Classics of baby-land

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Material Information

Title:
Classics of baby-land
Uniform Title:
Goldilocks and the three bears
Little Red Riding Hood
Cinderella
Puss in Boots
Portion of title:
Classics of baby land
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Bates, Clara Doty, 1838-1895
Merrill, Frank T ( Frank Thayer ), b. 1848 ( Illustrator )
Curtis, Jessie ( Illustrator )
Finley, Charlotte Doty ( Illustrator )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher:
D. Lothrop & Co.
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1877   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1877   ( rbgenr3 )
Bldn -- 1877
Genre:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr3 )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
versified by Clara Doty Bates ; illustrated by F.T. Merrill & Jessie Curtis from designs by Charlotte Doty Finley.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002222721
notis - ALG2967
oclc - 61353479
System ID:
UF00035130:00001


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CLASSICS OF BABY-LAND.



VERSIFIED BY



MRS. CLARA DOTY BATES.



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BOSTO N :
D. LOTHROP & Co. PUBLISHERS,
-:i1 ::.-; FPANl-KLIN STREET.



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Copyright by

D. LOTHROP & CO.

1877.























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CLASSICS OF BABY-LAND.



STORY OF THE FIVE



LITTLE PIGS.



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SILVER LOCKS AND THE BEARS.



SILVER LOCKS AND THE BEARS.

VERSIFIED PY MRS. CLARA DOTY P\Tr,-.


ILVER Locks was a little girl,
I Lovely and good;
She strayed out one day
." And got lost in the wood,
And was lonely and sad,
.. .. I Till she came where there stood
S' The house which belonged to the Bears.


She pulled the latch string,
SAnd the door opened wide;
S',- She peeped softly first,
And at last stepped inside;

So tired her little feet
Were that she cried,
And so hungry she, sobbed to herself.

She dId not know
Vllctllcl ts: stay or to go; .
"but tlerc \re three chairs
Standing. all in a row, _-
S And there ucre three bowls
"Full of milk white as snow,
And there "ere thrre bedg by the wall. '

But the II.ltul:r Bear's'chair -
Was too-hard to sit in it,

.- And the Mother Bear's chair
Was too hard to sit in it;
"But the Baby Bear's chair
Was so soft in a minute
She had broken it all into pieces.



Was too sour to drink,
And the Mother Bear's milk
Was too sour to drin''
But the Baby Bear's milk
-_- Was .so sweet, only think,
\- When she tasted she drank it all ul.



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SILVER LOCKS AND THE BEARS.



'l- And the Father Bear's bed
-I'Was as hard as a stone,
And the Mother Bear's bed
Was as hard as a stone;
But the Baby Bear's bed
Was so soft she. lay down,
knd before she could wink was asleep.

By and by came the scratch
Of old Father Bear's claw,
And the fumbling knock
SOf old Mother Bear's paw,
And the latch string flew up,
And the Baby Bear saw
--- That a stranger had surely been there.

'Then Father Bear cried,
"Who's been sitting in my chair?"
And Mother Bear cried,
"Who's been sitting in my chair?" ,
And Baby Bear smiled,
"Who's been sitting in my chair, __
And broken it all into pieces?" ,

Then Father Bear growled,
"Who's been tasting of my milk? "
And Mother Bear growled,
"Who's been tasting of my milk i ?
And Baby Bear wondered,
"Who's tasted of my milk,
And tasting has drank it all up ? "

- And I athici Bear roared,
Who's been lying myin bed ? "
And Mother Bear roared,
". Who's been lying on my bed ? '
And Baby Bear laughed,
S. Who's been lying on my b-ed
SO, here she is, fast asleep!"

SThe savage old Father Bear cried,
SLet us eat her "
The savage old Mother Bear cried,
"Let us eat her "
SBut the Baby Bear said,;
Nothing .ever was skVeeter,,ll
"Let'skiss her, and send her home !i



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JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK.











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JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK.


At last he came to a path that led- '
To a house he had never seen before; W .
And he begged of a woman there some bread;
But she heard her husband, the Giant, roar, ---
And she gave him a shove in the old brick oven. '





I smell fresh meat! I will have some -
ie cried the louder, Fe, fi,fo,fum/


He ate as much as would feed ten men, j II i' C
And drank a barrel of beer to the dregs; I
"Then he called for his little favorite hen, a
As under the table he stretched his legs, -
And he roared Ho ho "-like a buffalo-
Lay your gold eggs "



She laid a bee tiCitiel to I .-Z I
And at last lh.: G( A .' I:.. ll-S L.. I l.I.
Jack waited a ii '''iii. IIi. I .. i ll.- .
H e crept ftrP i. l*i .... 1.ii 1 11.I:
And caught tih I. i iA ii 'i! i..1 ii


But the Giant li. -. 1 I m ,lIi I.. i Ii1. ,'
And followp.eI iou ii, 1. 11
But Jack was 'i I., I-a a* -. -
And sang o- I,. 1 i .11 -ill .
SHi/tchity-hat. A .'. 2 I 'i


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And the Giant howled, and gnashed his teeth.
Jack got down first, and, in a flash, .
Cut the ladder from underneath
And Giant and Bean-stalk, in one dash, -
No shilly-shally, no dilly-dally, -
Fell with a crash.

This brought Jack fame, and riches, too; ;i
For the little gold-egg hen would lay 't.1.l
An egg whenever he told her to,
If lie asked one fifty times a day.
And he and his mother lived with each other
In peace always.







LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD.



LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD.,

VERSIFIED BY MRS. CLARA DOTY BATES.


f --. A pat of butter, and cakes of cheese,
S'- Were stored in the napkin, nice and neat:
SI As she danced along beneath the trees,
: ''tAI s light as a shadow were her feet;
1AI A nd she hummed such tunes as the bumble-be.
Hum when the clover-tops are sweet.
S| But an ugly wolf by chance espied
i"'ll The child, and marked her for his prize.
AI 1." What are you carrying there ? he cried ;
'-. "Is it some fresh-baked cakes and pies ?"
"" r And he walked along close by her side,
A/nd sniffed and,rolled his hungry eyes.

F you listen, children, I will tell '
The story of little Red Riding-hood: i
Such wonderful, wonderful things befell I;I
Her and her grandmother, old and good
(So old she was never very well),'
Who lived in a cottage in a wood. iI
Little Red Riding-hood, every day,
Whatever the weather, shine or storm,
'o see her grandmother tripped away, '
With a scarlet hood to keep her warm,,
And a little mantle, soft and gay,
And a basket of goodies on her arm. I
S.... -Sh






"A basket of things for granny, it is,"
She answered brightly, without fear.
"Oh, I know her very well, sweet miss!
Two roads branch towards her cottage here;
You go tha. way, and I'll go this,
~'iJi 4, .. Y"See which will get there first, my dear!"







LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD.



He fled to the cottage, swift and sly; -
Rapped softly, with a dreadful grin.
Who's there? asked granny. Only I . ',; .
Piping his voice up high and thin. 't "'
Pull the string, and the latch will fly l
Old granny said; and he went in.

He glared her over from foot to head;
In a second more the thing was done !
He gobbled her up, and merely said,'
"She wasn't a very tend er one!" -
And then he jumped into the bed,
And put her sack and night-cap on.

Her innocent head on the pillow laid,
She spied great pricked-up, hairy ears,
And a fierce great mouth, wide open spread,
"And green eyes, filled with wicked leers;
And all of a sudden she grew afraid;
Yet she softly asked, in spite of her fears:
Oh, granny what makes your ears so big ?"
"To hear you with! to hear you with! '";
'Oh, granny! what I ake your eyes so big ?"
"To see you with! to see you with! "
Oh, granny what makes your teeth so big ?'
""-To eat you with to eat you with !"
And he sprang to swallow her up alive;
S- But it chanced a woodman from the ,..rd,
t- Hearing her shriek, rushed, with his knife,
And drenched the wolf in his own blood.
--- .....And in that way he saved the life
"- Of pretty little Red Riding-hood.

And he heard soft footsteps presently,
And then on the door a timid rap; "
He knew Red Riding-hood was shy, '
So he answered faintly to the tap:
"Pull the string and the latch will fly !"
S She did: and granny, in her night-cap,

Lay covered almost up to her nose. II
Oh, granny dear !" she cried, "are you worse? I
"I'm all of a shiver, even to my toes !
Please won't you be my little nurse,
And snug up tight here under the clothes ?" --
Red Riding-hood answereA, "Yes," of course. .
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iCINDERELLA.













S' '^ --- -A With eyes as.blue as larkspurs,
S- And a mass of tossing curls;
a, p ;''"- But her step-mother had for her
Only blows and bitter words,
While she thought her own two ugly. crows,
-The whitest of all birds.

---=- l She was the little household drudge,
-And wore a cotton gown,
^ While the sisters, clad in silk and satin,
u -Flaunted through the town.
When her work was done, her only place
--- -=& Was the chimney-corner bench.
LF "or which one called her Cinderella,"
"B yer The other, C.nder wench.

2;,. But years went on, and Cinderella
Bloomed like a wild-wood rose,. .' '.,".
In spite of all her kitchen-work, .
And her common, dingy clothes; I I, I,
While the two step-sisters, year by year,
Grew scrawnier and plainer; '
"Two peacocks, with their tails outspread,
Were never any vainer. i, /d\ -
-T^ (One day they got a note, a pir,. .
SSweet-scented, crested one, .
St Which was an invitation .'' -l"
1To a ball, from the king's s ":n. '
Oh. tn poor Cinderella '
SiHad to starch, and iron, and pli .
.nd run of errands, frill and crinl. '



Sr i She helped to paint their faces,
h'"l'^ t' J s To lace their satin shoes, and deck
;Them up with flowers and laces;
T aThen watched their coach roll grandly
"- She sat down by the chimney,
In the cinders, with the cat,


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CINDERELLA. /



And sobbed as if her heart would break.
Hot tears were on her lashes, .
Her little hands got black with soot,
Her feet begrimed with ashes,
When right before her, on the hearth,-
She knew not how nor why,
A little odd old woman stood,
And said, Why do you cry ?"

It is so very lonely here,"
Poor Cinderella said,
And sobbed again. The little odd
Old woman bobbed her head,
And laughed a merry kind of laugh,
SAnd whispered, Is that all? I -
Wouldn't my little Cinderella
Like to go to the ball? A "' P'

Run to the garden, then, and fetch
"J A pumpkin, large and nice;
Go to the pantry shelf, and from
The mouse-traps get the mice;
"i Rats you will find in the rat-trap;
And, from the watering-pot,
Or from under the big, flat garden-stone,
Six lizards must be got."
Nimble as crickets in the grass
I 'She ran, till it was done,
And then God-mother stretched her wand
S" And touched them every one.
The pumpkin changed into a coach,
Which glittered as it rolled,
With harnesses of gold.
I And the mice became six horses,

1 i I i One rat a herald was, to blow
A trumpet in advance,
SAnd the first blast that he sounded
Made the horses plunge and prance;
And the lizards were made footmen,
h Because they were so spry;
"", And the old rat-coachman on the box
Wore jeweled livery.

And then on Cinderella's dress
The magic wand-was laid,
And straight the dingy gown became
S. A glistening gold brocade.
S- The gems that shone up.nri her fingers
Nothing could surpass
And on her dainty little feet
Were slippers made of glass.




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CINDERELLA.



"Be sure you get back here, my dear,
At twelve o'clock at night," i
Godmother said, and in a twinkling i i .
She was out of sight. I j i i
When Cinderella reached the ball, ,
And entered at the door, ,
So beautiful a lady .
None had ever seen before. 'Ii !^.
The Prince his admiration showed
In every word and glance; i i
He led her out to supper,
And he chose her for the dance i '"
But she kept in mind the warning
That her Godmother had given, -i
And left the ball, with all its charms, V
At just half after eleven. L ta
Next night there was another ball;
She helped her sisters twain
To pinch their waists, and curl their hair, I
And paint their cheeks again.
Then came the fairy Godmother,
And, with her wand, once more
Arrayed her out in greater splendor
Even than before.


*' l i I pThe coach and six, with gay outriders,
", *Bore her through the street,
And a crowd was gathered round to look,
I II The lady was so sweet, -


I Her slipper twinkled like a star.
'' light o heart, anda, and milen,
Again the Prince chose only her
S: For waltz or tete-a-tete;
SSo swift the minutes flew she did not
SBut all at once, remembering
SWhat her Godmother had said,
And hearing twelve begin to strike
I: Upon the clock, she fled.

S: L Swift as a swallow on the wing
S.' She darted, but, alas!
'I Dropped from one flying foot the tiny
Slipper made of glass;
But she got away, and well it was
She did, for in a trice
_. Her.coach changed to a pumpkin,
And her horses became mice;



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CINDERELLA.



And back into the cinder dress
Was changed the gold brocade !
The prince secured the slipper,
And this proclamation made:
That the country should be searched,
And any lady, far or wide,
Who could get the slipper on her foot,
Should straightway be his bride.



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So every lady tried it,
With her "Mys! and Ahs!" and "Ohs
And Cinderella's sisters pared
Their heels, and pared their toes, -
But all in vain Nobody's foot
Was small enough for it, ,'.
Till Cinderella tried it, !l
And it was a perfect fit. l'
Then the royal heralds hardly 1 I -r
Knew what it was best to do,
When from out her tattered pocket'
Forth she drew the other shoe, '',!
While the eyelids on the larkspur e- i
Dropped down a snowy vail, I i i'',
And the sisters turned from pale to i.l. 1
And then from red to pale, -.



And in hateful anger cried, and stormed,
And scolded, and all that,
And a courtier, without thinking,
Tittered out behind his hat.
For here was all the evidence
The Prince had asked, complete,
Two little slippers made of glass,
Fitting two little feet.



So the Prince, with all his retinue,
Came there to claim his wife;
And he promised he would love her
With devotion all his life.
At the marriage there was splendid
Music, dancing, wedding cake;
And he kept the slipper as a treasure
Ever, for her sake.



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PUSS IN BOOTS.



PUSS IN BOOTS.

VERSTFIED BY MRS. CLARA DOTY BATES.


The youth sighed heavy sighs,
SI ' And laughed a scornful laugh:
"Of all the silly things I know,
I' You're the silliest, by half! "
Still, after a space of doubt and thought,
The pair of boots and the bag were bought.
'" And Puss, at the peep of dawn,
I i Was out upon the street,
-With shreds of parsley in her bag,
And the boots upon her feet.
She was on her way to the woods, for game,
"- -- nd soon to the rabbit-warren came.



A MILLER had three sons, ,04 J
And, on his dying day,
lie willed that all he owned should be '
Shared by them in this way:
The mill to this, and the donkey to that,
And to the youngest only the cat.
This last, poor fellow, of course "
Thought it a bitter fate;
With a cat to feed, he should die, indeed,
Of hunger, sooner or late.
And he stormed, with many a bitter word,
Which Puss, who lay in the cupboard, I-card.
And the simple rabbits cried,
S' "The parsley smells like spring!"
i And into the bag their noses slipped,
e s- e a-And Pussy pulled the string.
r Only a kick, and a gasp for breath,
", And, one by one, they were choked to death.
. -., So Sly Boots bagged her game,
SAnd gave it an easy swing
Over her shoulder; and, starting off
For the palace of the king,
". She found him upon his throne, in state,
While near him his lovely daughter sate.
She stretched, and began to purr, Puss made a graceful bow
Then came to her master's knee, No courtier could surpass,
And, looking slyly up, began: And said, "I come to your Highness from
". "Pray be content with me The Marquis of Carabas.
Get me a pair of boots ere night, His loyal love he sends to you,
And a bag, -and it,.will be all right !" With a tender rabbit for a stew."


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PUSS IN BOOTS.



Ahd the petty princess smiled,
And the king said, Many thanks."
And Puss strode off to her master's home,
Purring, and full of pranks.
And cried, "I've a splendid plan for you !
Say nothing, but do as I tell you to !
"To-morrow, at noon, the king
And his beautiful daughter ride;
And you must go, as they draw near,
And bathe at the river side."
The youth said Pooh but still, next day,
Bathed, when the king went by that way.



Puss hid his dingy clothes
In the marshy river-grass,
And screamed, when the king came into sight,
"The Marquis of Carabas-
My master is drowning close by!
Help help good king, or he will die "

Then servants galloped fast,
And dragged him from the water.
'Tis the knight who sent the rabbit stew,"
The king said, to his daughter.
And a suit of clothes was brought with speed,
And he rode in their midst, on a royal steed,

Meanwhile Puss, in advance,
To the Ogre's palace fled,
SWhere he sat, with a great club in his hand,.,
' 1d monstrous ugly head.
... I politely as she went in,
) grinned, with a ., in,,l grin.
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"I have heard it said," she purred,
That, with the greatest ease,
You change, in the twinkling of an eye,
Into any shape you please !
"Of course I can the Ogre cried,
And a roaring lion stood at her side.

Puss shook like a leaf, in her boots,
But said, "' It is very droll !
Now, please, if you can, change into a mouse!"
He did. And she swallowed him whole !
Then, as the king and his suite appeared,
She stood on the palace porch and cheered.

"Twas a grand old palace indeed,
Builded of stone and brass.
"Welcome, most noble ladies and lords,
To the Castle of Carabas! "
Puss said, with a sweeping courtesy;
And they entered, and feasted royally.



And the Marquis lost his heart
At the beautiful princess' smile;
And the very next day the two were wed,
In wonderful state and style.
And Puss in Boots was their favorite page,.
And lived with them to a good old age.

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DICK WHITTINGTON AND HIS CAT.



DICK WHITTINGTON AND HIS CAT.


VERSIFIED BY MRS. CLARA DOTY BATES.



Yes-ran away to London city!
Poor little lad! he needs your pity; .
For there, instead of a golden street,
The hot, sharp stones abused his feet.

So tired he was he was fit to fall, -
Yet nobody cared for him at all;
He wandered here, and he wandered there,
With a heavy heart, for many a square.
And at last, when he could walk no more,
He sank down faint at a merchant's door.
And the cook-for once compassionate -
Took him in at the area-gate.



DICK, as a little lad, was told
That the London streets were paved with gold.
He never, in all his life, had seen
A place more grand than the village green
So his thoughts by day, and his dreams by night,
Pictured this city of delight,
Till, whatever he did, wherever he went,
His mind was filled with discontent.



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And a restless, hlirdne,- to his bed;
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And she gave him bits of broken meat,
And scattered crusts, and crumbs, to eat;
And kept him there for her commands
To pare potatoes, and scour pans,
To wash the kettles and sweep the room
And she beat him dreadfully with the broom /
And he staid as long as lie could stay,
And again, in despair, he ran away.

Out towards the famous Highgate Hill
He fled, in the morning gray and chill
And there he sat on a wayside stone,
And the bells ot Bow, witl merry t



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DICK WHITTINGTON AND HIS CAT.



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Jangled a musical chime together,
Over the miles of blooming heather :
"Turn, turn, turn again, Whittington,
Thrice Lord Mayor of London town !"

And he turned -so cheered he was at that -
And, meeting a boy who carried a cat,
He bought the cat with his only penny,-
For where he had slept the mice were many.
Back to the merchant's his way he took,
To the pans and potatoes and cruel cook,
And he found Miss Puss a fine device,
For she kept his garret clear of mice.



The merchant was sending his ship abroad,
And he let each servant share h. 1.. .I1;
One sent this thing, and one -cut d[il,
And little Dick Whittington sent his cat.
The ship sailed out and over the sea,
Till she touched at last at a far country;
And while she waited to sell her store,
The captain and officers went ashore.

They dined with the king ; the tables fine
Groaned with the meat and frtit and wine;
But, as soon as the guests were ranged about,
Millions of rats and mice came out.
They swarmed on the table, and on the floor,
Up from the crevices, in at the door,
They swept the food away in a breath,
And the guests were frightened almost to death!

To lose their dinners they thought a shame.
The captain sent for the cat. She came !
And right and left, in a wonderful way,
-She threw, and slew, and spread dismay.



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Then the Moorish king spoke up so bold:
I will give you eighteen bags of gold,
If you will sell me the little thing."
I will! and the cat belonged to the king.

When the good ship's homeward voyage was done,
The money was paid to Dick Whittington;
At his master's wish 'twas put in trade;
Each dollar another dollar made.
Richer he grew each month and year,
Honored by all both far and near;
With his master's daughter for a wife,
He lived a prosperous, noble life.

And the tune the Bow-bells sang that day,
When to Highgate Hill he ran away, -
"Turn, turn, turn again, Whittington,
Thrice Lord Mayor of London town,"-



In the course of time came tile and rp',''t.
He was Mayor of London, and Sir Knight;
And in English history he is known,:
By-the name of Sir Richard Whlrtinit.-.n !



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" GOLD-LOCKS' DREAM OF PUSSIE-WILLOW.












J BY CLARA DOTY BATES.

ONE sunny day, in the early spring,
Before a bluebird dared to sing,
Cloaked and furred as in winter weather,
Seal-brown hat and cardinal feather,-
Forth with a piping song,
Went Gold-Locks "after flowers."
"Tired of waiting so long,"
Said this little girl of ours.

And found not even a leaf of clover;
Nor where the sod was chill and wet
SCould she spy one tint of violet;
SBut where the brooklet ran
A noisy swollen billow,

A branch of pussie-willow.
She shouted out, in a happy way,
At the catkins' fur, so soft and gray;
She smoothed them down with loving pats,
And called them her little pussie-cats.
She played at scratch and bite;
She played at feeding.cream;
SAnd when she went to bed that night,
Gold-Locks dreamed a dream.
Curled in a little cosy heap,
SUnder the bed-clothes, fast asleep,
SShe heard, although she scarce knew how,
M A:" And right before her bed,
Upon a branching tree,
"Were kittens, and kittens, and kittens,
tAs thick as.they could be.
Maltese, yellow, and black as ink;
White, with both ears lined with pink;
Striped, like a royal tiger's skin;
S- Yet all were hollow-eyed, and thin;
And each one wailed aloud.
S i 'Once, and twice, and thrice:
I We are the willow-pussies
"O, where are the willow-mice!"
Meanwhile, outside, through branch and bough,
"The March wind wailed, M-e-o-w m-e-o-w /I"
'Twas dark, and yet Gold-Locks awoke,
And softly to her mother spoke:
If they were fed, mamma,
SI It would be very nice;
But I hofe the willow-pussies
Won't find the willow-mice "



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TONY.



TONY.


BY MRS. CLARA DOTY BATES.



WHISK !- away in the sun
His little flying feet
Scamper as softly fleet
As ever the rabbits run.
He is gone like a flash, and then
In a breath is back again.



The silky flosses shine
Down to his very toes:
Tipped with white is his nose:
And his ears are fleeces fine,
Blowing a shadow-grace
Breeze-like about his face.



Quick to a whistled call
Hearkens his ready ear,
Scarcely waiting to hear;
Silk locks, white feet, all
Rush, like a furry elf
Tumbling over himself.



How does he sleep? He winks
Twice with his mischief eyes;
Dozes a bit; then lies
Down with a sigh;,then thinks
Over some roguish play,
And is up and away!



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CAMPING OUT.



CAMPING OUT.


BY MRS. CLARA DOTY BATES.



So they all decided that they must seek
Their health in the country for a week.
And they made a mixed but a merry throng,
For those who had children took them along.
They pitched their tent and made their camp,
Shelter from possible cold and damp.



"D AME SPIDER had spun herself lank and thin
With trying to take her neighbors in;
Grasshopper had traveled so far and so fast
That he found he must give up at last;
And the maiden Ant had bustled about
The village till she was all worn out.



Old Bumble Bee had lived on sweet
Till he couldn't help but overeat;
Miss Worm had. measured her puny length
Till she had no ,ln, a.. -trength;
,And Mr. Beetle .Is aboi.,:, to find
His eves were f i ;l- and almostt blind.



'Twas novel, and eac.in his own.way
Sought to make happy the holiday.
Grasshopper took his youngest daughter
Out for a stroll along the water;
She shrieked with joy, "0, see the cherries!"
When they found some low-bush huckleberries.



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CAMPING OUT.



A leaf on the water lay afloat,
Which the blundering Beetle thought a boat.
Far down in his heart his dearest wish
W as to find some hitherto unfound fish.
'- He never came back from that fatal swim,
So 'twas always thought that a fish found him.



Dame Spider, with mischief in her eye,- -
Thought she would angle for a fly ;
So, spinning a silk thread, long and fine,
With wicked skill she cast the line; .
While Bumble Bee, in his gold-laced clothes,' -. V -l*'l
In the shade of a clover leaf lay for a doze. ."'"-


SI At night when the cheery fire was lit
'' i They heaped dry branches over it,
i '' i'I -. I' "And in the light of the crackling blaze
,'i .. -Told funny stories of other days,
.-, fAnd smoked, till the Ant yawned wide and said:
"'Tis time we folks were all abed! "


Miss Worm, who was full of sentiment, 7 .....
With the maiden Ant for a ramble went; -
Here was a flower, and there a flower- -
But suddenly rose a thunder shower.
They screamed; but they got on very well,
For they found what the Ant called an "umberell." --


_i- _', -- B But scarce was each to his slumber laid,
,', "' ''' '' When the country folks came to serenade;
/ -' With twang of fiddle, and toot of horn,
4, r ?,- - .' And shriek of fife, they stayed till morn!
"-' "'- -_- Poor Campers never a wink g...t iirL !
So they :artc'ed for home at break of day.



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DAME FIDGET AND HER SILVER PENNY.



TF1uTW 9 rUR I V LV IR1 *YNN I.
-q fri#o Ar MRvSs. C'LARA 27Qr'r.ATES.



A WEE, wee woman
Was little old Dame
And she lived by herself
"In a wee, wee room,
And early every morning,
So tidy was her habit,
She began to sweep it out
With a wee, wee broom.



To sweep for the cinders,
Though never, were there any,
She whisked about, and brushed about,
Humming like a bee;
When, odd enough, one day
She found a silver penny,
Shining in a corner, ,
As bright as bright could be.



... She eyed it, she took it
Between her thumb and finger;
She put it in the sugar bowl
And quickly shut the lid;
And after planning 'over carefully
The way to spend it,
She resolved to go to market
And to buy herself a kid. And
S The


At f
-A: :. : And

Just then Dame Fidget saw a dog run by,, Till
And whistled to him, It
And Lried :-" Pray dog bite kid, .',%
Kid won't go!
I see by the moonlight
'Tis almost midnight,
And time kid and I were home
Half an hour ago !" 7-



I that she did next day; but, ah,
kid proved very lazy!
it moved toward home so slowly ;
he could scarcely see it crawl; .
first she coaxed and petted it,
then she-stormed and scolded,
at last, when they had reached the bridge,
would not go at all.



But no, he said he wouldn't; i
So to the stick she pleaded:-
"Pray stick beat dog, dog won't bite kid,
Kid won't go!
I see by the moonlight
'Tis almost:midnight,
And time kid and I were home
Half an hour ago "






DAME FIDGET AND HER SILVER PENNY.



But the stick didn't stir,
So she called upon the fire:--
" Pray fire burn stick, stick won't beat dog,
Dog won't bite kid,
Kid won't go!
And I see by the moonlight A ,
P'Tis almost midnight,
And time kid and I were home
/ Half an hour ago \



But the fire only smoked, W .
So she turned and begged the water:-
"Pray water quench fire, fire won't burn stick,
Stick won't beat dog, dog won't bite kid,
Kid won't go !
I see by the moonlight
'Tis already midnight,
And time kid and I were home -
An hour and a half ago !"



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But the ox bellowed no -"" a "
So she shouted to the butcher:-
" Pray butcher kill ox, .ox won't drink water,
Water won't quench fire, fire won't burn stick,
Stick won't beat dog, dog won't bite kid,
Kid won't go !
I see by the moonlight
'Tis getting past midnight,
And time kid and I were home
An hour and a half ago!"



" Ha, ha the water gurgled,
So to the ox appealing:
"Pray ox drink water, water won't quench fire,
Fire won't burn stick, stick won't beat dog,
Dog won't bite kid,
Kid won't go!
And I see by the moonlight
'Tis already midnight,__
And time kid and I were home '
An hour and a half ago .> '1I



S, .



But the butcher only laughed at her,
And to the rope she hurried:- --
Pray rope hang butcher, butcher won't kill ox,
Ox won't drink water, water won't quench fire,.
Fire won't burn stick, stick won't beat dog.
Dog won't bite kid,
"Kid won't go! .
And I see by the moonlight
'Tis getting past midnight,
And time kid and I were home ,
An hour and a half ago."




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DAME FIDGET AND HER SILVER PENNY.



The rope swayed round for "nay!"
So to the rat she beckoned: -
" Pray rat gnaw rope, rope won't hang butcher,
Butcher won't kill ox, ox won't drink water,
Water won't quench fire, fire won't burn stick,
Stick won't beat dog, dog won't bite kid,
Kid won't go -
And I see by the moonlight
'Tis long past midnight,
And time kid and I were home A scornful sc
A couple of hours ago !" And so she
~: "Pray cat ea
...-.."' ,Rope won't I
"Ox won't dri
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Fire won't b
Dog won't bi
Kid won't
And I see b3
'Tis long pas
And time kic
Hours and



lueak was all he deigned,
called the kitten:- : -
It rat, rat won't gnaw rope,
lang butcher, butcher won't kill ox,
nk water, water won't quench fire,
urn stick, stick won't beat d:..
ite kid,
go!
Sthe moonlight -_L.
t midnight,
Sand I were home
Hours ago!"



Now pussy loved a rat,
So she seized him in a minute:
And the cat began to eat the rat,
The rat began to gnaw the rope,
The rope began to hang the butcher,
The butcher began to kill the ox,
The ox began to drink the water,
The water began to quench the fire,
The fire began to burn the stick,
The stick began to beat the dog,
The dog began to bite the kid,
And the kid began to go !
And home through the moonlight,
Long after midnight,
The little dame and little kid
Went trudging oh, so slow !



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HICKORY DICKORY DOCK.



ICK-TACK! tick-tack!
This way, that way, forward, back,
Swings the pendulum to and fro,
Always regular, always slow.
Grave and solemn on the wall,
Hear it whisper.! hear it call!
Little Ginx knows naught of Time,'
But-has heard the mystic rhyme,-
Hickory, dickory, dock I
The mouse ran up the clock !"



Tick-tack tick-tack!
White old face with figures black !
So when dismal, stormy days
Keep him from his out-door plays,
Most that he cares for is to sit
Watching, always watching it.
And when the hour strikes he thinks, -
(A dear, wise head has the little Ginx!)
The clock strikes one,
The mice run down! "



Tick-tack! tick-tack!
This way, that way, forward, back!
Though so measured and precise,
Ginx believes it full of mice.
A mouse runs up at every tick,
But when the stroke comes, scampering quick,
Mice run down again; so they go,
Up and down, and to and fro!
Hickory, dickory, dock.
Full of mice is the clock!



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FOOLISH BOBOLINK.


BY MRS. CLARA DOTY BATES.



T HAT a silly bobo-
link,
Down in the meadow
grasses!
What can the noisy fellow
"think,
When, to everyone who
S: I, passes,
i ii He calls out cheerily,
"Here, here is my nest I See see "

He could hide the summer through
In the thick, sweet-smelling clover,
Nor could anyone from dawn to dew,
H;s little house discover,
Did he not make so free
With the secret- Here! see! see !"



Little Ted has ears and eyes,
And how can he keep from knowing
Just where the cosy treasure lies,
When bobolink, coming, going,
Sh.,lutS. pl.wh ., plain

,' Here. here is a
,-St! See!
,e "



And Teddy would like to creep
Tip-toe across the meadow,
And for just one minute stoop and peep
Under the clover shadow.
He would do no harm not he!
But would only see, see, see!



And what would he find below
The sheltering grass, you wonder ?
Why, a nest, of course, and an egg or so,
A mother's dark wings under.
But bobolink he would flee
In a fright- A boy! see! see! "

So Teddy, whose heart is kind,
Though he longs to venture near him,
Sighs to himself, "Ah, never mind "
And listens, glad to hear him
Shouting, in tireless glee,
"Here, here is my nest! See i "



FOOLISH BOBOLINK.



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DAME SPIDER.



DAME SPIDER.

BY MRS. CLARA DOTY BATES.

"0, no," he cried. "I am off to discover
What I can find fresh in the way of white clover;
But since your window is cosy and shady,
1 will sit down half a minute, dear Lady."

Little Dame Spider arose with a rustle,
Welcomed him with ceremonious bustle;
Quick as a flash threw her long arms around him,
Heeded no buzzing, but held him and bound him;



LITTLE Dame Spider had finished her spinning,
Just as the warm summer day was beginning,
And the white threads of her beautiful curtain
Tied she and glued she to make them more certain.

Dressed in her old-fashioned feathers and fringes,
Then she sat down to wait; on silken hinges
Swung the light fleece with a moonshiny glisten;
Nothing for her but to watch and to listen.

Tied knots so tight that he could not undo them;
-" ', Wove snares so strong that he could not break
-. .. through them;
Then, with are lish, stood chuckling and iininhg.
.) r "This is to pay me for my early spinning! "

-' At the home-hive the bees going and coming
Kept up all day their industrious humming,
Nor did it one of their busy heads bother
^/ That Madame Spider had dined iff their brother.


Presently, going off early to labor, :
Bowing politely, as neighbor to neighbor,
When he caught sight of this little old woman,- '
Sailed by a honey-bee, serge-clad and common. - '

"Are you so scornful because I am humble?
Many a time your rich relatives, Bumble,
Pause in their flying to chat for an hour!" '
She called out after him, half gay, half sour. .






THE CHRISTMAS BOOK FOR THE BABIES.



BABYLAND.
Quarto Pictorial. 100 pages.
boards. Price 76 cents.



Chromo,



This is without doubt, the most bewitching book ever
made for little children. The engravings represent scenes in
baby life, the type is large, the words divided into syllables,
and with but little help from the mother the child teaches itself
to read.



- -4



(See BABYLA\ND.)



BABYLAND.
A PICTORIAL MAGAZINE FOR THE
ELLA FARMAN, Editor.



BABIES.



ONLY 50 CENTS A YEAR!!! FREE OF POSTAGE.
TAKE IT FOR YOUR BABY!
D. LOTHROP & CO., Publishers,
30 & 32 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON.



Large



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Mom031- wl





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(See WIDE A ,m K for August, IS77.)
A cli-ti-ri.i ., ; i man in speaking of children's periodicals said My chil-
dren leave the other magazines fresh and clean, on the table, but they read WIDErn 3
AWAKE to tatters "

W IDE AWAKE.

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE FOR YOUNG FOLKS. )
$2.00 A YEAR. FREE OF POSTAGE.

"ELLA FARMAN, EDITOR.

TO Al BETTER AND BRIGHTER THAN EVER,DURING I

SD ; L OTH R OP & CO., Publishers,
"30 & x'RFANKTIN YTrPr





*. ^ -,


W,. e give the children hoidays in the year




' ( .1 ____













MILTIADES EATS TOO MUCH TNKSG G DINNER. TH. RESULT.- 11i s-S TH GHOST OF THlL TURKEY.
(See WVID. A\\.\KE I.nW AIu. .

The Ne plus /ultra of Holiday Gifts.

THE LEADING ILLUS TRA TED BOOKS OF THE StEAISON.

S^lje Wibt ^taone iCrint
Four Handsome Illustrated Volumes. Each volume contairs- Inearl 400 large
.. square pages. Bound in cloth, Black and Gold starmps $8.00.
In Chromo Boards $6.00.

S' hese books are in every sense wide a\%ak' ," a most \,'',lcon-( gift '. the youth-
Sul rmbers of any family, and well adapted to the the training of their young minds for
S\te- reception of the most desirable literature and to abhlor tl e perniciou- and profitless.
.t the pre-ecnt time when the country is so full of trash story books, it should be a source
om gratification to a parent to know there are oublicatioois of a highLi standard which chil-
h dien ma' peruse with profit."
I ndclee there isn't a page that will uot interest my girl or boy, and \-e know of some
1 i fol -, wh-:o are as anxious for W AWAKE as fo0 the NOrI:' \mcrican Review and the
I ,lantic. \\'IDE AWAKE is all t-. s name implies."--Cra-wjc (1 Joi/mal.
LOTHROP & CO., Publishers,
"30 & 32 FRANKLIN STREETj BOSTON.









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