The news-sun

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The news-sun
Uniform Title:
News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title:
Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Sebring Fla
Creation Date:
June 7, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates:
27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note:
Also published for Avon Park.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID:
UF00028423:01517

Related Items

Preceded by:
Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by:
Avon Park sun


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NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 192750 Family Easter projectsB1Lake Placid police now wearing on-body video cameraB2 VOL. 95 NO. 41 Partly sunny today, patchy clouds tonight High 82 Low 61 Details on B12Classi eds .............. B9 Dear Abby ................ B2 Healthy Living .......... B3 Obituaries .............. A6 Lottery Numbers ...... A2 Movie Review .......... B2 Religion .................. B5 Sports on TV ......... A10 Sudoku Puzzle......... B2 facebook.com/ newssun twitter.com/ thenewssunSebring International Raceway will welcome clunkers and junkers for 24 Hours of LeMons in July JUNK IN MORE THAN THE TRUNKA9 www.newssun.com Friday-Saturday, April 11-12, 2014 BY BARRY FOSTERNews-Sun correspondentAVON PARK The Florida Department of Juvenile Justice has released its nal report on the Aug. 17, 2013 riot at the Avon Park Youth Academy. The 25-page Florida Inspector Generals analysis was issued late last Friday afternoon without fanfare. The facility was cited for several shortcomings including the lack of a Riot and Major Disturbance Plan, Master Control failing to initially contact 911 and instruction to staff to discontinue attempting to stop the youth from ghting. Areas of concern also included the lack of staff training on how to deal with disturbance and the absence of Report: Academy lacked riot planDJJ release ndings on August fracas at APYA BY BARRY FOSTERNews-Sun CorrespondentNumbers released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture this week are predicting the states orange crop is approaching the lowest harvest numbers in nearly a quarter century. The Wednesday report indicated the 2013-2014 orange forecast at 110 million boxes. Thats down 4 percent from last month, and 18 percent less than last seasons nal production gure. Of cials of the Highlands County Citrus Growers Association said those totals should be re ected in the local harvest as well. The USDA formulates these numbers from a statistical model and Highlands County represents about 13 percent of Floridas citrus industry, so there is a good representative sample that is being done here, said HCCGA Executive Director Ray Royce He said the totals for Valencia oranges are telling since that is the portion of the season up next for local growers. I think Highlands County has evolved into a heavy Valencia harvest. My guess is that the majority of fruit we grow here actually is Valencia, he said. We picked some earlies and mids, but really, April and May will be the big heavy harvesting season here in Highlands County. Statewide, the report shows fruit drop appears to be more signi cant than numbers estimated locally. According to the USDA, a survey conducted in March showed droppage at as much as 31 percent. If accurate, Katara Simmons/News-SunFruit drop, while not as bad this year in Highlands County as it was last season, is a major problem statewide. This years citrus crop could be the lowest in decades, and a lot of that crop is lost to drop.DROPPING FORTUNESCitrus harvest could be worst since 1990Estimates keep sinking now down 18% Courtesy photoThe windows in the medical center were broken out during a riot at Avon Park Youth Academy on Aug. 17. BY SAMANTHA GHOLARStaff WriterSEBRING Im a product of the school system. My children come from this system. This is the opportunity to give back, Sebring International Raceway President William Tres Stephenson said from his of ce chair Thursday morning. Stephenson is the one of six people who have led to run for the Highlands County School Board District 5 seat that opened when Andy Tuck was appointed to a position with the Florida Department of Education earlier this year by Gov. Rick Scott. Trevor Murphy, Dustin Woods, William Pep Hutchinson, Jill Compton and Clinton Culverhouse have also led campaign qualifying documents. Stephensons business nance degree from the University of Florida has enabled him to head a $7 million budget annually for the Sebring International Raceway operations, experience he says would help the school board. Im running on a business background, Stephenson said. I think that I can be of assistance to the board and be a working part of the quali ed people that are already there. I just want to help them. Stephenson said the school district needs nancial-minded people. Right now I know that there are issues with the Stephenson says his business experience would help school board Samantha Gholar/News SunTres Stephenson is running for the District 5 school board seat.CANDIDATE PROFILE SEE CITRUS | A7SEE SCHOOL | A7SEE RIOT | A7 BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterLAKE PLACID High school vocational training is about to get another boost with the addition of an Internet marketing class and a production technician certi cation. The School Board of Highlands County on Tuesday approved the creation of a new Entrepreneurial Academy at Lake Placid High School next year. It will set up at Lake Placid High Schools existing Green Dragon Chair Company and expand to include an Ecommerce/Marketing course and to provide skills in the areas of machine and tool safety, market research, Groundbreaking Green Dragon Chair Co. to grow SEE CHAIR | A7

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A2 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com http//:www.newssun.com The News-Sun (USPS ISSN 0163-3988) is published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday. Peri-odical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry ofce(s). All material contained herein is the property of the News-Sun, which is an afliate of Sun Newspa-pers. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the writ-ten permission of the publisher. All material submitted for publica-tion becomes the property of the newspaper and may be edited for clarity and space, as well as re-printed, published and used in all media. Postmaster: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870.COMMITMENT TO A CC URA C YThe News-Sun promptly cor-rects errors of fact appearing in its news stories. If you believe we have made an error, call the news-room at (863) 385-6155, ext. 516. If you have a question or comment about coverage, write to Scott Dressel, editor, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; email editor@newssun.com.; or call (863) 385-6155.O FFI C E Location: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon-day-Friday Phone: (863) 385-6155 Main Fax: (863) 385-1954 Newsroom Fax: 385-2453SUB SC RIPTION RATE SHome 12 mos. Tax Total $72.22 $5.06 $77.28 In Florida mail 12 mos. Tax Total $107.24 $7.51 $114.75 Out of Florida mail 12 mos. Tax Total $122.41 $8.57 $130.98 Your newspaper is delivered by an independent contractor. If you do not receive your home deliv-ered newspaper by 6 a.m. on any publication date, please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday, and before 11 a.m. Sunday. A re-placement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after said times will be issued an account credit. Deadlines for subscription changes are noon Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon Thursday for the Friday edition and noon Fri-day for the Sunday edition. Chang-es received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date.O BITUARIE S AND A NNOUNC EMENT SEmail all obituaries and death notices to obits@newssun.com Email all other announcements to editor@newssun.comP LA C E A CLA SS IFIE D ADFrom 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. M-F (863) 385-6155, ext. 505 or (863) 314-9876RETAIL AD VERTI S INGMitch Collins 386-5626 mitch.collins@newssun.com Vickie Watson 386-5631 vickie.watson@newssun.com Terri Lee 386-5628 terri.lee@newssun.comL EGAL AD VERTI S INGJanet Emerson 385-6155, ext. 596 legals@newssun.comN EW SROOM Call 385-6155 Scott Dressel, Editor, ext. 516 or scott.dressel@newssun.com Phil Attinger, Staff Writer, ext. 541 or phil.attinger@newssun. com Samantha Gholar, Staff Writ-er, ext. 526 or samantha.gholar@ newssun.com Dan Hoehne, Sports Editor, ext. 528 or daniel.hoehne@newssun. com Katara Simmons, Photographer, ext. 538 or katara.simmons@ newssun.com. ROMONA W ASHINGTON Publisher and Executive Editor romona.washington@newssun.com 385-6155, ext. 515 NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927LOTTERYLOTTOWednesday, April 9 11-26-32-44-45-51 X-2 Saturdays Jackpot: $33 millionP OWERBALLWednesday, April 9 9-14-44-48-49 PB-29 X-2 Saturdays Jackpot: $94 millionMEGA MONEYTuesday, April 8 26-30-39-41 PB-1 Todays Jackpot: $500,000MEGA M ILLION STuesday, April 8 35-36-41-60-71 PB-3 X-3 Todays Jackpot: $20 million CASH 3 Monday, April 7 Day: 2-6-1 Night: 6-9-4 Tuesday, April 8 Day: 6-3-7 Night: 6-9-9 Wednesday, April 9 Day: 9-2-9 Night: 6-8-7 P LAY 4Monday, April 7 Day: 8-7-1-0 Night: 0-4-4-9 Tuesday, April 8 Day: 2-7-0-3 Night: 8-7-2-3 Wednesday, April 9 Day: 2-0-0-0 Night: 1-4-1-6F ANTA S Y 5 Monday, April 7 3-4-13-26-29 Tuesday, April 8 2-7-22-24-48 Wednesday, April 9 5-8-9-19-27 BY PHIL A TTINGERStaff WriterLAKE PLACID Po-lice now have a new tool on their uniforms: Tas-ers Axon Body camer-as to supplement their in-car video systems. The lightweight, com-pact single-piece video units attach directly to their uniforms in hopes of eliminating a limita-tion of in-car video sys-tems: The fact that they only capture approx-imately 10 percent of what happens, especial-ly if the ofcer steps out of the line of sight of the camera for any reason. With an on-body cam-era, ofcers will be able to capture nearly 100 percent of the encoun-ter. The cameras only re-cord when the ofcer turns on the recorder at the beginning of an en-counter, said Lake Plac-id Police Chief James Fansler. He hopes the camer-as will save money at the department level and state level by providing evidence that may mean fewer challenges in court, which would free up ofcers from having to sit in court and reduce prosecution costs. Given that many of-cer encounters have been recorded by smart phones, its also hoped that the cameras may provide additional evi-dence that may show that ofcers conducted themselves in a profes-sional manner, Fansler said. The mere presence of the camera should im-prove the behavior of all participants during po-lice encounters, Fansler wrote in a press release about the cameras. Anyone with questions or has an interest in see-ing the Axon Body cam-era is welcome to come by the Lake Placid Police Department to view it and discuss. Feedback is also wel-come at lakeplacid-chief@gmail.com.Lake Placid police now wearing body cameras Courtesy photoLake Placid police ofcers are now wearing these new on-body cameras.Department hopes they will save money, improve safety United Way Day of Caring setOn Wednesday, May 21, volunteer teams from local businesses and or-ganizations will partici-pate in the 2014 United Way Day of Caring in Highlands County. Volunteer teams are matched with United Way Partner Agencies and local non-prot groups in order to perform tasks that the agencies might not otherwise have the manpower or funds to be able to accomplish. Jobs such as assisting clients, painting, land-scaping, clerical work, and many other tasks will be completed during the 2014 Day of Caring. This is an opportunity for local residents to make a hands on impact with United Way Partner Agencies and also view how their United Way contributions are being invested. Sponsors Budget BiRite Insurance, Florida Hospital Heartland Division, Howard Fertilizer, Lykes Bros. Inc., The Andersons, Duke Energy, and The Palms of Sebring who help make this day pos-sible. When the volunteer teams nish their tasks at 11:30 a.m., they are in-vited to participate in a celebration luncheon at Buttonwood Bay provid-ed by Chef Mac, Palms Court Catering. The Highlands County Division of the United Way of Central Florida has been serving the local community for 25 years by understanding local needs and driving last-ing change to build bet-ter lives and stronger communities. For addi-tional information re-garding the 2013 United Way Day of Caring and how you can submit your team to participate, con-tact Kristin Handley, Highlands County direc-tor, United Way of Central Florida/Highlands County Division, at 4533401 or email kristin. handley@uwcf.org.Dressel to hold CD release partyLAKE PLACID Local country singer Logan Dressel will have a CD release party Saturday night at the Elks Lodge in Lake Placid. Doors open at 8 p.m. Entry is $20, which in-cludes free beer all night. Dressels debut CD Live It Up, which includes nine original songs, will be available for $10. The Elks Lodge is at 200 East County Road 621. Call 465-2661.Busy Kids registering for VPKSEBRING Registration is under way for Busy Kids Creative Learning Center Inc.s 2014 free Summer Voluntary PreKindergarten Program. VPK is a free program to prepare every Florida child for kindergarten. Children must be 5 years old on or before Sept. 1, 2014 and have not pre-viously completed a VPK program. VPK Summer Pgrogram is from 7:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. Monday-Friday from June 10 to Aug. 5. All children attending Busy Kids summer VPK program can attend ex-tended childcare from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. ab-solutely free. Breakfast, lunch, and snacks will be provided at no cost, how-ever, transportation will not be provided. Busy Kids is at 922 Persimmon Ave. For more information, call Anne Lang or Kathi Borecky with Busy Kids Creative Learning Center at 3860808 or email busykidsse-bring@yahoo.com.O rchid Society, R obbins Nursery hold orchid repotting workshopSEBRING Orchid Society Highlands and Robbins Nursery will hold an orchid repot-ting workshop at Robbins Nursery. This is the time of the year to repot or-chids. Members of the Orchid Society will teach the proper way to do it. Members will repot or-chid plants for a cost of $4 for the rst two divi-sions and $3 for each ad-ditional division. There will be an additional $10 charge for large root bound plants. Pots and potting mix must be supplied by the attendee. Robbins will have a full supply of or-chid supplies available for sale. The workshop is from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at Robbins Nursery, 4803 U.S. 27 South.Military Sea Services Museum has saleSEBRING The Military Sea Services Museum will hold a garage sale at 1402 Roseland Ave. between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. today and Saturday. Romona W ashington/News-SunCommunity leaders visited Avon Park Community Child Development Center this week to read to the children as part of Week of the Young Child, but they werent the only ones reading. Verkiera Bennett, one of the children at the center, took a few minutes to read to her friends as well. Verkiera will be entering kindergarten next school year.WEEK OF THE Y OUNG CHILD SNAP S HOT S L OC AL N EW S Phil Attigner/News-SunThe Avon Park Middle School choir sings Down to the River as part of its character word presentation for self-control at Tuesdays meeting for the School Board of Highlands County.A VON P ARK MIDDLE SCHOOL CHOIR SINGS DOWN TO THE RIVER FOR SCHOOL B OARDMORE SNAPSHOTS | A6

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 11, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A3 Downtown Sebring Circle Park Saturday, May 10 10 AM 4 PMFree General Admission Vendors, live music by The Landsharks Band, food & beer Limited Number of Wine Tasting & Culinary Demonstration Tickets Available $25 pre-purchase (first 100 get Swag Bag) Tickets sold at Dogtown USA(112 N. Ridgewood Drive in Downtown Sebring)or at www.GirlsGoneWineFest.comA portion of the proceeds from this event benefits the Champion for Children Foundation and the Getaway Girl Foundation. COHAN RADIO GROUP Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Highlands Art League (HAL) will host the annual High School Student Art Show for teen artists tonight. The juried show features art from all three county high schools from grades 9-12 with the opening reception from 5-8 p.m. tonight. Admission is free. The awards presentation will take place at 6:30 p.m. with winners in all categories, including drawing, watercolor, mixed media (2D), acrylic, clay, and non-clay (3D). HAL provides a $500 scholarship to the show winner, and South Florida State College (SFSC) matches the scholarship if the winner enrolls in SFSC to pursue their education. Judges for the contest were Mollie Doctrow, Linda Kegley and Susan Milam, who spent several hours studying the categories of works and said they were extremely impressed with the quality of the submissions. The choices they made were very dif cult, the judges said. The show will be on exhibit in HALs newly renovated Clovelly House (1971 Lakeview Drive in downtown Sebring), which is dedicated to youth art education. For more information about this or any of HALs programs, visit www. HighlandsArtLeague.org.HAL hosting student art show tonight Courtesy photos BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterAVON PARK A man who allegedly tried to stab a woman and then hit a girl during a domestic dispute is facing charges of child abuse and of aggravated assault and aggravated battery, both with a deadly weapon. Reynaldo Diaz Ruiz, 27, of Avon Park is being held in the Highlands County Jail in lieu of $7,000 bond. The incident took place late Saturday night. Highlands County Sheriffs deputies received a call about a domestic dispute at 10 p.m. Saturday and arrived at an address on County Road 64 East in Avon Park to nd a woman with a cut below her left eye and a cut on the bottom of her left hand. She said her boyfriend, Diaz Ruiz, was drinking that night and and that he gets violent when drunk. She told deputies that he tried to stab her with a small silver knife, trying to thrust it into the center of her chest. She grabbed the knife with her left hand, cutting it, reports said. As she was ghting off Diaz Ruiz, her 8-year-old daughter tried to help. Diaz Ruiz then hit her in the mouth with a closed st, reports said. Both the mother and daughter declined to be transported by ambulance, reports said. Deputies then went to Diaz Ruizs home and attempted to talk to the man there and identify him as Diaz Ruiz, but found a language barrier. After handcuf ng him and placing him against the deputys patrol car, the deputy asked the victim to identify him and she said he was Diaz Ruiz. On the way to the jail, reports said, Diaz Ruiz kicked the seat of the car and yelled in Spanish, but eventually stopped and was turned over to jail staff without further incident.Man charged with attempted stabbing; hitting girl Special to the News-SunSEBRING Local law enforcement agencies are again, proud to participate with the Drug Enforcement Administration and its national and community partners, which include Drug Free Highlands, for the National Prescription Drug TakeBack Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 26 for citizens who want to dispose of unwanted and unused or expired prescription drugs. National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. According to the CDC (Center for Disease Control), a pharmaceutical drug-related death occurs every 24 minutes. Approximately, 2,500 teens use prescription drugs to get high for the rst time, according to the Partnership for a Drug Free America. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including the home medicine cabinet. To date, the combined efforts of the DEA and its state, local, and tribal law-enforcement and community partners have removed more than 2 million pounds (1,018 tons) of medication from circulation. In the last Operation Medicine Cabinet in October 2013, Highlands County collected 1368.7 pounds (64 boxes). Drop-off locations on April 26 are: Sebring Police Department 307 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring Lake Placid Police Department 8 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid Highlands County Sheriffs Of ce North Sub Station 304 W. Pleasant St., Avon Park Highlands County Sheriffs Of ce Sub Station Liberty Star Plaza, 7177 S. George Blvd., Sebring For those unable to attend and dispose of medications on April 26, permanent drop boxes are available at the Lake Placid and Sebring police departments. Medications may be disposed of from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. MondayFriday. Contact Drug Free Highlands at 382-2138 or any of the local law enforcement of ces for more information.Operation Medicine Cabinet set for April 26Chance to turn in unwanted or expired prescriptions Start and end your week with us!Wednesday. Friday. Sunday.863-385-6155 2227 US 27 Sebring, FL 33870

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A4 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com 5019096Serious Illness affects patients and their caregivers.Cornerstone can help! We provide comfort care through...+ Pain & Symptom Management + Emotional & Spiritual Support Serving Central FloridaInformation: Toll Free: 866-742-6655www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/Cornerstone BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterAVON PARK A 16-year-old student ac-cused of stealing mon-ey has been charged with possession of a weapon on school property when a school resource ofcer found a box cutter in his pocket. The incident took place at 10:58 a.m. Friday, April 4. The dean of students at Avon Park High School searched the teenager in a case involving mon-ey stolen from the school gymnasium. During the search, the dean found a black and yellow box cut-ter razor knife in the boys right front pants pock-et, according to arrest re-ports. The dean also found eye drops, lighters, a cell phone, a wallet and other miscellaneous items. According to reports, the teen denied know-ing the box cutter was there. He said the pants belonged to his cous-in who works at Walmart and uses a box cutter at work. The boy said he put the pants on not knowing the box cutter was in the pocket, reports said. The boy was released into his mothers custo-dy, based on instructions from the Department of Juvenile Justice, reports said.Editors Note: Although the of-fense is a third-degree felony and the students name is available in public records, his name is be-ing withheld from this report given the circumstances of the incident.Student faces weapon charge for box cutter on campus Phil Attinger/News-SunPraised for everything from helping with logistics to running entire programs for the schools, top volunteers from Highlands County schools were honored Tuesday at The School Board of Highlands County meeting. They are (front, from left) Melissa Reed of Cracker Trail Elementary School, Linda Roth of Park Elementary School, Ginger Keimel of Lake Country Elementary School, Linda Campbell of Lake Placid Elementary School, Lizette Epps of Memorial Elementary School, Elsie Scanlan of Sun N Lake Elementary School, (back, from left) Dawn Miller of Avon Elementary School, Leroy Roth of Park Elementary School, Julie Fowler of Woodlawn Elementary School, Arnold Davis of Avon Park Middle School, Suzanne Armand of Hill-Gustat Middle School, Heather Harshman of Lake Placid Middle School, Melanie Jackson of Avon Park High School and Victoria Stephenson of Sebring Middle School. Not present Tuesday were Lisa Collins of Fred Wild Elementary School, Debbie Albritton of the Kindergarten Learning Center and Reed Bowman and Charlotte Wilson, both of Sebring High School.SCHOOLS HONOR TOP VOLUNTEERS Special to the News-SunSEBRING Health-care professionals at the Somers Hospice House routinely ask patients and families, Is there any-thing else I can do for you? When a Good Shepherd Hospice social worker asked patient Bob Green that question, he had his standard answer ready. He jokingly responded, Why, yes. Id like to go for a ride in a Corvette. Little did he know that very day hed be driven around Sebring in a black-on-black, mintcondition 1998 Chevrolet Corvette. According to Becky Mc-Intyre, chief clinical of-cer at Good Shepherd Hospice, the purpose of hospice care is to address the needs of patients at the end of life. Many times, our support goes beyond medications, sup-plies and equipment, said McIntyre. When possible, we want to help patients fulll a dream or desire. Green, 64, casually men-tioned his wish to social worker Sally Beck, which quickly put a plan into motion. Beck discussed this with coworkers, who got word to McIntyre. She called a Sebring business owner that she knows who owns a Corvette and ex-plained Greens request. He agreed to lend his clas-sic car. Later that day, a member of Greens church pulled the Corvette into a parking space outside the Somers Hospice House for the ride around town. The weather was perfect for driving with the top down, breezy with a high of 89 degrees. The pair went on a 30-mile ride around Highlands Coun-ty, driving by Sebring In-ternational Raceway and taking a slow ride around the lake. Greens wife, Sharon, did her part. She called family and friends to tell them about the adventure and they lined the route to cheer on Bob. It was a pretty good crowd consid-ering I had an hour and a half to plan, Sharon said. Green retired a year ago in December after a 15year career with the post ofce, another job tour-ing with their triplet sons Christian music group and a position for 11 years at Advanced Auto Parts. But Green wanted to keep busy. He then start-ed a lawn business in his Tanglewood community, signing up 30 accounts. But Greens retirement plans took a turn when doctors recently diag-nosed him with cancer. It just showed up, said Sha-ron. Green was admitted to the Somers Hospice House to get his symp-toms under control before returning home. McIntyre stated that most patients coping with life-limiting illnesses want to be in fa-miliar surroundings with family and friends. A hospice house allows patients to receive the focused care they need without unwanted tests and treatments, said Mc-Intyre.Good Shepherd helps patient take dream ride Courtesy photoOn his ride around town in a 1998 Corvette, Bob Green stopped by the Sebring Raceway. Green, a patient with Good Shepherd Hospice, casually remarked that hed like to go for a ride in a Corvette. Staff members at the Somers Hospice House worked together to get him that ride.

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 11, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A5 NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927Romona Washington Publisher publisher@newssun.com Scott Dressel Editor editor@newssun.com VIEWPOINTS ANOTHER VIEW YOUR VIEWS Abusive and frivolous lawsuits brought by holders of patents are costing the American economy billions of dollars. Fortunately, Congress is on the case. A large bipartisan majority in the House approved a bill last year that would reduce such litigation; the Senate, where a similar bill is being negotiated, may soon follow. The patent system encourages innovation by giving inventors a temporary monopoly over their creation. But in the last two decades, as the number of patents issued by the Patent and Trademark Of ce has increased signi cantly, businesses are increasingly using patents to sue or threaten to sue other companies to get them to pay licensing fees. The number of patent cases increased 29 percent just in 2012, to nearly 5,200, according to PricewaterhouseCoopers. Various studies have shown that the cost of litigating these cases and paying licensing fees and damages amounts to billions of dollars a year, even though many of the patents at issue are so broad and vague that they should never have been granted in the rst place. Lawmakers are particularly concerned about cases in which patent owners sue small businesses like cafes and hotels for their use of technology for example, Internet routers made by Apple or Cisco Systems. The rms that bring these suits sometimes also sue the manufacturers of the equipment, but they often sue the users of technology since they know that many small businesses would rather settle than ght costly court cases. The Senate and House bills would allow manufacturers, which are in the best position to defend these cases, to step in and ght claims on behalf of their customers. The two bills differ on one important issue: legal fees. In an attempt to raise the cost of bringing frivolous lawsuits, the House bill would require plaintiffs who lose a patent case to pay the legal fees of the defendants unless a court determines that the case was reasonably justi ed or that special circumstances make an award unjust. Current law allows judges to award legal fees to defendants only in exceptional cases, which courts have interpreted very narrowly. Some lawmakers in the Senate, notably Patrick Leahy, Democrat of Vermont, are pushing for legislation that would give judges more discretion than the House bill would. Granting judges more freedom to award fees in patent cases can reduce the number of abusive cases. But Congress should be careful not to adopt a standard that is so tough that it effectively closes the courthouse door to small inventors, universities and other patent holders.An editorial from the New York Times. Bringing patent trolls into the light of dayMoving onI would like to say what a wonderful day and time I had last Sunday, April 6, at the Italian Festival in Ybor City. The festival started with Monsignor Higgins celebrating Holy Mass there in the Italian Cub. It was then followed by a procession venerating a statue of the Holy Family into Centennial Park. After that, there was live entertainment featuring Lena Prima, Tre Bella, Paul Salos, Johnny Charro & the Johnny Charro Dance Band, Salvador Live, Citta Dei Templi. There were more than 35 Bay area restaurants nd cateres serving from 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. This is all put on by the Lunione Italiana (Italian Club) of which I am a member. I have friends there to and miss our rich Italian culture and heritage. Tampa also has a great Latino Spanish culture and heritage and also has clubs and festivals in Ybor City to. I am half Italian and Spanish and miss my true culture and heritage. Here in Highlands County, Sebring used to have a Latin night at Quality Inn for a few years, and the new owners closed it. We also started an Italian Club for a few years and that folded and closed, too. I am sorry folks, I have nothing bad to say about Highlands County, but feel very lonely here and I have certain health problems. Tampa is a much easier and better place for me to live, so I am planning to move back to the coast by the end of this year. I have many good friends here and I will come back to visit Sebring for a few days once a month. I will write another letter to you all again. I love you all much. Take care and may God bless each and everyone of you.RENALDO FERNANDEZ MILIISebringReelection campaignIn his reelection campaign, Gov. Scott is again crying poor mouth, his humble origins, demonstrating he is one of us, a man of the people. The Governor who bought his last election by spending $75 million of his own dollars made his fortune in a health care swindle in Texas, which set a record for fraud and paid $600 million in nes. Getting out of town as an almost unindicted co-conspirator, Scott arrived in Florida as a well-funded carpetbagger. In of ce, Scott wasted millions of state funds in incentive programs giving large grants of money to corporations, no strings attached, while sponsoring programs to cut pensions for teachers, police and remen at all levels of government in Florida. Now is campaign mode, he daily nds small concessions to win votes (reduction of auto tag fees) while proposing more grants to corporations. Meanwhile, his minions in the legislature are drafting bills to destroy the Florida Retirement System, converting it to an investment plan similar to George Bushs plan to destroy social security by privatizing it into savings accounts. Scott and the Florida Legislature refuse to acknowledge that pension plans are a security device, paid for by a lifetime of hard work and loyal service. Converting them to something akin to a lottery ticket and calling it an investment account is a sham and a disservice to thousands of hard working civil servants. Our economic chameleon governor is one again prepared to throw most of us under the bus in order to support his corporate interests.RANDY LUDACERLake PlacidRing. Ring. Hello, this is Tom. We know who you are, Tom. In the digital age, you will be shocked by what we know about you. Who is this? The National Security Agency? I thought President Obama issued orders to rein you in! Thats a good one, Tom. Obama told the NSA to stop storing bulk phone records on millions of Americans. The NSA can easily access that information through phone companies. Im not from the NSA, however. Then who are you and what do you want? What is more important, Tom, is who are you and what do you want? Lots of government and private organizations are interested in that information and you are making it easy for them to get it. I have given no one permission to access my information! Really, Tom? Didnt you hand over your address, Social Security number and other information to buy a car, get a credit card, apply for a job or vote? Maybe a few times. Did you know that since 1961, various Congresses and presidential administrations have enacted more than 40 laws, regulations and policies that require the use of Social Security numbers? That is a godsend to people like me and that was before the digital era made my job easier! What do you mean? Every website you visit, every online purchase you make, every email, text or online comment you make leaves an incredibly rich electronic trail that de nes who you are and what you do. You are bluf ng. Really, Tom? That 32-year-old Bolivian ight attendant youve been irting with on Facebook? What about her? Hes 45 and hes an undercover surveillance expert for a large retail out t. Oh. My. God. You should be more careful with your password selections, Tom. It took me less than a minute to access your credit card account. Only a fool would use , the worst password of 2013, according to PC World. You are invading my right to privacy. Really, Tom? There is no mention of any right to privacy in the U.S. Constitution. Sure, the Fourth Amendment stops the police and other government agents from searching our property without probable cause. And, says the American Civil Liberties Union, other amendments protect our freedom to make certain decisions about our bodies and our private lives without interference from the government. But a speci c right to privacy does not exist. You must be breaking some law! Thats a good one, too, Tom. There are no laws to prevent us from knowing about you particularly when you so willingly hand over so much private information to so many strangers! You have no idea how vulnerable you are! Vulnerable? Identity theft is a growing problem, Tom. The personal information you willingly gave about yourself exists forever in the digital ecosystem. That gives savvy technical people lots of opportunities to steal your identity and destroy your nances. I didnt realize it was that easy. Identity theft is less worrisome than what government entities could do to you. Look how the IRS has been used to attack political enemies. Now imagine what government entities can do when they know EVERYTHING about you! Thats why I called you today, Tom. I called to help you. Help me how? You know those new anti-terrorist scanners they use at the airports? Well, at your age, you might want to consider switching from briefs to boxers. That, sir, is an outrage. I demand to know who you are and what you want! Sorry, Tom. That information is private.Tom Purcell, author of Misadventures of a 1970s Childhood and Comical Sense: A Lone Humorist Takes on a World Gone Nutty! is a Pittsburgh Tribune-Review humor columnist. Send comments to Tom at Purcell@caglecartoons.com. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the News-Sun staff.Right to privacy? Surely you jest! GUEST COLUMNTom Purcell LETTERS TO THE EDITORShoulde be 250 words or less and must contain the writers full name, address and telephone number for veri cation. We reserve the right to edit or reject letters for clarity, length, taste and libel. Submission does not guarantee publication. Only two letters per month per writer will be accepted. Send letters to:EMAILeditor@newssun.comMAILLetters to the Editor 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870

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A6 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com Downtown Sebring hosts Second Friday Wine WalkSEBRING Destination Downtown Sebring (DDS) continues its celebration of spring with an April Wine Walk from 5-8 p.m. today. Participating galler-ies, stores and boutiques will feature one-of-a-kind art, home decor, jewelry, and gifts available for pur-chase as well as music, en-tertainment, exhibits, and special drawings. Pick up the list of par-ticipating Wine Walk mer-chants and organiza-tions at the Highlands Art Leagues Yellow House Gallery & Gift Shop, 1989 Lakeview Drive. Stroll the Circle and the Cultural Center while participating merchants provide free wine. No glass purchase necessary. Held the second Friday of each month, Sebrings Downtown comes alive with the unique and en-joyable Destination Downtown Sebrings monthly themed events. For details about the event and participating stores, visit www.Destination DowntownSebring. com. This event is co-sponsored by the Sebring Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA).Calvarys Hill Quartet sings at DeesSSEBRING Calvarys Hill Quartet will pro-vide a free Christian Gospel concert at Dees Place Restaurant, 138 N. Ridgewood Drive, at 6 p.m. Saturday. The food and concert are free but donations are greatly appreciated. Call 471-2228 for reservations.APHS Project Graduation plans raffleAVON PARK A gun rafe is planned to support Avon Park High School Project Graduation. To see the AR-15 gun rafe, visit Boom Booms Guns and Ammo in Sebring. Tickets are $10. Contact Doreen Pearlman at 4430602 or tickets can be pur-chased at Boom Booms.Car show set at Shelby CrossingSEBRING The Shops at Shelby Crossing will host a Spring Car Show and Pet Adoption event from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Registration for the car and truck show is $10. The show will feature an-tiques, classics, muscle, sports cars and more. There will be pet adop-tions, music and food. Enter your pet in a con-test recognizing the Best Dressed, Unique, Best Trick and Funniest.Pancake breakfast plannedSEBRING There will be a pancake breakfast from 8-10 a.m. Saturday at the Sebring Hills Clubhouse, 200 Lark Ave. All the pancakes, sausage, orange juice, coffee or tea you want for only $3 for members and $3.50 for non-members.Good Stuff to appear at TanglewoodSEBRING The fa-ther and daughter duo of Tony and Trish, better known as Good Stuff, will be performing at the Tanglewood dance on Saturday. The duo just re-turned from a western Caribbean cruise where they were one of the fea-tured entertainers on the Carnival ship Paradise. Dance is from 7-10 p.m. Saturday. Admission is $6. Bring your own beverage; ice is provided. Tanglewood is one mile north of Walmart on U.S. 27. SNAP S HOT S LOCA L NEWS Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The Ak-tion Club of Highlands County collected 11,083 diapers, 6,084 wipes and 20 baby blankets to help 10 local charities. A total of $1,329.40 was collected in cash and that was converted into diapers and wipes pur-chased from Diapers. com. That shipment ar-rived April 7, in time for all the charities to receive their equal share of dia-pers on April 10. The response has been overwhelming from our community and very much appre-ciated by all the chari-ties being helped, Ak-tion Club advisor Cindy Marshall said. When we organized this proj-ect, we never dreamed it would be this huge but we are glad everyone had such big hearts. No baby should be left laying in a soggy wet diaper just be-cause a family cant af-ford to buy them. All of these charities reach out to help families in need. The club kicked off the campaign on March 20 with the members bring-ing in their donations of 6,938 diapers and $335.27 in cash. The Aktion Club consists of 65 members who are all adults with disabilities who do civic projects in the commu-nity. Marshall challenged the club members to see who could bring in the most diapers. The winner will be treated to a mov-ie complete with snacks and a drink. Bill Sobczak, of Se-bring, took that lead and maintained it throughout the campaign. He col-lected 1,115 diapers and $642.48 in cash, which converted to diapers brought his total to 4,035 diapers. Sobczak received assis-tance from his co-work-ers at Publix in Sebring and from residents at his mobile home commu-nity, Leisure Acres in Se-bring. The club then orga-nized Diaper Dump Day on March 29, which brought in $994.13 in cash, 3,212 diapers and the blankets. There were 15 club members and four volunteers from the charities working along U.S. 27 in front of Florida Hospital Heartland Medi-cal Center in Sebring col-lecting cash in milk jug canisters. A tent was set up along the road for the diaper dump off. The Highlands Coun-ty Sheriffs Ofce contrib-uted to the Diaper Dump Day by collecting 2,400 diapers and more than $100 in cash. Courtney Godbold, with the sher-iffs nance department, spearheaded their effort. Im a single mom with two boys. One is 10 months old and one is 6 years old. I know how hard it is to buy diapers. They are expensive, Godbold said. I sent out emails and handed ev-erybody a yer. They just came pouring in, she added. Godbold also brought the blankets that were made by the Hands of Love group at Lake Bon-net Village in Avon Park. This is a group of la-dies from that commu-nity who meet weekly for three months to sew or make items needed in the community. Aktion Cub president Elizabeth Jordon was able to solicit the help of Comfort Keepers who do-nated 1,257 adult diapers. Those diapers will benet charities like Ridge Area Arc and Nu-Hope Elder Care Services Inc. The eight different childrens charities that equally received 9,826 baby diapers, 6,084 baby wipes and 20 blankets were Avon Park Commu-nity Child Development Center, Childrens Advo-cacy Center, Family Safe-house, Guardian ad Li-tem, Healthy Families, Healthy Start, One Hope United and Gulf Coast Early Steps Program. The Aktion Club will make this an annual event for the local chari-ties. Anyone wishing to help can call the club at 4521295, ext. 124.Aktion Club dumps 11,000-plus diapers onto 10 local charities Courtesy photoThe Aktion Club of Highlands County distributed 11,083 diapers, 6,084 wipes and 20 baby blankets on April 10 to 10 local charities. Representatives from the charities beneting from the clubs March 29 Diaper Dump Day are (from left) Karen Wright, of Childrens Services Council of Highlands County; Cynthia Acevedo, program manager, and Wanda Tookes, supervisor, both of Healthy Families; Wendy Hall, service coordinator of Early Steps; Bill Sobczak, vice president of Aktion Club and top diaper collector; Tikia Lodge, ofce manager and family support worker with Avon Park Community Child Development Center; Alyssa Steger, records specialist, and Rebecca Brownell, family support worker, both of One Hope United; Sherrie Schwab, director of Victim Services at Peace River Center for the Family Safehouse; Candice Ciesla, director of programs and services for Ridge Area Arc; Ralph Meyers and Eva Monk, Diaper Dump chairpersons for Aktion Club; and Renee Grider, child advocate coordinator for Guardian ad Litem Program. Representatives from Nu-Hope Elder Care Services and Healthy Families also received diapers but were not present for the photo.JA N ET W HITAKERJanet H. Whitaker, 68, of Ocklawaha passed away April 5, 2014 at The Villages Re-gional Hospital. She was born on Oct. 25, 1945 in Bethesda, Md. to Floyd and Mary Holton. Janet enjoyed spending time outdoors gardening and enjoying wildlife. She also enjoyed painting, liq-uid embroidery, and at-tending auctions and ea markets. Janet is survived by her son, Larry Whitaker of Ock-lawaha; her daughter, Sha-ron Whitaker of Okeechobee; Georgia Lee McDaniel of Jay; Juanita Kindrick of Spartan-burg, S.C.; Donald Holton of Sebring; Bennie Holton of Sebring; Donna Goodwin of Sebring; Barba-ra Schroeder of Se-bring; and Eugene Bengston of Sebring She was preced-ed in death by her husband, Travis L. Whitaker; her par-ents, Floyd and Mary Holton; and two brothers, Dean and John. The family will receive friends at Hiers-Baxley Fu-neral Services, Belleview on Saturday, April 12 from 3-5 p.m. WHITAKER OBITUARIES MIAMI (AP) Floridas Republican lawmakers re-main staunchly opposed to expanding Medicaid a system theyve repeat-edly said is too expen-sive and doesnt improve health outcomes. Yet Flor-idas Medicaid rolls are expanding under the Af-fordable Care Act. Thats because peo-ple trying to sign up for health insurance under Obamas new health law are nding out to their surprise that they qual-ify for Medicaid, the fed-eral health insurance pro-gram for the poor. Some 245,000 Florid-ians were added to the Medicaid rolls between October and the end of February. Thats a more than 8 percent increase. The Sunshine State is one of ten states that account-ed for more than 80 per-cent of the 3 million new Medicaid enrollees un-der the Affordable Care Act, according to Avalere Health, a market research and consulting rm. But Florida was the only state of the ten, which include California, Oregon and Washington, that didnt expand Medicaid. Floridas newest enroll-ees include more than 51,000 children, accord-ing to health advocacy group Florida CHAIN. As parents began apply-ing for their own health coverage under the Af-fordable Care Act, they discovered that their chil-dren were eligible for Medicaid or the Chil-drens Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Many werent enrolled. It has been an eye opening experience to learn how many families were not aware that their children could be covered for health care and heartwarming to give them the good news. I see imme-diate relief and gratitude in their eyes and words, said Lynne Thorp, an en-rollment counselor in Fort Myers. Lawmakers repeated-ly acknowledged last year that the massive adver-tising campaigns, enroll-ment drives and celebrity endorsements surround-ing Obamas health law would likely lead to an in-crease in regular Medic-aid enrollment. Thats what happened to Donna Refuse, 44, when she tried to sign up for insurance as the mar-ketplace rst opened in early October. The unem-ployed Miami mother of two thought that people without an income like herself would have ac-cess to affordable insur-ance. Refuse was shocked when she was informed that she didnt qualify for a tax credit under the health care law but she learned that she did qual-ify for Medicaid. It makes me feel bet-ter. Now I can go to a doc-tor and see if anything is wrong, said Refuse. Lawmakers will have to grapple with the fact that the states Medicaid costs will rise. The state has to pay 40 percent of the cost.Medicaid enrollment rises 8 percent TALLAHASSEE (AP) The Supreme Court de-nied an appeal for a man scheduled to be execut-ed April 23 for killing his cousin and his cousins wife to prevent him from testifying in a burglary case. Lawyers for Robert Eu-gene Hendrix say that the judge at his murder trial was biased and he had an ineffective law-yer. Hendrix, and his cous-in, Elmer Scott, were ar-rested for breaking into a house in 1990. Scott ac-cepted a plea deal that would keep him out of prison if he testied against Hendrix. Before the case went to court, Hendrix went to Scotts Lake County home. Prosecutors say he shot Scott in the head and slashed the throat of his wife, Michelle.Court denies appeal of man to be executed

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 11, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A7 that would be the highest statewide drop rate of any non-hurricane, non-freeze season since the 1969-70 harvest year. Orange harvesting ends in June, and if the crop doesnt decline further, it will barely exceed the 110.2 million orange box-es harvested in 1989-90 following the worst freeze in Florida citrus history. The report also shows the second smallest fruit size dating back to the 1960-61 harvest year. Florida had an estimat-ed 66 percent of the to-tal U.S. market share last year. Approximately 95 percent of the states or-ange crop is used for juice. CITRUS FROM PAGE A1budget. Thats a tough is-sue, but I know I can help with that. I not only have an interest in the money side of things, but on ev-ery level. Its important to understand all the con-cerns of the teachers, the administrators and the district board members. I listen and I have heard some concerns from some of the teachers. I want to have a voice for them as well. I feel (candi-dates) should all be famil-iar with every level of the district, Stephenson said. Growing up in High-lands County and now raising children here, Ste-phenson has a deep love and connection with the area. Along with his loyal-ty to the county, Stephen-son said the new owners of the Raceway also fac-tored into his decision to run for ofce. This new company I work for (NASCAR) wants us all to be leaders in our community. This commu-nity has been very good to me. From the time I was at Woodlawn Elementary to wrestling championships at Sebring High School, Ive had so much sup-port. That, plus a job that allows me to be a leader. I knew this was the next step for me, Stephenson said. Im an out-of-thebox thinker. I believe I would be a good t for the school board. Its a really great school system, but we are facing many chal-lenges. Ive got a lot of work to do, but I am ful-ly committed to this po-sition, said Stephenson. This is not going to be taken lightly by me.Samantha Gholar can be reached at samantha.gholar@newssun. com or 385-6155 ext: 526. SCHOOL FROM PAGE A1monitoring cameras and other equipment. In issuing the docu-ment, DJJ ofcials said they are committed to applying the lessons learned to ensure the youth we serve are pro-vided the right services in the right way at the right time in order to fulll our mission of reducing juve-nile delinquency and in-creasing public safety. The incident apparently revolved around a game of basketball between ri-val teams from St. Peters-burg and Orlando. The report indicated that a donnybrook ensued af-ter the game. However, whether it was because the losing team refused to pay up a wager remains unconrmed. As word of the ght spread, the analysis said, more of the youth joined in on the altercation. De-spite efforts by staff, it then got out of control. After a call to the Avon Park Bombing Range Fire Department, emer-gency 911 dispatch was called. In all, some 150 law enforcement per-sonnel from Highlands, Osceola and Polk coun-ties responded along with Florida Highway Pa-trol troopers, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser-vation Commission the State Fire Marshals Ofce and the Sebring Police Department, as well as the Polk County Fire and Emergency Management Service. In all, 61 youth at the facility since have been charged with varying of-fenses in connection with the incident. Damage to the complex has been set at $350,000 although in-surance coverage paid less than $47,000. In a cover letter, DJJ of-cials indicated they have already taken correc-tive action such as the in-stallation of surveillance cameras throughout the facility, decreasing the program size by cutting the facility from 144 beds to 80 beds, increasing the staff-to-youth ratio and a review of the training procedures at the Youth Academy. As part of the report, the Inspector Gener-als Ofce noted current-ly there are no specics as to what that training should include. The report recom-mended that among oth-er things, the Riot and Major Disturbance Plan should be updated and that the staff should coor-dinate and participate in training and practice sce-nario drills. RIOT FROM PAGE A1 Samantha Gholar/News SunP atricia Austin (left) and Edwin P adillo rally outside the Highlands County Courthouse Thursday morning hoping to gain the support of local residents in their ght to change laws regarding child support enforcement. FIxing a broken system is the main goal of Austin, who supports P adillo, a father whose driver license privileges were revoked after falling behind on child support payments. P adillo stated that he was bullied and ridiculed in the court room. Im ghting for everyone not just myself. We shouldnt be threatened or belittled when we enter the courtroom, P adillo said. More rallies are scheduled in the coming weeks and supporters may contact Austin to become a part of the Drive to Provide movement at 443-7733.RALLY FOR CHILD SUPPORT CHANGEScustomer service, busi-ness operations and both teamwork and problem solving. When they are done, each student could earn certication as a produc-tion technician, which would allow them to work a production line of any type, anywhere, said John Rousch, wood shop in-structor at Lake Placid High School and head of the Chair Company. Rousch, who has also served as the district-lev-el coordinator for devel-opment of vocational ed-ucation policy, told the board that while students have challenges keeping up with changes in man-ufacturing and market-ing methods, the students also need a reason to stay in Highlands County. The county, in turn, needs skilled workers to attract new industry. Donna Doubleday of the Heartland Workforce In-vestment Board stated in a press release that Flori-da ranks among the top 10 states for companies man-ufacturing a wide range of goods, and manufactur-ing has been designated as a targeted industry for Highlands and surround-ing counties. However, businesses wont come if they cant nd enough skilled local labor, Rousch said. We want to keep the kids here, Rousch said. We want to give them good jobs. Rousch will team-teach the academy with Scott Morgan, LPHS business education instructor. They want community partners to come forward and help sponsor the program. Board member Don-na Howerton asked if this was a rst for Florida, and Rousch believes it may be. Lake Placid High marked itself on the na-tional map 12 years ago by establishing the Chair Company to sell Adiron-dack chair kits online as a way of defraying sup-plies costs, Rousch said. The chairs gained popu-larity because the kit sales helped support education. I have two of these chairs, Howerton said. If I would have thought about it, (Id) get one more. The company and chairs also have been the sub-ject of a segment of Ron Hazelton Home Improve-ment Online, Rousch said. When eBay changed its policy disallowing ca-shiers checks or money orders, sales dropped to local sales and some re-peat out-of-state custom-ers, Rousch said. Lumber prices had tripled, which cut into prot margins for each $79 pinewood kit. Students would learn how to market the chairs online and sell them in ways that can overcome such challenges, he said. Rousch said he serves as the CEO of the company, who talks to the student foreman a rotating po-sition, l ike all of the work stations who then gives marching orders to the other students. Students are eager to become fore-man until they learn that everything that goes on, or goes wrong, becomes their responsibility, he said. Because each handcrafted and hand-assem-bled chair goes through six or seven students, its inspected for quality that many times, Rousch said. That will help them appre-ciate quality work. Rotating through the work stations also helps each student learn the complete manufacturing process, he said. Thats part of the (com-pany) design, Rousch said. For details on the pro-gram or to be a business partner, contact Rousch at Lake Placid High at 863699-5010, ext. 247 or email rouschj@highlands.k12. .us. CHAIR FROM PAGE A1 Courtesy photoAn August riot at the A von P ark Youth Academy did an estimated $350,000 in damage.

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A8 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com PAIGE SUTHERLANDAssociated PressBOSTON Every time Roseann Sdoia comes home, she must climb 18 steps six stairs into the building, another 12 to her apartment. It is an old building in Bostons North End, with doors that are big and heavy, not an easy place for an amputee to live. When she left the hos-pital, a month after the Boston marathon bomb-ing, she had a choice: She could nd another place to live, one more suitable for someone who wears a prosthetic that replaces most of her right leg. Or, she could stay. Early on when all this happened, so many peo-ple were telling me to move out of the city and move out of my apart-ment because of the stairs and I dont have an ele-vator and parking is not very convenient, she re-calls. But I have been able to get past all of that. In that, she mirrors Bos-ton itself. I have to tell you, hon-estly, Boston is a better city now than it was be-fore, says Thomas Meni-no, Bostons former may-or. People learned how to deal with each other, they had to deal with a tragedy. Not that its been easy. Three people were killed that day, and more than 260 were injured, and the legacy of trauma and lost limbs remains as does the shock of having en-dured a terrorist attack on Marathon Monday. Nor can Bostonians forget the fear that gripped a city locked down in the midst of a manhunt. But Boston has been able to get past all of that. Copley Square is no longer littered with im-promptu tributes to the dead and injured; theyre now on display in an ex-hibit at the Boston Pub-lic Library, where Robert White of Lynn saw mean-ing in every teddy bear and pair of sneakers: Ev-ery last one of the items says Boston Strong or I will return next year. --Sdoia is 46 years old, a vice president of property management for a Boston development company. She is a cheerful woman; she smiles broadly when she arrives at the Spauld-ing Rehabilitation Hos-pital in Charlestown for physical therapy. Its just my nature, she says. Im not a negative person. Im not a Debbie Downer. Still, she says, she cries every day. What is sinking in is that life has changed, she says, her face awash with tears. Sdoia is a runner, but she did not take part in the marathon. She was at the nish line on April 15, rooting for friends in the race, when the sec-ond bomb went off. Aside from her leg injury, she suffered hearing loss. Other than losing the bottom of my right leg, Im still me, she says. I havent changed, I am still the same person I was be-fore. And yet, so much has changed. She had to take more leave from the job she loved. Winter, and snow, were tough to han-dle. Shes had to tackle daily tasks showering, vacuuming differently. Marc Fucarile, a 35-year-old roofer from Stoneham, also lost his right leg from above the knee; he has shrapnel in his heart, and still could lose his left leg. Everything has changed, he says. How I use the bathroom, how I shower, how I brush my teeth, how I get in and out of bed. His 6-year-old son, Gavin, does not always understand. Gavin is like, Hey, you want to go out and play? and Im like, Theres a foot of snow. I cant do snow. Were not going out and playing right now, sorry buddy. It breaks my heart. --In the rst three months after the explosions, the One Fund collected near-ly $61 million in dona-tions. In the next ve months, another $12 mil-lion in contributions came in. This big-heartedness was mirrored by a sort of proud deance, exempli-ed by Boston Strong. The amount of merchan-dise bearing the slogan was astonishing. In the immediate after-math of the bombings, it became a peaceful man-tra that people could re-peat and believe in. And if they said it enough, tweeted it enough, hashtagged it enough, it would actually be true, says Dan Soleau, a brand de-velopment manager for Marathon Sports. Jennifer Lawrence, a social worker at Bos-ton Medical Center, says the emphasis on Bos-ton Strong had had some unhappy consequences. A lot of it is portraying that people are so resil-ient and so strong. While that is absolutely true, we are neglecting that peo-ple still have hard days, she said. In the aftermath of the bombings, more than 600 people took advantage of the medical centers mental health services. And while most needed no help after the rst few months, she has seen an increase in demand in re-cent weeks, as the anni-versary approached. Still, she says a vast majority of those who came through the hospi-tals programs intend to attend this years mara-thon, either as bystanders or runners. Nicole Lynch will be there. Her brother, Sean Collier, was the MIT of-cer who was shot to death, allegedly by the two suspects in the bombings. She will be at the race with Team Collier Strong a group of 25 friends and family mem-bers, including two of her siblings, who will run to raise money for a scholar-ship fund to put one per-son a year through law enforcement training. William Evans will be there, but he has little choice. He has run the marathon 18 times in-cluding last year but this time he will be there as police commission-er, supervising beefed-up security including more than 3,500 police of-cers (more than twice last years force), more securi-ty cameras, more bombsnifng dogs, and restric-tions on the kinds of bags runners and spectators can bring. It weighs heavy on my mind, that I want this to go off well, he says. I dont want anyone hurt. I dont ever want a repeat of the tragedy we saw that day.Reporters Denise Lavoie, Steve LeBlanc, Philip Marcelo and Bob Salsberg contributed to this story.A year after, Boston and its people heal Alana Semuels/Los Angeles Times/MCTLiz Norden, left, and one of her ve sons, J.P., sit on a couch in the living room of her apartment in Stoneham, Mass. Norden moved into a ground oor apartment so her sons, each of whom lost a leg in the Boston Marathon bombings, could get around more easily. I have to tell you, honestly, Boston is a better city now than it was before. People learned how to deal with each other, they had to deal with a tragedy.Thomas Menino former Boston mayor

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www.newssun.com Friday, April 11, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A9 SPORTS FISHIN AROUND Don Norton BY DON NORTON Special to the News-Sun Last week, a custom er came into the store and told me about his friend who had caught a large mouth bass weighing over 21 pounds. Its not unusual for me to hear about big sh be ing caught from custom ers, and often the stories are accompanied by pic tures. But a 21 pound bass? That I dont hear very of ten. Why is this so hard to believe? Well, George Perry, who caught the world re cord largemouth bass, a 22-pound, 4-ounce lunk er held the record for well over 60 years before a sh erman in Japan, Manabu Kurita, caught and certi ed a bass from Lake Biwa (Japan) weighing only one ounce more. At 22 pounds and 5 ounces, which according to the record keepers only qualies as a tie (new re cords must be 2 ounces or greater than the previous set record), provided even more evidence that under the right conditions, there is a possibility of a bass growing to such huge di mensions. After I listened to the story told by my customer, I believe its true. Actually, I believe he be lieves its true. I guess Id have to say I believe its possible. According to him, his friend owns a number of small ponds, all of which hold some pretty big bass. Of course he didnt tell me where these ponds are, although he did men tion Avon Park, and then later in the conversation, Frostproof. He claims the sh was weighed on a scale that listed the weight at 9.9 kg. For some reason the scale did not work in the pounds and ounces selec tor. One km converts to 2.204622622 pounds. If you convert 9.9 kg to pounds and ounces youre talking about a bass that weighed 21.13 ounces just eight ounces short of the world record. Its interesting to note that Doug Hannon, of ten called the Bass Profes sor, wrote often about his belief that a world record bass would most like ly come from a 150-mile range of his Tampa home. In his opinion, south Florida, specically Lake Okeechobee was not a likely site for a bass to grow that large due to the high water temperatures during the summer, caus ing the metabolism of the bass to increase, which in turn causes rapid growth but often, premature death. North Florida was also ruled out since the wa ter temperatures often fall too low for longer periods of time, causing the basss metabolism to slow down, thus allowing them to live longer, but grow at a slow er rate. According to Hannon, the 150 radius of Tampa offers the ideal water con ditions year round. Water temperatures typ ically do not get too hot, or too cold, allowing sh the opportunity to live in fairly stable conditions, extending their life as well as their growth opportu nities. In the April 2014 is sue of BassMaster Maga zine, James Hall wrote a nice article about Dr. Gary Schwarz, owner of the El Tecomate Ranch near Lar edo, Texas. Deer hunters may rec ognize the name of Dr. Schwarz from way back in 1983 when he pioneered the concept of food plots that could improve the antler growth and body size of deer. He developed a food plot seed called Lablab and eventually created the Tecomate Seed Company. No one believed his claim that he could greatly improve the size of white tail deer, but by 2000, Schwarz and the El Teco mate Ranch had grown world-record-class deer topping 200 inches. A few miles northwest of the El Tecomate Ranch sits La Perla Ranch. Schwarz purchased the property as an investment in 2005 and within a short period of time, brought in John Jones, owner of World record largemouth bass? Courtesy photo Manabu Kurita and his record-tying largemouth bass. SEE BASS | A11 BY DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.com AVON PARK The Red Devils left no doubt who reigns supreme in the District 9-4A stand ings, as they nished off the district schedule Wednesday night with an 8-3 win over visiting Mul berry. Tuesdays rains pushed the con test back a day, but Avon Park wasted lit tle time in getting things go ing. After Daniel Simons worked a one-two-three top of the rst, Alfred Brown tripled to left to lead off the bottom half. He would come in one out later when Tyrone Perry plastered a double deep in the left-center eld gap. Simons surrendered a walk and single in the top of the second, but came back strong in striking out the next three bat ters. The Devils then broke it open in their next at bat. With the bases load ed and one out, Brown singled home Alex Go mez before Luis Martinez rocketed one to center that went for a three-run double. One out later, Mykel Gordon singled Marti nez home and Mulber ry was looking up at a 6-0 decit. The Panthers did scratch for two in the Devils lock up district Dan Hoehne/News-Sun Trey Frazier crosses home plate with Alfred Brown hot on his heels as two of the three runs Luis Martinez knocked in with a double in Wednesdays win. AVON PARK 8 MULBERRY 3 SEE DEVILS | A12 BY DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.com It was more than a de cade in the making, from an unlikely group of Se bring tennis players. But the 2014 edition of Lady Blue Streak tennis pulled off a Class 2A Re gional win Tuesday, stun ning Golden Gate by a 5-2 match score. With only Nisha Patel as an experienced, fulledged varsity starter from a season ago, a rebuilding sort of season might have been expected. But while a consistent Lady Streaks pull of Regional win Courtesy photo For the rst time in more than a decade, the Lady Streaks picked up a regional tennis win. All smiles af ter the victory over Golden Gate, from left, Ashley Castelli, Amanda Rios, Micaela DeVane, Nisha Patel, Sarah Beth Rogers, Alaina Keith and head coach Janie Hollinger. SEE SEBRING | A12 BY BARRY FOSTER Special to the News-Sun SEBRING There will be re works on Independence Day week end at the Sebring International Raceway but it will have nothing to do with pyrotechnics. The 24 Hours of LeMons has an nounced the series will make its debut at the storied airport race course July 5-6. Its called the Humidi TT the TT being time trials. Its a play on that and your summertime weath er, said 24 Hours of LeMons Asso ciate Perpetrator Nick Pons from his ofce in California. Like a similar series known as the ChumpCar World Series which also has raced at Sebring, the LeMons group conducts endurance rac es for cars valued at no more than $500. The group also lays claim to be ing the rst of its kind. We actually staged our initial race in October of 2006 at the old Altamonte Speedway here in Cali fornia, Pons said.It was supposed to be a one-time thing. We nev er thought it would snowball into this. The 24 Hours of LeMons now has burgeoned from that one-off event to a 19-race series. Another feature that sets LeM 24 Hours of LeMons coming to SIR Courtesy photo Cars of all shapes, sizes, styles and adornments will be on hand as the 24 Hours of LeMons debuts at Sebring International Raceway in July. SEE LEMONS | A12

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A10 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com COMING UP High School Baseball Today Avon Park vs. Booker, 7 p.m.; Se bring vs. Hardee, 7 p.m. College Baseball Today SFSC vs. Polk State, 6 p.m. Saturday SFSC at Polk State, 1 p.m. High School Softball Today Avon Park vs. Liberty, 6/7:30 p.m.; Lake Placid at All Saints, 6 p.m. TODAY AUTO RACING NASCAR VFW Sport Clips 200 8 p.m. ESPN2 BOXING Giovanni Lorenzo vs. Gilberto Ramirez 10 p.m. ESPN2 GOLF 2014 Masters Tournament 3 p.m. ESPN MLB Tampa Bay at Cincinnati 7 p.m. SUN NBA Detroit at Chicago 8 p.m. WGN SATURDAY AUTO RACING NASCAR Bojangles Southern 500 6 p.m. FOX NHRA Four-Wide Nationals, Qualifying 9 p.m. ESPN2 COLLEGE BASEBALL Arkansas at LSU 1 p.m. ESPN2 COLLEGE HOCKEY NCAA Tournament Final 7:30 p.m. ESPN GOLF 2014 Masters Tournament 3 p.m. CBS MLB Tampa Bay at Cincinnati 1 p.m. SUN Cleveland at Chicago White Sox 2 p.m. WGN NHL Philadelphia at Pittsburgh 3 p.m. NBC SPORTS ON TV STANDINGS National Basketball Association EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB x-Toronto 46 32 .590 x-Brooklyn 43 35 .551 3 New York 33 45 .423 13 Boston 23 55 .295 23 Philadelphia 17 61 .218 29 Southeast W L Pct GB y-Miami 53 25 .679 x-Charlotte 40 38 .513 13 x-Washington 40 38 .513 13 Atlanta 35 43 .449 18 Orlando 23 55 .295 30 Central W L Pct GB y-Indiana 54 25 .684 x-Chicago 46 32 .590 7 Cleveland 32 47 .405 22 Detroit 29 50 .367 25 Milwaukee 14 64 .179 39 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB y-San Antonio 60 18 .769 x-Houston 52 26 .667 8 Dallas 48 31 .608 12 Memphis 46 32 .590 14 New Orleans 32 46 .410 28 Northwest W L Pct GB y-Oklahoma City 57 21 .731 x-Portland 51 28 .646 6 Minnesota 39 39 .500 18 Denver 34 44 .436 23 Utah 24 54 .308 33 Pacic W L Pct GB y-L.A. Clippers 55 24 .696 Golden State 48 29 .623 6 Phoenix 47 31 .603 7 Sacramento 27 52 .342 28 L.A. Lakers 25 53 .321 29 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Fridays Games Washington at Orlando, 7 p.m. New York at Toronto, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Charlotte at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Indiana at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m. Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m. New Orleans at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at Memphis, 8 p.m. Cleveland at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m. Phoenix at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Portland at Utah, 9 p.m. Golden State at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. LEAGUE LEADERS Scoring G FG FT PTS AVG Durant, OKC 77 803 669 2461 32.0 Anthony, NYK 75 728 444 2065 27.5 James, MIA 75 746 423 2026 27.0 Love, MIN 74 623 482 1908 25.8 Harden, HOU 70 528 543 1769 25.3 Grifn, LAC 78 700 468 1879 24.1 Curry, GOL 74 606 287 1740 23.5 Aldridge, POR 67 633 290 1559 23.3 DeRozan, TOR 76 586 494 1726 22.7 Cousins, SAC 69 566 415 1547 22.4 George, IND 78 564 391 1695 21.7 Jefferson, CHA 69 656 181 1496 21.7 Nowitzki, DAL 77 605 328 1663 21.6 Irving, CLE 68 519 276 1436 21.1 Lillard, POR 79 543 362 1657 21.0 Davis, NOR 67 522 348 1394 20.8 Thomas, SAC 70 488 345 1447 20.7 Dragic, PHX 74 540 313 1515 20.5 Gay, SAC 71 528 315 1435 20.2 Wall, WAS 78 562 308 1539 19.7 National Hockey League EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA z-Boston 79 53 18 8 114 254 171 x-Montreal 80 45 27 8 98 214 202 x-Tampa Bay 79 43 27 9 95 232 211 x-Detroit 80 38 27 15 91 218 228 Toronto 80 38 34 8 84 229 251 Ottawa 79 34 31 14 82 230 262 Florida 80 28 44 8 64 190 263 Buffalo 79 21 49 9 51 152 238 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Pittsburgh 80 51 24 5 107 244 200 x-N.Y. Rangers 80 44 31 5 93 216 191 x-Philadelphia 79 41 29 9 91 225 222 x-Columbus 80 42 31 7 91 226 211 Washington 79 36 30 13 85 226 237 New Jersey 79 34 29 16 84 191 201 Carolina 79 34 34 11 79 197 219 N.Y. Islanders 79 31 37 11 73 216 262 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-St. Louis 79 52 20 7 111 246 181 x-Colorado 79 51 21 7 109 243 210 x-Chicago 80 46 19 15 107 262 209 x-Minnesota 80 42 26 12 96 200 197 Dallas 80 39 30 11 89 231 226 Nashville 79 35 32 12 82 200 234 Winnipeg 80 35 35 10 80 220 233 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Anaheim 80 52 20 8 112 259 204 x-San Jose 80 49 22 9 107 241 197 x-Los Angeles 80 45 28 7 97 200 170 Phoenix 79 36 28 15 87 212 225 Vancouver 79 35 33 11 81 187 213 Calgary 80 35 38 7 77 205 231 Edmonton 80 28 43 9 65 198 265 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Fridays Games Chicago at Washington, 7 p.m. Carolina at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Columbus at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m. St. Louis at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Winnipeg at Calgary, 9 p.m. Colorado at San Jose, 10 p.m. Major League Baseball AMERICAN LEAGUE East W L Pct GB Toronto 5 4 .556 Tampa Bay 5 5 .500 Baltimore 4 5 .444 1 Boston 4 5 .444 1 New York 4 5 .444 1 Central W L Pct GB Detroit 5 2 .714 Cleveland 5 4 .556 1 Kansas City 4 4 .500 1 Chicago 4 5 .444 2 Minnesota 3 5 .375 2 West W L Pct GB Oakland 5 3 .625 Seattle 5 3 .625 Los Angeles 4 5 .444 1 Texas 4 5 .444 1 Houston 3 6 .333 2 Fridays Games Boston (Lester 0-2) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 1-1), 7:05 p.m. Toronto (McGowan 0-1) at Baltimore (B.Norris 0-1), 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 1-0) at Cincinnati (Cueto 0-1), 7:10 p.m. Houston (Feldman 2-0) at Texas (Darvish 1-0), 8:05 p.m. Cleveland (Carrasco 0-1) at Chicago White Sox (Sale 2-0), 8:10 p.m. Kansas City (B.Chen 0-0) at Minnesota (Gibson 1-0), 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Gee 0-0) at L.A. Angels (Skaggs 1-0), 10:05 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 1-0) at San Diego (Cashner 0-1), 10:10 p.m. Oakland (Milone 0-0) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 2-0), 10:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East W L Pct GB Washington 6 2 .750 Atlanta 5 3 .625 1 Miami 5 4 .556 1 New York 3 5 .375 3 Philadelphia 3 5 .375 3 Central W L Pct GB Milwaukee 6 2 .750 Pittsburgh 5 3 .625 1 St. Louis 5 4 .556 1 Chicago 3 5 .375 3 Cincinnati 3 6 .333 3 West W L Pct GB San Francisco 6 3 .667 Los Angeles 6 4 .600 Colorado 5 5 .500 1 San Diego 3 6 .333 3 Arizona 3 8 .273 4 Fridays Games Miami (Fernandez 2-0) at Philadelphia (Burnett 0-1), 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 1-0) at Cincinnati (Cueto 0-1), 7:10 p.m. Washington (Roark 1-0) at Atlanta (Teheran 1-1), 7:35 p.m. Pittsburgh (Liriano 0-1) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta 0-0), 8:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 0-1) at St. Louis (J.Kelly 1-0), 8:15 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 1-1) at Arizona (McCarthy 0-1), 9:40 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Gee 0-0) at L.A. Angels (Skaggs 1-0), 10:05 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 1-0) at San Diego (Cashner 0-1), 10:10 p.m. Colorado (De La Rosa 0-1) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 1-0), 10:15 p.m. SNAP S HOT S SPORTS H.O.P.E. Basketball Tournament SEBRING The 4th Annual Mary Toney H.O.P.E. Foundation 3-on3 Basketball Tournament will tip off Saturday, April 19, in the Sebring High School Gym. From 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. teams will compete amid concessions and music, with a cost of just $5 per player. Monetary prizes will be awarded to rst-place teams, with second-place nishers receiving gift card awards. The tournament will have male and female brackets consisting of three players per team. For boys and girls, age groups are 7-9 years old, 10-12, 13-15 and 16-19. The 7-9 and 10-12 yearold teams begin play at 8:30 a.m., with the 1315s and 16-19s starting at 11 a.m. Teams need to report to the gym 30 minutes prior to the rst game of their division. Registration deadline is Thursday, April 17. For more information, call LaVaar Scott at (863) 214-3880, Nick Brooks at (850) 322-8398 or Princeton Harris at (863) 381-8898 Nu-Hope Golf tournament AVON PARK NUHOPE Elder Care Services will hold the Sandy Foster Memorial Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 19. This years event, spon sored by MIDFLORIDA, will be held at Pinecrest Golf Club in Avon Park. The event is a 2-person scramble. Cost is $65/person ($130 per 2-person team.) Sponsorship opportuni ties are available. Registration opens at 7:30 a.m., with a Shot Gun start at 8:30 a.m. An awards luncheon fol lows the event. All funds raised are used to support services for se niors in Highlands and Hardee County. To register or for more information, please con tact Laurie Murphy at 382-2134 or MurphyL@ nuhope.org or visit www. nuhopeeldercare.org Sottile Memorial Golf LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Athletic Association will be host ing the 8th Annual Nick Sottile Memorial Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 12, at the Placid Lakes Country Club. The event is a four-per son scramble with cash prizes for winning teams in each ight and individ ual cash prizes for clos est to the line, closest to the pin and a $2,000 Hole in One prize sponsored by Cohan Radio Group. Cost is $100 per golfer, $400 per team, and there will be an 8 a.m. tee-off time. Entry fee includes greens fee, cart, comple mentary beverages and lunch catered by Smoke Shack BBQ, with appe tizers of shrimp and crab clusters. Bill Jarrett Ford is help ing to underwrite the event for the eighth con secutive year, but more sponsors are needed. Sponsorship ranges from $1,000 to $50 holesponsors and lunch tick ets are included with most sponsorship levels. Proceeds from the tour nament directly bene t youth sports in Lake Placid and a portion of the proceeds are donated to the Nick Sottile Memorial Scholarship Fund. A portion of the pro ceeds will also be used for completion of a new sports weight-training facility. For more informa tion, call Laura Teal at (863) 441-0729 or Tom Reifsnyder at (954) 675-9581. Florida Hospital Clay Shoot OKEECHOBEE The Florida Hospital Heartland Clay Shoot will be held on Friday, April 25, at the Quail Creek Plantation beginning at 8:30 a.m. A continental breakfast will be served at 8 a.m. at Quail Creek, locat ed at 12399 NE 224th St., Okeechobee. There will also be a home-cooked BBQ lunch and fantastic rafe and green bird prizes. There are four levels of sponsorships avail able, from Station Sponsor which includes advertis ing on course station sig nage and lunch for two for $100, Individual Sponsor for $125 which includes registration for one shoot er and lunch. The $500 Team Sponsor includes one four-man shooting team and lunch, along with advertising on banner displayed at lunch tents. The $2,500 Gold Sponsor includes one four-man team, cart and lunch, a banner hanging during event with com pany logo, company logo on yer/registration and all mail pieces, one sta tion sign, one suite for Thursday nights social and two Thursday night dinner tickets. For more informa tion or to register, call the Foundation at (863) 4025525, or visit the website www.FHHeartland.org/ Foundation Wings of Faith Golf SEBRING The Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center will be hosting their 4th Annual Scholarship Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 26, at Sun N Lake. Format is a four-per son scramble with handi capped ights. Entry fee is $65 per person, which includes greens fee, golf cart and lunch. Registration is at 7:30 a.m. the day of the tournament, with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Please submit entries by Thursday, April 24. Make checks payable to Wings of Faith CWC Scholarship Fund. All proceeds go to ben et college-bound senior graduates for the class of 2014. For questions, call Alvin Walters at 381-5706 or 381-6578. Highlands County Summer Leagues SEBRING The Highlands County Parks and Natural Resources Department announc es that the 2014 Summer Leagues will start the week of May 12. Leagues will include Womens, Church and Recreational A and B Leagues and are open to all adults and youth 16 years and older. Registration and fees are due by Wednesday, May 7, no exceptions. Fees are $360 and $15 sanctioning fee for the year. For any further informa tion please call Bob Keefe at 863-381-8284, Dustin Ridenour at 381-8269 or the Sports Complex at 863-402-6755. Bass N Trash Tournament SEBRING The Sebring Sr. FFA will host the First Annual Bass N Trash Fishing Tournament on Saturday, May 17, on Lake Jackson at the Veterans Beach boat ramp. Cost is $25 per person, with a maximum of four people per team, with all registered team members receiving a free T-shirt and lunch. Meet time is 7 a.m. and shing will get underway at 7:30 a.m. Weigh-in takes place at Noon. Cass prizes will be given to heaviest total of three bass, three trash sh, heaviest bass and heaviest trash sh. All sh must be alive at weigh-in. Registration deadline is May 1, which guarantees a shirt, registrations after that, up through the day of the tournament, arent guaranteed a shirt. To register, or for more information, contact Sarah Cleveland at (352) 214-9883, or Rebekah Wills at (863) 273-0208. SHS Summer of Swim Sebring High School will be offering swimming les sons with four sessions to choose from. The rst session begins Monday, June 9 and runs through Friday, June 20. The second session runs from June 23-July 3, the third session July 7-July 18 and the fourth from July 21-August 1. Registrations are being taken, beginning Monday, May 5, at the front ofce of Sebring High School during the day from 9 a.m.-2 p.m., where ofce secretaries will be able to sign you up. For questions, call 4715500, ext. 229, or 381-7092 and leave a message for Ms. Pat. Emails can also be sent to catonp@highlands.k12. .us The Sebring High School pool will be open on Wednesday, May 1, Monday through Friday from 6-7:30 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from 1-3 p.m. Additional hours will be added once school is out for the summer. Cost is $2 per swim mer, and family passes are available at $50 for rst family member and $15 for each additional. Sebring Summer Swim Program The Summer Swim Program will again offer four (4) instructional sessions. Each will last two weeks and the swim class meets each weekday, Monday through Friday. The Program will offer eight types of instruction: 1. Adult Beginner: Adults Only. For the novice-no experience necessary. 2. Parent and Tot: Water Orientation. Mother/ Father must participate with child. (6 months to 2 years of age.) 3. Level I: Introduction to Water Skills. Students rst water orientation without Mother/Father. Part A--Preschool Aquatics (2-4 years of age) Part B-School Age (4-5 years of age) 4. Level II: Fundamental Aquatic Skills. Students do not need Mother/Father in pool. (4-5 years of age.) 5. Level III: Stroke Development. Students must be comfortable in water. 6. Level IV: Stroke Improvement. Students must be able to swim 10 yards, do a front dive, and oat on their backs. 7. Level V: Stroke Renement. Students must be able to swim 50 yards, tread water 30 sec onds, and elementary back stroke 25 yards. 8. Level VI: Part A Personal Water Safety/ Diving Fundamentals. Students must be able to swim 100 yards, tread water for 3 minutes, back stroke 100 yards. Will learn basics of diving. Part B Fitness Swimmer/Diving Fundamentals. Students will learn necessary skills to make swimming part of their exercise program. Will learn basics of diving. There will be a $50 fee for the two-week session and students will be en rolled on a rst come, rst served basis. There will be no refunds after completion of reg istration and payment of fees, unless the swim class is cancelled. There must be at least four swimmers per class for the lessons to be taught. This Date In Baseball April 11 1907 New York catcher Roger Bresnahan ap peared wearing shin guards for the rst time in a major league game. 1912 Rube Marquard of the New York Giants be gan a 19-game winning streak with an 18-3 triumph over the Brooklyn Dodgers. 1961 The Los Angeles Angels won their rst ma jor league game with a 7-2 victory over the Orioles at Baltimore. Ted Kluszewski had a pair of homers for the Angels. 1962 The New York Mets played their rst game and lost 11-4 to the Cardinals in St. Louis. Stan Musial of the cardinals had three hits and tied Mel Otts National League career record with his 1,859th run scored. The Mets would lost their rst nine games on the way to a 40-120 record. 1969 The Seattle Pilots played their rst game, with Gary Bell shutting out the White Sox 7-0 at Sicks Stadium. 1985 Seattles Gorman Thomas hit three hom ers and drove in six runs to lead the Mariners to a 14-6 victory over the Oakland As. 1990 Mark Langston made his Angels debut by combining with Mike Witt on a no-hitter as Califor nia beat the Seattle Mariners 1-0. 1996 Greg Madduxs major league record of road victories ended at 18 in a row with a 2-1 loss to the San Diego Padres. He had been 18-0 with an 0.99 ERA in 20 regular-season road starts since losing at Montreal on June 27, 1994. 2001 Atlantas Greg Maddux was almost aw less for seven innings, combining with a pair of relievers to pitch a one-hitter in a 2-0 win over the New York Mets. The Mets wound up with only one runner against Maddux, Mike Remlinger and John Rocker. Todd Zeile lined a single about a foot be yond second baseman Quilvio Veras glove with one out in the second. 2007 Felix Hernandez pitched a one-hitter and struck out six, helping Seattle beat Boston 3-0. 2008 Missouris Jacob Priday set a Big 12 Conference record, hitting four home runs against Texas in a 31-12 rout. The senior went 5-for-5, drove in nine runs and scored six times. 2011 Sam Fuld had four extra-base hits and drove in three runs to help Tampa Bay bust out of an early season slump with a 16-5 win over the Boston Red Sox. Fuld, needing a single to complete the cycle, doubled into the left-eld corner in his last at-bat in the ninth. Fuld hit a two-run homer in the second inning to give the Rays a 6-0 lead. Fuld doubled in the fourth and tripled in the sixth. Todays birthdays: Pete Kozma 26; Charlie Furbush 28; Alejandro De Aza 30; Mark Teixeira 34.

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www.newssun.com Friday, April 11, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A11 Golf Hammock The Golf Hammock Ladies Played a scram ble for their Farewell Tournament and Luncheon on Wednesday, April 9. First-place win ners, with a 65.1, were Joan Robillard, Caroline Duncan, Mary Cripps and Shirley Enochs. Coming in with a 65.3 for second were Jeannie Fivecoat,. Anne Coffey and Carol Troup. Taking third, with a 65.5. were Cindy Borwer, Joyce Stanley, Roxie McMillon and Audrey Walther. And in fourth place, with a 67.1, were Judy Trier, Kaydee Depolito, Jo Thornburg and Alma Barefoot. Closest to the Pin on No. 7 was Helene Trembly and on No. 17 was Roxie McMillon The Ringer winners for the year saw Jeannie Fivecoat top the First Flight with a 72, with Second Flight honors going to Judy Trier with a 78 and Kaydee Depolito topped the Third Flight with 86. Last Monday, April 7, the Mezza Group played Individual Pro-Am points. Joe Hyzny took rst in A group with +5, Gary Towell placed second with +4, Don Brewer took third with +3. In B group, Mike Lajiness was in rst at +2, Gary Fivecoat in second at -1, and in third was Dana Smith at -2. C group saw Paul Brown take rst with +6, Ned Bauer in second with +4, followed by Jan Nigh in third with +1. John Robertson led the way in D group at +5, with Ken Granger in second at +2, and Delbert Nelson in third at -1. In E group, Dick Botelhos +5 took rst place, Stan Grifs took second with +4, fol lowed by a tie between Jim Daigneault and Bob Wimmers at +1. F group was lead by Bob Hughes, who took rst with +4, Ralph Pickering in second with +3, and Jack Bardelli in third with +2. G group saw Howard Brown come in rst with +4, Terri Trumbull in sec ond with +3, and Jack Carlton in third with +1 Bill Wouderberg won H group with +8, Richard Ramazetti took second with +2, in third we saw Dave Hankinson at Even. I groups top nish came from Ken Porter with +4, Bob Fidlin took second with +2, in third was Don Meitz at Even. Bill Kratcher easily took rst in J group with a whopping +12, Jean Terrell took second with +4, and Bob Goldsworth grabbed third with +1. Next Monday the Mezza Group will contin ue to play, beginning at 7:45 a.m. This one will be a scramble. Please arrive early due to a big eld of players. For more information, or to join the group, call Pete at 382-1280. Lake June West A Best Ball tournament was played on Wednesday, April 9, and saw the team of Ron West, Don Bolton, Orville Huffman and Walt Nagel card a 41 for the win. Ron Cobert, Art Schmeltz, Fred Neer and Angelo Iarlano came in with a 43 for second. In closest to the pin for the round, Bill Fowler landed a shot 23 feet from No. 4, Cobert hit to with in 17 feet from No. 8 and Ron West dropped one 11 feet from No. 2. A Monday Ladies event was played on April 7, with Annie Hall, Charlotte Mathew and Mary Malone coming in rst with a 36. Joyce Swartz, Doris Weeks and Betty Kinchloe were just a shot back with 37 for second place, and one more shots back, at 38, was the team of Kathy Armstrong, Janice Barringer and Pat Asmus for third. In closest to the pin for the day, Jane Roush hit to 9-feet, 5-inches from No. 2, Swartz to 8-feet, 9-inch es from No. 8 and Kim Fiers to 6-feet, 9-inches from No. 4. A Couples Scramble was played on Thursday, April 3. Larry Heath and Bob Orr joined Orville and Eva Huffman to get the win with a 53. Doyan and Wayne Eades teamed with JoAnn McGill and Mary McNamee to card a 54 for second and Joe and Joyce Swartz joined Walt and Velma Nagel for a third-place nish with 55. In closest to the pin, Art Schmeltz hit to 21-feet from No. 4, McGill to 14 feet from No. 8 and Helen Mellon to 9-feet, 2-inches from No. 2. Placid Lakes The Mens Association played a Best Ball Front, Two Best Balls Back event on Wednesday, April 9. First place went to the team of Tom Lacy, Bob McMillian, Howard Ticknor and Wayne Wood who brought in a -27. Taking second, with a -23, were Tony Grande, Gary Huffman and Mike Ketring, with the team of Lane Capp, Dan King, Bob Sheets and Jim Rozzy one shot back at -24 for third. Coming in with a -21 for fourth were Bill Brinegar, Ed Bartusch, Russ Isaacs and Henry Shaw. Rozzy had closest to the pin for the round, hitting to 7 feet from No. 11. The Womens Golf Association played a Best Ball event on Tuesday, April 8. Gail Ladig, Judy Thompson, Pat Haas and Joan Sniffen took rst place with a -18, while Von Lacy, Carol Olsen, Handan Schneider and Karen Wallin were second with a -17. Three shots back, at -14, were Alice Bitzer, Bobbie Miller and Gloria Ziegler. Bitzer had closest to the pin, getting to 12-feet, 2-inches from No. 11 and Haas chipped one in on No. 6. The Mens Association played a Two Best Ball event on Wednesday, April 2. Dan King, Jack Marceau and Dick McArdle came in with a -26 for the win, while Lane Capp, Bob McMillian and Bud Snyder carded a -25 for second. Tom Lacy, Ed Bartusch, Gene Ransom and Jim Rozzy shot a -21 to take third. Frank Fisher had clos est to the pin on the day, sticking his shot on No. 2 to just 5-feet, 6-inches. The Womens Association played a Scramble on Tuesday, April 1. Alice Blitzer, Rose Hunter, Pam Thomas and Pat Haas came in with a +3 for the win, while a match of cards had to settle second and third. Two teams came in with +4s, but after the match, Bobbie Miller, Karen Wallin and Joan Sniffen got the nod for second while Sue Mackey, Barb Moriarity, Narola Rosenberg and Bev Burke settled for third. Alice Blitzer had the closest to the pin on the day, hitting to 5-feet, 6-inches from No. 2. But sinking one into the hole on the day was Wallin, who notched a Hole in One on No. 11, from 105 yards out. SpringLake On Tuesday, April 9, the SpringLake Mens Golf Association held a Two Man Team Net Score competition with two ights; Flight A for team handicaps of 0 to 29 and Flight B for 30 and up. It was held on the Cougar Trail course under the best of golng condi tions cool and cloudy. Bill Lawens and Bart Bartholomy took the A Flight handily, both shooting net 68s for a combined 136 strokes. In second place in A, there was a tie at 143 strokes between Joe Austin and Bill Kingshott and the team of Gerry Esty and Gene Hearn. Mr. Esty shot a gross 73 with 10 handicap strokes for a net 63. B Flight was won by Ken Kirby and Larry Colclasure with the over all best net score of 132; Mr. Kirby with a net 68 and Mr. Colclasure with a net 64. Second place in B Flight went to Charlie Keniston and Jim Foote with 137 net strokes; Mr. Kenistons net 63 and Mr. Footes lackadaisical net 74. Third place went to Bob Hinde and Dave Docherty with a combined net 144 strokes. On Thursday, April 3, the SpringLake Mens Golf Association completed a two-day tournament con sisting of nine four-man teams. On Tuesday, the teams played Two Best Balls on the Panther Creek course, and on Thursday they played Three Best Balls on the Cougar Trail course. Teams were evenly matched with most team handicaps between 62 and 67. The winning team, with a score of 309 net strokes, was composed of Gary Behrendt, Joe Troia, Ron Brochu and Jim Foote. Jan Hard, Joe Austin, Bill Kingshott and Ed Grifth took second place with 312 net strokes. Third place went to Ken Kirby, Jim Hearn, Charlie Keniston and Leon Van with 317 net strokes. Bob Hinde, Ken Rohr, Ron McNeil and Bob Berg came in fourth with 318 strokes. The team of Kirby Gann, Bo Bohanon, Ed Clay and Bill Schauwecker took fth place with 321 net strokes. Under sunny skies, both days were beautiful days to be playing golf at SpringLake Golf Resort. Lochow Ranch Lake Man agement to consult on the muddy, shallow body of water on the property. Jones and his team of biologists shocked the lake and reported misera ble results. The largest bass they found weighed less than a pound. In a relatively short pe riod of time, Schwarz and Jones decided to com pletely rebuild the fea tureless pond into the most unique private body of water in the country. Once completed, the lake covered 90 acres with over seven miles of shore line. The next step involved building forage ponds on the hill over-looking the lake, and stocking with shad and sunsh which he could then ush into the impoundment. Although the concept seemed sound, by 2008, shocking data was less than impressive. But a random idea popped into his head: Freshwater prawns. These creatures are high in protein, grow fast and prove to be easy targets for hungry largemouth bass. Although the prawns can only reproduce in saltwater, they can grow to over 12 inches in body length (and when you add in their long pincers, some reach two feet or more); they can be transferred to fresh water at the larval stage when theyre about the size of mosquitoes. By the end of 2009, the lake was producing healthy ve pounders. Three years later, double digit bass were fairly com mon. To date, the largest bass shocked up has been a 13.15 pounder, named Pearl, and she could well be on her way to becom ing a new Texas state re cord. Garys condent, with the freshwater prawns that he can not only grow a state record bass, but he is condent of a new world record is possible. Scharz is not the rst to attempt growing a world record many have tried and failed in the past. Glen Lau raised a large mouth bass to 18 pounds in central Florida years ago, only to have poach ers raid his pond and kill the sh. Doug Hannon made many attempts to raise such a beast, but he too failed. Over the past 20-some years, a number of 20+ bass have been caught, weighed and certied and eventually released back into the waters from which they came. Most were caught in California where the Flori da strain largemouth have a steady diet of trout, a slower moving sh full of protein and an easy meal for a hungry largemouth. But what if my custom ers story is true? Could there be a bass that large swimming around in a pond some where in Highlands or Polk County? And if theres one, could there be two, or three? I can assure you, if someone does catch, weigh and certify a bass over 20 pounds, well have every media person from all over the country here in Highlands County to cover the event. And the lucky sher man? His story will be told and re-told for genera tions to come. Whether the sh is a new world record or not, it just needs to be close. If that lucky sherman happens to be you, every thing you used to catch the sh, as well as the clothes on your back will present opportunities for endorsements and you can probably kiss that day job good-bye. Don Norton is a professional tour nament bass sherman, bass sh ing guide, and custom rod builder. He lives in the Golf Hammock area of Sebring with his wife Lexie, and is the owner of a custom rod build ing company appropriately named The American Fisherman. He is also the owner of REDS II, a full-ser vice shing tackle store located at 3603 Sebring Parkway, in Sebring, FL. You can reach him at 863-2734998 or by email at donorton13@ gmail.com. Visit his REDS FISHING facebook page or his website at theamericansherman.com. or stop by the store to see him anytime. BASS FROM PAGE A9 SNAP S HOT S LOCAL GOLF

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A12 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com third, albeit just one was earned, but Gomez dou bled in the bottom half and came in one out later on a Trey Frazier double to right. Another unearned run crossed the plate for Mul berry in the fourth to make it 7-3, but the only other score that would come the rest of the way was Devil J.C. Cobb rac ing in on a wild pitch in the fth to provide for the nal margin. Simons would pitch through the sixth, allow ing just the one earned run while striking out sev en. Kyle Kelley then came on in the seventh and re tired the side in order, with one strikeout. This latest triumph moves the Devils to 16-3 on the season, 7-1 in District 9-4A play, giv ing them the top seed in the district tournament, which they will host the week of April 21. Before then, however, a handful of non-district games remain. Avon Park hosted Se bring Thursday night and will welcome Sarasota Booker tonight at Head Field. Next week marks the end of the regular season with a Tuesday date at Hardee and a home con test Thursday, April 17, against DeSoto. DEVILS FROM PAGE A9 Dan Hoehne/News-Sun Daniel Simons peers in for the signs Wednesday night and would go six strong innings to get the win over Mulberry. Dan Hoehne/News-Sun les Team leader Nisha Patels hard-fought win at No. 1 singles set the stage for Sebrings Class 2A Regional win Tuesday. and strong cast were pe rennial regional qualiers, it was this squad of essen tial newbies that got over the hump. Having nished as the District 11 runner-up to Lemon Bay, Sebring had to travel to Naples to take on District 12 win ner Golden Gate on their home turf. But it was Patel setting the tone for the Streaks as she battled to a win at No. 1 singles. After winning the rst set by a 6-3 score over Thi Doan, Patel had to pull out all the stops to avoid it being pushed to a third set. Doan gave her all she could handle and had the second set tied at 6-6, with the tie-breaker prov ing a nip-and-tuck affair as well. But Patel squeaked out a 7-5 edge in the tie-breaker to take the set and match. Sebring took a loss at No. 2 singles as Lady Ti tan Taylor Scott got past Micaela DeVane, and it looked like it might be an other at No. 3 singles as Alaina Keith dropped her rst set against Kevii New bold by a 4-6 score. But Keith bounced back strong, ipping the script and getting a 6-2 win in the second set to force a third. From there she cruised, winning six straight games for a 6-0 win to put the Streaks up 2-1. Golden Gate evened it up with Rachel Ly berg outlasted Sarah Beth Rogers in another close match. Rogers had it even up at 6-6 in the opener but Ly berg took a 7-4 edge in the tie-breaker to get the set win. Rogers stayed close in the second set as well be fore Lyberg pulled out a 7-5 win. But then Sebring took the lead for good when Ashley Castelli was domi nant at No. 5 singles and took a 6-0, 6-1 win over Shivagni Patel. Up 3-2 heading into the doubles matches, the Lady Streaks closed it out with two wins, but not without a bit of drama. In the No. 1 doubles match, the Titans threat ened to even things back up when Doan and Scott took the opening set 7-5 over Patel and DeVane. But the Sebring duo re grouped for a 6-4 win in the second set and grew stronger in taking a 6-3 win in the third to secure both their match as well as the team win. Castelli and Amanda Rio then put the icing on the cake as they handled the Titan duo of Kassandra Aguirre and Patel by 6-1, 6-0 scores. We are just so excit ed, head coach Janie Hol linger said. We have been district runner-up several times, but this is the rst time weve won a regional match since 2003. Fresh off this histor ic win, the girls had lit tle time to savor it as they had a quick turnaround and headed to Englewood to face District 11 foe and champion Lemon Bay, who swept past Bishop Verot on Tuesday. See Sundays News-Sun for the nal results. SEBRING FROM PAGE A9 ons apart is the num ber of more colorful en trants such as race cars that sport airplane bodies, sharks jaws, one which carries a Goodyear-type blimp and even a HarleyDavidson powered Toyota Prius which compete. Really, were proud to have created an atmo sphere where that kind of thing can happen and is encouraged, Pons said. It was the history of the Sebring Internation al Raceway along with its reputation for the combi nation of fun and frolic in the Green Park which en ticed LeMons to come for their mid-summer stop. Generally the partic ipants come from with in about 200 miles from where the event is hap pening but the rst team to sign up is from Cali fornia so Id say there ap pears to be a greater inter est, Pons said. Pons said he has ex plained the philosophy of the series by comparing it to an amateur softball league where the games are played as much for fun as they are competi tion. But racing at Sebring is like playing your softball game at Wrigley Field, Pons said. I think for our guys its an opportunity to race at a place that is real ly iconic. The LeMons cars will be using the entire 3.74 mile road course, meaning fans will have an opportuni ty to see the vehicles up close and personal in the Paddock area. They actually will have a chance to get closer than recommended by your lawyer or your doc tor, Pons said. Organizers also are hop ing that some of the Green Park stalwarts such as The Turn 10 crew, F-Troop, La Bamba Racing and the Florida SkunkApes will turn out for the event. I went to the 12 Hours of Sebring several years ago and the Green Park is more or less what a LeM ons race is on track, he said. Pons said that an ofcial entry list wont be avail able for at least two more weeks when the participa tion deadline closes. LEMONS FROM PAGE A9 Dan Hoehne/News-Sun Kiana Antone put a good rip on this pitch Wednesday night, and the Lady Streaks got their knocks in on Senior Night against Frost proof. But it would be the Lady Bulldogs pulling out a 9-6 win. Sebring closed out the regular season Thursday at Lake Placid and head into their District 11-5A tournament next week with their opening-round contest at Hardee Tuesday. FROSTPROOF CHILLS SEBRING SENIOR NIGHT

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LIVING BFriday, April 11, 2014 With all due respect to Mr. Bunny, eggs really play the starring role at Easter. Here, FamilyFun magazine gives you plenty of ways them with goodies, perch them atop frilly pedestals, even give them a snorkeling vacation. Thats right get em out of their shells! Naomi Shulman SURPRISE INSIDE EGGSAn un-eggs-pected treat hides in each of these colorful orbs. Kids can hunt for them, smash them open and enjoy. To keep the contents secret, Mom or Dad can handle the job make a golden egg holding a dollar.YOU WILL NEED: Pushpin White eggs Clean nail scissors Egg dye Skewers or chopsticks Egg carton Small trinkets Paper and pen Paintbrush White glue Mini cupcake liners (1 per egg) 1. With the pushpin, make a small hole in one end of each egg. Using the inch wide, then empty out the whites and yolks (they can be reserved for cooking).2. Dye the eggs and let them dry overnight by resting them on skewers or chopsticks set in a mug.3. Place eggs, hole facing up, in the 4. Cut narrow strips of paper and write a message, such as Crack Me, at the end of each strip.5. Brush a thin coat of glue around the holes, then stick a message strip and a cupcake liner in place on each egg. Turn the eggs over and let the glue dry. Note: If you include edible surprises, use wrapped candies only and soak the emptied shells in a bleach solution quart of water) for 2 minutes. Let them dry before dying them.(Idea by Megan Reardon, notmartha.org)These hard-boiled snorkelers are fully equipped for a dip in the blue (or green or terpiece, display a row of in their dye-ving tanks.YOU WILL NEED: Egg dye White eggs, hard-boiled Permanent marker 3/4-inch round white adhesive labels 1-inch-wide clear bottle tops Small rubber bands White glue or glue gun* Flexible straws Self-adhesive foam Small clear glasses or bowls (optional) 1. third of an egg, then let it dry.2. Draw eyes on a label and adhere it to the bottle top. Slip the rubber band around the egg, about a quarter of the way down. Glue the lid over a rubber band.3. T section. Bend it into a snorkel shape and glue it in place.4. below). Glue them to the egg, adhesive side down, and let dry. Stick the adhesive side to the display surface, or, if you like, to the inside of a small glass or bowl. With a pitcher, gently pour in dye until the egg is partly submerged.*Note: White glue is kidfriendly but requires drying time; using a glue gun is an adults job.(Idea by Tracy Ripon) DYE-VING DUDESHeres a clever use for leftover egg dye (and cardboard tubes), and the more of a wow factor, use the trimmings to make matching collaged eggs (see Bonus Idea, below).FOR EACH TUFFET, YOU WILL NEED: 2 coffee lters Egg dye in various colors 1-inch-tall segment of cardboard tube White glue 1. dip its edges and point into a differentdry on a paper towel or draped over an empty egg carton.2. again and snip fringe along the edges. If you plan to make the collage eggs below, reserve the trimmings.3. the outside of a tube segment with glue, BONUS IDEA from the tuffets; instead, use them to make pretty collage eggs. Simply brush hard-boiled eggs with watered-down white glue, stick on the trimmings, and brush the eggs with another coat of glue. Let them dry for an hour.(Idea by A. J. Freund, auntpeaches. com)TIE-DYE TUFFETS MELTED-CRAYON EGGS colors swirl together in a magical way. The results are fast, fun and gorgeous. To begin, hard-boil white eggs. Remove them from the hot water with tongs or a slotted spoon, dry them, and rest them in an empty egg carton or on plastic bottle caps (an adults job). Color them with the crayons side. When youre done coloring, leave them to dry for about an hour.

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B2 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com PUZZLE CORNER Solution on B8DEAR ABBY: My wife and I were discussing our sons-in-law, and young men in their 20s and 30s in general. We were won-dering where the atti-tude of any money I earn is mine in a marriage or live-in situation got start-ed. For the rst few years of my daughter and her hus-band Joes marriage, Joe resented giving her any of the money he earned. My other daughters hus-band thinks nothing of spending money on him-self and his friends with-out consulting her. We have seen this at-titude reected in their friends as well. They dont seem to discuss with each other how each is spend-ing their joint income. There seems to be an ele-ment of selshness, too. My wife and I have been married 40 years and from the beginning I have always considered what each of us earned was OURS, not mine or hers (when she worked). We always discuss any signicant purchases, and I have always be-lieved it was my responsi-bility to support my fam-ily. I realize the current economic situation has made that difcult, but the attitude should still be there. WONDERING IN WASHINGTONDEAR WONDERING: You have raised an inter-esting subject. There is a difference between living together and being mar-ried because of our le-gal system. Because peo-ple who co-habit without benet of marriage are considered individuals in the eyes of the law, it is probably prudent to keep their nancial affairs sep-arate. However, each per-son should contribute to the expenses they share. In a marriage, the situ-ation is different: The law assumes that the man and wife are one unit. This is the mindset you adopted when you and your wife were married. There is a tendency among young couples, not only because of the high divorce rate, but also what they have been ex-posed to in the media from the time they were born, to view marriage as something that might not last. There is also a sense of entitlement among many NOT ALL that makes them centered on themselves. We have be-come a society in which disposability has spread from material posses-sions to relationships. I would LOVE to hear what my readers par-ticularly my younger readers views are re-garding this. Click on the link Write to Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or write to P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Dear Abby is written by Abi-gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found-ed by her mother, Pauline Phil-lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.State of modern marriage mirrors disposable society DEAR A BB YJeanne Phillips JESSICA HERNDONAP Film WriterA vivid and delightful animat-ed spectacle, Rio 2 is chock-full of colorful 3-D wonder and jubilant musical numbers set against a tale of family dynamics and environ-mental dilemmas. The sequel opens with a vibrant New Years Eve bash, as partying in the music-lled streets of Rio de Ja-neiro is punctuated by reworks bursting above the Christ the Re-deemer statue. Supervised by composer John Powell, more emphasis has been placed on the music of this lm, which benets from numbers by art-ists like Bruno Mars (who also voic-es the smooth bird Roberto in the lm), Janelle Monae and celebrated Brazilian musician Carlinhos Brown. After mating in Brazil in 2011s Rio, rare macaws Blu (Jesse Eisen-berg) and Jewel (Anne Hathaway) now have three lively kids who have become accustomed to the same domestication Blu was brought up on in Minnesota. Theyre attached to gadgets like iP-ods and eat pancakes for breakfast, which irks the raised-in-the-wild Jewel. But the family heads off to the Amazon rainforest, to Jewels delight and Blus strife, when they get wind that a tribe of blue macaws may live there and are being pursued by Blus past owner and animal lover, Lin-da (voiced by Leslie Mann), and her husband, Tulio (Rodrigo Santoro). With a few of the quirky support-ing characters from the rst lm in tow including birds voiced by George Lopez (as frisky toucan Ra-fael) and Jamie Foxx and will.i.am (as rapping canary-and-cardinal duo Nico and Pedro) they soar through a dazzling journey to the rainforest, making the often-wast-ed 3-D effect worth it as we take in the broad scope and graphically lay-ered air. Once there, Jewel discovers the large macaw crew is led by her longlost father (Andy Garcia), who is unimpressed with his daughters choice of a mate. He cant help but roll his eyes over Blus use of a GPS or a Swiss Army kit rather than the use of his own sharp beak. But their classic in-law banter is sublimely comical. Brazilian native writer-director Carlos Saldanha and Don Rhymer returned to pen the story. But they try too hard to make up for the mini-malist plot of the original and drown in subplots: Blu battles with Jew-el over staying in the wild versus re-turning to the city; Linda and Tulio clash with a few bad guys threaten-ing to cut down the rainforest (the lms eco push); and Blus old rival, Niguel (Jemaine Clement of Flight of the Conchords), pops up with a beautiful yet poisonous neon pink and purple frog (an angelic and cutesy Kristin Chenoweth) plotting revenge. Phew! And then there are the moments when characters break out into song. Niguels hotshot rendition of Gloria Gaynors I Will Survive seems a little ill-set when he really should be crooning a sinister track a la Ursulas Poor Unfortunate Souls in The Little Mermaid. The sweet voice of Hathaway shines with her solo lullaby. But its Chenoweths Broadway-like deliv-ery that trumps all when she belts out an anthem on forbidden love. Though the original songs here are whimsical and fun, few are irresist-ible. With so much going on, its a won-der this kids movie is only ve min-utes longer than the original. But for the music and brilliantly pictur-esque look, its worth the 3-D ticket. Rio 2, a 20th Century Fox release, is rated G by the Motion Picture As-sociation of America. Running time: 101 minutes. Three stars out of four. Rio 2 dazzling but overloaded MOVIE REVIEW CRITI C S RATING: 20th Century FoxNico, Pedro, Jewel, Rafael from 20th Century Foxs Rio 2.

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 11, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B3 CARPET MART, INC HEALT H Y LIVING TOM MURPHYAP Business WriterIt has long been gos-pel among retailers that tobacco pulls so much business into stores, with smokers also picking up water, gum or a bag of chips, that dumping it would be a sales killer. However, with pres-sure from anti-smoking forces growing, tobac-co use waning and now a national drugstore chain jettisoning cigarettes for good, is this calculus starting to crack? Its probably too early to say, but major retailers will be paying close atten-tion to the sales numbers after CVS Caremark pulls tobacco from its shelves by October. If the old retail rules governing tobacco have not changed outright, they are at least coming up for review. Since the nations sec-ond-largest drugstore chain announced it would dump tobacco just over two months ago, its shares have hit new alltime highs 10 times. Thats not to say that the CVS case is unique. CVS Caremark Corp. is part of a booming indus-try. In that same stretch since early February, shares of rivals Walgreen Co. and Rite Aid Corp. have surged as well. And most of last years $126 billion in revenue at CVS came from its phar-macy benets manage-ment business. That sets it apart because it doesnt depend so much, like oth-er drugstores, on tobac-co to draw customers through the door. But when CVS Care-mark Corp. announced it was going cold turkey, it caught almost everyone by surprise. The retailer will be giv-ing up $2 billion in annu-al revenue a year, it esti-mates. About a half billion of that would come from non-tobacco products, the additional items that smokers pick up when they come in to buy smokes. The response from Wall Street? Something between a yawn and a shrug. CVS stock is up about 11 percent since the announcement. Thats quite a run for a compa-ny that just announced it was giving up $2 bil-lion in revenue annual-ly, and during a period in which all major U.S. in-dexes have been under pressure. Yet while CVS is not the rst major retailer to give up tobacco, most indus-try analysts do not see the ood gates opening. Target Corp. gave up tobacco in 1996, citing a commitment to the health and well-being of our communities, and no one followed it through the anti-tobacco exit door. Each retailer has to weigh the bottom line against the message, but that has been going on for some time now, said Craig R. Johnson, president of retail consultant Custom-er Growth Partners. This isnt just a bolt out of the blue, Johnson said. Theyve done the plus-ses and minuses, and they havent decided to do it. Some have chosen the opposite path. Discount-ers like Family Dollar have actually started sell-ing tobacco in the past few years. Just last month Wal-green CEO Greg Wasson, when asked by an indus-try analyst if tobacco had become a long-term li-ability given the CVS de-cision, signaled that the nations largest drugstore would not be following suit. Instead, the CEO said that Walgreen, which still sells tobacco, will focus on helping people quit. Yet there are at least two forces adding weight to the no-tobacco side of the scale: one internal, one external. Internally, the cigarette business has become tougher in the face of tax hikes, smoking bans, health concerns and so-cial stigma. Plus, the number of U.S. adults who smoke dropped below 20 percent between 2005 and 2012, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The drugstores and ma-jor retailers angling to grab a bigger slice of the health care spending pie as the American popula-tion ages are looking at margins as well. Cigarettes probably generate a prot margin of 3 percent to 7 percent. Generic drugs, in con-trast, can fetch margins of 20 percent or more, said Burt P. Flickinger III, man-aging director of the re-tail and consumer brands consultant Strategic Re-source Group. The question of wheth-er retailers and drugstores can sell both health and tobacco raises the issue of those external forces that have been building for some time. The presence of tobacco behind checkout counters creates an image problem for an industry that says it puts a priority on helping provide healthier lifestyle options for customers.Quitting for goodCVS goes cold turkey; may pressure rivals, or not MCTCVS announced in February that it would pull all tobacco products off its shelves by October. Free Diabetes Management class setSEBRING The Florida Department of Health in Highlands County is offer-ing Diabetes SelfManagement Education classes as part of its Wellness and Diabetes Education Program. This program serves Highlands County res-idents of all ages, es-pecially those with diabetes or at risk for de-veloping diabetes. Education is the key to success for diabe-tes control and for the prevention of compli-cations. These classes are free of charge and provided by Margaret Pierce, RN and Aleyda Oliveros, Nutritionist. Classes in English are scheduled in Sebring from 8:30-11:30 a.m. May 5-7, and from 5:308:30 p.m. May 19-21 at the Florida Department of Health in Highlands County, 7205 S. George Blvd. in Sebring Conference Room A. Enrollment is limit-ed and registration is required. To register and for more information, contact the Florida Department of Health in Highlands County Wellness and Diabetes Education Program at 382-7294.Outreach programs setAce Homecare has a number of community outreach programs set for next week: Monday 9 a.m., Rest Haven Assisted Living Facility (Zolfo Springs), Music and Motion; 10:30 a.m., Chatham Point Apartments (Wauchula), health fair. Tuesday 7:30 a.m., Lake Josephine RV Park (Sebring), health fair. Wednesday 10 a.m., Faith Pentecostal House of God (Avon Park), health fair; 1:30 p.m., Crown Point Assisted Living Facility (Sebring), gaming. Thursday 10 a.m., Balmoral Assisted Living and Memory Care (Lake Placid), Music and Motion. Friday 8:30 a.m., Covered Bridge Community (Lake Placid), health fair. All programs are free of charge and are open to the public. For more information, call Ace Homecare at 385-7058. SNAP S HOT S LOC A L HE A LTH The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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B4 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com HEALT H Y LIVING The NewspaperAll Around Your World In the Classroomcurrent events vocabulary geography At the Officebusiness news networking Over Coffeegarage sales local advertising community Family Timetravel recreation family events Sunday Morningcomics games puzzles Onlinelocal events email highlights 24-hour updates Support your local newspaper and the continued tradition of quality journalism by renewing your subscription today,and well continue to deliver. Thanks,readers! Rain,Sleet,Hail,Heat,Potholes,Flat Tires...Nothing stops them from making their deliveries!www.newssun.comWe celebrate how the newspaper has evolved to meet our changing needs without sacrificing the quality coverage youve come to expect. Day after day, anywhere you go,the newspaper delivers. Whether in print or online,it brings us the latest headlines from across town and around the world,local events,lots of laughs, touching stories,money-saving offers and so much more. Call 863-385-6155 for home delivery! Dear Pharmacist: I have chronic pain and take ibu-profen daily plus hydro-codone and celecoxib. Im willing to do anything right now that could help. The craziest thing is that nothing happened to me, I just developed pain over the years, no accidents, no trauma. Can you help me? D.W., Boca RatonAnswer: Pain is a symp-tom not a disease itself. Its your clue that some-thing is out of balance in your system. With-out knowing more de-tails its hard to hit the nail on the head so I will give you (and other readers who are suffering in pain) some general information. My goal today is to teach you about two different pain chemicals that your body releases in response to something. What that something is could be different for everyone. Sometimes pain is trig-gered by foods like glu-ten or nightshade vegeta-bles, sometimes it is from a nutrient deciency (like magnesium or CoQ10), and sometimes it is from poor elimination. If you are constipated and toxins back up in your gut, or in your blood, then this triggers a physiologi-cal response in your body that causes cells to release pain-causing chemicals called cytokines. Two cytokines implicat-ed in pain include the leu-kotrienes and the prosta-glandins. Those are such big names for little sub-stances but too much of these will make you hurt. Your goal as a pain suf-ferer is to reduce levels of those. First up leukotrienes! These are a subclass of eicosanoids pro-nounced I-koss-anoids, which when you say that out loud, the last syllable sounds like the word an-noyed and thats exact-ly what they do. They are very annoying and irritat-ing! Leukotrienes spark pro-duction of other com-pounds involved in aller-gies, food sensitivities, autoimmune disorders and anaphylactic reac-tions. Leukotrienes tend to increase if you eat food coloring, like yellow dye No. 5, tartrazine, and oth-er articial substances. If you have pain, then non-steroidal anti-inam-matory drugs (referred to as NSAIDs), such as ibu-profen or naproxen (Ad-vil, and Aleve respective-ly) can help you. These are sold over the counter at pharmacies nationwide. The prescription drug Ce-lebrex (celecoxib) can also help. Interestingly, research-ers have found that some natural compounds like boswelia and querce-tin can reduce those an-noying eicosanoids. Since about 2001, the medical literature has shown that dark chocolate can reduce eiconanoids, too. Other natural rescue remedies include omega 3 fatty ac-ids, ax seed, perilla seed oil, curcumin and glycyr-rhiza. The prescription medi-cations Accolate and Sin-gulair may help too, espe-cially if your problems are primarily allergies. Next up prostaglandins. Excessive amounts of this cytokine occur with ar-thritis, heavy menstrual cycles, premenstrual syn-drome, migraines, multi-ple sclerosis, chronic lyme disease, as well as colon and breast cancer. What substances re-duce prostaglandins? Fish oils, white willow bark (sa-lix alba), ecklonia cava (a brown algae), meadow-sweet (dont take if youre allergic to salicylates like aspirin), turmeric, skull-cap, ginger root and pas-sionower. Medications to consider include aspirin, celecoxib, and the NSAID class including ibuprofen and naproxen. Ask your doctor if any of these are right for you.Suzy Cohen is a registered phar-macist and the author of The 24Hour Pharmacist and Real Solu-tions. For more information, visit www. suzycohen. com. This infor-mation is not intended to treat, di-agnose or cure your condition. A dozen ways to reduce chronic painFirst step is to figure out what is causing you to hurt DEAR PHARMACISTSuzy Cohen Associated PressBOSTON Gov. De-val Patrick defend-ed the states rst-inthe-nation ban of the powerful new painkill-er Zohydro after a fed-eral judge suggested in court that his adminis-tration may have over-reached. I wouldnt have done it if I didnt think I had a legal footing to do it, Patrick said at an unre-lated event at the State-house. More to the point, I wouldnt have done it if I didnt think we had a real emergency, and we have a real emergency. Patrick issued an ex-ecutive order banning local doctors from pre-scribing or dispensing Zohydro on March 27, amid concerns that the drugs availability might exacerbate the states prescription drug abuse epidemic. But Zogenix, the San Diego-based maker of the drug, led a federal lawsuit on Monday ar-guing that the ban was unconstitutional be-cause the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has already approved its use for treatment of severe and chronic pain.Painkiller ban raises constitutional questions WASHINGTON (AP) Medicare paid a tiny group of doctors $3 million or more apiece in 2012. One got nearly $21 million. Those are among the ndings of an Associated Press analysis of physician data released Wednesday by the Obama administra-tion, part of a move to open the books on health care -nancing. Topping Medicares list was Florida ophthalmol-ogist Salomon Melgen, whose relationship with Sen. Robert Menendez, DN.J., made headlines last year after news broke that the lawmaker used the doc-tors personal jet for trips to the Dominican Republic. Medicare paid Melgen $20.8 million. His law-yer said the doctors billing conformed with Medicare rules and is a reection of high drug costs. APs analysis found that a small sliver of the more than 825,000 individu-al physicians in Medicares claims data base just 344 physicians took in top dollar, at least $3 million apiece for a total of nearly $1.5 billion. AP picked the $3 mil-lion threshold because that was the gure used by the Health and Human Servic-es inspector general in an audit last year that recom-mended Medicare auto-matically scrutinize total billings above a set level. About 1 in 4 of the toppaid doctors (87) practice in Florida. Rounding out the top ve states were Cal-ifornia with 38 doctors in the top group, New Jersey with 27, Texas with 23, and New York with 18.Medicare database reveals top-paid doctors

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 11, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B5 Highlands Social Center Highlands Social Center Saturday, April 5th at 6:00-9:00pm Don West and Silver Eagle Band Classic Country Music L I V E BYOB Admission $ 5 RELIGION Atonement Lutheran ChurchSEBRING Services on Palm Sunday begin at 9:30 a.m. with the procession of palms. Maundy Thursday service with stripping of the altar is at 7 p.m. Good Friday service is Stations of the Cross at 7 p.m. Jesus the Sovereign King Missionary Church joins the church Sunday afternoons and Sunday evenings. The church is at 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive. Call 385-0797.Avon Park Christian Church Avon ParkAVON PARK Pastor Greg Ratliff will bring a message in this years Easter series. Then on Sunday evening the church will host a traditional Hymn Sing. Easter Sunday will be re ection and rejoicing on the death and the resurrection of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ! There will not be any services the evening of April 20 (Easter). Avon Park Christian Church is at 1016 W. Camphor St. (behind Wells Fargo Bank). Call 453-5334 or email accountapcc.2014@yahoo. com.. The church website is www.avonparkchristianchurch.com/.Christ Lutheran Church LCMSSEBRING Pastor Scott McLean will preach a sermon titled Having the Mind-set of Christ. April 17 Maundy Thursday celebration at 7 pm. April 18 Good Friday service at 7 pm. The church is at 1320 County Road 64, east of the Avon Park High School past the four-way stop sign. For more information call 471-2663 or search online at christlutheranavonpark.org.Christian Training ChurchSEBRING Rev. Linda M. Downing will bring the message titled Greater Vision: Part 2 at the Sunday morning service. The Wednesday night Bible study is the Gospel of John.Church of Buttonwood BaySEBRING For Palm Sunday, Pastor Cecil Hess is preaching on After Hosanna, What Comes Next? Special music will be by the choir and the mens quartet. Holy Week services include Maundy Thursday Communion at 7 p.m., and Good Friday worship at noon, both led by Hess. The church is on U.S. 27, four miles south of Highlands Regional Medical Center. Call 3821737 for information.Church of the BrethrenSEBRING On Sunday, Pastor David Smalley will preach from Luke 19:2840. The title of his sermon will be Transformation Rolling Downhill. The theme for Sunday school will be Creating a New Covenant, with scripture from Jeremiah 29:1-14, 31:31-34. For information, call 385-1597.Faith Lutheran ChurchSEBRING Sunday, the church will celebrate Palm Sunday / Sunday of the Passion Guest Pastor Tony Douches will deliver his sermon at Faith Lutheran based on the readings of the day. Holy Week begins on Sunday. Maunday Thursday service will be at 6:30 pm. Holy Thursday, occurring on the eve of the Lords cruci xion, begins the celebration of the holy three days of Christs Passover, commonly known as the Triduum. The Service for Holy Thursday consists of four parts: the Service of Corporate Confession and Absolution, Service of the Word, the Service of Sacrament, and the Stripping of the Altar. Good Fridays service will be at 6:30 p.m. Good Friday is part of the sacred Triduum, the threeday observance of Christs Passion. Good Friday is not observed as a funeral for Christ. It is a day for repentance over sin and restrained joy and praise for the redemption Christ accomplished for us on the cross. The service of Tenebrae (meaning darkness) consists of extinguishing of the church lights.Emmanuel United Church of ChristSEBRING Rev. George Miller will deliver the sermon, Quarters for Christ, from Matthew 21:1-11. The church is 1.7 miles west of U.S. 27 on County Road 634 (Hammock Road). Call 471-1999 or visit sebringemmanuelucc.com.First Baptist Church Avon ParkAVON PARK The Easter Cantata is at 10:45 a.m. Sunday. The church is at 100 N. Lake Ave. For more information call 453-6681 or email info@fbcap.netFirst Baptist Church of Lake JosephineSEBRING First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine extends a special invitation to this Sunday services. This Sunday the topic is Nick at Nite, a drama presentation of Nicodemus by Pastor Kevin Ahrens. Sunday evening the sermon will be Gifted to Go. The church is at 111 Lake Josephine Drive (halfway between Lake Placid and Sebring). Call 655-1524 with any questions.First Baptist Church of Placid LakesLAKE PLACID First Baptist Church of Placid Lakes is hosting a community-wide Easter egg hunt from 2-4 p.m. Saturday. There will be lots of prizes and candy for everyone in addition to the egg hunt. Everyone is invited to come meet the Easter bunny and Cookie from Sweet Frog. Sunday worship service, the adult choir will present the Easter cantata, It Is Finished, under the direction of Aristides Salgueiro, minister of music. The church is at the corner of Washington and Kemper Avenues.First Christian Church of Sebring Disciples of ChristSEBRING Sundays message is from Mark 11: 1-9, Jesus Rides Into Jerusalem, by Pastor Ron Norton. Greeting the congregation will be Terry Ducar. Elders are Lynne Warman and Howard Lewis. Deacons and servers are Carol Graves, Richard Neff, Barbara Slinkard and Terry Ducar.First Presbyterian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK On Sunday, Pastor Bob Johnsons sermon is titled Knowing and Doing based on James 1:21-25. The choirs introit will be I Come to the Cross and the anthem Seek the Lord. The adult Sunday School class is using the denominational quarterly featuring lessons from the book of Matthew. Sundays lesson is titled Hosanna to the Son of God based on Matthew 21:1-17. On Wednesday, Bible study will see Pastor Johnson teaching from the book Spiritual Warfare. On Friday, April 18 Greg Savaitt from Chosen Peoples Ministry will speak on Christ in the Passover beginning at 5:30 p.m. At 6:15 p.m., an abbreviated Passover meal will be served. Tickets are $5. The church is at 215 E. Circle St. (with two entrances on Lagrand Street). Call the church at 453-3242 or check out the website at avonparkapchurch.com or the Avon Park Chamber website.First Presbyterian ChurchSEBRING Rev. Darrell A. Peer will preach Praise Him! on Sunday. Maundy Thursday Communion Service is at 7 p.m. in the sanctuary. Good Friday Commnity Service is at noon at St. Catherines Catholic Church. The church is at 319 Poinsettia Ave. Call 385-0107 for information.First United Methodist Church of SebringSEBRING On this Palm Sunday, Pastor John Bryant will bring the message with the adult vocal ensemble providing the anthem. Jubilee Ringers rehearse at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. Maundy Thursday services will be held at 7 p.m. in the sanctuary. Listen Live on WITSAM 1340 each Sunday to hear the 10:50 am Worship Service. The church is downtown at 126 S. Pine St. Call the church ofce for information at 385-5184.Grace Pointe MinistriesSEBRING Grace Pointe Ministries meets at Sebring Hills Clubhouse, one block behind Aspen Dental. The pastors Palm Sunday service sermon is The Palms and The King. Call the church of ce at 658-2534 for location and details of Tuesday home Bible study. Friday night Bible study is at 10:30 p.m. to include the California church. Anyone interested in joining this service, call the church of ce for details.Heartland Christian ChurchSEBRING Pastor Ted Moores sermon this week will be Clearing the Bench with scripture from Matthew 21:12-17. The service will include Heartland singers singing Hosanna and The Blood Will Never Lose Its Power, Young Heartland singers, and Ralph Sylvester playing Holy City on the trombone. The church is at 2705 Alternate Route 17 South (behind Publix). Call 314-9693.Memorial United Methodist ChurchSEBRING Pastor Tim Haas will preach Sunday on the subject of Carrying The Cross with the Scripture lesson from Matthew 27:32-44. The church is at 500 Kent Ave., east of the Tower. For information, phone 465-2422.New Beginnings ChurchSEBRING On Sunday, Pastor Gary Kindles sermon is titled The Triumphal Entry based on John12:12-29. The churchs present location is The Morris Chapel, 3 07 S. Commerce Ave. For more information, call 835-2405.New Life Evangelical Lutheran ChurchSEBRING Pastor Luke John Willitz will preach Sunday from Philippians 2:5-11 on Jesus Christ is Lord. The Maundy Thursday service will be Glory Hidden in the Saviors Feast from Matthew 26:26-30 and the Good Friday service will be Glory Hidden in the Saviors Promises from John 19:31-37. The church is at 3725 Hammock Road.Parkway Free Will Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Sunday morning Bible lesson, The Sur ng of the King, is taken from Jeremiah 23, Zechariah 6 and John 19. Pastor Jim Scaggs will bring the message. Easter Sunrise Service will be at 6:30 a.m. on April 20. Regular worship services will follow the remainder of the day. The church is at 3413 Sebring Parkway. Call 3823552 for information. St. John United Methodist ChurchSEBRING On Sunday, Pastor Ronald De Genaro Jr.s sermon topic will be The Coming King. Biblical reference is from Luke 19:28-38. Thursday, Maundy Service is at 7 p.m.Spring Lake United Methodist ChurchSEBRING Spring Lake United Methodist Churchis at 8170 Cozumel Lane. The pastors sermon is As He Rode, He Wept! SNAPSHOTS CHURCH SERVICES The Associated PressFormer college football broadcaster Craig James has joined the conservative Family Research Council, where he said he would ght against the kind of religious bigotry he blames for his ring by Fox Sports after expressing opposition to gay marriage. James, who will serve as an assistant to council President Tony Perkins, was a longtime color commentator for ESPN who quit to run for U.S. Senate two years ago in Texas, where he grew up and starred at SMU. He lost in the primary. During a campaign debate, James said he opposed gay marriage and that gay people would one day have to answer to the Lord for their actions. Fox Sports let him go, saying he was a polarizing gure who had abused a previous on-air position to further a personal agenda. James has led a complaint with the Texas Workforce Commission accusing Fox of violating his religious freedom. Craig has experienced the very workplace disquali cation that cultural elites are seeking to impose throughout the country: expressing a politically incorrect opinion on a cultural issue, totally unconnected to employment, is enough to get you red, Perkins said. Former football announcer Craig James joins Family Research Council

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B6 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com PLACES TO WORSHI PPlaces to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sun that is published Friday and Sunday. To place a listing in this directory, call the News-Sun at 3856155, ext. 596.ANGLIC ANNew Life Anglican Fellowship, 10 N. Main Ave. (Womans Club), Lake Placid, FL 33852. Rev. Susan Rhodes, Deacon in Charge, (863) 243-3191; strhodes1020@yahoo.com. Sun-day Worship, 10 a.m. Teaching, Holy Commu-nion, Music, Fellowship, Healing Prayer. Pas-toral and Spiritual.ASSEMBL Y OF G ODChrist Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Await-ing His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morn-ing Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 471-0924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Eve-ning Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431.BAPT I STA von Park Lakes Baptist Church, 22600 N. Highlands Blvd., Avon Park, FL 33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ cen-tered and biblically based. Sunday wor-ship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C17A (truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., and evening worship service is at 6 p.m. On Wednes-days, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20s+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.betha-nybaptistap.com or call the church ofce at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Wor-ship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Max-well St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Wor-ship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Ser-vice, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Tele-phone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: ofce@apfellowship.org; Web site, www.ap-fellowship.org. First Baptist Church of A von Park, N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 453-6681. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Rev. Johnattan Soltero, His-panic pastor; Joy Loomis, director of music. Sunday Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Wor-ship, 10:45 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:45 a.m.; Youth Choir, 4:30 p.m.; Evening Wor-ship, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for both ser-vices. Wednesday Wednesday Night Sup-per, 5:15 p.m.; Childrens Choir, 5:45 p.m.; Youth Activities, 6 p.m.; Prayer Meeting/Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Worship Choir Practice, 6 p.m.; Mission Programs for Children, 6:45 p.m. Hispanic Services: Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., worship service at 11 a.m. Wednes-day Bible study at 7 p.m. To watch services online, go to the website at www.fbcap.net. In the heart of Avon Park, for the hearts of Avon Park. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both ser-vices with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meet-ing at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all chil-dren. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm St., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Website: www.fbclp. com. Email: information@fbclp.com. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contem-porary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Wednesday Activities: Fam-ily dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reserva-tions required). Prayer meeting, Youth Inter-sections, and MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. The church is at 119 E. Royal Palm St., Lake Placid. For information, call 465-3721 or go to www.fbclp.com. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School be-gins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday wor-ship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., fol-lowed by adult choir rehearsal. From Septem-ber the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the minis-tries offered, call 655-1878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Rev. Matthew D. Crawford, se-nior pastor; Rev. Nuno Norberto, associ-ate pastor, minister of music and senior adults; and Dixie Kreulen, preschool direc-tor. Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.; Blend-ed Service, 10:30 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Call 385-4704. Website www.fbsebring.com Florida A venue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Gird-ley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sun-day Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children and youth at 6 p.m. and for adults at 6:30 p.m. Independent Baptist Church, 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday wor-ship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church, 808 Gar-denia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Wor-ship service at 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Eve-ning Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 6 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morn-ing Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870. Wel-come to the church where the Son al-ways shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 2143025. Afliated with the National Associa-tion of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Evangelist Roger Jaudon. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For infor-mation, call 382-0869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Awana kin-dergarten through fth grade, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for under age 3 is avail-able at all services. Provisions for handi-capped and hard-of-hearing. Ofce phone, 385-0752. Spring Lake Baptist Church, Where the Bible is Always Open. Pastor Richard Schermerhorn, 7408 Valencia Road; 6552610. Assistant Pastor Ronald Smith, 3861610. On U.S. 98 at the Spring Lake Vil-lage II entrance. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. for all ages; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednes-day Mid-week Bible Study and Prayer Ser-vice, 6:30 p.m. Nursery available for all services. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695.C ATHOLICOur Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 E. Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vig-il Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English. Sunday Life Teen Mass at 6 p.m. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. English confession at 3:30 p.m. Saturday; Spanish confession at 6:30 p.m. Religious Education Classes (September to May) are 9-10:20 a.m. Sun-day for grades K through 5th. Grades 6th through Youth Bible Study are from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hick-ory St., Sebring. Parrish ofce/mailing ad-dress: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 3850049, 385-6762 (Spanish); fax, 385-5169; email, ofce@stcathe.com; website, www. stcathe.com. School Ofce/Mailing, Princi-pal Dr. Anna V. Adam, 747 S. Franklin St., Se-bring, FL 33870; 385-7300; fax, 385-7310; email school@stcathe.com. School ofce hours 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday-Fri-day. Clergy: Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F., fr-jose@stcathe.com or 385-0049; Parochial Vicar, Rev. Victor Caviedes, 385-3993; Assist-ing Priest (retired), Rev. J. Peter Sheehan; De-cons, Rev. Mr. James R. McGarry and Rev. Mr. Max M. Severe. WEEKEND MASS SCHED-ULE: Saturday: 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 and 10 a.m., 12 p.m. (Spanish), 5 p.m. (Holy Fam-ily Youth Center), every third Sunday of the month at 2 p.m. (French Mass). Daily Mass: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m. Sacrament of Reconcilliation: 7:157:45 a.m. rst Friday, 2:30-3:15 p.m. Satur-day and 9-9:45 a.m. Sunday. Ofce Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placid-view Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Sun-day 8 a..m. and 10 a.m. year round. Sat-urday Vigil 4 p.m. Weekdays 9 a.m. Holy days 9:30 a.m. (Vigil evening before at 7 p.m.) First Saturday of each month: Healing Mass, 9 a.m.C HR IST I A NCornerstone Christian Church, (Sax-on Hall) 1003 W. Pine St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Love Christ Love People. Jon Carter, Music Minister. Sunday, 9 a.m. Bible Study; 10 a.m. Worship; Communion avail-able each week. Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellow-ship Group. For more information call 4537679. Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Ham-mock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher. Kristy Marvin, Child-rens Director. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets at 1 p.m. Thursdays. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-0358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.C HR IST I A N & MISS IO N ARY A LLI A NC EThe Alliance Church of Sebring, 451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL 33875. Call 3821343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednes-day Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m.C HUR C H OF BRETHRE NChurch of the Brethren, 700 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m. Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-1597.CHUR CH OF CHR I STA von Park Church of Christ, 200 S. For-est Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Minister: Don Smith. Sunday Worship Services, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available at every service. Bible Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered class-es for all ages. Church phone: 453-4692. Heartland church of Christ, Lakeshore Mall Suite 42 (outside entrance), 901 U.S. Highway 27 N, Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday worship, 9 a.m. to noon; Wednesday, Bible study, 7 p.m. Evangelist Carl Ford, (863) 4022159. Lake Placid Church of Christ, 1069 Hwy 27 North, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Mailing address is P.O. Box 1440, Lake Placid, FL 33862. Sunday morning worship is at 10 a.m. Sunday evening worship is 6 p.m. Bi-ble class 9 a.m. Sundays and Wednesday evenings at 7 p.m. All are invited to join us. For more information, call the church at 863465-4636 or visit the website www.thelord-sway.com/lakeplacidcofc/. Sebring Parkway Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870; 3857443. Minister: Kevin Patterson. Times of ser-vice are: Sunday Bible Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening Ser-vice, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Bible Class, 7 p.m. C HUR C H OF GODChurch on the Ridge, Church of God, Anderson, Ind.; 1130 State Road 17 North, Sebring, FL 33870. Worship Service Sun-day, 10 a.m.; Bible Study and Prayer, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Pastor Dr. Collet Varner, (863) 382-0773.C HUR C H OF N AZARE N EFirst Church of the Nazarene of A von Park P.O. Box 1118., Avon Park, FL 338251118. 707 W. Main St. Sunday: Sunday school begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning worship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening service at 6 p.m. Wednesday evening service is at 7 p.m. with special services for children and adults. If you need any more information, call 453-4851. Church of the Nazarene of Lake Plac-id, 512 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852. Adult Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednes-day evening: All church meal, 6 p.m.; Chris-tian Life Study, 6:45 p.m. Winter Life groups pending. Call 446-1339. Pastor Tim Taylor.C HUR C HES OF C HR I ST IN C HR IST I A N U NIO N Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christian Union, (Orange Blos-som Conference Center) 1400 C-17A North (truck route), Avon Park. Presenting Jesus Christ as the answer for time and eterni-ty. Sunday morning worship service, 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided. Junior Church ac-tivities at same time for K-6 grade. Sun-day School Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m. (Transportation available.) Sunday eve-ning praise and worship service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and youth activities at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Everyone is welcome, please come worship with us. Tom Schwankweiler, Pastor. Phone 453-6052.EP I S C OPA LEpiscopal Church of the Redeemer A von Park, 910 W. Martin St., Avon Park, FL 33825 (U.S. 27 across from Wells Mo-tor Co.). Rev. Canon George Conger. Sun-day services: Holy Communion at 9:30 a.m.; Bible study Wednesday at 10 a.m. Everyone is welcome. Come and wor-ship with us; we would love to meet you. Church ofce, 453-5664; fax, 453-4853. Visit us at our website at redeemeravon-park.com. Email redeemer1895@aol. com. Call the thrift store for hours open and donation pick up at 664-9668 or 453-5664. St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Fa-ther Scott Walker. Sunday Services: Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucha-rist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek service on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bi-ble study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always welcome. Church ofce 385-7649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Epis-copal Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-0051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Nelson, Rector. Worship: Sunday, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday Bible study at 9:15 a.m. Sunday School at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Wor-ship 6 p.m. and Thursday 9 a.m. Holy Communion with Healing. Call the thrift store for hours open 699-0221.EVA NG E LIC A L FREE C HUR C H OF AMER IC AThe Church of the Way EFCA, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunda1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednes-days. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teach-ing of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way A place for you. Ofce Phone: 471-6140, Church Cell Phone: 273-3674. Email: thewaychurch@ hotmail.com. Web site: www.TheWayChurch.orgG RA C E BRETHRE NGrace Brethren Church, 3626 Thunder-bird Road, (863) 835-0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednes-day services at 7 p.m. We offer Kid City Childrens Ministry throughout all ser-vices, and there are variosu other class-es for teens, married couples, primetimers, and Bible studies in Spanish. Kid City Day Care, Preschool and AfterSchool Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For registration call: 385-3111). Check us out on the Web at www.sebringgrace.org.IN DEPE N DE N TFirst Christian Church, 1016 W. Cam-phor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.rstchristi-anap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church. Greg Ratliff, Se-nior Minister; Bible School 9 a.m.; Wor-ship 10 a.m.; Wednesday studies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events.IN TERDE N OM IN AT I O N A L World Harvest and Restoration Min-istries, (non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd.,(non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd., Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-3771. Sunday service: Sunday School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rog-ers.L UTHERANAtonement Lutheran Church (ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. Rev. Sharon Dorr and Deacon David Thoresen will be the Spiritual Leaders, alternating Sundays. Jim Helwig, organist. Worship service with the Holy Eucharist is at 9:30 a.m. every Sunday. Birthday Sunday is the rst Sunday of each month after the service. Council meeting is on the rst Tuesday of each month. WELCA meets at noon second Tuesday of the month with a light lunch. Labyrinth Prayer Garden is open to the public 24 hours a day, seven days a week. When in need of prayers or to talk to God, come to the Garden. Come and grow with us; we would love to meet you and your family. Dont worry about how you look. Jesus went to the temple in a robe and san-dals. Quilting classes every Monday at 6 p.m. Looking for quilters or people willing to learn. Call 840-3303. Christ Lutheran Church A von Park LCMS, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School past the four-way stop sign. Sunday Divine Wor-ship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with tradition-al Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come wor-ship and fellowship with us. For informa-tion call Pastor Scott McLean at (863) 471-2663 or see christlutheranavonpark. org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS,2740 Lakeview Dr, Sebring; Church phone: 3857848; Faith Child Development Center: 385-3232. Sunday Traditional Worship Ser-vice: 8 a.m.; Sunday Praise Worship Ser-vice: 10:30 a.m.; Communion served 1st, 3rd & 5th Sunday. Sunday School & Bible Classes: 9:15 a.m. Worship Svc. Broad-cast at 8 a.m. on WITS 1340AM each Sun-day. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies, Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. All are warm-ly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Luther-an Churches, 3240 Grand Prix Drive, Se-bring, FL 33872. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Bi-ble Study, 9 a.m. Nursery provided. So-cial activities: Choir, Missions, Evange-lism. Phone 385-2346. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangeli-cal Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Wor-ship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Luke Willitz at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www. newlifesebring.com. Resurrection Lutheran Church ELCA, 324 E. Main St., at Memorial Drive, Avon Park. Pastor Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Sun-day worship 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Sunday School at 9:15 a.m. Coffee and fellowship following 10:30 a.m. service. Wednesday Worship Service is at 7 p.m. Open Com-munion celebrated at all services. Gods Work, Our Hands. T rinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots PreSchool director Education Hour, 8:45 a.m.; Worship service, 10 a.m. Holy Com-munion each rst and third Sunday. Chil-drens Church scheduled during worship service, 4-year-olds through fth grade. Nursery provided during worship service for infants to 3-year-olds. Seasonal MidWeek Services each Wwednesday eve-ning during Advent and Lent. Call church ofce at 465-5253 or visit the website at www.Trinitylutheranlp.com. Other ac-tivities and groups include: Choir; Ladies Guild and LWML; Mens Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies; Trinity Tots Pre-school, and Youth Group.N O N -DE N OM IN AT I O N A LBible Fellowship Church, 3750 Ham-mock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed rst and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 yrs through 5th grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church of-ce 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An inde-pendent community church. Sunday morn-ing worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening service, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian T raining Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. A nursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Chris-tian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister, lindadown-ing@live.com. Casey L. Downing, associ-ate minister, caseydowning@hotmail.com. Church phone: 314-0482. Web site: www. ctmforme.com Crossroads of Life,148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852; Tel. 863655-9163. The place of your Divine ap-pointment. We expect our supernatural God to transform our lives through His power and grace. Come, learn of His plan and destiny for you. With His plan we re-ceive His provision along with His perfect timing and opportunity. What you have longed for, but have been missing, can now be received. The direction you have been thirsty for will suddenly quench your parched soul. Come to experience what you have been missing for so long empowerment in every area of life. We teach, train and send forth to win souls. You dont speak English no problema. We have a Spanish interpreter. We look forward to fellowship and worship with you at 7 p.m. every Wednesday. Pastoers Gil and Rosa Benton (Faith Never Fails). Faith & Familylife Worship Center, Pastors Leroy and JoAnn Taylor invite you to discover one of Sebrings hidden trea-sures at 2349 U.S. 27 South (Banyan Plaza off Sparta Road and Lake Jackson). We provide biblical solutions for every-day challenges through our multicultur-al worship services available on Sun-days at 11 a.m. and Wednesdays at 7 p.m. Child care is available for all who at-tend. For more information, all 385-1800. Plan your rst visit. Matthew 7:7 says, Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will nd; knock and the door will be opened to you. Our guests are very im-portant, so please let us know how we can meet your need by emailing theffwc@ gmail.com. Our mission at Faith & Fami-lylife is centered around Restoring Lives, Families and Communities. Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone, 382-1085. Dustin Woods, lead pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Monday, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry. www.GBCco-nnected.org Highlands Community Church, a ca-sual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. New Beginnings Church of Sebring, worshiping at The Morris Chapel, 307 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Pastor Gary Kindle. Bible study every Sunday, 9 a.m. Blended Church Service, 10:15 a.m. Phone (863) 835-2405. newbeginningschurchofsebring.com Be-gin your week with us. The Lords Sentinel Fellowship Church, 148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid (at Lake Placid Christian School), Pastor Juanita Folsom. Sunday morning service, 10:30 a.m.; Monday, Sentinel School of Theology, 7 p.m.; Church service, Tues-day, 7 p.m. More information at www. juanitafolsomministries.com. Union Church, 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday traditional worship service is at 7:45 a.m. (October through Easter) and 9 a.m. Contemporary Sunday worship service is at 10:45 a.m. Nursery and childrens church available. Wednesday night worship with Pastor Ti-ger Gullett and CrossTalk with Pastor Bill Breylinger at 6 p.m. Breakfast and lunch menus at Solid Grounds. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Ofce: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. Unity Life Enrichment Centre,new lo-cation, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.uni-tyofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Cel-ebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Book-store and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life En-richment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Cony-er, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. RELIGION

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 11, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B7 PRESBYTERIANCovenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. Pastor Tom Schneider. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Sunday morning worship: Traditional ser-vice, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday school, 9:15 a.m. Wednes-day evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Childrens/Youth Group, 5:30-7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato. net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Ofce hours: 8:3012:30 a.m. Monday-Friday.First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6 p.m. each Wednesday; Children Ministry and Youth Group, 6 p.m. each Sunday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. 385-0107. Email: faith@ strato.net, Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Fellowship Time, 10:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m. Tuesday: Youth Groups meet for devotions/Bible study, crafts, sport activities and dinner. Middle and high school, 3:306:30 p.m. Elementary School, 4-5:30 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m. Choir Rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. A nursery is available during worship. Call the church ofce for more information and other classes. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com, 117 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday Traditional Worship, 8 and 9:30 a.m.; Contemporary Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. Wednesday evenings: Adult small group Bible Study 7 p.m. (Nursery available), Youth Group (6-12th grades) 7 p.m., nursery and childrens ministry, 7 p.m. Family Biblical Counseling available by appointment. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September through June. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. rst Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 6550713; e-mail, springlakepc@embarqmail.com, Web site, http://slpc.embarqspace.com.SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTISTAvon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com, Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. A sale takes place the rst Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Frank Gonzalez. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALL ARE WELCOME. Associate Pastor is Ryan Amos. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Nathan Madrid.THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTSThe Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 3829092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-1p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: rst and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m.THE SALVATION ARMYThe Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www. salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODISTFirst United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., 105 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870. Pastor John A. Bryant. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church, 200 S. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759, Rev. Gary Pendrak, Pastor. Sunday School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Bible study every Wednesday at 6 p.m. Visit us at our church website: www.fumcap. org. Memorial United Methodist Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL, 33852. Rev. Tim Haas, pastor. Rev. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral assistant. Rev. Jerry McCauley, visitation pastor. Sunday worship services: Worship Service, 8:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m. We offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth programs, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship. We are a congregation that wants to know Christ and make Him known. Check out our church website at www.memorialumc.com or call the church ofce at 465-2422. Lakeview Christian School, VPK to Grade 5, 465-0313. St. John United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Adult Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all services. Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring. org Spring Lake United Methodist Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church ofce phone: 655-0040.UNITED CHURCH OF CHRISTEmmanuel United Church of Christ, Jesus didnt reject people, neither do we. Join us for worship every Sunday at 9:30 a.m. and youll be embraced by a compassionate congregation that is all-inclusive. Were at the corner of Hammock and Hope. Choir and Bell Choir practice on Wednesday; Bible studies throughout the week. 471-1999; sebringemmanuelucc.com.P LACES T O WO RS HI P RELIGION A well-known public speaker started off a sem-inar by holding up a $20 bill. In a room lled with 200 people, he asked, Who would like to have this $20 bill? Hands started going up all over the place. He then said, I am going to give this $20 to one of you present this evening, but rst, I am going to do something. He proceeded to wad the bill up into a little ball. He then asked, Who still wants this money? Hands ew into the air. Well, he replied, what if I do this? He dropped the $20 bill on the ground and started to grind it into the oor with his shoe. He picked up the money, which was now all crumpled and dirty. Now, who still wants it? The same hands went up all over the room. My friends, you have all learned a very valu-able lesson. No matter what I did to the mon-ey, you still wanted it, be-cause it did not decrease in value. It was always worth $20. Many times in our lives, we are dropped, crumpled, and ground into the dirt by the de-cisions we make and the circumstances that come our way. We feel as though we are worthless. However, no matter what has happened, is hap-pening, or will ever hap-pen to you, you will never lose your value in Gods eyes. To Him, dirty or clean, crumpled or ne-ly creased, you are still priceless in His eyes. In the rst century, Paul wrote the Christians in Rome about Gods great love for them, even though they had been crumpled and dirtied with sin. Romans 5:8-10 reads, But God demon-strates His own love to-ward us, in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. Much more then, having now been justied by His blood, we shall be saved from the wrath of God through Him. For if while we were enemies we were recon-ciled to God through the death of His Son, much more, having been recon-ciled, we shall be saved by His life. God values you no mat-ter what your circum-stances. In fact, you are so valuable to Him, that He gave His one and only Son to die on a cross to save you.Kevins Komments is written by Kevin Patterson and present-ed by Sebring Parkway church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Park-way. On the Internet visit at www. sebringcoc.com, or e-mail se-bringparkway@sebringcoc.com.You are still valuable! K EVIN S K OMMENTSKevin Patterson Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID Bill and Lin-da Lewis from Richmond, Va., will minister in music and song Sunday morning at Leisure Lakes Baptist Church of Lake Placid. Lewis will also be the fea-tured singer during the Holy Week celebration weekdays at noon at First Baptist Church of Lake Placid. The annual event is sponsored by the Lake Plac-id Christian Ministerial Associ-ation. Following the morning con-cert at Leisure Lakes, all are in-vited to stay for dinner on the grounds in the church fellow-ship hall. The church is at the western end of Lake June. From U.S. 27 take Lake June Road to Mill-er, turning north on Wildower. For further information contact the church ofce at 699-0671.Bill and Linda Lewis to sing Palm Sunday at Leisure Lakes Courtesy photoBill and Linda Lewis will minister in music at Leisure Lakes Baptist Church on Palm Sunday.We continue our exami-nation of reasons used to uphold infant baptism as authorized by the Word of God. Millions and mil-lions of people and hun-dreds of denominations subscribe to this prac-tice, therefore it is wor-thy of our attention. Is it based on traditions and doctrines of men or Scrip-ture? When Peter, by the pow-er of the Holy Spirit, pro-claimed to those believers to repent and be baptized (Acts 2:36-38), he then stated, For the promise is for you and your children, and for all who are afar off, as many as the Lord our God shall call to Him-self (Acts 2:39). So, therefore, the claim is that their children were to be baptized then! It is very obvious that chil-dren refers to present and future generations who hear and believe the gospel, repent of sins and are baptized will also re-ceive the promise of re-mission of sins and the gift of the Holy Spirit. If this teaches infants are to be baptized, it also teach-es that they must repent. But, repentance is pro-ceeded by knowledge, Or do you despise the riches of His goodness, forbear-ance, and longsuffer-ing, not knowing that the goodness of God leads you to repentance? (Ro-mans 2:4). Let the little children come to Me, and do not forbid them; for such is the kingdom of God. As-suredly, I say to you, who-ever does not receive the kingdom of God as a lit-tle child will by no means enter it (Luke 18:16,17). This statement of Jesus, also recorded in Matthew 19:14,15 and Mark 10:1316, has nothing to do with infant baptism. The con-text shows that Jesus was using the children as an example of humility and purity to the proud disci-ples. Another claimed justi-cation for infant baptism is the doctrine of Original Sin. Multitudes of de-nitions abound regarding this man made doctrine. Augustine, bishop of Hip-po (396-430 AD) stated, Nothing remain but to conclude that in the rst man all are understood to have sinned, because all were in him when he sinned; whereby sin is brought in with birth not removed save by the new birth it is manifest that in Adam all sinned, so to speak, en masse. By that sin we became a corrupt mass. As observed in the rst article, there is a differ-ence in the guilt of sin and consequences of sin. Nowhere does Inspira-tion declare that we suffer guilt of sin other than per-sonal sins. (Ezekiel 18:20) Therefore, what does an infant need to be saved from? The Apostolic Tradition of Hippolytus of Rome states, The children shall be baptized rst. All of the children who can answer for themselves, let them answer. If there are any children who cannot an-swer for themselves, let their parents answer for them, or someone else from their family. After this, the men will be bap-tized. Finally, the wom-en. Compare this manmade doctrine to Inspired instructions: Then Phil-ip opened his mouth, and beginning at this Scrip-ture, preached Jesus to Him. Now as they went down the road, they came to some water. And the eunuch said, See, here is water. What hinders me from being baptized? Then Philip said, If you believe with all your heart, you may. And he an-swered and said, I believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God (Acts 8:35-37 em-phasis added). Supporters of infant baptism claim that since the New Testament does not teach against it, therefore it must be approved. The reason there is no teaching against it is be-cause it was not an is-sue. Reading websites and books of denominations who practice infant bap-tism, it is very evident that the sources of authori-ty is not Gods Word, but church fathers, (i.e. Ire-naeus, Hippolytus, Ori-gen, Cyprian of Carthage, Augustine) and coun-cils of men. The Messiah warned, And in vain they worship Me, teaching as doctrines the command-ments of men (Matthew 15:9). Notice the reactions to this teaching, Then His disciples came and said to Him, Do You know that the Pharisees were offended when they heard this saying? (Matthew 15:12). First Corinthians 7:14, For the unbelieving hus-band is sanctied by the wife, and the unbeliev-ing wife is sanctied by the husband; otherwise your children would be unclean, but now they are holy, is suppose to sup-port infant baptism/sal-vation! The context is very simple: the marriage is recognized by God even if only one is a believer. If this is not so, then the children would be not pure/holy but rather un-clean, i.e. illegitimate. Where is infant baptism suggested here? Pauls prayer and peti-tion must be that of ev-ery gospel preacher, for me, that utterance may be given to me, that I may open my mouth boldly to make known the mystery of the gos-pel, for which I am an am-bassador in chains, that in it I may speak boldly, as I ought to speak (Ephe-sians 6:19,20). The faith-ful teacher of Truth will also heed the admonition to speak the truth in love. (Ephesians 4:15)Frank Parker can be contact-ed at frankparker27@gmail.com. Guest columns are the opin-ion of the writer, not necessari-ly those of the News-Sun staff.Comparative religion: infant baptism, part 2 GUEST C OLUMNFrank Parker

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B8 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com RELIGION First Baptist has Easter CantataAVON PARK The First Baptist Church of Avon Park will be have its an-nual Easter Cantata at 10:45 a.m. Sunday. Everyone is invited to share the morning in worship.Maranatha shares The Day He Wore My CrownSEBRING Maranatha Baptist Church in Sebring will present an Easter mu-sical drama at 7 p.m. Good Friday, April 18 and at 6 p.m. Easter Sunday, April 20. The Day He Wore My Crown, created by Russell Mauldin and Sue C. Smith, will involve both the choir and the drama team of the church. This presentation will bring to life the greatest story ever told! Jesus wore a crown of thorns and died on a rugged cross to pay the penalty for the sins of each one of us. Different characters will tell what this has meant in their lives between songs that tell the story of the suffering, crucixion, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. This musical is under the direction of Jan Burgess with Pat Seddon directing the drama. Accompanists are Judy Tinkham at the piano and Ann Truax at the organ. Character parts are played by Leon Moody, Bill Follett, Bruce Hendsbee, Hope Austin, Charles Welner, David Waite, Wayne Mattson and Jerry Carlson. Maranatha Baptist Church is just off Arbuckle Creek Road at 35 Maranatha Blvd. For more information call 382-4301 or 382-8594.Church plans garage saleAVON PARK The First United Methodist Church of Avon Park, 200 S. Lake Ave., will hold a garage clearance sale as well as a pre-Easter bake sale from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday the same day as a pan-cake breakfast from 8-10 a.m. The bake sale and the breakfast will be in Wesley Hall and the garage sale will be held outside in the pavilion, just south of the church.Sebring Christian plans egg huntSEBRING The Hallelujah Egg Hunt will be held at Sebring Christian Church at 11 a.m. on Sunday, April 20. There will be three dif-ferent age groups: 5 and younger, kindergarten through second grade and third through fth. The church is at 4514 Hammock Road.Church of Buttonwood Bay donates $7,000SEBRING The Church of Buttonwood Bay has announced gifts in the amount of $7,000 to local organizations to help meet the needs of coun-ty residents. Included are gifts of $1,000 each to Horses for the Handicapped, Meals on Wheels, New Testament Mission, Potter House and Nu-Hope Elder Care. In addition, the amount of $2,000 was presented to the local Rotary Club to sponsor the sending of two World War II veterans to Washington, D.C. next month. The church meets for worship in the recreation hall at Buttonwood Bay. Dr. Cecil D. Hess is pastor.St. Agnes plans Holy Week servicesSEBRING St. Agnes Episcopal Church invites the public to Holy Week services. Palm Sunday service is Sunday. Maunt Thursday service is at 7 p.m. Good Friday servic-es are at noon and 7 p.m. and the Easter Vigil is at 7 p.m. followed by the Agape Feast on Saturday, April 19. Easter Sunday starts with a sunrise service on the shore of Lake Jackson at 6:30 a.m., followed by an egg hunt at 9:15 a.m. and Rite II service at 10 a.m. Call the church of-ce, 385-7649, or check the churchs Facebook page for additional information.Family Easter Celebration planned at St. JohnSEBRING Children, moms, dads and grand-parents are invit-ed to join in a Family Easter Celebration at St. John United Methodist Church from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 19. Activities will include egg hunt, crafts, face painting, cake walk, cookie decorat-ing, popcorn, sno-cones plus the Easter Story. The church is at 3214 Grand Prix Drive, (behind the Sebring Walmart). For more information, call the church ofce at 382-1736.Memorial United Methodist plans egg huntLAKE PLACID Everyone is invit-ed to Memorial United Methodist Churchs an-nual Easter Egg Hunt Saturday, April 19, from 10 a.m. to noon. Rain or shine, there will be thou-sands of brightly colored eggs to nd and also a chance to nd the cher-ished golden egg and win big. You can also enjoy col-oring eggs with expert egg coloring artists. There will also be plen-ty of food and many other crafts. The church is at 500 Kent Ave., behind the Tower. Call 465-2422.Alive in the Spirit comes to Avon ParkAVON PARK A oneday convention titled Alive in the Spirit will be held at Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church. It is sponsored by the Venice Diocesan Council of Catholic Women. There will be great speakers, a Bishops Mass, entertainment and more. A continental breakfast and catered lunch will be served. Cost of the conven-tion is $35. Registrations will close for this event on Monday. Contact Cookie Perkins at (863) 993-0589 for more information and reservations. All ladies are welcome. SNAP S HOT S RELIGION NEWS BY BARR Y FOSTERNews-Sun CorrespondentAVON PARK This weekend will be Palm Sunday and in obser-vance of that, the Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church will stage a rare performance of The Shadow of the Cross. The program is a series of a half dozen vignettes of both Bible stories, and portrayals adapt-ed from an Easter season performance at the First Baptist Church of Hurst, Texas. My son, Mark Gar-ner, does a Palm Sunday performance each year at the church there and this was one of them, said Avon Park resident Jimmie Garner Butts. It has been adapted by the Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church. Billed as a multi-sen-sory experience, direc-tor Wendy Garcia said the presentation would be interactive with the audi-ence. Those who attend are going to be given a bag with a number of differ-ent symbolic items in-side, she explained. For instance, there will be a small rock for when the story of the accused adulteress is told and there also will be a spe-cial small tile given out that will be used later in the program. Eight different actors representing a myriad of characters will take part in the program. There will be portray-als of Jesus and Satan but also others, talk-ing about how Jesus im-pacted their lives and their reaction to it, Gar-cia said. It really is very powerful. Between the various scenes, there will be a musical presentation de-signed to reect each of the individual stories. There will be some so-los and the congregation will have an opportuni-ty to sing different praise songs as well. Although she has been a choir director in the past, Garcia said this was her initial attempt at di-recting a stage perfor-mance. This is my rst pro-gram with this type of acting in it and I am blessed with a very tal-ented group of people who are able to deliver their lines with feeling. It is just amazing, she said. Even during prac-tice I am seeing what an impact this will have on anyone who comes. Following the presen-tation there will be a short message by Pastor George Hall and Com-munion will be offered to those who wish to partic-ipate. The performance is scheduled to run about an hour and will be at 6 p.m. both Saturday and Sunday in the sanctu-ary of Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd. It is free and open to the public. This is an outreach program and we are hop-ing that there will be a lot of people who come that dont normally attend a church. I think they would get a lot from see-ing this, Garcia said.The Shadow of the Cross at AP Lakes Baptist GRIFFITH, Ind. (AP) What appears to be a tearstained cheek on a statue of Mary on the grounds of St. Mary Catholic Church is moving some people to tears as others caution against a rush to judg-ment. Among the skeptics is the church pastor, the Rev. Theodore Mens. There must be a natural explanation the cold, the melting of the snow, he said. Whenever we see something, we always look for a natural reason rst. The white statue, about 4 feet tall, depicts Mary, the mother of Jesus Christ. Surrounded by tulips wait-ing to bloom, it stands in what parishioners call the sunken garden along Broad Street and is the site of the annual May crown-ing. Mens said the statue has been there for at least as long as the 21 years he has been at St. Mary Church. Majdolin Haddad, re-ligious education secre-tary at St. Mary, said her daughter Reta, an aide in the fourth-grade Monday night class, told her about the tear. Students in the class had left the church after con-fession, paused at the stat-ue to pray and noticed a droplet of water clinging to the chin of Marys face, appearing to originate from the right eye. A photo snapped Tues-day morning shows the droplet intact. It was gone by early afternoon. Mens saw the photo but was reluctant to read any-thing into it. Everything we need to know for our salvation has been made known, Mens told The Times. Proven occurrences elsewhere in the world are signs of added grace from Mary, he said. The message of Our Lady throughout histo-ry wherever appearanc-es have been proven has always been the same, which is the scripture teaching of: repent, stop sinning, be baptized, be-lieve in the Gospel, he said. Mens said he is not nec-essarily a nonbeliever. Im not going to say anything against a possi-ble further sign of Gods love for us through Mary, he said. I just dont want to fall for anything. I am formed and shaped by the scriptures and the teach-ings of Jesus, not neces-sarily by a tear that some-body sees on a statue. If the statue brings peo-ple closer to God, thats wonderful, he said. Mens has no plans to further investigate the statue, and the Diocese of Gary has not issued a statement. The diocese has just found out about it and is not prepared to comment at this time, said Debbie Bosak, director of commu-nications for the Diocese of Gary. As word spread Tuesday, people visited the statue. Chicago resident Chris Kovich, who was in Grifth on business, theo-rized rain water may have followed the curve in the statues veil, dripping on its face. Kovich, who described himself as a lapsed Catho-lic, said it is premature to make assumptions about the appearance of tears. It is what it is, he said. Lupe Figueroa ran her hand along the cheek and jaw of the statue. A member of the Altar and Rosary Society at St. Mary Church, Figueroa had heard of the statues supposed tears Tuesday morning and stopped by. She visited again in ear-ly afternoon for another look. Grifth resident Jason Seitz heard from his moth-er about the statue. You can denitely see the dry teardrop, he said. Seitz said he was unde-cided. Im a realist, but Im also a believer and Chris-tian, he said. Mens doubts the statue will reach worldwide fame as other occurrences, such as Marian apparitions. I dont think this will become Lourdes or Fatima or anything, he said.Visitors flock to Indiana Catholic church to see statue with tear

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Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Ref No.PC 14-29 IN RE:ESTATE OF BERYL K.BERNHARDT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Beryl K.Bernhardt,deceased,whose date of death was December 6,2013,is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County,Florida, Probate Division,the address of which is 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,FL 33870.The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 11,2014. Personal Representative: Robert E.Bernhardt,Jr. 1415 22nd Avenue North St.Petersburg,FL 33704 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NUMBER:GC 13-535 HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. GERALDINE CAMERON,a single woman; if living including any unknown spouse of said Defendant,if remarried,and if deceased,the respective unknown hiers,devisees,grantees,assignees, creditors,lienors,and trustees,and all other pesons claiming by,through, under or against the named Defendant(s); ASSET ACCEPTANCE,LLC,a Delaware corporation; whether dissolved or presently existing,together with any grantees,assignees,successors, creditors,lienors,or trustees of said defendant(s) and all other persons claiming by,through,under,or against Defendant(s); and UNKNOWN TENANT #1, UNKNOWN TENANT #2, the names being fictitious to account for parties in possession; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final judgment of foreclosure entered in the abovetitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,I will sell the property situated in Highlands County,Florida, described as: The Property:a/k/a 124 Washington Blvd.,Lake Placid,FL 33852 Lot 13,Block 9,of HIGHLANDS PARK ESTATE SECTION 8,according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4,Page 68, Public Records of Highlands County,Florida. Parcel I.D.C-20-36-30-020-0090-0130 at public sale,to the highest and best bidder for cash,in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,in Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.on the 30th day of April,2014. SIGNED this 28th day of March,2014. (SEAL) ROBERT W.GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,(941) 534-4690,within two (2) working days of publication of this Notice of Sale; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call TDD (941) 534-7777 or Florida Relay Service (800) 955-8770. 10-4402-030 April 4,11,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NUMBER:13-603 GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES B.BUSH and LAUREN D.BUSH, Husband and Wife,if alive and if not, their unknown spouse,heirs, devisees,grantees,assignees,creditors, or other parties claiming by,through, under or against JAMES B.BUSH and LAURNE D.BUSH,and all claimants under any of such party; and CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A.,a national banking corporation; whether dissolved or presently existing, together with any grantees,assignees, successors,creditors,lienors,or trustees of said defendant(s) and all other persons claiming by,through, under,or against Defendant(s); Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final judgment of foreclosure entered in the abovetitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,I will sell the property situated in Highlands County,Florida, described as: The Property:20 Dasher Road,Lake Placid,FL 33852 Tract 4,of LAKE PEARL ESTATES,Lot 8, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3,Page 76,of the Public Records of Highlands County,Florida. Real property Tax I.D. #C-06-37-30-050-0040-0000 at public sale,to the highest and best bidder for cash,in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,in Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.on the 30th day of April,2014. SIGNED this 28th day of March,2014. (SEAL) ROBERT W.GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,(941) 534-4690,within two (2) working days of publication of this Notice of Sale; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call TDD (941) 534-7777 or Florida Relay Service (800) 955-8770. 10-4405-022 April 4,11,2014 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:10-316-GCS BANK OF AMERICA,N.A., Plaintiff, vs. AVIS ELAINE NEMBHARD F/K/A AVIS SMITH A/K/A AVIS ELAINE SMITH; LORETTA HEADLEY; TRIVON TAYLOR; et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO:Unknown Spouse of Trivon Taylor Last Known Residence:4931 NW 18th Street,Lauderhill,FL 33313 Unknown Spouse of Avis Elaine Nembhard F/K/A Avis Smith A/K/A Avis Elaine Smith N/K/A Hurton Nembhard Last Known Residence:6646 NW 4th Street,Margate,FL 33063 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County,Florida: LOT 9,BLOCK 731,SUN N LAKE ESTATE OF SEBRING,UNIT 25RI,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 15,PAGE 59,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses,if any,to it on Aldridge Connors,LLP, Plaintiff's attorney,at 1615 South Congress Avenue,Suite 200,Delray Beach,FL 33445 (Phone Number:561-392-6391),within 30 days of the first date of publication of this notice,and file the original with the clerk of this court either before May 2,2014 on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated on March 26,2014 Robert W.Germaine,Clerk As Clerk of the Court By:/s/ Toni Kopp As Deputy Clerk 1092-6040B April 4,11,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Ref.No.:2014-0081 Division Probate IN RE:ESTATE OF PHILLIP GORDON MITCHELL, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of PHILLIP GORDON MITCHELL,deceased, whose date of death was January 15,2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County,Florida,Probate Division,the address of which is 590 South Commerce Ave.,Sebring,Florida 33870.The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 4,2014. Personal Representative: Sharon L.Jill 2827 St.Croix Drive Clearwater,FL 33759 Attorney for Personal Representative: RICHARD D.GREEN,ESQ. Fla Bar 205877 rdgreen@greenlawoffices.net 1010 Drew Street Clearwater,FL 33755 (727) 441-8813 April 4,11,2014 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.13000919GCAXMX REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE NETWORK,INC., Plaintiff, vs. ROY ROBERT ADCOCK, A/K/A ROY ROBER ADCOCK,et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To:ROY ROBERT ADCOCK A/K/A ROY ROBER ADCOCK,1916 SPARTA CIRCLE,SEBRING,FL 33870 ROSA ISELA FLORES-ADCOCK F/K/A ROSA ISELA FLORES-GUTIERREZ A/K/A ROSA FLORES,1916 SPARTA CIR,SEBRING,FL 33875 LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED,CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows,to-wit: LOT 31,OF SPARTA HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8,PAGE 12,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses,if any,to it on Sara Collins,McCalla Raymer,LLC,225 E.Robinson St.Suite 660,Orlando,FL 32801 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 31st day of March,2014. 13-08082-1 April 4,11,2014 WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 21st day of March,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK Clerk of the Court Highlands County,Florida By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk CA13-07431/NM April 4,11,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.:14000092GCAXMX U.S.BANK,NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE BANC OF AMERICA FUNDING CORPORATION,2008-FT1 TRUST, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES,SERIES 2008-FT1, Plaintiff, vs. KAMPAN FARNAM,et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF JAMES E.FARNAM ADDRESS UNKNOWN Residence unknown and if living,including any unknown spouse of the Defendant,if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs,devisees, grantees,assignees,creditors,lienors,and trustees,and all other persons claiming by, through,under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants,incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property to-wit: LOT 450 AND LOT 451,OF AVON PARK LAKES UNIT NO.1,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4,PAGE 88,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. more commonly known as:1730 N VALENCIA DRIVE,AVON PARK,FL 33825 This action has been filed against you,and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense,if any,to it on the Plaintiff's attorney,FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS,PLLC,whose address is 601 Cleveland Street,Suite 690,Clearwater,FL 33755,on or before 30 days after date of first publication,response due by May 2, 2014,and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.282012CA000320XXXXXX GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, Plaintiff, vs ARLENE FISHER,et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated March 26,2014 and entered in Case No.282012CA000320XXXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County,Florida,wherein GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC,is Plaintif and ARELEN FISHER; UNKNOWN TENANT NO.1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO.2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH,UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION,OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT,TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED,are Defendants,I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse,430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870. Highlands County,Florida,11:00 a.m.on May 14,2014,the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 24,BLOCK 53,SEBRING COUNTRY ESTATES SECTION THREE,ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9,PAGE 6,PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE,IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990,persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Highlands County Courthouse.Telephone 863-386-6565 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Sebring,Florida,on March 27, 2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE As Clerk,Circuit Court By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak AS DEPUTY CLERK 1425-110312 April 11,18,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.:28-2013-CA-000002 CENLAR FSB Plaintiff, vs. WAYNE M.MCMULLIAN A/K/A WAYNE MCMULLIAN,DEBORAH A.MCMULLIAN A/K/A DEBORAH MCMULLIAN, HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given,pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on April 1,2014,in the Circuit Court of HIGHLANDS County,Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County,Florida described as: A PORTION OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 2,TOWNSHIP 36 SOUTH, RANGE 28 EAST,HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA,MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 2; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 70 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST PARALLEL WITH THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 2 FOR A DISTANCE OF 886.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 430.70 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1,011.37 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 430.70 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1,011.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.ALSO KNOWN AS TRACT 3 OF HENSCRATCH ESTATES UNRECORDED; LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED:COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 2; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 70 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST PARALLEL WITH THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 2 FOR A DISTANCE OF 886.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 430.70 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 527.74 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 430.70 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 527.74 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT OVER THE WEST 18 FEET OF THE NORTH 527.74 FEET FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS. and commonly known as:4825 W JOSEPHINE RD,LAKE PLACID,FL 33852; including the building,appurtenances,and fixtures located therein,at public sale,to the highest and best bidder,for cash,Sales are held in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870,on May 6,2014 at 11 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 3rd day of April,2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court ROBERT W.GERMAINE By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk 327470/1202374/abt April 11,18,2014 ticipate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact Court Administration at 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring, Florida 33870,telephone (863) 534-4690, within two (2) working days of receipt of this Notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. ROBERT W.GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Highlands County,Florida By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk of Court ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO,FISHMAN & GACHE',LLP 2424 North Federal Highway,Suite 360 Boca Raton,Florida 33431 (561)998-6700 (561) 998-6707 11-233323 FC01 ALL April 11,18,2014 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.:2012-CA-000015 Nationwide Advantage Mortgage Company Plaintiff, -vs.Raul A.Russo and Tamara A.Russo, Husband and Wife; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living,and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through,under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive,whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse,Heirs,Devisees, Grantees,or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2,If living,and all Unknown Parties claiming by,through,under and against the above named not known to be dead or alive,whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs,Devisees,Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment,entered in Civil Case No. 2012-CA-000015 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County,Florida,wherein Nationwide Advantage Mortgage Company,Plaintiff and Raul A.Russo and Tamara A.Russo,Husband and Wife are defendant(s),I,Clerk of Court, ROBERT W.GERMAINE,will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash,AT THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE,SEBRING,FLORIDA AT 11:00 A.M., April 30,2014,the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: DESCRIPTION OF A PARCEL OF LAND FOR VILLA UNIT 5,ADJACENT TO AND NORTH OF LOT 4,OF THE REPLAT OF PORTION OF BLOCK 2,SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES,HOLIDAY COUNTRY CLUB SECTION,AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 12,PAGE 68,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA,FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN FROM THE NORTHEASTERLY CORNER OF THE SAID LOT 4,AND RUN THENCE ALONG A CURVE TO THE RIGHT,R=65.00', A=4.68',C=4.69',CB=NORTH 13 DEGREES 33'46.5'' WEST; THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST,116.32 FEET,FOR A P.O.B.; THENCE RUN SOUTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST,35.75 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST,0.33 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST, 6.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST,0.33 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST,43.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST, 0.33 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST,6.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST,0.33 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST, 19.25 FEET; THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST,27.67 FEET; THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST,19.25 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST, 0.33 FEET; THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST,6.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST,0.33 FEET; THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST, 43.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST,0.33 FEET; THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST,6.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST, 0.33 FEET; THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST,35.75 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST,27.67 FEET TO P.O.B.TOGETHER WITH A 30 FOOT WIDE, INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:BEGIN FROM THE NORTHEASTERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT 4, ALSO THE P.O.B.; THENCE RUN ALONG A CURVE TO THE RIGHT,R=65.00',A=4.68', C=4.68',CB=NORTH 13 DEGREES 33'46.5'' WEST; THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST,237.32 FEET; THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST, 30.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST,237.32 FEET; THENCE ALONG A CURVE TO THE LEFT,R=35.00', A=2.52',C=2.52',CB=SOUTH 13 DEGREES 33'46.5'' EAST; THENCE SOUTH 74 DEGREES 22'27'' WEST,30.00 FEET,TO THE P.O.B. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE,IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par1050Legals 1000 Announcements

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B10 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com 6300Unfurnished Houses NICE 1BRapt $775 mo., 300 dep., plus electric, other utl. incl.in rent. Close to town, train. Appliances included, shared laundry room, pet rent $20 sm, $49 lg. 847-344-1313.BEAUTIFULAPTSSEBRING2BR/1BA, tile floors, screen back porch, beautiful landscaping. 3113 Medical Way. $595/mo. 863-446-1822 6200UnfurnishedApartments 6000 RentalsMOBILE HOMEFOR SALE 50 x 125' Lot, clear. No lot rent. 2/2, carport, screen room, covered patio. Close to Hospital. Furnished. $30,000 OBO. 4800 Al Hambra Ave., Sebring. Call 863-382-3049. 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale PALM HARBORHOMES limited time offer! $5K towards any exterior package. We have 24 wide, 26, 28 & 30 wide homes. 3 stock units reduced 26K, Homes from the $60's plantcity.palmharbor.com or 800-622-2832 MOBILE 14X60,2 bedrooms/11/2 baths, 2 Fla. rooms, 2 carports, garage, workshop, roofover, Smithbuilt shed, 100x125 lot, all fenced, own land, 863-385-2979. HOME OFMERIT, 1 bedroom/1 bath, double lot, Senior citizen park, closed-in porch, double shed, well, fruit trees. 863-382-0393, 570-679-2922. 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile Homes3 BEDROOM/2BATH home, 125x80 lot, CC block & stucco. Central air/heat, 2 car garage, $125,000. 863-835-0294. 4080Homes for SaleSebringFOR SALE,CBS 3BR/2BA, 1 car gar., in Avon Park Lakes, fenced back yard, built in 2006, newly renovated in 2010, asking, $99,900, 863-368-1963. 4060Homes for SaleAvon Park 4000 Real EstateSUCCESSFUL PRINTINGbusiness for sale. Winners of Readers Choice Award. Family owned 40 years. Owners retiring. Great opportunity. Will train. 863-385-9800 or 863-414-2270. 3050BusinessOpportunities 3000 FinancialGENTLEMAN/ SITTERCOMPANION Looking for position. Experienced with References. 863-658-4837 2300Work WantedPETROLEUM PIPEfitter helper, tank installation, at least 1 yr exp. Must have valid drivers license and clean record. Some travel. Call Mark for details 863-243-0660. 2100Help Wanted RN/LPN FULLTime 3-11 Shift Experience in long term care preferred Apply at: Lake Placid Health Care Center 125 Tomoka Blvd South EEOC/Smoke Free/ Drug Free Work Place R &R Harvesting Inc 50 Temporary workers needed in Tifton, Ga. area from approximately May 15, 2014 July 31, 2014. Following Supervisors instructions, the worker will perform manual labor to hand cut and pack watermelons. Use hand tools such as shears and knives. Duties also include cleaning, loading and unloading harvested products. Grade and sort products according to factors such as color, species, length, width, appearance, feel and quality to ensure correct processing and usage. Discard inferior or defective products and/or foreign matter, and place acceptable products in containers for further processing. Weigh products or estimate their weight, visually or by feel. Place products in containers according to grade and mark grades on containers. Measure, weigh and count products and materials. Examine and inspect containers, materials and products to ensure that packing specifications are met. Clean and maintain work areas. Must assist with all Good Agricultural Practices policies. Perform prolonged bending, reaching, pushing, pulling, walking stooping and lifting up to 60 lbs. Exposure to extreme temperatures. Workers may be required to perform miscellaneous grove clean-up work. These activities may include removing debris, boxes, discarded fruit from fields to clean growing areas, pruning, painting trees, repair and or replace irrigation equipment, may maintain fence lines. The highest of $10.00 per hr, 3/4 guarantee, 35 hrs per week, housing and transportation provided at no cost to workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each work day, must be 18 years or older. Transportation and subsistence expenses to the worksite will be reimbursed upon completion of 50% of the work contract. We participate in the E-Verify program and workers must have valid identification for I-9 preparation when they report to begin work. Apply for this job at the State Workforce/Job Center office in your area, please call for the nearest office in your area GA 229-430-5010, FL 863-385-3672, AL 256-259-1835,SC 803-737-2400 using job # GA8167605 MEDICAL RECORDS/ACCOUNTS PAYABLE COORDINATOR Royal Care of Avon Park currently has a FT position available. Candidate must be accurate detail oriented and have computer skills. Salary based on experience. Apply in person at Royal Care of Avon Park, 1213 W Stratford Rd., Avon Park. (863) 453-6674. EOE,, M/F, DFWP. MECHANIC TOwork on farm/ranch equipment, diesel and gasoline engines, fleet maintenance, fabrication and electrical. Computer skills peferred. Florida Driver License required. Pay based on experience. Drug-free workplace. Apply in person from 8am-11am & 1pm-4pm Monday thru Friday @ 109 Arron Drive, Lake Placid, FL 863-465-2821 or office@lpclp.com COMMERCIAL LINECSR EXPERIENCED 220 LICENSE REQUIRED FAX RESUME TO 863-465-5512 2100Help Wanted5 DAYLIVE-IN nanny needed, Spanish speaking preferred. Call Neda 949-413-4951. 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentFOUND: LARGEdog, white male, lost collar, north of Dinner Lake, Sebring. Call 863-385-4491. 1200Lost & FoundCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:385-6155 News-Sun Classified 1100Announcements NOTICE OF INTERNET AUCTION START DATE:April 14,2014 at 8:00 AM END DATE:April 21,2014 at 8:00 AM LOCATION:GOVDEALS.COM Pursuant to Florida Statutes and Sebring City Council policies,the City of Sebring,Sebring,Florida has declared various items as surplus property and have therefore authorized an Internet Auction to be conducted for the purpose of disposing said property. 1 Tank,Steel,10,000 gallon hydro-pnematic 1 Tank,Steel,30,000 gallon hydro-pnematic For further information on these items please contact Jay Angell,Water Production Supervisor,at 863.471.5113 or jayangell@mysebring.com Note:all property will be sold on as "as is","where is"basis.The City of Sebring reserves the right to add or delete items from GovDeals' website at anytime during the Internet bidding dates above. Kirk Zimmerman,CPPB Purchasing Agent City of Sebring,Florida April 11,13,2014 ************************************* **** HIGHLANDS COUNTY LEGAL NOTICES ************************************* **** The following legal notices are from the Highlands County Board of County Commissioners and are being published in the font, size, and leading as per their specifications. 1055HighlandsCounty LegalsNOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09 FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,desiring to engagein business under the fictitious name of CARE CENTER OF LAKE PLACID,located at 299 E.Interlake Blvd.,in the County of Highlands,in the City of Lake Placid,Florida 33852,intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State,Tallahassee,Florida. Dated at Sebring,Florida,this 9th day of April,2014. Veronica Walker April 11,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA JUVENILE DIVISION CASE NO.JP13-000474-XX IN THE INTEREST OF: Z.T.07/13/2011 Minor children DOB SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIP THE STATE OF FLORIDA TO: THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON:DOB:4/16/1957Address UnknownYOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in the above-styled Court by the Department of Children & Families,seeking the termination of your parental rights to: Z.T. a white female child born July 13,2011 mother Cara Anne Parnell and you are hereby commanded to personally appear before the Honorable Sheryl D.Snodgrass,a Magistrate/hearing officer in the Juvenile Division of the Circuit Court in and for Highlands County,State of Florida,on the 30th day of April,2014 at 10:00 A.M.,at the Highlands County Courthouse,430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida,Courtroom 1A. YOU MUST PERSONALL Y APPEAR ON THE DAY AND TIME SPECIFIED OR YOU WILL LOSE ALL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION. YOUR FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR WILL BE DEEMED TO BE YOUR CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILDREN NAMED IN THE PETITION.YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO HAVE AN ATTORNEY REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD AN ATTORNEY,YOU MUST BE PRESENT AND REQUEST THAT THE COURT APPOINT AN ATTORNEY FOR YOU IF YOU WANT ONE.``If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,590 South Commerce Ave.,Sebring,FL 33870 (863) 402-6565 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled court appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call (TDD) (1-800-955-8771) or Voice (V) (1-800-955-8770).'' ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK DATED THIS 3RD DAY OF MARCH,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK By:/s/ Lisa J.Bass Deputy Clerk (Clerk's Seal) March 28; April 4,11,18,2014 PUBLIC AUCTION:APRIL 25,2014 AT:9:00 AM LOCATION:AVON TOWING 1102 KERSEY ST.AVON PARK,FL 33825 YEAR MAKE VIN # 1994 NISSAN 1N4EB31P1RC783960 April 11,2014 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.PC 14-93 Division IN RE:ESTATE OF JOHN H.WEBER a/k/a JOHN WEBER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of John H.Weber,deceased,whose date of death was October 07th,2013,is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County,Florida, Probate Division,the address of which is 430 S.Commerce Ave.,Sebring,FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 11th,2014. Personal Representatives: John-Michael Weber 11 Oswego Court Kitchener,Ontario N2B 3P5 Deborah Weber 94 Rochampton Court Kitchener,Ontario N2A 3K8 David Weber 888 Wolverton Street Woverton,Ontario N0J 1G0 J.TIMOTHY SHEEHAN SHEEHAN & CELAYA,P.A. Attorneys for Personal Representatives 300 DAL HALL BLVD. LAKE PLACID,FL 33852 By:/s/ J.Timothy Sheehan Florida Bar No.184165 April 11,18,2014 NOTICE OF POLICY ADOPTION SOUTH FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE DISTRICT BOARD OF TRUSTEES The following policy will be considered for adoption at the regular Board meeting to be held Wednesday,April 23,2014 at 6:00 p.m.at the Highlands Campus at 600 W. College Drive,Avon Park,FL. Policy Implementation:Proposed new policy. Policy 1.18 Substance Abuse Testing For addition information,interested parties may visit the college website at www.southflorida.edu/trustees,or contact the Office of the President,South Florida State College at 600 West College Drive,Avon Park,FL 33825. IF A PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE DISTRICT BOARD OF TRUSTEES WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS MEETING, THAT PERSON WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS,AND MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE,WHICH RECORD INCLUDED THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. 600 West College Drive, Avon Park,Florida 33825-9356 863-453-6661AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION ACCREDITED BY THE SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND SCHOOLSApril 11,13,2014 Attorney for Personal Representative: John M.Sakellarides,Esquire Florida Bar Number:935107 HERDMAN & SAKELLARIDES PA 29605 US Highway 19 North,Suite 110 Clearwater,FL 33761 Telephone:(727) 785-1228 Fax:(727) 786-4107 E-Mail:john@herdsaklaw.com April 11,18,2014 1050LegalsFOUND MALE Shih-tzu on Sun. April 6 on US 27 in front of the Lake Placid Publix. Contact Carolyn at 863-840-2880. Classified Ads € 385-6155 NEWS-SUN The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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www.newssun.com Friday, April 11, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B11 WE BUYALL AUTOS with or without Title. Any Year / Make / Model / Condition. We will pay up to $20,000. Free Towing. Call Cindy 813-505-6935 9400Automotive Wanted SLT GMCTruck 2500HD CRW CB/SB/4WD/Texas Ranch Ed, Diesel, auto 5spd OD, Duramax, Allison, Tow Package w/braking w/auto side mirror arrow sens.extends/all electric/seats heated saddle leather interior/Bose stereo/CD/satellite radio/back sliding window/rhino spray/tubular chrome steps/skid plate/chrome trim/alloy wheels all new tire and brakes/black and gold trim paint. 36800mi $35,000 OBO. 850-867-8521. Warranty available. 1998 FORDRANGER XLT. Runs good, new tires & brakes, automatic, 4 cylinder, green & tan, $2500, 863-873-9058. 9200Trucks 9000 Transportation 8000 Recreation NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. NEED GOODhome for lovable cat. Fixed, declawed, papered. Pure Siamese. 863 314-6671 or 863 273-4563 7520Pets & SuppliesCUB CADETLTX1040 MOWER AS GOOD AS NEW. SERVICED WITH NEW BATTERY AND CARBURETOR. THE CLOCK HAS LESS THAN 35HRS. CONTACT VIJAY ON 863-699-6923 BETWEEN 10AM AND 7PM PRICE $1000 7400Lawn & Garden SEBRING BAKEDGOODS & CRAFTS 3235 Grand Prix Dr. Sat. April 12, 9am-3pm. CHURCH CAMP FUND RAISER SEBRING *ESTATE SALE 4010 Thompson Ave. US 27 to Hammock to Lakewood to Golfview to Thompson. Friday April 11, through Sunday April 13, 8am to 4pm. Home decor items, green and deep wine sofas, sofa table, washer/dryer, king Broyhill BR furniture, kitchen items, linens, lamps, oriental figurines, 4 Wolfgang Puck lidded pans, Pyrex, framed art, mirrors, small tables, towels, King sheets (some queen), nice ladies clothes various sizes, accessories, paper shredder, 3 sp. fan, bed frames, hand tools, hardware, lawn items, 70s rock n roll records (covers are in very poor condition). www.estatesales.net Sunday will be half-price day on all items marked $1.00 and up. Donna Collins Estate Sales SEBRING YARDSALE 3307 Baxter Ave April 11th & 12th, 8 to 1, Kitchenware, VCR tapes, Books, Toys, Christmas Items, Clothes, Lots of Misc. SEBRING -YARD SALE, 306 Swallow Ave., Fri.-Sat., 4/11-12, 7am-? Something for everyone! SEBRING -CHURCH YARD SALE Saturday, April 12, 8am-1pm. House of Change, 4011 US Hwy 27 S. Little bit of everything! Clothes, shoes, furn., tv's, fishing equipment, dishes, small appliances. LORIDA -Join us at this Lake Istokpoga Property! And enter to win a FREE $25 Gas card! OPEN HOUSE FRIDAY, APRIL 11th from 1 3 PM at 841 Racoon, Lorida Jen Brown Highlands Ridge Realty 863-655-5554/LakeIstokpoga.com LAKE PLACIDPLACID LAKES, 311 West Waterway Ave. N.W., 35 year moving sale. Furn., weedeater, freezer, misc. 8am-1pm, Thurs.-Sat., April 10-12. 7320Garage &Yard Sales THREE-IN-ONE TABLE:regular table, poker table or bumper ball table. Round. 29" x 47 1/2". $100. OBO 863 381-9990 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER WITH SIDE CURIO SHELVES, $100 863-471-9341 ANTIQUE BLANKETCHEST $110 863-441-0495 80'' COUCH LIKE NEW CONDITION, $100 863-441-0495 10'' DELTAMITER SAW $50 863-471-9341 7310Bargain Buys 7000 Merchandise3/2 ONLAKE CARRIE access LAKE JUNE/HENRY. $800 1st/sec. Ref req Call/text 786-285-5026 6300Unfurnished Houses

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B12 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com WRITTEN BY: Leslie Ayvazian, David Cale, Jessica Goldberg, Beth Henley, Lameece Issaq, Claire LaZebnik, Lisa Lomer, Michele Lowe, Marco Pennette, Theresa Rebeck, Luanne Rice, Anne Weisman and Cheryl L. West. CONTAINS ADULT LANGUAGE. Produced by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Tickets $15Drs. Thakkar Pavilion Friday & Saturday Evening 7:30pm Sunday Matinee 2:30pmPlease bring remembrances of your own motherhood to cherish and share. Tickets available now! Call or go online today! 356 West Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870 AL#9756 Bunny PicturesOPEN TO THE PUBLIC!Dont ght the crowds at the Malls. Join us at Crown Pointe Assisted Living Facility for Easter Bunny Pictures! Monday, April 14th 5pm-7pm at 5005 Sun n Lake Blvd., just one mile down from the hospital.863-386-1060www.cpcommunities.com TODAYPartly sunny82 / 61Winds: E at 6-12 mphMostly sunny84 / 62Winds: E at 7-14 mphSATURDAYPartly sunny and humid87 / 64Winds: E at 7-14 mphSUNDAYClouds and sun with a shower89 / 68Winds: SSE at 6-12 mphMONDAYNot as warm with t-storms possible81 / 64Winds: SW at 6-12 mphTUESDAY High .............................................. 6:40 a.m. Low ............................................. 12:20 a.m. High .............................................. 7:06 p.m. Low ............................................. 12:42 p.m. High ............................................ 12:10 a.m. Low ............................................... 6:38 a.m. High .............................................. 1:09 p.m. Low ............................................... 7:02 p.m. Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 13.46 Normal ............................................... 14.51 High Sunday .......................................... 90 Low Sunday ........................................... 60 High Monday ......................................... 93 Low Monday .......................................... 67 High Tuesday ......................................... 81 Low Tuesday .......................................... 49 High Wednesday .................................... 77 Low Wednesday ..................................... 45 Relative humidity .................................. 44% Expected air temperature ....................... 82 Makes it feel like .................................... 82 Monday ............................................... 29.73 Tuesday ............................................... 29.96 Wednesday ......................................... 30.18 Monday ............................................... 0.02 Tuesday ............................................... 0.36 Wednesday ......................................... 0.00 Month to date ..................................... 0.38 Year to date ......................................... 7.39Sunrise 7:07 a.m. 7:06 a.m. Sunset 7:47 p.m. 7:48 p.m. Moonrise 4:46 p.m. 5:38 p.m. Moonset 4:42 a.m. 5:17 a.m.Albuquerque 79/52/pc 78/50/pc 73/46/pc Atlanta 75/56/s 78/57/s 78/59/pc Baltimore 68/49/t 71/48/pc 73/54/s Birmingham 76/56/s 78/57/s 80/62/pc Boston 60/43/c 62/47/r 60/50/pc Charlotte 78/50/s 78/53/s 80/55/pc Cheyenne 70/42/pc 64/31/c 35/25/sn Chicago 66/44/pc 72/45/pc 52/35/r Cleveland 57/41/pc 68/53/pc 66/51/sh Columbus 63/46/pc 73/56/pc 74/56/pc Dallas 80/62/pc 83/66/pc 80/52/t Denver 76/44/pc 71/36/pc 38/28/r Detroit 63/41/pc 69/53/pc 61/44/r Harrisburg 65/43/sh 72/49/pc 76/55/pc Honolulu 81/68/s 83/70/pc 83/72/pc Houston 80/64/pc 80/67/pc 81/67/t Indianapolis 64/47/pc 72/56/pc 71/48/sh Jackson, MS 77/57/s 79/59/pc 79/65/pc Kansas City 73/54/pc 74/55/pc 61/37/r Lexington 68/50/t 74/56/pc 78/56/pc Little Rock 76/60/pc 78/60/pc 74/56/c Los Angeles 75/59/pc 68/55/pc 67/56/pc Louisville 68/52/t 76/59/pc 79/58/pc Memphis 76/59/pc 77/62/pc 80/58/pc Milwaukee 62/43/pc 64/42/r 43/32/r Minneapolis 67/48/pc 61/33/r 48/31/pc Nashville 74/54/t 77/58/pc 79/58/pc New Orleans 75/63/pc 78/64/pc 79/68/pc New York City 67/48/sh 66/50/r 64/51/pc Norfolk 76/58/pc 70/56/pc 78/58/s Oklahoma City 81/60/s 84/61/pc 75/41/t Philadelphia 68/52/sh 70/49/pc 77/52/s Phoenix 95/70/pc 90/67/pc 90/67/s Pittsburgh 62/42/sh 71/49/s 76/53/pc Portland, ME 58/35/pc 57/36/pc 56/46/pc Portland, OR 65/44/pc 65/44/s 72/45/s Raleigh 78/52/s 78/55/s 82/57/s Rochester 57/35/pc 68/48/pc 67/50/sh St. Louis 71/53/pc 77/60/pc 74/40/r San Francisco 64/49/pc 63/49/pc 64/49/pc Seattle 61/42/c 62/43/pc 67/43/s Wash., DC 73/54/t 73/55/pc 79/58/s Cape Coral 83/63/pc 85/64/s 87/66/pc Clearwater 81/66/pc 83/67/s 84/69/pc Coral Springs 81/70/pc 82/71/s 84/73/pc Daytona Beach 78/61/pc 79/63/s 79/64/sh Ft. Laud. Bch 81/72/pc 82/75/s 84/75/sh Fort Myers 83/65/pc 86/65/s 87/67/pc Gainesville 80/54/pc 81/56/s 83/59/pc Hollywood 80/69/pc 82/71/s 84/73/sh Homestead AFB 80/70/pc 82/72/s 83/73/pc Jacksonville 78/55/pc 81/57/s 79/60/pc Key West 81/74/pc 83/75/s 82/76/pc Miami 81/72/pc 83/73/s 84/74/sh Okeechobee 79/65/pc 80/67/s 81/67/pc Orlando 80/61/pc 82/63/s 84/64/sh Pembroke Pines 81/69/pc 83/71/s 85/73/sh St. Augustine 75/61/pc 75/63/s 76/63/pc St. Petersburg 81/66/pc 83/67/s 85/69/pc Sarasota 82/63/pc 83/64/s 85/65/pc Tallahassee 79/49/pc 82/56/s 83/59/pc Tampa 81/64/pc 84/64/s 84/67/pc W. Palm Bch 79/70/pc 81/71/s 82/73/sh Winter Haven 80/62/pc 82/63/s 85/65/pc Acapulco 91/72/s 89/72/pc 89/70/s Athens 64/50/sh 65/49/s 66/50/pc Beirut 70/61/s 72/56/pc 70/55/pc Berlin 56/39/c 60/43/pc 58/39/pc Bermuda 68/61/s 67/62/pc 69/64/pc Calgary 56/20/c 34/23/sf 46/27/s Dublin 54/42/pc 53/37/sh 52/41/s Edmonton 47/22/sn 38/23/sf 46/27/s Freeport 77/69/pc 79/70/pc 80/72/sh Geneva 66/46/pc 69/46/pc 68/42/pc Havana 86/64/t 87/66/t 91/68/pc Hong Kong 78/72/pc 81/71/c 83/71/pc Jerusalem 70/53/s 69/49/pc 66/49/c Johannesburg 69/49/pc 70/51/pc 65/48/pc Kiev 44/38/c 51/39/r 54/41/pc London 59/44/pc 60/42/pc 61/43/s Montreal 53/36/pc 57/41/pc 60/41/sh Moscow 45/28/pc 46/35/pc 51/37/c Nice 66/55/pc 65/54/pc 66/56/pc Ottawa 54/34/pc 56/39/pc 57/36/r Quebec 43/28/pc 48/35/pc 51/35/r Rio de Janeiro 88/76/pc 90/76/pc 87/73/t Seoul 66/49/c 66/47/c 67/45/c Singapore 90/78/t 89/79/t 90/79/t Sydney 81/62/t 80/59/sh 78/61/r Toronto 56/38/pc 59/45/pc 58/39/r Vancouver 55/43/pc 59/44/pc 59/41/s Vienna 54/40/pc 64/47/pc 65/47/c Warsaw 52/37/c 55/37/r 57/41/c Winnipeg 46/28/pc 38/19/sn 38/19/sf Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. The weather around the United States today will be fairly tranquil overall. A cold front will extend from southern New England to the Ohio valley to start the day and slowly move southward. This will cause several showers and even a thunderstorm or two from southern Massachusetts and south to Virginia, extending as far west as southeastern Missouri. The other areas where precipitation will be a concern will be the northern Plains and northern Great Lakes, where a front will produce showers from Minnesota into Michigan. National Forecast for April 11 Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rrain, sf-snow urries, sn-snow, i-ice. Partly sunny today. Patchy clouds tonight. Mostly sunny tomorrow. Sunday: partly sunny and humid. Monday: times of clouds and sun with a shower. Tuesday: mostly cloudy and not as warm. A swarm of 37 tornadoes swept across the Midwest on April 11, 1965, from Iowa to Ohio. Nearly 300 people were killed and 3,000 others injured. Partly sunny today. Winds east-southeast 6-12 mph. Expect 6-10 hours of sunshine with average relative humidity 55% and good drying conditions. Patchy clouds tonight. Sunday. and Saturday. a.m. and after 4 p.m. Full Last New First Apr 15 Apr 22 Apr 29 May 6 Today SaturdayForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 78/55 80/54 80/56 78/61 80/61 80/62 81/64 81/66 81/66 82/63 83/65 84/66 79/65 79/70 81/72 81/72 79/49 75/56 75/59 82/62 82/61 80/63 82/60 82/60 80/63 81/74 TemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHeat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayBarometer PrecipitationFive-Day forecast for Highlands County Almanac U.S. Cities World Cities National Summary Tides UV Index Today Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional Summary Lake Levels Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows. Readings at Palm Beach Readings at St. Petersburg The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterday 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. Jacksonville Gainesville Ocala Daytona Beach Orlando Winter Haven Tampa Clearwater St. Petersburg Sarasota Fort Myers Naples Okeechobee West Palm Beach Fort Lauderdale Miami Tallahassee Apalachicola Key West Avon Park Sebring Lorida Lake Placid Venus Brighton PensacolaCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W



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NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 192750 Family Easter projectsB1Lake Placid police now wearing on-body video cameraB2 VOL. 95 NO. 41 Partly sunny today, patchy clouds tonight High 82 Low 61 Details on B12Classi eds .............. B9 Dear Abby ................ B2 Healthy Living .......... B3 Obituaries .............. A6 Lottery Numbers ...... A2 Movie Review .......... B2 Religion .................. B5 Sports on TV ......... A10 Sudoku Puzzle......... B2 facebook.com/ newssun twitter.com/ thenewssunSebring International Raceway will welcome clunkers and junkers for 24 Hours of LeMons in July JUNK IN MORE THAN THE TRUNKA9 www.newssun.com Friday-Saturday, April 11-12, 2014 BY BARRY FOSTERNews-Sun correspondentAVON PARK The Florida Department of Juvenile Justice has released its nal report on the Aug. 17, 2013 riot at the Avon Park Youth Academy. The 25-page Florida Inspector Generals analysis was issued late last Friday afternoon without fanfare. The facility was cited for several shortcomings including the lack of a Riot and Major Disturbance Plan, Master Control failing to initially contact 911 and instruction to staff to discontinue attempting to stop the youth from ghting. Areas of concern also included the lack of staff training on how to deal with disturbance and the absence of Report: Academy lacked riot planDJJ release ndings on August fracas at APYA BY BARRY FOSTERNews-Sun CorrespondentNumbers released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture this week are predicting the states orange crop is approaching the lowest harvest numbers in nearly a quarter century. The Wednesday report indicated the 2013-2014 orange forecast at 110 million boxes. Thats down 4 percent from last month, and 18 percent less than last seasons nal production gure. Of cials of the Highlands County Citrus Growers Association said those totals should be re ected in the local harvest as well. The USDA formulates these numbers from a statistical model and Highlands County represents about 13 percent of Floridas citrus industry, so there is a good representative sample that is being done here, said HCCGA Executive Director Ray Royce He said the totals for Valencia oranges are telling since that is the portion of the season up next for local growers. I think Highlands County has evolved into a heavy Valencia harvest. My guess is that the majority of fruit we grow here actually is Valencia, he said. We picked some earlies and mids, but really, April and May will be the big heavy harvesting season here in Highlands County. Statewide, the report shows fruit drop appears to be more signi cant than numbers estimated locally. According to the USDA, a survey conducted in March showed droppage at as much as 31 percent. If accurate, Katara Simmons/News-SunFruit drop, while not as bad this year in Highlands County as it was last season, is a major problem statewide. This years citrus crop could be the lowest in decades, and a lot of that crop is lost to drop.DROPPING FORTUNESCitrus harvest could be worst since 1990Estimates keep sinking now down 18% Courtesy photoThe windows in the medical center were broken out during a riot at Avon Park Youth Academy on Aug. 17. BY SAMANTHA GHOLARStaff WriterSEBRING Im a product of the school system. My children come from this system. This is the opportunity to give back, Sebring International Raceway President William Tres Stephenson said from his of ce chair Thursday morning. Stephenson is the one of six people who have led to run for the Highlands County School Board District 5 seat that opened when Andy Tuck was appointed to a position with the Florida Department of Education earlier this year by Gov. Rick Scott. Trevor Murphy, Dustin Woods, William Pep Hutchinson, Jill Compton and Clinton Culverhouse have also led campaign qualifying documents. Stephensons business nance degree from the University of Florida has enabled him to head a $7 million budget annually for the Sebring International Raceway operations, experience he says would help the school board. Im running on a business background, Stephenson said. I think that I can be of assistance to the board and be a working part of the quali ed people that are already there. I just want to help them. Stephenson said the school district needs nancial-minded people. Right now I know that there are issues with the Stephenson says his business experience would help school board Samantha Gholar/News SunTres Stephenson is running for the District 5 school board seat.CANDIDATE PROFILE SEE CITRUS | A7SEE SCHOOL | A7SEE RIOT | A7 BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterLAKE PLACID High school vocational training is about to get another boost with the addition of an Internet marketing class and a production technician certi cation. The School Board of Highlands County on Tuesday approved the creation of a new Entrepreneurial Academy at Lake Placid High School next year. It will set up at Lake Placid High Schools existing Green Dragon Chair Company and expand to include an Ecommerce/Marketing course and to provide skills in the areas of machine and tool safety, market research, Groundbreaking Green Dragon Chair Co. to grow SEE CHAIR | A7

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A2 | NEWSSS U nN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com http//:www.newssun.com The News-Sun (USPS ISSN 0163-3988) is published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday. Peri odical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entr y ofce(s). All material contained herein is the property of the News-Sun, which is an afliate of Sun Newspa pers. Reproduction in whole or in par t is forbidden without the writ ten permission of the publisher. All material submitted for publica tion becomes the property of the ne wspaper and may be edited for clarity and space, as well as re printed, published and used in all media. P ostmaster: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870.COMMITMENT TO A ccC C U RA cC YThe News-Sun promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its ne ws stories. If you believe we have made an error, call the news room at (863) 385-6155, ext. 516. If you ha ve a question or comment about coverage, write to Scott Dressel, editor, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; email editor@newssun.com.; or call (863) 385-6155. OO FFI cC E Location: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon day-Friday Phone: (863) 385-6155 Main Fax: (863) 385-1954 Newsroom Fax: 385-2453SUB scSC RIPTION RATE sS Home 12 mos. T ax T otal $72.22 $5.06 $77.28 In Florida mail 12 mos. T ax T otal $107.24 $7.51 $114.75 Out of Florida mail 12 mos. T ax T otal $122.41 $8.57 $130.98 Y our newspaper is delivered by an independent contractor. If you do not receive your home deliv ered newspaper by 6 a.m. on any publication date, please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday, and before 11 a.m. Sunday. A re placement copy will be delivered to you. Subscriber s who notify us after said times will be issued an account credit. Deadlines for subscription changes are noon Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon Thursday for the Friday edition and noon Fri day for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date. OO BITUARIE sS ANA N D AA N NOUN c C E MENT sS Email all obituaries and death notices to obits@newssun.com Email all other announcements to editor@newssun.com PP LA cC E A CLA ssS S I FIE dD Ad AD From 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. M-F (863) 385-6155, ext. 505 or (863) 314-9876 RETAILRETAIL AdAD VERTI sS INGMitch Collins 386-5626 mitch.collins@newssun.com Vickie Watson 386-5631 vickie.watson@newssun.com Terri Lee 386-5628 terri.lee@newssun.com LL EGAL Ad AD VERTI sS INGJanet Emerson 385-6155, ext. 596 legals@newssun.com NN EW sS ROOM Call 385-6155 Scott Dressel, Editor, ext. 516 or scott.dressel@newssun.com Phil Attinger, Staff Writer, ext. 541 or phil.attinger@newssun. com Samantha Gholar, Staff Writ er, ext. 526 or samantha.gholar@ ne wssun.com Dan Hoehne, Sports Editor, ext. 528 or daniel.hoehne@newssun. com Katara Simmons, Photographer, ext. 538 or katara.simmons@ newssun.com. ROMON a A W aA SHINGTON Publisher and Executive Editor romona.washington@newssun.com 385-6155, ext. 515 NEWS-SSUnN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927LOTTERY LL OTTOWednesday, April 9 11-26-32-44-45-51 X-2 Saturdays Jackpot: $33 million PP OWERBALLWednesday, April 9 9-14-44-48-49 PB-29 X-2 Saturdays Jackpot: $94 million MM EGA MM ONEYTuesday, April 8 26-30-39-41 PB-1 Todays Jackpot: $500,000 MM EGA MM ILLION sS Tuesday, April 8 35-36-41-60-71 PB-3 X-3 Todays Jackpot: $20 million CA sS H 3 Monday, April 7 Day: 2-6-1 Night: 6-9-4 Tuesday, April 8 Day: 6-3-7 Night: 6-9-9 Wednesday, April 9 Day: 9-2-9 Night: 6-8-7 PP LAY 4Monday, April 7 Day: 8-7-1-0 Night: 0-4-4-9 Tuesday, April 8 Day: 2-7-0-3 Night: 8-7-2-3 Wednesday, April 9 Day: 2-0-0-0 Night: 1-4-1-6 FF ANTA sS Y 5 Monday, April 7 3-4-13-26-29 Tuesday, April 8 2-7-22-24-48 Wednesday, April 9 5-8-9-19-27 BY PHIL A TTTT ING ER ER Staff WriterLAKE PLACID Police now have a new tool on their unifor ms: Tas ers Axon Body camer as to supplement their in-car video systems The lightweight, com pact single-piece video units attach dir ectly to their uniforms in hopes of eliminating a limita tion of in-car video systems: The fact that they only captur e approx imately 10 percent of what happens especial ly if the ofcer steps out of the line of sight of the camera for any reason. With an on-body cam era, ofcers will be able to captur e nearly 100 percent of the encoun ter. The camer as only re cord when the ofcer tur ns on the recorder at the beginning of an en counter, said Lake Placid Police Chief James F ansler. He hopes the camer as will save money at the depar tment level and state level by providing evidence that may mean fewer challenges in court, which would free up ofcers from having to sit in court and reduce prosecution costs. Given that many of cer encounters have been r ecorded by smart phones, its also hoped that the cameras may provide additional evi dence that may show that ofcers conducted themselves in a profes sional manner, Fansler said. The mere presence of the camera should im prove the behavior of all par ticipants during po lice encounters, Fansler wr ote in a press release about the cameras. Anyone with questions or has an interest in see ing the Axon Body camera is welcome to come b y the Lake Placid Police Department to view it and discuss. Feedback is also wel come at lakeplacidchief@gmail.com.Lake Placid police now wearing body cameras Courtesy photoLake Placid police ofcers are now wearing these new on-body cameras.Department hopes they will save money, improve safety United Way Day of Caring setOn Wednesday, May 21, volunteer teams from local businesses and or ganizations will participate in the 2014 United W ay Day of Caring in Highlands County. Volunteer teams are matched with United Way Partner Agencies and local non-prot groups in order to perform tasks that the agencies might not otherwise have the manpower or funds to be able to accomplish. Jobs such as assisting clients, painting, land scaping, clerical work, and many other tasks will be completed during the 2014 Day of Caring. This is an opportunity for local residents to make a hands on impact with United Way Partner Agencies and also view how their United Way contributions are being invested. Sponsors Budget BiRite Insurance, Florida Hospital Heartland Division, Howard Fertilizer, Lykes Bros. Inc., The Andersons, Duke Energy, and The Palms of Sebring who help make this day pos sible. When the volunteer teams nish their tasks at 11:30 / a.m., they are in vited to participate in a celebr ation luncheon at Buttonwood Bay provid ed by Chef Mac, Palms C ourt Catering. The Highlands County Division of the United Way of Central Florida has been serving the local community for 25 years by understanding local needs and driving last ing change to build better lives and stronger communities For addi tional information regarding the 2013 United W ay Day of Caring and how you can submit your team to participate, contact Kristin Handley, H ighlands County direc tor, United Way of Central F lorida/Highlands County Division, at 4533401 or email kristin. handley@uwcf.org.Dressel to hold CD release partyLAKE PLACID Local country singer Logan Dressel will have a CD release party Saturday night at the Elks Lodge in Lake Placid. Doors open at 8 / p.m. Entry is $20, which in cludes free beer all night. D ressels debut CD Live It Up, which includes nine original songs, will be available for $10. The Elks Lodge is at 200 East County Road 621. Call 465-2661.Busy Kids registering for VPKSEBRING Registration is under way for Busy Kids Creative Learning Center Inc.s 2014 free Summer Voluntary PreKindergarten Program. VPK is a free program to prepare every Florida child for kindergarten. Children must be 5 years old on or before Sept. 1, 2014 and have not pre viously completed a VPK pr ogram. VPK Summer Pgrogram is from 7:45 / a.m. to 4:15 / p.m. Monday-Friday from June 10 to Aug. 5. All children attending Busy Kids summer VPK program can attend ex tended childcare from 7:30 / a.m. to 5:30 / p.m. ab solutely free. Breakfast, lunch, and snacks will be provided at no cost, how ever, transportation will not be pr ovided. Busy Kids is at 922 Persimmon Ave. For more information, call Anne Lang or Kathi Borecky with Busy Kids Creative Learning Center at 3860808 or email busykidsse bring@yahoo.com. OO rchid Society, RR ob bins Nursery hold orchid repotting workshopSEBRING Orchid Society Highlands and Robbins Nursery will hold an orchid repot ting workshop at Robbins N ursery. This is the time of the year to repot or chids. Members of the Or chid Society will teach the proper way to do it. Members will repot or chid plants for a cost of $4 for the rst two divi sions and $3 for each additional division. There will be an additional $10 charge for large root bound plants. Pots and potting mix must be supplied by the attendee. Robbins will have a full supply of or chid supplies available for sale The workshop is from 9 a.m. to 1 / p.m. Saturday at Robbins Nursery, 4803 U.S. 27 South.Military Sea Services Museum has saleSEBRING The Military Sea Services Museum will hold a garage sale at 1402 Roseland Ave. between 8 / a.m. and 4 / p.m. today and Saturday. RR omona WW ashington/ N N ews-SunCommunity leaders visited Avon Park Community Child Development Center this week to read to the children as part of Week of the Young Child, but they werent the only ones reading. Verkiera Bennett, one of the children at the center, took a few minutes to read to her friends as well. Verkiera will be entering kindergarten next school year. WW EEK OF THE YY OUNG CHIL d D SNAPs S HOTs S LL O c C AL N N EW sS PP hil AA ttigner/ NN ews-SunThe Avon Park Middle School choir sings Down to the River as part of its character word presentation for self-control at Tuesdays meeting for the School Board of Highlands County. AA VON P P ARK M M I dd DD LE S c C HOOL CHOIR s S ING s S DOWN TO THE R R IVER FOR S c C HOOL B B O AR d D M oO R eE S napshotsNAPSHOTS | AA 6

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 11, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A3 Downtown Sebring Circle Park Saturday, May 10 10 AM 4 PMFree General Admission Vendors, live music by The Landsharks Band, food & beer Limited Number of Wine Tasting & Culinary Demonstration Tickets Available $25 pre-purchase (first 100 get Swag Bag) Tickets sold at Dogtown USA(112 N. Ridgewood Drive in Downtown Sebring)or at www.GirlsGoneWineFest.comA portion of the proceeds from this event benefits the Champion for Children Foundation and the Getaway Girl Foundation. COHAN RADIO GROUP Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Highlands Art League (HAL) will host the annual High School Student Art Show for teen artists tonight. The juried show features art from all three county high schools from grades 9-12 with the opening reception from 5-8 p.m. tonight. Admission is free. The awards presentation will take place at 6:30 p.m. with winners in all categories, including drawing, watercolor, mixed media (2D), acrylic, clay, and non-clay (3D). HAL provides a $500 scholarship to the show winner, and South Florida State College (SFSC) matches the scholarship if the winner enrolls in SFSC to pursue their education. Judges for the contest were Mollie Doctrow, Linda Kegley and Susan Milam, who spent several hours studying the categories of works and said they were extremely impressed with the quality of the submissions. The choices they made were very dif cult, the judges said. The show will be on exhibit in HALs newly renovated Clovelly House (1971 Lakeview Drive in downtown Sebring), which is dedicated to youth art education. For more information about this or any of HALs programs, visit www. HighlandsArtLeague.org.HAL hosting student art show tonight Courtesy photos BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterAVON PARK A man who allegedly tried to stab a woman and then hit a girl during a domestic dispute is facing charges of child abuse and of aggravated assault and aggravated battery, both with a deadly weapon. Reynaldo Diaz Ruiz, 27, of Avon Park is being held in the Highlands County Jail in lieu of $7,000 bond. The incident took place late Saturday night. Highlands County Sheriffs deputies received a call about a domestic dispute at 10 p.m. Saturday and arrived at an address on County Road 64 East in Avon Park to nd a woman with a cut below her left eye and a cut on the bottom of her left hand. She said her boyfriend, Diaz Ruiz, was drinking that night and and that he gets violent when drunk. She told deputies that he tried to stab her with a small silver knife, trying to thrust it into the center of her chest. She grabbed the knife with her left hand, cutting it, reports said. As she was ghting off Diaz Ruiz, her 8-year-old daughter tried to help. Diaz Ruiz then hit her in the mouth with a closed st, reports said. Both the mother and daughter declined to be transported by ambulance, reports said. Deputies then went to Diaz Ruizs home and attempted to talk to the man there and identify him as Diaz Ruiz, but found a language barrier. After handcuf ng him and placing him against the deputys patrol car, the deputy asked the victim to identify him and she said he was Diaz Ruiz. On the way to the jail, reports said, Diaz Ruiz kicked the seat of the car and yelled in Spanish, but eventually stopped and was turned over to jail staff without further incident.Man charged with attempted stabbing; hitting girl Special to the News-SunSEBRING Local law enforcement agencies are again, proud to participate with the Drug Enforcement Administration and its national and community partners, which include Drug Free Highlands, for the National Prescription Drug TakeBack Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 26 for citizens who want to dispose of unwanted and unused or expired prescription drugs. National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. According to the CDC (Center for Disease Control), a pharmaceutical drug-related death occurs every 24 minutes. Approximately, 2,500 teens use prescription drugs to get high for the rst time, according to the Partnership for a Drug Free America. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including the home medicine cabinet. To date, the combined efforts of the DEA and its state, local, and tribal law-enforcement and community partners have removed more than 2 million pounds (1,018 tons) of medication from circulation. In the last Operation Medicine Cabinet in October 2013, Highlands County collected 1368.7 pounds (64 boxes). Drop-off locations on April 26 are: Sebring Police Department 307 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring Lake Placid Police Department 8 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid Highlands County Sheriffs Of ce North Sub Station 304 W. Pleasant St., Avon Park Highlands County Sheriffs Of ce Sub Station Liberty Star Plaza, 7177 S. George Blvd., Sebring For those unable to attend and dispose of medications on April 26, permanent drop boxes are available at the Lake Placid and Sebring police departments. Medications may be disposed of from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. MondayFriday. Contact Drug Free Highlands at 382-2138 or any of the local law enforcement of ces for more information.Operation Medicine Cabinet set for April 26Chance to turn in unwanted or expired prescriptions Start and end your week with us!Wednesday. Friday. Sunday.863-385-6155 2227 US 27 Sebring, FL 33870

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A4 | NEWSSS U nN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com 5019096Serious Illness affects patients and their caregivers.Cornerstone can help! We provide comfort care through...+ Pain & Symptom Management + Emotional & Spiritual Support Serving Central FloridaInformation: Toll Free: 866-742-6655www.cornerstonehospice.org www.SeriousIllness.org/Cornerstone BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterAVON PARK A 16-year-old student ac cused of stealing money has been charged with possession of a w eapon on school property when a school resource ofcer found a box cutter in his pocket. The incident took place at 10:58 / a.m. Friday, April 4. The dean of students at Avon Park High School searched the teenager in a case involving mon ey stolen from the school gymnasium. D uring the search, the dean found a black and yellow box cut ter razor knife in the boys r ight front pants pock et, according to arrest reports. The dean also found eye drops, lighters, a cell phone, a wallet and other miscellaneous items. According to reports, the teen denied know ing the box cutter was ther e. He said the pants belonged to his cous in who works at Walmart and uses a box cutter at work. The boy said he put the pants on not knowing the box cutter was in the pocket, reports said. The boy was released into his mothers custo dy, based on instructions fr om the Department of Juvenile Justice, reports said.Editors Note: Although the offense is a third-degree felony and the student s name is available in public records, his name is be ing withheld from this report given the cir cumstances of the incident.Student faces weapon charge for box cutter on campus Phil Attinger/News-SunPraised for everything from helping with logistics to running entire programs for the schools, top volunteers from Highlands County schools were honored Tuesday at The School Board of Highlands County meeting. They are (front, from left) Melissa Reed of Cracker Trail Elementary School, Linda Roth of Park Elementary School, Ginger Keimel of Lake Country Elementary School, Linda Campbell of Lake Placid Elementary School, Lizette Epps of Memorial Elementary School, Elsie Scanlan of Sun N Lake Elementary School, (back, from left) Dawn Miller of Avon Elementary School, Leroy Roth of Park Elementary School, Julie Fowler of Woodlawn Elementary School, Arnold Davis of Avon Park Middle School, Suzanne Armand of Hill-Gustat Middle School, Heather Harshman of Lake Placid Middle School, Melanie Jackson of Avon Park High School and Victoria Stephenson of Sebring Middle School. Not present Tuesday were Lisa Collins of Fred Wild Elementary School, Debbie Albritton of the Kindergarten Learning Center and Reed Bowman and Charlotte Wilson, both of Sebring High School.SCHOOL sS HO nN OR TO pP VOLU nN TEER sS Special to the News-SunSEBRING Healthcare professionals at the S omers Hospice House routinely ask patients and families, Is there any thing else I can do for y ou? When a Good Shepherd Hospice social worker asked patient Bob Green that question, he had his standard answer ready. He jokingly responded, Why, yes. Id like to go for a ride in a Corvette. Little did he know that very day hed be driven around Sebring in a black-on-black, mintcondition 1998 Chevrolet Corvette. According to Becky Mc Intyre, chief clinical ofcer at Good Shepherd H ospice, the purpose of hospice care is to address the needs of patients at the end of life. Many times, our support goes beyond medications, sup plies and equipment, said McIntyre. When possible, we want to help patients fulll a dream or desire. Green, 64, casually men tioned his wish to social wor ker Sally Beck, which quickly put a plan into motion. Beck discussed this with coworkers, who got word to McIntyre. She called a Sebring business owner that she knows who owns a Corvette and ex plained Greens request. H e agreed to lend his clas sic car. Later that day, a member of G reens church pulled the Corvette into a parking space outside the Somers Hospice House for the ride around town. The weather was perfect for driving with the top down, breezy with a high of 89 degrees. The pair went on a 30-mile ride around Highlands Coun ty, driving by Sebring International Raceway and taking a slo w ride around the lake. Greens wife, Sharon, did her part. She called family and friends to tell them about the adventure and they lined the route to cheer on Bob. It was a pretty good crowd consid ering I had an hour and a half to plan, Sharon said. Green retired a year ago in December after a 15year career with the post ofce, another job tour ing with their triplet sons Chr istian music group and a position for 11 years at Advanced Auto Parts. But Green wanted to keep busy. He then start ed a lawn business in his T anglewood community, signing up 30 accounts. But Greens retirement plans took a turn when doctors recently diag nosed him with cancer. It just sho wed up, said Sha ron. G reen was admitted to the Somers Hospice House to get his symp toms under control before r eturning home. McIntyre stated that most patients coping with life-limiting illnesses want to be in fa miliar surroundings with family and fr iends. A hospice house allows patients to receive the focused care they need without unwanted tests and treatments, said Mc Intyre.Good Shepherd helps patient take dream ride CC ourtesy photoOn his ride around town in a 1998 Corvette, Bob Green stopped by the Sebring Raceway. Green, a patient with Good Shepherd Hospice, casually remarked that hed like to go for a ride in a Corvette. Staff members at the Somers Hospice House worked together to get him that ride.

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 11, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A5 NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927Romona Washington Publisher publisher@newssun.com Scott Dressel Editor editor@newssun.com VIEWPOINTS ANOTHER VIEW YOUR VIEWS Abusive and frivolous lawsuits brought by holders of patents are costing the American economy billions of dollars. Fortunately, Congress is on the case. A large bipartisan majority in the House approved a bill last year that would reduce such litigation; the Senate, where a similar bill is being negotiated, may soon follow. The patent system encourages innovation by giving inventors a temporary monopoly over their creation. But in the last two decades, as the number of patents issued by the Patent and Trademark Of ce has increased signi cantly, businesses are increasingly using patents to sue or threaten to sue other companies to get them to pay licensing fees. The number of patent cases increased 29 percent just in 2012, to nearly 5,200, according to PricewaterhouseCoopers. Various studies have shown that the cost of litigating these cases and paying licensing fees and damages amounts to billions of dollars a year, even though many of the patents at issue are so broad and vague that they should never have been granted in the rst place. Lawmakers are particularly concerned about cases in which patent owners sue small businesses like cafes and hotels for their use of technology for example, Internet routers made by Apple or Cisco Systems. The rms that bring these suits sometimes also sue the manufacturers of the equipment, but they often sue the users of technology since they know that many small businesses would rather settle than ght costly court cases. The Senate and House bills would allow manufacturers, which are in the best position to defend these cases, to step in and ght claims on behalf of their customers. The two bills differ on one important issue: legal fees. In an attempt to raise the cost of bringing frivolous lawsuits, the House bill would require plaintiffs who lose a patent case to pay the legal fees of the defendants unless a court determines that the case was reasonably justi ed or that special circumstances make an award unjust. Current law allows judges to award legal fees to defendants only in exceptional cases, which courts have interpreted very narrowly. Some lawmakers in the Senate, notably Patrick Leahy, Democrat of Vermont, are pushing for legislation that would give judges more discretion than the House bill would. Granting judges more freedom to award fees in patent cases can reduce the number of abusive cases. But Congress should be careful not to adopt a standard that is so tough that it effectively closes the courthouse door to small inventors, universities and other patent holders.An editorial from the New York Times. Bringing patent trolls into the light of dayMoving onI would like to say what a wonderful day and time I had last Sunday, April 6, at the Italian Festival in Ybor City. The festival started with Monsignor Higgins celebrating Holy Mass there in the Italian Cub. It was then followed by a procession venerating a statue of the Holy Family into Centennial Park. After that, there was live entertainment featuring Lena Prima, Tre Bella, Paul Salos, Johnny Charro & the Johnny Charro Dance Band, Salvador Live, Citta Dei Templi. There were more than 35 Bay area restaurants nd cateres serving from 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. This is all put on by the Lunione Italiana (Italian Club) of which I am a member. I have friends there to and miss our rich Italian culture and heritage. Tampa also has a great Latino Spanish culture and heritage and also has clubs and festivals in Ybor City to. I am half Italian and Spanish and miss my true culture and heritage. Here in Highlands County, Sebring used to have a Latin night at Quality Inn for a few years, and the new owners closed it. We also started an Italian Club for a few years and that folded and closed, too. I am sorry folks, I have nothing bad to say about Highlands County, but feel very lonely here and I have certain health problems. Tampa is a much easier and better place for me to live, so I am planning to move back to the coast by the end of this year. I have many good friends here and I will come back to visit Sebring for a few days once a month. I will write another letter to you all again. I love you all much. Take care and may God bless each and everyone of you.RENALDO FERNANDEZ MILIISebringReelection campaignIn his reelection campaign, Gov. Scott is again crying poor mouth, his humble origins, demonstrating he is one of us, a man of the people. The Governor who bought his last election by spending $75 million of his own dollars made his fortune in a health care swindle in Texas, which set a record for fraud and paid $600 million in nes. Getting out of town as an almost unindicted co-conspirator, Scott arrived in Florida as a well-funded carpetbagger. In of ce, Scott wasted millions of state funds in incentive programs giving large grants of money to corporations, no strings attached, while sponsoring programs to cut pensions for teachers, police and remen at all levels of government in Florida. Now is campaign mode, he daily nds small concessions to win votes (reduction of auto tag fees) while proposing more grants to corporations. Meanwhile, his minions in the legislature are drafting bills to destroy the Florida Retirement System, converting it to an investment plan similar to George Bushs plan to destroy social security by privatizing it into savings accounts. Scott and the Florida Legislature refuse to acknowledge that pension plans are a security device, paid for by a lifetime of hard work and loyal service. Converting them to something akin to a lottery ticket and calling it an investment account is a sham and a disservice to thousands of hard working civil servants. Our economic chameleon governor is one again prepared to throw most of us under the bus in order to support his corporate interests.RANDY LUDACERLake PlacidRing. Ring. Hello, this is Tom. We know who you are, Tom. In the digital age, you will be shocked by what we know about you. Who is this? The National Security Agency? I thought President Obama issued orders to rein you in! Thats a good one, Tom. Obama told the NSA to stop storing bulk phone records on millions of Americans. The NSA can easily access that information through phone companies. Im not from the NSA, however. Then who are you and what do you want? What is more important, Tom, is who are you and what do you want? Lots of government and private organizations are interested in that information and you are making it easy for them to get it. I have given no one permission to access my information! Really, Tom? Didnt you hand over your address, Social Security number and other information to buy a car, get a credit card, apply for a job or vote? Maybe a few times. Did you know that since 1961, various Congresses and presidential administrations have enacted more than 40 laws, regulations and policies that require the use of Social Security numbers? That is a godsend to people like me and that was before the digital era made my job easier! What do you mean? Every website you visit, every online purchase you make, every email, text or online comment you make leaves an incredibly rich electronic trail that de nes who you are and what you do. You are bluf ng. Really, Tom? That 32-year-old Bolivian ight attendant youve been irting with on Facebook? What about her? Hes 45 and hes an undercover surveillance expert for a large retail out t. Oh. My. God. You should be more careful with your password selections, Tom. It took me less than a minute to access your credit card account. Only a fool would use , the worst password of 2013, according to PC World. You are invading my right to privacy. Really, Tom? There is no mention of any right to privacy in the U.S. Constitution. Sure, the Fourth Amendment stops the police and other government agents from searching our property without probable cause. And, says the American Civil Liberties Union, other amendments protect our freedom to make certain decisions about our bodies and our private lives without interference from the government. But a speci c right to privacy does not exist. You must be breaking some law! Thats a good one, too, Tom. There are no laws to prevent us from knowing about you particularly when you so willingly hand over so much private information to so many strangers! You have no idea how vulnerable you are! Vulnerable? Identity theft is a growing problem, Tom. The personal information you willingly gave about yourself exists forever in the digital ecosystem. That gives savvy technical people lots of opportunities to steal your identity and destroy your nances. I didnt realize it was that easy. Identity theft is less worrisome than what government entities could do to you. Look how the IRS has been used to attack political enemies. Now imagine what government entities can do when they know EVERYTHING about you! Thats why I called you today, Tom. I called to help you. Help me how? You know those new anti-terrorist scanners they use at the airports? Well, at your age, you might want to consider switching from briefs to boxers. That, sir, is an outrage. I demand to know who you are and what you want! Sorry, Tom. That information is private.Tom Purcell, author of Misadventures of a 1970s Childhood and Comical Sense: A Lone Humorist Takes on a World Gone Nutty! is a Pittsburgh Tribune-Review humor columnist. Send comments to Tom at Purcell@caglecartoons.com. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the News-Sun staff.Right to privacy? Surely you jest! GUEST COLUMNTom Purcell LETTERS TO THE EDITORShoulde be 250 words or less and must contain the writers full name, address and telephone number for veri cation. We reserve the right to edit or reject letters for clarity, length, taste and libel. Submission does not guarantee publication. Only two letters per month per writer will be accepted. Send letters to:EMAILeditor@newssun.comMAILLetters to the Editor 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870

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A6 | NEWSSS U nN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com Downtown Sebring hosts Second Friday Wine WalkSEBRING Destination Downtown Sebring (DDS) continues its celebration of spring with an April Wine Walk from 5-8 / p.m. today. Participating galler ies, stores and boutiques will featur e one-of-a-kind art, home decor, jewelry, and gifts available for pur chase as well as music, en tertainment, exhibits, and special dr awings. Pick up the list of par ticipating Wine Walk mer chants and organizations at the Highlands Art League s Yellow House Gallery & Gift Shop, 1989 Lakeview Drive. Stroll the Circle and the Cultural Center while participating merchants provide free wine. No glass purchase necessary. Held the second Friday of each month, Sebrings Downtown comes alive with the unique and en joyable Destination Do wntown Sebrings monthly themed events. For details about the event and participating stores, visit www.Destination DowntownSebring. com. This event is co-sponsored by the Sebring Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA).Calvarys Hill Quartet sings at DeesSSEBRING Calvarys Hill Quartet will pro vide a free Christian G ospel concert at Dees Place Restaurant, 138 N. Ridgewood Drive, at 6 / p.m. Saturday. The food and concert are free but donations are greatly appreciated. Call 471-2228 for reservations.APHS Project Graduation plans raffleAVON PARK A gun rafe is planned to support Avon Park High School Project Graduation. To see the AR-15 gun rafe, visit Boom Booms Guns and Ammo in Sebring. Tickets are $10. Contact Doreen Pearlman at 4430602 or tickets can be pur chased at Boom Booms.Car show set at Shelby CrossingSEBRING The Shops at Shelby Crossing will host a Spring Car Show and Pet Adoption event from 10 / a.m. to 4 / p.m. Saturday. Registration for the car and truck show is $10. The show will feature an tiques, classics, muscle, spor ts cars and more. There will be pet adop tions, music and food. E nter your pet in a con test recognizing the Best D ressed, Unique, Best Trick and Funniest.Pancake breakfast plannedSEBRING There will be a pancake breakfast from 8-10 / a.m. Saturday at the Sebring Hills Clubhouse, 200 Lark Ave. All the pancakes, sausage, orange juice, coffee or tea you want for only $3 for members and $3.50 for non-members.Good Stuff to appear at TanglewoodSEBRING The father and daughter duo of T ony and Trish, better known as Good Stuff, will be performing at the Tanglewood dance on Saturday. The duo just re turned from a western C aribbean cruise where they were one of the fea tured entertainers on the C arnival ship Paradise. Dance is from 7-10 / p.m. Saturday. Admission is $6. Bring your own beverage; ice is provided. Tanglewood is one mile north of Walmart on U.S. 27. SNAPs S HOTs S LOCA lL NEWS Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The Aktion Club of Highlands C ounty collected 11,083 diapers, 6,084 wipes and 20 baby blankets to help 10 local charities. A total of $1,329.40 was collected in cash and that was converted into diapers and wipes pur chased from Diapers. com. That shipment ar rived April 7, in time for all the char ities to receive their equal share of dia pers on April 10. The response has been overwhelming from our community and very much appre ciated by all the charities being helped, Aktion Club advisor Cindy M arshall said. When we organized this proj ect, we never dreamed it would be this huge but we are glad everyone had such big hearts. No baby should be left laying in a soggy wet diaper just be cause a family cant afford to buy them. All of these char ities reach out to help families in need. The club kicked off the campaign on March 20 with the members bring ing in their donations of 6,938 diapers and $335.27 in cash. The Aktion Club consists of 65 members who are all adults with disabilities who do civic projects in the commu nity. M arshall challenged the club members to see who could bring in the most diapers. The winner will be treated to a mov ie complete with snacks and a dr ink. Bill Sobczak, of Se bring, took that lead and maintained it thr oughout the campaign. He col lected 1,115 diapers and $642.48 in cash, which converted to diapers brought his total to 4,035 diapers. Sobczak received assis tance from his co-workers at Publix in Sebring and fr om residents at his mobile home commu nity, Leisure Acres in Sebring. The club then or ga nized Diaper Dump D ay on March 29, which brought in $994.13 in cash, 3,212 diapers and the blankets. There were 15 club members and four volunteers from the charities working along U.S. 27 in front of Florida Hospital Heartland Medi cal Center in Sebring collecting cash in milk jug canisters A tent was set up along the road for the diaper dump off. The Highlands Coun ty Sheriffs Ofce contributed to the Diaper Dump D ay by collecting 2,400 diapers and more than $100 in cash. Courtney Godbold, with the sher iffs nance department, spear headed their effort. Im a single mom with two boys. One is 10 months old and one is 6 years old. I know how hard it is to buy diapers. They are expensive, Godbold said. I sent out emails and handed ev erybody a yer. They just came pour ing in, she added. Godbold also brought the blankets that were made by the Hands of Love group at Lake Bon net Village in Avon Park. This is a gr oup of la dies from that community who meet weekly for thr ee months to sew or make items needed in the community. Aktion Cub president Elizabeth Jordon was able to solicit the help of Comfort Keepers who do nated 1,257 adult diapers. Those diapers will benet charities like Ridge Area Arc and Nu-Hope Elder Care Services Inc. The eight different childrens charities that equally received 9,826 baby diapers, 6,084 baby wipes and 20 blankets were Avon Park Commu nity Child Development C enter, Childrens Advo cacy Center, Family Safehouse, Guardian ad Litem, Healthy Families, H ealthy Start, One Hope United and Gulf Coast Early Steps Program. The Aktion Club will make this an annual event for the local chari ties. Any one wishing to help can call the club at 4521295, ext. 124.Aktion Club dumps 11,000-plus diapers onto 10 local charities CC ourtesy photoThe Aktion Club of Highlands County distributed 11,083 diapers, 6,084 wipes and 20 baby blankets on April 10 to 10 local charities. Representatives from the charities beneting from the clubs March 29 Diaper Dump Day are (from left) Karen Wright, of Childrens Services Council of Highlands County; Cynthia Acevedo, program manager, and Wanda Tookes, supervisor, both of Healthy Families; Wendy Hall, service coordinator of Early Steps; Bill Sobczak, vice president of Aktion Club and top diaper collector; Tikia Lodge, ofce manager and family support worker with Avon Park Community Child Development Center; Alyssa Steger, records specialist, and Rebecca Brownell, family support worker, both of One Hope United; Sherrie Schwab, director of Victim Services at Peace River Center for the Family Safehouse; Candice Ciesla, director of programs and services for Ridge Area Arc; Ralph Meyers and Eva Monk, Diaper Dump chairpersons for Aktion Club; and Renee Grider, child advocate coordinator for Guardian ad Litem Program. Representatives from Nu-Hope Elder Care Services and Healthy Families also received diapers but were not present for the photo.JA nN ET W W HITAKERJanet H. Whitaker, 68, of Ocklawaha passed away April 5, 2014 at The Villages Re gional Hospital. She was bor n on Oct. 25, 1945 in Bethesda, Md. to Floyd and Mary Holton. Janet enjoyed spending time outdoors gardening and enjoying wildlife. She also enjoyed painting, liq uid embroidery, and attending auctions and ea mar kets. Janet is survived by her son, Larry Whitaker of Ock lawaha; her daughter, Sharon Whitaker of Okeechobee; Georgia Lee McDaniel of Ja y; Juanita Kindrick of Spartan burg, S.C.; Donald Holton of Sebring; Bennie Holton of Sebring; Donna Goodwin of Sebring; Barba ra Schroeder of Sebring; and Eugene Bengston of Sebring She w as preced ed in death by her husband, Travis L. Whitaker; her par ents, Floyd and Mary Holton; and two brothers, Dean and John. The family will receive friends at Hiers-Baxley Fu neral Services, Belleview on Saturda y, April 12 from 3-5 / p.m. WW HITAKER OBITUARIES MIAMI (AP) Floridas Republican lawmakers re main staunchly opposed to expanding M edicaid a system theyve repeat edly said is too expensive and doesnt improve health outcomes Yet Flor idas Medicaid rolls are expanding under the Af fordable Care Act. That s because peo ple trying to sign up for health insur ance under Obamas new health law are nding out to their surprise that they qual ify for Medicaid, the federal health insurance program for the poor. S ome 245,000 Florid ians were added to the M edicaid rolls between October and the end of February. Thats a more than 8 percent increase. The Sunshine State is one of ten states that account ed for more than 80 per cent of the 3 million new M edicaid enrollees un der the Affordable Care A ct, according to Avalere Health, a market research and consulting rm. But Florida was the only state of the ten, which include California, Oregon and Washington, that didnt expand Medicaid. Floridas newest enroll ees include more than 51,000 childr en, accord ing to health advocacy gr oup Florida CHAIN. As parents began apply ing for their own health co verage under the Af fordable Care Act, they disco vered that their chil dren were eligible for M edicaid or the Chil drens Health Insurance P rogram (CHIP). Many werent enrolled. It has been an eye opening experience to learn how many families were not aware that their children could be covered for health care and heartwarming to give them the good news. I see imme diate relief and gratitude in their ey es and words, said Lynne Thorp, an en rollment counselor in F ort Myers. Lawmakers repeated ly acknowledged last year that the massiv e adver tising campaigns, enrollment drives and celebrity endorsements surr ound ing Obamas health law would likely lead to an in crease in regular Medicaid enrollment. That s what happened to Donna Refuse, 44, when she tried to sign up for insurance as the mar ketplace rst opened in early O ctober. The unem ployed Miami mother of two thought that people without an income like herself would have ac cess to affordable insur ance. R efuse was shocked when she was informed that she didnt qualify for a tax credit under the health care law but she learned that she did qual ify for Medicaid. It makes me feel bet ter. Now I can go to a doctor and see if anything is wr ong, said Refuse. Lawmakers will have to grapple with the fact that the states Medicaid costs will rise. The state has to pay 40 percent of the cost.Medicaid enrollment rises 8 percent TALLAHASSEE (AP) The Supreme Court de nied an appeal for a man scheduled to be execut ed April 23 for killing his cousin and his cousin s wife to prevent him from testifying in a burglary case. Lawyers for Robert Eu gene Hendrix say that the judge at his mur der trial was biased and he had an ineffective law yer. H endrix, and his cous in, Elmer Scott, were ar rested for breaking into a house in 1990. Scott ac cepted a plea deal that would keep him out of prison if he testied against Hendrix. Before the case went to court, Hendrix went to Scotts Lake County home. Prosecutors say he shot Scott in the head and slashed the throat of his wife, Michelle.Court denies appeal of man to be executed

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 11, 2014 | NEWSSS U nN | A7 that would be the highest statewide drop rate of any non-hurricane, non-freeze season since the 1969-70 harvest year. Orange harvesting ends in June, and if the crop doesnt decline further, it will barely exceed the 110.2 million orange box es harvested in 1989-90 follo wing the worst freeze in Florida citrus history. The report also shows the second smallest fruit size dating back to the 1960-61 harvest year. Florida had an estimat ed 66 percent of the total U.S. market share last y ear. Approximately 95 percent of the states or ange crop is used for juice. CITRUS FROM PAGE A A 1budget. Thats a tough issue, but I know I can help with that. I not only hav e an interest in the money side of things, but on ev ery level. Its important to understand all the con cerns of the teachers, the administr ators and the district board members. I listen and I have heard some concerns from some of the teachers. I want to have a voice for them as well. I feel (candi dates) should all be familiar with every level of the distr ict, Stephenson said. Growing up in High lands County and now r aising children here, Ste phenson has a deep love and connection with the area. Along with his loyal ty to the county, Stephenson said the new owners of the R aceway also fac tored into his decision to r un for ofce. This new company I work for (NASCAR) wants us all to be leaders in our community. This commu nity has been very good to me From the time I was at Woodlawn Elementary to wrestling championships at Sebring High School, Ive had so much support. That, plus a job that allo ws me to be a leader. I knew this was the next step for me, Stephenson said. Im an out-of-thebox thinker. I believe I would be a good t for the school board. Its a really great school system, but we are facing many chal lenges. Ive got a lot of wor k to do, but I am ful ly committed to this position, said Stephenson. This is not going to be taken lightly by me.Samantha Gholar can be reached at samantha.gholar@newssun. com or 385-6155 ext: 526. SCHOOL FROM PAGE A A 1monitoring cameras and other equipment. In issuing the docu ment, DJJ ofcials said they are committed to applying the lessons learned to ensure the youth we serve are pro vided the right services in the r ight way at the right time in order to fulll our mission of reducing juve nile delinquency and increasing public safety. The incident appar ently revolved around a game of basketball between ri val teams from St. Petersburg and Orlando. The r eport indicated that a donnybrook ensued af ter the game. However, whether it was because the losing team refused to pay up a wager remains unconrmed. As word of the ght spread, the analysis said, more of the youth joined in on the altercation. De spite efforts by staff, it then got out of contr ol. After a call to the Avon Park Bombing Range Fire Department, emer gency 911 dispatch was called. I n all, some 150 law enforcement per sonnel from Highlands, O sceola and Polk coun ties responded along with F lorida Highway Pa trol troopers, the Florida F ish and Wildlife Conser vation Commission the S tate Fire Marshals Ofce and the Sebring Police Department, as well as the Polk County Fire and Emergency Management Service. In all, 61 youth at the facility since have been charged with varying of fenses in connection with the incident. D amage to the complex has been set at $350,000 although in surance coverage paid less than $47,000. I n a cover letter, DJJ of cials indicated they have alr eady taken correc tive action such as the installation of surveillance camer as throughout the facility, decreasing the program size by cutting the facility from 144 beds to 80 beds, increasing the staff-to-youth ratio and a review of the training procedures at the Youth Academy. As part of the report, the Inspector Gener als Ofce noted currently there are no specics as to what that tr aining should include. The report recom mended that among other things, the Riot and M ajor Disturbance Plan should be updated and that the staff should coor dinate and participate in tr aining and practice sce nario drills. RIOT FROM PAGE A A 1 Samantha Gholar/News Sun PP atricia A A ustin (left) and E E dwin P P adillo rally outside the Highlands County Cour thouse Thursday morning hoping to gain the support of local residents in their ght to change laws regarding child support enforcement. FIxing a broken system is the main goal of A A ustin, who supports P P adillo, a father whose driver license privileges were revoked after falling behind on child support payments. P P adillo stated that he w as bullied and ridiculed in the court room. Im ghting for everyone not just myself. We shouldnt be threatened or belittled when we enter the courtroom, P P adillo said. M M ore rallies are scheduled in the coming weeks and supporters may contact AA ustin to become a part of the Drive to P P rovide movement at 443-7733.RALLY FO rR CHILD sS UPPO rR T CHA ngNG E sS customer service, business operations and both teamwor k and problem solving. When they are done, each student could earn certication as a produc tion technician, which would allo w them to work a production line of any type, anywhere, said John Rousch, wood shop in structor at Lake Placid H igh School and head of the Chair Company. Rousch, who has also served as the district-lev el coordinator for development of vocational education policy, told the boar d that while students have challenges keeping up with changes in man ufacturing and marketing methods, the students also need a r eason to stay in Highlands County. The county, in turn, needs skilled workers to attract new industry. Donna Doubleday of the Heartland Workforce In vestment Board stated in a pr ess release that Flori da ranks among the top 10 states for companies man ufacturing a wide range of goods and manufactur ing has been designated as a tar geted industry for Highlands and surround ing counties. H owever, businesses wont come if they cant nd enough skilled local labor, Rousch said. We want to keep the kids here, Rousch said. We want to give them good jobs. Rousch will team-teach the academy with Scott Morgan, LPHS business education instructor. They want community partners to come forward and help sponsor the program. Board member Don na Howerton asked if this was a rst for F lorida, and Rousch believes it may be. Lake Placid High marked itself on the na tional map 12 years ago b y establishing the Chair Company to sell Adiron dack chair kits online as a way of defr aying sup plies costs, Rousch said. The chairs gained popu larity because the kit sales helped suppor t education. I have two of these chairs, Howerton said. If I would have thought about it, (Id) get one more. The company and chairs also have been the sub ject of a segment of Ron H azelton Home Improve ment Online, Rousch said. When eB ay changed its policy disallowing ca shiers checks or money or ders, sales dropped to local sales and some re peat out-of-state customers, Rousch said. Lumber pr ices had tripled, which cut into prot margins for each $79 pinewood kit. Students would learn how to market the chairs online and sell them in ways that can overcome such challenges, he said. Rousch said he serves as the CEO of the company, who talks to the student foreman a rotating po sition, l ike all of the work stations who then giv es marching orders to the other students. Students are eager to become fore man until they learn that ev erything that goes on, or goes wrong, becomes their responsibility, he said. Because each handcrafted and hand-assem bled chair goes through six or sev en students, its inspected for quality that many times, Rousch said. That will help them appre ciate quality work. R otating through the work stations also helps each student learn the complete manufacturing process, he said. Thats part of the (com pany) design, Rousch said. F or details on the pro gram or to be a business par tner, contact Rousch at Lake Placid High at 863699-5010, ext. 247 or email rouschj@highlands.k12. .us. CHAIR FROM PAGE A A 1 CC ourtesy photo AA n AA ugust riot at the AA von P P ar k Youth A A cademy did an estimated $350,000 in damage.

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A8 | NEWSSS U nN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com PAIGE SUTHERLANDAssociated PressBOSTON Every time Roseann Sdoia comes home, she must climb 18 steps six stairs into the building, another 12 to her apartment. It is an old building in Bostons North End, with doors that are big and heavy, not an easy place for an amputee to live. When she left the hos pital, a month after the B oston marathon bomb ing, she had a choice: She could nd another place to live, one more suitable for someone who wears a prosthetic that replaces most of her right leg. Or, she could stay. Early on when all this happened, so many peo ple were telling me to mo ve out of the city and move out of my apart ment because of the stairs and I don t have an ele vator and parking is not v ery convenient, she re calls. But I have been able to get past all of that. In that, she mirrors Bos ton itself. I have to tell you, hon estly, Boston is a better city no w than it was be fore, says Thomas Menino, Bostons former may or. People learned how to deal with each other they had to deal with a tragedy. Not that its been easy. Three people were killed that day, and more than 260 were injured, and the legacy of trauma and lost limbs remains as does the shock of having en dured a terrorist attack on M arathon Monday. Nor can Bostonians forget the fear that gripped a city locked down in the midst of a manhunt. But Boston has been able to get past all of that. Copley Square is no longer littered with im promptu tributes to the dead and injur ed; theyre now on display in an ex hibit at the Boston Public Library, where Robert White of L ynn saw mean ing in every teddy bear and pair of sneakers: Ev ery last one of the items says Boston Strong or I will return next year. --Sdoia is 46 years old, a vice president of property management for a Boston development company. She is a cheerful woman; she smiles broadly when she arrives at the Spauld ing Rehabilitation Hospital in Charlestown for physical ther apy. Its just my nature, she says. Im not a negative person. Im not a Debbie Downer. Still, she says, she cries every day. What is sinking in is that life has changed, she says, her face awash with tears. Sdoia is a runner, but she did not take part in the marathon. She was at the nish line on April 15, rooting for friends in the race, when the sec ond bomb went off. Aside fr om her leg injury, she suffered hearing loss. Other than losing the bottom of my right leg, Im still me, she says. I havent changed, I am still the same person I was be fore. And y et, so much has changed. She had to take more leave from the job she loved. Winter, and snow, were tough to han dle. Shes had to tackle daily tasks sho wering, vacuuming differently. Marc Fucarile, a 35-year-old roofer from Stoneham, also lost his right leg from above the knee; he has shrapnel in his heart, and still could lose his left leg. Everything has changed, he says. How I use the bathroom, how I shower, how I brush my teeth, how I get in and out of bed. His 6-year-old son, Gavin, does not always understand. Gavin is like, Hey, you want to go out and play? and Im like, Theres a foot of snow. I cant do snow. Were not going out and playing right now, sorry buddy. It breaks my heart. --In the rst three months after the explosions, the One Fund collected near ly $61 million in donations. In the next ve months another $12 mil lion in contributions came in. This big-hear tedness was mirrored by a sort of proud deance, exempli ed by Boston Strong. The amount of mer chan dise bearing the slogan was astonishing. In the immediate after math of the bombings, it became a peaceful mantra that people could repeat and believe in. And if they said it enough, tweeted it enough, hashtagged it enough, it would actually be true, says Dan Soleau, a brand de velopment manager for M arathon Sports. Jennifer Lawrence, a social worker at Bos ton Medical Center, says the emphasis on Bos ton Strong had had some unhapp y consequences. A lot of it is portraying that people are so resil ient and so strong. While that is absolutely tr ue, we are neglecting that peo ple still have hard days, she said. I n the aftermath of the bombings, more than 600 people took advantage of the medical centers mental health services. And while most needed no help after the rst few months, she has seen an increase in demand in re cent weeks, as the anniversary approached. S till, she says a vast majority of those who came through the hospi tals programs intend to attend this y ears mara thon, either as bystanders or r unners. Nicole Lynch will be there. Her brother, Sean Collier, was the MIT of cer who was shot to death, allegedly b y the two suspects in the bombings. She will be at the race with Team Collier Strong a group of 25 friends and family mem bers, including two of her siblings who will run to raise money for a scholar ship fund to put one per son a year through law enfor cement training. William Evans will be there, but he has little choice. He has run the marathon 18 times in cluding last year but this time he will be ther e as police commission er, supervising beefed-up secur ity including more than 3,500 police of cers (more than twice last y ears force), more securi ty cameras, more bombsnifng dogs and restric tions on the kinds of bags r unners and spectators can bring. It weighs heavy on my mind, that I want this to go off well, he says. I dont want anyone hurt. I dont ever want a repeat of the tragedy we saw that day.Reporters Denise Lavoie, Steve LeBlanc, Philip Marcelo and Bob Salsberg contributed to this story.A year after, Boston and its people heal Alana Semuels/Los Angeles Times/MCTLiz Norden, left, and one of her ve sons, J.P., sit on a couch in the living room of her apartment in Stoneham, Mass. Norden moved into a ground oor apartment so her sons, each of whom lost a leg in the Boston Marathon bombings, could get around more easily. I have to tell you, honestly, Boston is a better city now than it was before. People learned how to deal with each other, they had to deal with a tragedy.Thomas Menino former Boston mayor

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 11, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A9 SPORTsS FISHIN AROUNDDon Norton BY DON NORTONSpecial to the News-SunLast week, a customer came into the store and told me about his friend who had caught a largemouth bass weighing over 21 pounds. Its not unusual for me to hear about big sh being caught from customers, and often the stories are accompanied by pictures. But a 21 pound bass? That I dont hear very often. Why is this so hard to believe? Well, George Perry, who caught the world record largemouth bass, a 22-pound, 4-ounce lunker held the record for well over 60 years before a sherman in Japan, Manabu Kurita, caught and certied a bass from Lake Biwa (Japan) weighing only one ounce more. At 22 pounds and 5 ounces, which according to the record keepers only qualies as a tie (new records must be 2 ounces or greater than the previous set record), provided even more evidence that under the right conditions, there is a possibility of a bass growing to such huge dimensions. After I listened to the story told by my customer, I believe its true. Actually, I believe he believes its true. I guess Id have to say I believe its possible. According to him, his friend owns a number of small ponds, all of which hold some pretty big bass. Of course he didnt tell me where these ponds are, although he did mention Avon Park, and then later in the conversation, Frostproof. He claims the sh was weighed on a scale that listed the weight at 9.9 kg. For some reason the scale did not work in the pounds and ounces selector. One km converts to 2.204622622 pounds. If you convert 9.9 kg to pounds and ounces youre talking about a bass that weighed 21.13 ounces just eight ounces short of the world record. Its interesting to note that Doug Hannon, often called the Bass Professor, wrote often about his belief that a world record bass would most likely come from a 150-mile range of his Tampa home. In his opinion, south Florida, specically Lake Okeechobee was not a likely site for a bass to grow that large due to the high water temperatures during the summer, causing the metabolism of the bass to increase, which in turn causes rapid growth but often, premature death. North Florida was also ruled out since the water temperatures often fall too low for longer periods of time, causing the basss metabolism to slow down, thus allowing them to live longer, but grow at a slower rate. According to Hannon, the 150 radius of Tampa offers the ideal water conditions year round. Water temperatures typically do not get too hot, or too cold, allowing sh the opportunity to live in fairly stable conditions, extending their life as well as their growth opportunities. In the April 2014 issue of BassMaster Magazine, James Hall wrote a nice article about Dr. Gary Schwarz, owner of the El Tecomate Ranch near Lar edo, Texas. Deer hunters may recognize the name of Dr. Schwarz from way back in 1983 when he pioneered the concept of food plots that could improve the antler growth and body size of deer. He developed a food plot seed called Lablab and eventually created the Tecomate Seed Company. No one believed his claim that he could greatly improve the size of whitetail deer, but by 2000, Schwarz and the El Tecomate Ranch had grown world-record-class deer topping 200 inches. A few miles northwest of the El Tecomate Ranch sits La Perla Ranch. Schwarz purchased the property as an investment in 2005 and within a short period of time, brought in John Jones, owner of World record largemouth bass? Courtesy photoManabu Kurita and his record-tying largemouth bass. SEE BASS | A11 BY DAN HOEHNEdaniel.hoehne@newssun.comAVON PARK The Red Devils left no doubt who reigns supreme in the District 9-4A standings, as they nished off the district schedule Wednesday night with an 8-3 win over visiting Mulberry. Tuesdays rains pushed the contest back a day, but Avon Park wasted little time in getting things going. After Daniel Simons worked a one-two-three top of the rst, Alfred Brown tripled to left to lead off the bottom half. He would come in one out later when Tyrone Perry plastered a double deep in the left-center eld gap. Simons surrendered a walk and single in the top of the second, but came back strong in striking out the next three batters. The Devils then broke it open in their next at bat. With the bases loaded and one out, Brown singled home Alex Gomez before Luis Martinez rocketed one to center that went for a three-run double. One out later, Mykel Gordon singled Martinez home and Mulber ry was looking up at a 6-0 decit. The Panthers did scratch for two in the Devils lock up district Dan Hoehne/News-SunTrey Frazier crosses home plate with Alfred Brown hot on his heels as two of the three runs Luis Martinez knocked in with a double in Wednesdays win.AVON PARK8MULBERRY3SEE DEVILS | A12 BY DAN HOEHNEdaniel.hoehne@newssun.comIt was more than a decade in the making, from an unlikely group of Sebring tennis players. But the 2014 edition of Lady Blue Streak tennis pulled off a Class 2A Regional win Tuesday, stunning Golden Gate by a 5-2 match score. With only Nisha Patel as an experienced, fulledged varsity starter from a season ago, a rebuilding sort of season might have been expected. But while a consistent Lady Streaks pull of Regional win Courtesy photoFor the rst time in more than a decade, the Lady Streaks picked up a regional tennis win. All smiles af ter the victory over Golden Gate, from left, Ashley Castelli, Amanda Rios, Micaela DeVane, Nisha Patel, Sarah Beth Rogers, Alaina Keith and head coach Janie Hollinger. SEE SEBRING | A12 BY BARRY FOSTERSpecial to the News-SunSEBRING There will be reworks on Independence Day week end at the Sebring International Raceway but it will have nothing to do with pyrotechnics. The 24 Hours of LeMons has announced the series will make its debut at the storied airport race course July 5-6. Its called the Humidi TT the TT being time trials. Its a play on that and your summertime weath er, said 24 Hours of LeMons Associate Perpetrator Nick Pons from his ofce in California. Like a similar series known as the ChumpCar World Series which also has raced at Sebring, the LeMons group conducts endurance rac es for cars valued at no more than $500. The group also lays claim to be ing the rst of its kind. We actually staged our initial race in October of 2006 at the old Altamonte Speedway here in California, Pons said.It was supposed to be a one-time thing. We never thought it would snowball into this. The 24 Hours of LeMons now has burgeoned from that one-off event to a 19-race series. Another feature that sets LeM-24 Hours of LeMons coming to SIR Courtesy photoCars of all shapes, sizes, styles and adornments will be on hand as the 24 Hours of LeMons debuts at Sebring International Raceway in July. SEE LEMONS | A12

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A10 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com COMING UP High School Baseball Today Avon Park vs. Booker, 7 p.m.; Sebring vs. Hardee, 7 p.m. College Baseball Today SFSC vs. Polk State, 6 p.m. Saturday SFSC at Polk State, 1 p.m. High School Softball Today Avon Park vs. Liberty, 6/7:30 p.m.; Lake Placid at All Saints, 6 p.m. TODAYAUTO RACING %  en NASCAR VFW Sport Clips 200 8 p.m. ESPN2 BOXING %  en Giovanni Lorenzo vs. Gilberto Ramirez 10 p.m. ESPN2 GOLF %  en 2014 Masters Tournament 3 p.m. ESPN MLB %  en Tampa Bay at Cincinnati 7 p.m. SUN NBA %  en Detroit at Chicago 8 p.m. WGN SATURDAYAUTO RACING %  en NASCAR Bojangles Southern 500 6 p.m. FO X %  en NHRA Four-Wide Nationals, Qualifying 9 p.m. ESPN2 COLLEGE BASEBALL %  en Arkansas at LSU 1 p.m. ESPN2 COLLEGE HOCKEY %  en NCAA Tournament Final 7:30 p.m. ESPN GOLF %  en 2014 Masters Tournament 3 p.m. CBS MLB %  en Tampa Bay at Cincinnati 1 p.m. SUN %  en Cleveland at Chicago White Sox 2 p.m. WGN NHL %  en Philadelphia at Pittsburgh 3 p.m. NBC SPORTS ON TV STANDINGS National Basketball Association EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB x-Toronto 46 32 .590 x-Brooklyn 43 35 .551 3 New York 33 45 .423 13 Boston 23 55 .295 23 Philadelphia 17 61 .218 29 Southeast W L Pct GB y-Miami 53 25 .679 x-Charlotte 40 38 .513 13 x-Washington 40 38 .513 13 Atlanta 35 43 .449 18 Orlando 23 55 .295 30 Central W L Pct GB y-Indiana 54 25 .684 x-Chicago 46 32 .590 7 Cleveland 32 47 .405 22 Detroit 29 50 .367 25 Milwaukee 14 64 .179 39 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB y-San Antonio 60 18 .769 x-Houston 52 26 .667 8 Dallas 48 31 .608 12 Memphis 46 32 .590 14 New Orleans 32 46 .410 28 Northwest W L Pct GB y-Oklahoma City 57 21 .731 x-Portland 51 28 .646 6 Minnesota 39 39 .500 18 Denver 34 44 .436 23 Utah 24 54 .308 33 Pacic W L Pct GB y-L.A. Clippers 55 24 .696 Golden State 48 29 .623 6 Phoenix 47 31 .603 7 Sacramento 27 52 .342 28 L.A. Lakers 25 53 .321 29 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Fridays Games Washington at Orlando, 7 / p.m. New York at Toronto, 7 / p.m. Atlanta at Brooklyn, 7:30 / p.m. Charlotte at Boston, 7:30 / p.m. Indiana at Miami, 7:30 / p.m. Detroit at Chicago, 8 / p.m. Houston at Minnesota, 8 / p.m. New Orleans at Oklahoma City, 8 / p.m. Philadelphia at Memphis, 8 / p.m. Cleveland at Milwaukee, 8:30 / p.m. Phoenix at San Antonio, 8:30 / p.m. Portland at Utah, 9 / p.m. Golden State at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 / p.m. LEAGUE LEADERS Scoring G FG FT PTS AVG Durant, OKC 77 803 669 2461 32.0 Anthony, NYK 75 728 444 2065 27.5 James, MIA 75 746 423 2026 27.0 Love, MIN 74 623 482 1908 25.8 Harden, HOU 70 528 543 1769 25.3 Grifn, LAC 78 700 468 1879 24.1 Curry, GOL 74 606 287 1740 23.5 Aldridge, POR 67 633 290 1559 23.3 DeRozan, TOR 76 586 494 1726 22.7 Cousins, SAC 69 566 415 1547 22.4 George, IND 78 564 391 1695 21.7 Jefferson, CHA 69 656 181 1496 21.7 Nowitzki, DAL 77 605 328 1663 21.6 Irving, CLE 68 519 276 1436 21.1 Lillard, POR 79 543 362 1657 21.0 Davis, NOR 67 522 348 1394 20.8 Thomas, SAC 70 488 345 1447 20.7 Dragic, PHX 74 540 313 1515 20.5 Gay, SAC 71 528 315 1435 20.2 Wall, WAS 78 562 308 1539 19.7 National Hockey LeagueEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA z-Boston 79 53 18 8 114 254 171 x-Montreal 80 45 27 8 98 214 202 x-Tampa Bay 79 43 27 9 95 232 211 x-Detroit 80 38 27 15 91 218 228 Toronto 80 38 34 8 84 229 251 Ottawa 79 34 31 14 82 230 262 Florida 80 28 44 8 64 190 263 Buffalo 79 21 49 9 51 152 238 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Pittsburgh 80 51 24 5 107 244 200 x-N.Y. Rangers 80 44 31 5 93 216 191 x-Philadelphia 79 41 29 9 91 225 222 x-Columbus 80 42 31 7 91 226 211 Washington 79 36 30 13 85 226 237 New Jersey 79 34 29 16 84 191 201 Carolina 79 34 34 11 79 197 219 N.Y. Islanders 79 31 37 11 73 216 262 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-St. Louis 79 52 20 7 111 246 181 x-Colorado 79 51 21 7 109 243 210 x-Chicago 80 46 19 15 107 262 209 x-Minnesota 80 42 26 12 96 200 197 Dallas 80 39 30 11 89 231 226 Nashville 79 35 32 12 82 200 234 Winnipeg 80 35 35 10 80 220 233 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Anaheim 80 52 20 8 112 259 204 x-San Jose 80 49 22 9 107 241 197 x-Los Angeles 80 45 28 7 97 200 170 Phoenix 79 36 28 15 87 212 225 Vancouver 79 35 33 11 81 187 213 Calgary 80 35 38 7 77 205 231 Edmonton 80 28 43 9 65 198 265 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Fridays Games Chicago at Washington, 7 / p.m. Carolina at Detroit, 7:30 / p.m. Columbus at Tampa Bay, 7:30 / p.m. N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 7:30 / p.m. St. Louis at Dallas, 8:30 / p.m. Winnipeg at Calgary, 9 / p.m. Colorado at San Jose, 10 / p.m. Major League BaseballAMERICAN LEAGUE East W L Pct GB Toronto 5 4 .556 Tampa Bay 5 5 .500 Baltimore 4 5 .444 1 Boston 4 5 .444 1 New York 4 5 .444 1 Central W L Pct GB Detroit 5 2 .714 Cleveland 5 4 .556 1 Kansas City 4 4 .500 1 Chicago 4 5 .444 2 Minnesota 3 5 .375 2 West W L Pct GB Oakland 5 3 .625 Seattle 5 3 .625 Los Angeles 4 5 .444 1 Texas 4 5 .444 1 Houston 3 6 .333 2 Fridays Games Boston (Lester 0-2) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 1-1), 7:05 / p.m. Toronto (McGowan 0-1) at Baltimore (B.Norris 0-1), 7:05 / p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 1-0) at Cincinnati (Cueto 0-1), 7:10 / p.m. Houston (Feldman 2-0) at Texas (Darvish 1-0), 8:05 / p.m. Cleveland (Carrasco 0-1) at Chicago White Sox (Sale 2-0), 8:10 / p.m. Kansas City (B.Chen 0-0) at Minnesota (Gibson 1-0), 8:10 / p.m. N.Y. Mets (Gee 0-0) at L.A. Angels (Skaggs 1-0), 10:05 / p.m. Detroit (Porcello 1-0) at San Diego (Cashner 0-1), 10:10 / p.m. Oakland (Milone 0-0) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 2-0), 10:10 / p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East W L Pct GB Washington 6 2 .750 Atlanta 5 3 .625 1 Miami 5 4 .556 1 New York 3 5 .375 3 Philadelphia 3 5 .375 3 Central W L Pct GB Milwaukee 6 2 .750 Pittsburgh 5 3 .625 1 St. Louis 5 4 .556 1 Chicago 3 5 .375 3 Cincinnati 3 6 .333 3 West W L Pct GB San Francisco 6 3 .667 Los Angeles 6 4 .600 Colorado 5 5 .500 1 San Diego 3 6 .333 3 Arizona 3 8 .273 4 Fridays Games Miami (Fernandez 2-0) at Philadelphia (Burnett 0-1), 7:05 / p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 1-0) at Cincinnati (Cueto 0-1), 7:10 / p.m. Washington (Roark 1-0) at Atlanta (Teheran 1-1), 7:35 / p.m. Pittsburgh (Liriano 0-1) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta 0-0), 8:10 / p.m. Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 0-1) at St. Louis (J.Kelly 1-0), 8:15 / p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 1-1) at Arizona (McCarthy 0-1), 9:40 / p.m. N.Y. Mets (Gee 0-0) at L.A. Angels (Skaggs 1-0), 10:05 / p.m. Detroit (Porcello 1-0) at San Diego (Cashner 0-1), 10:10 / p.m. Colorado (De La Rosa 0-1) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 1-0), 10:15 / p.m. SNAPs S HOTs S SPORTSH.O.P.E. Basketball TournamentSEBRING The 4th Annual Mary Toney H.O.P.E. Foundation 3-on3 Basketball Tournament will tip off Saturday, April 19, in the Sebring High School Gym. From 8:30 / a.m.-4 / p.m. teams will compete amid concessions and music, with a cost of just $5 per player. Monetary prizes will be awarded to rst-place teams, with second-place nishers receiving gift card awards. The tournament will have male and female brackets consisting of three players per team. For boys and girls, age groups are 7-9 years old, 10-12, 13-15 and 16-19. The 7-9 and 10-12 yearold teams begin play at 8:30 / a.m., with the 1315s and 16-19s starting at 11 / a.m. Teams need to report to the gym 30 minutes prior to the rst game of their division. Registration deadline is Thursday, April 17. For more information, call LaVaar Scott at (863) 214-3880, Nick Brooks at (850) 322-8398 or Princeton Harris at (863) 381-8898Nu-Hope Golf tournamentAVON PARK NUHOPE Elder Care Services will hold the Sandy Foster Memorial Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 19. This years event, sponsored by MIDFLORIDA, will be held at Pinecrest Golf Club in Avon Park. The event is a 2-person scramble. Cost is $65/person ($130 per 2-person team.) Sponsorship opportunities are available. Registration opens at 7:30 / a.m., with a Shot Gun start at 8:30 / a.m. An awards luncheon follows the event. All funds raised are used to support services for seniors in Highlands and Hardee County. To register or for more information, please contact Laurie Murphy at 382-2134 or MurphyL@ nuhope.org or visit www. nuhopeeldercare.orgSottile Memorial GolfLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Athletic Association will be hosting the 8th Annual Nick Sottile Memorial Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 12, at the Placid Lakes Country Club. The event is a four-per son scramble with cash prizes for winning teams in each ight and individual cash prizes for closest to the line, closest to the pin and a $2,000 Hole in One prize sponsored by Cohan Radio Group. Cost is $100 per golfer, $400 per team, and there will be an 8 / a.m. tee-off time. Entry fee includes greens fee, cart, complementary beverages and lunch catered by Smoke Shack BBQ, with appetizers of shrimp and crab clusters. Bill Jarrett Ford is helping to underwrite the event for the eighth consecutive year, but more sponsors are needed. Sponsorship ranges from $1,000 to $50 holesponsors and lunch tickets are included with most sponsorship levels. Proceeds from the tour nament directly benet youth sports in Lake Placid and a portion of the proceeds are donated to the Nick Sottile Memorial Scholarship Fund. A portion of the proceeds will also be used for completion of a new sports weight-training facility. For more information, call Laura Teal at (863) 441-0729 or Tom Reifsnyder at (954) 675-9581.Florida Hospital Clay ShootOKEECHOBEE The Florida Hospital Heartland Clay Shoot will be held on Friday, April 25, at the Quail Creek Plantation beginning at 8:30 / a.m. A continental breakfast will be served at 8 / a.m. at Quail Creek, located at 12399 NE 224th St., Okeechobee. There will also be a home-cooked BBQ lunch and fantastic rafe and green bird prizes. There are four levels of sponsorships available, from Station Sponsor which includes advertising on course station signage and lunch for two for $100, Individual Sponsor for $125 which includes registration for one shooter and lunch. The $500 Team Sponsor includes one four-man shooting team and lunch, along with advertising on banner displayed at lunch tents. The $2,500 Gold Sponsor includes one four-man team, cart and lunch, a banner hanging during event with company logo, company logo on yer/registration and all mail pieces, one station sign, one suite for Thursday nights social and two Thursday night dinner tickets. For more information or to register, call the Foundation at (863) 4025525, or visit the website www.FHHeartland.org/ Foundation.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING The Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center will be hosting their 4th Annual Scholarship Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 26, at Sun N Lake. Format is a four-per son scramble with handicapped ights. Entry fee is $65 per person, which includes greens fee, golf cart and lunch. Registration is at 7:30 / a.m. the day of the tournament, with an 8:30 / a.m. shotgun start. Please submit entries by Thursday, April 24. Make checks payable to Wings of Faith CWC Scholarship Fund. All proceeds go to benet college-bound senior graduates for the class of 2014. For questions, call Alvin Walters at 381-5706 or 381-6578.Highlands County Summer LeaguesSEBRING The Highlands County Parks and Natural Resources Department announces that the 2014 Summer Leagues will start the week of May 12. Leagues will include Womens, Church and Recreational A and B Leagues and are open to all adults and youth 16 years and older. Registration and fees are due by Wednesday, May 7, no exceptions. Fees are $360 and $15 sanctioning fee for the year. For any further information please call Bob Keefe at 863-381-8284, Dustin Ridenour at 381-8269 or the Sports Complex at 863-402-6755.Bass N Trash TournamentSEBRING The Sebring Sr. FFA will host the First Annual Bass N Trash Fishing Tournament on Saturday, May 17, on Lake Jackson at the Veterans Beach boat ramp. Cost is $25 per person, with a maximum of four people per team, with all registered team members receiving a free T-shirt and lunch. Meet time is 7 / a.m. and shing will get underway at 7:30 / a.m. Weigh-in takes place at Noon. Cass prizes will be given to heaviest total of three bass, three trash sh, heaviest bass and heaviest trash sh. All sh must be alive at weigh-in. Registration deadline is May 1, which guarantees a shirt, registrations after that, up through the day of the tournament, arent guaranteed a shirt. To register, or for more information, contact Sarah Cleveland at (352) 214-9883, or Rebekah Wills at (863) 273-0208.SHS Summer of SwimSebring High School will be offering swimming lessons with four sessions to choose from. The rst session begins Monday, June 9 and runs through Friday, June 20. The second session runs from June 23-July 3, the third session July 7-July 18 and the fourth from July 21-August 1. Registrations are being taken, beginning Monday, May 5, at the front ofce of Sebring High School during the day from 9 / a.m.-2 / p.m., where ofce secretaries will be able to sign you up. For questions, call 4715500, ext. 229, or 381-7092 and leave a message for Ms. Pat. Emails can also be sent to catonp@highlands.k12. .us. The Sebring High School pool will be open on Wednesday, May 1, Monday through Friday from 6-7:30 / p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from 1-3 / p.m. Additional hours will be added once school is out for the summer. Cost is $2 per swimmer, and family passes are available at $50 for rst family member and $15 for each additional. Sebring Summer Swim Program The Summer Swim Program will again offer four (4) instructional sessions. Each will last two weeks and the swim class meets each weekday, Monday through Friday. The Program will offer eight types of instruction: 1. Adult Beginner: Adults Only. For the novice-no experience necessary. 2. Parent and Tot: Water Orientation. Mother/ Father must participate with child. (6 months to 2 years of age.) 3. Level I: Introduction to Water Skills. Students rst water orientation without Mother/Father. Part A--Preschool Aquatics (2-4 years of age) Part B-School Age (4-5 years of age) 4. Level II: Fundamental Aquatic Skills. Students do not need Mother/Father in pool. (4-5 years of age.) 5. Level III: Stroke Development. Students must be comfortable in water. 6. Level IV: Stroke Improvement. Students must be able to swim 10 yards, do a front dive, and oat on their backs. 7. Level V: Stroke Renement. Students must be able to swim 50 yards, tread water 30 seconds, and elementary back stroke 25 yards. 8. Level VI: Part A Personal Water Safety/ Diving Fundamentals. Students must be able to swim 100 yards, tread water for 3 minutes, backstroke 100 yards. Will learn basics of diving. Part B Fitness Swimmer/Diving Fundamentals. Students will learn necessary skills to make swimming part of their exercise program. Will learn basics of diving. There will be a $50 fee for the two-week session and students will be enrolled on a rst come, rst served basis. There will be no refunds after completion of registration and payment of fees, unless the swim class is cancelled. There must be at least four swimmers per class for the lessons to be taught.This Date In BaseballApril 11 1907 New York catcher Roger Bresnahan appeared wearing shin guards for the rst time in a major league game. 1912 Rube Marquard of the New York Giants be gan a 19-game winning streak with an 18-3 triumph over the Brooklyn Dodgers. 1961 The Los Angeles Angels won their rst major league game with a 7-2 victory over the Orioles at Baltimore. Ted Kluszewski had a pair of homers for the Angels. 1962 The New York Mets played their rst game and lost 11-4 to the Cardinals in St. Louis. Stan Musial of the cardinals had three hits and tied Mel Otts National League career record with his 1,859th run scored. The Mets would lost their rst nine games on the way to a 40-120 record. 1969 The Seattle Pilots played their rst game, with Gary Bell shutting out the White Sox 7-0 at Sicks Stadium. 1985 Seattles Gorman Thomas hit three homers and drove in six runs to lead the Mariners to a 14-6 victory over the Oakland As. 1990 Mark Langston made his Angels debut by combining with Mike Witt on a no-hitter as California beat the Seattle Mariners 1-0. 1996 Greg Madduxs major league record of road victories ended at 18 in a row with a 2-1 loss to the San Diego Padres. He had been 18-0 with an 0.99 ERA in 20 regular-season road starts since losing at Montreal on June 27, 1994. 2001 Atlantas Greg Maddux was almost awless for seven innings, combining with a pair of relievers to pitch a one-hitter in a 2-0 win over the New York Mets. The Mets wound up with only one runner against Maddux, Mike Remlinger and John Rocker. Todd Zeile lined a single about a foot beyond second baseman Quilvio Veras glove with one out in the second. 2007 Felix Hernandez pitched a one-hitter and struck out six, helping Seattle beat Boston 3-0. 2008 Missouris Jacob Priday set a Big 12 Conference record, hitting four home runs against Texas in a 31-12 rout. The senior went 5-for-5, drove in nine runs and scored six times. 2011 Sam Fuld had four extra-base hits and drove in three runs to help Tampa Bay bust out of an early season slump with a 16-5 win over the Boston Red Sox. Fuld, needing a single to complete the cycle, doubled into the left-eld corner in his last at-bat in the ninth. Fuld hit a two-run homer in the second inning to give the Rays a 6-0 lead. Fuld doubled in the fourth and tripled in the sixth. Todays birthdays: Pete Kozma 26; Charlie Furbush 28; Alejandro De Aza 30; Mark Teixeira 34.

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 11, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A11 Golf HammockThe Golf Hammock Ladies Played a scramble for their Farewell Tournament and Luncheon on Wednesday, April 9. First-place winners, with a 65.1, were Joan Robillard, Caroline Duncan, Mary Cripps and Shirley Enochs. Coming in with a 65.3 for second were Jeannie Fivecoat,. Anne Coffey and Carol Troup. Taking third, with a 65.5. were Cindy Borwer, Joyce Stanley, Roxie McMillon and Audrey Walther. And in fourth place, with a 67.1, were Judy Trier, Kaydee Depolito, Jo Thornburg and Alma Barefoot. Closest to the Pin on No. 7 was Helene Trembly and on No. 17 was Roxie McMillon The Ringer winners for the year saw Jeannie Fivecoat top the First Flight with a 72, with Second Flight honors going to Judy Trier with a 78 and Kaydee Depolito topped the Third Flight with 86. Last Monday, April 7, the Mezza Group played Individual Pro-Am points. Joe Hyzny took rst in A group with +5, Gary Towell placed second with +4, Don Brewer took third with +3. In B group, Mike Lajiness was in rst at +2, Gary Fivecoat in second at -1, and in third was Dana Smith at -2. C group saw Paul Brown take rst with +6, Ned Bauer in second with +4, followed by Jan Nigh in third with +1. John Robertson led the way in D group at +5, with Ken Granger in second at +2, and Delbert Nelson in third at -1. In E group, Dick Botelhos +5 took rst place, Stan Grifs took second with +4, followed by a tie between Jim Daigneault and Bob Wimmers at +1. F group was lead by Bob Hughes, who took rst with +4, Ralph Pickering in second with +3, and Jack Bardelli in third with +2. G group saw Howard Brown come in rst with +4, Terri Trumbull in second with +3, and Jack Carlton in third with +1 Bill Wouderberg won H group with +8, Richard Ramazetti took second with +2, in third we saw Dave Hankinson at Even. I groups top nish came from Ken Porter with +4, Bob Fidlin took second with +2, in third was Don Meitz at Even. Bill Kratcher easily took rst in J group with a whopping +12, Jean Terrell took second with +4, and Bob Goldsworth grabbed third with +1. Next Monday the Mezza Group will continue to play, beginning at 7:45 / a.m. This one will be a scramble. Please arrive early due to a big eld of players. For more information, or to join the group, call Pete at 382-1280.Lake June WestA Best Ball tournament was played on Wednesday, April 9, and saw the team of Ron West, Don Bolton, Orville Huffman and Walt Nagel card a 41 for the win. Ron Cobert, Art Schmeltz, Fred Neer and Angelo Iarlano came in with a 43 for second. In closest to the pin for the round, Bill Fowler landed a shot 23 feet from No. 4, Cobert hit to within 17 feet from No. 8 and Ron West dropped one 11 feet from No. 2. A Monday Ladies event was played on April 7, with Annie Hall, Charlotte Mathew and Mary Malone coming in rst with a 36. Joyce Swartz, Doris Weeks and Betty Kinchloe were just a shot back with 37 for second place, and one more shots back, at 38, was the team of Kathy Armstrong, Janice Barringer and Pat Asmus for third. In closest to the pin for the day, Jane Roush hit to 9-feet, 5-inches from No. 2, Swartz to 8-feet, 9-inches from No. 8 and Kim Fiers to 6-feet, 9-inches from No. 4. A Couples Scramble was played on Thursday, April 3. Larry Heath and Bob Orr joined Orville and Eva Huffman to get the win with a 53. Doyan and Wayne Eades teamed with JoAnn McGill and Mary McNamee to card a 54 for second and Joe and Joyce Swartz joined Walt and Velma Nagel for a third-place nish with 55. In closest to the pin, Art Schmeltz hit to 21-feet from No. 4, McGill to 14 feet from No. 8 and Helen Mellon to 9-feet, 2-inches from No. 2.Placid LakesThe Mens Association played a Best Ball Front, Two Best Balls Back event on Wednesday, April 9. First place went to the team of Tom Lacy, Bob McMillian, Howard Ticknor and Wayne Wood who brought in a -27. Taking second, with a -23, were Tony Grande, Gary Huffman and Mike Ketring, with the team of Lane Capp, Dan King, Bob Sheets and Jim Rozzy one shot back at -24 for third. Coming in with a -21 for fourth were Bill Brinegar, Ed Bartusch, Russ Isaacs and Henry Shaw. Rozzy had closest to the pin for the round, hitting to 7 feet from No. 11. The Womens Golf Association played a Best Ball event on Tuesday, April 8. Gail Ladig, Judy Thompson, Pat Haas and Joan Sniffen took rst place with a -18, while Von Lacy, Carol Olsen, Handan Schneider and Karen Wallin were second with a -17. Three shots back, at -14, were Alice Bitzer, Bobbie Miller and Gloria Ziegler. Bitzer had closest to the pin, getting to 12-feet, 2-inches from No. 11 and Haas chipped one in on No. 6. The Mens Association played a Two Best Ball event on Wednesday, April 2. Dan King, Jack Marceau and Dick McArdle came in with a -26 for the win, while Lane Capp, Bob McMillian and Bud Snyder carded a -25 for second. Tom Lacy, Ed Bartusch, Gene Ransom and Jim Rozzy shot a -21 to take third. Frank Fisher had closest to the pin on the day, sticking his shot on No. 2 to just 5-feet, 6-inches. The Womens Association played a Scramble on Tuesday, April 1. Alice Blitzer, Rose Hunter, Pam Thomas and Pat Haas came in with a +3 for the win, while a match of cards had to settle second and third. Two teams came in with +4s, but after the match, Bobbie Miller, Karen Wallin and Joan Sniffen got the nod for second while Sue Mackey, Barb Moriarity, Narola Rosenberg and Bev Burke settled for third. Alice Blitzer had the closest to the pin on the day, hitting to 5-feet, 6-inches from No. 2. But sinking one into the hole on the day was Wallin, who notched a Hole in One on No. 11, from 105 yards out.SpringLakeOn Tuesday, April 9, the SpringLake Mens Golf Association held a Two Man Team Net Score competition with two ights; Flight A for team handicaps of 0 to 29 and Flight B for 30 and up. It was held on the Cougar Trail course under the best of golng conditions cool and cloudy. Bill Lawens and Bart Bartholomy took the A Flight handily, both shooting net 68s for a combined 136 strokes. In second place in A, there was a tie at 143 strokes between Joe Austin and Bill Kingshott and the team of Gerry Esty and Gene Hearn. Mr. Esty shot a gross 73 with 10 handicap strokes for a net 63. B Flight was won by Ken Kirby and Larry Colclasure with the over all best net score of 132; Mr. Kirby with a net 68 and Mr. Colclasure with a net 64. Second place in B Flight went to Charlie Keniston and Jim Foote with 137 net strokes; Mr. Kenistons net 63 and Mr. Footes lackadaisical net 74. Third place went to Bob Hinde and Dave Docherty with a combined net 144 strokes. On Thursday, April 3, the SpringLake Mens Golf Association completed a two-day tournament consisting of nine four-man teams. On Tuesday, the teams played Two Best Balls on the Panther Creek course, and on Thursday they played Three Best Balls on the Cougar Trail course. Teams were evenly matched with most team handicaps between 62 and 67. The winning team, with a score of 309 net strokes, was composed of Gary Behrendt, Joe Troia, Ron Brochu and Jim Foote. Jan Hard, Joe Austin, Bill Kingshott and Ed Grifth took second place with 312 net strokes. Third place went to Ken Kirby, Jim Hearn, Charlie Keniston and Leon Van with 317 net strokes. Bob Hinde, Ken Rohr, Ron McNeil and Bob Berg came in fourth with 318 strokes. The team of Kirby Gann, Bo Bohanon, Ed Clay and Bill Schauwecker took fth place with 321 net strokes. Under sunny skies, both days were beautiful days to be playing golf at SpringLake Golf Resort. Lochow Ranch Lake Management to consult on the muddy, shallow body of water on the property. Jones and his team of biologists shocked the lake and reported miserable results. The largest bass they found weighed less than a pound. In a relatively short period of time, Schwarz and Jones decided to completely rebuild the featureless pond into the most unique private body of water in the country. Once completed, the lake covered 90 acres with over seven miles of shoreline. The next step involved building forage ponds on the hill over-looking the lake, and stocking with shad and sunsh which he could then ush into the impoundment. Although the concept seemed sound, by 2008, shocking data was less than impressive. But a random idea popped into his head: Freshwater prawns. These creatures are high in protein, grow fast and prove to be easy targets for hungry largemouth bass. Although the prawns can only reproduce in saltwater, they can grow to over 12 inches in body length (and when you add in their long pincers, some reach two feet or more); they can be transferred to fresh water at the larval stage when theyre about the size of mosquitoes. By the end of 2009, the lake was producing healthy ve pounders. Three years later, double digit bass were fairly common. To date, the largest bass shocked up has been a 13.15 pounder, named Pearl, and she could well be on her way to becoming a new Texas state record. Garys condent, with the freshwater prawns that he can not only grow a state record bass, but he is condent of a new world record is possible. Scharz is not the rst to attempt growing a world record many have tried and failed in the past. Glen Lau raised a largemouth bass to 18 pounds in central Florida years ago, only to have poachers raid his pond and kill the sh. Doug Hannon made many attempts to raise such a beast, but he too failed. Over the past 20-some years, a number of 20+ bass have been caught, weighed and certied and eventually released back into the waters from which they came. Most were caught in California where the Florida strain largemouth have a steady diet of trout, a slower moving sh full of protein and an easy meal for a hungry largemouth. But what if my customers story is true? Could there be a bass that large swimming around in a pond somewhere in Highlands or Polk County? And if theres one, could there be two, or three? I can assure you, if someone does catch, weigh and certify a bass over 20 pounds, well have every media person from all over the country here in Highlands County to cover the event. And the lucky sher man? His story will be told and re-told for generations to come. Whether the sh is a new world record or not, it just needs to be close. If that lucky sherman happens to be you, every thing you used to catch the sh, as well as the clothes on your back will present opportunities for endorsements and you can probably kiss that day job good-bye.Don Norton is a professional tournament bass sherman, bass shing guide, and custom rod builder. He lives in the Golf Hammock area of Sebring with his wife Lexie, and is the owner of a custom rod building company appropriately named The American Fisherman. He is also the owner of REDS II, a full-service shing tackle store located at 3603 Sebring Parkway, in Sebring, FL. You can reach him at 863-2734998 or by email at donorton13@ gmail.com. Visit his REDS FISHING facebook page or his website at theamericansherman.com. or stop by the store to see him anytime. BASS FROM PAGE A9 SNAPs S HOTs S LOCAL GOLF

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A12 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com third, albeit just one was earned, but Gomez doubled in the bottom half and came in one out later on a Trey Frazier double to right. Another unearned run crossed the plate for Mulberry in the fourth to make it 7-3, but the only other score that would come the rest of the way was Devil J.C. Cobb racing in on a wild pitch in the fth to provide for the nal margin. Simons would pitch through the sixth, allowing just the one earned run while striking out sev en. Kyle Kelley then came on in the seventh and retired the side in order, with one strikeout. This latest triumph moves the Devils to 16-3 on the season, 7-1 in District 9-4A play, giving them the top seed in the district tournament, which they will host the week of April 21. Before then, however, a handful of non-district games remain. Avon Park hosted Sebring Thursday night and will welcome Sarasota Booker tonight at Head Field. Next week marks the end of the regular season with a Tuesday date at Hardee and a home contest Thursday, April 17, against DeSoto. DEVILS FROM PAGE A9 Dan Hoehne/News-SunDaniel Simons peers in for the signs Wednesday night and would go six strong innings to get the win over Mulberry. Dan Hoehne/News-Sun lesTeam leader Nisha Patels hard-fought win at No. 1 singles set the stage for Sebrings Class 2A Regional win Tuesday.and strong cast were perennial regional qualiers, it was this squad of essential newbies that got over the hump. Having nished as the District 11 runner-up to Lemon Bay, Sebring had to travel to Naples to take on District 12 winner Golden Gate on their home turf. But it was Patel setting the tone for the Streaks as she battled to a win at No. 1 singles. After winning the rst set by a 6-3 score over Thi Doan, Patel had to pull out all the stops to avoid it being pushed to a third set. Doan gave her all she could handle and had the second set tied at 6-6, with the tie-breaker proving a nip-and-tuck affair as well. But Patel squeaked out a 7-5 edge in the tie-breaker to take the set and match. Sebring took a loss at No. 2 singles as Lady Titan Taylor Scott got past Micaela DeVane, and it looked like it might be another at No. 3 singles as Alaina Keith dropped her rst set against Kevii Newbold by a 4-6 score. But Keith bounced back strong, ipping the script and getting a 6-2 win in the second set to force a third. From there she cruised, winning six straight games for a 6-0 win to put the Streaks up 2-1. Golden Gate evened it up with Rachel Ly berg outlasted Sarah Beth Rogers in another close match. Rogers had it even up at 6-6 in the opener but Ly berg took a 7-4 edge in the tie-breaker to get the set win. Rogers stayed close in the second set as well before Lyberg pulled out a 7-5 win. But then Sebring took the lead for good when Ashley Castelli was dominant at No. 5 singles and took a 6-0, 6-1 win over Shivagni Patel. Up 3-2 heading into the doubles matches, the Lady Streaks closed it out with two wins, but not without a bit of drama. In the No. 1 doubles match, the Titans threatened to even things back up when Doan and Scott took the opening set 7-5 over Patel and DeVane. But the Sebring duo regrouped for a 6-4 win in the second set and grew stronger in taking a 6-3 win in the third to secure both their match as well as the team win. Castelli and Amanda Rio then put the icing on the cake as they handled the Titan duo of Kassandra Aguirre and Patel by 6-1, 6-0 scores. We are just so excited, head coach Janie Hollinger said. We have been district runner-up several times, but this is the rst time weve won a regional match since 2003. Fresh off this histor ic win, the girls had little time to savor it as they had a quick turnaround and headed to Englewood to face District 11 foe and champion Lemon Bay, who swept past Bishop Verot on Tuesday. See Sundays News-Sun for the nal results. SEBRING FROM PAGE A9 ons apart is the number of more colorful entrants such as race cars that sport airplane bodies, sharks jaws, one which carries a Goodyear-type blimp and even a HarleyDavidson powered Toyota Prius which compete. Really, were proud to have created an atmosphere where that kind of thing can happen and is encouraged, Pons said. It was the history of the Sebring International Raceway along with its reputation for the combination of fun and frolic in the Green Park which enticed LeMons to come for their mid-summer stop. Generally the participants come from within about 200 miles from where the event is happening but the rst team to sign up is from California so Id say there appears to be a greater inter est, Pons said. Pons said he has explained the philosophy of the series by comparing it to an amateur softball league where the games are played as much for fun as they are competition. But racing at Sebring is like playing your softball game at Wrigley Field, Pons said. I think for our guys its an opportunity to race at a place that is really iconic. The LeMons cars will be using the entire 3.74 mile road course, meaning fans will have an opportunity to see the vehicles up close and personal in the Paddock area. They actually will have a chance to get closer than recommended by your lawyer or your doctor, Pons said. Organizers also are hoping that some of the Green Park stalwarts such as The Turn 10 crew, F-Troop, LaBamba Racing and the Florida SkunkApes will turn out for the event. I went to the 12 Hours of Sebring several years ago and the Green Park is more or less what a LeMons race is on track, he said. Pons said that an ofcial entry list wont be available for at least two more weeks when the participation deadline closes. LEMONS FROM PAGE A9 Dan Hoehne/News-Sun Kiana Antone put a good rip on this pitch Wednesday night, and the Lady Streaks got their knocks in on Senior Night against Frostproof. But it would be the Lady Bulldogs pulling out a 9-6 win. Sebring closed out the regular season Thursday at Lake Placid and head into their District 11-5A tournament next week with their opening-round contest at Hardee Tuesday.FROSTPROOF CHILLS SEBRING SENIOR NIGHT

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LIVING BFriday, April 11, 2014 With all due respect to Mr. Bunny, eggs really play the starring role at Easter. Here, FamilyFun magazine gives you plenty of ways them with goodies, perch them atop frilly pedestals, even give them a snorkeling vacation. Thats right get em out of their shells! Naomi Shulman SURPRI seSE II N sS ID eE EGG sS An un-eggs-pected treat hides in each of these colorful orbs. Kids can hunt for them, smash them open and enjoy. To keep the contents secret, Mom or Dad can handle the job make a golden egg holding a dollar.YO UU W II LL NN EE D D : Pushpin White eggs Clean nail scissors Egg dye Skewers or chopsticks Egg carton Small trinkets Paper and pen Paintbrush White glue Mini cupcake liners (1 per egg) 1. With the pushpin, make a small hole in one end of each egg. Using the inch wide, then empty out the whites and yolks (they can be reserved for cooking).2. Dye the eggs and let them dry overnight by resting them on skewers or chopsticks set in a mug.3. Place eggs, hole facing up, in the 4. Cut narrow strips of paper and write a message, such as Crack Me, at the end of each strip.5. Brush a thin coat of glue around the holes, then stick a message strip and a cupcake liner in place on each egg. Turn the eggs over and let the glue dry. NN ote: If you include edible surprises, use wrapped candies only and soak the emptied shells in a bleach solution quart of water) for 2 minutes. Let them dry before dying them.(Idea by Megan Reardon, notmartha.org)These hard-boiled snorkelers are fully equipped for a dip in the blue (or green or terpiece, display a row of in their dye-ving tanks.YO UU W II LL NN EE D D : Egg dye White eggs, hard-boiled Permanent marker 3/4-inch round white adhesive labels 1-inch-wide clear bottle tops Small rubber bands White glue or glue gun* Flexible straws Self-adhesive foam Small clear glasses or bowls (optional) 1. third of an egg, then let it dry.2. Draw eyes on a label and adhere it to the bottle top. Slip the rubber band around the egg, about a quarter of the way down. Glue the lid over a rubber band.3. T section. Bend it into a snorkel shape and glue it in place.4. below). Glue them to the egg, adhesive side down, and let dry. Stick the adhesive side to the display surface, or, if you like, to the inside of a small glass or bowl. With a pitcher, gently pour in dye until the egg is partly submerged.* NN ote: White glue is kidfriendly but requires drying time; using a glue gun is an adults job.(Idea by Tracy Ripon) DD YE-V INGING DUDDUD ESHeres a clever use for leftover egg dye (and cardboard tubes), and the more of a wow factor, use the trimmings to make matching collaged eggs (see Bonus Idea, below).FO RR EACH T UU FFET, YO UU W II LL NN EE DD : 2 coffee lters Egg dye in various colors 1-inch-tall segment of cardboard tube White glue 1. dip its edges and point into a differentdry on a paper towel or draped over an empty egg carton.2. again and snip fringe along the edges. If you plan to make the collage eggs below, reserve the trimmings.3. the outside of a tube segment with glue, BO NUNU S IDID EA from the tuffets; instead, use them to make pretty collage eggs. Simply brush hard-boiled eggs with watered-down white glue, stick on the trimmings, and brush the eggs with another coat of glue. Let them dry for an hour.(Idea by A. J. Freund, auntpeaches. com)T II EDD YE T UU FFETS MELTE DD -C RR AYO NN E GGGG S colors swirl together in a magical way. The results are fast, fun and gorgeous. To begin, hard-boil white eggs. Remove them from the hot water with tongs or a slotted spoon, dry them, and rest them in an empty egg carton or on plastic bottle caps (an adults job). Color them with the crayons side. When youre done coloring, leave them to dry for about an hour.

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B2 | NEWSSS U nN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com PUZZLE CORNER Solution on B8DEAR ABBY: My wife and I were discussing our sons-in-law, and young men in their 20s and 30s in general. We were won dering where the attitude of any money I earn is mine in a marriage or live-in situation got start ed. F or the rst few years of my daughter and her hus band Joes marriage, Joe r esented giving her any of the money he earned. My other daughters hus band thinks nothing of spending money on him self and his friends without consulting her. W e have seen this at titude reected in their fr iends as well. They dont seem to discuss with each other how each is spend ing their joint income. Ther e seems to be an ele ment of selshness, too. M y wife and I have been married 40 years and from the beginning I have always considered what each of us earned was OURS, not mine or hers (when she worked). We always discuss any signicant purchases, and I have always be lieved it was my responsibility to support my family. I realize the current economic situation has made that difcult, but the attitude should still be there. WONDERING IN WASHINGTONDEAR WONDERING: You have raised an inter esting subject. There is a differ ence between living together and being mar ried because of our legal system. Because people who co-habit without benet of marr iage are considered individuals in the eyes of the law, it is probably prudent to keep their nancial affairs sep arate. However, each per son should contribute to the expenses they shar e. In a marriage, the situ ation is different: The law assumes that the man and wife are one unit. This is the mindset you adopted when you and your wife were married. There is a tendency among young couples, not only because of the high divorce rate, but also what they have been ex posed to in the media fr om the time they were born, to view marriage as something that might not last. There is also a sense of entitlement among many NOT ALL that makes them centered on themselves. We have be come a society in which disposability has spr ead from material posses sions to relationships. I would L OVE to hear what my readers par ticularly my younger r eaders views are re garding this. Click on the link Write to Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or write to P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as J eanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbb y.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.State of modern marriage mirrors disposable society DEAR A bbBB YJeanne Phillips J EE SSI CC A H ERNERN D ONON AP Film WriterA vivid and delightful animated spectacle, Rio 2 is chock-full of color ful 3-D wonder and jubilant musical numbers set against a tale of family dynamics and environ mental dilemmas. The sequel opens with a vibr ant New Years Eve bash, as partying in the music-lled streets of Rio de Ja neiro is punctuated by reworks bursting abo ve the Christ the Re deemer statue. S upervised by composer John Powell, more emphasis has been placed on the music of this lm, which benets from numbers by art ists like Bruno Mars (who also voices the smooth bird Roberto in the lm), J anelle Monae and celebrated Brazilian musician Carlinhos Brown. After mating in Brazil in 2011s Rio, rare macaws Blu (Jesse Eisen berg) and Jewel (Anne Hathaway) no w have three lively kids who have become accustomed to the same domestication Blu was brought up on in Minnesota. Theyre attached to gadgets like iP ods and eat pancakes for breakfast, which ir ks the raised-in-the-wild Jewel. But the family heads off to the Amazon rainforest, to Jewels delight and Blus strife, when they get wind that a tribe of blue macaws may live there and are being pursued by Blus past owner and animal lover, Lin da (voiced by Leslie Mann), and her husband, Tulio (Rodrigo Santoro). With a few of the quirky support ing characters from the rst lm in to w including birds voiced by George Lopez (as frisky toucan Ra fael) and Jamie Foxx and will.i.am (as r apping canary-and-cardinal duo Nico and Pedro) they soar through a dazzling journey to the rainforest, making the often-wast ed 3-D effect worth it as we take in the br oad scope and graphically lay ered air. O nce there, Jewel discovers the large macaw crew is led by her longlost father (Andy Garcia), who is unimpressed with his daughters choice of a mate. He cant help but roll his eyes over Blus use of a GPS or a Swiss Army kit rather than the use of his own sharp beak. But their classic in-law banter is sublimely comical. Brazilian native writer-director Carlos Saldanha and Don Rhymer returned to pen the story. But they try too hard to make up for the mini malist plot of the original and drown in subplots: B lu battles with Jew el over staying in the wild versus returning to the city; Linda and Tulio clash with a few bad guys thr eaten ing to cut down the rainforest (the lm s eco push); and Blus old rival, Niguel (Jemaine Clement of Flight of the Conchords), pops up with a beautiful yet poisonous neon pink and purple frog (an angelic and cutesy Kristin Chenoweth) plotting revenge. Phew! And then there are the moments when characters break out into song. Niguels hotshot rendition of Gloria Gaynors I Will Survive seems a little ill-set when he really should be crooning a sinister track a la Ursulas Poor Unfortunate Souls in The Little Mermaid. The sweet voice of Hathaway shines with her solo lullaby. But its Chenoweths Broadway-like deliv ery that trumps all when she belts out an anthem on forbidden lo ve. Though the original songs here are whimsical and fun, few are irresist ible. W ith so much going on, its a won der this kids movie is only ve minutes longer than the original. But for the music and br illiantly pictur esque look, its worth the 3-D ticket. Rio 2, a 20th Century Fox release, is rated G by the Motion Picture As sociation of America. Running time: 101 minutes Three stars out of four. RR io 2 dazzling but overloaded MOVIE REVIEW CRITI cC sS RATING: 20th Century FoxNico, Pedro, Jewel, Rafael from 20th Century Foxs Rio 2.

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 11, 2014 | NEWSSS U nN | B3 CARPET MART, INC HEALTh H Y L LIVING TOM MURPHYAP Business WriterIt has long been gospel among retailers that tobacco pulls so much business into stores, with smokers also picking up water, gum or a bag of chips, that dumping it would be a sales killer. However, with pres sure from anti-smoking for ces growing, tobac co use waning and now a national dr ugstore chain jettisoning cigarettes for good, is this calculus starting to crack? Its probably too early to say, but major retailers will be paying close atten tion to the sales numbers after CVS C aremark pulls tobacco from its shelves by October. If the old retail rules governing tobacco have not changed outright, they are at least coming up for review. Since the nations sec ond-largest drugstore chain announced it would dump tobacco just over two months ago, its shares have hit new alltime highs 10 times. Thats not to say that the CVS case is unique. CVS Caremark Corp. is part of a booming indus try. In that same stretch since early F ebruary, shares of rivals Walgreen Co. and Rite Aid Corp. have surged as well. And most of last years $126 billion in revenue at CVS came from its phar macy benets management business. That sets it apar t because it doesnt depend so much, like oth er drugstores, on tobacco to draw customers thr ough the door. But when CVS Care mark Corp. announced it was going cold tur key, it caught almost everyone by surprise. The retailer will be giv ing up $2 billion in annual revenue a year, it estimates. About a half billion of that would come fr om non-tobacco products, the additional items that smokers pick up when they come in to buy smokes. The response from Wall Street? Something between a yawn and a shrug. CVS stock is up about 11 percent since the announcement. Thats quite a run for a compa ny that just announced it was giving up $2 bil lion in revenue annually, and during a period in which all major U.S. in dexes have been under pr essure. Yet while CVS is not the rst major retailer to give up tobacco, most indus try analysts do not see the ood gates opening. T arget Corp. gave up tobacco in 1996, citing a commitment to the health and well-being of our communities, and no one followed it through the anti-tobacco exit door. Each retailer has to weigh the bottom line against the message, but that has been going on for some time now, said Craig R. Johnson, president of retail consultant Custom er Growth Partners. This isnt just a bolt out of the blue, Johnson said. Theyve done the plus ses and minuses, and they hav ent decided to do it. Some have chosen the opposite path. Discount ers like Family Dollar hav e actually started sell ing tobacco in the past few y ears. Just last month Wal green CEO Greg Wasson, when asked b y an indus try analyst if tobacco had become a long-ter m li ability given the CVS decision, signaled that the nation s largest drugstore would not be following suit. Instead, the CEO said that Walgreen, which still sells tobacco, will focus on helping people quit. Yet there are at least two forces adding weight to the no-tobacco side of the scale: one internal, one external. Internally, the cigarette business has become tougher in the face of tax hikes, smoking bans, health concerns and so cial stigma. P lus, the number of U.S. adults who smoke dropped below 20 percent between 2005 and 2012, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The drugstores and ma jor retailers angling to gr ab a bigger slice of the health care spending pie as the American popula tion ages are looking at mar gins as well. Cigarettes probably generate a prot margin of 3 percent to 7 percent. Generic drugs, in con trast, can fetch margins of 20 per cent or more, said Burt P. Flickinger III, man aging director of the retail and consumer brands consultant S trategic Re source Group. The question of wheth er retailers and drugstores can sell both health and tobacco raises the issue of those external forces that have been building for some time. The presence of tobacco behind checkout counters creates an image problem for an industry that says it puts a priority on helping provide healthier lifestyle options for customers.Quitting for goodCVS goes cold turkey; may pressure rivals, or not MCTCVS announced in February that it would pull all tobacco products off its shelves by October. Free Diabetes Management class setSEBRING The Florida Department of Health in Highlands County is offer ing Diabetes SelfM anagement Education classes as part of its Wellness and Diabetes Education Program. This program serves Highlands County res idents of all ages, especially those with diabetes or at r isk for de veloping diabetes. E ducation is the key to success for diabe tes control and for the pr evention of compli cations. These classes ar e free of charge and provided by Margaret Pierce, RN and Aleyda Oliveros, Nutritionist. Classes in English are scheduled in Sebring from 8:30-11:30 / a.m. May 5-7, and from 5:308:30 / p.m. May 19-21 at the Florida Department of Health in Highlands County, 7205 S. George Blvd. in Sebring Conference Room A. Enrollment is limit ed and registration is r equired. To register and for more information, contact the Florida Department of Health in Highlands County Wellness and Diabetes Education Program at 382-7294.Outreach programs setAce Homecare has a number of community outreach programs set for next week: %  M onday 9 / a.m., Rest Haven Assisted Living Facility (Zolfo Springs), Music and Motion; 10:30 / a.m., Chatham Point Apartments (Wauchula), health fair. %  T uesday 7:30 / a.m., Lake Josephine RV Park (Sebring), health fair. %  W ednesday 10 / a.m., Faith Pentecostal House of God (Avon Park), health fair; 1:30 / p.m., Crown Point Assisted Living Facility (Sebring), gaming. %  Thursday 10 / a.m., Balmoral Assisted Living and Memory Care (Lake Placid), Music and Motion. %  F riday 8:30 / a.m., Covered Bridge Community (Lake Placid), health fair. All programs are free of charge and are open to the public. For more information, call Ace Homecare at 385-7058. SNAPs S HOTs S LO cC A lL HE AA LTH The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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B4 | NEWSSS U nN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com HEALTh H Y L LIVING The NewspaperAll Around Your World In the Classroomcurrent events vocabulary geography At the Officebusiness news networking Over Coffeegarage sales local advertising community Family Timetravel recreation family events Sunday Morningcomics games puzzles Onlinelocal events email highlights 24-hour updates Support your local newspaper and the continued tradition of quality journalism by renewing your subscription today,and well continue to deliver. Thanks,readers! Rain,Sleet,Hail,Heat,Potholes,Flat Tires...Nothing stops them from making their deliveries!www.newssun.comWe celebrate how the newspaper has evolved to meet our changing needs without sacrificing the quality coverage youve come to expect. Day after day, anywhere you go,the newspaper delivers. Whether in print or online,it brings us the latest headlines from across town and around the world,local events,lots of laughs, touching stories,money-saving offers and so much more. Call 863-385-6155 for home delivery! Dear Pharmacist: I have chronic pain and take ibu profen daily plus hydrocodone and celecoxib. I m willing to do anything right now that could help. The craziest thing is that nothing happened to me, I just developed pain over the years, no accidents, no trauma. Can you help me? D.W., Boca RatonAnswer: Pain is a symptom not a disease itself. I ts your clue that some thing is out of balance in y our system. With out knowing more details its hard to hit the nail on the head so I will giv e you (and other readers who are suffering in pain) some general information. My goal today is to teach you about two different pain chemicals that your body releases in response to something. What that something is could be different for everyone. Sometimes pain is trig gered by foods like gluten or nightshade vegetables, sometimes it is from a nutr ient deciency (like magnesium or CoQ10), and sometimes it is from poor elimination. If you are constipated and toxins back up in your gut, or in your blood, then this triggers a physiologi cal response in your body that causes cells to r elease pain-causing chemicals called cytokines. Two cytokines implicat ed in pain include the leukotrienes and the prostaglandins. Those are such big names for little sub stances but too much of these will make y ou hurt. Your goal as a pain suf ferer is to reduce levels of those First up leukotrienes! These are a subclass of eicosanoids pro nounced I-koss-anoids, which when y ou say that out loud, the last syllable sounds like the word an noyed and thats exactly what they do. They are v ery annoying and irritat ing! Leukotr ienes spark pro duction of other compounds involved in aller gies, food sensitivities, autoimmune disor ders and anaphylactic reac tions. Leukotrienes tend to incr ease if you eat food coloring, like yellow dye No. 5, tartrazine, and oth er articial substances. I f you have pain, then non-steroidal anti-inam matory drugs (referred to as NSAIDs), such as ibu profen or naproxen (Advil, and Aleve respectively) can help you. These are sold o ver the counter at pharmacies nationwide. The prescription drug Ce lebrex (celecoxib) can also help Interestingly, research ers have found that some natur al compounds like boswelia and querce tin can reduce those annoying eicosanoids. Since about 2001, the medical literature has shown that dark chocolate can reduce eiconanoids, too. Other natural rescue remedies include omega 3 fatty ac ids, ax seed, perilla seed oil, cur cumin and glycyr rhiza. The pr escription medi cations Accolate and Singulair may help too, especially if your problems are pr imarily allergies. Next up prostaglandins. Excessive amounts of this cytokine occur with ar thritis, heavy menstrual cy cles, premenstrual syn drome, migraines, multiple sclerosis, chronic lyme disease as well as colon and breast cancer. What substances re duce prostaglandins? Fish oils white willow bark (sa lix alba), ecklonia cava (a br own algae), meadow sweet (dont take if youre aller gic to salicylates like aspirin), turmeric, skull cap, ginger root and passionower. Medications to consider include aspir in, celecoxib, and the NSAID class including ibuprofen and naproxen. Ask your doctor if any of these are right for you.Suzy Cohen is a registered pharmacist and the author of The 24Hour Pharmacist and Real Solu tions. For more information, visit www suzycohen. com. This infor mation is not intended to treat, diagnose or cure your condition. A dozen ways to reduce chronic painFirst step is to figure out what is causing you to hurt DEAR PHARMACISTSuzy Cohen Associated PressBOSTON Gov. Deval Patrick defended the states rst-inthe-nation ban of the powerful new painkill er Zohydro after a federal judge suggested in cour t that his adminis tration may have over reached. I wouldnt have done it if I didnt think I had a legal footing to do it, Patrick said at an unre lated event at the Statehouse. More to the point, I wouldnt have done it if I didnt think we had a real emergency, and we have a real emergency. Patrick issued an ex ecutive order banning local doctors fr om pre scribing or dispensing Z ohydro on March 27, amid concerns that the drugs availability might exacerbate the states prescription drug abuse epidemic. But Zogenix, the San Diego-based maker of the drug, led a federal lawsuit on Monday ar guing that the ban was unconstitutional be cause the U.S. Food and D rug Administration has already approved its use for treatment of severe and chronic pain.Painkiller ban raises constitutional questions WASHINGTON (AP) Medicare paid a tiny group of doctors $3 million or more apiece in 2012. One got nearly $21 million. Those are among the ndings of an Associated Press analysis of physician data released Wednesday by the Obama administra tion, part of a move to open the books on health car e nancing. T opping Medicares list was Florida ophthalmol ogist Salomon Melgen, whose r elationship with Sen. Robert Menendez, DN.J., made headlines last year after news broke that the lawmaker used the doc tors personal jet for trips to the Dominican R epublic. Medicare paid Melgen $20.8 million. His law yer said the doctors billing confor med with Medicare rules and is a reection of high drug costs. APs analysis found that a small sliver of the more than 825,000 individu al physicians in Medicares claims data base just 344 physicians took in top dollar, at least $3 million apiece for a total of nearly $1.5 billion. AP picked the $3 mil lion threshold because that was the gur e used by the Health and Human Servic es inspector general in an audit last y ear that recom mended Medicare automatically scrutinize total billings abo ve a set level. About 1 in 4 of the toppaid doctors (87) practice in Florida. Rounding out the top ve states were Cal ifornia with 38 doctors in the top gr oup, New Jersey with 27, Texas with 23, and New York with 18.Medicare database reveals top-paid doctors

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 11, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B5 Highlands Social Center Highlands Social Center Saturday, April 5th at 6:00-9:00pm Don West and Silver Eagle Band Classic Country Music L I V E BYOB Admission $ 5 RELIGION Atonement Lutheran ChurchSEBRING Services on Palm Sunday begin at 9:30 a.m. with the procession of palms. Maundy Thursday service with stripping of the altar is at 7 p.m. Good Friday service is Stations of the Cross at 7 p.m. Jesus the Sovereign King Missionary Church joins the church Sunday afternoons and Sunday evenings. The church is at 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive. Call 385-0797.Avon Park Christian Church Avon ParkAVON PARK Pastor Greg Ratliff will bring a message in this years Easter series. Then on Sunday evening the church will host a traditional Hymn Sing. Easter Sunday will be re ection and rejoicing on the death and the resurrection of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ! There will not be any services the evening of April 20 (Easter). Avon Park Christian Church is at 1016 W. Camphor St. (behind Wells Fargo Bank). Call 453-5334 or email accountapcc.2014@yahoo. com.. The church website is www.avonparkchristianchurch.com/.Christ Lutheran Church LCMSSEBRING Pastor Scott McLean will preach a sermon titled Having the Mind-set of Christ. April 17 Maundy Thursday celebration at 7 pm. April 18 Good Friday service at 7 pm. The church is at 1320 County Road 64, east of the Avon Park High School past the four-way stop sign. For more information call 471-2663 or search online at christlutheranavonpark.org.Christian Training ChurchSEBRING Rev. Linda M. Downing will bring the message titled Greater Vision: Part 2 at the Sunday morning service. The Wednesday night Bible study is the Gospel of John.Church of Buttonwood BaySEBRING For Palm Sunday, Pastor Cecil Hess is preaching on After Hosanna, What Comes Next? Special music will be by the choir and the mens quartet. Holy Week services include Maundy Thursday Communion at 7 p.m., and Good Friday worship at noon, both led by Hess. The church is on U.S. 27, four miles south of Highlands Regional Medical Center. Call 3821737 for information.Church of the BrethrenSEBRING On Sunday, Pastor David Smalley will preach from Luke 19:2840. The title of his sermon will be Transformation Rolling Downhill. The theme for Sunday school will be Creating a New Covenant, with scripture from Jeremiah 29:1-14, 31:31-34. For information, call 385-1597.Faith Lutheran ChurchSEBRING Sunday, the church will celebrate Palm Sunday / Sunday of the Passion Guest Pastor Tony Douches will deliver his sermon at Faith Lutheran based on the readings of the day. Holy Week begins on Sunday. Maunday Thursday service will be at 6:30 pm. Holy Thursday, occurring on the eve of the Lords cruci xion, begins the celebration of the holy three days of Christs Passover, commonly known as the Triduum. The Service for Holy Thursday consists of four parts: the Service of Corporate Confession and Absolution, Service of the Word, the Service of Sacrament, and the Stripping of the Altar. Good Fridays service will be at 6:30 p.m. Good Friday is part of the sacred Triduum, the threeday observance of Christs Passion. Good Friday is not observed as a funeral for Christ. It is a day for repentance over sin and restrained joy and praise for the redemption Christ accomplished for us on the cross. The service of Tenebrae (meaning darkness) consists of extinguishing of the church lights.Emmanuel United Church of ChristSEBRING Rev. George Miller will deliver the sermon, Quarters for Christ, from Matthew 21:1-11. The church is 1.7 miles west of U.S. 27 on County Road 634 (Hammock Road). Call 471-1999 or visit sebringemmanuelucc.com.First Baptist Church Avon ParkAVON PARK The Easter Cantata is at 10:45 a.m. Sunday. The church is at 100 N. Lake Ave. For more information call 453-6681 or email info@fbcap.netFirst Baptist Church of Lake JosephineSEBRING First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine extends a special invitation to this Sunday services. This Sunday the topic is Nick at Nite, a drama presentation of Nicodemus by Pastor Kevin Ahrens. Sunday evening the sermon will be Gifted to Go. The church is at 111 Lake Josephine Drive (halfway between Lake Placid and Sebring). Call 655-1524 with any questions.First Baptist Church of Placid LakesLAKE PLACID First Baptist Church of Placid Lakes is hosting a community-wide Easter egg hunt from 2-4 p.m. Saturday. There will be lots of prizes and candy for everyone in addition to the egg hunt. Everyone is invited to come meet the Easter bunny and Cookie from Sweet Frog. Sunday worship service, the adult choir will present the Easter cantata, It Is Finished, under the direction of Aristides Salgueiro, minister of music. The church is at the corner of Washington and Kemper Avenues.First Christian Church of Sebring Disciples of ChristSEBRING Sundays message is from Mark 11: 1-9, Jesus Rides Into Jerusalem, by Pastor Ron Norton. Greeting the congregation will be Terry Ducar. Elders are Lynne Warman and Howard Lewis. Deacons and servers are Carol Graves, Richard Neff, Barbara Slinkard and Terry Ducar.First Presbyterian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK On Sunday, Pastor Bob Johnsons sermon is titled Knowing and Doing based on James 1:21-25. The choirs introit will be I Come to the Cross and the anthem Seek the Lord. The adult Sunday School class is using the denominational quarterly featuring lessons from the book of Matthew. Sundays lesson is titled Hosanna to the Son of God based on Matthew 21:1-17. On Wednesday, Bible study will see Pastor Johnson teaching from the book Spiritual Warfare. On Friday, April 18 Greg Savaitt from Chosen Peoples Ministry will speak on Christ in the Passover beginning at 5:30 p.m. At 6:15 p.m., an abbreviated Passover meal will be served. Tickets are $5. The church is at 215 E. Circle St. (with two entrances on Lagrand Street). Call the church at 453-3242 or check out the website at avonparkapchurch.com or the Avon Park Chamber website.First Presbyterian ChurchSEBRING Rev. Darrell A. Peer will preach Praise Him! on Sunday. Maundy Thursday Communion Service is at 7 p.m. in the sanctuary. Good Friday Commnity Service is at noon at St. Catherines Catholic Church. The church is at 319 Poinsettia Ave. Call 385-0107 for information.First United Methodist Church of SebringSEBRING On this Palm Sunday, Pastor John Bryant will bring the message with the adult vocal ensemble providing the anthem. Jubilee Ringers rehearse at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. Maundy Thursday services will be held at 7 p.m. in the sanctuary. Listen Live on WITSAM 1340 each Sunday to hear the 10:50 am Worship Service. The church is downtown at 126 S. Pine St. Call the church ofce for information at 385-5184.Grace Pointe MinistriesSEBRING Grace Pointe Ministries meets at Sebring Hills Clubhouse, one block behind Aspen Dental. The pastors Palm Sunday service sermon is The Palms and The King. Call the church of ce at 658-2534 for location and details of Tuesday home Bible study. Friday night Bible study is at 10:30 p.m. to include the California church. Anyone interested in joining this service, call the church of ce for details.Heartland Christian ChurchSEBRING Pastor Ted Moores sermon this week will be Clearing the Bench with scripture from Matthew 21:12-17. The service will include Heartland singers singing Hosanna and The Blood Will Never Lose Its Power, Young Heartland singers, and Ralph Sylvester playing Holy City on the trombone. The church is at 2705 Alternate Route 17 South (behind Publix). Call 314-9693.Memorial United Methodist ChurchSEBRING Pastor Tim Haas will preach Sunday on the subject of Carrying The Cross with the Scripture lesson from Matthew 27:32-44. The church is at 500 Kent Ave., east of the Tower. For information, phone 465-2422.New Beginnings ChurchSEBRING On Sunday, Pastor Gary Kindles sermon is titled The Triumphal Entry based on John12:12-29. The churchs present location is The Morris Chapel, 3 07 S. Commerce Ave. For more information, call 835-2405.New Life Evangelical Lutheran ChurchSEBRING Pastor Luke John Willitz will preach Sunday from Philippians 2:5-11 on Jesus Christ is Lord. The Maundy Thursday service will be Glory Hidden in the Saviors Feast from Matthew 26:26-30 and the Good Friday service will be Glory Hidden in the Saviors Promises from John 19:31-37. The church is at 3725 Hammock Road.Parkway Free Will Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Sunday morning Bible lesson, The Sur ng of the King, is taken from Jeremiah 23, Zechariah 6 and John 19. Pastor Jim Scaggs will bring the message. Easter Sunrise Service will be at 6:30 a.m. on April 20. Regular worship services will follow the remainder of the day. The church is at 3413 Sebring Parkway. Call 3823552 for information. St. John United Methodist ChurchSEBRING On Sunday, Pastor Ronald De Genaro Jr.s sermon topic will be The Coming King. Biblical reference is from Luke 19:28-38. Thursday, Maundy Service is at 7 p.m.Spring Lake United Methodist ChurchSEBRING Spring Lake United Methodist Churchis at 8170 Cozumel Lane. The pastors sermon is As He Rode, He Wept! SNAPSHOTS CHURCH SERVICES The Associated PressFormer college football broadcaster Craig James has joined the conservative Family Research Council, where he said he would ght against the kind of religious bigotry he blames for his ring by Fox Sports after expressing opposition to gay marriage. James, who will serve as an assistant to council President Tony Perkins, was a longtime color commentator for ESPN who quit to run for U.S. Senate two years ago in Texas, where he grew up and starred at SMU. He lost in the primary. During a campaign debate, James said he opposed gay marriage and that gay people would one day have to answer to the Lord for their actions. Fox Sports let him go, saying he was a polarizing gure who had abused a previous on-air position to further a personal agenda. James has led a complaint with the Texas Workforce Commission accusing Fox of violating his religious freedom. Craig has experienced the very workplace disquali cation that cultural elites are seeking to impose throughout the country: expressing a politically incorrect opinion on a cultural issue, totally unconnected to employment, is enough to get you red, Perkins said. Former football announcer Craig James joins Family Research Council

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B6 | NEWSSS U nN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com PLACES TO WORSHI pP Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sun that is published Friday and Sunday. To place a listing in this directory, call the News-Sun at 3856155, ext. 596.ANGLIC aA NNew LL ife AA nglican Fellowship, 10 N. Main A ve. (Womans Club), Lake Placid, FL 33852. Rev. Susan Rhodes, Deacon in Charge, (863) 243-3191; strhodes1020@yahoo.com. Sun day Worship, 10 a.m. Teaching, Holy Communion, Music, Fellowship, Healing Prayer. Pastoral and Spiritual.ASSEMB LL Y OF G G O D CC hrist Fellowship CC hurch ( AA ssembly of God) 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Await ing His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in T ruth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morn ing Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. W ednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 471-0924. First A A ssembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Eve ning Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431.BAPT II ST AA von Park L L akes Baptist C C hurch, 22600 N. Highlands Blvd., Avon Park, FL 33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ cen tered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nur sery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist C C hurch (G AR AR B C C )   We are located at the corner of SR17 and C17A (truck route) in Avon   Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., and   evening worship service is at 6 p.m.   On Wednes days, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20 s+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.betha nybaptistap.com or call the church ofce at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist C C hurch, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Wor ship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf inter pretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist C C hurch, 1000 Max well St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunda y School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Wor ship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: ofce@apfellowship.org; W eb site, www.ap fellowship.org. F irst Baptist C C hurch of A A von P ark, N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 453-6681. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Rev. Johnattan Soltero, His panic pastor; Joy Loomis, director of music. Sunda y Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Wor ship, 10:45 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:45 a.m.; Y outh Choir, 4:30 p.m.; Evening Wor ship, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for both ser vices. Wednesday Wednesday Night Sup per, 5:15 p.m.; Childrens Choir, 5:45 p.m.; Y outh Activities, 6 p.m.; Prayer Meeting/Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Worship Choir Practice, 6 p.m.; Mission Programs for Children, 6:45 p.m. Hispanic Services: Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., worship service at 11 a.m. Wednes day Bible study at 7 p.m. To watch services online, go to the website at www.fbcap.net. In the heart of Avon Park, for the hearts of Avon Park. First Baptist C C hurch of L L ake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both ser vices with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages star ts at 9:45 a.m. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meet ing at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility and missions training for all chil dren. Call the church at 655-1524. F irst Baptist C C hurch of L L ake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm St., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Website: www.fbclp. com. Email: information@fbclp.com. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contem porary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Wednesday Activities: Fam ily dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reserva tions required). Prayer meeting, Youth Inter sections, and MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. The church is at 119 E. Ro yal Palm St., Lake Placid. For information, call 465-3721 or go to www.fbclp.com. First Baptist C C hurch of L L orida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School be gins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday wor ship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is pro vided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., fol lowed by adult choir rehearsal. From Septem ber the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to disco ver Gods love. For more information about the church or the minis tries offered, call 655-1878. F irst Baptist C C hurch, S S ebring, 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Rev. Matthew D. Crawford, se nior pastor; Rev. Nuno Norberto, associate pastor, minister of music and senior adults; and Dixie Kreulen, preschool direc tor. Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.; Blended Service, 10:30 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Call 385-4704. Website www.fbsebring.com Florida A A venue Baptist C C hurch, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Gird ley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunda y Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children and youth at 6 p.m. and for adults at 6:30 p.m. II ndependent Baptist C C hurch, 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday wor ship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. W ednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. LL eisure L L akes Baptist C C hurch, 808 Gar denia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the w est end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Wor ship service at 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 6 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist C C hurch (G AR AR B C C ), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morn ing Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-w eek service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist C C hurch, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870. Wel come to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Mor ning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 2143025. Afliated with the National Associa tion of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. SS parta R R oad Baptist C C hurch, ( S S B C C ) 4400 Sparta Road. Evangelist Roger Jaudon. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For infor mation, call 382-0869. SS outhside Baptist C C hurch (G AR AR B C C ), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Awana kin dergarten through fth grade, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Mid week Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for under age 3 is avail able at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Ofce phone, 385-0752. SS pring L L ake Baptist C C hurch, Where the Bible is Always Open. Pastor Richard Schermerhorn, 7408 Valencia Road; 6552610. Assistant Pastor Ronald Smith, 3861610. On U.S. 98 at the Spring Lake Vil lage II entrance. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. for all ages; Mor ning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednes day Mid-week Bible Study and Prayer Service, 6:30 p.m. Nursery available for all ser vices. SS unridge Baptist C C hurch, ( S S B C C ) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CC ATHO LIC LICOO ur LL ady of Grace CC atholic CC hurch, 595 E. Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vig il Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunda y mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English. Sunday Life Teen Mass at 6 p.m. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. English confession at 3:30 p.m. Saturday; Spanish confession at 6:30 p.m. Religious Education Classes (September to May) are 9-10:20 a.m. Sun day for grades K through 5th. Grades 6th through Y outh Bible Study are from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. SS t. C C atherine C C atholic C C hurch, 820 Hick ory St., Sebring. Parrish ofce/mailing ad dress: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 3850049, 385-6762 (Spanish); fax, 385-5169; email, ofce@stcathe.com; website, www. stcathe.com. School Ofce/Mailing, Princi pal Dr. Anna V. Adam, 747 S. Franklin St., Se bring, FL 33870; 385-7300; fax, 385-7310; email school@stcathe.com. School ofce hours 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday-Fri day. Clergy: Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F., fr jose@stcathe.com or 385-0049; Parochial V icar, Rev. Victor Caviedes, 385-3993; Assist ing Priest (retired), Rev. J. Peter Sheehan; De cons, Rev. Mr. James R. McGarry and Rev. Mr Max M. Severe. WEEKEND MASS SCHED ULE: Saturday: 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 and 10 a.m., 12 p.m. (Spanish), 5 p.m. (Holy Fam ily Youth Center), every third Sunday of the month at 2 p.m. (F rench Mass). Daily Mass: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m. Sacrament of Reconcilliation: 7:157:45 a.m. rst Friday, 2:30-3:15 p.m. Satur day and 9-9:45 a.m. Sunday. Ofce Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monda y-Friday. SS t. James C C atholic C C hurch, 3380 Placid view Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Sun day 8 a..m. and 10 a.m. year round. Saturday Vigil 4 p.m. Weekdays 9 a.m. Holy da ys 9:30 a.m. (Vigil evening before at 7 p.m.) First Saturday of each month: Healing Mass, 9 a.m. CC HR II ST II A NNCC ornerstone CC hristian CC hurch, (Saxon Hall) 1003 W. Pine St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Lo ve Christ Love People. Jon Carter, Music Minister. Sunday, 9 a.m. Bible Study; 10 a.m. Worship; Communion avail able each week. Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship Group. For more information call 4537679. SS ebring C C hristian C C hurch, 4514 Ham mock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher. Kristy Marvin, Child rens Director. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y School, 11 a.m.; Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets at 1 p.m. Thursdays. Phone 382-6676. First C C hristian C C hurch (Disciples of CC hrist) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of P oinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-0358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m. CC HR II ST II A NN & M I I SS II O NN A RY A LLILLI A NCN C E TT he AA lliance CC hurch of SS ebring, 451 Spar ta Road, Sebring, FL 33875. Call 3821343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednes day Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CC HUR CC H OF BRETHRE NNCC hurch of the Brethren, 700 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m. Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CC HUR CC H OF C C HR II S T AA von Park C C hurch of C C hrist, 200 S. Forest Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Minister: Don Smith. Sunda y Worship Services, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available at every service. Bible Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered class es for all ages. Church phone: 453-4692. HH eartland church of C C hrist, Lakeshore Mall Suite 42 (outside entrance), 901 U.S. Highway 27 N, Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday worship, 9 a.m. to noon; Wednesday, Bible study, 7 p.m. Evangelist Carl Ford, (863) 4022159. LL ake Placid C C hurch of C C hrist, 1069 Hwy 27 North, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Mailing address is P.O. Box 1440, Lake Placid, FL 33862. Sunday morning worship is at 10 a.m. Sunday evening worship is 6 p.m. Bi ble class 9 a.m. Sundays and Wednesday e venings at 7 p.m. All are invited to join us. For more information, call the church at 863465-4636 or visit the website www.thelord sway.com/lakeplacidcofc/. SS ebring Parkway C C hurch of C C hrist, 3800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870; 3857443. Minister: Kevin Patterson. Times of ser vice are: Sunday Bible Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday W orship Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening Ser vice, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Bible Class, 7 p.m. CC HUR CC H OF G G OD CC hurch on the RR idge, Church of God, Ander son, Ind.; 1130 State Road 17 North, Sebring, FL 33870. Worship Service Sun day, 10 a.m.; Bible Study and Prayer, W ednesday, 7 p.m. Pastor Dr. Collet Varner, (863) 382-0773. CC HUR CC H OF N N A ZARE NN EFirst CC hurch of the Nazarene of AA von Park P.O. Box 1118., Avon Park, FL 338251118. 707 W. Main St. Sunday: Sunday school begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning worship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening service at 6 p.m. Wednesday evening service is at 7 p.m. with special services for children and adults. If you need any more information, call 453-4851. CC hurch of the Nazarene of L L ake Plac id, 512 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852. Adult Sunda y school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednes day evening: All church meal, 6 p.m.; Chris tian Life Study, 6:45 p.m. Winter Life groups pending Call 446-1339. Pastor Tim Taylor. CC HUR CC HES OF C C H R II S T IN IN CC HR II ST II A NN U NIN I O NN CC ommunity Bible CC hurch CC hurches of CC hrist in C C hristian Union, (Orange Blos som Conference Center) 1400 C-17A North (tr uck route), Avon Park. Presenting Jesus Christ as the answer for time and eterni ty. Sunday morning worship service, 10:30 a.m. Nur sery provided. Junior Church ac tivities at same time for K-6 grade. Sunday School Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m. (T ransportation available.) Sunday eve ning praise and worship service, 6 p.m. W ednesday evening prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and youth activities at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Everyone is welcome, please come worship with us. Tom Schwankweiler, Pastor. Phone 453-6052.EP II S CC OPA LLEE piscopal CC hurch of the RR edeemer AA von P ark, 910 W. Martin St., Avon Park, FL 33825 (U.S. 27 across from Wells Mo tor Co.). Rev. Canon George Conger. Sunday services: Holy Communion at 9:30 a.m.; Bible study W ednesday at 10 a.m. Everyone is welcome. Come and wor ship with us; we would love to meet you. Church ofce, 453-5664; fax, 453-4853. Visit us at our website at redeemeravon park.com. Email redeemer1895@aol. com. Call the thrift store for hour s open and donation pick up at 664-9668 or 453-5664. SS t. A A gnes E E piscopal C C hurch, 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Fa ther Scott Walker. Sunday Services: Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucha rist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek service on W ednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bi ble study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always w elcome. Church ofce 385-7649, for more information. SS t. Francis of A A ssisi A A nglican E E pis copal CC hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-0051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Nelson, Rector. Worship: Sunday, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday Bible study at 9:15 a.m. Sunday School at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Wor ship 6 p.m. and Thursday 9 a.m. Holy Communion with Healing Call the thrift store for hours open 699-0221.EVA NGNG E LICLIC A LL FREE C C H UR CC H O F AMER ICIC A TT he CC hurch of the Way EE F CACA 1005 N. Ridge wood Drive, Sebring. Sunda1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednes days. The Way is a church family who gather s for contemporary worship, teach ing of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come ear ly and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way A place for you. Ofce Phone: 471-6140, Church Cell Phone: 273-3674. Email: thewaychurch@ hotmail.com. Web site: www.TheWayChurch.org GG RA CC E BRETHRE NN Grace Brethren CC hurch, 3626 Thunder bird Road, (863) 835-0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednes day services at 7 p.m. We offer Kid City Children s Ministry throughout all ser vices, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married couples, primetimer s, and Bible studies in Spanish. Kid City Day Care, Preschool and AfterSchool Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For registration call: 385-3111). Check us out on the Web at www.sebringgrace.org. ININ DEPE NN DE NN TFirst CC hristian CC hurch, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the W eb at www.rstchristi anap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at F irst Christian Church. Greg Ratliff, Se nior Minister; Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Wednesday studies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. ININ TERDE NN OM INI N A T II O NN A LL World H H arvest and R R estoration Ministries, (non-denominational) 2200 N. A von Blvd.,(non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd., Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-3771. Sunday service: Sunday School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rog ers. LL UTHERA N NAA tonement LL utheran CC hurch ( ELCAELCA ), 1178 S.E. Lak eview Drive., Sebring. Rev. Sharon Dorr and Deacon David Thoresen will be the Spiritual Leaders, alternating Sundays. Jim Helwig, organist. Worship service with the Holy Eucharist is at 9:30 a.m. every Sunday. Birthday Sunday is the rst Sunday of each month after the service. Council meeting is on the rst Tuesday of each month. WELCA meets at noon second Tuesday of the month with a light lunch. Labyrinth Prayer Garden is open to the public 24 hours a day, seven days a week. When in need of prayers or to talk to God, come to the Garden. Come and grow with us; we would love to meet you and your family. Dont worry about how you look. Jesus went to the temple in a robe and san dals. Quilting classes every Monday at 6 p.m. Looking for quilter s or people willing to learn. Call 840-3303. CC hrist L L utheran C C hurch A A von P ark LCLC M S S 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School past the four-way stop sign. Sunday Divine Wor ship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated e very week with tradition al Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. F ellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come wor ship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at (863) 471-2663 or see christlutherana vonpark. org. Faith L L utheran C C hurch LC LC M S S ,2740 Lakeview Dr, Sebring; Church phone: 3857848; Faith Child Development Center: 385-3232. Sunday Traditional Worship Ser vice: 8 a.m.; Sunday Praise Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.; Communion served 1st, 3rd & 5th Sunda y. Sunday School & Bible Classes: 9:15 a.m. Worship Svc. Broad cast at 8 a.m. on WITS 1340AM each Sunday. Educational opportunities include w eekly adult Bible studies, Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. All are warm ly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good S S hepherd L L utheran C C hurch (AALC) American Association of Luther an Churches, 3240 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. James Weed, pastor. W orship Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Bi ble Study, 9 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 385-2346. Ne w L L ife E E vangelical L L utheran C C hurch, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangeli cal Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more infor mation, call Pastor Luke Willitz at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www. newlifesebring.com. RR esurrection L L utheran C C hurch ELCA ELCA 324 E. Main St., at Memorial Drive, Avon Park. Pastor Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Sun day worship 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Sunday School at 9:15 a.m. Coffee and fellowship following 10:30 a.m. service. Wednesday Worship Service is at 7 p.m. Open Com munion celebrated at all services. Gods W ork, Our Hands. TT rinity L L utheran C C hurch LC LC M S S 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots PreSchool director Education Hour, 8:45 a.m.; Worship service, 10 a.m. Holy Com munion each rst and third Sunday. Childrens Church scheduled during worship ser vice, 4-year-olds through fth grade. Nursery provided during worship service for infants to 3-year-olds. Seasonal MidWeek Services each Wwednesday eve ning during Advent and Lent. Call church ofce at 465-5253 or visit the w ebsite at www.Trinitylutheranlp.com. Other ac tivities and groups include: Choir; Ladies Guild and L WML; Mens Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies; Trinity Tots Pre-school, and Youth Group. NN O NN -DE NN OM INI N A T II O NN A LL Bible Fellowship CC hurch, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: F irst Worship sermon, songs signed rst and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 yrs through 5th grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church of ce 385-1024. CC alvary C C hurch, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An inde pendent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunda y evening service, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small friendly church waiting for your visit. CC hristian T T raining Ministries I I nc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. A nursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Chris tian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister, lindadowning@live.com. Casey L. Downing, associate minister, caseydowning@hotmail.com. Church phone: 314-0482. W eb site: www. ctmforme.com CC rossroads of L L ife,148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852; Tel. 863655-9163. The place of your Divine ap pointment. We expect our supernatural God to transfor m our lives through His power and grace. Come, learn of His plan and destiny for you. With His plan we re ceive His provision along with His perfect timing and oppor tunity. What you have longed for, but have been missing, can now be received. The direction you have been thirsty for will suddenly quench your parched soul. Come to experience what you have been missing for so long empowerment in every area of life. We teach, train and send forth to win souls. You dont speak English no problema. We have a Spanish interpreter. We look forward to fellowship and worship with you at 7 p.m. every Wednesday. Pastoers Gil and Rosa Benton (Faith Never Fails). Faith & Familylife Worship C C enter, Pastors Leroy and JoAnn Taylor invite you to discover one of Sebrings hidden trea sures at 2349 U.S. 27 South (Banyan Plaza off Spar ta Road and Lake Jackson). We provide biblical solutions for every day challenges through our multicultural worship services available on Sundays at 11 a.m. and Wednesdays at 7 p.m. Child care is a vailable for all who at tend. For more information, all 385-1800. Plan your r st visit. Matthew 7:7 says, Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will nd; knock and the door will be opened to you. Our guests are very im portant, so please let us know how we can meet your need b y emailing theffwc@ gmail.com. Our mission at Faith & Fami lylife is centered around Restoring Lives, F amilies and Communities. Grace Bible C C hurch, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone, 382-1085. Dustin Woods, lead pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Monday, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry. www.GBCco nnected.org HH ighlands C C ommunity C C hurch, a ca sual contemporary church, meets at 3005 Ne w Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. New Beginnings C C hurch of S S ebring, worshiping at The Morris Chapel, 307 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Pastor Gary Kindle. Bible study every Sunday, 9 a.m. Blended Church Service, 10:15 a.m. Phone (863) 835-2405. newbeginningschurchofsebring.com Be gin your week with us. TT he L L ords S S entinel Fellowship C C hurch, 148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid (at Lake Placid Christian School), Pastor Juanita Folsom. Sunday morning service, 10:30 a.m.; Monday, Sentinel School of Theology, 7 p.m.; Church service, Tues day, 7 p.m. More information at www. juanitafolsomministries.com. Union C C hurch, 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday traditional worship service is at 7:45 a.m. (October through Easter) and 9 a.m. Contemporary Sunday worship service is at 10:45 a.m. Nursery and childrens church available. Wednesday night worship with Pastor Ti ger Gullett and CrossTalk with Pastor Bill Bre ylinger at 6 p.m. Breakfast and lunch menus at Solid Grounds. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Ofce: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. Unity L L ife E E nrichment C C entre,new lo cation, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.uni tyofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. W eekly Classes, Christian Book store and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinar y to extraordinary. RELIGION

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 11, 2014 | NEWSSS U nN | B7 PRESBYTERIANCovenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. Pastor Tom Schneider. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Sunday morning worship: Traditional ser vice, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday school, 9:15 a.m. Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Childrens/Youth Group, 5:30-7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato. net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Ofce hours: 8:3012:30 a.m. Monday-Friday.First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6 p.m. each Wednesday; Children Ministry and Youth Group, 6 p.m. each Sunday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. 385-0107. Email: faith@ strato.net, Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Fellowship Time, 10:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m. Tuesday: Youth Groups meet for devotions/Bible study, crafts, sport activities and dinner. Middle and high school, 3:306:30 p.m. Elementary School, 4-5:30 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m. Choir Rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. A nursery is available during worship. Call the church ofce for more information and other classes. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com, 117 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday Traditional Worship, 8 and 9:30 a.m.; Contemporary Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. Wednesday evenings: Adult small group Bible Study 7 p.m. (Nursery available), Youth Group (6-12th grades) 7 p.m., nursery and childrens ministry, 7 p.m. Family Biblical Counseling available by appointment. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September through June. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. rst Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 6550713; e-mail, springlakepc@embarqmail.com, Web site, http://slpc.embarqspace.com.SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTISTAvon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com, Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. A sale takes place the rst Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Frank Gonzalez. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALL ARE WELCOME. Associate Pastor is Ryan Amos. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Nathan Madrid.THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTSThe Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 3829092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-1p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: rst and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m.THE SALVATION ARMYThe Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www. salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODISTFirst United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., 105 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870. Pastor John A. Bryant. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church, 200 S. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759, Rev. Gary Pendrak, Pastor. Sunday School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Bible study every Wednesday at 6 p.m. Visit us at our church website: www.fumcap. org. Memorial United Methodist Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL, 33852. Rev. Tim Haas, pastor. Rev. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral assistant. Rev. Jerry McCauley, visitation pastor. Sunday worship services: Worship Service, 8:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m. We offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth programs, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship. We are a congregation that wants to know Christ and make Him known. Check out our church website at www.memorialumc.com or call the church ofce at 465-2422. Lakeview Christian School, VPK to Grade 5, 465-0313. St. John United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Adult Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all services. Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring. org Spring Lake United Methodist Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church ofce phone: 655-0040.UNITED CHURCH OF CHRISTEmmanuel United Church of Christ, Jesus didnt reject people, neither do we. Join us for worship every Sunday at 9:30 a.m. and youll be embraced by a compassionate congregation that is all-inclusive. Were at the corner of Hammock and Hope. Choir and Bell Choir practice on Wednesday; Bible studies throughout the week. 471-1999; sebringemmanuelucc.com.P lacesLACES t T O W O rsRS H I pP RELIGION A well-known public speaker started off a sem inar by holding up a $20 bill. I n a room lled with 200 people, he asked, Who would like to have this $20 bill? Hands started going up all over the place. He then said, I am going to give this $20 to one of you present this evening, but rst, I am going to do something. He proceeded to wad the bill up into a little ball. He then asked, Who still wants this money? Hands ew into the air. Well, he replied, what if I do this? He dropped the $20 bill on the ground and started to grind it into the oor with his shoe. He picked up the money, which was now all crumpled and dirty. Now, who still wants it? The same hands went up all over the room. My friends, you have all learned a very valu able lesson. No matter what I did to the mon ey, you still wanted it, because it did not decrease in v alue. It was always worth $20. Many times in our lives, we are dropped, crumpled, and ground into the dirt by the de cisions we make and the cir cumstances that come our way. We feel as though we are worthless. However, no matter what has happened, is hap pening, or will ever happen to you, you will never lose y our value in Gods eyes. To Him, dirty or clean, crumpled or ne ly creased, you are still pr iceless in His eyes. In the rst century, Paul wrote the Christians in Rome about Gods great love for them, even though they had been crumpled and dirtied with sin. Romans 5:8-10 reads, But God demon strates His own love toward us, in that while we w ere yet sinners, Christ died for us. Much more then, having now been justied by His blood, we shall be saved from the wrath of God through Him. For if while we were enemies we were recon ciled to God through the death of H is Son, much more, having been recon ciled, we shall be saved b y His life. God values you no mat ter what your circumstances. In fact, you are so v aluable to Him, that He gave His one and only Son to die on a cross to save you.Kevins Komments is written by Kevin Patterson and present ed by Sebring Parkway church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Park way. On the Internet visit at www. sebringcoc.com, or e-mail se bringparkway@sebringcoc.com.You are still valuable! K evinEVIN sS K ommentsOMME NTS Kevin Patterson Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID Bill and Linda Lewis from Richmond, Va., will minister in music and song Sunday morning at Leisure Lakes Baptist Church of Lake Placid. Lewis will also be the fea tured singer during the Holy W eek celebration weekdays at noon at First Baptist Church of Lake Placid. The annual event is sponsored by the Lake Plac id Christian Ministerial Association. F ollowing the morning con cert at Leisure Lakes, all are invited to stay for dinner on the gr ounds in the church fellow ship hall. The chur ch is at the western end of Lake June. From U.S. 27 take Lake June Road to Mill er, turning north on Wildower. F or further information contact the church ofce at 699-0671.Bill and Linda Lewis to sing Palm Sunday at Leisure Lakes Courtesy photoBill and Linda Lewis will minister in music at Leisure Lakes Baptist Church on Palm Sunday.We continue our examination of reasons used to uphold infant baptism as authorized by the Word of God. Millions and mil lions of people and hundreds of denominations subscr ibe to this prac tice, therefore it is wor thy of our attention. Is it based on tr aditions and doctrines of men or Scrip ture? When P eter, by the pow er of the Holy Spirit, proclaimed to those believers to r epent and be baptized (Acts 2:36-38), he then stated, For the promise is for you and your children, and for all who are afar off, as many as the Lord our God shall call to Him self (Acts 2:39). S o, therefore, the claim is that their children were to be baptized then! It is very obvious that chil dren refers to present and futur e generations who hear and believe the gospel, repent of sins and are baptized will also re ceive the promise of remission of sins and the gift of the H oly Spirit. If this teaches infants are to be baptized, it also teach es that they must repent. B ut, repentance is pro ceeded by knowledge, Or do y ou despise the riches of His goodness, forbear ance, and longsuffer ing, not knowing that the goodness of G od leads you to repentance? (Ro mans 2:4). Let the little children come to Me, and do not forbid them; for such is the kingdom of God. As suredly, I say to you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of G od as a lit tle child will by no means enter it (Luke 18:16,17). This statement of Jesus, also recorded in Matthew 19:14,15 and Mark 10:1316, has nothing to do with infant baptism. The con text shows that Jesus was using the childr en as an example of humility and purity to the proud disci ples. Another claimed justi cation for infant baptism is the doctr ine of Original Sin. Multitudes of de nitions abound regarding this man made doctr ine. Augustine, bishop of Hip po (396-430 AD) stated, Nothing remain but to conclude that in the rst man all are understood to have sinned, because all were in him when he sinned; whereby sin is brought in with birth not removed save by the new birth it is manifest that in Adam all sinned, so to speak, en masse. By that sin we became a corrupt mass. As observed in the rst article, there is a differ ence in the guilt of sin and consequences of sin. Nowhere does Inspira tion declare that we suffer guilt of sin other than per sonal sins. (Ezekiel 18:20) Ther efore, what does an infant need to be saved from? The Apostolic Tradition of Hippolytus of Rome states, The children shall be baptized rst. All of the children who can answer for themselves, let them answer. If there are any children who cannot an swer for themselves, let their par ents answer for them, or someone else from their family. After this, the men will be bap tized. Finally, the women. Compare this manmade doctr ine to Inspired instructions: Then Phil ip opened his mouth, and beginning at this Scr ip ture, preached Jesus to H im. Now as they went down the road, they came to some water. And the eunuch said, See, here is water. What hinders me from being baptized? Then Philip said, If you believe with all your heart, you may. And he an swered and said, I believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God (Acts 8:35-37 em phasis added). S upporters of infant baptism claim that since the New Testament does not teach against it, there fore it must be approved. The reason there is no teaching against it is be cause it was not an issue. Reading websites and books of denominations who practice infant bap tism, it is very evident that the sour ces of authori ty is not Gods Word, but church fathers, (i.e. Ire naeus, Hippolytus, Origen, Cyprian of Carthage, A ugustine) and coun cils of men. The Messiah war ned, And in vain they worship Me, teaching as doctrines the command ments of men (Matthew 15:9). N otice the reactions to this teaching, Then His disciples came and said to Him, Do You know that the Pharisees were offended when they heard this saying? (Matthew 15:12). First Corinthians 7:14, For the unbelieving hus band is sanctied by the wife and the unbeliev ing wife is sanctied by the husband; other wise your children would be unclean, but now they are holy, is suppose to sup port infant baptism/salvation! The context is very simple: the marr iage is recognized by God even if only one is a believer. If this is not so, then the children would be not pure/holy but rather un clean, i.e. illegitimate. Wher e is infant baptism suggested here? Pauls prayer and peti tion must be that of every gospel preacher, for me that utterance may be given to me, that I may open my mouth boldly to make known the mystery of the gos pel, for which I am an ambassador in chains, that in it I may speak boldly as I ought to speak (Ephe sians 6:19,20). The faithful teacher of Truth will also heed the admonition to speak the truth in love. (Ephesians 4:15)Frank Parker can be contacted at frankparker27@gmail.com. Guest columns ar e the opin ion of the writer, not necessarily those of the News-Sun staff.Comparative religion: infant baptism, part 2 G uestUEST C olumnOLUMN Frank Parker

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B8 | NEWSSS U nN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com RELIGION First Baptist has Easter CantataAVON PARK The First Baptist Church of Avon Park will be have its an nual Easter Cantata at 10:45 / a.m. Sunday. Everyone is invited to share the morning in worship.Maranatha shares The Day He Wore My CrownSEBRING Maranatha Baptist Church in Sebring will present an Easter mu sical drama at 7 / p .m. Good Friday, April 18 and at 6 / p .m. Easter Sunday, April 20. The Day He Wore My Crown, created by Russell Mauldin and Sue C. Smith, will involve both the choir and the drama team of the church. This presentation will bring to life the greatest story ever told! Jesus wore a crown of thorns and died on a rugged cross to pay the penalty for the sins of each one of us. Different characters will tell what this has meant in their lives between songs that tell the story of the suffering, crucixion, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. This musical is under the direction of Jan Burgess with Pat Seddon directing the drama. Accompanists are Judy Tinkham at the piano and Ann Truax at the organ. Character parts are played by Leon Moody, Bill Follett, Bruce Hendsbee, Hope Austin, Charles Welner, David Waite, Wayne Mattson and Jerry Carlson. Maranatha Baptist Church is just off Arbuckle Creek Road at 35 Maranatha Blvd. For more information call 382-4301 or 382-8594.Church plans garage saleAVON PARK The First United Methodist Church of Avon Park, 200 S. Lake Ave., will hold a garage clearance sale as well as a pre-Easter bake sale from 8 / a.m. to 1 / p.m. Saturday the same day as a pan cake breakfast from 8-10 / a.m. The bake sale and the breakfast will be in Wesley Hall and the garage sale will be held outside in the pavilion, just south of the church.Sebring Christian plans egg huntSEBRING The Hallelujah Egg Hunt will be held at Sebring Christian Church at 11 / a.m. on Sunday, April 20. There will be three dif ferent age groups: 5 and y ounger, kindergarten through second grade and third through fth. The church is at 4514 Hammock Road.Church of Buttonwood Bay donates $7,000SEBRING The Church of Buttonwood Bay has announced gifts in the amount of $7,000 to local organizations to help meet the needs of coun ty residents. Included ar e gifts of $1,000 each to Horses for the Handicapped, Meals on Wheels, New Testament Mission, Potter House and Nu-Hope Elder Care. In addition, the amount of $2,000 was presented to the local Rotary Club to sponsor the sending of two World War II veterans to Washington, D.C. next month. The church meets for worship in the recreation hall at Buttonwood Bay. Dr. Cecil D. Hess is pastor.St. Agnes plans Holy Week servicesSEBRING St. Agnes Episcopal Church invites the public to Holy Week services. Palm Sunday service is Sunday. Maunt Thursday service is at 7 / p.m. Good Friday servic es are at noon and 7 / p.m. and the Easter Vigil is at 7 / p.m. followed by the Agape Feast on Saturday, April 19. Easter Sunday starts with a sunrise service on the shore of Lake Jackson at 6:30 / a.m., followed by an egg hunt at 9:15 / a.m. and Rite II service at 10 / a.m. Call the church of ce, 385-7649, or check the chur chs Facebook page for additional information.Family Easter Celebration planned at St. JohnSEBRING Children, moms, dads and grand parents are invited to join in a Family Easter C elebration at St. John United Methodist Church from 10 / a.m. to noon Saturday, April 19. Activities will include egg hunt, crafts, face painting, cake walk, cookie decorat ing, popcorn, sno-cones plus the Easter S tory. The church is at 3214 Grand Prix Drive, (behind the Sebring Walmart). For more information, call the church ofce at 382-1736.Memorial United Methodist plans egg huntLAKE PLACID Everyone is invit ed to Memorial United M ethodist Churchs an nual Easter Egg Hunt S aturday, April 19, from 10 / a.m. to noon. Rain or shine, there will be thou sands of brightly colored eggs to nd and also a chance to nd the cher ished golden egg and win big. Y ou can also enjoy col oring eggs with expert egg color ing artists. There will also be plen ty of food and many other cr afts. The church is at 500 Kent Ave., behind the Tower. Call 465-2422.Alive in the Spirit comes to Avon ParkAVON PARK A oneday convention titled Alive in the Spirit will be held at Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church. It is sponsored by the Venice Diocesan Council of Catholic Women. There will be great speakers, a Bishops Mass, entertainment and more. A continental breakfast and catered lunch will be served. Cost of the conven tion is $35. Registrations will close for this ev ent on Monday. Contact Cookie Perkins at (863) 993-0589 for more information and reservations. All ladies are welcome. SNAPs S HOTs S RELIGION NN EWS BY BARR YY FOSTERNews-Sun CorrespondentAVON PARK This weekend will be Palm Sunday and in obser vance of that, the Avon P ark Lakes Baptist Church will stage a rare performance of The Shadow of the Cross. The program is a series of a half dozen vignettes of both Bible stories, and portrayals adapt ed from an Easter season per formance at the First Baptist Church of Hurst, Texas. My son, Mark Gar ner, does a Palm Sunday per formance each year at the church there and this was one of them, said Avon Park resident Jimmie Garner Butts. It has been adapted by the Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church. Billed as a multi-sen sory experience, director Wendy Garcia said the pr esentation would be interactive with the audi ence. Those who attend are going to be given a bag with a number of differ ent symbolic items inside, she explained. For instance there will be a small rock for when the story of the accused adulteress is told and there also will be a spe cial small tile given out that will be used later in the program. Eight different actors representing a myriad of characters will take part in the program. There will be portray als of Jesus and Satan but also others talk ing about how Jesus impacted their lives and their r eaction to it, Gar cia said. It really is very po werful. Between the various scenes, there will be a musical presentation de signed to reect each of the individual stor ies. There will be some so los and the congregation will hav e an opportuni ty to sing different praise songs as w ell. Although she has been a choir director in the past, Garcia said this was her initial attempt at di recting a stage perfor mance. This is my rst pro gram with this type of acting in it and I am blessed with a very tal ented group of people who ar e able to deliver their lines with feeling. It is just amazing, she said. Even during prac tice I am seeing what an impact this will hav e on anyone who comes. Following the presen tation there will be a shor t message by Pastor George Hall and Com munion will be offered to those who wish to par tic ipate. The per formance is scheduled to run about an hour and will be at 6 / p.m. both Saturday and Sunday in the sanctu ary of Avon Park Lakes B aptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd. It is free and open to the public. This is an outreach program and we are hop ing that there will be a lot of people who come that dont normally attend a church. I think they would get a lot from see ing this, Garcia said.The Shadow of the Cross at AP Lakes Baptist GRIFFITH, Ind. (AP) What appears to be a tearstained cheek on a statue of Mary on the grounds of St. Mary Catholic Church is moving some people to tears as others caution against a rush to judg ment. Among the skeptics is the church pastor, the Rev. Theodore Mens. There must be a natural explanation the cold, the melting of the snow, he said. Whenever we see something, we always look for a natural reason rst. The white statue, about 4 feet tall, depicts Mary, the mother of Jesus Christ. Surrounded by tulips wait ing to bloom, it stands in what par ishioners call the sunken garden along Broad Street and is the site of the annual May crown ing. M ens said the statue has been there for at least as long as the 21 years he has been at St. Mary Church. Majdolin Haddad, re ligious education secretary at St. Mary, said her daughter R eta, an aide in the fourth-grade Monday night class, told her about the tear. Students in the class had left the church after con fession, paused at the statue to pray and noticed a dr oplet of water clinging to the chin of Marys face, appearing to originate from the right eye. A photo snapped Tues day morning shows the dr oplet intact. It was gone by early afternoon. Mens saw the photo but was reluctant to read any thing into it. Everything we need to know for our salvation has been made known, Mens told The Times. Proven occurrences elsewhere in the world are signs of added grace from Mary, he said. The message of Our Lady throughout histo ry wherever appearances have been proven has always been the same which is the scripture teaching of: repent, stop sinning, be baptized, be lieve in the Gospel, he said. M ens said he is not nec essarily a nonbeliever. Im not going to say anything against a possi ble further sign of Gods lo ve for us through Mary, he said. I just dont want to fall for anything. I am formed and shaped by the scriptures and the teach ings of Jesus, not necessarily by a tear that somebody sees on a statue. I f the statue brings peo ple closer to God, thats wonder ful, he said. Mens has no plans to further investigate the statue, and the Diocese of Gary has not issued a statement. The diocese has just found out about it and is not prepared to comment at this time, said Debbie Bosak, director of commu nications for the Diocese of G ary. As word spread Tuesday, people visited the statue. Chicago resident Chris Kovich, who was in Grifth on business, theo rized rain water may have follo wed the curve in the statues veil, dripping on its face. Kovich, who described himself as a lapsed Catho lic, said it is premature to make assumptions about the appearance of tears. It is what it is, he said. Lupe Figueroa ran her hand along the cheek and jaw of the statue. A member of the Altar and Rosary Society at St. Mary Church, Figueroa had heard of the statues supposed tears Tuesday morning and stopped by. She visited again in ear ly afternoon for another look. G rifth resident Jason Seitz heard from his moth er about the statue. You can denitely see the dry teardrop, he said. Seitz said he was unde cided. Im a realist, but Im also a believer and Chris tian, he said. M ens doubts the statue will reach worldwide fame as other occurrences, such as Marian apparitions. I dont think this will become Lourdes or Fatima or anything, he said.Visitors flock to Indiana Catholic church to see statue with tear

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www.newssun.com Friday, April 11, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B9 Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under the Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed under our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be pla ced under the Bargain Buy category. 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Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Ref No.PC 14-29 IN RE:ESTATE OF BERYL K.BERNHARDT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Beryl K.Bernhardt,deceased,whose date of death was December 6,2013,is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County,Florida, Probate Division,the address of which is 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,FL 33870.The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 11,2014. Personal Representative: Robert E.Bernhardt,Jr. 1415 22nd Avenue North St.Petersburg,FL 33704 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NUMBER:GC 13-535 HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. GERALDINE CAMERON,a single woman; if living including any unknown spouse of said Defendant,if remarried,and if deceased,the respective unknown hiers,devisees,grantees,assignees, creditors,lienors,and trustees,and all other pesons claiming by,through, under or against the named Defendant(s); ASSET ACCEPTANCE,LLC,a Delaware corporation; whether dissolved or presently existing,together with any grantees,assignees,successors, creditors,lienors,or trustees of said defendant(s) and all other persons claiming by,through,under,or against Defendant(s); and UNKNOWN TENANT #1, UNKNOWN TENANT #2, the names being fictitious to account for parties in possession; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final judgment of foreclosure entered in the abovetitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,I will sell the property situated in Highlands County,Florida, described as: The Property:a/k/a 124 Washington Blvd.,Lake Placid,FL 33852 Lot 13,Block 9,of HIGHLANDS PARK ESTATE SECTION 8,according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4,Page 68, Public Records of Highlands County,Florida. Parcel I.D.C-20-36-30-020-0090-0130 at public sale,to the highest and best bidder for cash,in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,in Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.on the 30th day of April,2014. SIGNED this 28th day of March,2014. (SEAL) ROBERT W.GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,(941) 534-4690,within two (2) working days of publication of this Notice of Sale; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call TDD (941) 534-7777 or Florida Relay Service (800) 955-8770. 10-4402-030 April 4,11,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NUMBER:13-603 GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES B.BUSH and LAUREN D.BUSH, Husband and Wife,if alive and if not, their unknown spouse,heirs, devisees,grantees,assignees,creditors, or other parties claiming by,through, under or against JAMES B.BUSH and LAURNE D.BUSH,and all claimants under any of such party; and CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A.,a national banking corporation; whether dissolved or presently existing, together with any grantees,assignees, successors,creditors,lienors,or trustees of said defendant(s) and all other persons claiming by,through, under,or against Defendant(s); Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final judgment of foreclosure entered in the abovetitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,I will sell the property situated in Highlands County,Florida, described as: The Property:20 Dasher Road,Lake Placid,FL 33852 Tract 4,of LAKE PEARL ESTATES,Lot 8, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3,Page 76,of the Public Records of Highlands County,Florida. Real property Tax I.D. #C-06-37-30-050-0040-0000 at public sale,to the highest and best bidder for cash,in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,in Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.on the 30th day of April,2014. SIGNED this 28th day of March,2014. (SEAL) ROBERT W.GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,(941) 534-4690,within two (2) working days of publication of this Notice of Sale; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call TDD (941) 534-7777 or Florida Relay Service (800) 955-8770. 10-4405-022 April 4,11,2014 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:10-316-GCS BANK OF AMERICA,N.A., Plaintiff, vs. AVIS ELAINE NEMBHARD F/K/A AVIS SMITH A/K/A AVIS ELAINE SMITH; LORETTA HEADLEY; TRIVON TAYLOR; et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO:Unknown Spouse of Trivon Taylor Last Known Residence:4931 NW 18th Street,Lauderhill,FL 33313 Unknown Spouse of Avis Elaine Nembhard F/K/A Avis Smith A/K/A Avis Elaine Smith N/K/A Hurton Nembhard Last Known Residence:6646 NW 4th Street,Margate,FL 33063 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County,Florida: LOT 9,BLOCK 731,SUN N LAKE ESTATE OF SEBRING,UNIT 25RI,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 15,PAGE 59,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses,if any,to it on Aldridge Connors,LLP, Plaintiff's attorney,at 1615 South Congress Avenue,Suite 200,Delray Beach,FL 33445 (Phone Number:561-392-6391),within 30 days of the first date of publication of this notice,and file the original with the clerk of this court either before May 2,2014 on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated on March 26,2014 Robert W.Germaine,Clerk As Clerk of the Court By:/s/ Toni Kopp As Deputy Clerk 1092-6040B April 4,11,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Ref.No.:2014-0081 Division Probate IN RE:ESTATE OF PHILLIP GORDON MITCHELL, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of PHILLIP GORDON MITCHELL,deceased, whose date of death was January 15,2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County,Florida,Probate Division,the address of which is 590 South Commerce Ave.,Sebring,Florida 33870.The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 4,2014. Personal Representative: Sharon L.Jill 2827 St.Croix Drive Clearwater,FL 33759 Attorney for Personal Representative: RICHARD D.GREEN,ESQ. Fla Bar 205877 rdgreen@greenlawoffices.net 1010 Drew Street Clearwater,FL 33755 (727) 441-8813 April 4,11,2014 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.13000919GCAXMX REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE NETWORK,INC., Plaintiff, vs. ROY ROBERT ADCOCK, A/K/A ROY ROBER ADCOCK,et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To:ROY ROBERT ADCOCK A/K/A ROY ROBER ADCOCK,1916 SPARTA CIRCLE,SEBRING,FL 33870 ROSA ISELA FLORES-ADCOCK F/K/A ROSA ISELA FLORES-GUTIERREZ A/K/A ROSA FLORES,1916 SPARTA CIR,SEBRING,FL 33875 LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED,CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows,to-wit: LOT 31,OF SPARTA HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8,PAGE 12,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses,if any,to it on Sara Collins,McCalla Raymer,LLC,225 E.Robinson St.Suite 660,Orlando,FL 32801 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 31st day of March,2014. 13-08082-1 April 4,11,2014 WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 21st day of March,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK Clerk of the Court Highlands County,Florida By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk CA13-07431/NM April 4,11,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.:14000092GCAXMX U.S.BANK,NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE BANC OF AMERICA FUNDING CORPORATION,2008-FT1 TRUST, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES,SERIES 2008-FT1, Plaintiff, vs. KAMPAN FARNAM,et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF JAMES E.FARNAM ADDRESS UNKNOWN Residence unknown and if living,including any unknown spouse of the Defendant,if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs,devisees, grantees,assignees,creditors,lienors,and trustees,and all other persons claiming by, through,under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants,incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property to-wit: LOT 450 AND LOT 451,OF AVON PARK LAKES UNIT NO.1,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4,PAGE 88,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. more commonly known as:1730 N VALENCIA DRIVE,AVON PARK,FL 33825 This action has been filed against you,and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense,if any,to it on the Plaintiff's attorney,FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS,PLLC,whose address is 601 Cleveland Street,Suite 690,Clearwater,FL 33755,on or before 30 days after date of first publication,response due by May 2, 2014,and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.282012CA000320XXXXXX GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, Plaintiff, vs ARLENE FISHER,et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated March 26,2014 and entered in Case No.282012CA000320XXXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County,Florida,wherein GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC,is Plaintif and ARELEN FISHER; UNKNOWN TENANT NO.1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO.2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH,UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION,OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT,TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED,are Defendants,I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse,430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870. Highlands County,Florida,11:00 a.m.on May 14,2014,the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 24,BLOCK 53,SEBRING COUNTRY ESTATES SECTION THREE,ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9,PAGE 6,PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE,IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990,persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Highlands County Courthouse.Telephone 863-386-6565 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Sebring,Florida,on March 27, 2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE As Clerk,Circuit Court By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak AS DEPUTY CLERK 1425-110312 April 11,18,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.:28-2013-CA-000002 CENLAR FSB Plaintiff, vs. WAYNE M.MCMULLIAN A/K/A WAYNE MCMULLIAN,DEBORAH A.MCMULLIAN A/K/A DEBORAH MCMULLIAN, HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given,pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on April 1,2014,in the Circuit Court of HIGHLANDS County,Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County,Florida described as: A PORTION OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 2,TOWNSHIP 36 SOUTH, RANGE 28 EAST,HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA,MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 2; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 70 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST PARALLEL WITH THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 2 FOR A DISTANCE OF 886.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 430.70 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1,011.37 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 430.70 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1,011.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.ALSO KNOWN AS TRACT 3 OF HENSCRATCH ESTATES UNRECORDED; LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED:COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 2; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 70 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST PARALLEL WITH THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 2 FOR A DISTANCE OF 886.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 430.70 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 527.74 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 430.70 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 527.74 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT OVER THE WEST 18 FEET OF THE NORTH 527.74 FEET FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS. and commonly known as:4825 W JOSEPHINE RD,LAKE PLACID,FL 33852; including the building,appurtenances,and fixtures located therein,at public sale,to the highest and best bidder,for cash,Sales are held in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870,on May 6,2014 at 11 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 3rd day of April,2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court ROBERT W.GERMAINE By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk 327470/1202374/abt April 11,18,2014 ticipate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact Court Administration at 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring, Florida 33870,telephone (863) 534-4690, within two (2) working days of receipt of this Notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. ROBERT W.GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Highlands County,Florida By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk of Court ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO,FISHMAN & GACHE',LLP 2424 North Federal Highway,Suite 360 Boca Raton,Florida 33431 (561)998-6700 (561) 998-6707 11-233323 FC01 ALL April 11,18,2014 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.:2012-CA-000015 Nationwide Advantage Mortgage Company Plaintiff, -vs.Raul A.Russo and Tamara A.Russo, Husband and Wife; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living,and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through,under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive,whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse,Heirs,Devisees, Grantees,or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2,If living,and all Unknown Parties claiming by,through,under and against the above named not known to be dead or alive,whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs,Devisees,Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment,entered in Civil Case No. 2012-CA-000015 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County,Florida,wherein Nationwide Advantage Mortgage Company,Plaintiff and Raul A.Russo and Tamara A.Russo,Husband and Wife are defendant(s),I,Clerk of Court, ROBERT W.GERMAINE,will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash,AT THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE,SEBRING,FLORIDA AT 11:00 A.M., April 30,2014,the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: DESCRIPTION OF A PARCEL OF LAND FOR VILLA UNIT 5,ADJACENT TO AND NORTH OF LOT 4,OF THE REPLAT OF PORTION OF BLOCK 2,SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES,HOLIDAY COUNTRY CLUB SECTION,AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 12,PAGE 68,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA,FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN FROM THE NORTHEASTERLY CORNER OF THE SAID LOT 4,AND RUN THENCE ALONG A CURVE TO THE RIGHT,R=65.00', A=4.68',C=4.69',CB=NORTH 13 DEGREES 33'46.5'' WEST; THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST,116.32 FEET,FOR A P.O.B.; THENCE RUN SOUTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST,35.75 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST,0.33 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST, 6.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST,0.33 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST,43.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST, 0.33 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST,6.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST,0.33 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST, 19.25 FEET; THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST,27.67 FEET; THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST,19.25 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST, 0.33 FEET; THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST,6.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST,0.33 FEET; THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST, 43.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST,0.33 FEET; THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST,6.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST, 0.33 FEET; THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST,35.75 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST,27.67 FEET TO P.O.B.TOGETHER WITH A 30 FOOT WIDE, INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:BEGIN FROM THE NORTHEASTERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT 4, ALSO THE P.O.B.; THENCE RUN ALONG A CURVE TO THE RIGHT,R=65.00',A=4.68', C=4.68',CB=NORTH 13 DEGREES 33'46.5'' WEST; THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' WEST,237.32 FEET; THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST, 30.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 30'00'' EAST,237.32 FEET; THENCE ALONG A CURVE TO THE LEFT,R=35.00', A=2.52',C=2.52',CB=SOUTH 13 DEGREES 33'46.5'' EAST; THENCE SOUTH 74 DEGREES 22'27'' WEST,30.00 FEET,TO THE P.O.B. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE,IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par1050Legals 1000 Announcements

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B10 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com 6300Unfurnished Houses NICE 1BRapt $775 mo., 300 dep., plus electric, other utl. incl.in rent. Close to town, train. Appliances included, shared laundry room, pet rent $20 sm, $49 lg. 847-344-1313.BEAUTIFULAPTSSEBRING2BR/1BA, tile floors, screen back porch, beautiful landscaping. 3113 Medical Way. $595/mo. 863-446-1822 6200UnfurnishedApartments 6000 RentalsMOBILE HOMEFOR SALE 50 x 125' Lot, clear. No lot rent. 2/2, carport, screen room, covered patio. Close to Hospital. Furnished. $30,000 OBO. 4800 Al Hambra Ave., Sebring. Call 863-382-3049. 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale PALM HARBORHOMES limited time offer! $5K towards any exterior package. We have 24 wide, 26, 28 & 30 wide homes. 3 stock units reduced 26K, Homes from the $60's plantcity.palmharbor.com or 800-622-2832 MOBILE 14X60,2 bedrooms/11/2 baths, 2 Fla. rooms, 2 carports, garage, workshop, roofover, Smithbuilt shed, 100x125 lot, all fenced, own land, 863-385-2979. HOME OFMERIT, 1 bedroom/1 bath, double lot, Senior citizen park, closed-in porch, double shed, well, fruit trees. 863-382-0393, 570-679-2922. 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile Homes3 BEDROOM/2BATH home, 125x80 lot, CC block & stucco. Central air/heat, 2 car garage, $125,000. 863-835-0294. 4080Homes for SaleSebringFOR SALE,CBS 3BR/2BA, 1 car gar., in Avon Park Lakes, fenced back yard, built in 2006, newly renovated in 2010, asking, $99,900, 863-368-1963. 4060Homes for SaleAvon Park 4000 Real EstateSUCCESSFUL PRINTINGbusiness for sale. Winners of Readers Choice Award. Family owned 40 years. Owners retiring. Great opportunity. Will train. 863-385-9800 or 863-414-2270. 3050BusinessOpportunities 3000 FinancialGENTLEMAN/ SITTERCOMPANION Looking for position. Experienced with References. 863-658-4837 2300Work WantedPETROLEUM PIPEfitter helper, tank installation, at least 1 yr exp. Must have valid drivers license and clean record. Some travel. Call Mark for details 863-243-0660. 2100Help Wanted RN/LPN FULLTime 3-11 Shift Experience in long term care preferred Apply at: Lake Placid Health Care Center 125 Tomoka Blvd South EEOC/Smoke Free/ Drug Free Work Place R &R Harvesting Inc 50 Temporary workers needed in Tifton, Ga. area from approximately May 15, 2014 July 31, 2014. Following Supervisors instructions, the worker will perform manual labor to hand cut and pack watermelons. Use hand tools such as shears and knives. Duties also include cleaning, loading and unloading harvested products. Grade and sort products according to factors such as color, species, length, width, appearance, feel and quality to ensure correct processing and usage. Discard inferior or defective products and/or foreign matter, and place acceptable products in containers for further processing. Weigh products or estimate their weight, visually or by feel. Place products in containers according to grade and mark grades on containers. Measure, weigh and count products and materials. Examine and inspect containers, materials and products to ensure that packing specifications are met. Clean and maintain work areas. Must assist with all Good Agricultural Practices policies. Perform prolonged bending, reaching, pushing, pulling, walking stooping and lifting up to 60 lbs. Exposure to extreme temperatures. Workers may be required to perform miscellaneous grove clean-up work. These activities may include removing debris, boxes, discarded fruit from fields to clean growing areas, pruning, painting trees, repair and or replace irrigation equipment, may maintain fence lines. The highest of $10.00 per hr, 3/4 guarantee, 35 hrs per week, housing and transportation provided at no cost to workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each work day, must be 18 years or older. Transportation and subsistence expenses to the worksite will be reimbursed upon completion of 50% of the work contract. We participate in the E-Verify program and workers must have valid identification for I-9 preparation when they report to begin work. Apply for this job at the State Workforce/Job Center office in your area, please call for the nearest office in your area GA 229-430-5010, FL 863-385-3672, AL 256-259-1835,SC 803-737-2400 using job # GA8167605 MEDICAL RECORDS/ACCOUNTS PAYABLE COORDINATOR Royal Care of Avon Park currently has a FT position available. Candidate must be accurate detail oriented and have computer skills. Salary based on experience. Apply in person at Royal Care of Avon Park, 1213 W Stratford Rd., Avon Park. (863) 453-6674. EOE,, M/F, DFWP. MECHANIC TOwork on farm/ranch equipment, diesel and gasoline engines, fleet maintenance, fabrication and electrical. Computer skills peferred. Florida Driver License required. Pay based on experience. Drug-free workplace. Apply in person from 8am-11am & 1pm-4pm Monday thru Friday @ 109 Arron Drive, Lake Placid, FL 863-465-2821 or office@lpclp.com COMMERCIAL LINECSR EXPERIENCED 220 LICENSE REQUIRED FAX RESUME TO 863-465-5512 2100Help Wanted5 DAYLIVE-IN nanny needed, Spanish speaking preferred. Call Neda 949-413-4951. 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentFOUND: LARGEdog, white male, lost collar, north of Dinner Lake, Sebring. Call 863-385-4491. 1200Lost & FoundCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:385-6155 News-Sun Classified 1100Announcements NOTICE OF INTERNET AUCTION START DATE:April 14,2014 at 8:00 AM END DATE:April 21,2014 at 8:00 AM LOCATION:GOVDEALS.COM Pursuant to Florida Statutes and Sebring City Council policies,the City of Sebring,Sebring,Florida has declared various items as surplus property and have therefore authorized an Internet Auction to be conducted for the purpose of disposing said property. 1 Tank,Steel,10,000 gallon hydro-pnematic 1 Tank,Steel,30,000 gallon hydro-pnematic For further information on these items please contact Jay Angell,Water Production Supervisor,at 863.471.5113 or jayangell@mysebring.com Note:all property will be sold on as as is,where isbasis.The City of Sebring reserves the right to add or delete items from GovDeals website at anytime during the Internet bidding dates above. Kirk Zimmerman,CPPB Purchasing Agent City of Sebring,Florida April 11,13,2014 ************************************* **** HIGHLANDS COUNTY LEGAL NOTICES ************************************* **** The following legal notices are from the Highlands County Board of County Commissioners and are being published in the font, size, and leading as per their specifications. 1055HighlandsCounty LegalsNOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09 FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,desiring to engagein business under the fictitious name of CARE CENTER OF LAKE PLACID,located at 299 E.Interlake Blvd.,in the County of Highlands,in the City of Lake Placid,Florida 33852,intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State,Tallahassee,Florida. Dated at Sebring,Florida,this 9th day of April,2014. Veronica Walker April 11,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA JUVENILE DIVISION CASE NO.JP13-000474-XX IN THE INTEREST OF: Z.T.07/13/2011 Minor children DOB SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIP THE STATE OF FLORIDA TO: THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON:DOB:4/16/1957Address UnknownYOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in the above-styled Court by the Department of Children & Families,seeking the termination of your parental rights to: Z.T. a white female child born July 13,2011 mother Cara Anne Parnell and you are hereby commanded to personally appear before the Honorable Sheryl D.Snodgrass,a Magistrate/hearing officer in the Juvenile Division of the Circuit Court in and for Highlands County,State of Florida,on the 30th day of April,2014 at 10:00 A.M.,at the Highlands County Courthouse,430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida,Courtroom 1A. YOU MUST PERSONALL Y APPEAR ON THE DAY AND TIME SPECIFIED OR YOU WILL LOSE ALL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION. YOUR FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR WILL BE DEEMED TO BE YOUR CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILDREN NAMED IN THE PETITION.YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO HAVE AN ATTORNEY REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD AN ATTORNEY,YOU MUST BE PRESENT AND REQUEST THAT THE COURT APPOINT AN ATTORNEY FOR YOU IF YOU WANT ONE.``If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,590 South Commerce Ave.,Sebring,FL 33870 (863) 402-6565 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled court appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call (TDD) (1-800-955-8771) or Voice (V) (1-800-955-8770).'' ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK DATED THIS 3RD DAY OF MARCH,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK By:/s/ Lisa J.Bass Deputy Clerk (Clerk's Seal) March 28; April 4,11,18,2014 PUBLIC AUCTION:APRIL 25,2014 AT:9:00 AM LOCATION:AVON TOWING 1102 KERSEY ST.AVON PARK,FL 33825 YEAR MAKE VIN # 1994 NISSAN 1N4EB31P1RC783960 April 11,2014 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.PC 14-93 Division IN RE:ESTATE OF JOHN H.WEBER a/k/a JOHN WEBER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of John H.Weber,deceased,whose date of death was October 07th,2013,is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County,Florida, Probate Division,the address of which is 430 S.Commerce Ave.,Sebring,FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 11th,2014. Personal Representatives: John-Michael Weber 11 Oswego Court Kitchener,Ontario N2B 3P5 Deborah Weber 94 Rochampton Court Kitchener,Ontario N2A 3K8 David Weber 888 Wolverton Street Woverton,Ontario N0J 1G0 J.TIMOTHY SHEEHAN SHEEHAN & CELAYA,P.A. Attorneys for Personal Representatives 300 DAL HALL BLVD. LAKE PLACID,FL 33852 By:/s/ J.Timothy Sheehan Florida Bar No.184165 April 11,18,2014 NOTICE OF POLICY ADOPTION SOUTH FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE DISTRICT BOARD OF TRUSTEES The following policy will be considered for adoption at the regular Board meeting to be held Wednesday,April 23,2014 at 6:00 p.m.at the Highlands Campus at 600 W. College Drive,Avon Park,FL. Policy Implementation:Proposed new policy. Policy 1.18 Substance Abuse Testing For addition information,interested parties may visit the college website at www.southflorida.edu/trustees,or contact the Office of the President,South Florida State College at 600 West College Drive,Avon Park,FL 33825. IF A PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE DISTRICT BOARD OF TRUSTEES WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS MEETING, THAT PERSON WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS,AND MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE,WHICH RECORD INCLUDED THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. 600 West College Drive, Avon Park,Florida 33825-9356 863-453-6661AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION ACCREDITED BY THE SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND SCHOOLSApril 11,13,2014 Attorney for Personal Representative: John M.Sakellarides,Esquire Florida Bar Number:935107 HERDMAN & SAKELLARIDES PA 29605 US Highway 19 North,Suite 110 Clearwater,FL 33761 Telephone:(727) 785-1228 Fax:(727) 786-4107 E-Mail:john@herdsaklaw.com April 11,18,2014 1050LegalsFOUND MALE Shih-tzu on Sun. April 6 on US 27 in front of the Lake Placid Publix. Contact Carolyn at 863-840-2880. Classified Ads 385-6155 NEWS-SUN The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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www.newssun.com Friday, April 11, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B11 WE BUYALL AUTOS with or without Title. Any Year / Make / Model / Condition. We will pay up to $20,000. Free Towing. Call Cindy 813-505-6935 9400Automotive Wanted SLT GMCTruck 2500HD CRW CB/SB/4WD/Texas Ranch Ed, Diesel, auto 5spd OD, Duramax, Allison, Tow Package w/braking w/auto side mirror arrow sens.extends/all electric/seats heated saddle leather interior/Bose stereo/CD/satellite radio/back sliding window/rhino spray/tubular chrome steps/skid plate/chrome trim/alloy wheels all new tire and brakes/black and gold trim paint. 36800mi $35,000 OBO. 850-867-8521. Warranty available. 1998 FORDRANGER XLT. Runs good, new tires & brakes, automatic, 4 cylinder, green & tan, $2500, 863-873-9058. 9200Trucks 9000 Transportation 8000 Recreation NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. NEED GOODhome for lovable cat. Fixed, declawed, papered. Pure Siamese. 863 314-6671 or 863 273-4563 7520Pets & SuppliesCUB CADETLTX1040 MOWER AS GOOD AS NEW. SERVICED WITH NEW BATTERY AND CARBURETOR. THE CLOCK HAS LESS THAN 35HRS. CONTACT VIJAY ON 863-699-6923 BETWEEN 10AM AND 7PM PRICE $1000 7400Lawn & Garden SEBRING BAKEDGOODS & CRAFTS 3235 Grand Prix Dr. Sat. April 12, 9am-3pm. CHURCH CAMP FUND RAISER SEBRING *ESTATE SALE 4010 Thompson Ave. US 27 to Hammock to Lakewood to Golfview to Thompson. Friday April 11, through Sunday April 13, 8am to 4pm. Home decor items, green and deep wine sofas, sofa table, washer/dryer, king Broyhill BR furniture, kitchen items, linens, lamps, oriental figurines, 4 Wolfgang Puck lidded pans, Pyrex, framed art, mirrors, small tables, towels, King sheets (some queen), nice ladies clothes various sizes, accessories, paper shredder, 3 sp. fan, bed frames, hand tools, hardware, lawn items, 70s rock n roll records (covers are in very poor condition). www.estatesales.net Sunday will be half-price day on all items marked $1.00 and up. Donna Collins Estate Sales SEBRING YARDSALE 3307 Baxter Ave April 11th & 12th, 8 to 1, Kitchenware, VCR tapes, Books, Toys, Christmas Items, Clothes, Lots of Misc. SEBRING -YARD SALE, 306 Swallow Ave., Fri.-Sat., 4/11-12, 7am-? Something for everyone! SEBRING -CHURCH YARD SALE Saturday, April 12, 8am-1pm. House of Change, 4011 US Hwy 27 S. Little bit of everything! Clothes, shoes, furn., tv's, fishing equipment, dishes, small appliances. LORIDA -Join us at this Lake Istokpoga Property! And enter to win a FREE $25 Gas card! OPEN HOUSE FRIDAY, APRIL 11th from 1 3 PM at 841 Racoon, Lorida Jen Brown Highlands Ridge Realty 863-655-5554/LakeIstokpoga.com LAKE PLACIDPLACID LAKES, 311 West Waterway Ave. N.W., 35 year moving sale. Furn., weedeater, freezer, misc. 8am-1pm, Thurs.-Sat., April 10-12. 7320Garage &Yard Sales THREE-IN-ONE TABLE:regular table, poker table or bumper ball table. Round. 29" x 47 1/2". $100. OBO 863 381-9990 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER WITH SIDE CURIO SHELVES, $100 863-471-9341 ANTIQUE BLANKETCHEST $110 863-441-0495 80'' COUCH LIKE NEW CONDITION, $100 863-441-0495 10'' DELTAMITER SAW $50 863-471-9341 7310Bargain Buys 7000 Merchandise3/2 ONLAKE CARRIE access LAKE JUNE/HENRY. $800 1st/sec. Ref req Call/text 786-285-5026 6300Unfurnished Houses

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B12 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 11, 2014 www.newssun.com WRITTEN BY: Leslie Ayvazian, David Cale, Jessica Goldberg, Beth Henley, Lameece Issaq, Claire LaZebnik, Lisa Lomer, Michele Lowe, Marco Pennette, Theresa Rebeck, Luanne Rice, Anne Weisman and Cheryl L. West. CONTAINS ADULT LANGUAGE. Produced by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Tickets $15Drs. Thakkar Pavilion Friday & Saturday Evening 7:30pm Sunday Matinee 2:30pmPlease bring remembrances of your own motherhood to cherish and share. Tickets available now! Call or go online today! 356 West Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870 AL#9756 Bunny PicturesOPEN TO THE PUBLIC!Dont ght the crowds at the Malls. Join us at Crown Pointe Assisted Living Facility for Easter Bunny Pictures! Monday, April 14th 5pm-7pm at 5005 Sun n Lake Blvd., just one mile down from the hospital.863-386-1060www.cpcommunities.com TODAYPartly sunny82 / 61Winds: E at 6-12 mphMostly sunny84 / 62Winds: E at 7-14 mphSATURDAYPartly sunny and humid87 / 64Winds: E at 7-14 mphSUNDAYClouds and sun with a shower89 / 68Winds: SSE at 6-12 mphMONDAYNot as warm with t-storms possible81 / 64Winds: SW at 6-12 mphTUESDAY High .............................................. 6:40 a.m. Low ............................................. 12:20 a.m. High .............................................. 7:06 p.m. Low ............................................. 12:42 p.m. High ............................................ 12:10 a.m. Low ............................................... 6:38 a.m. High .............................................. 1:09 p.m. Low ............................................... 7:02 p.m. Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 13.46 Normal ............................................... 14.51 High Sunday .......................................... 90 Low Sunday ........................................... 60 High Monday ......................................... 93 Low Monday .......................................... 67 High Tuesday ......................................... 81 Low Tuesday .......................................... 49 High Wednesday .................................... 77 Low Wednesday ..................................... 45 Relative humidity .................................. 44% Expected air temperature ....................... 82 Makes it feel like .................................... 82 Monday ............................................... 29.73 Tuesday ............................................... 29.96 Wednesday ......................................... 30.18 Monday ............................................... 0.02 Tuesday ............................................... 0.36 Wednesday ......................................... 0.00 Month to date ..................................... 0.38 Year to date ......................................... 7.39Sunrise 7:07 a.m. 7:06 a.m. Sunset 7:47 p.m. 7:48 p.m. Moonrise 4:46 p.m. 5:38 p.m. Moonset 4:42 a.m. 5:17 a.m.Albuquerque 79/52/pc 78/50/pc 73/46/pc Atlanta 75/56/s 78/57/s 78/59/pc Baltimore 68/49/t 71/48/pc 73/54/s Birmingham 76/56/s 78/57/s 80/62/pc Boston 60/43/c 62/47/r 60/50/pc Charlotte 78/50/s 78/53/s 80/55/pc Cheyenne 70/42/pc 64/31/c 35/25/sn Chicago 66/44/pc 72/45/pc 52/35/r Cleveland 57/41/pc 68/53/pc 66/51/sh Columbus 63/46/pc 73/56/pc 74/56/pc Dallas 80/62/pc 83/66/pc 80/52/t Denver 76/44/pc 71/36/pc 38/28/r Detroit 63/41/pc 69/53/pc 61/44/r Harrisburg 65/43/sh 72/49/pc 76/55/pc Honolulu 81/68/s 83/70/pc 83/72/pc Houston 80/64/pc 80/67/pc 81/67/t Indianapolis 64/47/pc 72/56/pc 71/48/sh Jackson, MS 77/57/s 79/59/pc 79/65/pc Kansas City 73/54/pc 74/55/pc 61/37/r Lexington 68/50/t 74/56/pc 78/56/pc Little Rock 76/60/pc 78/60/pc 74/56/c Los Angeles 75/59/pc 68/55/pc 67/56/pc Louisville 68/52/t 76/59/pc 79/58/pc Memphis 76/59/pc 77/62/pc 80/58/pc Milwaukee 62/43/pc 64/42/r 43/32/r Minneapolis 67/48/pc 61/33/r 48/31/pc Nashville 74/54/t 77/58/pc 79/58/pc New Orleans 75/63/pc 78/64/pc 79/68/pc New York City 67/48/sh 66/50/r 64/51/pc Norfolk 76/58/pc 70/56/pc 78/58/s Oklahoma City 81/60/s 84/61/pc 75/41/t Philadelphia 68/52/sh 70/49/pc 77/52/s Phoenix 95/70/pc 90/67/pc 90/67/s Pittsburgh 62/42/sh 71/49/s 76/53/pc Portland, ME 58/35/pc 57/36/pc 56/46/pc Portland, OR 65/44/pc 65/44/s 72/45/s Raleigh 78/52/s 78/55/s 82/57/s Rochester 57/35/pc 68/48/pc 67/50/sh St. Louis 71/53/pc 77/60/pc 74/40/r San Francisco 64/49/pc 63/49/pc 64/49/pc Seattle 61/42/c 62/43/pc 67/43/s Wash., DC 73/54/t 73/55/pc 79/58/s Cape Coral 83/63/pc 85/64/s 87/66/pc Clearwater 81/66/pc 83/67/s 84/69/pc Coral Springs 81/70/pc 82/71/s 84/73/pc Daytona Beach 78/61/pc 79/63/s 79/64/sh Ft. Laud. Bch 81/72/pc 82/75/s 84/75/sh Fort Myers 83/65/pc 86/65/s 87/67/pc Gainesville 80/54/pc 81/56/s 83/59/pc Hollywood 80/69/pc 82/71/s 84/73/sh Homestead AFB 80/70/pc 82/72/s 83/73/pc Jacksonville 78/55/pc 81/57/s 79/60/pc Key West 81/74/pc 83/75/s 82/76/pc Miami 81/72/pc 83/73/s 84/74/sh Okeechobee 79/65/pc 80/67/s 81/67/pc Orlando 80/61/pc 82/63/s 84/64/sh Pembroke Pines 81/69/pc 83/71/s 85/73/sh St. Augustine 75/61/pc 75/63/s 76/63/pc St. Petersburg 81/66/pc 83/67/s 85/69/pc Sarasota 82/63/pc 83/64/s 85/65/pc Tallahassee 79/49/pc 82/56/s 83/59/pc Tampa 81/64/pc 84/64/s 84/67/pc W. Palm Bch 79/70/pc 81/71/s 82/73/sh Winter Haven 80/62/pc 82/63/s 85/65/pc Acapulco 91/72/s 89/72/pc 89/70/s Athens 64/50/sh 65/49/s 66/50/pc Beirut 70/61/s 72/56/pc 70/55/pc Berlin 56/39/c 60/43/pc 58/39/pc Bermuda 68/61/s 67/62/pc 69/64/pc Calgary 56/20/c 34/23/sf 46/27/s Dublin 54/42/pc 53/37/sh 52/41/s Edmonton 47/22/sn 38/23/sf 46/27/s Freeport 77/69/pc 79/70/pc 80/72/sh Geneva 66/46/pc 69/46/pc 68/42/pc Havana 86/64/t 87/66/t 91/68/pc Hong Kong 78/72/pc 81/71/c 83/71/pc Jerusalem 70/53/s 69/49/pc 66/49/c Johannesburg 69/49/pc 70/51/pc 65/48/pc Kiev 44/38/c 51/39/r 54/41/pc London 59/44/pc 60/42/pc 61/43/s Montreal 53/36/pc 57/41/pc 60/41/sh Moscow 45/28/pc 46/35/pc 51/37/c Nice 66/55/pc 65/54/pc 66/56/pc Ottawa 54/34/pc 56/39/pc 57/36/r Quebec 43/28/pc 48/35/pc 51/35/r Rio de Janeiro 88/76/pc 90/76/pc 87/73/t Seoul 66/49/c 66/47/c 67/45/c Singapore 90/78/t 89/79/t 90/79/t Sydney 81/62/t 80/59/sh 78/61/r Toronto 56/38/pc 59/45/pc 58/39/r Vancouver 55/43/pc 59/44/pc 59/41/s Vienna 54/40/pc 64/47/pc 65/47/c Warsaw 52/37/c 55/37/r 57/41/c Winnipeg 46/28/pc 38/19/sn 38/19/sf Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. The weather around the United States today will be fairly tranquil overall. A cold front will extend from southern New England to the Ohio valley to start the day and slowly move southward. This will cause several showers and even a thunderstorm or two from southern Massachusetts and south to Virginia, extending as far west as southeastern Missouri. The other areas where precipitation will be a concern will be the northern Plains and northern Great Lakes, where a front will produce showers from Minnesota into Michigan. National Forecast for April 11 Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rrain, sf-snow urries, sn-snow, i-ice. Partly sunny today. Patchy clouds tonight. Mostly sunny tomorrow. Sunday: partly sunny and humid. Monday: times of clouds and sun with a shower. Tuesday: mostly cloudy and not as warm. A swarm of 37 tornadoes swept across the Midwest on April 11, 1965, from Iowa to Ohio. Nearly 300 people were killed and 3,000 others injured. Partly sunny today. Winds east-southeast 6-12 mph. Expect 6-10 hours of sunshine with average relative humidity 55% and good drying conditions. Patchy clouds tonight. Sunday. and Saturday. a.m. and after 4 p.m. FullLastNewFirst Apr 15Apr 22Apr 29May 6 Today SaturdayForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 78/55 80/54 80/56 78/61 80/61 80/62 81/64 81/66 81/66 82/63 83/65 84/66 79/65 79/70 81/72 81/72 79/49 75/56 75/59 82/62 82/61 80/63 82/60 82/60 80/63 81/74 TemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHeat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayBarometer PrecipitationFive-Day forecast for Highlands County Almanac U.S. Cities World Cities National Summary Tides UV Index Today Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional Summary Lake Levels Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows. Readings at Palm Beach Readings at St. Petersburg The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterday 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. Jacksonville Gainesville Ocala Daytona Beach Orlando Winter Haven Tampa Clearwater St. Petersburg Sarasota Fort Myers Naples Okeechobee West Palm Beach Fort Lauderdale Miami Tallahassee Apalachicola Key West Avon Park Sebring Lorida Lake Placid Venus Brighton PensacolaCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W