The news-sun

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Material Information

Title:
The news-sun
Uniform Title:
News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title:
Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Sebring Fla
Creation Date:
June 7, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates:
27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note:
Also published for Avon Park.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID:
UF00028423:01514

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Preceded by:
Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by:
Avon Park sun


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twitter.com/ thenewssun NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 192750 Shelton wins three races for DragonsA7Sebring brush re quickly containedA2Simple Acts Willy Wonka Jr. on stage at Circle TheatreA2 VOL. 95 NO. 38 Warm with a blend of sun and clouds High 87 Low 65 Details on B10Classi eds .............. B7 Dear Abby ................ B2 Healthy Living .......... B3 Obituaries .............. A6 Lottery Numbers ...... A2 Movie Review .......... B2 Religion .................. B4 Sports on TV ........... A8 Viewpoints ............... A5 facebook.com/ newssunWays you can reinvent yourself and your home this springB1 Review: Captain America is zippy, but hollowB2 www.newssun.com Friday-Saturday, April 4-5, 2014 BY SAMANTHA GHOLARStaff WriterSEBRING In exactly three months, the night sky above Lake Jackson will ll with red, white and blue excitement ... and the sighs of relief of countless residents and business owners throughout the city. After serious doubt, the reworks show will go on this year on Friday, July 4 after the Sebring City Council, with three newly elected of cials, voted unanimously to allocate funds to contribute to the annual Fourth of July reworks display over Lake Jackson. It was the rst meeting for newly elected council members Mark Stewart and Lenard Carlisle Jr., as well as for Mayor John Shoop. For the past several years, the City has been contributing to the cost of the rework display for several years, paying $5,000 of the overall $10,000 cost the last two scal years while the Rotary Club of Sebring raised the rest through donations and sponsorships. In October 2013, the Rotary Club told the city it wasnt going to be able to continue and that other local organizations declined or showed no interest in coordinating the event. With the potential of having no rework show for the Fourth of July holiday, Push Event Productions, which organizes numerous Fireworks will fly on 4th of July in Sebring Katara Simmons/News-Sun le photoThe reworks will re over Lake Jackson on July 4 after the city council agreed to fund up to $10,000 for the show if the CRA provides $5,000.With deadline looming, council OKs fundsSEE FOURTH | A6 BY BARRY FOSTERNews-Sun correspondentAVON PARK It was a year ago that of cials of the Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church announced that they would be opening Cornerstone Academy as Highlands Countys newest private school. This Sunday afternoon at 2 p.m., they plan to hold an open house to show off their success. The crown jewel is the a new two-story, 20,000-square-foot building on the North Highlands Avenue campus of the church, which now houses school activities as well New school to host open house SundaySEE SCHOOL | A4 BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterSEBRING When Ms. Florida 2013 Dawn Lightsey read to autistic students on Wednesday, she spent just a few minutes entertaining them for Autism Awareness Day. What she hopes to do is increase awareness and raise funding to help a local couple set up an education center designed for children with autism and other developmental disabilities. The couple Gary and Melissa Duffey of Sebring want to build a center in Highlands County devoted to caring for students with developmental disabilities. Melissa Duffey said she would like it to be as caring as the Exceptional Student Education classrooms at Memorial Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID Almost unreadable headstones lay broken, toppled and overgrown by weeds, while large trees with deep roots had shifted monuments and toppling other headstones at Highway Park Cemetery in Lake Placid. But that is changing. On Wednesday, volunteers from the Interact Club consisting of Rescuing a resting placeVolunteers work to clean up cemetery Courtesy photoVolunteers work to clean up Highway Park Cemetery Wednesday. SEE RESCUE | A4Dealing with the ripple effectMs. Florida Dawn Lightsey to help raise funds for autism center Phil Attinger/News-SunMs. Florida Dawn Lightsey (right) tickles a student Wednesday at Memorial Elementary School as they gather for a group photo after she read Windows, written by Gary Duffey, father of Makayla Duffey, a fellow autistic student. Exceptional Student Education teacher Lisa Schrader (left) invited Lightsey to her class to entertain them, raise awareness for autism and help promote an effort by Gary Duffey and his wife, Melissa, to build an education center devoted to special needs children. SEE AUTISM | A3 BY SAMANTHA GHOLARStaff WriterSEBRING A hefty price tag came along with Sebring Utilities Director Bob Boggus request for further testing at the abandoned Park Street power plant Tuesday evening during the citys regular council meeting. It was built in the 1920s, but hasnt been in use since the s. As you know, the building is empty now and a while back some contamination had been found, Boggus said. The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has said the city must deal with the Power plant clean-up comes with steep priceCity approves $35,000 for water testing at Park St. plantSEE PLANT | A3

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A2 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.com http//:www.newssun.com The News-Sun (USPS ISSN 0163-3988) is published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday. Peri-odical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry ofce(s). All material contained herein is the property of the News-Sun, which is an afliate of Sun Newspa-pers. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the writ-ten permission of the publisher. All material submitted for publica-tion becomes the property of the newspaper and may be edited for clarity and space, as well as re-printed, published and used in all media. Postmaster: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870.COMMITMENT TO A CC URA C YThe News-Sun promptly cor-rects errors of fact appearing in its news stories. If you believe we have made an error, call the news-room at (863) 385-6155, ext. 516. If you have a question or comment about coverage, write to Scott Dressel, editor, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; email editor@newssun.com.; or call (863) 385-6155.O FFI C E Location: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon-day-Friday Phone: (863) 385-6155 Main Fax: (863) 385-1954 Newsroom Fax: 385-2453SUB SC RIPTION RATE SHome 12 mos. Tax Total $72.22 $5.06 $77.28 In Florida mail 12 mos. Tax Total $107.24 $7.51 $114.75 Out of Florida mail 12 mos. Tax Total $122.41 $8.57 $130.98 Your newspaper is delivered by an independent contractor. If you do not receive your home deliv-ered newspaper by 6 a.m. on any publication date, please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday, and before 11 a.m. Sunday. A re-placement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after said times will be issued an account credit. Deadlines for subscription changes are noon Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon Thursday for the Friday edition and noon Fri-day for the Sunday edition. Chang-es received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date.O BITUARIE S AND A NNOUNC EMENT SEmail all obituaries and death notices to obits@newssun.com Email all other announcements to editor@newssun.comP LA C E A CLA SS IFIE D ADFrom 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. M-F (863) 385-6155, ext. 505 or (863) 314-9876RETAIL AD VERTI S INGMitch Collins 386-5626 mitch.collins@newssun.com Vickie Watson 386-5631 vickie.watson@newssun.com Terri Lee 386-5628 terri.lee@newssun.comL EGAL AD VERTI S INGJanet Emerson 385-6155, ext. 596 legals@newssun.comN EW SROOM Call 385-6155 Scott Dressel, Editor, ext. 516 or scott.dressel@newssun.com Phil Attinger, Staff Writer, ext. 541 or phil.attinger@newssun. com Samantha Gholar, Staff Writ-er, ext. 526 or samantha.gholar@ newssun.com Dan Hoehne, Sports Editor, ext. 528 or daniel.hoehne@newssun. com Katara Simmons, Photographer, ext. 538 or katara.simmons@ newssun.com. ROMONA W ASHINGTON Publisher and Executive Editor romona.washington@newssun.com 385-6155, ext. 515 NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927LOTTERYLOTTOWednesday, April 2 13-23-38-41-45-48 X-2 Saturdays Jackpot: $30 millionP OWERBALLWednesday, April 2 8-13-19-22-53 PB-24 X-2 Saturdays Jackpot: $70 millionMEGA MONEYTuesday, April 1 23-25-34-42 PB-21 Todays Jackpot: $700,000MEGA M ILLION STuesday, April 1 10-23-68-74-75 PB-9 X-5 Todays Jackpot: $30 million CASH 3 Monday, March 31 Day: 1-7-2 Night: 9-7-6 Tuesday, April 1 Day: 5-5-6 Night: 7-9-7 Wednesday, April 2 Day: 1-9-3 Night: 3-8-5 P LAY 4Monday, March 31 Day: 5-7-4-2 Night: 5-8-7-1 Monday, March 31 Day: 5-3-3-2 Night: 8-4-0-6 Monday, March 31 Day: 4-8-8-5 Night: 8-0-1-8 F ANTA S Y 5 Monday, March 31 10-11-12-30-33 Tuesday, April 1 5-6-19-28-29 Wednesday, April 2 3-10-17-18-28 BY PHIL A TTINGERStaff WriterSEBRING Ray Wil-liams didnt want to think that the column of smoke he saw just before 5 p.m. Tuesday on Thun-derbird Road was his inlaws home. It wasnt, but the re was in a vacant area of two acres thick with pines and palmettos right beside the house at 4236 Thunderbird Road. The vacant land was bordered by homes and the re was burning to-ward LeMans Drive. His wife called 911 while he broke out the garden hose to protect the house. (The re) was calm as glass when we arrived. When we called 911, it started spreading, Wil-liams said. The wind hurled it every which way. He was glad to see West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department arrive. His wifes parents, Ar-nold and Alice Belcher, were founders of the de-partment, he said. These guys did a good job, Williams said, es-pecially with a tanker to protect the house. West Sebring Chief Scott Mann said he had 12 reghters with four brush trucks, two en-gines and a tanker. Florida Forestry Di-vision sent a bulldozer and a brush truck while DeSoto City Volunteer Fire Department sent an engine with a load of wa-ter to help out the effort. Emergency Medical Services and Highlands County Sheriffs depu-ties stood by, helping block the Thunderbird Road from through traf-c. Mann said time is marching toward the time of year when brush res will be more com-mon, but there has been plenty of rain recently and no lightning strikes this week. Mann suspects the re was set, either deliber-ately or by carelessness. This thing didnt start by itself, Mann said. Although most hot spots were doused with-in 90 minutes, re crews were still being called as late at 7:45 p.m. to help soak the area and make sure it didnt reignite.Anytime Fitness grand opening set in LPLAKE PLACID Anytime Fitness will host its grand opening at 138 Plaza Ave. from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. The rib-bon cutting is at 11 a.m. Attendees are eligible to enter for the grand prize of a one year free mem-bership. Light refresh-ments will be served. Contact Lisa or Greg Hill at 659-1647.Karaoke night at T anglewoodSEBRING Tanglewood will host a free karaoke night from 7-10 p.m. on Saturday. With almost 80,000 songs available, Phil Candela probably has your favorite. Check his list online at www.song-bookslive.com under Philsharmonics. The event is BYOB. Snacks and ice will be provided. Tanglewood is on U.S. 27, one mile north of Walmart.T ampa Bay Downs tickets to be raffledLAKE PLACID Team Lykes will be rafing a Race 4 Pack to Tampa Bay Downs Saturday at the Lake Placid Relay for Life event. The Race 4 Pack includes lunch for four in the Skye Terrace Dining Room, clubhouse admission and racing programs for Tampa Bay Downs. Winner will be required to make res-ervations at the Skye Terrace on a date of their choice. Rafe tickets will be on sale at the Relay event from 6-9 p.m. for a donation of $2 per ticket or $10 for six tickets. The winner will be drawn at 9 p.m. at Team Lykes campsite. The winner does not need to be pres-ent to collect prize. The Relay for Life be-gins at 6 p.m. today at the football eld.Highlands Park E state plans dinnerLAKE PLACID The annual Spring Dinner will be held Sunday at 1:30 p.m. at the Highlands Park Estates Firehouse on Columbus Street. Ham and drinks will be provid-ed by the Homeowners Association and those attending are asked to bring a dish to pass and their own service. Reservations are pre-ferred to help with plan-ning and seating. Guests may attend for a charge of $5. Final plans for the Clubhouse will be on display and a short up-date on the building and plans for ood con-trol will take place. Call Helen at 465-2468 for details.Caladium Co-op open late todayLAKE PLACID The Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative will be open for the st Friday today until 8 p.m. Artist of the Month Michelle Weidner from Micanopy will be available to explain her artistic gourds and there will be members avail-able from 4-8 p.m. to explain the new mem-bership program. Light refreshments will be served and you can reg-ister for the gift basket. The other non-prot groups will not be join-ing the 1st Friday again until the fall. The Caladium Arts & Crafts Co-operative, 132 E. Interlake Blvd., is open Monday-Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 699-5940 or visit www. caladiumarts.org. SNAP S HOT S L OC AL N EW S Brush fire quickly contained Phil Attinger/News-SunA West Sebring volunteer reghter sprays hot spots with a hose from a brush truck Tuesday evening at an area thick with pine and palmetto at the corner of Thunderbird Road and LeMans Drive. The two-acre area surrounded by homes was quickly contained by a re break from a Florida Forestry Division bulldozer, but Fire Chief Scott Mann suspects the re was set, either deliberately or by carelessness. BY BARRY FOSTERNews-Sun correspondentSEBRING Audienc-es have seen the youthful version of The Nutcrack-er and enjoyed a grown-up version of fairytales with The Big Bad, now Simple-Acts United will present the kids version of Charlie and the Choc-olate Factory with their production of Ronald Dahls Willie Wonka Jr. today and Saturday. The stage play actual-ly was created with ed-ucators and students in mind, which made it a perfect t for the troupe put together by the chief executive ofcer of Sim-ple-Acts United, Trish Da-vis. With this produc-tion you really can go ei-ther way with the 1971 Gene Wilder Version or with the more modern Johnny Depp interpreta-tion, she said. Davis said she has bor-rowed from both lms to come up with a meld-ing of the two styles while staying true to the story. She said putting togeth-er a cast was a creative task since nding young-sters that t the parts who both could sing and act proved to be a challenge. One of the adaptations has been that all three of the lead roles Won-ka, Charlie Bucket and Grandpa Joe all will be played by girls. Cara Keller is Willie Wonka Jr., Madelyn Weav-er will be Charlie Buck-et and Grandpa Joe will be portrayed by Shaelyn MacCool, she said. Even though there are nearly three dozen differ-ent roles, Davis said she was not able to acquire that many youngsters, meaning some of them have doubled up in their roles. There are some of the children who play grand-parents in the rst half and come back as squir-rels in the second half, she said. Not only the young-sters have doubled up, but stage sets and props are also have been dou-bled up with a switch out coming at intermission. The Circle Theatre is a fabulous venue, but I have to tell you there is not much room back-stage, she said. To help alleviate the problem, Davis said she had rented an enclosed trailer for prop storage. Additionally, all of the backdrops will be done digitally, using the the-aters state-of-the-art sound and projection fa-cilities. We just dont have the room for 10-20 individu-al backdrops. Digitally, we can have as many as we like, she said. The show will have per-formances tonight at 7 p.m. and Saturday eve-nings at 7 p.m. with a 2 p.m. Saturday matinee. Tickets will be $20 for adults and $10 for young-sters on the day of show. The next production will be a staging of Alice in Wonderland in July.Simple Acts United to present Willy Wonka Jr.Today and Saturday at Circle Theatre

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 4, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A3 contamination on the site, Boggus told the council. Theres no way around it. We really dont have the option to do nothing at this point, said Imperi-al Testing representative Al McGinn. McGinn placed a bid to do testing on the prop-erty in order to locate the contamination and begin clean up efforts. Testing the ground water will cost the city $35,000. Following the test, drill-ing, extraction and recir-culation of the ground water through the under-ground water tables must take place in order to pro-vide safe water at the site. Its going to take be-tween three and four weeks to drill and get in there. We have a known method that will work to clean up the heavy oils that is at the bottom of these wells. After all the oil is extracted, well have to send the ground water back through the water ta-bles, McGinn said. Its probably going to take about a year and a half to get this clean up completed. Scott Stanley cast the only dissenting vote in the 4-1 approval of the re-quested action from Bog-gus. Im just not a believ-er in it. Weve been mess-ing around with this since 1997. We just spent thirtysomething thousand last year on this. Its an endless cycle, Stanley said. The original bid for the projected was estimated to cost the city $189,000. Council approved Boggus request for $159,529 for the testing and cleaning proj-ect at Park St. Council approved two other requests from Bog-gus. One was for a $68,275 project headed by Excava-tion Point to nish work on Sebring Parkway man-holes. Phil Attinger/News-SunLisa Schraders class of sensory learners at Memorial Elementary School take a moment with Ms. Florida 2013 Dawn Lightsey to celebrate Autism Awareness Day on Wednesday. Lightsey read from a book titled Windows, written and illustrated by the father of 8-year-old Makayla Duffey (center front, standing), who was diagnosed with autism at a young age. Her parents, Melissa and Gary Duffey, want to establish an educational center to help both children with disabilities and their families.Elementary School, such as the one for their 8-year-old daughter, diag-nosed with autism. The book Lightsey read, Windows, was inspired by Makayla, written and illustrated by Gary Duf-fey. It was a way for him to show what the world must be like for his daughter. Autistic children are so over-stimulated by every-thing, said Lisa Schrad-er, ESE teacher at Memo-rial Elementary. Sounds (that are OK to most peo-ple) might be excruciating to them. Thats especially true in her class of seven senso-ry learners. The school has 55 ESE students with various disabilities in sep-arate classrooms from general population stu-dents, whom she tries to educate on the normal behavior for autistic stu-dents. She said teachers and paraprofessionals are with the students all day, un-til 2 p.m. When the stu-dents go home, parents take over. Melissa Duffey said parents often count on school to provide some much-needed time to get things done without working around the needs of their child. Thats why Lightsey wants to help. A fellow contestant for Ms. Flori-da told of being a single mother trying to take her autistic child to a restau-rant or store and having people scowl or scold her for the child acting out. Now she is sponsoring a Run for Autism 5K on July 19 at Highlands Ham-mock State Park to sup-port the Duffeys efforts. Im just helping them raise the money to where they want to be, Light-sey said. Its not been easy. Melis-sa Duffey said she worked 12to 14-hour shifts at Florida Hospital to get a nursing degree before the demands of caring for Makayla became too great, even with the help of her husband and her two older children, Laura Castle, now 14; and Des-mond Gaines, now 12. At one point, both she and her husband lost their jobs, then lost their home, she said. Gary Duf-fey works out of town for months at a time as a con-tractor for Duke Energy, but even when hes home, Melissa cannot work a regular job. Gary Duffey, speak-ing by phone, said many people have spoken to him about nding cures, but hes more interested in helping families cope with the ripple effect of caring for a special needs child. (Children) need to be in an environment that is comforting for them, Gary Duffey said. Melissa Duffey said any-thing would be a tremen-dous help to couples to help keep them together. How many marriag-es can we help or families can we help because they can then go and do with (help from) the center? Melissa Duffey asked. By Schraders count, quite a few. To register for the Run for Autism 5K, message Lightsey on Facebook at Ms. Florida US Continen-tal 2013. AUTISM FROM P AGE A1 PLANT FROM P AGE A1 BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterLORIDA It was tak-ing too long for a pool to be installed at a home on Sunnyside Drive in Lorida, even though the checks had already been cashed by the contractor. After four months, the homeowner contacted deputies, and now Jim William Terry, 53, of 1534 Assembly Point Drive in Sebring has been charged with grand theft and fraud by swindling. The victim had con-tracted Terry, owner of Jim Terry Pools, on Nov. 5, 2013, to install a pool at 1809 Sunnyside Drive. Af-ter three weeks, however, no work had been done on the pool, despite the fact that the homeowner had written Terry a check, arrest reports said. On Nov. 27, Terry trav-eled to the victims home and had the pool dug. While there, he asked for another check of $4,632, which the victim wrote. Terry reportedly promised the victim additional pool accessories for paying in advance. Reports said that check was only supposed to have been given when steel work for the pool was nished. The work was started, but never n-ished, reports said. Deputies noted that Ter-ry had four other simi-lar incidents of unn-ished work where he was charged with grand theft.Pool contractor charged with fraud

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A4 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.com BY BARR Y FOSTERNews-Sun correspondentSEBRING Fans of the Heartland Pops have an opportunity to take a trip around the world when they perform their last concert of the sea-son tonight at 7:30 p.m. at the South Florida State College Performing Arts Center. We have music from England, Japan, Spain, Israel and of course the United States, said group spokesman Steve Newell. Formed in 2009, the Pops has grown to more than three dozen musi-cians and performs con-certs throughout the year We offer advanced student musicians the opportunity to play with experienced musicians some who have as much as 50 years experi-ence, Newell said. Friday evenings show is a series of selections including British Col-ors, Yagi Bushi, Jun-gle Drums, El Relicrio, and Songs of Israel, among others. There also will be a wide selection of Amer-ican music including Sinatra in Concert, Armed Forces Salute and the Pops standard rendition of Stars and Stripes Forever. As part of the perfor-mance, Newell said he has obtained a real Japa-nese Taiko drum for the bands rendition of the folk song Yagi Bushi. I got a small one its only about 4 feet wide Id wanted to get an 8-by-12 footer, he said. The program will be narrated by Marti Wan-delt, ying the audi-ence from country to country and back again. Newell said that while the Pops has become re-nowned for some of the tunes, the bulk of the playlist is comprised of new music. One of those will be a rendition of Buglers Holiday. Three of our guys will trade off on that num-ber. Devere Fader, our associate conductor, along with Dave Naylor and Dick Babino all will play on it, Newell said The Pops usually per-forms at least three shows at SFSC with oth-er, special performanc-es, including the Music on the Mall in Avon Park, as well as for Memorial Day and Independence Day. Tickets are $10 each and will be available at the door.Heartland Pops to take Musical Tripas a number of church functions. There wont be any for-mal presentations as such on Sunday, said Corner-stone Headmaster Jen-ny Cornell. We will have our classrooms open with some of our students and staff to show people around. Cornell is a longtime el-ementary educator and former Avon Park Middle School assistant principal. She was appointed to the post last year even before the school was a reality. In addition to class-rooms, visitors will have an opportunity to see the schools music room and computer lab. The tour will end upstairs in the sprawling fellowship hall, where light refreshments will be served. Well have a video up there that will show the different activities our stu-dents have done through-out the year, Cornell said Currently, the school houses students from kin-dergarten through fth grade. The curriculum in-cludes standard courses in reading, writing math-ematics, science, social studies and physical edu-cation. We also have Bible studies, Cornell added. Arts also are included as an integral component for students, with adminis-trators saying it is part of educating the whole stu-dent. Moreover, each morn-ing at Cornerstone, the day begins with prayers, pledges and songs. Mission projects also are included in the cur-riculum throughout the school year with students participating in outreach programs both locally and globally. We have collected shoes for orphans in Hon-duras and now are making salvation bracelets for one of our church members who will be going to South America later this spring, Cornell said. Students accepted to the academy must dem-onstrate that they are at or above their current grade level with an exemplary conduct history. Those unable to attend the open house may vis-it the groups web site at www.ccaap.org or call the school at 453-0894. SCHOOL FROM PAGE A1students from Lake Plac-id High School and Lake Placid Middle School under the guidance of Deputy Michael Brod joined the Keep Highway Park Beautiful Commis-sion, the Highway Park Neighborhood Coun-cil and local volunteers to clear brush and over-growth from the historic cemetery. Each of those stones has an interesting story to it and it is important to maintain that piece of our towns history. We must not let it be bur-ied, literally, again, said Evelyn Colon, execu-tive director of the High-way Park Neighborhood Council in appeals to the community to help re-store the cemetery. More than 15 volun-teers, most from within the Highway Park Com-munity, came to help with the clean up. De-bris, shrubbery and trash lled 29 oversized gar-bage bags. The 20-foot agpole holding the U.S. ag, which had been damaged in a storm, was removed to be replaced in the very near fu-ture. Loose stones were picked up, grass was mowed, weeds trimmed away from the graves and trees were trimmed. Unincorporated towns with no budgets have often had little to no money to improve their cemeteries, leading to disrepair, crumbling gravestones, overgrown grass, persistent weeds and no irrigation to sus-tain owers or grass. This clean-up is one of many planned activities to restore the Highway Park Cemetery, organiz-ers said. It is hoped that with this and subsequent efforts, the cemetery will be better preserved to include historic signage and fencing. The High-way Park Neighborhood Council, Keep Highway Park Beautiful, and the Highway Park Ministerial Alliance are working to-gether to restore digni-ty and add beautication to our cemetery, a press release on the event said. Donations are wel-come. Call Tiffany Green at 863-840-2995. RESCUE FROM PAGE A1 Katara Simmons/News-SunTwo Sebring High School choirs directed by Luanne Hawk take the stage Thursday morning during the 2014 Highlands County Choral Festival at South Florida State College auditorium in A von P ark. Nearly every school in the county was represented during the annual event. It was a full house with about 1,400 elementary, middle and high school students performing.HIGHLANDS COUNTY CHORAL FESTIVALWe will have our classrooms open with some of our students and staff to show people around.Jenny Cornell Cornerstone Academy headmasterShow set for tonight at SFSC Each of these stones has an interesting story to it and it is important to maintain that piece of our towns history.Evelyn Colon Highway Park Neighborhood Council TALLAHASSEE (AP) Investors and those not directly tied to the oper-ation of nursing homes would be protected from lawsuits by a measure passed by the Florida Sen-ate. The bill (SB 670) passed the Senate Thursday with a 36-3 vote. Proponents say the move will free up more money for new homes and investment in current facilities. Nursing home bill passes Senate

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 4, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A5 NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927Romona Washington Publisher publisher@newssun.com Scott Dressel Editor editor@newssun.com VIEWPOINTS ANOTHER VIEW On Monday, the Affordable Care Act passed its enrollment dead-line. Sign-up numbers eclipsed the Obama administrations ratcheted down goal of 6 million and came close, media groups say, to meeting the original 7 mil-lion target. Its time to focus on the more important questions: Will ACA signicantly reduce the num-bers who are uninsured and make health care affordable and accessible to all Americans? Will it lead to or provide the foundation for lower medical costs for individuals, families and business-es? Most importantly, will it lead to im-proved overall health outcomes and bet-ter health services? Those questions likely wont be an-swered for at least two or three years. But ACA cant be judged a success or failure without them. For a lot of people, though, the verdict is already in. Polls show from 46 percent to 57 percent opposing the law, depend-ing on the survey. The disastrous launch last fall of health-care.gov didnt help. Technology glitches kept millions sidelined from enrolling for health-care coverage on the federal web-site. Glitches continued on Monday, put-ting the website out of commission again. Administration ofcials said anyone who started the process or tried to get on the website and couldnt by Mondays dead-line will be granted extra time to enroll. Obamacare critics, though, should pay attention to what else the polls are saying. Survey respondents say they dont want to repeal it. Nearly 60 percent in a recent Kaiser Family Foundation poll said Con-gress should work to improve the mea-sure or keep it the way it currently stands. The polls also show public approval of specic parts of the law. A recent Bloom-berg poll showed nearly 75 percent ap-prove of allowing children to stay on their parents insurance up to age 26. More than 66 percent approve of prohibiting insurers from denying health-care cover-age based on pre-existing conditions. The enrollment numbers underscore that many Americans are eager for access to affordable health care coverage. Much work lies ahead to fulll ACAs goal of making affordable, quality health services accessible to all Americans improvements that will lead to better health outcomes. With the enrollment hoopla over, its time for policymakers to focus squarely on that goal.An editorial from the Charlotte (N.C.) Observer.Vital goals lie ahead for ObamacareWe purchased the Sebring News-Sun newspaper Tues-day. Id like to take this op-portunity to address all of our employees, news cor-respondents and delivery partners on why we made this acquisition. Readers and advertisers are wel-come to follow along. We believe in a bright fu-ture for community news and advertising. That does not mean the future will be easy just that if we work hard and compete intel-ligently, the future will be ours to create. With all the innovation of the past 100 years, the local newspaper is still the primary source for local news and local ad-vertising. We create a unique news product every day. Each new day, that requires sig-nicant news gathering, analysis and writing. The Internet and mobile news sites are ways to extend our reach not a replacement for the labor intensive news gathering required to prop-erly serve a local commu-nity. The privilege of ful-lling a communitys need for local news will be ours as long as we stay true to the mission of helping our communities become a better place to live. Likewise, we are still the number one local advertis-ing partner because no na-tional company has been able to replicate what a lo-cal newspaper does to create local sales for lo-cal companies. Yes, the In-ternet has replaced yel-low pages for search. But local merchants are more swamped than ever with places to put their money search engine advertis-ing, search engine optimi-zation, websites, Facebook, Twitter and email. This is in addition to the traditional players crossing their doorway like cable, TV, radio, magazines, and spe-cialty promotion products. With even more market-ing choices, it is now even more difcult for the local business to know where to put their money to get ad-vertising results. As long as we focus on creating compelling adver-tising that works for our advertisers, instead of just taking their money for ad space, we will have a suc-cessful growing business as we do now. With so many other needs inside our compa-ny, why buy Sebring now? We purchased Sebring now for three reasons: 1) Se-bring is already a part of the community that we serve with our existing pa-pers in Sarasota, Charlotte, DeSoto, Highlands and Polk counties; 2) it was avail-able now; 3) the purchase will increase our nan-cial strength as a compa-ny making it easier to meet our other needs. The Sebring News-Sun more fully adds to a geo-graphic community we serve in our newspaper footprint between the newspapers we own in Lake Placid and Arcadia to the south and west and Bartow, Lake Wales, Frostproof and Fort Meade to the north. There should be opportu-nities for advertising and news sharing we dont have today. The acquisition utiliz-es our existing building, presses and distribution equipment. That, along with the advertising and news sharing opportuni-ties that come with the Se-bring News-Sun acquisi-tion should strengthen our resources as a company beneting not only our em-ployees but also the com-munities we serve. It is our goal to be a stronger, safer business as a result of this new addition to our news-paper family. Every community de-serves a top-notch com-munity newspaper and thats the business were in.David Dunn-Rankin is president of Sun Coast Media Group and Sun Newspapers. He can be reached at daviddr@sun-herald.comStill investing in newspapers PRESIDENTS INBOXDavid Dunn-Rankin Hes the GOPs emerg-ing conservative rock star who sets the base on re. But can he go the distance? Is it realistic to think that Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul can really get the 2016 Re-publican Presidential nom-ination and usher in a new GOP era in more ways than one? Or does he have too much political hubris some of it from his father? If you believe a series of polls of Republicans and activists, he is indeed seri-ous. At last months Conser-vative Political Action Con-ference he won its straw poll for the second time and electried the membership. In Republican poll after poll hes on top. The latest WPA Opinion Research poll has Paul and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee at 13 percent, with former Flori-da Gov. Jeb Bush at 11 per-cent. Because of his positions on foreign issues, Pauls chances are often poohpoohed, but the GOP seems poised for a takeover and not-liberal makeover. The Daily Beasts Patri-cia Murphy called Paul the de facto head of the lib-ertarian wing of the par-ty, still pushing the GOP to broaden its message and its membership. Paul is urg-ing the Republican Party to woo groups no already in its coalition, arguing there should be a strug-gle to make the party bet-ter, rather than the usual mantra that the party must be more conservative and needs ideological bouncers. The question: can Paul win over voters who dont know the difference be-tween a libertarian and a li-brarian? Can he take his fa-thers libertarianism a kind of boutique libertar-ianism that appealed to niche voters and make it more accessible? For months Paul seemed engaged in a growing war of zingers with his per-ceived presidential nomi-nation rival, the more mod-erate New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. But then came Christies Bridge Over Troubled Political Waters. Comeback, shmomeback. Christie is now badly dam-aged political goods, which is why some inuential Re-publicans are scrambling to draft Jeb Bush to run. Paul has shown an ability to play the insiders political game more skillfully than his dad. He seemed embar-rassed and apologetic sup-porting the re-election bid of the quintessential Re-publican establishment in-sider, Senate Majority Lead-er Mitch McConnell. But its something he had to do. Be-ing a pragmatist and an ide-alist could serve him well. He also distinguished himself from the partys most extreme, nay saying elements by getting into a feud and public rivalry with Texas Sen. Ted Cruz. One scenario for Paul winning the nomination is for him to get momentum in early primaries, woo disaffected and millennial voters and hope his political competi-tion blows it. Some charge thats a awed analysis. But others, such as MSNBCs Chris Matthews, predict Paul has a good shot at it. If so, hell have to walk some political tightropes. Hed have to win over dis-trustful social conservatives and neocons, and if he cali-brates positions too much he could negate his libertar-ian appeal. Nationally, he must do some image repair. On his Facebook page, sati-rist Andy Borowitz who often captures the gener-al national cultures think-ing wrote: POLL: Giv-en choice between Paul and Cruz, most voters choose suicide. Pauls Achilles heel is for-eign policy. Neocons and many other Republicans consider his foreign poli-cy naive, impractical and isolationist. And the long knives are out. Another storm cloud: bil-lionaire GOP fat cat Shel-don Adelson. Adelson is prepared to donate mil-lions to bolster a potential nominee who (1) can win the election, and (2) strong-ly supports Israel. Rand Paul is not the most Isra-el-friendly candidate, and many Jews considered his father Ron Paul an outright disaster and an anti-Semite. There are many factors about Paul that conven-tional wisdom says will sink him. But has the political and cultural context shift-ed for the conventional wis-dom? Has what normally played well in prime time America changed enough to make Rand Paul the wave of the GOPs future?Joe Gandelman is a veteran journal-ist who wrote for newspapers over-seas and in the United States. He can be reached at jgandelman@themod-eratevoice.com. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not neces-sarily those of the News-Sun staff.Can Rand Paul really get the 2016 GOP nomination? GUEST COLUMNJoe Gandelman

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A6 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.com MARVIN SPIRE SMarvin E. Spires, 81, went to be with the Lord on Mon-day, April 1, 2014. He was born in Center Hill, son of the late, William Henry and Lizzie (Selph) Spires. He was a lifelong resident of Sebring and was a former city police ofcer, reghter and retired owner of Spires Roong. He was a member of Sebring Firemen, Inc. Marvin was preceded in death by his grandson, Coy Benson, and great grandson, Tristan Roberts. A loving and devoted husband and father, he married Imogene Light-sey on Sept. 1, 1951 and are proud parents of daugh-ters Marva (Mike) Willingham, Cheryl (Russ) Sharp, Beverly (Ted) Glarner, Nancy (Ron) Ow-ens; a son, Eugene (Sarah) Spires; 11 grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren. Visitation is from 1011 a.m. Friday, April 4, with Service to follow at 11 a.m. at Morris Funeral Chapel with Dr. Eugene Bengston ofciat-ing. Burial with military hon-ors by V.W.W. Post #4300 at Pinecrest Cemetery. Those de-siring may make donations to any charity. www.morrisfuner-alchapel.com. OBITUARIES events in downtown Se-bring including the monthly wine walks, the Roaring 20s Festival and the Red White and Blues Festival planned for the Fourth of July. But Push told the city on March 19 that without reworks, that event would be called off. Since our agreement was to coordinate and manage the festival (and not the reworks) and since the Red, White and Blues Festival will only be successful with con-rmed reworks show, we will regretfully decline this festival opportuni-ty..., a letter from Lora Todd and Casey Wohl of Push Events Promotion said. Council members dis-cussed the options to make the reworks show happen with City Admin-istrator Scott Noethlich Tuesday. There just wasnt any interest in coordinating the event. Staff is recom-mending a couple op-tions here. One option would involve a one/ third participation with the city, CRA (Communi-ty Redevelopment Agen-cy) and nding the re-maining $5,000 privately. Step No. 2 of that would be to start a commit-tee to get started on next years reworks, Noeth-lich said. Avon Park and Lake Placid reworks show or-ganizers have already placed orders and paid for their respective re-works, which will both be held on July 4, and Se-bring was running up on a deadline to get its own order in, Noethlich told the council. I have spoken to one reworks company they essentially said I need to have an order this week so that they can make their orders and build the reworks and organize the event in order to have them this year, Noeth-lich said. Hes already placed his orders for the other cities. Bud Whitlock made a motion to fund up to $10,000 for this years reworks contingent upon the CRA contribut-ing $5,000. The CRA has provided $2,500 towards the cost of the show for the past three years and contributed $5,000 for the 2011 rework show. Mayor John Shoop stated a commitment from last years local ma-jor sponsor has been made to contribute $2,500 to the cost of the show. Wohl said the Red, White and Blues Festival will be held July 4-5.Samantha Gholar can be reached at 385-6155 ext: 526 or saFOURTH FROM PAGE A1 Courtesy photoAktion Club members Gerald Bass and Angie Luft wave Saturday, March 29, at trafc and collect donations along U.S. 27 in front of Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center in Sebring with One Hope United Family Support Worker Rebecca Brownell. One Hope is just one of the nine charities who will benet from the Diaper Dump Day collections sponsored by the Aktion Club of Highlands County. Saturdays event brought in 3,212 diapers and $994. This total will be added with the clubs previous collection from last week and it will be presented to the charities once the cash is turned into diapers. In addition to One Hope, the diapers will help babies at Avon Park Community Child Development Center, Childrens Advocacy Center, Family Safehouse, Guardian ad Litem, Healthy Families, Healthy Start and the Early Steps Program. The club also received 1,257 adult diapers, which will benet needy people served by Nu-Hope Elder Care Services and Ridge Area Arc.COLLECTING FOR DIAPER DUMP DAY FORT HOOD, Texas (AP) An Iraq War veteran be-ing treated for mental ill-ness was the gunman who opened re at Fort Hood, killing three people and wounding 16 others be-fore committing suicide, in an attack on the same Texas military base where more than a dozen people were slain in 2009, author-ities said. Within hours of the Wednesday attack, inves-tigators started looking into whether the mans combat experience had caused lingering psy-chological trauma. Fort Hoods senior ofcer, Lt. Gen. Mark Milley, said the gunman had sought help for depression, anxiety and other problems. Among the possibili-ties investigators planned to explore was whether a ght or argument on the base triggered the attack. We have to nd all those witnesses, the wit-nesses to every one of those shootings, and nd out what his actions were, and what was said to the victims, said a federal law enforcement ofcial who spoke on condition of an-onymity. The ofcial said au-thorities would begin by speaking with the mans wife, and expected to search his home and any computers he owned. The shooter was identi-ed as Ivan Lopez by Tex-as Rep. Michael McCaul, chairman of the House Homeland Security Com-mittee. But the congress-man offered no other de-tails, and the military declined to identify the gunman until his family members had been noti-ed. Lopez apparently walked into a building Wednesday afternoon and began ring a .45-caliber semi-automatic pistol. He then got into a vehicle and continued ring before entering another build-ing, but he was eventual-ly confronted by military police in a parking lot, ac-cording to Milley, senior ofcer on the base. As he came within 20 feet of an ofcer, the gun-man put his hands up but then reached under his jacket and pulled out his gun. The ofcer drew her own weapon, and the sus-pect put his gun to his head and pulled the trig-ger a nal time.Fort Hood gunman sought mental health treatment BRADENTON (AP) Two months after running over and kill-ing three people in a parking lot follow-ing a church service, a 79-year-old Florida woman had her license suspended for a year and was ned $1,000. Doreene Landstra pleaded no contest in court Wednesday to im-proper backing, which is a noncriminal traf-c infraction. The maxi-mum penalty is usual-ly a six-month license suspension, but a judge can impose up to a year when fatalities and oth-er serious circumstanc-es are involved. The Florida Highway Patrol said Doreene Landstra accidental-ly backed her SUV into a group of people leav-ing a church service in the Sugar Creek Coun-try Club.Woman who killed three loses licenseTeens jailed for attack on 83-year-oldPINELLAS PARK (AP) Two teenagers have been arrested in con-nection with an attack on an 83-year-old man and the theft of his car. Police say a 13-yearold boy turned him-self in to Pinellas Coun-ty Sheriffs deputies late Wednesday. Hes charged with grand theft of a motor vehicle and is being held in the Pinellas County juve-nile assessment center. According to police, a 16-year-old boy was ar-rested Wednesday and theyre looking for a 15-year-old girl. BRENDAN FARRINGTONAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE This years gubernatorial race could have even greater implications if a proposed constitutional amend-ment on Florida Supreme Court appointments is approved. The Senate voted 2614 on Thursday to place a question on the fall bal-lot that could mean an outgoing governor would make appointments to the Supreme Court for va-cancies that are created the same day a new gov-ernor is sworn in. The issue is particu-larly important now be-cause three of the sev-en high court justices will have to retire the same day in 2019 when the gov-ernor is sworn in because they will have reached the mandatory retirement age of 70 during their cur-rent six-year terms. That means if Gov. Rick Scott is re-elected, he will be able to replace the justices as he leaves ofce. And the justices he would replace Barba-ra Pariente, Fred Lewis and Peggy Quince are part of an ongoing major-ity that has ruled against Scott and the GOP-con-trolled Legislature in a line of high-prole cases, including a recent deci-sion to let a medical mar-ijuana amendment go on this years ballot. Likewise, if a Democrat is elected in November, he or she would be able to appoint the three jus-tices even if he or she los-es a 2018 re-election bid or simply decides not to seek a second term. Sen. Tom Lee said he sponsored the bill to avoid a potential consti-tutional crisis if the ap-pointments become an issue, and he noted the constitution doesnt make it clear how appoint-ments should be handled when Supreme Court vacancies occur when theres a change in the governors ofce. Democrats agreed that the way appointments are handled in cases like this needs to be addressed, but they opposed the bill (SB 1188) because they believe if people elect a governor in November, that governor should be the one to appoint the Supreme Court justices for vacancies that begin on inauguration day two months later. Its not a partisan is-sue. We dont know who will be the next governor, said Sen. Jeremy Ring, DMargate. I just believe that the incoming gover-nor should have those ap-pointments. Senate Democratic Leader Chris Smith said its customary for gover-nors-elect to form a tran-sition ofce and make decisions that lay the ground for their rst day in ofce, and the Su-preme Court appoint-ments should be part of that.Senate passes ballot measure on court appointments

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www.newssun.com Friday, April 4, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A7 SPORTS In South-central Flori da, the rst week of April generally marks the be ginning of gill season. Not that you cant catch this feisty pansh throughout the year, but with the warming water and the seasonal change, bluegills typically begin spawning in late March and early April. For many anglers, bass shing can be fun, but challenging; crap pie shing offers a bet ter chance for success, as well as a great meal, but bluegill shermen are a completely differ ent breed. Fishing light lines, light and ultra-lite rods and even yrods offers up some of the funnest shing Florida has to of fer. According to the Flor ida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commis sion, Florida has more than 7,700 named lakes and ponds and over 10,000 miles of streams and rivers, all brimming with bream. Bream is the lo cal term throughout the southeast that includes a variety of deep-bodied pansh belonging to the sunsh family. The most common of these are bluegill, red ear sunsh (shellcrack ers), redbreast sunsh, spotted sunsh (stump knockers) and war mouth. Although black bass are technically in the sunsh family, they are not considered to be bream. Almost any body of water in the Sunshine State, regardless of size or locale, contains the popular bluegill and, probably to a lesser ex tent, redear sunsh. Sunsh concentrate to spawn in water depths that range anywhere from three to ten feet, but are usually found at the shallower end of this range. Bluegills seem to opt for slightly shallower ar eas, but its not unusu al to see shellcracker and bluegills intermingle, us ing the same bedding ar eas at the same time. Shellcrackers typically begin spawning about a month before bluegill. In South Florida, shell crackers may spawn as early as the last week of February but more likely around the fourth week of March. In central Florida, they could rst go into spawning beds during late March. If the water temper ature remains low in March, shellcrackers will concentrate on spawn ing between the second and the fourth weeks of April. Lake Istokpoga is out standing for bluegill. Pansh anglers can concentrate their efforts from April through June around the inshore and offshore cattail and bul rush areas. In other months, like ly spots for bluegill and shellcrackers include the Big Island, Grassy Is land, Bumblebee Island, around various sandy bars, and along edges of BY DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.com It was three months and three days early, but the Avon Park nine did their best Fourth of July tribute Tuesday night, sparking reworks in an 18-10 win at Frostproof. And they explod ed right out of the gate, scoring ve runs in each of the rst two innings. Ma son Jahna singled home two in the rst, Alex Go mez knocked a run in and Trey Frazier belted an RBI double. The Devils then sent 13 batters to the plate in the second, with Alfred Brown singling twice and Luis Martinez reaching base both times he came up in the frame. But the big blow came off Gomezs bat when he launched a two-run homer to left-center to help push Avon Parks lead to a stunning 10-0 after two. The real stunner, how ever, came in the bot tom of the second, when the Bulldogs plated seven and got right back into the game. Though their surge wasnt so much reworks as Red Devil misres as the seven runs came courtesy of ve walks, one hit batter, two errors and two singles. But however the runs were scored, this was now a barn-burner. Frazier, on in relief dur ing the second, held the Bulldogs down in the third, while the Avon Park offense added two in the fourth and one in the fth. Kyle Kelley doubled to Its Bluegill Season! FISHIN AROUND Don Norton SEE FISH | A9 Red Devils ride fireworks to win Kyle Kelley grand slam in sixth highlights high-scoring affair Dan Hoehne/News-Sun les Alex Gomez smashed a second-inning home run in Avon Parks 18-10 win at Frostproof Tuesday. AVON PARK 18 FROSTPROOF 10 BY DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.com The Lady Dragons showed their strength at Tuesdays track and eld meet in Lake Placid, tying for rst with LaBelle at 70 points apiece. Hardee took third on the girls side with 66 points and Avon Park fourth with 51 in this evenly matched meet. Things were a little more spread out on the boys side as the Wildcats won with 115.5 points, Avon Park was second with 62, the Green Drag ons third with 42.5 and the Cowboys fourth with 39. Starting with the eld events, the Red Devils started strong in the shot put as Imani Tate took second on the girls side and Bryan Johnson won with a toss of 38-feet. Tate also took second in the discus with a throw of 86-feet, 10-inches. Christian Suarez was third on the boys side of the event with a distance of 96-feet, 4-inches. The Dragons got things going in the girls long jump, getting a win from Quiahja Williams (16feet, 11-inches) and a third from Devany Moore, while Lady Devil Torianna Jones was second. Moise Satine got anoth er Avon Park win on the boys side, leaping to a dis tance of 16-feet, 8.5-inch es. Lady Dragons get tie on the track Dan Hoehne/News-Sun les Sonia Becerra earned a pair of points for the Lady Dragons by taking fourth in the pole vault Tuesday. SEE TRACK | A10 SEE DEVILS | A10 BY DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.com The Lady Blue Streaks of the ten nis courts came in second in the two-day, District 2-2A Tournament Monday and Tuesday. After the rst day of battles, Se bring had three girls move into Tuesdays singles nals. At No. 3 singles, Alaina Keith bounced back from a 6-1, opening set loss to push Lemon Bays Sarah Lown, before falling 7-5. In the No. 4 singles match, Sarah Beth Rogers gave Madison Casad a wake-up call by taking the rst set 6-2. The pair fought hard in the sec ond set, with Casad outlasting Rog ers 7-6. The third set was another grueling grapple back and forth before Casad took it 6-4 for the match win. Ashley Castelli then fell in No. 5 singles to Lemon Bays Ashley Tormey 6-2, 6-3. The No. 2 doubles team of Keith and Castelli also reached the nals, but to the Lemon Bay Bay duo of Lady Streaks runner-up in districts, heading on to regionals Courtesy photo The district runner-up Lady Streaks, left to right, Destiny Lewis, Sarah Beth Rogers, Ashley Castel li, Micaela DeVane, coach Janie Hollinger, Alaina Keith, Nisha Patel and Amanda Rios. SEE SEBRING | A10 JOHN MARSHALL AP Basketball Writer The invitation to this years Final Four seemed to have specic rules: No upstarts or Cinderellas. Big boys only. Yes, were well aware that Kentucky was a No. 8 seed and UConn was a 7. But cmon. These are two pow er programs with sto ried histories, each with a championship under their belt within the past four seasons. Following a string of NCAA tournaments with mid-major party crash ers, the Final Four is go ing back to the big time with Florida and Wiscon sin joining the Wildcats and Huskies in North Texas. Weve got a rundown of what to look for: ___ THE TEAMS Florida. The top overall seed in the NCAA tour nament has played like it by extending its winning streak to 30 games. Kentucky. John Calipa ris latest group of oneand-dones needed a little time to get going. Once the roll started, no one has been able to stop it. Wisconsin. The Bad gers are feisty, funda mentally sound and one of those teams oppo nents hate to play. UConn. The Huskies won the 2011 behind Kemba Walker. A guide to the Final Four Final Four Guide: Bo and Billy, Gators and Cats, Shabazz and Scottie SEE NCAA | A10

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A8 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.com COMING UP High School Baseball Today Avon Park vs. McKeel, 7 p.m.; Lake Placid vs. Frostproof, 7 p.m.; Sebring vs. Oviedo, 7 p.m. College Baseball Today SFSC vs. Southeastern, 6 p.m. Saturday SFSC vs. U. of Tampa B team, Doubleheader, Noon. High School Softball Today Lake Placid at Gateway Charter, 6 p.m. Monday Avon Park at LaBelle, 6/7:30 p.m.; Lake Placid at DeSoto, 6/7:30 p.m.; Sebring at Mulberry, 6/7:30 p.m. TODAY AUTO RACING NASCAR OReilly Auto Parts 300 8:30 p.m. ESPN2 GOLF LPGA Kraft Nabisco Championship Noon GOLF PGA Shell Houston Open 3 p.m. GOLF HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL Dicks Sporting Goods National Tournament 2:30 p.m. ESPN2 Dicks Sporting Goods National Tournament 4:30 p.m. ESPN2 MLB Philadelphia at Chicago Cubs 2 p.m. WGN Texas at Tampa Bay 7 p.m. SUN NBA Denver at Memphis 7 p.m. ESPN Oklahoma City at Houston 9:30 p.m. ESPN TENNIS WTA Family Circle Cup 1 p.m. ESPN2 Tampa Bay at Colorado 8 p.m. SUN SATURDAY AUTO RACING Gulf Air Bahrain Grand Prix, Qualifying 11 a.m. CNBC COLLEGE BASKETBALL Reeses All-Star Game Noon CBS NCAA Tournament 6 p.m. TNT NCAA Tournament 8:30 p.m. TNT GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL Dicks Sporting Goods National Tournament 10 a.m. ESPN2 Dicks Sporting Goods National Tournament Noon ESPN2 GOLF PGA Shell Houston Open 1 p.m. GOLF PGA Shell Houston Open 3 p.m. NBC LPGA Kraft Nabisco Championship 5 p.m. GOLF MLB Chicago White Sox at Kansas City 2 p.m. WGN Texas at Tampa Bay 7 p.m. SUN NBA Chicago at Washington 7 p.m. WGN TENNIS WTA Family Circle Cup 1 p.m. ESPN2 SPORTS ON TV SCORE BOARD National Basketball Association EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB x-Toronto 43 32 .573 x-Brooklyn 40 34 .541 2 New York 33 43 .434 10 Boston 23 52 .307 20 Philadelphia 16 59 .213 27 Southeast W L Pct GB y-Miami 52 22 .703 x-Washington 39 36 .520 13 Charlotte 37 38 .493 15 Atlanta 32 42 .432 20 Orlando 21 54 .280 31 Central W L Pct GB y-Indiana 53 23 .697 x-Chicago 43 32 .573 9 Cleveland 31 45 .408 22 Detroit 27 48 .360 25 Milwaukee 14 61 .187 38 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB y-San Antonio 59 16 .787 Houston 49 25 .662 9 Dallas 44 31 .587 15 Memphis 44 31 .587 15 New Orleans 32 43 .427 27 Northwest W L Pct GB x-Oklahoma City 54 19 .740 Portland 49 27 .645 6 Minnesota 37 37 .500 17 Denver 33 42 .440 22 Utah 23 52 .307 32 Pacic W L Pct GB y-L.A. Clippers 54 22 .711 Golden State 46 29 .613 7 Phoenix 44 31 .587 9 Sacramento 27 48 .360 26 L.A. Lakers 25 50 .333 28 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Wednesdays Games Cleveland 119, Orlando 98 Indiana 101, Detroit 94 Washington 118, Boston 92 Charlotte 123, Philadelphia 93 New York 110, Brooklyn 81 Toronto 107, Houston 103 Miami 96, Milwaukee 77 Chicago 105, Atlanta 92 Minnesota 102, Memphis 88 San Antonio 111, Golden State 90 Denver 137, New Orleans 107 L.A. Clippers 112, Phoenix 108 Sacramento 107, L.A. Lakers 102 Thursdays Games San Antonio at Oklahoma City, late Dallas at L.A. Clippers, late Fridays Games Denver at Memphis, 7 p.m. Indiana at Toronto, 7 p.m. Orlando at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Detroit at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Cleveland at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Washington at New York, 7:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Chicago, 8 p.m. New Orleans at Utah, 9 p.m. Oklahoma City at Houston, 9:30 p.m. Phoenix at Portland, 10 p.m. Sacramento at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. League Leaders Scoring G FG FT PTS AVG Durant, OKC 72 756 629 2317 32.2 Anthony, NYK 73 719 440 2042 28.0 James, MIA 71 698 389 1888 26.6 Love, MIN 71 600 470 1844 26.0 Harden, HOU 66 499 497 1655 25.1 Grifn, LAC 75 673 444 1801 24.0 Curry, GOL 72 589 284 1696 23.6 Aldridge, POR 64 605 281 1494 23.3 DeRozan, TOR 73 567 472 1666 22.8 Cousins, SAC 65 522 402 1446 22.2 George, IND 76 551 377 1651 21.7 Nowitzki, DAL 73 570 318 1574 21.6 Jefferson, CHA 66 625 170 1423 21.6 Davis, NOR 65 513 343 1371 21.1 Irving, CLE 65 494 266 1371 21.1 Lillard, POR 76 523 353 1603 21.1 Thomas, SAC 70 488 345 1447 20.7 Dragic, PHX 71 514 305 1450 20.4 Gay, SAC 69 514 303 1393 20.2 Rebounds G OFF DEF TOT AVG Jordan, LAC 76 309 741 1050 13.8 Drummond, DET 74 386 560 946 12.8 Love, MIN 71 211 684 895 12.6 Howard, HOU 68 226 613 839 12.3 Cousins, SAC 65 204 553 757 11.6 Aldridge, POR 64 151 561 712 11.1 Noah, CHI 73 256 555 811 11.1 Vucevic, ORL 57 185 441 626 11.0 Jefferson, CHA 66 130 558 688 10.4 Davis, NOR 65 207 455 662 10.2 Assists G AST AVG Paul, LAC 57 620 10.9 Lawson, DEN 61 540 8.9 Wall, WAS 75 653 8.7 Rubio, MIN 74 631 8.5 Curry, GOL 72 607 8.4 Jennings, DET 73 571 7.8 Lowry, TOR 74 560 7.6 Nelson, ORL 64 439 6.9 Teague, ATL 71 484 6.8 James, MIA 71 461 6.5 National Hockey League EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Boston 76 52 18 6 110 243 161 x-Tampa Bay 76 42 25 9 93 226 202 x-Montreal 77 43 27 7 93 200 192 Detroit 76 36 26 14 86 205 215 Toronto 77 37 32 8 82 223 241 Ottawa 76 32 30 14 78 219 252 Florida 77 27 42 8 62 184 254 Buffalo 75 21 45 9 51 145 224 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Pittsburgh 76 48 23 5 101 233 189 N.Y. Rangers 77 43 30 4 90 208 184 Philadelphia 75 39 27 9 87 213 211 Columbus 75 38 30 7 83 210 203 Washington 76 34 29 13 81 217 231 New Jersey 76 32 28 16 80 186 198 Carolina 76 33 32 11 77 191 211 N.Y. Islanders 76 31 35 10 72 212 250 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-St. Louis 75 51 17 7 109 241 168 x-Colorado 75 48 21 6 102 230 204 x-Chicago 76 42 19 15 99 248 200 Minnesota 76 39 26 11 89 189 191 Dallas 75 37 27 11 85 219 212 Winnipeg 77 34 33 10 78 214 226 Nashville 76 33 32 11 77 190 229 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Anaheim 76 50 18 8 108 247 193 x-San Jose 77 48 20 9 105 237 188 Los Angeles 77 45 26 6 96 195 162 Phoenix 77 36 28 13 85 207 218 Vancouver 77 34 32 11 79 185 209 Calgary 76 31 38 7 69 194 226 Edmonton 77 26 42 9 61 190 257 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Wednesdays Games N.Y. Islanders 2, Ottawa 1 Detroit 3, Boston 2 Anaheim 3, Edmonton 2 Los Angeles 4, Phoenix 0 Thursdays Games Columbus at Philadelphia, late Dallas at Carolina, late Boston at Toronto, late Calgary at Tampa Bay, late Minnesota at Chicago, late Buffalo at St. Louis, late Pittsburgh at Winnipeg, late N.Y. Rangers at Colorado, late Los Angeles at San Jose, late Fridays Games Montreal at Ottawa, 7 p.m. Chicago at Columbus, 7 p.m. Washington at New Jersey, 7 p.m. Buffalo at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Calgary at Florida, 7:30 p.m. Edmonton at Phoenix, 10 p.m. Nashville at Anaheim, 10 p.m. SNAP S HOT S SPORTS Major League Baseball American League East W L Pct GB Toronto 2 1 .667 Baltimore 1 1 .500 Boston 1 1 .500 Tampa Bay 1 2 .333 1 New York 0 2 .000 1 Central W L Pct GB Chicago 2 0 1.000 Detroit 2 0 1.000 Cleveland 2 1 .667 Kansas City 0 2 .000 2 Minnesota 0 2 .000 2 West W L Pct GB Seattle 3 0 1.000 Houston 2 0 1.000 Texas 2 1 .667 1 Oakland 1 2 .333 2 Los Angeles 0 3 .000 3 Wednesdays Games Detroit 2, Kansas City 1, 10 innings Chicago White Sox 7, Minnesota 6, 11 innings Oakland 6, Cleveland 1, 1st game Boston 6, Baltimore 2 Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 0 Texas 4, Philadelphia 3 Houston 3, N.Y. Yankees 1 Cleveland 6, Oakland 4, 2nd game Seattle 8, L.A. Angels 2 Thursdays Games Kansas City at Detroit, late Minnesota at Chicago White Sox, late Boston at Baltimore, late Toronto at Tampa Bay, late N.Y. Yankees at Houston, late Seattle at Oakland, late Fridays Games Baltimore (M.Gonzalez 0-0) at Detroit (Porcello 0-0), 1:08 p.m. Milwaukee (Estrada 0-0) at Boston (Peavy 0-0), 2:05 p.m. Minnesota (Pelfrey 0-0) at Cleveland (Salazar 0-0), 3:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (E.Johnson 0-0) at Kansas City (Guthrie 0-0), 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Tanaka 0-0) at Toronto (McGowan 0-0), 7:07 p.m. Texas (Saunders 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Odorizzi 0-0), 7:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Richards 0-0) at Houston (Harrell 0-0), 8:10 p.m. Seattle (C.Young 0-0) at Oakland (Straily 0-0), 10:05 p.m. National League East W L Pct GB Washington 2 0 1.000 Atlanta 2 1 .667 Miami 2 1 .667 Philadelphia 1 2 .333 1 New York 0 2 .000 2 Central W L Pct GB Pittsburgh 2 0 1.000 Cincinnati 1 1 .500 1 St. Louis 1 1 .500 1 Milwaukee 1 2 .333 1 Chicago 0 2 .000 2 West W L Pct GB Los Angeles 4 1 .800 San Francisco 2 1 .667 1 Colorado 1 2 .333 2 San Diego 1 2 .333 2 Arizona 1 4 .200 3 Wednesdays Games Atlanta 1, Milwaukee 0 Pittsburgh 4, Chicago Cubs 3, 16 innings Colorado 6, Miami 5 Cincinnati 1, St. Louis 0 Washington 5, N.Y. Mets 1 Texas 4, Philadelphia 3 San Francisco 2, Arizona 0 L.A. Dodgers 5, San Diego 1 Thursdays Games Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, late St. Louis at Cincinnati, late Colorado at Miami, late Washington at N.Y. Mets, late San Francisco at Arizona, late Fridays Games Atlanta (Hale 0-0) at Washington (Roark 0-0), 1:05 p.m. Milwaukee (Estrada 0-0) at Boston (Peavy 0-0), 2:05 p.m. Philadelphia (R.Hernandez 0-0) at Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 0-0), 2:20 p.m. Arizona (Delgado 0-0) at Colorado (Nicasio 0-0), 4:10 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 0-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 1-0), 4:10 p.m. St. Louis (Miller 0-0) at Pittsburgh (Cole 0-0), 7:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Leake 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Mejia 0-0), 7:10 p.m. San Diego (Stults 0-0) at Miami (Koehler 0-0), 7:10 p.m. Sebring Chamber Golf Classic SEBRING The Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce will hold their Spring Golf Classic tourna ment on Saturday, April 5, at Sun N Lake Golf Club. The event is a four per son scramble with handi capped ights. There will be cash priz es: $2,000 for hole-in-one, $250 for longest drive and $250 for closest to the pin. Entry fee is $60 per play er, or $225 for a four-per son team, and includes greens fee, cart, drinks on the course and lunch. Corporate sponsor ship includes a four-per son team and hole sign for $300. Registration is at 7:30 a.m., and a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. All proceeds benet the Sebring Chamber of Commerce. For questions or a reg istration form, call (863) 385-8448 or email infor mation@sebring.org SHS Golf Tournament SEBRING Sebring High School will be hold ing its Project Graduation 2014 Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 5, at Golf Hammock Country Club. Format is a four-per son scramble, ighted by handicap, with registra tion starting at 7 a.m. and a shotgun start at 8 a.m. Entry fees are $65 per player, $240 per foursome and includes greens fee, cart and lunch. Mulligans will be avail able for purchase at $3 each or $5 for two, and hole sponsors are avail able for $100. There will be a 50/50 raf e and rafe prizes avail able as well. Make checks payable and remit to SHS Project Graduation, 2157 US 27 S, Sebring, FL 33870. For more information, call Tim Baker at 385-5100. Sebring Elks Golf SEBRING The Sebring Elks Lodge No. 1529 monthly golf outing will be held at Golf Hammock Golf and Country Club on Monday, April 7, begin ning at 8 a.m. Cost is $32, which in cludes golf, cart, lunch and prize fund. To sign up contact Jack McLaughlin at jacknju dy33872@gmail.com or leave a message on 863 471-3295. Check in no later than 7:40 a.m. by the Pro Shop H.O.P.E. Basketball Tournament SEBRING The 4th Annual Mary Toney H.O.P.E. Foundation 3-on3 Basketball Tournament will tip off Saturday, April 19, in the Sebring High School Gym. From 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. teams will compete amid concessions and music, with a cost of just $5 per player. Monetary prizes will be awarded to rst-place teams, with second-place nishers receiving gift card awards. The tournament will have male and female brackets consisting of three players per team. For boys and girls, age groups are 7-9 years old, 10-12, 13-15 and 16-19. The 7-9 and 10-12 yearold teams begin play at 8:30 a.m., with the 1315s and 16-19s starting at 11 a.m. Teams need to report to the gym 30 minutes prior to the rst game of their division. Registration deadline is Thursday, April 17. For more information, call LaVaar Scott at (863) 214-3880, Nick Brooks at (850) 322-8398 or Princeton Harris at (863) 381-8898 Nu-Hope Golf tournament AVON PARK NUHOPE Elder Care Services will hold the Sandy Foster Memorial Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 19. This years event, spon sored by MIDFLORIDA, will be held at Pinecrest Golf Club in Avon Park. The event is a 2-person scramble. Cost is $65/person ($130 per 2-person team.) Sponsorship opportuni ties are available. Registration opens at 7:30 a.m., with a Shot Gun start at 8:30 a.m. An awards luncheon fol lows the event. All funds raised are used to support services for se niors in Highlands and Hardee County. To register or for more information, please con tact Laurie Murphy at 382-2134 or MurphyL@ nuhope.org or visit www. nuhopeeldercare.org LP Project Graduation LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid High School Project Graduation 2014 Golf Tournament will tee off on Saturday, March 29, at the Placid Lakes Golf Course. Registration begins at 7 a.m. before a shot gun start kicks off play at 8 a.m. Cost is $60 per person, $240 per team, and in cludes greens fee, cart and meal. There will be a 50/50 drawing, a rafe, straight est drive and closest to the pin contests and a $2,000 Hole in One prize spon sored by Cohan Radio Group. For more informa tion, contact Charlotte McQuillen at 633-8450. Sottile Memorial Golf LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Athletic Association will be host ing the 8th Annual Nick Sottile Memorial Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 12, at the Placid Lakes Country Club. The event is a four-per son scramble with cash prizes for winning teams in each ight and individ ual cash prizes for clos est to the line, closest to the pin and a $2,000 Hole in One prize sponsored by Cohan Radio Group. Cost is $100 per golfer, $400 per team, and there will be an 8 a.m. tee-off time. Entry fee includes greens fee, cart, comple mentary beverages and lunch catered by Smoke Shack BBQ, with appe tizers of shrimp and crab clusters. Bill Jarrett Ford is help ing to underwrite the event for the eighth con secutive year, but more sponsors are needed. Sponsorship ranges from $1,000 to $50 holesponsors and lunch tick ets are included with most sponsorship levels. Proceeds from the tour nament directly bene t youth sports in Lake Placid and a portion of the proceeds are donated to the Nick Sottile Memorial Scholarship Fund. A portion of the pro ceeds will also be used for completion of a new sports weight-training facility. For more informa tion, call Laura Teal at (863) 441-0729 or Tom Reifsnyder at (954) 675-9581. Florida Hospital Clay Shoot OKEECHOBEE The Florida Hospital Heartland Clay Shoot will be held on Friday, April 25, at the Quail Creek Plantation be ginning at 8:30 a.m. A continental break fast will be served at 8 a.m. at Quail Creek, locat ed at 12399 NE 224th St., Okeechobee. There will also be a home-cooked BBQ lunch and fantastic rafe and green bird prizes. There are four levels of sponsorships avail able, from Station Sponsor which includes advertis ing on course station sig nage and lunch for two for $100, Individual Sponsor for $125 which includes registration for one shoot er and lunch. The $500 Team Sponsor includes one four-man shooting team and lunch, along with advertising on banner displayed at lunch tents. The $2,500 Gold Sponsor includes one four-man team, cart and lunch, a banner hanging during event with company logo, company logo on yer/ registration and all mail pieces, one station sign, one suite for Thursday nights social and two Thursday night dinner tickets. For more informa tion or to register, call the Foundation at (863) 4025525, or visit the website www.FHHeartland.org/ Foundation. Wings of Faith Golf SEBRING The Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center will be hosting their 4th Annual Scholarship Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 26, at Sun N Lake. Format is a four-per son scramble with handi capped ights. Entry fee is $65 per person, which includes greens fee, golf cart and lunch. Registration is at 7:30 a.m. the day of the tournament, with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Please submit entries by Thursday, April 24. Make checks payable to Wings of Faith CWC Scholarship Fund. All proceeds go to ben et college-bound senior graduates for the class of 2014. For questions, call Alvin Walters at 381-5706 or 381-6578. Bass N Trash Tournament SEBRING The Sebring Sr. FFA will host the First Annual Bass N Trash Fishing Tournament on Saturday, May 17, on Lake Jackson at the Veterans Beach boat ramp. Cost is $25 per person, with a maximum of four people per team, with all registered team members receiving a free T-shirt and lunch. Meet time is 7 a.m. and shing will get underway at 7:30 a.m. Weigh-in takes place at Noon. Cass prizes will be given to heaviest total of three bass, three trash sh, heaviest bass and heaviest trash sh. All sh must be alive at weigh-in. Registration deadline is May 1, which guarantees a shirt, registrations after that, up through the day of the tournament, arent guaranteed a shirt. To register, or for more information, contact Sarah Cleveland at (352) 214-9883, or Rebekah Wills at (863) 273-0208.

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 4, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A9 Golf HammockThe Golf Hammock La-dies played Low Gross/ Low Net on Wednesday, April 2, and winning the First Flight Low Gross was Jeannie Fivecoat with a 90, while Judy Kelly took sec-ond with 98. There was a tie for third between Shirley Enochs and Florence Towell with dueling 106s. In Low Net for the ight, Judy Trier came in with a 71 for the win, while Anne Coffey was second with 72 and Ruth Kirk third with 77. Low Gross in Second Flight went to Carol Troup and her 103. Joyce Stanley was second with 104 and Roxie McMil-lon third with 107. Low Net went to Alma Barefoot and her 66, while Kaydee Depolito was sec-ond at 71 and Jean Haig third at 73. Last Monday, March 31, the Mezza Group played Individual Pro-Am Points and saw Ike Richards win A group with a +4, while Les Campbells +2 put him in second, and Gary Towel took third with Even. In B group, Joe Hyzny took rst with -1, second went to a tie at -2 between Mike Lajinness and Fred Latshaw. C group had Dana Smith and Bobby Culbert shar-ing rst place with +3, fol-lowed by Taff Brown at +2, and Gary Fivecoat at +1. Ned Bauer took rst in D group with +1, Bob Trier was second with Even, and David Mulligan was third at -2. In E group, Jan Nigh came in rst with +4, Mike Anselm in second with +3, and David Mangold grabbed third with -2. F group was lead by Ed Northrup, who took rst with +7, Curt Matterson grabbed second with Even, and third went to Paul Skidmore at -2. Terry Yandle took rst in G group with +4, followed by a tie for third between Doug Haire and John Rob-ertson at +3. H group went to Ozzie Bergroth with +4, Dick Bothelo took second with +3, and Bob Wimmers was in third with +2. In I group, Doc Thomas grabbed rst with +6, Jack Carlton took second with +1, followed by Terri Trum-bull at Even. J group saw Jerry Lins-ley take rst place with +6, followed by Ginny McVey in second at +5, and Ralph Pickering in third with +4. Pete Mezzas +3 got him rst placein K group, fol-lowed by a tie for third between Ken Porter and Dave Hankinson at +1. And in L group, Ron Geoque was in rst place with +7, Frank Branca in second with +6, and fol-lowed by Don Meitz at Even. Next Monday, April 7, the Mezza Group will continue to play at Golf Hammock, beginning at 7:45 a.m. Please arrive early due to a big eld of players. For more information, call Pete at 382-1280.Harder HallThe streak of aces con-tinued Tuesday, April 1, as Michael Jozsa recorded an-other hole in one. From 115 yards on the par-3 fth hole, Jozsa used a 5 wood to span the dis-tance and nd the bottom of the cup. The feat was witnessed by playing partners Tom Wilhelm and Len Depend-er.Lake June WestThe Ladies League played on Monday, March 31, and needed a match of cards to declare a winner. The team of Wanda Jones, Eva Huffman, Ber-yl Hansen and Barb Cash got the nod as their 36 out-matched the 36 brought in by Donna Palmatier, Carol Cobert, Jan Mann and Jan-ice Barringer. Taking third, with a 37, were Kim Fiers, Mary Mc-Namee, Virginia Simmons and Charlotte Mathew. In closest to the pin, Jane Roush hit to 26-feet, 6-inches from No. 4, Huff-man to 5-feet, 6-inch-es from No. 2 and Doris Weeks to 3-feet, 7-inches from No. 8. A Mixed Scramble was played on Thursday, March 27, and also re-quired a match of cards to settle the placings. A pair of 51s were brought in, with top hon-ors going to the team of Doyan Eades, Beth Schuenke, Wayne Eades and Mary McNamee. Taking second were Wanda Jones, Charlotte Mathew and John and Donna Stewart. Carding a 52, for third place, were Joe and Joyce Swartz with Jane Roush and Betty Bevard. For closest to the pin, Walt Nagel hit to 16feet, 4-inches from No. 4, Mathew to 12-feet, 6-inches from No. 8 and Art Schmeltz to 3-feet, 10-inches from No. 2. eelgrass. Most anglers prefer crickets for bluegill and redworms or waxworms for shellcrackers. Fly shermen expe-rience incredible top-water action with small popping bugs or oating ies. Early morning and late evening are typically the best times to sh for pansh, with the excep-tion being the spawning period. Large groups of spawn-ing bluegills and shell-crackers will be on their beds constantly through-out the day and will gen-erally strike anything that lands near them. Bluegills tend to be deep-bodied with a long dorsal n and slightly forked tail. A dark ear covering and a blotch at the dorsal ns back bottom edge set them apart. They typically feed on insects and their larvae. The state record is 2.95 pounds. A Big Catch is consid-ered to be 11 inches or 1.25 pounds. Redear (shellcrackers) display a red mark on the back edge of the gill that is very distinctive. They generally prefer hard bottoms, often con-gregating in deeper water than bluegill. They prefer snails and clams, giving them their common nickname. Shellcrackers grow much larger than blue-gills with sh over one pound pretty common. The state record is 4.86 pounds and a Big Catch is considered to be 12 inches or 2.25 pounds. Redbreast Sunsh have a very long ear ap that distinguishes this sh from other Florida bream. Common in rivers in north Florida, they are generally not found in south or central Florida. Spotted Sunsh are ol-ive-green to brown in color, with black or red-dish spots on the base of each scale forming rows of dots on its sides. They prefer slow-mov-ing, heavily vegetated streams and rivers with limestone, sand or gravel substrates. The state re-cord is .83 pounds. A Big Catch is con-sidered 8 inches or 0.50 pounds. One of my fondest memories as a kid was shing off a dock for bluegills with my young-er brother Bill. We were too young to go out in the boat with my dad and older broth-er so we spent day after day with our old, used Mitchell 300s, a cou-ple of shin rods older than the two of us, and a can of freshly dug earth-worms. The bluegills didnt care how old we were or whether we were experi-enced shermen. They would bite all day long. We learned how to clean sh at about the same time, and although we both had a hard time throwing the small ones back, we learned quick-ly from our father, if you keep em, you clean em. With bluegill season upon us, nows the time to take that young boy or girl and teach them how to sh. Children have a short attention span and blue-gill tend to be pretty ac-commodating, so they shouldnt lose interest in catching them. With any luck, and with the experience learned from catching gills, theyll be hooked on sh-ing for life.REDS Friday Istokpoga Bass TournamentRough weather kept most of the guys home Friday (including me). Only four boats par-ticipated in the event, which is held every Fri-day out of the State Park on Route 98. Charlie Houser and his partner Tom won with three nice sh, and the big bass of the day top-ping 7 pounds. Everyone is eligible to participate in this weekly event and you can pay at the ramp just be there early. We check livewells and once youve paid your entry fee, you can head out. Articial bait only, no live shiners. Entry fee is $30 per boat, with $10 of every entry fee going to the big bass winner. Kyle King will be run-ning the tournaments going forward and Ill sh as many as I can. This is a three sh per boat limit, and state ex-emption certicates are provided to each angler, requiring all sh to be re-leased alive at the end of the tournament, 100 yards from the opening of the canal at the state park. Come on out and join us. The tournament ends at 1 p.m.Don Norton is a professional tour-nament bass sherman, bass sh-ing guide, and custom rod build-er. He lives in the Golf Hammock area of Sebring with his wife Lex-ie, and is the owner of a custom rod building company appropri-ately named The American Fish-erman. He is also the owner of REDS II, a full-service shing tack-le store located at 3603 Sebring Parkway, in Sebring, FL. You can reach him at 863-273-4998 or by email at donorton13@gmail.com. Visit his REDS FISHING facebook page or his website at theamer-icansherman.com. or stop by the store to see him anytime. FISH FROM PAGE A7 Area Golf League Results

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A10 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.com Dan Hoehne/News-Sun lesDalton Shelton found no peers in the distance running Tuesday, getting wins in the 800-, 1,600and 3,200-meter runs.Lashaday Love got an-other win for the Lady Devils in the triple jump and the Lady Dragons earned some points in the pole vault from Kathryn LeBlanc (third) and Sonia Becerra (fourth). Gabriel Yungbluth got fourth on the boys side of the event for a pair of Lake Placid points. Williams got her second win of the meet for the Dragons, taking the girls high jump, clearing 4-feet, 10-inches and Avon Park got a second and third on the boys side from Jermi-ah Almondea and Ahmad Smith. Back on the track, the Lady Dragons took third in the 4X800 relay with the foursome of Jacqueline Barajas, Gabriella Perez, Elizabeth Gloria and Rosa Ramirez, while the boys quartet of Gabriel Mercer, Julian Obregon, Scott Sig-rist and Dalton Shelton nished second on the boys side. Shanice Leverson got a win for the Lady Devils in the 100-meter hurdles, with Quincy Claitt tak-ing third for the Avon Park boys and Johnathan Ger-vais fourth for Lake Plac-id. Lady Dragons took the top three spots in the 100-meter dash in the forms of Williams, Briana Bodon and Ramirez, and the Avon Park boys took the top four spots on their side with Josh Jones, Sat-ine, Caludy Antoine and Almondea getting the job done. Shelton then showed his distance prowess in win-ning the 1,600 by more than ve seconds. In the 4X100 relay, Lake Placids girls took second while Avon Parks boys won their side. Jones then got another Lady Devil win in the 400, with teammate Keyanes-sahe Fullard taking third and Lady Dragon Belkis Rivero nishing fourth. Leverson took a third in the 300 hurdles for Avon Park and Allison Kinchen was fourth for Lake Placid. And on the boys side, Gervais got third for the Dragons and Dominick Hutchins and Claitt went fourth and fth for the Devils. LeBlanc and Shelton got Lake Placid wins in the 800-meter run, with Kinchen getting another win in the 200. Jones and Satine went rst and third for Avon Park in the 200, before Shelton nished off the Dragon wins by taking the 3,200 by nearly 30 sec-onds. Avon Park got their nal win from the girls 4X400 relay team. TRACK FROM PAGE A7 Lown and Casad 6-2, 6-2. The overall point to-tals saw Lemon Bay on top with 27 points and Sebring edging out Cape Coral for second, 17-14. We had two great days of tennis with nine teams, head coach Janie Hollinger said. The girls played beyond my ex-pectations and are excit-ed to play next week at Regionals. The teams will play the rstand second-place teams from District 12, which covers the Fort Myers and Naples area. SEBRING FROM PAGE A7start the fourth, Gomez walked and after a sto-len base, both would come in on a J.C. Cobb single. Kelley then drove in Martinez in the fth with a base-knock to center. Frostproof scratched for single runs in the fourth, fth and sixth, but the Devils pretty much put it away with another ve-run frame in the sixth. Frazier lead it off with a walk and came around on consecutive singles from Kyle Thompson, Brown and Martinez. Then, with two outs and the bases load-ed, Kelley had the games big bang with a grand slam blast over the center-eld fence that pushed the lead to the 18-10 margin that would stand at games end. We feel good. We are all getting better as a team, we still have our little moments where we break down, but our teamates pick us back up and we are back to business, Gomez said. But there is always room for improvement. And thats what we are trying to do, improve each and every day. That mentality, along with their now 13-3 re-cord on the season, bodes well for the team as it heads into the clos-ing stretch of the regu-lar season. The Devils hosted La-Belle Thursday, and get back into District 9-4A play tonight against McKeel at Head Field and Tuesday at the Mul-berry Panthers. DEVILS FROM PAGE A7Shabazz Napier is the one-man gang this time. ___ THE STARS Shabazz Napier, UConn. A 6-foot-1 point guard who can do it all and had a great mentor in Kemba Walker. Julius Randle, Kentucky. The projected No. 1 overall NBA draft pick is big, athletic and often un-stoppable. Frank Kaminsky, Wis-consin. When hes hitting his 3-pointers, this 7-footer is all but unguardable. Scottie Wilbekin, Florida. From being asked to transfer by his own coach to becoming one of college basketballs best closers. ___ THE OTHERS Patrick Young, Florida. The Gators big man is like a linebacker in bas-ketball shorts. Aaron Harrison, Ken-tucky. Hit the winning jumper against Michigan despite struggling with his shot. Has a twin brother whos not bad, either. Sam Dekker, Wisconsin. Hes scrappy, versatile and a good shooter a perfect t for the Badgers. Ryan Boatwright, UCo-nn. Napiers backcourt side-kick can shoot and has be-come a point-guard stop-per on defense. ___ THE COACHES Billy Donovan, Florida. So much for not be-ing able to get the Gators to the Final Four without NBA-ready players. Might be the best coaching job of his career. Calipari, Kentucky. The slick coach with the designer suits might irri-tate some, but he sure can recruit players and win games. Bo Ryan, Wisconsin. His has been the feelgood story so far, making the Final Four for the rst time as a coach after tak-ing his late father, Butch, every year since 1976 as a birthday gift. Kevin Ollie, UConn. Thrust into a difcult situation following the re-tirement of Jim Calhoun and NCAA sanctions last season. Managed it all incredi-bly well, particularly for a rst-time head coach. ___ NUMBERS 0 Points by Kentuckys Marcus Lee had in the 10 games pri-or to scor-ing 10 against Michigan in the Elite Eight. 0.000051 Per-centage of people (612 to-tal) who accurate-ly predicted the Final Four out of 11 million entries in ESPNs Tournament Chal-lenge. 2 SEC teams (Kentucky and Florida) in the Fi-nal Four out of three that made it into the NCAA tournament. 3 Teams that Ken-tucky beat in the bracket that were in the Final Four a year ago (Wichita State, Louisville and Michigan). 4 Times UConns mens and womens teams have reached the Final Four in the same season, most of any school. 8 Years since there were no repeat Fi-nal Four teams be-fore this season. 8.1 Turnovers per game by Wisconsin, best in the nation. 16 Straight NCAA tour-nament appearances by Wisconsin, most among the Final Four teams. 73 Years since Wiscon-sins last and only national championship. 2,720 Points scored by Wisconsin this season, a school record. ___ FAMOUS ALUMNI Connecticut: Actress Meg Ryan, physicist David Lee, actor Ron Palillo (Hor-shack!), screenwriter/pro-ducer Jeremy Leven. Florida: Actress Faye Du-naway, Nobel Prize win-ners Marshall Nirenberg and Robert Grubbs, Yan-kees owner Hal Stein-brenner, Wendys owner Dave Thomas. Kentucky: Actress Ashley Judd, Sen. Mitch McCon-nell, astronaut Story Mus-grave, Nobel Prize winner William Lipscomb. Wisconsin: Base-ball Commissioner Bud Selig, Vice President Dick Cheney, architect Frank Lloyd Wright, actor Don Ameche, singers Steve Miller and Boz Scaggs. NCAA FROM PAGE A7 BERNIE WILSONAssociated PressSAN DIEGO A Brit-ish sailor who fell over-board during a yacht race and spent near-ly two hours in the cold, rough North Pacic says he never gave up hope of being rescued be-cause he knew his fel-low crew members were well-trained for such an emergency. Andrew Taylor tells The Associated Press via satellite phone that he didnt panic even though he lost sight of his boat, but did wonder if his mates would be able to nd him in the big waves. Says Taylor: I believe Im a very, very lucky boy. There were many even-tualities and possibilities that could have ended very differently. Taylor injured his right leg when he smashed into the rudder after he fell overboard Monday. Hell have X-rays when the 70-toot Derry-Lon-donderry-Doire reach-es San Francisco in the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race.British sailor praises mates after ocean rescueSailor says hes a very, very lucky boy

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LIVING BFriday, April 4, 2014 Family Features The changing season evokes a sense of renewal, inside and out, making it the perfect opportunity to rejuvenate you and your surroundings. Its time to let a little sunlight in and celebrate the warmer months ahead. From trying a bold, new hue with living room accents to taking a yoga class, there are numerous ways to reinvent yourself and your surroundings as you mentally prep for the season ahead even if the weather is saying otherwise. Use your senses and embrace the unbridled joy that comes with the change of seasons from the bright pops of color that enliven your home to the comforting oral scents that enhance your mood. Use these simple tips to transition into this exciting and vibrant time of year. Make it a scent-filled seasonAccording to a recent survey conducted by Glade, nearly 90 percent of Ameri-cans say that scent has the power to inspire feelings. Experience the powerful effect fra-grance can have on ev-eryday life by following these tips: Create everyday in-dulgences Freshen up your bathroom by adding soaps or room sprays in your favorite fresh scents, like laven-der or citrus. Invigorate your sens-es Liven up your home with fragrance, while awakening your taste buds by trying new recipes with season-al fruits, vegetables and spices like refreshing mint, zesty grapefruits and sweet cherries. Bring in some buds Plant a window gar-den using your favor-ite herbs or grab some fresh-cut owers from your garden for an in-stant pop of color and a burst of fresh fragrance. Freshen up your homeFrom the drapes that adorn your windows to the artwork that lines the walls your home is a true reection of your personality and style. As you break free from last seasons routine, be sure to update your space too. Store away old decor and make room for more up-beat, invigorated gear. Add vibrant pops of col-or and bright patterns with new accessories for a simple update that feels fresh. Wake up your sensesFragrance offers an-other easy way to invigor ate your routine. Choose fragrances that embody the rejuvenation and excitement of the season. The new Glade Limited Edition Spring Collection for ex-ample, is a refreshing assort ment of ve fra-grances inspired by the uplift ing feelings of the season, such as Lift Off and Let Loose.Make time for hobbies you loveAs the weather warms up, you will likely nd yourself attending more get-togethers, out door sporting events and oth-er celebrations with friends and family. As schedules become in-creasingly hectic, be sure to set aside time for the hobbies you love most. Whether its gar-dening, cooking or read-ing, scheduling time for the activities you en-joy will help ensure they happen. After all, mak-ing me time a priority can benet your overall happiness in more ways than one. Try something new This is a time of new beginnings and what better way to start fresh than by trying something new? Work a new hobby into your routine, such as yoga or paint-ing. Or, attempt some-thing youve always been afraid to try. The thrill of accom plishing some-thing you havent done or feared doing will leave you feeling empowered. Feel the breezeWhen the birds are chirping and the tulips are blooming, take ad-vantage of the beautiful, mild weather. Incorpo-rate more outdoor activ-ities into your schedule and nd ways to enjoy time outside each day. Some fun out-door activities include biking to work, hosting a dinner party on your patio or plant ing a gar-den. A nd while youre at home, be sure open up those windows and wel-come the lovely breeze inside. For more fresh ideas to embrace the season, visit www.glade.com. Photos courtesy of Getty Images

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B2 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.com JAKE COYLEAP Film WriterNEW YORK For the latest Mar-vel release, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, most fan boys might prefer a Consumer Reportsstyle product review. New character introductions: Smooth. Action sequences: Excel-lent if sometimes lacking nesse. Viewer satisfaction: Likely high. Box-ofce prospects: Bankable. Teasers for future Marvel install-ments: Yes, two. With slick design and plushy in-teriors, The Winter Soldier is an excellent product. But is it a good movie? Are the two indistinguish-able at this point? Like the recent Thor: The Dark World, Winter Soldier is a se-quel to a pre-Avengers franchise starter. The earlier Captain Ameri-ca: First Avenger was a mostly clev-er period lm, set in the s and awash with a charming WWII thrill-er nostalgia. Winter Soldier brings Steve Rog-ers the weakling recruit made a brawny Greatest Generation icon, played by Chris Evans up to pres-ent day for a Washington D.C. con-spiracy thriller. Fittingly, Marvel has attracted the default hero of such lms, Robert Redford. Hes a ma-jor get for the franchise, especial-ly since (unlike in last years All is Lost) hes actually talking now. While Rogers runs laps around the Lincoln Memorial Reecting Pool and jots notes on the pop cul-ture he missed while frozen for 70 years, theres trouble brewing at S.H.I.E.L.D. Its head, Nick Fury (Samuel Jackson), believes some-thing is amiss with the agencys lat-est project: a trio of helicarriers that can kill evildoers from the sky even before the evil is done. Its in this way that Marvel lms use a complicated current-events issue NSA-like spying to feign contemporary relevance. Its the ap-pearance of having something to say. Captain America, a stand-in for a more innocent, noble America, wonders if the helicarriers are like holding a gun to everyone on Earth and calling it protection. But thats about the extent of such talk in Winter Soldier: a politi-cal thriller without the politics. (Be warned: some small spoilers follow.) Fury, having doubted the proj-ect, nds himself a hunted man. Captain America is left to investi-gate with only a few trustworthy friends: Scarlett Johanssons scar-let-haired former KGB agent Nata-sha Romanoff, a.k.a. the Black Wid-ow (an Avengers toss-in, added like a dash of paprika) and Anthony Mackies veteran Sam Wilson (a wel-come newbie). The best thing Winter Soldier has going for it is its cast, a uniform-ly likable bunch, particularly the winning Mackie, whose character dons mechanical wings to become the Falcon. And then theres Red-ford, who plays Alexander Pierce, a S.H.I.E.L.D. director. Redford, naturally, classes up the joint. Historically, in lms like Three Days of the Condor and All the Presidents Men, hes been the regular guy ghting government conspiracy which makes his du-plicitous turn in Winter Soldier exciting. Like Jackson, he lends a gravitas to the lm that it perhaps doesnt quite deserve. Directing brothers Anthony Rus-so and Joe Russo (You, Me and Du-pree) and screenwriters Christo-pher Markus and Stephen McFeely (Thor: The Dark World) put per-haps a bit more into character de-velopment than these lms often do. (The biggest misstep is with the handling of the title character, an assassin played by Sebastian Stan, whose true identity is mysterious.) The brightly lit D.C. environs, too, give the lm something of a sense of the real world. Yet when Marvin Gayes Trouble Man plays popculture homework for Rogers its like a window into another, wholly separate universe. One with soul. Its getting difcult to tell the Mar-vel movies apart. The ght scenes on a departing aircraft blur to-gether. The reversals of friend and foe refract like an innity mirror. The characters are spread across so many movies that youd need a detectives cork board to keep it straight. So while The Winter Soldier suc-ceeds as nely engineered mer-chandise built to be crowd-pleasing entertainment, for moviegoers and shareholder alike, it has a shelf life that wont last much past its run-ning time. Captain America: The Winter Sol-dier, a Walt Disney release, is rated PG-13 by the Motion Picture Asso-ciation of America for intense se-quences of violence, gunplay and action throughout. Running time: 136 minutes. Captain America zippy but hollow Courtesy Marvel Studios/MCTChris Evans, left, and Scarlett Johansson in Captain America: The Winter Soldier.DEAR ABBY: My boy-friend and I have been to-gether for two years. We recently spent a romantic night at a hotel, complete with dinner, drinks the whole shebang that he organized. I know he was a little stressed about money be-cause he mentioned it. He asked if I could shell out some money, which I did, and when the bill came, he asked me if I could shell out some more. I was a little upset be-cause I wasnt planning on spending that much. He says he is going to pay me back some of it, and now I just feel bad. I told him I didnt enjoy being put in that situation and things got awkward quickly. Now I am the one apolo-gizing, and I feel like I ru-ined our night. Am I being a brat? NEW YORK READERDEAR N.Y. READER: I dont think so. If your boy-friend couldnt afford to pay for the romantic eve-ning, he should have dis-cussed it with you before-hand so you wouldnt be put on the spot. DEAR ABBY: I work at an elementary school, and I help out during lunch, keeping order and mak-ing sure the kids are not too loud. Two of their moms work here. The kids are bullies and have no respect for adults whatsoever. When I try to discipline them or give them a time out, they go to their moms and accuse me of target-ing them because they are black. Then the moms come to me and complain and ask me why Im targeting them. This is causing me a lot of stress. I cant al-low them to bully other kids, but at the same time I dont want trouble with the parents. How can I approach this situation without it get-ting more complicated? SCHOOLYARD MOM IN FLORIDADEAR SCHOOLYARD MOM: Because these women are preventing you from effectively su-pervising the children, which is your job, you should address this prob-lem with the principal of the school.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phil-lips, and was founded by her moth-er, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Romantic night comes at a cost DEAR ABBYJeanne Phillips MOVIE REVIEW CRI T I C S RA T ING: PUZZLE CO RN E R

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 4, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B3 HEALT H Y LIVING Until the advent of pen-icillin in World War II, the biggest cause of death in war was disease. George Washington had the soldiers of the Army of the Potomac vaccinat-ed for smallpox because of his concern about los-ing troops to that scourge. Sixty percent of Union sol-diers and 54 percent of World War I soldiers died of disease. With the discovery of antibiotics, only 28 per-cent of World War II deaths were due to dis-ease. Penicillin was dis-covered in England be-fore the war, but it was the wartime need that led to a cooperative effort of many drug companies in the United States that got penicillin into mass pro-duction. The biggest killer in battle is blood loss. Ear-ly wounds were cauter-ized with boiling oil or hot metal. In the 16th century a French barber, Ambrose Pare, acting as a eld sur-geon, decided there must be a better way. He be-gan nding, clamping and then tying off arteries us-ing silk ligatures. He had improved results, but it took nearly 100 years for his ligatures to become standard. Blood banks were start-ed in France in 1918 to improve the care for wounded soldiers. Ko-rea and Vietnam saw in-creased survival rates due to better blood manage-ment in the eld. Today, troops carry tour-niquets that can be ap-plied one-handed to a leg or arm injury in the eld. The high survival rate of the Boston Marathon bombing was attributed in part to the large number of rst responders who had studied or had practi-cal experience with explo-sive war wounds. During the Korean War, a registry of vascular in-juries, the repairs and the outcomes was started. The 8,000 case records were one of the rst at-tempts to improve care with evidenced-based medicine. Knowing which inju-ries could be repaired and what methods worked helped save many limbs. The number of limbs lost due to explosive de-vices has led to improved prosthetics as the young, otherwise healthy, ampu-tees returned from Viet-nam and Afghanistan. They refused to be limited by their injuries and de-manded better answers to the limitations of older prosthetics. The carbon blades that allowed Oscar Pisto-rius to participate in the Olympics and the oth-er specialized feet that allow skiing, hiking and even swimming, are good examples of this. Perhaps the most excit-ing area is in hand trans-plants. These were con-troversial because of the serious long-term con-sequences of the anti-re-jection drugs. The De-partment of Defense, in cooperation with the University of Pittsburg, is funding a study using bone marrow taken from the limb donor and then injected, after processing, into the limb recipient. This has dramatically de-creased the need for antirejection drugs. This technique may turn out to be applicable to other transplants, de-creasing both the risk and the long-term drug costs. Wars have brought advances in civilian medi-cine as new procedures are developed to help our troops.Dr. Diana D. Carr treats patients at The Hand & Shoulder Special-ists with a concentration on heal-ing shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand problems. She is certied by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery and a Fellow of the Ameri-can Academy of Orthopaedic Sur-geons. For more information, please visit http://hand-shoulder-special-ist.com or call (863) 382-7777. This information is not intended to diag-nose, treat or cure your condition.Wartime medicine has led to advances MetroMany of the advances in medical technology that we now take for granted were pioneered by doctors treating war casualties.Dear Pharmacist: I have neuropathies all over my body, it feels like pins and needles. I take pain medi-cations. Is there anything natural I can do or take? G.D. Seattle, ColoradoAnswer: Neuropa-thy may cause more than the discomfort you de-scribe. It can also cause pain, weakness, dizziness when standing up, burn-ing sensations (even in the tongue), shooting pain, trigeminal neuralgia, tin-gling, numbness, cystitis, urinary urgency, and vibra-tion/buzzing sensations. In men, erectile dysfunc-tion is possible. Recognizing that your neuropathy is related to another disorder is huge. If you treat the neuropathy as a disease in and of itself, then you miss the big pic-ture, and the opportunity to cure yourself. Neuropathy is a symp-tom of post-herpetic neu-ralgia (shingles), high in-sulin, diabetes, gluten sensitivity or Celiac, heavy metal toxicity, autoim-mune disorders, Lyme dis-ease and medications. A little-known fact is that medications can mug your body of nutrients that would otherwise protect your nerves, so neuropathy pain is a side effect. The list of drugs that can indi-rectly do this goes is in the hundreds and some clas-sic offenders include ant-acids, acid blockers, oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy, cor-ticosteroids, statin cho-lesterol reducers, breast cancer drugs and uoro-quinolone antibiotics. That last class of drugs, the uoroquinolones (Cip-ro, Floxin, Avelox, Leva-quin) have a uoride back-bone. Fluoride is known to harm the thyroid gland, reduce thyroid produc-tion and cause irrevers-ible damage to the nervous system. One solution for neurop-athies is to reduce insulin and blood sugar. My book Diabetes Without Drugs offers natural remedies to help. Id get off medi-cations that cause neu-ropathies (with physician approval) and simultane-ously get on medications that support nerve growth. Thyroid medications, specically T3 and/or growth hormone shots can help. If your doctor approves and supervises you, you could take a few of the fol-lowing supplements. Its all trial and error, I dont know whats right for you: Thiamine: A glass of wine every night can steal nerve-protective nutrients like vitamin B1 (thiamine). You can also try benfotiamine, a fat-soluble form of thia-mine. Probiotics: Sounds strange, but heres a con-nection. Probiotics allow you to make methylco-balamin (vitamin B12) which you need to pro-duce myelin and protect the nerve cells. Methylcobalamin (B12): When your body starves for B12, you lose the my-elin sheath and your nerves short circuit. This can cause neuropathy and depression. There are dozens of drug mug-gers of B12, including the diabetic medica-tions that you take as well as processed foods, sugar, antibiotics, estro-gen hormones and acid blockers. Lipoic Acid: You can buy it as alpha at any health food store, or R lipoic acid as a more bioavailable form. This antioxidant squash-es free radicals that at-tack your myelin sheath and fray your nerve wiring. It reduces blood sugar, too. High dos-es are needed to im-prove nerve pain, but if you take high doses, you need to also supplement with a little biotin. The reason is because lipoic acid is a drug mugger of biotin. Suzy Cohen is a registered phar-macist and the author of The 24Hour Pharmacist and Real Solu-tions. For more information, visit www.suzycohen.com. This infor-mation is not intended to treat, di-agnose or cure your condition.Stop nerve pain in its tracks DEAR PHAR M ACISTSuzy Cohen GUEST C OLUM NDr. Diana Carr WASHINGTON (AP) Patients may soon get an unprecedented look at how their doc-tor compares to oth-er physicians, after Medicare announced Wednesday it plans to publicly post bill-ing data for more than 888,000 practitioners. Considered the mother lode of infor-mation on doctors, the Medicare claims data-base has been off-lim-its to the public for de-cades, blocked in the courts by physician groups. The American Medical Association has argued that its re-lease would amount to an invasion of doctors privacy. Consumer groups, insurers, em-ployers and the news media have sought the information to help them evaluate clini-cians. Wednesday, the Obama administration came down on the side of disclosure. Medicare Deputy Ad-ministrator Jonathan Blum said in a letter to the American Medi-cal Association that the agency intends to post the data publicly as early as next week.Medicare to release billing data for 880K doctors

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B4 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.com Cornerstone Hospice seeks volunteers with hospice heartsSEBRING Highlands and Hardee County residents who want to make a difference in their community are invited to join the team of dedicated and caring Cornerstone Hospice and Palliative Care volunteers. Hospice volunteers assist with of ce duties and marketing events, as well as visit hospice patients in their homes, offering conversation and giving caregivers a welcome break. All Cornerstone Hospice volunteers must complete a 16hour training session and the next training is scheduled for April, in Sebring: Tuesday, April 8; Friday, April 11; Tuesday, April 15 and Friday, April 18, each day, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Cornerstone Hospice, 209 N. Ridgewood Drive, Suite 3. Breakfast and coffee will be provided. All four days of training are required. Call Dorothy Harris, volunteer specialist, at 382-4563; Lisa Gray, volunteer manager at 352742-6806 or toll-free, 888-728-6234.Caregiver support groups offeredChange of Pace offers several Caring for Caregivers support groups. In Avon Park, the group meet at the First Christian Church, 1016 Camphor St., every Monday from 10:3011:30 a.m. Facilitators Cora Schwingel and Jean Maas. In Sebring, the group meets at Sebring Christian Church/ Change of Pace, 4514 Hammock Road, every Thursday from 1-2 p.m. Facilitators are Jean Maas and Ellen McKissock. There is also an evening group that meets every second and fourth Thursday from 6-7 p.m. The facilitator is Cora Schwingel. There is also and Anticipatory Grief Support Group that meets in Sebring at Sebring Christian Church/Change of Pace, 4514 Hammock Road, every Tuesday 9:3011 a.m. The facilitator is Charlie Stroup. In Lake Placid, the group meets at Memorial United Methodist Church, 500 Kent St., every Tuesday from 10 p.m. Facilitators are Lisa Rodriguez and Sharon Puckett. Call 382-1188 for more information.Childbirth education workshops setSEBRING The Florida Department of Health and Healthy Start will host free childbirth education workshops on April 11 and May 15 at 7205 South George Blvd., Sebring. Space is limited and pre-registration is required. Call 382-7233.Free quit smoking programIf youre ready to quit tobacco, there is a sixsession program that will help you for free, including free nicotine patches. For more information, call 877-252-6094 or visit www.ahectobacco.com.Diabetes management classes offeredSEBRING Free diabetes self management classes will be offered at the Health Department, 7205 South George Blvd. April 21-23, from 5:308:30 p.m. and again May 5-7 from 8:30-11:30 a.m. Classes are taught by Peggy Pierce, RN, and nutritionist Aleyda Oliveros. Space is limited. Call 382-7294 to reserve a seat.Atonement Lutheran ChurchSEBRING Rev. Sharon Dorr will lead the Sunday service. This will be Birthday Sunday. Coffee and birthday cake will be served after the service in the fellowship hall.Avon Park Christian ChurchAVON PARK Pastor Greg Ratliff will bring a message in the sermon series Is Something On Fire? on Sunday. The church is at 1016 W. Camphor St. (behind the Wells Fargo Bank). Call 453-5334 or email apcc.2014@yahoo.com with any questions or to request information. The website is www.avonparkchristianchurch.com.Christ Lutheran ChurchAVON PARK Pastor Scott McLean will preach a sermon titled Living in the Spirit in the Flesh on Sunday. The church is at 1320 County Road 64, east of the Avon Park High School past the four-way stop sign. For more information, call 471-2663 or visit www.christlutheranavonpark.org.Christian Training ChurchSEBRING Rev. Linda M. Downing will bring the message titled Greater Vision at the Sunday morning service. The Wednesday night Bible study is the Gospel of John.Church of the BrethrenSEBRING Pastor David Smalley will preach from Ephesians 1:18-23 on Sunday. This Sunday the title of his sermon will be Transformation Power. The theme for Sunday school will be Creating a Redeemed People. The scripture will be from Isaiah 43. Call 385-1597.Emmanuel United Church of ChristSEBRING Rev. George Millers sermon on Sunday will be Whole; Holy from Romans 8:6-11. The church is 1.7 miles west of U.S. 27 on Hammock Road. Call 471-1999 or visit www.sebringemmanuelucc.com for more information.Faith Baptist Church of Lake PlacidLAKE PLACID Pastor Bill Cole will be preaching Marching Orders for Believers from the book of Romans Sunday morning, and Sunday evening he will preach How Do You Spell Love from the Gospel of John. Mid-week prayer & Bible study is held on Wednesday. The Easter Musical, Jesus Messiah, will be on Palm Sunday, April 13, at 10:45 a.m. To listen to Faith Baptist Sunday morning sermons or for more information, visit www. faithbaptistchurchLP. com or call 465-0060. The church is at 660 Holmes Ave.Faith Lutheran Church of SebringSEBRING This Sunday, the church celebrates Fifth Sunday in Lent. Guest Pastor Tony Douches will be delivering his sermon at Faith Lutheran titled, Can These Bones Live? Every Tuesday and Thursday morning, Senior Aerobics is offered by teacher Barbara. Classes are no charge and are various levels. L.I.F.T. Ladies In Faith/Fellowship Together meets Friday, April 11. The study will be on Give Work A Rest. The text is from Exodus 31:12-17. The church is having Lenten services on Wednesday evenings, the theme for Wednesday is Facing Suffering from Romans 8:18-19. For more information on any event, visit www.facebook.com/ FaithLutheranSebring.First Baptist Church Avon ParkAVON PARK Rev. Jon Beck will be preaching from James 5:12 on Sunday. Nursery is available for the morning and evening services. Wednesdays schedule includes supper, childrens choir, Bible study/ prayer meeting, youth and children activities, choir rehearsal and the Spanish service. The church is at 100 N. Lake Ave. Call 863-4536681 or email info@fbcap. net.First Christian Church of Sebring Disciples of ChristSEBRING Sundays message by Pastor Ron Norton will be A Woman Anoints Jesus from Mark 14: 3-9. Greeting the congregation will be Terry Ducar. Elders will be Diane Beidler and Linda Ellis. Deacons and servers will be Carol Graves, Catherine Baker, Barbara Slinkard and Carol Chandler. The Church is at 510 Poinsettia Ave. Call 385-0352.First Presbyterian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK Rev. Ed Fleagle will be the guest speaker Sunday. His sermon is entitled Baptism with the Holy Spirit based on Luke 24:44-49. The choirs introit will be I Come to the Cross and the anthem How Beautiful. The adult Sunday school class is using the denominational quarterly. The theme this quarter is the Gospel of Matthew. Sundays lesson is entitled Greatness in the Kingdom based on Matthew 20:1-28. Youth Group will be led by Dave Blackmon and Kathaleen Black. On Wednesday, Pastor Bob Johnson will lead Bible study on the book What is Spiritual Warfare? The church is at 215 E. Circle St. (with two entrances on Lagrand St.). Call 453-3242 or visit www.avonparkapchurch. com.First Presbyterian Church of SebringSEBRING Rev. Darrell A. Peers sermon title for Sunday is Building Faith, Part 2. Miriam Circle meets Monday. Dorcas Sewing Circle meets Tuesday, as will youth groups. Wednesday is adult Bible study and choir rehearsal. The church is at 319 Poinsettia Ave. Call 385-0107.First United Methodist Church of SebringSEBRING Pastor John Bryant will bring the message with the Youth Choir providing the special music. Holy Communion will be served. Wednesday evening will be fellowship with dinner and Bible study. Listen Live on WITS-AM 1340 each Sunday to hear the morning service. The church is downtown at 126 South Pine St. Call 385-5184.Grace Pointe MinistriesSEBRING The church meets in the Sebring Hills Clubhouse, 200 Lark Ave. Call Myrna at 385-1671 for details. Sundays sermon message is celebrating the month of Nissan, Rosh Chodesh of the Jewish calendar. The tribe attached to this month is the Tribe of Judah. Tuesday Home Bible Study continues the study Messiah: Shadow to Image. Each week is a independent study. Call 863-658-2534 for directions. Friday Night Bible Study is with GoToMeeting. Let the pastor know if you would like to participate in this live interactive study at www.gracepointecog@ comcast.net and he will send you the link.Heartland Christian ChurchSEBRING Pastor Ted Moores sermon this week will be Christian Arobics, Part 2 with scripture from 1 Thessalonians 5:12-22. Communion is offered during the service weekly The service will include specials by Allen Warchak and Ruth Rayburn. Tuesday night adult Bible study is taught by Pastor Ted Moore. Wednesday night supper is served by Barbra Kelly and Dorothy Newton. The church is at 2705 Alternate Route 17 South in Sebring (behind Publix). Call 314-9693.Memorial United Methodist ChurchLAKE PLACID Pastor Tim Haas will preach on Journey to the Cross-The Dead Man at the traditional and contemporary worship services, with the scripture lesson from John 11:38-45. Youth Group will meet Sunday afternoon in Rob Reynolds Hall, led by Pastor Claude Burnett. The Church is at 500 Kent Ave., east of the Tower. Call 465-2422.New Beginnings ChurchSEBRING On Sunday, Pastor Gary Kindles sermon is titled Valley of the Dry Bones based on Ezekiel 37:1-14 New Beginnings Church of Sebring is a Bibleoriented, non-denominational church led by Pastor Gary Kindle. There is a blended service with contemporary and traditional music. The church meets in The Morris Chapel, 307 S. Commerce Ave. Call 835-2405. Highlands Social Center Highlands Social Center Saturday, April 5th at 6:00-9:00pm Don West and Silver Eagle Band Classic Country Music L I V E BYOB Admission $ 5 HEALTHY LIVING SNAPSHOTS LOCAL NEWS RELIGION SNAPSHOTS CHURCH SERVICESCONTINUED | B6 M C Y K

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 4, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B5 PLACES TO WORSHI PPlaces to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sun that is published Friday and Sunday. To place a listing in this directory, call the News-Sun at 3856155, ext. 596.ANGLIC ANNew Life Anglican Fellowship, 10 N. Main Ave. (Womans Club), Lake Placid, FL 33852. Rev. Susan Rhodes, Deacon in Charge, (863) 243-3191; strhodes1020@yahoo.com. Sun-day Worship, 10 a.m. Teaching, Holy Commu-nion, Music, Fellowship, Healing Prayer. Pas-toral and Spiritual.ASSEMBL Y OF G ODChrist Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Await-ing His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morn-ing Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 471-0924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Eve-ning Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431.BAPT I STA von Park Lakes Baptist Church, 22600 N. Highlands Blvd., Avon Park, FL 33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ cen-tered and biblically based. Sunday wor-ship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C17A (truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., and evening worship service is at 6 p.m. On Wednes-days, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20s+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.betha-nybaptistap.com or call the church ofce at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Wor-ship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Max-well St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Wor-ship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Ser-vice, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Tele-phone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: ofce@apfellowship.org; Web site, www.ap-fellowship.org. First Baptist Church of A von Park, N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 453-6681. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Rev. Johnattan Soltero, His-panic pastor; Joy Loomis, director of music. Sunday Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Wor-ship, 10:45 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:45 a.m.; Youth Choir, 4:30 p.m.; Evening Wor-ship, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for both ser-vices. Wednesday Wednesday Night Sup-per, 5:15 p.m.; Childrens Choir, 5:45 p.m.; Youth Activities, 6 p.m.; Prayer Meeting/Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Worship Choir Practice, 6 p.m.; Mission Programs for Children, 6:45 p.m. Hispanic Services: Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., worship service at 11 a.m. Wednes-day Bible study at 7 p.m. To watch services online, go to the website at www.fbcap.net. In the heart of Avon Park, for the hearts of Avon Park. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both ser-vices with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meet-ing at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all chil-dren. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm St., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Website: www.fbclp. com. Email: information@fbclp.com. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contem-porary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Wednesday Activities: Fam-ily dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reserva-tions required). Prayer meeting, Youth Inter-sections, and MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. The church is at 119 E. Royal Palm St., Lake Placid. For information, call 465-3721 or go to www.fbclp.com. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School be-gins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday wor-ship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., fol-lowed by adult choir rehearsal. From Septem-ber the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the minis-tries offered, call 655-1878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Rev. Matthew D. Crawford, se-nior pastor; Rev. Nuno Norberto, associ-ate pastor, minister of music and senior adults; and Dixie Kreulen, preschool direc-tor. Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.; Blend-ed Service, 10:30 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Call 385-4704. Website www.fbsebring.com Florida A venue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Gird-ley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sun-day Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children and youth at 6 p.m. and for adults at 6:30 p.m. Independent Baptist Church, 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday wor-ship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church, 808 Gar-denia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Wor-ship service at 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Eve-ning Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 6 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morn-ing Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870. Wel-come to the church where the Son al-ways shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 2143025. Afliated with the National Associa-tion of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Evangelist Roger Jaudon. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For infor-mation, call 382-0869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Awana kin-dergarten through fth grade, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for under age 3 is avail-able at all services. Provisions for handi-capped and hard-of-hearing. Ofce phone, 385-0752. Spring Lake Baptist Church, Where the Bible is Always Open. Pastor Richard Schermerhorn, 7408 Valencia Road; 6552610. Assistant Pastor Ronald Smith, 3861610. On U.S. 98 at the Spring Lake Vil-lage II entrance. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. for all ages; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednes-day Mid-week Bible Study and Prayer Ser-vice, 6:30 p.m. Nursery available for all services. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695.C ATHOLICOur Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 E. Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vig-il Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English. Sunday Life Teen Mass at 6 p.m. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. English confession at 3:30 p.m. Saturday; Spanish confession at 6:30 p.m. Religious Education Classes (September to May) are 9-10:20 a.m. Sun-day for grades K through 5th. Grades 6th through Youth Bible Study are from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hick-ory St., Sebring. Parrish ofce/mailing ad-dress: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 3850049, 385-6762 (Spanish); fax, 385-5169; email, ofce@stcathe.com; website, www. stcathe.com. School Ofce/Mailing, Princi-pal Dr. Anna V. Adam, 747 S. Franklin St., Se-bring, FL 33870; 385-7300; fax, 385-7310; email school@stcathe.com. School ofce hours 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday-Fri-day. Clergy: Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F., fr-jose@stcathe.com or 385-0049; Parochial Vicar, Rev. Victor Caviedes, 385-3993; Assist-ing Priest (retired), Rev. J. Peter Sheehan; De-cons, Rev. Mr. James R. McGarry and Rev. Mr. Max M. Severe. WEEKEND MASS SCHED-ULE: Saturday: 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 and 10 a.m., 12 p.m. (Spanish), 5 p.m. (Holy Fam-ily Youth Center), every third Sunday of the month at 2 p.m. (French Mass). Daily Mass: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m. Sacrament of Reconcilliation: 7:157:45 a.m. rst Friday, 2:30-3:15 p.m. Satur-day and 9-9:45 a.m. Sunday. Ofce Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placid-view Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Sun-day 8 a..m. and 10 a.m. year round. Sat-urday Vigil 4 p.m. Weekdays 9 a.m. Holy days 9:30 a.m. (Vigil evening before at 7 p.m.) First Saturday of each month: Healing Mass, 9 a.m.C HR IST I A NCornerstone Christian Church, (Sax-on Hall) 1003 W. Pine St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Love Christ Love People. Jon Carter, Music Minister. Sunday, 9 a.m. Bible Study; 10 a.m. Worship; Communion avail-able each week. Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellow-ship Group. For more information call 4537679. Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Ham-mock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher. Kristy Marvin, Child-rens Director. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets at 1 p.m. Thursdays. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-0358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.C HR IST I A N & MISS IO N ARY A LLI A NC EThe Alliance Church of Sebring, 451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL 33875. Call 3821343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednes-day Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m.C HUR C H OF BRETHRE NChurch of the Brethren, 700 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m. Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-1597.CHUR CH OF CHR I STA von Park Church of Christ, 200 S. For-est Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Minister: Don Smith. Sunday Worship Services, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available at every service. Bible Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered class-es for all ages. Church phone: 453-4692. Heartland church of Christ, Lakeshore Mall Suite 42 (outside entrance), 901 U.S. Highway 27 N, Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday worship, 9 a.m. to noon; Wednesday, Bible study, 7 p.m. Evangelist Carl Ford, (863) 4022159. Lake Placid Church of Christ, 1069 Hwy 27 North, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Mailing address is P.O. Box 1440, Lake Placid, FL 33862. Sunday morning worship is at 10 a.m. Sunday evening worship is 6 p.m. Bi-ble class 9 a.m. Sundays and Wednesday evenings at 7 p.m. All are invited to join us. For more information, call the church at 863465-4636 or visit the website www.thelord-sway.com/lakeplacidcofc/. Sebring Parkway Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870; 3857443. Minister: Kevin Patterson. Times of ser-vice are: Sunday Bible Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening Ser-vice, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Bible Class, 7 p.m. C HUR C H OF GODChurch on the Ridge, Church of God, Anderson, Ind.; 1130 State Road 17 North, Sebring, FL 33870. Worship Service Sun-day, 10 a.m.; Bible Study and Prayer, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Pastor Dr. Collet Varner, (863) 382-0773.C HUR C H OF N AZARE N EFirst Church of the Nazarene of A von Park P.O. Box 1118., Avon Park, FL 338251118. 707 W. Main St. Sunday: Sunday school begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning worship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening service at 6 p.m. Wednesday evening service is at 7 p.m. with special services for children and adults. If you need any more information, call 453-4851. Church of the Nazarene of Lake Plac-id, 512 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852. Adult Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednes-day evening: All church meal, 6 p.m.; Chris-tian Life Study, 6:45 p.m. Winter Life groups pending. Call 446-1339. Pastor Tim Taylor.C HUR C HES OF C HR I ST IN C HR IST I A N U NIO N Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christian Union, (Orange Blos-som Conference Center) 1400 C-17A North (truck route), Avon Park. Presenting Jesus Christ as the answer for time and eterni-ty. Sunday morning worship service, 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided. Junior Church ac-tivities at same time for K-6 grade. Sun-day School Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m. (Transportation available.) Sunday eve-ning praise and worship service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and youth activities at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Everyone is welcome, please come worship with us. Tom Schwankweiler, Pastor. Phone 453-6052.EP I S C OPA LEpiscopal Church of the Redeemer A von Park, 910 W. Martin St., Avon Park, FL 33825 (U.S. 27 across from Wells Mo-tor Co.). Rev. Canon George Conger. Sun-day services: Holy Communion at 9:30 a.m.; Bible study Wednesday at 10 a.m. Everyone is welcome. Come and wor-ship with us; we would love to meet you. Church ofce, 453-5664; fax, 453-4853. Visit us at our website at redeemeravon-park.com. Email redeemer1895@aol. com. Call the thrift store for hours open and donation pick up at 664-9668 or 453-5664. St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Fa-ther Scott Walker. Sunday Services: Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucha-rist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek service on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bi-ble study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always welcome. Church ofce 385-7649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Epis-copal Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-0051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Nelson, Rector. Worship: Sunday, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday Bible study at 9:15 a.m. Sunday School at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Wor-ship 6 p.m. and Thursday 9 a.m. Holy Communion with Healing. Call the thrift store for hours open 699-0221.EVA NG E LIC A L FREE C HUR C H OF AMER IC AThe Church of the Way EFCA, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunda1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednes-days. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teach-ing of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way A place for you. Ofce Phone: 471-6140, Church Cell Phone: 273-3674. Email: thewaychurch@ hotmail.com. Web site: www.TheWayChurch.orgG RA C E BRETHRE NGrace Brethren Church, 3626 Thunder-bird Road, (863) 835-0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednes-day services at 7 p.m. We offer Kid City Childrens Ministry throughout all ser-vices, and there are variosu other class-es for teens, married couples, primetimers, and Bible studies in Spanish. Kid City Day Care, Preschool and AfterSchool Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For registration call: 385-3111). Check us out on the Web at www.sebringgrace.org.IN DEPE N DE N TFirst Christian Church, 1016 W. Cam-phor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.rstchristi-anap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church. Greg Ratliff, Se-nior Minister; Bible School 9 a.m.; Wor-ship 10 a.m.; Wednesday studies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events.IN TERDE N OM IN AT I O N A L World Harvest and Restoration Min-istries, (non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd.,(non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd., Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-3771. Sunday service: Sunday School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rog-ers.L UTHERANAtonement Lutheran Church (ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. Rev. Sharon Dorr and Deacon David Thoresen will be the Spiritual Leaders, alternating Sundays. Jim Helwig, organist. Worship service with the Holy Eucharist is at 9:30 a.m. every Sunday. Birthday Sunday is the rst Sunday of each month after the service. Council meeting is on the rst Tuesday of each month. WELCA meets at noon second Tuesday of the month with a light lunch. Labyrinth Prayer Garden is open to the public 24 hours a day, seven days a week. When in need of prayers or to talk to God, come to the Garden. Come and grow with us; we would love to meet you and your family. Dont worry about how you look. Jesus went to the temple in a robe and san-dals. Quilting classes every Monday at 6 p.m. Looking for quilters or people willing to learn. Call 840-3303. Christ Lutheran Church A von Park LCMS, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School past the four-way stop sign. Sunday Divine Wor-ship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with tradition-al Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come wor-ship and fellowship with us. For informa-tion call Pastor Scott McLean at (863) 471-2663 or see christlutheranavonpark. org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS,2740 Lakeview Dr, Sebring; Church phone: 3857848; Faith Child Development Center: 385-3232. Sunday Traditional Worship Ser-vice: 8 a.m.; Sunday Praise Worship Ser-vice: 10:30 a.m.; Communion served 1st, 3rd & 5th Sunday. Sunday School & Bible Classes: 9:15 a.m. Worship Svc. Broad-cast at 8 a.m. on WITS 1340AM each Sun-day. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies, Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. All are warm-ly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Luther-an Churches, 3240 Grand Prix Drive, Se-bring, FL 33872. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Bi-ble Study, 9 a.m. Nursery provided. So-cial activities: Choir, Missions, Evange-lism. Phone 385-2346. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangeli-cal Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Wor-ship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Luke Willitz at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www. newlifesebring.com. Resurrection Lutheran Church ELCA, 324 E. Main St., at Memorial Drive, Avon Park. Pastor Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Sun-day worship 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Sunday School at 9:15 a.m. Coffee and fellowship following 10:30 a.m. service. Wednesday Worship Service is at 7 p.m. Open Com-munion celebrated at all services. Gods Work, Our Hands. T rinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots PreSchool director Education Hour, 8:45 a.m.; Worship service, 10 a.m. Holy Com-munion each rst and third Sunday. Chil-drens Church scheduled during worship service, 4-year-olds through fth grade. Nursery provided during worship service for infants to 3-year-olds. Seasonal MidWeek Services each Wwednesday eve-ning during Advent and Lent. Call church ofce at 465-5253 or visit the website at www.Trinitylutheranlp.com. Other ac-tivities and groups include: Choir; Ladies Guild and LWML; Mens Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies; Trinity Tots Pre-school, and Youth Group.N O N -DE N OM IN AT I O N A LBible Fellowship Church, 3750 Ham-mock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed rst and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 yrs through 5th grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church of-ce 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An inde-pendent community church. Sunday morn-ing worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening service, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian T raining Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. A nursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Chris-tian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister, lindadown-ing@live.com. Casey L. Downing, associ-ate minister, caseydowning@hotmail.com. Church phone: 314-0482. Web site: www. ctmforme.com Crossroads of Life,148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852; Tel. 863655-9163. The place of your Divine ap-pointment. We expect our supernatural God to transform our lives through His power and grace. Come, learn of His plan and destiny for you. With His plan we re-ceive His provision along with His perfect timing and opportunity. What you have longed for, but have been missing, can now be received. The direction you have been thirsty for will suddenly quench your parched soul. Come to experience what you have been missing for so long empowerment in every area of life. We teach, train and send forth to win souls. You dont speak English no problema. We have a Spanish interpreter. We look forward to fellowship and worship with you at 7 p.m. every Wednesday. Pastoers Gil and Rosa Benton (Faith Never Fails). Faith & Familylife Worship Center, Pastors Leroy and JoAnn Taylor invite you to discover one of Sebrings hidden trea-sures at 2349 U.S. 27 South (Banyan Plaza off Sparta Road and Lake Jackson). We provide biblical solutions for every-day challenges through our multicultur-al worship services available on Sun-days at 11 a.m. and Wednesdays at 7 p.m. Child care is available for all who at-tend. For more information, all 385-1800. Plan your rst visit. Matthew 7:7 says, Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will nd; knock and the door will be opened to you. Our guests are very im-portant, so please let us know how we can meet your need by emailing theffwc@ gmail.com. Our mission at Faith & Fami-lylife is centered around Restoring Lives, Families and Communities. Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone, 382-1085. Dustin Woods, lead pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Monday, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry. www.GBCco-nnected.org Highlands Community Church, a ca-sual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. New Beginnings Church of Sebring, worshiping at The Morris Chapel, 307 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Pastor Gary Kindle. Bible study every Sunday, 9 a.m. Blended Church Service, 10:15 a.m. Phone (863) 835-2405. newbeginningschurchofsebring.com Be-gin your week with us. The Lords Sentinel Fellowship Church, 148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid (at Lake Placid Christian School), Pastor Juanita Folsom. Sunday morning service, 10:30 a.m.; Monday, Sentinel School of Theology, 7 p.m.; Church service, Tues-day, 7 p.m. More information at www. juanitafolsomministries.com. Union Church, 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday traditional worship service is at 7:45 a.m. (October through Easter) and 9 a.m. Contemporary Sunday worship service is at 10:45 a.m. Nursery and childrens church available. Wednesday night worship with Pastor Ti-ger Gullett and CrossTalk with Pastor Bill Breylinger at 6 p.m. Breakfast and lunch menus at Solid Grounds. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Ofce: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. Unity Life Enrichment Centre,new lo-cation, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.uni-tyofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Cel-ebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Book-store and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life En-richment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Cony-er, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. RELIGION

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B6 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.comPRESBYTERIANCovenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. Pastor Tom Schneider. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Sunday morning worship: Traditional ser-vice, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday school, 9:15 a.m. Wednes-day evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Childrens/Youth Group, 5:30-7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato. net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Ofce hours: 8:3012:30 a.m. Monday-Friday.First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6 p.m. each Wednesday; Children Ministry and Youth Group, 6 p.m. each Sunday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. 385-0107. Email: faith@ strato.net, Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Fellowship Time, 10:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m. Tuesday: Youth Groups meet for devotions/Bible study, crafts, sport activities and dinner. Middle and high school, 3:306:30 p.m. Elementary School, 4-5:30 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m. Choir Rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. A nursery is available during worship. Call the church ofce for more information and other classes. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com, 117 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday Traditional Worship, 8 and 9:30 a.m.; Contemporary Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. Wednesday evenings: Adult small group Bible Study 7 p.m. (Nursery available), Youth Group (6-12th grades) 7 p.m., nursery and childrens ministry, 7 p.m. Family Biblical Counseling available by appointment. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September through June. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. rst Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 6550713; e-mail, springlakepc@embarqmail.com, Web site, http://slpc.embarqspace.com.SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTISTAvon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com, Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. A sale takes place the rst Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Frank Gonzalez. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALL ARE WELCOME. Associate Pastor is Ryan Amos. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Nathan Madrid.THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTSThe Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 3829092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-1p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: rst and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m.THE SALVATION ARMYThe Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www. salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODISTFirst United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., 105 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870. Pastor John A. Bryant. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church, 200 S. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759, Rev. Gary Pendrak, Pastor. Sunday School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Bible study every Wednesday at 6 p.m. Visit us at our church website: www.fumcap. org. Memorial United Methodist Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL, 33852. Rev. Tim Haas, pastor. Rev. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral assistant. Rev. Jerry McCauley, visitation pastor. Sunday worship services: Worship Service, 8:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m. We offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth programs, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship. We are a congregation that wants to know Christ and make Him known. Check out our church website at www.memorialumc.com or call the church ofce at 465-2422. Lakeview Christian School, VPK to Grade 5, 465-0313. St. John United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Adult Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all services. Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring. org Spring Lake United Methodist Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church ofce phone: 655-0040.UNITED CHURCH OF CHRISTEmmanuel United Church of Christ, Jesus didnt reject people, neither do we. Join us for worship every Sunday at 9:30 a.m. and youll be embraced by a compassionate congregation that is all-inclusive. Were at the corner of Hammock and Hope. Choir and Bell Choir practice on Wednesday; Bible studies throughout the week. 471-1999; sebringemmanuelucc.com.P LACES T O WO RS HI P New Life Evangelical Lutheran ChurchSEBRING Pastor Luke John Willitz will preach from John 11:1727, 38-45 on Sunday. The theme is I am the resurrection and the life. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church (ELS/WELS) is at 3725 Hammock Road.Parkway Free Will Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Sunday morning Bible lesson, The Cleansing of the Temple, is taken from Isaiah 56, Zechariah 6, and John 19. Pastor Jim Scaggs will bring the message. The church is at 3413 Sebring Parkway. Call 382-3552.St. John United Methodist ChurchSEBRING On Sunday, Pastor Ronald De Genaro Jr.s ser-mon topic will be The Anointed One. Biblical reference is from Luke 4:16-30. Communion will be served. Nursery is provided at all services. CONTINUED FROM B4 SNAP S HOT S C HURCH S ERVICES Spaghetti dinner set at St. JohnSEBRING St. John United Methodist Church will host a spaghetti din-ner on Tuesday. Serving times are 4, 5 and 6 p.m. A limited number of walkins and take-outs will be available. Tickets are $8 each and may be reserved by call-ing the church ofce at 382-1736. The church is at 3214 Grand Prix Drive (just behind Walmart).Night of Prophecy set MondaySEBRING Pastor Reinhold Buxbaum from The Church of the Way (1005 N. Ridgewood Drive in Sebring) will pres-ent the monthly Monday night prophesy at Homers Restaurant, 1000 Sebring Square, Monday at 6:30 p.m. Buxbaum will take the current events happening around the world, espe-cially in the Middle East, and relate them to Biblical prophesy. The event is free. You can come early to eat if you wish. RELIGION The Bear (Russia) has re-cently taken over Crimea, which belonged until just a view days ago to the country of Ukraine. But did you know that the Bear will try to grab Isra-el in the not so distant fu-ture? This is not the rst time that Russia is on the move. Remember Georgia in 2008? Parts of Georgia by the names of South Osse-tia and Abhazia were in-vaded by Russia and sepa-rated from Georgia. What is even more amazing is that we can know with 100 percent certainty that Russia will come South to invade Isra-el. How do we know that? Because the Bible tells us in Ezekiel 38-39 that in the latter years (expres-sion for end times 38:8) the nation from the Far North (39:1) Russia is as far north as you can get by the name of Magog (38:1) will come down with many other nations (like Turkey and Iran 38:5-6) to invade Israel. But why? First of all no-tice that none of the invad-ing countries are next door neighbors to Israel, even though they all hate Isra-el. Why are Lebanon, Syr-ia, Jordan, Egypt and Gaza not mentioned in this war? Because Israel will take care of them in the next war, along with Iran. This war is mentioned in Psalm 83. The surrounding nations are all mentioned by their ancient names with one goal in mind: Come, they say, let us destroy them as a nation, that the name of Israel be remembered no more (Psalm 83:4 NIV). So the rst reason is re-venge for the nations at-tacked by Israel, but sup-ported by Russia. And secondly, even more important, the Russians want to get their hands on the spoil (38:13). What is the spoil? Besides the riches of the land of Isra-el? As you know, Israel has discovered natural gas. Lots of it. So much so that they started to sell liqui-ed gas to Europe. That hits Russia where it hurts the most, their bottom line. Russia is the greatest exporter of natural gas to Europe. It is their biggest cash crop to the tune of $515 billion per year. Recently, Israel has dis-covered 25 trillion cubic feet of natural gas just off the coast of Haifa and is on its way not just to be com-pletely energy indepen-dent but also turn the gas into an income-producing export item. When can we expect the Israeli war with Iran and Israels neighbors? Just before Iran is ready to mount an atomic bomb on a rocket, aimed at Is-rael. And that will happen very soon. As the Israe-li Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon recently expressed: Israel can no longer count on the United States. Is-rael will have to do it alone with a preemptive strike on Iran. Of course, the rapture of the church can happen at any time, because the Bi-ble does not give us any warning signs for it. All the 400 warning signs are for the second coming of Je-sus at the end of the tribu-lation period. One thing is for sure, we are very close to these Middle East events. Yes, the stage is set for our rapture!Reinhold Buxbaum is Pas-tor of The Church of the Way. Guest columns are the opin-ion of the writer, not necessari-ly those of the News-Sun staff.The Bear is on the moveA preacher for a fron-tier congregation end-ed a stirring sermon with, All those who want to go to Heaven, put up your hands! Everybody en-thusiastically raised their hands. Everybody, that is, except a grizzled old cow-boy who had been slouch-ing against the door post at the back of the room. All heads turned as he sauntered up to the front with spurs jangling and said, Preacher, that was too easy. How dya know if these folks are serious? I cn gar-an-tee to prove who really means to go to Heaven an who dont! Bewildered at the state-ment, yet wanting to show condence in the con-gregation, the preacher mustered up the courage to say, OK, stranger. Go ahead and put the faith of these good people to the test. Ask them anything! At that, the cowboy pulled his twin six-shoot-ers from their holsters, turned to the congrega-tion, aimed the guns right at them, and said, Alright, who wants to go Heaven? Raise your hands! I believe that most of us would be just as enthusi-astic about our answers as the people in the sto-ry if someone asked us if we wanted to go to Heav-en. Surely, there would be a chorus of people shouting, YES! Howev-er, Heaven is not simply the result of answering a question in the afrma-tive. It is the result of fol-lowing the right direction in our lives. Jesus said in Matthew 7:13-14, Enter through the narrow gate; for the gate is wide and the way is broad that leads to de-struction, and there are many who enter through it. For the gate is small and the way is narrow that leads to life, and there are few who nd it. In other words, we have two choices of paths to follow: a way that leads to death and a way that leads to life. There is no other option. And, just in case you are still unsure about which path to follow, listen once again to the words of Jesus in John 14:6, Jesus said to him, I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no one comes to the Father but through Me. Jesus is the only means by which one may enter Heaven. He is the one and only way to eternal life. So, which path are you following?Kevins Komments is written by Kevin Patterson and presented by the Sebring Parkway church of Christ assembling at 3800 Se-bring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870. Find us on the internet at www. sebringcoc.com, or e-mail us at sebringparkway@sebringcoc. com. Guest columns are the opin-ion of the writer, not necessari-ly those of the News-Sun staff.Who wants to go to Heaven? K EVIN S K OMMENTSKevin Patterson SNAP S HOT S RELI G ION NE W S WINE F AMILY IN CONCERT SUNDAY IN LAKE PLACIDCourtesy photoThe Wine Family will be in Sunday at 6 p.m. at Community Church of God, 735 S. Sun N Lakes Blvd. (also on C.R. 29, directly across from Lake Country Elementary School) in Lake Placid. Call the church at 454-3715. GUEST C OLUMNReinhold Buxbaum

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AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NUMBER:GC 13-535 HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. GERALDINE CAMERON,a single woman; if living including any unknown spouse of said Defendant,if remarried,and if deceased,the respective unknown hiers,devisees,grantees,assignees, creditors,lienors,and trustees,and all other pesons claiming by,through, under or against the named Defendant(s); ASSET ACCEPTANCE,LLC,a Delaware corporation; whether dissolved or presently existing,together with any grantees,assignees,successors, creditors,lienors,or trustees of said defendant(s) and all other persons claiming by,through,under,or against Defendant(s); and UNKNOWN TENANT #1, UNKNOWN TENANT #2, the names being fictitious to account for parties in possession; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final judgment of foreclosure entered in the abovetitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,I will sell the property situated in Highlands County,Florida, described as: The Property:a/k/a 124 Washington Blvd.,Lake Placid,FL 33852 Lot 13,Block 9,of HIGHLANDS PARK ESTATE SECTION 8,according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4,Page 68, Public Records of Highlands County,Florida. Parcel I.D.C-20-36-30-020-0090-0130 at public sale,to the highest and best bidder for cash,in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,in Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.on the 30th day of April,2014. SIGNED this 28th day of March,2014. (SEAL) ROBERT W.GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Cler k IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:10-316-GCS BANK OF AMERICA,N.A., Plaintiff, vs. AVIS ELAINE NEMBHARD F/K/A AVIS SMITH A/K/A AVIS ELAINE SMITH; LORETTA HEADLEY; TRIVON TAYLOR; et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO:Unknown Spouse of Trivon Taylor Last Known Residence:4931 NW 18th Street,Lauderhill,FL 33313 Unknown Spouse of Avis Elaine Nembhard F/K/A Avis Smith A/K/A Avis Elaine Smith N/K/A Hurton Nembhard Last Known Residence:6646 NW 4th Street,Margate,FL 33063 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County,Florida: LOT 9,BLOCK 731,SUN N LAKE ESTATE OF SEBRING,UNIT 25RI,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 15,PAGE 59,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses,if any,to it on Aldridge Connors,LLP, Plaintiff's attorney,at 1615 South Congress Avenue,Suite 200,Delray Beach,FL 33445 (Phone Number:561-392-6391),within 30 days of the first date of publication of this notice,and file the original with the clerk of this court either before May 2,2014 on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated on March 26,2014 Robert W.Germaine,Clerk As Clerk of the Court By:/s/ Toni Kopp As Deputy Clerk 1092-6040B April 4,11,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NUMBER:13-603 GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES B.BUSH and LAUREN D.BUSH, Husband and Wife,if alive and if not, their unknown spouse,heirs, devisees,grantees,assignees,creditors, or other parties claiming by,through, under or against JAMES B.BUSH and LAURNE D.BUSH,and all claimants under any of such party; and CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A.,a national banking corporation; whether dissolved or presently existing, together with any grantees,assignees, successors,creditors,lienors,or trustees of said defendant(s) and all other persons claiming by,through, under,or against Defendant(s); Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final judgment of foreclosure entered in the abovetitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,I will sell the property situated in Highlands County,Florida, described as: The Property:20 Dasher Road,Lake Placid,FL 33852 Tract 4,of LAKE PEARL ESTATES,Lot 8, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3,Page 76,of the Public Records of Highlands County,Florida. Real property Tax I.D. #C-06-37-30-050-0040-0000 at public sale,to the highest and best bidder for cash,in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,in Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.on the 30th day of April,2014. SIGNED this 28th day of March,2014. (SEAL) ROBERT W.GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,(941) 534-4690,within two (2) working days of publication of this Notice of Sale; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call TDD (941) 534-7777 or Florida Relay Service (800) 955-8770. 10-4405-022 April 4,11,2014 **OFICIAL** AVISO DE ELECCIONES GENERALES Yo,Ken Detzner,Secretario de Estado del Estado de la Florida,por el presente notifico que se llevar‡n a cabo ELECCIONES GENERALES en el Condado de HIGHLANDS, Estado de la Florida,el d’a CUATRO de NOVIEMBRE de 2014 d.C.,para determinar la ocupaci—n o la retenci—n de los siguientes cargos: Representante ante el Congreso:distrito 17 Gabinete de la Florida Gobernador Gabinete de la Florida Vicegobernador Gabinete de la Florida Procurador General Gabinete de la Florida Funcionario Principal de Finanzas Gabinete de la Florida Comisionado de Agricultura Senador Estatal:distrito 26 Representante Estatal:distrito 55 Tribunal de Apelaciones del 2. Distrito: retenci—n de 3 jueces Juez del Circuito,10. Circuito Judicial:grupos 2,5,8,16,18,19,21,23,24,25 y 26 Juez del Condado:grupo 1 Junta Escolar:distritos 1,4 y 5 Comisionado del Condado:distritos 2 y 4 Distrito de Conservaci—n de Tierra y Agua de Highlands:grupos 3 y 4 Distrito para la Mejora de Spring Lake:esca–os 4 y 5 Distrito para la Mejora de Sun N Lake de Sebring:1 miembro 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Ref.No.:2014-0081 Division Probate IN RE:ESTATE OF PHILLIP GORDON MITCHELL, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of PHILLIP GORDON MITCHELL,deceased, whose date of death was January 15,2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County,Florida,Probate Division,the address of which is 590 South Commerce Ave.,Sebring,Florida 33870.The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 4,2014. Personal Representative: Sharon L.Jill 2827 St.Croix Drive Clearwater,FL 33759 Attorney for Personal Representative: RICHARD D.GREEN,ESQ. Fla Bar 205877 rdgreen@greenlawoffices.net 1010 Drew Street Clearwater,FL 33755 (727) 441-8813 April 4,11,2014 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.13000919GCAXMX REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE NETWORK,INC., Plaintiff, vs. ROY ROBERT ADCOCK, A/K/A ROY ROBER ADCOCK,et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To:ROY ROBERT ADCOCK A/K/A ROY ROBER ADCOCK,1916 SPARTA CIRCLE,SEBRING,FL 33870 ROSA ISELA FLORES-ADCOCK F/K/A ROSA ISELA FLORES-GUTIERREZ A/K/A ROSA FLORES,1916 SPARTA CIR,SEBRING,FL 33875 LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED,CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows,to-wit: LOT 31,OF SPARTA HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8,PAGE 12,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses,if any,to it on Sara Collins,McCalla Raymer,LLC,225 E.Robinson St.Suite 660,Orlando,FL 32801 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 31st day of March,2014. 13-08082-1 April 4,11,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.:14000092GCAXMX U.S.BANK,NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE BANC OF AMERICA FUNDING CORPORATION,2008-FT1 TRUST, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES,SERIES 2008-FT1, Plaintiff, vs. KAMPAN FARNAM,et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF JAMES E.FARNAM ADDRESS UNKNOWN Residence unknown and if living,including any unknown spouse of the Defendant,if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs,devisees, grantees,assignees,creditors,lienors,and trustees,and all other persons claiming by, through,under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants,incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property to-wit: LOT 450 AND LOT 451,OF AVON PARK LAKES UNIT NO.1,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4,PAGE 88,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. more commonly known as:1730 N VALENCIA DRIVE,AVON PARK,FL 33825 This action has been filed against you,and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense,if any,to it on the Plaintiff's attorney,FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS,PLLC,whose address is 601 Cleveland Street,Suite 690,Clearwater,FL 33755,on or before 30 days after date of first publication,response due by May 2, 2014,and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 21st day of March,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK Clerk of the Court Highlands County,Florida By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk CA13-07431/NM April 4,11,2014 **OFFICIAL** NOTICE OF GENERAL ELECTION I,Ken Detzner,Secretary of State of the State of Florida,do hereby give notice that a GENERAL ELECTION will be held in HIGHLANDS County,State of Florida,on the FOURTH day of NOVEMBER,2014,A.D.,to fill or retain the following offices: Representative in Congress:District 17 Florida Cabinet Governor Florida Cabinet Lieutenant Governor Florida Cabinet Attorney General Florida Cabinet Chief Financial Officer Florida Cabinet Commissioner of Agriculture State Senator:District 26 State Representative:District 55 Second District Court of Appeal:Retention of Three Judges Circuit Judge,Tenth Judicial Circuit:Groups 2,5,8,16,18,19,21,23,24,25 and 26 County Judge:Group 1 School Board:Districts 1,4 and 5 County Commissioner:Districts 2 and 4 Highlands Soil and Water Conservation District:Groups 3 and 4 Spring Lake Improvement District:Seats 4 and 5 Sun 'N Lake of Sebring Improvement District: 1 Member (813)254-5222 March 28; April 2,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.14-CP-92 IN RE:ESTATE OF LINSLEY OSMOND WALKER A/K/A LINDSLEY WALKER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LINSLEY OSMOND WALKER A/K/A LINDSLEY WALKER,deceased,whose date of death was May 10,2013; File Number 14-CP-92, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands Court,Florida,Probate Division,the address of which is 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring,FL 33870.The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate,on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 28,2014. GLADYS WALKER Personal Representative 704 West State Street Avon Park,FL 33825 Derek B.Alvarez,Esquire FBN:114278 dba@gendersalvarez.com Anthony F.Diecidue,Esquire FBN: 146528 afd@gendersalvarez.com GENDERS ALVAREZ DIECIDUE,P.A. 2307 West Cleveland Street Tampa,Florida 33609 Phone:(813)254-4744 Fax: Probate Division,the address of which is 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870; that the decedent's date of death was September 13,2013; that the total value of the estate is $30,875.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Barbara S.Nash 614 East 8th Street Northampton,PA 18067 Lucy A.Reinsmith 5210 Mill Road Emmaus,PA 18049 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 28,2014. Person Giving Notice: /s/ Barbara S.Nash 614 East 8th Street Northampton,Pennsylvania 18067 /s/ Lucy A.Reinsmith 5210 Mill Road Emmaus,Pennsylvania 18049 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: /s/ David F.Lanier E-Mail Address:lanier30@embarqmail.com Florida Bar No.045399 DAVID F.LANIER P.O.Box 400 Avon Park,Florida 33826-0400 Tele:(863)453-4457 March 28; April 4,2014 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.PC 14-90 Division Probate IN RE:ESTATE OF LOIS A.CRAMMER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of LOIS A.CRAMMER, deceased,File Number PC 14-90,by the Circuit Court for HIGHLANDS County,Florida, 1050Legals 1000 Announcements Get the paper delivered to you! NEWS-SUN€385-6155

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B8 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.com LAKE PLACIDRoxy/Hollister/AE. Prom-Summer dresses. Mens suits/jackets 40/42. Easter, pinatas, graduation, kitchen, lighting, baskets, tables, art, lamps, exercise equipment & more. Saturday only 8-3, 16 Diamond Bay Dr. AVON PARKChurch of the Redeemer Clearance Sale. Clothes were .25 cents or $5 for $1, NOW $10 for $1! Hanging clothes were $1 or $2, NOW buy one get one! Lots of new stock, kitchenwares. Most items marked down! Across from Wells Motors Fri.-Sat., 8-2. 7320Garage &Yard Sales VARIOUS PORCELAINDOLLS $50 EACH GREAT SHAPE CALL 863-253-1667 MEDICAL WALKER,Opens up and folds, adjustable settings, Like New $40. 863 385-1615 LARGE MICROWAVE(Spacesaver Brand) 4 settings, New $20. 863 385-1615 HOOVER UPRIGHTvacuum cleaner, reconditioned to like new & guaranteed for 30 days. $20. 863 402-2285 HITCH BARfor trailers, NEW, fits 1 1/4", rear receiver w/used 2"dia. ball, $10, 863 453-7027 GOLF CLUBS(Ladies), full set w/head covers,golf bag w/stand. Used a few times, all in good cond. $65 complete. 863 453-7027 DOLL HOUSEfurniture & lots of extras $40. Doll house free, needs reconstruction 863 402-2285 CURIO CABINET TWO SHELVES ONE GLASS, 2ND WOOD, $100 863-655-0321 ADULT TRIKEMIAMI SUN $100 863-655-1235 7310Bargain Buys2 TWINBEDS WITH HEADBOARDS & LINENS $200 863-382-0601 7180Furniture 7000 Merchandise 3/2 ONLAKE CARRIE access LAKE JUNE/HENRY. $800 1st/sec. Ref req Call/text 786-285-5026 6300Unfurnished Houses BEAUTIFULAPTSSEBRING2BR/1BA, tile floors, screen back porch, beautiful landscaping. 3113 Medical Way. $595/mo. 863-446-1822 6200UnfurnishedApartments 6000 Rentals TRIPLE YOURTAX REFUND at Palm Harbor Homes Plant City!! www.plantcity.palmharbor.com John Lyons @ 800-622-2832 ext 210 for details PALM HARBORHOMES end of year sale!! 3 retirement models MUST go... Save over $26k, homes from the low 60's, this week only plantcity.palmharbor.com or 800-622-2832 AVON PARK3/1 Trailer in Country. 8 mi. from town. Call 863-443-2000 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesSPRING LAKE2BR/2BA VILLA Central Air/Heat, Washer Dryer Hook Up, Dishwasher, Fridge w/ice maker, range. $49,900 owner financin g 863-381-8069. 4120Villas & CondosFor SaleFOR SALE,CBS 3BR/2BA, 1 car gar., in Avon Park Lakes, fenced back yard, built in 2006, newly renovated in 2010, asking, $99,900, 863-368-1963. 4060Homes for SaleAvon Park 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial RN/LPN FULLTime 3-11 Shift Experience in long term care preferred Apply at: Lake Placid Health Care Center 125 Tomoka Blvd South EEOC/Smoke Free/ Drug Free Work Place MEDICAL RECORDS/ACCOUNTS PAYABLE COORDINATOR Royal Care of Avon Park currently has a FT position available. Candidate must be accurate detail oriented and have computer skills. Salary based on experience. Apply in person at Royal Care of Avon Park, 1213 W Stratford Rd., Avon Park. (863) 453-6674. EOE,, M/F, DFWP. LAWN MAINTENANCE workers needed to run mowers & trimmers, exp. only. 863-385-6768 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:385-6155 News-Sun Classified 1100Announcementswho needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,590 South Commerce Ave.,Sebring,FL 33870 (863) 402-6565 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled court appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call (TDD) (1-800-955-8771) or Voice (V) (1-800-955-8770).'' ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK DATED THIS 3RD DAY OF MARCH,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK By:/s/ Lisa J.Bass Deputy Clerk (Clerk's Seal) March 28; April 4,11,18,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA JUVENILE DIVISION CASE NO.JP13-000474-XX IN THE INTEREST OF: Z.T.07/13/2011 Minor children DOB SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIP THE STATE OF FLORIDA TO: THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON:DOB:4/16/1957Address UnknownYOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in the above-styled Court by the Department of Children & Families,seeking the termination of your parental rights to: Z.T. a white female child born July 13,2011 mother Cara Anne Parnell and you are hereby commanded to personally appear before the Honorable Sheryl D.Snodgrass,a Magistrate/hearing officer in the Juvenile Division of the Circuit Court in and for Highlands County,State of Florida,on the 30th day of April,2014 at 10:00 A .M.,at the Highlands County Courthouse,430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida,Courtroom 1A. Y OU MUST PERSONALL Y APPEAR ON THE DAY AND TIME SPECIFIED OR YOU WILL LOSE ALL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION. Y OUR FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR WILL BE DEEMED TO BE YOUR CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILDREN NAMED IN THE PETITION.YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO HAVE AN ATTORNEY REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD AN ATTORNEY,YOU MUST BE PRESENT AND REQUEST THAT THE COURT APPOINT AN ATTORNEY FOR YOU IF Y OU WANT ONE.``If you are a person with a disability IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.PC 14-102 IN RE:ESTATE OF STEPHEN M.SENTERS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of STEPHEN M.SENTERS, deceased,File Number PC 14-102,by the Circuit Court for Highlands County,Florida, Probate Division,the address of which is 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870; that the decedent's date of death was May 24 ,2013; that the total value of the estate is $15,000.00 and that the name and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order is Brian M.Senters, 411 Lynch Street,Flint,Michigan 48503. A LL INTERESTED PARTIES ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER A PPLICABLE TIME PERIOD,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 28,2014. A ttorney for Person Giving Notice Charlotte C.Stone A ttorney for Petitioner Florida Bar Number:21297 3200 US Hwy 27 S.,Suite 307 Sebring,FL 33870 Telephone:(863) 402-5424 Fax:(863) 402-5425 E-Mail:charlotte@stonelawgroupfl.com Secondary E-Mail: kelly@stonelawgroupfl.com Person Giving Notice: Brian M.Senters 411 Lynch Street Flint Michigan 48503 March 28; April 4,2014 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.PC 14-100 Division Probate IN RE:ESTATE OF DONALD L.JONES a.k.a.DONALD LEE JONES Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of DONALD L.JONES a.k.a DONALD LEE JONES,deceased,whose date of death was January 29,2014,and whose social security number is XXX-XX-9551,is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida,Probate Division,the address of which is 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring, Florida 33870.The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS A FTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 28,2014. Personal Representative: /s/ Shirley Traci a.k.a.Shirlee Tracy 1635 Melaleucia Lane Ft.Myers,Florida 33901 A ttorney for Personal Representative: / s/ David F.Lanier E-Mail Address:lanier30@embarqmail.com Florida Bar No.045399 DAVID F.LANIER P.O.Box 400 A von Park,Florida 33826-0400 Telephone:(863)453-4457 March 28; April 4,2014 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,(941) 534-4690,within two (2) working days of publication of this Notice of Sale; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call TDD (941) 534-7777 or Florida Relay Service (800) 955-8770. 10-4402-030 April 4,11,2014 1050Legals Did YouKNOW?EMERGENCY VEHICLESUpon the immediate approach of an authorized emergency vehicle,while en route to meet an existing emergency,the driver of every other vehicle shall,when such emergency vehicle is giving audible signals by siren,exhaust whistle, or other adequate device,or visible signals by the use of displayed blue or red lights,yield the right-of-way to the emergency vehicle and shall immediately proceed to a position parallel to,and as close as reasonable to the closest edge of the curb of the roadway,clear of any intersection and shall stop and remain in position until the authorized emergency vehicle has passed,unless otherwise directed by any law enforcement officer.YOUCANBETICKETEDFORFAILINGTOPULL OVERANDSTOPWHENANAMBULANCE, POLICE, FIREOROTHEREMERGENCYVEHICLEIS TRAVELLINGTOMEETANEMERGENCY. BELOWISTHEFLORIDALAW.

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w ww.newssun.com Friday, April 4, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B9 WE BUYALL AUTOS with or without Title. Any Year / Make / Model / Condition. We will pay up to $20,000. Free Towing. Call Cind y 813-505-6935 9400Automotive Wanted SLT GMCTruck 2500HD CRW CB/SB/4WD/Texas Ranch Ed, Diesel, auto 5spd OD, Duramax, Allison, Tow Package w/braking w/auto side mirror arrow sens. extends/all electric/seats heated saddle leather interior/Bose stereo/CD/satellite radio/back sliding window/rhino spray/tubular chrome steps/skid plate/chrome trim/alloy wheels all new tire and brakes/black and gold trim paint. 36800mi $35,000 OBO. 850-867-8521. Warranty available. 1998 FORDRANGER XLT. Runs good, new tires & brakes, automatic, 4 cylinder, green & tan, $2500, 863-873-9058. 9200Trucks 9000 Transportation2013 44'5TH WHEEL RV 3 slideouts, 2BR, full bath, full kitchen, sleeps 8, excellent condition, $23,500. 210-800-6389. 8400RecreationalVehicles9.8 HPMERCURY OUTBOARD MOTOR SERVICED 2 YEARS AGO, $350. 863-471-9341 SOLD!!! 8050Boats & Motors 8000 RecreationNOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & SuppliesCUB CADETLTX1040 MOWER A S GOOD AS NEW. SERVICED WITH NEW BATTERY AND CARBURETOR. THE CLOCK HAS LESS THAN 35HRS. CONTACT V IJAY ON 863-699-6923 BETWEEN 10AM AND 7PM PRICE $1000 7400Lawn & Garden SPRING LAKEMOVING SALE, Fri Sat, 4/4 & 4/5 8:30-?, 6824 Concord St. Dishes, clothes, pots & pans, sweepers, carpet cleaners, tools, tv's, something for everyone! SEBRING ESTATESALE Fri. April 4th & Sat. April 5th Living room, antique dressers, trunk, linens, many very clean small appliances, tools, cookware, pots, pans, flatware, quilting material, sewing items, glassware, jewelry, lamps, violin parts, side tables, kitchen set, bookcase, collectibles. Too must to list! Sale starts @ 7:30am to 2pm Friday & Saturday. 1524 Falcon behind Walmart Follow signs! Sale being conducted by TRANSITIONS NOW LLC "Assisting with life's changes" SEBRING 2Day Garage Sale, Fri. & Sat., April 4-5 7:30-2:30, A little bit of this & a little bit of that. Clothes, books, furniture, toys, etc. 1618 Shamrock Dr. SEBRING -YARD SALE 1701 Hawthorne Dr., Fri. & Sat., 8am-? Tools, knick-knacks, some housewares, entertainment center. SEBRING -MULTI-FAMILY Fri.-Sat. April 4-5, 7am-3pm, 1440 Schlosser Rd. (off Sparta). Tools, tool boxes, household, lamps, toys, other kids items, too much to list! SEBRING -HUGE SALE under cover, 1011 N. Franklin by Matlow, Fri.-Sat. April 4-5, 8am-3pm. Lots of good stuff! Old wicker rocker, wood chairs, bike, charcoal grill, variety of vacuums, audio book cassetts, too much to list! SEBRING -Garage sale, everything must go! Tools, housewares, linens, clothes, misc. Friday and Saturday, A pril 4 and 5, 6101 Oceanside Ave. SEBRING -FRI.-SAT. April 4-5, 8am-?? HUGE MOVING & business inventory sale! 2006 cargo, Nascar, military, collectibles and more! 1026 Corvette Ave. SEBRING -BIG GARAGE sale 3305 V illage Rd. April 3 to 5, 8am till ? Household items, children & adult clothes, toys, jewelry, mens & womens shoes, purses, many more! SEBRING -ANTIQUES, Slag Glass, Jewel Tea, Fire King, Fenton, West Moreland, St. Clair, Joe Rice, Imperial Boyd's, other glassware, lighter's, old pocket knives, old & newer fish lures, rods & reels, Western books, clothes, lots of j ewelry & sterling silver, furniture, tools, misc. Fri.-Sat., 4119 Lakewood Rd. SEBRING -4125 Kearly Ave. Harder Hall area Fri.-Sat. 4/4-4/5, 7-? Harder Hall area. Furn., wicker, glider, antiques, baby items, sports, tools, pad locks, pottery, jewelry, pictures, linens, clothes, glass, misc. & new items. 7320Garage &Yard Sales

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B10 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.com TODAYWarm with a blend of sun and clouds87 / 65Winds: S at 6-12 mphPartly sunny, warm and humid87 / 66Winds: SSW at 4-8 mphSATURDAYTimes of clouds and sun88 / 67Winds: SSE at 4-8 mphSUNDAYAn afternoon thunderstorm possible89 / 69Winds: SSW at 10-20 mphMONDAYMostly cloudy, t-storms possible82 / 64Winds: SW at 10-20 mphTUESDAY High ............................................ 12:34 a.m. Low ............................................... 6:29 a.m. High ............................................ 12:44 p.m. Low ............................................... 6:49 p.m. High .............................................. 6:52 a.m. Low ............................................. 12:05 a.m. High .............................................. 4:57 p.m. Low ............................................. 10:31 a.m. Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 13.58 Normal ............................................... 14.51 High Sunday .......................................... 78 Low Sunday ........................................... 41 High Monday ......................................... 78 Low Monday .......................................... 42 High Tuesday ......................................... 84 Low Tuesday .......................................... 45 High Wednesday .................................... 85 Low Wednesday ..................................... 47 Relative humidity .................................. 41% Expected air temperature ....................... 86 Makes it feel like .................................... 86 Monday ............................................... 30.11 Tuesday ............................................... 30.14 Wednesday ......................................... 30.09 Monday ............................................... 0.00 Tuesday ............................................... 0.00 Wednesday ......................................... 0.00 Month to date ..................................... 0.00 Year to date ......................................... 7.01Sunrise 7:14 a.m. 7:13 a.m. Sunset 7:44 p.m. 7:45 p.m. Moonrise 10:51 a.m. 11:40 a.m. Moonset none 12:35 a.m.Albuquerque 62/44/s 63/39/pc 61/38/pc Atlanta 75/48/t 70/49/pc 65/56/r Baltimore 61/47/r 64/37/pc 60/38/s Birmingham 76/46/t 67/48/s 65/56/r Boston 44/39/c 56/38/pc 56/39/pc Charlotte 81/54/t 72/44/pc 67/48/c Cheyenne 51/29/s 52/31/pc 50/29/c Chicago 53/32/sh 50/31/s 55/37/pc Cleveland 66/37/r 45/30/pc 53/37/s Columbus 71/39/r 54/35/pc 61/42/s Dallas 68/46/s 69/50/t 62/48/r Denver 54/29/s 54/31/pc 55/29/c Detroit 59/33/r 48/31/pc 51/36/s Harrisburg 55/47/r 57/32/pc 61/36/s Honolulu 85/70/pc 84/70/pc 82/69/pc Houston 77/53/pc 67/57/t 73/55/r Indianapolis 60/33/t 53/36/s 60/42/pc Jackson, MS 75/47/t 69/53/pc 68/57/r Kansas City 51/32/c 59/41/s 60/43/c Lexington 70/36/t 56/37/s 65/46/pc Little Rock 67/42/s 65/45/s 64/49/r Los Angeles 68/52/pc 71/55/s 77/57/s Louisville 69/38/t 59/39/s 68/46/pc Memphis 68/45/s 63/47/s 67/52/r Milwaukee 48/29/sh 45/31/s 48/34/pc Minneapolis 37/23/sn 46/38/s 48/36/pc Nashville 72/42/t 61/42/s 69/49/c New Orleans 79/59/t 68/60/t 80/66/r New York City 46/42/r 62/40/pc 56/41/pc Norfolk 78/60/c 70/45/pc 55/45/s Oklahoma City 62/40/s 67/44/pc 59/44/r Philadelphia 50/44/r 64/38/pc 61/45/s Phoenix 78/57/s 77/58/s 82/60/s Pittsburgh 70/42/r 50/30/pc 61/37/pc Portland, ME 41/35/pc 50/31/r 48/29/c Portland, OR 55/45/r 57/46/r 60/47/r Raleigh 85/56/pc 72/44/pc 65/47/pc Rochester 52/39/r 41/26/c 51/32/pc St. Louis 55/34/pc 58/41/s 63/44/c San Francisco 60/49/c 63/49/pc 69/51/s Seattle 53/41/r 55/43/r 56/45/r Wash., DC 66/53/r 65/39/pc 65/43/s Cape Coral 85/67/pc 85/66/s 86/68/pc Clearwater 83/68/c 86/67/pc 84/69/pc Coral Springs 85/72/pc 85/72/pc 86/75/pc Daytona Beach 84/63/pc 82/64/pc 82/67/pc Ft. Laud. Bch 84/74/pc 85/75/pc 85/76/pc Fort Myers 86/68/pc 86/67/s 86/70/pc Gainesville 85/62/pc 81/61/t 83/63/sh Hollywood 84/71/pc 85/72/pc 86/75/pc Homestead AFB 83/70/pc 83/71/pc 84/74/pc Jacksonville 84/63/pc 79/60/t 77/64/sh Key West 83/75/pc 83/76/s 84/77/pc Miami 84/73/pc 86/74/pc 86/75/pc Okeechobee 83/67/pc 84/67/pc 85/69/pc Orlando 87/64/pc 86/66/pc 87/67/pc Pembroke Pines 84/71/pc 86/72/pc 87/75/pc St. Augustine 81/61/pc 78/63/t 78/66/sh St. Petersburg 82/68/pc 85/67/pc 86/69/pc Sarasota 82/66/pc 81/66/pc 83/68/pc Tallahassee 81/65/pc 77/58/t 81/62/sh Tampa 83/67/pc 84/67/pc 85/69/pc W. Palm Bch 83/72/pc 83/71/pc 84/75/pc Winter Haven 86/66/pc 86/67/pc 87/68/pc Acapulco 91/70/s 89/71/s 89/70/s Athens 71/59/c 69/54/c 69/53/pc Beirut 68/55/s 73/62/pc 85/62/pc Berlin 61/42/pc 64/46/pc 66/51/pc Bermuda 72/64/sh 73/65/pc 72/64/c Calgary 47/25/c 48/31/pc 48/30/pc Dublin 54/45/pc 58/51/sh 59/44/r Edmonton 42/22/c 43/25/pc 47/29/s Freeport 80/70/pc 80/71/pc 82/73/pc Geneva 65/52/c 59/46/r 67/44/c Havana 90/63/s 92/65/s 92/67/s Hong Kong 76/67/c 75/67/pc 71/69/sh Jerusalem 64/51/s 74/57/s 81/61/s Johannesburg 73/52/t 72/50/pc 71/48/pc Kiev 52/30/pc 47/28/s 55/38/s London 64/45/pc 62/54/sh 61/54/r Montreal 45/37/r 43/30/c 46/32/pc Moscow 39/20/sf 38/27/pc 49/33/c Nice 67/57/sh 69/57/s 70/56/s Ottawa 40/33/r 42/26/r 49/33/pc Quebec 39/30/pc 37/30/c 41/27/pc Rio de Janeiro 82/73/sh 83/72/s 85/72/s Seoul 54/35/pc 56/36/pc 57/38/s Singapore 91/79/t 88/79/t 91/79/t Sydney 77/64/sh 79/64/sh 77/63/pc Toronto 51/31/r 42/28/c 51/29/pc Vancouver 53/42/r 50/43/r 52/45/r Vienna 72/49/s 70/48/s 68/55/r Warsaw 54/33/s 55/33/s 62/43/c Winnipeg 32/21/pc 37/25/sf 37/25/pc Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. A cold front associated with a powerful storm system will slice through the East today. Strong thunderstorms will ignite out ahead of the front from Cleveland, Ohio, to Chattanooga, Tenn., as warm and moist air surges in. Rain will fall across parts of the mid-Atlantic. Thunderstorms will also extend into the South but are not expected to be as strong. Cold air will sink in behind the system and will bring heavy snow to Wisconsin and parts of Michigan. While this storm impacts the East, rain will move into the West. National Forecast for April 4 Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rrain, sf-snow urries, sn-snow, i-ice. Warm today with a blend of sun and clouds. Partly cloudy and mild tonight. Partly sunny, humid and remaining warm tomorrow. Sunday: clouds and sun. Monday: a thunderstorm possible in the afternoon. The U.S.S. Akron crashed on April 4, 1933, during a wind-whipped storm near Barnegat Light, N.J. Fog-induced collisions, icebergs and storms have sunk many ships. Warm today with a blend of sun and clouds. Winds south 6-12 mph. Expect 4-8 hours of sunshine with relative humidity 75% early, 45% in the afternoon and good drying conditions. Sunday. and Saturday. a.m. and after 4 p.m. First Full Last New Apr 7 Apr 15 Apr 22 Apr 29 Today SaturdayForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 84/63 85/62 84/61 84/63 87/64 86/66 83/67 83/68 82/68 82/66 86/68 84/68 83/67 83/72 84/74 84/73 81/65 75/63 75/59 88/65 87/65 86/66 87/64 87/64 85/66 83/75 TemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHeat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayBarometer PrecipitationFive-Day forecast for Highlands County Almanac U.S. Cities World Cities National Summary Tides UV Index Today Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional Summary Lake Levels Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows. Readings at Palm Beach Readings at St. Petersburg The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterday 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. Jacksonville Gainesville Ocala Daytona Beach Orlando Winter Haven Tampa Clearwater St. Petersburg Sarasota Fort Myers Naples Okeechobee West Palm Beach Fort Lauderdale Miami Tallahassee Apalachicola Key West Avon Park Sebring Lorida Lake Placid Venus Brighton PensacolaCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W



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twitter.com/ thenewssun NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 192750 Shelton wins three races for DragonsA7Sebring brush re quickly containedA2Simple Acts Willy Wonka Jr. on stage at Circle TheatreA2 VOL. 95 NO. 38 Warm with a blend of sun and clouds High 87 Low 65 Details on B10Classi eds .............. B7 Dear Abby ................ B2 Healthy Living .......... B3 Obituaries .............. A6 Lottery Numbers ...... A2 Movie Review .......... B2 Religion .................. B4 Sports on TV ........... A8 Viewpoints ............... A5 facebook.com/ newssunWays you can reinvent yourself and your home this springB1 Review: Captain America is zippy, but hollowB2 www.newssun.com Friday-Saturday, April 4-5, 2014 BY SAMANTHA GHOLARStaff WriterSEBRING In exactly three months, the night sky above Lake Jackson will ll with red, white and blue excitement ... and the sighs of relief of countless residents and business owners throughout the city. After serious doubt, the reworks show will go on this year on Friday, July 4 after the Sebring City Council, with three newly elected of cials, voted unanimously to allocate funds to contribute to the annual Fourth of July reworks display over Lake Jackson. It was the rst meeting for newly elected council members Mark Stewart and Lenard Carlisle Jr., as well as for Mayor John Shoop. For the past several years, the City has been contributing to the cost of the rework display for several years, paying $5,000 of the overall $10,000 cost the last two scal years while the Rotary Club of Sebring raised the rest through donations and sponsorships. In October 2013, the Rotary Club told the city it wasnt going to be able to continue and that other local organizations declined or showed no interest in coordinating the event. With the potential of having no rework show for the Fourth of July holiday, Push Event Productions, which organizes numerous Fireworks will fly on 4th of July in Sebring Katara Simmons/News-Sun le photoThe reworks will re over Lake Jackson on July 4 after the city council agreed to fund up to $10,000 for the show if the CRA provides $5,000.With deadline looming, council OKs fundsSEE FOURTH | A6 BY BARRY FOSTERNews-Sun correspondentAVON PARK It was a year ago that of cials of the Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church announced that they would be opening Cornerstone Academy as Highlands Countys newest private school. This Sunday afternoon at 2 p.m., they plan to hold an open house to show off their success. The crown jewel is the a new two-story, 20,000-square-foot building on the North Highlands Avenue campus of the church, which now houses school activities as well New school to host open house SundaySEE SCHOOL | A4 BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterSEBRING When Ms. Florida 2013 Dawn Lightsey read to autistic students on Wednesday, she spent just a few minutes entertaining them for Autism Awareness Day. What she hopes to do is increase awareness and raise funding to help a local couple set up an education center designed for children with autism and other developmental disabilities. The couple Gary and Melissa Duffey of Sebring want to build a center in Highlands County devoted to caring for students with developmental disabilities. Melissa Duffey said she would like it to be as caring as the Exceptional Student Education classrooms at Memorial Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID Almost unreadable headstones lay broken, toppled and overgrown by weeds, while large trees with deep roots had shifted monuments and toppling other headstones at Highway Park Cemetery in Lake Placid. But that is changing. On Wednesday, volunteers from the Interact Club consisting of Rescuing a resting placeVolunteers work to clean up cemetery Courtesy photoVolunteers work to clean up Highway Park Cemetery Wednesday. SEE RESCUE | A4Dealing with the ripple effectMs. Florida Dawn Lightsey to help raise funds for autism center Phil Attinger/News-SunMs. Florida Dawn Lightsey (right) tickles a student Wednesday at Memorial Elementary School as they gather for a group photo after she read Windows, written by Gary Duffey, father of Makayla Duffey, a fellow autistic student. Exceptional Student Education teacher Lisa Schrader (left) invited Lightsey to her class to entertain them, raise awareness for autism and help promote an effort by Gary Duffey and his wife, Melissa, to build an education center devoted to special needs children. SEE AUTISM | A3 BY SAMANTHA GHOLARStaff WriterSEBRING A hefty price tag came along with Sebring Utilities Director Bob Boggus request for further testing at the abandoned Park Street power plant Tuesday evening during the citys regular council meeting. It was built in the 1920s, but hasnt been in use since the s. As you know, the building is empty now and a while back some contamination had been found, Boggus said. The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has said the city must deal with the Power plant clean-up comes with steep priceCity approves $35,000 for water testing at Park St. plantSEE PLANT | A3

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A2 | NEWSSS U nN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.com http//:www.newssun.com The News-Sun (USPS ISSN 0163-3988) is published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday. Peri odical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entr y ofce(s). All material contained herein is the property of the News-Sun, which is an afliate of Sun Newspa pers. Reproduction in whole or in par t is forbidden without the writ ten permission of the publisher. All material submitted for publica tion becomes the property of the ne wspaper and may be edited for clarity and space, as well as re printed, published and used in all media. P ostmaster: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870.COMMITMENT TO A ccC C U RA cC YThe News-Sun promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its ne ws stories. If you believe we have made an error, call the news room at (863) 385-6155, ext. 516. If you ha ve a question or comment about coverage, write to Scott Dressel, editor, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; email editor@newssun.com.; or call (863) 385-6155. OO FFI cC E Location: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon day-Friday Phone: (863) 385-6155 Main Fax: (863) 385-1954 Newsroom Fax: 385-2453SUB scSC RIPTION RATE sS Home 12 mos. T ax T otal $72.22 $5.06 $77.28 In Florida mail 12 mos. T ax T otal $107.24 $7.51 $114.75 Out of Florida mail 12 mos. T ax T otal $122.41 $8.57 $130.98 Y our newspaper is delivered by an independent contractor. If you do not receive your home deliv ered newspaper by 6 a.m. on any publication date, please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday, and before 11 a.m. Sunday. A re placement copy will be delivered to you. Subscriber s who notify us after said times will be issued an account credit. Deadlines for subscription changes are noon Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon Thursday for the Friday edition and noon Fri day for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date. OO BITUARIE sS ANA N D AA N NOUN c C E MENT sS Email all obituaries and death notices to obits@newssun.com Email all other announcements to editor@newssun.com PP LA cC E A CLA ssS S I FIE dD Ad AD From 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. M-F (863) 385-6155, ext. 505 or (863) 314-9876 RETAILRETAIL AdAD VERTI sS INGMitch Collins 386-5626 mitch.collins@newssun.com Vickie Watson 386-5631 vickie.watson@newssun.com Terri Lee 386-5628 terri.lee@newssun.com LL EGAL Ad AD VERTI sS INGJanet Emerson 385-6155, ext. 596 legals@newssun.com NN EW sS ROOM Call 385-6155 Scott Dressel, Editor, ext. 516 or scott.dressel@newssun.com Phil Attinger, Staff Writer, ext. 541 or phil.attinger@newssun. com Samantha Gholar, Staff Writ er, ext. 526 or samantha.gholar@ ne wssun.com Dan Hoehne, Sports Editor, ext. 528 or daniel.hoehne@newssun. com Katara Simmons, Photographer, ext. 538 or katara.simmons@ newssun.com. ROMON a A W aA SHINGTON Publisher and Executive Editor romona.washington@newssun.com 385-6155, ext. 515 NEWS-SSUnN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927LOTTERY LL OTTOWednesday, April 2 13-23-38-41-45-48 X-2 Saturdays Jackpot: $30 million PP OWERBALLWednesday, April 2 8-13-19-22-53 PB-24 X-2 Saturdays Jackpot: $70 million MM EGA MM ONEYTuesday, April 1 23-25-34-42 PB-21 Todays Jackpot: $700,000 MM EGA MM ILLION sS Tuesday, April 1 10-23-68-74-75 PB-9 X-5 Todays Jackpot: $30 million CA sS H 3 Monday, March 31 Day: 1-7-2 Night: 9-7-6 Tuesday, April 1 Day: 5-5-6 Night: 7-9-7 Wednesday, April 2 Day: 1-9-3 Night: 3-8-5 PP LAY 4Monday, March 31 Day: 5-7-4-2 Night: 5-8-7-1 Monday, March 31 Day: 5-3-3-2 Night: 8-4-0-6 Monday, March 31 Day: 4-8-8-5 Night: 8-0-1-8 FF ANTA sS Y 5 Monday, March 31 10-11-12-30-33 Tuesday, April 1 5-6-19-28-29 Wednesday, April 2 3-10-17-18-28 BY PHIL A TTTT ING ER ER Staff WriterSEBRING Ray Williams didnt want to think that the column of smoke he saw just before 5 / p .m. Tuesday on Thun derbird Road was his inlaws home. It wasnt, but the re was in a vacant area of two acres thick with pines and palmettos right beside the house at 4236 Thunderbird Road. The vacant land was bordered by homes and the re was burning to ward LeMans Drive. H is wife called 911 while he broke out the garden hose to protect the house. (The re) was calm as glass when we arrived. When we called 911, it started spreading, Wil liams said. The wind hurled it ev ery which way. He was glad to see West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department arrive. His wifes parents, Ar nold and Alice Belcher, w ere founders of the de partment, he said. These guys did a good job, Williams said, es pecially with a tanker to pr otect the house. West Sebring Chief Scott Mann said he had 12 reghters with four brush trucks, two en gines and a tanker. F lorida Forestry Di vision sent a bulldozer and a br ush truck while DeSoto City Volunteer Fire Department sent an engine with a load of wa ter to help out the effort. E mergency Medical Services and Highlands County Sheriffs depu ties stood by, helping block the Thunderbird Road from through traf c. M ann said time is marching toward the time of year when brush res will be more com mon, but there has been plenty of r ain recently and no lightning strikes this week. Mann suspects the re was set, either deliber ately or by carelessness. This thing didnt start by itself, Mann said. Although most hot spots were doused with in 90 minutes, re crews w ere still being called as late at 7:45 / p.m. to help soak the area and make sure it didnt reignite.Anytime Fitness grand opening set in LPLAKE PLACID Anytime Fitness will host its grand opening at 138 Plaza Ave. from 9 / a.m. until 6 / p.m. The rib bon cutting is at 11 / a.m. A ttendees are eligible to enter for the grand prize of a one year free mem bership. Light refreshments will be served. C ontact Lisa or Greg Hill at 659-1647.Karaoke night at T T a nglewoodSEBRING Tanglewood will host a free karaoke night from 7-10 p.m. on Saturday. With almost 80,000 songs available, Phil Candela probably has your favorite. Check his list online at www.song bookslive.com under Philsharmonics. The event is BYOB. Snacks and ice will be provided. Tanglewood is on U.S. 27, one mile north of Walmart. TT ampa Bay Downs tickets to be raffledLAKE PLACID Team Lykes will be rafing a Race 4 Pack to Tampa Bay Downs Saturday at the Lake Placid Relay for Life event. The Race 4 Pack includes lunch for four in the Skye Terrace Dining Room, clubhouse admission and racing programs for Tampa Bay Downs. Winner will be required to make res ervations at the Skye T errace on a date of their choice. Rafe tickets will be on sale at the Relay event from 6-9 / p.m. for a donation of $2 per ticket or $10 for six tickets. The winner will be drawn at 9 / p.m. at Team Lykes campsite. The winner does not need to be pres ent to collect prize. The R elay for Life be gins at 6 / p.m. today at the football eld.Highlands Park EE s tate plans dinnerLAKE PLACID The annual Spring Dinner will be held Sunday at 1:30 / p.m. at the Highlands Park Estates Firehouse on Columbus Street. Ham and drinks will be provid ed by the Homeowners Association and those attending are asked to bring a dish to pass and their own service. Reservations are pre ferred to help with planning and seating. Guests may attend for a char ge of $5. Final plans for the Clubhouse will be on display and a short up date on the building and plans for ood con trol will take place. Call H elen at 465-2468 for details.Caladium Co-op open late todayLAKE PLACID The Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative will be open for the st Friday today until 8 / p.m. Artist of the Month Michelle Weidner from Micanopy will be available to explain her artistic gourds and there will be members avail able from 4-8 / p.m. to explain the new mem bership program. Light r efreshments will be served and you can reg ister for the gift basket. The other non-pr ot groups will not be join ing the 1st Friday again until the fall. The C aladium Arts & Crafts Co-operative, 132 E. Interlake Blvd., is open Monday-Saturday from 10 / a.m. to 5 / p.m. Call 699-5940 or visit www. caladiumarts.org. SNAPs S HOTs S LL O c C AL N N EW sS Brush fire quickly contained PP hil AA ttinger/ NN ews-SunA West Sebring volunteer reghter sprays hot spots with a hose from a brush truck Tuesday evening at an area thick with pine and palmetto at the corner of Thunderbird Road and LeMans Drive. The two-acre area surrounded by homes was quickly contained by a re break from a Florida Forestry Division bulldozer, but Fire Chief Scott Mann suspects the re was set, either deliberately or by carelessness. BY BA RRYRRY F OO S TERTER News-Sun correspondentSEBRING Audiences have seen the youthful v ersion of The Nutcrack er and enjoyed a grownup version of fairytales with The Big Bad, now Simple-Acts United will present the kids version of Charlie and the Choc olate Factory with their pr oduction of Ronald Dahls Willie Wonka Jr. today and Saturday. The stage play actual ly was created with educators and students in mind, which made it a perfect t for the troupe put together by the chief executive ofcer of Sim ple-Acts United, Trish Davis. With this produc tion you really can go either way with the 1971 G ene Wilder Version or with the more modern Johnny Depp interpreta tion, she said. D avis said she has bor rowed from both lms to come up with a meld ing of the two styles while staying tr ue to the story. She said putting togeth er a cast was a creative task since nding y oung sters that t the parts who both could sing and act proved to be a challenge. One of the adaptations has been that all three of the lead roles Won ka, Charlie Bucket and G randpa Joe all will be played by girls. Cara Keller is Willie Wonka Jr., Madelyn Weav er will be Charlie Bucket and Grandpa Joe will be por trayed by Shaelyn MacCool, she said. Even though there are nearly three dozen differ ent roles, Davis said she was not able to acquir e that many youngsters, meaning some of them have doubled up in their roles. There are some of the children who play grand parents in the rst half and come back as squir rels in the second half, she said. N ot only the young sters have doubled up, but stage sets and pr ops are also have been dou bled up with a switch out coming at inter mission. The Circle Theatre is a fabulous venue, but I have to tell you there is not much room back stage, she said. T o help alleviate the problem, Davis said she had rented an enclosed trailer for prop storage. Additionally, all of the backdrops will be done digitally, using the the aters state-of-the-art sound and pr ojection fa cilities. We just dont have the room for 10-20 individu al backdrops. Digitally, we can hav e as many as we like, she said. The show will have per formances tonight at 7 p .m. and Saturday eve nings at 7 / p.m. with a 2 / p.m. Saturday matinee. Tickets will be $20 for adults and $10 for young sters on the day of show. The next pr oduction will be a staging of Alice in Wonderland in July.Simple Acts United to present Willy Wonka Jr.Today and SS aturday at Circle Theatre

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 4, 2014 | NEWSSS U nN | A3 contamination on the site, Boggus told the council. Theres no way around it. We really dont have the option to do nothing at this point, said Imperi al Testing representative Al M cGinn. McGinn placed a bid to do testing on the prop erty in order to locate the contamination and begin clean up efforts. Testing the ground water will cost the city $35,000. Following the test, drill ing, extraction and recir culation of the ground water thr ough the under ground water tables must take place in or der to pro vide safe water at the site. Its going to take be tween three and four w eeks to drill and get in there. We have a known method that will work to clean up the heavy oils that is at the bottom of these wells. After all the oil is extracted, well have to send the ground water back through the water ta bles, McGinn said. Its probably going to take about a year and a half to get this clean up completed. Scott Stanley cast the only dissenting vote in the 4-1 approval of the re quested action from Boggus. Im just not a believ er in it. Weve been messing around with this since 1997. We just spent thirtysomething thousand last year on this. Its an endless cycle, Stanley said. The original bid for the projected was estimated to cost the city $189,000. Council approved Boggus request for $159,529 for the testing and cleaning proj ect at Park St. C ouncil approved two other requests from Bog gus. One was for a $68,275 pr oject headed by Excava tion Point to nish work on S ebring Parkway man holes. Phil Attinger/News-SunLisa Schraders class of sensory learners at Memorial Elementary School take a moment with Ms. Florida 2013 Dawn Lightsey to celebrate Autism Awareness Day on Wednesday. Lightsey read from a book titled Windows, written and illustrated by the father of 8-year-old Makayla Duffey (center front, standing), who was diagnosed with autism at a young age. Her parents, Melissa and Gary Duffey, want to establish an educational center to help both children with disabilities and their families.Elementary School, such as the one for their 8-year-old daughter, diag nosed with autism. The book Lightsey r ead, Windows, was inspired by Makayla, written and illustrated by Gary Duf fey. It was a way for him to sho w what the world must be like for his daughter. Autistic children are so over-stimulated by every thing, said Lisa Schrader, ESE teacher at Memorial Elementary. Sounds (that ar e OK to most peo ple) might be excruciating to them. Thats especially true in her class of seven senso ry learners. The school has 55 ESE students with various disabilities in sep arate classrooms from general population stu dents, whom she tries to educate on the nor mal behavior for autistic stu dents. S he said teachers and paraprofessionals are with the students all day, un til 2 / p.m. When the students go home, parents take o ver. Melissa Duffey said parents often count on school to provide some much-needed time to get things done without working around the needs of their child. Thats why Lightsey wants to help. A fellow contestant for Ms. Flori da told of being a single mother tr ying to take her autistic child to a restau rant or store and having people sco wl or scold her for the child acting out. Now she is sponsoring a Run for Autism 5K on July 19 at Highlands Ham mock State Park to support the Duffeys efforts. Im just helping them raise the money to where they want to be, Light sey said. I ts not been easy. Melis sa Duffey said she worked 12to 14-hour shifts at Florida Hospital to get a nursing degree before the demands of caring for Makayla became too great, even with the help of her husband and her two older children, Laura Castle, now 14; and Des mond Gaines, now 12. A t one point, both she and her husband lost their jobs, then lost their home, she said. Gary Duf fey works out of town for months at a time as a con tractor for Duke Energy, but ev en when hes home, Melissa cannot work a regular job. Gary Duffey, speak ing by phone, said many people hav e spoken to him about nding cures, but hes more interested in helping families cope with the ripple effect of caring for a special needs child. (Children) need to be in an environment that is comforting for them, Gary Duffey said. Melissa Duffey said any thing would be a tremendous help to couples to help keep them together How many marriag es can we help or families can w e help because they can then go and do with (help from) the center? Melissa Duffey asked. By Schraders count, quite a few. To register for the Run for Autism 5K, message Lightsey on Facebook at Ms. Florida US Continen tal 2013. AUTISM FRO mM P ageAGE A1 PLANT FRO mM P ageAGE A1 BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterLORIDA It was taking too long for a pool to be installed at a home on Sunnyside Drive in Lorida, even though the checks had already been cashed by the contractor. After four months, the homeowner contacted deputies, and now Jim William Terry, 53, of 1534 Assembly Point Drive in Sebring has been charged with grand theft and fraud by swindling. The victim had con tracted Terry, owner of J im Terry Pools, on Nov. 5, 2013, to install a pool at 1809 Sunnyside Drive. Af ter three weeks, however, no wor k had been done on the pool, despite the fact that the homeowner had written Terry a check, arrest reports said. On Nov. 27, Terry trav eled to the victims home and had the pool dug. While there, he asked for another check of $4,632, which the victim wrote. Terry reportedly promised the victim additional pool accessories for paying in advance. Reports said that check was only supposed to have been given when steel work for the pool was nished. The work was started, but never n ished, reports said. D eputies noted that Ter ry had four other similar incidents of unnished work where he was char ged with grand theft.Pool contractor charged with fraud

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A4 | NEWSSS U nN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.com BY BARR YY FOSTERNews-Sun correspondentSEBRING Fans of the Heartland Pops have an opportunity to take a trip around the world when they perform their last concert of the sea son tonight at 7:30 / p.m. at the S outh Florida State College Performing Arts Center. We have music from England, Japan, Spain, Israel and of course the United States, said group spokesman Steve Newell. Formed in 2009, the Pops has grown to more than three dozen musi cians and performs concerts throughout the y ear We offer advanced student musicians the opportunity to play with experienced musicians some who have as much as 50 years experi ence, Newell said. F riday evenings show is a series of selections including British Col ors, Yagi Bushi, Jungle Drums, El Relicrio, and Songs of Israel, among others. There also will be a wide selection of Amer ican music including Sinatra in Concert, Armed Forces Salute and the Pops standard rendition of Stars and Stripes Forever. As part of the perfor mance, Newell said he has obtained a r eal Japa nese Taiko drum for the band s rendition of the folk song Yagi Bushi. I got a small one its only about 4 feet wide Id wanted to get an 8-by-12 footer, he said. The program will be narrated by Marti Wan delt, ying the audience from country to countr y and back again. Newell said that while the Pops has become re nowned for some of the tunes the bulk of the playlist is comprised of new music. One of those will be a rendition of Buglers Holiday. Three of our guys will trade off on that num ber. Devere Fader, our associate conductor along with Dave Naylor and Dick Babino all will play on it, Newell said The Pops usually per forms at least three sho ws at SFSC with oth er, special performances, including the Music on the M all in Avon Park, as well as for Memorial Day and Independence Day. Tickets are $10 each and will be available at the door.Heartland Pops to take Musical Tripas a number of church functions. There wont be any for mal presentations as such on S unday, said Corner stone Headmaster Jenny Cornell. We will have our classr ooms open with some of our students and staff to show people around. Cornell is a longtime el ementary educator and for mer Avon Park Middle School assistant principal. She was appointed to the post last year even before the school was a reality. In addition to class rooms, visitors will have an oppor tunity to see the schools music room and computer lab. The tour will end upstairs in the sprawling fellowship hall, where light refreshments will be served. Well have a video up there that will show the different activities our stu dents have done throughout the year, Cornell said C urrently, the school houses students from kin dergarten through fth gr ade. The curriculum in cludes standard courses in r eading, writing math ematics, science, social studies and physical edu cation. We also have Bible studies, Cornell added. Arts also are included as an integral component for students, with adminis trators saying it is part of educating the whole stu dent. M oreover, each morn ing at Cornerstone, the day begins with pr ayers, pledges and songs. Mission projects also are included in the cur riculum throughout the school y ear with students participating in outreach programs both locally and globally. We have collected shoes for orphans in Hon duras and now are making salv ation bracelets for one of our church members who will be going to South America later this spring, Cornell said. Students accepted to the academy must dem onstrate that they are at or abo ve their current grade level with an exemplary conduct history. Those unable to attend the open house may vis it the groups web site at www .ccaap.org or call the school at 453-0894. SCHOOL FROM PAGE A A 1students from Lake Placid High School and Lake P lacid Middle School under the guidance of Deputy Michael Brod joined the Keep Highway Park Beautiful Commis sion, the Highway Park N eighborhood Coun cil and local volunteers to clear br ush and over growth from the historic cemeter y. Each of those stones has an interesting story to it and it is important to maintain that piece of our towns history. We must not let it be bur ied, literally, again, said E velyn Colon, execu tive director of the Highway Park Neighborhood C ouncil in appeals to the community to help re store the cemetery. M ore than 15 volun teers, most from within the H ighway Park Com munity, came to help with the clean up De bris, shrubbery and trash lled 29 o versized gar bage bags. The 20-foot agpole holding the U.S. ag, which had been damaged in a storm, was removed to be replaced in the very near fu ture. Loose stones were picked up grass was mowed, weeds trimmed away from the graves and trees were trimmed. Unincorporated towns with no budgets have often had little to no money to improve their cemeteries, leading to disrepair, crumbling gravestones, overgrown grass, persistent weeds and no irrigation to sus tain owers or grass. This clean-up is one of many planned activities to restore the Highway Park Cemetery, organiz ers said. It is hoped that with this and subsequent efforts, the cemetery will be better preserved to include historic signage and fencing. The High way Park Neighborhood C ouncil, Keep Highway Park Beautiful, and the Highway Park Ministerial Alliance are working to gether to restore dignity and add beautication to our cemeter y, a press release on the event said. Donations are wel come. Call Tiffany Green at 863-840-2995. RESCUE FROM PAGE A A 1 Katara Simmons/News-SunTwo Sebring High School choirs directed by Luanne Hawk take the stage Thursday morning during the 2014 Highlands County Choral Festival at South Florida State College auditorium in A A von P P ar k. Nearly every school in the county was represented during the annual event. It was a full house with about 1,400 elementary, middle and high school students performing.HIG hH LA nN D sS COU nN TY C hH ORAL FE sS TIVALWe will have our classrooms open with some of our students and staff to show people around.Jenny Cornell Cornerstone Academy headmaster SS how set for tonight at S S F S S C Each of these stones has an interesting story to it and it is important to maintain that piece of our towns history.Evelyn Colon Highway Park Neighborhood Council TALLAHASSEE (AP) Investors and those not directly tied to the oper ation of nursing homes would be pr otected from lawsuits by a measure passed by the Florida Sen ate. The bill (SB 670) passed the Senate Thursday with a 36-3 vote. Proponents say the move will free up more money for new homes and investment in current facilities. Nursing home bill passes Senate

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 4, 2014 | NEWSSS U nN | A5 NEWS-SSUnN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927Romona Washington Publisher publisher@newssun.com Scott Dressel Editor editor@newssun.com VIEWPOINTS ANOTHER VIEW On Monday, the Affordable Care Act passed its enrollment dead line. Sign-up numbers eclipsed the O bama administrations ratcheted down goal of 6 million and came close, media groups say, to meeting the original 7 mil lion target. Its time to focus on the more i mportant questions: Will ACA signicantly reduce the num bers who are uninsured and make health car e affordable and accessible to all Americans? Will it lead to or provide the foundation for lower medical costs for individuals, families and business es? Most importantly, will it lead to im proved overall health outcomes and bet ter health services? Those questions likely won t be an swered for at least two or three years. But A CA cant be judged a success or failure without them. For a lot of people, though, the verdict is already in. Polls show from 46 percent to 57 percent opposing the law, depend ing on the survey. The disastr ous launch last fall of health care.gov didnt help. Technology glitches kept millions sidelined fr om enrolling for health-care coverage on the federal web site. Glitches continued on Monday, putting the website out of commission again. A dministration ofcials said anyone who started the process or tried to get on the website and couldnt by Mondays dead line will be granted extra time to enroll. Obamacar e critics, though, should pay attention to what else the polls are saying. Survey respondents say they dont want to repeal it. Nearly 60 percent in a recent Kaiser Family Foundation poll said Con gress should work to improve the measure or keep it the way it currently stands. The polls also sho w public approval of specic parts of the law. A recent Bloom berg poll showed nearly 75 percent ap prove of allowing children to stay on their par ents insurance up to age 26. More than 66 percent approve of prohibiting insurers from denying health-care cover age based on pre-existing conditions. The enr ollment numbers underscore that many Americans are eager for access to affordable health care coverage. Much work lies ahead to fulll ACAs goal of making affordable, quality health services accessible to all Americans improvements that will lead to better health outcomes. With the enrollment hoopla over, its time for policymakers to focus squarely on that goal.An editorial from the Charlotte (N.C.) Observer.Vital goals lie ahead for ObamacareWe purchased the Sebring News-Sun newspaper Tues day. Id like to take this opportunity to address all of our emplo yees, news cor respondents and delivery par tners on why we made this acquisition. Readers and advertisers are wel come to follow along. W e believe in a bright fu ture for community news and adv ertising. That does not mean the future will be easy just that if we work hard and compete intel ligently, the future will be ours to cr eate. With all the innovation of the past 100 years, the local newspaper is still the primary source for local news and local ad vertising. W e create a unique news product every day. Each new day, that requires sig nicant news gathering, analysis and wr iting. The Internet and mobile news sites are ways to extend our reach not a replacement for the labor intensive news gathering required to prop erly serve a local community. The privilege of fullling a communitys need for local news will be ours as long as we stay true to the mission of helping our communities become a better place to live. Likewise, we are still the number one local advertis ing partner because no national company has been able to r eplicate what a lo cal newspaper does to cr eate local sales for lo cal companies. Yes, the Internet has replaced yellow pages for search. But local mer chants are more swamped than ever with places to put their money search engine advertis ing, search engine optimization, websites, Facebook, T witter and email. This is in addition to the traditional players crossing their doorway like cable, TV, radio, magazines, and spe cialty promotion products. W ith even more market ing choices, it is now even mor e difcult for the local business to know where to put their money to get ad vertising results. As long as w e focus on creating compelling adver tising that works for our adv ertisers, instead of just taking their money for ad space, we will have a suc cessful growing business as w e do now. With so many other needs inside our compa ny, why buy Sebring now? W e purchased Sebring now for three reasons: 1) Se bring is already a part of the community that w e serve with our existing pa pers in Sarasota, Charlotte, D eSoto, Highlands and Polk counties; 2) it was avail able now; 3) the purchase will incr ease our nan cial strength as a company making it easier to meet our other needs The Sebring News-Sun more fully adds to a geo graphic community we serve in our newspaper footprint between the newspapers we own in Lake Placid and Arcadia to the south and west and Bartow, Lake Wales, Frostproof and Fort Meade to the north. There should be opportu nities for advertising and news shar ing we dont have today. The acquisition utiliz es our existing building, pr esses and distribution equipment. That, along with the advertising and news sharing opportuni ties that come with the Sebring News-Sun acquisition should strengthen our r esources as a company beneting not only our em ployees but also the communities we serve. It is our goal to be a str onger, safer business as a result of this new addition to our news paper family. E very community de serves a top-notch community newspaper and that s the business were in.David Dunn-Rankin is president of Sun Coast Media Group and Sun Newspapers. He can be reached at daviddr@sun-herald.comStill investing in newspapers PRESIDENTS INBOXDavid Dunn-Rankin Hes the GOPs emerging conservative rock star who sets the base on r e. But can he go the distance? Is it realistic to think that Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul can really get the 2016 Re publican Presidential nom ination and usher in a new GOP er a in more ways than one? Or does he have too much political hubris some of it from his father? If you believe a series of polls of Republicans and activists, he is indeed seri ous. At last months Conser vative Political Action Conference he won its straw poll for the second time and electried the membership. In Republican poll after poll hes on top. The latest WPA Opinion Research poll has Paul and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee at 13 percent, with former Flori da Gov. Jeb Bush at 11 per cent. B ecause of his positions on foreign issues, Pauls chances are often poohpoohed, but the GOP seems poised for a takeover and not-liberal makeover. The Daily Beasts Patri cia Murphy called Paul the de facto head of the lib ertarian wing of the par ty, still pushing the GOP to br oaden its message and its membership. Paul is urg ing the Republican Party to woo gr oups no already in its coalition, arguing there should be a strug gle to make the party better, rather than the usual mantr a that the party must be more conservative and needs ideological bouncers. The question: can Paul win over voters who dont know the difference be tween a libertarian and a librarian? Can he take his fathers libertarianism a kind of boutique liber tar ianism that appealed to niche v oters and make it more accessible? For months Paul seemed engaged in a growing war of zingers with his per ceived presidential nomination rival, the more moderate New Jersey Gov. Chris Chr istie. But then came Christies Bridge Over Troubled Political Waters. Comeback, shmomeback. Christie is now badly dam aged political goods, which is why some inuential R e publicans are scrambling to dr aft Jeb Bush to run. Paul has shown an ability to play the insiders political game more skillfully than his dad. He seemed embar rassed and apologetic supporting the re-election bid of the quintessential R e publican establishment in sider, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. But its something he had to do Be ing a pragmatist and an idealist could serve him well. H e also distinguished himself from the partys most extreme, nay saying elements by getting into a feud and public rivalry with Texas Sen. Ted Cruz. One scenario for Paul winning the nomination is for him to get momentum in early primaries, woo disaffected and millennial voters and hope his political competi tion blows it. Some charge that s a awed analysis. But others, such as MSNBCs Chris Matthews, predict Paul has a good shot at it. If so, hell have to walk some political tightropes. Hed have to win over dis trustful social conservatives and neocons and if he cali brates positions too much he could negate his liber tar ian appeal. Nationally, he must do some image r epair. On his Facebook page, sati rist Andy Borowitz who often captur es the gener al national cultures thinking wrote: POLL: Given choice between Paul and C ruz, most voters choose suicide. Pauls Achilles heel is for eign policy. Neocons and many other R epublicans consider his foreign poli cy naive, impractical and isolationist. And the long knives are out. Another storm cloud: bil lionaire GOP fat cat Sheldon Adelson. Adelson is pr epared to donate mil lions to bolster a potential nominee who (1) can win the election, and (2) strong ly supports Israel. Rand P aul is not the most Isra el-friendly candidate, and many J ews considered his father Ron Paul an outright disaster and an anti-Semite. There are many factors about Paul that conven tional wisdom says will sink him. B ut has the political and cultural context shift ed for the conventional wisdom? Has what normally play ed well in prime time America changed enough to make Rand Paul the wave of the GOPs future?Joe Gandelman is a veteran journal ist who wrote for newspapers over seas and in the United States. He can be r eached at jgandelman@themod eratevoice.com. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer not neces sarily those of the News-Sun staff.Can Rand Paul really get the 2016 GOP nomination? GUEST COLUMNJoe Gandelman

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A6 | NEWSSS U nN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.com MARVIN SPIRE sS Marvin E. Spires, 81, went to be with the Lord on Mon day, April 1, 2014. He was bor n in Center Hill, son of the late, William Henry and Lizzie (Selph) Spires. He was a lifelong resident of Sebring and was a former city police ofcer, reghter and retired owner of Spires Roong. He was a member of Sebring Firemen, Inc. Marvin was preceded in death by his grandson, Coy Benson, and great grandson, Tristan Roberts. A loving and devoted husband and father, he married Imogene Light sey on Sept. 1, 1951 and are proud parents of daugh ters Marva (Mike) Willingham, Cher yl (Russ) Sharp, Beverly (Ted) Glarner, Nancy (Ron) Ow ens; a son, Eugene (Sarah) Spires; 11 grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren. Visitation is from 1011 / a.m. Friday, April 4, with Service to follow at 11 / a.m. at Morris Funeral Chapel with Dr. Eugene Bengston ofciat ing. Burial with military honors by V.W.W. Post #4300 at Pinecrest Cemeter y. Those de siring may make donations to an y charity. www.morrisfuner alchapel.com. OBITUARIES events in downtown Sebring including the monthly wine walks the Roaring 20s Festival and the Red White and Blues Festival planned for the Fourth of July. But Push told the city on March 19 that without reworks, that event would be called off. Since our agreement was to coordinate and manage the festival (and not the reworks) and since the Red, White and Blues Festival will only be successful with con rmed reworks show, w e will regretfully decline this festival opportuni ty..., a letter from Lora T odd and Casey Wohl of Push Events Promotion said. Council members dis cussed the options to make the r eworks show happen with City Admin istrator Scott Noethlich T uesday. There just wasnt any interest in coordinating the event. Staff is recom mending a couple options here. One option would inv olve a one/ third participation with the city, CRA (Communi ty Redevelopment Agency) and nding the remaining $5,000 privately. S tep No. 2 of that would be to start a commit tee to get started on next y ears reworks, Noeth lich said. A von Park and Lake Placid reworks show or ganizers have already placed or ders and paid for their respective re works, which will both be held on J uly 4, and Se bring was running up on a deadline to get its o wn order in, Noethlich told the council. I have spoken to one reworks company they essentially said I need to have an order this week so that they can make their orders and build the reworks and organize the event in order to have them this year, Noethlich said. Hes already placed his or ders for the other cities. Bud Whitlock made a motion to fund up to $10,000 for this years reworks contingent upon the CRA contribut ing $5,000. The CRA has pr ovided $2,500 towards the cost of the show for the past three years and contributed $5,000 for the 2011 rework show. Mayor John Shoop stated a commitment from last years local ma jor sponsor has been made to contr ibute $2,500 to the cost of the show. Wohl said the Red, White and Blues Festival will be held July 4-5.Samantha Gholar can be reached at 385-6155 ext: 526 or sa FOURTH F romROM pagePAGE A1 Courtesy photoAktion Club members Gerald Bass and Angie Luft wave Saturday, March 29, at trafc and collect donations along U.S. 27 in front of Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center in Sebring with One Hope United Family Support Worker Rebecca Brownell. One Hope is just one of the nine charities who will benet from the Diaper Dump Day collections sponsored by the Aktion Club of Highlands County. Saturdays event brought in 3,212 diapers and $994. This total will be added with the clubs previous collection from last week and it will be presented to the charities once the cash is turned into diapers. In addition to One Hope, the diapers will help babies at Avon Park Community Child Development Center, Childrens Advocacy Center, Family Safehouse, Guardian ad Litem, Healthy Families, Healthy Start and the Early Steps Program. The club also received 1,257 adult diapers, which will benet needy people served by Nu-Hope Elder Care Services and Ridge Area Arc.COLLE cC TING FOR DIAPER DU mM P DAY FORT HOOD, Texas (AP) An Iraq War veteran be ing treated for mental illness was the gunman who opened r e at Fort Hood, killing three people and wounding 16 others be fore committing suicide, in an attack on the same Texas military base where more than a dozen people were slain in 2009, author ities said. W ithin hours of the Wednesday attack, inves tigators started looking into whether the man s combat experience had caused lingering psy chological trauma. Fort H oods senior ofcer, Lt. Gen. Mark Milley, said the gunman had sought help for depression, anxiety and other problems. Among the possibili ties investigators planned to explor e was whether a ght or argument on the base triggered the attack. We have to nd all those witnesses, the witnesses to every one of those shootings and nd out what his actions were, and what was said to the victims, said a federal law enforcement ofcial who spoke on condition of an onymity. The ofcial said au thorities would begin by speaking with the man s wife, and expected to search his home and any computers he owned. The shooter was identi ed as Ivan Lopez by Texas Rep. Michael McCaul, chair man of the House Homeland Security Com mittee. But the congressman offered no other details, and the military declined to identify the gunman until his family members had been noti ed. Lope z apparently walked into a building Wednesday afternoon and began ring a .45-caliber semi-automatic pistol. He then got into a vehicle and continued ring before entering another build ing, but he was eventually confronted by military police in a par king lot, ac cording to Milley, senior ofcer on the base As he came within 20 feet of an ofcer, the gun man put his hands up but then r eached under his jacket and pulled out his gun. The ofcer drew her own weapon, and the sus pect put his gun to his head and pulled the tr ig ger a nal time.Fort Hood gunman sought mental health treatment BRADENTON (AP) Two months after running over and kill ing three people in a par king lot follow ing a church service, a 79-y ear-old Florida woman had her license suspended for a year and was ned $1,000. Doreene Landstra pleaded no contest in court Wednesday to im proper backing, which is a noncr iminal traf c infraction. The maximum penalty is usually a six-month license suspension, but a judge can impose up to a year when fatalities and oth er serious circumstances are involved. The F lorida Highway Patrol said Doreene Landstra accidental ly backed her SUV into a gr oup of people leav ing a church service in the S ugar Creek Coun try Club.Woman who killed three loses licenseTeens jailed for attack on 83-year-oldPINELLAS PARK (AP) Two teenagers have been arrested in con nection with an attack on an 83-y ear-old man and the theft of his car. Police say a 13-yearold bo y turned him self in to Pinellas County Sheriffs deputies late W ednesday. Hes charged with grand theft of a motor vehicle and is being held in the Pinellas County juve nile assessment center. According to police, a 16-y ear-old boy was ar rested Wednesday and they re looking for a 15-year-old girl. BRENDAN FARRINGTONAssociated PressTALLAHASSEE This years gubernatorial race could have even greater implications if a proposed constitutional amend ment on Florida Supreme C ourt appointments is approved. The Senate voted 2614 on Thursday to place a question on the fall bal lot that could mean an outgoing go vernor would make appointments to the Supreme Court for va cancies that are created the same day a new go v ernor is sworn in. The issue is par ticu larly important now because three of the seven high court justices will hav e to retire the same day in 2019 when the gov ernor is sworn in because they will hav e reached the mandatory retirement age of 70 during their cur rent six-year terms. That means if G ov. Rick Scott is re-elected, he will be able to replace the justices as he leaves ofce. And the justices he would replace Barba ra Pariente, Fred Lewis and P eggy Quince are part of an ongoing major ity that has ruled against Scott and the GOP -con trolled Legislature in a line of high-pr ole cases, including a recent deci sion to let a medical mar ijuana amendment go on this y ears ballot. Likewise, if a Democrat is elected in November, he or she would be able to appoint the three jus tices even if he or she loses a 2018 re-election bid or simply decides not to seek a second term. Sen. Tom Lee said he sponsored the bill to avoid a potential consti tutional crisis if the appointments become an issue and he noted the constitution doesnt make it clear how appoint ments should be handled when S upreme Court vacancies occur when theres a change in the governors ofce. Democrats agreed that the way appointments are handled in cases like this needs to be addressed, but they opposed the bill (SB 1188) because they believe if people elect a governor in November, that governor should be the one to appoint the Supreme Court justices for vacancies that begin on inauguration day two months later. Its not a partisan is sue. We dont know who will be the next go vernor, said Sen. Jeremy Ring, DMargate. I just believe that the incoming gover nor should have those appointments. S enate Democratic Leader Chris Smith said its customary for gover nors-elect to form a transition ofce and make decisions that lay the ground for their rst day in ofce, and the Su preme Court appointments should be part of that.Senate passes ballot measure on court appointments

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 4, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A7 SPORTsS In South-central Florida, the rst week of April generally marks the beginning of gill season. Not that you cant catch this feisty pansh throughout the year, but with the warming water and the seasonal change, bluegills typically begin spawning in late March and early April. For many anglers, bass shing can be fun, but challenging; crappie shing offers a better chance for success, as well as a great meal, but bluegill shermen are a completely differ ent breed. Fishing light lines, light and ultra-lite rods and even yrods offers up some of the funnest shing Florida has to offer. According to the Flor ida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Florida has more than 7,700 named lakes and ponds and over 10,000 miles of streams and rivers, all brimming with bream. Bream is the local term throughout the southeast that includes a variety of deep-bodied pansh belonging to the sunsh family. The most common of these are bluegill, redear sunsh (shellcrackers), redbreast sunsh, spotted sunsh (stumpknockers) and war mouth. Although black bass are technically in the sunsh family, they are not considered to be bream. Almost any body of water in the Sunshine State, regardless of size or locale, contains the popular bluegill and, probably to a lesser extent, redear sunsh. Sunsh concentrate to spawn in water depths that range anywhere from three to ten feet, but are usually found at the shallower end of this range. Bluegills seem to opt for slightly shallower ar eas, but its not unusual to see shellcracker and bluegills intermingle, using the same bedding ar eas at the same time. Shellcrackers typically begin spawning about a month before bluegill. In South Florida, shellcrackers may spawn as early as the last week of February but more likely around the fourth week of March. In central Florida, they could rst go into spawning beds during late March. If the water temper ature remains low in March, shellcrackers will concentrate on spawning between the second and the fourth weeks of April. Lake Istokpoga is outstanding for bluegill. Pansh anglers can concentrate their efforts from April through June around the inshore and offshore cattail and bulrush areas. In other months, likely spots for bluegill and shellcrackers include the Big Island, Grassy Island, Bumblebee Island, around various sandy bars, and along edges of BY DAN HOEHNEdaniel.hoehne@newssun.comIt was three months and three days early, but the Avon Park nine did their best Fourth of July tribute Tuesday night, sparking reworks in an 18-10 win at Frostproof. And they exploded right out of the gate, scoring ve runs in each of the rst two innings. Ma son Jahna singled home two in the rst, Alex Gomez knocked a run in and Trey Frazier belted an RBI double. The Devils then sent 13 batters to the plate in the second, with Alfred Brown singling twice and Luis Martinez reaching base both times he came up in the frame. But the big blow came off Gomezs bat when he launched a two-run homer to left-center to help push Avon Parks lead to a stunning 10-0 after two. The real stunner, however, came in the bottom of the second, when the Bulldogs plated seven and got right back into the game. Though their surge wasnt so much reworks as Red Devil misres as the seven runs came courtesy of ve walks, one hit batter, two errors and two singles. But however the runs were scored, this was now a barn-burner. Frazier, on in relief dur ing the second, held the Bulldogs down in the third, while the Avon Park offense added two in the fourth and one in the fth. Kyle Kelley doubled to Its Bluegill Season! FISHIN AROUNDDon NortonSEE FISH | A9Red Devils ride fireworks to winKyle Kelley grand slam in sixth highlights high-scoring affair Dan Hoehne/News-Sun lesAlex Gomez smashed a second-inning home run in Avon Parks 18-10 win at Frostproof Tuesday.AVON PARK18FROSTPROOF10 BY DAN HOEHNEdaniel.hoehne@newssun.comThe Lady Dragons showed their strength at Tuesdays track and eld meet in Lake Placid, tying for rst with LaBelle at 70 points apiece. Hardee took third on the girls side with 66 points and Avon Park fourth with 51 in this evenly matched meet. Things were a little more spread out on the boys side as the Wildcats won with 115.5 points, Avon Park was second with 62, the Green Dragons third with 42.5 and the Cowboys fourth with 39. Starting with the eld events, the Red Devils started strong in the shot put as Imani Tate took second on the girls side and Bryan Johnson won with a toss of 38-feet. Tate also took second in the discus with a throw of 86-feet, 10-inches. Christian Suarez was third on the boys side of the event with a distance of 96-feet, 4-inches. The Dragons got things going in the girls long jump, getting a win from Quiahja Williams (16feet, 11-inches) and a third from Devany Moore, while Lady Devil Torianna Jones was second. Moise Satine got another Avon Park win on the boys side, leaping to a distance of 16-feet, 8.5-inches.Lady Dragons get tie on the track Dan Hoehne/News-Sun lesSonia Becerra earned a pair of points for the Lady Dragons by taking fourth in the pole vault Tuesday. SEE TRACK | A10SEE DEVILS | A10 BY DAN HOEHNEdaniel.hoehne@newssun.comThe Lady Blue Streaks of the tennis courts came in second in the two-day, District 2-2A Tournament Monday and Tuesday. After the rst day of battles, Sebring had three girls move into Tuesdays singles nals. At No. 3 singles, Alaina Keith bounced back from a 6-1, opening set loss to push Lemon Bays Sarah Lown, before falling 7-5. In the No. 4 singles match, Sarah Beth Rogers gave Madison Casad a wake-up call by taking the rst set 6-2. The pair fought hard in the second set, with Casad outlasting Rogers 7-6. The third set was another grueling grapple back and forth before Casad took it 6-4 for the match win. Ashley Castelli then fell in No. 5 singles to Lemon Bays Ashley Tormey 6-2, 6-3. The No. 2 doubles team of Keith and Castelli also reached the nals, but to the Lemon Bay Bay duo of Lady Streaks runner-up in districts, heading on to regionals Courtesy photoThe district runner-up Lady Streaks, left to right, Destiny Lewis, Sarah Beth Rogers, Ashley Castel li, Micaela DeVane, coach Janie Hollinger, Alaina Keith, Nisha Patel and Amanda Rios. SEE SEBRING | A10 JOHN MARSHALLAP Basketball WriterThe invitation to this years Final Four seemed to have specic rules: No upstarts or Cinderellas. Big boys only. Yes, were well aware that Kentucky was a No. 8 seed and UConn was a 7. But cmon. These are two power programs with storied histories, each with a championship under their belt within the past four seasons. Following a string of NCAA tournaments with mid-major party crashers, the Final Four is going back to the big time with Florida and Wisconsin joining the Wildcats and Huskies in North Texas. Weve got a rundown of what to look for: ___ THE TEAMS Florida. The top overall seed in the NCAA tour nament has played like it by extending its winning streak to 30 games. Kentucky. John Caliparis latest group of oneand-dones needed a little time to get going. Once the roll started, no one has been able to stop it. Wisconsin. The Badgers are feisty, fundamentally sound and one of those teams opponents hate to play. UConn. The Huskies won the 2011 behind Kemba Walker. A guide to the Final FourFinal Four Guide: Bo and Billy, Gators and Cats, Shabazz and ScottieSEE NCAA | A10

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A8 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.com COMING UP High School Baseball Today Avon Park vs. McKeel, 7 p.m.; Lake Placid vs. Frostproof, 7 p.m.; Sebring vs. Oviedo, 7 p.m. College Baseball Today SFSC vs. Southeastern, 6 p.m. Saturday SFSC vs. U. of Tampa B team, Doubleheader, Noon. High School Softball Today Lake Placid at Gateway Charter, 6 p.m. Monday Avon Park at LaBelle, 6/7:30 p.m.; Lake Placid at DeSoto, 6/7:30 p.m.; Sebring at Mulberry, 6/7:30 p.m. TODAYAUTO RACING %  en NASCAR OReilly Auto Parts 300 8:30 p.m. ESPN2 GOLF %  en LPGA Kraft Nabisco Championship Noon GOLF %  en PGA Shell Houston Open 3 p.m. GOLF HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL %  en Dicks Sporting Goods National Tournament 2:30 p.m. ESPN2 %  en Dicks Sporting Goods National Tournament 4:30 p.m. ESPN2 MLB %  en Philadelphia at Chicago Cubs 2 p.m. WGN %  en Texas at Tampa Bay 7 p.m. SUN NBA %  en Denver at Memphis 7 p.m. ESPN %  en Oklahoma City at Houston 9:30 p.m. ESPN TENNIS %  en WTA Family Circle Cup 1 p.m. ESPN2 %  en Tampa Bay at Colorado 8 p.m. SUN SATURDAYAUTO RACING %  en Gulf Air Bahrain Grand Prix, Qualifying 11 a.m. CNBC COLLEGE BASKETBALL %  en Reeses All-Star Game Noon CBS %  en NCAA Tournament 6 p.m. TNT %  en NCAA Tournament 8:30 p.m. TNT GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL %  en Dicks Sporting Goods National Tournament 10 a.m. ESPN2 %  en Dicks Sporting Goods National Tournament Noon ESPN2 GOLF %  en PGA Shell Houston Open 1 p.m. GOLF %  en PGA Shell Houston Open 3 p.m. NBC %  en LPGA Kraft Nabisco Championship 5 p.m. GOLF MLB %  en Chicago White Sox at Kansas City 2 p.m. WGN %  en Texas at Tampa Bay 7 p.m. SUN NBA %  en Chicago at Washington 7 p.m. WGN TENNIS %  en WTA Family Circle Cup 1 p.m. ESPN2 SPORTS ON TV SCORE BOARD National Basketball Association EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB x-Toronto 43 32 .573 x-Brooklyn 40 34 .541 2 New York 33 43 .434 10 Boston 23 52 .307 20 Philadelphia 16 59 .213 27 Southeast W L Pct GB y-Miami 52 22 .703 x-Washington 39 36 .520 13 Charlotte 37 38 .493 15 Atlanta 32 42 .432 20 Orlando 21 54 .280 31 Central W L Pct GB y-Indiana 53 23 .697 x-Chicago 43 32 .573 9 Cleveland 31 45 .408 22 Detroit 27 48 .360 25 Milwaukee 14 61 .187 38 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB y-San Antonio 59 16 .787 Houston 49 25 .662 9 Dallas 44 31 .587 15 Memphis 44 31 .587 15 New Orleans 32 43 .427 27 Northwest W L Pct GB x-Oklahoma City 54 19 .740 Portland 49 27 .645 6 Minnesota 37 37 .500 17 Denver 33 42 .440 22 Utah 23 52 .307 32 Pacic W L Pct GB y-L.A. Clippers 54 22 .711 Golden State 46 29 .613 7 Phoenix 44 31 .587 9 Sacramento 27 48 .360 26 L.A. Lakers 25 50 .333 28 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Wednesdays Games Cleveland 119, Orlando 98 Indiana 101, Detroit 94 Washington 118, Boston 92 Charlotte 123, Philadelphia 93 New York 110, Brooklyn 81 Toronto 107, Houston 103 Miami 96, Milwaukee 77 Chicago 105, Atlanta 92 Minnesota 102, Memphis 88 San Antonio 111, Golden State 90 Denver 137, New Orleans 107 L.A. Clippers 112, Phoenix 108 Sacramento 107, L.A. Lakers 102 Thursdays Games San Antonio at Oklahoma City, late Dallas at L.A. Clippers, late Fridays Games Denver at Memphis, 7 / p.m. Indiana at Toronto, 7 / p.m. Orlando at Charlotte, 7 / p.m. Detroit at Brooklyn, 7:30 / p.m. Philadelphia at Boston, 7:30 / p.m. Minnesota at Miami, 7:30 / p.m. Cleveland at Atlanta, 7:30 / p.m. Washington at New York, 7:30 / p.m. Milwaukee at Chicago, 8 / p.m. New Orleans at Utah, 9 / p.m. Oklahoma City at Houston, 9:30 / p.m. Phoenix at Portland, 10 / p.m. Sacramento at Golden State, 10:30 / p.m. Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 / p.m. League LeadersScoring G FG FT PTS AVG Durant, OKC 72 756 629 2317 32.2 Anthony, NYK 73 719 440 2042 28.0 James, MIA 71 698 389 1888 26.6 Love, MIN 71 600 470 1844 26.0 Harden, HOU 66 499 497 1655 25.1 Grifn, LAC 75 673 444 1801 24.0 Curry, GOL 72 589 284 1696 23.6 Aldridge, POR 64 605 281 1494 23.3 DeRozan, TOR 73 567 472 1666 22.8 Cousins, SAC 65 522 402 1446 22.2 George, IND 76 551 377 1651 21.7 Nowitzki, DAL 73 570 318 1574 21.6 Jefferson, CHA 66 625 170 1423 21.6 Davis, NOR 65 513 343 1371 21.1 Irving, CLE 65 494 266 1371 21.1 Lillard, POR 76 523 353 1603 21.1 Thomas, SAC 70 488 345 1447 20.7 Dragic, PHX 71 514 305 1450 20.4 Gay, SAC 69 514 303 1393 20.2 Rebounds G OFF DEF TOT A VG Jordan, LAC 76 309 741 1050 13.8 Drummond, DET 74 386 560 946 12.8 Love, MIN 71 211 684 895 12.6 Howard, HOU 68 226 613 839 12.3 Cousins, SAC 65 204 553 757 11.6 Aldridge, POR 64 151 561 712 11.1 Noah, CHI 73 256 555 811 11.1 Vucevic, ORL 57 185 441 626 11.0 Jefferson, CHA 66 130 558 688 10.4 Davis, NOR 65 207 455 662 10.2 Assists G AST A VG Paul, LAC 57 620 10.9 Lawson, DEN 61 540 8.9 Wall, WAS 75 653 8.7 Rubio, MIN 74 631 8.5 Curry, GOL 72 607 8.4 Jennings, DET 73 571 7.8 Lowry, TOR 74 560 7.6 Nelson, ORL 64 439 6.9 Teague, ATL 71 484 6.8 James, MIA 71 461 6.5 National Hockey LeagueEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Boston 76 52 18 6 110 243 161 x-Tampa Bay 76 42 25 9 93 226 202 x-Montreal 77 43 27 7 93 200 192 Detroit 76 36 26 14 86 205 215 Toronto 77 37 32 8 82 223 241 Ottawa 76 32 30 14 78 219 252 Florida 77 27 42 8 62 184 254 Buffalo 75 21 45 9 51 145 224 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Pittsburgh 76 48 23 5 101 233 189 N.Y. Rangers 77 43 30 4 90 208 184 Philadelphia 75 39 27 9 87 213 211 Columbus 75 38 30 7 83 210 203 Washington 76 34 29 13 81 217 231 New Jersey 76 32 28 16 80 186 198 Carolina 76 33 32 11 77 191 211 N.Y. Islanders 76 31 35 10 72 212 250 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-St. Louis 75 51 17 7 109 241 168 x-Colorado 75 48 21 6 102 230 204 x-Chicago 76 42 19 15 99 248 200 Minnesota 76 39 26 11 89 189 191 Dallas 75 37 27 11 85 219 212 Winnipeg 77 34 33 10 78 214 226 Nashville 76 33 32 11 77 190 229 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Anaheim 76 50 18 8 108 247 193 x-San Jose 77 48 20 9 105 237 188 Los Angeles 77 45 26 6 96 195 162 Phoenix 77 36 28 13 85 207 218 Vancouver 77 34 32 11 79 185 209 Calgary 76 31 38 7 69 194 226 Edmonton 77 26 42 9 61 190 257 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Wednesdays Games N.Y. Islanders 2, Ottawa 1 Detroit 3, Boston 2 Anaheim 3, Edmonton 2 Los Angeles 4, Phoenix 0 Thursdays Games Columbus at Philadelphia, late Dallas at Carolina, late Boston at Toronto, late Calgary at Tampa Bay, late Minnesota at Chicago, late Buffalo at St. Louis, late Pittsburgh at Winnipeg, late N.Y. Rangers at Colorado, late Los Angeles at San Jose, late Fridays Games Montreal at Ottawa, 7 / p.m. Chicago at Columbus, 7 / p.m. Washington at New Jersey, 7 / p.m. Buffalo at Detroit, 7:30 / p.m. Calgary at Florida, 7:30 / p.m. Edmonton at Phoenix, 10 / p.m. Nashville at Anaheim, 10 / p.m. SNAPs S HOTs S SPORTSMajor League Baseball American League East W L Pct GB Toronto 2 1 .667 Baltimore 1 1 .500 Boston 1 1 .500 Tampa Bay 1 2 .333 1 New York 0 2 .000 1 Central W L Pct GB Chicago 2 0 1.000 Detroit 2 0 1.000 Cleveland 2 1 .667 Kansas City 0 2 .000 2 Minnesota 0 2 .000 2 West W L Pct GB Seattle 3 0 1.000 Houston 2 0 1.000 Texas 2 1 .667 1 Oakland 1 2 .333 2 Los Angeles 0 3 .000 3 Wednesdays Games Detroit 2, Kansas City 1, 10 innings Chicago White Sox 7, Minnesota 6, 11 innings Oakland 6, Cleveland 1, 1st game Boston 6, Baltimore 2 Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 0 Texas 4, Philadelphia 3 Houston 3, N.Y. Yankees 1 Cleveland 6, Oakland 4, 2nd game Seattle 8, L.A. Angels 2 Thursdays Games Kansas City at Detroit, late Minnesota at Chicago White Sox, late Boston at Baltimore, late Toronto at Tampa Bay, late N.Y. Yankees at Houston, late Seattle at Oakland, late Fridays Games Baltimore (M.Gonzalez 0-0) at Detroit (Porcello 0-0), 1:08 / p.m. Milwaukee (Estrada 0-0) at Boston (Peavy 0-0), 2:05 / p.m. Minnesota (Pelfrey 0-0) at Cleveland (Salazar 0-0), 3:05 / p.m. Chicago White Sox (E.Johnson 0-0) at Kansas City (Guthrie 0-0), 4:10 / p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Tanaka 0-0) at Toronto (McGowan 0-0), 7:07 / p.m. Texas (Saunders 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Odorizzi 0-0), 7:10 / p.m. L.A. Angels (Richards 0-0) at Houston (Harrell 0-0), 8:10 / p.m. Seattle (C.Young 0-0) at Oakland (Straily 0-0), 10:05 / p.m. National League East W L Pct GB Washington 2 0 1.000 Atlanta 2 1 .667 Miami 2 1 .667 Philadelphia 1 2 .333 1 New York 0 2 .000 2 Central W L Pct GB Pittsburgh 2 0 1.000 Cincinnati 1 1 .500 1 St. Louis 1 1 .500 1 Milwaukee 1 2 .333 1 Chicago 0 2 .000 2 West W L Pct GB Los Angeles 4 1 .800 San Francisco 2 1 .667 1 Colorado 1 2 .333 2 San Diego 1 2 .333 2 Arizona 1 4 .200 3 Wednesdays Games Atlanta 1, Milwaukee 0 Pittsburgh 4, Chicago Cubs 3, 16 innings Colorado 6, Miami 5 Cincinnati 1, St. Louis 0 Washington 5, N.Y. Mets 1 Texas 4, Philadelphia 3 San Francisco 2, Arizona 0 L.A. Dodgers 5, San Diego 1 Thursdays Games Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, late St. Louis at Cincinnati, late Colorado at Miami, late Washington at N.Y. Mets, late San Francisco at Arizona, late Fridays Games Atlanta (Hale 0-0) at Washington (Roark 0-0), 1:05 / p.m. Milwaukee (Estrada 0-0) at Boston (Peavy 0-0), 2:05 / p.m. Philadelphia (R.Hernandez 0-0) at Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 0-0), 2:20 / p.m. Arizona (Delgado 0-0) at Colorado (Nicasio 0-0), 4:10 / p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 0-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 1-0), 4:10 / p.m. St. Louis (Miller 0-0) at Pittsburgh (Cole 0-0), 7:05 / p.m. Cincinnati (Leake 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Mejia 0-0), 7:10 / p.m. San Diego (Stults 0-0) at Miami (Koehler 0-0), 7:10 / p.m. Sebring Chamber Golf ClassicSEBRING The Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce will hold their Spring Golf Classic tourna ment on Saturday, April 5, at Sun N Lake Golf Club. The event is a four per son scramble with handicapped ights. There will be cash prizes: $2,000 for hole-in-one, $250 for longest drive and $250 for closest to the pin. Entry fee is $60 per play er, or $225 for a four-per son team, and includes greens fee, cart, drinks on the course and lunch. Corporate sponsor ship includes a four-per son team and hole sign for $300. Registration is at 7:30 / a.m., and a shotgun start at 8:30 / a.m. All proceeds benet the Sebring Chamber of Commerce. For questions or a registration form, call (863) 385-8448 or email infor mation@sebring.org.SHS Golf TournamentSEBRING Sebring High School will be holding its Project Graduation 2014 Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 5, at Golf Hammock Country Club. Format is a four-per son scramble, ighted by handicap, with registration starting at 7 / a.m. and a shotgun start at 8 / a.m. Entry fees are $65 per player, $240 per foursome and includes greens fee, cart and lunch. Mulligans will be available for purchase at $3 each or $5 for two, and hole sponsors are available for $100. There will be a 50/50 rafe and rafe prizes available as well. Make checks payable and remit to SHS Project Graduation, 2157 US 27 S, Sebring, FL 33870. For more information, call Tim Baker at 385-5100.Sebring Elks GolfSEBRING The Sebring Elks Lodge No. 1529 monthly golf outing will be held at Golf Hammock Golf and Country Club on Monday, April 7, beginning at 8 / a.m. Cost is $32, which includes golf, cart, lunch and prize fund. To sign up contact Jack McLaughlin at jacknjudy33872@gmail.com or leave a message on 863 471-3295. Check in no later than 7:40 / a.m. by the Pro Shop H.O.P.E. Basketball TournamentSEBRING The 4th Annual Mary Toney H.O.P.E. Foundation 3-on3 Basketball Tournament will tip off Saturday, April 19, in the Sebring High School Gym. From 8:30 / a.m.-4 / p.m. teams will compete amid concessions and music, with a cost of just $5 per player. Monetary prizes will be awarded to rst-place teams, with second-place nishers receiving gift card awards. The tournament will have male and female brackets consisting of three players per team. For boys and girls, age groups are 7-9 years old, 10-12, 13-15 and 16-19. The 7-9 and 10-12 yearold teams begin play at 8:30 / a.m., with the 1315s and 16-19s starting at 11 / a.m. Teams need to report to the gym 30 minutes prior to the rst game of their division. Registration deadline is Thursday, April 17. For more information, call LaVaar Scott at (863) 214-3880, Nick Brooks at (850) 322-8398 or Princeton Harris at (863) 381-8898Nu-Hope Golf tournamentAVON PARK NUHOPE Elder Care Services will hold the Sandy Foster Memorial Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 19. This years event, sponsored by MIDFLORIDA, will be held at Pinecrest Golf Club in Avon Park. The event is a 2-person scramble. Cost is $65/person ($130 per 2-person team.) Sponsorship opportunities are available. Registration opens at 7:30 / a.m., with a Shot Gun start at 8:30 / a.m. An awards luncheon follows the event. All funds raised are used to support services for seniors in Highlands and Hardee County. To register or for more information, please contact Laurie Murphy at 382-2134 or MurphyL@ nuhope.org or visit www. nuhopeeldercare.orgLP Project GraduationLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid High School Project Graduation 2014 Golf Tournament will tee off on Saturday, March 29, at the Placid Lakes Golf Course. Registration begins at 7 / a.m. before a shot gun start kicks off play at 8 / a.m. Cost is $60 per person, $240 per team, and includes greens fee, cart and meal. There will be a 50/50 drawing, a rafe, straightest drive and closest to the pin contests and a $2,000 Hole in One prize sponsored by Cohan Radio Group. For more information, contact Charlotte McQuillen at 633-8450.Sottile Memorial GolfLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Athletic Association will be hosting the 8th Annual Nick Sottile Memorial Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 12, at the Placid Lakes Country Club. The event is a four-per son scramble with cash prizes for winning teams in each ight and individual cash prizes for closest to the line, closest to the pin and a $2,000 Hole in One prize sponsored by Cohan Radio Group. Cost is $100 per golfer, $400 per team, and there will be an 8 / a.m. tee-off time. Entry fee includes greens fee, cart, complementary beverages and lunch catered by Smoke Shack BBQ, with appetizers of shrimp and crab clusters. Bill Jarrett Ford is helping to underwrite the event for the eighth consecutive year, but more sponsors are needed. Sponsorship ranges from $1,000 to $50 holesponsors and lunch tickets are included with most sponsorship levels. Proceeds from the tour nament directly benet youth sports in Lake Placid and a portion of the proceeds are donated to the Nick Sottile Memorial Scholarship Fund. A portion of the proceeds will also be used for completion of a new sports weight-training facility. For more information, call Laura Teal at (863) 441-0729 or Tom Reifsnyder at (954) 675-9581.Florida Hospital Clay ShootOKEECHOBEE The Florida Hospital Heartland Clay Shoot will be held on Friday, April 25, at the Quail Creek Plantation beginning at 8:30 / a.m. A continental breakfast will be served at 8 / a.m. at Quail Creek, located at 12399 NE 224th St., Okeechobee. There will also be a home-cooked BBQ lunch and fantastic rafe and green bird prizes. There are four levels of sponsorships available, from Station Sponsor which includes advertising on course station signage and lunch for two for $100, Individual Sponsor for $125 which includes registration for one shooter and lunch. The $500 Team Sponsor includes one four-man shooting team and lunch, along with advertising on banner displayed at lunch tents. The $2,500 Gold Sponsor includes one four-man team, cart and lunch, a banner hanging during event with company logo, company logo on yer/ registration and all mail pieces, one station sign, one suite for Thursday nights social and two Thursday night dinner tickets. For more information or to register, call the Foundation at (863) 4025525, or visit the website www.FHHeartland.org/ Foundation.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING The Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center will be hosting their 4th Annual Scholarship Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 26, at Sun N Lake. Format is a four-per son scramble with handicapped ights. Entry fee is $65 per person, which includes greens fee, golf cart and lunch. Registration is at 7:30 / a.m. the day of the tournament, with an 8:30 / a.m. shotgun start. Please submit entries by Thursday, April 24. Make checks payable to Wings of Faith CWC Scholarship Fund. All proceeds go to benet college-bound senior graduates for the class of 2014. For questions, call Alvin Walters at 381-5706 or 381-6578.Bass N Trash TournamentSEBRING The Sebring Sr. FFA will host the First Annual Bass N Trash Fishing Tournament on Saturday, May 17, on Lake Jackson at the Veterans Beach boat ramp. Cost is $25 per person, with a maximum of four people per team, with all registered team members receiving a free T-shirt and lunch. Meet time is 7 / a.m. and shing will get underway at 7:30 / a.m. Weigh-in takes place at Noon. Cass prizes will be given to heaviest total of three bass, three trash sh, heaviest bass and heaviest trash sh. All sh must be alive at weigh-in. Registration deadline is May 1, which guarantees a shirt, registrations after that, up through the day of the tournament, arent guaranteed a shirt. To register, or for more information, contact Sarah Cleveland at (352) 214-9883, or Rebekah Wills at (863) 273-0208.

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 4, 2014 | NEWSSS U nN | A9 Golf HammockThe Golf Hammock Ladies played Low Gross/ Lo w Net on Wednesday, April 2, and winning the First Flight Low Gross was Jeannie Fivecoat with a 90, while Judy Kelly took sec ond with 98. Ther e was a tie for third between Shirley Enochs and Florence Towell with dueling 106s. In Low Net for the ight, Judy Trier came in with a 71 for the win, while Anne Coffey was second with 72 and Ruth Kirk third with 77. Low Gross in Second Flight went to Carol Troup and her 103. Joyce Stanley was second with 104 and Roxie McMil lon third with 107. Lo w Net went to Alma Barefoot and her 66, while Kaydee Depolito was sec ond at 71 and Jean Haig thir d at 73. Last Monday, March 31, the Mezza Group played Individual Pro-Am Points and saw Ike Richards win A group with a +4, while Les Campbells +2 put him in second, and Gary Towel took third with Even. In B group, Joe Hyzny took rst with -1, second went to a tie at -2 between Mike Lajinness and Fred Latshaw. C group had Dana Smith and Bobby Culbert shar ing rst place with +3, followed by Taff Brown at +2, and G ary Fivecoat at +1. Ned Bauer took rst in D group with +1, Bob Trier was second with Even, and David Mulligan was third at -2. In E group, Jan Nigh came in rst with +4, Mike Anselm in second with +3, and David Mangold grabbed third with -2. F group was lead by Ed Northrup, who took rst with +7, Curt Matterson grabbed second with Even, and third went to Paul Skidmore at -2. Terry Yandle took rst in G group with +4, followed by a tie for third between Doug Haire and John Rob ertson at +3. H gr oup went to Ozzie Bergroth with +4, Dick Bothelo took second with +3, and Bob Wimmers was in third with +2. In I group, Doc Thomas grabbed rst with +6, Jack Carlton took second with +1, followed by Terri Trum bull at Even. J gr oup saw Jerry Lins ley take rst place with +6, follo wed by Ginny McVey in second at +5, and Ralph Pickering in third with +4. Pete Mezzas +3 got him rst placein K group, fol lowed by a tie for third betw een Ken Porter and Dave Hankinson at +1. And in L group, Ron Geoque was in rst place with +7, Frank Branca in second with +6, and fol lowed by Don Meitz at E ven. Next Monday, April 7, the Mezza Group will continue to play at Golf Hammock, beginning at 7:45 / a.m. Please arrive early due to a big eld of players. For more information, call Pete at 382-1280.Harder HallThe streak of aces continued Tuesday, April 1, as M ichael Jozsa recorded an other hole in one. F rom 115 yards on the par-3 fth hole, Jozsa used a 5 wood to span the dis tance and nd the bottom of the cup The feat was witnessed by playing partners Tom Wilhelm and Len Depend er.Lake June WestThe Ladies League played on Monday, March 31, and needed a match of cards to declare a winner. The team of Wanda Jones, Eva Huffman, Ber yl Hansen and Barb Cash got the nod as their 36 out matched the 36 brought in b y Donna Palmatier, Carol Cobert, Jan Mann and Jan ice Barringer. T aking third, with a 37, were Kim Fiers, Mary Mc Namee, Virginia Simmons and Charlotte M athew. In closest to the pin, Jane Roush hit to 26-feet, 6-inches from No. 4, Huff man to 5-feet, 6-inches from No. 2 and Doris W eeks to 3-feet, 7-inches from No. 8. A Mixed Scramble was played on Thursday, March 27, and also re quired a match of cards to settle the placings A pair of 51s were brought in, with top hon ors going to the team of Do yan Eades, Beth Schuenke, Wayne Eades and Mary McNamee. Taking second were Wanda Jones, Charlotte Mathew and John and Donna Stewart. Carding a 52, for third place, were Joe and Joyce Swartz with Jane Roush and Betty Bevard. For closest to the pin, Walt Nagel hit to 16feet, 4-inches from No. 4, Mathew to 12-feet, 6-inches from No. 8 and Art Schmeltz to 3-feet, 10-inches from No. 2. eelgrass. Most anglers prefer crickets for bluegill and redworms or waxworms for shellcrackers. Fly shermen expe rience incredible topwater action with small popping bugs or oating ies. Early morning and late evening are typically the best times to sh for pansh, with the excep tion being the spawning per iod. Large groups of spawn ing bluegills and shellcrackers will be on their beds constantly thr ough out the day and will generally strike anything that lands near them. B luegills tend to be deep-bodied with a long dorsal n and slightly forked tail. A dark ear covering and a blotch at the dorsal ns back bottom edge set them apart. They typically feed on insects and their larvae. The state record is 2.95 pounds. A Big Catch is consid ered to be 11 inches or 1.25 pounds Redear (shellcrackers) display a red mark on the back edge of the gill that is very distinctive. They generally prefer hard bottoms, often con gregating in deeper water than bluegill. They pr efer snails and clams, giving them their common nickname. Shellcrackers grow much larger than blue gills with sh over one pound pr etty common. The state record is 4.86 pounds and a Big Catch is considered to be 12 inches or 2.25 pounds. Redbreast Sunsh have a very long ear ap that distinguishes this sh from other Florida bream. Common in rivers in north Florida, they are generally not found in south or central Florida. Spotted Sunsh are ol ive-green to brown in color with black or red dish spots on the base of each scale for ming rows of dots on its sides. They prefer slow-mov ing, heavily vegetated str eams and rivers with limestone, sand or gravel substrates. The state re cord is .83 pounds. A Big Catch is con sidered 8 inches or 0.50 pounds One of my fondest memories as a kid was shing off a dock for bluegills with my young er brother Bill. W e were too young to go out in the boat with my dad and older broth er so we spent day after day with our old, used Mitchell 300s, a cou ple of shin rods older than the two of us and a can of freshly dug earth worms. The bluegills didn t care how old we were or whether we were experi enced shermen. They would bite all day long. We learned how to clean sh at about the same time, and although we both had a hard time throwing the small ones back, we learned quick ly from our father, if you keep em , you clean em. With bluegill season upon us, nows the time to take that young boy or girl and teach them how to sh. Children have a short attention span and blue gill tend to be pretty accommodating, so they shouldn t lose interest in catching them. With any luck, and with the experience learned from catching gills, theyll be hooked on sh ing for life.REDS Friday Istokpoga Bass TournamentRough weather kept most of the guys home Friday (including me). Only four boats par ticipated in the event, which is held ev ery Fri day out of the State Park on R oute 98. Charlie Houser and his partner Tom won with three nice sh, and the big bass of the day top ping 7 pounds. E veryone is eligible to participate in this weekly event and you can pay at the ramp just be there early. We check livewells and once youve paid your entry fee, you can head out. Articial bait only, no live shiners. Entry fee is $30 per boat, with $10 of every entry fee going to the big bass winner. Kyle King will be run ning the tournaments going for ward and Ill sh as many as I can. This is a three sh per boat limit, and state ex emption certicates are pr ovided to each angler, requiring all sh to be re leased alive at the end of the tour nament, 100 yards from the opening of the canal at the state park. Come on out and join us. The tournament ends at 1 / p.m.Don Norton is a professional tournament bass sherman, bass shing guide, and custom rod builder. He lives in the Golf Hammock ar ea of Sebring with his wife Lex ie, and is the owner of a custom rod b uilding company appropri ately named The American Fisherman. He is also the owner of REDS II, a full-service shing tack le store located at 3603 Sebring P arkway, in Sebring, FL. You can reach him at 863-273-4998 or by email at donorton13@gmail.com. Visit his REDS FISHING facebook page or his website at theamer icansherman.com. or stop by the stor e to see him anytime. FISH FROM PAGE A A 7 Area Golf League Results

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A10 | NEWSSS U nN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.com Dan Hoehne/News-Sun lesDalton Shelton found no peers in the distance running Tuesday, getting wins in the 800-, 1,600and 3,200-meter runs.Lashaday Love got another win for the Lady D evils in the triple jump and the Lady Dragons earned some points in the pole vault from Kathryn LeBlanc (third) and Sonia Becerra (fourth). Gabriel Yungbluth got fourth on the boys side of the event for a pair of Lake Placid points. Williams got her second win of the meet for the Dragons, taking the girls high jump, clearing 4-feet, 10-inches and Avon Park got a second and third on the boys side from Jermi ah Almondea and Ahmad S mith. Back on the track, the Lady Dragons took third in the 4X800 relay with the foursome of Jacqueline Barajas, Gabriella Perez, Elizabeth Gloria and Rosa Ramirez, while the boys quartet of Gabriel Mercer, Julian Obregon, Scott Sig rist and Dalton Shelton nished second on the boys side. Shanice Leverson got a win for the Lady Devils in the 100-meter hurdles, with Quincy Claitt tak ing third for the Avon Park bo ys and Johnathan Ger vais fourth for Lake Placid. Lady D ragons took the top three spots in the 100-meter dash in the forms of Williams, Briana Bodon and Ramirez, and the Avon Park boys took the top four spots on their side with Josh Jones, Sat ine, Caludy Antoine and Almondea getting the job done. Shelton then showed his distance prowess in win ning the 1,600 by more than v e seconds. In the 4X100 relay, Lake Placids girls took second while Avon Parks boys won their side. Jones then got another Lady Devil win in the 400, with teammate Keyanes sahe Fullard taking third and Lady D ragon Belkis Rivero nishing fourth. Leverson took a third in the 300 hurdles for Avon Park and Allison Kinchen was fourth for Lake Placid. And on the boys side, Gervais got third for the Dragons and Dominick Hutchins and Claitt went fourth and fth for the Devils. LeBlanc and Shelton got Lake Placid wins in the 800-meter run, with Kinchen getting another win in the 200. Jones and Satine went rst and third for Avon Park in the 200, before Shelton nished off the Dragon wins by taking the 3,200 by nearly 30 sec onds. A von Park got their nal win from the girls 4X400 relay team. TRACK FROM PAGE A A 7 Lown and Casad 6-2, 6-2. The overall point to tals saw Lemon Bay on top with 27 points and Sebring edging out Cape Coral for second, 17-14. We had two great days of tennis with nine teams, head coach Janie Hollinger said. The girls played beyond my ex pectations and are excited to play next week at R egionals. The teams will play the rstand second-place teams from District 12, which covers the Fort Myers and Naples area. SEBRING FROM PAGE A A 7start the fourth, Gomez walked and after a sto len base, both would come in on a J.C. C obb single. Kelley then drove in Martinez in the fth with a base-knock to center. Frostproof scratched for single runs in the fourth, fth and sixth, but the Devils pretty much put it away with another ve-run frame in the sixth. Frazier lead it off with a walk and came around on consecutive singles from Kyle Thompson, Brown and Martinez. Then, with two outs and the bases load ed, Kelley had the games big bang with a grand slam blast over the center-eld fence that pushed the lead to the 18-10 margin that would stand at games end. We feel good. We are all getting better as a team, we still have our little moments where we break down, but our teamates pick us back up and we are back to business, Gomez said. But there is always room for improvement. And thats what we are trying to do, improve each and every day. That mentality, along with their now 13-3 re cord on the season, bodes w ell for the team as it heads into the clos ing stretch of the regular season. The D evils hosted La Belle Thursday, and get back into D istrict 9-4A play tonight against McKeel at Head Field and Tuesday at the Mul berry Panthers. DEVILS FROM PAGE A A 7Shabazz Napier is the one-man gang this time. ___ THE STARS Shabazz Napier, UConn. A 6-foot-1 point guard who can do it all and had a great mentor in Kemba Walker. Julius Randle, Kentucky. The projected No. 1 overall NBA draft pick is big, athletic and often un stoppable. F rank Kaminsky, Wis consin. When he s hitting his 3-pointers, this 7-footer is all but unguardable. Scottie Wilbekin, Florida. From being asked to transfer by his own coach to becoming one of college basketballs best closers. ___ THE OTHERS Patrick Young, Florida. The Gators big man is like a linebacker in bas ketball shorts. Aar on Harrison, Ken tucky. H it the winning jumper against Michigan despite struggling with his shot. Has a twin brother whos not bad, either. Sam Dekker, Wisconsin. Hes scrappy, versatile and a good shooter a perfect t for the Badgers. Ryan Boatwright, UCo nn. N apiers backcourt side kick can shoot and has become a point-guard stopper on defense. ___ THE C OACHES Billy Donovan, Florida. So much for not be ing able to get the Gators to the F inal Four without NBA-ready players. Might be the best coaching job of his career. Calipari, Kentucky. The slick coach with the designer suits might irri tate some, but he sure can r ecruit players and win games. Bo Ryan, Wisconsin. His has been the feelgood story so far, making the Final Four for the rst time as a coach after tak ing his late father, Butch, ev ery year since 1976 as a birthday gift. Kevin Ollie, UConn. Thrust into a difcult situation following the re tirement of Jim Calhoun and NCAA sanctions last season. Managed it all incredibly well, particularly for a rst-time head coach. ___ NUMBERS 0 P oints by Kentuckys Marcus Lee had in the 10 games pri or to scor ing 10 against Michigan in the Elite Eight. 0.000051 Per centage of people (612 to tal) who accur ate ly predicted the Final Four out of 11 million entr ies in ESPNs Tournament Chal lenge. 2 SEC teams (K entucky and Florida) in the Fi nal Four out of three that made it into the NCAA tournament. 3 Teams that Ken tucky beat in the bracket that w ere in the Final Four a year ago (Wichita State, Louisville and Michigan). 4 Times UConns mens and womens teams have reached the Final Four in the same season, most of any school. 8 Years since there were no repeat Fi nal Four teams be fore this season. 8.1 Turnovers per game by Wisconsin, best in the nation. 16 Straight NCAA tour nament appearances by W isconsin, most among the Final Four teams. 73 Years since Wiscon sins last and only national championship 2,720 Points scored by Wisconsin this season, a school record. ___ FAMOUS ALUMNI Connecticut: Actress Meg Ryan, physicist David Lee, actor Ron Palillo (Hor shack!), screenwriter/producer Jeremy Leven. F lorida: Actress Faye Du naway, Nobel Prize winners Marshall Nirenberg and R obert Grubbs, Yan kees owner Hal Steinbrenner, Wendys owner D ave Thomas. Kentucky: Actress Ashley Judd, Sen. Mitch McCon nell, astronaut Story Musgrave, Nobel Prize winner W illiam Lipscomb. Wisconsin: Base ball Commissioner Bud S elig, Vice President Dick Cheney, architect Frank Lloyd Wright, actor Don Ameche, singers Steve Miller and Boz Scaggs. NCAA FROM PAGE A A 7 BERNIE WILSON AA ssociated PP ressSAN DIEGO A British sailor who fell over board during a yacht r ace and spent near ly two hours in the cold, r ough North Pacic says he never gave up hope of being rescued be cause he knew his fellow crew members were w ell-trained for such an emergency. Andrew Taylor tells The Associated Press via satellite phone that he didnt panic even though he lost sight of his boat, but did wonder if his mates would be able to nd him in the big waves. Says Taylor: I believe Im a very, very lucky boy. There were many even tualities and possibilities that could hav e ended very differently. Taylor injured his right leg when he smashed into the rudder after he fell overboard Monday. Hell have X-rays when the 70-toot Derry-Lon donderry-Doire reaches San Francisco in the Clipper R ound the World Yacht Race.British sailor praises mates after ocean rescue SS ailor says hes a very, very lucky boy

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LIVING BFriday, April 4, 2014 Family Features The changing season evokes a sense of renewal, inside and out, making it the perfect opportunity to rejuvenate you and your surroundings. Its time to let a little sunlight in and celebrate the warmer months ahead. From trying a bold, new hue with living room accents to taking a yoga class, there are numerous ways to reinvent yourself and your surroundings as you mentally prep for the season ahead even if the weather is saying otherwise. Use your senses and embrace the unbridled joy that comes with the change of seasons from the bright pops of color that enliven your home to the comforting oral scents that enhance your mood. Use these simple tips to transition into this exciting and vibrant time of year. Make it a scent-filled seasonAccording to a recent survey conducted by Glade, nearly 90 percent of Americans say that scent has the po wer to inspire feelings. Experience the powerful effect fra grance can have on everyday life by following these tips: %  C reate everyday in dulgences F reshen up your bathroom by adding soaps or room sprays in your favorite fresh scents, like lavender or citrus. %  I nvigorate your sens es Liv en up your home with fragrance, while awakening your taste buds by trying new recipes with season al fruits, vegetables and spices like r efreshing mint, zesty grapefruits and sweet cherries. %  B ring in some buds Plant a window gar den using your favor ite herbs or grab some fr esh cut owers from your garden for an in stant pop of color and a burst of fr esh fragrance. Freshen up your homeFrom the drapes that adorn your windows to the artwork that lines the walls y our home is a true reection of your personality and style. As you break free from last seasons routine, be sure to update your space too. Store away old decor and make room for more up beat, invigorated gear. A dd vibrant pops of col or and bright patterns with new accessor ies for a simple update that feels fresh. Wake up your sensesFragrance offers another easy way to invigor ate y our routine. Choose fragrances that embody the rejuvenation and excitement of the season. The new G lade Limited Edition Spring Collection for ex ample, is a refreshing assor t ment of v e fra grances inspired by the uplift ing feelings of the season, such as Lift Off and Let Loose.Make time for hobbies you loveAs the weather warms up, you will likely nd yourself attending more get togethers, out door sporting events and oth er celebrations with fr iends and family. As schedules become in creasingly hectic, be sur e to set aside time for the hobbies you love most. Whether its gar dening, cooking or reading, scheduling time for the activities y ou en joy will help ensure they happen. After all, mak ing me time a priority can benet y our overall happiness in more ways than one. Try something new This is a time of new beginnings and what better way to start fresh than by trying something new? Work a new hobby into your routine, such as yoga or paint ing. Or, attempt something youve always been afr aid to try. The thrill of accom plishing some thing you havent done or fear ed doing will leave you feeling empowered. Feel the breezeWhen the birds are chirping and the tulips are blooming, take advantage of the beautiful, mild w eather. Incorpo rate more outdoor activities into your schedule and nd ways to enjoy time outside each day Some fun out door activities include biking to wor k, hosting a dinner party on your patio or plant ing a gar den. A nd while y oure at home, be sure open up those windows and wel come the lovely breeze inside For more fresh ideas to embrace the season, visit www.glade.com. Photos courtesy of Getty Images

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B2 | NEWSSS U nN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.com JAKE COYLEAP Film WriterNEW YORK For the latest Mar vel release, Captain America: The W inter Soldier, most fan boys might prefer a Consumer Reportsstyle product review. New character introductions: Smooth. Action sequences: Excel lent if sometimes lacking nesse. V iewer satisfaction: Likely high. Box-ofce prospects: Bankable. Teasers for future Marvel install ments: Yes, two. W ith slick design and plushy in teriors, The Winter Soldier is an ex cellent product. But is it a good movie? Are the two indistinguish able at this point? Like the r ecent Thor: The Dark World, Winter Soldier is a se quel to a pre-Avengers franchise star ter. The earlier Captain Ameri ca: First Avenger was a mostly clever period lm, set in the s and awash with a char ming WWII thrill er nostalgia. Winter Soldier brings Steve Rog ers the weakling recruit made a br awny Greatest Generation icon, played by Chris Evans up to pres ent day for a Washington D.C. conspiracy thriller. Fittingly, Marvel has attr acted the default hero of such lms, Robert Redford. Hes a ma jor get for the franchise, especially since (unlike in last years All is Lost ) hes actually talking now. While Rogers runs laps around the Lincoln Memorial Reecting Pool and jots notes on the pop cul ture he missed while frozen for 70 y ears, theres trouble brewing at S.H.I.E.L.D. Its head, Nick Fury (Samuel Jackson), believes some thing is amiss with the agencys latest project: a trio of helicarriers that can kill evildoers fr om the sky even before the evil is done. Its in this way that Marvel lms use a complicated current-events issue NSA-like spying to feign contemporary relevance. Its the ap pearance of having something to say Captain America, a stand-in for a more innocent, noble America, wonders if the helicarriers are like holding a gun to everyone on Earth and calling it protection. But thats about the extent of such talk in Winter Soldier: a politi cal thriller without the politics. (Be war ned: some small spoilers follow.) Fury, having doubted the proj ect, nds himself a hunted man. C aptain America is left to investi gate with only a few trustworthy fr iends: Scarlett Johanssons scar let-haired former KGB agent Natasha Romanoff, a.k.a. the Black Widow (an Avengers toss-in, added like a dash of papr ika) and Anthony Mackies veteran Sam Wilson (a wel come newbie). The best thing Winter Soldier has going for it is its cast, a uniform ly likable bunch, particularly the winning M ackie, whose character dons mechanical wings to become the Falcon. And then theres Red ford, who plays Alexander Pierce, a S.H.I.E.L.D director. Redford, naturally, classes up the joint. Historically, in lms like Three Days of the Condor and All the Presidents Men, hes been the regular guy ghting government conspiracy which makes his du plicitous turn in Winter Soldier ex citing. Like Jackson, he lends a gravitas to the lm that it perhaps doesnt quite deserve. Directing brothers Anthony Rus so and Joe Russo (You, Me and Dupree) and screenwriters Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely ( Thor: The Dark World) put per haps a bit more into character development than these lms often do (The biggest misstep is with the handling of the title character, an assassin played by Sebastian Stan, whose true identity is mysterious.) The brightly lit D.C. environs, too, give the lm something of a sense of the real world. Yet when Marvin Gayes Trouble Man plays popculture homework for Rogers its like a window into another, wholly separate universe. One with soul. Its getting difcult to tell the Mar vel movies apart. The ght scenes on a depar ting aircraft blur to gether. The reversals of friend and foe r efract like an innity mirror. The characters are spread across so many movies that youd need a detectives cork board to keep it straight. So while The Winter Soldier suc ceeds as nely engineered mer chandise built to be crowd-pleasing enter tainment, for moviegoers and shareholder alike, it has a shelf life that wont last much past its run ning time. Captain America: The Winter Sol dier, a Walt Disney release, is rated PG-13 b y the Motion Picture Asso ciation of America for intense sequences of violence, gunplay and action thr oughout. Running time: 136 minutes. Captain America zippy but hollow Courtesy Marvel Studios/MCTChris Evans, left, and Scarlett Johansson in Captain America: The Winter Soldier.DEAR ABBY: My boy friend and I have been together for two years. We r ecently spent a romantic night at a hotel, complete with dinner, drinks the whole shebang that he organized. I know he was a little stressed about money be cause he mentioned it. He asked if I could shell out some money, which I did, and when the bill came, he asked me if I could shell out some more. I was a little upset be cause I wasnt planning on spending that much. H e says he is going to pay me back some of it, and now I just feel bad. I told him I didnt enjoy being put in that situation and things got awkward quickly. Now I am the one apolo gizing, and I feel like I ruined our night. Am I being a br at? NEW YORK READERDEAR N.Y. READER: I dont think so. If your boy friend couldnt afford to pay for the r omantic eve ning, he should have discussed it with you beforehand so you wouldnt be put on the spot. DEAR ABBY : I work at an elementary school, and I help out during lunch, keeping order and making sure the kids are not too loud. T wo of their moms work here. The kids are bullies and have no respect for adults whatsoever. When I try to discipline them or give them a time out, they go to their moms and accuse me of target ing them because they are black. Then the moms come to me and complain and ask me why Im targeting them. This is causing me a lot of stress. I cant al low them to bully other kids but at the same time I dont want trouble with the parents. How can I approach this situation without it getting more complicated? SCHOOLYARD MOM IN FLORIDADEAR SCHOOLYARD MOM: Because these women are preventing you from effectively su pervising the children, which is y our job, you should address this prob lem with the principal of the school.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phil lips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www .DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Romantic night comes at a cost DEAR ABBYJeanne Phillips MOVIE REVIEW CRI tT I cC sS RA tT ING : PUZZ leLE coCO R N eE R

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 4, 2014 | NEWSSS U nN | B3 HEALTh H Y L LIVING Until the advent of penicillin in World War II, the biggest cause of death in war was disease. George Washington had the soldiers of the Army of the Potomac vaccinat ed for smallpox because of his concer n about los ing troops to that scourge. S ixty percent of Union sol diers and 54 percent of W orld War I soldiers died of disease. With the discovery of antibiotics, only 28 per cent of World War II deaths w ere due to dis ease. Penicillin was discovered in England before the war, but it was the war time need that led to a cooperative effort of many drug companies in the United States that got penicillin into mass pro duction. The biggest killer in battle is blood loss. Ear ly wounds were cauter ized with boiling oil or hot metal. I n the 16th century a French barber, Ambrose Pare, acting as a eld sur geon, decided there must be a better way He be gan nding, clamping and then tying off ar teries us ing silk ligatures. He had impr oved results, but it took nearly 100 years for his ligatures to become standard. Blood banks were start ed in France in 1918 to impr ove the care for wounded soldiers. Ko rea and Vietnam saw increased survival rates due to better blood manage ment in the eld. T oday, troops carry tour niquets that can be applied one-handed to a leg or ar m injury in the eld. The high survival rate of the Boston Marathon bombing was attributed in part to the large number of rst responders who had studied or had practi cal experience with explosive war wounds. D uring the Korean War, a registry of vascular in juries, the repairs and the outcomes was star ted. The 8,000 case records were one of the rst at tempts to improve care with evidenced-based medicine. Knowing which inju ries could be repaired and what methods wor ked helped save many limbs. The number of limbs lost due to explosive de vices has led to improved pr osthetics as the young, otherwise healthy, ampu tees returned from Vietnam and Afghanistan. They r efused to be limited by their injuries and de manded better answers to the limitations of older prosthetics. The carbon blades that allowed Oscar Pisto rius to participate in the O lympics and the oth er specialized feet that allo w skiing, hiking and even swimming, are good examples of this. Perhaps the most excit ing area is in hand transplants. These were controversial because of the ser ious long-term con sequences of the anti-rejection drugs. The Department of Defense, in cooper ation with the University of Pittsburg, is funding a study using bone marrow taken from the limb donor and then injected, after processing, into the limb recipient. This has dramatically de creased the need for antir ejection drugs. This technique may turn out to be applicable to other transplants, de creasing both the risk and the long-ter m drug costs. Wars have brought ad vances in civilian medicine as new procedures ar e developed to help our troops.Dr. Diana D. Carr treats patients at The Hand & Shoulder Special ists with a concentration on healing shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand problems. She is certied by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery and a Fellow of the Ameri can Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. For more information, please visit http://hand-shoulder-special ist.com or call (863) 382-7777. This information is not intended to diag nose, treat or cure your condition.Wartime medicine has led to advances MetroMany of the advances in medical technology that we now take for granted were pioneered by doctors treating war casualties.Dear Pharmacist: I have neuropathies all over my body, it feels like pins and needles. I take pain medi cations. Is there anything natur al I can do or take? G.D. Seattle, ColoradoAnswer: Neuropathy may cause more than the discomfor t you de scribe. It can also cause pain, w eakness, dizziness when standing up, burn ing sensations (even in the tongue), shooting pain, trigeminal neuralgia, tin gling, numbness, cystitis, ur inary urgency, and vibra tion/buzzing sensations. I n men, erectile dysfunc tion is possible. R ecognizing that your neuropathy is related to another disorder is huge. If you treat the neuropathy as a disease in and of itself, then you miss the big pic ture, and the opportunity to cur e yourself. Neuropathy is a symp tom of post-herpetic neuralgia (shingles), high insulin, diabetes, gluten sensitivity or C eliac, heavy metal toxicity, autoim mune disorders, Lyme disease and medications. A little-kno wn fact is that medications can mug your body of nutrients that would otherwise protect your nerves, so neuropathy pain is a side effect. The list of drugs that can indi rectly do this goes is in the hundr eds and some clas sic offenders include antacids, acid blockers, oral contr aceptives, hormone replacement therapy, cor ticosteroids, statin cholesterol reducers, breast cancer dr ugs and uoro quinolone antibiotics. That last class of dr ugs, the uoroquinolones (Cip ro, Floxin, Avelox, Levaquin) have a uoride backbone. Fluoride is known to har m the thyroid gland, reduce thyroid produc tion and cause irreversible damage to the nervous system. O ne solution for neurop athies is to reduce insulin and blood sugar My book Diabetes Without Drugs offers natural remedies to help. Id get off medi cations that cause neuropathies (with physician appr oval) and simultane ously get on medications that suppor t nerve growth. Thyroid medications, specically T3 and/or growth hormone shots can help. If your doctor approves and supervises you, you could take a few of the fol lowing supplements. Its all tr ial and error, I dont know whats right for you: %  Thiamine: A glass of wine every night can steal nerve-protective nutrients like vitamin B1 (thiamine). You can also try benfotiamine, a fat-soluble form of thiamine. %  P robiotics: Sounds strange, but heres a con nection. Probiotics allow y ou to make methylco balamin (vitamin B12) which y ou need to pro duce myelin and protect the ner ve cells. %  M ethylcobalamin (B12): When your body starves for B12, you lose the my elin sheath and your ner ves short circuit. This can cause neuropathy and depression. There are dozens of drug mug gers of B12, including the diabetic medica tions that you take as w ell as processed foods, sugar, antibiotics, estro gen hormones and acid blockers %  Lipoic A cid: You can buy it as alpha at any health food store, or R lipoic acid as a more bioavailable form. This antioxidant squash es free radicals that attack your myelin sheath and fray your nerve wiring. It reduces blood sugar, too. High dos es are needed to improve nerve pain, but if y ou take high doses, you need to also supplement with a little biotin. The reason is because lipoic acid is a drug mugger of biotin. %  Suzy Cohen is a registered pharmacist and the author of The 24Hour Pharmacist and Real Solu tions. For more information, visit www .suzycohen.com. This infor mation is not intended to treat, diagnose or cure your condition.Stop nerve pain in its tracks DEAR PHAR mM A CISTSuzy Cohen GUEST CC OLU m M NDr. Diana Carr WASHINGTON (AP) Patients may soon get an unprecedented look at how their doc tor compares to other physicians, after M edicare announced Wednesday it plans to publicly post bill ing data for more than 888,000 pr actitioners. Considered the mother lode of infor mation on doctors, the M edicare claims data base has been off-limits to the public for decades, blocked in the cour ts by physician groups. The American Medical Association has argued that its re lease would amount to an inv asion of doctors privacy. Consumer groups, insurers, em ployers and the news media hav e sought the information to help them evaluate clini cians. W ednesday, the Obama administration came down on the side of disclosure. Medicare Deputy Ad ministrator Jonathan B lum said in a letter to the American Medi cal Association that the agency intends to post the data publicly as early as next week.Medicare to release billing data for 880K doctors

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B4 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.com Cornerstone Hospice seeks volunteers with hospice heartsSEBRING Highlands and Hardee County residents who want to make a difference in their community are invited to join the team of dedicated and caring Cornerstone Hospice and Palliative Care volunteers. Hospice volunteers assist with of ce duties and marketing events, as well as visit hospice patients in their homes, offering conversation and giving caregivers a welcome break. All Cornerstone Hospice volunteers must complete a 16hour training session and the next training is scheduled for April, in Sebring: Tuesday, April 8; Friday, April 11; Tuesday, April 15 and Friday, April 18, each day, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Cornerstone Hospice, 209 N. Ridgewood Drive, Suite 3. Breakfast and coffee will be provided. All four days of training are required. Call Dorothy Harris, volunteer specialist, at 382-4563; Lisa Gray, volunteer manager at 352742-6806 or toll-free, 888-728-6234.Caregiver support groups offeredChange of Pace offers several Caring for Caregivers support groups. In Avon Park, the group meet at the First Christian Church, 1016 Camphor St., every Monday from 10:3011:30 a.m. Facilitators Cora Schwingel and Jean Maas. In Sebring, the group meets at Sebring Christian Church/ Change of Pace, 4514 Hammock Road, every Thursday from 1-2 p.m. Facilitators are Jean Maas and Ellen McKissock. There is also an evening group that meets every second and fourth Thursday from 6-7 p.m. The facilitator is Cora Schwingel. There is also and Anticipatory Grief Support Group that meets in Sebring at Sebring Christian Church/Change of Pace, 4514 Hammock Road, every Tuesday 9:3011 a.m. The facilitator is Charlie Stroup. In Lake Placid, the group meets at Memorial United Methodist Church, 500 Kent St., every Tuesday from 10 p.m. Facilitators are Lisa Rodriguez and Sharon Puckett. Call 382-1188 for more information.Childbirth education workshops setSEBRING The Florida Department of Health and Healthy Start will host free childbirth education workshops on April 11 and May 15 at 7205 South George Blvd., Sebring. Space is limited and pre-registration is required. Call 382-7233.Free quit smoking programIf youre ready to quit tobacco, there is a sixsession program that will help you for free, including free nicotine patches. For more information, call 877-252-6094 or visit www.ahectobacco.com.Diabetes management classes offeredSEBRING Free diabetes self management classes will be offered at the Health Department, 7205 South George Blvd. April 21-23, from 5:308:30 p.m. and again May 5-7 from 8:30-11:30 a.m. Classes are taught by Peggy Pierce, RN, and nutritionist Aleyda Oliveros. Space is limited. Call 382-7294 to reserve a seat.Atonement Lutheran ChurchSEBRING Rev. Sharon Dorr will lead the Sunday service. This will be Birthday Sunday. Coffee and birthday cake will be served after the service in the fellowship hall.Avon Park Christian ChurchAVON PARK Pastor Greg Ratliff will bring a message in the sermon series Is Something On Fire? on Sunday. The church is at 1016 W. Camphor St. (behind the Wells Fargo Bank). Call 453-5334 or email apcc.2014@yahoo.com with any questions or to request information. The website is www.avonparkchristianchurch.com.Christ Lutheran ChurchAVON PARK Pastor Scott McLean will preach a sermon titled Living in the Spirit in the Flesh on Sunday. The church is at 1320 County Road 64, east of the Avon Park High School past the four-way stop sign. For more information, call 471-2663 or visit www.christlutheranavonpark.org.Christian Training ChurchSEBRING Rev. Linda M. Downing will bring the message titled Greater Vision at the Sunday morning service. The Wednesday night Bible study is the Gospel of John.Church of the BrethrenSEBRING Pastor David Smalley will preach from Ephesians 1:18-23 on Sunday. This Sunday the title of his sermon will be Transformation Power. The theme for Sunday school will be Creating a Redeemed People. The scripture will be from Isaiah 43. Call 385-1597.Emmanuel United Church of ChristSEBRING Rev. George Millers sermon on Sunday will be Whole; Holy from Romans 8:6-11. The church is 1.7 miles west of U.S. 27 on Hammock Road. Call 471-1999 or visit www.sebringemmanuelucc.com for more information.Faith Baptist Church of Lake PlacidLAKE PLACID Pastor Bill Cole will be preaching Marching Orders for Believers from the book of Romans Sunday morning, and Sunday evening he will preach How Do You Spell Love from the Gospel of John. Mid-week prayer & Bible study is held on Wednesday. The Easter Musical, Jesus Messiah, will be on Palm Sunday, April 13, at 10:45 a.m. To listen to Faith Baptist Sunday morning sermons or for more information, visit www. faithbaptistchurchLP. com or call 465-0060. The church is at 660 Holmes Ave.Faith Lutheran Church of SebringSEBRING This Sunday, the church celebrates Fifth Sunday in Lent. Guest Pastor Tony Douches will be delivering his sermon at Faith Lutheran titled, Can These Bones Live? Every Tuesday and Thursday morning, Senior Aerobics is offered by teacher Barbara. Classes are no charge and are various levels. L.I.F.T. Ladies In Faith/Fellowship Together meets Friday, April 11. The study will be on Give Work A Rest. The text is from Exodus 31:12-17. The church is having Lenten services on Wednesday evenings, the theme for Wednesday is Facing Suffering from Romans 8:18-19. For more information on any event, visit www.facebook.com/ FaithLutheranSebring.First Baptist Church Avon ParkAVON PARK Rev. Jon Beck will be preaching from James 5:12 on Sunday. Nursery is available for the morning and evening services. Wednesdays schedule includes supper, childrens choir, Bible study/ prayer meeting, youth and children activities, choir rehearsal and the Spanish service. The church is at 100 N. Lake Ave. Call 863-4536681 or email info@fbcap. net.First Christian Church of Sebring Disciples of ChristSEBRING Sundays message by Pastor Ron Norton will be A Woman Anoints Jesus from Mark 14: 3-9. Greeting the congregation will be Terry Ducar. Elders will be Diane Beidler and Linda Ellis. Deacons and servers will be Carol Graves, Catherine Baker, Barbara Slinkard and Carol Chandler. The Church is at 510 Poinsettia Ave. Call 385-0352.First Presbyterian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK Rev. Ed Fleagle will be the guest speaker Sunday. His sermon is entitled Baptism with the Holy Spirit based on Luke 24:44-49. The choirs introit will be I Come to the Cross and the anthem How Beautiful. The adult Sunday school class is using the denominational quarterly. The theme this quarter is the Gospel of Matthew. Sundays lesson is entitled Greatness in the Kingdom based on Matthew 20:1-28. Youth Group will be led by Dave Blackmon and Kathaleen Black. On Wednesday, Pastor Bob Johnson will lead Bible study on the book What is Spiritual Warfare? The church is at 215 E. Circle St. (with two entrances on Lagrand St.). Call 453-3242 or visit www.avonparkapchurch. com.First Presbyterian Church of SebringSEBRING Rev. Darrell A. Peers sermon title for Sunday is Building Faith, Part 2. Miriam Circle meets Monday. Dorcas Sewing Circle meets Tuesday, as will youth groups. Wednesday is adult Bible study and choir rehearsal. The church is at 319 Poinsettia Ave. Call 385-0107.First United Methodist Church of SebringSEBRING Pastor John Bryant will bring the message with the Youth Choir providing the special music. Holy Communion will be served. Wednesday evening will be fellowship with dinner and Bible study. Listen Live on WITS-AM 1340 each Sunday to hear the morning service. The church is downtown at 126 South Pine St. Call 385-5184.Grace Pointe MinistriesSEBRING The church meets in the Sebring Hills Clubhouse, 200 Lark Ave. Call Myrna at 385-1671 for details. Sundays sermon message is celebrating the month of Nissan, Rosh Chodesh of the Jewish calendar. The tribe attached to this month is the Tribe of Judah. Tuesday Home Bible S tudy continues the study Messiah: Shadow to Image. Each week is a independent study. Call 863-658-2534 for directions. Friday Night Bible Study is with GoToMeeting. Let the pastor know if you would like to participate in this live interactive study at www.gracepointecog@ comcast.net and he will send you the link.Heartland Christian ChurchSEBRING Pastor Ted Moores sermon this week will be Christian Arobics, Part 2 with scripture from 1 Thessalonians 5:12-22. Communion is offered during the service weekly The service will include specials by Allen Warchak and Ruth Rayburn. Tuesday night adult Bible study is taught by Pastor Ted Moore. Wednesday night supper is served by Barbra Kelly and Dorothy Newton. The church is at 2705 Alternate Route 17 South in Sebring (behind Publix). Call 314-9693.Memorial United Methodist ChurchLAKE PLACID Pastor Tim Haas will preach on Journey to the Cross-The Dead Man at the traditional and contemporary worship services, with the scripture lesson from John 11:38-45. Youth Group will meet Sunday afternoon in Rob Reynolds Hall, led by Pastor Claude Burnett. The Church is at 500 Kent Ave., east of the Tower. Call 465-2422.New Beginnings ChurchSEBRING On Sunday, Pastor Gary Kindles sermon is titled Valley of the Dry Bones based on Ezekiel 37:1-14 New Beginnings Church of Sebring is a Bibleoriented, non-denominational church led by Pastor Gary Kindle. There is a blended service with contemporary and traditional music. The church meets in The Morris Chapel, 307 S. Commerce Ave. Call 835-2405. Highlands Social Center Highlands Social Center Saturday, April 5th at 6:00-9:00pm Don West and Silver Eagle Band Classic Country Music L I V E BYOB Admission $ 5 HEALTHY LIVING SNAPSHOTS LOCAL NEWS RELIGION SNAPSHOTS CHURCH SERVICESCONTINUED | B6 M C Y K

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www.newssun.comFriday, April 4, 2014 | NEWSSS U nN | B5 PLACES TO WORSHI pP Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sun that is published Friday and Sunday. To place a listing in this directory, call the News-Sun at 3856155, ext. 596.ANGLIC aA NNew LL ife AA nglican Fellowship, 10 N. Main A ve. (Womans Club), Lake Placid, FL 33852. Rev. Susan Rhodes, Deacon in Charge, (863) 243-3191; strhodes1020@yahoo.com. Sun day Worship, 10 a.m. Teaching, Holy Communion, Music, Fellowship, Healing Prayer. Pastoral and Spiritual.ASSEMB LL Y OF G G O D CC hrist Fellowship CC hurch ( AA ssembly of God) 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Await ing His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in T ruth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morn ing Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. W ednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 471-0924. First A A ssembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Eve ning Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431.BAPT II ST AA von Park L L akes Baptist C C hurch, 22600 N. Highlands Blvd., Avon Park, FL 33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ cen tered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nur sery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist C C hurch (G AR AR B C C )   We are located at the corner of SR17 and C17A (truck route) in Avon   Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., and   evening worship service is at 6 p.m.   On Wednes days, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20 s+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.betha nybaptistap.com or call the church ofce at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist C C hurch, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Wor ship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf inter pretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist C C hurch, 1000 Max well St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunda y School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Wor ship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: ofce@apfellowship.org; W eb site, www.ap fellowship.org. F irst Baptist C C hurch of A A von P ark, N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 453-6681. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Rev. Johnattan Soltero, His panic pastor; Joy Loomis, director of music. Sunda y Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Wor ship, 10:45 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:45 a.m.; Y outh Choir, 4:30 p.m.; Evening Wor ship, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for both ser vices. Wednesday Wednesday Night Sup per, 5:15 p.m.; Childrens Choir, 5:45 p.m.; Y outh Activities, 6 p.m.; Prayer Meeting/Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Worship Choir Practice, 6 p.m.; Mission Programs for Children, 6:45 p.m. Hispanic Services: Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., worship service at 11 a.m. Wednes day Bible study at 7 p.m. To watch services online, go to the website at www.fbcap.net. In the heart of Avon Park, for the hearts of Avon Park. First Baptist C C hurch of L L ake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both ser vices with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages star ts at 9:45 a.m. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meet ing at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility and missions training for all chil dren. Call the church at 655-1524. F irst Baptist C C hurch of L L ake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm St., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Website: www.fbclp. com. Email: information@fbclp.com. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contem porary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Wednesday Activities: Fam ily dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reserva tions required). Prayer meeting, Youth Inter sections, and MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. The church is at 119 E. Ro yal Palm St., Lake Placid. For information, call 465-3721 or go to www.fbclp.com. First Baptist C C hurch of L L orida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School be gins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday wor ship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is pro vided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., fol lowed by adult choir rehearsal. From Septem ber the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to disco ver Gods love. For more information about the church or the minis tries offered, call 655-1878. F irst Baptist C C hurch, S S ebring, 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Rev. Matthew D. Crawford, se nior pastor; Rev. Nuno Norberto, associate pastor, minister of music and senior adults; and Dixie Kreulen, preschool direc tor. Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.; Blended Service, 10:30 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Call 385-4704. Website www.fbsebring.com Florida A A venue Baptist C C hurch, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Gird ley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunda y Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children and youth at 6 p.m. and for adults at 6:30 p.m. II ndependent Baptist C C hurch, 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday wor ship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. W ednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. LL eisure L L akes Baptist C C hurch, 808 Gar denia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the w est end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Wor ship service at 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 6 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist C C hurch (G AR AR B C C ), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morn ing Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-w eek service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist C C hurch, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870. Wel come to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Mor ning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 2143025. Afliated with the National Associa tion of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. SS parta R R oad Baptist C C hurch, ( S S B C C ) 4400 Sparta Road. Evangelist Roger Jaudon. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For infor mation, call 382-0869. SS outhside Baptist C C hurch (G AR AR B C C ), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Awana kin dergarten through fth grade, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Mid week Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for under age 3 is avail able at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Ofce phone, 385-0752. SS pring L L ake Baptist C C hurch, Where the Bible is Always Open. Pastor Richard Schermerhorn, 7408 Valencia Road; 6552610. Assistant Pastor Ronald Smith, 3861610. On U.S. 98 at the Spring Lake Vil lage II entrance. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. for all ages; Mor ning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednes day Mid-week Bible Study and Prayer Service, 6:30 p.m. Nursery available for all ser vices. SS unridge Baptist C C hurch, ( S S B C C ) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CC ATHO LIC LICOO ur LL ady of Grace CC atholic CC hurch, 595 E. Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vig il Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunda y mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English. Sunday Life Teen Mass at 6 p.m. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. English confession at 3:30 p.m. Saturday; Spanish confession at 6:30 p.m. Religious Education Classes (September to May) are 9-10:20 a.m. Sun day for grades K through 5th. Grades 6th through Y outh Bible Study are from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. SS t. C C atherine C C atholic C C hurch, 820 Hick ory St., Sebring. Parrish ofce/mailing ad dress: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 3850049, 385-6762 (Spanish); fax, 385-5169; email, ofce@stcathe.com; website, www. stcathe.com. School Ofce/Mailing, Princi pal Dr. Anna V. Adam, 747 S. Franklin St., Se bring, FL 33870; 385-7300; fax, 385-7310; email school@stcathe.com. School ofce hours 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday-Fri day. Clergy: Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F., fr jose@stcathe.com or 385-0049; Parochial V icar, Rev. Victor Caviedes, 385-3993; Assist ing Priest (retired), Rev. J. Peter Sheehan; De cons, Rev. Mr. James R. McGarry and Rev. Mr Max M. Severe. WEEKEND MASS SCHED ULE: Saturday: 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 and 10 a.m., 12 p.m. (Spanish), 5 p.m. (Holy Fam ily Youth Center), every third Sunday of the month at 2 p.m. (F rench Mass). Daily Mass: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m. Sacrament of Reconcilliation: 7:157:45 a.m. rst Friday, 2:30-3:15 p.m. Satur day and 9-9:45 a.m. Sunday. Ofce Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monda y-Friday. SS t. James C C atholic C C hurch, 3380 Placid view Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Sun day 8 a..m. and 10 a.m. year round. Saturday Vigil 4 p.m. Weekdays 9 a.m. Holy da ys 9:30 a.m. (Vigil evening before at 7 p.m.) First Saturday of each month: Healing Mass, 9 a.m. CC HR II ST II A NNCC ornerstone CC hristian CC hurch, (Saxon Hall) 1003 W. Pine St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Lo ve Christ Love People. Jon Carter, Music Minister. Sunday, 9 a.m. Bible Study; 10 a.m. Worship; Communion avail able each week. Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship Group. For more information call 4537679. SS ebring C C hristian C C hurch, 4514 Ham mock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher. Kristy Marvin, Child rens Director. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y School, 11 a.m.; Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets at 1 p.m. Thursdays. Phone 382-6676. First C C hristian C C hurch (Disciples of CC hrist) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of P oinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-0358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m. CC HR II ST II A NN & M I I SS II O NN A RY A LLILLI A NCN C E TT he AA lliance CC hurch of SS ebring, 451 Spar ta Road, Sebring, FL 33875. Call 3821343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednes day Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CC HUR CC H OF BRETHRE NNCC hurch of the Brethren, 700 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m. Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CC HUR CC H OF C C HR II S T AA von Park C C hurch of C C hrist, 200 S. Forest Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Minister: Don Smith. Sunda y Worship Services, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available at every service. Bible Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered class es for all ages. Church phone: 453-4692. HH eartland church of C C hrist, Lakeshore Mall Suite 42 (outside entrance), 901 U.S. Highway 27 N, Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday worship, 9 a.m. to noon; Wednesday, Bible study, 7 p.m. Evangelist Carl Ford, (863) 4022159. LL ake Placid C C hurch of C C hrist, 1069 Hwy 27 North, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Mailing address is P.O. Box 1440, Lake Placid, FL 33862. Sunday morning worship is at 10 a.m. Sunday evening worship is 6 p.m. Bi ble class 9 a.m. Sundays and Wednesday e venings at 7 p.m. All are invited to join us. For more information, call the church at 863465-4636 or visit the website www.thelord sway.com/lakeplacidcofc/. SS ebring Parkway C C hurch of C C hrist, 3800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870; 3857443. Minister: Kevin Patterson. Times of ser vice are: Sunday Bible Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday W orship Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening Ser vice, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Bible Class, 7 p.m. CC HUR CC H OF G G OD CC hurch on the RR idge, Church of God, Ander son, Ind.; 1130 State Road 17 North, Sebring, FL 33870. Worship Service Sun day, 10 a.m.; Bible Study and Prayer, W ednesday, 7 p.m. Pastor Dr. Collet Varner, (863) 382-0773. CC HUR CC H OF N N A ZARE NN EFirst CC hurch of the Nazarene of AA von Park P.O. Box 1118., Avon Park, FL 338251118. 707 W. Main St. Sunday: Sunday school begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning worship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening service at 6 p.m. Wednesday evening service is at 7 p.m. with special services for children and adults. If you need any more information, call 453-4851. CC hurch of the Nazarene of L L ake Plac id, 512 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852. Adult Sunda y school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednes day evening: All church meal, 6 p.m.; Chris tian Life Study, 6:45 p.m. Winter Life groups pending Call 446-1339. Pastor Tim Taylor. CC HUR CC HES OF C C H R II S T IN IN CC HR II ST II A NN U NIN I O NN CC ommunity Bible CC hurch CC hurches of CC hrist in C C hristian Union, (Orange Blos som Conference Center) 1400 C-17A North (tr uck route), Avon Park. Presenting Jesus Christ as the answer for time and eterni ty. Sunday morning worship service, 10:30 a.m. Nur sery provided. Junior Church ac tivities at same time for K-6 grade. Sunday School Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m. (T ransportation available.) Sunday eve ning praise and worship service, 6 p.m. W ednesday evening prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and youth activities at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Everyone is welcome, please come worship with us. Tom Schwankweiler, Pastor. Phone 453-6052.EP II S CC OPA LLEE piscopal CC hurch of the RR edeemer AA von P ark, 910 W. Martin St., Avon Park, FL 33825 (U.S. 27 across from Wells Mo tor Co.). Rev. Canon George Conger. Sunday services: Holy Communion at 9:30 a.m.; Bible study W ednesday at 10 a.m. Everyone is welcome. Come and wor ship with us; we would love to meet you. Church ofce, 453-5664; fax, 453-4853. Visit us at our website at redeemeravon park.com. Email redeemer1895@aol. com. Call the thrift store for hour s open and donation pick up at 664-9668 or 453-5664. SS t. A A gnes E E piscopal C C hurch, 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Fa ther Scott Walker. Sunday Services: Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucha rist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek service on W ednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bi ble study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always w elcome. Church ofce 385-7649, for more information. SS t. Francis of A A ssisi A A nglican E E pis copal CC hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-0051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Nelson, Rector. Worship: Sunday, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday Bible study at 9:15 a.m. Sunday School at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Wor ship 6 p.m. and Thursday 9 a.m. Holy Communion with Healing Call the thrift store for hours open 699-0221.EVA NGNG E LICLIC A LL FREE C C H UR CC H O F AMER ICIC A TT he CC hurch of the Way EE F CACA 1005 N. Ridge wood Drive, Sebring. Sunda1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednes days. The Way is a church family who gather s for contemporary worship, teach ing of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come ear ly and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way A place for you. Ofce Phone: 471-6140, Church Cell Phone: 273-3674. Email: thewaychurch@ hotmail.com. Web site: www.TheWayChurch.org GG RA CC E BRETHRE NN Grace Brethren CC hurch, 3626 Thunder bird Road, (863) 835-0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednes day services at 7 p.m. We offer Kid City Children s Ministry throughout all ser vices, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married couples, primetimer s, and Bible studies in Spanish. Kid City Day Care, Preschool and AfterSchool Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For registration call: 385-3111). Check us out on the Web at www.sebringgrace.org. ININ DEPE NN DE NN TFirst CC hristian CC hurch, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the W eb at www.rstchristi anap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at F irst Christian Church. Greg Ratliff, Se nior Minister; Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Wednesday studies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. ININ TERDE NN OM INI N A T II O NN A LL World H H arvest and R R estoration Ministries, (non-denominational) 2200 N. A von Blvd.,(non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd., Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-3771. Sunday service: Sunday School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rog ers. LL UTHERA N NAA tonement LL utheran CC hurch ( ELCAELCA ), 1178 S.E. Lak eview Drive., Sebring. Rev. Sharon Dorr and Deacon David Thoresen will be the Spiritual Leaders, alternating Sundays. Jim Helwig, organist. Worship service with the Holy Eucharist is at 9:30 a.m. every Sunday. Birthday Sunday is the rst Sunday of each month after the service. Council meeting is on the rst Tuesday of each month. WELCA meets at noon second Tuesday of the month with a light lunch. Labyrinth Prayer Garden is open to the public 24 hours a day, seven days a week. When in need of prayers or to talk to God, come to the Garden. Come and grow with us; we would love to meet you and your family. Dont worry about how you look. Jesus went to the temple in a robe and san dals. Quilting classes every Monday at 6 p.m. Looking for quilter s or people willing to learn. Call 840-3303. CC hrist L L utheran C C hurch A A von P ark LCLC M S S 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School past the four-way stop sign. Sunday Divine Wor ship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated e very week with tradition al Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. F ellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come wor ship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at (863) 471-2663 or see christlutherana vonpark. org. Faith L L utheran C C hurch LC LC M S S ,2740 Lakeview Dr, Sebring; Church phone: 3857848; Faith Child Development Center: 385-3232. Sunday Traditional Worship Ser vice: 8 a.m.; Sunday Praise Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.; Communion served 1st, 3rd & 5th Sunda y. Sunday School & Bible Classes: 9:15 a.m. Worship Svc. Broad cast at 8 a.m. on WITS 1340AM each Sunday. Educational opportunities include w eekly adult Bible studies, Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. All are warm ly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good S S hepherd L L utheran C C hurch (AALC) American Association of Luther an Churches, 3240 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. James Weed, pastor. W orship Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Bi ble Study, 9 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 385-2346. Ne w L L ife E E vangelical L L utheran C C hurch, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangeli cal Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more infor mation, call Pastor Luke Willitz at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www. newlifesebring.com. RR esurrection L L utheran C C hurch ELCA ELCA 324 E. Main St., at Memorial Drive, Avon Park. Pastor Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Sun day worship 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Sunday School at 9:15 a.m. Coffee and fellowship following 10:30 a.m. service. Wednesday Worship Service is at 7 p.m. Open Com munion celebrated at all services. Gods W ork, Our Hands. TT rinity L L utheran C C hurch LC LC M S S 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots PreSchool director Education Hour, 8:45 a.m.; Worship service, 10 a.m. Holy Com munion each rst and third Sunday. Childrens Church scheduled during worship ser vice, 4-year-olds through fth grade. Nursery provided during worship service for infants to 3-year-olds. Seasonal MidWeek Services each Wwednesday eve ning during Advent and Lent. Call church ofce at 465-5253 or visit the w ebsite at www.Trinitylutheranlp.com. Other ac tivities and groups include: Choir; Ladies Guild and L WML; Mens Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies; Trinity Tots Pre-school, and Youth Group. NN O NN -DE NN OM INI N A T II O NN A LL Bible Fellowship CC hurch, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: F irst Worship sermon, songs signed rst and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 yrs through 5th grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church of ce 385-1024. CC alvary C C hurch, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An inde pendent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunda y evening service, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small friendly church waiting for your visit. CC hristian T T raining Ministries I I nc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. A nursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Chris tian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister, lindadowning@live.com. Casey L. Downing, associate minister, caseydowning@hotmail.com. Church phone: 314-0482. W eb site: www. ctmforme.com CC rossroads of L L ife,148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852; Tel. 863655-9163. The place of your Divine ap pointment. We expect our supernatural God to transfor m our lives through His power and grace. Come, learn of His plan and destiny for you. With His plan we re ceive His provision along with His perfect timing and oppor tunity. What you have longed for, but have been missing, can now be received. The direction you have been thirsty for will suddenly quench your parched soul. Come to experience what you have been missing for so long empowerment in every area of life. We teach, train and send forth to win souls. You dont speak English no problema. We have a Spanish interpreter. We look forward to fellowship and worship with you at 7 p.m. every Wednesday. Pastoers Gil and Rosa Benton (Faith Never Fails). Faith & Familylife Worship C C enter, Pastors Leroy and JoAnn Taylor invite you to discover one of Sebrings hidden trea sures at 2349 U.S. 27 South (Banyan Plaza off Spar ta Road and Lake Jackson). We provide biblical solutions for every day challenges through our multicultural worship services available on Sundays at 11 a.m. and Wednesdays at 7 p.m. Child care is a vailable for all who at tend. For more information, all 385-1800. Plan your r st visit. Matthew 7:7 says, Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will nd; knock and the door will be opened to you. Our guests are very im portant, so please let us know how we can meet your need b y emailing theffwc@ gmail.com. Our mission at Faith & Fami lylife is centered around Restoring Lives, F amilies and Communities. Grace Bible C C hurch, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone, 382-1085. Dustin Woods, lead pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Monday, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry. www.GBCco nnected.org HH ighlands C C ommunity C C hurch, a ca sual contemporary church, meets at 3005 Ne w Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. New Beginnings C C hurch of S S ebring, worshiping at The Morris Chapel, 307 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Pastor Gary Kindle. Bible study every Sunday, 9 a.m. Blended Church Service, 10:15 a.m. Phone (863) 835-2405. newbeginningschurchofsebring.com Be gin your week with us. TT he L L ords S S entinel Fellowship C C hurch, 148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid (at Lake Placid Christian School), Pastor Juanita Folsom. Sunday morning service, 10:30 a.m.; Monday, Sentinel School of Theology, 7 p.m.; Church service, Tues day, 7 p.m. More information at www. juanitafolsomministries.com. Union C C hurch, 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday traditional worship service is at 7:45 a.m. (October through Easter) and 9 a.m. Contemporary Sunday worship service is at 10:45 a.m. Nursery and childrens church available. Wednesday night worship with Pastor Ti ger Gullett and CrossTalk with Pastor Bill Bre ylinger at 6 p.m. Breakfast and lunch menus at Solid Grounds. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Ofce: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. Unity L L ife E E nrichment C C entre,new lo cation, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.uni tyofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. W eekly Classes, Christian Book store and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinar y to extraordinary. RELIGION

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B6 | NEWSSS U nN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.comPRESBYTERIANCovenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. Pastor Tom Schneider. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Sunday morning worship: Traditional ser vice, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday school, 9:15 a.m. Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Childrens/Youth Group, 5:30-7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato. net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Ofce hours: 8:3012:30 a.m. Monday-Friday.First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6 p.m. each Wednesday; Children Ministry and Youth Group, 6 p.m. each Sunday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. 385-0107. Email: faith@ strato.net, Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Fellowship Time, 10:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m. Tuesday: Youth Groups meet for devotions/Bible study, crafts, sport activities and dinner. Middle and high school, 3:306:30 p.m. Elementary School, 4-5:30 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m. Choir Rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. A nursery is available during worship. Call the church ofce for more information and other classes. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com, 117 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday Traditional Worship, 8 and 9:30 a.m.; Contemporary Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. Wednesday evenings: Adult small group Bible Study 7 p.m. (Nursery available), Youth Group (6-12th grades) 7 p.m., nursery and childrens ministry, 7 p.m. Family Biblical Counseling available by appointment. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September through June. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. rst Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 6550713; e-mail, springlakepc@embarqmail.com, Web site, http://slpc.embarqspace.com.SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTISTAvon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com, Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. A sale takes place the rst Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Frank Gonzalez. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALL ARE WELCOME. Associate Pastor is Ryan Amos. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Nathan Madrid.THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTSThe Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 3829092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-1p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: rst and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m.THE SALVATION ARMYThe Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www. salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODISTFirst United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., 105 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870. Pastor John A. Bryant. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church, 200 S. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759, Rev. Gary Pendrak, Pastor. Sunday School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Bible study every Wednesday at 6 p.m. Visit us at our church website: www.fumcap. org. Memorial United Methodist Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL, 33852. Rev. Tim Haas, pastor. Rev. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral assistant. Rev. Jerry McCauley, visitation pastor. Sunday worship services: Worship Service, 8:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m. We offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth programs, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship. We are a congregation that wants to know Christ and make Him known. Check out our church website at www.memorialumc.com or call the church ofce at 465-2422. Lakeview Christian School, VPK to Grade 5, 465-0313. St. John United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Adult Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all services. Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring. org Spring Lake United Methodist Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church ofce phone: 655-0040.UNITED CHURCH OF CHRISTEmmanuel United Church of Christ, Jesus didnt reject people, neither do we. Join us for worship every Sunday at 9:30 a.m. and youll be embraced by a compassionate congregation that is all-inclusive. Were at the corner of Hammock and Hope. Choir and Bell Choir practice on Wednesday; Bible studies throughout the week. 471-1999; sebringemmanuelucc.com.P lacesLACES t T O W O rsRS H I pP New Life Evangelical Lutheran ChurchSEBRING Pastor Luke John Willitz will preach from John 11:1727, 38-45 on Sunday. The theme is I am the resurrection and the life. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church (ELS/WELS) is at 3725 Hammock Road.Parkway Free Will Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Sunday morning Bible lesson, The Cleansing of the Temple, is taken from Isaiah 56, Zechariah 6, and John 19. Pastor Jim Scaggs will bring the message. The church is at 3413 Sebring Parkway. Call 382-3552.St. John United Methodist ChurchSEBRING On Sunday, Pastor Ronald De Genaro Jr.s ser mon topic will be The Anointed O ne. Biblical reference is from Luke 4:16-30. Communion will be served. Nursery is provided at all services. C ontinuedONTINUED fromFROM B4 SNAPs S HOTs S C hurchHURCH S ervicesERVICES Spaghetti dinner set at St. JohnSEBRING St. John United Methodist Church will host a spaghetti din ner on Tuesday. Serving times ar e 4, 5 and 6 / p.m. A limited number of walkins and take-outs will be available. Tickets are $8 each and may be reserved by call ing the church ofce at 382-1736. The church is at 3214 Grand Prix Drive (just behind Walmart).Night of Prophecy set MondaySEBRING Pastor Reinhold Buxbaum from The Church of the Way (1005 N. Ridgewood Drive in Sebring) will pres ent the monthly Monday night pr ophesy at Homers Restaurant, 1000 Sebring Square, Monday at 6:30 / p.m. Buxbaum will take the current events happening around the world, espe cially in the Middle East, and relate them to Biblical prophesy. The event is free. You can come early to eat if you wish. RELIGION The Bear (Russia) has recently taken over Crimea, which belonged until just a view days ago to the country of Ukraine. But did you know that the Bear will try to grab Isra el in the not so distant future? This is not the rst time that Russia is on the move. Remember Georgia in 2008? Parts of Georgia by the names of South Osse tia and Abhazia were invaded by Russia and separated from Georgia. What is ev en more amazing is that we can know with 100 percent certainty that Russia will come South to invade Isra el. How do we know that? B ecause the Bible tells us in Ezekiel 38-39 that in the latter years (expres sion for end times 38:8) the nation fr om the Far North (39:1) Russia is as far north as you can get by the name of Magog (38:1) will come down with many other nations (like Turkey and Iran 38:5-6) to invade Israel. But why? First of all no tice that none of the invad ing countries are next door neighbors to I srael, even though they all hate Isra el. Why are Lebanon, Syr ia, Jordan, Egypt and Gaza not mentioned in this war? Because Israel will take care of them in the next war, along with Iran. This war is mentioned in Psalm 83. The surrounding nations are all mentioned by their ancient names with one goal in mind: Come, they say, let us destroy them as a nation, that the name of Israel be remembered no more (Psalm 83:4 NIV). So the rst reason is re venge for the nations attacked by Israel, but supported by Russia. And secondly, even more important, the Russians want to get their hands on the spoil (38:13). What is the spoil? Besides the riches of the land of Isra el? As you know, Israel has disco vered natural gas. Lots of it. So much so that they started to sell liqui ed gas to Europe. That hits R ussia where it hurts the most, their bottom line. Russia is the greatest exporter of natural gas to Europe. It is their biggest cash crop to the tune of $515 billion per year. Recently, Israel has dis covered 25 trillion cubic feet of natural gas just off the coast of Haifa and is on its way not just to be com pletely energy independent but also turn the gas into an income-pr oducing export item. When can we expect the Israeli war with Iran and Israels neighbors? Just before Iran is ready to mount an atomic bomb on a rocket, aimed at Is rael. And that will happen v ery soon. As the Israe li Defense Minister Moshe Y aalon recently expressed: Israel can no longer count on the United States. Is rael will have to do it alone with a pr eemptive strike on Iran. Of course, the rapture of the church can happen at any time, because the Bi ble does not give us any war ning signs for it. All the 400 warning signs are for the second coming of Je sus at the end of the tribulation period. O ne thing is for sure, we are very close to these Middle East events. Yes, the stage is set for our rapture!Reinhold Buxbaum is Pastor of The Church of the Way. Guest columns ar e the opin ion of the writer, not necessarily those of the News-Sun staff.The Bear is on the moveA preacher for a frontier congregation ended a stirring sermon with, All those who want to go to Heaven, put up your hands! Everybody en thusiastically raised their hands Everybody, that is, except a grizzled old cow boy who had been slouching against the door post at the back of the r oom. All heads turned as he sauntered up to the front with spurs jangling and said, Preacher, that was too easy. How dya know if these folks are serious? I cn gar-an-tee to prove who really means to go to Heaven an who dont! Bewildered at the state ment, yet wanting to show condence in the con gregation, the preacher muster ed up the courage to say, OK, stranger. Go ahead and put the faith of these good people to the test. Ask them anything! At that, the cowboy pulled his twin six-shoot ers from their holsters, tur ned to the congrega tion, aimed the guns right at them, and said, Alright, who wants to go Heaven? Raise your hands! I believe that most of us would be just as enthusi astic about our answers as the people in the sto ry if someone asked us if w e wanted to go to Heav en. Surely, there would be a chor us of people shouting, YES! Howev er, Heaven is not simply the r esult of answering a question in the afrma tive. It is the result of following the right direction in our liv es. Jesus said in Matthew 7:13-14, Enter through the narrow gate; for the gate is wide and the way is broad that leads to de struction, and there are many who enter through it. For the gate is small and the way is narrow that leads to life, and there are few who nd it. In other words, we have two choices of paths to follow: a way that leads to death and a way that leads to life. There is no other option. And, just in case you are still unsure about which path to follow, listen once again to the words of Jesus in John 14:6, Jesus said to him, I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no one comes to the Father but through Me. Jesus is the only means by which one may enter Heaven. He is the one and only way to eternal life. So, which path are you following?Kevins Komments is written by Kevin Patterson and presented by the Sebring Parkway church of Christ assembling at 3800 Se bring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870. F ind us on the internet at www. sebringcoc.com, or e-mail us at sebringparkway@sebringcoc. com. Guest columns are the opin ion of the writer, not necessarily those of the News-Sun staff.Who wants to go to Heaven? K evinEVIN sS K ommentsOMME NTS Kevin Patterson SNAPs S HOTs S reliRELI G ionION N e E W sS WineWINE F amilyAMILY in IN concert CONCERT S unday UNDAY inIN L a A K e E P lacid LACID Courtesy photoThe Wine Family will be in Sunday at 6 / p.m. at Community Church of God, 735 S. Sun N Lakes Blvd. (also on C.R. 29, directly across from Lake Country Elementary School) in Lake Placid. Call the church at 454-3715. GuestGUEST C olumnOLUMN Reinhold Buxbaum

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www.newssun.com Friday, April 4, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B7 Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or le ss. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under the Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom se t ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed under our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be placed under the Bargain Buy category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com 863-314-9876 DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 314-9876. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NUMBER:GC 13-535 HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. GERALDINE CAMERON,a single woman; if living including any unknown spouse of said Defendant,if remarried,and if deceased,the respective unknown hiers,devisees,grantees,assignees, creditors,lienors,and trustees,and all other pesons claiming by,through, under or against the named Defendant(s); ASSET ACCEPTANCE,LLC,a Delaware corporation; whether dissolved or presently existing,together with any grantees,assignees,successors, creditors,lienors,or trustees of said defendant(s) and all other persons claiming by,through,under,or against Defendant(s); and UNKNOWN TENANT #1, UNKNOWN TENANT #2, the names being fictitious to account for parties in possession; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final judgment of foreclosure entered in the abovetitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,I will sell the property situated in Highlands County,Florida, described as: The Property:a/k/a 124 Washington Blvd.,Lake Placid,FL 33852 Lot 13,Block 9,of HIGHLANDS PARK ESTATE SECTION 8,according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4,Page 68, Public Records of Highlands County,Florida. Parcel I.D.C-20-36-30-020-0090-0130 at public sale,to the highest and best bidder for cash,in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,in Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.on the 30th day of April,2014. SIGNED this 28th day of March,2014. (SEAL) ROBERT W.GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Cler k IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:10-316-GCS BANK OF AMERICA,N.A., Plaintiff, vs. AVIS ELAINE NEMBHARD F/K/A AVIS SMITH A/K/A AVIS ELAINE SMITH; LORETTA HEADLEY; TRIVON TAYLOR; et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO:Unknown Spouse of Trivon Taylor Last Known Residence:4931 NW 18th Street,Lauderhill,FL 33313 Unknown Spouse of Avis Elaine Nembhard F/K/A Avis Smith A/K/A Avis Elaine Smith N/K/A Hurton Nembhard Last Known Residence:6646 NW 4th Street,Margate,FL 33063 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County,Florida: LOT 9,BLOCK 731,SUN N LAKE ESTATE OF SEBRING,UNIT 25RI,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 15,PAGE 59,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses,if any,to it on Aldridge Connors,LLP, Plaintiff's attorney,at 1615 South Congress Avenue,Suite 200,Delray Beach,FL 33445 (Phone Number:561-392-6391),within 30 days of the first date of publication of this notice,and file the original with the clerk of this court either before May 2,2014 on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated on March 26,2014 Robert W.Germaine,Clerk As Clerk of the Court By:/s/ Toni Kopp As Deputy Clerk 1092-6040B April 4,11,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NUMBER:13-603 GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES B.BUSH and LAUREN D.BUSH, Husband and Wife,if alive and if not, their unknown spouse,heirs, devisees,grantees,assignees,creditors, or other parties claiming by,through, under or against JAMES B.BUSH and LAURNE D.BUSH,and all claimants under any of such party; and CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A.,a national banking corporation; whether dissolved or presently existing, together with any grantees,assignees, successors,creditors,lienors,or trustees of said defendant(s) and all other persons claiming by,through, under,or against Defendant(s); Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final judgment of foreclosure entered in the abovetitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,I will sell the property situated in Highlands County,Florida, described as: The Property:20 Dasher Road,Lake Placid,FL 33852 Tract 4,of LAKE PEARL ESTATES,Lot 8, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3,Page 76,of the Public Records of Highlands County,Florida. Real property Tax I.D. #C-06-37-30-050-0040-0000 at public sale,to the highest and best bidder for cash,in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,in Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.on the 30th day of April,2014. SIGNED this 28th day of March,2014. (SEAL) ROBERT W.GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,(941) 534-4690,within two (2) working days of publication of this Notice of Sale; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call TDD (941) 534-7777 or Florida Relay Service (800) 955-8770. 10-4405-022 April 4,11,2014 **OFICIAL** AVISO DE ELECCIONES GENERALES Yo,Ken Detzner,Secretario de Estado del Estado de la Florida,por el presente notifico que se llevarn a cabo ELECCIONES GENERALES en el Condado de HIGHLANDS, Estado de la Florida,el da CUATRO de NOVIEMBRE de 2014 d.C.,para determinar la ocupacin o la retencin de los siguientes cargos: Representante ante el Congreso:distrito 17 Gabinete de la Florida Gobernador Gabinete de la Florida Vicegobernador Gabinete de la Florida Procurador General Gabinete de la Florida Funcionario Principal de Finanzas Gabinete de la Florida Comisionado de Agricultura Senador Estatal:distrito 26 Representante Estatal:distrito 55 Tribunal de Apelaciones del 2. Distrito: retencin de 3 jueces Juez del Circuito,10. Circuito Judicial:grupos 2,5,8,16,18,19,21,23,24,25 y 26 Juez del Condado:grupo 1 Junta Escolar:distritos 1,4 y 5 Comisionado del Condado:distritos 2 y 4 Distrito de Conservacin de Tierra y Agua de Highlands:grupos 3 y 4 Distrito para la Mejora de Spring Lake:escaos 4 y 5 Distrito para la Mejora de Sun N Lake de Sebring:1 miembro 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Ref.No.:2014-0081 Division Probate IN RE:ESTATE OF PHILLIP GORDON MITCHELL, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of PHILLIP GORDON MITCHELL,deceased, whose date of death was January 15,2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County,Florida,Probate Division,the address of which is 590 South Commerce Ave.,Sebring,Florida 33870.The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 4,2014. Personal Representative: Sharon L.Jill 2827 St.Croix Drive Clearwater,FL 33759 Attorney for Personal Representative: RICHARD D.GREEN,ESQ. Fla Bar 205877 rdgreen@greenlawoffices.net 1010 Drew Street Clearwater,FL 33755 (727) 441-8813 April 4,11,2014 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.13000919GCAXMX REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE NETWORK,INC., Plaintiff, vs. ROY ROBERT ADCOCK, A/K/A ROY ROBER ADCOCK,et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To:ROY ROBERT ADCOCK A/K/A ROY ROBER ADCOCK,1916 SPARTA CIRCLE,SEBRING,FL 33870 ROSA ISELA FLORES-ADCOCK F/K/A ROSA ISELA FLORES-GUTIERREZ A/K/A ROSA FLORES,1916 SPARTA CIR,SEBRING,FL 33875 LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED,CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows,to-wit: LOT 31,OF SPARTA HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8,PAGE 12,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses,if any,to it on Sara Collins,McCalla Raymer,LLC,225 E.Robinson St.Suite 660,Orlando,FL 32801 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 31st day of March,2014. 13-08082-1 April 4,11,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.:14000092GCAXMX U.S.BANK,NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE BANC OF AMERICA FUNDING CORPORATION,2008-FT1 TRUST, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES,SERIES 2008-FT1, Plaintiff, vs. KAMPAN FARNAM,et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF JAMES E.FARNAM ADDRESS UNKNOWN Residence unknown and if living,including any unknown spouse of the Defendant,if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs,devisees, grantees,assignees,creditors,lienors,and trustees,and all other persons claiming by, through,under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants,incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property to-wit: LOT 450 AND LOT 451,OF AVON PARK LAKES UNIT NO.1,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4,PAGE 88,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. more commonly known as:1730 N VALENCIA DRIVE,AVON PARK,FL 33825 This action has been filed against you,and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense,if any,to it on the Plaintiff's attorney,FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS,PLLC,whose address is 601 Cleveland Street,Suite 690,Clearwater,FL 33755,on or before 30 days after date of first publication,response due by May 2, 2014,and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 21st day of March,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK Clerk of the Court Highlands County,Florida By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk CA13-07431/NM April 4,11,2014 **OFFICIAL** NOTICE OF GENERAL ELECTION I,Ken Detzner,Secretary of State of the State of Florida,do hereby give notice that a GENERAL ELECTION will be held in HIGHLANDS County,State of Florida,on the FOURTH day of NOVEMBER,2014,A.D.,to fill or retain the following offices: Representative in Congress:District 17 Florida Cabinet Governor Florida Cabinet Lieutenant Governor Florida Cabinet Attorney General Florida Cabinet Chief Financial Officer Florida Cabinet Commissioner of Agriculture State Senator:District 26 State Representative:District 55 Second District Court of Appeal:Retention of Three Judges Circuit Judge,Tenth Judicial Circuit:Groups 2,5,8,16,18,19,21,23,24,25 and 26 County Judge:Group 1 School Board:Districts 1,4 and 5 County Commissioner:Districts 2 and 4 Highlands Soil and Water Conservation District:Groups 3 and 4 Spring Lake Improvement District:Seats 4 and 5 Sun 'N Lake of Sebring Improvement District: 1 Member (813)254-5222 March 28; April 2,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.14-CP-92 IN RE:ESTATE OF LINSLEY OSMOND WALKER A/K/A LINDSLEY WALKER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LINSLEY OSMOND WALKER A/K/A LINDSLEY WALKER,deceased,whose date of death was May 10,2013; File Number 14-CP-92, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands Court,Florida,Probate Division,the address of which is 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring,FL 33870.The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate,on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 28,2014. GLADYS WALKER Personal Representative 704 West State Street Avon Park,FL 33825 Derek B.Alvarez,Esquire FBN:114278 dba@gendersalvarez.com Anthony F.Diecidue,Esquire FBN: 146528 afd@gendersalvarez.com GENDERS ALVAREZ DIECIDUE,P.A. 2307 West Cleveland Street Tampa,Florida 33609 Phone:(813)254-4744 Fax: Probate Division,the address of which is 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870; that the decedent's date of death was September 13,2013; that the total value of the estate is $30,875.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Barbara S.Nash 614 East 8th Street Northampton,PA 18067 Lucy A.Reinsmith 5210 Mill Road Emmaus,PA 18049 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 28,2014. Person Giving Notice: /s/ Barbara S.Nash 614 East 8th Street Northampton,Pennsylvania 18067 /s/ Lucy A.Reinsmith 5210 Mill Road Emmaus,Pennsylvania 18049 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: /s/ David F.Lanier E-Mail Address:lanier30@embarqmail.com Florida Bar No.045399 DAVID F.LANIER P.O.Box 400 Avon Park,Florida 33826-0400 Tele:(863)453-4457 March 28; April 4,2014 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.PC 14-90 Division Probate IN RE:ESTATE OF LOIS A.CRAMMER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of LOIS A.CRAMMER, deceased,File Number PC 14-90,by the Circuit Court for HIGHLANDS County,Florida, 1050Legals 1000 Announcements Get the paper delivered to you! NEWS-SUN-6155

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B8 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.com LAKE PLACIDRoxy/Hollister/AE. Prom-Summer dresses. Mens suits/jackets 40/42. Easter, pinatas, graduation, kitchen, lighting, baskets, tables, art, lamps, exercise equipment & more. Saturday only 8-3, 16 Diamond Bay Dr. AVON PARKChurch of the Redeemer Clearance Sale. Clothes were .25 cents or $5 for $1, NOW $10 for $1! Hanging clothes were $1 or $2, NOW buy one get one! Lots of new stock, kitchenwares. Most items marked down! Across from Wells Motors Fri.-Sat., 8-2. 7320Garage &Yard Sales VARIOUS PORCELAINDOLLS $50 EACH GREAT SHAPE CALL 863-253-1667 MEDICAL WALKER,Opens up and folds, adjustable settings, Like New $40. 863 385-1615 LARGE MICROWAVE(Spacesaver Brand) 4 settings, New $20. 863 385-1615 HOOVER UPRIGHTvacuum cleaner, reconditioned to like new & guaranteed for 30 days. $20. 863 402-2285 HITCH BARfor trailers, NEW, fits 1 1/4", rear receiver w/used 2"dia. ball, $10, 863 453-7027 GOLF CLUBS(Ladies), full set w/head covers,golf bag w/stand. Used a few times, all in good cond. $65 complete. 863 453-7027 DOLL HOUSEfurniture & lots of extras $40. Doll house free, needs reconstruction 863 402-2285 CURIO CABINET TWO SHELVES ONE GLASS, 2ND WOOD, $100 863-655-0321 ADULT TRIKEMIAMI SUN $100 863-655-1235 7310Bargain Buys2 TWINBEDS WITH HEADBOARDS & LINENS $200 863-382-0601 7180Furniture 7000 Merchandise 3/2 ONLAKE CARRIE access LAKE JUNE/HENRY. $800 1st/sec. Ref req Call/text 786-285-5026 6300Unfurnished Houses BEAUTIFULAPTSSEBRING2BR/1BA, tile floors, screen back porch, beautiful landscaping. 3113 Medical Way. $595/mo. 863-446-1822 6200UnfurnishedApartments 6000 Rentals TRIPLE YOURTAX REFUND at Palm Harbor Homes Plant City!! www.plantcity.palmharbor.com John Lyons @ 800-622-2832 ext 210 for details PALM HARBORHOMES end of year sale!! 3 retirement models MUST go... Save over $26k, homes from the low 60's, this week only plantcity.palmharbor.com or 800-622-2832 AVON PARK3/1 Trailer in Country. 8 mi. from town. Call 863-443-2000 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesSPRING LAKE2BR/2BA VILLA Central Air/Heat, Washer Dryer Hook Up, Dishwasher, Fridge w/ice maker, range. $49,900 owner financin g 863-381-8069. 4120Villas & CondosFor SaleFOR SALE,CBS 3BR/2BA, 1 car gar., in Avon Park Lakes, fenced back yard, built in 2006, newly renovated in 2010, asking, $99,900, 863-368-1963. 4060Homes for SaleAvon Park 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial RN/LPN FULLTime 3-11 Shift Experience in long term care preferred Apply at: Lake Placid Health Care Center 125 Tomoka Blvd South EEOC/Smoke Free/ Drug Free Work Place MEDICAL RECORDS/ACCOUNTS PAYABLE COORDINATOR Royal Care of Avon Park currently has a FT position available. Candidate must be accurate detail oriented and have computer skills. Salary based on experience. Apply in person at Royal Care of Avon Park, 1213 W Stratford Rd., Avon Park. (863) 453-6674. EOE,, M/F, DFWP. LAWN MAINTENANCE workers needed to run mowers & trimmers, exp. only. 863-385-6768 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:385-6155 News-Sun Classified 1100Announcementswho needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,590 South Commerce Ave.,Sebring,FL 33870 (863) 402-6565 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled court appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call (TDD) (1-800-955-8771) or Voice (V) (1-800-955-8770).'' ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK DATED THIS 3RD DAY OF MARCH,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK By:/s/ Lisa J.Bass Deputy Clerk (Clerk's Seal) March 28; April 4,11,18,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA JUVENILE DIVISION CASE NO.JP13-000474-XX IN THE INTEREST OF: Z.T.07/13/2011 Minor children DOB SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIP THE STATE OF FLORIDA TO: THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON:DOB:4/16/1957Address UnknownYOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in the above-styled Court by the Department of Children & Families,seeking the termination of your parental rights to: Z.T. a white female child born July 13,2011 mother Cara Anne Parnell and you are hereby commanded to personally appear before the Honorable Sheryl D.Snodgrass,a Magistrate/hearing officer in the Juvenile Division of the Circuit Court in and for Highlands County,State of Florida,on the 30th day of April,2014 at 10:00 A .M.,at the Highlands County Courthouse,430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida,Courtroom 1A. Y OU MUST PERSONALL Y APPEAR ON THE DAY AND TIME SPECIFIED OR YOU WILL LOSE ALL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION. Y OUR FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR WILL BE DEEMED TO BE YOUR CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILDREN NAMED IN THE PETITION.YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO HAVE AN ATTORNEY REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD AN ATTORNEY,YOU MUST BE PRESENT AND REQUEST THAT THE COURT APPOINT AN ATTORNEY FOR YOU IF Y OU WANT ONE.``If you are a person with a disability IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.PC 14-102 IN RE:ESTATE OF STEPHEN M.SENTERS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of STEPHEN M.SENTERS, deceased,File Number PC 14-102,by the Circuit Court for Highlands County,Florida, Probate Division,the address of which is 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870; that the decedent's date of death was May 24 ,2013; that the total value of the estate is $15,000.00 and that the name and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order is Brian M.Senters, 411 Lynch Street,Flint,Michigan 48503. A LL INTERESTED PARTIES ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER A PPLICABLE TIME PERIOD,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 28,2014. A ttorney for Person Giving Notice Charlotte C.Stone A ttorney for Petitioner Florida Bar Number:21297 3200 US Hwy 27 S.,Suite 307 Sebring,FL 33870 Telephone:(863) 402-5424 Fax:(863) 402-5425 E-Mail:charlotte@stonelawgroupfl.com Secondary E-Mail: kelly@stonelawgroupfl.com Person Giving Notice: Brian M.Senters 411 Lynch Street Flint Michigan 48503 March 28; April 4,2014 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.PC 14-100 Division Probate IN RE:ESTATE OF DONALD L.JONES a.k.a.DONALD LEE JONES Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of DONALD L.JONES a.k.a DONALD LEE JONES,deceased,whose date of death was January 29,2014,and whose social security number is XXX-XX-9551,is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida,Probate Division,the address of which is 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring, Florida 33870.The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS A FTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 28,2014. Personal Representative: /s/ Shirley Traci a.k.a.Shirlee Tracy 1635 Melaleucia Lane Ft.Myers,Florida 33901 A ttorney for Personal Representative: / s/ David F.Lanier E-Mail Address:lanier30@embarqmail.com Florida Bar No.045399 DAVID F.LANIER P.O.Box 400 A von Park,Florida 33826-0400 Telephone:(863)453-4457 March 28; April 4,2014 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,(941) 534-4690,within two (2) working days of publication of this Notice of Sale; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call TDD (941) 534-7777 or Florida Relay Service (800) 955-8770. 10-4402-030 April 4,11,2014 1050Legals Did YouKNOW?EMERGENCY VEHICLESUpon the immediate approach of an authorized emergency vehicle,while en route to meet an existing emergency,the driver of every other vehicle shall,when such emergency vehicle is giving audible signals by siren,exhaust whistle, or other adequate device,or visible signals by the use of displayed blue or red lights,yield the right-of-way to the emergency vehicle and shall immediately proceed to a position parallel to,and as close as reasonable to the closest edge of the curb of the roadway,clear of any intersection and shall stop and remain in position until the authorized emergency vehicle has passed,unless otherwise directed by any law enforcement officer.YOUCANBETICKETEDFORFAILINGTOPULL OVERANDSTOPWHENANAMBULANCE, POLICE, FIREOROTHEREMERGENCYVEHICLEIS TRAVELLINGTOMEETANEMERGENCY. BELOWISTHEFLORIDALAW.

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w ww.newssun.com Friday, April 4, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B9 WE BUYALL AUTOS with or without Title. Any Year / Make / Model / Condition. We will pay up to $20,000. Free Towing. Call Cind y 813-505-6935 9400Automotive Wanted SLT GMCTruck 2500HD CRW CB/SB/4WD/Texas Ranch Ed, Diesel, auto 5spd OD, Duramax, Allison, Tow Package w/braking w/auto side mirror arrow sens. extends/all electric/seats heated saddle leather interior/Bose stereo/CD/satellite radio/back sliding window/rhino spray/tubular chrome steps/skid plate/chrome trim/alloy wheels all new tire and brakes/black and gold trim paint. 36800mi $35,000 OBO. 850-867-8521. Warranty available. 1998 FORDRANGER XLT. Runs good, new tires & brakes, automatic, 4 cylinder, green & tan, $2500, 863-873-9058. 9200Trucks 9000 Transportation2013 44'5TH WHEEL RV 3 slideouts, 2BR, full bath, full kitchen, sleeps 8, excellent condition, $23,500. 210-800-6389. 8400RecreationalVehicles9.8 HPMERCURY OUTBOARD MOTOR SERVICED 2 YEARS AGO, $350. 863-471-9341 SOLD!!! 8050Boats & Motors 8000 RecreationNOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & SuppliesCUB CADETLTX1040 MOWER A S GOOD AS NEW. SERVICED WITH NEW BATTERY AND CARBURETOR. THE CLOCK HAS LESS THAN 35HRS. CONTACT V IJAY ON 863-699-6923 BETWEEN 10AM AND 7PM PRICE $1000 7400Lawn & Garden SPRING LAKEMOVING SALE, Fri Sat, 4/4 & 4/5 8:30-?, 6824 Concord St. Dishes, clothes, pots & pans, sweepers, carpet cleaners, tools, tv's, something for everyone! SEBRING ESTATESALE Fri. April 4th & Sat. April 5th Living room, antique dressers, trunk, linens, many very clean small appliances, tools, cookware, pots, pans, flatware, quilting material, sewing items, glassware, jewelry, lamps, violin parts, side tables, kitchen set, bookcase, collectibles. Too must to list! Sale starts @ 7:30am to 2pm Friday & Saturday. 1524 Falcon behind Walmart Follow signs! Sale being conducted by TRANSITIONS NOW LLC "Assisting with life's changes" SEBRING 2Day Garage Sale, Fri. & Sat., April 4-5 7:30-2:30, A little bit of this & a little bit of that. Clothes, books, furniture, toys, etc. 1618 Shamrock Dr. SEBRING -YARD SALE 1701 Hawthorne Dr., Fri. & Sat., 8am-? Tools, knick-knacks, some housewares, entertainment center. SEBRING -MULTI-FAMILY Fri.-Sat. April 4-5, 7am-3pm, 1440 Schlosser Rd. (off Sparta). Tools, tool boxes, household, lamps, toys, other kids items, too much to list! SEBRING -HUGE SALE under cover, 1011 N. Franklin by Matlow, Fri.-Sat. April 4-5, 8am-3pm. Lots of good stuff! Old wicker rocker, wood chairs, bike, charcoal grill, variety of vacuums, audio book cassetts, too much to list! SEBRING -Garage sale, everything must go! Tools, housewares, linens, clothes, misc. Friday and Saturday, A pril 4 and 5, 6101 Oceanside Ave. SEBRING -FRI.-SAT. April 4-5, 8am-?? HUGE MOVING & business inventory sale! 2006 cargo, Nascar, military, collectibles and more! 1026 Corvette Ave. SEBRING -BIG GARAGE sale 3305 V illage Rd. April 3 to 5, 8am till ? Household items, children & adult clothes, toys, jewelry, mens & womens shoes, purses, many more! SEBRING -ANTIQUES, Slag Glass, Jewel Tea, Fire King, Fenton, West Moreland, St. Clair, Joe Rice, Imperial Boyd's, other glassware, lighter's, old pocket knives, old & newer fish lures, rods & reels, Western books, clothes, lots of j ewelry & sterling silver, furniture, tools, misc. Fri.-Sat., 4119 Lakewood Rd. SEBRING -4125 Kearly Ave. Harder Hall area Fri.-Sat. 4/4-4/5, 7-? Harder Hall area. Furn., wicker, glider, antiques, baby items, sports, tools, pad locks, pottery, jewelry, pictures, linens, clothes, glass, misc. & new items. 7320Garage &Yard Sales

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B10 | NEWSSS U nN | Friday, April 4, 2014 www.newssun.com TODAYWarm with a blend of sun and clouds87 / 65Winds: S at 6-12 mphPartly sunny, warm and humid87 / 66Winds: SSW at 4-8 mphSATURDAYTimes of clouds and sun88 / 67Winds: SSE at 4-8 mphSUNDAYAn afternoon thunderstorm possible89 / 69Winds: SSW at 10-20 mphMONDAYMostly cloudy, t-storms possible82 / 64Winds: SW at 10-20 mphTUESDAY High ............................................ 12:34 a.m. Low ............................................... 6:29 a.m. High ............................................ 12:44 p.m. Low ............................................... 6:49 p.m. High .............................................. 6:52 a.m. Low ............................................. 12:05 a.m. High .............................................. 4:57 p.m. Low ............................................. 10:31 a.m. Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 13.58 Normal ............................................... 14.51 High Sunday .......................................... 78 Low Sunday ........................................... 41 High Monday ......................................... 78 Low Monday .......................................... 42 High Tuesday ......................................... 84 Low Tuesday .......................................... 45 High Wednesday .................................... 85 Low Wednesday ..................................... 47 Relative humidity .................................. 41% Expected air temperature ....................... 86 Makes it feel like .................................... 86 Monday ............................................... 30.11 Tuesday ............................................... 30.14 Wednesday ......................................... 30.09 Monday ............................................... 0.00 Tuesday ............................................... 0.00 Wednesday ......................................... 0.00 Month to date ..................................... 0.00 Year to date ......................................... 7.01Sunrise 7:14 a.m. 7:13 a.m. Sunset 7:44 p.m. 7:45 p.m. Moonrise 10:51 a.m. 11:40 a.m. Moonset none 12:35 a.m.Albuquerque 62/44/s 63/39/pc 61/38/pc Atlanta 75/48/t 70/49/pc 65/56/r Baltimore 61/47/r 64/37/pc 60/38/s Birmingham 76/46/t 67/48/s 65/56/r Boston 44/39/c 56/38/pc 56/39/pc Charlotte 81/54/t 72/44/pc 67/48/c Cheyenne 51/29/s 52/31/pc 50/29/c Chicago 53/32/sh 50/31/s 55/37/pc Cleveland 66/37/r 45/30/pc 53/37/s Columbus 71/39/r 54/35/pc 61/42/s Dallas 68/46/s 69/50/t 62/48/r Denver 54/29/s 54/31/pc 55/29/c Detroit 59/33/r 48/31/pc 51/36/s Harrisburg 55/47/r 57/32/pc 61/36/s Honolulu 85/70/pc 84/70/pc 82/69/pc Houston 77/53/pc 67/57/t 73/55/r Indianapolis 60/33/t 53/36/s 60/42/pc Jackson, MS 75/47/t 69/53/pc 68/57/r Kansas City 51/32/c 59/41/s 60/43/c Lexington 70/36/t 56/37/s 65/46/pc Little Rock 67/42/s 65/45/s 64/49/r Los Angeles 68/52/pc 71/55/s 77/57/s Louisville 69/38/t 59/39/s 68/46/pc Memphis 68/45/s 63/47/s 67/52/r Milwaukee 48/29/sh 45/31/s 48/34/pc Minneapolis 37/23/sn 46/38/s 48/36/pc Nashville 72/42/t 61/42/s 69/49/c New Orleans 79/59/t 68/60/t 80/66/r New York City 46/42/r 62/40/pc 56/41/pc Norfolk 78/60/c 70/45/pc 55/45/s Oklahoma City 62/40/s 67/44/pc 59/44/r Philadelphia 50/44/r 64/38/pc 61/45/s Phoenix 78/57/s 77/58/s 82/60/s Pittsburgh 70/42/r 50/30/pc 61/37/pc Portland, ME 41/35/pc 50/31/r 48/29/c Portland, OR 55/45/r 57/46/r 60/47/r Raleigh 85/56/pc 72/44/pc 65/47/pc Rochester 52/39/r 41/26/c 51/32/pc St. Louis 55/34/pc 58/41/s 63/44/c San Francisco 60/49/c 63/49/pc 69/51/s Seattle 53/41/r 55/43/r 56/45/r Wash., DC 66/53/r 65/39/pc 65/43/s Cape Coral 85/67/pc 85/66/s 86/68/pc Clearwater 83/68/c 86/67/pc 84/69/pc Coral Springs 85/72/pc 85/72/pc 86/75/pc Daytona Beach 84/63/pc 82/64/pc 82/67/pc Ft. Laud. Bch 84/74/pc 85/75/pc 85/76/pc Fort Myers 86/68/pc 86/67/s 86/70/pc Gainesville 85/62/pc 81/61/t 83/63/sh Hollywood 84/71/pc 85/72/pc 86/75/pc Homestead AFB 83/70/pc 83/71/pc 84/74/pc Jacksonville 84/63/pc 79/60/t 77/64/sh Key West 83/75/pc 83/76/s 84/77/pc Miami 84/73/pc 86/74/pc 86/75/pc Okeechobee 83/67/pc 84/67/pc 85/69/pc Orlando 87/64/pc 86/66/pc 87/67/pc Pembroke Pines 84/71/pc 86/72/pc 87/75/pc St. Augustine 81/61/pc 78/63/t 78/66/sh St. Petersburg 82/68/pc 85/67/pc 86/69/pc Sarasota 82/66/pc 81/66/pc 83/68/pc Tallahassee 81/65/pc 77/58/t 81/62/sh Tampa 83/67/pc 84/67/pc 85/69/pc W. Palm Bch 83/72/pc 83/71/pc 84/75/pc Winter Haven 86/66/pc 86/67/pc 87/68/pc Acapulco 91/70/s 89/71/s 89/70/s Athens 71/59/c 69/54/c 69/53/pc Beirut 68/55/s 73/62/pc 85/62/pc Berlin 61/42/pc 64/46/pc 66/51/pc Bermuda 72/64/sh 73/65/pc 72/64/c Calgary 47/25/c 48/31/pc 48/30/pc Dublin 54/45/pc 58/51/sh 59/44/r Edmonton 42/22/c 43/25/pc 47/29/s Freeport 80/70/pc 80/71/pc 82/73/pc Geneva 65/52/c 59/46/r 67/44/c Havana 90/63/s 92/65/s 92/67/s Hong Kong 76/67/c 75/67/pc 71/69/sh Jerusalem 64/51/s 74/57/s 81/61/s Johannesburg 73/52/t 72/50/pc 71/48/pc Kiev 52/30/pc 47/28/s 55/38/s London 64/45/pc 62/54/sh 61/54/r Montreal 45/37/r 43/30/c 46/32/pc Moscow 39/20/sf 38/27/pc 49/33/c Nice 67/57/sh 69/57/s 70/56/s Ottawa 40/33/r 42/26/r 49/33/pc Quebec 39/30/pc 37/30/c 41/27/pc Rio de Janeiro 82/73/sh 83/72/s 85/72/s Seoul 54/35/pc 56/36/pc 57/38/s Singapore 91/79/t 88/79/t 91/79/t Sydney 77/64/sh 79/64/sh 77/63/pc Toronto 51/31/r 42/28/c 51/29/pc Vancouver 53/42/r 50/43/r 52/45/r Vienna 72/49/s 70/48/s 68/55/r Warsaw 54/33/s 55/33/s 62/43/c Winnipeg 32/21/pc 37/25/sf 37/25/pc Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. A cold front associated with a powerful storm system will slice through the East today. Strong thunderstorms will ignite out ahead of the front from Cleveland, Ohio, to Chattanooga, Tenn., as warm and moist air surges in. Rain will fall across parts of the mid-Atlantic. Thunderstorms will also extend into the South but are not expected to be as strong. Cold air will sink in behind the system and will bring heavy snow to Wisconsin and parts of Michigan. While this storm impacts the East, rain will move into the West. National Forecast for April 4 Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rrain, sf-snow urries, sn-snow, i-ice. Warm today with a blend of sun and clouds. Partly cloudy and mild tonight. Partly sunny, humid and remaining warm tomorrow. Sunday: clouds and sun. Monday: a thunderstorm possible in the afternoon. The U.S.S. Akron crashed on April 4, 1933, during a wind-whipped storm near Barnegat Light, N.J. Fog-induced collisions, icebergs and storms have sunk many ships. Warm today with a blend of sun and clouds. Winds south 6-12 mph. Expect 4-8 hours of sunshine with relative humidity 75% early, 45% in the afternoon and good drying conditions. Sunday. and Saturday. a.m. and after 4 p.m. FirstFullLastNew Apr 7Apr 15Apr 22Apr 29 Today SaturdayForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 84/63 85/62 84/61 84/63 87/64 86/66 83/67 83/68 82/68 82/66 86/68 84/68 83/67 83/72 84/74 84/73 81/65 75/63 75/59 88/65 87/65 86/66 87/64 87/64 85/66 83/75 TemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHeat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayBarometer PrecipitationFive-Day forecast for Highlands County Almanac U.S. Cities World Cities National Summary Tides UV Index Today Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional Summary Lake Levels Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows. Readings at Palm Beach Readings at St. Petersburg The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterday 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. Jacksonville Gainesville Ocala Daytona Beach Orlando Winter Haven Tampa Clearwater St. Petersburg Sarasota Fort Myers Naples Okeechobee West Palm Beach Fort Lauderdale Miami Tallahassee Apalachicola Key West Avon Park Sebring Lorida Lake Placid Venus Brighton PensacolaCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W