oak. Rick kicked an acorn than nothing' in the world. Die o' rheumatiz! Why,
along in front of himself as he replied that he bless yer heart. I've heerd tell of a man I can
shouldn't care if he was." never describe to you how Fred pulled down those
(I must remind you here that this really was a most slanting brows of his, nor tell you the injured-inno-
humiliating way of going home. Sawny had broken cence air which he put on as he told this. "I've
bones ; they had set East Hill on fire, and put every heerd tell of a man who just went out and drowned
man in town out of conceit with them, and Rick him- himselff in a quicksand 'cause he thought he was a-goin'
self was returning under guard, as it were, of Fred to die o' rheumatiz, 'Twas in his family, you see.
Tozer, because Tom thought him too badly banged His great-aunt on his mother's side had been attack-
up to go alone.) ted with it. Yes, sir, that man drowned himselff in
"Sho, now! Wha' do you want to go'n' talk that a quicksand. They didn't have no buryin' at the
way for? Sh'd think you'd he glad to git home 'n' funeral, 'cause, you see, he'd done that for himself .
see y'r folks." The quicksand had just swallowed 'im up like 'proud
Fred," cried Rick in sudden enthusiasm, do you Korah's troop' in the catechiz, you remember. Wa'n't
know anything about aunty ?" nothing' left on 'im but an ole palm-leaf hat a-stickin'







YOUNG RICK.

up out o' the mud. My gran'f'ther he went by there "There is a strong wind and the fire is gaining on
once, an' he see the hat right in the water. So that them, I'm afraid."
shows it's the truth I'm a-tellin' on ye." It was aunty's voice surely, and there yes, there
The young reprobate sighed a sigh which he seemed she was in the bay-window, sitting up in her. easy-
to heave up from the soles of his boots somewhere, chair, looking a little pale, but otherwise much the
Then he was silent for the space of a minute or so. same as usual. Rick uttered a little cry of surprise,
He looked more dejected than ever. As for Rick, he his aunt glanced toward him, her knitting fell down,
was trying to think how it would seem to go home and her hands came up with an uncertain flutter, and
and find his aunt so very ill, "dangerous," as Fred then with an expression on her face such as the child
expressed it. had never seen there -such amazement, and love,
They passed the meeting-house, and came over and grief, and joy all together -she cried out,-
against the grave-yard. Fred then observed, "Why, my boy! My poor child!"
I shouldn't a ben a mite sup-prised to a seen em She spread out her arms toward him. Rick dimly
diggin' a grave over there," turning his pathetic glance remembered thinking he would try to reach those out-
in the direction of the granite obelisk that marked the stretched arms, and die in their embrace; for he must
Cranson lot. "No, not a mite sup-prised, I shouldn't be dying, he was sure. Daylight was turning black
a ben. I don't suppose she'll know you." around him, and he could scarcely move his feet.
Fred answered to his conscience for this last speech He took one step forward. Then the floor, and the
by stopping to take a look at our hero. He had no pattern of the carpet rose up a wall before his eyes.
hat on his head, his garments were torn in all possible He thought Graythorpe is going to be put an end
ways and places, he had an immense sign of addition to by an earthquake;" dimly wondered whether it
on his left cheek (the perpendicular being a dash of was for his wickedness or Fred Tozer's, and then -
charcoal, and the cross bar a. brier scratch), and his the next thing he remembered was this: There was
right cheek was At study in color of which black and a boy too weak to turn himself in bed, who lay in his
blue were the predominant hues. Verily Rick's friends room up-stairs, lay and watched the snow outside as
needed not to be very far gone with rheumatism, or it came floating down upon the window, the elm-
any other disease, to fail to "know him." boughs, and into the empty bird's-nest on the moun-
"Well -here you be at the gate. Guess I won't tain ash. He remembered very little at first, but he
go in." was sure, he believed he was sure, that this boy was
Fred added that he guessed, all things considering, himself.
that wouldn'tt be best. I think he was wise so far. Rick had been sick a month. Fred Tozer had not
He walked in a depressed manner round the corner, called to enquire afterhim. All things considering, "
where he was seen to turn two somersets, and also to he still thought best to give a wide berth to Miss
jump over an astonished Newfoundland dog. Cranson and her house. Rick, in his delirium, had
Poor Rick -the state of mind that he was in as told some things, and I have reason to believe if
he went up to the door He had a natural terror of Aunt Lesbia could have had Fred brought within
sickness and sick persons. "How Aunt Lesbia must reach of her hands during those days, that youth
look," he thought, as he remembered Fred's "joints would have learned that there might be troubles in this
and legyments all up in a snarl." He supposed she life as severe, for the time at least, as rheumatism.
would be in bed in her room, and wondered if her
head had kept its shape sufficiently to wear her usual CHAPTER VIII.
frilled night-cap. "0!" and he was aware of a
deathly feeling coming all over him. He opened the
door, and crept along down the hall to the sitting- THE FACE AT THE WINDOW.
room. That door was wide open. Miss Margaret
had a turkey-feather duster in her hand, and was PATY, naturally, knew very little about her family
standing in front of the mantel, with her back towards connections; but as she grew older, she quite made
him. up in imagination what she lacked in knowledge.







YOUNG RICK.

She had fully settled it in her mind that her relatives The short winter days had come, and two after-
on both sides were people of high respectability; and noons in a week Paty used to go up and read an hour,
had she suddenly ascertained that she was descended from four to five, to Gran'ma Dunscomb. Miss Mar-
from a princess and prince of the blood, she would garet when she went away, left something for nearly
not have been at all surprised. To be sure, it might every one of her scholars to do for some one till she
seem strange to some people that a family of position came back; for she was in New York now. To Rick
should leave a scion of their house to languish, as and Sawny she had said, -
Paty's father had done for fourteen years, in an illy- I saw something this morning which reminded
regulated insane asylum maintained by the public, me of you two boys. It was old Mrs. Wilkins. blimd,
But Paty's faith was not staggered by this fact. Prob- and lame, trying to do, what do you suppose ? '
ably her father's friends did not know where he was, Hobble down to prayer-meeting, most likely," said
and even if they did, why, history furnished parallels. Sawny; "she's always there."
Did not Nebuchadnezzar have his dwelling with the She scours the cents she gives to the children, -
beasts of the field ? And was Charles the Second scours 'em up real bright in the sand out by her door.
any better off in his oak tree ? Wasn't Alfred the Maybe she was up to that. She can't see a bit, you
Great made to bake cakes in a peasant's cottage ? and know. She says she can feel if the coppers are
didn't Bruce of Scotland lay him down to sleep in bright."
a barn ? Paty thought it over nights, after she went It wasn't going to prayer-meeting, and it wasn't
to bed, and made all sorts of pictures in imagination brightening cents. It was- sawing wood; and she
of herself when she should have found her family, seemed to have very little ready for this cold weather."
and come to her own. How noble and generous she Why, I'll get my father to send her up a load."
wduld be to all her Graythorpe friends Gran'ma "That's very well, Sawny, but -"
Dunscomb should have a big room in her house, and O, we boys '11 all go up and saw it for her. It '11
a carriage and horse to drive. She decided to give be real jolly fun, won't it, Sawny ?"
Rick a gold watch with a wonderful chain, and pre- I can't saw -couldn't saw a broomstick in two,"
sent the Graythorpe Sunday School with a new library. asid Sawny rather coolly.
These, and a hundred gifts beside, the younggirl had "Very well ; you shall pile up, then. I'm going to
determined upon; and you can never think how much see Sam Farley about it now."
happiness she got out of her plans. For herself, she A day or two before Miss Margaret went away,
was to move anout this beautiful, imaginary world in little Daisy Austin came to her at recess with a mes-
dresses of indescribable magnificence. She had de- sage.
vised for herself a wardrobe twice as extensive as The boys want me to tell you that they made an
Queen Elizabeth's, and her favorite dress was a sky- agreement to keep Mrs. Wilkins in wood till you come
blue satin covered with small birds wrought in solid back. And if her pile gets low, or if the sticks aren't
gold, and fastened thereupon. She would wear in her sawed and split, I'm going to write straight off to you.
hair a bird of wonderful make, which should fly up, and Wouldn't it be an awful thing if I should have to
sing whenever she touched a certain hairpin. Paty do it ?"
trembled in anticipation when she thought, what if she And one of Paty's duties, as I have said, was to
should forget, and touch that hairpin in church, read to Gran'ma Dunscomb. She read in a book of
Ah, Paty I think her small head was getting very theology. Its title was Boston's Fourfold State."
full of these dreams. Not that she ever would have What it was about I cannot tell you. Paty could have
lisped them to any person. Even good Mrs. Harka- told no better. But she was happy in dear old gran-
way, who was very kind to her, never imagined what ma's enjoyment of the work. O yes, yes " That's
her young handmaiden was thinking about, as she so true !" Beautiful These words were the fer-
wiped dishes, and rubbed knives, and washed potatoes. vent punctuations as the reading went on.
Paty was quick with her hands, stepped lightly up and This Saturday afternoon Paty put on her red sacque,
down the house, and helped everywhere. She had girls wore red sacques in those days, and her
a sleight at work," Mrs. Harkaway said. little gray velvet, quilted hood, and her mittens with








YOUNG RICK.

fur wrists, and started off up the snow-path to the through the room. The coals, where the damper is
poor-farm. I suppose she looked, with her brown open, show the glow of their warm hearts. The banks
eyes, and her red lips, and her arched feet, much as of clouds down the west are gathering the same glad
many pretty girls look whom you might meet to-day color upon their fleeces. Paty's eyes take it all in,
in New England towns and villages. For I must tell and she is silent for a minute after she sits down
you, because you who like her and I hope many of again. Gran'mamma is watching her, and she
you do like Paty, for she is a favorite of mine will says, -
be glad to know it, that she was getting to be a very You have a look like your mother, sometimes,
pretty girl indeed. Those slender feet of hers seemed Paty."
to have some mysterious spring in them which gave a I shouldn't think you could remember how she
lightness to every movement of her body; and had looked, it's so long ago- more than fourteen years."
her mother been the disguised princess that her child "Fourteen years is all your life, Paty. It's only a
dreamed her to be, the daughter's hands could not little piece of life to me;" and gran'mamma turns
have been more taper, or her dark lashes longer. But toward the fire and the crimson-hearted coals. Yes,
I think the best thing in her face, after all, was its it's fourteen years, and it doesn't seem longer ago
bright, happy look, and that had come from Mrs. than yesterday that I looked out and saw her coming
Harkaway's kindness and Miss Margaret's gentle up to the gate."
teachings. It was nearly night, wasn't it ?"
Paty had received a letter from Miss Margaret that Paty knows the story quite well, but it is as good as
very day, and she was not long in telling gran'mamma new to her ears every time. She cannot tell why, but
about it. she has an uncommon longing to hear it this evening,
"I'm so happy. 0, you can't think how happy I the story of that young mother who came through the
am." She had laid off her sacque and hood now, and winter's snow to bring her little babe to a safe, warm
was down on the rug shaking hands with the cat. shelter that snow-falling night.
Her winter walk had given her a fine color, and her Yes, nearly night, and the air was full of snow, so
eyes were very bright. She has gone to her mother's it was darker than it is now. I saw her coming, a
in New York, Miss Margaret has, and just think of little slight-built thing, with a child on her arm, and I
this, gran'ma she has invited me to come, and make minded that she stepped slow, heavy steps, and she
her a visit." put out her hand, and clung hold of the fence-rail as
"Come to New York ? she came. There was a fence round the yard in those
"Yes'm. Come to New York; and Deacon Hark- days.
away says I may go. Isn't Deacon Harkaway an "That was when Pardon Sykes and his wife kept
angel ?" the farm.' (So gran'mamma always mentions the
Gran'mamma says she has no doubt he will be in poor-house.) We've had a good many-nice, kind
the Lord's own good time. She doesn't think the people to tend to things here in my day; but I believe
deacon has quite attained to it yet. But she is so Pardon and Electa were the best of them all. While
glad the girl herself is not more so that Paty is I was watching the poor thing, I heard the outer door
to go to New York. open, and saw Electa run down the walk, and go up
The book is on the stand. Paty will not neglect to the stranger.
her reading because she is going to visit her beloved Let me take the baby,' I heard her say. She was
Mrs. Clancy. So she takes her low chair near such a kind, motherly sort of woman. You couldn't
gran'ma, and opens The Fourfold State." (" By help loving her the minute you looked into her eyes.
ye learned and pious Mr. Thomas Boston of Et- 'Let me take the baby, and you lean on me. You
trick.") are very tired, I'm afraid. Here, you shall come right
And now it is nearly five o'clock. Paty pauses to into gran'ma's room; it's all snug and warm here.'"
put a stick of wood in the stove. It is white birch- Paty begins to wipe her eyes, she scarcely knows
wood, which catches fire and bursts into a bright blaze why. But how good the tired little woman must have
in an instant, and then diffuses a sweet, woody odor thought them, those two women with their kind hands








YOUNG RICK.

fluttering about her, and their gentle voices cooing to Gran'mamma has never told Paty this part of the
her and her baby. story before.
Did she seem glad ?" she asks. She was dead, Paty; and your own little baby
She was too sick and suffering to seem glad about hand was stained with her blood. It was the next
anything, but I think she was as glad as she could be. day that a young man came riding fast to the door.
We undressed her and laid her in my bed.there, and 'I think my wife is here, Mrs. Rhea,' he said,
we put the baby-- "That's me i" "Yes, you, and, somehow, there was that in his bearing and tone
Paty, on her arm; and then Pardon went down to Gray- that persuaded me that his birth had-been on the
thorpe village, and brought up the doctor. It was other side of the sea. I was to have met her below
old Dr. Andrus. He's been dead now these ten here last night but was detained.'
years, but any one in Graythorpe who remembers "'A young person came here last night, and a
anything at all about him, remembers this. He was child,' said Mrs. Sykes.
a man of few words. Whatever sins he had to answer 'Yes, the baby of course; hurriedly.
for-and he had some, but I hope he repented of "'But she was very much worn out-very sick,
them before he died, poor soul!- the sin of idle indeed.'
words wasn't one of 'em. 'All the king's horses, and Let me see my wife at once, if you please.'
all the king's men,' couldn't have got a thing out of "'My friend,' said Electa, gently, 'you have no
the old doctor if he didn't mean to tell it. wife: she is dead.'
"Well, he came, and he stood and looked at the "' Dead ? Who is dead ? It was not she, it was
little thing lying there in my bed; and then he sat not Annie, who came.'
down and looked at her a while longer. Then he He was led into the room where the pretty thing
gathered up his great white beard, and sat drawing it was lying in her rest. Not a word did he speak
through and through his two hands, with his eyes when he saw the little white face with its closed eyes,
shut, looking at nobody. Then he measured out but he gave one look, and Electa came out and shut
some little powders and said, 'Once in four hours, if the door, and left him there with his dead. All that
she doesn't sleep.' The next minute he had his sad- night we heard him walking to and fro, up and down,
dle-bags slung over his arm, and was leaving. In the and all the next day and the second night. No one
entry he said to Electa wanted to go in and disturb him there. But the
"' She won't trouble you long.' third day the town authorities interfered, and the
Whether that meant that his patient was going to selectmen went and brought up the minister. Dr.
die, or going to get well, nobody knew; though as for Grant opened the door, and found the young man sit-
a poor sick woman being a 'trouble,' it wasn't Electa ting still, looking more dead than alive himself, beside
Sykes's way to think that ever. Do you want to hear the body. He glanced up as the minister entered,
the rest ? and smiled in a vacant way and said -
O, tell me all, please! cried Paty. My wife is sleeping. Don't wake her with any
She was sitting bending forward in her chair, and noise.'
her eyes looking away and away at the glow of the "Then they knew that the poor man was crazed with
western sky. She saw not the sky, but that little his trouble, and the doctors where he is say he has
mother in gran'ma's bed. never had a sane hour since.'
"-" There was a cot-bed put up for me over in that Paty," gran'mamma had paused a moment -
corner that night, and I was lying there along in the go to that lower drawer there, and bring me the little
small hours wide awake, and the fire burning enough blue box down at the right hand."
just so I could see things in the room. And all at The box was opened, and there in the twilight the
once she sprang up and stretched out her arms. Her daughter was shown the only relic that was left of her
lips made a little sound like '0, mother !' Then poor young mother. No ring, no locket, no jewel of
there was a burst of bright red blood, and before I any kind. Only a little handkerchief carefully kept, but
could get to her it was all over." yellow with the dark of fourteen years, and with the
Was she dead really dead ? name in one corner written in a delicate, lady-like hand.








YOUNG RICK.

"ANNIE P. RHEA." tion was gone. Only one motion it had made. It
"Rhea, not Ray." Paty had been told by gran'- had placed its finger on its lips as though to say, Be
mamma long ago that her name was spelt in the for- silent."
mer way, and had always so spelled it herself. Now Paty sprang to the window. "What is it? cried
she tenderly unfolded the handkerchief, and her heart gran'mamma.
was full of pityfor the girlmother so long dead. How I thought I saw some one," Paty answered. "I
she would have loved her, she thought, if she had think it is time for me to go home now."
lived. "And you are to have your mother's handkerchief
"You have never seen your father, Paty ?" for your own, dearie. You are old enough to value it
No, 'm. Mrs. Clancey wrote to the superintend- now. And may God grant to you one day some other
ent, and he said it would be only painful, and no com- trace of your parents' friends,- we could never find
fort for us to try to see him. No." Paty had seated any. Good-by."
herself again, and mechanically taken the book into Down the hill through the gloaming went Paty, and
her hands. She was looking down at it as she said home to Deacon Harkaway's. Her head and her
again, heart were both full. There was love for the sweet
"No, I've never seen my father." mother whom she had never known, and wonder at
That instant she was aware of a dark shadow com- the strange features seen through the window-pane.
ing between herself and the red west. She glanced What could it mean ? What did he want? Would
up quickly, and saw, close against the pane on the she meet the sad-looking man again ? "
outside, saw for a moment only, a strange, haggard And that instant, there in the pine grove, behind a
face. A man's face it was, bearded, and with great, tree-trunk, crouched the shivering figure of a man
trouble-full eyes. These eyes were fixed not on gran'- who watched Paty with wild, hungry eyes, while she
mamma, not on the room, but on her, Paty herself, tripped past so near that he heard her draw her
Before she could rise, or cry out, the terrible appari- breath as she went.

























"4 p
i-
.,, '
tr







YOUNG RICK.



YOUNG RICK.

BY JULIA A. EASTMAN,
AUTHOR OF THE $1000 PRIZE STORY, "STRIKING FOR THE RIGHT."


CHAPTER IX. noon, and night to entertain and amuse him; but on
one subject she had kept silence. She had fed him
AUNT LESBIA'S PLANS. with beef-tea and mutton-broth, and gruel, and wine-
jelly. She had never asked what he had been fed on
" AUNT Lesbia! during those seven days. She had told him of her
"A Well, my boy? sorrows when she was a little girl, and her horse had
Don't you think been killed; but of her fright and grief during that
He stopped there, and fumbled with a ball of blue week when her boy was lost, not a word. This was
worsted that he held in his hand. Aunt Lesbia was Rick's punishment. Aunt Lesbia and Miss Marga-
knitting a soft, thick shawl for Gran'mamma Duns- ret had agreed upon it. Rick himself should be the
comb. Rick was doing nothing, he did a great deal first to introduce the subject. Miss Margaret and
of it these days; and the cat, a white one, was "mark- Rick had had one little talk which the boy re-
ing time on the cushion of a rocking-chair. Dr. membered. That had been ten days previous, and
Hyde had explained to Rick that "marking time," just as Miss Margaret was leaving for New York.
among soldiers, meant stepping in time to the music, But now, this topic of the practicing was breaking
but not getting on at all. Floss had marked time on the ice with his aunt.
Rick's white bed ever since he had been sick. Now Practicing? "
that he was down in the sitting-room, she made the Aunt Lesbia seemed not to understand.
chair-cushion the scene of her military drill. "Yes, 'm. My lessons on the piano, I mean."
This was the very Saturday afternoon when Paty 0, your lessons on the piano. Yes, yes."
had gone up to the poor-farm. Rick went on tossing A little tormenting smile flitted over the dear,
the ball back and forth between his hands, while he wrinkled, old face.
screwed up his lower lip, and wrinkled his brows like Yes, 'm." Rick being started, went on talking at a
a boy who has something to say, and doesn't quite great pace. "You know Miss Grant said she could give
know how to begin it. me my lessons this winter when cousin Margaret was
"Don't you think it's about time I went to practic- gone. It is Saturday, and I thought may be you'd
ing again ?" like to have me begin my lessons next Monday, you
There it was out now. Rick drew a long breath, know."
Do you wish to know why it was so hard for him to Your lessons, my child ? Don't you know they're
ask this question? This is why: Since Rick came not your lessons any more ?" Aunt Lesbia said it
home that frightful morning of wind, and smoke, and very quietly. Full of amaze, Rick asked, -
horror, which it made him sick to think of, since that Whose lessons are they, then ?"
morning his aunt had never once mentioned to him Paty's."
the subject of the camping out. She had nursed and Paty's ?"
cossetted her sick boy; she had told him stories of "Yes; Miss Grant gives Paty lessons now. She
"old times when she was a child; she had played has practiced at Dr. Grant's house since you have
checkers with him, and cat's-cradle, and guessed rid- been sick."
dles and initials; indeed, she had tried morning, Rick was so astonished that he didn't know just
L








YOUNG RICK.

what to say next. This new plan was -.. ery new, "Yes, 'm ; 0, yes, 'm and to Chicopee, and the
and aunty, though she was quite pleasant, vas yet so Ames Manufacturing Works."
very reserved on the subject. It was growing dark; Now I suppose you would like nothing better
a purple, winter dusk, with a star or two lighting up than to go there, and learn all that is to be learned
here and there. Miss Cranson went on knitting; about machinery and such things."
Rick put back her ball of worsted, took the cat and Such things," with Aunt Lesbia, included a thou-
held her in his arms on her back, with her four cush- sand indefinite items. They are definite enough to
ioned feet sticking up. her nephew, however, who jumps up, puts puss in her
But, aunty," he began presently, I can't quite own green chair, and begins to trot up and down the
see what made you." room.
How old are you, Rick?" "0, if I could go there, aunty ; I wish I could go
Twelve years old, a month ago; and Paty is four- to-morrow," he cries.
teen." "To-morrow is Sunday ;" and aunt Lesbia smiles
"Now listen." Miss Cranson stopped knitting, at her small pleasantry. "Rick, you may, if you live,
and Rick stopped pooring the cat. A boy twelve go to that manufactory some time; but don't be-
years old who dislikes his piano so much that" -a gin to jump up and down yet-you are to go to
little pause- "so much that he runs away from his school and to college first."
home, and from all his friends, in the middle of the "
night, and stays a week away," aunty's voice "Yes; you are old enough to know that a man will
shakes a trifle here, all to get rid of his music- build just as good a steam-engine for knowing Latin
lessons, don't you think such a boy should have some and Greek. You shall be an engineer, or a machinist,
real work given him to do something quite as hard if, when you have finished your education, you still
as practice-hour ?" wish to be one; but you must study books, and learn
"Yes, 'm." lessons, and have what we call an "education," to
"And a girl fourteen years old, who never had a begin with. This is what I have been thinking about;
music-lesson in her whole life, and yet who can this is what I have made up my mind to, and this is
play all the exercises of her friends from memory, and what you may have to expect. That is all, no, not
from real, honest love for music, don't you think quite. One thing more, my dear little boy."
such a girl ought to have a chance to study music ?" Aunt Lesbia's knitting is lying on her knee now.
"Yes,'m." She puts out her two hands and takes Rick's, and
Rick answered meekly. He felt somehow as folds them, palm to palm, close inside her own, looks
though he were a good deal smaller than pussy lying through the dim dusk into the child's face with such
upside down in his arms. love and yearning in her eyes, as she says, -
So Paty is going to have your music-lessons twice Remember that the noble man you wish to be by
a week, and practice on your piano." and by, will only be this same Rick Cranson grown a
"O, I'm so glad. And I'm going to what ? little bigger. Remember that every bad thing you do
"You are to go into Mr. Stacy's tool-shop, and now is hurting that man that is going to be then; and
work half an hour every day." every good thing you do now is making that noble
"0, that will be fun," cried Rick. That tool-shop man a little nobler. Don't do anything you'd be
was anything but a house of bondage to him, and ashamed to have me know. Pray to God, and then
work in it he would not regard as punishment. do the best you can. That is all I can tell you ; but,
"But, my boy, I've one or two things more to say 0, my child,"- she said this with a sudden burst of
to you, and I think you are old enough now to un- feeling, as she drew the boy closer to her, "if I
derstand them." could only give you my life, and the little it has
Kitty began to look smaller to Rick now, or him- taught me, to help you in your own There, Olive
self to seem larger. is coming with the tea-bell."
You remember when I let you go once with Tom And, aunty, I'm I'm awfully sorry I ran away."
Dorrance to Springfield ? Rick whispered this in his aunt's ear, and the next







YOUNG RICK.

instant he cried out, O, here is Paty coming down He assuredly did not intend to injure the feelings
the hill; and who is with her ? of the well, nor 'the old oaken bucket that hung in
It is your doctor, I think, -Dr. Hyde." it,' Mr. Abiel said; and his mother remarked that
The after-glow was not quite gone out; there was a 'they'd had that well cleaned out, many was the
moon up beside the church-vane, and there were time, and they never found any living creatures
plenty of stars. Against the snow it was easy for in it.' "
Miss Lesbia and Rick to distinguish the outlines of Paty had reached this point in her story; the two
the two figures. Paty did not walk like the other were walking slowly toward the deacon's gate, when
Graythorpe girls. She carried her shoulders well back, they were confronted by a third figure. It was a man,
and she stepped out with a movement more free and and he was close upon them before Paty looked up
light. The doctor was tall and powerfully built. He and met the glance of those same wild, haggard eyes.
had a way of striding on with his hands behind him. She did not utter a sound, but she was aware of a
Now he was talking to Paty, looking down into her sudden faint feeling sinking down into her very heart
face, while she was looking down at the snow. and stopping its beating.
0, how about the microscope ? he asked. Why, what is it, Paty ? asked the doctor.
I have looked at ever so many things through it He saw only an ill-dressed fellow cowering in the
at everything nearly," Paty answered brightly. "At snow-path beside them; but he felt the young girl
the leaves of my geranium ; and they were as big as clutch his arm, and crowd closer, as though in fright,
cabbage-leaves. And at our fly -we keep one, you to his side.
know, in the sitting-room all winter. I feed him on It is that man." An instant, and she would have
sugar and it intoxicates him. We call him 'our fly,' told of the appearance at the window of Gran'mamma
because he's different from all the other flies. He is Dunscomb's room. Then she remembered the signal
quite tame." of silence, remembered how the stranger had placed
"You looked at him through the microscope ? and his finger on his lips. So she only said, He came
the doctor has an amused look in his steady gray very close to us; I was frightened."
eyes. I should think you were, why, how you trem-
Yes indeed. I suppose you won't believe it, but ble ;" and the doctor drew Paty's shaking hand under
I think that fly winked at me through the glass. Then his arm. He added, laughing, that she would never
Mr. Abiel Harkaway -he's home now, you know do for the journey across the plains to California, if
got the glass, and he made such very wonderful re- she was so easily frightened ; though that was rather
marks about it. And at the tea-table he said this, a rough-looking customer;" and Dr. Hyde turned and
he took up his glass of water, you know, and squinted glanced back at the stranger.
through it, and said," To his surprise, the man had stopped, and was
(Paty put on the manner of Mr. Abiel Hark- watching them. They were still near enough to him
away here.) to hear muttered words.
I apprehend that there are millions of small, in- I never saw the fellow before. Wonder where he
finitely small and minute creatures in every drop of has started up from ? Here we are at your gate.
water we drink.' Good night. Don't dream of our new acquaintance
"' 0, dear me !' I screamed out, as though I was there ;" pointing over his shoulder at the slouching
scared to death, you know. 'I don't want to drink figure going out of sight up the still, moon-lighted
little beasts;' and Deacon Harkaway looked at Mr. street. He was the only moving object to be seen
Abiel ten times more solemn than usual, and he along the snow. The two at Mrs. Harkaway's door
said, watched the figure a moment, and then Dr. Hyde said
"' My son, if your college eddication hasn't taught cheerily, -
you nothing better than to abuse the water of the "By the by, Paty, about that microscope. The
well that your great-gran'father Meader dug in the next time we have a flurry of snow, just catch a few
year o' grace seventeen hundred an' fifty, then you flakes on your black silk apron, and give them the
better a' ben set to hoein' potatoes.' benefit of the magnifier. You draw, don't you? "







YOUNG RICK.

"A little. Miss Margaret has taught me."
"Yes. If you are quick with your pencil, suppose CHAPTER X.
you get the outlines of the snow-flakes; you've no SEVERAL EXPERIENCES.
notion how exquisite they are. Good night."
The doctor went off humming a tune to himself, an I NEVER did see such a change in any girl as
old tune which he had sung when he was a boy. He there's been in Paty Rhea since Miss Marg'ret took
remembered a certain bright parlor in Philadelphia her in hand." It was Miss Charity Giles that said
where he first sang the air to the accompaniment of a this. Now Paty always was smart enough. You'd
young girl's playing. Something, he could scarcely know that any time to see her eyes. But Marg'ret
have told what, but something about Paty reminded she's smoothed her off somehow; got some o' the
him of those old days. What was it? That little crinkles out of her as you m' say. An' now she's
trick of gesturing with the hands as she talked? or goin' to New York, I don't suppose we sh'll any of us
was it the loose wave of her fair hair? Stop and know her when she gets back."
Dr. Hyde did stop in the middle of a line, and in the Yes," said Miss Cranson, I think we shall all
middle of the snow-path. know Paty again; but I dare say she will come back
"RheaRhea Rea ?" he said to himself. Strange much improved. Education tells on Paty, and,
I never thought before of its being the same name. besides, it must be a very dull person who isn't
Though this is Ray, probably;" and he started on sweeter, and gentler, and higher up every way for
again. But there was a strange, preoccupied ex- knowing Margaret."
pression in his face, and once he said half aloud, There's where you're right, Lesbia ;" and Miss
"Why, that was sixteen years ago. Poor girl! I Charity stuck her knitting-needle into her belt with a
wonder what ever became of her. What fools we all determined expression about her lips. And Mrs.
are. Ah, excuse me, I nearly knocked you over, I Clancey, she's taken a deal o' pains with Paty. An'
believe." now she's agoin' to have her 'long o' herself in the
He had been nearly knocked over himself, and that city of New York "
by the same shabby, bearded man. Once the stranger That journey to New York! it meant much to all
had gone forward, and doubled on his track that Graythorpe, most of all to Paty herself. She would
he might meet Paty. Now, a second time, he had see those wonderful things, and hear those distin-
turned, and gone around a square in such a way as to guished people preach, and lecture, and sing, and
come in contact again with Dr. Hyde. His back perhaps--Paty always ended with this perhaps--she
was to the moon, which shone full in the doctor's should find some of her own mother's people there.
face. In the highest house, with the finest carriage, and the
I don't 'like your looks' exactly, as these Gray- greatest number of horses, and of servants, this was
thorpe people say," thought Dr. Hyde. That is how she pictured it all to herself. Not that Paty was
rather too long a stare for an ordinary street civility;" vain, -vainer than you and I am, I mean, but she
and he walked on. had a good, strong imagination. It is as easy to
The stranger went as far as the trunk of the near- imagine a palace as a cottage, we all know, and it is
est maple, stepped behind it, and watched the young so much more interesting.
doctor's broad shoulders go out of sight watched As to Paty and the improvement in her, I must
them with a glitter in his eyes. His right hand, too, stop here to put in a word or two. I'm afraid you will
came up in the clenched shape of a fist as he mut- think I wish to persuade you that our little faulty, fiery
tered, poor-house child had been made over into a piece
Ha, you don't remember your old acquaintances, of perfection, and that isn't true at all. She was far
it appears, you Jack Hyde. Fifteen years do change enough from being a saint yet; her frailties troubled
a man, that's a fact. But my memory 's good yet; yes, Mrs. Harkaway a little, and Paty a great deal. She
my memory's good;" and with a chuckle he went still sulked rainy days, and scowled when a bureau-
skulking down a back street, and slipped stealthily in drawer opened askew," and refused to shut. She
at the open door of a barn. said Well-there in one sharp word, when her








YOUNG RICK.

"sums wouldn't come right." And she did, and said "0, can I? It's so long since I've been to church.
several other wrong things, the which you each one Aunty, kitty is in such a hurry for her breakfast "
of you, my dear-but-not-perfect young persons, may Yes, here it is. Spread her napkin on the
fancy for yourselves, carpet."
But this she had learned or Miss Margaret: When I don't know but other cats have had their own
she was very angry, to stop and count ten; when she napkins and napkin-rings, and their own service of
knew she had done wrong, to say I'm sorry," and dishes, a milk-cup, and a meat-saucer, and an oat-
say it not like a martyr; when she prayed to God, to meal-saucer, but if they have, I haven't been
ask Him for what she honestly wanted, to confess acquainted with those pussies.
what she really was sorry for, and not to use a multi- Rick spread the napkin on the carpet by his aunt's
tude of words which meant little or nothing to her. chair. Kitty rounded her back, curled her tail, stood
Besides these there were a thousand little things tiptoe, and rubbed her sides the while. Then Rick
about life and living. Miss Margaret had a different set down the three dishes, meat, oatmeal, and
idea from Graythorpe people concerning these, be- warmed milk, and as he jumped up, glanced out the
cause her associations had been among another sort window toward Mrs. Harkaway's, saying, -
of people. It was from her that Paty learned the "0, there's Paty feeding her chickens Aren't
special uses of a knife and a fork; concerning a collar those little bantams cunning ?"
and no collar, cuffs and no cuffs; brushing hair fifty "Yes ; and how bright Paty's scarlet sacque looks
strokes on either side before she went to bed at against the snow for the early sun was pouring a
night; that a bath meant water from head to foot; whole flood of glory down into the Graythorpe valleys,
that ain't and ain't, and in' for ing, and commence for and against the slopes of the Graythorpe hills.
begin, and a hundred long words instead of fifty short Aunty, look there," Rick cried out. Why, who
ones, -that these and many other matters were worth is that man ?" Miss Lesbia looked up the road and
a girl's remembering. Paty's memory was good, and down. No, not there. Up at the barn-window
it was the practice of all these small rules which were above the hay-mow. There, he's gone back now.
making her, as Tom Dorrance said, a regular little Did you see ?"
lady." More than this, she had been faithful at "I think there was some one there," answered
school, and was already, Doctor Grant said, "a Aunt Lesbia cautiously.
better scholar in history than half the graduates." She had actually seen, for one instant only, a
This was Paty that winter, after she was fourteen strange, wild face -just a glimpse, and it had been
years old, and when she was to go to New York. She gone.
spent a great deal of time in wondering what New Possibly," she added, Deacon Harkaway has
York was like. It was on a very high hill, she sup- hired a new man."
posed, because the Bible spoke of the city set upon See, Paty has gone in there. She has dropped
a hill." I think Paty had never been happier in her her chickens' dish right in the path. Why, I wonder
life than she was that Saturday afternoon when she who it can be ? "
went up to the poor-house. She remembered that "Never mind, dear. Come back to your breakfast.
day always. It was a kind of landmark between two Whoever it is, remember our neighbors' affairs don't
very different lives. You will see presently what I concern us."
mean. This was one of the pieces of wisdom with which'
How bright it was in Miss Cranson's breakfast- Miss Cranson fed her nephew occasionally. This
room next morning! Miss Lesbia had on her black time, however, though he came to his seat at the
silk dress so plain, but so nice, as was proper for her table, he contrived to peer over his shoulder now and
years and standing. She always dressed for church then; but it was not until he had put up his napkin,
before breakfast, and afternoons studied her own Sun- and was getting the Bible for prayers, that he saw
day-school lesson and Rick's. Paty come out of the barn. Little fellow that he was,
It is so warm and bright, I think you can go to he was quick to see changes in faces that he knew.
church with me half a day," she said. He noticed now that Paty was pale, and walked








YOUNG RICK.

slowly. He wondered who that strange man could And yet through all these times, Paty, going ,to
be. He would ask Paty the next time he saw her, school, and coming home, up in Gran'mamma Duns-
he thought; but when Mrs. Harkaway came in her comb's quiet room, and down on the playground with
sleigh to take Aunt Lesbia and himself to church, her mates, by daylight and night-dark, was carrying
when he noticed how tightly Paty held her books on her shoulders a burden very heavy and grievous
between her gloved hands, and how there was some- to be carried. And the hardest of it all was, that
thing in her white face that he had never seen there it was a trouble which she was forbidden to tell to
before, and such a look of trouble in her brown eyes, any one., She must bear it, and bear it all alone.
something told him not to ask any questions. And
from that day to the end of this story he obeyed that
something. CHAPTER XI.
Poor Paty! She looked, and spoke, and moved as GRAYTHORPE "MANIFESTATIONS."
though some of the life had gone out of her. Dr.
Hyde noted it as she came in and walked to her seat THERE was a great noise all through the country
in church. When they all stood up, and turned just at this time. The papers brought the news to
round in the last singing, -that was the fashion then Graythorpe, and a certain subject was talked over at
in all country churches, the doctor saw Paty's face the hotel, the corner-store, the post-office, and in
turn suddenly whiter than before, and an expression every private house. You boys and girls won't re-
of horror came into the eyes which seemed to freeze member about it; all your fathers and mothers will.
themselves upon some object down under the gal- It was the Rochester knockings"
leries. Dr. Hyde looked and saw there, what ? Simply Miss Lesbia didn't wish Rick to know anything of
the same crouching figure, wrapped in an old cloak, it, so she burned the newspaper. Rick had brought
of the man whom they had met in their walk last that paper from the post-office.
evening. "Well, what is it, anyhow ? "
I'll get to the bottom of that," he said to himself. Fred Tozer asked this question. It was noon-
"I won't have him frightening that child." ing" at school, and the boys were out under the
The truth was that Paty, in her new trouble, what- wood-house making a bob-sled intended to carry ten.
ever it was, reminded the young physician more and Yes, Rick, you tell, while Fred and I get this join-
more of the girl-friend dead so many years before, ing-board square. That is, if you know."
The instant the benediction was pronounced, Dr. Well, I read what the paper said about it, but
Hyde was down the aisle and out of church, but the I'm sure I don't see why all the grown-ups are making
stranger was gone. None had seen him go, and, such a hullabaloo."
save two or three, no person had taken note of him Let's have it any way," said Sawny.
at all. "Why, it was only that some people out in Roches-
That week Miss Margaret received a strange, sad ter, Rochester in New York, you know."
little letter from Paty. It said, I am so sorry, but Bless you, yes. Let alone the geography, and go
I cannot go to New York now. I wish I could tell ahead ;" from Fred.
you why. Perhaps some time I can, but not now." These people their name is Fox -have got up
There were a few lines more, and the note ended, the queerest sort of goings-on--rapping on tables,
It was from Mrs. Clancey's lovingest little girl and tipping tables, and floating lights round a dark
Paty;" and that was all. room, and all such things-"
Miss Margaret wrote to ask Miss Lesbia if any "Goodness me! what of that?" and Fred paused
trouble had come upon Paty Rhea. Was she ill, or with uplifted hammer. Can't any fool rap on a
had any one objected to her journey to New York ? table, or carry a candle round, or-"
No, the answer said. Paty seemed very quiet of late. "Yes; but you see this is all done without any-
Miss Lesbia did not even know that the visit to New body's hands touching 'em, just as if this bob-sled
York had been given up. She thought nothing was should get up and walk out into the road, and go off
amiss with the girl. down hill with no fellow near "








YOUNG RICK.

Strikes me that would be rather convenient, if it and Fred ran to avoid anything heavier than quar-
would only steer straight. But wouldd be sort o' ters that might fly his way.
queerish, wouldn't it? I know what they wanted," he said to the others
Fred remarked this in a meditative way, and Sawny as he came back to the bob-sled. They do say 't a
observed that he supposed there was where the fellow got out, the other day, run away from the
" spiritual part came in. Some folks, he had heard, county-house over here in Dunfield, an' they do say
believed that it was spirits that moved the tables, another thing too."
and all. What ? "
"Well, I don't believe it," up spoke Rick. "I don't They say 't there's a wild man up in the woods on
believe in ghosts anyhow, and if there were any, they East Hill."
wouldn't be up to any such awful nonsense as tum- "I saw handcuffs in the sleigh," said Sawny.
bling an old table round." "Well, they may find 'im. That 'ere 's their busi-
Could make a better ghost than that myself," ness, an' I dunno 's I feel called on to help 'em."
remarked Fred Tozer. "Who's coming there?" Fred Tozpr was very quiet for him that afternoon,
Two men in a long sleigh drew rein in the road he seemed to have something on his mind. The
close by the wood-house, and one asked,- teacher -not Miss Margaret, but a very young man,
Have you seen a man go by here, walking, within member of a freshman class somewhere wished the
an hour ? boy might always have something on his mind. It
Fred, the largest of the three boys, stood nearest was just so much off his own.
the road. He took off his old cap, and looked very "Come here you two fellows, Sawny and Rick, I
solemn as he dug in to the roots of his thick hair, mean," Fred called the instant school was out. I've,
as though for some half-lost memory, got the jolliest plan now."
A man ? The bob-sled ? "
Yes, a man in an old coat. Come, shake up your "Bob-sled! Bob-sled's nowhere. You come along,,
wits a little," said the larger of the two strangers. and I'll tell you;" and off went the trio.
Both were brawny, huge-fisted fellows. It was a week later than this when it began to be
"A man in an old coat? Bless me, yes, I remem- whispered mysteriously through the village that "the
ber and he had a beard, and his boots had been spirits had come to Graythorpe, and had taken up
patched considerable." their quarters, of all places in the world, at the old
That's him, Bill," said the second man. Cranson house. What did they do ? O, fifty things.
Limped a little on the left foot, though he might They went rap, rap, rapping in the wall. Rats," an-
a' come some ways." swered the skeptic. Then they went tap, tap, tapping
Fred said this with vivacity. He wanted to help straight across the ceiling over your head. Exactly;.
very much, you would have thought. that was a way they had, these rats." Well, then,
"All right; you're the chap for us. Now tell they rang bells, house-bells and door-bells; and they
us which road he went on, and we'll give you a floated round like little lamps all through the air, and
quarter." over Miss Lesbia's bed, and round in front of Lady
My mother wouldn't allow me to take money," Cranson's portrait; and they slammed doors O, no
Fred remarked virtuously. Keep it, and give it to person knew who hadn't heard, or could have the re-
the heathen, which I ain't. But the road? Do you motest idea of how these spirits could slam doors,
see that guide-post down there ? He turned off to half a dozen at once, and with noise enough to break
the left, up toward that barn." yourbones; and once-most frightful of all-a Some-
The man said thank you," and Fred said not at thing in white, looking like Rick, had glided once and
all and they started to drive on. The boy allowed again through Miss Lesbia's room, all in trailing gar-
them to go about ten rods, and then called out, ments, you know, and it was enough to make your
"Hullo, you Mister, I 'most forgot to tell ye 't the blood run cold.
man was driving' sheep, and he went to that barn. And where was Rick at the time ?" inquires the
The man's name is Harkaway, Deacon Harkaway;" unbeliever, who is Tom Dorrance.







YOUNG RICK.

"O, he was in bed, and asleep. His aunt had Well, the doors went on slamming, and the bells
locked him into his room, and kept the key with her went on ringing, and the clock took to untimely strik-
purse under her pillow. No one, under penalty of ing, and the lights still floated in front of Lady Cran-
Miss Lesbia's wrath, was to hint at the matter in son's portrait, and the whole village became aroused.
Rick's presence." There were stories of a wild horse carrying two ghosts
"You'll be sure, Tom,"- Mrs. Tozer it was who which went flying through the air from Graythorpe
added this, not to mention it to him." down toward the Iron Mills. There were other re-
"0, no; I'll be as dumb as possible ;" and going off, ports of a strange man, who stood on the top of
Tom remarked quietly to his beard, "Bless you, no. East Hill, and stretched out his arms at midnight
Let 'em work. I won't be the one to meddle with the over the town. Many persons thought the end of the
little chaps." world was near. Nearly every one believed that Miss

-:-"---- -















those who disbelieved entirely, Dr. Grant was quoted the selectmen of the town convened on the matter---=----
T"l' i, I!, i II' '-", II




Sb g t e we D G D H D




















son's is at present. I can only say I do not know said the good woman. "She does the strangest
what it means." thins. She doesn't et anythi but she hs be ed
I','i I, -'I'i ,'' I IIi Ii .


















"THERE NVAS A CRASH FROM ABOVE r "-i Pge 3013.





where those two good men, John and Charles Wesley for an hour or two, and to witness these marvels.
were brought up, the house presided over by their Among these were Dr. Grant, Dr. Hyde, Deacon and
father a worthy clergyman of the established church, Mrs. Harkaway, and others. Paty came, not because
womeii the world ever saw, -that this house was for sister.


'what it means," thins. She doesn't et a hin bt she s e-e











what it means." thin-s. She doesn't eat ann,'thin 5 but she has be-rred







YOUNG RICK.

loaves of bread of me lately, and couldn't tell what body after her, not least nor last, her son. Only Dr.
she wanted of them." Hyde and Tom stayed behind. Tom stepped out-
That reminds me," Miss Lesbia said, there was side, felt the bell-knob carefully over with his hands,
a wretched-looking little woman begging food at our said, Well, I declare, there she goes again !" then
kitchen-door three nights ago. She wore a slouched bending down and looking very closely, he laughed
old hood, and she wouldn't come in. After she had out, A string !"
gone with her basket full, Rick said he knew it was There it was tied neatly to the stem of the knob,
Paty knew her by some scar on her hand. I won- a stout twine cord. Tom cut it and began to wind,
der if it could have been." and kept on winding until he had a large ball of that
"Perhaps so; I'm going to have a serious talk with same twine in his pocket. Then he and the doctor
her to-morrow. Whatever it is, I don't believe it's went back up stairs, and took their places once more.
anything the poor child can help." At that moment another phenomenon occurred out-
Dr. Hyde could have told more than this. He had side. A boy crept from behind a wood-pile across
been riding slowly home over the new snow that even- the street, made a flank movement round to the back
ing, and had come suddenly on two figures by the of Miss Cranson's- house, and disappeared. That
roadside. The light gleamed out from a kitchen- boy had lost a ball of twine.
window, and showed a woman and a man. The Then there was slamming of doors, then there were
former was giving something to the latter, and he rappings above and tappings below. Abiel undertook
heard her say in a voice as of one pleading, to translate the rappings which were distinctly heard
"There, there it is. Go away now, please." on the stove-pipe. This pipe went from the stove up
The man went, the other sank down in a tempest through the ceiling, and entered the chimney in the
of sobs on the snow. The hood slid back, and in attic above.
the ray of light Dr. Hyde saw who the poor child "Well, Abiel, what is it ? inquired Dr. Hyde.
was. Spirits object to the presence of two persons in
Paty," he said gently, not to frighten her. And this room," answered Abiel.
then, without another word, he lifted her up, set her Dr. Grant and myself, probably," remarked Dea-
on his horse, and led the creature to Deacon Harka- con Harkaway, with solemnity.
way's door. There in silence he set Paty down. No. The two are Dr. Hyde and Thomas Dor-
Just fancy all those friends of ours, and of Miss rance," answered Abiel.
Lesbia's, sitting round her room that winter evening. These two remained, however. There came a long
Rick was there by special favor of his aunt, advised silence; then some one proposed a committee to
by Dr. Grant. search the attic. I've done it four times," Miss
"You will hear nothing until the lights are out," Lesbia said; and that instant a voice whispered,-
said Miss Lesbia. Look The light? "
So she carried a lamp into the closet, and shut it There it was, floating gracefully overhead, a soft,
up there. Just then the bell of the front door rang bright light. It was of a spherical form, the'size of a
very loud. man's head, and it seemed to waver as it went. It
Ah, our friends have not all arrived," remarked paused before the portrait of Lady Cranson, and
the minister blandly. lighted up the lace on the sleeves, the puffs of dark
0, that," said Abiel Harkaway, with a scientific hair.
air, "that is one of the phenomena It always stops there," spoke Miss Cranson, in a
As they had come to examine into the phenomena, low tone.
now was the time to begin. Miss Lesbia produced a "A phenomenon truly," whispered another voice,
candle, and all went down stairs. They opened the and then the globe of light passed gently on again,
front door, peered into the outer dark, saw no one, and seemed to fade away before their eyes. That
but behold, that bell bewitched was "ringing away I instant, before any one could draw breath, there rang
before their face and eyes," as Mrs. Harkaway out from overhead a wild shriek. Again and again,
said, adding, "she would have no more to do with voices with the very extremity of terror in their tones;
such iniquity." Up stairs she went, and nearly every- a sound of rushing feet, and then all these things








"YOUNG RICK."

seemed to happen -did happen at once. Miss Hyde, let me alone I haven't hurt you," mut-
Lesbia brought a light; Mrs. Harkaway jumped up tered the man.
into her chair; Dr. Hyde whispered Paty not to be "0 father cried Paty, as though in agony.
afraid; there was a crash from above, and a boy's Ned Rhea!" exclaimed Dr. Hyde amazed, and
foot came through the ceiling; Abiel emerged from loosened his hold. Come with me."
the closet where he had hidden from the last "phe- The two walked away down stairs. "Remember,
nomenon;" and then there was a great commotion my office at ten to-morrow morning," were the doctor's
on the attic stairs. words as he shut the door on the stranger, and went
Down they came: Sawny Austin ahead, Al Stacy back again. He reached Miss Cranson's door just
and Fred Tozer nearly tumbling over him, and, leap- in season to hear Tom say sternly to the boys, -
ing on behind them, a man in a horrible mask "Now, you young whelps, you don't go out of this
Hold on here, you!" cried the doctor, and he house till you've owned up the whole thing."
seized this last figure, and tore the mask off.






S..... T {-7-,.--






A SUNFLOWER.

BY E. B.

I MET just the very sweetest of girls, "Sunflower, indeed little maiden," said I,
With a sunny face, hung round with soft curls, Why, you can't even look the sun in the eye!
Peeping from under a yellow straw hat, Or, what is still less, stare at a passer-by !
With a crown so low and a brim so flat. See here; I'll pull you up, roots and all,
And plant you close to my garden wall.
Said I, Little maiden, who may you be ? You're a rose, or a pink but as I said that,
Then a pair of blue eyes looked up to me, Away flew the maid with the br6ad-brimmed hat;
While she stood in clover up to her knee ; And then I saw, in a moment more,
With a voice as sweet as a bird's, said she, The golden curls of this bright sunflower,
Why I am a Sunflower didn't you know ? Peeping at me, just over the wall,
You see I've come out in the field to grow Blue eyes, cherry lips, plump cheeks and alL








YOUNG RICK.




YOUNG RICK.
PART II.

BY JULIA A. EASTMAN,
AUTHOR OF THE $1000 PRIZE STORV, "STRIKING FOR THE RIGHT."


CHAPTER XII. wound up down at the front door, saying "he sup-
posed it belonged to him."
HOW THEY DID IT." Strings slammed doors, and strings rung door-
bells, and strings banged cat-holes."
" TOW then, Fred Tozer," said Tom, and he Did I tell you ? All the valves of all the cat-holes
I said it sternly too, you're the oldest, and had danced like so many jerking-jacks, or as though
you 're at the bottom of this mischief. Begin." seventy generations of Cranson cats had come back
There was light enough in the room now. Every- to "join the dreadful revelry."
body was tired of "dark s6ances." The minister, and "The phenomena of the raps ? spoke Abiel, in
the deacon, the deacon's son, and several ladies, were the spirit of inquiry.
seated round the chamber.- Mrs. Harkaway whis- Thumped with the rubber head of my pencil on
pered to Miss Lesbia, Did you hear that ? Paty the stove-pipe in the attic," said Sawny.
called that horrible creature father." Then they And we made 'em read just like those Foxes out
both looked toward Paty, who was sitting on a low in Rochester, you know."
chair in the corner, with her white face turned into Foxes out in Rochester !" groaned Aunt Lesbia.
the shadow. Her nephew had spoken. "Rick, where were you
Yes, Frederick Tozer," came from Deacon Hark- when the clock struck twelve, last Wednesday
away's bass voice, "we are listening. We desire to night?"
know how you did it." I was walking round your room, aunty, with my
Fred's straight red hair was slowly settling from counterpane on. Did you see me ? "
the uprightness of terror, and he stooped to brush Miss Cranson rose up in hbr place. She took a
something white off the left leg of his trousers, lamp, and led the way to Rick's room.
Plaster it was, and whitewash, the same making it Go in," she said to him, and as he went she
evident to the most careless observer that it had been locked the door on the hall side. "Now please to
Fred's boot which had crushed through the ceiling get out as you did last Wednesday night."
overhead. But as yet the boy had not found his Directly there was a sound of something being
tongue. Doctor Hyde broke out, taken up and laid down on the carpet. Next a jump,
"Tell us what you meant by raising such a hulla- a lighting on the floor of the room below Rick's, and
baloo, and frightening half Graythorpe out of their then a jolly little figure in a white counterpane came
wits." rushing up the front stairs. Aunt Lesbia unlocked
"We meant fun," upspoke Sawny. "We'd no the door, and walked into the room.
notion of frightening anybody." I didn't know that ventilator would come out,"
And we did it," added Fred, well we did she said, touching with her foot a grate which lay on
the biggest part of it with strings." the floor.
Here Fred brought out of his pocket a ball of "Here are the screws, aunty. I saved 'em all in
twine and a spool of thread. Every other boy did my wash-stand drawer. We'll screw them in again,
the same, save Sawny, who had no ball. Tom Dor- and then it won't come out any more."
rance thereupon handed him the one which he had The "ventilator" was merely an opening cut in the







YOUNG RICK.

ceiling of the dining-room to let the hot air pass up There was a big, hearty laugh here. It came from
to Rick's bedroom. No one ever dreamed that the dear old Doctor Grant, whose eyes had been twink-
boy himself could pass down that way. ling ominously for the last half hour. As the minis-
The boys were well over their fright by this time. ter had set the example, the rest all followed, even to
The "committee of investigation" were taken through Abiel, who seldom laughed, because he never saw
the house, and everything was explained, and all its any joke anywhere, or in anything.
workings. We fixed most of it while aunty was gone As for their fright, all the boys could tell was, that
to mothers' meeting," Rick said. just as they had finished their light phenomenon,"
(I am not sure that I have told you that Miss they had seen close to them, in the dark of the attic, a
Cranson always attended mothers' meeting." She hideous, grinning face, with tongue of fire and glaring
felt that she needed whatever light was to be gained eyes. They had fled in haste. The creature had
on the subject of bringing up children.) pursued them, and they knew no more about it.
Now then," said Tom, there are two things Here it is," Doctor Hyde said, and brought out a
more that I want to know about. I want to know mask. It was daubed with phosphorus, and it must
Show you did your lighting up, and I want to know have been frightful up there in the dark."
about your scare." But who was it ? What did he want ?" spoke
Sawny and I did that light part," cried Rick. Miss Cranson.
"You look here." "I know who!" cried Fred. It was that old
A string was pulled, and down through the venti- 'luny' who has been hanging round here for the last
lator in the ceiling came a small balloon-like object month. He got out o' the X- county-house, 'n'
which the boy held in his hands, he'd a' ben back there if 't had a been for us fel-
"Whew !" whistled Tom. "A bladder." lers. I'll git 'im back there now, tho'. Good enough
Rick opened the mouth of the bladder, and took for him, scaring a lot o' youngsters this way."
out a small vial, half full of oil. I know about the man," the doctor said, quietly.
"There, do you see that ? That's sweet oil, you He saw Paty getting whiter every instant. The poor
know; and that little dark bit in there, just as big as a child was in agony. I will see that he is taken
pea, that's phosphorus. Now look !" care of to-morrow. He is, as Fred says, insane, and
He stepped out into the dark hall, uncorked the oughtn't to be at large."
bottle an instant, then corked it again, and held it up. The early train coming into Graythorpe in the
It seemed full of a oft, golden flame, and it gave wintry dimness of the next morning, turning a sharp
out a gentle light. Such pocket-lamps may be found, curve, ran against the prostrate body of a man. He
to-day, in the hands of every officer of the Paris night- had been lying close to the track, and though not run
police. "It would show better if it was darker," Rick over, he was thrown some distance by the cow-
said. "It burns till it has burned up the air in the catcher. They stopped the engine, and went back
vial, and then you can let in more air and get more for him. They found what had been the mysterious.
light." stranger, what had been Paty Rhea's father.
"We are getting' light all round," said Tom, laugh- They made a grave in the snow and the frozen
ing. I suppose you put that bottle into your blad- earth of the old churchyard, close beside that other
der." grave which Paty knew, the grave made in the snow
"Yes, we did," answered Fred; 'n' then we blew fourteen years before ; they covered it well, and Paty
her up, and fastened on a lot o' threads. 0, we had went home really, as she had always been practically,
a sight o' trouble gittin' those threads to work; 'n' an orphan. Doctor Hyde came in the evening after
then Al Stacy he stood out on the roof o' the the funeral, and he had a long story to tell.
piazza, 'n' pulled one string through the window ;-- He had known Paty's father years before, in Phila-
we opened the window an inch at the top, 'n' Jim delphia, known him as a rising young artist, without
pulled through the two-doored closet in t'other relatives, but with many friends.
corner, 'n Rick he had a string, 'n' so we made the It was the usual story. He loved a young girl,
thing go round." her parents objected to the match, they were married







YOUNG RICK.

secretly, and disappeared. She must have died the world owes a living to anybody, it's to old folks,
within the year." The doctor was silent a moment, that have earned it. Folks that can work 'd ought 'o
"Until I saw him in Graythorpe, I supposed your work. As for old women 'n' little child'n, I ain't
father to be dead. You, Paty," and he looked down agoin' to stan' by 'n' see 'm abused-not while I know
into the girl's large, tear-shadowed eyes, are like it! There's my old house down 't the end o' the
your mother at your age. I will tell you more about street, it's big, an' it's convenient. You may bring
her some day." And Doctor Hyde went away with- on your ole women, Marg'ret. I'll stay there:'n' help
out another word, take care of 'em."
Paty told Mrs. Harkaway then of her troubles "I don't know how much we can pay you," said
these last weeks. Miss Margaret.
My father said he had been cruelly confined, and Pay I don't wan' no pay, bless ye If I c'n
treated unjustly and harshly; that no one must just have my keep. I've got fifty dollars a year
know where he was, and if I could help him keep his interest money, 'n' that'll buy me my clo'es, 'n' leave a
secret for a little while, he should then be able to margin to give to the missionaries besides."
take me to his friends, and do a great deal for me. I "Very well ;" and Miss Margaret and Charity
mustn't even tell you." both looked as happy as though they had come into a
"And that was the reason you wished for the bread fortune, instead of being about to go out of one.
and the meat-that you starved yourself almost? you "Then it is only a question of money to feed the
poor Paty women, and to furnish a few rooms. Your rooms are
Poor papa said Paty, crying, I was so sorry so bright The sun always seems to shine east and
for him." west at once in them."
This was how Paty and Daisy Austin, and Nan
Tozer, and all the girls in school, and all the young
CHAPTER XIII,
Ladies in Graythorpe, now started sewing, and knit-
THE MENAGERIE. tinrg and crocheting, drawing, painting, and making
wax flowers and feather flowers, and fifty things
TOM DORRANCE was in the secret. After the busi- besides, for the Fair for the Home.
ness of the spiritual manifestations," it had been "What can we boys do ? Tom, I say you might
agreed between the elders, and the younger, in all think up something," Rick burst out, one day early in
good faith, and good temper on either side, that, here- June.
after, every plan "for fun" should have one grown-up "Well,"- and Tom took off his cap, and tumbled
confidant. Half a dozen adults were mentioned as. his thick hair, if I was a boy- if I was half a
candidates, but as the boys liked Tom, he was dozen boys, all I've got to say is, wouldd go hard
usually selected. Accordingly, he was in this secret, with me if I didn't put my half dozen heads together,
It was all about the Graythorpe Home, and this and hatch up something 'r other."
was a plan of Miss Margaret's. It was for old Rick was out in front of the church, and he was
women who had no homes. There was Phebe Mc- sitting on Sawny Austin's pony. His face was
Creery who had been found in a wretched corner of toward the animal's tail, and he was looking very
New York, dying for lack of good, pure country air. seriously in the direction of the horse-sheds which
There was Gran'ma Dunscomb, who was miserable stood in a long row, just across the common. Tom
under a new and unpleasant matron at the poor- was cutting the early grass on the green.
house. There was the rheumatic old woman, whose "Tom !" shrieked Rick, suddenly, I've got it.
wood the boys had cut during the winter, but who We'll have a -I'll tell you in a minute;" and he
was now helpless in bed; and there were several came down with a neat somerset from the pony's
others, back. "0, won't that be fun? We'll get up a
The idea of the Home started with Miss Margaret, m- "
and went on with Charity Giles. I'll tell presently. Tom stopped mowing, and
"You see, it's my opinion," Charity said, that if listened, with his elbow leaning on the pony's back.








YOUNG RICK.

The pony tossed the fresh hay with his nose; there The Fourth was a fair day, and every boy in
was a smell of clover in the air, honey-bees were town was up before the sun. The procession moved
sailing about, and Fred Tozer happened along. So, at eight o'clock from Miss Cranson's barn. It was
between Tom, and Fred, and Rick, it was all arranged. led by the band, ten pieces, among which were one
If you had lived in Graythorpe in those days (I conch shell, one accordeon, and two jews-harps.
wish you had), you would have been aware of three Rick came next, riding the famous performing zebra
things, to wit: much private talk among the boys, a Angelica." The gorilla, with a huge club, stalked
carrying of mysterious parcels along back streets, and "grim and terrible at Angelica's tail, and a large
much hard wear of paths leading to Miss Cranson's collection of odd creatures came crowding after. At
barn. If you or I had tried to get into that barn, we nine o'clock, those of the public who were there to
should have found all doors barred and guarded on see, beheld a strange spectacle. The long horse-
the inside. Standing without, we should have heard shed of Graythorpe meeting-house, i. e. the grand
only a chorus of boy voices, and, most likely, a laugh, pavilion," was filled from end to end with the most
Tom Dorrance went in there one day by invitation, marvelous-looking creatures. In each section there
By and by he came out, bringing a roll of foolscap was one, or more than one, and their names were
paper, closely written, in his hand. placarded on boards at the entrance. A gigantic/
0, the editor, Sammis, is one of my boys," he figure strode up and down, and spoke now and then'
said. I'll make him print it for you gratis." to the boys who were running to and fro. "The
The Graythorpe Eagle, the next week, contained a great American giant," this was. (Tom Dorrance, of
new and extraordinary advertisement. I will copy it course, in high heels and military dress, wearing a
for you in common letters, and you can fancy how it tall silk hat, and a plume rising a foot above the top
would look printed in staring capitals, headed and of its crown.)
footed with whole processions of exclamation points. "Better begin, Rick," whispered the giant. "No
great of an audience yet, but they'll keep on coming.
GRAND EXHIBITION. Now then, mind you speak up loud."
"Will be shown in the Great Pavilion, on the Rick sprang out from the curtained horse-shed,
Common at Graythorpe, Mass., U. S., on the Fourth stepped to the top of a little knoll where he could be
of July proximo, between the hours of nine A. M. and seen by all, and made a low bow.
seven P. M., the most remarkable collection of Wild "Gentleman and ladies, I mean, ladies and gen-
Beasts ever brought together on the Western Conti-
nent! These creatures have been captured in all the tleman,-good morning. This exhibition is now
habitable and unhabitable parts of the earth. They about to begin.-Pluto? in a low voice, "the Capra
are maintained at a frightful expense, by private 7aala."
benevolence, for the good of the public. The public A well-grown negro (Al Stacy, disguised by a wool
is, therefore, strongly advised to come and see them, wig and several coats'of burnt cork) led out an
and to bring its wife and children. an
Although the beasts are natives, many of them anmal.
of pagan countries, the show is a 'moral' one "Biddy Flannigan's nanny-goat," whispered Char-
throughout. Proceeds to be given to the Graythorpe ity Giles from her seat in front. Rick, wand in hand,
Home for Aged Women. with a face of great seriousness, went on.
N. B. The public is requested to arrive by the This, my friends, is the Capra Jaala, or Jaal-
east gate, corner of Dea. Harkaway's meadow lot. goat. It is found in eastern countries, such.as Egypt
"Admission fifteen cents. Old people, and babies I
free -(the former because of the good they have and Abyssinia. This one was captured on the top-
done, the latter because of the bad they haven't-)" most crag of the Mountains of the Moon. The first
one of the species was owned by Heber the Kenite,
The last sentence in parentheses was annexed by and named by him for his wife Jaal. The "capra "
the editor. His beneficence also took the form of is from caper, a suitable name, as you shall see.
sundry woodcuts, scattered here and there down the Pluto ?"
column. Each one of these pictures seemed a design Pluto came forward with a small switch. The
from the interior of Noah's ark. Capra 7aala was tickled therewith, and after per-







YOUNG RICK.

forming a short dance, was allowed to caper off to his to which the boys had helped themselves) "the koo-
quarters. doo is from a distance. It is found chiefly in South
"The next animal shown will be a rare creature, Africa. The climate is so hot that it crisps up the
known as the Strepsiceros Kudu, or koodoo." hair of human beings, and also curls the horns of the
"Of all things!" ejaculated Charity. If that isn't koodoo, as you see. When you think of the sea-
the deacon's hornless cow, with some twisted paste- voyage it has gone through, the perils of the passage,
board horns fastened on to her." and the separation from its family friends, you will, I
The koodoo," Rick went on (and let me say believe, look on this koodoo with great interest.
here, look in Webster's Illustrated Dictionary, and you "The Hystrix Cristata, or porcupine." (This animal
will find pictures, long names, and other information was brought on the stage in a box of lattice-work.)

...... .. "I-- : ... .. "- I - --
,' --... L I I,..t_ - -- I'I J



', ; .1 : '! } :' 1 '" I"
",i )i il. . II 1, . Ii ,II
L E'




Si t ',I, e ,,,I
i I i ., ', I' ',



"" / i i l o. i ,
A,.
i i. I' .- '
.. .
, .- - \ L,[ i,
L "f ,- -' i .. .. . .

L I'










RICK' S MLNAGERIE.

"It is cousin to the hedge-hog, and is mentioned by A verbatim report of Rick's address that morning
Shakespeare as having a bad disposition. 'The fretful would fill several chapters, and we haven't them to
porcupine.' Look at him, my friends, and -pity him." fill. Fancy each what you would have said if you had
The spectators (they were increasing in numbers) had the following creatures to exhibit and describe,
looked at the porcupine, but very few of them knew to wit, -
how much time and trouble had been spent in mak- The Lagostomys, native of South America, trained
ing that coat of canvas, sticking it full of hedge-hog to jump over a stick, to open a door, and able to see
quills, and in persuading Mrs. Tozer's old mamma- in the dark. (The lagostomys, is known in Gray-
cat to wear it; for the porcupine was nothing more thorpe private circles as Mrs. Dr. Grant's Angola
nor less than puss in disguise. For the appearance cat.)
kittie presented, see Webster as aforesaid.








YOUNG RICK.

The Troglodytes Gorilla. Fred Tozer in abear-skin in the pavilion, and opening its gate with her teeth.
overcoat fastened behind, having a full set of teeth And there ended the morning's exhibition. The same
cut from lemon-peel, brandishing a club, growling, ceremonies were gone through with in the afternoon,
grinning, and chattering. The gorilla was one of the and nearly all Graythorpe was there to see. When, at
successes of the show, climbing, crouching, leaping, dusk, the strange animals were taken to their homes,
eating and drinking, and performing many other feats when the koodoo became a cow, and the porcupine a
at the order of the master, cat once more, when Tom and Sawny counted the
The Red Lemur. This was Rick's gray squirrel, proceeds, they were found to amount to sixty-eight
powdered with red chalk for the occasion. The Tor- dollars and seven cents. This money, with the profits
toise, a big mud-turtle who had "happened along" of the ladies' fair, and some gifts from friends of
last week, just in time for the menagerie. A pair of Miss Margaret in New York, made up a sum of five
the Gecko tribe. Two small lizards, such as chil- hundred dollars. With this beginning, the Gray-
dren call evits." thorpe Home started. Don't you think every boy and
Madame Rana Palustris, and her family of five girl in town had an interest in that Home ? Can you
hundred children This was a frog surrounded by a think how cheery it was for those old women to have
large company of tadpoles. Many o Mrs. Rana young faces showing bright in their rooms every day?
Palustris's children," Rick explained, 'die in early How pleased they were when Paty brought her
life, else the world would be overrun/with grown-up new picture to show them! and Rick stayed two
frogs." hours one afternoon to tell about his journey, and the
There were small snakes introduced under big great glass palace in New York, where he had been
names. There were fowls of all known varieties, each to see the World's Exhibition." You can imagine
with a story attached. There were doves and rabbits, all this, and much more; but one thing I must tell
robins and canaries, weasels and ferrets, a fox, and a you: it is about dear old Gran'mamma Dunscomb.
woodchuck. The American eagle was a caged hawk, "This is your room. This is going to be home to
curved as to his beak, fierce as to his eyes. There you now."
was a tableau of Bopeep and her sheep, a play of Miss Margaret had led her friend into the south
Cinderella, and a grand show of the giant escorted by room, where the sunlight was lying out in yellow
Tom Thumb. Monsieur Thumb was Mrs. Tozer's squares on the floor. There was fresh paint, and
youngest, a boy of two years, arrayed in dress-coat and whitewash, and-everything so bright and clean.
boots, and warranted to be as old as the giant. There "We hope you'll be very happy here now," she
were these ; and there was, to end with, an exhibition went on, as she took off gran'ma's shawl.
of trained dogs, and of "the famous performing zebra Gran'ma had seen pretty uncomfortable days late-
Angelica." ly at the poor-house. She had been weak and ailing,
"The zebra," Rick explained, "is distinguished and even now her mind seemed to wander some-
from all other creatures by its stripes." Every one times. She looked about her and said, -
looked at the stripes. Painted? No. Paty and "Yes, dear, this is a very nice place. I will stay
Daisy wouldn't allow the Austin pony to be painted, and visit you a few days, and then I must go home."
so they, with Miss Lesbia and others, spent a day in And from that day till the day of her death, six
cutting stripes of gay flannel, and making a sort of months later, gran'mamma was always "on a visit,"
skeleton garment for the creature. Its legs were in always going home." She had lived at the poor-
two pairs of Bernie's long, striped stockings, and, house so long, you know. Many a time at nightfall
withal, pony made a very respectable zebra; "This she would say to Miss Margaret, -
one knows more than you would believe possible. I believe I must go now. I've made you a pretty
Please to notice. Now, Angelica." long visit, and I've had a nice time, dear; but I must
Angelica went through her programme. She stood be going home now, if you'll bring me my bonnet."
on her hind legs, and pawed the air ; she knelt down; Then Margaret would bring it, and would give
she made a bow; she shook hands; she danced to gran'ma her arm, and they would walk down the yard,
music; and she finished by trotting back to her stall and out on to the street. After a little, their steps








YOUNG RICK.

would get slow, as the elder grew tired, and the mound. Bernie is grown tall and broad, and has
younger would say, noisy boys of his own. Other men and women get
Hadn't you better go back, and stay with me one older from year to year; but in Daisy's memory,
night more ? Sawny is, and for all time will be, the handsome, chiv-
Well, may be I had. I'll go home to-morrow." alrous young soldier who, one summer's day, went
And so Margaret, night after night, led her gently marching with his regiment down the Graythorpe
back to the nice room, which, after all, was "not Main Street.
home." One evening, they found her, seated in her Miss Margaret did not go into the hospitals, did not
easy-chair, her bonnet in her hand, and a strange, leave Graythorpe; but every father of a family who
white smile on her dear old face. Gran'mamma had enlisted from that village went away with these words
"gone home." in his ears,-
If you never come back, I will take care of your
And so we come to the end--not of the stories we children." Some never did come back; and the new
have to tell, but of the space and time in which we wing which has been built out from the east side of
must tell them. You remember how it is in the best the Home, the long hall and its half dozen bedrooms,
of all books, in the truest of all histories, in the sto- with their little white beds on either hand, show how
ries of the old kings who lived when the earth was well the promise was kept.
younger than it is now. And the rest of the acts And Paty ? When the soldiers went away, she was
which they did "--their wars, their journeys, their in New York. Miss Margaret had obtained admis-
hatreds, and their loves -" are they not written sion for her to Cooper's Institute, where she could
in "-some book now lost forever, perhaps, to the have good teachers in painting. Her poor father's
world. Of making many books there is no end," artistic talent had come down to her, and these les-
and yet it is very little of life that gets written down, sons were an unmixed delight. Dr. Hyde came to
after all. I'm inclined to think that the best-alas, see her one day. He was going away with the army,
and the worst of it too never finds its way to tongue he told her; but one thing- two things he must say
or pen. But I've a little more to tell you. to her first. Paty's face grew white, and her head
Twenty years; and between those days and these, bent forward a trifle. She wasn't a child any more.
the story of a great, sad war. Graythorpe, and the She was seventeen then, and a tall, slender girl.
towns on the hills about, sent out one of the earliest There they stood in the shadow of an old church
regiments. Tom Dorrance was captain of one com- porch, where they had stepped aside for a moment.
pany, Dr. Hyde was surgeon, and the chaplain was a The city crowd surged by, and through its turbulent
white-haired man, you know who, Dr. Grant. Among noise Paty heard the low voice speak,-
the privates were Sawny, and Rick, and Fred Tozer, "I loved your mother once, Paty; and now, after
and the rest. Do you think they all came back all the years "
as they went away? Rick came in a captain's uni- The words I will not speak again. Whatever Dr.
form. Fred was higher up still, for the Yankee boy Hyde said, it was something never to be said over
had made a rare soldier, and had risen to a colonel's again. I can only tell you that those were words
place. Tom shook hands with his own strong right which made day and night, summer and winter, life
arm, and bade it good by in the officers' hospital at and death, and all beyond, a new thing to Paty from
Annapolis. The nurse who stood near, and wiped that hour onward. I have told you that she has a
her eyes, was Charity Giles. bright home of her own to-day. You can guess who
Under the shadow of the Graythorpe church-spire brought her there.
there is a grave marked by a slender obelisk, where, In my walk of a summer morning, I often meet an
in summer, an ivy is trained. The monument bears old lady, very erect, with such white hair, and who
Sawny's name, and the one word Antietam." Here leads a fine little boy. She calls him not Richard,
the gentle invalid, Daisy, comes in the dusk to lay nor Rick, but Dick.
her flowers, from earliest spring to latest autumn, My grand-nephew," she explained to me one day.
pink arbutus to white chrysanthemum, upon the I think you know his father."








"YOUNG RICK."

I had heard of a young man, a graduate of Z. adopted him, as I've been told, insisted on his going
College, class of 186-, who had gone straight from through college, and then allowed him to take his own
his studies to one of the largest manufacturing estab- course. He went to C., began at the bottom, and is
lishments in the country, and had there entered as a now one of the firm. Went to Munich for them last
common workman. I had chanced to be at Wash- year."
ington when the great bronze doors were brought on Bound to distinguish himself, I should judge,"
from the C. manufactory, to be hung in the Capitol, said the congressional member, with dignity.
and I had recognized the bright, clear-eyed face that Yes, sir, he is. Clearest head for mechanics I
was everywhere, the cheery voice that directed every- ever came across. There is nothing, let me tell
thing. you, sir, like giving the mind its natural bent. The
Young Cranson, one of our alumni," I heard Pro- great thing is to find out what that is ;" and the pro-
fessor Van explain to a member of Congress. The fessor stepped away to shake hands with his old
two were watching the work. An old aunt, who pupil.

























nI






.. -...... ... <..
291k






BH HI^^ '~-^^H1j|











r r'
; . ,


h'7












...--.....
7. ,5 .,. '' ~ ilE'





t .

Ya -



.I^ H

^^ I I .i
nnP~~ ~-





Full Text















































I,