Aesop's fables in words of one syllable

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Material Information

Title:
Aesop's fables in words of one syllable
Physical Description:
174 p., 7 leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 18 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Aikin, Lucy, 1781-1864
Aesop
Miller, James, d. 1883 ( Publisher )
Publisher:
James Miller
Place of Publication:
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1878   ( lcsh )
Fables -- 1878   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1878   ( local )
Bldn -- 1878
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Fables   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Mary Godolphin.
General Note:
Illustrations hand-colored.
General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002464204
notis - AMG9592
oclc - 61464089
System ID:
UF00035161:00001


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TIE DOVES AND THE MOUSE.









AESOP'S FABLES,





Words of One Syllable.



BY

MARY GODOLPHIN.



NEW YORK:
JAMES MILLER, PUBLISHER,
779 BROADWAY.















CONTENTS.



PAGE
THE BOY AND THE WOLF 5
BOYS AND FROGS . . 6
THE.WAR HORSE AND THE
Ass . . . . 7
THE FOX AND THE GRAPES 9
THE FLY AND THE MOTH 10
THE LYNX AND THE MOLE II
THECHILDANDTHEBROOK 14
THE MICE, THE CAT, AND
THE BELL . . .. 15
THE BEAR IN THE WOOD 16
THE OLD FOX AND HER
YOUNG ONE . .. 18
THE WOLF AND THE LAMB 20
THE SQUEAK OF A PIG . 23
STONE BROTH . . ..24
THE GNAT AND THE BULL 26
THE DOVESAND THE MOUSE 27
THE COCK AND THE GEM 30
THE MAN AND THE APE 31
THE BAG OF GOLD . . 32
THE KID AND THE WOLF 35
THE FOX WHO HAD LOST
HIS TAIL . . .. 36
THE OAK AND THE REED 38
THE MAN AND HIS LIVE
STOCK ........ 40
THE FROGS AND THE BULLS 41
THE BLUE WOLF . . 42
THE MAN, HIS SON, AND
HIS Ass . . .. 45
THE BOY AND THE HORN
BOOK. . . . 48
THE OLD HEN AND HER
YOUNG ONES ..... .CO



PAGE
THE FOX AND THE CRANE 52
THE ASS WITH A LOAD OF
SALT . . ... .53
THE WOLF AND THE HOUSE
DOG .... .......55
THE STAG IN THE LAKE 58
THE MAN, THE FOX, AND
THE BEAR . . . 59
THE BOOR AND THE STAG 61
THE FOX AND THE CROW 64
THE CAT, THE MOUSE, AND
THE COCK . ....65
THE PLANE TREE . .. 68
THE DOG WHO WAS HUNG 69
THE BIRDS, THE BEASTS,
AND THE BAT . . 72
THE BOY AND THE NUTS 73
THE APE AND HER YOUNG
ONES . . . . 74
THE HORSE, THE WOLF,
AND THE FOX . . 76
THE LARK AND HER YOUNG
ONES . . . .. 78
THE KITE, THE SOW, AND
THE CAT . . .80
THE ROSE AND THE CLAY 83
THE MAN AND THE PERCH 84
THE OX AND THE CALF. 85
THE WOLVES AND THE
SHEEP . . . .. 87
THE KID AND THE WOLF 88
THE COCK, THE FOX, AND
THE SPRING . .. 89
THE OLD DAME AND HER
MAIDS. . .. 91








4



CONTENTS.



PAGE
THE BEES AND THE SNAIL 92
THE ASS AND THE LAMB 94
THE AXE AND THE TREES 96
THE TWO GOATS ON THE
BRIDGE . . .. 97
THE DOG AND THE THIEF 98
THE WOLF AND THE FOX
IN THE WELL . . 100
THE FLY AND THE ANT 102
THE CAT AND THE MICE 103
THE HART AND THE VINE 105
THE FOX AND THE STORK 106
THE LEAP AT RHODES . 108
THE DAW AND THE JAY IIO
THEOWLSANDTHEWREN 112
THE GOOSE WITH THE
GOLD EGG .... 113
THE NURSE AND THE
WOLF .... .. 114
THE DOG IN THE OX'S
STALL ...... 115
THE COCK, THE DOG, AND
THE FOX . . .. I16
THE OLD BLIND DAME. II8
THE BOAR AND HORSE. 120
THE APE MADE KING . 121
THE WOLF IN A SHEEP'S
SKIN . . ... .123
THE FROG, THE MOUSE,
AND THE HAWK . 124
THE DOG WHO WENT OUT
TO SUP . . .. .126
THE JUDGE AND THE POOR
MAN . . . .. 128
THE STAG IN THE OX'S
STALL ...... 131
THE FOX AND THE CAT 132



PAGE
THE WAR HORSE . .. 134
THE WIND AND THE SUN 135
THE APE, THE WOLF, AND
THE FOX . . .. 136
THE GOAT, AND THE FOX
IN THE WELL . 137
THE HOG, OX, COW, DOG,
AND SHEEP ... 139
THE MULES AND THE
THIEVES . . .. 143
THE BALD KNIGHT . 144
THE BLIND MAN AND THE
LAME MAN .... .145
THE MAN, THE HORSE,
AND THE ASS . .. 147
THE DRUM AND THE VASE 148
THE STAG, THE CROW AND
THE WOLF ... 149
THE FROGS AND THEIR
KING . . . .. 152
THE FIELD OF CORN . 154
THE JAY AND THE OWL 157
THE WOLF AND THE
STORK ...... 158
THE COCK AND THE FOX 159
THE HAWK, THE ROOKS,
AND THE CAT . 162
THELARKANDTHEFINCH 164
THE NURSE AND THE
SNAKE . . .. 166
THE MAID AND HER MILK
PAIL . . . .. .167
THE HARE AND HER
FRIENDS . . .. .169
THE ASS AND THE LAP
DOG ......... 171
THE DOVE AND THE ANT 173











AESOP'S FABLES.



THE BOY AND THE
WOLF.
A BOY, who kept watch on a flock
of sheep, was heard from time to
time to call out, "The Wolf! The
Wolf!" in mere sport. Scores of
times, in this way, had he drawn
the men in the fields from their
work. But when they found it was
a joke, they made up their minds
that, should the boy call "Wolf"






6ESOP'S FABLES.



once more, they would not stir to
help him. The wolf, at last, did
come. "The Wolf! The Wolf!"
shrieks out the boy, in great fear,
but none will now heed his cries,
and the wolf kills the boy, that he
may feast on the sheep.
One knows not how to trust those
who speak lies, though they may tell
one the truth.



BOYS AND FROGS.
SOME boys were at play at the edge
of a pond, and, as their game was
"ducks and drakes," they had to
throw stones with as much force as



6






THE WAR HORSE AND THE ASS.



they could, to the great harm of
some poor frogs in the pool. At
length one of them, who was more
brave than the rest, put his head
out of the pond, and said, "Oh,
dear young sirs, stop, I pray you,
for what is sport to you is death
to us!"


THE WAR HORSE AND
THE ASS.
A FINE horse broke loose from his
stall, and as he ran down the road
with a loud, shrill neigh, he met an
ass with a load on his back, to whom
he said, in a proud tone, that if he
did not make way for him, he would



7








kick him with his heels, and tread
him in the dust. The poor ass held
his peace, and made room for him
as fast as he could. In course of
time the horse went to the wars,
and was shot in the eye, which so
spoilt his good looks, that he was
sent to work on the farm. Stript
of all his pomp, he was met by the
ass, who said to him, Ha! is it
you? Your state is now as low as
mine. I thought your pride would
have a fall some day!"



8



IESOP'S FABLES.






THE FOX AND TILE GRAPES.



THE FOX AND THE
GRAPES.
ONE hot day a fox saw some grapes
which hung on a wall, and he took
a spring to seize them, but made
too short a bound ; so then he leapt
with all his might, but could not
quite reach them; and each jump
he took was still too short. There
hung the fine ripe grapes, but not
for him. Then, as he found he
could not get at them, he said, It
is not worth my while to try, for
the grapes are sour."
They who can not as they will,
must will as they can.



9









THE FLY AND THE
MOTH.
A FLY, one night, stood on the
rim of a pot of jam, and as he
could not turn from so rare a
feast, he went down the jar that
he might reach the fruit ; but found
to his cost that he stuck fast like
a bird caught with lime. A moth
that flew by, chid him thus: "It
serves thee right! How couldst
thou think that such legs and
wings as thine would be safe in a
pot of jam ?" By and by the moth
saw a lamp in the same room, and
flew in the light of it ; but at
last his sight grew dim, he sprang



IESOP'S FABLES.



10






THE LYNX AND THE MOLE.



up to the flame, and was burnt to
death. "What!" says the fly, who
saw him, "How is this? You
love to play with fire! You who
took me to task for so small a
crime as a taste for jam!"
We tax our friends with faults,
but see not our own.




THE LYNX AND THE
MOLE.
A LYNX by chance met a mole at
the foot of a mound. "Ah, poor
wretch!" said the lynx, "what a
life is yours! Shut up in the cold,



I








damp ground, you see no light, nor
feel the warmth of the sun, for you
do but move from mine to mine. If
you could but see me as I vault by
your dark mound with limbs so
free, and my sight-ah my sight-
so keen, you would die of grief at
your dull life. Would that I
could change it for you, my
friend !" "I thank you for your
kind wish," said the mole; "but I
need not your help, nor do I feel
so dull as you think, for I was
bred and born in the ground, and
all my days have been spent here.
I have my dear young ones round
me, and more than all, I am
safe. My eyes are small, it is



.ESOP'S FABLES.



12






THE LYNX AND THE MOLE.



true, but that has made my ears
sharp, and if they serve me well
now, I hear a sound which seems
to come from where you stand, and
it tells of a foe." Just then up rode
some men from the hunt, who
thrust a spear through the heart of
the poor lynx, and he fell dead;
but the mole went safe back to
her hole in the bank, and said,
when she got there, "Home is
home for all that."
What the eye sees not, the heart
rues not.
Though the fox runs, the chick
has wings.



13






,ESOP'S FABLES.



THE CHILD AND THE
BROOK.
AN old man who saw a child
stand for a long time by the side
of a stream, said, "My boy, why
do you gaze so long on this
brook ?" "Sir," said the child,
" I stay here to wait till the
stream has run off, for then I
shall pass with dry feet." Nay,"
quoth the old man, "you might
stay out your life, and yet not do
that, for this brook will run on as
long as time. And as you wend
your way through life, you will
find this out. If you go with the
stream, you will get to the sea;



14






THE MICE, THE CAT, AND THE BELL. 15



but if you do not go with the
stream, you will have to wade."



THE MICE, THE CAT,
AND THE BELL.
ONCE on a time some mice were in
such great dread of a cat, that they
did not dare to stir day or night lest
she should kill them. At this rate
they thought they should starve, so
they all met to talk of the best thing
for them to do. While they thus sat
in great doubt, a pert young mouse
rose and said, "I have thought of
a good plan, and that is to tie a
bell to the cat's neck, which would






,ESOP'S FABLES.



ring at each step she takes, and
let us know when she comes near."
This bright speech brought hope
with it, and made the mice jump
for joy. Then a grave old mouse,
who till now had been quite mute,
rose and said, "I have heard that
you 'hold a wolf by the ears' and
that you 'put salt on the bird's tail,'
but what shall we do to bell the cat ?"
Safe bind, safe find.



THE BEAR IN THE WOOD.
Two men had to pass through a
thick wood, and one of them said,
"Should we fall in with wild beasts,






THE BEAR IN THE WOOD.



I will come to your help, if you
will do the same by me." So be
it," said his friend, and off they set.
They had not gone far when a bear
made a rush out of the wood. TLhe
man who had made the good rule
for them to act on, got up a tree to
hide, and his poor friend was put to
his wits' end to save his life, so
he fell flat on the ground, held his
breath, and lay quite still, that the
bear might think he was dead. The
huge beast came close up to him,
and felt him with his snout, but as
he took him for a dead man, did
him no harm. When the bear was
gone, and all was safe, the man
came down from the tree, and with
2



I7






.ESOP'S FABLES.



a smile, said, What did the bear
tell you when he put his snout so
close up to your ear ?" "Well,"
said his friend, "what he told me
was this-' Have a care of that
rogue up the tree, and for the time
to come put no trust in him!'"
Prove thy friend ere thou have
need of him.



THE OLD FOX AND HER
YOUNG ONE.
AN old fox and her young one
found their way to a yard where
hens were kept, and one by one
they put them all to death. It



18






THE OLD FOX AND HER YOUNG ONE. 19
was the wish of the young fox to
eat them all then and there, but
his dam said, "We have had great
luck, yet we must not spend all
our stock at once, but put some
by, and come for it when we want
it." "Don't preach to me," said
the pert young fox, "the fowls will
not keep sweet a day, so I shall
eat as much as I can now, for
when the men on the farm see
what we have done, they will, of
course, look out for us." The
young fox then eat such a meal
that it was as much as he could do
to crawl to his hole, and in less
than an hour he was dead. The
old fox came back to the hoard,








and was caught by the men, who
had lain in wait to kill her. "Ah !"
said she, with her last breath, each
age hath its fault; each bean its
black; each day its night; each
weal its woe!"



THE WOLF AND THE
LAMB.
ONE hot day a wolf came to quench
his thirst at a clear brook that ran
down the side of a hill. By chance
a young lamb stood there. The
wolf had a wish to eat her, but felt
some qualms, so for a plea he made
out that the lamb was his foe.



.ESOP'S FABLES.



20






THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.



"Stand off from the banks, sir," said
he, "for as you tread them you stir
mud in the stream, and all I can get
to drink is thick and foul." The young
lamb said, in a mild tone, that she
did not see how that could be the
case, as the brook ran down hill to
her from the spot where he stood.
"But," said the wolf, "how dare
you drink of it at all, till I have had
my fill ?" Then the poor lamb told
him that as yet her dam's milk was
both food and drink to her. "Be
that as it may," said the wolf, "you
are a bad lamb; for last year I
heard that you spoke ill of me and
all my race." "Last year! dread
sir," quoth the lamb, "why, I have



21








not yet been shorn, and at the time
you name I was not born. The
wolf, who found it was of no use to
tell lies, fell in a great rage, and as
he came up to the lamb, he said,
"All you sheep have the same dull
kind of face, and how is one to
know which is which? If it was
not you, it was your dam, and that's
all the same thing, so I shall not
let you go from here." He then
flew at the poor meek lamb, and
made a meal of her.
Might beats Right.



,ESOP'S FABLES.



22








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THE SQUEAK OF A PJ1.



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9






THE SQUEAK OF A PIG.



THE SQUEAK OF A PIG.
A MAN, well known for his wit, said
he could show a trick which had
not yet been seen. So he took his
stand on a stage, and, with his head
thrust down, he gave out a sound
like the squeak of a pig. This he
did so well, that all thought he had
brought a young pig in his cloak;
but though a search was made, they
did not find one. A rough man
from a farm, who had come to look
on, said, "Faith, I can do this as
well as he." So the next night they
were both to try their skill. A great
crowd came to see them, and the
men went on the stage. The first



23






.ESOP'S FABLES.



man gave his squeak, which brought
a roar of praise, as it had done the
first night. The boor's turn then
came, and he had a real young pig
in his cloak; but though he made
it squeak by a hard pinch on the
ear, all gave the palm to the first
man, and sent the boor off the stage
with a loud hiss.
Give a man luck, and you may
throw him in the sea.



STONE BROTH.
A POOR man, in a storm of wind and
rain, came to a great house to beg
for alms, and was sent off with cross



24






STONE BROTH.



words. But he went back, and said,
"May I but ask to dry my clothes
at your fire, for I am wet with rain ?"
This the maids thought would not
cost them much, so they let him
come in. He then told the cook
that if she would but give him a
pan, and let him fill it from the
pump, he would make some stone
broth. This kind of dish was so
new to the cook, that she let him
make it. The man then got a stone
from the road, and put it in the pan.
The cook gave him some salt, peas,
mint, thyme, and all the scraps of
meat that she could spare, to throw
in. Thus the poor man made a rich
mess, and the cook said, Well



25






/ESOP'S FABLES.



done! you have made a silk purse
out of a sow's ear ; and it just shows
that 'they who crave for food will
break through stone walls.' "
Where there's a will there's a
way.



THE GNAT AND THE
BULL.
ONCE on a time a poor gnat sat on
the horn of a bull, and said, I
have made free to rest on the tip of
your horn; but if my weight is at all
too much for you, pray say so, and
I will move off." "I think you are
more nice than wise," said the bull.



26






THE DOVES AND THE MOUSE.



" To tell you the truth, I did not
know when you sat down, so I
shall not miss you when you think
fit to rise up." At this the bull
gave his head a toss, and put the
gnat to death with his tongue.
It is a dull bird that points out
her own nest.



THE DOVES AND THE
MOUSE.
A MAN who sold doves in the East
threw down some grains of rice in
a wood, and flung a net on the top
of them in such a way that it could
not be seen in the grass, and then



27






zESOP'S FABLES.



hid close by to watch. Soon the
king of the wild doves, "Smooth
Neck" by name, flew up to the spot
with his train, and said, Whence
can all these grains of rice come ?
Let it be seen to. Eat them not
yet." But the doves, drawn by
greed, set to work to pick them
up, and they were all caught in the
net. "Ha!" said Smooth Neck,
" I thought this might be the work
of a foe. You would not wait, as
I told you to do, and this has come
of it. Hark to the plan which I
have in hand. We know that
small things may work out great
ends, and that huge beasts may be
bound with straws made firm in a



28






THE DOVES AND THE MOUSE.



thick rope. Now, all put out your
strength at once, take up the net,
and fly off." This they did, and
the man who had set the snare was
much struck to see his net borne
off in the air by the birds. This
is well," said one of the doves, "but
what are we to do now, with these
toils on our feet ?" Smooth Neck
said, We are in an ill plight, but
Gold Fur, the wise king of the mice,
may help us." So he went in search
of Gold Fur's hole, which had scores
of small doors that led to it, deep
down in the ground. The good
mouse came out to meet them, and
when he had heard their tale, he
said, "As long as my teeth do not



29






,ESOP'S FABLES.



break, I will gnaw the nets for
you." So with his sharp teeth he
cut the snare, and set them all free.
Then, with great joy, the king of the
doves bent low his smooth neck to
him, and said, "How much we owe
to you! Think of us as your slaves
for life; for a friend in need is the
best friend of all."



THE COCK AND THE
GEM.
A COCK came down from his roost
at break of day, and set up a loud,
shrill crow; he then went to work
to scratch the ground in search of



30






THE MAN AND THE APE.



food for the hens. By and by, what
should he turn up but a bright
gem. He gave it a kick and said,
" Ha! you are a fine thing, no
doubt; but, to my mind, one good
grain of. wheat is worth all the
gems in the world."
Do not cast pearls to swine.




THE MAN AND THE APE.

A MAN in the East kept a tame
ape, who was of great use to him,
for he could scare the birds from
the fruit and peas. One day the
man took his sleep at noon, and



31








the ape sat by his side to brush
the flies from his face. One fly
came and stood on the tip of his
nose, so the ape, with a grin, sent
it off; then it flew to his chin, and
this put the ape in such a rage
that he flung a stone at it, which
smote the fly; but, sad to tell, the
force with which the stone was
thrown broke the man's jaw.
A rash friend is worse than a
foe.


THE BAG OF GOLD.
Two men set off to walk from
Bath to York, and said they would
each share the same fate, come



zESOP'S FABLES.



32






THE BAG OF GOLD.



what might. All went well till
they got half way, when one of
them saw a bag of gold in the
path, which he took up. "Ha!"
said he, I am in luck's way. See,
I have found a bag of gold! I
will buy a horse and ride the rest
of my way." "My friend," said the
man who went with him, "when
we set out you told me we were
to share the same luck, be it good
or bad; so you ought to say 'we'
have found a bag of gold, not 'I.'"
"You may think just as you please,"
said the man, but as it was I who
found the gold, I shall keep it, and
do with it as I said, and wish you
good day." Just then they heard
3



33








a hue and cry of "Stop thief !"
"Come, I pray you," said the
man (who held the bag), in a great
fright; come, let us hide in this
wood, for if the men find us with
the gold, they will take us for
thieves, and we shall get hung for
it." "How now ?" said his friend;
"you swore it should be 'I' when
you found the bag, so pray let it
be 'I' as long as there is fear of
theft."
A just man's word is as good as
a bond.
One gets the prize, and both
bear the blame.



,ESOP'S FABLES.



34






THE KID AND THE WOLF.



THE KID AND THE
WOLF.
A YOUNG kid that would stray from
the herd saw a wolf, and did her
best to get out of his reach; but
when she found that all hope was
lost, she said, "Sir wolf, I know
that I am to die at your hands, so
as my life will now be but short, I
pray of you to let it be a gay one.
Now do you pipe while I dance."
So the wolf pipes, and the kid
jumps and springs to please him.
A pack of hounds who heard the
sound, ran up to see who was there,
and then the wolf set off as fast as
his legs would take him, and the



35








kid came home safe. Quoth she,
with a hop and a skip-

"He that sticks to chance,
When fools pipe he may dance."

But the wolf gave a deep sigh,
and said-
"He who will not when he may,
When he wills, he shall have nay."

--g*,.-


THE FOX WHO HAD
LOST HIS TAIL.

A FOX who went to steal some
young chicks was caught in a trap,
from which he got free, but with
the loss of his tail; and when he



.ESOP'S FABLES.



36






THE FOX WHO HAD LOST HIS TAIL.



came to mix with the world, he saw
how high a price he had paid for
it, for none of the beasts who stole
a look at him could hide a laugh,
and the fox thought it would have
been well for him if his life had gone
with the "brush." But, to make the
best of things, he sent to all the rest
of his race to beg of them to meet
him on a heath, and there the fox
held forth and said, I would have
you all cut off your tails. You know
not the ease with which I can now
move. Of what use is the tail to
us? If we creep through a hole
in the hedge, as we fly from the
hounds, it stops us in the way. It
is the 'brush,' you know, that man



37






3ESOP'S FABLES.



strives for in the hunt; and then,
too, in spite of all we can do, it is
apt to be caught in a trap." A
sly old fox who heard him, said,
with a leer, "It strikes me that you
would not so much care to see us
part with our tails, if you had a
chance to get your own back !"
Bought wit is the best.




THE OAK AND THE
REED.
AN oak which stood on the side of
a brook was torn up by the roots
in a storm, and as the wind took it



38






THE OAK AND THE REED.



down the stream, its boughs caught
on some reeds which grew on the
bank. "How strange it is," said
the oak, "that such a slight and frail
thing as a reed should face the
blast, while my proud front, which
till now has stood like an Alp, is
torn down, root and branch!" A
reed, which caught the sound of
these words, said, in soft tones, "If
I may be free with you, I think the
cause of it lies in your pride of
heart. You are stiff and hard, and
trust in your own strength, while
we yield and bow to the rough
blast."
It is worse to break than to bend.



39






,,ESOP'S FABLES.



THE MAN AND HIS LIVE
STOCK.
A MAN who had a farm in a cold
part of the world, was shut up in it
by a deep fall of snow, and could
not get out to buy food, so he ate
all his sheep, one by one; and as the
frost did not break up, he then ate
his pigs, then his goats, and, at last,
the ox that was kept for the plough.
When the dogs on the farm found
this out, they said, "Let us be off!
for since the man thinks it no harm
to kill his sheep, his pigs, his goats,
and his ox, how can we hope that
he will spare us ?"
When the house next door is on



40






THE FROGS AND THE BULLS.



fire, it is high time to look to our
own.



THE FROGS AND THE
BULLS.
SOME frogs that were in a damp
marsh saw two bulls which fought in
a field some way off. "Look !" said
one of them, "there's a sight! Dear
sirs, what must we do ?" "I pray
thee," said a young frog, "do not
take fright at that. How can the
feuds of two bulls hurt us ? They
are not of the same tribe as we are,
far less in the same rank of life;
and as to size, why we are too



41








small for such large beasts as those
to take note of us. They do but
fight to see which shall be head of
the herd." "That is true," said an
old frog, "but as one will win the
day, one must, of course, yield, and
the bull that is sent out of the field
will come to the marsh for rush and
reed, and will crush us to death at
each step. Know you not that when
great folk fall out, small folk smart
for it ?"


THE BLUE WOLF.
A WOLF once fell in a vat of blue
dye which is made in the East. A
man came by and thought he was



,ESOP'S FABLES.



42








dead, so he took him out and laid him
on the bank and went his way; and
then the wolf, glad to be safe, ran
off to the woods. One by one, all
the beasts came to gaze on him,
and knew not what to make of him.
So then the sly wolf said, "My
fur is of a fine blue! You see in
me a new kind of beast, and so I
must, of course, be king of all the
rest!" Then the bears, the boars,
the apes, the wolves, as well as the
ounce, the lynx, the bull, the fox,
and all the rest of them, drew near
to bow their heads to him as the
lord of the wood. But soon the
wolves thought they saw in the king
some trace of kin, and one of them



THE BLUE WOLF.



43








said, "Be it for me to find him
out, and let it be done as I say.
At night you must all set up a
loud yell near him, and if he be
one of us-as I think he is-he
will send forth a loud howl too."
So all at once the wolves put up
their heads to howl, and they
soon heard the new king join in
the cry, for he could not help it.
At this, a loud laugh rang through
the wood from all the beasts of
the plain.
What is bred in the bone will
not out of the flesh



,'SOP'S FIABLES.



44





















,/' ,



-J



T'IEi MAN, IllS SON, AND ASS.



------;
_=_ Sr.=



h



' 7=q
SE-_-.B

_- f: -- .-



1-,



- -' i-.1'*



-

__Tl,b ---- _-






THE MA N HIS SON, AND HIS ASS.



THE MAN, HIS SON,
AND HIS ASS.
A MAN and his son drove their
ass to a fair to sell him. They
had not gone far, when one of a
group of girls, who stood round a
well, said, with a laugh, "Look at
those two fools-they let their ass
walk at his ease, while they trudge
on foot by his side." The man
heard this, and set his son on the
beast. They had not gone more
than half a mile, when they came
up to some old men who sat in
grave talk. "There," said one of
them, "that just proves what I
say: now a days the young take no



45






AESOP'S FABLES,



care of the old; see, that young
rogue rides, while the old man has
to walk by his side. Get down,
and let your sire rest his limbs."
At this the man made his son
jump off the ass, that he might
ride him. Thus they went on for
a space, when they met three kind
dames, each with a child on her
arm. "Why, you old sloth," said
one of them, "what a shame to
sit at ease while that poor slight
lad can scarce keep pace by the
side of you !" The man then took
his son on the croup of the ass by
his side, and so they rode till they
got near the town. Pray, good
friend," said a young man who



46






THE MAN, HIS SON, AND HIS ASS.



met them, "is that ass your own?"
"Yes," said he. "One would not
have thought so by the way you
load him. Why, it seems to me
more fit that you two should take
him to the fair, than that he
should take you." "Well, be it
so," said the old man; "we can
but try." So they got off, and
made fast the legs of the ass to a
pole, which each took hold of at
one end, and so went on their
way, till they came to a bridge.
This was a rare sight, and so the
boys and girls thought, for they
ran in crowds to laugh at the
farce, till the ass-which took fright
at the noise-gave a kick which



47






AESOP'S FABLES.



broke the cords that bound him;
so he fell in the stream, and sank.
The old man then made the best
of his way home, and said, If
we try to please all, we please
none.



THE BOY AND THE
HORN BOOK.
A BOY stole a horn book from
school, and brought it home to his
aunt, who did not take him to task
for what he had done, but gave
him some plums for his pains. In
course of time the child grew up
to be a man, and-need we say ?-



48






THE BOY AND THE HORN BOOK.



a thief. He stole more and more,
and at last was caught in a great
theft, and was hung. A crowd
came to look on at the sad scene,
and with them the aunt of the thief,
who, with sobs and tears, tore her
hair and beat her breast. The thief
saw her, and said to those who were
in charge of him, "Give me leave
to say a word to my aunt." When
she came up, he put his face to
hers, as if he would speak, and bit
off her ear! At this the aunt gave
a loud cry, and all who stood near
were struck with awe at so base a
deed. "Good sirs," said the young
man, "it is she who is the cause of
my guilt; for if, when I stole the
4



49






zESOP'S FABLES.



horn book from school, she had had
the sense to point out to me that I
had done wrong, I should not have
come to this sad end."
Spare the rod, and spoil the child.
He that will steal an ounce, will
steal a pound.




THE OLD HEN AND HER
YOUNG ONES.
A HEN led her train of young chicks
through a yard, to rake the chaff
and to show the grain, when one of
them flew on the edge of a well
to try her wings, and by chance



5"






THE OLD HEN AND HER YOUNG ONES. 5s



dropt down it, to the great grief
of the old bird. The next day,
when the hen met one of her chicks
from an old brood, she said, "My
dear son, I know you are strong and
bold, but, for your life, do not go
near that well ; if you do, some great
harm will come to you." "Why
should she give me this charge?"
said he. "Does she think I am
not brave, or does she store some
good thing down the well, which
she keeps for her last brood? I
will go and see." So he stood at
the brink of the well, and, far down
in the dark, he saw a spruce young
cock, whose plumes rose, and whose
wings spread, as if he had a wish






.,ESOP'S FABLES.



to fight. Down flew the young
bird-to rise no more.
If a fool is bid not to do a thing,
he is sure to do it.
The best shield is to keep out of
the reach of shot.



THE FOX AND THE
CRANE.
A FOX that had been out to poach,
had got hurt in a trap, and lay at
the point of death. For a long
time he sought in vain for aid, but
at last he saw a crane, and said to
her, "I beg of you to bring me
some drink to quench my thirst,



52






THE ASS WITH A LOAD OF SALT.



for I might then gain strength to
go in search of food." "Not far
in search, I think," said. the crane,
"for were I to bring you drink, I
make no doubt that the food would
come with me."
Play not with edge tools.


--Zo--


THE ASS WITH A LOAD
OF SALT.
A MAN drove his ass down to
the coast to buy a load of salt,
and on his way home the ass fell
in the midst of a stream. The
salt, of course, did not take long



53








to melt, and so the ass lost his
load, and came home fresh and
gay. The next day the man set
off to the coast for some more salt,
and put the load on his ass once
more. As they went through the
stream, the ass took care to fall
down just at the same spot, and
thus got rid of his load this time
too. But the man, who now saw
the trick, made a plan to cure the
ass of it. He bought a large load
of sponge, and put it on the back
of the beast, and drove him, for
the third time, to the coast. By
and by they came to the stream,
when the ass thought to play his
old pranks. But the sponge got



,ESOP'S FABLES.



54






THE WOLF AND THE HOUSE DOG.



wet through, and the ass found to
his cost that so far from a light
load, he had now on his back one
which was ten times the weight of
the first.
If a man cheats me once, shame
on him. If he cheats me twice,
shame on me.




THE WOLF AND THE
HOUSE DOG.
A POOR lean wolf, that was but
skin and bone, fell in with a
plump house dog, and said,
" How comes it, my friend, that



55






ZESOP'S FABLES.



you look so fat and sleek, while I
who am in the woods night and
day in search of food, do but
starve at the best?" Well," said
the dog, "you may be as well off
as I am, if you will do the same
for it. I have but to guard the
house from thieves; so come home
with me and see how you like the
life." With all my heart!" cries
the wolf.
As they went down the road side
by side, the wolf saw a mark on
the dog's neck, and would know
what it was. So they had a talk.
Dog.-Well, it may be a slight
mark from the chain.
Wolf.-Chain! Do you mean



56






THE WOLF AND THE HOUSE DOG.



to say that you may not room when
and where you please ?
Dog.-Why, not quite. For,
you see, they do look on me
as the least in the world fierce, so
they tie me up by the day, but I am
let loose at night. And all in the
house pet me, and feed me with
scraps from their own plates,
and- Come on. What ails
you ?
Wolf-Oh, good night to you.
I wish you joy of your fine life;
but, for my part, though I may not
be fat, I will at least be free.
No one loves chains, though
they be made of gold.



57






.ESOP'S FABLES.



THE STAG IN THE LAKE.
ONE hot day, a stag came to quench
his thirst at a lake, and stood there
to scan his shape from head to
foot, as it shone in the clear pool.
"What strength is there," said he,
"in this fine pair of horns which
branch out with so much grace from
each side of my head! If the rest
of my form were but of a piece
with my horns, I would give place
to none. But, ah, me! how slight
are these poor legs of mine! I
would as lief have none at all."
Just then some men, and a pack of
hounds that had been on the scent,
made to the spot where the stag





























































































THE STAG IN THE LAKE.



------ ----
-f

---
-=-
--






THE MAN, THE FOX, AND THE BEAR. 59



stood. Off he went, at full speed;
and those legs, with which he found
so much fault, soon took him out
of the reach of hounds and men.
But the horns which he was so vain
of, by ill luck, caught in the boughs
of a tree, and held him there till
the hounds came to pull him down.




THE MAN, THE FOX,
AND THE BEAR.
A MAN once saw a fox which had
so sleek a coat that he felt a wish
to kill him for the sake of it, and
he thought of a plan by which he








might save the skin whole. He
dug a deep trench just in front of
his hole, on which he spread leaves,
sticks, and straw, and then hid in
the thick trees out of sight, to wait
till the fox came home. But he
went to sleep; and while he slept,
the fox came up, saw the piece of
meat, and had a great wish to taste
it; yet when he stole a look round
him, he had his doubts that all was
right, so he did not touch it. Soon
a bear came up, and sprang on the
bait. The sticks gave way as he
lit on them, and down he fell in the
pit. The noise woke up the man,
who, as he thought of course it was
his friend the fox, went down the



6o



,ESOP'S FABLES.






THE BOOR AND THE STAG.



pit, where the bear gave him a hug
which took all the breath out of his
lungs, and then ate him up. So
the man was caught in his own
trap.
He must rise in good time who
would cheat the fox.




THE BOOR AND THE
STAG.
A STAG that had left the hounds a
long way off, came up to a man
who was at work on a farm, to ask
if he would show him some safe
place to hide in. So the man bade



61






6ESOP'S FABLES.



him hide in his own hut, which was
close by. The stag lay quite still
in the hut, and in a short time up
came the squire and his train with
the hounds. The squire caught
sight of the boor, and drew back to
ask him if he had seen the stag pass
that way. "No," said the boor, in
a loud tone, "I have not." At the
same time-as he had a wish to
keep on good terms with the squire
-he held out his hand, with a sly
look, to point to the hut where the
stag lay hid; but as luck would
have it, the squire took no heed of
this sign, nor did he so much as
see it. So on he went to join the
rest; but though they rode through



62






THE BOOR AND THE STAG.



the field where the hut was, they
did not see the stag. As soon as
they were well out of sight, the stag
stole from the hut, but said not a
word to the boor, who now gave a
loud call to him. "You wretch!"
said he, "you owe your life to me,
yet when you leave my hut, where
I sent you to screen you from your
foes, you say not one word of
thanks." "Nay," quoth the stag,
"you may make sure I should fill
your ears as full of praise and thanks
as my heart is of joy, if your deeds
had been true to your words; in
short, if I had not, through the door
of the hut, seen your hand play false
to your tongue."



63






.ESOP'S FABLES.



THE FOX AND THE
CROW.
A CROW sat on a bough of a tree
with a piece of cheese in her beak.
A sly old fox which saw her, said,
"What a fine bird thou art! How
bright is thine eye, how sleek are
thy wings, what grace is there in
the turn of thy whole form! Oh,
that such a bird should lack a
voice !" The poor crow was much
struck with this speech, saw not its
guile, and would fain prove how
sweet her note was; so she gave a
loud caw, and down fell the cheese
to the ground. The fox ran off
with it, and said, as he went, "I



64






THE CAT, THE MOUSE, AND THE COCK. 65
spoke loud of her charms; but fair
words do not cost much, nor does
the heart feel all that the false
tongue speaks. Yet I said not a
word of her brains ; for a wise head
makes a close mouth, and a close
mouth will catch no flies."




THE CAT, THE MOUSE,
AND THE COCK.
A YOUNG mouse, which had not seen
much of the world, came home one
day and said, "Oh, I have had
such a fright! I have seen a thing
with such a fierce look, that struts
5






6ESOP'S FABLES.



now here, now there, on two legs;
on his head he wears a small red
flag, and one round his throat, his
arms flap up and down on his sides
as if he meant to rise in the air.
But you should have seen him
stretch out his head and roar at
me with his sharp mouth, till I
thought he would eat me up. It
made me shake from head to foot
with fear, and I was glad to run
home as fast as my feet would take
me. But for this I should have
made friends with as sweet a soul
as could be. She had soft fur like
ours, which was black and gray in
streaks. Her look was so bland
and meek that I fell quite in love



66






THE CAT, THE MOUSE, AND THE COCK. 67



with her. Then she had a fine
long tail, which you might see wave
to and fro, first on this side, then
on that; and when I saw her fix
her bright eyes on me I thought
she had a wish to speak ; when
that fierce wretch set up his scream,
which drove me in this haste, quite
out of breath with fear." "Ah my
dear child," said the old mouse, "in
good truth, you have run for your
life; but the fierce thing you speak
of was not your foe, for it was but
a bird, that would not have done
you the least harm in the world;
while that sweet thing, of which
you seem so fond, was a cat, and
cats eat all us mice when they








have a chance-in short, they live
on mice."
Judge not by looks.

--Z-~-


THE PLANE TREE.
ONE hot day in June, two men lay
down in the shade of a plane tree,
to get out of the rays of the sun,
and as they lay there, they cast their
eyes up to the boughs. "A plane
tree bears no fruit," said one of
them. In good sooth," quoth his
friend, "that seems but a poor tree
that is of no use to man!" The
plane chid them, and said, "Sirs,



68



SESOP'S FABLES.






THE DOG WHO WAS HUNG.



you must be as blind as you are
base, to come here and lie in the
shade I give, and yet rail at me
as a thing that is of no use to
man.




THE DOG WHO WAS
HUNG.
ONCE on a time two sheep met,
and one of them said to her friend,
"Last night our dog Spring ate a
lamb, and then bit the old one to
death, as well as the man of the
farm." "Nay," quoth the friend, "if
that be true, in whom can we put our



69






7IESOP'S FABLES.



trust ?" Thus spread the news, and
such was the crime of Spring, who now
lay bound, while a group of men sat
to judge his case. Spring then said,
with a firm voice, "For more than
ten years I have done my work as
a sheep dog should. Last night, as
I lay on the ground, a wolf leapt
forth from the wood, sprang at a
lamb, and drank its blood, then let
fall his prize, and stood at bay. We
fought and I slew the wolf. But
now, when I saw the lamb, as it lay
dead on the grass, I could in no
way curb my wish to eat it. While
I was at my feast, the ewe came
up to seek for her young one; so,
lest she should charge its death on



70






THE DOG WHO WAS HUNG.



me, I thought it best to kill her.
Just then, up came the man of the
farm, who of course thought that I
had put both to death. His eye
met mine; he held up his staff; I
could not pause; dead men tell no
tales, thought I, and so flew at his
throat. You know, too well, the
rest."
If we do not crush sin in the
bud, it will grow strong, and crush
US.
Do what you ought, come what
may.



71






.ESOP'S FABLES.



"72



THE BIRDS, THE BEASTS,
AND THE BAT.
THE birds and the beasts once went
to war. The bat-which could not
be said to be bird or beast-at first
kept out of the way of both, but
when he thought the beasts would
win the day, he was found in their
ranks, and to prove his right to be
there, he said, "Can you find a
bird that has two rows of teeth in
his head, as I have?" At last the
birds had the best of the fight, so
then the bat was seen to join their
ranks. "Look," said he, "I have
wings, so what else can I be but
a bird ?" "To grind with all






THE BOY AND THE NUTS.



winds" was thought base in the
bat by both sides of the fight, and
he could not get bird or beast to
own him, and to this day he hides
and skulks in caves and stems of
trees, and does not come out till
dark, when all the birds of the air
have gone to roost, and the beasts
of the field are wrapt in sleep.
One must not blow hot and
cold.


THE BOY AND THE
NUTS.
A YOUNG child put his hands in a
jar where nuts and figs were kept.
He took all that his fist could



73






,ESOP'S FABLES.



hold, but when he came to pull it
out, the neck of the jar was too
small for him to do so. At this
the tears came in his eyes, and a
friend, who stood by, said, "Grasp
at but half, my boy, and you will
have it; but grasp at all, and lose
all."




THE APE AND HER
YOUNG ONES.
AN ape, who had two young ones,
felt a great love for her fine child,
but did not care at all for the plain
one. One day, when by chance the



74






THE APE AND HER YOUNG ONES.



old dam was put to flight, she
caught up the fine young ape in
her arms, but left the plain one to
get on as it could, so it leapt on
the dam's back, and off they set.
The old ape ran so fast to save her
pet, that in her haste its head was
caught by the branch of a tree, and
it fell down dead from the blow;
but the plain one clung on tight to
the dam's rough back, and so came
off safe and sound.
The pet child may die from too
much care.



75






.,ESOP'S ;FABLES.



THE HORSE, THE WOLF,
AND THE FOX.
A FOX one night had been out
some hours in the snow in search
of food, and yet had found none.
At last he met a wolf in the same
case, to whom he said, "Do you
see the horse in that field ? Well,
I think if you lend me your help,
I could kill him." When they came
up to the horse, the fox was much
struck to find how small his size
was by the side of him. May I
ask your name, and that of the man
who owns you ?" "My name is
Squire," said the horse ; I have not
yet heard the man's name, but I



76






THE HORSE, THE WOLF, AND THE FOX. 77
think if you wish to know it you
can see the stamp on my shoe."
The sly fox, who made a shrewd
guess at what this meant, said,
"( Nay, I do not know how to read,
but"-here he gave a low bow to
the wolf-"my friend has a gift that
way." The wolf, who was made
quite vain by this soft speech, came
up to read, but as he bent down
his head to do so, Squire gave
a kick, which clave his skull in
two.
Take the nuts out of the fire
with the cat's paw.






78 IESOP'S FABLES.

THE LARK AND HER
YOUNG ONES.
A LARK had a nest of young birds
in a field of corn, and one day two
men came to look at the state of
the crop. "Well," says one of them
to his son, "I think this wheat is
ripe, so now go and ask our friends
to help us reap it." When the old
lark came back to her nest, the
young brood told her, in a great
fright, what they had heard. "So
they look to their friends," said she;
"well, I think we have no cause to
fear." The next day the man of
the farm came, and saw no friends
in the corn field, so he bade his



1






THE LARK AND HER YOUNG ONES.



son fetch his kith and kin to help
him. This the young birds heard,
and told to the old one when she
came home to her nest. Quoth
she, "I do not see that men go
much out of their way to help
those that are of the same kith and
kin." In the course of a day or
two, as the man found that no one
came, he said to his son, Hark
you, John; we will trust to none,
but you and I will reap the corn
at dawn of day." "Now," said the
old lark, "we must be gone; for
when a man takes his work in his
own hands, it is sure to be done."
No eye so good as one's own;
no work so well done.



79






oESOP'S FABLES.



He that by the plough would
thrive . must hold or drive.




"THE KITE, THE SOW,
AND THE CAT.
A KITE had built her nest at the
top of an old oak, and in a hole
half way up the tree, a wild cat had
found a home; while the foot of the
tree made a stye for a sow and her
young pigs. For some time they all
went on in peace, and might have
done so to this day, but for the spite
of the cat. For, first of all, she
crept up to the kite, and said, Good



80




























































'I'l l : K l I THEi SI \\, \N i) 'ITil V \T






THE KITE, THE SOW, AND THE CAT 81
friend, I have news to tell you,
which will plunge us both in grief.
The old sow does naught else than
grub at the foot of the tree, and
we all know what that will come
to. It is clear that she means to
root it up, that she may kill your
young ones. For my part, I will
take care of my own, and you can
do as you please; but you may be
sure I shall watch her well, though
I were to stay at home for a month
for it." When she had said this to
"the kite, she went down and made
-a call on the sow at the foot of the
tree. She put on a grave face, and
said, "I hope you do not mean to
go out?" "Why not ?" said the
6








sow. "Nay," said she, "you may
do as you please ; but I heard the
kite say to her brood that she would
treat them with a pig the first time
she saw you go out; and I do not
feel sure that she may not take one
of my young ones at the same time.
So good day to you, for I must
look at home, you see." With these
words she went back to her hole.
The scheme that puss had in her
head was to steal out at night for
her prey, and peep all day at her
hole, that the sow and the kite might
think she was in great dread. Thit
plan put them both in such a fright,.
that the kite did not dare to stir
out in search of food, for fear of the



82



,ESOP'S FABLES.






THE ROSE AND THE CLAY



sow, nor the sow for fear of the
kite; and the end of it was that
they and their young ones were all
kept in their homes to starve, and
so were made a prey of by the cat.

--Z-


THE ROSE AND THE
CLAY.
A MAN in the East by chance took
up a piece of clay which lay in his
"C- pathl, and was much struck to find
:it smell so sweet. "It is but a
.or piece of clay," said he, "a
'mean clod of earth, yet how sweet
is it! How fresh! But whence



83






.ESOP'S FABLES.



has it this scent ?" The clay said,
"I have dwelt with the rose."
Make friends with the good, if
you wish to be like them.




THE MAN AND THE
PERCH.
A MAN went to fish in a fresh
stream, and caught a small perch,
who said, "I pray of you to save
my life, and put me in the stream
once more, for as I am but young
and small now, it is not so well
worth your while to take me as it
will be some time hence, when I



84






THE OX AND THE CALF



am grown a large fish." "So you
think," said the man; "but I am
not one of those who give up that
which is at hand for that which is
far off; nor do I make sure of fish,
flesh, or fowl till I have got it, for
one bird in the hand is worth two
in the bush."
All is fish that comes to the
net.



THE OX AND THE
CALF.
IN days of old, a calf that ran wild
in some fields near Rome, and had
not yet felt the yoke, said to an






8.ESOP'S FABLES.



old ox, "Dull slave! How can
you drudge on in this way from
day to day with a plough at your
tail ? Look at me, see how I skip
and play!" The ox said not a
word, but went on with his work.
The next day there was a great
feast held at Rome, so the ox did
not go to the plough; but his
friend the calf was led off in great
pomp to be slain, with a wreath
round his neck. "If this is the
last scene of your gay life," said
the ox, "let me drudge on at the
plough, for the yoke is more to my
mind than the axe."
Of two ills, choose the least.



86






THE WOL VES AND THE SHEEP.



THE WOLVES AND THE
SHEEP.
THE wolves and the sheep had been
for a long time at war. At last the
wolves said, "It is the dogs that
are the cause of it all; they bark
if we do but come near you. Now,
if you will but send them off from
your heels, we, on our part, will give
up our young ones to you." The
poor sheep thought it a fair thing;
but as soon as the change was made,
the young cubs set up a howl for
want of their dams. On this the
old wolves gave out that the peace
was at an end; so they fell on the
sheep, who, as they had lost their



87






.ESOP'S FABLES.



best friends, the dogs, had none
now to help them, and were torn to
death by the wolves.



THE KID AND THE
WOLF.
A YOUNG kid who stood on the roof
of a house, out of harm's way, saw
a wolf pass by, and set to work to
taunt and tease his foe. But the
wolf said, "I hear you. Yet it is
not you who mock me, but the roof
on which you stand."
Time and place will give to the
weak more strength than the
strong.



88






THE COCK, THE FOX, AND THE SPRING. 89



THE COCK, THE FOX,
AND THE SPRING.
A FOX, who came to a farm at break
of day, was caught in a spring,
which had been put there for that
end. A cock, who sat on the
bough of a tree, did not at first
dare to go near so dire a foe;
but when he saw that the fox could
not stir from the spot, he came down
from the tree to greet him. The
fox said, "Dear bird, you see what
has come to me, and all for your
sake; for as I crept through the
hedge, on my way home, I felt I
must come to ask how you are.






AESOP'S FABLES.



And now I will beg of you to
fetch me a knife to cut this wire."
The cock spoke not, but flew off
as fast as he could to tell the news to
the men on the farm, who soon
came up with a knife with which
to cut the wire, and kill the fox.
The cock said that he thought
those who spoke doves' words
should lead doves' lives. "Ha!"
cries the fox, "he gives twice who
gives in a trice."



90






THE OLD DAME AND HER MAIDS.



THE OLD DAME AND
HER MAIDS.
IN the good old times, when there
were no clocks, an old dame kept
a cock in her yard, which at dawn
of day gave a loud crow, and then
she got up to rouse her maids, that
they might go to their work. But
they thought it hard to be woke out
of their sweet sleep at such an hour,
so, one day, they wrung the cock's
neck. The next night the old dame
slept till late, as she had not heard
the cock crow ; but when she found
that he was dead, and that there
was now no means by which to tell
the time, she went at all hours of



91








the night to wake up her maids,
for fear they should sleep too long.
Strive to mend, and you will oft
times mar what's well.





THE BEES AND THE
SNAIL.
A SNAIL, one day, made his way
through the hole of a bee hive,
where, in a great rage, the bees
flew round him, and stung him to
death. But soon they found that
the snail, when dead, was all the
more a foe than when he had life,



.ESOP'S FABLES.



92