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 Front Matter
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 Back Cover














Title: A nice secret, and other stories
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00035131/00001
 Material Information
Title: A nice secret, and other stories
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Cupples, George, 1839-1898
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: T. Nelson & Sons,
T. Nelson & Sons
Place of Publication: London ;
Edinburgh ;
New York
Publication Date: 1877
Copyright Date: 1877
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1877   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1877
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Mrs. George Cupples ; with a picture on every page.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00035131
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - ALG5388
oclc - 61352548
alephbibnum - 002225116

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Front Matter
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Main
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
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        Page 15
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        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
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        Page 51
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    Back Cover
        Page 53
        Page 54
Full Text
























































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The Baldwin Library
Univcrsyiy
Scaida
ThR alwnLirr





4 ^






Mi~n-: Toc/irdo .

cX* *l2 7/ /. / :













,.- ..L,-t-,..._ ^ -



A NICE SECRET



7Lnb ther Stories.



BY

MRS. GEORGE CUPPLES,
AUTHOR OF BERTHA MARCHMONT," "THE STORY OF OUR DOLL,"
"GRANDPPAP'S PRESENTS," ETC.


WITH A PICTURE ON EVERY PAGE.












LONDON:
T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;
EDINBURGH; AND NEW YORK.



























Also uniform, bound in muslin extra, with an Illustration
on euery page.


By Mrs. GEORGE CUPPLES.

THE HERD BOY. WATCHING CRABS.
THE DONKEY DICK. A NICE SECRET.
JACK TAR AT SEA. GRANDPAPA'S COMPANIONS
CLEVER LITTLE MADGE. MY COMICAL PUG.
THE PICTURE SHOW. A CHILD'S DUTY.
THE SCRAP BOOK, THE LORD'S PRAYER.
PICTURE LESSONS. PICTURE PAGES.




THOMAS NELSON AND SONS,
42 Bleecker Street, New York.








A NICE SECRET.



































girl's mamma is whispering to her. The secret
ii
II!















I'LL tell you a secret hat is what this little



girl's mamma is whispering to her. The secret







is, that if she will try to be a very good girl, she
shall be taken out with her in the afternoon.
(446) 5







PITY THE BLIND.































faithfully so spare him a copper. please.
S.:.





























faithfully ; so spare him a copper, please.








HOMEWARD BOUND.












;I T



.- I--













HERE are some very jolly-looking sailors. They
are on their homeward voyage, and are bringing
a gay bird of paradise. They seem to be very
fond of it. and pleased that it has become so tame.







DR. BLACK'S PATIENT.


















OH! isn't this comical? Here is a long, thin
fellow, who is so annoyed because he is so much
taller than his friends, that he goes to Dr. Black
to see if he can give him anything to fill up his
very long legs, and make him grow shorter. "Oh
yes," says Dr. Black, putting his hands behind his
back; and he calls in his assistant to ask what he
thinks upon the subject. His opinion is, that the
fellow is ridiculously too long; and he at once
pulls out a pair of scissors, and begins to snip
off a piece of his legs! Just look at the tall
fellow's face; see how he is going to roar out !






CAPE HORN.









I Il ; 'I







4 ,-i^ -




HERE is a picture of a fine ship on its way home
round Cape Horn. It is a very cold part of the
sea, and ships often pass great icebergs floating
about, and the sailors are very much afraid of
them. The birds you see flying about are the
great albatrosses. When their wings are spread
out, they measure fourteen feet sometimes. You
may see the width by measuring that out on the
nursery floor.







THE HAPPY SHEPHERD-BOY.





..-, ,














A VERY merry fellow is this; and such a pretty
picture altogether! This little shepherd-boy
comes out in the morning, carrying his long crook,
and with his bottle of milk slung round his waist.
He carries his breakfast and dinner in his
wallet on his back; and, followed by his good,
clever dog, away he goes to look after his master's
flocks. When he has got them all gathered to-
gether, he takes out his little flageolet and plays a
tune. His dog lies down at his feet to listen; for
he is almost as fond of music as his master.






A NEW ZEALAND CHIEF.



















WHO is this fierce-looking man? A New Zea-
lander. He has got all sorts of strange patterns
traced out on his skin; that is, he is tattooed.
He has tried to make himself as ugly as possible;
but he thinks himself very beautiful. New Zea-
landers used to be cannibals; but they are not
so now. Many of them are Christians; and some
of them keep the Sabbath even more strictly than
we do in some parts of Great Britain, putting
away their pretty flaxen mats and bags, and all
their week-day work, till the Monday.






A SNAKE! A SNAKE!

:* r i,[ ,"" '






M",




....." I' - ...-. _
I












HERE is a picture of a scene in Jamaica. These
two black fellows have been out in the woods, and
they suddenly see a snake wrigging itself away
through the thick bushes. One has got such a
fright, that he has dropped his axe; but the other
is springing forward to kill it before it bite.






DANCING THE POLKA.
1-1

















OH '\ \ 1







OH dear, look here Ha! ha ha! Old Mother
Hubbard must have forgiven her naughty dog
for spoiling her spinning-wheel. We know
what a cunning fellow he is, and we are not at
all surprised that he has got 'the good old dame
to dance a polka with him before she goes to
bed.






A FRAIL BRIDGE.





















HERE is a very different kind of picture, and one
that almost makes us shudder. We can hardly
believe that there are men who can trust them-
selves to cross from one side of a ravine to the other
by such a slender-looking rope. How sore their
hands and feet must be I and how glad they must
be when they get to the other side in safety!
It is a good thing there are such hardy, brave
men in the world; for it helps to make it move
on more smoothly.







WATCHING THE HAY-MAKERS.

- ^ r 7 -_ .- V - .. .

2-Z























AN English hay-field See how busy the reapers
are mowing down the sweet hay. I hope the
little boy under the tree has been helping, and
that he is resting after his labours rather than
being lazy. It is so nice to toss up the hay when
it is dry,-its smell is so sweet.






REMEMBER THE POOR.

















HERE is a busy group, at any rate. See what a
lot of nice sticks they have been gathering in the
wood. They are too poor to buy coals, so they
go out and gather the broken branches. The
farmer does not object to them taking them, be-
cause he knows such thrifty, diligent people
never destroy the trees; and he often tells the for-
ester to order the workmen to leave as many of
the small branches as possible. In this time of
dear coals, and dear provisions of every kind, I
hope you remember the poor. I know of an
old woman in London, who comes twice a week
for the old tea-leaves a little boy saves for her.







A FRENCH TEA-GARDEN.




; q .h.-






NA.
o-
















THIS must be a garden in France, I think. The
people there are very fond of the open air, and
sometimes take their food in the tea-gardens. They
are certainly very merry; but I rather think we,
who are accustomed to home comforts, would soon
get tired of this noisy out-of-door life. The climate
there is so much warmer than ours, that it must be
pleasant to have such a nice garden to go to; and
the children cannot but enjoy it much.








OUT FOR A RAMBLE,








A4
)r


'~- ^



















I THINK these must be very nice children, because
of one thing,-their dog seems to be very fond. of
them. He has come back from a good scamper,
and is looking up in. their faces, sure of being
praised.







ENTERTAINING A VISITOR.

"---, -,"




I- -.













HERE is a very funny picture. This monkey has
found his way into the drawing-room, where sits
one of his mistress's visitors. She is rather afraid
of him, but thinks it is wiser to keep on friendly
terms with him, and is offering him some sweet
cake she intended to give to the children. Mr.
Monkey, who wants to be thought like his master
rather than like a little child, is shaking his head
and making all sorts of queer faces and sounds in
his throat. It is no wonder the poor visitor is
somewhat alarmed.







A WRECK AT SEA.




X-A-V
S' '-'' --. _- -.

._ .:--'- v ,- _- ^ '^w'y^^s^'33^-. '-












OH dear, what a sad scene is here A vessel in
distress, with her crew clinging to the sides of the
deck. If she is wrecked, I hope they will get off
in time in their boats, with a good compass and
plenty of food and water to serve till they reach
some safe haven, or some land. What dark clouds,
and what an angry sea! It is no wonder people
are fond of sailors, and like to see them walking
about the streets. When we think of the dangers
they have to endure, they must enjoy getting back
to land again, especially to their own homes, where
their wives and children are ready to give them,
oh how hearty a welcome !







A PRACTICAL JOKE.













/^iI -4
I I le














A-
-.- -. 7 & -



WHAT is the matter ? is anybody killed? I
"rather fear this stupid fellow has fired off his gun
in fun and has wounded somebody. His little
"brother has fainted with fright.
(440) 6






ON BOARD A STEAMER.







'F









ItL








HERE is a young lady going a long journey.
She is sitting on her trunk watching the busy
crowds of people coming and going. Every-
thing is so new and strange to her, that she has
no time to feel sad.







THE THRESHING-FLOOR.

























How busy old Tim is in the threshing-floor! Only
look how his flail is swinging over his head.
Ah, how cunning the ducks are i They have left
the pond, and have gathered round the door, ready
to pick up any stray grains of corn that Tim may
send out. The hens, too, have perched themselves
on the ledge, and are keeping a sharp look-out.







POOR LITTLE JOHNNIE.


,I It






















HERE is poor little Johnnie Green crying on his
door-step. But why is he crying, you would
like to know. Well, because a naughty boy who
was passing, snatched off his cap and tossed it
somewhere out of Johnnie's reach. It is well
that his big brother is close at hand to get it for
him, after he hears the cause of his tears.







MOVE ON! MOVE ON!

ul *; I l__ -
', i


















" MOVE on! move on That is what the police-
man is saying to this strange-looking man. He
is blind; but I fear he is only pretending, and is
not such an honest man as the old sailor with the
wooden leg I showed you before. His dog, too,
looks rather sly; though, poor beast, it is trying
to do its duty to its master, and is holding out
the tin dish very carefully. The man is roaring
so loud, that he is frightening the ladies who are
passing; so no wonder he is told to move on.







THE FRIENDLY ISLANDS.




















THIS is a canoe belonging to the Friendly Islands,
in the South Pacific Ocean. When you are old
enough, you will be able to read all about them, and
how Captain Cook thought this would be a good
name for them, because the natives all seemed to
live on such friendly terms with one another, and
from their politeness to strangers. They live upon
cocoa-nuts, yams, hogs, fowls, fish, and shell-fish.
They are very fond of bathing themselves in
ponds; and even though stagnant, they prefer
them to the water of the sea.







PRETTY COCKATOO.






J-









" PRETTY cockatoo." The little girls like to pay
him a visit, for he is such a very funny bird. He
is pure white, with such a lovely yellow crest; and
when he is pleased, he makes it stand up on his
head till you can see every feather quite distinctly.
Unfortunately, when he does that he almost always
gives a terribly loud screech, which forces you to
put your hands to your ears to shut out the ugly
sound. When he gets a piece of sugar, or a bit
of the yolk of an egg, he is so pleased, and makes
a sound like giving you a kiss, to show his thanks.
I hope the little girl who is holding up her finger
is not teazing him, because he may lose his temper
in a moment, and give her a severe bite.







NAUGHTY MARY.

-C-




ti













REALLY, Miss Mary, this is a very strange way to
use your doll, holding her up by her poor hand,
and letting her curls almost sweep the floor.
Miss Mary is in a cross humour, and so she is cross
with her doll; which is very stupid of her, I am
sure you will say. You take very great care of
your doll, I am certain; and put her to bed every
night, folding up her clothes as you do your own,
and teaching her to be a very tidy, well-behaved
doll. And you call her by a pretty name, don't you?







THE ACTIVE LITTLE SQUIRREL.





















I KNOW you will like to see this picture. Isn't
this a dear little pet of a squirrel ? He has
come down from the trees to enjoy the warmth
of the sun before it sets, and is eating his supper
with much content. All day he has been very
busy laying up a store of acorns in a hollow of
a tree; for God has taught him to know that
winter, dreary winter, is coming, and that he
must be active in the autumn, else he will starve
when the snow comes.







A NAUTILUS.






; -- ---- - .- -- - ----
^ ^^ ..::..- .-
























THIS is a picture of a nautilus; and I am sure
papa will be delighted to tell you about this
strange creature. We can

Learn of the little nautilus to sail,
Spread the thin oar, or catch the driving gale."

"This is the ship of pearl, which poets feign
Sails the unshaded main-
The venturous bark that flings
On the sweet summer wind its purpled wings."







AMERICAN SLAVES.

s: -- -- -' A
















AH, here is a sad sight. This is a cabin where
the slaves live, on a cotton plantation. I am glad
to say there are no slaves in America now; and
the overseer dare not use that great long whip to
force them to work, as he did only a very few
years ago. These men have been sent to tie up
and whip one of the women, because she did not
do as much work as the overseer thought she ought
to have done. How glad the negroes must be
now to think they cannot be whipped, or sold
away from their children and homes; and that
they can sing, No more auction block for me."







TAHITI.





.:-'- '- ^ s '- .. . -.
















THIS is an island in the South Pacific, called
Tahiti. The canoes seem to be very different
from those of the Friendly Islands; but the
people are very different. They used to be
in manners quite savages; but the missionaries
have done them a great deal of good, and they
are becoming just like people in this country.
All sorts of roots and plants grow here, and
fragrant sandal-wood.







ON BOARD A STEAMER.


'yi
















THIS is the picture of the interior of a saloon of
one of the steamers to Dublin. It has just newly
started, and the passengers are beginning to feel
uncomfortable, at least some of them are. The
stout old lady is too angry with the gentleman
opposite her to think of anything, and scarcely
feels the motion of the vessel. She thinks he is
very rude because he keeps staring at her grand-
daughter, who is so sad about leaving her mamma
and papa, that she can think of nothing else. And
though she promised to make ever so many
sketches, she lets her portfolio lie idly in her lap.







A YOUNG ROBBER.


"-"r.-- -7 -




















_-_ ._ b-r_-"1 -


"OH, shocking Gertrude is quite right to
say so to this cruel boy, for taking away the
bird's nest. He likes Gertrude, and intended to
make her a present of it; but when he sees how
sorry she is, it is to be hoped he will put it safely
back in the bush again.






THE SQUIRE IN HIS GARDEN.

. ', '. 1 .
'- -. *''*,, ,' "



















HERE is a picture of an English squire walking
in his garden. He is very fond of flowers, and
keeps a gardener to look after them. Tom the
gardener is as proud of the garden as his master
is, and always does his best to attend to the
flowers. He tenderly carries some of the delicate
ones into the green-house the moment the sun
"sets, lest they should get chilled and die.
__ -,. .


-.- , -
S.. ..'- .,. . ,,.
















sets, lest they should get chilled and die.






WALKING WITH PAPA.







__




-- -r ,





2r---
S -.






"REALLY, did ever any one wear such a funny
bonnet as this young lady ?" Oh yes; not many
years ago, either; and very comfortable it was,
too, I do assure you. I think the gentleman is
her father, and is an officer; and she is very proud
of walking out with him. He has taught her to
walk very neatly, and so she is pointing out her
toe as prettily as she can. Her father is a very
polite man, and is carrying her bag, and even her
parasol, which is rather a comical one.







JULIA MAYTON.
















Now, here is such a very pretty picture that I
must tell you a story about it. This is Julia
Mayton, the squire's little daughter. She some-
times tires of being in the garden, though she
likes the pretty flowers, and is allowed to wander
by herself through the wood out to the edge of
the common where the shepherd has his sheep
feeding. The moment she appears, Help, the
shepherd's dog, bounds off to greet her. He likes
to be patted by her; and to show that it is only
for affection he comes, he always refuses to take
any cake or bits of biscuit. He keeps a sharp
look-out, too, upon the flock, and if he sees one
straying he bounds away back to his duty.
(446) 7






GRANDPAPA'S PRESENT.




2 ", ,ii
'--









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,.




S- .













HERE are two sisters sitting on one of the garden
seats. The younger has brought out her new
book of history her kind grandpapa gave her for
a Christmas present; but she has quite startled
her elder sister by saying that she really does
not like to read it. She calls it a stupid book.






A TAHITIAN DANCER.

















THIS is a female dancer of Tahiti; and a very
funny figure she has made of herself. The things
like fans at her back must be intended for wings,
I think, and will add much to her grace when she
dances. She seems to have no shoes on her feet;
but she has been careful to provide herself with a
very fine head-dress. You must read all about
this beautiful island when you grow bigger, and
about its brave inhabitants. You will be very
much amused, too, to hear about the strange pillow
they lay their heads on when they go to sleep.
: .... "





.3 "- -
/ -=_-r _,- _. :.-













they lay their heads on when they go to sleep.







MAMMA AND BABY.






-' -.






S--






OH, what a sleepy-headed mamma Ah, but
baby is getting two new teeth, and they have
been so troublesome during the night that poor
mamma did not get a wink of sleep; and now that
they have shot their little white points through
the gums, poor baby is so relieved that he has
popped off to sleep; and his mamma has followed
his example, and dropped off too. You must be
very careful not to make any noise, in case you
awake them. Slip about on tip-toe, and shut the
doors very quietly.







LEARNING TO READ.

6 -






















HERE is an old'man teaching his son to read.
In those days there were no printed books;-all
were written; and so books were very scarce.
Gentlemen used to send their sons to be educated
by the monks. They used to have the most books.
Nearly all the copies of the Bible were in their
keeping. There was a copy chained to a pillar in
old St. Paul's Church in London.







ANGLERS.

S.... =_=.- -:%_ --
=_; :t^;.igcgo^.. a-
















AH, what is this now? Two anglers busy at
work. I greatly fear some foolish trout must
have spied out the glittering fly at the end of the
line, and swallowed it. Of course he does his
best to make his escape, and darts under the
bank; but the fisher is trying to force him to
come out. He must do so, because the hook is
sticking in his poor throat, and he can't bear the
pain any longer. It is such a pity he was so
greedy, else he might have swam about the pleasant
river.







TURKEYS TO SELL.

























HERE is a poulterer going round selling his fine
turkeys and chickens. He is trying to get the
doctor of the small town to buy one; but the
doctor is telling him that the last was much too
dear, and not at all good. Both the men seem
surprised; but, of course, the doctor ought to
know best.







OUT ON THE LAKE.




:- J .-: -.'- -j .-"^ '
"high r T a qu a n


-.-,% .' ,




--' --" -.
o---














How would you like to live up on the top of that
high rock ? The castle is quite a ruin now, and
the ferryman's daughter takes many people in her
boat to see it. She rows the boat about the lake
all the day, and never seems weary.







RIDING ON A GOAT.










/ 6







,,'.I,.It,


4 I'


I REALLY think this is Old Mother Hubbard's
dog again. You remember when she went out to the
clothier's to buy him a coat, when she returned home
to her own house he was riding on the back of
her goat. It is just as well he has the sense to
hold on by her horns, for Mrs. Nanny does not
seem to be very well pleased, and I can't help
thinking that she will toss him off the first mo-
ment she can.







PRETTY MISS MAUD.























lovely house she seems to live in! I wonder
what she is thinking about. She looks rather
grave, doesn't she ? And this surprises us, because
we often think that people who live in grand
houses, and wear fine clothes, ought never to be




happy, contented life of some poor people.
happy, contented life of sonic poor people.






THE LITTLE INVALID.



,i I


I' /-

,'.* ,, ,(! _- _- _--2














very delicate, and all his money cannot purchase
health. She has to lie in bed almost all the day;
but she has a kind little friend, the rector's
daughter, who comes very often and sits beside
her and reads to her. Though this little girl
cannot run about, she has learned to be content.






LEAVING HOME.





7.
SI" ? i















HERE is Arthur Young. He is leaving home for
the first time in his life, and is going away to be
a sailor on board a very large ship. He was so
proud of his fine clothes when they came home, and
was never tired of talking about the ship to his
little brothers and sisters; but now he cannot
help thinking that he will not see his dear, kind
mother, for ever so long, and he is trying to listen
very attentively to her last words of advice.







IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN.




















Ocean. It is called Raiatea. Do you notice what





in that canoe, and look through the clear water,
--- --- - .i












down to the very bottom, and watch the lovely
fishes swimming about, blue and yellow, and with
crimson spots sometimes. How we should laugh,
too, at the funny coloured crabs.







OUT IN THE WOODS.


.7,


















HERE is a picture nearer home. These children
have a half holiday, and are spending it in the
woods. They have not forgotten to take their
baby brothers and sisters with them; and as the
little ones are tired, they are taking a rest.
Henry wishes his sister Alice to blow very hard
upon the white feathery head of the dandelion
seed, to see if their mother requires her at home;
but Alice is a little afraid, in case it should be
true, and this makes them all laugh very much.







SULKY JESSIE.








'I








1.
S- _




















HEYDAY, and what's the matter here ? I fear some-
body has been naughty; and even though the
governess is talking kindly, I fear somebody is in
the sulks. Just look at them! I think they
must have been quarrelling, and are both to blame.
It is a great pity they are not friends, because it
is so painful to quarrel with one's playmates;
it makes everything feel wrong together. I do
hope they will forgive each other.







MARY AND HER PETS.






-' 4sh.* UL























GATHERING pretty posies. Oh, do look at the
dove taking a peep at her and the squirrels know
they need not scamper off, for she is too good to
hurt them.





23 LI~r~eSd








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