• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Main
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Our picture book
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00035137/00001
 Material Information
Title: Our picture book
Physical Description: 86, 2, 8 p. : ill., music ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: John
Cassell, Petter & Galpin ( Publisher )
Publisher: Cassell, Petter & Galpin
Place of Publication: London
Paris
New York
Publication Date: 1877
Copyright Date: 1877
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's songs   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1877   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1877   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1877   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1877
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
France -- Paris
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Contains prose, verse and songs.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility: by Uncle John.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00035137
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - ALH5686
oclc - 61352539
alephbibnum - 002235243

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Advertising
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Back Cover
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Spine
        Page 99
Full Text





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OUR PICTURE BOOK.





BY
UNCLE JOHN.






TENTH THOUSAND.







-UAPELL, BETTER & ,ALPIN:
LO.VDOVN, PARIS & NEW YORK.





s OUR PICTURE BOOK.

MAT AND POLLY.
QUARRELLING MAT and meddling Polly
Disturb the whole house by their noise
and their folly;
For the one interferes, and says nothing
is right, [fight.
Till the other gets angry and ready to
In the school-room just now there are
squabbles and tears,
Their noisy loud voices rouse both
sisters' fears;
For their mildest of words are-" You
shall!" and I won't!"
They don't seem to believe in-" Will
you ?" and Pray don't !"
O what a sad picture of sister and brother!
I am sure we shall none of us wish such
another; [hot wrath away,"
For remember, Soft words will turn
Whether spoken in school -room, at
work, or at play.











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MAT AND POLLY.
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MAT AND POLLY.





4 OUR PICTURE BOOR.

THE IBEX.
THE grey and yellow Ibex is found
darting about the bleak mountain sum-
mits of the Alps and the Tyrol. It
has long horns-sometimes three feet
long--sweeping round right over its
back, and is bold and active, scrambling
about among sharp cliffs, and bounding
over precipices, in such a fashion that the
hardy hunter who has spent many hours
in pursuit has often to give the chase up
in disgust; for when the Ibex gets des-
perate, and cannot escape any other way,
he will sometimes turn on the unlucky
hunter, and with those long horns of
his send him flying over the steep rocks.
Ibex, chamois, goats, and antelopes are
much sought after for their skins.
" And this we know, we men that hunt the chamois,
They never turn to feed-sagacious creatures!-
Till they have placed a sentinel ahead,
Who pricks his ears, whenever we approach,
And gives alarm with clear and piercing pipe."



















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6 OUR PICTURE BOOK.
PHILIP THE IDIOT.
IT is a very sad sight to see a poor
man who is not quite right in his mind,
even though he be not altogether insane.
Some of these poor half-witted creatures
are able to move about the streets, doing
simple errands for their friends. We
should always be very kind to such,
and never run after them, or shout and
make fun of them, as some bad boys
and girls will do. Philip Turner was
one of these poor creatures, and lived
with his sister Sophia, who was very
good to him, and took great care of
him. Philip was very quiet and harm-
less, and had such funny ways. He
would hold the yarn for his sister to
wind into a ball, but he would lie down
on his back, and hold it with his feet as
well as his hands, and, as it pleased
him, his kind sister would humour him,
and let him do it in his own way.










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8 OUR PICTURE BOOR.

THE CAPTAIN'S DOG.
POOR old Bruce! his master brought
him over from Spain in a big ship,
where all the sailors were kind to the
old dog, and had many a romp with
him. But one day a great storm arose,
the sun looked red and angry, and at
last the good ship was dashed against
the rocks, and broken all to pieces.
No one was left alive excepting Captain
Baines, who was carried safely ashore
by old Bruce, who, having once caught
his master, never let go his hold until
he had him safe on the beach even
then he stood over him, and guarded
him from the angry waves, until the
people could come to the rescue. You
are sure that they did not forget poor
old Bruce. His master got him a fine
brass collar, and had his name engraved
upon it in fine bold letters, and always
called him his brave old Bruce.
























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tO OUR PICTURE BOOK.


THE FLOWER SELLERS.
Andante. espres. Music by T. CRAMPTON.

VOICE

and I. We get our bread by sell ing flowers, Gather'd each

PIANO.





S morn in wild-wood bow'rs; We car ry them hence by







S road and down, To cheer sad hearts in the dus ty town.




"2. In early months we snowdrops bring,
Promising all of coming spring;
Then cowslips so sweet and the primrose pale
Help us tell them a warmer tale.

g. With roses wild and briar sweet,
Summer's sweet hours we joyous greet;
And no one would care for hot-house flow'rs
While they can buy such wreaths as ours.

4. But winter comes with snow and show'rs,
Burying all our wildwood flowers;
So, ladies, please buy our flow'rs we pray,
That we may save for a wintry day.










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THE FLOWER-SELLERS.





I OUR PICTURE BOOK

FATHER, COME HOME!
POOR little Sandy Forbes! He and
his little sister Minnie are in great
trouble. Father went to his work quite
early in the morning, and now it is quite
dark, and the snow is falling thickly,
and he has not come back. Alice, the
eldest girl, wishes to see him very much,
too, but she is not crying like the others,
for she feels sure father is quite safe,
and that he will be home as soon as
ever he can; so she has made up a
bright fire and swept the kitchen, and
made everything look as comfortable as
she can, so that when her father returns
weary and cold, he may find home warm
and cheerful. Then she has given the
little ones their suppers, and has been
trying to comfort them, but it has been
of no use; so now she is sitting, know-
ing that father will be there in a minute
or two, and then all will be well.
















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FATHER, COME HOME!





14 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

THE BROKEN CUP.
THERE was once a prince who was very
rich, and had fine clothes, and horses
and carriages, and houses and gardens,
and everything he could wish for. But
this prince was not happy for all that;
indeed, he was very ill, and got worse
instead of getting better. So he said
he would give any one a large purse full
of money who could make him better.
Well, one day there came an old man,
with a long gown and grey beard, and
said he would cure him. The prince
was at dinner when he came, and what
do you think the old man did ? He
went up and knocked the cup from
which the prince was drinking right
out of his hand, and broke it. Then
he told him he was so ill because he
drank too much wine, and the prince,
like a wise man, followed his advice.
and never took any more.
















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THE BROKEN CUP.





t6 OUR PICTURE BOOK.
THE PRISONER'S FRIENDS.
LITTLE birds are easily tamed by kind-
ness. I once heard of a poor girl, who
was taken prisoner during the wars in
France. She was kept shut up for
seven years. At first she was very
lonely and sad, for she never saw any
one, but at last she found the little wild
birds came and peeped shily at her.
Then she saved a few crumbs from her
poor meals, and scattered them through
the bars, until at last the birds came
every day for their dinners, and used to
perch on her hand, and thank her with
their sweetest songs the kindest and
gentlest of little comforters. I think
those in the picture are Robins. We
all know that they are to be found
near the window in winter time, and we
should be careful not to frighten them
away, but give them a few crumbs to
cheer them when the snow comes down.























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'RE PRISONER S FRIENDS
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i8 OUR PICTURE BOOK.
OLD BRUIN.
OLD Bruin, the bear, lived in a hole he
had made at the foot of a great tree.
There he sat, on the look-out for any-
thing he could catch, for when he was
free in the woods old Bruin used to live
upon anything he could get. One day
some men came and caught poor Bruin,
and they brought him to England in
a ship, and put him in a cage at the
Zoological Gardens, where you can see
him and his two friends in the bear-pit
any day. Did you hear of the foolish
fellow who was throwing biscuits to the
bears one day, when his hat fell into the
pit, and who, without thinking what he
was doing, foolishly jumped into the pit
after it ? Old Bruin got hold of him,
and would very quickly have squeezed
him to death, if the keeper had not
come and released him from his perilous
situation.








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so OUR PICTURE BOOK

LITTLE MARY'S HOME.
LITTLE MARY'S father took care of the
great tall Lighthouse you see in the
picture. It was a very high tower, with
a little glass house at the top, and quite
at the top of all there was a large lamp,
which Mary's father used to light up at
night, that the sailors might see it, and
know to keep their ships away from the
rocks. One day her father had gone
on shore, and little Mary was left all
alone. It got quite dark, and her
father did not come back, and, worse
still, the wind began to blow so loud!
Mary knew there was a storm coming,
and the lamp was not lit. She brought
a chair, and put it on the table, but she
could not reach the lamp; so she got a
large book, and put that on the chair,
and then, carefully steadying herself so
as not to fall, she managed to light it,
and the sailors saw it and were saved.


















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22 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

DOBBIN.
THIS is old Dobbin, the Captain's
horse, and that is the Captain putting
on his head-dress. Dobbin is a good
little horse, and has been in many
battles, but he is not at all afraid of the
guns and the cannon. His master is
very kind to him, and always takes care
that he has plenty of nice corn to eat,
and that makes Dobbin very fond of
the Captain. He will trot or gallop
just as his master tells him, and never
seems tired at all. He has been fast
asleep all night outside the Captain's
tent, but now it is time to be off, and
so his master is putting on his saddle
and bridle, and getting him ready, and
as soon as the trumpet sounds they will
be off and away. They have a long way
to go before night, but Dobbin does not
care for that at all, for he knows his kind
master will not work him too hard.































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DOBBIN.





24 OUR PICTURE BOOK.
THE DONKEY-RACE.
TOM JONES and Bill Hunter were
donkey-drivers, and had each a little
donkey of their own to take care of.
But they treated them quite differently.
Tom was very kind to his, and used to
pat it gently on the head when he
wanted it to go, and it would trot
merrily on at the sound of his voice.
But Bill Hunter was cruel and hasty, and
would beat his donkey so often and so
hard that it scarcely knew whether to go
on or stand still. One day they had a
fine race. Tom had only to pat his
donkey's neck, and say, "Off we go !"
when it soon got past poor Bill's,
though he beat his with his cap, and
shouted himself almost hoarse. That
is Tom, laughing, and snapping his
fingers with glee, and all the people are
pleased to see him win, because they
know he is kind to the donkey he rides.









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THE DON KEY-RACEi.





26 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

THE FLOWER GIRL.
THIS is Mary, the Flower Girl, who
brings us sweet fresh flowers every
morning from the market. How pale
she looks! for, poor girl, she has a long
distance to walk, and I dare say she has
not had so good a breakfast as we have,
for she has to get up very early to be at
the market, or all the choice nosegays
would be gone. We ought to be very
grateful to Mary for bringing us such
pretty flowers to our very door, for
flowers are very precious things, and are
given us to love and to take pleasure in
by our kind Father in heaven; and
we shall please him very much by being
kind to Mary, who brings them. As we
sometimes sing-
How dearly God must love us,
And this poor world of ours,
To spread blue skies above us,
And deck the earth with flowers"



















































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THE FOWR GRL.
THE F OWFRG IL





.28 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

RESCUED!
IT is after school hours, and all the big
boys are away down to the river, to the
boats, for a row. What a noisy, merry
lot they are, as they splash away, sing-
ing and shouting, "Row brothers, row!"
But, hark! What is that? Some one
has fallen out of one of the boats, and
is sinking, for he cannot swim. In a
moment everybody is quiet; but Harry
Clay jumps right into the water, and
swims to the spot where the poor fellow
was last seen imploring help. Brave
young fellow! How everybody laughs,
and cheers, and weeps all at once, as he
brings the drowning boy safe to the
shore, where a dozen hands are stretched
out to help him and his burden into the
boat again. What a noble pleasure his
must be, when he thinks of the good
deed he has been able to do, by res-
cuing his schoolfellow from drowning!















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30 OUR PICTURE BOOK.


SONG OF THE FISHES.
Legato larghetto. Music by T. CRAMPTON.

VOICE

and I. Un- der the wa ters we gleam and we glide,
na 2. Div ing and dart ing we flash here and there;

PIANO.






Down where the shells 'mid dark sea weeds hide;
Like a bright beam or bird in the air;








The lil ies a-bove lie sleeping all day, Safe
S Our nests are so snug, not one can be seen, And
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un der their shade we fro -lic and play.
"mer ry we are from morn ing to e'en.













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THE SONG OF THE FISHES.





32 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

THE LITTLE LADY.
Miss PRETTYMAN keeps a school for
young ladies, and is very much loved
by all the little girls who go there.
They are quite a happy little party,
more like friends at a feast than -scholars
at a school. The secret is, that their
good teacher has taught them to be
loving and kind to one another, and she
is gentle with them all. As you may
suppose, they are very nice girls, and all
very lady-like in their manners. Ally
Parker is so much so, that even by her
schoolfellows she is called the Little
Lady, for she is as gentle and as loving
as she is pretty and well-behaved. That
is Ally, standing whilst Miss Prettyman
fastens her cape for her. Her parents
live a long way from England, and
little Ally would be very sad without
them, but that her gentle manners have
made her so many friends.











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34 OUR PICTURE BOOK.
THE WAITS.
HERE are the waits. What a queer-
looking band they are! Three old men
with battered old hats, and one little
boy playing a horn nearly as big as him-
self; another one going round with a
hat, collecting the pennies. I fear he
won't get very many, for the man at the
window looks more vexed than pleased,
and inclined to slam the window down
without giving him anything. Poor old
souls! they have not much idea of
music, and blow away as hard as they
can, as though each were trying to make
the loudest noise. Very often they get
a penny to go away, but they don't
mind; for so long as they can get any
coppers at all, they go on puffing and
blowing as if their very lives depended
upon their making a great noise. I only
hope they will not burst their instru-
ments some day by blowing so hard.











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36 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

LOST ON THE MOORS.
ROSE and Nelly Latimer set out one
fine day to cross the moor, on a visit to
Uncle Andy. The sun shone bright,
and the lark sang loud.; the moor-birds
flew round them with a whirr and a
whoop as they stepped almost into their
nests, walking through the long, thick
heather. The two girls spent a happy
day at their uncle's, but stayed rather
late, and coming back they lost their
way. So what do you think they did?
Rose pulled the dry heath, and made a
nice soft bed under a large rock, and
there they lay snugly and safely enough
till morning; for they were not afraid,
but put their trust in God, who, whether
it is night or day, takes care of those
who love him. As soon as ever it was
daylight they hurried home as fast as
ever they could, and I am thankful to
say they arrived there safely.
































































LOST ON THE MOORS.





38 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

MARKET PEOPLE.
THESE good people are coming in from
the fields, where they have been gather-
ing fruit for to-morrow's market. You
see how prettily they are dressed. They
live a long way from England, in a very
hot country, called Italy, where the sky
is almost always a very bright blue. So
they do not need such thick, warm
clothing as we do. Sometimes the
women wear a kind of hood over their
heads, to keep the sun from burning
them; and the men and boys scarcely
ever wear coats. It is a very beautiful
country to live in, but not nearly so
happy a home as dear old England,
after all, for the people have very hot
tempers, and often, when angry, they
draw their knives, and stab one another
in the most brutal manner. Italy is a
beautiful country, but there are no homes
anywhere like those in Old England.


















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MARKE PEPL





40 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

THE BOY WHO MADE UP
HIS MIND.
FREDDY RAYMOND was quite a boy
when he lost both father and mother,
and was left to battle in the wide
world all by himself. His kind mother-
had always taught him to depend upon
himself, and not upon others; so when
he got over his first grief at the loss of
his parents, Freddy wasted no time in
useless fretting, but resolutely deter-
mined to set to work and make a man
of himself. Pacing about in his little
bedroom, with his arms folded and his
mouth firmly set, he made up his mind
to work on bravely, doing his duty and
putting his trust in God. It was very
hard at first, but he got stronger as he
went on; and when he became a man,
he could always point back proudly to
his own life as an example of courage
and perseverance.












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42 OUR PICTURE BOOK.
OLD LETTERS.
IN a quiet little room, with the curtains
drawn and the lamp lit up, sits dear old
Grandpa. What is he doing ? he looks
so sad and quiet.' Don't you see? he
has been turning over his papers, and
has found some old letters, and they
have made him think of old times and
old faces. Of the days when he was
as young and as active as any of us; of
the schoolfellows, most of whom are
now dead, or gone far away; and, most
of all, of the dear, kind, loving face of
Grandmamma when he first knew her,
many years ago. Dear old Grandpa!
We must try to cheer him up, must we
not ? and be very kind and gentle with
him. He has lost many friends, and
needs all the more the love of those he
has left. We will try who can be
kindest to him, and do our very best
to please him and make him happy.












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OLD LETTERS.





44 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

CROSSING THE STREAM.
NEAR- the house where Polly and
Louisa live there is a pretty little
stream, which runs prattling by all day
and all night, singing-
Men may come, and men may go,
But I go on for ever."
Polly and Louie are great friends, and
often go out for a nice quiet walk in the
summer time along the banks of the
stream. Their home is far away in the
country, and the place is so lonely they
can run out without shoes or stockings,
and paddle about in the water. But
Louie is a very timid girl, not so brave
as Polly, and sometimes she gets so
frightened she dare not cross the stream.
So Polly takes her up in her arms and
carries her across, as she is doing here.
Then they have a good laugh about it
when they get safely across, and Louie
declares she will be braver next time.






































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CROSSING THE STREAM.~ l~~;~L







46 OUR PICTURE BOOR.


THE KNIFE-GRINDER.
Allegretto martial. Music by T. CRAMPTON
I -- -- --- - I N : .
VOICE

and i. Oh, here am I, the same ola
S2. Oh, all know me, and I know

PIANO.

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friend, With knives to grind and scissors to mend;
all, At ev' ry house I con-stant ly call;







One touch of my foot and my wheel goes round, And be-
"And where I may go, it's the same in the end, I get







fore you can speak your scis sors are ground.
"knives to grind and scis sors to mend.


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THE KNIFE-GRINDER.





48 OUR PICTURE BOOK.
THE RABBITS.
Do you see all those pretty little pusses
scampering about over the rocks, and
bobbing in and out of the many holes
leading down to their homes under
ground ? There are quite a lot of them,
and very happy and full of fun they are,
for their master takes great care to keep
all dogs out of the way. Bob, the
gamekeeper, looks after them, and when
the cold weather comes, and they cannot
get at the sweet grass because of the
snow, he brings them nice green leaves
and roots to eat, so that they have quite
a. feast all the year round. That little
lot in the corner seem to be having
quite a chat. I wonder what they
are talking about. Perhaps telling one
another of the fun they have had in play-
ing hide and seek, or laying their plans
for a good hunt to-morrow; for these
young ones are very full of life and glee.



















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THE RABBITS.
D**





50 OUR PICTURE BOOK.
THE CAROL-SINGERS.
IT was Christmas Day morning when
Elly and Alice Brookes heard the
carol-singers in the garden outside the
dining-room window. They were the
children from the village, who were
always very glad to come and sing for
Mr. Brookes, for well they knew how
kind and generous he was at Christmas-
tide. He was not one of those gruff
people who open the door sharply at
the first sound of the singers, and order
them off the premises. He always
taught his children to be kind and
charitable to the little folks when they
came. And so Elly and Alice are
listening to them now; and when the
sweet old carol is over, they will open
wide the kitchen door, and have the
little ones in around the bright warm
fire, to sing in-doors, whilst they regale
them all with hearty Christmas cheer.







P07



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[HE CAROL-SINGERS.





52 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

NELLIE WATSON.
HERE is Nellie Watson, starting for
school, and coming to say good-bye to
mamma before she goes. Nellie has
been taught at home until now, for she
is the only child, and her parents did
not wish to part with her; but now they
have decided to send her to school.
Nellie thinks she shall like school very
much, and she wants to get there, and
wonders if she shall love her schoolmis-
tress and her young companions; but her
mamma scarcely likes to let her go even
now, and begs her once more, as she has
done many times before, to be diligent
in her work, and kind and obliging in
her playtime, and then she will be sure
to be loved. I do not think Mrs.
Watson need fear, for Nellie is a good
girl, and has been well taught, so that
I think she will be very happy at
school.







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NELLI wATson.





q4 OUR PICTURE BOOR.
THE SICK BOY.
LITTLE EDWARD LEE is very ill in bed;
so ill, poor little man! that papa, who
stands at the foot of the bed, looks very
sad and sorrowful. Mary, the nurse,
has brought Edward some nice beef-
tea, but he does not seem to have
strength to take it, and little Bessie,
his sister, is holding him in her arms
whilst the kind doctor pours him some
medicine into a glass to revive him.
Edward's playthings are opened out for
him to see, but he cannot play with his
kite, or his bat and ball, or his horse
and cart, or his drum; nor even with
his Noah's ark, though he has it on the
bed close to him. It is very hard for
the little man to be obliged to stop in
bed, and drink such nasty physic, but
by taking care I hope he may soon be
well again, and live to have many a good
game with his drum and other toys.








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56 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

MOUNT VESUVIUS.
Do you see that large pillar of smoke
and the thick black cloud behind it ?
How very small the houses, and even
the mountain out of which it rises, look
by the side of it! It is a volcano in
Italy, called Vesuvius. A volcano is a
mountain on fire deep down below the
earth, and every now and then the fire
bursts out, and shoots up into the sky
to a very great height, and then falls
down in red-hot rain, burning every-
thing it comes near. Years and years
ago this very mountain burst into flames,
and the lava (as the fire is called) ran
down upon the houses at its foot, and
destroyed both them and all the people
in them. The ruins have been dug
out within the last few years, and many
most interesting things have been found,
showing what the people were doing at
the time of the explosion.






















































MUN_ VESUVIUS.-












M UN\1 VESUVIUS.





58 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

FRIDAY AND THE BEAR.
Do you remember Robinson Crusoe
and his black man, Friday ? This is
Friday. One day a great black bear
came after him, and Friday got up a
tree out of its way, but the bear got up
after him. Friday was not a bit afraid,
however, but sat waiting till the bear
had got nearly to him, and then he
scrambled out upon one of the boughs
of the tree. There you see him. The
bough is strong enough to hold him,
but the bear is afraid to go any further,
for fear the bough should break. So
Friday is laughing at him, and making
all sorts of fun of him; asking Mr.
Bruin to come along-telling him not
to be afraid, and teasing him by shaking
the branch as if it was about to break,
till the bear got really terrified. When
Friday was tired he jumped down to
the ground, and killed the bear
















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MEL

























FRIDAY ANI TIlE BEAR





60 GUR PICTURE BOOK.

THE SCHOOL BAND.
THIS is just as they all looked when
they stood together in the school-yard
to have their portraits taken; and they
would have Mr. Fairchild, the master,
in the picture too. They were a merry
lot of fellows; and when Mr. Fairchild
proposed they should form themselves
into a drum and fife band, they were
delighted at the idea, but somewhat
doubtful as to the result. They got on
rapidly, however; and when they found
they could really play a tune, there was
no bound to their delight. The triangles
declared their music was the sweetest,
but the fifes tried hard to drown them,
and might have done so had not the
drummers beaten them all by the won-
derful sounds they brought out of their
tiny kettle-drums. Now they all play in
tune, and keep capital time; and their
master is very proud of them.















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THE SCHOOL BAND.
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T SHLA





62 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

THE YOUNG ARTISTS.
IN an old churchyard, on a bright sum-
mer's day, were two little boys, named
Willie Heaton and Tommy Tannett.
There they sat, side by side, with pencil
in hand, making a picture of the church
just in front of them. Tommy was the
eldest, so he made his drawing first, and
little Willie sat and watched him, so
that he might know how to do it him-
self. They were cousins, and very great
friends, being very kind to each other,
as little cousins should be. They went
to the same school, and on fine bright
days the master would let them go out
together, to draw pictures, as you see
them here. Sometimes they would go
into the park, and sketch the foliage
of the fine old trees there, but their
favourite spot was the churchyard the
church made such a pretty picture. See
how carefully Tommy goes to work.


















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T,







THE YO-UN; ARTISTS





"64 OUR PICTURE BOOr.

THE HARE.
WHAT fine long ears Master Hare has
got, and how they stand on end just
now, because he fancies he hears
somebody coming. He is a pretty
little animal, and can scamper over the
ground at a fine rate when he likes.
But he is a playful little fellow, and
does not keep on doing the same thing
long together. Don't you remember
the race he once had with old Mr.
Tortoise, who crawls so slowly along,
when Master Hare was beaten, because,
though he ran fast at first, he fell asleep
on the way, and let Mr. Tortoise crawl
past him and win the race ? Oh! but
that was a sore grief to him. He had
made such fun of the old Tortoise, and
had laughingly said he could run as far in
an hour as the Tortoise could walk in a
week. But he was, like all boasters, soon
put to shame, and very much he felt it.















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THE HARE.





66 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

THE MURDERED PRINCES.
IN a little room, in the great Tower of
London, there lay two bonny boys, fast
asleep in each other's arms. They
were the sons of Edward the Fourth,
and had been put in prison by their
cruel uncle, who wished to be made
king hitiself. So one night, whilst
they were asleep, he sent two wicked
men to kill them. The men crept
quietly in, and held the pillows tightly
down upon the little boys' faces till they
were quite dead. Their bodies were
buried under the staircase in the Tower,
but were afterwards taken up and car-
ried to Westminster Abbey, where you
may any day see the coffin in which
they were supposed to have been buried.
Their cruel uncle became king, and
was called Richard the Third. He
was killed in a great battle a few years
after at Bosworth Field.













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68 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

JOHNNY FOUND OUT.
JOHNNY TODDLEKINS was a strange little
fellow, always getting into mischief, but
always getting out again very soon.
For he had such a merry round phiz,
and looked you so straight in the face
when he spoke to you, it was very hard
to be angry with him for long. One
day, however, Johnny had seen a nice
long plank, near a little pool of water,
and had got on to it, and had a fine bit
of fun, but when he got home he found
he had wetted his shoes and stockings
sadly, so Johnny put them out of sight.
Next day his mother found them, and
there she is telling Johnny how sorry
she is he tried to hide them. She
would not have been nearly so angry if
he had told her all about it; it was.
Johnny's attempt to deceive that made
his mother angry with him. If he had
told her, she would have forgiven him.












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70 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

THE WIDOW.
How sad poor Mrs. Fortescue looks,
as she walks along, with her little
daughter Annie by her side, thinking
of happy days long since gone by.
Annie's papa was an officer, and he
went to fight the Russians, in the Cri-
mean War, when his little girl was quite
a baby, and his poor wife was left at
home to long and pray that he might
be brought safely back again. At last,
one sad morning, she was told that he
was killed. He was fighting bravely,
when a shot entered his side, and he
fell. And when the battle was over,
and he was borne from the field, he only
lingered long enough to send a loving
message to his wife and a kiss to his
little girl. Since then Annie has been
her mamma's only comfort; and I am
sure the little girl will do all she can
to make her mother forget her grief.












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THE WIDOW.
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THE WIOW






72 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

"LITTLE TREASURE."
JENNY is never idle, always looking
about for something to do; the servant
calls her The Little Treasure," and is
sorry when dear Miss Jenny is out of
her sight. Beatrice wanders about the
house, never doing anything but getting
into other people's way. She has been
in and out all the morning, and now is
trying to persuade Jenny to leave the
currants she is picking, and come with
her to look at a hedge-sparrow's nest.
But Little Treasure" knows better,
and is gravely shaking her head, and
saying, Please run away, dear Bea-
trice, and leave me to finish the work I
have promised sister Mary to get done
before dinner." It is very wrong of
Beatrice to tempt her away, but Beatrice
is like the little idle boy, who could not
get anybody to play with him, and was
miserable because he had nothing to do.









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"LITTLE TRE-ASU (E."






74 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

THE READING LESSON.
HERE is little Bella Holding learning
her letters. Oh, how difficult she thinks
them, and fears she shall never know
great A from B. Her mamma has
told her that if she learns just one
letter every day, in twenty-six days she
will know them all; but twenty-six
days seems to Bella a very long time,
and she would like so much to be
playing with the pretty doll and the
large bouncing ball, which you see
on the ground there. Never mind,
little girl, play will be all the sweeter
when lessons are done. How nice it
will be when you can read pretty story
books, all by yourself, and not need to
wait until mamma has time to read
them to you. I dare say, sometimes
when mamma is sewing, she will let
you read them aloud to her, and how
pleasant that will be.






















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76 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

THE PARTRIDGES.
THIS is the Partridge family at home.
Mr. Partridge is only a little chap, but
he stands straight up, and cocks his
little bill at you in quite a knowing way,
as much as to say, I am a smart little
fellow, am I not ?" He keeps a look-
out all day amongst the corn, to take
care no nasty dogs or long-legged men
come near his little ones; and Mrs.
Partridge, who seems a very motherly
old body, looks after the young chicks
as they go pecking and rolling about.
Through the summer they are very
busy. The mistress is laying eggs, and
keeping them warm until the little folks
pop out. Mr. Partridge, meantime,
runs about, hunting up corn and nice
sweet roots for them to eat. But when
the first of September comes it is a
dreadful time, for then it is that the
sportsmen destroy so many of the birds.
























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THE ARTRDGES





78 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

THE TIMBER RAFT.
A LONG vway off, across the sea, there is
a great wide country, almost covered
over with forests. A great deal of wood
to make ships and build houses with
comes from there, and, as it is a long
way from the sea-shore, the men who
cut down the trees make them into rafts,
by tying the pieces together. When a
raft is made the men get on to it, and
away they float down the river to the
sea, where the wood is taken and put
into ships, that bring it to England and
other places. The men on the rafts
have a nice sail down the river, but it
is hard work steering it safely, for all
that; and sometimes, when they come
to a sudden bend, or have to pass the
rocky places, the raft gets locked quite
fast. But the men are skilful and
courageous, and soon set it to rights
again, and then away they go.
























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THE TIMBER RAFT.





8o OUR PICTURE BOOK.

FLOSS.
LITTLE MISS MARY has been a long
way through the woods with her dog
Floss, and a merry romping morning
they have had. She has filled her
apron with wild flowers, and sits down
quite tired, but Floss is as fresh as
ever, watching eagerly for the little red
ball which she holds in her hand. He
has already had a great many runs after
it, once into the river, where he found it
after a long search hidden among the
weeds. Mary is just going to throw it
once more, when she hears the dinner-
bell, and off she runs with Floss hard
after her, for Floss knows as well as
Mary does what the sound of the
dinner-bell means, and his long run has
made him as hungry as his mistress.
I hope they will be home in time; for if
they are late, Mamma will be anxious,
and wonder where they are.











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OUR PICTURE POOR.

TOMMY TUMPS.
TOMMY TUMPS was very angry because
Grandma said that he would be afraid
to say Bo!" to a goose. Off started
Tommy, tied an old tin can to a string,
which he hung round his neck, and
marched down to the river side, tapping
his can, and pretending to be a soldier.
When he reached the pond where all
the geese were quietly feeding, near the
white cow, he rapped very loudly, and
roared out "Bo!" at the top of his
voice. All this made one cross old
gander very angry indeed. He flew
out of the water after our little friend;
off flew Tommy Tumps screaming to
Grandma, the tin can rattling behind
him, and the old gander at his heels,
making such a din that even the old
lady, who is very deaf, heard him, and
came to the rescue. Poor Tommy was
frightened almost out of his wits.










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84 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

GRANDPAPA.
HERE is little Willie Hamer telling his
grandpapa how he spends his time at
school, while papa and mamma stand
by listening to his prattle. His little
sister Maggie sits on grandpapa's knee
"-" Dantie" she calls him, for she can-
not speak very plainly-and she thinks
how glad she will be when she is a big
girl, big enough to go to school. She feels
quite sure she will soon know as much
as Willie; indeed, she intends to learn
more than he, for she will sew and knit,
which Willie cannot do at all. Grand-
papa loves the little folks very much,
and likes to hear them talk. It reminds
him of the time, many years ago, though
to him it seems like yesterday, when
Willie's papa was a little boy, and went
to school, and was so proud when he
could read a whole chapter in the Bible
without having to spell a single word.


















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GRANDPAPA.





86 OUR PICTURE BOOK.

THE BRAVE BOY.
ARTHUR'S Papa has had to go away
from home, and Mamma is very much
afraid at being left alone in the house.
She has called to Jane, and is telling
her to be sure and fasten all the doors
and windows, lest the robbers get in
whilst they are asleep. But Arthur,
who stands close by, tells Mamma not
to be afraid; he will see that all is right.
He feels himself to be a big boy now,
and Papa has left him in charge. So
Mamma and Baby may go to bed
without fear, Arthur is a brave, bold
boy, and they feel they can safely trust
in him; for he is not one of those little
boys who are always boasting about what
they can do, and then, when the time
comes, are afraid to do it. So mamma
feels she can depend upon him, and
goes to bed quite cheerfully, relying on
her little boy's watchfulness and courage.













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'I-JE BRAV[ BOY,






CASSELL'S

CHILDREN'S TREASURIES:
A SERIES OF
P/ITUHE BOOKS FOR CHILDREN,
UNIFORM IN SIZE AND PRICE,
Each containing 39 Full-page Pictures and accompanying
Stories, Poetry, and Music.
Square Crown 8vo, bound in cloth, price Is. each.


ilHE BOOKS COMPRISE-

The Children's Joy.

Pretty Pictures and Pleasanl Stories.

Our Picture Book.

Tales for the Little Ones.

My Sunday Book of Pictures.

Sunday Garland of Pictures and Stories.

Sunday Readings for Little Folks.

CASSELL, BETTER, & GALPIN, LONDON, PARIS, AND NEW YORK.
"1173







SELECTIONS FROM

Cassell Petter & Galpin's Publications.

Illustrated Volumes for Children and Young People.

The Little Folks' Picture Gallery.
Containing over 150 beautiful Pictures, printed on good
paper, with accompanying Rhymes to each Picture. Extra
crown 4to. Fourth Edition, Enlarged. Cloth, gilt edges, 5s.
Paws and Claws.
Being True Stories of Clever Creatures, Tame and Wild. By
the Author of Poems Written for a Child." Cloth gilt, 5s.
The Boy Joiner and Model-Maker.
By ELLIS A. DAVIDSON. Containing Practical Directions for
Making numerous Articles for Use and Ornament, with
Descriptions of various Tools, and the method of using them.
Extra fcap. 4to, 256 pages. Cloth gilt, 5s.
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By C. L. MATkAUX. Illustrated throughout. Second Edition.
Fcap. 4to, cloth, 5s.
Home Chat with Our Young Folks.
By C. L. MATEAUX. 200 Engravings. Fcap. 4to, 260
pages. Fifth Edition. Cloth, 5s.
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Cassell Petter &- Galpin : London, Paris c New York.
7T--I76







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Illustrated Volumes for Children and Young People-Continued.

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With upwards of 500 Illustrations. New and Improved
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The Old Fairy Tales.
A Choice Collection of Favourite Fairy Tales. With 24
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Picture Teaching for Young and Old.
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Books in Words of One Syllable;
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Being a Series of Entertaining Tales for. Children. Crown
i6mo. Illustrated. Cloth limp, 6d. each.
1. Everybody's Boy. 5. Nelly.
2. The Crooked Sixpence. 6. Lucky Ty.
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Cassell Petter & Gal4pn: London, Paris & New York.






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With 250 Illustrations and 33 Pieces of Music, with Accom-
paniments, and containing a charming Collection of Hymns
and Poetry. Second Edition. Cloth, 5s.; gilt edges, 6s. 6d.

Cassell Petter & Galfin: London, Paris &6 New York.


It






4 Selections from Cassell Petter .& Galhin's Publications.

Books for School Prizes and Rewards.

Stories about Animals.
By the Rev. T. JACKSON, M.A. A Familiar Description of
the Life and Habits of the different varieties of the Animal
World. Profusely Illustrated. Third Edition. 256 pp.,
extra fcap. 4to, cloth, 5s.

Stories about Birds.
By M. and E. KIRBY, Authors of Chapters on Trees," &c.
&c. An Interesting Account of the Life and Habits of the
various descriptions of the Feathered Tribes. Profusely
Illustrated. Second Edition. 256 pp., extra fcap. 4to, cloth, 5s.

Stories of the Olden Time.
Being a Selection of some of the Chief Historical Episodes
from the Chronicles of De Joinville and Froissart. Arranged
by M. JONES. Cloth lettered, is. 6d.

Little Fables for Little Folks.
Containing a large Collection of Fables suitable for Children.
Illustrated with Four Coloured Plates. Cloth lettered, Is.

The Little Folks' History of England.
By ISA CRAIG-KNOX. With Thirty Illustrations. 288 pages.
Third and Cheaper Edition. Cloth, is. 6d. -
Threads of Knowledge Drawn from a
CAMBRIC HANDKERCHIEF, A BRUSSELS CARPET,
A PRINT DRESS, A SHEET OF PAPER. By ANNIE
CAREY. Illustrated. Cloth lettered, is. 6d.

Cassell Petter Galpin: London, Paris &C New York.






Selections from Cassell Petter & Galpin's Publications. 5

Books for School Prizes and Rewards-Continued.
Scraps of Knowledge for the Little
ONES. By JANET BYRNE. With One Hundred Illustrations.
Fcap. 4to. Third Edition. Cloth gilt, 3s. 6d.

Autobiographies of a Lump of Coal,
A GRAIN OF SALT, A DROP OF WATER, A PIECE
OF OLD IRON, A BIT OF FLINT. By ANNIE CAREY.
Illustrated. Second Edition. Cloth lettered, is. 6d.
Notable Shipwrecks.
Being Tales of Disaster and Heroism at Sea. By UNCLE
HARDY." 320 pp.,. crown 8vo. With Frontispiece. Second
Edition. Cloth, 5s.

Soldier and Patriot.
The Story of George Washington. By F. M. OWEN. Illus-
trated. 256 pp., crown 8vo, cloth, 3s. 6d.

Pictures of School Life and Boyhood.
By PERCY FITZGERALD, M.A., F.S.A. Crown 8vo, 256 pp.
and Frontispiece. Cloth gilt, 3s. 6d.
Chapters on Trees.
A Popular Account of their Nature and Uses. By M. and
E. KIRBY, Authors of "The World at Home," &c. Illus-
trated. Extra crown 8vo. Cloth gilt, 5s.

The Story of Robin Hood.
Illustrated with Eight Plates printed in Colours, and adapted
for Young Children. Printed in large type. Cloth gilt, 3s. 6d.

Cassell Petter & Galiin: London, Paris & New York.






6 Selections from Cassell Petter &- Galfin's Publications.


Books for Rewards in Sunday-Schools.

The Child's Bible Narrative:
Being a Consecutive Arrangement of the Narrative and other
portions of the Holy Scriptures, in the Words of the Autho-
rised Version. Fourth and Cheaper Edition. Cloth, 2s.

Great Lessons from Little Things.
A Series of Practical Lessons on Bible Natural History.
Illustrated throughout. Extra fcap. 4to, cloth gilt, 3s. 6d.

The Young Man in the Battle of Life.
By the Rev. Dr. LANDELS, Author of "Woman: Her Posi-
tion and Power," &c. Third Edition. Cloth, 3s. 6d.
The Three Homes.
A Tale for Fatheis and Sons. By F. T. L. HOPE. 400
pages, crown 8vo. Cloth bevelled, gilt edges, 5s.
Working to Win.
A Story for Girls. By MAGGIE SYMINGTON. With full-page
Illustrations. 448 pages, crown 8vo. Second Edition. Cloth
gilt, price 5s.

Patsy's First Glimpse of Heaven.
By JANET BYRNE. Second Edition. Illustrated. Cloth, is.
Marion Lee's Good Work; or, How
A LITTLE GIRL BUILT A CHURCH. By the Author
of "A Trap to Catch a Sunbeam." With Illustrations. Cloth
limp, 6d.

Cassell Petter & Galpin: London, Paris & New York.








Selections from Cassell Petter &* Gal/in's Publications. 7


STORY BOOKS FOR CHILDREN, SUITABLE FOR
REWARDS AND PRIZES.


Shilling Story Books. The following Books are Illustrated, and each contains
several Stories. They are bound in cloth.
Lottie's White Frock. The Delft Jug. By SILVERPEN.
Helpful N ellie. The Elchester College Boys. By
Only Just Once. Mrs. HENRY WOOD.
The Boot on the Wrong Foot. The Little Peacemaker. By MARY
Little Content. HOWITT.
Little Lizzie. By MARY GILLIES. Jonas on a Farm.
Luke Barnicott. By WILLIAM Little Pickles. ByJEANIE HaRING.
HOWITT. Life and Adventures of a Little
My First Cruise. By W. H. G. Bird. By J. WATTS.
KINGSTON. Baggles, Baggles, and the
Charlie's Lessons about Animals. Emperor. By C. MATAAUX.
The Boat Club. Patsy's First Glimpse of Heaven.

The following Books (price is. eac!) each contain FOUR COLOURED PLATES :-
Little Blackcap. Ashfield Farm; or, Ellen and
Tommy and his Broom. Robert's First Journey from Home.
The Broken Promise. By the Granomamma's Spectacles. By
Hon. Mrs. GREENE, the Author of "A Trap to Catch a
Little Red Shoes. Sunbeam."
The Holidays at Llandudno. Hid in a Cave.
The Hop Garden. Little Fables for Little Folks.
Algy'sLesson. ByS.E.DEMORGAN. Flora Selwyn: AStoryforGirls.

Eighteenpenny Story Books. With FOUR COLOURED PICTURES in each.
Dr. Savory's Tongs. The Boy who Wondered.
New Stories and Old Legends. The Story of Arthur Hunter
By Mrs. T. K. HERVEY. and his First Shilling.
Owen Carstone: A Story of School The Story of the Hamiltons.
Life. The Hill-side Farm.

The following Books are bound in cloth lettered, with Illustrations and Ornamental
Chapter Heads, price is. 6d. each :-
Threads of Knowledge. By ANNIE Autobiography of a Lump of
CAREY. Coal, &c. By ANNIE CAREY.
Labour Stands on Golden Feet. SecondEdition.
Translated by J. YEATS. The Fishing Girl. ByBJoRNSTJERNE
Stories of the Olden Time. BJORNSON.
Love and Life in Norway. By One Trip Moie, and other Stories.
BJORNSTJERNE BJORNSON. By the Author of Mary Powell."


Cassell Petter &' Galjin: London, Paris d& New York.








Selections from Cassell Petter & Galfin's Publications.



LITTLE FOLKS:

THE ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE FOR CHILDREN.

Published in Weekly Numbers, id.; Monthly Parts, 6d.; and
Half-Yearly Volumes, at Ss. Ed.

LITTLE POLKS is one of the very LITTLE FOLKS has out-distanced
best Magazines for young children. We most all competitors, and keeps the position so well
cordially recommend it as a Magazine which I won with a boldness and firmness defying
should find a place in every nursery."-- competition. Its tales are the best we have
Graphic. ever seen for children."-Derby Mercury.
LITTLE K i as ha in LITTLE FOLKS is decidedly the
merit as it is wide in scope."- ily Tele- t attractive of the children's magazines."-
merit as it is wide in scope."-Daily Tel- Newcastle Chronicle.
S" LITTLE FOLKS is a joy in the
LITTLE POLKS aims not only at household."-Bolton journal.
informing the young, but also at inducing LITTLE FOLKS is the most delight-
them to become contributors."- Daily ful of children's magazines."-Herefordourl.
LITTLE FOLKS is by far the best
LITTLE FOLKS is charming alike children's serial we have ever met with."-
in its engravings and stories."-Standard. Birmingham Mail.
*.* VOLUMES I. and II. of the New and Enlarged Series of "LITTLE
FOLKS" are now ready, each containing nearly 500 PICTURES
and 430 Pages, crown 4to, price 3s. 6d. each, coloured boards; or 5s.,
cloth gilt, gilt edges.


Ew To be obtained of all Booksellers, or post free from the Publishers:-
Cassell's Complete Catalogue, containing a List of several hundred
Works, including :-
Bibles and Religious Literature. History.
Children's Books. Miscellaneous.
Dictionaries. Natural )History.
Educational Works. Poetry.
Fine Art Volumes. Serial Publications.
Hand-books and Guides. Travel and Adventure.


Cassell's Educational Catalogue, containing a Description of their
numerous Educational Works, also supplying particulars of CASSELL PETTER
& GALPIN'S Mathematical Instruments, Water-Colours, Drawing Models,
Drawing Pencils, &c.

Cassell Petter & Galpin : London, Paris & New York.













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