The news-sun

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The news-sun
Uniform Title:
News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title:
Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Sebring Fla
Creation Date:
June 7, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates:
27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note:
Also published for Avon Park.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID:
UF00028423:01509

Related Items

Preceded by:
Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by:
Avon Park sun


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NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 192775 Projects that are kid and earth friendlyB1Streaks knock off Oklahoma state champsA9 VOL. 95 NO. 33 Partly sunny and fairly warm High 86 Low 65 Details on A14Books .................... B7 Business ................ A8 Classieds ............ B12 Dear Abby ................ B2 Obituaries .............. A6 Lottery Numbers ...... A2 Religion .................. B6 Sports on TV ......... A10 Sudoku Puzzle......... B2 facebook.com/ newssun twitter.com/ thenewssun Something to chew on: Gum is losing its pop B3 BY MA NUEL CORT AZ ALSpecial to the News-SunHighlands homeowners who saw their home values plummet after the housing boom went bust will have to hold out hope that 2014 is kinder to them than last year. While Tampa, Miami, and other cities across the nation hit hard by the 2008 collapse posted dou ble-digit sales prices gains, Highlands registered a meager 2.2 percent increase in 2013. Outside of Highlands home prices are on a tear. Year-over-year price growth remains robust, said Brad OConnor, a research economist with Florida Realtors, in his 2014 guidance to mem bers of the trade group. He said Floridians selling single-family homes last year fetched prices 11 percent higher than in 2012, based on his groups analysis of sales data. Nationwide in 2013, home prices rose 11 per cent from their 2012 levels according S&Ps CaseShiller Home Price Index, a closely watched gauge that tracks data in 20 large metropolitan areas and nationally. But the upward momentum lifting home price across the nation and state sidestepped Highlands last Highlands home prices lag behind stateState prices up 11 percent last year, but county had just 2.2 percent rise BY BARRY FOSTERNews-Sun CorrespondentSebring Highlands County commissioners have been warned about a number problems with their budget process, including weaknesses in inter nal controls over nancial reporting and issues surrounding the countys involvement with the State Housing Initiative Partnership (SHIP) program. The advisories came from representatives of CliftonLar sonAllen, who performed the annual audit for the county. Over the last few years we have reported internal control problems related to the SHIP program, said Julie Fowler, who made the presentation to the county commission Tues day. This year, as part of the program, Fowler said that the countys Local Housing Assistance Plan for 2010-2013 had not been submitted to the Flor ida Housing Finance Corporation for approval. As a result, there was one plan the county was operating under locally and another the state thought you were using, she told the board.County warned of budget issuesWeaknesses in internal contols over reporting just one of the problems BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterAVON PARK The City Council may discuss Monday whether or not the city should take on another wastewater service area. Sebring Ridge Utilities has approached the city with an offer to have the city buy its wastewater system for $500,000. The item is listed on the agen da for the Avon Park City Council meeting at 6 p.m. Monday. at 123 E. Pine St. City Manager Julian Deleon has estimated the system would need at least that much more in improvements, which would give the project a total cost of $1 mil lion and could require a special assessment to pay for those improvements, Deleon said. The utility has three lift stations and 530 residential units or that many equivalent residential units, Deleon said in agenda materials. The estimated cost of connecting to the city, should the city take on the utility, would be $1,887 per connection, which could be nanced over 15 years at 5 percent for an added sewer bill fee of $14.92 per month. Of course, he said, each customer could opt to pay his or her cost all at once. With a 70 percent oc cupancy rate at $35 per Avon Park to consider buying utility BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterSEBRING Clinton Culverhouse said its hard to put his passion for local schools into a nutshell. Culverhouse, 33, has lived in Highlands County all his life and considers him self lucky to be born, raised, married and raising his own children here especially because of the schools. His mother, aunt, and now his wife, Ashley Jackson Culver house, all have either worked for or taught in the school district. What drove me to do this is my kids, Culverhouse said. Being involved in their lives has opened up a new world for me. Culverhouse has been married 11 years. He and Culverhouse says kids inspired run for school board CULVERHOUSESEE PRICES | A5 DELEON BY SAMANTHA GHOLARStaff WriterSEBRING If you use your imagination, the Fireies in the Hammock event could easily pass as an inter stellar experience. Floating, glowing, ashing and whisking through the air, thousands of reies put on an awe-inspiring Fireies take center stage at Hammock Katara Simmons/News-SunWhile reies are not the easiest subjects to photograph, they are extremely impressive in person. Thousands of the illuminated insects can be seen nightly for the next few weeks at Highlands Hammock State Park in Sebring. Katara Simmons/News-SunHighlands Hammock State Park is offering a new nightly rey experience at the park in Sebring. Visitors can pay to take a tram through the park to see the glowing beetles in their natural habitat.NIGHT LIGHTS SEE FIREFLIES | A7SEE UTILITY | A6SEE BUDGET | A6SEE RUN | A7 www.newssun.com Sunday, March 23, 2014 M C Y K

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A2 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com http//:www.newssun.com The News-Sun (USPS ISSN 0163-3988) is published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday. Peri odical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry ofce(s). All material contained herein is the property of the News-Sun, which is an afliate of Halifax Media Group. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the writ ten permission of the publisher. All material submitted for publication becomes the property of the newspaper and may be edited for clarity and space, as well as reprinted, published and used in all media. Postmaster: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870.COMMITMENT TO A CC URACYThe News-Sun promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its news stories. If you believe we have made an error, call the newsroom at (863) 385-6155, ext. 516. If you have a question or comment about coverage, write to Scott Dressel, editor, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; email editor@newssun.com.; or call (863) 385-6155.O FFI CE Location: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday Phone: (863) 385-6155 Main Fax: (863) 385-1954 Newsroom Fax: 385-2453SUB SC RIPTION RATE SHome 12 mos. Tax Total $72.22 $5.06 $77.28 In Florida mail 12 mos. Tax Total $107.24 $7.51 $114.75 Out of Florida mail 12 mos. Tax Total $122.41 $8.57 $130.98 Your newspaper is delivered by an independent contractor. If you do not receive your home deliv ered newspaper by 6 a.m. on any publication date, please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday, and before 11 a.m. Sunday. A replacement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after said times will be issued an account credit. Deadlines for subscription changes are noon Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon Thursday for the Friday edition and noon Fri day for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date.O BITUARIE S AN D A NNOUN C EMENT SEmail all obituaries and death notices to obits@newssun.com Email all other announcements to editor@newssun.comP LA C E A CLA SS IFIE D ADFrom 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. M-F (863) 385-6155, ext. 505 or (863) 314-9876RETAIL AD VERTI S INGMitch Collins 386-5626 mitch.collins@newssun.com Vickie Watson 386-5631 vickie.watson@newssun.com Terri Lee 386-5628 terri.lee@newssun.comL EGAL AD VERTI S INGJanet Emerson 385-6155, ext. 596 legals@newssun.comNEW S ROOM Call 385-6155 Scott Dressel, Editor, ext. 516 or scott.dressel@newssun.com Phil Attinger, Staff Writer, ext. 541 or phil.attinger@newssun. com Samantha Gholar, Staff Writ er, ext. 526 or samantha.gholar@ newssun.com Dan Hoehne, Sports Editor, ext. 528 or daniel.hoehne@newssun. com Katara Simmons, Photographer, ext. 538 or katara.simmons@ newssun.com. ROMONA W A SHINGTON Publisher and Executive Editor romona.washington@newssun.com 385-6155, ext. 515 NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927Final Nature Walk of spring is MondaySEBRING The nal Monday Morning Nature Walk that volun teer trail guides Brian and Susan Woodworth will be leading this spring will be held Monday at Highlands Hammock State Park. The walk will be on the Fern Garden Trail from 9:30-10:30 a.m. The walk is free. Regular park admission of $6 per vehicle (up to eight per car) or $4 per vehicle (one person) applies.Cornerstone Academy plans open houseAVON PARK Ofcials of the Cornerstone Christian Academy have announced an open house for their new facility on Sunday, April 6, beginning at 2 p.m. The two-story building is on the grounds of the Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church and now is being used for student instruction. There will be students on site for the event, as well as video presenta tions on how classes are run and what students are learning at the new facility. Call headmaster Jenny Cornell at 453-0894 or email jennycornell@ ccaap.org.NRAC meets WednesdaySEBRING The Natural Resources Advisory Committee will hold a meeting at 4 p.m. Wednesday in Conference Room 3 of the Bert J. Harris Agricultural Center, 4509 George Blvd.Kindergarten Roundup is TuesdayAVON PARK Walker Memorial Academy will hold its Kindergarten Roundup on Tuesday. Call 453-3131, Ext. 201, to sign up for your choice of a one-hour session at 9 a.m. or 5:30 p.m. You can visit the classroom, meet the principal, tour cam pus and ask questions for pre-testing. Students must be 5 years old before Aug. 15. For nancial assistance, check out www. StepUpForStudents. org/.LPHS students collecting bikesLAKE PLACID Lake Placid High Schools Student Government Association has teamed up with the Highlands County Sheriffs Ofce to prevent delinquen cy and develop strong, lawful, resilient and productive citizens who will make a positive contribution to Highlands County for years to come. Each summer, the HCSO hosts a youth camp. This year, the SGA has decided to take on the task of collecting bi cycles for that camp, where the bicycles stay to be used in coming years. The SGA has a goal of collecting 30 bicy cles during the month of April. They are asking for gently used or new bicy cles, but will also accept monetary donations to buy bicycles. If interested in sending a check, make it pay able to Lake Placid High School and mail it to the SGA at 202 Green Dragon Drive, Lake Placid, FL 33852. To nd out more about donating a bicycle, call the high school at 699-5010 or email sohnm@highlands.k12.us.Arbuckle Creek boat ramp to be closedSEBRING The Highlands County Parks and Recreation Departments Arbuckle Creek Road boat ramp will be closed for repair and maintenance from April 7 through May 15, 2014. It is schedule to re open Friday, May 16. For further information on boat ramp closings you may contact the Highlands County Parks and Recreation Department at (863) 402-6812. SNAPSHOTS LOCAL N EW S Special to the News-SunTALLAHASSEE The Arc of Florida, Ridge Area Arc and Florida Developmental Disabilities Council on March 18 unveiled a plan designed to ensure that Floridians with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) are fully included in their communities and not segregated in institutions and nursing homes. The four-part Invest in Floridas Communities plan includes Medicaid Waiver Waitlist Funding, Increased Rates for Ser vices, Community-Based Services and Alternative Family Homes. We encourage lawmakers and Gov. Scott to take this opportunity to invest in our communities and protect some of Floridas most vulnerable citizens, said Pat Young, president of The Arc of Florida. This plan will keep individuals with de velopmental disabilities out of institutions and allow them to become contributing members of society. The approval of this plan would have a very positive impact on ser vices available to individuals in Highlands County, said Ridge Area Arc CEO Rhonda Beckman. Here is a breakdown of the Invest in Floridas Communities plan: The plan calls for Flor ida to invest in Medicaid Waiver Waitlist Funding by supporting the Governors recommen dation for $20 million in funding, increase provider rates by 5 percent for the 2014-2015 scal year without taking funding away from current client services, to create and implement a comprehensive ve-year plan to reduce the number of people with I/DD liv ing in Florida institutions and for funding and ser vices to be made available to families caring for children who are medi cally fragile so they can leave nursing homes and return to their communities. The Arc of Florida, Inc. is a non-prot organization whose mission is to improve the quality of life for persons with developmental disabilities. Working with local, state and national partners, The Arc of Florida advocates for local chapters, public policies and high quality supports for people with developmental and other disabilities to be fully included in all aspects of their community. Find out how to get in volved by visiting www. arcorida.org.Arc urges lawmakers to invest in communities Courtesy photoPat Young (from left), president of The Arc of Florida, Deborah Linton, executive director of The Arc of Florida and Rhonda Beckman, CEO of Ridge Area Arc who were in Tallahassee Tuesday, March 18 for the Disability Awareness Day. BY BARRY FOSTERNews-Sun CorrespondentSEBRING Highlands County ofcials are looking for 11 good people who are willing to serve in an effort to put the countys Affordable Housing Advisory Committee back together. Highlands County Commissioners recently decided to re-activate the board which is charged with, among other things, reviewing policies, pro cedures ordinances and land development regulations as well as ensur ing compliance with the countys comprehensive land use development plan. I am personally excited about the re-establishment of the board, said Highlands County Commissioner Don Elwell, who recently was assigned as the new liaison to the countys muchtroubled housing assistance effort. The committees input and recommendations will be very helpful as our countys approach to af fordable housing continues to evolve. Specically being sought are residents who are involved in the residential home building industry, advocates for lowincome persons, banking or mortgage bank representatives, home building labor representatives, real estate professionals, planning agency members, educators, those working in the medical eld, utility workers, those in public safety, but other residents are invited to apply. Board members will be given two-year terms and will be appointed by county commissioners. Applications will be accepted through April 30. We hope to raise as much awareness in the community as possible, said Highlands County Community Programs/ Administrative Project Manager Chris Benson, who was assigned the re sponsibility of overseeing the countys housing programCounty reforming Affordable Housing Committee The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN L OTTER YCAS H 3 Wednesday, March 19 Day: 9-4-4 Night: 4-9-3 Thursday, March 20 Day: 4-0-1 Night: 1-6-6 Friday, March 21 Day: 4-8-5 Night: 6-4-2 P LAY 4Wednesday, March 19 Day: 2-8-1-1 Night: 3-6-0-0 Thursday, March 20 Day: 0-4-1-4 Night: 2-8-9-5 Friday, March 21 Day: 2-9-3-8 Night: 9-9-8-0 F ANTA SY 5 Wednesday, March 19 1-19-22-23-27 Thursday, March 20 4-7-16-28-29 Friday, March 21 3-5-6-8-21L OTTOWednesday, March 19 8-9-24-36-38-40 X-2 Saturdays Jackpot: $24 millionP OWERBALLWednesday, March19 2-19-23-24-34-43 PB-14 X-2 Saturdays Jackpot: $96 millionMEGA M ONEYFriday, March 21 13-24-38-42 PB-13 Todays Jackpot: $550,000MEGA M ILLION SFriday, March 21 2-23-30-35-53 PB-10 X-5 Todays Jackpot: $20 million M C Y K

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www.newssun.comSunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A3 BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterAVON PARK The citys Planning and Zoning Board will have a eld trip Tuesday evening. Members need to see the location of a city right of way together because it got confusing during last Tuesdays meeting. The board will meet at or shortly after 5 p.m. Tuesday at 301 E. Circle St., where Councilman Garrett Anderson lives on land co-owned by his sis ters, Candice Anderson and Brittany McGuire. Anderson and McGuire requested the city vacate a section of right of way that crosses the property from the end of North Lake Ve rona Boulevard south to East Circle Street. Ander son told the board last Tuesday that the city has approved drainage plans using land close to the lake, but not the right of way hes asking to have vacated. McGuire said immediate neighbors on East Circle Street and commercial entities approved, but they didnt hear from the city. When she took the application to City Manager Julian Deleon, she said he offered to trade the right of way for all of their lakeside property on East Cir cle Street, to extend the citys multi-use path. I talked to engineers and they agreed that they are two separate issues. You cant try to trade like that, Anderson said. Deleon, who wasnt at Tuesdays meeting, had concerns read into the re cord by Administrative Services Director Maria Sutherland. He advised against vacating the right of way, claiming the city might need that proper ty in the future to create drainage and retention as the only remaining right of way the city had, and said giving it up would take away the citys exibility for future drainage improvements. While stating that the city was not opposed to a possible trade off to miti gate other drainage concerns, Deleon also wrote, The city is not required to vacate what has been platted as a public right of way. Anderson said the city drainage plans, as drafted by Polston Engineer ing Inc. of Sebring, call for no pipes, berms, ponds or other drainage improvements along the right of way from North Lake Vero na Boulevard to East Cir cle Street. One pipe goes through the lower portion of the right of way, from East Circle Street to the lake, and he was ne with that, he said. Anderson said he re ceived an email from Deleon saying the city needed all of the right of way to complete the project, but he saw no evidence of that in the plans. He also said the city didnt need the full lakefront proper ty because the pathway is designed to t the existing street right of way. As for water retention, its a well-known fact that you cannot put water re tention on a steep slope, Anderson said. This easement is a steep slope all the way down to the lake. You cant put swales on a steep slope. They wash out. Any engineer knows that. McGuire said Anderson hopes to put up a fence and a retaining wall to keep the land from wash ing out in storms. Engineer Dale Polston said the plan is to provide as much retention as possible on city land. He said the city is using an outfall pipe on the lake side of the street, but none of the land north of the street. He did say, however, that more right of way along Circle Street could help with drainage plans. Tuesdays discussion brought up other issues. Board member Jean Jor dan, whose daughter lives adjacent to the property, was upset someone had put up no trespassing signs along North Lake Verona Boulevard, which has impeded parking during Independence Day celebrations. McGuire and her par ents told the board they had to put up signs to prevent people from using parts of their 17-acre tract for car parties and to keep four-wheeler riders including Jordans grandson off the property. Both situation are liability hazards, she said.Avon Park Planning & Zoning Board to take field trip Tuesday ANDERSONMembers need to see city right of way to clear up confusion Courtesy photoOlivia Worley, the 2013 volunteer of the year is shown accepting her award from Linda Crowder, Director of The Childrens Museum. Olivia has been a wonderful asset to the Museum, Crowder said. We really appreciate her dedication. The Museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit the Museum website at www.childrensmuseumhighlands.com for more information.CHILDRENS MUSEUM HONORS VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR Special to the News-SunSEBRING Van Samuels, outreach specialist from the Seminole Tribe of Florida, will present a program on the history and culture of the Seminole Tribe of Florida at the Circle Theatre in Se bring at 2:30 p.m. Monday. Samuels comes from the AH-TAH-THI-KI Museum in Clewiston. Guests will learn who the Seminole people are, how they came to be in Florida and how they survive in the Ever glades. Samples of their dress and artwork will also be available. This is the second in a series of programs on Getting to Know the Real Florida, presented by the Highlands County Genealogical Society and the Capt. John W. Whidden Chapter UDC. Topics of future programs will be railroads, stories of old Florida, the real Ponce de Leon, and old timey music. Tickets for Samuels program are $7 and may be purchased at the Circle Theatre or the downtown ofce of the Sebring Chamber of Commerce. The Sweet Shop of the Theatre will be open for the purchase of pop corn, candy, ice cream and drinks. Seminole Tribe program is Monday at Circle Theatre BY SAMANTHA GHOLARStaff WriterSEBRING Pay increases for three city departments re, police and city clerk are on the back burner for now as the city prepares to head into budget season with two new faces on the council. City Administrator Scott Noethlich pre sented the council with requests from the departments for pay adjustments Tuesday. Theres three departments requesting adjustments. The police department requests are from the chief, the commander and two record clerks. Code enforce ment is also included in the adjustment. This can be funded by a frozen position at the beginning of the year, Noethlich said. The Sebring Fire De partment wage adjustments were approved by council late last year. The adjustments, if approved, would be funded within this years current budget. There we are looking at adjustments for the re chief and three deputy chiefs, said Noethlich. The adjustments can be made with no impact on the current budget. The city clerk along with two of the clerks employees are up for ad justments, which will be funded by the current budget. Councilman John Grifn made a motion to table the request for wage adjustments until budget talk begins for the city and its departments. The motion passed 3-2 with Scott Stanley, John Grifn and Andrew Fells voting yes and John Clark and Bud Whitlock casting dissenting votes. No specic date was set for the item to return to the agenda.Pay adjustments on hold for 3 departments The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN M C Y K

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A4 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com Great American MeatoutAfter several months of crippling snowstorms and ooding, I really look forward to spring weather, green grass, and owers in bloom. The advent of spring is also a great opportunity to turn over a new leaf on our dietary and exercise habits. In fact, Ive been told that hundreds of communities celebrate the advent of spring with something called the Great American Meatout. Local health advocates host educa tional events, where they ask visitors to get a fresh start this spring with a healthy diet of vegetables, fresh fruits, legumes, and whole grains. For those who need a little encouragement, their website provides useful information and a chance to pledge a healthy diet for one day or more.SIMON M ILL SSebringA slippery slopeThe ACLU and those eight samesex couples who are challenging Floridas non-recognition of samesex marriages performed in oth er states evidently havent learned much from the past. In a way, werent we here a couple thousand years ago? The ancient and primitive Greeks and Romans crassly valued homo sexual relations. But eventually the people wised up and realized that was a mistake (e.g., Plato condemned homosexual activity), and homosexual activity was again logically deemed unethical. Now, misguided progressives are trying to take us back thousands of years to more primitive and decadent times, despite the fact that thinking people have known for centuries that homosexual activity is immoral and a bad legal precedent. (Its easy to show that all the arguments homosexuals use to try to rationalize homosexual activity are seriously awed.) It may surprise you that some colleges like Harvard now have ofcially recognized student groups devoted to promoting the acceptance of BDSM sexually deviant bondage, discipline, sadism, and masochism. Thats right. If you are a student who gets turned on by smacking people around, some colleges like Harvard now have groups for you. He who has eyes to see, let them see. The logic of heterophobic ho mosexuals is rapidly leading this society down a slippery slope to a more aberrant, disordered, and irrational society. Legal polygamy is coming soon. Maybe down the line well see marriage between straight and ho mosexual consenting-adult incestuous people. Whoopee! Anyone who thinks this is progress is deluding him/herself. Rome didnt fall in a day. But it did fall. Lets not join the race to the bottom.WAYNE L ELADowners Grove, Ill. NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927Romona Washington Publisher publisher@newssun.com Scott Dressel Editor editor@newssun.com VIEWPOINTS O UR VIE W YO UR VIE WS L ETTER S TO THE EDITORShould be 250 words or less and must contain the writers full name, address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit or reject letters for clarity, length, taste and libel. Submission does not guarantee publication. Only two letters per month per writer will be accepted. Send letters to:E MAILeditor@newssun.comMAILLetters to the Editor 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870Were going to miss Sebring City Councilor John Clark. For example, at the March 18 Se bring City Council meeting during a discussion of a developers request for a zoning change to allow for a higher den sity apartment complex Clark cut right to the heart of the matter saying, These development agreements come out to be a big joke because weve never not modi ed them. He was referring to the history of excep tions given to developers for projects at odds with the long-term master plan. It is essential to consider the future if a community is to thrive. During the colo nial period and beyond, there was more than enough room. Immigrants arriving in the New World generally cleared land and built structures where and as they wished. As towns and cities grew and became more crowded, however, they were forced to adapt, especially following the indus trial revolution and the rise of industry, motorized trafc and rapidly increasing populations. With plentiful opportunities for devel opers, sub-divisions rapidly sprawled across Florida, often creating pockets of poverty and crime or endangering the environment. As communities learned more about the causes of social decay and the dan gers of pollution, they made a conscious effort to protect natural resources and create compatible residential areas while creating commercial ones. The result was zoning, an agreement to restrict certain types of activity in certain areas. Over the years, zoning led to planning for the future, which became a focus of state, county and municipal govern ments. The problem is, planning for the future only works when people consistently fol low the agree upon plan. This was the issue Clark addressed at the meeting. Why bother to zone property if the zone can be changed upon request? Think about other examples of similar exceptions like the Majestic Cove, a failed condo minium project on Lakeview Drive, now in foreclosure and blocking views of Lake Jackson. A related issue emerged when the city council, in a 4-1 vote, elected to table the zoning request until May 20. Winter resi dents of the Francis 2 mobile home park, which will be directly affected by the pro posed project, are upset the ultimate de cision will be made after they have re turned north. In other words, not only is a developer attempting to change the rules, the coun cil has deprived city homeowners of their voice in the matter. If Sebring is to thrive in the future, we must pay attention to our master plans now. Youre talking about a retirement com munity and (the proposed project) is go ing in another direction, Clark said. Put yourself in the shadow of a three-story building and youd be upset too. Like we said, were going to miss him. One thing most people might not know about me is that long after I became an adult I was diagnosed with Attention Decit Disorder (ADD). Im sure theres a neat professional diagnosis that explains it that you can look up somewhere if you want. Im not going to give you that kind of a denition. What ADD means as far as I am concerned is that Im easily distracted, sometimes anxious and jittery, and my mind likes to race at something like 500 miles an hour. This last is very inconvenient at night when Im trying to sleep and my brain at out refuses to slow down enough so I can. Fortunately, modern medicine has come out with a substance that calms me down and helps me focus. When I have it, I function quite well for a cra zy person (I am not crazy because I have ADD: I am crazy because I am a writer). Life is a lot less frustrating, and Im easier to be around. Well, its a long story, but Ive spent the past two days off my medication. This has not been good. I have been tired, cranky, and found it difcult to get things done. The fact I am sitting here typing this column is a testa ment to me rising above my circumstances. In my current state, I am easily attracted to what I refer to as bright shinys things that are attractive and tease me out of any focus I might have at the moment. For example, someone in the house has ordered pizza, an attractive distraction even if I wasnt off my medication. Being off it makes it that much more tempting to quit typing and go see if I can liber ate a piece or two. Thankfully, my latest distraction also happens to be the thing I need to get my column done. Im referring to my shiny new laptop that just arrived yesterday and has been taking up a great deal of my time today. My old laptop that has served me faithfully the past six or seven years has been showing its age. Its slow. The hard drive has been lling up. Some of the letters on the keys have worn off, testing my abilities as a touch typist. Thanks to some birthday money and a generous husband, I was able to go online and get myself a replace ment. That sounds wonderful and everything, and when it rst arrived, I was thrilled and happy to welcome it into my home. Then the process of getting it usable started and that made it less joyful. Im not complaining, but there were several bumps to getting the comput er ready to use. I spent most of today not writing, or working on writing-related issues, but on installing software and trans ferring les from the old system to the new. This required patience, especially with a couple of programs that demanded authorization codes I had to dig out of the old computer. Throw in that I have nally broken down and upgraded Microsoft Ofce to the latest version, which is different enough from the old version Ive used for years to make things seem a little off. It isnt as bad as I feared it would be, but there is a learning curve to the new system. Plus I have to congure the new programs to my liking, which will take still more time. But overall, I am pleased with my latest bright shiny. It looks pretty, it types just ne, and I am happy to pro duce a new column on it. Id go on, but its late. And time to try to shut down the distractions lest they keep me up all night. Wish me luck.Laura Ware is a Sebring resident. She can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady@embarqmail. com. Visit her website at www.laurahware.com. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the staff of the News-Sun.My new bright shiny L AURA S L OOKLaura Ware Zoning rules are there for a reason M C Y K

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www.newssun.comSunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A5 year. Locally, a review of sales data released by the countys property appraiser shows the median price for a single-family home rose $2,000 to $92,000 in 2013. At the height of the housing boom in 2006, the median sales price in Highlands topped out at $165,307, 44 percent above last years level. Floridas coastal cities ended last year with im pressive price gains. Miami and Tampa, two mar kets battered by the 2008 housing bust, posted increases of 16.5 percent and 15.8 percent respective ly, according to the CaseShiller index. The market remains healthy due to the increase participation of traditional homebuyers, OConnor said, referring to the waning inuence of investors who were snapping up properties and pushing up prices in 2012 and ear ly 2013. The analysis of 2013 data included all single-family homes that met the property appraisers denition of a sale conducted at arms length, and did not include distressed sales or other transfers. For all the upward momentum, statewide home prices remain 32 percent off the peak reached dur ing the housing boom, according to year-end data from CoreLogic, a real es tate analytics rm. While local sales price gains remain anemic, the review of sales data does point to one bright spot: a stout gain in sales volume. The number of sin gle family homes that changed hands in 2013 jumped 25 percent from 2012s level. Last years spike in sales volume, though, was not evenly spread across the county. Neighborhoods featuring higher-end prop erties registered more sales than those with modestly priced homes, especially those in the northern reaches of the county, like Avon Park. Tomoka Heights, a gated 55-and-older community outside of Lake Placid, bested other neighbor hoods, with 38 of its 356 single family residences, or 11 percent, nding new owners. Sun N Lake, Sebring Country Estates, and Golf Hammock areas per formed only half as well. Home sales in Avon Park stood in stark contrast to Tomoka Heights. Only 39, or 1.4 percent, of the City of Charms 2,700 single family homes sold in 2013. What accounts for the success of Tomoka Heights? I believe that a major ity of the retiring buying public is looking for a gated, 55-and-older community, of which there are few in Highlands County said Shelagh Byatt, a broker and developer of Tomoka Heights. Byatt views last years sluggish price gains not as a sign that the local market needs further healing but as indicator of an improv ing trend. Florida Realtors President Sherri Meadows shares Byatts assessment. Were seeing homeowners ready to take that next step and list their properties for sale, she said in response to the spate of positive g ures statewide. Still, for the all the optimism looming economic headwinds could put the brakes on the improved outlook. The number of mortgage applications dropped in late 2013 when interest rates spiked after the Federal Reserve signaled an end to its monetary easing. Many in the mortgage industry fear that 2014 could bring further rate hikes as the central bank withdraws its stimulus from nancial markets. Whats more, job growth remains uneven and wag es stagnant, which many in the industry see as key supports for home sales. Recent economic reports suggest a bleaker picture for housing, said David M. Blitzer, chairman of the index committee that publishes the CaseShiller measure. He cites rising home prices and mortgage rates as factors that could push affordable homes out the reach of many buyers. For now, the upbeat numbers bode well for a market that starts the year on the heels of what is now a two-year run up in price increases. A review of March data from the property appraisers ofce shows single-family home sales in January exceeding the pace set last year. OConnor, the econo mist with Florida Realtors, sees little downside to 2014s market and said that homeowners could look forward to a balanced market. PRICES FROM PAGE A1 Manuel Cortazal Katara Simmons/News-SunTomoka Heights had 11 percent of its 356 homes sold last year in Lake Placid, while the city of Avon Park only had 1.4 percent of its single-family homes change hands. A ssociated P ressMIAMI The National Hurricane Center says its storm track forecasts keep improving, helping to shrink the so-called cone of uncertainty a bit in forecasts this year. Coastal residents wont notice much of a change in the forecasts showing the probable path of the center of a tropi cal storm or hurricane. In fact, forecasters worry that people mistakenly believe that the cone shows all the areas at risk for storm damage. A storms winds and storm surge can extend well beyond the forecast track. This year, forecasters are trying col or-coded maps to show people where storm surge could happen during storms.Cone of uncertainty to shrink a little M C Y K

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A6 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com month, he estimates the city would receive $81,732 per year in revenue, along with $51,944 each year from The Bluffs, based on water use. That would bring a total of approxi mately $134,000 per year, he said. However, he said the city would need to rehabilitate the existing sanitary infrastructure, build additional infrastructure to connect the system to the citys existing system and bring operations to a central location. Another item on the agenda is a request from the Florida Department of Transportation to have an easement through city property for stormwater drainage. The proposed easement would go from Verona Avenue to Lake Verona through city park property. The City Council is also set to consider a nal vote on annexing two pieces of property that have been on the agenda for a while. They were approved on rst reading in February, but had to be repealed because one had a typo graphical error. One is a 31-acre cityowned parcel at 2055 U.S. 27 N. and another is a 3.6acre tract owned by Guru Krupa Investment LLC at 2511 U.S. 27 S. The cityowned parcel must rst be approved for the private parcel to be approved, since the second parcel is contiguous to the rst and must be adjacent to the city limits to be annexed. The City Council, in its role as the Community Redevelopment Agency Board, will also consider whether or not to approve $2,000 to pay half the ad vertising costs for the 2014 Bluegrass & Blueberry Festival, as well as whether or not to approve $725 half of the advertising budget for the Avon Park Veterans Engraved Brick project. Both were recommended for approval by the Avon Park Main Street CRA Advisory Board on March 6. The CRA meeting will take place at 5 p.m. Monday, before the city council meeting in council chambers at 123 E. Main St. UTILITY FROM PAGE A1Fowler further reported that, because of the shortcoming, the auditors had been unable to determine whether or not all of the programs provisions had been followed. The plan the board adopted had some very specic requirements, she said. Fowler also noted that the countys 2009-2010 plan had an extended due date and still had not been led. That ap parently was the result of missing or incomplete documentation. Highlands County Administrator June Fisher told the board that the mistakes had come despite the fact the county had hired a consultant to identify potential problems. They did look into some of our reporting and made some improvements. They actually corrected some of the reports we previously had submitted, she said. Fisher said the county staff made corrections on the LHAP program and noted that the county also had the opportunity to again hire a consultant if additional assistance was needed. Auditors also pointed to the countys investment in a new $8 million radio system as an accounting red ag. They informed the board that the countys listing of that expenditure had not been offset by a corresponding revenue source. Moreover, staff apparently had missed a mandated Nov. 20 dead line to correct the issue. Fowler said that the goal with all of the auditors ndings were to make certain that the internal controls of the county would ensure that Highlands would be in compliance with federal and state requirements. Its a big project and a big effort, said County Commission Chairman Greg Harris. Fisher told the board that the county staff is in the process of address ing the areas of concern raised by the auditors. BUDGET FROM PAGE A1BUD WARRENG arland G lenn Bud Warren Jr. was born in M ount A iry, North Carolina Sept. 11, 1936. He passed quietly in slumber Wednesday morn ing in his home in Lake P lacid. He is survived by his wife, Jean Keyes Warren; son, Chris L. Warren and wife, Charlotte M eeks of O coee; daughter, Diana W. A larcon and husband Jorge A of P lantation; son, G. G lenn Warren III, esq. and wife Lori Foley of O range P ark; daughter Janet W. M id dleton of Winter Springs; granddaughters Choyce and Chelsea M iddleton; Katherine S. and E mma I. Warren; M ary E lizabeth Warren; and grandsons John L. Warren, and M iguel and G eorge A A larcon. G.G Bud Warren graduated in 1959 from North Carolina State University in R aleigh, N.C., where he met his wife, Jean. Bud was employed by Southern Bell Telephone Co. and retired from Bellsouth as an assistant vice-president after 35 years of service. The family moved to M iami in 1968. Later assignments took Bud and family to Jacksonville, A tlanta, G a., and Birmingham, A la. Upon retirement in Jacksonville in 1994, Bud and Jean relocated in Lake P lacid permanently in 2005 at present address. Bud was an active member of Kiwanis, M iami-M idtown and served as president from 1975-76. While in Jacksonville, the family lived in O range P ark and Bud served as a mem ber of O range P ark R otary Club, as well as Director of the Black Creek District Boys Scouts of A merica. Buds interest in the Scouting began in his youth and he earned his E agle Scout from O ld Hickory Council while in M ount A iry, N.C. He continued his lifelong services with Boy Scouts of A merica and earned the Silver Beaver (highest award to a civilian) while in O range P ark. Bud served in the U.S. A rmy Corps and A rmy Reserves from 1960 to 1965. He was an ham radio operator, call sign, KD4-APE, and a member of ARRL, the national association for amateur radio, for 40 years. This interest and skill rendered untold assistance to victims of Hurricane A ndrew in 1992. Upon retirement, Bud became a M aster G ardener and when relocating to Lake P lacid he continued his interest in Highlands County M aster G ardener P rogram volunteering weekly at the Bert Harris A g Center on G eorge Blvd. He was a prudent advocate of Florida friendly landscaping and natural habitats for birds. He served as P resident of Highlands County A udubon Society and reinstated the Bluebird Data Collection P roject at R oyce R anch, which he spearheaded until his illness in 2011 forced him to turn over the project to dedicated friends of bluebirds. O n Feb. 11, 2013, Bud submitted a proclamation to the mayor and council members declaring the Town of Lake P lacid a Bluebird Sanctuary. With a lifelong interest in owers and nature, Bud successfully grew orchids and maintained an interest in orchid growing for 45 years. He was a member of Saint James Catholic Church in Lake P lacid, and a 4th degree member of the Knights of Columbus, Council #7245. A Memorial M ass Celebration for Bud will be held on A pril 4, 2014 at Saint James Catholic Church, 3380 P lacid View Drive, Lake Placid at 11 a.m. In lieu of owers, the family requests donations be sent to Cornerstone Hospice, 209 North R idgewood Dr., Suite 3, Sebring, 33870 and/or St.Vincent de P aul Society, St. James Catholic Church, 3380 P lacid View Dr. Lake P lacid, 33852. OBITUARIES Courtesy photoThe long line of volunteers of the Avon Park Depot Museum that make events happen on the Silver Palm Dining Car. (From left) Eden Dickerson, Grace Hudson, Eileen Sachsenmaier, Thetis Casey, Judy Laycock, Jim Deal, Elaine Levey, Carlos Deloera, Brandon Vargas and Eduardo Hernandez. Carlos, Brandon and Eduardo are with the South Florida State College Honors Student Services Learning Program and freely volunteer with the Historical Society of Avon Park.LONG LINE OF VOLUNTEERS WINDERMERE (AP) A police ofcer was shot and killed early Saturday after stopping two people and calling for help in an Or lando suburb, authorities said. Windermere Police Department Ofcer Robert German called for backup after stopping a young man and woman on foot shortly before 4 a.m., investigators said. German, 31, reported his location and was found lying on the ground when a deputy arrived at the scene, Orange County Sher iffs Ofce spokeswoman Jane Watrel said. He just said he was doing a subject stop and then all the tragic events unfolded, Wa trel said. The deputy put Ger man in his squad car and rushed him to the re department. Ger man was then taken to Orlando Regional Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead. As ofcers responded to the scene, they heard shots red and found two individuals deceased nearby matching the description of the man and woman German had stopped, Watrel said. They are believed to have committed suicide. Their identities have not been released. Windermere is located 15 miles west of Or lando. It has a population of about 3,000 people and one of the lowest crime rates in Florida, Mayor Gary Bruhn said. He said it was the rst lineof-duty death in the towns history. Violent crime is just not something that happens in the town of Windermere, Bruhn said. So its really, real ly difcult. German had been with the department for ve years and just recently returned from desk duty after falling and injuring his shoul der, Bruhn said.Cop shot, killed near Orlando BELBEK AIR BASE, Crimea (AP) Pro-Russian forces stormed a Ukrainian air force base in Crimea, ring shots and smashing through concrete walls with armored personnel carriers. At least one person was wounded, the base commander said. An APC also smashed open the front gate of the Belbek base near the port city of Sevastopol, accord ing to footage provided by the Ukrainian Defense ministry. Two ambulances arrived and then departed shortly after, and at least one of them was car rying what appeared to be a wounded person, an Associated Press journalist said. The Ukrainian com mander of the base, Yuliy Mamchur, said there was at least one injury. He called his men together, they sang the Ukrainian national anthem and then stood at ease. He said they are going to turn over their weapons. Russian forces have been seizing Ukrainian military facilities for sev eral days in the Black Sea peninsula, which voted a week ago to secede and join Russia. Elsewhere, more than 5,000 pro-Russia residents of a major city in Ukraines east demonstrated in fa vor of holding a referendum on whether to seek to split off and become part of Russia. The rally in Donetsk came less than a week after the Ukrainian region of Crimea approved secession in a referendum regarded as illegitimate by Western countries. After the referendum, Russia formally annexed Crimea. With Crimea now effec tively under the control of Russian forces, which ring Ukrainian military bases on the strategic Black Sea peninsula, concern is ris ing that Ukraines eastern regions will agitate for a similar move. Russia has brought large military contingents to ar eas near the border with eastern Ukraine. Russian President Vladimir Putin has said there is no intention to move into eastern Ukraine, but the prospect of violence between proand anti-secession groups in the east could be used as a pretext for sending in troops.Pro-Russian forces storm Ukrainian base in Crimea Get the paper delivered to you! NEWS-SUN M C Y K

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www.newssun.comSunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A7 show Friday evening as the normally dark, dense areas of Highlands Hammock State Park glowed brightly with more reies than anyone could attempt to count, whizzing by like tiny shooting stars. Fireies in the Ham mock, which is put on by the Friends of Highlands, allows paid guests to ride a tram through Highlands Hammock after hours to experience the parks newly discovered resi dents. Park Manager Brian Pinson initiated the Firey experience after making the surprise discovery of the insects a few weeks back. It was about three weeks ago that I rst began to notice them out, said Pinson. The rst night I saw just a few. The second night I saw a lot more and I kept going out and then I noticed just how many there actually are out here. With the excitement of the new discovery, Pinson knew the reies had to be shared with the pub lic. The park ranger, along with other employees and park volunteers, coordinated the tram rides for interested Hammock visitors and began giving tours lled with educational commentary on the nightly encounters this past week. There are many differ ent species of reies, Pinson told guests Friday night. As it gets darker and your eyes adjust, you may see different ight patterns, different ashing patterns. These can tell you what species the reies are. If you can follow one for long enough you can see all this. Pinson isnt yet aware of just how many rey species inhabit the Hammock, but hopes to initiate a study by the leading rey expert from the University of Florida by the end of the year. Do you guys know that reies arent really ies? Pinson asked guests on the trams. Pinson revealed the true identity of the ashy insects they are actual ly beetles as well as an hours worth of other information about reies (they dont taste good, for example) to eager guests both young and old. Fireies arent as common in the area as they used to be, Pinson said, mainly due to light pollution and loss of their preferred habitat. The dense, lush areas around the Hammock make perfect homes for the mating bugs. In fact, reies glow in order to catch the attention of a potential mate, Pinson told the riders. Fireies in the Ham mock will continue nightly until the reies are no longer visible. Guests must register ahead of time through the Friends of Highlands Hammock State Park Facebook page in order to secure a spot on their selected night. Seating on the two trams is limited. The Fireies in the Hammock event is $5 per person (cash only). Guests must pre-register themselves and provide number of guests accom panying them prior to the event. Payment will be collected as guests board the trams. For more information, visit the Friends of Highlands Hammock State Park Facebook page.Samantha Gholar can be reached at samantha.gholar@newssun. com or 385-6155 ext: 526. FIREFLIES FROM PAGE A1 Katara Simmons/News-SunHighlands Hammock Park Manager Brian Pinson talks to visitors about reies Friday evening and explains that the glowing insects taste terrible and most animals avoid eating them.his wife live in Sebring and have two children: 11-year-old Madison and 6-year-old Camden, both at Cracker Trail Elementary School. He has volunteered with the school district through the Parent Teacher Organization, School Advisory Council, and District School Advisory Council. His vision is to continue the good work he already sees happening at the Highlands County schools, such as Youth For Christ and the Stephen R. Covey Leader In Me program. Adding to that, he wants to be sure that the School Board of High lands County continues to forge strong teamwork with all the schools. I want to be visible to all the schools. I want to be a good listener, an advocate for the needs of our students, the needs of our kids, Culverhouse said. He has seen students reach out and help the community, including at the recent Care Mob event on March 1 at High lands Art League in Sebring, where he provided pulled pork barbecue lunch to more than 75 Sebring High School students who came out to refurbish and repaint the Art League village. For the community, he asks that people volunteer in their schools. Teachers cant do it by themselves. They need help and one way to do it is through communi ty involvement and keeping children as our focus, Culverhouse said. His family has attended Grace Bible Church for the last eight years, where he has been a deacon for the last ve years. He and his wife lead a small study group. Culverhouse said he works to follow the scripture of Proverbs 16:3: Commit to the Lord whatever you do, and your plans will succeed. He has served 11 years as an Avon Park city re ghter and is now also the ofce manager for Sebring-based attorney Steve Kackley, his uncle, for whom he had worked while in high school. He was nominated in 2003 to serve as the sec retary/treasurer for Avon Park Professional Fireghters Local 3132, and has been ever since then. He is also a member of Sebring Firemen Inc., a community service-based organization that works for the benet of local athletics and community fundraising. Hes dedicat ed time to the Highlands Art League, the school districts International Baccalaureate program, the Highlands County Fair and the Central Florida Futbol Club. Culverhouse has raised $2,475 in contributions all monetary and $225.98 in expenditures, according to campaign treasurers reports on the Supervisor of Elections website at www.votehigh lands.gov. RUN FROM PAGE A1It was about three weeks ago that I first began to notice them out. The first night I saw just a few. The second night I saw a lot more and then I noticed just how many there actually are out here.Brian Pinson park manager I want to be ... an advocate for the needs of our students.Clinton Culverhouse school board candidate M C Y K

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A8 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com BUSINESS BY SAMANTHA GHOLARStaff WriterSEBRING Two of Highlands Countys supermarkets will get new names after parent company Bi-Lo Holdings, LLC announced that a rebranding of more than 30 Tampa Bay area Sweetbay stores will take place in the coming weeks. The Sebring and Lake Placid Sweetbay super markets twill be converted into Winn-Dixie stores beginning on March 29. Sebrings Sweetbay store was announced as part of the rst round of stores to be transformed on Wednesday by Bi-Lo ofcials. A second an nouncement was made Friday that the Lake Placid store would also be included in the overhaul. A press release from Bi-Lo Holdings stated that two phases of store conversions would take place, breaking the over hauls into two groups. The Sebring Sweetbay at 3250 U.S. 27 South behind Wells Fargo bank, will close on Saturday, March 29 and re-open on Friday, April 4. Lake Placids Sweetbay at 1519 U.S. 27 South will close on Saturday, April 5 and re-open as Winn-Di xie on Friday, April 11. Upon reopening as a Winn-Dixie, we believe customers will be pleasantly surprised to see that we have been working hard to provide the fresh, quality products they want at prices they can afford, said Joey Medina, Winn-Dixies regional vice president. Plus, we will offer a suite of in-store savings programs, like the fu elperks! Reward Program, which lets customers earn incredible savings at par ticipating Shell stations every time they shop with their Winn-Dixie Custom er Reward Card. A total of 35 stores throughout the Tampa, Bradenton and north Polk County regions will be converted to Winn-Dixie supermarkets by the sec ond weekend in April. Bi-Lo has invited cur rent employees to remain in their current positions during and following the store transformations. While the name on the fronts of the stores is changing, the people running them dont have to. Weve invited Sweet bay associates to join the Winn-Dixie family and look forward to exchanging what it means to be local as we work together to run even greater stores, Medina said.Samantha Gholar can be reached at samantha.gholar@newssun. com or 385-6155 ext: 526.Goodbye Sweetbay, hello Winn-Dixie Samantha Gholar/News SunCustomers make their way in and out of the Sebring Sweetbay supermarket Friday morning. Store #1792 will be one of two Highlands County Sweetbay markets that will get a complete overhaul in early April. Both the Sebring and Lake Placid stores will be converted into Winn-Dixie Supermarkets in the coming weeks.Sebring, LP stores to be converted in coming weeks Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Leadership Team of the Boys and Girls Club of Highlands County is starting the Supporter of the Month Program to highlight the local businesses, sponsors and other donors who have provid ed nancial contributions or in-kind services to the club. The clubs current mem bership includes 350 students ages 6-18 in Avon Park and Sebring. Boys and Girls Clubs have been instrumental in the lives of youngsters nationwide since 1860. Positive Medical Trans port is the Supporter of the Month for February. Positive Medical Transport has made nancial contributions to the club to assist in providing ser vices through its School Liaison, who works collaboratively with the teachers and other school staff to further support and enhance the success of our students. Positive Medical Transport recognizes the importance of the companys connectivity with the community and is committed to assisting local agencies in achieving their strategic goals. We extend our congratulations and sincere appreciation to Positive Medical Transport, a news release from the club said. We solicit the individual support of the citizens of Highlands County to continue to patronize local businesses, as many of them, like Positive Medi cal Transport, give back to the community in numer ous ways. In addition, we ask that you please consider donating to and/or visiting our re-sale store, The Emporium, located at 248 Pomegranate Ave. (in) Sebring. There are many, many articles avail able, including clothing, household items, appliances, and furniture, at very reasonable prices. All proceeds are used to assist in funding the services and programs provided for the members of the club. Because the club relies so heavily on the contributions of local businesses, agencies, organizations, and private donors, we are continuously seeking opportunities to increase our Partnership Bank to meet the grow ing needs of our students and the organization. If you would like to assist us in our efforts to guide and direct these students toward positive actions and activities, then please consider making a tax-de ductible contribution to The Boys and Girls Club of Highlands County.Positive Medical Transport honored by Boys and Girls Club Courtesy photoRon Layne (right) and Melissa Worley (left) of Positive Medical Transport join Boys and Girls Club director Woodraun Wright in raising a banner next to one of the companys ambulances. Positive Mobility was named the Supporter of the Month for February.WASHINGTON (AP) A federal appeals court has handed a defeat to a coalition of retail groups that chal lenged as too high the Federal Reserves cap on how much banks can charge businesses for handling debit card transactions. The ruling issued Friday by the U.S. Appeals Court for the District of Columbia overturned a lower courts decision in July that favored the merchants and was a setback for banks. In the July ruling, a federal judge struck down the Feds cap on socalled swipe fees, saying the Fed didnt have the authority to set the limit the way it did in 2011, improp erly including data that made the cap too high. The retail groups had sued the Fed over its setting the cap at an aver age of about 24 cents per debit-card transaction. The appeals court ruling upholding the Feds cap was a blow to an industry already buffeted by public and congressional outrage over the massive data breach that hit Target Corp. during the holiday season and other data-security violations at big retailers. Congress mandated a ceiling on debit-card swipe fees as part of the 2010 nancial regulatory overhaul. Prior to the cap, fees averaged 44 cents per swipe. The Fed had initially proposed a 12-cent fee limit, and the retailers argued that the Fed buckled under pressure from bank lobbyists when it doubled that level. The retailers had argued that the Fed deviated from the 2010 laws in tent by factoring banks expenses into the cap that the law didnt allow.Court upholds Feds cap on swipe fees M C Y K

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www.newssun.comSunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A9 By the time you read this things could well have changed dramatically. But at the time Im writing this, Saturday morning, the opening two days of the NCAA Tournament, not counting the play-in games, havent gone so bad for my brackets. Sure, in one of those that I lled out for the ESPN Challenge, I did have Oklahoma State reaching the nal game, albeit not winning. So while one full quarter of that bracket has been demolished, Im still in decent shape on that one. That Gonzaga beat OK St. hurt, but it wasnt a major upset. It technically wasnt an upset at all as the Zags were the eighth seed play ing a nine. I guess weve just heard a lot more about the Cowboys this season, even though Gonzaga has been a tournament staple for SPORTS BY DAN HOEHNEdaniel.hoehne@newssun.comAnother day on the diamond, another win for Avon Park as they lassoed LaBelle by a 7-4 score Thursday. Tyrone Perry and Luis Martinez lead the way with three hits each, while ve separate players each had an RBI in the win. Freshman starting pitcher Daniel Simons had one of his few rough outings this year, allowing four runs in his four innings of work, but was effective enough and was backed up by his hitters. The rst two innings went by with no scores, but the Devils got on the board in the top of the third. Cody Pearlman lead things off with a single and moved up a base on Martinezs shot back up the middle. With one out, Per ry singled sharply through the right side and Pearlmand came around to score. Mykel Gordon reached on an error, bringing Mar tinez in and Mason Jahna singled to bring Perry plateward. The Cowboys came right back, however, and tied it in the bottom of the inning. A single by Chandler McCormick was followed by a walk to Jake Martinez, with both runners moving up on a wild pitch and McCormick coming in on a passed ball. Jarred Miller then powered one over the fence in center for a two-run shot to make it 3-3. Avon Park got two of those runs back in the fourth. Trey Frazier drew a leadoff walk and was bunted over to second by Pearlman. Martinez went the other way with a double to left, bringing Frazier in and Gordon would later plate Red Devils keep rolling Dan Hoehne/News-Sun lesLuis Martinez was solid in the eld and accounted for three hits, two runs and an RBI in Avon Parks win at LaBelle Thursday. SEE DEVILS | A11AVON PARK7LABELLE4 BY DAN HOEHNEdaniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING In the midst of a ve-game losing streak, perhaps the last team you want to be paid a visit from is Owasso High School. Traveling on their Spring Break for a handful of Florida games, the defending Class 6A Oklahoma State champs came to Firemens Field for a Thursday afternoon matinee. And it seemed to be just what the doctor ordered as the Blue Streaks battled back to topple the Rams 6-4. They come down every year and we always played them when I was at Lake Wales, Sebring head coach Jayson DeWitt said. Now that Im here, I just called their coach and asked them to come play us and he agreed. Which ts right into DeWitts mantra of having his squad face the best competition it can as a means to progress. But early on, some of the same problems that have plagued the Streaks during their recent rut, cropped back up. Weve been in every game weve played, DeWitt said. But little things happen that get us in trouble. Such as split-second hesitations on throws, such as the one that allowed a rst-inning, ineld hit. Starter Jonathan Struck worked around it when a sharp grounder to David DeGenaro at third was turned into a 5-4-3 double play. He couldnt work around it in the second, however. With one on and two out, an error on a ground-Blue Streaks overcome Oklahoma champ Owasso Dan Hoehne/News-SunMatt Portis slides in under Owassos catcher with a key insurance run in the Streaks Thursday win.SEBRING6OWASSO4SEE SEBRING | A11 Dan Hoehne/News-Sun lesNicole Rosado and the Lady Panthers got their Suncoast Conference season off to a strong start Thursday as they swept a twin-bill from visiting St. Pete. South Florida held on for a 5-4 win in the opener before taking the nightcap a bit easier by a 4-1 count. After starting the season 0-10, the Panthers have gone 12-8 and seem headed in the right direction. When they play like theyre capable, they are a very good team, head coach Carlos Falla said. There is a lot of talent there. To which assistant coach Heather Barnes agreed. They can be very good, she said. Its just that so far, theyve tried every other way that didnt work. Now theyve gured out the right way and were winning. Tied atop the Suncoast standings with Polk State at 2-0, South Florida continues its conference slate with a pair of away dates this week. Tuesday they have a doubleheader at the State College of Florida and will be in Tampa Thursday for two games against Hillsborough. LADY PANTHERS START SUNCOAST SLATE WITH SWEEP AND ANOTHER THING..Dan HoehneBrackets not too badSEE NCAA | A12 Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Alan Jay Red Sox won the Memorial Playoffs of the Sebring Senior League, upending Reections 12-11 in a thrilling softball game. The Memorial Playoff games honor our fallen players. The following are playing with the Lord Lou Gaum, John Grill, Gary Luciani, Bob McKinney, Hank Gomez, Jerry OBrien, Jim Larnard, Mike Jurma, Ralph Rhoten, Ken Stanek, Ra Concepcion, Barry Hurlbut and recently Bob Flack. Leading up to the winning game the Red Sox beat Fairmount ser vices 19-9 while Reections won out over the VFW 4300 White Sox 16-11. In the championship game, Reections got off to a fast start, scoring ve runs in the rst inning. They were led by Ron Rieches, Bill Kelsey, Greg Ramos and Rick Enfelis all with key hits. Alan Jay cut the led to 5-3 after three innings. But Reections upped the lead in the fth inning to 7-3. The Sox rallied to take lead with six runs in the sixth. Key hits from Ray Trudell, Rog er Gasperlin, Steve Smutnik, John Buja and a triple by Les Osbeck Alan Jay Red Sox take titleSEE SENIORS | A12 M C Y K

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A10 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com COMING UPHigh School Baseball Monday Avon Park at Booker, 7 p.m. Tuesday Avon Park vs. Hardee, 7 p.m.; Lake Placid vs. DeSoto, 7 p.m.; Sebring at Okeechobee, 7 p.m. College Baseball Monday SFSC vs. State College of Florida, 6 p.m. High School Softball Tuesday Lake Placid vs. Charlotte, 5/7 p.m.; Sebring vs. Hardee, 6/7:30 p.m. College Softball Tuesday SFSC at State College of Florida, 5 p.m. Boys Tennis Monday Avon Park vs. Sebring, 4 p.m. Tuesday Lake Placid at Okeechobee, 4:30 p.m.; Sebring vs. Clewiston, 4 p.m. Girls Tennis Monday Avon Park at Sebring, 4 p.m. Tuesday Lake Placid at Okeechobee, 4:30 p.m.; Sebring at Clewiston, 4 p.m. TODAYAUTO RACING NASCAR Auto Club 400 2:30 p.m. FOXBOWLING PBA League Pittsburgh vs. Philadelphia 1 p.m. ESPNCOLLEGE BASKETBALL NIT Tournament 11 a.m. ESPN NCAA Tournament Noon CBS NCAA Tournament 2:30 p.m. CBS NCAA Tournament 5 p.m. CBS NCAA Tournament 6 p.m. TNT NCAA Tournament 7 p.m. TBS NCAA Tournament 8:30 p.m. TNT NCAA Tournament 9:30 p.m. TBSGOLF PGA Arnold Palmer Invitational 12:30 p.m. GOLF PGA Arnold Palmer Invitational 2 p.m. NBC PGA Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic 5 p.m. GOLF LPGA Founders Cup 7 p.m. GOLFMLB PRESEASON Chicago Cubs at Oakland 4 p.m. WGNWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL NCAA Tournament 12:30 p.m. ESPN2 NCAA Tournament 3 p.m. ESPN NCAA Tournament 5:30 p.m. ESPN NCAA Tournament 8 p.m. ESPNWOMENS COLLEGE GYMNASTICS West Virginia at Florida 9 a.m. SUNWOMENS COLLEGE SOFTBALL Alabama at Florida 1 p.m. SUN Arkansas at Mississippi 4 p.m. SUNMONDAYCOLLEGE BASKETBALL NIT Tournament 7 p.m. ESPN NIT Tournament 9 p.m. ESPN NIT Tournament 11 p.m. ESPN2MLB PRESEASON Detroit at Pittsburgh 1 p.m. ESPNNHL Ottawa at Tampa Bay 7:30 p.m. SUNWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL NCAA Tournament 6:30 p.m. ESPN2 NCAA Tournament 9 p.m. ESPN2TUESDAYCOLLEGE BASKETBALL NIT Tournament 7 p.m. ESPN NIT Tournament 9 p.m. ESPNMLB PRESEASON Atlanta at Detroit 1 p.m. ESPN Boston at Tampa Bay 1 p.m. SUNNBA Oklahoma City at Dallas 8 p.m. TNT New York at L.A. Lakers 10:30 p.m. TNTWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL NCAA Tournament 7 p.m. ESPN2 NCAA Tournament 9:30 p.m. ESPN2SPORTS ON TV SCORE BOARDNational Basketball AssociationEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 38 30 .559 Brooklyn 36 31 .537 1 New York 29 40 .420 9 Boston 23 47 .329 16 Philadelphia 15 54 .217 23 Southeast W L Pct GB x-Miami 47 20 .701 Washington 36 33 .522 12 Charlotte 33 36 .478 15 Atlanta 31 36 .463 16 Orlando 19 50 .275 29 Central W L Pct GB x-Indiana 51 18 .739 Chicago 38 31 .551 13 Cleveland 26 43 .377 25 Detroit 25 43 .368 25 Milwaukee 13 56 .188 38 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 52 16 .765 Houston 46 22 .676 6 Dallas 42 28 .600 11 Memphis 40 28 .588 12 New Orleans 28 40 .412 24 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 51 18 .739 Portland 45 24 .652 6 Minnesota 34 33 .507 16 Denver 31 38 .449 20 Utah 22 47 .319 29 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 48 21 .696 Golden State 44 26 .629 4 Phoenix 40 29 .580 8 Sacramento 24 45 .348 24 L.A. Lakers 22 46 .324 25 x-clinched playoff spot Sundays Games Atlanta at Toronto, 1 p.m. Phoenix at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m. Washington at Denver, 5 p.m. Milwaukee at Sacramento, 6 p.m. Brooklyn at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Cleveland at New York, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.National Hockey LeagueEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 70 48 17 5 101 225 149 Tampa Bay 70 39 24 7 85 208 185 Montreal 71 38 26 7 83 182 180 Toronto 71 36 27 8 80 208 219 Detroit 69 32 24 13 77 183 194 Ottawa 69 28 28 13 69 198 234 Florida 70 26 36 8 60 173 225 Buffalo 70 20 42 8 48 136 206 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 69 45 19 5 95 218 173 Philadelphia 69 37 25 7 81 199 197 N.Y. Rangers 71 38 29 4 80 188 175 Columbus 70 36 28 6 78 200 192 Washington 71 33 27 11 77 205 211 New Jersey 70 30 27 13 73 172 183 Carolina 70 30 31 9 69 174 198 N.Y. Islanders 70 26 35 9 61 195 239 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA St. Louis 69 47 15 7 101 226 156 Chicago 71 41 15 15 97 240 184 Colorado 71 44 21 6 94 216 194 Minnesota 70 36 23 11 83 174 172 Dallas 69 32 26 11 75 196 201 Winnipeg 71 32 30 9 73 199 208 Nashville 71 30 31 10 70 171 213 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA San Jose 71 46 18 7 99 219 170 Anaheim 70 45 18 7 97 222 178 Los Angeles 70 39 25 6 84 170 149 Phoenix 70 34 25 11 79 194 197 Vancouver 72 32 30 10 74 172 194 Calgary 70 28 35 7 63 173 209 Edmonton 71 25 37 9 59 177 228 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Sundays Games Columbus at N.Y. Islanders, 1 p.m. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Toronto at New Jersey, 7 p.m. Nashville at Chicago, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Buffalo at Vancouver, 8 p.m. Florida at Anaheim, 8 p.m. OBT Baseball GamesSEBRING Orange Blossom Tours has reserved excellent grandstand seats for an upcoming Tampa Bay Rays Spring Training baseball game. The game is Friday, March 28, when the Rays will play the Detroit Tigers in Lakeland. The March 28 trip also includes dinner and Ernie, a play about renowned Detroit radio broadcaster Ernie Harwell, in the beautifully restored Polk Theater. For ticket prices and pickup times and locations, please go to www. orangeblossomtours.com or call 855-628-0855 or 451-3040.Lake Placid Cornhole TournamentLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Senior FFA will be hosting its third annual Cornhole Tournament on Friday, March 28, at Roger Scarborough Field. Registration begins at 5:30 p.m., with tournament play beginning at 6 p.m. Entry fee is $40 per team, with the winner receiving a commemorative set of Cornhole boards. The tournament is being held in conjunction with the Lake Placid Alumni BBQ. For more information, call Lake Placid Sr. FFA advisor Lauren Butler at (863) 699-5010, or email ButlerL@highlands.k12. .us.STR8UP Family Sports DayLAKE PLACID STR8UP Youth Ministry will be presenting a Family Sports Day on Saturday, March 29, from 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. The day will feature Sun, Sand and Hoops with 2-on-2 and 5-on-5 volleyball tournaments, as well as 3-on-3 and 5-on-5 basketball tournaments, with cash prizes to overall winners not to mention food, drinks and music all day long. Cost is $10 per person that pre-registers, $15 per person the day of the event. Registration forms are available at Dock 633, the Florida Hospital Gym and Chef Buddys, or go to www.str8up.org for Paypal registration. Listen on 91.5 JOY FM for details. Please make checks payable to STR8UP Youth Ministry, Inc., and send to P.O. Box 654, Lake Placid, FL 33862. There will be a live DJ and announcer, featur ing guest speakers Chad Varga, Magic Benton and Big John Merrill. Kalie Spurlock will be singing the national anthem, along with ribbon cutting by the Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce. For more information, call (863) 699-1480.Lake Placid Bass TournamentLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce will be hosting its 18th Annual Bass Tournament on Sunday, March 30, on Lake Istokpoga. Cost is $120 per team, which includes Big Bass, with a 100-percent pay back. Applications are available on the Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce website at www.visitlakeplacidorida.com, or by calling the Chamber at (863) 465-4331.Sebring Chamber Golf ClassicSEBRING The Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce will hold their Spring Golf Classic tour nament on Saturday, April 5, at Sun N Lake Golf Club. The event is a four per son scramble with handicapped ights. There will be cash prizes: $2,000 for hole-in-one, $250 for longest drive and $250 for closest to the pin. Entry fee is $60 per player, or $225 for a fourperson team, and includes greens fee, cart, drinks on the course and lunch. Corporate sponsor ship includes a four-per son team and hole sign for $300. Registration is at 7:30 a.m., and a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. All proceeds benet the Sebring Chamber of Commerce. For questions or a registration form, call (863) 385-8448 or email infor mation@sebring.org.SHS Golf TournamentSEBRING Sebring High School will be holding its Project Graduation 2014 Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 5, at Golf Hammock Country Club. Format is a four-per son scramble, ighted by handicap, with registration starting at 7 a.m. and a shotgun start at 8 a.m. Entry fees are $65 per player, $240 per foursome and includes greens fee, cart and lunch. Mulligans will be available for purchase at $3 each or $5 for two, and hole sponsors are available for $100. There will be a 50/50 rafe and rafe prizes available as well. Make checks payable and remit to SHS Project Graduation, 2157 US 27 S, Sebring, FL 33870. For more information, call Tim Baker at 385-5100.H.O.P.E. Basketball TournamentSEBRING The 4th Annual Mary Toney H.O.P.E. Foundation 3-on3 Basketball Tournament will tip off Saturday, April 5, in the Sebring High School Gym. From 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. teams will compete amid concessions and music, with a cost of just $5 per player. Monetary prizes will be awarded to rst-place teams, with second-place nishers receiving gift card awards. The tournament will have male and female brackets consisting of three players per team. For boys and girls, age groups are 7-9 years old, 10-12, 13-15 and 16-19. The 7-9 and 10-12 yearold teams begin play at 8:30 a.m., with the 1315s and 16-19s starting at 11 a.m. Teams need to report to the gym 30 minutes prior to the rst game of their division. Registration deadline is Thursday, April 3. For more information, call LaVaar Scott at (863) 214-3880, Nick Brooks at (850) 322-8398 or Princeton Harris at (863) 381-8898Nu-Hope Golf tournamentAVON PARK NUHOPE Elder Care Services will hold the Sandy Foster Memorial Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 19. This years event, spon sored by MIDFLORIDA, will be held at Pinecrest Golf Club in Avon Park. The event is a 2-person scramble. Cost is $65/person ($130 per 2-person team.) Sponsorship opportunities are available. Registration opens at 7:30 a.m., with a Shot Gun start at 8:30 a.m. An awards luncheon follows the event. All funds raised are used to support services for seniors in Highlands and Hardee County. To register or for more information, please contact Laurie Murphy at 382-2134 or MurphyL@ nuhope.org or visit www. nuhopeeldercare.orgLP Project GraduationLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid High School Project Graduation 2014 Golf Tournament will tee off on Saturday, March 29, at the Placid Lakes Golf Course. Registration begins at 7 a.m. before a shotgun start kicks off play at 8 a.m. Cost is $60 per person, $240 per team, and includes greens fee, cart and meal. There will be a 50/50 drawing, a rafe, straightest drive and closest to the pin contests and a $2,000 Hole in One prize sponsored by Cohan Radio Group. For more information, contact Charlotte McQuillen at 633-8450.Sottile Memorial GolfLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Athletic Association will be hosting the 8th Annual Nick Sottile Memorial Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 12, at the Placid Lakes Country Club. The event is a four-per son scramble with cash prizes for winning teams in each ight and individual cash prizes for closest to the line, closest to the pin and a $2,000 Hole in One prize sponsored by Cohan Radio Group. Cost is $100 per golfer, $400 per team, and there will be an 8 a.m. tee-off time. Entry fee includes greens fee, cart, complementary beverages and lunch cater ed by Smoke Shack BBQ, with appetizers of shrimp and crab clusters. Bill Jarrett Ford is helping to underwrite the event for the eighth consecutive year, but more sponsors are needed. Sponsorship ranges from $1,000 to $50 holesponsors and lunch tickets are included with most sponsorship levels. Proceeds from the tour nament directly benet youth sports in Lake Placid and a portion of the proceeds are donated to the Nick Sottile Memorial Scholarship Fund. A portion of the proceeds will also be used for completion of a new sports weight-training facility. For more information, call Laura Teal at (863) 441-0729 or Tom Reifsnyder at (954) 675-9581.Florida Hospital Clay ShootOKEECHOBEE The Florida Hospital Heartland Clay Shoot will be held on Friday, April 25, at the Quail Creek Plantation beginning at 8:30 a.m. A continental breakfast will be served at 8 a.m. at Quail Creek, located at 12399 NE 224th St., Okeechobee. There will also be a home-cooked BBQ lunch and fantastic rafe and green bird prizes. There are four levels of sponsorships available, from Station Sponsor which includes adver tising on course station signage and lunch for two for $100, Individual Sponsor for $125 which includes registration for one shooter and lunch. The $500 Team Sponsor includes one four-man shooting team and lunch, along with advertising on banner displayed at lunch tents. The $2,500 Gold Sponsor includes one four-man team, cart and lunch, a banner hanging during event with company logo, company logo on yer/registration and all mail pieces, one station sign, one suite for Thursday nights social and two Thursday night dinner tickets. For more information or to register, call the Foundation at (863) 4025525, or visit the website www.FHHeartland.org/ Foundation.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING The Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center will be hosting their 4th Annual Scholarship Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 26, at Sun N Lake. Format is a four-per son scramble with handicapped ights. Entry fee is $65 per person, which includes greens fee, golf cart and lunch. Registration is at 7:30 a.m. the day of the tournament, with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Please submit entries by Thursday, April 24. Make checks payable to Wings of Faith CWC Scholarship Fund. All proceeds go to benet college-bound senior graduates for the class of 2014. For questions, call Alvin Walters at 381-5706 or 381-6578. SNAPSHOTS SPORTSThe New York Jets have signed quarterback Michael Vick and released Mark Sanchez. The Sanchez move comes as no surprise. Vick was a free agent after playing for the Eagles for the last ve seasons.Jets sign Vick and release Sanchez M C Y K

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www.newssun.com Sunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A11 er put two on, and the en suing double into shallow right center put Owasso up 1-0. The lead grew to 3-0 in the third with some more of those little mistakes. The lead-off batter was hit by a pitch, with an er ror on a sacrice bunt at tempt putting runners on rst and second. Another sacrice bunt was laid down to move the runners to second and third. A suicide squeeze bunt was then attempted, but missed, leaving a Ram runner putting on the breaks after racing down the third-base line. But after feigning a retreat, the runner eluded catcher Jimmy Pecks at tempted tag and reached the plate for a score. Later, another bunt single brought another run in. The Streaks looked to get on the board in the bottom of the fourth when Seth Cannady reached on an error and with one out, moved to third on a Josh Crouch single to right. But a double steal attempt saw Cannady nabbed and a strike out ended the threat. Struck got through a scoreless fth, and thats when Sebring made its move. Designated hitter Kyle Helms drew a walk and gave way to pinch runner Jordan Baker. A diving catch in center robbed Jared Lang of a hit, but Jordan Austin reached on an error and Matt Portis walked to load the bases. A Ram pitching change was made, but Peck greeted him with an RBI single to right. With two out, Ty Little beat out an ineld single, scoring Austin, and Crouch showed a patient eye in drawing a walk to force in the tying run. During DeGenaros at bat, an errant pick-off throw tried nabbing Eli White at third, running for Peck, bringing another run in to make it 4-3. DeGenaro would draw a walk to re-load the bases and Garret Zeegers kept a sharp eye to draw yet another walk and give the Streaks a 5-3 lead. Keat Waldron came on in relief in the top of the sixth, with Owasso getting to him for one run, but Sebring got it back in the bottom of the inning. With one out, Portis blooped one down the left-eld line for a single and with two strikes on him, Peck belted one over the left elders head, short-hopping the wall. Portis came all the way around and slid under the leaping Ram catcher and the lead now stood at 6-4 with three outs to go. Waldron got the rst two before walking a batter and bringing Everett Hurst to get the nal out on a shallow y to left. The kids just kept battling, which they always do, DeWitt said. They did a real good job of hitting with runners on and hitting with two strikes. Its been a tough stretch and weve kind of been searching for our identity as a team, he continued. After a game like this, I think we may have found it. They will see further as they have three games on the docket this week. Tuesday they travel to Okeechobee, host DeSoto in a district tilt Friday and have a rare Saturday matinee on the road at Tampa Catholic. Martinez with a single to knock the lead to 5-3. But LaBelle got a run closer when Glenn Bur ton lead the bottom of the fourth off with a triple and came in on a ground out to make it a 5-4 game. After the Devils went scoreless in the fth, Per ry came on in relief of Simons and worked around a two-out walk to strike out the side and hold the lead. Then, in the sixth, Avon Park picked up a pair of insurance runs. Alfred Brown and Per ry singled to start it, and one out later Mason Jahna belted an RBI double, scoring Brown. Alex Gomez then lofted a deep y to center that went for an RBI sac y with Perry cruising in with run number seven. Perry then held the Cowboys at bay over his nal two innings, moving the Devils season record to 12-2. The team had the rest of the week to enjoy what was left of their Spring Break before picking it up for three games this coming week. Monday, the Devils travel to Sarasota to face Booker, host Hardee on Tuesday and get a visit from Okeechobee Friday at Head Field. DEVILS FROM PAGE A9 Dan Hoehne/News-Sun lesTyrone Perry showed a disciplined eye at the plate in collecting three hits and a walk Thursday. He also pitched three innings of scoreless relief, striking out six. Dan Hoehne/News-SunTy Little squares this pitch up and would contribute an RBI single in Sebrings 6-4, Thursday win. SEBRING FROM PAGE A9 KEIRAN SMITHAssociated PressSYDNEY Bob Wardle came ready to root for the Arizona Diamondbacks on opening day Down Under, all dressed in his Paul Goldschmidt jersey. The special menu at Sydney Cricket Ground? Not quite to his taste. Im not sure if Ill try anything here, said War dle, born in Canada and now living in Sydney. Ive already had some very strange things at ball parks in the U.S. At $36 for a 2-foot-long hot dog, he was ready to pass Saturday night. He was holding off on the nachos and ice-cream sundaes served in batting helmets, too. No worries, though. Wardle and his daughter were having a fun time as the most quint essential of American sports took top billing at the symbolic home of Australias national game when the 2014 Major League Baseball season got started. At a venue steeped in the history of another bat and ball game cricket the Los Angeles Dodg ers defeated the Dia mondbacks 3-1 before a sellout crowd of around 40,000. The two-game series marked the rst regularseason games in Australia. Previous MLB season openers were held in Monterrey, Mexico, in 1999, San Juan, Puer to Rico in 2001 and four times in Tokyo (2000, and ). Speaking ahead of the rst pitch, Commissioner Bud Selig said this visit had been a success. He was noncommittal on when MLB would return to Australia or any where else around the globe. We dont know yet, were working on several things, Selig said. Were going to examine all our possibilities. The nice part about all of this is were getting now over tures, really good ones, from all over the world. It wont be 100 years until were back here, I can promise you that, he said in reference to the 100th anniversary of an exhibition game played by the White Sox and the New York Giants at the Sydney Cricket Ground, won 5-4 by Chicago before 10,000 fans on Jan. 3, 1914. While excitement for this series may be muted within the U.S., Australian baseball fans ar rived in their thousands to catch a glimpse of multimillionaire players and the quality of a sport theyre not used to seeing. Dodgers fans Narelle Walton and Mereana Joseph traveled for more than seven hours, including taking two ights in the 2,810-mile jour ney from Karratha a remote mining town in Western Australia state to see this matchup. This is our rst major league game, said Walton, donning a Dodgers cap and shirt. Its on our bucket list to be here. Wardle had far less distance to travel, but was just as keen to experience the major leagues here after playing in a masters baseball tournament in Phoenix and adopting the Diamondbacks as his team. Im originally from Canada, so Im an old Expos and Blue Jays fan, he said. My rst game was back in 1968 in Detroit, where Denny McLain lost one of his six games in a season where he won 31. Another novelty for the local crowd was keeping a ball hit into the stands, unlike cricket where the ball is returned to play. Dodgers second baseman Justin Turner threw ve balls into the members enclosure at the bottom of the rst inning, setting off desperate attempts by fans to catch a souvenir.Gday, baseball! Opening day goes Down Under MCYK

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A12 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com JIM LITKEAssociated PressWelcome back to a mostly Mercer-packed edition of BracketRacket, the one-stop shopping place for your offbeat NCAA tournament needs. Today, we get to the bottom of Dukes dirty trick, take a whirlwind tour of Little Richards hometown and try to placate the eggheads in our midst. Without further ado: ___ NOW YOU KNOW THE REST OF THE STORY Turns out tiny Mercers takedown of mighty Duke was even better than it looked. Never mind all the other advantages the Blue Devils brought to the game that the Bears couldnt hope to match: NBA-caliber players, a Hall of Fame coach, a bigger budget than two dozen BCS football programs, a pedigree and blue blood (whatever thats good for), not to mention a 27-minute commute from their campus in Durham to the loading dock at the PNC Arena in Raleigh, N.C. But just to drive home the point, someone locked Mercer out of its locker room at halftime. We dispatched Associated Press sports writer Joedy McCreary to investigate. Sophomore Ike Nwamu told him the Bears viewed the setback as just one more hill to climb. They went over their game plan whispering, we presume, since Duke probably has NSA connections, too and did what they could to stay loose. Teammates kept reminding each other, as Nwamu put it, Weve got a big task ahead of us. Barely two minutes passed before someone got the door open. When the Bears came back out after halftime, they shot 58 percent and sank the Blue Devils 7871. All that proved is that if the folks at Duke were as smart as they think they are, they would have made sure to lock Mer cer in. ___ CELEBRITY ALUM OF THE DAY As the nal seconds ticked down on the Mer cer-Duke game, former NBA player and coach Sam Mitchell stood in middle of the TSN studios and did his version of an Irish river dance. Mitchell may have been born in Macon, Ga., but he comes by his varied musical tastes honestly. Let me ask you a question: Have you ever heard of Little Richard? the proud Mercer grad began without waiting for an answer. Have you ever heard of Otis Redding? Theyre from Macon, Ga. Actually, Redding was born in Dawson, Ga. But just like the classic scene from Animal House where Boon overlooks Blutos historical faux pas Was it over when the Ger mans bombed Pearl Har bor? Hell no! APs Jon Krawczynski didnt inter rupt Mitchell because he was rolling. Have you ever heard of (former L.A. Lakers guard) Norm Nixon? Mitchell continued. Thats Norm Nixons hometown. And so it is. But among that distinguished crowd, only Mitchell could lay claim to helping the Bears make the NCAAs. But that was back in the early 1980s, and the small school from Macon didnt win a game. Its one thing to advance in the NCAA tour nament, Mitchell demurred. Its a whole nother thing to beat a school like Duke. They put us on the map and gave us an identity, he said, rolling once again. Thats something that all of us graduates of Mercer will be indebted to these guys for forever. They put us on the map. Right. Which still shows Macon exactly 101.3 miles up the road from Dawson. ___ THIS JUST IN: HUMANS FALL SHORT OF PERFECTION FOR ANOTHER YEAR Somewhere, Warren Buffet is smiling. We said that when he went to bed Thursday night, too, but that was a guess. Now its ofcial. As of 4:45 p.m. Eastern, right about the time Stanford beat New Mexico, there were still 16 per fect brackets left among millions of entries. Four hours later, not long after Memphis beat George Washington, the last three were kaput. This shouldnt come as a surprise. Another thing BracketRacket noted the night before last were the odds (9.2 quintillion-to-1, give or take a few hundred trillion, we think) that Buffet would have to fork over the $1 billion himself, since one of his companies served as underwriter for the Quicken Loans Billion Dollar Bracket Challenge. Those who put a downpayment on a house planning to use proceeds from Mr. Buffet are advised to call his friends at Quicken Loans. ___ DUDE, WHAT ARE THOSE THINGS UNDER YOUR ARM CALLED? BOOKS? NO SERIOUSLY, WHAT ARE THEY? Dayton wins! Dayton wins! In your dreams, maybe. Or if this were the old TV show College Bowl, instead of the NCAA tournament, then absolutely. At least thats what the folks at Inside Higher Ed assured us would happen if the schools lling out the brackets competed at educating students instead of padding their bottom lines. What a quaint notion! But for those who still believe athletes are actually students, heres the short version of how things would have played out: Dayton and Kansas are the only two teams to make the Sweet 16 boasting perfect Academic Progress Rates, which is NCAAs multiyear measure of a teams classroom performance in this case, from 2008-12. But if the two South Region entrants wind up meeting in the Elite Eight, where the Federal Graduation Rate is applied as a tiebreaker, handing a close decision to the Flyers. Dayton goes on to defeat East Region champ Memphis in the Final Four and winds up in the championship game against Midwest winner Michigan, which got past West region representative American University. See the entire bracket here: http://bit. ly/1gSmSKL Daytons ultimate victory over Michigan means that the Flyers while talented on the court in the words of Inside Higher Ed, also know how to hit the books hard. Tell me you dont feel smarter already. ___ STAT OF THE DAY With only two rounds in the books, Stats LLC notes the all-time mark for most overtime games is in jeopardy. Stephen F. Austins come-from-behind thriller against VCU was the sixth OT affair in the tournament, topped only by the seven over time games in 1995 and 1997. In three other years 1975, 2006 and 2008 there were also six games that extended past regulation. That leaves this years edition with 31 games, or chances if you like, to match or surpass the alltime mark. ___ QUOTE OF THE DAY I thought Id be play ing after today. Duke sophomore forward Rodney Hood, who along with freshman teammate Jabari Parker is considered a potential NBA pick, explaining why he hasnt yet considered whether to return to school or go pro. years. And so that was basically a ipem game that hurt me on one bracket. But it was a true upset that actually helped me, even though I got it wrong in two of the three Ive lled out. Before Mercer upended Duke Friday, I was lagging back in about the 44th percentile on my brackets on ESPN. Once the Bears clinched the win, it seemed to bring the rest of the eld back to me as Im somewhere in the high 60s now, percentile wise. At the particular bracket I have in front of me, out of the 32 games played Thursday and Friday, I was incorrect in my guesses on eight of them. But only one of those hurts me moving forward, the Mercer-Duke result. I had the Blue Devils topping UMass in the next round, but then losing to Michigan. So as long as Michigan makes it to the Elite Eight, then the damage is limited. Of all the other games I got wrong, I had them losing their next games, against teams I correctly picked. Though, as we all know, a relatively serene Thursday and Friday of the NCAA Tournament, bracket wise, can quickly change come Saturday and Sunday.Dan Hoehne is the Sports Editor of the News-Sun. He can be reached at daniel.hoehne@newssun.com. NCAA FROM PAGE A9helped to take the lead over Reections. In the last inning, with the score 12-8. Reections came close with a big triple by Rick Enfelis scoring two runs. Rick then scored to cut the lead to 12-11, but a y out to left eld ended the game and made Alan Jay the winners of the play offs. The next season will start anew in Januarys rst week of 2015. Anyone interested in playing in the 60s and 70s brackets, call John Kloet at 471-0405. SENIORS FROM PAGE A9 Have you ever heard of Little Richard?BracketRacket: Which school would win the NCAAs if the athletes really were students? KISSIMMEE Garrett Jones homered in the rst inning and drove in three runs, leading the Miami Marlins to a 7-2 win over the Houston Astros on Friday. It was the second home run of spring training for Jones, who also had an RBI during the Marlins error-aided, three-run fth. Jake Marisnick went 3 for 3 and scored twice for Miami. Marisnick is batting .429 in 16 spring games.Jones homers in Marlins win over Astros M C Y K

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www.newssun.com Sunday, March 23, 2014 l NEWS-SUN l A13

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A14 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com TODAYPartly sunny and nice86 / 65Winds: W at 6-12 mphCouple of thunderstorms81 / 66Winds: N at 4-8 mphMONDAYChance of a little morning rain80 / 53Winds: WNW at 8-16 mphTUESDAYSunny to partly cloudy and cooler69 / 52Winds: N at 8-16 mphWEDNESDAYRather cloudy73 / 62Winds: ESE at 7-14 mphTHURSDAY High .............................................. 2:15 a.m. Low ............................................... 8:02 a.m. High .............................................. 2:26 p.m. Low ............................................... 8:32 p.m. High .............................................. 7:00 p.m. Low ............................................... 2:16 a.m. High ..................................................... none Low ...................................................... none Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 13.68 Normal ............................................... 14.51 High Tuesday ......................................... 78 Low Tuesday .......................................... 49 High Wednesday .................................... 84 Low Wednesday ..................................... 56 High Thursday ....................................... 86 Low Thursday ........................................ 60 Heat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayMakes it feel like .................................... 84 BarometerTuesday ............................................... 30.01 Thursday ............................................. 29.97 PrecipitationTuesday ............................................... 0.00 Thursday ............................................. 0.00 Month to date ..................................... 0.42 Year to date ......................................... 5.29Sunrise 7:27 a.m. 7:26 a.m. Sunset 7:39 p.m. 7:39 p.m. Moonrise 1:28 a.m. 2:24 a.m. Moonset 12:34 p.m. 1:34 p.m.Albuquerque 61/39/pc 65/39/pc 67/45/s Atlanta 60/36/r 57/41/pc 58/30/r Baltimore 47/27/c 40/28/s 40/26/sn Birmingham 57/37/r 62/39/pc 58/28/pc Boston 39/11/pc 27/16/pc 35/23/pc Charlotte 56/28/r 55/36/pc 44/29/r Cheyenne 47/24/pc 38/19/sf 52/35/s Chicago 32/17/pc 34/22/pc 33/17/c Cleveland 29/16/pc 28/23/pc 34/14/c Columbus 38/20/pc 37/25/pc 36/17/c Dallas 57/40/pc 62/42/s 66/44/s Denver 49/30/pc 46/24/pc 61/38/s Detroit 29/14/c 33/20/pc 34/12/c Harrisburg 44/23/pc 36/27/s 38/24/sn Honolulu 81/71/pc 82/71/pc 83/71/s Houston 66/49/r 60/47/r 68/48/pc Indianapolis 37/17/s 38/25/pc 36/14/c Jackson, MS 58/40/c 62/43/pc 62/35/s Kansas City 43/28/pc 42/23/sf 38/25/pc Lexington 45/21/pc 45/28/pc 40/19/c Little Rock 56/35/pc 57/37/pc 58/34/s Los Angeles 70/55/pc 80/58/s 75/56/pc Louisville 47/24/pc 48/31/pc 42/21/c Memphis 53/33/pc 58/39/pc 53/31/s Milwaukee 26/14/pc 32/17/pc 28/12/c Minneapolis 23/14/s 33/8/sf 21/12/pc Nashville 52/28/pc 54/32/pc 52/25/pc New Orleans 71/52/t 61/51/r 69/48/pc New York City 45/22/pc 36/26/s 38/28/sn Norfolk 50/33/r 40/32/s 42/34/r Oklahoma City 54/33/pc 60/31/pc 60/36/s Philadelphia 47/26/pc 37/27/s 38/28/sn Phoenix 82/62/s 85/62/s 88/62/s Pittsburgh 34/18/sf 34/23/s 38/17/c Portland, ME 32/2/sf 24/1/pc 30/19/c Portland, OR 61/39/s 67/46/pc 57/45/sh Raleigh 53/29/r 49/33/s 42/31/r Rochester 24/10/sf 26/19/s 34/19/c St. Louis 41/23/s 45/25/c 36/21/pc San Francisco 65/49/pc 64/49/s 58/51/c Seattle 55/39/pc 63/44/pc 56/42/r Wash., DC 50/27/c 43/32/s 42/29/sn Cape Coral 84/66/pc 82/68/t 80/56/t Clearwater 79/67/pc 78/65/r 74/57/r Coral Springs 86/68/pc 82/71/t 82/63/c Daytona Beach 81/63/t 70/62/r 75/49/r Ft. Laud. Bch 85/70/s 82/71/t 82/65/c Fort Myers 85/67/pc 82/68/t 80/57/t Gainesville 80/58/t 67/56/r 73/41/r Hollywood 84/68/s 82/70/t 80/62/c Homestead AFB 84/69/s 82/68/t 80/63/c Jacksonville 79/57/t 63/52/r 72/41/r Key West 81/72/s 81/71/pc 82/70/c Miami 86/70/s 83/72/t 80/65/c Okeechobee 84/65/pc 79/66/t 80/56/t Orlando 84/65/pc 77/64/r 79/52/r Pembroke Pines 85/68/s 82/70/t 81/62/c St. Augustine 78/60/t 64/60/r 71/44/r St. Petersburg 80/67/pc 78/65/r 75/56/r Sarasota 79/65/pc 77/65/t 76/54/r Tallahassee 75/55/t 65/51/r 72/38/c Tampa 78/66/pc 76/65/r 76/51/r W. Palm Bch 85/69/s 81/71/t 82/61/c Winter Haven 84/65/pc 79/65/r 78/52/r Acapulco 93/73/pc 89/70/pc 89/71/pc Athens 68/51/pc 68/53/pc 66/47/s Beirut 77/64/pc 76/61/s 71/59/pc Berlin 53/36/c 51/34/c 47/32/c Bermuda 71/66/pc 70/57/sh 64/62/pc Calgary 23/7/sf 20/13/pc 33/14/pc Dublin 49/32/pc 48/42/r 48/38/sh Edmonton 22/4/sf 19/6/pc 24/12/c Freeport 78/69/s 78/67/t 78/66/c Geneva 45/34/c 44/29/pc 49/38/pc Havana 89/65/s 89/65/s 86/63/t Hong Kong 71/64/s 72/66/s 74/70/pc Jerusalem 72/53/c 69/54/s 66/50/sh Johannesburg 76/55/s 77/55/s 76/52/pc Kiev 62/41/s 64/43/pc 64/45/pc London 51/31/pc 54/40/pc 52/38/sh Montreal 23/1/sf 18/5/pc 25/18/pc Moscow 58/42/pc 60/43/pc 59/41/pc Nice 62/45/pc 61/44/s 60/44/pc Ottawa 21/3/pc 21/8/pc 29/13/c Quebec 19/-6/sf 16/0/pc 21/7/pc Rio de Janeiro 78/69/r 79/69/pc 80/70/sh Seoul 63/43/s 60/45/pc 62/46/pc Singapore 91/76/pc 91/77/s 90/77/t Sydney 84/63/pc 75/63/t 77/64/r Toronto 22/11/pc 25/18/pc 31/17/c Vancouver 48/39/c 54/45/pc 50/44/r Vienna 58/42/r 48/38/r 51/35/pc Warsaw 60/45/r 51/42/r 48/37/c Winnipeg 11/0/s 16/-10/sf 14/1/pc Today Mon. Tue. Today Mon. Tue. An arctic cold front will advance across the Midwest and into the Northeast today, spreading colder and drier Canadian air. A slow-moving cold front will deliver rounds of showers to the Deep South and Gulf Coast states. Morning thunderstorms in Louisiana will reappear along the western coast of Florida late in the day. A piece of the front extends up along the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains and will cause some snow in Nebraska, Wyoming and Montana. Accumulations are expected to be on the light side, however. National Forecast for March 23 Today Mon. Tue. Today Mon. Tue. Today Mon. Tue. Today Mon. Tue. Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rrain, sf-snow urries, sn-snow, i-ice. Partly sunny and nice today. Partly cloudy and mild tonight. Mostly cloudy tomorrow with showers and a thunderstorm, mainly later. Tuesday: chance for morning rain or drizzle; otherwise, mostly cloudy. Record oods hit the Midwest on March 23, 1913, with major rainstorms adding to snowmelt. This prompted the federal governments rst widespread ood control projects. Partly sunny and nice today. Winds west 6-12 mph. Expect 6-10 hours of sunshine with average relative humidity 55% and good drying conditions. Partly cloudy and mild tonight. Sunday. and Saturday. a.m. and after 4 p.m. LastNewFirstFull Mar 23Mar 30Apr 7Apr 15 Today MondayForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 79/57 80/58 81/61 81/63 84/65 84/65 78/66 79/67 80/67 79/65 85/67 82/68 84/65 85/69 85/70 86/70 75/55 72/56 70/49 85/66 86/65 85/65 85/65 86/65 85/65 81/72 TemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidRelative humidity .................................. 40% Expected air temperature ....................... 84 Wednesday ......................................... 29.98 Wednesday ......................................... 0.00 Five-Day forecast for Highlands County Almanac U.S. Cities World Cities National Summary Tides UV Index Today Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional Summary Lake Levels Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows. Readings at Palm Beach Readings at St. Petersburg The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterday 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. Jacksonville Gainesville Ocala Daytona Beach Orlando Winter Haven Tampa Clearwater St. Petersburg Sarasota Fort Myers Naples Okeechobee West Palm Beach Fort Lauderdale Miami Tallahassee Apalachicola Key West Avon Park Sebring Lorida Lake Placid Venus Brighton PensacolaCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W M C Y K

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LIVING BSunday, March 23, 2014 SCRAP SAVER memos by stacking them, blank side up, in accessible bins.YOU WILL NEED: it at an angle, as shown. (Our shorter top panel is 71/2 inches, the bottom panel, 9 inches.) Using the tape, cover the boxes with patterned paper. Use letter stamps (or a marker) to print NAME A NAPKIN YOU WILL NEED: and cut a 21/2 TIME OUT! YOU WILL NEED: adhere the whale to the timer with glue dots. On the timer (time your shower, then try reducing it by a minute or two). TOWEL TAGSBe sure everyone knows whose towel is whose so that they stay on the hook and YOU WILL NEED: Bath towel and wash cloth Permanent, waterproof ink pad Letter stamps Cotton twill tape Pinking shears Iron Needle and threadUsing the stamps and ink pad, spell out 41/2 is dry, set it by covering the tape with a cloth and pressing it with a hot, dry iron. 1/4 Whale template (download the template at family funmag.com/printables) Timer Blue felt Red felt Cereal-box cardboard Black felt or googly eye Tacky glue Glue dots Cloth napkins Con-Tact paper Foam or stencil brush Fabric paint Sturdy cardboard shipping box Double-sided tape Patterned paper 1 sheet of card stock SNACK PACKSRepurpose a milk or juice carton into a reusable snack YOU WILL NEED: Half-gallon milk/juice carton (clean, dry) Colored/patterned duct tape Adhesive-backed Velcro squareMeasure, mark and cut the carton so three sides are 4 P APER MONSTER up the whole shebang and send it to the recycling center.YOU WILL NEED: 2 large brown paper bags (for a sturdier creature, use paper lawn bags) White and black paper Glue stick Masking tapeCut a large oval hole in one of the bags. Use a glue stick to attach a row of pointy, white paper teeth inside. Add eyes using black paper and the leftover white scraps. Open the second bag and inch or two. Seal the seam with masking tape.By Deborah Way FamilyFun magazine

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B2 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com ACROSS 1 Matter of faith 6 Statutes 10 Plays the harpy 14 Puckish sort 17 Brooks Robinson, notably 19 Johns 2008 running mate 20 Schubert classic 22 Precursor to reality shows like Punkd 24 Least likely to make a faux pas 25 Blackthorn fruit 26 Beach feature 27 Test in a small room, may be 29 Comes in last 30 Sploshed 32 Apothecarys bottle 33 Guard 34 Oh, I give up! 39 Singer Grant 40 Plant sometimes called a false shamrock 41 Australias lang. 42 Intimate 44 __ Martin Cognac 45 Collar target 47 Hank who voices Moe Szyslak 50 Soup holder 53 Annie couple? 54 Unlikely job for one with acrophobia? 57 Pet shop purchase 59 Perch 60 Spinner in the wind 61 Fell from grace 62 Slide preparations 64 North Pole explorer 66 Straightened (up) 67 Walk on By singer War wick 68 Narrated 69 Honda, even in reverse? 70 Reporter assigned to a pla toon, e.g. 71 Deceptive action 74 Dancer Charisse 77 Mario Kart console 78 Lampoon 80 Shells out 81 Botanical balm 82 Bath sponge 84 A pop 85 Seal, in a way 87 Girl o my heart 88 1952 Groucho Marx lm 94 Many a cottonwood 96 River nymph 97 Solo 98 Rose pest 99 Colorado resort 100 Smart __ 101 Nimbus 105 Most fair 107 General Lee, in The Dukes of Hazzard 110 Sexy sleepwear 111 Silas Marner novelist 112 Lacing aid 113 Opposite of six, on a die 114 Gather 115 Phoned 116 Uplift DOWN 1 Severinsen and a dwarf 2 Spoken 3 Futurist painter Severini 4 Without pretension 5 Fight of the Century con tender 6 Barely believable 7 ... such stuff / As dreams __ made on: Shak. 8 Wild African pig 9 Funny Girl actor 10 Italia seaport 11 Stratfords river 12 Brylcreem, e.g. 13 Request at a sitting 14 That proves it 15 King novel 16 Sitting duck 18 Swirling currents 19 __ Domingo 21 Without a key 23 Select 28 Edible tuber 31 Upsilon follower 32 __ code 33 Ice Road Truckers truck 34 Links cry 35 Team in a eld 36 Ewes guys 37 Second in command 38 Stareet captain 43 Legendary attendant of Charlemagne 45 Own (up) 46 Never __ Me Go: Kazuo Ishiguro novel 47 Slightly open 48 Screwball 49 Lowest gin card 51 Secondhand 52 Profs degree 54 Whats-his-face 55 Went like the dickens 56 Skirt 58 Really amazing, to a dude 59 Artist Magritte 61 Not taped 62 __ Valley, Calif. 63 Where the ends of 22-, 34-, 54-, 71-, 88and 107-Across and 14-Down can be found 64 Slipshod 65 Actress Sommer 66 Binds 67 Web revealer 68 OMG, stop telling me all this! 69 Call out 71 Does beau 72 Use 73 Give a hoot 74 Pinocchio goldsh 75 In __ Eyes: Peter Gabri el hit 76 Agcy. 79 Miles off 81 Stood before the court 83 Flashing irtatious looks 84 Self-playing instrument 85 Lozenge 86 Writer Rand 87 Ribbed fabric 89 Keeping up (with) 90 Kool Moe Dee genre 91 German ballads 92 Worker with many keys 93 Fridge juice: Abbr. 94 Cellist Casals 95 One doing sums 99 Cambodia setting 100 All autter 102 Hybrid citrus fruit 103 Snorkeling site 104 Affectedly cultured 106 Before, to Byron 108 Continuous babble 109 I see, at sea CA LL ME BY ANNE MARIE BRETHAUERSolution on B9 Metro News ServiceARIES A difcult challenge lies ahead, Aries. Save up your energy for the next few days, and keep socializing to a minimum for the time being. TAURUS The path you have been taking seems more stable, Taurus. This is a good way to go for a while. Y ou will nd others are looking to you more for advice. Its a role you enjoy. GEMINI Gemini, a string of bad luck is not as bad as it seems. Like most things, this, too, shall pass. Keep your chin up, and hang out with friends to keep your mind busy. CANCER A great oppor tunity presents itself this week, Cancer. Focus your energy on making the most of this opportunity, and you will be glad for having done so. LEO Leo, speak a little louder to ensure your voice is heard on an important issue this week. Y our in put is valuable, and those around you will be glad you spoke up. VIRGO Virgo, a new career opportunity is coming your way soon. Make the most of this opportunity if change is something you feel you need at this point in your career. LIBRA Extra spending leaves you a little light in the wallet, Libra. Look for ways to generate some ex tra income or curtail your spending in the months ahead. SCORPIO Scorpio, a bumpy road will soon give way to greener pastures. Ride out this rough patch with a smile on your face, and it will pass quickly without wreaking any signif icant havoc. SAGITTARIUS Sagittarius, a relationship is blossoming and youre not sure in which direction it should be going. Trust your gut instincts, and things will work out ne. CAPRICORN Y ou are tougher than others sus pect, Capricorn, and you will prove your mettle with a difcult task that requires all of your focus and energy to master. Others will be impressed. AQUARIUS Things are changing, but its for the best, Aquarius. Instead of going against the tide, let the waves take you where you need to go. Surprises are in store. PISCES Think about moving in a new direc tion, Pisces. Change can be a good thing, and you will benet from embracing change this time.FAMOU S B IRTHDAY SMarch 23, Jason Kidd, Athlete (41); March 24, Jim Parsons, Actor (41); March 25, Elton John, Singer (67); March 26; Jennifer Grey, Actress (54); March 27, Nathan Fillion, Actor (43); March 28, Lady Gaga, Sing er (28); March 29, Jill Goodacre, Model (49).Things are changing this week, but its for the best, AquariusWEEKLY HORO S COPE DEAR ABBY: My husband and I were both married previously. We have been together for seven years. When we rst started dating, we would sometimes go to one of the casinos after dinner as a fun outing. We never spent much money and went only occasionally. Our game of choice was the slot machine. Over the last few years, it seems like the casino has taken over our lives. We go there to the exclu sion of almost everything else and spend money we cant afford to lose. We both have the mentality that the big win is right around the corner. How can we break this habit? Its causing unbear able nancial and emotional stress in our mar riage. Im afraid it wont last another year. IN OVER MY HEAD IN NEW Y ORKDEAR IN OVER YOUR HEAD: In case you are not aware, there is a name for the habit you and your husband have acquired. Its compulsive gam bling, and its an addiction in much the same way as the abuse of alcohol or drugs. Fortunately, you have nally reached a point where you have realized this fun outing is out of control. Gamblers Anonymous can help you break this destructive cycle. Its a 12step program based on the principles of Alcohol ics Anonymous. Its members support one another by sharing their strength and experiences with one another. The website is www.gamblersanony mous.org. Many people have experienced what youre going through, and this well-established organization has helped them. To locate a meeting near you, visit the website or check your telephone directory. DEAR ABBY: My mom and stepfather are divorcing. They were married for 25 years. He was always a great father gure to me and has been a very active grandfather to my children. The reason for the divorce is his indelity and the disrespect he has shown my mother. We are his only family, and he wants to be involved with us as if nothing is different, even showing up at family gatherings. I want to be loyal to my mother and I do feel he betrayed us but I still recognize that he has also been good to me and the kids. He doesnt deserve to be cut out of our lives. How does one handle a situation like this? SEEING THE BIG PICTUREDEAR SEEING: Your stepdad may want to pretend that nothing is different, but something IS different. He hurt your mother so badly they will no longer be married. If you want to be loy al to your mother and still have a relationship with him, then you need to have a talk with him. Explain that because he is no longer married to your mother, he will no longer be invited to family gatherings where your mother will be present. Be sure to tell him you regard him with affection, but will be seeing him separately for the foreseeable future.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phil lips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Fun outings at casino become costly compulsion DEAR A BB YJeanne Phillips MCYK

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www.newssun.comSunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B3 CANDICE CHOIAP Food Industry WriterNEW YORK Gum seems as appealing as that sticky wad on the bottom of a shoe these days. Its not that Americans still dont ever enjoy a stick of Trident or Or bit, the two most popular brands. They just arent as crazy about chomping away on the stuff as they once were, with U.S. sales tumbling 11 percent over the past four years. No one in the industry can pinpoint a single fac tor thats causing the decline the theories include an unwillingness to shell out $2 or more for a pack in the bad economy or that advertising veered too far from underlining gums cavity-ghting benets. But the biggest reason may be that people simply have more to chew on. From designer mints to fruit chews, candy companies have invented plenty of other ways to get a sugar x or battle bad breath and anxiety. The alter natives dont come with gums unpleasant char acteristics either, like the question of whether to spit out or gulp the remains. Theyre also less likely to annoy parents, co-workers or romantic interests. You talk to someone and theyre just chomping on gum, said Matt Smith, a 46-year-old who lives Albany, N.Y. and hates gum so much he refers to it only by its rst let ter. If you substitute gum for any other food, like mashed potatoes, would you nd that acceptable? Its disgusting. The gum chewing habit dates as far back as the ancient Greeks but arrived in the U.S. in its modern form in the 1860s, according to Mars Inc., the No. 1 player in the market with its Wrigley unit. Over the years, gum makers positioned it as a way to Kiss a Little Longer in the famous Big Red jingle, quit smoking, curb cravings or just make the chewer happier. Catchy slogans or characters included the Doublemint Twins and Orbits blonde spokeswoman who ends commercials with Dirty mouth? Clean it up. It popped up in pop culture too. In the 1960s, a genre of music aimed at younger audiences came to be known as Bubble gum. In the 1975 movie One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest, the silent Chief Bromden speaks for the rst time saying, Mmm, Juicy Fruit after the char acter played by Jack Nicholson gives him a stick of the gum. And Janet Jackson played a feisty, gumchewing beautician in the 1993 lm Poetic Justice. But gums image as a tasteless habit also stuck, with some high-prole gum chewing only making it worse. In 2003, Britney Spears gave an interview to CNN where a white piece of gum could be seen oat ing around her mouth as she elded questions on a range of topics, including the war in Iraq. Talk show host Wendy Williams has a gum wall backstage, where she sticks wads of it before walking out. In one episode, she told Patti La Belle that she could put her gum on the wall after the singer spit out a wad into her hand. Such imagery may be why gum is still a nono in business meetings or rst dates, according to Lizzie Post, the greatgreat granddaughter of et iquette expert Emily Post and co-author of Emily Posts Etiquette. My grandmother used to tell me, You look like a cow chewing cud, she said. The habit so bothered author Malachy McCourt that the extremely longshot gubernatorial candi date in 2006 told the New York Times he wanted to triple the tax on gum. The former Green Party nominee explained that he didnt like the mess it created on sidewalks and subways. The other aspect of it is that it makes people look so stupid, said McCourt, 82, in a recent interview. Gums bad image is one reason that alterna tives look more attractive. Theres also another perennial complaint: The avor runs out too fast, said Ryan Furbush, a 17-year-old from Sayreville, N.J. who has stopped chewing gum in favor of chewy candies and chocolates. It may be why Mars said its gum declines have been most signi cant with people who are 25 and younger. In the meantime, Altoids mints, Welchs Fruit Snacks and countless other options have taken up space in the checkout aisles where most gum is purchased. Since peaking in 2009, U.S. gum sales have fall en 11 percent to $3.71 billion last year, according to market researcher Eu romonitor International. Thats even as overall candy sales including gum, chocolate, mints and licorice have climbed 10 percent to $31.53 billion. Over the next ve years, Euromonitor projects gum sales will drop another 4 percent to $3.56 billion. Hershey, which makes Reeses, Kit Kat and Al mond Joy, is taking data to retailers to illustrate the slowing demand for gum. The idea is to encourage them to devote less of their candy aisles to it, and perhaps make way for more of its own prod ucts. Hershey, which also makes Ice Breakers mints and gum, is planning another blow against gum: This fall, its slated to roll out a version of Ice Breakers that chews like a gum, but dissolves like a mint. Steven Schiller, global head of Hersheys nonchocolate candies including mints, said it gives gum chewers an alternative that doesnt require disposal at the end. Gum makers are strat egizing too. The maker of Trident, whose total gum sales were down as much as 16 percent in developed markets at one point last year, has an online campaign reminding people to run through the mental checklist before leaving the house: phone, keys, gum. We know when people have gum in their pocket or backpack or desk, theyre much more likely to chew it, said Stephanie Wilkes, who heads the North American candy business for Mondelez, the No. 2 player in gum with Trident, Dentyne and Bubbalicious. Mars, which makes Big Red, Doublemint, Juicy Fruit and Orbit, is testing illuminated racks in candy aisles to make its gum and candy stand out more. The company said the racks have led to a 10 to 30 percent sales increase in tests. And after years of slow ly vanishing from shelves, Bazooka bubble gum last year relaunched its brand with new marketing and packaging. Distribution has since rebounded. Still, executives are re alistic about gums turnaround prospects. Were not expecting any dramatic recovery in the category anytime soon, Mondelez CEO Irene Rosenfeld said dur ing an earnings call last month.Follow Candice Choi at www. twitter.com/candicechoiChew on this: Gum loses its popGum sales sink as competition rises; celeb gum chewing helps make tasteless image stick MCTWhile there are still plenty of people chewing gum, sales have dropped 11 percent over the past four years. SEATTLE (AP) Seattle police on Thursday released previously unseen images showing drug par aphernalia from the scene of Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobains suicide 20 years ago. Police spokeswoman Renee Witt said that a detective who recently reviewed the Cobain case les found several rolls of undevel oped lm that were taken at the suicide scene. The images released late Thursday were from that discovery. One shows a box containing a spoon and what look like needles on the oor next to half a cigarette and sunglasses. The other showed the paraphernalia box closed, next to cash, a cigarette pack and a wallet that appears to show Co bains identication. There was nothing earth-shattering in any of these images, Witt said. Police took another look at the Cobain suicide to be ready to answer questions in connection with next months anniversary, she said. Theres still a lot of interest in this case, Witt said. The detective went into the case les to refresh himself. The outcome of the case has not changed. Cobains body was dis covered in Seattle on April 8, 1994. Police release pictures from Cobain suicide scene M C Y K

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B4 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com LEANNE ITALIEAssociated PressNEW YORK Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg and the Girls Scouts recently declared a campaign to Ban Bossy, complete with Beyonce, Jane Lynch and Condoleezza Rice on video, a website full of tips and thousands of fans who pledged to stamp out that B word for girls. But the effort is also being questioned on a variety of fronts, including its focus on a word that not everyone considers damaging, and for encouraging a behavior that not everybody believes equals leadership, as Ban Bossy contends. Harold Koplewicz, who heads a think tank called the Child Mind Institute, went on the hunt for evidence that the word bossy discourages girls from becoming leaders, as Sandberg and the Girl Scouts believe. Koplewicz asked rst-graders and sixth-graders at a public elementary school for gifted children how they feel about the word. Save for a couple of outliers, he found that most students he observed at Hunter College Elementary School in Manhattan didnt love the term bossy, but they didnt love the word leader, either. The kids also told him that acting bossy car ries a high risk of not being liked. They thought that being liked was better than being a leader, Koplewicz said. The Ban Bossy campaign cites a study by the Girl Scout Research Institute in which girls reported being twice as likely as boys to worry that leadership roles would make them seem bossy. The fear of being seen as bossy is put forth as a primary rea son girls resist leadership roles. Alicia Clark, a Washing ton, D.C., psychologist whose specialties include parenting and couples counseling, lauded the campaigns suggested alternatives to bossy and ideas for fostering leader ship in girls, but she sees a broader sense of social anxiety at play. Girls experience fears and inhibitions about so cial acceptance more acutely, in the form of stress, she said. In some cases, Mean, bossy girls, as my 13-year-old daughter describes them, are closer to being bullies than they are leaders. And we know that bullies fundamentally feel insecure, hate themselves for it and assert themselves over other insecure people as a way of garnering a sense of control and dominance. This is not leadership. This is intimidation. Caroline Price, a 17-year-old high school junior in Andover, Mass., loved Sandbergs book, Lean In, and admires many of the women who have jumped on Ban Bossy. But to me bossy isnt the same as leader ship. Bossy people arent people you want to follow. Leaders inspire us to be better versions of our selves. Bossy means my way or the highway. Leadership is when someone listens and encourages others around them, she said. Sometimes, Price added, leaders arent just the loudest the bossiest. There are different kinds of leaders and some lead more quietly, or by consensus or by example and so on. Like critics of Sandbergs Lean In movement urging working women to strive for leadership positions, the backlash against Ban Bossy is multifaceted. Some detractors think girls and women of the bossy ilk should own the word rather than demand to be free of it, not unlike the way queer has been reclaimed as celebratory among many people who are LGBTQ, for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning their sexual identities. Sandberg, Rice and oth er celebrity supporters of Ban Bossy recall how being called bossy made them feel diminished as kids and dinged their selfesteem, but what about kids who are not bossy, but are bossed around? The people who are bossy, sometimes they have an attitude, said Rose Wladis, 11, a Girl Scout and fth-grader in New York (not at Hunt er). I think being a leader is kind of showing people what to do, but being nice about it and encouraging people and, like, setting an example for them. But bossiness is just telling someone what to do. Koplewicz said research shows teen girls are more likely than boys to have symptoms of mental health issues, some relat ed to low self-esteem. Yet girls also tend to do better than boys in school, getting better grades and earning degrees in higher numbers. Despite their academic success, women hold only a fraction of top executive positions, a point Lean In emphasizes. But were female executives seen as bossy growing up, and did they suffer under the weight of the word? At the moment there is no direct research that categorizes the word bossy as dangerous, said Koplewicz, who gener ally supports Sandbergs campaign to promote female leadership but not so much the focus on the lone word. The focus wasnt lost on Hillary Rodham Clinton. She spoke to a gathering of book publishers Wednesday about a memoir shes working on cover ing her years as U.S. secretary of state. Clinton threw out Bossy Pantsuit as a possible title, rifng on Tina Feys best-selling Bossypants, then she paused and earned laughs for her punch line: We can no longer say one of those words. Maura Ciammetti, 26, works for a small technol ogy company in suburban Philadelphia. She said being called bossy at times in college and work situations allowed her to step back and assess how I am approaching a situation. Was I too forceful? Am I listening to my peers? Am I looking at the big picture? Why is this person challenging me with this label? Instead of banning the word, Ciammetti said, what if we taught girls how to deal with their peers calling them names and other situations of ad versity. Julia Angelen Joy, 42, a Girl Scout troop leader and mother of four in Boise, Idaho, works in public relations and marketing, where lots of women dominate and where she has encountered many a bossy female boss. She calls them chictators. She cant get behind the Ban Bossy project. Bossy can mean two things a strong lead er or a domineering nag. Using the word in a campaign is a double-edge sword, Joy said.Beyond banning bossyIs there some middle ground in Sheryl Sandbergs splashy Ban Bossy campaign?Karl Mondon/Contra Costa Times/MCTSheryl Sandberg, chief operating ofcer of Facebook, delivers the luncheon keynote session to the 2011 Professional Business Women of California conference in San Francisco. RYAN J. FOLEYAssociated PressIOWA CITY, Iowa Nationwide Mutual Insurance Co. did not discriminate against an employee who claims she was denied a room to pump breast milk and pressured to resign on her rst day back from maternity leave, a federal appeals court has ruled. Angela Ames, a former loss-mitigation special ist in Nationwides Des Moines ofce, did not meet the legal burden of showing she was treated so badly that any reasonable person would have resigned, the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Thursday. The decision means Ames wont get a trial on her claims of gender and pregnancy discrimination. Ames claimed that on the morning she returned from a twomonth maternity leave in July 2010, the company refused to let her use its lactation rooms because its policy required mothers to complete paperwork seeking security access and wait three days for processing. She had been unaware of that require ment. A company nurse suggested she use a wellness room that was occupied at the time, but also cautioned that doing so might expose her milk to germs. Ames said she was in pain while waiting for that room to be vacated, when her supervisor informed her that she would be expected to work overtime to catch up on her work or face disciplinary action. Ames then went to her department head, Karla Neel, to see if she could nd her a place to lac tate, but was told that was not Neels responsibility. Neel handed Ames a piece of paper and pen and told her to write her resignation, saying, I think its best that you go home to be with your babies, Ames claimed. Ames had also taken a two-month maternity leave after giving birth to her rst child in 2009. The U.S. Equal Em ployment Opportunity Commission led a friend-of-the-court brief urging the lawsuit be reinstated after it was dismissed in 2012 by U.S. District Judge Robert Pratt. The remark that Ames should go home to be with your babies was evidence of discrimina tion because it invoked stereotypes about the role of women, commission lawyers wrote.Breastfeeding employee cant sue insurer, court says M C Y K

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www.newssun.comSunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B5 JESSE J. HOLLAND AND KIMBERLY HEFLINGAssociated PressWASHINGTON Black students are more likely to be suspended from U.S. public schools even as tiny preschoolers. The racial disparities in American education, from access to high-level class es and experienced teachers to discipline, were highlighted in a report released Friday by the Education Departments civil rights arm. The suspensions and disparities begin at the earliest grades. Black children represent about 18 percent of children in preschool programs in schools, but they make up almost half of the preschoolers suspended more than once, the report said. Six percent of the nations districts with preschools reported suspending at least one preschool child. Advocates long have said get-tough suspension and arrest policies in schools have contributed to a school-to-prison pipeline that snags minor ity students, but much of the emphasis has been on middle school and high school policies. This was the rst time the department reported data on preschool discipline. Earlier this year, the Obama administration issued guidance encouraging schools to abandon what it described as over ly zealous discipline policies that send students to court instead of the principals ofce. But even before the announcement, school districts have been adjusting policies that disproportionately affect minority students. Overall, the data show that black students of all ages are suspended and expelled at a rate thats three times higher than that of white children. Even as boys receive more than two-thirds of sus pensions, black girls are suspended at higher rates than girls of any other race or most boys. The data doesnt explain why the disparities exist or why the students were suspended. It is clear that the United States has a great distance to go to meet our goal of providing opportunities for every student to succeed, Education Secretary Arne Duncan said in a statement. This critical report shows that racial dispar ities in school discipline policies are not only well documented among older students, but actually begin during preschool, Attorney General Eric Holder said. Every data point represents a life impacted and a future potentially diverted or derailed. This administration is moving aggressively to disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline in order to ensure that all of our young people have equal educational oppor tunities. Nationally, 1 million children were served in public preschool programs, with about 60 per cent of districts offer ing preschool during the 2011-2012 school year, according to the data. The data show nearly 5,000 preschoolers were suspended once. At least 2,500 were suspended more than once. Reggie Felton, interim associate executive director at the National School Boards Association, called the rates unacceptable. He said theres more training going on to ensure teachers are aware of the importance of keeping students in school. Daniel Losen, director of the Center for Civil Rights Remedies for the Civ il Rights Project at UCLA, said the ndings are disturbing because the suspended preschoolers are unlikely to be presenting a danger, such as a teenager bringing a gun to school. Almost none of these kids are kids that wouldnt be better off with some support from educators, Losen said. Just kicking them out of school is de nying them access to educational opportunity at such a young age. Then, as they come in for kinder garten, they are just that much less prepared. Losen said its appropriate to discipline a 4-yearold, but a more appropriate response might be moving them to a differ ent educational setting with additional services. Most preschool kids want to be in school, Losen said. Kids just dont understand why they cant go to school. Kimbrelle Lewis, principal of Raleigh-Bartlett Meadows Elementary School in Memphis, said shes never suspended a child in her schools preschool program and would only consider it in an extreme circumstance. She said her district provides behavior specialists and other ser vices to children with discipline problems so strategies can be worked out with teachers and parents if preschoolers need additional support. If there are racial disparities among preschoolers disciplined, I do think its something to look at. I think its a conversation to have, said Lewis, who served on a committee with the National Association of Elementary School Principals looking at issues affecting younger school children. Dennis Van Roekel, the president of the National Education Association teachers union, said in a statement that the ndings show that too many children dont have equitable access to experienced and fully licensed teachers. The inequities detailed in this report have been caused, at least in part, by policies that disregard the professionalism of teach ing and create a revolving door of under-prepared and under-supported novices who leave before theyve reached the levels of mastery required to truly make a difference, Van Roekel said. Judith Browne Dianis, co-director of the Advancement Project, a think tank that specializes in social issues affecting minority communities, said the ndings didnt surprise her. I think most people would be shocked that those numbers would be true in preschool, because we think of 4and 5-yearolds as being innocent, she said. But we do know that schools are using zero tolerance policies for our youngest also, that while we think our children need a head start, schools are kicking them out in stead.Follow Kimberly Heing on Twitter: http://twitter.com/kheing Follow Jesse J. Holland on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jessejhollandBlack preschoolers more likely to face suspension MCTNationally, 1 million children were served in public preschool programs, with about 60 percent of districts offering preschool during the 2011-2012 school year, according to the data. The data show nearly 5,000 preschoolers were suspended once. At least 2,500 were suspended more than once.Every data point represents a life impacted and a future potentially diverted or derailed. This administration is moving aggressively to disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline in order to ensure that all of our young people have equal educational opportunities.Eric Holder U.S. attorney general Associated PressWASHINGTON For mer Florida Gov. Jeb Bush said Thursday the partisan divide isnt as wide when it comes to improving the nations higher education system as it is in many other areas. Hillary Rodham Clinton, who like Bush is often mentioned as a potential 2016 president candidate, accepted Bushs invitation to appear at a conference he is co-hosting on global higher education issues. It begins Monday in Irving, Texas. This isnt a political conference, Bush, a Republican, said in a telephone interview when asked why he invited Clinton, a Democrat who served as secretary of state. Theres a real consensus in our country that higher education is hugely important and if we can nd ways to improve quality and lower costs and provide greater access in the United States and around the world, its hard to ar gue against that, Bush said. The question is, how do you do it? Bush said its good that at the federal level and in many states there are discussions about ways to improve higher education. He noted that among full-time college students, about 60 percent of students graduate within six years. Initiatives that focus on better outcomes and helping students get the courses they need to garner degrees of relevance quicker are a very good thing, Bush said. Jeb Bush seeks common ground in higher education The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN M C Y K

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B6 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com PLACES TO WORSHIPPlaces to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sun that is published Friday and Sunday. To place a listing in this directory, call the News-Sun at 3856155, ext. 596.ANGLIC ANNew L ife A nglican Fellowship, 10 N. Main Ave. (Womans Club), Lake Placid, FL 33852. Rev. Susan Rhodes, Deacon in Charge, (863) 243-3191; strhodes1020@yahoo.com. Sun day Worship, 10 a.m. Teaching, Holy Communion, Music, Fellowship, Healing Prayer. Pastoral and Spiritual.ASSEMB L Y OF GODC hrist Fellowship C hurch (A ssembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Await ing His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 471-0924. First A ssembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morn ing Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Fam ily Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431.BAPT I STA von Park L akes Baptist C hurch, 22600 N. Highlands Blvd., Avon Park, FL 33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ cen tered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist C hurch (GARBC ) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C17A (truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., and evening worship service is at 6 p.m. On Wednes days, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20s+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time be gins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church ofce at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist C hurch, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Wor ship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist C hurch, 1000 Max well St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Tele phone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: ofce@apfellowship.org; Web site, www.ap fellowship.org. First Baptist C hurch of A von Park, N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 453-6681. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Rev. Johnattan Soltero, Hispanic pastor; Joy Loomis, director of mu sic. Sunday Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:45 a.m.; Youth Choir, 4:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for both services. Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper, 5:15 p.m.; Childrens Choir, 5:45 p.m.; Youth Activities, 6 p.m.; Prayer Meet ing/Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Worship Choir Practice, 6 p.m.; Mission Programs for Children, 6:45 p.m. Hispanic Services: Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., worship service at 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. To watch services online, go to the website at www.fb cap.net. In the heart of Avon Park, for the hearts of Avon Park. First Baptist C hurch of L ake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both ser vices with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meet ing at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist C hurch of L ake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm St., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Website: www.fbclp. com. Email: information@fbclp.com. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contem porary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Wednesday Activities: Fam ily dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. The church is at 119 E. Royal Palm St., Lake Placid. For information, call 465-3721 or go to www.fbclp.com. First Baptist C hurch of L orida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School be gins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., fol lowed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the minis tries offered, call 655-1878. First Baptist C hurch, S ebring, 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Tele phone: 385-5154. Rev. Matthew D. Crawford, senior pastor; Rev. Nuno Norberto, associate pastor, minister of music and senior adults; and Dixie Kreulen, preschool director. Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.; Blended Service, 10:30 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Call 385-4704. Website www.fbsebring.com Florida A venue Baptist C hurch, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Gird ley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children and youth at 6 p.m. and for adults at 6:30 p.m. I ndependent Baptist C hurch, 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday wor ship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. L eisure L akes Baptist C hurch, 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Wor ship service at 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 6 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist C hurch (GARBC) 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Eve ning Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Mes senger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist C hurch, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 2143025. Afliated with the National Associa tion of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. S parta R oad Baptist C hurch, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Evangelist Roger Jaudon. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For infor mation, call 382-0869. S outhside Baptist C hurch (GARBC) 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Ser vice, 10:45 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Awana kindergarten through fth grade, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bi ble Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Ofce phone, 385-0752. S pring L ake Baptist C hurch, Where the Bible is Always Open. Pastor Richard Schermerhorn, 7408 Valencia Road; 6552610. Assistant Pastor Ronald Smith, 3861610. On U.S. 98 at the Spring Lake Vil lage II entrance. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. for all ages; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednes day Mid-week Bible Study and Prayer Service, 6:30 p.m. Nursery available for all services. S unridge Baptist C hurch, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695.C ATHO LICO ur L ady of Grace C atholic C hurch, 595 E. Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vig il Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English. Sunday Life Teen Mass at 6 p.m. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. English confession at 3:30 p.m. Saturday; Spanish confession at 6:30 p.m. Religious Education Classes (September to May) are 9-10:20 a.m. Sun day for grades K through 5th. Grades 6th through Youth Bible Study are from 6:308:30 p.m. Wednesday. S t. C atherine C atholic C hurch, 820 Hick ory St., Sebring. Parrish ofce/mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 3850049, 385-6762 (Spanish); fax, 385-5169; email, ofce@stcathe.com; website, www. stcathe.com. School Ofce/Mailing, Princi pal Dr. Anna V. Adam, 747 S. Franklin St., Se bring, FL 33870; 385-7300; fax, 385-7310; email school@stcathe.com. School ofce hours 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday-Fri day. Clergy: Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F., frjose@stcathe.com or 385-0049; Parochial Vicar, Rev. Victor Caviedes, 385-3993; As sisting Priest (retired), Rev. J. Peter Sheehan; Decons, Rev. Mr. James R. McGarry and Rev. Mr. Max M. Severe. WEEKEND MASS SCHEDULE: Saturday: 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 and 10 a.m., 12 p.m. (Spanish), 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center), every third Sunday of the month at 2 p.m. (French Mass). Daily Mass: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m. Sacrament of Reconcilli ation: 7:15-7:45 a.m. rst Friday, 2:30-3:15 p.m. Saturday and 9-9:45 a.m. Sunday. Ofce Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. MondayFriday. S t. James C atholic C hurch, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Sunday 8 a..m. and 10 a.m. year round. Saturday Vigil 4 p.m. Weekdays 9 a.m. Holy days 9:30 a.m. (Vigil evening before at 7 p.m.) First Saturday of each month: Healing Mass, 9 a.m.CHR I ST IANC ornerstone C hristian C hurch, (Saxon Hall) 1003 West Pine St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Love Christ Love People. Jon Carter, Music Minister. Sunday, 9 a.m. Bi ble Study; 10 a.m. Worship; Communion available each week. Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship Group. For more information call 453-7679. S ebring C hristian C hurch, 4514 Ham mock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher. Kristy Marvin, Child rens Director. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets at 1 p.m. Thursdays. Phone 382-6676. First C hristian C hurch (Disciples of C hrist), 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-0358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.CHR I ST IAN & M I SS ION ARY A LLI A NC ET he A lliance C hurch of S ebring, 451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL 33875. Call 3821343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sun day services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m.CHUR CH OF BRETHRE NC hurch of the Brethren, 700 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m. Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-1597.CHUR CH OF CHR I STA von Park C hurch of C hrist, 200 S. Forest Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Minister: Don Smith. Sunday Worship Services, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available at every service. Bible Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered class es for all ages. Church phone: 453-4692. H eartland church of C hrist, Lakeshore Mall Suite 42 (outside entrance), 901 U.S. Highway 27 N, Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday worship, 9 a.m. to noon; Wednesday, Bible study, 7 p.m. Evangelist Carl Ford, (863) 4022159. L ake Placid C hurch of C hrist, 1069 Hwy 27 North, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Mailing address is P.O. Box 1440, Lake Placid, FL 33862. Sunday morning worship is at 10 a.m. Sunday evening worship is 6 p.m. Bi ble class 9 a.m. Sundays and Wednesday evenings at 7 p.m. All are invited to join us. For more information, call the church at 863465-4636 or visit the website www.thelord sway.com/lakeplacidcofc/. S ebring Parkway C hurch of C hrist, 3800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870; 3857443. Minister: Kevin Patterson. Times of ser vice are: Sunday Bible Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Bible Class, 7 p.m. CHUR CH OF G ODC hurch on the R idge, Church of God, Anderson, Ind.; 1130 State Road 17 North, Sebring, FL 33870. Worship Service Sunday, 10 a.m.; Bible Study and Prayer, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Pastor Dr. Collet Varner, (863) 382-0773.CHUR CH OF N AZARE NEFirst C hurch of the Nazarene of A von Park P.O. Box 1118., Avon Park, FL 338251118. 707 W. Main St. Sunday: Sunday school begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning worship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening service at 6 p.m. Wednesday evening service is at 7 p.m. with special services for children and adults. If you need any more information, call 453-4851. C hurch of the Nazarene of L ake Plac id, 512 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852. Adult Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednes day evening: All church meal, 6 p.m.; Christian Life Study, 6:45 p.m. Winter Life groups pending. Call 446-1339. Pastor Tim Taylor.CHUR CHES OF CHR I ST IN CHR I ST IAN U NI ON C ommunity Bible C hurch C hurches of C hrist in C hristian Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17A North (truck route), Avon Park. Presenting Jesus Christ as the answer for time and eterni ty. Sunday morning worship service, 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided. Junior Church ac tivities at same time for K-6 grade. Sunday School Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m. (Transportation available.) Sunday evening praise and worship service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and youth activities at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Everyone is welcome, please come worship with us. Tom Schwankweiler, Pastor. Phone 453-6052.EP ISC OPA LE piscopal C hurch of the R edeemer A von Park, 910 W. Martin St., Avon Park, FL 33825 (U.S. 27 across from Wells Motor Co.). Rev. Canon George Conger. Sunday services: Holy Communion at 9:30 a.m.; Saturday Bible study at 2:15 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Come and worship with us; we would love to meet you. Church ofce, 453-5664; fax, 4534853. Visit us at our website at redeem eravonpark.com. Email redeemer1895@ aol.com. Call the thrift store for hours open and donation pick up at 664-9668 or 453-5664. S t. A gnes E piscopal C hurch, 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Fa ther Scott Walker. Sunday Services: Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek service on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bi ble study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always welcome. Church ofce 385-7649, for more information. S t. Francis of A ssisi A nglican E pis copal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-0051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Nelson, Rector. Wor ship: Sunday, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday Bible study at 9:15 a.m. Sunday School at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Worship 6 p.m. and Thursday 9 a.m. Holy Communion with Healing. Call the thrift store for hours open 699-0221.EVA NG E LIC AL FREE C HUR C H OF AMER IC AT he C hurch of the Way EF CA, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunda1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednes days. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teach ing of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way A place for you. Ofce Phone: 471-6140, Church Cell Phone: 2733674. Email: thewaychurch@ hotmail. com. Web site: www.TheWayChurch.orgG RA C E BRETHRE NGrace Brethren C hurch, 3626 Thunderbird Road, (863) 835-0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday services at 7 p.m. We offer Kid City Childrens Ministry through out all services, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married couples, prime-timers, and Bible studies in Spanish. Kid City Day Care, Preschool and After-School Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.6 p.m. (For registration call: 385-3111). Check us out on the Web at www.sebring grace.org.INDEPE N DE NTFirst C hristian C hurch, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.rstchris tianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church. Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Wednesday studies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events.INTERDE N OM IN ATIONAL World H arvest and R estoration Ministries, (non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd.,(non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd., Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-3771. Sunday service: Sunday School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rog ers.L UTHERANA tonement L utheran C hurch (ELCA) 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. Rev. Sharon Dorr and Deacon David Thoresen will be the Spiritual Leaders, alternating Sun days. Jim Helwig, organist. Worship service with the Holy Eucharist is at 9:30 a.m. every Sunday. Birthday Sunday is the rst Sunday of each month after the service. Council meeting is on the rst Tuesday of each month. WELCA meets at noon second Tuesday of the month with a light lunch. Labyrinth Prayer Garden is open to the public 24 hours a day, seven days a week. When in need of prayers or to talk to God, come to the Gar den. Come and grow with us; we would love to meet you and your family. Dont worry about how you look. Jesus went to the tem ple in a robe and sandals. Quilting classes every Monday at 6 p.m. Looking for quilters or people willing to learn. Call 840-3303. C hrist L utheran C hurch A von Park LCMS 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School past the four-way stop sign. Sunday Divine Wor ship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come wor ship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at (863) 471-2663 or see christlutheranavonpark. org. Faith L utheran C hurch LCMS ,2740 Lakeview Dr, Sebring; Church phone: 3857848; Faith Child Development Center: 385-3232. Sunday Traditional Worship Ser vice: 8 a.m.; Sunday Praise Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.; Communion served 1st, 3rd & 5th Sunday. Sunday School & Bible Classes: 9:15 a.m. Worship Svc. Broad cast at 8 a.m. on WITS 1340AM each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies, Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. All are warm ly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good S hepherd L utheran C hurch (AALC) American Association of Luther an Churches, 3240 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 9 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 385-2346. New L ife E vangelical L utheran C hurch, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congre gation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Luke Willitz at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlifesebring.com. R esurrection L utheran C hurch ELCA, 324 E. Main St., at Memorial Drive, Avon Park. Pastor Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Sun day worship 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Sunday School at 9:15 a.m. Coffee and fellowship following 10:30 a.m. service. Wednesday Worship Service is at 7 p.m. Open Com munion celebrated at all services. Gods Work, Our Hands. T rinity L utheran C hurch LCMS 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots PreSchool director Education Hour, 8:45 a.m.; Worship service, 10 a.m. Holy Com munion each rst and third Sunday. Childrens Church scheduled during worship service, 4-year-olds through fth grade. Nursery provided during worship service for infants to 3-year-olds. Seasonal MidWeek Services each Wwednesday eve ning during Advent and Lent. Call church ofce at 465-5253 or visit the website at www.Trinitylutheranlp.com. Other ac tivities and groups include: Choir; Ladies Guild and LWML; Mens Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies; Trinity Tots Pre-school, and Youth Group.NON -DE N OM IN AT IONALBible Fellowship C hurch, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed rst and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 yrs through 5th grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church of ce 385-1024. C alvary C hurch, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening service, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small friendly church waiting for your visit. C hristian T raining Ministries I nc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. A nursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Chris tian Inter national Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister, lindadowning@live.com. Casey L. Downing, associate minister, caseydowning@hotmail. com. Church phone: 314-0482. Web site: www.ctmforme.com C rossroads of L ife,148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852; Tel. 863655-9163. The place of your Divine ap pointment. We expect our supernatural God to transform our lives through His power and grace. Come, learn of His plan and destiny for you. With His plan we re ceive His provision along with His perfect timing and opportunity. What you have longed for, but have been missing, can now be received. The direction you have been thirsty for will suddenly quench your parched soul. Come to experience what you have been missing for so long empowerment in every area of life. We teach, train and send forth to win souls. You dont speak English no problema. We have a Spanish interpreter. We look forward to fellowship and worship with you at 7 p.m. every Wednesday. Pastoers Gil and Rosa Benton (Faith Never Fails). Grace Bible C hurch, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone, 382-1085. Dustin Woods, lead pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Monday, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry. www.GBCco nnected.org Faith C enter West Ministry, Restor ing Lives, Families & Communities. In the Banyan Plaza at 2349 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. Pastors Leroy and JoAnn Taylor the public to worship on Sundays at 11 a.m. for Praise & Wor ship and on Wednesdays at 7 p.m. for Bible study and prayer. Children classes are available for all services. Ministries for youth, men and women are held throughout the month. Please attend these Spirit-lled services. Moving For ward in Unity. Church ofce, 385-1800 or 655-2748. H ighlands C ommunity C hurch, a ca sual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. New Beginnings C hurch of S ebring, worshiping at The Morris Chapel, 307 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Pastor Gary Kindle. Bible study every Sunday, 9 a.m. Blended Church Service, 10:15 a.m. Phone (863) 835-2405. newbeginningschurchofsebring.com Be gin your week with us. T he L ords S entinel Fellowship C hurch, 148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid (at Lake Placid Christian School), Pastor Juanita Folsom. Sunday morning service, 10:30 a.m.; Monday, Sentinel School of Theology, 7 p.m.; Church ser vice, Tuesday, 7 p.m. More information at www.juanitafolsomministries.com. Union C hurch, 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday traditional worship service is at 7:45 a.m. (October through Easter) and 9 a.m. Contemporary Sunday worship service is at 10:45 a.m. Nursery and childrens church available. Wednesday night worship with Pastor Ti ger Gullett and CrossTalk with Pastor Bill Breylinger at 6 p.m. Breakfast and lunch menus at Solid Grounds. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Ofce: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. Unity L ife E nrichment C entre,new lo cation, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; email unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www. unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Chil drens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister trans forming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. RELIGION M C Y K

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www.newssun.com Sunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B7 PRESBYTERIANCovenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. Pastor Tom Schneider. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Sunday morning worship: Traditional ser vice, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday school, 9:15 a.m. Wednes day evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Childrens/Youth Group, 5:30-7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato. net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Ofce hours: 8:3012:30 a.m. Monday-Friday.First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6 p.m. each Wednesday; Children Ministry and Youth Group, 6 p.m. each Sunday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. 385-0107. Email: faith@ strato.net, Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Fellowship Time, 10:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m. Tuesday: Youth Groups meet for devotions/Bible study, crafts, sport activities and dinner. Middle and high school, 3:306:30 p.m. Elementary School, 4-5:30 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m. Choir Rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. A nursery is available during worship. Call the church ofce for more information and other classes. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com, 117 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday Traditional Worship, 8 and 9:30 a.m.; Contemporary Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. Wednesday evenings: Adult small group Bible Study 7 p.m. (Nursery available), Youth Group (6-12th grades) 7 p.m., nursery and childrens ministry, 7 p.m. Family Biblical Counseling available by appointment. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September through June. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. rst Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 6550713; e-mail, springlakepc@embarqmail.com, Web site, http://slpc.embarqspace.com.SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTISTAvon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com, Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. A sale takes place the rst Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Frank Gonzalez. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALL ARE WELCOME. Associate Pastor is Ryan Amos. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Nathan Madrid.THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTSThe Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 3829092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-1p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: rst and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m.THE SALVATION ARMYThe Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www. salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODISTFirst United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., 105 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870. Pastor John A. Bryant. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church, 200 S. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759, Rev. Gary Pendrak, Pastor. Sunday School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Bible study every Wednesday at 6 p.m. Visit us at our church website: www.fumcap. org. Memorial United Methodist Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL, 33852. Rev. Tim Haas, pastor. Rev. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral assistant. Rev. Jerry McCauley, visitation pastor. Sunday worship services: Worship Service, 8:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m. We offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth programs, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship. We are a congregation that wants to know Christ and make Him known. Check out our church website at www.memorialumc.com or call the church ofce at 465-2422. Lakeview Christian School, VPK to Grade 5, 465-0313. St. John United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Adult Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all services. Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring. org Spring Lake United Methodist Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church ofce phone: 655-0040.UNITED CHURCH OF CHRISTEmmanuel United Church of Christ, Jesus didnt reject people, neither do we. Join us for worship every Sunday at 9:30 a.m. and youll be embraced by a compassionate congregation that is all-inclusive. Were at the corner of Hammock and Hope. Choir and Bell Choir practice on Wednesday; Bible studies throughout the week. 471-1999; sebringemmanuelucc.com.P LACES T O WO RS HI P RELIGION A playground that our grandchildren enjoy has a walking path that twists and turns leading young explorers through a woodland area. Yet with all there is to do, they keep asking what were doing next. They dont want this adventure to end, but they anticipate what might take its place. Whats next? Its a good question that keeps us on our toes anticipating the future. Young children arent the only ones wanting to know whats around the next bend in the road. I want to know. Teenagers want to know. Young adults want to know. Were hungry to live lives that are meaningful and adventuresome. We long to take on the next challenge and feel that sense of ac complishment. Recently our son taught a lesson on Whats next? He and his wife minister to the young adults in their congregation in Colorado. These young men and women long to know what Gods will is for their lives. Theyre on the verge of leaping into that produc tive time of life and they want to experience all God has for them. But sometimes its difcult to discern. And they dont want to miss it. Thats where the story of Caleb gave them some food for thought. In Joshua 14:6-12, NKJV, Caleb reminds Joshua how when they spied out the land years before he be lieved God that they could take it. But the others were afraid and convinced everyone else not to follow Calebs advice. So, they wandered in the wilder ness for 45 years. Whats next? Calebs se cret to his longevity, vitality and purpose at age 85 is revealed in verse 9b. Moses promised that Caleb would receive his inheritance, because you have wholly followed the Lord my God. Caleb says to Joshua, Behold, the Lord has kept me alive, as He said, these forty-ve yearsand now, here I am this day, eightyve years old. As yet I am as strong this day as on the day that Moses sent me; just as my strength was then, so now is my strengthboth for going out and for coming in. The key that unlocks the future is found in whol ly following the Lord God. Our son termed it long obedience in one direction. God is our Keeper and Preserver. Psalm 121:8 echoes Calebs words, The Lord shall preserve your going out and your coming in from this time forth, and even forevermore. Please God and live the empowered life (Gods power within) that will un fold before you. SelahJan Merop of Sebring is a News-Sun correspondent.Obidence in one direction P AUSE & C ONSIDERJan Merop WALL STREET JOURNAL BEST-SELLERSFICTION1. Rush Revere and the First Patriots by Rush Limbaugh (Threshold Editions) 2. Insurgent by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegan Books) 3. Allegiant by Veroni ca Roth (Katherine Tegen Books) 4. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green (Dutton Books 5. Power Play by Dani elle Steel (Delacorte) 6. Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss (Random House) 7. One Fish Two Fish by Dr. Seuss (Random House) 8. The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss (Random House) 9. The Bootlegger by Clive Cussler and Justin Scott (Putnam Adult) 10. Big Nate: In the Zone by Lincoln Pierce (HarperCollins)NONFICTION1. The Blood Sugar Solution 10-Day Detox Diet by Mark Hyman (Little, Brown) 2. Jesus Calling by Sarah Young (Thomas Nelson) 3. Uganda Be Kidding Me by Chelsea Handler (Grand Central Publishing) 4. Dark Souls II Collec tors Ed. Strategy Guide by Future Press (Brady Games) 5. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath (Gallup) 6. Minecraft: Essential Handbook by Scholastic (Scholastic) 7. Grain Brain by David Perlmutter (Little, Brown) 8. Killing Jesus: A Histo ry by Bill OReilly & Martin Dugard (Henry Holt & Co) 9. The Body Book by Cameron Diaz (Harper Wave) 10. The Hard Thing About Hard Things by Ben Horowitz (HarperBusiness)FICTION E-BOOKS1. Divergent by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books) 2. Insurgent by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books) 3. Night Broken by Patricia Briggs (Ace) 4. Aftershock by Sylvia Day (Harlequin Cosmo Red-Hot Reads) 5. Allegiant by Veroni ca Roth (Katherine Tegen Books) 6. Power Play by Dani elle Steel (Delacorte) 7. Hawaii by James Michener (Dial Press) 8. Be Careful What You Wish For by Jeffrey Archer (St. Martins Press) 9. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green (Dutton Books) 10. The Husbands Se cret by Liane Moriarty (Amy Einhorn Books/Putnam)NONFICTION E-BOOKS1. Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup (HarperCollins) 2. percent Happier by Dan Harris (It Books) 3. The Nazi Ofcers Wife by Edith Hahn Beer (Harper Collins) 4. Zen and Art of Motor cycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig (HarperTouch) 5. Uganda Be Kidding Me by Chelsea Handler (Grand Central Publishing) 6. Unbroken by Lau ren Hillenbrand (Random House) 7. I Will Never Forget by Elaine C. Pereira (Elaine C. Pereira) 8. Free country by Bill OReilly and Martin Dugard (Henry Holt & Co.) 9. Killing Jesus: A Histo ry by Bill OReilly & Martin Dugard (Macmillan) 10. Excuses Begone! by Wayne W. Dyer (Hay House) USA TODAY BEST-SELLERS 1. Divergent by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books) 2. Insurgent by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books) 3. Allegiant by Veroni ca Roth (Katherine Tegen Books) 4. Rush Revere and the First Patriots by Rush Limbaugh (Threshold Editions) 5. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green (Duttons Children) 6. Night Broken by Patri cia Briggs (Ace) 7. Power Play by Dani elle Steel (Delacorte) 8. Aftershock by Sylvia Day (Harlequin Cosmo Red-Hot Reads) 9. Be Careful What You Wish For by Jeffrey Archer (St. Martins Press) 10. Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup (Harp erPerrenial) 11. Divergent Series Complete Box Set by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books) 12. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak (Knopf Books for Young Readers) 13. Hawaii by James Mi chener (Dial Press) 14. Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins (Scholastic) 15. Stone Cold by C.J. Box (Putnam Adult) 16. The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd (Viking Adult) 17. The Goldnch by Donna Tartt (Little, Brown) 18. The Chance by Robyn Carr (Harlequin MIRA) 19. The Husbands Se cret by Liane Moriarty (Amy Einhorn Books/Putnam) 20. The Bootlegger by Clive Cussler and Justin Scott (Putnam Adult)BOOKS MCYK

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B8 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com BILL DRAPERAssociated PressKANSAS CITY, Mo. For much of the past three decades, pit bulls have been widely regarded as Americas most dangerous dog the favorite breed of thugs, drug dealers and dog-ghting rings, with a fearsome reputation for unprovoked, sometimes deadly attacks. Hostility toward pits grew so intense that some cities began treating them as the canine equivalent of assault ries and pro hibited residents from owning them. But attitudes have softened considerably since then as animal activists and even television shows cast the dogs in a more positive light. The image makeover has prompted many states to pass new laws that forbid commu nities from banning specic breeds. And it illustrates the power and persistence of dog-advocacy groups that have worked to fend off pit bull restrictions with much the same zeal as gun-rights groups have defeated gun-control measures. Lawmakers are real izing that targeting dogs based on their breed or what they look like is not a solution to dealing with dangerous dogs, said Lisa Peters, a spokeswoman for the American Kennel Club. Seventeen states now have laws that prohib it communities from adopting breed-specific bans. Lawmakers in six more states are consider ing similar measures, and some cities are reviewing local policies that classify pit bulls as dangerous animals. Pit bull advocates hail the changes as recognition that breed-specic laws discriminate against dogs that are not inher ently aggressive or dangerous unless they are made to be that way by ir responsible owners. The dogs foes complain that their message is being drowned out by a wellfunded, well-organized lobbying effort in state capitols. The debate puts millions of pit bull owners up against a relatively small number of people who have been victimized by the dogs. Ron Hicks, who sponsored a bill in the Missouri House to forbid breedspecic legislation, said he was surprised when nobody spoke against his proposal last month at a committee hearing. I gured a few parents would be there who would bring tears to my eyes, the Republican said. Would it have changed my opinion or what I be lieve in? No. A version of Hicks leg islation was endorsed by a House committee last month and needs to clear another committee before a full House vote. The state Senate is considering a comparable bill, as are lawmakers in Utah, South Dakota, Washington, Ver mont and Maryland. In Kansas, the commu nities of Bonner Springs and Garden City repealed their pit-bull bans earlier this year. Summer Freeman did not know there was a ban when she moved to Bon ner Springs last year after a divorce. She panicked when an animal-control ofcer discovered her pet and told her she had 15 days to get rid of the dog named Titan or move out of town. I think of him like my son, she said. Hes my dog-son, I guess you could say. Hes at my hip all the time. Hes just a big baby that wouldnt hurt a y. Freeman was forced to leave Titan at a shelter in Lawrence for nine months until she successfully fought to overturn the law in January. For dog owners and pit bull opponents alike, the battle is as deeply person al as any gun-control or religious issue. Each side accuses the other of lying, exploiting emotions and using bullying tactics. Pit bull owners insist their dogs are harmless, loving family members that shouldnt be blamed for something they didnt do. To opponents, they are a volatile breed whose ge netics drive them to kill more than two dozen people in the U.S. each year, many of them young children. Popular television shows such as Pit Boss and Pit Bulls and Parol ees on Animal Planet glorify the animals and minimize the tragedies that occur when pit bulls turn on humans, pit bull opponents say. Everything is telling us these animals are safe if you raise them right, said Jeff Borchardt, an East Troy, Wis., man whose 14-month-old son was mauled to death a year ago by two pit bulls that tore the child from the arms of their owner, who was baby-sitting. My sons dead because of a lie, because of a myth. My life will never be the same. The two dogs that killed Borchardts son had lived with their owner since soon after they were born, were well-cared for and had no history of aggres sive behavior, he said. Both had been spayed or neutered. That contradicts the contention that only mistreated, neglected or abused pit bulls attack people. Colleen Lynn, founder of DogsBite.org, pointed to a friend-of-the-court brief her organization submitted in a 2012 case in which the Maryland Court of Appeals declared pit bulls inherently dangerous. Appellate courts agree with us. Doctors and sur geons agree with us. That is credibility right there, Lynn said. We also have the support of three divisions of the U.S. military, huge, massive bodies in the U.S. government. The Marines, Army and Air Force all have banned dangerous dogs includ ing pit bulls and rottweilers from their bases because of the unreasonable risk they pose to safety, Lynn said. On the other side stand the American Bar Association and National Animal Control Association, which oppose breed-specic laws because they are discriminatory against a type of dog that isnt really a single breed. Three main breeds Staffordshire bull terrier, American pit bull terri er and American Staffordshire terrier along with mixes of those breeds are generally considered pit bulls. But many muscular, square-jawed, boxer-type dogs often are misidentied as pit bulls, making breed-specic bans hard to enforce. And because fatal pit bull attacks are a rarity compared with other causes of death such as auto accidents, dog advocates argue that breedspecic bans amount to legislative overkill. All communities deserve comprehensive dog laws that demand responsible dog ownership and that hold reckless owners accountable when their poor decisions wind up getting other dogs or other people hurt, said Ledy Vankavage, a top lobbyist for the Best Friends Animal Society. Don Burmeister, assistant city attorney for Council Bluffs, Iowa, led the effort to pass a local pit bull ban that took effect in 2005. He recalled rst reading about the issue in the July 27, 1987, issue of Sports Illustrated, which carried a full-cover shot of an angry pit bull baring its teeth. Across the top, it said BEWARE OF THIS DOG. After the Council Bluffs ban went into place, the number of pit bull attacks that resulted in hospital ization plummeted from 29 in 2004 to zero the past few years proof, Bur meister said, that breedspecic bans work. The opposition to pit bull bans, he added, is a sign that many American pet owners have lost touch with reality.Pit bulls benet from softening attitudes, advocacy groupsMCTA pit bull looks from its cage at the Waukegan Police Animal Control facility in Waukegan, Ill.No longer Americas most dangerous dog? M C Y K

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www.newssun.comSunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B9 JENNIFER KAYAssociated PressMIAMI Aside from being scarily large and voracious, Burmese py thons also are really good at nding their way home, according to new research conducted in Floridas Everglades. The discovery about py thons unusual navigational abilities doesnt much help wildlife agencies desperately trying to curb the invasive snakes population in the fragile wetlands. It might be something reptile owners should think about, though, if theyve considered illegally dumping an unwanted pet python in the wild. This is like the differ ence between homing pigeons and other birds, said the University of Flor idas Frank Mazzotti, one of the researchers for the study being published Wednesday in Biology Letters, a journal of Britains Royal Society. Mazzotti and other researchers have been studying what pythons eat and trying to nd a way to keep their population from growing. In 2006 and 2007, they captured 12 adult pythons in Ever glades National Park and surgically implanted radio transmitters in the snakes to track their movements. Six of the snakes were released in areas 13 to 22 miles from where they originally were captured. To the researchers sur prise, the snakes gured out which way was home, and they stayed on track for months even when temperatures dropped and the cold-blood ed snakes were less active. Unlike other snakes, the pythons moved with a purpose through their landscape instead of slithering randomly. It took the snakes three to nine months to get back to their original locations, according to the research ers. Little is known about pythons movements in their native habitats in India and other parts of Asia, and researchers had expected the snakes to es tablish new home ranges where they were released, said Shannon Pittman of the University of Missouri-Columbia, the studys lead author. Its not clear how the snakes mapped out their routes whether they relied on smell, light or some kind of magnetic force. If researchers can gure out what the snakes look for in the landscape, then maybe theyll have an easier time spotting pythons in the wild, Maz zotti said. I cant say its going to provide us with any magical management solutions. Its really neat that the pythons do this, Mazzotti said. Along with Pittman and Mazzotti, the studys authors include researchers from Davidson College, the U.S. Geological Sur vey and the National Park Service. Estimates for how many pythons now call South Florida home vary wildly, ranging from several thousands to 100,000 or more. The tan, splotchy snakes can disappear in the vast wetlands, and researchers say theyll fail to see a python theyre tracking with a radio tracking device until theyre nearly standing on it. Floridas population of Burmese pythons likely developed from pets let loose either intentionally or in the aftermath of Hur ricane Andrew in 1992. State and federal ofcials have evaluated specially designed traps, dogs trained to sniff out py thons and a massive amateur hunt to try and get a handle on the invasive py thon population. So far, only cold weather and exotic pet amnesty days, where people can relinquish non-native species with no questions asked, have reliably delivered py thons to ofcials. Florida prohibits possession or sale of the py thons for use as pets, and federal law bans the importation and interstate sale of the species.Follow Jennifer Kay on Twitter at www.twitter.com/jnkay.Researchers learn pythons have good homing skills MCTNew research shows that Burmese pythons have the ability to nd their way home. SUE MANNINGAssociated PressLOS ANGELES The large cat that attacked a baby and trapped an Or egon family in a bedroom touched off an Internet uproar that worries Jackson Galaxy, star of Animal Planets My Cat from Hell. Cats dont become ferocious felines that turn on their families for no reason, says the cat behavior expert, who is heading to Portland soon to work with the 4-year-old partHimalayan pet named Lux. Galaxy will lm the visit for his shows fth season, which kicks off April 26. Every parental site on the Internet blames the cat for this confrontation. Every pet site blames the family, he said, adding that something is wrong if the cat is acting out. We need to step away from the hysteria. There is a story behind all this. Dont assume anything. Lux became a world wide phenomenon after owner Lee Palmer called 911 and said the cat had cornered him, his girlfriend, their baby and the family dog inside a room. Palmer says his 7-month-old pulled Luxs tail, and he kicked the an imal after it scratched the child. Then, the cat just went off over the edge, Palmer told an emergency dispatcher after the family barricaded themselves. Hes charging us, Palmer said, as the cat was heard screeching in the background. Ofcers arrived and caught Lux with a dog snare. Palmer said the cat had a history of violence, but the family kept Lux un til Monday, when they turned him over to a Portland-area shelter. But the family assured Animal Planet they were going to keep the cat and agreed to therapy with Galaxy. Palmer didnt return a call from The Associated Press seeking comment Tuesday. There are many reasons a cat can turn aggressive, and there is no universal way to deal with it, Gal axy said. But the star feline behaviorist provided ve ways to tame out-ofcontrol cats: Never leave a young child unsupervised with a cat. Take it to a vet at least once a year. If a cat is acting suspiciously, the owner needs to pay at tention. Know what suspicious looks like, Galaxy said. If theyre not feeling well, cats will socially withdraw themselves, or they will lose weight, or they will gain weight, or theyll be howling in the middle of the night when they never did before. Ive known cats who acted out similarly to Lux because of an abscessed tooth, a brain tumor, hy perthyroidism or diabetes. Make sure cats can literally climb out of a situation. Having a space up high, like a cat condo, to get away from children and other pets is crucial, Galaxy said. Make sure the cat can make the choice to get away from the kid, he said. Timeouts are good things. We associate timeouts with punish ment, but in the world of cats, timeout is not a punishment. They can go to a designated place where they can set tle down, come back to a peaceful moment or ground themselves, he said. Stop ghts between felines with timeout drills. With simple pieces of cardboard, left strate gically around the house, you can stop a ght between two cats. Put the cardboard between them, blocking their vision and providing a moment of disorientation when you can lead them to their timeout spot. Its espe cially important to have the drills with aggressive cats. Galaxy said he was going to Portland to act as Luxs advocate and nd out whats wrong. I have no idea what made Lux aggressive, he said. It could be a chemical imbalance, a history of stressful environments or because he was kicked. If you want a blan ket statement on how to deal with aggression, how about, Dont set the cat up for failure, he said. The behaviorist, who has worked with tens of thousands of cats, said the thing that bothered him most about Lux was his continued aggression the day Palmer called 911, including the ani mals ongoing assault on the door even though the threat was gone. But the word attack doesnt sit well with Galaxy because 75 percent of the time, its tied to a grouchy mood or a warning, he said. If I have a headache, I wont be the nicest guy in the world. I may snap at you, he said. This may have been Luxs way of snapping. Hypothetically speaking, someone pulling his tail may have been the last straw.Cat whisperer heading to Oregon after attackJackson Galaxy to work with animal that trapped family CRO SS WO RD SOL UTION M C Y K

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B10 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com CARLA K. JOHNSONAssociated PressCHICAGO For uninsured people, the nations new health care law may offer an escape from wor ry about unexpected, astronomical medical bills. But for Stephanie Payne of St. Louis, who already had good insurance, the law could offer another kind of escape: the chance to quit her job. At 62, Payne has worked for three decades as a nurse, most recently traveling house to house caring for 30 elderly and disabled patients. But shes ready to leave that behind, in cluding the job-based health benets, to move to Oregon and promote her self-published book. She envisions herself blogging, doing radio interviews and speaking to seniors groups. I want the freedom to t that into my day without squeezing it into my day, she said. One of the selling points of the new health care plan, which has a March 31 enrollment deadline, is that it breaks the link between affordable health insurance and having a job with benets. Payne believes shell be able to replace her current coverage with a $400to $500-a-month plan on Oregons ver sion of the new insurance exchange system set up under the law. Federal experts believe the new insurance option will be a power ful temptation for a lot of job-weary workers ready to bail out. Last month, congressional budget analysts estimated that within 10 years, the equivalent of 2.5 million fulltime workers could be working less because of the expanded coverage. But is the new option a gamble? Thats a matter of debate, not only among the politicians who are still arguing furiously over the laws merits, but among economists and industry experts. We dont know what the future of exchange insurance will be, said economist Douglas Holtz-Eakin, president of the American Action Forum, a center-right public poli cy institute. Premiums should remain stable if enrollment picks up and broadens to include younger, healthier people. But if older, sicker people are the vast majority of customers, prices eventually could spike. For Mike Morucci, 50, the idea of leaving his information technology job and its health benets is terrifying, he said. But he decided to take the plunge after reviewing the range of coverage available at different price points. Tax credits will help those with moderate incomes pay their insurance premiums. And cover age is guaranteed even for those with pre-existing conditions. Twenty-ve states also agreed to expand their Medicaid programs, providing health care for more low-income people. It denitely freed up my thinking when I thought, Do I want to give this a go? Morucci, of Ellicott City, Md.With health law, workers ponder the I-Quit option DAVID CRARY AND JOHN HANNAAssociated PressTOPEKA, Kan. Fred Phelps Sr. led his small To peka church for more than two decades in a bellicose crusade against gays and lesbians, saying they were worthy of death and openly declaring often at military funerals that the U.S. was doomed because of its tolerance of homosexuality. But in targeting grieving families of troops killed overseas, taunting peo ple entering other churches and carrying signs with anti-gay slurs and vulgar language or symbols, Phelps and his Westboro Baptist congregation created public circuses that may have helped the gayrights movement. Following Phelps death Wednesday at age 84, some gay-rights advocates suggested that he and his church created sympathy for lesbians, gays, bisexu als and the transgendered. Religious leaders who oppose gay marriage also said the pastors tactics clouded the debate over such issues and put them on the defensive in discussing both policy and faith. The world lost someone who did a whole lot more for the LGBT com munity than we realize or understand, said Cathy Renna, a longtime consultant to LGBT groups. He has brought along al lies who are horried by the hate. So his legacy will be exactly the opposite of what he dreamed. Phelps founded the church in the 1950s, and it has drawn much of its small congregation from his extended family. Its rise to national and even international notoriety began in the early 1990s, as it picketed against gays and lesbians, then pro tested funerals of AIDS victims and, eventually, fallen soldiers. The protests sparked outrage, with the federal government and lawmakers in more than 40 states passing specic laws to limit the protests and local residents using various tactics including lining up to block views of the protesters to protect grieving families. Conservative religious leaders regularly de nounced Phelps, wor ried that his relentless attacks would be perceived as representing the Christian case against same-sex relationships. At the 2003 annual Southern Baptist Convention, leaders spent a session drawing a distinction between their opposition to same-sex unions and Phelps pro tests. Phelps called his church Baptist but had no ties with the Southern Baptist Convention or any other mainstream Baptist group. Westboro Baptist is to Baptist Christianity what the Book of Mormon Broadway play was to the Latter-Day Saints, said the Rev. Russell Moore, who leads the Southern Baptist Conventions Eth ics and Religious Liberties Commission. They were kind of a performance art of vitriolic hatred rather than any kind of religious organization. Phelps professed not to care what anyone thought of his church. He said in a 2006 interview with The Associated Press that no minister could preach the Bible with out preaching Gods hate. Westboro spokesman Steve Drain said in an email a few days before Phelps death that the churchs doctrines werent changing. The church of the Lord Jesus Christ does not rise or fall with any man in fact, the Lord doesnt need ANY of us, Drain wrote. Any nation that embrac es that sin as an innocent lifestyle can expect to incur the wrath of God. Phelps often reserved especially caustic comments for evangelical Christians and Catholics who view homosexual behavior as sinful but also preach that God also loves and reaches out to gays and lesbians. Phelps dismissed them as enablers, and his congregation often picketed their churches. The Rev. Terry Fox, a Southern Baptist minister whos pastor of Wichitas non-denominationalleaning Summit Church, once felt compelled to apologize for Phelps shocking behavior on television. Fox called Phelps a false prophet and said Satan greatly used him. Fox was prominent in a successful effort in 2005 to persuade voters to amend the Kansas Constitution to ban gay marriage and said Phelps was an embarrassment but had become the face of Christian work in Kansas. Michael Schuttloffel, executive director of the Kansas Catholic Confer ence, said Phelps and his congregation still repre sent an easy device for gay-marriage supporters to short-circuit the conversation on that and related issues in recent years. People were justiably, appropriately outraged by the things that they did, Schuttloffel said of Phelps and his church. As soon as someone, then, is able to tar you as being relat ed to them or thinking the same way as them, right away youre starting be hind the eight ball. Gay-rights advocates, meanwhile, were assessing Phelps place in the history of their movement. An obscene footnote is how Tom Witt, executive director of Equality Kansas, the states leading gay-rights group, believes Phelps and his followers will be remembered. Witt said progress began well before Westboros protests and will continue long af ter Phelps death. However, James Esseks, director of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Project at the American Civil Liberties Union, acknowledged that he eventually saw Phelps protests as helping his own movement. He would show up with his extreme antigay views, and a bunch of people in the middle would think, If thats what it means to be anti-gay, I want no part of it, Esseks said.Phelps hate seen by some as aiding gay rights MCTFred Phelps Sr., founder of the Westboro Baptist Church that protests soldiers funerals and other events claiming that the U.S. was doomed because of its tolerance of homosexuality, died Wednesday.He has brought along allies who are horrified by the hate. So his legacy will be exactly the opposite of what he dreamed.Cathy Renna LGBT group consultant M C Y K

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www.newssun.com Sunday, March 23, 2014 l NEWS-SUN l B11

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B12 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com rffntbffnfn frnffnf ffnfffnnnnn nnnfnffnnnbnf bfffnffbf fnbfnbf fn rff nt bf t f tf f rf ntbn rfntfrb btbfntf fbtbf tff fbftbfbnbfb bbbbbbnrbtn brfbbbnbbrftrfb fbbbttnbbtnftfbfrrb ntftffbfntftbbnb trfnt Classifiedtn bfbrbrnfnbnbffbftrb bbttnbbntbntrnbrffbb fnrfntntftbnrfbrfb bfbtbfbf bbfbtntftrfbntnbnn nnntnrnfftnbrbbbrnnf nntnfrbnrrbrbn btfrftrbfntrfbtftb bbtnntbbnftftb bffbnrftrbfrftrbbnnrbb bfntfbbbnrnbbttbf tbrftbnb rfffntbtbt ttn tbnnbbtnfntbntn nbn ttf IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.:28-2010-CA-001372 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK,NA, Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS E.HAAKE,et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated March 05,2014 and entered in Case No.28-2010-CA-001372 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County,Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK,NA,is the Plaintiff and THOMAS E.HAAKE; WENDY ANN HAAKE; SEACOST NATIONAL BANK; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBL Y ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE,430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM,on the 8th day of April,2014,the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS 1 AND 2,BLOCK 3,LAKE BLUE ESTATES,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 59,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA.LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY:BEGIN AT THE EASTERLY MOST CORNER OF SAID LOT 2,THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 152.97 FEET; THENCE NORTH 28 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 80.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 68 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 151.33 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 28 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 90.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 610 LAKE BLUE DRIVE,LAKE PLACID,FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on March 6,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Cler k Ronald R Wolfe & Associates,P.L. P.O.Box 25018 Tampa,Florida 33622-5018 F10039574 WELLSLPS-SPECFHLMC-R-nrodriguez-Team 1 F10039574 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act,persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates,P.A.,P.O.Box 25018,Tampa, FL 33622-5018,telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding.If hearing impaired,(TDD) 1-800-955-8771,or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770,via Florida Relay Service. March 16,23,2014 Elizabeth R.Wellborn,P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd,Suite 100 Deerfield Beach,FL 33442 Telephone:(954) 354-3544 Facsimile:(954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT,If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at not cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,255 N.Broadway Avenue,Bartow,Florida 33830,(863) 534-4686,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call 711. FILE # 8377ST-34753 March 16,23,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.:28-2012-CA-000183 Division: BANK OF AMERICA,N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING,LP Plaintiff, v. MARIA P.DIAZ; et.al., Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated February 5, 2014,entered in Civil Case No.: 28-2012-CA-000183,of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County,Florida,wherein BANK OF AMERICA,N.A.,SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP,is Plaintiff,and MARIA P.DIAZ; ROBERTO J.DIAZ; PRAIRIE OAKS COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH,UNDER,AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS,are Defendant(s). ROBERT W.GERMAINE,the Clerk of Court shall sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m.in the Jury Assembly Room in the Basement of the Highlands County Courthouse,located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida,33870 on the 9th day of April,2014,the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment,to wit: LOT 28,OF THE COUNTRY CLUB OF SEBRING,PHASE 3,SECTION 2,``STERLING OAKS'',ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 16,PAGE 35, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. The property is located at the Street address of:2812 Briarwood Lane,Sebring,FL 33875. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale,you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale.If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days,only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on February 5,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE CLERK OF THE COURT By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk (COURT SEAL) Attorney for Plaintiff: Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.,offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash,the following-described property situate in Highlands County,Florida: LOT 4,IN BLOCK 187,OF LEISURE LAKES,SECTION THREE,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6,PAGE 25,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court,the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus,if any,resulting from the foreclosure sale,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens,mus file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 13th day of December,2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,255 N.Broadway Avenue,Bartow,Florida 33830,(863) 534-4686,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk B&H #329563 March 23,30,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:GC-13-000239 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. JANET GERBERICH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JANET GERBERICH; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT II; FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION,A PUBLIC CORPORATION,and any unknown heirs, devisees,grantees,creditors,and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by,through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,will on the 16th day of April, 2014,at 11:00 A.M.in the Jury Assembly IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.:28-2012-CA-000215 CENLAR FSB Plaintiff, vs. KATHLEEN FITZPATRICK AKA KATHLEEN BOADO, EDUARDO PETERSON BOADO, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given,pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on January 29,2014,in the Circuit Court of HIGHLANDS County, Florida,I will sell the property situated in Highlands County,Florida described as: BEGIN AT THE NORTHWESTERLY CORNER OF LOT 17,BLOCK BB,SPRING LAKE VILLAGE VII,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 11, PAGE 7,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA,SAID CORNER ALSO BEING THE BEGINNING OF A NON-TANGENT CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST HAVING AS ITS ELEMENTS A RADIUS OF 75.00 FEET; A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 20 DEGREES 33'04'' (PLAT),A CHORD OF 26.75 FEET AND WHOSE CHORD BEARS S 64 DEGREES 04'37'' E; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE (ALSO BEING THE NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 17) TO THE LEFT FOR 26.90 FEET TO THE END OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S 74 DEGREES 21'03'' E AND TANGENT TO SAID CURVE AND ALONG SAID NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 17 FOR 4.04 FEET; THENCE S 15 DEGREES 29'11'' W FOR 125.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 17; THENCE N 74 DEGREES 21'03'' W ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY LINE OF LOT 17 FOR 79.37 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT 17; THENCE N 36 DEGREES 12'01'' E ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 17 FOR 138.59 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. and commonly known as:1137 DOGWOOD TER,SEBRING,FL 33876; including the building,appurtenances,and fixtures located therein,at public sale,to the highest and best bidder,for cash,Sales are held in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870,on April 9,2014 at 11 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 5th day of February,2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court ROBERT W.GERMAINE By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk 327470/1121488/wmr March 16,23,2014 1499 W.Palmetto Park Rd.,Suite 300 Boca Raton,FL 33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact Office of the Court Administrator at 863-534-4686,255 North Broadway Avenue,Bartow,FL 33830 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call 711. File #12-004432-FNMA-FSC March 23,30,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. CASE NO.13000235GCAXMX RESIDENTIAL CREDIT SOLUTIONS,INC., PLAINTIFF, VS. JANET D.GREGORY,ET AL., DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated,in the above action,I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Highlands,Florida,on April 22, 2014,at 11:00 AM,at Basement of courthouse in Jury Assembly Room 430 S. Commerce Ave.,Sebring,FL 33870 for the following described property: LOT 67,OF FIESTA VILLA,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 13,AT PAGE 42,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA,TOGETHER WITH 2003 JACOBSEN OMES CLASSIC III MOBILE HOME,SERIAL #JACFL24583A&B,HUD #FLA737294 AND FLA 737295 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.The Court,in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale.Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. DATED:February 13,2104. ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk of the Court Prepared by: Gladstone Law Group,P.A. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. CASE NO.28 2012 CA 000234 XXAXMX BANK OF AMERICA,N.A., AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,LP, PLAINTIFF, VS. RAY H.COX,ET AL., DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated,in the above action,I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Highlands,Florida,on April 9, 2014,at 11:00 AM,at Basement of courthouse in Jury Assembly Room 430 S. Commerce Ave.,Sebring,FL 33870 for the following described property: LOT 17 AND 18,BLOCK 413,HILL CREST HEIGHTS,ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2,PAGE 5,PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.The Court,in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale.Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. DATED:February 5,2104. By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk of the Court Prepared by: Gladstone Law Group,P.A. 1499 W.Palmetto Park Rd.,Suite 300 Boca Raton,FL 33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact Office of the Court Administrator at 863-534-4686,255 North Broadway Avenue,Bartow,FL 33830 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call 711. File #13-003213-FNMA-FIH March 16,23,2014 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,(863) 534-4690.within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call TDD (863) 534-7777 or Florida Relay Service 711. CLERK OF THE COURT Bob Germaine By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk 1113-8862 March 16,23,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:28-2012-CA-000160 WELLS FARGO BANK,NA, Plaintiff, vs. WAYNE EUGENE BRADY; BERNADETTE MARIE MCEWAN N/K/A BERNADETTE MARIE BRADY A/K/A BERNADETTE; et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment.Final Judgment was awarded on January 29,2014 in Civil Case No.28-2012-CA-000160,of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County,Florida,wherein WELLS FARGO BANK,NA,is the Plaintiff, and WAYNE EUGENE BRADY; BERNADETTE MARIE MCEWAN N/K/A BERNADETTE MARIE BRADY A/K/A BERNADETTE,are Defendants. The Clerk of the Court,Robert Germaine,will sell to the highest bidder for cash IN THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM,BASEMENT,430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE,SEBRING,FL 33870,at 11:00 A.M.on the 9th day of April,2014,the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment,to wit: LOT 303,OF SEBRING HILLS,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6,PAGE 2,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE,IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on February 4,2014. IMPORTANT IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. CASE NO.28-2010-CA-000745 BANK OF AMERICA,N.A., PLAINTIFF, VS. CAROLYN B.RZESZEWICZ,ET AL., DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated,in the above action,I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Highlands,Florida,on April 9, 2014,at 11:00 AM,at Basement of courthouse in Jury Assembly Room 430 S. Commerce Ave.,Sebring,FL 33870 for the following described property: LOT 5,6,19 AND 20,BLOCK 87,RED HILL FARMS SUBDIVISION,SECTION 18,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1,PAGE 60,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.The Court,in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale.Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. DATED: By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk of the Court Prepared by: Gladstone Law Group,P.A. 1499 W.Palmetto Park Rd.,Suite 300 Boca Raton,FL 33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact Office of the Court Administrator at 863-534-4686,255 North Broadway Avenue,Bartow,FL 33830 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call 711. File #10-002019-F March 16,23,2014 Telephone:(863) 402-1888 Fax:(863) 402-2436 E-Mail:jkmpleadings@mllaw.net Secondary E-Mail:johnmc@mllaw.net Person Giving Notice: Antoinette J.Abernathy,Petitioner 2600 Timber Trail Denton,Texas 76209 March 23,30,2014 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.PC 14-118 Division Probate IN RE:ESTATE OF JENNIFER V.LAVERTY Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that a Petition for Summary Administration in the estate of JENNIFER V.LAVERTY,deceased,File Number PC 14-118,by the Circuit Court for Highlands County,Florida,Probate Division, the address of which is 430 South Commerce Ave.Sebring,Florida 33870; that the decedent's date of death was December 30,2013; that the total value of the estate is $2,300.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address A NTOINETTE J.ABERNATHY 2600 Timber Trail Denton,Texas 76209 A LL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER A PPLICABLE TIME PERIOD,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 23,2014. A ttorney for Person Giving Notice: John K.McClure A ttorney for Petitioner Florida Bar No.286958 MCCLURE & LOBOZZO 211 South Ridgewood Drive Sebring,Florida 33870 1050Legals 1000 KNOW?rf ntbtffb nnntttbf ntfnftftbtb nbntft tttfbtf fntttt tttbttt fbt tttr fntbt trfn fntbnb tft

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w ww.newssun.com Sunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B13 SEBRING *NICE & LARGE NEWLY REMODELED 2BR, 1BA, 1917 Wightman Ave. $500/mo. & $500 sec. dep. 863-381-0357 or 863-446-2838. 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 RentalsNEWLY RENOVATEDsinglewide mobile home, fenced, on large lot, 2BR/2BA, washer/dryer, $650 mo., $500 security. 863-658-4264 or 305-522-5024. 5150Mobile HomesFor Rent PALM HARBORHOMES 2014 models are here! $8,500 Pre Construction Savings John Lyons @ 800-622-2832 ext 210 for details MOBILE HOMEFOR SALE 50 x 125' Lot, clear. 2/2, carport, screen room, covered patio. Close to Hospital. Furnished. $32,000 OBO. Call 863-382-3049 BROADMORE M.H.,2BR/2BA, 14x60, NICE PARK, 55 plus. Fully furn., double carport, new appl., utility room. Make offer, negotiable. MUST SEE! 863-382-2011. AVON PARK3/1 Trailer in Country. 8 mi. from town. Call 863-443-2000 AVON PARK2/1, 55+ Community. $3,000 obo. Call 863-453-3315, leave message. 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesSPRING LAKE2BR/2BA VILLA Central Air/Heat, Washer Dryer Hook Up, Dishwasher, Fridge w/ice maker, range. $49,900 owner financing. 863-381-8069. 4120Villas & CondosFor SaleFOR SALE,CBS 3BR/2BA, 1 car gar., in Avon Park Lakes, fenced back yard, built in 2006, newly renovated in 2010, asking, $99,900, 863-368-1963. 4060Homes for SaleAvon Park 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 FinancialGENTLEMAN/ SITTERCOMPANION looking for position, live-in. Experienced with References. 863-658-4837 2300Work Wanted OPEN HOUSE ON SITE INTERVIEWS Monday, March 24, 2014 10:00 am 2:00 pm 6801 US Hwy 27 N Ste D2 Sebring, FL 33870 Positions available for RN LPN, OT, PT, ST, Psych RN Home Health experience preferred For more information call Karen at 813-514-5520 MEDICAL RECEPTIONISTS FOR BUSY OFFICE. Send Resume to P. O. Box 991, Lake Placid FL, 33862. MANAGER -CIRCLE THEATRE Full-time employment opportunity: Manager of the beautiful newly renovated Circle Theatre in historic downtown Sebring. Salary is competitive. Employment hours are flexible, requiring some evening and weekend work. The Executive Committee of the Champion for Children Foundation will interview all finalists that are selected from the pool of applicants. This position will report directly to the CEO. Strong leadership qualities are essential. An associate's or bachelor's degree is preferred but not required. Applicants should have at least 5 years of proven management and administrative experience. The Circle Theatre Manager will oversee operations and supervise all aspects of the Circle Theatre, including events, Sweet Shoppe, personnel, volunteers, facilities and children's programs. The successful applicant must have outstanding communication and interpersonal skills, and be organized, focused and detail oriented. Computer skills are a must. We are looking for a dynamic team player and a problem solver. Marketing, networking, public presentations, financial management & event planning are important requirements of this professional job. Send resume and references, postmarked by March 31, 2014 to: Champion for Children Foundation, P.O. Box 7125, Sebring, Fl 33872-0103 LOOKING FORLPN F/T & P/T for 24 bed ICF in Avon Park. We have a casual work environment with home-like setting. Apply online atwww.jobs.thementornetwork.com/floridaQuestions call 863-452-5141 ask for Angelina or Melissa LOCAL EPISCOPALCHURCH seeking an Organist/Choir Director. Call 863-385-7649 for details. LAWN MAINTENANCE workers needed to run mowers & trimmers, exp. only. 863-385-6768 EYE EXPRESSSebring Ophthalmology & Optometry Join our family for exciting opportunities! We are currently looking for individuals that have wonderful interpersonal skills, willing to learn, highly driven, possess a flexible personality, displays great professionalism and works great in team environment. If this fits you, we would love to meet you. Please send your resume to lwills@eyeexpress.com COORDINATOR, PURCHASING(FT)Application deadline: 3/27/14. Please visit http://sfsc.interviewexchange.com for detailed position posting. 863-784-7132.EA/EO. ARTIST ASSISTANT,part-time could become full time. Cataloging and restoring paintings. Flexible hours. Lake Placid area. 863-699-0072, 239-287-6298. 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:314-9876 News-Sun Classified 1100AnnouncementsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.13000775GCAXMX SECTION NO. MIDFLORIDA CREDIT UNION FKA MIDFLORIDA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, v. KENNETH E.MCLEOD; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KENNETH E.MCLEOD; TENANT #1; TENANT #2; MIDFLORIDA CREDIT UNION FKA MIDFLORIDA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,THROUGH,AND UNDER,AND AGAINST THE HEREIN-NAMED DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Final Judgment entered in this case in the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,the real property described as: LEGAL:LOTS 1908,1909,1910,1911, 1912,1913,1914,1915,AND 1916,INCLUSIVE,AVON PARK LAKES UNIT NO.6,A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AT PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 93,IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. PHYSICAL:2576 N.SENECA DRIVE WEST,AVON PARK,FL 33825 will be sold at public sale to the highest and best bidder for cash,on 16th day of April, 2014,at 11:00 a.m.at the Jury Assembly Room of the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and seal of this Court on this 11th day of March,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED,AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE.PLEASE CONTACT THE OFFICE OF THE COURT ADMINISTRATOR, 863-534-4690,WITHIN TWO (2) WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE OF SALE; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED,CALL TDD (863) 534-7777 OR FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE 711. March 23,30,2014 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.PC 14-78 IN RE:ESTATE OF NANCY K.TESH, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of NANCY K.TESH,deceased,File Number PC 14-78,is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County,Florida,Probate Division, the address of which is 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870.The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate,including unmatured, contingent,or unliquidated claims,on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate,including unmatured,contingent,or unliquidated claims,on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 16,2014. Personal Representative: /s/ Kris F.Tesh Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Michael L.Keiber MICHAEL L.KEIBER,ESQUIRE Law Office of Michael L.Keiber,P.A. 129 South Commerce Avenue Sebring,FL 33870 V.(863)385-5188 F.(863) 471-1111 Florida Bar No.620610 service@keiberlaw.com March 16,23,2014 1050Legals NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that FRANCIS G. WARWIN died on December 19,2013, whose last known address was 245 Oak Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870.The name and address of the Successor Trustee of the FRANCIS G.WARWIN REVOCABLE TRUST is as follows:Sandy Hurner,c/o McClure & Lobozzo,211 South Ridgewood Drive,Sebring, Florida 33870,attention John K.McClure, P.A. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with the Successor Trustee WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 23,2014. Person Giving Notice: John K.McClure Attorney for Sandy Hurner, Successor Trustee Florida Bar No.286958 MCCLURE & LOBOZZO 211 South Ridgewood Drive Sebring,Florida 33870 Telephone:(863) 402-1888 Fax:(863) 402-2436 E-Mail:efile@mllaw.net Secondary E-Mail:johnmc@mllaw.net March 23,30,2014 assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,(863) 534-4690,within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice of Foreclosure Sale; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call TDD (863) 534-7777 or Florida Relay Service 711. March 23,30,2014 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.28-2013-CA-000357 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, vs. SALLY FORD A/K/A SALLY M.FORD A /K/A SALLYE HART FORD, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SALLY FORD A /K/A SALLY M.FORD A /K/A SALLYE HART FORD, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed February 5,2014 entered in Civil Case No.28-2013-CA-00357 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County,Sebring,Florida,the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Jury Assembly Room in the Highlands County Courthouse,430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,FL 33870 in accordance with Chapter 45,Florida Statutes on the 16th day of April,2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 11840 and 11841,AVALON PARK LAKES,UNIT 37,according to plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 5,Page 69,of the Public Records of Highlands County,Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens,must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 11th day of March,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk 2322787 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain 1050LegalsAGERO 3X10.5 AD # 00036770HIGHLANDS CO. SHERIFFS DEPT. 3X4 AD # 00036730DAWN DELL 1X4 AD # 00036309

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B14 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com WE BUYALL AUTOS with or without Title. Any Year / Make / Model / Condition. We will pay up to $20,000. Free Towing. Call Cindy 813-505-6935 9400Automotive WantedKAWASAKI VULCAN1500. 1988, Good condition, 20,000 miles, new tires, leather saddle bags. $1850.00 or best offer. 863-465-7112 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation2013 44'5TH WHEEL RV 3 slideouts, 2BR, full bath, full kitchen, sleeps 8, excellent condition, $23,500. 210-800-6389. 8400RecreationalVehiclesDIRT BIKEHonda, for teens. Golf Cart, Yamaha, gas. $1000. 863-382-0192 8350Sporting Goods 8000 RecreationNOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & SuppliesCUB CADETLTX1040 MOWER A S GOOD AS NEW. SERVICED WITH NEW BATTERY AND CARBURETOR. THE CLOCK HAS LESS THAN 35HRS. CONTACT V IJAY ON 863-699-6923 BETWEEN 10AM AND 7PM PRICE $1000 7400Lawn & Garden REFRIGERATOR/FREEZER KENMORE,67"H x 31"W x 29.5"D. Works good. $75. 609-540-4170 GOOD USEDtires: One 205 70 R-15, three 215 70 R-15, $20 a piece, 863-458-2687. GAS GRILL,2 BURNERS, WITH WHEELS AND PROPANE TANK, $60, 863-214-8462. COMFORTER -FULL or Regular size 2 pillow cases & skirt. Tiger & Jungle scene. $20, 863-402-2285. 7310Bargain BuysAPPLE BLOSSOMDINNERWARE EXCELLENT CONDITION NEVER USED Gold trim. By Theodore Haviland. 60 plus pieces. 863-205-3944. 7300MiscellaneousORGAN LOWREYGrand Royal Limited. New cond. Cost over $60,000 new. Current Book $15,000+. Now $8,990 obo. Serious inquiries only. 863-835-0962 7260MusicalMerchandise 7000 Merchandise3/2 ONLAKE CARRIE access LAKE JUNE/HENRY. $800 1st/sec. Ref req Call/text 786-285-5026 6300Unfurnished Houses 6200UnfurnishedApartments***PROCESS COLOR***** DUMMY 2014 SERVICE DIRECTORY DUMMY 5X21.5 AD # 00036497AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 AD # 00036344 AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 AD # 00036343



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NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 192775 Projects that are kid and earth friendlyB1Streaks knock off Oklahoma state champsA9 VOL. 95 N O 33 Partly sunny and fairly warm High 86 Low 65 Details on A14Books .................... B7 Business ................ A8 Classieds ............ B12 Dear Abby ................ B2 Obituaries .............. A6 Lottery Numbers ...... A2 Religion .................. B6 Sports on TV ......... A10 Sudoku Puzzle......... B2 facebook.com/ newssun twitter.com/ thenewssun Something to chew on: Gum is losing its pop B3 BY MA NUEL CORT A Z ALSpecial to the News-SunHighlands homeowners who saw their home values plummet after the housing boom went bust will have to hold out hope that 2014 is kinder to them than last year. While Tampa, Miami, and other cities across the nation hit hard by the 2008 collapse posted dou ble-digit sales prices gains, Highlands registered a meager 2.2 percent in crease in 2013. Outside of Highlands home prices are on a tear. Year-over-year price growth remains robust, said Brad OConnor, a re search economist with Florida Realtors, in his 2014 guidance to mem bers of the trade group. He said Floridians selling sin gle-family homes last year fetched prices 11 percent higher than in 2012, based on his groups analysis of sales data. Nationwide in 2013, home prices rose 11 per cent from their 2012 levels according S&Ps CaseShiller Home Price Index, a closely watched gauge that tracks data in 20 large met ropolitan areas and nationally. But the upward momen tum lifting home price across the nation and state sidestepped Highlands last Highlands home prices lag behind stateState prices up 11 percent last year, but county had just 2.2 percent rise BY BARRY FOSTERNews-Sun CorrespondentSebring Highlands County commissioners have been warned about a number prob lems with their budget process, including weaknesses in inter nal controls over nancial reporting and issues surrounding the countys involvement with the State Housing Initiative Partnership (SHIP) program. The advisories came from representatives of CliftonLar sonAllen, who performed the annual audit for the county. Over the last few years we have reported internal control problems related to the SHIP program, said Julie Fowler, who made the presentation to the county commission Tues day. This year, as part of the pro gram, Fowler said that the countys Local Housing Assis tance Plan for 2010-2013 had not been submitted to the Flor ida Housing Finance Corporation for approval. As a result, there was one plan the county was operating under locally and another the state thought you were using, she told the board.County warned of budget issuesWeaknesses in internal contols over reporting just one of the problems BY PHIL A TTINGERStaff WriterAVON PARK The City Council may discuss Mon day whether or not the city should take on an other wastewater service area. Sebring Ridge Utilities has approached the city with an offer to have the city buy its wastewater system for $500,000. The item is listed on the agen da for the Avon Park City Council meeting at 6 p.m. Monday. at 123 E. Pine St. City Manager Julian De leon has estimated the system would need at least that much more in improvements, which would give the project a total cost of $1 mil lion and could re quire a special as sessment to pay for those im provements, Deleon said. The utility has three lift stations and 530 res idential units or that many equivalent residen tial units, Deleon said in agenda materials. The es timated cost of connecting to the city, should the city take on the utility, would be $1,887 per con nection, which could be nanced over 15 years at 5 percent for an added sew er bill fee of $14.92 per month. Of course, he said, each customer could opt to pay his or her cost all at once. With a 70 percent oc cupancy rate at $35 per Avon Park to consider buying utility BY PHIL A TTINGERStaff WriterSEBRING Clinton Culverhouse said its hard to put his passion for local schools into a nutshell. Culverhouse, 33, has lived in Highlands County all his life and considers him self lucky to be born, raised, married and raising his own children here especially because of the schools. His mother, aunt, and now his wife, Ashley Jackson Culver house, all have either worked for or taught in the school district. What drove me to do this is my kids, Culverhouse said. Being involved in their lives has opened up a new world for me. Culverhouse has been married 11 years. He and Culverhouse says kids inspired run for school board CUL VERHOUSESEE PRICES | A5 DELEON BY SAMANTHA GHOLARStaff WriterSEBRING If you use your imagination, the Fireies in the Hammock event could easily pass as an inter stellar experience. Floating, glowing, ashing and whisking through the air, thousands of reies put on an awe-inspiring Fireies take center stage at Hammock Katara Simmons/News-SunWhile reies are not the easiest subjects to photograph, they are extremely impressive in person. Thousands of the illuminated insects can be seen nightly for the next few weeks at Highlands Hammock State Park in Sebring. Katara Simmons/News-SunHighlands Hammock State Park is offering a new nightly rey experience at the park in Sebring. Visitors can pay to take a tram through the park to see the glowing beetles in their natural habitat.NIGHT LIGHTS SEE FIREFLIES | A7SEE UTILITY | A6SEE BUDGET | A6SEE RUN | A7 www.newssun.com S unday, March 23, 2014 M C Y K

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A2 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com http//:www.newssun.com The News-Sun (USPS ISSN 0163-3988) is published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday. Peri odical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry ofce(s). All material contained herein is the property of the News-Sun, which is an afliate of Halifax Media Group. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the writ ten permission of the publisher. All material submitted for publica tion becomes the property of the newspaper and may be edited for clarity and space, as well as re printed, published and used in all media. Postmaster: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870.COMMITMENT TO A CC URA C YThe News-Sun promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its news stories. If you believe we have made an error, call the news room at (863) 385-6155, ext. 516. If you have a question or comment about coverage, write to Scott Dressel, editor, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; email editor@newssun.com.; or call (863) 385-6155.O FFI C E Location: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon day-Friday Phone: (863) 385-6155 Main Fax: (863) 385-1954 Newsroom Fax: 385-2453SUB SC RIPTION RATE SHome 12 mos. Tax Total $72.22 $5.06 $77.28 In Florida mail 12 mos. Tax Total $107.24 $7.51 $114.75 Out of Florida mail 12 mos. Tax Total $122.41 $8.57 $130.98 Your newspaper is delivered by an independent contractor. If you do not receive your home deliv ered newspaper by 6 a.m. on any publication date, please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday, and before 11 a.m. Sunday. A re placement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after said times will be issued an account credit. Deadlines for subscription changes are noon Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon Thursday for the Friday edition and noon Fri day for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date.O BITUARIE S AN D A NNOUN C EMENT SEmail all obituaries and death notices to obits@newssun.com Email all other announcements to editor@newssun.comP LA C E A CLA SS IFIE D ADFrom 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. M-F (863) 385-6155, ext. 505 or (863) 314-9876RETAIL AD VERTI S INGMitch Collins 386-5626 mitch.collins@newssun.com Vickie Watson 386-5631 vickie.watson@newssun.com Terri Lee 386-5628 terri.lee@newssun.comL EGAL AD VERTI S INGJanet Emerson 385-6155, ext. 596 legals@newssun.comNEW S ROOM Call 385-6155 Scott Dressel, Editor, ext. 516 or scott.dressel@newssun.com Phil Attinger, Staff Writer, ext. 541 or phil.attinger@newssun. com Samantha Gholar, Staff Writ er, ext. 526 or samantha.gholar@ newssun.com Dan Hoehne, Sports Editor, ext. 528 or daniel.hoehne@newssun. com Katara Simmons, Photographer, ext. 538 or katara.simmons@ newssun.com. ROMONA W A SHINGTON Publisher and Executive Editor romona.washington@newssun.com 385-6155, ext. 515 NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927Final Nature Walk of spring is MondaySEBRING The nal Monday Morning Nature Walk that volun teer trail guides Brian and Susan Woodworth will be leading this spring will be held Monday at Highlands Hammock State Park. The walk will be on the Fern Garden Trail from 9:30-10:30 a.m. The walk is free. Regular park admission of $6 per vehicle (up to eight per car) or $4 per vehicle (one person) applies.Cornerstone Academy plans open houseAVON PARK Ofcials of the Cornerstone Christian Academy have an nounced an open house for their new facility on Sunday, April 6, begin ning at 2 p.m. The two-story build ing is on the grounds of the Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church and now is being used for student instruction. There will be students on site for the event, as well as video presenta tions on how classes are run and what students are learning at the new facility. Call headmaster Jenny Cornell at 453-0894 or email jennycornell@ ccaap.org.NRAC meets WednesdaySEBRING The Natural Resources Advisory Committee will hold a meeting at 4 p.m. Wednesday in Conference Room 3 of the Bert J. Harris Agricultural Center, 4509 George Blvd.Kindergarten Roundup is TuesdayAVON PARK Walker Memorial Academy will hold its Kindergarten Roundup on Tuesday. Call 453-3131, Ext. 201, to sign up for your choice of a one-hour session at 9 a.m. or 5:30 p.m. You can visit the classroom, meet the principal, tour cam pus and ask questions for pre-testing. Students must be 5 years old before Aug. 15. For nancial assis tance, check out www. StepUpForStudents. org/.LPHS students collecting bikesLAKE PLACID Lake Placid High Schools Student Government Association has teamed up with the Highlands County Sheriffs Ofce to prevent delinquen cy and develop strong, lawful, resilient and pro ductive citizens who will make a positive con tribution to Highlands County for years to come. Each summer, the HCSO hosts a youth camp. This year, the SGA has decided to take on the task of collecting bi cycles for that camp, where the bicycles stay to be used in coming years. The SGA has a goal of collecting 30 bicy cles during the month of April. They are asking for gently used or new bicy cles, but will also accept monetary donations to buy bicycles. If interested in send ing a check, make it pay able to Lake Placid High School and mail it to the SGA at 202 Green Dragon Drive, Lake Placid, FL 33852. To nd out more about donat ing a bicycle, call the high school at 699-5010 or email sohnm@high lands.k12.us.Arbuckle Creek boat ramp to be closedSEBRING The Highlands County Parks and Recreation Departments Arbuckle Creek Road boat ramp will be closed for repair and maintenance from April 7 through May 15, 2014. It is schedule to re open Friday, May 16. For further informa tion on boat ramp closings you may contact the Highlands County Parks and Recreation Department at (863) 402-6812. SNAP S HOT S L OC AL N EW S Special to the News-SunTALLAHASSEE The Arc of Florida, Ridge Area Arc and Florida Devel opmental Disabilities Council on March 18 un veiled a plan designed to ensure that Floridians with intellectual and de velopmental disabilities (I/DD) are fully included in their communities and not segregated in institu tions and nursing homes. The four-part Invest in Floridas Communities plan includes Medicaid Waiver Waitlist Funding, Increased Rates for Ser vices, Community-Based Services and Alternative Family Homes. We encourage law makers and Gov. Scott to take this opportunity to invest in our communi ties and protect some of Floridas most vulnerable citizens, said Pat Young, president of The Arc of Florida. This plan will keep individuals with de velopmental disabilities out of institutions and al low them to become contributing members of society. The approval of this plan would have a very positive impact on ser vices available to individuals in Highlands County, said Ridge Area Arc CEO Rhonda Beckman. Here is a breakdown of the Invest in Floridas Communities plan: The plan calls for Flor ida to invest in Medicaid Waiver Waitlist Funding by supporting the Governors recommen dation for $20 million in funding, increase pro vider rates by 5 percent for the 2014-2015 scal year without taking fund ing away from current client services, to create and implement a com prehensive ve-year plan to reduce the number of people with I/DD liv ing in Florida institutions and for funding and ser vices to be made available to families caring for children who are medi cally fragile so they can leave nursing homes and return to their commu nities. The Arc of Florida, Inc. is a non-prot organiza tion whose mission is to improve the quality of life for persons with de velopmental disabilities. Working with local, state and national partners, The Arc of Florida advo cates for local chapters, public policies and high quality supports for peo ple with developmental and other disabilities to be fully included in all aspects of their commu nity. Find out how to get in volved by visiting www. arcorida.org.Arc urges lawmakers to invest in communities Courtesy photoPat Young (from left), president of The Arc of Florida, Deborah Linton, executive director of The Arc of Florida and Rhonda Beckman, CEO of Ridge Area Arc who were in Tallahassee Tuesday, March 18 for the Disability Awareness Day. BY BARR Y FOSTERNews-Sun CorrespondentSEBRING Highlands County ofcials are looking for 11 good peo ple who are willing to serve in an effort to put the countys Affordable Housing Advisory Com mittee back together. Highlands County Commissioners recently decided to re-activate the board which is charged with, among other things, reviewing policies, pro cedures ordinances and land development regu lations as well as ensur ing compliance with the countys comprehensive land use development plan. I am personally ex cited about the re-establishment of the board, said Highlands County Commissioner Don El well, who recently was assigned as the new liaison to the countys muchtroubled housing assis tance effort. The committees input and recommendations will be very helpful as our countys approach to af fordable housing continues to evolve. Specically being sought are residents who are involved in the resi dential home building industry, advocates for lowincome persons, banking or mortgage bank repre sentatives, home building labor representatives, real estate professionals, planning agency mem bers, educators, those working in the medi cal eld, utility workers, those in public safety, but other residents are invit ed to apply. Board members will be given two-year terms and will be appointed by county commissioners. Applications will be ac cepted through April 30. We hope to raise as much awareness in the community as possible, said Highlands County Community Programs/ Administrative Project Manager Chris Benson, who was assigned the re sponsibility of overseeing the countys housing pro gramCounty reforming Affordable Housing Committee The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN L OTTER YCAS H 3 Wednesday, March 19 Day: 9-4-4 Night: 4-9-3 Thursday, March 20 Day: 4-0-1 Night: 1-6-6 Friday, March 21 Day: 4-8-5 Night: 6-4-2 P LAY 4Wednesday, March 19 Day: 2-8-1-1 Night: 3-6-0-0 Thursday, March 20 Day: 0-4-1-4 Night: 2-8-9-5 Friday, March 21 Day: 2-9-3-8 Night: 9-9-8-0 F ANTA S Y 5 Wednesday, March 19 1-19-22-23-27 Thursday, March 20 4-7-16-28-29 Friday, March 21 3-5-6-8-21L OTTOWednesday, March 19 8-9-24-36-38-40 X-2 Saturdays Jackpot: $24 millionP OWERBALLWednesday, March19 2-19-23-24-34-43 PB-14 X-2 Saturdays Jackpot: $96 millionM EGA M ONEYFriday, March 21 13-24-38-42 PB-13 Todays Jackpot: $550,000M EGA M ILLION SFriday, March 21 2-23-30-35-53 PB-10 X-5 Todays Jackpot: $20 million M C Y K

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www.newssun.comSunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A3 BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterAVON PARK The citys Planning and Zoning Board will have a eld trip Tuesday evening. Members need to see the location of a city right of way together because it got confusing during last Tuesdays meeting. The board will meet at or shortly after 5 p.m. Tuesday at 301 E. Circle St., where Councilman Garrett Anderson lives on land co-owned by his sis ters, Candice Anderson and Brittany McGuire. Anderson and McGuire requested the city vacate a section of right of way that crosses the property from the end of North Lake Ve rona Boulevard south to East Circle Street. Ander son told the board last Tuesday that the city has approved drainage plans using land close to the lake, but not the right of way hes asking to have va cated. McGuire said immediate neighbors on East Circle Street and commercial en tities approved, but they didnt hear from the city. When she took the appli cation to City Manager Julian Deleon, she said he offered to trade the right of way for all of their lake side property on East Cir cle Street, to extend the citys multi-use path. I talked to engineers and they agreed that they are two separate issues. You cant try to trade like that, Anderson said. Deleon, who wasnt at Tuesdays meeting, had concerns read into the re cord by Administrative Services Director Maria Sutherland. He advised against vacating the right of way, claiming the city might need that proper ty in the future to create drainage and retention as the only remaining right of way the city had, and said giving it up would take away the citys ex ibility for future drainage improvements. While stating that the city was not opposed to a possible trade off to miti gate other drainage concerns, Deleon also wrote, The city is not required to vacate what has been platted as a public right of way. Anderson said the city drainage plans, as drafted by Polston Engineer ing Inc. of Sebring, call for no pipes, berms, ponds or other drainage improvements along the right of way from North Lake Vero na Boulevard to East Cir cle Street. One pipe goes through the lower portion of the right of way, from East Circle Street to the lake, and he was ne with that, he said. Anderson said he re ceived an email from Deleon saying the city needed all of the right of way to complete the project, but he saw no evidence of that in the plans. He also said the city didnt need the full lakefront proper ty because the pathway is designed to t the existing street right of way. As for water retention, its a well-known fact that you cannot put water re tention on a steep slope, Anderson said. This ease ment is a steep slope all the way down to the lake. You cant put swales on a steep slope. They wash out. Any engineer knows that. McGuire said Anderson hopes to put up a fence and a retaining wall to keep the land from wash ing out in storms. Engineer Dale Polston said the plan is to provide as much retention as pos sible on city land. He said the city is using an outfall pipe on the lake side of the street, but none of the land north of the street. He did say, however, that more right of way along Circle Street could help with drainage plans. Tuesdays discussion brought up other issues. Board member Jean Jor dan, whose daughter lives adjacent to the property, was upset someone had put up no trespassing signs along North Lake Ve rona Boulevard, which has impeded parking during Independence Day cele brations. McGuire and her par ents told the board they had to put up signs to pre vent people from using parts of their 17-acre tract for car parties and to keep four-wheeler riders in cluding Jordans grandson off the property. Both situation are liability haz ards, she said.Avon Park Planning & Zoning Board to take field trip Tuesday ANDERSONMembers need to see city right of way to clear up confusion Courtesy photoOlivia Worley, the 2013 volunteer of the year is shown accepting her award from Linda Crowder, Director of The Childrens Museum. Olivia has been a wonderful asset to the Museum, Crowder said. We really appreciate her dedication. The Museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit the Museum website at www.childrensmuseumhighlands.com for more information.CHILDRENS MUSEUM HONORS V OLUNTEER OF THE YEAR Special to the News-SunSEBRING Van Samuels, outreach specialist from the Seminole Tribe of Florida, will present a program on the history and culture of the Semi nole Tribe of Florida at the Circle Theatre in Se bring at 2:30 p.m. Monday. Samuels comes from the AH-TAH-THI-KI Museum in Clewiston. Guests will learn who the Seminole people are, how they came to be in Florida and how they survive in the Ever glades. Samples of their dress and artwork will also be available. This is the second in a series of programs on Getting to Know the Real Florida, presented by the Highlands Coun ty Genealogical Society and the Capt. John W. Whidden Chapter UDC. Topics of future pro grams will be railroads, stories of old Florida, the real Ponce de Leon, and old timey music. Tickets for Samu els program are $7 and may be purchased at the Circle Theatre or the downtown ofce of the Sebring Chamber of Commerce. The Sweet Shop of the Theatre will be open for the purchase of pop corn, candy, ice cream and drinks. Seminole Tribe program is Monday at Circle Theatre BY SAMANTHA GHOLARStaff WriterSEBRING Pay increases for three city departments re, police and city clerk are on the back burner for now as the city prepares to head into budget season with two new faces on the council. City Administrator Scott Noethlich pre sented the council with requests from the de partments for pay adjustments Tuesday. Theres three depart ments requesting adjustments. The police department requests are from the chief, the com mander and two record clerks. Code enforce ment is also included in the adjustment. This can be funded by a frozen position at the begin ning of the year, Noethlich said. The Sebring Fire De partment wage adjustments were approved by council late last year. The adjustments, if ap proved, would be funded within this years current budget. There we are looking at adjustments for the re chief and three dep uty chiefs, said Noethlich. The adjustments can be made with no im pact on the current budget. The city clerk along with two of the clerks employees are up for ad justments, which will be funded by the current budget. Councilman John Grif n made a motion to table the request for wage adjustments until budget talk begins for the city and its departments. The motion passed 3-2 with Scott Stanley, John Grifn and Andrew Fells voting yes and John Clark and Bud Whitlock casting dissenting votes. No specic date was set for the item to return to the agenda.Pay adjustments on hold for 3 departments The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN M C Y K

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A4 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com Great American MeatoutAfter several months of crippling snowstorms and ooding, I really look forward to spring weather, green grass, and owers in bloom. The advent of spring is also a great opportunity to turn over a new leaf on our dietary and exercise habits. In fact, Ive been told that hundreds of communities celebrate the advent of spring with something called the Great American Meatout. Local health advocates host educa tional events, where they ask visitors to get a fresh start this spring with a healthy diet of vegetables, fresh fruits, legumes, and whole grains. For those who need a little encourage ment, their website provides useful information and a chance to pledge a healthy diet for one day or more.SIMON M ILL SSebringA slippery slopeThe ACLU and those eight samesex couples who are challenging Floridas non-recognition of samesex marriages performed in oth er states evidently havent learned much from the past. In a way, werent we here a couple thousand years ago? The ancient and primitive Greeks and Romans crassly valued homo sexual relations. But eventually the people wised up and realized that was a mistake (e.g., Plato condemned homosexual activity), and homo sexual activity was again logically deemed unethical. Now, misguided progressives are trying to take us back thousands of years to more primitive and dec adent times, despite the fact that thinking people have known for cen turies that homosexual activity is immoral and a bad legal precedent. (Its easy to show that all the arguments homosexuals use to try to rational ize homosexual activity are seriously awed.) It may surprise you that some col leges like Harvard now have ofcially recognized student groups devoted to promoting the acceptance of BDSM sexually deviant bondage, discipline, sadism, and masochism. Thats right. If you are a student who gets turned on by smacking people around, some colleges like Harvard now have groups for you. He who has eyes to see, let them see. The logic of heterophobic ho mosexuals is rapidly leading this society down a slippery slope to a more aberrant, disordered, and irrational society. Legal polygamy is coming soon. Maybe down the line well see marriage between straight and ho mosexual consenting-adult incestuous people. Whoopee! Anyone who thinks this is progress is deluding him/herself. Rome didnt fall in a day. But it did fall. Lets not join the race to the bottom.WAYNE L ELADowners Grove, Ill. NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927Romona Washington Publisher publisher@newssun.com Scott Dressel Editor editor@newssun.com VIEWPOINTS O UR VIE W YO UR VIE WS L ETTER S TO THE EDITORShould be 250 words or less and must contain the writers full name, ad dress and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit or reject letters for clarity, length, taste and li bel. Submission does not guarantee publication. Only two letters per month per writer will be accepted. Send letters to:E MAILeditor@newssun.comMAILLetters to the Editor 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870Were going to miss Sebring City Councilor John Clark. For example, at the March 18 Se bring City Council meeting during a discussion of a developers request for a zoning change to allow for a higher den sity apartment complex Clark cut right to the heart of the matter saying, These development agreements come out to be a big joke because weve never not modi ed them. He was referring to the history of excep tions given to developers for projects at odds with the long-term master plan. It is essential to consider the future if a community is to thrive. During the colo nial period and beyond, there was more than enough room. Immigrants arriving in the New World generally cleared land and built structures where and as they wished. As towns and cities grew and became more crowded, however, they were forced to adapt, especially following the indus trial revolution and the rise of industry, motorized trafc and rapidly increasing populations. With plentiful opportunities for devel opers, sub-divisions rapidly sprawled across Florida, often creating pockets of poverty and crime or endangering the environment. As communities learned more about the causes of social decay and the dan gers of pollution, they made a conscious effort to protect natural resources and create compatible residential areas while creating commercial ones. The result was zoning, an agreement to restrict certain types of activity in certain areas. Over the years, zoning led to planning for the future, which became a focus of state, county and municipal govern ments. The problem is, planning for the future only works when people consistently fol low the agree upon plan. This was the issue Clark addressed at the meeting. Why bother to zone property if the zone can be changed upon request? Think about other examples of similar exceptions like the Majestic Cove, a failed condo minium project on Lakeview Drive, now in foreclosure and blocking views of Lake Jackson. A related issue emerged when the city council, in a 4-1 vote, elected to table the zoning request until May 20. Winter resi dents of the Francis 2 mobile home park, which will be directly affected by the pro posed project, are upset the ultimate de cision will be made after they have re turned north. In other words, not only is a developer attempting to change the rules, the coun cil has deprived city homeowners of their voice in the matter. If Sebring is to thrive in the future, we must pay attention to our master plans now. Youre talking about a retirement com munity and (the proposed project) is go ing in another direction, Clark said. Put yourself in the shadow of a three-story building and youd be upset too. Like we said, were going to miss him. One thing most people might not know about me is that long after I be came an adult I was diagnosed with Attention Decit Disorder (ADD). Im sure theres a neat professional di agnosis that explains it that you can look up somewhere if you want. Im not going to give you that kind of a denition. What ADD means as far as I am concerned is that Im easily distract ed, sometimes anxious and jittery, and my mind likes to race at some thing like 500 miles an hour. This last is very inconvenient at night when Im trying to sleep and my brain at out refuses to slow down enough so I can. Fortunately, modern medicine has come out with a substance that calms me down and helps me focus. When I have it, I function quite well for a cra zy person (I am not crazy because I have ADD: I am crazy because I am a writer). Life is a lot less frustrating, and Im easier to be around. Well, its a long story, but Ive spent the past two days off my medication. This has not been good. I have been tired, cranky, and found it difcult to get things done. The fact I am sitting here typing this column is a testa ment to me rising above my circumstances. In my current state, I am easily at tracted to what I refer to as bright shinys things that are attractive and tease me out of any focus I might have at the moment. For example, someone in the house has ordered pizza, an attractive distraction even if I wasnt off my medication. Being off it makes it that much more tempting to quit typing and go see if I can liber ate a piece or two. Thankfully, my latest distraction also happens to be the thing I need to get my column done. Im referring to my shiny new laptop that just arrived yesterday and has been taking up a great deal of my time today. My old laptop that has served me faithfully the past six or seven years has been showing its age. Its slow. The hard drive has been lling up. Some of the letters on the keys have worn off, testing my abilities as a touch typist. Thanks to some birthday money and a generous husband, I was able to go online and get myself a replace ment. That sounds wonderful and everything, and when it rst arrived, I was thrilled and happy to welcome it into my home. Then the process of getting it usable started and that made it less joyful. Im not complaining, but there were several bumps to getting the comput er ready to use. I spent most of today not writing, or working on writing-related issues, but on installing software and trans ferring les from the old system to the new. This required patience, especial ly with a couple of programs that demanded authorization codes I had to dig out of the old computer. Throw in that I have nally broken down and upgraded Microsoft Ofce to the latest version, which is different enough from the old version Ive used for years to make things seem a little off. It isnt as bad as I feared it would be, but there is a learning curve to the new system. Plus I have to congure the new programs to my liking, which will take still more time. But overall, I am pleased with my latest bright shiny. It looks pretty, it types just ne, and I am happy to pro duce a new column on it. Id go on, but its late. And time to try to shut down the distractions lest they keep me up all night. Wish me luck.Laura Ware is a Sebring resident. She can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady@embarqmail. com. Visit her website at www.laurahware.com. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the staff of the News-Sun.My new bright shiny L AURA S L OOKLaura Ware Zoning rules are there for a reason M C Y K

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www.newssun.comSunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A5 year. Locally, a review of sales data released by the countys property apprais er shows the median price for a single-family home rose $2,000 to $92,000 in 2013. At the height of the housing boom in 2006, the median sales price in Highlands topped out at $165,307, 44 percent above last years level. Floridas coastal cities ended last year with im pressive price gains. Miami and Tampa, two mar kets battered by the 2008 housing bust, posted in creases of 16.5 percent and 15.8 percent respective ly, according to the CaseShiller index. The market remains healthy due to the increase participation of tradition al homebuyers, OConnor said, referring to the wan ing inuence of investors who were snapping up properties and pushing up prices in 2012 and ear ly 2013. The analysis of 2013 data included all single-family homes that met the prop erty appraisers denition of a sale conducted at arms length, and did not include distressed sales or other transfers. For all the upward mo mentum, statewide home prices remain 32 percent off the peak reached dur ing the housing boom, according to year-end data from CoreLogic, a real es tate analytics rm. While local sales price gains remain anemic, the review of sales data does point to one bright spot: a stout gain in sales volume. The number of sin gle family homes that changed hands in 2013 jumped 25 percent from 2012s level. Last years spike in sales volume, though, was not evenly spread across the county. Neighborhoods featuring higher-end prop erties registered more sales than those with modest ly priced homes, especially those in the northern reaches of the county, like Avon Park. Tomoka Heights, a gat ed 55-and-older community outside of Lake Placid, bested other neighbor hoods, with 38 of its 356 single family residences, or 11 percent, nding new owners. Sun N Lake, Se bring Country Estates, and Golf Hammock areas per formed only half as well. Home sales in Avon Park stood in stark contrast to Tomoka Heights. Only 39, or 1.4 percent, of the City of Charms 2,700 single family homes sold in 2013. What accounts for the success of Tomoka Heights? I believe that a major ity of the retiring buying public is looking for a gat ed, 55-and-older community, of which there are few in Highlands County said Shelagh Byatt, a broker and developer of Tomoka Heights. Byatt views last years sluggish price gains not as a sign that the local market needs further healing but as indicator of an improv ing trend. Florida Realtors Pres ident Sherri Meadows shares Byatts assessment. Were seeing homeowners ready to take that next step and list their properties for sale, she said in response to the spate of positive g ures statewide. Still, for the all the opti mism looming economic headwinds could put the brakes on the improved outlook. The number of mort gage applications dropped in late 2013 when interest rates spiked after the Fed eral Reserve signaled an end to its monetary easing. Many in the mortgage in dustry fear that 2014 could bring further rate hikes as the central bank with draws its stimulus from nancial markets. Whats more, job growth remains uneven and wag es stagnant, which many in the industry see as key supports for home sales. Recent economic re ports suggest a bleaker picture for housing, said David M. Blitzer, chairman of the index committee that publishes the CaseShiller measure. He cites rising home prices and mortgage rates as factors that could push affordable homes out the reach of many buyers. For now, the upbeat numbers bode well for a market that starts the year on the heels of what is now a two-year run up in price increases. A review of March data from the property appraisers ofce shows single-family home sales in January exceeding the pace set last year. OConnor, the econo mist with Florida Realtors, sees little downside to 2014s market and said that homeowners could look forward to a bal anced market. PRICES FROM PAGE A1 Manuel Cortazal Katara Simmons/News-SunTomoka Heights had 11 percent of its 356 homes sold last year in Lake Placid, while the city of A von P ark only had 1.4 percent of its single-family homes change hands. A ssociated P ressMIAMI The National Hurricane Center says its storm track forecasts keep improving, helping to shrink the so-called cone of uncertainty a bit in forecasts this year. Coastal residents wont notice much of a change in the forecasts showing the probable path of the center of a tropi cal storm or hurricane. In fact, forecasters worry that people mistakenly believe that the cone shows all the areas at risk for storm damage. A storms winds and storm surge can extend well beyond the forecast track. This year, forecasters are trying col or-coded maps to show people where storm surge could happen during storms.Cone of uncertainty to shrink a little M C Y K

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A6 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com month, he estimates the city would receive $81,732 per year in revenue, along with $51,944 each year from The Bluffs, based on water use. That would bring a total of approxi mately $134,000 per year, he said. However, he said the city would need to reha bilitate the existing sanitary infrastructure, build additional infrastructure to connect the system to the citys existing system and bring operations to a central location. Another item on the agenda is a request from the Florida Department of Transportation to have an easement through city property for stormwater drainage. The proposed easement would go from Verona Avenue to Lake Verona through city park property. The City Council is also set to consider a nal vote on annexing two pieces of property that have been on the agenda for a while. They were approved on rst reading in February, but had to be repealed because one had a typo graphical error. One is a 31-acre cityowned parcel at 2055 U.S. 27 N. and another is a 3.6acre tract owned by Guru Krupa Investment LLC at 2511 U.S. 27 S. The cityowned parcel must rst be approved for the private parcel to be approved, since the second parcel is contiguous to the rst and must be adjacent to the city limits to be annexed. The City Council, in its role as the Community Redevelopment Agency Board, will also consider whether or not to approve $2,000 to pay half the ad vertising costs for the 2014 Bluegrass & Blueberry Festival, as well as wheth er or not to approve $725 half of the advertis ing budget for the Avon Park Veterans Engraved Brick project. Both were recommended for approv al by the Avon Park Main Street CRA Advisory Board on March 6. The CRA meeting will take place at 5 p.m. Mon day, before the city council meeting in council chambers at 123 E. Main St. UTILITY FROM PAGE A1Fowler further reported that, because of the shortcoming, the audi tors had been unable to determine whether or not all of the programs provisions had been fol lowed. The plan the board adopted had some very specic requirements, she said. Fowler also noted that the countys 2009-2010 plan had an extended due date and still had not been led. That ap parently was the result of missing or incomplete documentation. Highlands County Ad ministrator June Fisher told the board that the mistakes had come de spite the fact the county had hired a consultant to identify potential problems. They did look into some of our report ing and made some improvements. They actually corrected some of the reports we previous ly had submitted, she said. Fisher said the coun ty staff made corrections on the LHAP program and noted that the county also had the op portunity to again hire a consultant if additional assistance was needed. Auditors also pointed to the countys invest ment in a new $8 million radio system as an ac counting red ag. They informed the board that the countys list ing of that expenditure had not been offset by a corresponding revenue source. Moreover, staff apparently had missed a mandated Nov. 20 dead line to correct the issue. Fowler said that the goal with all of the au ditors ndings were to make certain that the internal controls of the county would ensure that Highlands would be in compliance with fed eral and state requirements. Its a big project and a big effort, said County Commission Chairman Greg Harris. Fisher told the board that the county staff is in the process of address ing the areas of concern raised by the auditors. BUDGET FROM PAGE A1BUD WARRENG arland G lenn Bud Warren Jr. was born in M ount A iry, North Carolina Sept. 11, 1936. He passed quietly in slumber Wednesday morn ing in his home in Lake P lacid. He is survived by his wife, Jean Keyes Warren; son, Chris L. Warren and wife, Charlotte M eeks of O coee; daughter, Diana W. A larcon and husband Jorge A of P lantation; son, G G lenn Warren III, esq. and wife Lori Foley of O range P ark; daughter Janet W. M id dleton of Winter Springs; granddaughters Choyce and Chelsea M iddleton; Kath erine S. and E mma I. Warren; M ary E lizabeth Warren; and grandsons John L. War ren, and M iguel and G eorge A A larcon. G G Bud War ren graduated in 1959 from North Carolina State Univer sity in R aleigh, N.C., where he met his wife, Jean. Bud was employed by Southern Bell Telephone Co. and re tired from Bellsouth as an assistant vice-president af ter 35 years of service. The family moved to M iami in 1968. Later assignments took Bud and family to Jack sonville, A tlanta, G a., and Birmingham, A la. Upon re tirement in Jacksonville in 1994, Bud and Jean relo cated in Lake P lacid permanently in 2005 at present address. Bud was an active member of Kiwanis, M iami-M idtown and served as president from 1975-76. While in Jacksonville, the family lived in O range P ark and Bud served as a mem ber of O range P ark R otary Club, as well as Director of the Black Creek District Boys Scouts of A merica. Buds interest in the Scout ing began in his youth and he earned his E agle Scout from O ld Hickory Council while in M ount A iry, N.C. He continued his lifelong servic es with Boy Scouts of A merica and earned the Silver Beaver (highest award to a civilian) while in O range P ark. Bud served in the U.S. A rmy Corps and A rmy R e serves from 1960 to 1965. He was an ham radio opera tor, call sign, KD4-APE, and a member of ARRL, the na tional association for amateur radio, for 40 years. This interest and skill rendered untold assistance to vic tims of Hurricane A ndrew in 1992. Upon retirement, Bud became a M aster G ardener and when relocating to Lake P lacid he continued his in terest in Highlands County M aster G ardener P rogram volunteering weekly at the Bert Harris A g Center on G eorge Blvd. He was a prudent advocate of Florida friendly landscaping and nat ural habitats for birds. He served as P resident of High lands County A udubon Society and reinstated the Bluebird Data Collection P roject at R oyce R anch, which he spearheaded until his ill ness in 2011 forced him to turn over the project to ded icated friends of bluebirds. O n Feb. 11, 2013, Bud sub mitted a proclamation to the mayor and council members declaring the Town of Lake P lacid a Bluebird Sanctu ary. With a lifelong interest in owers and nature, Bud successfully grew or chids and maintained an interest in orchid growing for 45 years. He was a mem ber of Saint James Catholic Church in Lake P lacid, and a 4th degree member of the Knights of Colum bus, Council #7245. A M e morial M ass Celebration for Bud will be held on A pril 4, 2014 at Saint James Cath olic Church, 3380 P lacid View Drive, Lake P lacid at 11 a.m. In lieu of ow ers, the family requests donations be sent to Cornerstone Hospice, 209 North R idgewood Dr., Suite 3, Sebring, 33870 and/or St.Vincent de P aul Society, St. James Catholic Church, 3380 P lacid View Dr. Lake P lacid, 33852. OBITUARIES Courtesy photoThe long line of volunteers of the A von P ark Depot Museum that make events happen on the Silver P alm Dining Car. (From left) Eden Dickerson, Grace Hudson, Eileen Sachsenmaier, Thetis Casey, Judy Laycock, Jim Deal, Elaine Levey, Carlos Deloera, Brandon Vargas and Eduardo Hernandez. Carlos, Brandon and Eduardo are with the South Florida State College Honors Student Services Learning Program and freely volunteer with the Historical Society of A von P ark.LONG LINE OF VOLUNTEERS WINDERMERE (AP) A police ofcer was shot and killed early Saturday after stopping two people and call ing for help in an Or lando suburb, authorities said. Windermere Police Department Ofcer Robert German called for backup after stop ping a young man and woman on foot shortly before 4 a.m., investi gators said. German, 31, report ed his location and was found lying on the ground when a depu ty arrived at the scene, Orange County Sher iffs Ofce spokeswoman Jane Watrel said. He just said he was doing a subject stop and then all the tragic events unfolded, Wa trel said. The deputy put Ger man in his squad car and rushed him to the re department. Ger man was then taken to Orlando Regional Med ical Center, where he was pronounced dead. As ofcers respond ed to the scene, they heard shots red and found two individu als deceased nearby matching the descrip tion of the man and woman German had stopped, Watrel said. They are believed to have committed sui cide. Their identities have not been released. Windermere is locat ed 15 miles west of Or lando. It has a population of about 3,000 people and one of the lowest crime rates in Florida, Mayor Gary Bruhn said. He said it was the rst lineof-duty death in the towns history. Violent crime is just not something that happens in the town of Windermere, Bruhn said. So its really, real ly difcult. German had been with the department for ve years and just recently returned from desk duty after falling and injuring his shoul der, Bruhn said.Cop shot, killed near Orlando BELBEK AIR BASE, Crimea (AP) Pro-Rus sian forces stormed a Ukrainian air force base in Crimea, ring shots and smashing through con crete walls with armored personnel carriers. At least one person was wounded, the base commander said. An APC also smashed open the front gate of the Belbek base near the port city of Sevastopol, accord ing to footage provided by the Ukrainian Defense ministry. Two ambulanc es arrived and then departed shortly after, and at least one of them was car rying what appeared to be a wounded person, an As sociated Press journalist said. The Ukrainian com mander of the base, Yuliy Mamchur, said there was at least one injury. He called his men together, they sang the Ukrainian national anthem and then stood at ease. He said they are going to turn over their weapons. Russian forces have been seizing Ukrainian military facilities for sev eral days in the Black Sea peninsula, which voted a week ago to secede and join Russia. Elsewhere, more than 5,000 pro-Russia residents of a major city in Ukraines east demonstrated in fa vor of holding a referendum on whether to seek to split off and become part of Russia. The rally in Donetsk came less than a week af ter the Ukrainian region of Crimea approved seces sion in a referendum regarded as illegitimate by Western countries. After the referendum, Russia formally annexed Crimea. With Crimea now effec tively under the control of Russian forces, which ring Ukrainian military bases on the strategic Black Sea peninsula, concern is ris ing that Ukraines eastern regions will agitate for a similar move. Russia has brought large military contingents to ar eas near the border with eastern Ukraine. Russian President Vladimir Putin has said there is no inten tion to move into eastern Ukraine, but the prospect of violence between proand anti-secession groups in the east could be used as a pretext for sending in troops.Pro-Russian forces storm Ukrainian base in Crimea Get the paper delivered to you! NEWS-SUN M C Y K

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www.newssun.comSunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A7 show Friday evening as the normally dark, dense areas of Highlands Ham mock State Park glowed brightly with more re ies than anyone could attempt to count, whiz zing by like tiny shooting stars. Fireies in the Ham mock, which is put on by the Friends of Highlands, allows paid guests to ride a tram through Highlands Hammock after hours to experience the parks newly discovered resi dents. Park Manager Brian Pinson initiated the Fire y experience after making the surprise discovery of the insects a few weeks back. It was about three weeks ago that I rst be gan to notice them out, said Pinson. The rst night I saw just a few. The second night I saw a lot more and I kept going out and then I noticed just how many there actually are out here. With the excitement of the new discovery, Pinson knew the reies had to be shared with the pub lic. The park ranger, along with other employees and park volunteers, co ordinated the tram rides for interested Hammock visitors and began giv ing tours lled with educational commentary on the nightly encounters this past week. There are many differ ent species of reies, Pinson told guests Friday night. As it gets darker and your eyes adjust, you may see different ight patterns, different ash ing patterns. These can tell you what species the reies are. If you can fol low one for long enough you can see all this. Pinson isnt yet aware of just how many rey species inhabit the Ham mock, but hopes to initiate a study by the leading rey expert from the University of Florida by the end of the year. Do you guys know that reies arent really ies? Pinson asked guests on the trams. Pinson revealed the true identity of the ashy insects they are actual ly beetles as well as an hours worth of other in formation about reies (they dont taste good, for example) to eager guests both young and old. Fireies arent as com mon in the area as they used to be, Pinson said, mainly due to light pollu tion and loss of their preferred habitat. The dense, lush areas around the Hammock make perfect homes for the mating bugs. In fact, reies glow in order to catch the attention of a potential mate, Pinson told the riders. Fireies in the Ham mock will continue nightly until the reies are no longer visible. Guests must register ahead of time through the Friends of Highlands Hammock State Park Facebook page in order to secure a spot on their selected night. Seating on the two trams is limited. The Fireies in the Hammock event is $5 per person (cash only). Guests must pre-register themselves and provide number of guests accom panying them prior to the event. Payment will be collected as guests board the trams. For more information, visit the Friends of High lands Hammock State Park Facebook page.Samantha Gholar can be reached at samantha.gholar@newssun. com or 385-6155 ext: 526. FIREFLIES FROM PAGE A1 Katara Simmons/News-SunHighlands Hammock P ark Manager Brian Pinson talks to visitors about reies Friday evening and explains that the glowing insects taste terrible and most animals avoid eating them.his wife live in Sebring and have two children: 11-year-old Madison and 6-year-old Camden, both at Cracker Trail Elementa ry School. He has volunteered with the school district through the Parent Teach er Organization, School Advisory Council, and District School Advisory Council. His vision is to contin ue the good work he already sees happening at the Highlands County schools, such as Youth For Christ and the Stephen R. Covey Leader In Me pro gram. Adding to that, he wants to be sure that the School Board of High lands County continues to forge strong teamwork with all the schools. I want to be visible to all the schools. I want to be a good listener, an ad vocate for the needs of our students, the needs of our kids, Culverhouse said. He has seen students reach out and help the community, including at the recent Care Mob event on March 1 at High lands Art League in Sebring, where he provided pulled pork barbecue lunch to more than 75 Se bring High School students who came out to refurbish and repaint the Art League village. For the community, he asks that people volun teer in their schools. Teachers cant do it by themselves. They need help and one way to do it is through communi ty involvement and keeping children as our focus, Culverhouse said. His family has attend ed Grace Bible Church for the last eight years, where he has been a deacon for the last ve years. He and his wife lead a small study group. Culverhouse said he works to follow the scripture of Proverbs 16:3: Commit to the Lord whatever you do, and your plans will succeed. He has served 11 years as an Avon Park city re ghter and is now also the ofce manager for Sebring-based attorney Steve Kackley, his uncle, for whom he had worked while in high school. He was nominated in 2003 to serve as the sec retary/treasurer for Avon Park Professional Fire ghters Local 3132, and has been ever since then. He is also a member of Sebring Firemen Inc., a community service-based organization that works for the benet of local athletics and community fundraising. Hes dedicat ed time to the Highlands Art League, the school districts International Baccalaureate program, the Highlands County Fair and the Central Flori da Futbol Club. Culverhouse has raised $2,475 in contributions all monetary and $225.98 in expenditures, according to campaign treasurers reports on the Supervisor of Elections website at www.votehigh lands.gov. RUN FROM PAGE A1It was about three weeks ago that I first began to notice them out. The first night I saw just a few. The second night I saw a lot more and then I noticed just how many there actually are out here.Brian Pinson park manager I want to be ... an advocate for the needs of our students.Clinton Culverhouse school board candidate M C Y K

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A8 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com BUSINESS BY SAMANTHA GHOLARStaff WriterSEBRING Two of Highlands Countys su permarkets will get new names after parent com pany Bi-Lo Holdings, LLC announced that a re branding of more than 30 Tampa Bay area Sweetbay stores will take place in the coming weeks. The Sebring and Lake Placid Sweetbay super markets twill be converted into Winn-Dixie stores beginning on March 29. Sebrings Sweetbay store was announced as part of the rst round of stores to be transformed on Wednesday by Bi-Lo ofcials. A second an nouncement was made Friday that the Lake Plac id store would also be included in the overhaul. A press release from Bi-Lo Holdings stated that two phases of store conversions would take place, breaking the over hauls into two groups. The Sebring Sweetbay at 3250 U.S. 27 South behind Wells Fargo bank, will close on Saturday, March 29 and re-open on Friday, April 4. Lake Placids Sweetbay at 1519 U.S. 27 South will close on Saturday, April 5 and re-open as Winn-Di xie on Friday, April 11. Upon reopening as a Winn-Dixie, we believe customers will be pleas antly surprised to see that we have been working hard to provide the fresh, quality products they want at prices they can afford, said Joey Medina, Winn-Dixies regional vice president. Plus, we will offer a suite of in-store savings programs, like the fu elperks! Reward Program, which lets customers earn incredible savings at par ticipating Shell stations every time they shop with their Winn-Dixie Custom er Reward Card. A total of 35 stores throughout the Tampa, Bradenton and north Polk County regions will be converted to Winn-Dixie supermarkets by the sec ond weekend in April. Bi-Lo has invited cur rent employees to remain in their current positions during and following the store transformations. While the name on the fronts of the stores is changing, the people running them dont have to. Weve invited Sweet bay associates to join the Winn-Dixie family and look forward to exchang ing what it means to be local as we work togeth er to run even greater stores, Medina said.Samantha Gholar can be reached at samantha.gholar@newssun. com or 385-6155 ext: 526.Goodbye Sweetbay, hello Winn-Dixie Samantha Gholar/News SunCustomers make their way in and out of the Sebring Sweetbay supermarket Friday morning. Store #1792 will be one of two Highlands County Sweetbay markets that will get a complete overhaul in early April. Both the Sebring and Lake Placid stores will be converted into Winn-Dixie Supermarkets in the coming weeks.Sebring, LP stores to be converted in coming weeks Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Leadership Team of the Boys and Girls Club of High lands County is starting the Supporter of the Month Program to high light the local businesses, sponsors and other donors who have provid ed nancial contributions or in-kind services to the club. The clubs current mem bership includes 350 students ages 6-18 in Avon Park and Sebring. Boys and Girls Clubs have been instrumental in the lives of youngsters nationwide since 1860. Positive Medical Trans port is the Supporter of the Month for February. Positive Medical Trans port has made nancial contributions to the club to assist in providing ser vices through its School Liaison, who works col laboratively with the teachers and other school staff to further support and enhance the success of our students. Positive Medical Trans port recognizes the importance of the companys connectivity with the community and is com mitted to assisting local agencies in achieving their strategic goals. We extend our congratula tions and sincere appreciation to Positive Medical Transport, a news release from the club said. We solicit the individu al support of the citizens of Highlands County to continue to patronize lo cal businesses, as many of them, like Positive Medi cal Transport, give back to the community in numer ous ways. In addition, we ask that you please con sider donating to and/or visiting our re-sale store, The Emporium, located at 248 Pomegranate Ave. (in) Sebring. There are many, many articles avail able, including clothing, household items, appli ances, and furniture, at very reasonable prices. All proceeds are used to as sist in funding the services and programs provided for the members of the club. Because the club relies so heavily on the contri butions of local businesses, agencies, organizations, and private donors, we are continuously seek ing opportunities to increase our Partnership Bank to meet the grow ing needs of our students and the organization. If you would like to assist us in our efforts to guide and direct these students toward positive actions and activities, then please consider making a tax-de ductible contribution to The Boys and Girls Club of Highlands County.Positive Medical Transport honored by Boys and Girls Club Courtesy photoRon Layne (right) and Melissa Worley (left) of Positive Medical Transport join Boys and Girls Club director Woodraun Wright in raising a banner next to one of the companys ambulances. Positive Mobility was named the Supporter of the Month for February.WASHINGTON (AP) A federal appeals court has handed a defeat to a coalition of retail groups that chal lenged as too high the Federal Reserves cap on how much banks can charge businesses for handling debit card transactions. The ruling issued Friday by the U.S. Appeals Court for the District of Columbia overturned a lower courts decision in July that favored the merchants and was a setback for banks. In the July ruling, a federal judge struck down the Feds cap on socalled swipe fees, saying the Fed didnt have the authority to set the limit the way it did in 2011, improp erly including data that made the cap too high. The retail groups had sued the Fed over its setting the cap at an aver age of about 24 cents per debit-card transaction. The appeals court ruling uphold ing the Feds cap was a blow to an industry already buffeted by public and congressional outrage over the massive data breach that hit Target Corp. during the holiday season and other data-security violations at big retailers. Congress mandated a ceiling on debit-card swipe fees as part of the 2010 nancial regulatory overhaul. Prior to the cap, fees averaged 44 cents per swipe. The Fed had initially proposed a 12-cent fee limit, and the retailers argued that the Fed buckled under pressure from bank lobbyists when it doubled that level. The retailers had argued that the Fed deviated from the 2010 laws in tent by factoring banks expenses into the cap that the law didnt allow.Court upholds Feds cap on swipe fees M C Y K

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www.newssun.comSunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A9 By the time you read this things could well have changed dramatically. But at the time Im writing this, Saturday morning, the opening two days of the NCAA Tournament, not counting the play-in games, havent gone so bad for my brackets. Sure, in one of those that I lled out for the ESPN Challenge, I did have Oklahoma State reaching the nal game, albeit not winning. So while one full quarter of that bracket has been demolished, Im still in decent shape on that one. That Gonzaga beat OK St. hurt, but it wasnt a major upset. It technically wasnt an upset at all as the Zags were the eighth seed play ing a nine. I guess weve just heard a lot more about the Cowboys this season, even though Gonzaga has been a tournament staple for SPORTS BY DAN HOEHNEdaniel.hoehne@newssun.comAnother day on the diamond, another win for Avon Park as they lassoed LaBelle by a 7-4 score Thursday. Tyrone Perry and Luis Martinez lead the way with three hits each, while ve separate players each had an RBI in the win. Freshman starting pitcher Daniel Simons had one of his few rough outings this year, allowing four runs in his four innings of work, but was effective enough and was backed up by his hitters. The rst two innings went by with no scores, but the Devils got on the board in the top of the third. Cody Pearlman lead things off with a single and moved up a base on Martinezs shot back up the middle. With one out, Per ry singled sharply through the right side and Pearlmand came around to score. Mykel Gordon reached on an error, bringing Mar tinez in and Mason Jahna singled to bring Perry plateward. The Cowboys came right back, however, and tied it in the bottom of the inning. A single by Chandler McCormick was followed by a walk to Jake Martinez, with both runners moving up on a wild pitch and McCormick coming in on a passed ball. Jarred Miller then powered one over the fence in center for a two-run shot to make it 3-3. Avon Park got two of those runs back in the fourth. Trey Frazier drew a leadoff walk and was bunted over to second by Pearlman. Martinez went the other way with a double to left, bringing Frazier in and Gordon would later plate Red Devils keep rolling Dan Hoehne/News-Sun lesLuis Martinez was solid in the eld and accounted for three hits, two runs and an RBI in Avon Parks win at La Belle Thursday. SEE DEVILS | A11AVON PARK7LABELLE4 BY DAN HOEHNEdaniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING In the midst of a ve-game losing streak, perhaps the last team you want to be paid a visit from is Owasso High School. Traveling on their Spring Break for a handful of Florida games, the defending Class 6A Oklahoma State champs came to Firemens Field for a Thursday afternoon matinee. And it seemed to be just what the doctor ordered as the Blue Streaks battled back to topple the Rams 6-4. They come down every year and we always played them when I was at Lake Wales, Sebring head coach Jayson DeWitt said. Now that Im here, I just called their coach and asked them to come play us and he agreed. Which ts right into DeWitts mantra of having his squad face the best competition it can as a means to progress. But early on, some of the same problems that have plagued the Streaks during their recent rut, cropped back up. Weve been in every game weve played, DeWitt said. But little things happen that get us in trouble. Such as split-second hesitations on throws, such as the one that allowed a rst-inning, ineld hit. Starter Jonathan Struck worked around it when a sharp grounder to David DeGenaro at third was turned into a 5-4-3 double play. He couldnt work around it in the second, however. With one on and two out, an error on a ground-Blue Streaks overcome Oklahoma champ Owasso Dan Hoehne/News-SunMatt Portis slides in under Owassos catcher with a key insurance run in the Streaks Thursday win.SEBRING6OWASSO4SEE SEBRING | A11 Dan Hoehne/News-Sun lesNicole Rosado and the Lady Panthers got their Suncoast Conference season off to a strong start Thursday as they swept a twin-bill from visiting St. Pete. South Florida held on for a 5-4 win in the opener before taking the nightcap a bit easier by a 4-1 count. After starting the season 0-10, the Panthers have gone 12-8 and seem headed in the right direction. When they play like theyre capable, they are a very good team, head coach Carlos Falla said. There is a lot of talent there. To which assistant coach Heather Barnes agreed. They can be very good, she said. Its just that so far, theyve tried every other way that didnt work. Now theyve gured out the right way and were winning. Tied atop the Suncoast standings with Polk State at 2-0, South Florida continues its conference slate with a pair of away dates this week. Tuesday they have a doubleheader at the State College of Florida and will be in Tampa Thursday for two games against Hillsborough. LADY PANTHERS START SUNCOAST SLATE WITH SWEEP AND ANOTHER THING..Dan HoehneBrackets not too badSEE NCAA | A12 Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Alan Jay Red Sox won the Memorial Playoffs of the Sebring Senior League, upending Reections 12-11 in a thrilling softball game. The Memorial Playoff games honor our fallen players. The following are playing with the Lord Lou Gaum, John Grill, Gary Luciani, Bob McKinney, Hank Gomez, Jerry OBrien, Jim Larnard, Mike Jurma, Ralph Rho ten, Ken Stanek, Ra Concepcion, Barry Hurlbut and recently Bob Flack. Leading up to the winning game the Red Sox beat Fairmount ser vices 19-9 while Reections won out over the VFW 4300 White Sox 16-11. In the championship game, Reections got off to a fast start, scoring ve runs in the rst inning. They were led by Ron Rieches, Bill Kelsey, Greg Ramos and Rick Enfelis all with key hits. Alan Jay cut the led to 5-3 after three innings. But Reections upped the lead in the fth inning to 7-3. The Sox rallied to take lead with six runs in the sixth. Key hits from Ray Trudell, Rog er Gasperlin, Steve Smutnik, John Buja and a triple by Les Osbeck Alan Jay Red Sox take titleSEE SENIORS | A12 M C Y K

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A10 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com COMING UPHigh School Baseball Monday Avon Park at Booker, 7 p.m. Tuesday Avon Park vs. Hardee, 7 p.m.; Lake Placid vs. DeSoto, 7 p.m.; Sebring at Okeechobee, 7 p.m. College Baseball Monday SFSC vs. State College of Florida, 6 p.m. High School Softball Tuesday Lake Placid vs. Charlotte, 5/7 p.m.; Sebring vs. Hardee, 6/7:30 p.m. College Softball Tuesday SFSC at State College of Florida, 5 p.m. Boys Tennis Monday Avon Park vs. Sebring, 4 p.m. Tuesday Lake Placid at Okeechobee, 4:30 p.m.; Sebring vs. Clewiston, 4 p.m. Girls Tennis Monday Avon Park at Sebring, 4 p.m. Tuesday Lake Placid at Okeechobee, 4:30 p.m.; Sebring at Clewiston, 4 p.m. TODAYAUTO RACING NASCAR Auto Club 400 2:30 p.m. FOXBOWLING PBA League Pittsburgh vs. Philadelphia 1 p.m. ESPNCOLLEGE BASKETBALL NIT Tournament 11 a.m. ESPN NCAA Tournament Noon CBS NCAA Tournament 2:30 p.m. CBS NCAA Tournament 5 p.m. CBS NCAA Tournament 6 p.m. TNT NCAA Tournament 7 p.m. TBS NCAA Tournament 8:30 p.m. TNT NCAA Tournament 9:30 p.m. TBSGOLF PGA Arnold Palmer Invitational 12:30 p.m. GOLF PGA Arnold Palmer Invitational 2 p.m. NBC PGA Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic 5 p.m. GOLF LPGA Founders Cup 7 p.m. GOLFMLB PRESEASON Chicago Cubs at Oakland 4 p.m. WGNWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL NCAA Tournament 12:30 p.m. ESPN2 NCAA Tournament 3 p.m. ESPN NCAA Tournament 5:30 p.m. ESPN NCAA Tournament 8 p.m. ESPNWOMENS COLLEGE GYMNASTICS West Virginia at Florida 9 a.m. SUNWOMENS COLLEGE SOFTBALL Alabama at Florida 1 p.m. SUN Arkansas at Mississippi 4 p.m. SUNMONDAYCOLLEGE BASKETBALL NIT Tournament 7 p.m. ESPN NIT Tournament 9 p.m. ESPN NIT Tournament 11 p.m. ESPN2MLB PRESEASON Detroit at Pittsburgh 1 p.m. ESPNNHL Ottawa at Tampa Bay 7:30 p.m. SUNWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL NCAA Tournament 6:30 p.m. ESPN2 NCAA Tournament 9 p.m. ESPN2TUESDAYCOLLEGE BASKETBALL NIT Tournament 7 p.m. ESPN NIT Tournament 9 p.m. ESPNMLB PRESEASON Atlanta at Detroit 1 p.m. ESPN Boston at Tampa Bay 1 p.m. SUNNBA Oklahoma City at Dallas 8 p.m. TNT New York at L.A. Lakers 10:30 p.m. TNTWOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL NCAA Tournament 7 p.m. ESPN2 NCAA Tournament 9:30 p.m. ESPN2SPORTS ON TV SCORE BOARDNational Basketball AssociationEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 38 30 .559 Brooklyn 36 31 .537 1 New York 29 40 .420 9 Boston 23 47 .329 16 Philadelphia 15 54 .217 23 Southeast W L Pct GB x-Miami 47 20 .701 Washington 36 33 .522 12 Charlotte 33 36 .478 15 Atlanta 31 36 .463 16 Orlando 19 50 .275 29 Central W L Pct GB x-Indiana 51 18 .739 Chicago 38 31 .551 13 Cleveland 26 43 .377 25 Detroit 25 43 .368 25 Milwaukee 13 56 .188 38 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 52 16 .765 Houston 46 22 .676 6 Dallas 42 28 .600 11 Memphis 40 28 .588 12 New Orleans 28 40 .412 24 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 51 18 .739 Portland 45 24 .652 6 Minnesota 34 33 .507 16 Denver 31 38 .449 20 Utah 22 47 .319 29 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 48 21 .696 Golden State 44 26 .629 4 Phoenix 40 29 .580 8 Sacramento 24 45 .348 24 L.A. Lakers 22 46 .324 25 x-clinched playoff spot Sundays Games Atlanta at Toronto, 1 p.m. Phoenix at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m. Washington at Denver, 5 p.m. Milwaukee at Sacramento, 6 p.m. Brooklyn at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Cleveland at New York, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.National Hockey LeagueEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 70 48 17 5 101 225 149 Tampa Bay 70 39 24 7 85 208 185 Montreal 71 38 26 7 83 182 180 Toronto 71 36 27 8 80 208 219 Detroit 69 32 24 13 77 183 194 Ottawa 69 28 28 13 69 198 234 Florida 70 26 36 8 60 173 225 Buffalo 70 20 42 8 48 136 206 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 69 45 19 5 95 218 173 Philadelphia 69 37 25 7 81 199 197 N.Y. Rangers 71 38 29 4 80 188 175 Columbus 70 36 28 6 78 200 192 Washington 71 33 27 11 77 205 211 New Jersey 70 30 27 13 73 172 183 Carolina 70 30 31 9 69 174 198 N.Y. Islanders 70 26 35 9 61 195 239 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA St. Louis 69 47 15 7 101 226 156 Chicago 71 41 15 15 97 240 184 Colorado 71 44 21 6 94 216 194 Minnesota 70 36 23 11 83 174 172 Dallas 69 32 26 11 75 196 201 Winnipeg 71 32 30 9 73 199 208 Nashville 71 30 31 10 70 171 213 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA San Jose 71 46 18 7 99 219 170 Anaheim 70 45 18 7 97 222 178 Los Angeles 70 39 25 6 84 170 149 Phoenix 70 34 25 11 79 194 197 Vancouver 72 32 30 10 74 172 194 Calgary 70 28 35 7 63 173 209 Edmonton 71 25 37 9 59 177 228 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Sundays Games Columbus at N.Y. Islanders, 1 p.m. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Toronto at New Jersey, 7 p.m. Nashville at Chicago, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Buffalo at Vancouver, 8 p.m. Florida at Anaheim, 8 p.m. OBT Baseball GamesSEBRING Orange Blossom Tours has reserved excellent grandstand seats for an upcoming Tampa Bay Rays Spring Training baseball game. The game is Friday, March 28, when the Rays will play the Detroit Tigers in Lakeland. The March 28 trip also includes dinner and Ernie, a play about renowned Detroit radio broadcaster Ernie Harwell, in the beautifully restored Polk Theater. For ticket prices and pickup times and locations, please go to www. orangeblossomtours.com or call 855-628-0855 or 451-3040.Lake Placid Cornhole TournamentLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Senior FFA will be hosting its third annual Cornhole Tournament on Friday, March 28, at Roger Scarborough Field. Registration begins at 5:30 p.m., with tournament play beginning at 6 p.m. Entry fee is $40 per team, with the winner receiving a commemorative set of Cornhole boards. The tournament is being held in conjunction with the Lake Placid Alumni BBQ. For more information, call Lake Placid Sr. FFA advisor Lauren Butler at (863) 699-5010, or email ButlerL@highlands.k12. .us.STR8UP Family Sports DayLAKE PLACID STR8UP Youth Ministry will be presenting a Family Sports Day on Saturday, March 29, from 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. The day will feature Sun, Sand and Hoops with 2-on-2 and 5-on-5 volleyball tournaments, as well as 3-on-3 and 5-on-5 basketball tournaments, with cash prizes to overall winners not to mention food, drinks and music all day long. Cost is $10 per person that pre-registers, $15 per person the day of the event. Registration forms are available at Dock 633, the Florida Hospital Gym and Chef Buddys, or go to www.str8up.org for Paypal registration. Listen on 91.5 JOY FM for details. Please make checks payable to STR8UP Youth Ministry, Inc., and send to P.O. Box 654, Lake Placid, FL 33862. There will be a live DJ and announcer, featur ing guest speakers Chad Varga, Magic Benton and Big John Merrill. Kalie Spurlock will be singing the national anthem, along with ribbon cutting by the Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce. For more information, call (863) 699-1480.Lake Placid Bass TournamentLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce will be hosting its 18th Annual Bass Tournament on Sunday, March 30, on Lake Istokpoga. Cost is $120 per team, which includes Big Bass, with a 100-percent pay back. Applications are available on the Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce website at www.visitlakeplacidorida.com, or by calling the Chamber at (863) 465-4331.Sebring Chamber Golf ClassicSEBRING The Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce will hold their Spring Golf Classic tour nament on Saturday, April 5, at Sun N Lake Golf Club. The event is a four per son scramble with handicapped ights. There will be cash prizes: $2,000 for hole-in-one, $250 for longest drive and $250 for closest to the pin. Entry fee is $60 per player, or $225 for a fourperson team, and includes greens fee, cart, drinks on the course and lunch. Corporate sponsor ship includes a four-per son team and hole sign for $300. Registration is at 7:30 a.m., and a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. All proceeds benet the Sebring Chamber of Commerce. For questions or a registration form, call (863) 385-8448 or email infor mation@sebring.org.SHS Golf TournamentSEBRING Sebring High School will be holding its Project Graduation 2014 Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 5, at Golf Hammock Country Club. Format is a four-per son scramble, ighted by handicap, with registration starting at 7 a.m. and a shotgun start at 8 a.m. Entry fees are $65 per player, $240 per foursome and includes greens fee, cart and lunch. Mulligans will be available for purchase at $3 each or $5 for two, and hole sponsors are available for $100. There will be a 50/50 rafe and rafe prizes available as well. Make checks payable and remit to SHS Project Graduation, 2157 US 27 S, Sebring, FL 33870. For more information, call Tim Baker at 385-5100.H.O.P.E. Basketball TournamentSEBRING The 4th Annual Mary Toney H.O.P.E. Foundation 3-on3 Basketball Tournament will tip off Saturday, April 5, in the Sebring High School Gym. From 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. teams will compete amid concessions and music, with a cost of just $5 per player. Monetary prizes will be awarded to rst-place teams, with second-place nishers receiving gift card awards. The tournament will have male and female brackets consisting of three players per team. For boys and girls, age groups are 7-9 years old, 10-12, 13-15 and 16-19. The 7-9 and 10-12 yearold teams begin play at 8:30 a.m., with the 1315s and 16-19s starting at 11 a.m. Teams need to report to the gym 30 minutes prior to the rst game of their division. Registration deadline is Thursday, April 3. For more information, call LaVaar Scott at (863) 214-3880, Nick Brooks at (850) 322-8398 or Princeton Harris at (863) 381-8898Nu-Hope Golf tournamentAVON PARK NUHOPE Elder Care Services will hold the Sandy Foster Memorial Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 19. This years event, spon sored by MIDFLORIDA, will be held at Pinecrest Golf Club in Avon Park. The event is a 2-person scramble. Cost is $65/person ($130 per 2-person team.) Sponsorship opportunities are available. Registration opens at 7:30 a.m., with a Shot Gun start at 8:30 a.m. An awards luncheon follows the event. All funds raised are used to support services for seniors in Highlands and Hardee County. To register or for more information, please contact Laurie Murphy at 382-2134 or MurphyL@ nuhope.org or visit www. nuhopeeldercare.orgLP Project GraduationLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid High School Project Graduation 2014 Golf Tournament will tee off on Saturday, March 29, at the Placid Lakes Golf Course. Registration begins at 7 a.m. before a shotgun start kicks off play at 8 a.m. Cost is $60 per person, $240 per team, and includes greens fee, cart and meal. There will be a 50/50 drawing, a rafe, straightest drive and closest to the pin contests and a $2,000 Hole in One prize sponsored by Cohan Radio Group. For more information, contact Charlotte McQuillen at 633-8450.Sottile Memorial GolfLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Athletic Association will be hosting the 8th Annual Nick Sottile Memorial Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 12, at the Placid Lakes Country Club. The event is a four-per son scramble with cash prizes for winning teams in each ight and individual cash prizes for closest to the line, closest to the pin and a $2,000 Hole in One prize sponsored by Cohan Radio Group. Cost is $100 per golfer, $400 per team, and there will be an 8 a.m. tee-off time. Entry fee includes greens fee, cart, complementary beverages and lunch catered by Smoke Shack BBQ, with appetizers of shrimp and crab clusters. Bill Jarrett Ford is helping to underwrite the event for the eighth consecutive year, but more sponsors are needed. Sponsorship ranges from $1,000 to $50 holesponsors and lunch tickets are included with most sponsorship levels. Proceeds from the tour nament directly benet youth sports in Lake Placid and a portion of the proceeds are donated to the Nick Sottile Memorial Scholarship Fund. A portion of the proceeds will also be used for completion of a new sports weight-training facility. For more information, call Laura Teal at (863) 441-0729 or Tom Reifsnyder at (954) 675-9581.Florida Hospital Clay ShootOKEECHOBEE The Florida Hospital Heartland Clay Shoot will be held on Friday, April 25, at the Quail Creek Plantation beginning at 8:30 a.m. A continental breakfast will be served at 8 a.m. at Quail Creek, located at 12399 NE 224th St., Okeechobee. There will also be a home-cooked BBQ lunch and fantastic rafe and green bird prizes. There are four levels of sponsorships available, from Station Sponsor which includes adver tising on course station signage and lunch for two for $100, Individual Sponsor for $125 which includes registration for one shooter and lunch. The $500 Team Sponsor includes one four-man shooting team and lunch, along with advertising on banner displayed at lunch tents. The $2,500 Gold Sponsor includes one four-man team, cart and lunch, a banner hanging during event with company logo, company logo on yer/registration and all mail pieces, one station sign, one suite for Thursday nights social and two Thursday night dinner tickets. For more information or to register, call the Foundation at (863) 4025525, or visit the website www.FHHeartland.org/ Foundation.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING The Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center will be hosting their 4th Annual Scholarship Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 26, at Sun N Lake. Format is a four-per son scramble with handicapped ights. Entry fee is $65 per person, which includes greens fee, golf cart and lunch. Registration is at 7:30 a.m. the day of the tournament, with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Please submit entries by Thursday, April 24. Make checks payable to Wings of Faith CWC Scholarship Fund. All proceeds go to benet college-bound senior graduates for the class of 2014. For questions, call Alvin Walters at 381-5706 or 381-6578. SNAP S HOT S SPORTSThe New York Jets have signed quarterback Michael Vick and released Mark Sanchez. The Sanchez move comes as no surprise. Vick was a free agent after playing for the Eagles for the last ve seasons.Jets sign Vick and release Sanchez M C Y K

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www.newssun.com Sunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A11 er put two on, and the en suing double into shallow right center put Owasso up 1-0. The lead grew to 3-0 in the third with some more of those little mistakes. The lead-off batter was hit by a pitch, with an er ror on a sacrice bunt at tempt putting runners on rst and second. Another sacrice bunt was laid down to move the runners to second and third. A suicide squeeze bunt was then attempted, but missed, leaving a Ram runner putting on the breaks after racing down the third-base line. But after feigning a retreat, the runner eluded catcher Jimmy Pecks at tempted tag and reached the plate for a score. Later, another bunt single brought another run in. The Streaks looked to get on the board in the bottom of the fourth when Seth Cannady reached on an error and with one out, moved to third on a Josh Crouch single to right. But a double steal attempt saw Cannady nabbed and a strike out ended the threat. Struck got through a scoreless fth, and thats when Sebring made its move. Designated hitter Kyle Helms drew a walk and gave way to pinch runner Jordan Baker. A diving catch in center robbed Jared Lang of a hit, but Jordan Austin reached on an error and Matt Portis walked to load the bases. A Ram pitching change was made, but Peck greeted him with an RBI single to right. With two out, Ty Little beat out an ineld single, scoring Austin, and Crouch showed a patient eye in drawing a walk to force in the tying run. During DeGenaros at bat, an errant pick-off throw tried nabbing Eli White at third, running for Peck, bringing another run in to make it 4-3. DeGenaro would draw a walk to re-load the bases and Garret Zeegers kept a sharp eye to draw yet another walk and give the Streaks a 5-3 lead. Keat Waldron came on in relief in the top of the sixth, with Owasso getting to him for one run, but Sebring got it back in the bottom of the inning. With one out, Portis blooped one down the left-eld line for a single and with two strikes on him, Peck belted one over the left elders head, short-hopping the wall. Portis came all the way around and slid under the leaping Ram catcher and the lead now stood at 6-4 with three outs to go. Waldron got the rst two before walking a batter and bringing Everett Hurst to get the nal out on a shallow y to left. The kids just kept battling, which they always do, DeWitt said. They did a real good job of hitting with runners on and hitting with two strikes. Its been a tough stretch and weve kind of been searching for our identity as a team, he continued. After a game like this, I think we may have found it. They will see further as they have three games on the docket this week. Tuesday they travel to Okeechobee, host DeSoto in a district tilt Friday and have a rare Saturday matinee on the road at Tampa Catholic. Martinez with a single to knock the lead to 5-3. But LaBelle got a run closer when Glenn Bur ton lead the bottom of the fourth off with a triple and came in on a ground out to make it a 5-4 game. After the Devils went scoreless in the fth, Per ry came on in relief of Simons and worked around a two-out walk to strike out the side and hold the lead. Then, in the sixth, Avon Park picked up a pair of insurance runs. Alfred Brown and Per ry singled to start it, and one out later Mason Jahna belted an RBI double, scoring Brown. Alex Gomez then lofted a deep y to center that went for an RBI sac y with Perry cruising in with run number seven. Perry then held the Cowboys at bay over his nal two innings, moving the Devils season record to 12-2. The team had the rest of the week to enjoy what was left of their Spring Break before picking it up for three games this coming week. Monday, the Devils travel to Sarasota to face Booker, host Hardee on Tuesday and get a visit from Okeechobee Friday at Head Field. DEVILS FROM PAGE A9 Dan Hoehne/News-Sun lesTyrone Perry showed a disciplined eye at the plate in collecting three hits and a walk Thursday. He also pitched three innings of scoreless relief, striking out six. Dan Hoehne/News-SunTy Little squares this pitch up and would contribute an RBI single in Se brings 6-4, Thursday win. SEBRING FROM PAGE A9 KEIRAN SMITHAssociated PressSYDNEY Bob Wardle came ready to root for the Arizona Diamondbacks on opening day Down Under, all dressed in his Paul Goldschmidt jersey. The special menu at Sydney Cricket Ground? Not quite to his taste. Im not sure if Ill try anything here, said War dle, born in Canada and now living in Sydney. Ive already had some very strange things at ball parks in the U.S. At $36 for a 2-foot-long hot dog, he was ready to pass Saturday night. He was holding off on the nachos and ice-cream sundaes served in batting helmets, too. No worries, though. Wardle and his daughter were having a fun time as the most quint essential of American sports took top billing at the symbolic home of Australias national game when the 2014 Major League Baseball season got started. At a venue steeped in the history of another bat and ball game cricket the Los Angeles Dodg ers defeated the Dia mondbacks 3-1 before a sellout crowd of around 40,000. The two-game series marked the rst regularseason games in Australia. Previous MLB season openers were held in Monterrey, Mexico, in 1999, San Juan, Puer to Rico in 2001 and four times in Tokyo (2000, and ). Speaking ahead of the rst pitch, Commissioner Bud Selig said this visit had been a success. He was noncommittal on when MLB would return to Australia or any where else around the globe. We dont know yet, were working on several things, Selig said. Were going to examine all our possibilities. The nice part about all of this is were getting now over tures, really good ones, from all over the world. It wont be 100 years until were back here, I can promise you that, he said in reference to the 100th anniversary of an exhibition game played by the White Sox and the New York Giants at the Sydney Cricket Ground, won 5-4 by Chicago before 10,000 fans on Jan. 3, 1914. While excitement for this series may be muted within the U.S., Australian baseball fans ar rived in their thousands to catch a glimpse of multimillionaire players and the quality of a sport theyre not used to seeing. Dodgers fans Narelle Walton and Mereana Joseph traveled for more than seven hours, including taking two ights in the 2,810-mile jour ney from Karratha a remote mining town in Western Australia state to see this matchup. This is our rst major league game, said Walton, donning a Dodgers cap and shirt. Its on our bucket list to be here. Wardle had far less distance to travel, but was just as keen to experience the major leagues here after playing in a masters baseball tournament in Phoenix and adopting the Diamondbacks as his team. Im originally from Canada, so Im an old Expos and Blue Jays fan, he said. My rst game was back in 1968 in Detroit, where Denny McLain lost one of his six games in a season where he won 31. Another novelty for the local crowd was keeping a ball hit into the stands, unlike cricket where the ball is returned to play. Dodgers second baseman Justin Turner threw ve balls into the members enclosure at the bottom of the rst inning, setting off desperate attempts by fans to catch a souvenir.Gday, baseball! Opening day goes Down Under M C Y K

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A12 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com JIM LITKEAssociated PressWelcome back to a mostly Mercer-packed edition of BracketRacket, the one-stop shopping place for your offbeat NCAA tournament needs. Today, we get to the bottom of Dukes dirty trick, take a whirlwind tour of Little Richards hometown and try to placate the eggheads in our midst. Without further ado: ___ NOW YOU KNOW THE REST OF THE STORY Turns out tiny Mercers takedown of mighty Duke was even better than it looked. Never mind all the other advantages the Blue Devils brought to the game that the Bears couldnt hope to match: NBA-caliber players, a Hall of Fame coach, a bigger budget than two dozen BCS football programs, a pedigree and blue blood (whatever thats good for), not to mention a 27-minute commute from their campus in Durham to the loading dock at the PNC Arena in Raleigh, N.C. But just to drive home the point, someone locked Mercer out of its locker room at halftime. We dispatched Associated Press sports writer Joedy McCreary to investigate. Sophomore Ike Nwamu told him the Bears viewed the setback as just one more hill to climb. They went over their game plan whispering, we presume, since Duke probably has NSA connections, too and did what they could to stay loose. Teammates kept reminding each other, as Nwamu put it, Weve got a big task ahead of us. Barely two minutes passed before someone got the door open. When the Bears came back out after halftime, they shot 58 percent and sank the Blue Devils 7871. All that proved is that if the folks at Duke were as smart as they think they are, they would have made sure to lock Mer cer in. ___ CELEBRITY ALUM OF THE DAY As the nal seconds ticked down on the Mer cer-Duke game, former NBA player and coach Sam Mitchell stood in middle of the TSN studios and did his version of an Irish river dance. Mitchell may have been born in Macon, Ga., but he comes by his varied musical tastes honestly. Let me ask you a question: Have you ever heard of Little Richard? the proud Mercer grad began without waiting for an answer. Have you ever heard of Otis Redding? Theyre from Macon, Ga. Actually, Redding was born in Dawson, Ga. But just like the classic scene from Animal House where Boon overlooks Blutos historical faux pas Was it over when the Ger mans bombed Pearl Har bor? Hell no! APs Jon Krawczynski didnt inter rupt Mitchell because he was rolling. Have you ever heard of (former L.A. Lakers guard) Norm Nixon? Mitchell continued. Thats Norm Nixons hometown. And so it is. But among that distinguished crowd, only Mitchell could lay claim to helping the Bears make the NCAAs. But that was back in the early 1980s, and the small school from Macon didnt win a game. Its one thing to advance in the NCAA tour nament, Mitchell demurred. Its a whole nother thing to beat a school like Duke. They put us on the map and gave us an identity, he said, rolling once again. Thats something that all of us graduates of Mercer will be indebted to these guys for forever. They put us on the map. Right. Which still shows Macon exactly 101.3 miles up the road from Dawson. ___ THIS JUST IN: HUMANS FALL SHORT OF PERFECTION FOR ANOTHER YEAR Somewhere, Warren Buffet is smiling. We said that when he went to bed Thursday night, too, but that was a guess. Now its ofcial. As of 4:45 p.m. Eastern, right about the time Stanford beat New Mexico, there were still 16 per fect brackets left among millions of entries. Four hours later, not long after Memphis beat George Washington, the last three were kaput. This shouldnt come as a surprise. Another thing BracketRacket noted the night before last were the odds (9.2 quintillion-to-1, give or take a few hundred trillion, we think) that Buffet would have to fork over the $1 billion himself, since one of his companies served as underwriter for the Quicken Loans Billion Dollar Bracket Challenge. Those who put a downpayment on a house planning to use proceeds from Mr. Buffet are advised to call his friends at Quicken Loans. ___ DUDE, WHAT ARE THOSE THINGS UNDER YOUR ARM CALLED? BOOKS? NO SERIOUSLY, WHAT ARE THEY? Dayton wins! Dayton wins! In your dreams, maybe. Or if this were the old TV show College Bowl, instead of the NCAA tournament, then absolutely. At least thats what the folks at Inside Higher Ed assured us would happen if the schools lling out the brackets competed at educating students instead of padding their bottom lines. What a quaint notion! But for those who still believe athletes are actually students, heres the short version of how things would have played out: Dayton and Kansas are the only two teams to make the Sweet 16 boasting perfect Academic Progress Rates, which is NCAAs multiyear measure of a teams classroom performance in this case, from 2008-12. But if the two South Region entrants wind up meeting in the Elite Eight, where the Federal Graduation Rate is applied as a tiebreaker, handing a close decision to the Flyers. Dayton goes on to defeat East Region champ Memphis in the Final Four and winds up in the championship game against Midwest winner Michigan, which got past West region representative American University. See the entire bracket here: http://bit. ly/1gSmSKL Daytons ultimate victo ry over Michigan means that the Flyers while talented on the court in the words of Inside Higher Ed, also know how to hit the books hard. Tell me you dont feel smarter already. ___ STAT OF THE DAY With only two rounds in the books, Stats LLC notes the all-time mark for most overtime games is in jeopardy. Stephen F. Austins come-from-behind thriller against VCU was the sixth OT affair in the tournament, topped only by the seven over time games in 1995 and 1997. In three other years 1975, 2006 and 2008 there were also six games that extended past regulation. That leaves this years edition with 31 games, or chances if you like, to match or surpass the alltime mark. ___ QUOTE OF THE DAY I thought Id be play ing after today. Duke sophomore forward Rodney Hood, who along with freshman teammate Jabari Parker is considered a potential NBA pick, explaining why he hasnt yet considered whether to return to school or go pro. years. And so that was basically a ipem game that hurt me on one bracket. But it was a true upset that actually helped me, even though I got it wrong in two of the three Ive lled out. Before Mercer upended Duke Friday, I was lagging back in about the 44th percentile on my brackets on ESPN. Once the Bears clinched the win, it seemed to bring the rest of the eld back to me as Im somewhere in the high 60s now, percentile wise. At the particular bracket I have in front of me, out of the 32 games played Thursday and Friday, I was incorrect in my guesses on eight of them. But only one of those hurts me moving forward, the Mercer-Duke result. I had the Blue Devils topping UMass in the next round, but then losing to Michigan. So as long as Michigan makes it to the Elite Eight, then the damage is limited. Of all the other games I got wrong, I had them losing their next games, against teams I correctly picked. Though, as we all know, a relatively serene Thursday and Friday of the NCAA Tournament, bracket wise, can quickly change come Saturday and Sunday.Dan Hoehne is the Sports Editor of the News-Sun. He can be reached at daniel.hoehne@newssun.com. NCAA FROM PAGE A9helped to take the lead over Reections. In the last inning, with the score 12-8. Reections came close with a big triple by Rick Enfelis scoring two runs. Rick then scored to cut the lead to 12-11, but a y out to left eld ended the game and made Alan Jay the winners of the play offs. The next season will start anew in Januarys rst week of 2015. Anyone interested in playing in the 60s and 70s brackets, call John Kloet at 471-0405. SENIORS FROM PAGE A9 Have you ever heard of Little Richard?BracketRacket: Which school would win the NCAAs if the athletes really were students? KISSIMMEE Garrett Jones homered in the rst inning and drove in three runs, leading the Miami Marlins to a 7-2 win over the Houston Astros on Friday. It was the second home run of spring training for Jones, who also had an RBI during the Marlins error-aided, three-run fth. Jake Marisnick went 3 for 3 and scored twice for Miami. Marisnick is batting .429 in 16 spring games.Jones homers in Marlins win over Astros M C Y K

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www.newssun.com Sunday, March 23, 2014 l NEWS-SUN l A13

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A14 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com TODAYPartly sunny and nice86 / 65Winds: W at 6-12 mphCouple of thunderstorms81 / 66Winds: N at 4-8 mphMONDAYChance of a little morning rain80 / 53Winds: WNW at 8-16 mphTUESDAYSunny to partly cloudy and cooler69 / 52Winds: N at 8-16 mphWEDNESDAYRather cloudy73 / 62Winds: ESE at 7-14 mphTHURSDAY High .............................................. 2:15 a.m. Low ............................................... 8:02 a.m. High .............................................. 2:26 p.m. Low ............................................... 8:32 p.m. High .............................................. 7:00 p.m. Low ............................................... 2:16 a.m. High ..................................................... none Low ...................................................... none Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 13.68 Normal ............................................... 14.51 High Tuesday ......................................... 78 Low Tuesday .......................................... 49 High Wednesday .................................... 84 Low Wednesday ..................................... 56 High Thursday ....................................... 86 Low Thursday ........................................ 60 Heat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayMakes it feel like .................................... 84 BarometerTuesday ............................................... 30.01 Thursday ............................................. 29.97 PrecipitationTuesday ............................................... 0.00 Thursday ............................................. 0.00 Month to date ..................................... 0.42 Year to date ......................................... 5.29Sunrise 7:27 a.m. 7:26 a.m. Sunset 7:39 p.m. 7:39 p.m. Moonrise 1:28 a.m. 2:24 a.m. Moonset 12:34 p.m. 1:34 p.m.Albuquerque 61/39/pc 65/39/pc 67/45/s Atlanta 60/36/r 57/41/pc 58/30/r Baltimore 47/27/c 40/28/s 40/26/sn Birmingham 57/37/r 62/39/pc 58/28/pc Boston 39/11/pc 27/16/pc 35/23/pc Charlotte 56/28/r 55/36/pc 44/29/r Cheyenne 47/24/pc 38/19/sf 52/35/s Chicago 32/17/pc 34/22/pc 33/17/c Cleveland 29/16/pc 28/23/pc 34/14/c Columbus 38/20/pc 37/25/pc 36/17/c Dallas 57/40/pc 62/42/s 66/44/s Denver 49/30/pc 46/24/pc 61/38/s Detroit 29/14/c 33/20/pc 34/12/c Harrisburg 44/23/pc 36/27/s 38/24/sn Honolulu 81/71/pc 82/71/pc 83/71/s Houston 66/49/r 60/47/r 68/48/pc Indianapolis 37/17/s 38/25/pc 36/14/c Jackson, MS 58/40/c 62/43/pc 62/35/s Kansas City 43/28/pc 42/23/sf 38/25/pc Lexington 45/21/pc 45/28/pc 40/19/c Little Rock 56/35/pc 57/37/pc 58/34/s Los Angeles 70/55/pc 80/58/s 75/56/pc Louisville 47/24/pc 48/31/pc 42/21/c Memphis 53/33/pc 58/39/pc 53/31/s Milwaukee 26/14/pc 32/17/pc 28/12/c Minneapolis 23/14/s 33/8/sf 21/12/pc Nashville 52/28/pc 54/32/pc 52/25/pc New Orleans 71/52/t 61/51/r 69/48/pc New York City 45/22/pc 36/26/s 38/28/sn Norfolk 50/33/r 40/32/s 42/34/r Oklahoma City 54/33/pc 60/31/pc 60/36/s Philadelphia 47/26/pc 37/27/s 38/28/sn Phoenix 82/62/s 85/62/s 88/62/s Pittsburgh 34/18/sf 34/23/s 38/17/c Portland, ME 32/2/sf 24/1/pc 30/19/c Portland, OR 61/39/s 67/46/pc 57/45/sh Raleigh 53/29/r 49/33/s 42/31/r Rochester 24/10/sf 26/19/s 34/19/c St. Louis 41/23/s 45/25/c 36/21/pc San Francisco 65/49/pc 64/49/s 58/51/c Seattle 55/39/pc 63/44/pc 56/42/r Wash., DC 50/27/c 43/32/s 42/29/sn Cape Coral 84/66/pc 82/68/t 80/56/t Clearwater 79/67/pc 78/65/r 74/57/r Coral Springs 86/68/pc 82/71/t 82/63/c Daytona Beach 81/63/t 70/62/r 75/49/r Ft. Laud. Bch 85/70/s 82/71/t 82/65/c Fort Myers 85/67/pc 82/68/t 80/57/t Gainesville 80/58/t 67/56/r 73/41/r Hollywood 84/68/s 82/70/t 80/62/c Homestead AFB 84/69/s 82/68/t 80/63/c Jacksonville 79/57/t 63/52/r 72/41/r Key West 81/72/s 81/71/pc 82/70/c Miami 86/70/s 83/72/t 80/65/c Okeechobee 84/65/pc 79/66/t 80/56/t Orlando 84/65/pc 77/64/r 79/52/r Pembroke Pines 85/68/s 82/70/t 81/62/c St. Augustine 78/60/t 64/60/r 71/44/r St. Petersburg 80/67/pc 78/65/r 75/56/r Sarasota 79/65/pc 77/65/t 76/54/r Tallahassee 75/55/t 65/51/r 72/38/c Tampa 78/66/pc 76/65/r 76/51/r W. Palm Bch 85/69/s 81/71/t 82/61/c Winter Haven 84/65/pc 79/65/r 78/52/r Acapulco 93/73/pc 89/70/pc 89/71/pc Athens 68/51/pc 68/53/pc 66/47/s Beirut 77/64/pc 76/61/s 71/59/pc Berlin 53/36/c 51/34/c 47/32/c Bermuda 71/66/pc 70/57/sh 64/62/pc Calgary 23/7/sf 20/13/pc 33/14/pc Dublin 49/32/pc 48/42/r 48/38/sh Edmonton 22/4/sf 19/6/pc 24/12/c Freeport 78/69/s 78/67/t 78/66/c Geneva 45/34/c 44/29/pc 49/38/pc Havana 89/65/s 89/65/s 86/63/t Hong Kong 71/64/s 72/66/s 74/70/pc Jerusalem 72/53/c 69/54/s 66/50/sh Johannesburg 76/55/s 77/55/s 76/52/pc Kiev 62/41/s 64/43/pc 64/45/pc London 51/31/pc 54/40/pc 52/38/sh Montreal 23/1/sf 18/5/pc 25/18/pc Moscow 58/42/pc 60/43/pc 59/41/pc Nice 62/45/pc 61/44/s 60/44/pc Ottawa 21/3/pc 21/8/pc 29/13/c Quebec 19/-6/sf 16/0/pc 21/7/pc Rio de Janeiro 78/69/r 79/69/pc 80/70/sh Seoul 63/43/s 60/45/pc 62/46/pc Singapore 91/76/pc 91/77/s 90/77/t Sydney 84/63/pc 75/63/t 77/64/r Toronto 22/11/pc 25/18/pc 31/17/c Vancouver 48/39/c 54/45/pc 50/44/r Vienna 58/42/r 48/38/r 51/35/pc Warsaw 60/45/r 51/42/r 48/37/c Winnipeg 11/0/s 16/-10/sf 14/1/pc Today Mon. Tue. Today Mon. Tue. An arctic cold front will advance across the Midwest and into the Northeast today, spreading colder and drier Canadian air. A slow-moving cold front will deliver rounds of showers to the Deep South and Gulf Coast states. Morning thunderstorms in Louisiana will reappear along the western coast of Florida late in the day. A piece of the front extends up along the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains and will cause some snow in Nebraska, Wyoming and Montana. Accumulations are expected to be on the light side, however. National Forecast for March 23 Today Mon. Tue. Today Mon. Tue. Today Mon. Tue. Today Mon. Tue. Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rrain, sf-snow urries, sn-snow, i-ice. Partly sunny and nice today. Partly cloudy and mild tonight. Mostly cloudy tomorrow with showers and a thunderstorm, mainly later. Tuesday: chance for morning rain or drizzle; otherwise, mostly cloudy. Record oods hit the Midwest on March 23, 1913, with major rainstorms adding to snowmelt. This prompted the federal governments rst widespread ood control projects. Partly sunny and nice today. Winds west 6-12 mph. Expect 6-10 hours of sunshine with average relative humidity 55% and good drying conditions. Partly cloudy and mild tonight. Sunday. and Saturday. a.m. and after 4 p.m. Last New First Full Mar 23 Mar 30 Apr 7 Apr 15 Today MondayForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 79/57 80/58 81/61 81/63 84/65 84/65 78/66 79/67 80/67 79/65 85/67 82/68 84/65 85/69 85/70 86/70 75/55 72/56 70/49 85/66 86/65 85/65 85/65 86/65 85/65 81/72 TemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidRelative humidity .................................. 40% Expected air temperature ....................... 84 Wednesday ......................................... 29.98 Wednesday ......................................... 0.00 Five-Day forecast for Highlands County Almanac U.S. Cities World Cities National Summary Tides UV Index Today Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional Summary Lake Levels Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows. Readings at Palm Beach Readings at St. Petersburg The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterday 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. Jacksonville Gainesville Ocala Daytona Beach Orlando Winter Haven Tampa Clearwater St. Petersburg Sarasota Fort Myers Naples Okeechobee West Palm Beach Fort Lauderdale Miami Tallahassee Apalachicola Key West Avon Park Sebring Lorida Lake Placid Venus Brighton PensacolaCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W M C Y K

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LIVING BSunday, March 23, 2014 SCRAP SAVER memos by stacking them, blank side up, in accessible bins.YOU WILL NEED: it at an angle, as shown. (Our shorter top panel is 71/2 inches, the bottom panel, 9 inches.) Using the tape, cover the boxes with patterned paper. Use letter stamps (or a marker) to print NAME A NAPKIN YOU WILL NEED: and cut a 21/2 TIME OUT! YOU WILL NEED: adhere the whale to the timer with glue dots. On the timer (time your shower, then try reducing it by a minute or two). T OWEL T AGSBe sure everyone knows whose towel is whose so that they stay on the hook and YOU WILL NEED: Bath towel and wash cloth Permanent, waterproof ink pad Letter stamps Cotton twill tape Pinking shears Iron Needle and threadUsing the stamps and ink pad, spell out 41/2 is dry, set it by covering the tape with a cloth and pressing it with a hot, dry iron. 1/4 Whale template (download the template at family funmag.com/printables) Timer Blue felt Red felt Cereal-box cardboard Black felt or googly eye Tacky glue Glue dots Cloth napkins Con-Tact paper Foam or stencil brush Fabric paint Sturdy cardboard shipping box Double-sided tape Patterned paper 1 sheet of card stock SNACK PACKSRepurpose a milk or juice carton into a reusable snack YOU WILL NEED: Half-gallon milk/juice carton (clean, dry) Colored/patterned duct tape Adhesive-backed Velcro squareMeasure, mark and cut the carton so three sides are 4 P APER MONSTER up the whole shebang and send it to the recycling center.YOU WILL NEED: 2 large brown paper bags (for a sturdier creature, use paper lawn bags) White and black paper Glue stick Masking tapeCut a large oval hole in one of the bags. Use a glue stick to attach a row of pointy, white paper teeth inside. Add eyes using black paper and the leftover white scraps. Open the second bag and inch or two. Seal the seam with masking tape.By Deborah Way FamilyFun magazine

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B2 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com ACROSS 1 Matter of faith 6 Statutes 10 Plays the harpy 14 Puckish sort 17 Brooks Robinson, notably 19 Johns 2008 running mate 20 Schubert classic 22 Precursor to reality shows like Punkd 24 Least likely to make a faux pas 25 Blackthorn fruit 26 Beach feature 27 Test in a small room, may be 29 Comes in last 30 Sploshed 32 Apothecarys bottle 33 Guard 34 Oh, I give up! 39 Singer Grant 40 Plant sometimes called a false shamrock 41 Australias lang. 42 Intimate 44 __ Martin Cognac 45 Collar target 47 Hank who voices Moe Szyslak 50 Soup holder 53 Annie couple? 54 Unlikely job for one with acrophobia? 57 Pet shop purchase 59 Perch 60 Spinner in the wind 61 Fell from grace 62 Slide preparations 64 North Pole explorer 66 Straightened (up) 67 Walk on By singer War wick 68 Narrated 69 Honda, even in reverse? 70 Reporter assigned to a pla toon, e.g. 71 Deceptive action 74 Dancer Charisse 77 Mario Kart console 78 Lampoon 80 Shells out 81 Botanical balm 82 Bath sponge 84 A pop 85 Seal, in a way 87 Girl o my heart 88 1952 Groucho Marx lm 94 Many a cottonwood 96 River nymph 97 Solo 98 Rose pest 99 Colorado resort 100 Smart __ 101 Nimbus 105 Most fair 107 General Lee, in The Dukes of Hazzard 110 Sexy sleepwear 111 Silas Marner novelist 112 Lacing aid 113 Opposite of six, on a die 114 Gather 115 Phoned 116 Uplift DOWN 1 Severinsen and a dwarf 2 Spoken 3 Futurist painter Severini 4 Without pretension 5 Fight of the Century con tender 6 Barely believable 7 ... such stuff / As dreams __ made on: Shak. 8 Wild African pig 9 Funny Girl actor 10 Italia seaport 11 Stratfords river 12 Brylcreem, e.g. 13 Request at a sitting 14 That proves it 15 King novel 16 Sitting duck 18 Swirling currents 19 __ Domingo 21 Without a key 23 Select 28 Edible tuber 31 Upsilon follower 32 __ code 33 Ice Road Truckers truck 34 Links cry 35 Team in a eld 36 Ewes guys 37 Second in command 38 Stareet captain 43 Legendary attendant of Charlemagne 45 Own (up) 46 Never __ Me Go: Kazuo Ishiguro novel 47 Slightly open 48 Screwball 49 Lowest gin card 51 Secondhand 52 Profs degree 54 Whats-his-face 55 Went like the dickens 56 Skirt 58 Really amazing, to a dude 59 Artist Magritte 61 Not taped 62 __ Valley, Calif. 63 Where the ends of 22-, 34-, 54-, 71-, 88and 107-Across and 14-Down can be found 64 Slipshod 65 Actress Sommer 66 Binds 67 Web revealer 68 OMG, stop telling me all this! 69 Call out 71 Does beau 72 Use 73 Give a hoot 74 Pinocchio goldsh 75 In __ Eyes: Peter Gabri el hit 76 Agcy. 79 Miles off 81 Stood before the court 83 Flashing irtatious looks 84 Self-playing instrument 85 Lozenge 86 Writer Rand 87 Ribbed fabric 89 Keeping up (with) 90 Kool Moe Dee genre 91 German ballads 92 Worker with many keys 93 Fridge juice: Abbr. 94 Cellist Casals 95 One doing sums 99 Cambodia setting 100 All autter 102 Hybrid citrus fruit 103 Snorkeling site 104 Affectedly cultured 106 Before, to Byron 108 Continuous babble 109 I see, at sea CA LL ME BY ANNE MARIE BRETHAUERSolution on B9 Metro News ServiceARIES A difcult challenge lies ahead, Aries. Save up your energy for the next few days, and keep socializing to a minimum for the time being. TAURUS The path you have been taking seems more stable, Taurus. This is a good way to go for a while. Y ou will nd others are looking to you more for advice. Its a role you enjoy. GEMINI Gemini, a string of bad luck is not as bad as it seems. Like most things, this, too, shall pass. Keep your chin up, and hang out with friends to keep your mind busy. CANCER A great oppor tunity presents itself this week, Cancer. Focus your energy on making the most of this opportunity, and you will be glad for having done so. LEO Leo, speak a little louder to ensure your voice is heard on an important issue this week. Y our in put is valuable, and those around you will be glad you spoke up. VIRGO Virgo, a new ca reer opportunity is coming your way soon. Make the most of this opportunity if change is something you feel you need at this point in your career. LIBRA Extra spending leaves you a little light in the wallet, Libra. Look for ways to generate some ex tra income or curtail your spending in the months ahead. SCORPIO Scorpio, a bumpy road will soon give way to greener pastures. Ride out this rough patch with a smile on your face, and it will pass quickly without wreaking any signif icant havoc. SAGITTARIUS Sagittari us, a relationship is blossoming and youre not sure in which direction it should be going. Trust your gut instincts, and things will work out ne. CAPRICORN Y ou are tougher than others sus pect, Capricorn, and you will prove your mettle with a difcult task that re quires all of your focus and energy to master. Others will be impressed. AQUARIUS Things are changing, but its for the best, Aquarius. Instead of going against the tide, let the waves take you where you need to go. Surprises are in store. PISCES Think about moving in a new direc tion, Pisces. Change can be a good thing, and you will benet from embracing change this time.FAMOU S B IRTHDAY SMarch 23, Jason Kidd, Athlete (41); March 24, Jim Parsons, Actor (41); March 25, Elton John, Singer (67); March 26; Jennifer Grey, Actress (54); March 27, Nathan Fillion, Actor (43); March 28, Lady Gaga, Sing er (28); March 29, Jill Goodacre, Model (49).Things are changing this week, but its for the best, AquariusWEEKLY HORO S COPE DEAR ABBY: My husband and I were both married previously. We have been together for seven years. When we rst started dating, we would some times go to one of the casinos after dinner as a fun outing. We never spent much money and went only occasionally. Our game of choice was the slot machine. Over the last few years, it seems like the casino has taken over our lives. We go there to the exclu sion of almost everything else and spend money we cant afford to lose. We both have the mentality that the big win is right around the corner. How can we break this habit? Its causing unbear able nancial and emotional stress in our mar riage. Im afraid it wont last another year. IN OVER MY HEAD IN NEW Y ORKDEAR IN OVER YOUR HEAD: In case you are not aware, there is a name for the habit you and your husband have acquired. Its compulsive gam bling, and its an addiction in much the same way as the abuse of alco hol or drugs. Fortunately, you have nally reached a point where you have re alized this fun outing is out of control. Gamblers Anonymous can help you break this destructive cycle. Its a 12step program based on the principles of Alcohol ics Anonymous. Its members support one another by sharing their strength and experiences with one another. The website is www.gamblersanony mous.org. Many people have ex perienced what youre going through, and this well-established organi zation has helped them. To locate a meeting near you, visit the website or check your telephone di rectory. DEAR ABBY: My mom and stepfather are divorc ing. They were married for 25 years. He was al ways a great father gure to me and has been a very active grandfather to my children. The reason for the divorce is his indel ity and the disrespect he has shown my mother. We are his only fami ly, and he wants to be involved with us as if nothing is different, even showing up at family gatherings. I want to be loyal to my mother and I do feel he betrayed us but I still recognize that he has also been good to me and the kids. He doesnt deserve to be cut out of our lives. How does one handle a situation like this? SEEING THE BIG PICTUREDEAR SEEING: Your stepdad may want to pre tend that nothing is different, but something IS different. He hurt your mother so badly they will no longer be married. If you want to be loy al to your mother and still have a relationship with him, then you need to have a talk with him. Ex plain that because he is no longer married to your mother, he will no longer be invited to family gath erings where your mother will be present. Be sure to tell him you regard him with affection, but will be seeing him separately for the foreseeable future.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phil lips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Fun outings at casino become costly compulsion DEAR A BB YJeanne Phillips M C Y K

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www.newssun.comSunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B3 CANDICE CHOIAP Food Industry WriterNEW YORK Gum seems as appealing as that sticky wad on the bottom of a shoe these days. Its not that Ameri cans still dont ever enjoy a stick of Trident or Or bit, the two most popular brands. They just arent as crazy about chomping away on the stuff as they once were, with U.S. sales tumbling 11 percent over the past four years. No one in the industry can pinpoint a single fac tor thats causing the decline the theories include an unwillingness to shell out $2 or more for a pack in the bad economy or that advertising veered too far from underlining gums cavity-ghting ben ets. But the biggest reason may be that people simply have more to chew on. From designer mints to fruit chews, candy compa nies have invented plenty of other ways to get a sug ar x or battle bad breath and anxiety. The alter natives dont come with gums unpleasant char acteristics either, like the question of whether to spit out or gulp the re mains. Theyre also less likely to annoy parents, co-workers or romantic interests. You talk to someone and theyre just chomping on gum, said Matt Smith, a 46-year-old who lives Albany, N.Y. and hates gum so much he refers to it only by its rst let ter. If you substitute gum for any other food, like mashed potatoes, would you nd that acceptable? Its disgusting. The gum chewing hab it dates as far back as the ancient Greeks but arrived in the U.S. in its modern form in the 1860s, accord ing to Mars Inc., the No. 1 player in the market with its Wrigley unit. Over the years, gum makers positioned it as a way to Kiss a Little Lon ger in the famous Big Red jingle, quit smoking, curb cravings or just make the chewer happier. Catchy slogans or characters in cluded the Doublemint Twins and Orbits blonde spokeswoman who ends commercials with Dirty mouth? Clean it up. It popped up in pop cul ture too. In the 1960s, a genre of music aimed at younger audiences came to be known as Bubble gum. In the 1975 movie One Flew Over the Cuck oos Nest, the silent Chief Bromden speaks for the rst time saying, Mmm, Juicy Fruit after the char acter played by Jack Nicholson gives him a stick of the gum. And Janet Jack son played a feisty, gumchewing beautician in the 1993 lm Poetic Justice. But gums image as a tasteless habit also stuck, with some high-prole gum chewing only making it worse. In 2003, Britney Spears gave an interview to CNN where a white piece of gum could be seen oat ing around her mouth as she elded questions on a range of topics, including the war in Iraq. Talk show host Wendy Williams has a gum wall backstage, where she sticks wads of it before walking out. In one episode, she told Patti La Belle that she could put her gum on the wall after the singer spit out a wad into her hand. Such imagery may be why gum is still a nono in business meetings or rst dates, according to Lizzie Post, the greatgreat granddaughter of et iquette expert Emily Post and co-author of Emily Posts Etiquette. My grandmother used to tell me, You look like a cow chewing cud, she said. The habit so bothered author Malachy McCourt that the extremely longshot gubernatorial candi date in 2006 told the New York Times he wanted to triple the tax on gum. The former Green Party nom inee explained that he didnt like the mess it cre ated on sidewalks and subways. The other aspect of it is that it makes people look so stupid, said McCourt, 82, in a recent interview. Gums bad image is one reason that alterna tives look more attractive. Theres also another perennial complaint: The avor runs out too fast, said Ryan Furbush, a 17-year-old from Sayre ville, N.J. who has stopped chewing gum in favor of chewy candies and choc olates. It may be why Mars said its gum declines have been most signi cant with people who are 25 and younger. In the meantime, Altoids mints, Welchs Fruit Snacks and countless other options have taken up space in the checkout aisles where most gum is purchased. Since peaking in 2009, U.S. gum sales have fall en 11 percent to $3.71 billion last year, according to market researcher Eu romonitor International. Thats even as overall can dy sales including gum, chocolate, mints and lic orice have climbed 10 percent to $31.53 billion. Over the next ve years, Euromonitor projects gum sales will drop anoth er 4 percent to $3.56 billion. Hershey, which makes Reeses, Kit Kat and Al mond Joy, is taking data to retailers to illustrate the slowing demand for gum. The idea is to en courage them to devote less of their candy aisles to it, and perhaps make way for more of its own prod ucts. Hershey, which also makes Ice Breakers mints and gum, is planning an other blow against gum: This fall, its slated to roll out a version of Ice Break ers that chews like a gum, but dissolves like a mint. Steven Schiller, glob al head of Hersheys nonchocolate candies includ ing mints, said it gives gum chewers an alterna tive that doesnt require disposal at the end. Gum makers are strat egizing too. The maker of Trident, whose total gum sales were down as much as 16 percent in developed markets at one point last year, has an online cam paign reminding people to run through the men tal checklist before leaving the house: phone, keys, gum. We know when people have gum in their pock et or backpack or desk, theyre much more like ly to chew it, said Stephanie Wilkes, who heads the North American can dy business for Mondelez, the No. 2 player in gum with Trident, Dentyne and Bubbalicious. Mars, which makes Big Red, Doublemint, Juicy Fruit and Orbit, is testing illuminated racks in candy aisles to make its gum and candy stand out more. The company said the racks have led to a 10 to 30 percent sales increase in tests. And after years of slow ly vanishing from shelves, Bazooka bubble gum last year relaunched its brand with new marketing and packaging. Distribution has since rebounded. Still, executives are re alistic about gums turnaround prospects. Were not expecting any dramatic recovery in the category anytime soon, Mondelez CEO Irene Rosenfeld said dur ing an earnings call last month.Follow Candice Choi at www. twitter.com/candicechoiChew on this: Gum loses its popGum sales sink as competition rises; celeb gum chewing helps make tasteless image stick MCTWhile there are still plenty of people chewing gum, sales have dropped 11 percent over the past four years. SEATTLE (AP) Seattle police on Thursday released previously unseen images showing drug par aphernalia from the scene of Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobains suicide 20 years ago. Police spokeswoman Re nee Witt said that a detective who recently reviewed the Cobain case les found several rolls of undevel oped lm that were taken at the suicide scene. The images released late Thursday were from that discovery. One shows a box containing a spoon and what look like needles on the oor next to half a cigarette and sunglasses. The other showed the paraphernalia box closed, next to cash, a cigarette pack and a wallet that appears to show Co bains identication. There was nothing earth-shattering in any of these images, Witt said. Police took another look at the Cobain suicide to be ready to answer questions in connection with next months anniversary, she said. Theres still a lot of interest in this case, Witt said. The detective went into the case les to refresh himself. The outcome of the case has not changed. Cobains body was dis covered in Seattle on April 8, 1994. Police release pictures from Cobain suicide scene M C Y K

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B4 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com LEANNE ITALIEAssociated PressNEW YORK Facebook executive Sheryl Sand berg and the Girls Scouts recently declared a cam paign to Ban Bossy, complete with Beyonce, Jane Lynch and Condo leezza Rice on video, a website full of tips and thousands of fans who pledged to stamp out that B word for girls. But the effort is also be ing questioned on a variety of fronts, including its focus on a word that not everyone considers dam aging, and for encouraging a behavior that not everybody believes equals leadership, as Ban Bossy contends. Harold Koplewicz, who heads a think tank called the Child Mind Insti tute, went on the hunt for evidence that the word bossy discourages girls from becoming lead ers, as Sandberg and the Girl Scouts believe. Ko plewicz asked rst-graders and sixth-graders at a public elementary school for gifted children how they feel about the word. Save for a couple of out liers, he found that most students he observed at Hunter College Elemen tary School in Manhattan didnt love the term bossy, but they didnt love the word leader, either. The kids also told him that acting bossy car ries a high risk of not being liked. They thought that being liked was better than being a leader, Ko plewicz said. The Ban Bossy cam paign cites a study by the Girl Scout Research Insti tute in which girls reported being twice as likely as boys to worry that lead ership roles would make them seem bossy. The fear of being seen as bossy is put forth as a primary rea son girls resist leadership roles. Alicia Clark, a Washing ton, D.C., psychologist whose specialties include parenting and couples counseling, lauded the campaigns suggested al ternatives to bossy and ideas for fostering leader ship in girls, but she sees a broader sense of social anxiety at play. Girls experience fears and inhibitions about so cial acceptance more acutely, in the form of stress, she said. In some cases, Mean, bossy girls, as my 13-year-old daugh ter describes them, are closer to being bullies than they are leaders. And we know that bullies fun damentally feel insecure, hate themselves for it and assert themselves over other insecure people as a way of garnering a sense of control and dominance. This is not leadership. This is intimidation. Caroline Price, a 17-year-old high school junior in Andover, Mass., loved Sandbergs book, Lean In, and admires many of the women who have jumped on Ban Bossy. But to me bossy isnt the same as leader ship. Bossy people arent people you want to fol low. Leaders inspire us to be better versions of our selves. Bossy means my way or the highway. Lead ership is when someone listens and encourages others around them, she said. Sometimes, Price add ed, leaders arent just the loudest the bossiest. There are different kinds of leaders and some lead more quietly, or by consensus or by example and so on. Like critics of Sandbergs Lean In movement urging working women to strive for leadership positions, the backlash against Ban Bossy is multifaceted. Some detractors think girls and women of the bossy ilk should own the word rather than demand to be free of it, not unlike the way queer has been reclaimed as celebratory among many people who are LGBTQ, for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning their sexual identities. Sandberg, Rice and oth er celebrity supporters of Ban Bossy recall how be ing called bossy made them feel diminished as kids and dinged their selfesteem, but what about kids who are not bossy, but are bossed around? The people who are bossy, sometimes they have an attitude, said Rose Wladis, 11, a Girl Scout and fth-grader in New York (not at Hunt er). I think being a leader is kind of showing people what to do, but being nice about it and encouraging people and, like, setting an example for them. But bossiness is just telling someone what to do. Koplewicz said research shows teen girls are more likely than boys to have symptoms of mental health issues, some relat ed to low self-esteem. Yet girls also tend to do bet ter than boys in school, getting better grades and earning degrees in high er numbers. Despite their academic success, wom en hold only a fraction of top executive positions, a point Lean In empha sizes. But were female execu tives seen as bossy growing up, and did they suffer under the weight of the word? At the moment there is no direct research that categorizes the word bossy as dangerous, said Koplewicz, who gener ally supports Sandbergs campaign to promote fe male leadership but not so much the focus on the lone word. The focus wasnt lost on Hillary Rodham Clin ton. She spoke to a gathering of book publishers Wednesday about a mem oir shes working on cover ing her years as U.S. secretary of state. Clinton threw out Bossy Pantsuit as a possible title, rifng on Tina Feys best-selling Bossypants, then she paused and earned laughs for her punch line: We can no longer say one of those words. Maura Ciammetti, 26, works for a small technol ogy company in suburban Philadelphia. She said be ing called bossy at times in college and work situa tions allowed her to step back and assess how I am approaching a situation. Was I too forceful? Am I listening to my peers? Am I looking at the big pic ture? Why is this person challenging me with this label? Instead of banning the word, Ciammetti said, what if we taught girls how to deal with their peers calling them names and other situations of ad versity. Julia Angelen Joy, 42, a Girl Scout troop leader and mother of four in Boi se, Idaho, works in public relations and marketing, where lots of women dominate and where she has encountered many a bossy female boss. She calls them chictators. She cant get behind the Ban Bossy project. Bossy can mean two things a strong lead er or a domineering nag. Using the word in a cam paign is a double-edge sword, Joy said.Beyond banning bossyIs there some middle ground in Sheryl Sandbergs splashy Ban Bossy campaign?Karl Mondon/Contra Costa Times/MCTSheryl Sandberg, chief operating ofcer of Facebook, delivers the luncheon keynote session to the 2011 Professional Business Women of California conference in San Francisco. RYAN J. FOLEYAssociated PressIOWA CITY, Iowa Nationwide Mutual In surance Co. did not discriminate against an employee who claims she was denied a room to pump breast milk and pressured to resign on her rst day back from maternity leave, a federal appeals court has ruled. Angela Ames, a former loss-mitigation special ist in Nationwides Des Moines ofce, did not meet the legal burden of showing she was treat ed so badly that any reasonable person would have resigned, the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Ap peals ruled Thursday. The decision means Ames wont get a trial on her claims of gender and pregnancy discrim ination. Ames claimed that on the morning she re turned from a twomonth maternity leave in July 2010, the com pany refused to let her use its lactation rooms because its policy re quired mothers to complete paperwork seeking security access and wait three days for pro cessing. She had been unaware of that require ment. A company nurse suggested she use a wellness room that was occupied at the time, but also cautioned that doing so might expose her milk to germs. Ames said she was in pain while waiting for that room to be vacat ed, when her supervisor informed her that she would be expect ed to work overtime to catch up on her work or face disciplinary action. Ames then went to her department head, Karla Neel, to see if she could nd her a place to lac tate, but was told that was not Neels responsi bility. Neel handed Ames a piece of paper and pen and told her to write her resignation, saying, I think its best that you go home to be with your babies, Ames claimed. Ames had also taken a two-month maternity leave after giving birth to her rst child in 2009. The U.S. Equal Em ployment Opportunity Commission led a friend-of-the-court brief urging the lawsuit be re instated after it was dismissed in 2012 by U.S. District Judge Robert Pratt. The remark that Ames should go home to be with your babies was evidence of discrimina tion because it invoked stereotypes about the role of women, commis sion lawyers wrote.Breastfeeding employee cant sue insurer, court says M C Y K

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www.newssun.comSunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B5 JESSE J. HOLLAND AND KIMBERLY HEFLINGAssociated PressWASHINGTON Black students are more likely to be suspended from U.S. public schools even as tiny preschoolers. The racial disparities in American education, from access to high-level class es and experienced teachers to discipline, were highlighted in a report re leased Friday by the Education Departments civil rights arm. The suspensions and disparities begin at the earliest grades. Black children repre sent about 18 percent of children in preschool pro grams in schools, but they make up almost half of the preschoolers suspend ed more than once, the report said. Six percent of the nations districts with preschools reported sus pending at least one preschool child. Advocates long have said get-tough suspen sion and arrest policies in schools have contribut ed to a school-to-prison pipeline that snags minor ity students, but much of the emphasis has been on middle school and high school policies. This was the rst time the depart ment reported data on preschool discipline. Earlier this year, the Obama administration is sued guidance encouraging schools to abandon what it described as over ly zealous discipline policies that send students to court instead of the prin cipals ofce. But even before the announcement, school districts have been adjusting policies that dis proportionately affect minority students. Overall, the data show that black students of all ages are suspended and expelled at a rate thats three times higher than that of white children. Even as boys receive more than two-thirds of sus pensions, black girls are suspended at higher rates than girls of any other race or most boys. The data doesnt explain why the disparities exist or why the students were suspended. It is clear that the Unit ed States has a great distance to go to meet our goal of providing opportu nities for every student to succeed, Education Sec retary Arne Duncan said in a statement. This critical report shows that racial dispar ities in school discipline policies are not only well documented among older students, but actually be gin during preschool, Attorney General Eric Holder said. Every data point represents a life impact ed and a future potentially diverted or derailed. This administration is moving aggressively to disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline in order to ensure that all of our young people have equal educational oppor tunities. Nationally, 1 million children were served in public preschool pro grams, with about 60 per cent of districts offer ing preschool during the 2011-2012 school year, ac cording to the data. The data show nearly 5,000 preschoolers were sus pended once. At least 2,500 were suspended more than once. Reggie Felton, interim associate executive direc tor at the National School Boards Association, called the rates unacceptable. He said theres more train ing going on to ensure teachers are aware of the importance of keeping students in school. Daniel Losen, director of the Center for Civil Rights Remedies for the Civ il Rights Project at UCLA, said the ndings are dis turbing because the suspended preschoolers are unlikely to be presenting a danger, such as a teenager bringing a gun to school. Almost none of these kids are kids that wouldnt be better off with some support from educators, Losen said. Just kicking them out of school is de nying them access to educational opportunity at such a young age. Then, as they come in for kinder garten, they are just that much less prepared. Losen said its appropri ate to discipline a 4-yearold, but a more appro priate response might be moving them to a differ ent educational setting with additional services. Most preschool kids want to be in school, Los en said. Kids just dont understand why they cant go to school. Kimbrelle Lewis, prin cipal of Raleigh-Bartlett Meadows Elementa ry School in Memphis, said shes never suspend ed a child in her schools preschool program and would only consider it in an extreme circum stance. She said her district provides behavior specialists and other ser vices to children with discipline problems so strategies can be worked out with teachers and parents if preschoolers need addi tional support. If there are racial dis parities among preschoolers disciplined, I do think its something to look at. I think its a conversa tion to have, said Lewis, who served on a commit tee with the National Association of Elementary School Principals looking at issues affecting younger school children. Dennis Van Roekel, the president of the Nation al Education Association teachers union, said in a statement that the nd ings show that too many children dont have equitable access to experienced and fully licensed teachers. The inequities detailed in this report have been caused, at least in part, by policies that disregard the professionalism of teach ing and create a revolving door of under-prepared and under-supported novices who leave before theyve reached the levels of mastery required to tru ly make a difference, Van Roekel said. Judith Browne Dian is, co-director of the Advancement Project, a think tank that specializes in social issues affecting minority communities, said the ndings didnt surprise her. I think most people would be shocked that those numbers would be true in preschool, because we think of 4and 5-yearolds as being innocent, she said. But we do know that schools are using zero tolerance policies for our youngest also, that while we think our children need a head start, schools are kicking them out in stead.Follow Kimberly Heing on Twitter: http://twitter.com/kheing Follow Jesse J. Holland on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jessejhollandBlack preschoolers more likely to face suspension MCTNationally, 1 million children were served in public preschool programs, with about 60 percent of districts offering preschool during the 2011-2012 school year, according to the data. The data show nearly 5,000 preschoolers were suspended once. At least 2,500 were suspended more than once.Every data point represents a life impacted and a future potentially diverted or derailed. This administration is moving aggressively to disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline in order to ensure that all of our young people have equal educational opportunities.Eric Holder U.S. attorney general Associated PressWASHINGTON For mer Florida Gov. Jeb Bush said Thursday the partisan divide isnt as wide when it comes to improving the nations higher educa tion system as it is in many other areas. Hillary Rodham Clin ton, who like Bush is often mentioned as a potential 2016 president candidate, accepted Bushs invitation to appear at a conference he is co-hosting on glob al higher education issues. It begins Monday in Irving, Texas. This isnt a political conference, Bush, a Re publican, said in a telephone interview when asked why he invited Clin ton, a Democrat who served as secretary of state. Theres a real consensus in our country that high er education is hugely important and if we can nd ways to improve quality and lower costs and pro vide greater access in the United States and around the world, its hard to ar gue against that, Bush said. The question is, how do you do it? Bush said its good that at the federal level and in many states there are dis cussions about ways to improve higher educa tion. He noted that among full-time college students, about 60 percent of stu dents graduate within six years. Initiatives that focus on better outcomes and help ing students get the courses they need to garner degrees of relevance quicker are a very good thing, Bush said. Jeb Bush seeks common ground in higher education The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN M C Y K

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B6 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com PLACES TO WORSHI PPlaces to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sun that is published Friday and Sunday. To place a listing in this directory, call the News-Sun at 3856155, ext. 596.ANGLIC A NNew L ife A nglican Fellowship, 10 N. Main Ave. (Womans Club), Lake Placid, FL 33852. Rev. Susan Rhodes, Deacon in Charge, (863) 243-3191; strhodes1020@yahoo.com. Sun day Worship, 10 a.m. Teaching, Holy Communion, Music, Fellowship, Healing Prayer. Pastoral and Spiritual.ASSEMB L Y OF GODC hrist Fellowship C hurch (A ssembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Await ing His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Wor ship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 471-0924. First A ssembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morn ing Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Fam ily Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431.BAPT I STA von Park L akes Baptist C hurch, 22600 N. Highlands Blvd., Avon Park, FL 33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ cen tered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist C hurch (GARB C ) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C17A (truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., and evening worship service is at 6 p.m. On Wednes days, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20s+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time be gins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church ofce at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist C hurch, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Wor ship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist C hurch, 1000 Max well St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Wor ship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Tele phone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: ofce@apfellowship.org; Web site, www.ap fellowship.org. First Baptist C hurch of A von Park, N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 453-6681. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Rev. Johnattan Soltero, Hispanic pastor; Joy Loomis, director of mu sic. Sunday Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:45 a.m.; Youth Choir, 4:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for both services. Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper, 5:15 p.m.; Childrens Choir, 5:45 p.m.; Youth Activities, 6 p.m.; Prayer Meet ing/Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Worship Choir Practice, 6 p.m.; Mission Programs for Children, 6:45 p.m. Hispanic Services: Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., worship service at 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. To watch services online, go to the website at www.fb cap.net. In the heart of Avon Park, for the hearts of Avon Park. First Baptist C hurch of L ake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both ser vices with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meet ing at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist C hurch of L ake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm St., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Website: www.fbclp. com. Email: information@fbclp.com. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contem porary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Wednesday Activities: Fam ily dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. The church is at 119 E. Royal Palm St., Lake Placid. For information, call 465-3721 or go to www.fbclp.com. First Baptist C hurch of L orida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School be gins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday wor ship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., fol lowed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the minis tries offered, call 655-1878. First Baptist C hurch, S ebring, 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Tele phone: 385-5154. Rev. Matthew D. Crawford, senior pastor; Rev. Nuno Norberto, associate pastor, minister of music and senior adults; and Dixie Kreulen, pre school director. Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.; Blended Service, 10:30 a.m.; Mis ion Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Call 385-4704. Website www.fbsebring.com Florida A venue Baptist C hurch, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Gird ley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children and youth at 6 p.m. and for adults at 6:30 p.m. I ndependent Baptist C hurch, 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday wor ship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. L eisure L akes Baptist C hurch, 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Wor ship service at 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 6 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist C hurch (GARB C ) 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Eve ning Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Mes senger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist C hurch, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 2143025. Afliated with the National Associa tion of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. S parta R oad Baptist C hurch, (S B C ) 4400 Sparta Road. Evangelist Roger Jaudon. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For infor mation, call 382-0869. S outhside Baptist C hurch (GARB C ) 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Ser vice, 10:45 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Awana kindergarten through fth grade, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bi ble Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Ofce phone, 385-0752. S pring L ake Baptist C hurch, Where the Bible is Always Open. Pastor Richard Schermerhorn, 7408 Valencia Road; 6552610. Assistant Pastor Ronald Smith, 3861610. On U.S. 98 at the Spring Lake Vil lage II entrance. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. for all ages; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednes day Mid-week Bible Study and Prayer Service, 6:30 p.m. Nursery available for all services. S unridge Baptist C hurch, (S B C ) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695.C ATHO LICO ur L ady of Grace C atholic C hurch, 595 E. Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vig il Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English. Sunday Life Teen Mass at 6 p.m. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. English confession at 3:30 p.m. Saturday; Spanish confession at 6:30 p.m. Religious Education Classes (September to May) are 9-10:20 a.m. Sun day for grades K through 5th. Grades 6th through Youth Bible Study are from 6:308:30 p.m. Wednesday. S t. C atherine C atholic C hurch, 820 Hick ory St., Sebring. Parrish ofce/mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 3850049, 385-6762 (Spanish); fax, 385-5169; email, ofce@stcathe.com; website, www. stcathe.com. School Ofce/Mailing, Princi pal Dr. Anna V. Adam, 747 S. Franklin St., Se bring, FL 33870; 385-7300; fax, 385-7310; email school@stcathe.com. School ofce hours 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday-Fri day. Clergy: Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F., frjose@stcathe.com or 385-0049; Parochial Vicar, Rev. Victor Caviedes, 385-3993; As sisting Priest (retired), Rev. J. Peter Sheehan; Decons, Rev. Mr. James R. McGarry and Rev. Mr. Max M. Severe. WEEKEND MASS SCHEDULE: Saturday: 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 and 10 a.m., 12 p.m. (Spanish), 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center), every third Sunday of the month at 2 p.m. (French Mass). Daily Mass: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m. Sacrament of Reconcilli ation: 7:15-7:45 a.m. rst Friday, 2:30-3:15 p.m. Saturday and 9-9:45 a.m. Sunday. Of ce Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. MondayFriday. S t. James C atholic C hurch, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Sunday 8 a..m. and 10 a.m. year round. Saturday Vigil 4 p.m. Weekdays 9 a.m. Holy days 9:30 a.m. (Vigil evening before at 7 p.m.) First Saturday of each month: Healing Mass, 9 a.m.CHR I ST I A NC ornerstone C hristian C hurch, (Saxon Hall) 1003 West Pine St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Love Christ Love People. Jon Carter, Music Minister. Sunday, 9 a.m. Bi ble Study; 10 a.m. Worship; Communion available each week. Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship Group. For more information call 453-7679. S ebring C hristian C hurch, 4514 Ham mock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher. Kristy Marvin, Child rens Director. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets at 1 p.m. Thursdays. Phone 382-6676. First C hristian C hurch (Disciples of C hrist), 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-0358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.CHR I ST I A N & M I SS I ON ARY A LLI A NC ET he A lliance C hurch of S ebring, 451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL 33875. Call 3821343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sun day services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Ser vice meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m.CHUR CH OF BRETHRE NC hurch of the Brethren, 700 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m. Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-1597.CHUR CH OF CHR I STA von Park C hurch of C hrist, 200 S. Forest Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Minister: Don Smith. Sunday Worship Services, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available at every service. Bible Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered class es for all ages. Church phone: 453-4692. H eartland church of C hrist, Lakeshore Mall Suite 42 (outside entrance), 901 U.S. Highway 27 N, Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday worship, 9 a.m. to noon; Wednesday, Bible study, 7 p.m. Evangelist Carl Ford, (863) 4022159. L ake Placid C hurch of C hrist, 1069 Hwy 27 North, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Mailing address is P.O. Box 1440, Lake Placid, FL 33862. Sunday morning worship is at 10 a.m. Sunday evening worship is 6 p.m. Bi ble class 9 a.m. Sundays and Wednesday evenings at 7 p.m. All are invited to join us. For more information, call the church at 863465-4636 or visit the website www.thelord sway.com/lakeplacidcofc/. S ebring Parkway C hurch of C hrist, 3800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870; 3857443. Minister: Kevin Patterson. Times of ser vice are: Sunday Bible Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening Ser vice, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Bible Class, 7 p.m. CHUR CH OF G ODC hurch on the R idge, Church of God, Anderson, Ind.; 1130 State Road 17 North, Sebring, FL 33870. Worship Service Sunday, 10 a.m.; Bible Study and Prayer, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Pastor Dr. Collet Varner, (863) 382-0773.CHUR CH OF N AZARE N EFirst C hurch of the Nazarene of A von Park P.O. Box 1118., Avon Park, FL 338251118. 707 W. Main St. Sunday: Sunday school begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning worship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening service at 6 p.m. Wednesday evening service is at 7 p.m. with special services for children and adults. If you need any more information, call 453-4851. C hurch of the Nazarene of L ake Plac id, 512 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852. Adult Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednes day evening: All church meal, 6 p.m.; Christian Life Study, 6:45 p.m. Winter Life groups pending. Call 446-1339. Pastor Tim Taylor.CHUR CHES OF CHR I ST IN CHR I ST I A N U NI O N C ommunity Bible C hurch C hurches of C hrist in C hristian Union, (Orange Blos som Conference Center) 1400 C-17A North (truck route), Avon Park. Presenting Jesus Christ as the answer for time and eterni ty. Sunday morning worship service, 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided. Junior Church ac tivities at same time for K-6 grade. Sunday School Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m. (Transportation available.) Sunday eve ning praise and worship service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and youth activities at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Everyone is welcome, please come worship with us. Tom Schwankweiler, Pastor. Phone 453-6052.EP I S C OPA LE piscopal C hurch of the R edeemer A von Park, 910 W. Martin St., Avon Park, FL 33825 (U.S. 27 across from Wells Motor Co.). Rev. Canon George Conger. Sunday services: Holy Communion at 9:30 a.m.; Saturday Bible study at 2:15 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Come and worship with us; we would love to meet you. Church ofce, 453-5664; fax, 4534853. Visit us at our website at redeem eravonpark.com. Email redeemer1895@ aol.com. Call the thrift store for hours open and donation pick up at 664-9668 or 453-5664. S t. A gnes E piscopal C hurch, 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Fa ther Scott Walker. Sunday Services: Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucha rist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek service on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bi ble study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always welcome. Church ofce 385-7649, for more information. S t. Francis of A ssisi A nglican E pis copal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-0051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Nelson, Rector. Wor ship: Sunday, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday Bible study at 9:15 a.m. Sunday School at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Worship 6 p.m. and Thursday 9 a.m. Holy Communion with Healing. Call the thrift store for hours open 699-0221.EVA NG E LIC A L FREE C HUR C H OF AMER IC AT he C hurch of the Way E F CA, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunda1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednes days. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teach ing of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way A place for you. Ofce Phone: 471-6140, Church Cell Phone: 2733674. Email: thewaychurch@ hotmail. com. Web site: www.TheWayChurch.orgG RA C E BRETHRE NGrace Brethren C hurch, 3626 Thunderbird Road, (863) 835-0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday services at 7 p.m. We offer Kid City Childrens Ministry through out all services, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married cou ples, prime-timers, and Bible studies in Spanish. Kid City Day Care, Preschool and After-School Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.6 p.m. (For registration call: 385-3111). Check us out on the Web at www.sebring grace.org.INDEPE N DE N TFirst C hristian C hurch, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.rstchris tianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church. Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Wednesday studies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events.IN TERDE N OM IN AT I O N A L World H arvest and R estoration Ministries, (non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd.,(non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd., Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-3771. Sunday service: Sunday School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rog ers.L UTHERANA tonement L utheran C hurch (ELCA) 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. Rev. Sharon Dorr and Deacon David Thoresen will be the Spiritual Leaders, alternating Sun days. Jim Helwig, organist. Worship service with the Holy Eucharist is at 9:30 a.m. ev ery Sunday. Birthday Sunday is the rst Sunday of each month after the service. Council meeting is on the rst Tuesday of each month. WELCA meets at noon second Tues day of the month with a light lunch. Labyrinth Prayer Garden is open to the public 24 hours a day, seven days a week. When in need of prayers or to talk to God, come to the Gar den. Come and grow with us; we would love to meet you and your family. Dont worry about how you look. Jesus went to the tem ple in a robe and sandals. Quilting classes every Monday at 6 p.m. Looking for quilters or people willing to learn. Call 840-3303. C hrist L utheran C hurch A von Park LCM S 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School past the four-way stop sign. Sunday Divine Wor ship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with tradition al Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come wor ship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at (863) 471-2663 or see christlutheranavonpark. org. Faith L utheran C hurch LCM S ,2740 Lakeview Dr, Sebring; Church phone: 3857848; Faith Child Development Center: 385-3232. Sunday Traditional Worship Ser vice: 8 a.m.; Sunday Praise Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.; Communion served 1st, 3rd & 5th Sunday. Sunday School & Bible Classes: 9:15 a.m. Worship Svc. Broad cast at 8 a.m. on WITS 1340AM each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies, Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. All are warm ly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good S hepherd L utheran C hurch (AALC) American Association of Luther an Churches, 3240 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Bi ble Study, 9 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 385-2346. New L ife E vangelical L utheran C hurch, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congre gation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Luke Willitz at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlifesebring.com. R esurrection L utheran C hurch ELCA, 324 E. Main St., at Memorial Drive, Avon Park. Pastor Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Sun day worship 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Sunday School at 9:15 a.m. Coffee and fellowship following 10:30 a.m. service. Wednesday Worship Service is at 7 p.m. Open Com munion celebrated at all services. Gods Work, Our Hands. T rinity L utheran C hurch LCM S 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots PreSchool director Education Hour, 8:45 a.m.; Worship service, 10 a.m. Holy Com munion each rst and third Sunday. Childrens Church scheduled during worship service, 4-year-olds through fth grade. Nursery provided during worship service for infants to 3-year-olds. Seasonal MidWeek Services each Wwednesday eve ning during Advent and Lent. Call church ofce at 465-5253 or visit the website at www.Trinitylutheranlp.com. Other ac tivities and groups include: Choir; Ladies Guild and LWML; Mens Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies; Trinity Tots Pre-school, and Youth Group.N O N -DE N OM IN AT I O N A LBible Fellowship C hurch, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed rst and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 yrs through 5th grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church of ce 385-1024. C alvary C hurch, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening service, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small friendly church waiting for your visit. C hristian T raining Ministries I nc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. A nursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Chris tian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational minis try. Linda M. Downing, minister, lindadowning@live.com. Casey L. Downing, associate minister, caseydowning@hotmail. com. Church phone: 314-0482. Web site: www.ctmforme.com C rossroads of L ife,148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852; Tel. 863655-9163. The place of your Divine ap pointment. We expect our supernatural God to transform our lives through His power and grace. Come, learn of His plan and destiny for you. With His plan we re ceive His provision along with His perfect timing and opportunity. What you have longed for, but have been missing, can now be received. The direction you have been thirsty for will suddenly quench your parched soul. Come to experience what you have been missing for so long empowerment in every area of life. We teach, train and send forth to win souls. You dont speak English no problema. We have a Spanish interpreter. We look forward to fellowship and worship with you at 7 p.m. every Wednesday. Pastoers Gil and Rosa Benton (Faith Never Fails). Grace Bible C hurch, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone, 382-1085. Dustin Woods, lead pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Monday, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry. www.GBCco nnected.org Faith C enter West Ministry, Restor ing Lives, Families & Communities. In the Banyan Plaza at 2349 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. Pastors Leroy and JoAnn Taylor the public to worship on Sundays at 11 a.m. for Praise & Wor ship and on Wednesdays at 7 p.m. for Bible study and prayer. Children class es are available for all services. Ministries for youth, men and women are held throughout the month. Please attend these Spirit-lled services. Moving For ward in Unity. Church ofce, 385-1800 or 655-2748. H ighlands C ommunity C hurch, a ca sual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. New Beginnings C hurch of S ebring, worshiping at The Morris Chapel, 307 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Pastor Gary Kindle. Bible study every Sunday, 9 a.m. Blended Church Service, 10:15 a.m. Phone (863) 835-2405. newbeginningschurchofsebring.com Be gin your week with us. T he L ords S entinel Fellowship C hurch, 148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid (at Lake Placid Christian School), Pastor Juanita Folsom. Sunday morning service, 10:30 a.m.; Monday, Sentinel School of Theology, 7 p.m.; Church ser vice, Tuesday, 7 p.m. More information at www.juanitafolsomministries.com. Union C hurch, 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday traditional worship service is at 7:45 a.m. (October through Easter) and 9 a.m. Contemporary Sunday worship service is at 10:45 a.m. Nursery and childrens church available. Wednesday night worship with Pastor Ti ger Gullett and CrossTalk with Pastor Bill Breylinger at 6 p.m. Breakfast and lunch menus at Solid Grounds. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Ofce: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. Unity L ife E nrichment C entre,new lo cation, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; email unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www. unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Chil drens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister trans forming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. RELIGION M C Y K

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www.newssun.com Sunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B7 PRESBYTERIANCovenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. Pastor Tom Schneider. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Sunday morning worship: Traditional ser vice, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday school, 9:15 a.m. Wednes day evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Childrens/Youth Group, 5:30-7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato. net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Ofce hours: 8:3012:30 a.m. Monday-Friday.First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6 p.m. each Wednesday; Children Ministry and Youth Group, 6 p.m. each Sunday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. 385-0107. Email: faith@ strato.net, Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Fellowship Time, 10:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m. Tuesday: Youth Groups meet for devotions/Bible study, crafts, sport activities and dinner. Middle and high school, 3:306:30 p.m. Elementary School, 4-5:30 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m. Choir Rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. A nursery is available during worship. Call the church ofce for more information and other classes. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com, 117 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday Traditional Worship, 8 and 9:30 a.m.; Contemporary Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. Wednesday evenings: Adult small group Bible Study 7 p.m. (Nursery available), Youth Group (6-12th grades) 7 p.m., nursery and childrens ministry, 7 p.m. Family Biblical Counseling available by appointment. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September through June. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. rst Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 6550713; e-mail, springlakepc@embarqmail.com, Web site, http://slpc.embarqspace.com.SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTISTAvon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com, Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. A sale takes place the rst Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Frank Gonzalez. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALL ARE WELCOME. Associate Pastor is Ryan Amos. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Nathan Madrid.THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTSThe Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 3829092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-1p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: rst and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m.THE SALVATION ARMYThe Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www. salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODISTFirst United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., 105 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870. Pastor John A. Bryant. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church, 200 S. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759, Rev. Gary Pendrak, Pastor. Sunday School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Bible study every Wednesday at 6 p.m. Visit us at our church website: www.fumcap. org. Memorial United Methodist Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL, 33852. Rev. Tim Haas, pastor. Rev. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral assistant. Rev. Jerry McCauley, visitation pastor. Sunday worship services: Worship Service, 8:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m. We offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth programs, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship. We are a congregation that wants to know Christ and make Him known. Check out our church website at www.memorialumc.com or call the church ofce at 465-2422. Lakeview Christian School, VPK to Grade 5, 465-0313. St. John United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Adult Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all services. Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring. org Spring Lake United Methodist Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church ofce phone: 655-0040.UNITED CHURCH OF CHRISTEmmanuel United Church of Christ, Jesus didnt reject people, neither do we. Join us for worship every Sunday at 9:30 a.m. and youll be embraced by a compassionate congregation that is all-inclusive. Were at the corner of Hammock and Hope. Choir and Bell Choir practice on Wednesday; Bible studies throughout the week. 471-1999; sebringemmanuelucc.com.P LACES T O WO RS HI P RELIGION A playground that our grandchildren enjoy has a walking path that twists and turns leading young explorers through a wood land area. Yet with all there is to do, they keep asking what were doing next. They dont want this adventure to end, but they anticipate what might take its place. Whats next? Its a good question that keeps us on our toes anticipating the future. Young children arent the only ones wanting to know whats around the next bend in the road. I want to know. Teenagers want to know. Young adults want to know. Were hungry to live lives that are meaningful and adventuresome. We long to take on the next challenge and feel that sense of ac complishment. Recently our son taught a lesson on Whats next? He and his wife minister to the young adults in their congregation in Colora do. These young men and women long to know what Gods will is for their lives. Theyre on the verge of leaping into that produc tive time of life and they want to experience all God has for them. But sometimes its dif cult to discern. And they dont want to miss it. Thats where the story of Caleb gave them some food for thought. In Joshua 14:6-12, NKJV, Caleb reminds Joshua how when they spied out the land years before he be lieved God that they could take it. But the others were afraid and convinced ev eryone else not to follow Calebs advice. So, they wandered in the wilder ness for 45 years. Whats next? Calebs se cret to his longevity, vitality and purpose at age 85 is re vealed in verse 9b. Moses promised that Ca leb would receive his inheritance, because you have wholly followed the Lord my God. Caleb says to Joshua, Behold, the Lord has kept me alive, as He said, these forty-ve yearsand now, here I am this day, eightyve years old. As yet I am as strong this day as on the day that Moses sent me; just as my strength was then, so now is my strengthboth for going out and for coming in. The key that unlocks the future is found in whol ly following the Lord God. Our son termed it long obedience in one direc tion. God is our Keeper and Preserver. Psalm 121:8 echoes Calebs words, The Lord shall preserve your going out and your coming in from this time forth, and even forevermore. Please God and live the empowered life (Gods power within) that will un fold before you. SelahJan Merop of Sebring is a News-Sun correspondent.Obidence in one direction P AUSE & C ONSIDERJan Merop WALL STREET JOURNAL BEST-SELLERSFICTION1. Rush Revere and the First Patriots by Rush Limbaugh (Threshold Edi tions) 2. Insurgent by Veroni ca Roth (Katherine Tegan Books) 3. Allegiant by Veroni ca Roth (Katherine Tegen Books) 4. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green (Dutton Books 5. Power Play by Dani elle Steel (Delacorte) 6. Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss (Random House) 7. One Fish Two Fish by Dr. Seuss (Random House) 8. The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss (Random House) 9. The Bootlegger by Clive Cussler and Justin Scott (Putnam Adult) 10. Big Nate: In the Zone by Lincoln Pierce (HarperCollins)NONFICTION1. The Blood Sugar Solution 10-Day Detox Diet by Mark Hyman (Little, Brown) 2. Jesus Calling by Sar ah Young (Thomas Nelson) 3. Uganda Be Kidding Me by Chelsea Handler (Grand Central Publishing) 4. Dark Souls II Collec tors Ed. Strategy Guide by Future Press (Brady Games) 5. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath (Gallup) 6. Minecraft: Essential Handbook by Scholastic (Scholastic) 7. Grain Brain by David Perlmutter (Little, Brown) 8. Killing Jesus: A Histo ry by Bill OReilly & Martin Dugard (Henry Holt & Co) 9. The Body Book by Cameron Diaz (Harper Wave) 10. The Hard Thing About Hard Things by Ben Horowitz (HarperBusiness)FICTION E-BOOKS1. Divergent by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books) 2. Insurgent by Veroni ca Roth (Katherine Tegen Books) 3. Night Broken by Patri cia Briggs (Ace) 4. Aftershock by Syl via Day (Harlequin Cosmo Red-Hot Reads) 5. Allegiant by Veroni ca Roth (Katherine Tegen Books) 6. Power Play by Dani elle Steel (Delacorte) 7. Hawaii by James Mi chener (Dial Press) 8. Be Careful What You Wish For by Jeffrey Archer (St. Martins Press) 9. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green (Dutton Books) 10. The Husbands Se cret by Liane Moriarty (Amy Einhorn Books/Put nam)NONFICTION E-BOOKS1. Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup (Harp erCollins) 2. percent Happier by Dan Harris (It Books) 3. The Nazi Ofcers Wife by Edith Hahn Beer (Harper Collins) 4. Zen and Art of Motor cycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig (Harper Touch) 5. Uganda Be Kidding Me by Chelsea Handler (Grand Central Publishing) 6. Unbroken by Lau ren Hillenbrand (Random House) 7. I Will Never Forget by Elaine C. Pereira (Elaine C. Pereira) 8. Free country by Bill OReilly and Martin Dugard (Henry Holt & Co.) 9. Killing Jesus: A Histo ry by Bill OReilly & Martin Dugard (Macmillan) 10. Excuses Begone! by Wayne W. Dyer (Hay House) USA TODAY BEST-SELLERS 1. Divergent by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books) 2. Insurgent by Veroni ca Roth (Katherine Tegen Books) 3. Allegiant by Veroni ca Roth (Katherine Tegen Books) 4. Rush Revere and the First Patriots by Rush Limbaugh (Threshold Edi tions) 5. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green (Duttons Children) 6. Night Broken by Patri cia Briggs (Ace) 7. Power Play by Dani elle Steel (Delacorte) 8. Aftershock by Syl via Day (Harlequin Cosmo Red-Hot Reads) 9. Be Careful What You Wish For by Jeffrey Archer (St. Martins Press) 10. Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup (Harp erPerrenial) 11. Divergent Series Complete Box Set by Ve ronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books) 12. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak (Knopf Books for Young Readers) 13. Hawaii by James Mi chener (Dial Press) 14. Mockingjay by Su zanne Collins (Scholastic) 15. Stone Cold by C.J. Box (Putnam Adult) 16. The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd (Viking Adult) 17. The Goldnch by Donna Tartt (Little, Brown) 18. The Chance by Robyn Carr (Harlequin MIRA) 19. The Husbands Se cret by Liane Moriarty (Amy Einhorn Books/Putnam) 20. The Bootlegger by Clive Cussler and Justin Scott (Putnam Adult)BOOKS M C Y K

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B8 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com BILL DRAPERAssociated PressKANSAS CITY, Mo. For much of the past three decades, pit bulls have been widely regarded as Americas most dangerous dog the favorite breed of thugs, drug dealers and dog-ghting rings, with a fearsome reputation for unprovoked, sometimes deadly attacks. Hostility toward pits grew so intense that some cities began treating them as the canine equivalent of assault ries and pro hibited residents from owning them. But attitudes have soft ened considerably since then as animal activists and even television shows cast the dogs in a more positive light. The image makeover has prompted many states to pass new laws that forbid commu nities from banning specic breeds. And it illustrates the power and persistence of dog-ad vocacy groups that have worked to fend off pit bull restrictions with much the same zeal as gun-rights groups have defeated gun-control measures. Lawmakers are real izing that targeting dogs based on their breed or what they look like is not a solution to dealing with dangerous dogs, said Lisa Peters, a spokeswoman for the American Kennel Club. Seventeen states now have laws that prohib it communities from adopting breed-specif ic bans. Lawmakers in six more states are consider ing similar measures, and some cities are reviewing local policies that classify pit bulls as dangerous an imals. Pit bull advocates hail the changes as recogni tion that breed-specic laws discriminate against dogs that are not inher ently aggressive or dangerous unless they are made to be that way by ir responsible owners. The dogs foes complain that their message is be ing drowned out by a wellfunded, well-organized lobbying effort in state capitols. The debate puts millions of pit bull own ers up against a relatively small number of people who have been victimized by the dogs. Ron Hicks, who spon sored a bill in the Missouri House to forbid breedspecic legislation, said he was surprised when nobody spoke against his proposal last month at a committee hearing. I gured a few parents would be there who would bring tears to my eyes, the Republican said. Would it have changed my opinion or what I be lieve in? No. A version of Hicks leg islation was endorsed by a House committee last month and needs to clear another committee be fore a full House vote. The state Senate is considering a comparable bill, as are lawmakers in Utah, South Dakota, Washington, Ver mont and Maryland. In Kansas, the commu nities of Bonner Springs and Garden City repealed their pit-bull bans earlier this year. Summer Freeman did not know there was a ban when she moved to Bon ner Springs last year after a divorce. She panicked when an animal-control ofcer discovered her pet and told her she had 15 days to get rid of the dog named Titan or move out of town. I think of him like my son, she said. Hes my dog-son, I guess you could say. Hes at my hip all the time. Hes just a big baby that wouldnt hurt a y. Freeman was forced to leave Titan at a shelter in Lawrence for nine months until she successfully fought to overturn the law in January. For dog owners and pit bull opponents alike, the battle is as deeply person al as any gun-control or religious issue. Each side accuses the other of lying, exploiting emotions and using bullying tactics. Pit bull owners insist their dogs are harmless, loving family members that shouldnt be blamed for something they didnt do. To opponents, they are a volatile breed whose ge netics drive them to kill more than two dozen peo ple in the U.S. each year, many of them young chil dren. Popular television shows such as Pit Boss and Pit Bulls and Parol ees on Animal Planet glorify the animals and minimize the tragedies that occur when pit bulls turn on humans, pit bull oppo nents say. Everything is telling us these animals are safe if you raise them right, said Jeff Borchardt, an East Troy, Wis., man whose 14-month-old son was mauled to death a year ago by two pit bulls that tore the child from the arms of their owner, who was baby-sitting. My sons dead because of a lie, because of a myth. My life will never be the same. The two dogs that killed Borchardts son had lived with their owner since soon after they were born, were well-cared for and had no history of aggres sive behavior, he said. Both had been spayed or neutered. That contradicts the contention that only mis treated, neglected or abused pit bulls attack people. Colleen Lynn, found er of DogsBite.org, pointed to a friend-of-the-court brief her organization submitted in a 2012 case in which the Maryland Court of Appeals declared pit bulls inherently dan gerous. Appellate courts agree with us. Doctors and sur geons agree with us. That is credibility right there, Lynn said. We also have the support of three divi sions of the U.S. military, huge, massive bodies in the U.S. government. The Marines, Army and Air Force all have banned dangerous dogs includ ing pit bulls and rottweilers from their bases because of the unrea sonable risk they pose to safety, Lynn said. On the other side stand the American Bar Associ ation and National Animal Control Association, which oppose breed-spe cic laws because they are discriminatory against a type of dog that isnt really a single breed. Three main breeds Staffordshire bull terrier, American pit bull terri er and American Staffordshire terrier along with mixes of those breeds are generally considered pit bulls. But many muscular, square-jawed, boxer-type dogs often are misidentied as pit bulls, making breed-specic bans hard to enforce. And because fatal pit bull attacks are a rari ty compared with other causes of death such as auto accidents, dog ad vocates argue that breedspecic bans amount to legislative overkill. All communities de serve comprehensive dog laws that demand respon sible dog ownership and that hold reckless owners accountable when their poor decisions wind up getting other dogs or oth er people hurt, said Ledy Vankavage, a top lobbyist for the Best Friends Ani mal Society. Don Burmeister, as sistant city attorney for Council Bluffs, Iowa, led the effort to pass a local pit bull ban that took ef fect in 2005. He recalled rst reading about the is sue in the July 27, 1987, issue of Sports Illustrated, which carried a full-cov er shot of an angry pit bull baring its teeth. Across the top, it said BEWARE OF THIS DOG. After the Council Bluffs ban went into place, the number of pit bull attacks that resulted in hospital ization plummeted from 29 in 2004 to zero the past few years proof, Bur meister said, that breedspecic bans work. The opposition to pit bull bans, he added, is a sign that many Ameri can pet owners have lost touch with reality.Pit bulls benet from softening attitudes, advocacy groupsMCTA pit bull looks from its cage at the Waukegan Police Animal Control facility in Waukegan, Ill.No longer Americas most dangerous dog? M C Y K

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www.newssun.comSunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B9 JENNIFER KAYAssociated PressMIAMI Aside from being scarily large and voracious, Burmese py thons also are really good at nding their way home, according to new research conducted in Floridas Ev erglades. The discovery about py thons unusual navigational abilities doesnt much help wildlife agen cies desperately trying to curb the invasive snakes population in the frag ile wetlands. It might be something reptile own ers should think about, though, if theyve consid ered illegally dumping an unwanted pet python in the wild. This is like the differ ence between homing pigeons and other birds, said the University of Flor idas Frank Mazzotti, one of the researchers for the study being published Wednesday in Biology Let ters, a journal of Britains Royal Society. Mazzotti and oth er researchers have been studying what pythons eat and trying to nd a way to keep their popula tion from growing. In 2006 and 2007, they captured 12 adult pythons in Ever glades National Park and surgically implanted radio transmitters in the snakes to track their movements. Six of the snakes were released in areas 13 to 22 miles from where they originally were captured. To the researchers sur prise, the snakes gured out which way was home, and they stayed on track for months even when temperatures dropped and the cold-blood ed snakes were less active. Unlike other snakes, the pythons moved with a purpose through their landscape instead of slith ering randomly. It took the snakes three to nine months to get back to their original locations, according to the research ers. Little is known about pythons movements in their native habitats in India and other parts of Asia, and researchers had expected the snakes to es tablish new home ranges where they were released, said Shannon Pittman of the University of Missouri-Columbia, the studys lead author. Its not clear how the snakes mapped out their routes whether they relied on smell, light or some kind of magnetic force. If researchers can gure out what the snakes look for in the landscape, then maybe theyll have an easier time spotting pythons in the wild, Maz zotti said. I cant say its going to provide us with any mag ical management solutions. Its really neat that the pythons do this, Maz zotti said. Along with Pittman and Mazzotti, the studys au thors include researchers from Davidson College, the U.S. Geological Sur vey and the National Park Service. Estimates for how many pythons now call South Florida home vary wildly, ranging from several thousands to 100,000 or more. The tan, splotchy snakes can disappear in the vast wetlands, and re searchers say theyll fail to see a python theyre track ing with a radio tracking device until theyre nearly standing on it. Floridas population of Burmese pythons like ly developed from pets let loose either intentionally or in the aftermath of Hur ricane Andrew in 1992. State and federal of cials have evaluated specially designed traps, dogs trained to sniff out py thons and a massive amateur hunt to try and get a handle on the invasive py thon population. So far, only cold weather and ex otic pet amnesty days, where people can relin quish non-native species with no questions asked, have reliably delivered py thons to ofcials. Florida prohibits pos session or sale of the py thons for use as pets, and federal law bans the im portation and interstate sale of the species.Follow Jennifer Kay on Twitter at www.twitter.com/jnkay.Researchers learn pythons have good homing skills MCTNew research shows that Burmese pythons have the ability to nd their way home. SUE MANNINGAssociated PressLOS ANGELES The large cat that attacked a baby and trapped an Or egon family in a bedroom touched off an Internet uproar that worries Jack son Galaxy, star of Animal Planets My Cat from Hell. Cats dont become fero cious felines that turn on their families for no rea son, says the cat behavior expert, who is heading to Portland soon to work with the 4-year-old partHimalayan pet named Lux. Galaxy will lm the visit for his shows fth season, which kicks off April 26. Every parental site on the Internet blames the cat for this confrontation. Every pet site blames the family, he said, adding that something is wrong if the cat is acting out. We need to step away from the hysteria. There is a story behind all this. Dont assume anything. Lux became a world wide phenomenon after owner Lee Palmer called 911 and said the cat had cornered him, his girl friend, their baby and the family dog inside a room. Palmer says his 7-month-old pulled Luxs tail, and he kicked the an imal after it scratched the child. Then, the cat just went off over the edge, Palmer told an emergen cy dispatcher after the family barricaded them selves. Hes charging us, Palmer said, as the cat was heard screeching in the background. Ofcers arrived and caught Lux with a dog snare. Palmer said the cat had a history of violence, but the family kept Lux un til Monday, when they turned him over to a Portland-area shelter. But the family assured Ani mal Planet they were going to keep the cat and agreed to therapy with Galaxy. Palmer didnt return a call from The Associated Press seeking comment Tuesday. There are many reasons a cat can turn aggressive, and there is no universal way to deal with it, Gal axy said. But the star feline behaviorist provided ve ways to tame out-ofcontrol cats: Never leave a young child unsupervised with a cat. Take it to a vet at least once a year. If a cat is acting suspiciously, the owner needs to pay at tention. Know what suspicious looks like, Galaxy said. If theyre not feeling well, cats will so cially withdraw themselves, or they will lose weight, or they will gain weight, or theyll be howling in the middle of the night when they nev er did before. Ive known cats who acted out similarly to Lux because of an abscessed tooth, a brain tumor, hy perthyroidism or diabetes. Make sure cats can literally climb out of a sit uation. Having a space up high, like a cat condo, to get away from children and other pets is cru cial, Galaxy said. Make sure the cat can make the choice to get away from the kid, he said. Timeouts are good things. We associate timeouts with punish ment, but in the world of cats, timeout is not a punishment. They can go to a designated place where they can set tle down, come back to a peaceful moment or ground themselves, he said. Stop ghts between felines with timeout drills. With simple pieces of cardboard, left strate gically around the house, you can stop a ght be tween two cats. Put the cardboard between them, blocking their vision and providing a moment of disorientation when you can lead them to their timeout spot. Its espe cially important to have the drills with aggressive cats. Galaxy said he was go ing to Portland to act as Luxs advocate and nd out whats wrong. I have no idea what made Lux aggressive, he said. It could be a chem ical imbalance, a history of stressful environments or because he was kicked. If you want a blan ket statement on how to deal with aggression, how about, Dont set the cat up for failure, he said. The behaviorist, who has worked with tens of thousands of cats, said the thing that bothered him most about Lux was his continued aggression the day Palmer called 911, including the ani mals ongoing assault on the door even though the threat was gone. But the word attack doesnt sit well with Gal axy because 75 percent of the time, its tied to a grouchy mood or a warn ing, he said. If I have a headache, I wont be the nicest guy in the world. I may snap at you, he said. This may have been Luxs way of snapping. Hypothetically speaking, someone pulling his tail may have been the last straw.Cat whisperer heading to Oregon after attackJackson Galaxy to work with animal that trapped family C R O SS WO RD SOL UT I O N M C Y K

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B10 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com CARLA K. JOHNSONAssociated PressCHICAGO For uninsured people, the nations new health care law may offer an escape from wor ry about unexpected, astronomical medical bills. But for Stephanie Payne of St. Louis, who already had good insurance, the law could offer another kind of escape: the chance to quit her job. At 62, Payne has worked for three decades as a nurse, most recently traveling house to house caring for 30 elderly and disabled patients. But shes ready to leave that behind, in cluding the job-based health benets, to move to Oregon and promote her self-published book. She envi sions herself blogging, doing radio interviews and speaking to seniors groups. I want the freedom to t that into my day without squeezing it into my day, she said. One of the selling points of the new health care plan, which has a March 31 enrollment deadline, is that it breaks the link between af fordable health insurance and having a job with benets. Payne believes shell be able to replace her current coverage with a $400to $500-a-month plan on Oregons ver sion of the new insurance exchange system set up under the law. Federal experts believe the new insurance option will be a power ful temptation for a lot of job-weary workers ready to bail out. Last month, congressional budget ana lysts estimated that within 10 years, the equivalent of 2.5 million fulltime workers could be working less because of the expanded coverage. But is the new option a gamble? Thats a matter of debate, not only among the politicians who are still arguing furiously over the laws merits, but among economists and industry experts. We dont know what the future of exchange insurance will be, said economist Douglas Holtz-Eakin, president of the American Action Forum, a center-right public poli cy institute. Premiums should remain stable if enrollment picks up and broadens to include younger, healthier people. But if older, sick er people are the vast majority of customers, prices eventually could spike. For Mike Morucci, 50, the idea of leaving his information technology job and its health benets is terri fying, he said. But he decided to take the plunge after reviewing the range of cov erage available at different price points. Tax credits will help those with moderate incomes pay their insurance premiums. And cover age is guaranteed even for those with pre-existing conditions. Twen ty-ve states also agreed to expand their Medicaid programs, providing health care for more low-income people. It denitely freed up my thinking when I thought, Do I want to give this a go? Morucci, of Ellicott City, Md.With health law, workers ponder the I-Quit option DAVID CRARY AND JOHN HANNAAssociated PressTOPEKA, Kan. Fred Phelps Sr. led his small To peka church for more than two decades in a belli cose crusade against gays and lesbians, saying they were worthy of death and openly declaring often at military funerals that the U.S. was doomed be cause of its tolerance of homosexuality. But in targeting grieving families of troops killed overseas, taunting peo ple entering other churches and carrying signs with anti-gay slurs and vul gar language or symbols, Phelps and his Westboro Baptist congregation cre ated public circuses that may have helped the gayrights movement. Following Phelps death Wednesday at age 84, some gay-rights advocates suggested that he and his church created sympathy for lesbians, gays, bisexu als and the transgendered. Religious leaders who op pose gay marriage also said the pastors tactics clouded the debate over such issues and put them on the defensive in dis cussing both policy and faith. The world lost some one who did a whole lot more for the LGBT com munity than we realize or understand, said Cathy Renna, a longtime con sultant to LGBT groups. He has brought along al lies who are horried by the hate. So his legacy will be exactly the opposite of what he dreamed. Phelps founded the church in the 1950s, and it has drawn much of its small congregation from his extended family. Its rise to national and even international notoriety began in the early 1990s, as it picketed against gays and lesbians, then pro tested funerals of AIDS victims and, eventually, fallen soldiers. The protests sparked outrage, with the federal government and lawmak ers in more than 40 states passing specic laws to limit the protests and lo cal residents using various tactics including lining up to block views of the protesters to protect grieving families. Conservative religious leaders regularly de nounced Phelps, wor ried that his relentless attacks would be perceived as representing the Chris tian case against same-sex relationships. At the 2003 annual Southern Bap tist Convention, leaders spent a session drawing a distinction between their opposition to same-sex unions and Phelps pro tests. Phelps called his church Baptist but had no ties with the Southern Baptist Convention or any other mainstream Baptist group. Westboro Baptist is to Baptist Christianity what the Book of Mormon Broadway play was to the Latter-Day Saints, said the Rev. Russell Moore, who leads the Southern Baptist Conventions Eth ics and Religious Liberties Commission. They were kind of a performance art of vitriolic hatred rather than any kind of religious organization. Phelps professed not to care what anyone thought of his church. He said in a 2006 interview with The Associated Press that no minister could preach the Bible with out preaching Gods hate. Westboro spokes man Steve Drain said in an email a few days be fore Phelps death that the churchs doctrines werent changing. The church of the Lord Jesus Christ does not rise or fall with any man in fact, the Lord doesnt need ANY of us, Drain wrote. Any nation that embrac es that sin as an innocent lifestyle can expect to in cur the wrath of God. Phelps often reserved especially caustic com ments for evangelical Christians and Catho lics who view homosexual behavior as sinful but also preach that God also loves and reaches out to gays and lesbians. Phelps dismissed them as en ablers, and his congregation often picketed their churches. The Rev. Terry Fox, a Southern Baptist minis ter whos pastor of Wichitas non-denominationalleaning Summit Church, once felt compelled to apologize for Phelps shocking behavior on tele vision. Fox called Phelps a false prophet and said Satan greatly used him. Fox was prominent in a successful effort in 2005 to persuade voters to amend the Kansas Constitution to ban gay marriage and said Phelps was an em barrassment but had become the face of Christian work in Kansas. Michael Schuttloffel, executive director of the Kansas Catholic Confer ence, said Phelps and his congregation still repre sent an easy device for gay-marriage supporters to short-circuit the con versation on that and related issues in recent years. People were justiably, appropriately outraged by the things that they did, Schuttloffel said of Phelps and his church. As soon as someone, then, is able to tar you as being relat ed to them or thinking the same way as them, right away youre starting be hind the eight ball. Gay-rights advocates, meanwhile, were assess ing Phelps place in the history of their movement. An obscene footnote is how Tom Witt, execu tive director of Equality Kansas, the states leading gay-rights group, believes Phelps and his followers will be remembered. Witt said progress began well before Westboros protests and will continue long af ter Phelps death. However, James Es seks, director of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Project at the American Civil Liberties Union, acknowledged that he eventually saw Phelps protests as helping his own movement. He would show up with his extreme antigay views, and a bunch of people in the middle would think, If thats what it means to be anti-gay, I want no part of it, Esseks said.Phelps hate seen by some as aiding gay rights MCTFred Phelps Sr., founder of the Westboro Baptist Church that protests soldiers funerals and other events claiming that the U.S. was doomed because of its tolerance of homosexuality, died Wednesday.He has brought along allies who are horrified by the hate. So his legacy will be exactly the opposite of what he dreamed.Cathy Renna LGBT group consultant M C Y K

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www.newssun.com Sunday, March 23, 2014 l NEWS-SUN l B11

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B12 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com rffntbffnf n frnffn f ffnfffnn nnn nnnfnffnnnbn f bfffnffbf fnbfnb f fn rff nt bf t f tf f rf ntbn rfntfrb btbfntf fbtbf tff fbftbfbnbfb bbbbbbnrbtn brfbbbnbbrftrfb fbbbttnbbtnftfbfrrb ntftffbfntftbbnb trfnt Classifiedtn bfbrbrnfnbnbffbftrb bbttnbbntbntrnbrffbb fnrfntntftbnrfbrfb bfbtbfbf bbfbtntftrfbntnbnn nnntnrnfftnbrbbbrnnf nntnfrbnrrbrbn btfrftrbfntrfbtftb bbtnntbbnftftb bffbnrftrbfrftrbbnnrbb bfntfbbbnrnbbttbf tbrftbnb rfffntbtbt ttn tbnnbbtnfntbntn nbn ttf IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.:28-2010-CA-001372 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK,NA, Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS E.HAAKE,et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated March 05,2014 and entered in Case No.28-2010-CA-001372 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County,Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK,NA,is the Plaintiff and THOMAS E.HAAKE; WENDY ANN HAAKE; SEACOST NATIONAL BANK; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBL Y ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE,430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM,on the 8th day of April,2014,the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS 1 AND 2,BLOCK 3,LAKE BLUE ESTATES,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 59,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA.LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY:BEGIN AT THE EASTERLY MOST CORNER OF SAID LOT 2,THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 152.97 FEET; THENCE NORTH 28 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 80.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 68 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 151.33 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 28 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 90.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 610 LAKE BLUE DRIVE,LAKE PLACID,FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on March 6,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Cler k Ronald R Wolfe & Associates,P.L. P.O.Box 25018 Tampa,Florida 33622-5018 F10039574 WELLSLPS-SPECFHLMC-R-nrodriguez-Team 1 F10039574 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act,persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates,P.A.,P.O.Box 25018,Tampa, FL 33622-5018,telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding.If hearing impaired,(TDD) 1-800-955-8771,or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770,via Florida Relay Service. March 16,23,2014 Elizabeth R.Wellborn,P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd,Suite 100 Deerfield Beach,FL 33442 Telephone:(954) 354-3544 Facsimile:(954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT,If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at not cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,255 N.Broadway Avenue,Bartow,Florida 33830,(863) 534-4686,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call 711. FILE # 8377ST-34753 March 16,23,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.:28-2012-CA-000183 Division: BANK OF AMERICA,N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING,LP Plaintiff, v. MARIA P.DIAZ; et.al., Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated February 5, 2014,entered in Civil Case No.: 28-2012-CA-000183,of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County,Florida,wherein BANK OF AMERICA,N.A.,SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP,is Plaintiff,and MARIA P.DIAZ; ROBERTO J.DIAZ; PRAIRIE OAKS COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH,UNDER,AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS,are Defendant(s). ROBERT W.GERMAINE,the Clerk of Court shall sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m.in the Jury Assembly Room in the Basement of the Highlands County Courthouse,located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida,33870 on the 9th day of April,2014,the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment,to wit: LOT 28,OF THE COUNTRY CLUB OF SEBRING,PHASE 3,SECTION 2,``STERLING OAKS'',ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 16,PAGE 35, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. The property is located at the Street address of:2812 Briarwood Lane,Sebring,FL 33875. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale,you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale.If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days,only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on February 5,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE CLERK OF THE COURT By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk (COURT SEAL) Attorney for Plaintiff: Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.,offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash,the following-described property situate in Highlands County,Florida: LOT 4,IN BLOCK 187,OF LEISURE LAKES,SECTION THREE,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6,PAGE 25,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court,the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus,if any,resulting from the foreclosure sale,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens,mus file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 13th day of December,2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,255 N.Broadway Avenue,Bartow,Florida 33830,(863) 534-4686,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk B&H #329563 March 23,30,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:GC-13-000239 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. JANET GERBERICH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JANET GERBERICH; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT II; FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION,A PUBLIC CORPORATION,and any unknown heirs, devisees,grantees,creditors,and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by,through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,will on the 16th day of April, 2014,at 11:00 A.M.in the Jury Assembly IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.:28-2012-CA-000215 CENLAR FSB Plaintiff, vs. KATHLEEN FITZPATRICK AKA KATHLEEN BOADO, EDUARDO PETERSON BOADO, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given,pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on January 29,2014,in the Circuit Court of HIGHLANDS County, Florida,I will sell the property situated in Highlands County,Florida described as: BEGIN AT THE NORTHWESTERLY CORNER OF LOT 17,BLOCK BB,SPRING LAKE VILLAGE VII,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 11, PAGE 7,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA,SAID CORNER ALSO BEING THE BEGINNING OF A NON-TANGENT CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST HAVING AS ITS ELEMENTS A RADIUS OF 75.00 FEET; A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 20 DEGREES 33'04'' (PLAT),A CHORD OF 26.75 FEET AND WHOSE CHORD BEARS S 64 DEGREES 04'37'' E; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE (ALSO BEING THE NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 17) TO THE LEFT FOR 26.90 FEET TO THE END OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S 74 DEGREES 21'03'' E AND TANGENT TO SAID CURVE AND ALONG SAID NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 17 FOR 4.04 FEET; THENCE S 15 DEGREES 29'11'' W FOR 125.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 17; THENCE N 74 DEGREES 21'03'' W ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY LINE OF LOT 17 FOR 79.37 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT 17; THENCE N 36 DEGREES 12'01'' E ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 17 FOR 138.59 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. and commonly known as:1137 DOGWOOD TER,SEBRING,FL 33876; including the building,appurtenances,and fixtures located therein,at public sale,to the highest and best bidder,for cash,Sales are held in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870,on April 9,2014 at 11 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 5th day of February,2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court ROBERT W.GERMAINE By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk 327470/1121488/wmr March 16,23,2014 1499 W.Palmetto Park Rd.,Suite 300 Boca Raton,FL 33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact Office of the Court Administrator at 863-534-4686,255 North Broadway Avenue,Bartow,FL 33830 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call 711. File #12-004432-FNMA-FSC March 23,30,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. CASE NO.13000235GCAXMX RESIDENTIAL CREDIT SOLUTIONS,INC., PLAINTIFF, VS. JANET D.GREGORY,ET AL., DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated,in the above action,I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Highlands,Florida,on April 22, 2014,at 11:00 AM,at Basement of courthouse in Jury Assembly Room 430 S. Commerce Ave.,Sebring,FL 33870 for the following described property: LOT 67,OF FIESTA VILLA,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 13,AT PAGE 42,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA,TOGETHER WITH 2003 JACOBSEN OMES CLASSIC III MOBILE HOME,SERIAL #JACFL24583A&B,HUD #FLA737294 AND FLA 737295 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.The Court,in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale.Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. DATED:February 13,2104. ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk of the Court Prepared by: Gladstone Law Group,P.A. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. CASE NO.28 2012 CA 000234 XXAXMX BANK OF AMERICA,N.A., AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,LP, PLAINTIFF, VS. RAY H.COX,ET AL., DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated,in the above action,I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Highlands,Florida,on April 9, 2014,at 11:00 AM,at Basement of courthouse in Jury Assembly Room 430 S. Commerce Ave.,Sebring,FL 33870 for the following described property: LOT 17 AND 18,BLOCK 413,HILL CREST HEIGHTS,ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2,PAGE 5,PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.The Court,in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale.Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. DATED:February 5,2104. By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk of the Court Prepared by: Gladstone Law Group,P.A. 1499 W.Palmetto Park Rd.,Suite 300 Boca Raton,FL 33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact Office of the Court Administrator at 863-534-4686,255 North Broadway Avenue,Bartow,FL 33830 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call 711. File #13-003213-FNMA-FIH March 16,23,2014 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,(863) 534-4690.within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call TDD (863) 534-7777 or Florida Relay Service 711. CLERK OF THE COURT Bob Germaine By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk 1113-8862 March 16,23,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:28-2012-CA-000160 WELLS FARGO BANK,NA, Plaintiff, vs. WAYNE EUGENE BRADY; BERNADETTE MARIE MCEWAN N/K/A BERNADETTE MARIE BRADY A/K/A BERNADETTE; et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment.Final Judgment was awarded on January 29,2014 in Civil Case No.28-2012-CA-000160,of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County,Florida,wherein WELLS FARGO BANK,NA,is the Plaintiff, and WAYNE EUGENE BRADY; BERNADETTE MARIE MCEWAN N/K/A BERNADETTE MARIE BRADY A/K/A BERNADETTE,are Defendants. The Clerk of the Court,Robert Germaine,will sell to the highest bidder for cash IN THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM,BASEMENT,430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE,SEBRING,FL 33870,at 11:00 A.M.on the 9th day of April,2014,the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment,to wit: LOT 303,OF SEBRING HILLS,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6,PAGE 2,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE,IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on February 4,2014. IMPORTANT IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. CASE NO.28-2010-CA-000745 BANK OF AMERICA,N.A., PLAINTIFF, VS. CAROLYN B.RZESZEWICZ,ET AL., DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated,in the above action,I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Highlands,Florida,on April 9, 2014,at 11:00 AM,at Basement of courthouse in Jury Assembly Room 430 S. Commerce Ave.,Sebring,FL 33870 for the following described property: LOT 5,6,19 AND 20,BLOCK 87,RED HILL FARMS SUBDIVISION,SECTION 18,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1,PAGE 60,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.The Court,in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale.Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. DATED: By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk of the Court Prepared by: Gladstone Law Group,P.A. 1499 W.Palmetto Park Rd.,Suite 300 Boca Raton,FL 33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact Office of the Court Administrator at 863-534-4686,255 North Broadway Avenue,Bartow,FL 33830 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call 711. File #10-002019-F March 16,23,2014 Telephone:(863) 402-1888 Fax:(863) 402-2436 E-Mail:jkmpleadings@mllaw.net Secondary E-Mail:johnmc@mllaw.net Person Giving Notice: Antoinette J.Abernathy,Petitioner 2600 Timber Trail Denton,Texas 76209 March 23,30,2014 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.PC 14-118 Division Probate IN RE:ESTATE OF JENNIFER V.LAVERTY Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that a Petition for Summary Administration in the estate of JENNIFER V.LAVERTY,deceased,File Number PC 14-118,by the Circuit Court for Highlands County,Florida,Probate Division, the address of which is 430 South Commerce Ave.Sebring,Florida 33870; that the decedent's date of death was December 30,2013; that the total value of the estate is $2,300.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address A NTOINETTE J.ABERNATHY 2600 Timber Trail Denton,Texas 76209 A LL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER A PPLICABLE TIME PERIOD,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 23,2014. A ttorney for Person Giving Notice: John K.McClure A ttorney for Petitioner Florida Bar No.286958 MCCLURE & LOBOZZO 211 South Ridgewood Drive Sebring,Florida 33870 1050Legals 1000 KNOW?rf ntbtffb nnntttbf ntfnftftbtb nbntft tttfbtf fntttt tttbttt fbt tttr fntbt trfn fntbnb tft

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w ww.newssun.com Sunday, March 23, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B13 SEBRING *NICE & LARGE NEWLY REMODELED 2BR, 1BA, 1917 Wightman Ave. $500/mo. & $500 sec. dep. 863-381-0357 or 863-446-2838. 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 RentalsNEWLY RENOVATEDsinglewide mobile home, fenced, on large lot, 2BR/2BA, washer/dryer, $650 mo., $500 security. 863-658-4264 or 305-522-5024. 5150Mobile HomesFor Rent PALM HARBORHOMES 2014 models are here! $8,500 Pre Construction Savings John Lyons @ 800-622-2832 ext 210 for details MOBILE HOMEFOR SALE 50 x 125' Lot, clear. 2/2, carport, screen room, covered patio. Close to Hospital. Furnished. $32,000 OBO. Call 863-382-3049 BROADMORE M.H.,2BR/2BA, 14x60, NICE PARK, 55 plus. Fully furn., double carport, new appl., utility room. Make offer, negotiable. MUST SEE! 863-382-2011. AVON PARK3/1 Trailer in Country. 8 mi. from town. Call 863-443-2000 AVON PARK2/1, 55+ Community. $3,000 obo. Call 863-453-3315, leave message. 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesSPRING LAKE2BR/2BA VILLA Central Air/Heat, Washer Dryer Hook Up, Dishwasher, Fridge w/ice maker, range. $49,900 owner financing. 863-381-8069. 4120Villas & CondosFor SaleFOR SALE,CBS 3BR/2BA, 1 car gar., in Avon Park Lakes, fenced back yard, built in 2006, newly renovated in 2010, asking, $99,900, 863-368-1963. 4060Homes for SaleAvon Park 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 FinancialGENTLEMAN/ SITTERCOMPANION looking for position, live-in. Experienced with References. 863-658-4837 2300Work Wanted OPEN HOUSE ON SITE INTERVIEWS Monday, March 24, 2014 10:00 am 2:00 pm 6801 US Hwy 27 N Ste D2 Sebring, FL 33870 Positions available for RN LPN, OT, PT, ST, Psych RN Home Health experience preferred For more information call Karen at 813-514-5520 MEDICAL RECEPTIONISTS FOR BUSY OFFICE. Send Resume to P. O. Box 991, Lake Placid FL, 33862. MANAGER -CIRCLE THEATRE Full-time employment opportunity: Manager of the beautiful newly renovated Circle Theatre in historic downtown Sebring. Salary is competitive. Employment hours are flexible, requiring some evening and weekend work. The Executive Committee of the Champion for Children Foundation will interview all finalists that are selected from the pool of applicants. This position will report directly to the CEO. Strong leadership qualities are essential. An associate's or bachelor's degree is preferred but not required. Applicants should have at least 5 years of proven management and administrative experience. The Circle Theatre Manager will oversee operations and supervise all aspects of the Circle Theatre, including events, Sweet Shoppe, personnel, volunteers, facilities and children's programs. The successful applicant must have outstanding communication and interpersonal skills, and be organized, focused and detail oriented. Computer skills are a must. We are looking for a dynamic team player and a problem solver. Marketing, networking, public presentations, financial management & event planning are important requirements of this professional job. Send resume and references, postmarked by March 31, 2014 to: Champion for Children Foundation, P.O. Box 7125, Sebring, Fl 33872-0103 LOOKING FORLPN F/T & P/T for 24 bed ICF in Avon Park. We have a casual work environment with home-like setting. Apply online atwww.jobs.thementornetwork.com/floridaQuestions call 863-452-5141 ask for Angelina or Melissa LOCAL EPISCOPALCHURCH seeking an Organist/Choir Director. Call 863-385-7649 for details. LAWN MAINTENANCE workers needed to run mowers & trimmers, exp. only. 863-385-6768 EYE EXPRESSSebring Ophthalmology & Optometry Join our family for exciting opportunities! We are currently looking for individuals that have wonderful interpersonal skills, willing to learn, highly driven, possess a flexible personality, displays great professionalism and works great in team environment. If this fits you, we would love to meet you. Please send your resume to lwills@eyeexpress.com COORDINATOR, PURCHASING(FT)Application deadline: 3/27/14. Please visit http://sfsc.interviewexchange.com for detailed position posting. 863-784-7132.EA/EO. ARTIST ASSISTANT,part-time could become full time. Cataloging and restoring paintings. Flexible hours. Lake Placid area. 863-699-0072, 239-287-6298. 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:314-9876 News-Sun Classified 1100AnnouncementsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.13000775GCAXMX SECTION NO. MIDFLORIDA CREDIT UNION FKA MIDFLORIDA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, v. KENNETH E.MCLEOD; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KENNETH E.MCLEOD; TENANT #1; TENANT #2; MIDFLORIDA CREDIT UNION FKA MIDFLORIDA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,THROUGH,AND UNDER,AND AGAINST THE HEREIN-NAMED DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Final Judgment entered in this case in the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,the real property described as: LEGAL:LOTS 1908,1909,1910,1911, 1912,1913,1914,1915,AND 1916,INCLUSIVE,AVON PARK LAKES UNIT NO.6,A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AT PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 93,IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. PHYSICAL:2576 N.SENECA DRIVE WEST,AVON PARK,FL 33825 will be sold at public sale to the highest and best bidder for cash,on 16th day of April, 2014,at 11:00 a.m.at the Jury Assembly Room of the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and seal of this Court on this 11th day of March,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED,AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE.PLEASE CONTACT THE OFFICE OF THE COURT ADMINISTRATOR, 863-534-4690,WITHIN TWO (2) WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE OF SALE; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED,CALL TDD (863) 534-7777 OR FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE 711. March 23,30,2014 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.PC 14-78 IN RE:ESTATE OF NANCY K.TESH, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of NANCY K.TESH,deceased,File Number PC 14-78,is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County,Florida,Probate Division, the address of which is 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870.The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate,including unmatured, contingent,or unliquidated claims,on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate,including unmatured,contingent,or unliquidated claims,on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 16,2014. Personal Representative: /s/ Kris F.Tesh Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Michael L.Keiber MICHAEL L.KEIBER,ESQUIRE Law Office of Michael L.Keiber,P.A. 129 South Commerce Avenue Sebring,FL 33870 V.(863)385-5188 F.(863) 471-1111 Florida Bar No.620610 service@keiberlaw.com March 16,23,2014 1050Legals NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that FRANCIS G. WARWIN died on December 19,2013, whose last known address was 245 Oak Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870.The name and address of the Successor Trustee of the FRANCIS G.WARWIN REVOCABLE TRUST is as follows:Sandy Hurner,c/o McClure & Lobozzo,211 South Ridgewood Drive,Sebring, Florida 33870,attention John K.McClure, P.A. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with the Successor Trustee WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 23,2014. Person Giving Notice: John K.McClure Attorney for Sandy Hurner, Successor Trustee Florida Bar No.286958 MCCLURE & LOBOZZO 211 South Ridgewood Drive Sebring,Florida 33870 Telephone:(863) 402-1888 Fax:(863) 402-2436 E-Mail:efile@mllaw.net Secondary E-Mail:johnmc@mllaw.net March 23,30,2014 assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,(863) 534-4690,within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice of Foreclosure Sale; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call TDD (863) 534-7777 or Florida Relay Service 711. March 23,30,2014 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.28-2013-CA-000357 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, vs. SALLY FORD A/K/A SALLY M.FORD A /K/A SALLYE HART FORD, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SALLY FORD A /K/A SALLY M.FORD A /K/A SALLYE HART FORD, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed February 5,2014 entered in Civil Case No.28-2013-CA-00357 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County,Sebring,Florida,the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Jury Assembly Room in the Highlands County Courthouse,430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,FL 33870 in accordance with Chapter 45,Florida Statutes on the 16th day of April,2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 11840 and 11841,AVALON PARK LAKES,UNIT 37,according to plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 5,Page 69,of the Public Records of Highlands County,Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens,must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 11th day of March,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk 2322787 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain 1050LegalsAGERO 3X10.5 AD # 00036770HIGHLANDS CO. SHERIFFS DEPT. 3X4 AD # 00036730DAWN DELL 1X4 AD # 00036309

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B14 | NEWS-SUN | Sunday, March 23, 2014 www.newssun.com WE BUYALL AUTOS with or without Title. Any Year / Make / Model / Condition. We will pay up to $20,000. Free Towing. Call Cindy 813-505-6935 9400Automotive WantedKAWASAKI VULCAN1500. 1988, Good condition, 20,000 miles, new tires, leather saddle bags. $1850.00 or best offer. 863-465-7112 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation2013 44'5TH WHEEL RV 3 slideouts, 2BR, full bath, full kitchen, sleeps 8, excellent condition, $23,500. 210-800-6389. 8400RecreationalVehiclesDIRT BIKEHonda, for teens. Golf Cart, Yamaha, gas. $1000. 863-382-0192 8350Sporting Goods 8000 RecreationNOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & SuppliesCUB CADETLTX1040 MOWER A S GOOD AS NEW. SERVICED WITH NEW BATTERY AND CARBURETOR. THE CLOCK HAS LESS THAN 35HRS. CONTACT V IJAY ON 863-699-6923 BETWEEN 10AM AND 7PM PRICE $1000 7400Lawn & Garden REFRIGERATOR/FREEZER KENMORE,67"H x 31"W x 29.5"D. Works good. $75. 609-540-4170 GOOD USEDtires: One 205 70 R-15, three 215 70 R-15, $20 a piece, 863-458-2687. GAS GRILL,2 BURNERS, WITH WHEELS AND PROPANE TANK, $60, 863-214-8462. COMFORTER -FULL or Regular size 2 pillow cases & skirt. Tiger & Jungle scene. $20, 863-402-2285. 7310Bargain BuysAPPLE BLOSSOMDINNERWARE EXCELLENT CONDITION NEVER USED Gold trim. By Theodore Haviland. 60 plus pieces. 863-205-3944. 7300MiscellaneousORGAN LOWREYGrand Royal Limited. New cond. Cost over $60,000 new. Current Book $15,000+. Now $8,990 obo. Serious inquiries only. 863-835-0962 7260MusicalMerchandise 7000 Merchandise3/2 ONLAKE CARRIE access LAKE JUNE/HENRY. $800 1st/sec. Ref req Call/text 786-285-5026 6300Unfurnished Houses 6200UnfurnishedApartments***PROCESS COLOR***** DUMMY 2014 SERVICE DIRECTORY DUMMY 5X21.5 AD # 00036497AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 AD # 00036344 AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 AD # 00036343