Stories about horses

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Material Information

Title:
Stories about horses
Physical Description:
144, 8 p., 2 leaves of plates : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Huard, L., d. 1874 ( Illustrator )
S. W. Partridge & Co. (London, England) ( Publisher )
Geo. Watson & Co ( Printer )
Publisher:
S.W. Partridge & Co.
Place of Publication:
London
Manufacturer:
Geo. Watson & Co.
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Horses -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Human-animal relationships -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animal welfare -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1877   ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1877   ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1877
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
compiled by the editors of the "British Workman."
General Note:
Date of publication from prize inscription.
General Note:
Title page and frontispiece in a single rule red border.
General Note:
Some illustrations by Harrison Weir and L. Huard.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002237901
notis - ALH8394
oclc - 61328685
System ID:
UF00035147:00001

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STORIES ABOUT HORSES.












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THE FAITHFUL SERVANT. 35








STORIES ABOUT

HORSES.


















COMPILED BY
THE EDITOR OF THE BRITISH WORKMAN."

LONDON:
S. W. PARTRIDGE & Co., 9, PATERNOSTER ROW.







*; l,. .. I| i fe

























LADIES' EDUCATION COMMITTEE
J ."_" -- "- : - - -















OF CRUELTY TO ANIMALS,

THIS VOLUME IS
IESPECTFUCTLLY DEDICATED.









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Volumes of Our (Dumb Companions" Series

uniform with this. 5s. each.





i. OUR DUMB COMPANIONS.
2. OUR DUMB NEIGHBOURS.
3. OUR FEATHERED COMPANIONS.
4. ANIMAL SAGACITY.
5. DOGS AND THEIR DOINGS.
6. CLEVER DOGS, HORSES, &c.
7. OUR CHILDREN'S PETS.
8. OUR FOUR-FOOTED FRIENDS.
9. BIRDS AND THEIR NESTS.
o0. ANECDOTES IN NATURAL HISTORY.
in. NATURAL HISTORY STORIES.
12. ANIMALS AND THEIR YOUNG.















Printed by GEO. WATSOR & Co., 28, Charles Street, Farringdon IRad.










































CONTENTS.



PAGE
"ADONIS," THE FAVOURITE OF KING GEORGE III. 19
ANOTHER GOOD SWIMMER 56

BEARING-REINS AND BLINKERS 134
BRUSHING HORSES BY MACHINERY 88

CLEVER BARGE HORSE 75
CLEVER SOMERSETSHIRE HORSE, A 43

DON'T SELL THE POOR OLD HORSE 114

EXTRAORDINARY SAGACITY 71
EXTRAORDINARY SAGACITY OF A PONY 141

FAITHFUL COMPANION, THE 52










iv CONTENTS.


PAGE
FAITHFUL SERVANT, THE 35

FIRE BRIGADE HORSES 129

FRENCHMAN AND HIS HORSE, A 59

FROZEN POND, THE 68

GOOD HORSE, AND A GOOD MASTER, A 88

GOOD SWIMMER, A 55

GRATEFUL PATIENT. A 28

HELPING A COMRADE IN DISTRESS 122

HORSE AND CAT 6

HORSE AND GREYHOUND 36

HORSE AND THE IRON GATE, THE 93

HORSE AT MILFORD JUNCTION 16

HORSE FOND OF CHILDREN, A 72

HORSE FREE AT TWENTY-ONE, A 121

HORSE GOING TO THE BLACKSMITH'S SHOP 93

HORSE PROTECTING A DOG, A 55

HORSES ON THE BATTLE-FIELD 83

HORSES RESENT INJURIES 80

HORSE THAT WAS REFUSED ASSISTANCE, THE IIO

HORSE "WHISPERER," THE 64 -

HORSE WITHOUT BLINKERS OR BEARING-REINS 76

"JENNY" AND HER MASTER 122

"JIMMY" THE HORSE, AND "JACK" THE PIG -

LORD'S DAY OBSERVANCE PONY, A 43

MEMORY AND ATTACHMENT 47

NOBLE HORSE AND ITS RIDER, A 105

OLD CRONY, AN 44

OLD TROOPER, THE 24

PARLOUR VISITOR, THE 114










CONTENTS. V


PAGE
PET PONY, THE 125

POLISH GENERAL'S HORSE, THE 59

PONY'S PETITION, A 80

PUNCTUAL HORSE, THE 48

REMARKABLE CASE OF AFFECTION 47

REMARKABLE CASE OF A GENTLE HORSE 39

REMARKABLE CAUTION OF A HORSE 19

REMARKABLE DELIVERANCE, A 97

REMARKABLY CLEVER HORSE, A- 51

RESCUING A FRIEND I2

SAGACIOUS CART-HORSE, THE 15

SAGACIOUS HORSE, A 12

SAGACIOUS OLD TROOPER, A 94

SAGACITY AND SYMPATHY OF A HORSE 27

SAGACITY OF THE CART-HORSE 60

SAGACITY OF THE HORSE II

SINGULAR CASE OF INSTINCT IN A HORSE 31

SOLDIERS AND THEIR HORSES II8

STOLEN HORSE, A 48

STORY OF A FAITHFUL SERVANT 84

THAT COLT OF GOOD MEMORY 27

TROOPERS IN THUNDERSTORMS 39

TWO GOOD SWIMMERS 113

TYROLESE HORS 5

VALUABLE HORSE LOST BY CRUELTY, A- 35

WHARF HORSE, THE 130

WHY THE PONY SHIED 126

WISP INSTEAD OF A WHIP, A 133

WONDERFUL CASE OF SENSIBILITY TO DANGER 32
























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ULL-PAGE JLLUSTPATIONS.


SUBJECT. ARTIST. PAGE
FRONTISPIECE H- ison Weir 2
UNBOLTING THE GATE arrison Weir 13
GEORGE III. AND HIS FAVOURITE HORSE "ADONIS' arrison Weir 17










Viii FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS.


SUBJECT. 4 ARTIST. PAGE
HORSE ESCAPING FROM THE FALLING TREE Harrso Weir 21

THE OLD TROOPER AND THE MILK-GIRL Harrison Weir 25

THE GRATEFUL HORSE Harrison Weir 29

HORSE AVOIDING THE POISONED DOG Harrison Weir 33

HORSE AND GREYHOUND Harrison Weir 37

TROOPERS IN A, THUNDERSTORM Harrison Weir 41

THE OLD CAVALRY HORSE garrison Weir 45

THE PUNCTUAL HORSE Harrison Weir 49

THE FAITHFUL COMPANION ison Weir 53
THE GOOD SWIMMER Harrison Weir 57

HORSE CARING FOR THE CAT Harrison Weir 61

SULLIVAN, THE IRISH HORSE-TAMER Harrison Weir 65
. HORSE BREAKING THE ICE Harrison Weir 69
THE CART-HORSE PLAYING WITH CHILDREN- Harrison, Weir 73

MESSRS. SPENCE, BLUNDELL AND CO.'S HORSE AND CARMAN From a Photograph 77
RESENTING AN INJURY Harrison Weir 81

ON THE BATTLE-FIELD hinting y 85
Charles Zschaggeny
GROOMING BY MACHINERY From a Photograph 89
SURVEYOR AND OLD HORSE Harrison Weir 95

A REMARKABLE DELIVERANCE L. Hard 99

A NOBLE HORSE AND ITS RIDER Harrison Weir 103
THE HORSE THAT WAS REFUSED ASSISTANCE Harrison Weir 107
THE GOOD SWIMMERS Harrison Weir III
THE PARLOUR VISITOR Harrison Weir 115
THE MORNING KISS Anon. II9

JENNY AND HER KIND MASTER garrison Weir 123

WHY THE PONY SHIED garrison Weir 127
-WORKING THE CRANE Harrison Weir 131

WITH BLINKERS garrison Weir 135
WITHOUT BLINKERS Harrison Weir 139





















.- -:--
Aaft






STORIES ABOUT HORSES.


THE horse has been justly termed the noblest and most useful
animal God has given for the service of man. When rightly
treated, he not only readily obeys, but seems to anticipate the
wishes of his master. It is not yet, however, in England, that
we must look for the best illustrations of the affection and
sagacity of the horse. For this we must go to Arabia, where
the horse is treated with the affection of a child.; and the obedi-
ence and service which the' animal renders in return is mo-t
remarkable. If some of the Arabs were to visit England, and
see the cruel blows of the'whip which many of our drivers and
rema f se o



. ~"9







10 How to prevent Cruelly.


carters inflict on their poor horses, they would stand aghast,
and probably call us a cruel nation." Within the last few years,
however, there has been great improvement in many parts of
our country in the treatment of animals. This result is largely
attributable to the progress of education, but more especially to
the increased efforts made by the Royal Society for the Preven-
tion of Cruelty to Animals. This Society until a recent date
confined its efforts chiefly to the punishment of the cruel; but
now the more important duty of encouraging and rewarding
the kind has been adopted, with the most pleasing results. The
formation of the Ladies' Education Committee, of which the
Baroness Burdett-Coutts is the president, for working amongst
the rising gerferation, is likely, under the Divine blessing, to be
productive of beneficial results far greater than the most re-
pressive laws against cruelty. The influence of the labours of
these ladies, by the press, the platform, and by educational
literature, is already securing a rich reward.
Perhaps one of the best ways of preventing cruelty, is to
encourage the young to study the habits and the sagacity of
animals. To aid -in this desirable work, the following pages
have been compiled.

"JIMMY" THE HORSE, AND "JACK" THE PIG.
I have a favourite old horse, says a correspondent, that I have
ridden and driven for years, known almost to every child in the
parish, and which I once kept in an orchard close to my house.







Shaking the Apple Tree. I


He is called "Jimmy." To record all the manceuvres of this
faithful beast would fill a pamphlet. One day, however, I saw
him in the orchard in company with a large pig called Jack,"
which I had bred up from a little one. The pig was rubbing
the old horse's head, and at the same time making a peculiar
kind of noise which seemed to say, Come with me, Jimmy."
The pig proceeded in advance, and the horse followed until
both arrived under a large apple tree, a branch of which the
horse actually shook, and down fell a lot of apples. The pig
grunted with evident satisfaction, whilst eating the fine apples
which lay scattered on the ground. Jimmy then helped
himself from the branches until I thought he had had enough.
The most remarkable part of this story is that the horse never
attempted to shake the limbs a second time after the pig had
been, satisfied. This is the same animal which some months
since fractured his fetlock-joint at Long Ashton, in Somerset-
shire, through stopping instantly (whilst going very swiftly) to
save the ife of a child. F.
SAGACITY OF THE HORSE.
A horse, whose master was accidentally injured a long way
from home, returned to th3 house and neighed so loudly
that it brought the family to the door, when they saw he was
alone. The son mounted him and rode back, when the horse
carried him to where his injured master lay on the ground.
Had it not been for this faithful animal's sagacity, the man
would have perished. .








S2 Going to the Smilhy.


A friend of mine once was coming home from a distant town
in the night and lost his way; after trying to find it, he laid the
reins on his horse's neck and said, Go home, Fanny." She
turned into another road unknown to him, and the gentleman
was soon at his own door. A.

A SAGACIOUS HORSE.
A very large heavy horse, known as Dick," owned by Mr.
J. Campbell, and used as a coal-carrier, slipped and fell a few
days ago under a heavy load, and was sadly shaken by the fall.
After he got up, and while the men were freeing the team, Dick
was missing; no one knew where he had gone. He was not
in the stable; he could not be found. His master went in search
and found him at last in Mulloy's smithy, William's Street,
" Who brought that horse here ? he inquired. No one, sir;
he walked in himself unaccompanied, and signified that he
wanted a new pair of shoes. I understood the case instantly
and fitted him. He had fallen, and was aware that the poor
shoes that he had on were the cause of the disaster, and -came
to me to supply the preventive against future similar disaster."
Mr. Campbell took the horse and departed-the firm step of the
animal indicating his confidence in the improved understanding
given to him by the worthy smith.--Chlhsca Tlegraph (U.S.A.)

RESCUING A FRIEND.
Some years since the servant of Mr. Thomas Walker, of Man-
chester, going one day to water the carriage horses at a large








S2 Going to the Smilhy.


A friend of mine once was coming home from a distant town
in the night and lost his way; after trying to find it, he laid the
reins on his horse's neck and said, Go home, Fanny." She
turned into another road unknown to him, and the gentleman
was soon at his own door. A.

A SAGACIOUS HORSE.
A very large heavy horse, known as Dick," owned by Mr.
J. Campbell, and used as a coal-carrier, slipped and fell a few
days ago under a heavy load, and was sadly shaken by the fall.
After he got up, and while the men were freeing the team, Dick
was missing; no one knew where he had gone. He was not
in the stable; he could not be found. His master went in search
and found him at last in Mulloy's smithy, William's Street,
" Who brought that horse here ? he inquired. No one, sir;
he walked in himself unaccompanied, and signified that he
wanted a new pair of shoes. I understood the case instantly
and fitted him. He had fallen, and was aware that the poor
shoes that he had on were the cause of the disaster, and -came
to me to supply the preventive against future similar disaster."
Mr. Campbell took the horse and departed-the firm step of the
animal indicating his confidence in the improved understanding
given to him by the worthy smith.--Chlhsca Tlegraph (U.S.A.)

RESCUING A FRIEND.
Some years since the servant of Mr. Thomas Walker, of Man-
chester, going one day to water the carriage horses at a large










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--UNBOLTING THE GATE.-- -




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Protecting a Companion. 15


stone trough which was then at one end of the Exchange, a dog
which was accustomed to lie in a stall with one of them, followed
the horses as he usually did, and was attacked with such ferocity
by a large mastiff that he was in danger of being worried, when
one of the horses (his friend and favourite), which was led by the
servant with the halter, suddenly broke loose from him, and
went to the place where the dogs were fighting, and with a
kick of one of his heels tossed the mastiff into a cooper's cellar,
and having thus rescued his companion, returned quietly with
him to drink at the conduit.
THE SAGACIOUS CART-HORSE.
A carter in Fifeshire had a fine old horse. From the carter
having a large family, this animal had got particularly intimate
with the children, and would on no account move when they
were playing among its feet, as if it feared to do them injury.
The youngest boy being too small to mount, the horse would
put down its head to the ground, allow him to get astride its
neck, and then by gently elevating the head, would let him slip
backwards to his seat on his back. On one occasion, when
dragging a loaded cart through a narrowlane, a child happened
to be playing in the road, and would inevitably have been
crushed by the wheels, had it not been for the sagacity of this
animal. He carefully took it by the clothes with his teeth,
carried it a few yards, and then placed it on a bank by the way-
side, moving slowly all the while, and looking back as if to'
satisfy himself that the wheels of the cart had cleared it.
"i.








16 Jumping from the Bridge.


SINGULAR ESCAPE OF A HORSE.
A remarkable sight was witnessed one Monday morning by
the passengers on two trains of the Harlem Railroad. As the
down train, due at Twenty-sixth Street at 11.30 a.m., was
approaching the high stone bridge that spans the valley between
One Hundred and One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Street, and
had entered upon the high walled grade that leads to the bridge,
a spirited young horse was discovered trotting unconcernedly
on the track, ahead of the engine, going in the direction.of the
bridge. At this moment an upward-bound train approached,
thus blocking the animal's retreat in the other direction. The
dilemma of the horse became strikingly apparent in his dilating
nostrils and glaring eyes. Although advance and retreat were
alike impossible, one alternative remained. Rearing his head
with a toss of defiance at his advancing foes, the animal suddenly
turned and plunged headlong from the bridge, falling a distAnce
of over twenty feet. He alighted safely on his feet, and trotted
off as if nothing unusual had happened.-American Paper.
HORSE AT MILFORD JUNCTION.
Often have I watched with surprise and delight, at this rail-
way junction, the fine horse that was employed in making
up" and "shunting" the trains. On some occasions he was so
placed between carriages moving towards each other, that I felt
sure he would be killed; but just at the right moment the
sagacious creature would jump from between the rails to a
place of safety. No man could have acted with greater wisdom.








16 Jumping from the Bridge.


SINGULAR ESCAPE OF A HORSE.
A remarkable sight was witnessed one Monday morning by
the passengers on two trains of the Harlem Railroad. As the
down train, due at Twenty-sixth Street at 11.30 a.m., was
approaching the high stone bridge that spans the valley between
One Hundred and One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Street, and
had entered upon the high walled grade that leads to the bridge,
a spirited young horse was discovered trotting unconcernedly
on the track, ahead of the engine, going in the direction.of the
bridge. At this moment an upward-bound train approached,
thus blocking the animal's retreat in the other direction. The
dilemma of the horse became strikingly apparent in his dilating
nostrils and glaring eyes. Although advance and retreat were
alike impossible, one alternative remained. Rearing his head
with a toss of defiance at his advancing foes, the animal suddenly
turned and plunged headlong from the bridge, falling a distAnce
of over twenty feet. He alighted safely on his feet, and trotted
off as if nothing unusual had happened.-American Paper.
HORSE AT MILFORD JUNCTION.
Often have I watched with surprise and delight, at this rail-
way junction, the fine horse that was employed in making
up" and "shunting" the trains. On some occasions he was so
placed between carriages moving towards each other, that I felt
sure he would be killed; but just at the right moment the
sagacious creature would jump from between the rails to a
place of safety. No man could have acted with greater wisdom.





















































































GEORGE III. AND HIS FAVOURITE HORSE ADONIS."
- 6]B











Charlie's Caution. 19


"ADONIS," THE FAVOURITE OF KING GEORGE III.
The favourite charger of George the Third, named "Adonis,"
was an animal of great beauty and extraordinary sagacity.
His affection for his royal master was perhaps equal to either.
I have heard that on one occasion, when His Majesty visited
Cumberland Lodge, the horse, then in the stable, heard his voice,
and began neighing with great violence; the king hearing him
went to the door, which seemed only to increase his anxiety.
His Majesty, knowing the cause, said, "Well, well, I must
humour him; bring Adonis out." He was saddled and led
forth; his royal master mounted and rode him for a short time,
to the manifest delight of the creature, which appeared conscious
of his burden; and upon the king's alighting he returned to his
stable, perfectly quiet and satisfied. It is a curious and melan-
choly fact, that the horse which carried the king so long, died in
a state of madness, some time after the monarch's last attack.


REMARKABLE CAUTION OF A HORSE.
The following instance of the memory and caution of a horse
which narrowly escaped being killed by the fall of a tree is not
uninteresting. "During my residence," says the writer, on
the head-waters of the Susquehanna, I owned a small American
horse of the name of Charlie,' that was remarkable for his
attachment to my own person, as well as for his general good
qualities. He was a great favourite with all the family; and








Charlie's Caution. 19


"ADONIS," THE FAVOURITE OF KING GEORGE III.
The favourite charger of George the Third, named "Adonis,"
was an animal of great beauty and extraordinary sagacity.
His affection for his royal master was perhaps equal to either.
I have heard that on one occasion, when His Majesty visited
Cumberland Lodge, the horse, then in the stable, heard his voice,
and began neighing with great violence; the king hearing him
went to the door, which seemed only to increase his anxiety.
His Majesty, knowing the cause, said, "Well, well, I must
humour him; bring Adonis out." He was saddled and led
forth; his royal master mounted and rode him for a short time,
to the manifest delight of the creature, which appeared conscious
of his burden; and upon the king's alighting he returned to his
stable, perfectly quiet and satisfied. It is a curious and melan-
choly fact, that the horse which carried the king so long, died in
a state of madness, some time after the monarch's last attack.


REMARKABLE CAUTION OF A HORSE.
The following instance of the memory and caution of a horse
which narrowly escaped being killed by the fall of a tree is not
uninteresting. "During my residence," says the writer, on
the head-waters of the Susquehanna, I owned a small American
horse of the name of Charlie,' that was remarkable for his
attachment to my own person, as well as for his general good
qualities. He was a great favourite with all the family; and








20 Charlie's Place of Shelter.

being a favourite he was frequently indulged with less work and
more to eat than any of the other horses on the farm. At a
short distance from the dwelling-house was a small but luxuriant
pasture, where during the summer Charlie was often permitted
to graze.
When this pasture had been originally reclaimed from its
wild-forest state, about ten years previous to the per;id of which
I am speaking, four or five large trees, of the sugar-maple
species, had been left standing when the rest were cut down,
and means had afterwards been found to prevent their being
scorched by the fire at the time the rest of the timber had been
consumed. Though remarkably fine trees of their kind, they
were however no great ornament, their stems being long and
bare, their heads small, and by no means full of leaves-the
case generally with trees that have grown in close contact with
each other in the American forests: but if they were no orna-
ment, they might serve as shade trees. Beneath one of these
trees Charlie used to seek shelter, as well from the heat of the
meridian sun as from the severe thunder-gusts that occasionally
ravage that part of the country. On an occasion of this sort
Charlie had taken his stand close to his favourite tree, his tail
actually pressing against it, his head and body in an exact line
with the wind, apparently understanding the most advantageous
position to escape the violence of the storm, and quite at home,
as it-were, for he had stood in the same place some scores of
times. The storm came on, and raged with such violence









































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HORSE ESCAPING FROM THE FALLING TREE.


















































































9








The Falling Tree. 23


that the tree under which the horse had sought shelter was
literally torn up by the roots. I happened to be standing at a
window, from which I witnessed the whole scene. The moment
Charlie heard the roots giving way behind him, that is on the
contrary side of the tree from where he stood, and probably
feeling the uprooted tree pressing against his tail, he sprang
forward and barely cleared the ground, upon which at the next
moment the top of the tree fell with such force that the crash
was tremendous, for every limb and branch were actually riven
asunder. I have many a time seen horses alarmed, nay, exceed-
ingly frightened, but never in my life did I witness anything of
the sort that bore the slightest comparison to Charlie's extreme
terror; and yet Charlie on ordinary occasions was by no means
a coward. He galloped, he reared his mane and tossed his
head, he stopped short and snorted wildly, then darted off at
the top of his speed in a contrary direction, and then as suddenly
stopped and set off in another, until long after the storm had
considerably abated; and it was not until the lapse of some
hours that he ventured to reconnoitre-but that at a considerable
distance-the scene of his narrow escape.
For that day at least his appetite was completely spoiled;
for he never offered to stoop his head to the ground while day-
light continued. The next day his apprehension seemed some-
what abated; but his curiosity had been excited to such a pitch
that he kept pacing from place to place, never failing to halt as
he passed within a moderate distance of the prostrate tree,








24 Taking his Place in the Ranks.


gazing threat in utter bewilderment, as if wholly unable to
comprehend the scene he had witnessed the preceding day.
After this occurrence took place I kept this favourite horse
several years, and during the summer months he usually enjoyed
the benefit of his old pasture; but it was quite clear he never
forgot on any occasion the narrow escape he had had; for
neither the burning rays of the noontide summer sun, nor the
furious raging of the thunderstorm, could compel Charlie to
seek shelter under one of the trees that still remained standing
in his small pasture."

THE OLD TROOPER.
The following ludicrous incident occurred years ago in the
Castle-yard, Dublin. A farmer had some time previously pur-
chased at one of the sales an old troop-horse which had been
sold as unfit for further service in the army. The animal being
very quiet, the farmer mounted his daughter upon him, and
sent her with a supply of milk to the city, where she unfor-
tunately.for herself arrived just at the time the soldiers were
relieving guard. The horse, hearing the music to which he
had been long accustomed, became ungovernable by his fair
rider, and trotting, snuffing, and snorting, dashed into the Castle-
yard, with his rider and her milk-pails, and took his place in
the midst of the ranks, to the no small amusement of all present.
It required the help of some of the men to remove the old
trooper!
















I i ll


Nb




i s



















7s i
























THE OLD TROOER AND THE MILK-GIRL. -

C





























































































L
\








Saving the Blind Horse. 27


THAT COLT OF GOOD MEMORY.
A gentleman writing from Rawson Lodge,.Virginia, United
States, says:-" When I was a youth of eighteen years, I was
directed to ride a colt from Milford to Worcester, Massachusetts,
eighteen miles. The colt had never been on that road before.
In a very secluded locality on the way I had, my lunch, which
the colt gladly shared with me. On returning, the docile colt
surprised me by suddenly darting out of the road, to the iden-
tical- bar-post in the fence where we had eaten our lunch.
Much did I regret that I was not provided with another lunch
to give him. God holds us responsible for our treatment of
all dumb animals."

SAGACITY AND SYMPATHY OF A HORSE.
A blind horse lately wandered into the river near the National
Road Bridge, and getting beyond his depth, swam around in a
circle in his efforts to find his way out. His distress attracted the
attention of another horse near by on the bank, who instantly
went to his assistance. He first went to the water's edge, and
attempted to direct the blind horse by neighing; but finding
this proceeding ineffectual, he boldly took to the water and
swam out to his relief. After swimming around him for nearly
a quarter of an hour, he finally got the blind horse to under-
stand his good intentions, and in what direction the land lay,
and the two horses came to shore side by side amid the cheers
of upwards of one hundred spectators.-Indianopolis Yournal.








Saving the Blind Horse. 27


THAT COLT OF GOOD MEMORY.
A gentleman writing from Rawson Lodge,.Virginia, United
States, says:-" When I was a youth of eighteen years, I was
directed to ride a colt from Milford to Worcester, Massachusetts,
eighteen miles. The colt had never been on that road before.
In a very secluded locality on the way I had, my lunch, which
the colt gladly shared with me. On returning, the docile colt
surprised me by suddenly darting out of the road, to the iden-
tical- bar-post in the fence where we had eaten our lunch.
Much did I regret that I was not provided with another lunch
to give him. God holds us responsible for our treatment of
all dumb animals."

SAGACITY AND SYMPATHY OF A HORSE.
A blind horse lately wandered into the river near the National
Road Bridge, and getting beyond his depth, swam around in a
circle in his efforts to find his way out. His distress attracted the
attention of another horse near by on the bank, who instantly
went to his assistance. He first went to the water's edge, and
attempted to direct the blind horse by neighing; but finding
this proceeding ineffectual, he boldly took to the water and
swam out to his relief. After swimming around him for nearly
a quarter of an hour, he finally got the blind horse to under-
stand his good intentions, and in what direction the land lay,
and the two horses came to shore side by side amid the cheers
of upwards of one hundred spectators.-Indianopolis Yournal.







28 Coming for the Plaster.


A GRATEFUL PATIENT.
A lady remarkable for benevolence to the brute creation,
observed from her garden-gate one day a miserable horse, with
the shoulder raw and bleeding, attempting to graze on an open
spot adjacent. Having, by means of some bread, coaxed the
poor animal to the gate, she then managed, with some assistance,
to cover the wound with adhesive plaster spread on a piece of
soft leather. The man to whom the animal belonged (one of
those ignorant beings who are indifferent to the sufferings of
any but themselves) shortly afterwards led the horse away. The
next day, however, the horse made his appearance again at the
gate, over which he put his head and gently neighed. On look-
ing at him it was found that the plaster was removed, either by
the animal's master or by the rubbing of the ill-made collar in
which he worked. The plaster was renewed. The third day
he appeared again, requiring the same attention, which he
solicited in a similar manner. After this the plaster was allowed
to remain, and the horse recovered; but ever after, whenever
it saw its benefactress, it would immediately approach her, and
by voice and action testify its sense of her kindness and notice.
This anecdote, for the truth of which we can personally testify,
proves how, sensible the horse is of humane treatment, and how
grateful for benefits bestowed. Considerate treatment and
every care are due to an animal from whose services man
"derives such important benefits; but too often does man forget
that he has a duty to perform, not only towards his fellow-man,











di~



Ij IT







, -,a,-




I .-l










THE GRATEFUL HORSE.


















































































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I








The Visitor to the Shanty. 31

but towards those domestic animals which Providence has
entrusted to him for his welfare.

SINGULAR CASE OF INSTINCT IN A HORSE.
We do not remember ever to have heard of a more remarkable
exhibition of equine intelligence than was communicated to us
a few days since by Mr. Allen of this place. The circumstances
as they were related to us were as follows:-
Mr. Allen has had for a considerable time a span of sprightly
little horses, that he has never separated. In the stable, in the
field, in the harness, they have always been together. This has
caused a strong attachment to grow up between them. A few
days ago, he went with them out to Lake Minnetonka, on a
fishing excursion. Taking them out of the carriage, he led
them down to the lake, and tied them with stout ropes, several
rods apart, on a strip of grass that grew upon the shore, and
left them to feed. Returning to the shanty, he threw himself
upon the floor to await the return of the party who had repaired
to the lake to fish. Not much time had elapsed before the
sound of an approaching horse's feet attracted his attention,
and a moment after, one of his span appeared at the door. The
animal put his head in, and giving one neigh, turned, and at a
slow gallop, yet under evident excitement, returned to the spot
where but a few minutes before he and his companion had been
fastened. Surprised to find his horse loose, and struck with
his singular conduct, Mr. Allen immediately followed, and








32 A Remarkable Instance of Sympathy.

found the other lying in the water, entangled in the rope, and
struggling to keep his head from being submerged.
While Mr. Allen proceeded to disengage the unfortunate
horse, his noble benefactor stood by, manifesting the utmost
solicitude and sympathy, and when his mate was extricated from
its perilous situation, and again upon its feet, the generous
creature exhibited unquestionable signs of satisfaction and joy.
That this intelligent animal should have noticed the misfor-
tune of his mate, that he should know where to apply for res-
cue, and in his efforts should sunder a three-fourths of an inch
rope-and finally that he should exhibit so high an appreciation
of the event, are circumstances to astonish us, and commend
themselves to the thoughtful consideration of those who would
limit the power of reasoning to man.-American Paper.

WONDERFUL CASE OF SENSIBILITY TO DANGER.
Mr. Jesse writes:-
The following is an instance of the sensibility, if I may call
it so, of a horse, and proves how alive he is to danger.
A friend of mine was riding a horse one day in India, attended
by a spaniel dog, who had long been its companion. The dog
ran into some long grass and came out crying and shaking its
head: the horse, contrary to its usual custom, not only avoided
the dog, but showed the utmost dread of its coming near him :
the dog soon died, and, upon examining him, it was found that
he had been bitten in the tongue by a venomous snake.
4-











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HCRSE AVOIDING THE POISONED DOG.

































































































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Seeking for Help. 35


THE FAITHFUL SERVANT.
Professor Kruger, of Halle, relates the following instance of
fidelity in a horse:-" A friend of mine one night was riding
home through a wood, and had the misfortune to strike his
head against the overhanging branch of a tree, and fell from
his horse stunned by the blow. The horse immediately
returned to the house which they had left, about a mile distant.
He found the door closed, and the family gone to bed. He
paused at the door till one of them, hearing the noise, arose
and opened it, and to his surprise saw the horse of his friend.
No sooner was the door opened, than the horse turned round,
and the man, suspecting there was something wrong, followed
the animal, which led him directly to the spot where his master
lay on the ground in a faint."

A VALUABLE HORSE LOST BY CRUELTY.
A lady, a friend of animals, writes:-"While sitting at my
window there passed by a heavily loaded cart drawn by a remark-
ably fine horse. I thought how verystrong he looked; how proudly
he arched his glossy neck, and how stately was his tread, when
my admiration was quickly changed to sorrow, by seeing the
brutal and ignorant driver raise his heavy whip, bringing it down
upon the poor animal, who was already doing his very best.
The horse started and would have galloped off with his load, if
he could, but the weight of the cart jerked him back with such
suddenness as to be too much even for his iron frame, and the








Seeking for Help. 35


THE FAITHFUL SERVANT.
Professor Kruger, of Halle, relates the following instance of
fidelity in a horse:-" A friend of mine one night was riding
home through a wood, and had the misfortune to strike his
head against the overhanging branch of a tree, and fell from
his horse stunned by the blow. The horse immediately
returned to the house which they had left, about a mile distant.
He found the door closed, and the family gone to bed. He
paused at the door till one of them, hearing the noise, arose
and opened it, and to his surprise saw the horse of his friend.
No sooner was the door opened, than the horse turned round,
and the man, suspecting there was something wrong, followed
the animal, which led him directly to the spot where his master
lay on the ground in a faint."

A VALUABLE HORSE LOST BY CRUELTY.
A lady, a friend of animals, writes:-"While sitting at my
window there passed by a heavily loaded cart drawn by a remark-
ably fine horse. I thought how verystrong he looked; how proudly
he arched his glossy neck, and how stately was his tread, when
my admiration was quickly changed to sorrow, by seeing the
brutal and ignorant driver raise his heavy whip, bringing it down
upon the poor animal, who was already doing his very best.
The horse started and would have galloped off with his load, if
he could, but the weight of the cart jerked him back with such
suddenness as to be too much even for his iron frame, and the








36 Affction of a Hunter and Greyhound.

poor creature fell, and I learned that he died the next day, to the
great grief of his owner. All this for want of proper intelligence
and thought on the part of his careless driver. It is rarely-I
might almost say never-necessary to whip horses; but if it must
be done, let the driver give some warning sign or word before
striking, and thu ssave manyahard strain and permanent injury."

HORSE AND GREYHOUND.
A gentleman of Bristol had a greyhound, which slept in
the stable along with a very fine hunter of about five years of
age. These animals became mutually attached,-and regarded
each other with the most tender affection. The greyhound
always lay under the manger, beside the horse, who was so fond
of him, that he was unhappy and restless when out of his sight.
It was a common practice with the gentleman to whom they
belonged to call at the stable for the greyhound to accompany
him in his walks: on such occasions, the horse would look over
his shoulder at the dog with much anxiety, and neigh in a
manner which plainly said, Let me accompany you." When
the dog returned to the stable, he was always welcomed by a
loud neigh : he ran up ,to the horse, and licked his nose; in
return the horse would scratch his back with his teeth.
One day, when the groom was out with the horse and grey-
hound for exercise, a large dog attacked the latter, and quickly
bore him to the ground; on which the horse threw back his
ears, and, in spite of all the efforts of the groom, rushed at the



































































HORSE AND GREYHOUND.











Gentle Conduct of a Lady's Horse. 39


strange dog who was worrying the greyhound, seized him by
the back with his teeth, which speedily made him quit his hold:
he shook him till a large piece of the skin gave way, when he
fell to the ground. He no sooner got on his feet, than he
judged it prudent to beat a precipitate retreat from so
formidable an enemy.

REMARKABLE CASE OF A GENTLE HORSE.
A lady who was a clever rider was in the field one day, and
in trying to clear a hedge her horse fell into a ditch on the
other side of the fence. The lady fell completely under the
horse, and her head was between and slightly in advance of his
fore-legs, where she could be seen and talked to by those who
assisted in extricating her. At first it was thought that the only
way of releasing her would be by digging her out, commencing
on the further side of the hedge; but at last it was decided to
move the horse by urging him forward, raising his head and
hind-quarters at the same time by main force. The only fear
was that the horse might trample on his rider, which really
seemed almost impossible for him to avoid.
The lady showed marvellous courage during this trying pe-
riod, and put full faith in the gentleness and instinct of her horse,
which she said she had ridden for four years, and been accus-
tomed to pet and feed with horses' dainties. Her reliance on
him was merited by the result, as the horse on moving forward
placed his feet on the only available spot of ground which her








40 Forming into Line.

form did not cover; and the only mark made on the lady's face
was one where his knees rubbed her in making his first move-
ment, which it was impossible to avoid.

TROOPERS IN THUNDERSTORMS.
Soon after the year 1745 a troop of cavalry, commanded by
Sir Robert Clayton, was disbanded in the city of York; but as
Sir Robert could not bear the idea of selling the dumb com-
panions of his perils in Germany, to become butchers' hacks,
and thelike,,he absolutely purchased a piece of ground upon
Knavesmire Heath, upon which it was his desire these old horses
should remain for life. It was upon this spot they were seen
by the gentleman who communicated this article. A thunder-
storm coming on at the same time, he was also a witness of the
surprising powers of instinct in th p oble animals. They were
grazing promiscuously when the first flashes of lightning made
their appearance, and the distant thunder began to roll;. but
as if they supposed these appearances to be the signal of an
approaching battle, they were very soon collected; and with-
out the least assistance of any intelligent being, formed into a
line almost as complete as if they had been managed by their
respective riders.
About the period of the first American war, the horses of a
heavy dragoon regiment, during the summer months, were sent
to grass at Haverscr6ft, a village between Barnsley and Ponte-
fract in the West Riding of York. One hot summer day, a







.// 7 .


































































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TROOPERS IN A THUNDERSTORM. ~ -- ^.


T- "7 K-''
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-- -- ;:--.ur,
--. ---i;--;-1- :----- I--CRld*CBCIIIIIllBn








.What was accomplished without a Whip. 43

tremendous thunderstorm occurring, these horses, occupying
a large enclosure, were observed to collect in a body, and after-
wards form in a line, with as much regularity and exactness as
when exercised on a field day; and, whilst the thunder rolled
its awful burden to the wind," and the lightning glared on
every side, maintained their position during the continuance of
the storm, exhibiting a most astonishing proof of animal
sagacity, and one of the most magnificent spectacles that the
mind can well conceive.

A CLEVER SOMERSETSHIRE HORSE.
The following fact, which occurred in one of the prettiest towns
of Somersetshire, proves that the whip is not required for the
horse when it is properly trained. Some years ago the road in
front of our house required to be widened, and in consequence
there were a large number of men at work from daylight until
sunset. One day a man came up the road with his horse and
cart, although told by the men that he could not possibly pass
that way, there being quite a wall of earth laid across the road ;
he only said he must and would pass; still the men tried to dis-
suade him from attempting the feat, by telling him of the severe
flogging the poor horse would have to undergo before he would
go over the wall. He only laughed, and said he never beat his
horse at any time-and he said this with an air of triumph-he
and his horse perfectly understood one another. The men had
left off working, while the man stood patting his horse; presently








44 A Visit to Old Cronies.

he spoke a few kind words, which the horse seemed to under-
stand quite well, and in another moment he had taken the animal
by its bridle, and running by its side, they cleared the obstacle,
to the astonishment and admiration of the bystanders. The
man said a few more words in praise of his horse, and then went
on his way, leaving the men rather astonished that so much
could be accomplished without the aid of a whip. Is it not
desirable that men who thus train their horses to obey by kind
words instead of blows should be rewarded by medals or certi-
ficates of honour ?
AN OLD CRONY.
A few years b4ck, some squadrons of the Scots Greys which
were out for exercise had occasion to pass up Leith Walk, near
the middle of which the trumpets were ordered to sound a halt;
at that moment a, horse, dragging a cart of sand, which hap-
pened to be passing, pricked up his ears, gave a loud neigh,
and rushed into the middle of one of the troops, where he
quietly took up his station, to the no small annoyance of those
in his immediate neighbourhood.. The unfortunate carter was
immediately scolded by the adjutant for his carelessness; but
the poor man protested that he could not help it, as the animal
had made an instantaneous and precipitous bolt from him,
dragging the halter out of his hands. The carter informed the
adjutant that he supposed his horse had taken the troops in
question for some old cronies, as he had, some time before,
bought him at a sale of discharged dragoon horses.


oV ..


























-^- - - --
























































THE OLD CAVALRY HORSE.




THE OLD CAVALRY HORSE.








P
































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1
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j ..,-\- tc.e







The Survivor's Grief. 47


REMARKABLE CASE OF AFFECTION.
Two Hanoverian horses had long served together during
the Peninsular war, in the German brigade of artillery. They
had assisted in drawing the same gun, and had been inseparable
companions in many battles. One of them was at last killed;
and after the engagement the survivor was picketed as usual,
and his food brought to him. He refused, however, to eat, and
was constantly turning round his head to look for his com-
panion, sometimes neighing as if to call him. All the care that
was bestowed upon him was of no avail. He was surrounded
by other horses, but he did not notice them; and he shortly
afterwards died, not having once tasted food from the time his
former associate was killed. A gentleman who witnessed the
circumstance assured me that nothing could be more affecting.

MEMORY AND ATTACHMENT.
Colonel Hamilton Smith had a charger in his possession for
two years, which he left with the army, but which was brought
back and sold in London. About three years afterwards the
colonel travelled up to town, and at a relay, on getting out of
the mail, the off-wheel horse attracted his attention; on going
near to examine it with more care, he found the animal recog-
nising him, and testifying its satisfaction by rubbing its head
against him, and making every moment a little stamp with its
fore-feet, to the surprise of the coachman, who asked if the horse
was not an old acquaintance. It was his own old charger.







The Survivor's Grief. 47


REMARKABLE CASE OF AFFECTION.
Two Hanoverian horses had long served together during
the Peninsular war, in the German brigade of artillery. They
had assisted in drawing the same gun, and had been inseparable
companions in many battles. One of them was at last killed;
and after the engagement the survivor was picketed as usual,
and his food brought to him. He refused, however, to eat, and
was constantly turning round his head to look for his com-
panion, sometimes neighing as if to call him. All the care that
was bestowed upon him was of no avail. He was surrounded
by other horses, but he did not notice them; and he shortly
afterwards died, not having once tasted food from the time his
former associate was killed. A gentleman who witnessed the
circumstance assured me that nothing could be more affecting.

MEMORY AND ATTACHMENT.
Colonel Hamilton Smith had a charger in his possession for
two years, which he left with the army, but which was brought
back and sold in London. About three years afterwards the
colonel travelled up to town, and at a relay, on getting out of
the mail, the off-wheel horse attracted his attention; on going
near to examine it with more care, he found the animal recog-
nising him, and testifying its satisfaction by rubbing its head
against him, and making every moment a little stamp with its
fore-feet, to the surprise of the coachman, who asked if the horse
was not an old acquaintance. It was his own old charger.








48 The Pr..' Ow ership.

'H UNCT AL HORSE.
A farm-sei ant w ft to t public-house he night, and. for-
got to fa4tei the sable-d r.,. Through is drinking he was up
very in th/ ornin ar when hbwent to the stable o
of te horses as go e /He sea ed in all direcfTons,/but/
uldnot the mssin'g anim j.t-last he saw'a' lad in the
road, wh old hi rtha about x o'clock he,'ne.t a horse wit.
ta lr or atten nt goi in the directly of the field/in.
which t e man fad,Worked he previous ni it. The ma waA
/ m /t/ /"
ov jo ed at his formion, hastened /the field, an the e,
t hi surprise, f el by thb h ows ere he had 1b -n ,wced th rec ing
night!

SA STOLEN OR$E /
A cu.ious nst ce of instinct wciC curred t Bri ol proves
he gqeat oc : memory p sse e y hoses. p son,
ecogaisi-n horse best e by trynn to e o which-
he hinsel hd lost abo/ nine n s r vious y, s ie hhis
property, I d said, Tis is m i s .;' will rovt in ,two
min tes, qiit my cl m.'" He e r ated t e mal from
restraint et jhim go large, a dc ed his ro fUto be that
the, hours wc Ild ie und at hisstable som dis ace; a/fact
wtich w c iartai ed in a few minu s, b he o claimants
ariid the liY tand r' repairing thit whee t found the
hprse lqu t h e. j ,








48 The Pr..' Ow ership.

'H UNCT AL HORSE.
A farm-sei ant w ft to t public-house he night, and. for-
got to fa4tei the sable-d r.,. Through is drinking he was up
very in th/ ornin ar when hbwent to the stable o
of te horses as go e /He sea ed in all direcfTons,/but/
uldnot the mssin'g anim j.t-last he saw'a' lad in the
road, wh old hi rtha about x o'clock he,'ne.t a horse wit.
ta lr or atten nt goi in the directly of the field/in.
which t e man fad,Worked he previous ni it. The ma waA
/ m /t/ /"
ov jo ed at his formion, hastened /the field, an the e,
t hi surprise, f el by thb h ows ere he had 1b -n ,wced th rec ing
night!

SA STOLEN OR$E /
A cu.ious nst ce of instinct wciC curred t Bri ol proves
he gqeat oc : memory p sse e y hoses. p son,
ecogaisi-n horse best e by trynn to e o which-
he hinsel hd lost abo/ nine n s r vious y, s ie hhis
property, I d said, Tis is m i s .;' will rovt in ,two
min tes, qiit my cl m.'" He e r ated t e mal from
restraint et jhim go large, a dc ed his ro fUto be that
the, hours wc Ild ie und at hisstable som dis ace; a/fact
wtich w c iartai ed in a few minu s, b he o claimants
ariid the liY tand r' repairing thit whee t found the
hprse lqu t h e. j ,






Pages
49 50
missing
from
original








Openitng the Stable Door. 5 I

TYROLESE HORSES.
The Tyrolese, in one of their insurrections in the early part
of this century, captured fifteen horses from the troops sent
against them, and mounted them with as many of their own
men, in order to go out to a fresh encounter with the same
troops: but no sooner did these horses hear the well-known
sound of their own trumpet, and recognize the uniform of their
own squadrons, than they darted onward at full speed, and in spite
of all the efforts of their riders, bore them into the ranks, where
they were made prisoners.

A REMARKABLY CLEVER HORSE.
The following anecdote is given on the authority of Dr.
Macdonnel, well-known for his great talents as a naturalist:-
A gentleman with whom the Doctor was acquainted, had a
horse, which had been observed to disengage his head from the
halter; then to open the stable door, and go out in the middle
of the night only, aid regale himself upon corn in a field at a
considerable distance. TThe horse returned to his stall before
the break of day, and had continued this practice for some
time without being detected. He adroitly opened the door by
a string fastened to the latch, with his teeth; and it is said
that on returning to the stable he shut the door."
Horses, dogs, and indeed many other animals, give extra-
ordinary proofs of their intelligence and reflection. I have
known houses open a door or gate which was fastened with a








Openitng the Stable Door. 5 I

TYROLESE HORSES.
The Tyrolese, in one of their insurrections in the early part
of this century, captured fifteen horses from the troops sent
against them, and mounted them with as many of their own
men, in order to go out to a fresh encounter with the same
troops: but no sooner did these horses hear the well-known
sound of their own trumpet, and recognize the uniform of their
own squadrons, than they darted onward at full speed, and in spite
of all the efforts of their riders, bore them into the ranks, where
they were made prisoners.

A REMARKABLY CLEVER HORSE.
The following anecdote is given on the authority of Dr.
Macdonnel, well-known for his great talents as a naturalist:-
A gentleman with whom the Doctor was acquainted, had a
horse, which had been observed to disengage his head from the
halter; then to open the stable door, and go out in the middle
of the night only, aid regale himself upon corn in a field at a
considerable distance. TThe horse returned to his stall before
the break of day, and had continued this practice for some
time without being detected. He adroitly opened the door by
a string fastened to the latch, with his teeth; and it is said
that on returning to the stable he shut the door."
Horses, dogs, and indeed many other animals, give extra-
ordinary proofs of their intelligence and reflection. I have
known houses open a door or gate which was fastened with a








52 The Trumpeter aid h.s Chargtr.

latch, or bolt: a proof that they must have been aware that it
was the cause of the door keeping shut.
THE FAITHFUL COMPANION.
During t e Peninsular War, the trumpeter of a French
cavalry corps had A beautiful charger assigned to him, of which
he became passionately fond, and which by gentleness of disposi-
tion and uniform docility equally evinced its affection. The
sound of the trumpeter's voice, the sight of his uniform, or the
twang of his trumpet, was sufficient to throw this animal into
a state bf excitement; and he appeared to be pleased And happy
only-when under the saddle of his rider. Indeed, he was unruly
and u-Aless to everybody else; for, once on being removed to
another part of the forces, and consigned to a young officer, h
resolutely refused to perform his evolutions, and bolted to the
Trumpeter's station, and there took his stand, jostling alongside
Shis former master. This animal, on being restored to the
trumpeter, carried him, during several. of the Peninsular
campaigns, through many difficulties and hair-bread:h escapes.
At last the corps. to which he belonged wa's worsted, and in the
confusion of retreat, the trumpeter was mortagy wounded.
Dropping from his horse, his body was found nfity days after
the engagement stretched on the a d, with the faithful
charger standing beside it. .-'Duri ihe long interval it seems
that he had never quitted thet-rumpeter's side, but had stood
sentinel over his corpse, scaring away the tirds of .prey, and
remaining totally heedless of his own privations.









WE














FURN
















































THE FAITHFUL COMPANION.
















































*










.







































/ '; "








nrpecting the Broken Leg. 55-

A HORSE PROTECTING A DOG.
To what extent the horse may be endowed with any power of
reasoning may be a question; but the intelligence he sometimes
exhibits is certainly more than instinct. Some time ago, a poor
dog having been inhumanlypelted with sticks and stones by some
cruel boys until h:s flesh was bruised and his leg fractured,
limped into a stable. In one of the stalls was an intelligent
young horse, which seemed touched by the distress of the dog.
He bent his head and inspected the broken leg with his fore-
feet, pushed some straw into a corner of the stall, and made
a bed for the dog. One day, when the horse was eating the
bran mash which formed part of his food, he gently caught
the dog by the neck, and with his teeth lifted him into the
trough., For weeks the two friends fed together, and the
invalid grew strong. At night the horse arranged a soft bed for
the dog, and encircled him with one of his fore-feet, showing
the utmost carefulness.

A GOOD SWIMMER.
It is certain that horses have the power of swimming many
miles, of which the following fact is a proof. A gentleman,.
while bathing under the rocks which are close to the sea near
Dunraven Castle, in Glamorganshire, saw some strange object
at a considerable distance swimming towards him; as this object
came nearer, it made a great snorting and proved to be a horse.
The opposite coast was ten or twelve miles from the spot, and








nrpecting the Broken Leg. 55-

A HORSE PROTECTING A DOG.
To what extent the horse may be endowed with any power of
reasoning may be a question; but the intelligence he sometimes
exhibits is certainly more than instinct. Some time ago, a poor
dog having been inhumanlypelted with sticks and stones by some
cruel boys until h:s flesh was bruised and his leg fractured,
limped into a stable. In one of the stalls was an intelligent
young horse, which seemed touched by the distress of the dog.
He bent his head and inspected the broken leg with his fore-
feet, pushed some straw into a corner of the stall, and made
a bed for the dog. One day, when the horse was eating the
bran mash which formed part of his food, he gently caught
the dog by the neck, and with his teeth lifted him into the
trough., For weeks the two friends fed together, and the
invalid grew strong. At night the horse arranged a soft bed for
the dog, and encircled him with one of his fore-feet, showing
the utmost carefulness.

A GOOD SWIMMER.
It is certain that horses have the power of swimming many
miles, of which the following fact is a proof. A gentleman,.
while bathing under the rocks which are close to the sea near
Dunraven Castle, in Glamorganshire, saw some strange object
at a considerable distance swimming towards him; as this object
came nearer, it made a great snorting and proved to be a horse.
The opposite coast was ten or twelve miles from the spot, and








56 Swimming across the Solent.

it was never ascertained to whom the horse belonged, or from
whence it came. He was much exhausted when he landed, and
was taken to Dunraven Castle, the owner of which took care of
him for many years.
It is more than probable that the horse was endeavouring to
return to some former abode.

ANOTHER GOOD' SWIMMER.
A farmer residing on theb borders of the New Forest, in Hamp-
shire, went over to 'the Isle of Wight, and there purchased a
mare from a person of his acquaintance near Newport. The
mare was put into'a passage-boat, conveyed to the Hampshire
coast, and when landed, was taken to the purchaser's residence,
and afterwards turned into one of his fields. The next morning
the mare was missing: search was made for her, but she could
neither be found nor heard of, and it was supposed she had been
stolefl.
The farmer soon afterwards had occasion to go again to the
Isle of Wight; and on stating his loss to the person from whom
he had purchased the mare, he was informed' that she had
safely returned to the premises of her former master. The
nearest distance from the Hampshirecoast to the Isle of Wight
is five miles, although the mare probably had to swim a much
greater distance.
The farmer had to take special precautions to prevent the
horse again swimming over to her old quarters.











































































THE PUNCTUAL HORSE.
Sioru .' 1Iunscs F











Kosciusko's C/ari/y. 59


THE POLISH GENERAL'S HORSE.
Kosciusko, the Polish general, wished to send some pro-
visions to a clergyman at Solothurn ; and, as he hesitated to
entrust them to his servant, lest he should smuggle a part, he
gave the commission to a worthy young man of the name of
Zeltner, and desired him to take the horse which he himself
usually rode. Upon his return young Zeltner said to the
general that he would never ride his horse again, unless he
gave him his purse at the same time. Kosciusko, asking what
he meant, he answered: As soon as a poor man on the road
takes off his hat, and asks for charity, the horse immediately
stands still, and will not stir until something is given to the
petitioner ; and, as I had no money about me, I was obliged to
make a motion as if I were giving something, in order to satisfy
the horse."

A FRENCHMAN AND HIS HORSE.
A correspondent of one of the daily papers writes :
A touching incident occurred after the surrender of Metz.
As I was walking down one of the streets, a veterinary
surgeon of the Ambulance Corps came up, and said--' Monsieur,
my horse is dying for want of food; I have ridden him for four
years; he has shared my rations, and latterly also my bed. For
three days I have had nothing to give him to eat. Give him
something; save the poor thing's life, and take him for your
own; he is a good and faithful beast; you will never regret it.'








60 The Horse's Welcome.


I immediately accompanied the man, and on my way I bought
two loaves of bread, which we cut up as we walked along.
Arrived at the shed where his horse stood, the poor beast turned
his head, towards his master, and neighed out a welcome, though
so weak that he could scarcely move. The man, rushing up to
his horse, threw his arms round his neck, and, whilst the tears
stood in. his eyes, cried out, Tu es save Tit es savee'
The horse belonged to the staff of the French army, and,
being branded, it was, of course, the property of the conquerors
of Metz. I was, therefore, reluctantly obliged to hand him
over to the proper authorities-at the same time assuring my
friend that all possible care would be taken of his dumb but
affectionate friend."

HORSE AND CAT.
A horse and a cat were great friends, and the latter generally
slept in the manger. When the horse was going to have his
oats, he always took up the cat gently by the skin of her neck,
and dropped her into the next stall, that she might not be in his
way while he was feeding. At all other times he seemed pleased
to have her near him.

SAGACITY OF THE CART-HORSE.
Directly opposite my residence a church is being erected, and
during its progress temporary sheds have been put up for the
use of the workmen, and one as a stable for a very fine cart-








60 The Horse's Welcome.


I immediately accompanied the man, and on my way I bought
two loaves of bread, which we cut up as we walked along.
Arrived at the shed where his horse stood, the poor beast turned
his head, towards his master, and neighed out a welcome, though
so weak that he could scarcely move. The man, rushing up to
his horse, threw his arms round his neck, and, whilst the tears
stood in. his eyes, cried out, Tu es save Tit es savee'
The horse belonged to the staff of the French army, and,
being branded, it was, of course, the property of the conquerors
of Metz. I was, therefore, reluctantly obliged to hand him
over to the proper authorities-at the same time assuring my
friend that all possible care would be taken of his dumb but
affectionate friend."

HORSE AND CAT.
A horse and a cat were great friends, and the latter generally
slept in the manger. When the horse was going to have his
oats, he always took up the cat gently by the skin of her neck,
and dropped her into the next stall, that she might not be in his
way while he was feeding. At all other times he seemed pleased
to have her near him.

SAGACITY OF THE CART-HORSE.
Directly opposite my residence a church is being erected, and
during its progress temporary sheds have been put up for the
use of the workmen, and one as a stable for a very fine cart-













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SA_____








Avoiding the Scaffold Poles. 63


horse, the property of the builder. The extreme docility of this
animal attracted my attention to him, and since that some of
his manceuvres appear to me to border strongly on the sense
and the powers of reflection. His stable was erected at one end
of the church: on one occasion two poles had been fastened
across his usual road to it, in order to strengthen the scaffold-
ing; he went up, tried-the strength of these first, then finding
that he could neither get over nor under, he turned round, and,
at a full trot, made the circuit of the church, and got to the
other side of the poles by another path. Here was no straying
about, and at last finding his way; he resolved to go round, as
if an idea had at once flashed across his mind. Another day,
a waggon had been left standing in the narrowest part of his
road to the stable: he !ooked and tried each side, but found
there was not space enough for him to pass; he took very little
time for consideration, but put his breast against the back part
of the waggon, and pushed it on to a wider part of the road;
then deliberately passed on one side to his stable. Could human
wisdom have done better? But to crown all his manctuvres,
I mention the following as being, I consider, very extraordinary.
During the winter a large wide drain had been made, and over
this strong planks had been placed for our friend the cart-horse
to pass over to his stable. It had snowed during the night, and
froze very hard in the morning. How he passed over the planks
on going out to work I know not; but on being turned loose
from the cart at breakfast he came up to them, and I saw his








64 Sanding the Slipiery Planks.

fore-feet slip; he drew back immediately, and seemed for a
moment at a loss how to get on. Close to these planks a cart-
load of sand had been 'placed; he put his fore-feet on this, and
looked wistfully to the other side of the drain. The boy who
attends this horse, and who had gone round by another path,
seeing him stand there, called him. The horse immediately
turned round, and set about scraping the sand most vigorously,
first with one foot then the other. The boy, perhaps wondering
what he would be at, waited to see. When the planks were
completely covered with sand, the horse turned round again,
and unhesitatingly walked over, and trotted up to his stable
and driver.-Correspondent of the "Animal World.'

THE HORSE-" WHISPERER."

James Sullivan was a native of the county of Cork, generally
known by the appellation of the Whisperer," and his profession
was horse-breaking. The credulity of the vulgar bestowed
that epithet upon him, from an opinion that he communicated
his wishes to the animal by means of a whisper; and the
singularity of his method gave some colour to the superstitious
belief. As far as the sphere of his control extended, the boast
of Veni, vidi, vici," was more justly claimed by James Srllivan,
than by Caesar, or even Bonaparte himself. How his art was
acquired, or in what it consisted, is likely to remain for. ever
unknown, as he has lately left the world without divulging it.
His son, who follows the same occupation, possesses but. a





























































Q--


















































THE GOOD SWIMMER.
Stories of Horses.
---~-- *'









Pages
67 -68
missing
from
original










I- I /l' I I i l kII





\I 1 I I
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SULLIVAN, THE IRISH HORSE-TAMER.
Stories of Harses. I-





a







God's Care for Oxen. 71

afraid I cannot help thee," said my grandfather to the old horse,
just as I came up, and then we both stamped on the ice together,
but it was of no use. There was an out-house at a distance,
and there, directed by my grandfather, I ran and fetched an
old rail, with which we contrived to get at the water, and while
the old horse stood drinking, my grandfather kept patting him
on his chest and shoulders. It is a long time since this happened,
and very likely it might never have again occurred to me, had
it not been for these lines of my grandfather:-
Doth God care for oxen ? No doubt He does, for He gave
commandment to His chosen people, 'Thou shalt not muzzle
the ox that treadeth out the corn.' The High and Holy One
careth for all things that He has made. He can send His
creatures the ravens to satisfy the hunger of His prophet, and
his unworthy servants to assuage the thirst of His creatures."

EXTRAORDINARY SAGACITY.
One of the most remarkable instances of equine sagacity is
reported from Whitby. A young gentleman named Keene has
been for some time resident near Malton, and from Mr. Rutter,
of Hessle Farm, he bought a hunting mare, which, on leaving
Malton, he recently took with him to Whitby. On Wednesday
the mare was missing from the field, and a search was instituted
to no purpose. On Thursday the search was renewed, Mr.
Keene and his groom going about ten miles on the Guisborough
Moors, and then ,to Sleights, where they heard the mare had








72 The-Remarkable Traveller.

crossed the railway the previous morning. At this point the
trail was easy. The mare had taken the high road homewards,
and at Saltersgate six men tried to stop her, without avail. At
Pickering she jumped a load of sticks and the railway gates,
and then found herself in her old hunting country, making
across Ryedale for "home." In so doing she would have to
cross two rivers and a railway. Mr. Keene found her at home
on Thursday night with one shoe thrown and rather lame, but
otherwise no worse for her cross-country gallop of nearly sixty
miles, done in one day, for her previous owner found her on the
Wednesday night standing at the gate of the field where she
had grazed for the two previous years.

A HORSE FOND OF CHILDREN.
Strange indeed was the conduct of an old horse belonging
to a carter in Fifeshire. From the carter having a large family,
this animal had got particularly intimate with children, and
would on no account move when they were playing among its
feet, as if it feared to do them injury. The youngest boy being
too small to mount, the horse would put down its head to the
ground, allow him to -get astride its neck, and then by gently
elevating the head, would let him slip backwards to his seat on
its back. On one occasion, when dragging a loaded cart
through a narrow lane, a child happened to be playing in the
road, and would inevitably have been crushed by the wheels,
had it not been for the sagacity of this animal. He carefully






Pages
73 74
missing
from
original








The Skilful Swimmer. '75

took it by the clothes with his .teeth, eCarried it for a few yards,
and then placed it on a bank by the wayside, moving slowly all
the while, and looking back as if to satisfy himself that the
wheels of the cart had cleared it.

CLEVER BARGE HORSE.
Some years ago, a little boy, not quite eleven years of age,
was riding a barge horse on the banks of the river Thames, near
Staines. There had been much rain, and the floods were very
much out, and the boy had to guide the horse on the sides of the
river when up to its knees in water. The stream was very strong,
the waters got deeper and deeper, the horse pulled and tug-
ged, till at last the towing-rope broke, and both horse and rider
were thrown into the river, and the barge passed over them;
but the.little boy kept fast hold of the horse's mane. They rose
again behind the barge; the horse spread out his great fore-
legs and began to swim like a duck; the little boy held fast,'
but still the stream bore them along the river at a rapid rate.
The little boy, however, guided the horse. Now they were half
under water-now they were twirled round and round by an
eddy-now they were borne towards the land, and now again
to the middle of the stream; but the little boy never lost his
courage; and the old horse dashed away at a fine rate through
the flood, till he swam right into the canal-lock, and the little
boy and the big horse were both saved, and were warmed and
deservedly cheered by the spectators.



*** -









76 7ohn Hall and his Noble Horse.

HORSE WITHOUT BEARING-REIN.
The following letter will interest those who have to do with
horses. It is from John Hall, a carman in the employ of Messrs.
Spence, Blundell and Co., the well-known colour merchants of
Thames Street, London, to the editor of the British Workman,
and testifies clearly to the fact that horses can get through
their work satisfactorily without bearing-reins.

"9, Anchor Wharf, Upper Thames Street.
DEAR SIR,-You ask me to give you my opinion respecting
the use of bearing-reins and blinkers.
I have been employed as a carman for the last thirty-five
years, having been eighteen years in my former situation, and
seventeen years with Messrs. Spence, Blundell and Co. I was
induced, by a hint thrown out in the British Workman some
years ago, to try whether I could not manage my noble horse
without using the bearing-rein, and I cannot easily forget how
thankful the beautiful creature seemed to be in having the free
use of his head, and full play for his chest and limbs. I am
most happy to be able to say that I have induced other carmen
to abandon the use of these torturing appliances, but I also
grieve to say that sometimes I have met with abuse-though I
care not for that, as I know I have acted with an object of
kindness. I hope that you will try to induce many others to
take the same view.
Many are the instances I have met with of the benefit of not






























































til




























MESSRS. SPEN\CE, BLUNDELL AND COA H ORSE AND CARMAN.



































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THE CART-HORSE PLAYING WITH CHILDREN.
Stories of Horses. I







How I treat my Horse. 79

using bearing-reins. One particular case I call to mind. A van
drawn by one horse, and laden with two tons of coals, was
going over Blackfriars Bridge, just in front of my van. The
bearing-rein on the horse was drawn tight up. The poor
creature being unable to move the load up the incline, stopped,
and all the blows of the driver were of no avail. I then asked
the carman to release the horse's head, and I am sure, sir, it
would have gladdened your heart to have seen the result. On
finding his head free, the noble creature resumed his efforts,
and was able at once and with ease to move off with his load.
Then as regards blinkers. I have not until recently dis-
continued using them, owing to my horse being very nervous;
but I am glad to say that I can daily see the good result of
leaving them off. I am happy to see that the Midland Railway
Company do not use blinkers on their horses.
"And now, sir, I should like to give you a few facts as to
how I treat my fine horse. In the summer months I brush and
rinse him well all over with cold water, and after he has been
well dried, he seems so refreshed and delighted, that even after
a hard day's work he will race round the yard, take my hat
off my head, and on my holding up a stick, will dance before
me into the stable. Often on a Saturday afternoon there has
been a crowd collected round the gates to watch his gambols,
and many inquiries have been made about him.
"I may further say that we have one of the best of masters
for both man and beast.








80 Resenting Ill-treatment.


You ask me, sir, whether I think that my horse knows the
day of rest.
"On my entering his stable on a Sunday morning, and
shaking down his bed (which is not done on other mornings),
he will look round at me as if he understood that he was not
to be taken out, and will at once lie down again. This he does
not do on week-day mornings.
I am glad to be able to say that we have many teetotal car-
men in London, who as a rule are very kind to their horses. I
have been a teetotaler myself for over twenty one-years."

HORSES RESENT INJURIES.
Mr. Jesse writes :-
Horses will sometimes show resentment of injuries. I went
to see a fine hunter, who appeared perfectly docile when I went
up to him: his owner did not dare to approach him, and when
he came into the stable the noble animal was quite furious.
He had been ill-treated by him, and frequently severely beaten
when there was no occasion for it. The groom exhibited much
feeling when he told me this; and he added that with him the
horse was always good-tempered and docile."

A PONY'S PETITION.
Mr. Wadsworth, of Doncaster, writes:-
I send you a small scrap about a small grey pony, which I
know to be true, as I shod the pony for many years. When it








80 Resenting Ill-treatment.


You ask me, sir, whether I think that my horse knows the
day of rest.
"On my entering his stable on a Sunday morning, and
shaking down his bed (which is not done on other mornings),
he will look round at me as if he understood that he was not
to be taken out, and will at once lie down again. This he does
not do on week-day mornings.
I am glad to be able to say that we have many teetotal car-
men in London, who as a rule are very kind to their horses. I
have been a teetotaler myself for over twenty one-years."

HORSES RESENT INJURIES.
Mr. Jesse writes :-
Horses will sometimes show resentment of injuries. I went
to see a fine hunter, who appeared perfectly docile when I went
up to him: his owner did not dare to approach him, and when
he came into the stable the noble animal was quite furious.
He had been ill-treated by him, and frequently severely beaten
when there was no occasion for it. The groom exhibited much
feeling when he told me this; and he added that with him the
horse was always good-tempered and docile."

A PONY'S PETITION.
Mr. Wadsworth, of Doncaster, writes:-
I send you a small scrap about a small grey pony, which I
know to be true, as I shod the pony for many years. When it












































































GROOMING BY MACHINERY.
Stories of llorses 4





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Returning to the Old Home. 83

got almost past work it was taken to Bawtry fair, and sold for
a very trifle to a person from Maltby, and taken to its new home
In the same day. Next morning, at five o'clock, it was at the
yard door of its old master, as much as to say, 'Please do take
me back again;' but its petition was not complied with, and it
was sent away to its new master. Another morning found it at
its old master's yard door, waiting to be admitted, but- was sent
back a second time. Now Bawtry is ten miles from Balby, and
Maltby about the same distance from both places; so if it came
back by Bawtry, which it is supposed to have done (it had
never been the nearest road), it would have to travel twenty
miles each time to get to its old home. A kind lady hearing of
the above sent for me to purchase it at once, that. it might have
good treatment during its last days; but her letter was top late,
as death had just put an end to its suffering life."

HORSES ON THE BATTLE-FIELD,
Only those who have seen a battle-field can form a notion of
-the extraordinary way in which the horses, as long as they have
a leg to crawl on, will follow the regiment to which they belong.
I saw what evidently had been sergeants' horses keeping their
position in rear of their squadron, wheeling with it, and halting,
exactly as if their riders were on their backs, and all the time
streaming with blood. Poor creatures! they are indeed to be
pitied, for they have neither Vaterland, promotion, nor the
coveted medal to think of, whatever may be the issue; and few







84 Faithful Old Charley."

indeed are there which have been in action which have not
some honourable scars to show. While I am on the subject I
must relate one of the most pitiable sights I think I ever saw,
which made an impression on me such as I never shall forget.
On the way to Homburg-not the Homburg-we passed
the 3rd Hussars, the colonel of which was mounted on a
chestnut horse so like the one the late Lord Cardigan used
to ride, and on which he made his celebrated charge, that
it seemed as if it must be the identical horse. I saw him
again just before they made their charge against infantry,
in which they were fearfully cut up; and the third time I saw
him was standing in the middle of the plain on the morning
after the battle, totally divested of his trappings, three bullets
in him, and his fetlock-joint cut in two. Poor creature! he
"struggled up when he saw my horse and neighed. The difference
in him from the last time I had seen him galloping at the head
of the regiment, a king of horses, and now, the sight was
appalling.

STORY OF A FAITHFUL SERVANT.
Many years ago, there lived on the banks of the Brandywine,
in the State of Pennsylvania, an aged Quaker gentleman, who
possessed an old faithful servant. This servant was a horse,
and his name was Charley." Now Charley had trotted before
the chaise for many a long year, to the village post-office, to
the Meeting, and upon all kinds of errands. Old Charley was
















































































RESENTING AN INJURY.
Stories of Horses.











The Return by the Ford. 87

now ready to be hitched up." Not one trick had he shown,
nor had he once proved unfaithful, and grandfather always rode
him upon such errands of business as he might have about the
farm. The river divided the farm, and it was at times neces-
sary to visit the lot on the other side; there was a bridge a
mile and a half from the house, but there was a good ford just
down by the bank, which was always used when the water was
not too high. One day in the spring-time, grandfather had to
go over the river; but the freshet had come, the banks were over-
flowed, and the ice in great cakes and fields was coming down
with a rush ; so he mounted old Charley, and set off by the way
of the bridge. Arriving safely on the other side, he spent some
time in the business which had brought him over, and it was
nearly sun-down when he got ready to go home. He looked
up toward the bridge, saw it was a long three miles round, and
believed that he might safely return by the ford. Old Charley
can swim," he said, as he rode down to the bank of the stream,
" and it is but a short way over."
Charley looked reluctant; but after considerable urging he
entered the stream. In a moment he was striking out bravely
for the opposite shore; but in another moment a great cake of
ice came pounding along, overwhelming both man and horse.
They both rose; but grandfather had lost his seat, and as he
was swept along by the powerful current he caught the droop-
ing branches of a large sycamore tree, and was soon safe from
immediate danger.