The news-sun

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Material Information

Title:
The news-sun
Uniform Title:
News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title:
Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Sebring Fla
Creation Date:
June 7, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates:
27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note:
Also published for Avon Park.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID:
UF00028423:01498

Related Items

Preceded by:
Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by:
Avon Park sun


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35 easy ways to save money right now NEWS-SUNHighlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 192750 Red Devils roll to win; Streaks do, too## B1Avon Park adds to city limitsA8Pair of K-9 teams from HCSO shine in big competitionA2 www.newssun.com Friday-Saturday, February 28-March 1, 2014 VOL. 95 N O 23 Partly sunny and warming up High 76 Low 53 Details on A12Classieds .............. B8 Dear Abby ................ B2 Healthy Living ......... B3 Obituaries .............. A6 Lottery Numbers ...... A2 Movie Review ......... B2 Puzzle Corner ......... B2 Religion ................. B5 Sports on TV ........... A9 facebook.com/ newssun twitter.com/ thenewssun BY CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEYSpecial to the News-SunIn gratitude for his untir ing work on behalf of our children, teens and elderly citizens, the News-Sun is pleased to an nounce Chet Brojek, retired Avon Park High School teach er and track and eld coach, is our Unsung Hero for February. Brojek spent 35 years at Avon Park High School, mentoring, educating and inspiring young people to make the most of their lives. He estimates hes taught and coached upwards of 8,000 students two of whom, in the interest of full disclosure, are our own publisher Romo na Washington and editor Scott Dressel. Since retiring in 2003, he continues to mentor students and run track meets, provid ing young people with an opportunity for athletic scholar ships. He also serves on seven volunteer boards including MidFlorida Credit Union, Habi tat for Humanity, the Avon Park Housing Authority, the High lands County Education Foundation, Nu-Hope and Friends of Highlands Hammock and is a member of the Champions Club and Avon Park Noon Ro tary. He is well known as a fund raiser for charitable causes I know people who grab their wallets when they see me com ing, Brojek said with a grin. Over the years he guesses he has helped raise hundreds of thousands of dollars. While Brojek was born in Avon Park with Floridian roots, Chet Brojek has coached and helped thousands Katara Simmons/News-SunChet Brojek with his prized possession, a 2014 red Corvette. Brojek, a longtime teacher and running coach who also gives countless hours to community service was named the News-Sun Unsung Hero for the month of February.Need some help? Hell come runningUnsung Heroes BY BARR Y FOSTERNews-Sun CorrespondentAvon Park The Avon Park Rotary Club has proposed an ambi tious project to help raise money for local service personnel while deco rating Veterans Square in the City of Charm. We want to put com memorative bricks both around both the Veterans Memorial and at the ag pole there on the Mall, said spokesman Dr. Den nis Mungall. The program is a co operative effort involving both the Avon Park Rotary and the Avon Park Noon Rotary clubs as well as the Avon Park Community Redevelop ment Agency. The idea would be to get the bricks engraved and use the money to help nance several proj ects including a Gold Star/Blue Star Christ mas tree and to assist in the funding of Hon or Flights for veterans so they might see the World War II Memorial in Wash ington. Our plan is to charge $65 each for the en graved bricks that will go around the Veterans Me morial and $55 for those around the ag pole, he said. The plan calls for bricks to be grouped by the branch of service in the wedges that surround the veterans memori al, with civilians placed around the base of the ag pole. By his count, Mun gall said there are about 2,500 bricks that might BY BARR Y FOSTERNews-Sun CorrespondentSEBRING It is a project that has been years in the making. Now, ofcials of the Hu mane Society of Highlands County say they are ready to break ground on their new dog kennels. We signed the con tract Tuesday and plan to hand it in by the end of the week, said Hu mane Society President Judy Spiegel. The facility will be built in two phases. First will be the dog kennels, with a second unit to house cats, a medical unit for the animals and administrative space. This is not going to be a small facility, it is going to provide for a very professional opera tion, she said. We are looking to take the Hu mane Society here to the next step. Bevis Construction will be handling the work. The plan is to put down the footprint for the entire building, then develop it as funds be come available. We want to do as much as possible up front. We have to Humane Society ready to expand When youve had a good life and I found that here you owe something back.Chet BrojekSEE BROJEK | A5SEE HUMANE | A6Avon Park Rotary plans to honor veterans with bricksProject for Veterans Square launching soon Katara Simmons/News-Sun leThe Avon Park Rotary Club wants to sell commemorative bricks to be placed around Veterans Square and the ag pole on Main Street in Avon Park. B Y SAMANTHA GHOLARStaff WriterSEBRING Though he enjoys his nearly daily golf outings and all the oth er things that come with retirement, Sebring City Council candidate Mar ty Roepstorff is ready to share his time with the city of Sebring in a more proactive way. Roepstorff, former Se bring utilities director for 15 years, retired in late December only to nd himself back at city hall ling his paperwork in hopes of becoming one of the three new members of the city council.C AN DIDA TE PRO F ILERoepstorff has experience with city, departments Katara Simmons/News-SunMarty Roepstorff answers questions recently during a City of Sebring Candidate Forum hosted by the News-Sun. SEE PROFILE | A5SEE ROTARY | A6 A6 BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterSEBRING Getting enough volunteers to cover re calls or enough money to cover opera tional costs has long been a challenge for Highlands Countys volunteer re departments. Some have paid staff, whose jobs depend on the departments annual assessments in their dis tricts. But whether a department has paid staff or all-volunteer, with brand new re engines or older ones, the service they provide can never waver and must only get better, said Tim Eures, emergency operations director. Ive gotta give a lot of credit to these departments, Eures said: Eures says county fire services up to challenge Katara Simmons/News-Sun leVolunteer reghters handle a lot of the calls in Highlands County, which has more than 200 volunteer reghters. SEE FIRE | A6 M C Y K

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A2 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com http//:www.newssun.com The News-Sun (USPS ISSN 0163-3988) is published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday. Peri odical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry ofce(s). All material contained herein is the property of the News-Sun, which is an afliate of Halifax Media Group. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the writ ten permission of the publisher. All material submitted for publica tion becomes the property of the newspaper and may be edited for clarity and space, as well as re printed, published and used in all media. Postmaster: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870.COMMITMENT TO A CC URA C YThe News-Sun promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its news stories. If you believe we have made an error, call the news room at (863) 385-6155, ext. 516. If you have a question or comment about coverage, write to Scott Dressel, editor, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; email editor@newssun.com.; or call (863) 385-6155.O FFI C E Location: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon day-Friday Phone: (863) 385-6155 Main Fax: (863) 385-1954 Newsroom Fax: (863) 3852453SUB SC RIPTION RATE SHome 12 mos. Tax Total $72.22 $5.06 $77.28 In Florida mail 12 mos. Tax Total $107.24 $7.51 $114.75 Out of Florida mail 12 mos. Tax Total $122.41 $8.57 $130.98 Your newspaper is delivered by an independent contractor. If you do not receive your home deliv ered newspaper by 6 a.m. on any publication date, please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday, and before 11 a.m. Sunday. A re placement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after said times will be issued an account credit. Deadlines for subscription changes are noon Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon Thursday for the Friday edition and noon Fri day for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date.O BITUARIE S AN D A NNOUN C EMENT SEmail all obituaries and death notices to obits@newssun.com Email all other announcements to editor@newssun.comP LA C E A CLA SS IFIE D ADFrom 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. M-F (863) 386-6155, ext. 505 or (863) 314-9876RETAIL AD VERTI S INGMitch Collins 386-5626 mitch.collins@newssun.com Vickie Watson 386-5631 vickie.watson@newssun.com Terri Lee 386-5628 terri.lee@newssun.comL EGAL AD VERTI S INGJanet Emerson 385-6155, ext. 596 legals@newssun.comNEW S ROOM Call 385-6155 Scott Dressel, Editor, ext. 516 or scott.dressel@newssun.com Phil Attinger, Staff Writer, ext. 541 or phil.attinger@newssun. com Samantha Gholar, Staff Writ er, ext. 526 or samantha.gholar@ newssun.com Dan Hoehne, Sports Editor, ext. 528 or daniel.hoehne@newssun. com Katara Simmons, Photographer, ext. 538 or katara.simmons@ newssun.com. ROMONA W A SHINGTON Publisher and Executive Editor romona.washington@newssun.com 385-6155, ext. 515 NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927LOTTERYL OTTOWednesday, Feb. 26 3-36-37-41-47-48 X-5 Saturdays Jackpot: $15 millionP OWERBALLWednesday, Feb. 19 11-12-17-38-42 PB-2 X-2 Saturdays Jackpot: $60 millionM EGA M ONEYTuesday, Feb. 25 2-22-27-40 PB-22 Todays Jackpot: $550,000M EGA M ILLION STuesday, Feb. 25 12-18-25-35-66 PB-15 X-5 Todays Jackpot: $216 million CAS H 3 Tuesday, Feb. 25 Day: 9-4-3 Night: 1-2-5 Wednesday, Feb. 26 Day: 8-3-1 Night: 1-2-2 P LAY 4Tuesday, Feb. 25 Day: 1-9-9-2 Night: 9-2-1-1 Wednesday, Feb. 26 Day: 3-3-8-1 Night: 0-4-1-1 F ANTA S Y 5 Monday, Feb. 14 8-19-25-26-31 Tuesday, Feb. 25 14-16-20-32-34 Wednesday, Feb. 26 8-11-27-32-33 Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Five South Florida State College students had the opportunity to at tend the eighth annual Black, Brown, and College Bound (BBCB) Summit recently in Tampa. The summit is a na tional effort sponsored by Hillsborough Com munity College to encourage more AfricanAmerican and Latino young men to push through perceived ob stacles and earn a college degree that is wor thy of their aspirations and career goals. This years theme was, Setting the Record Straight: Demystifying the Perception of Afri can-American and Latino Males in Higher Education, and featured NBA legend and entre preneur Earvin Magic Johnson as the keynote speaker. Participants also had the chance to inter act with nationally renowned speakers and researchers who shared empirical data, best practices and model programs. The networking op portunity and the measure of success by some of the key note speakers at the conference such as Earvin Magic John son and Tampa Bay Rays pitcher Cesar Ra mos was an encouragement for the students to work hard towards achieving their goals, said Eddie Cuencas, ad visor for the international student organization at SFSC. For me personally, SFSC being one of the sponsors of the sum mit is an indication of the effort made by the institution to motivate more African-American and Latino students to enroll in postsecondary education and pursue their dreams of becom ing successful.SFSC students attend Black, Brown, and College Bound SummitWalker Academy accepting PreK applicationsAVON PARK Walker Memorial Academy is now accepting applications for PreK School Year 20142015. Walker Memorial Academy has dual term accreditation with the highest level awarded. Space is limited in the full-day PreKindergarten program to 21 children. There are two teachers per classroom. The student must be 4 years old before Sept. 1, 2014. To request an enroll ment application or schedule a tour, call 4533131, ext. 201. Florida State VPK funding avail able, visit www.elcoridasheartland.org.Maryland Day is SaturdaySEBRING If you were born in Maryland, lived in Maryland, passed through or want to visit Maryland, you are invit ed to Maryland Day on Saturday. The event will be at Homers restaurant, 1000 Sebring Square, from 2-5 p.m. Just pay for your buffet and ask for the Maryland Day room. For more information, contact Annette (after 5 p.m.) at 382-3891 or 3811739 or call Darlene or Bill at 382-3101.E lks plan trip to Hard R ockSEBRING Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has a bus going to Tampa Hard Rock on Monday, March 17. The cost is $20. Anyone interested should con tact Angie Warchak at 471-2150.Sebring Village plans trip to dinner theatreSEBRING Sebring Village has a bus going March 22 to the Ed Fletcher Dinner Theatre for a hilarious comedy, A Bad Year for Tomatoes. Cost is $58 and Includes transportation, din ner, show, all taxes and gratuity. Contact Angie Warchak at 471-2150.Skylarks plays at Dance ClubSEBRING The Highlands Social Dance Club will host the music of the Skylarks 10piece dance band from 7-9:30 p.m. today at the Highlands Social Center, 3400 Sebring Parkway. Dance to the big band sounds of the 50s, 60s and 70s. Snacks and sandwich es will be available. Admission is $7 for non-members, and $5 for members. Dress is smart casual. Everyone is welcome, in cluding singles. BYOB. For more information, call 386-0855 or visit www. highlandsdanceclub.org.Sweet T hang and StringBean at Under the O aksSEBRING It is rumored that SweetThang and StringBean will be at Under The Oaks Opry, 3501 Beck Ave., to offer country, bluegrass, gospel, blues at 7 p.m. today and 2 p.m. Sunday. The events are hosted by singer/songwriter G.W.. Saunders. Call 253-0771.Y MCA hosting Christian ConcertSEBRING The Highlands County Family YMCA will be host ing their third annual Christian Concert from 6-8 p.m. Saturday at the Champions For Children Circle Theatre. This years show will feature The Jayc Harold Band, The Wacaster Family, and Nala Price. Tickets will be avail able for purchase at YMCA through Saturday. Call 382-9622 for information.Democratic Party dinner is SaturdaySEBRING The annual Democratic Party JJ Dinner will take place at 6 p.m. Saturday at the Sun N Lake Community Center, 3500 Edgewater Drive. The featured speaker will be Dr. Joyce Hamilton Henry, the Mid-Florida regional director of the ACLU. Also speaking will be Charlene Edwards, candidate for school board. Dinner will be catered. Tickets may be purchased online at http://hcdem. org/events.html, or by calling 382-9961 or party headquarters at 385-8601. Ticket cost is $50.1st Saturday Breakfast servedAVON PARK Avon Park 1st Saturday Breakfast, formerly the Avon Park Airport Fly-in Breakfast, will be served at Christ Lutheran Church, 1320 County Road 64 East (Main Street), a half mile past Avon Park High School. Enjoy fresh pancakes, scrambled eggs, hash browns, sausage, as well as homemade break fast casseroles and sticky buns as long as they last. Serving is from 8-10:30 a.m. on the rst Saturdays of the month through April. Cost is $5 for one serv ing of each item. For information, call Rev. Scott McLean at 446-0911.Volunteers sought for Guardian ad Litem ProgramSEBRING The Guardian ad Litem pro gram, which serves abused and neglected children across Highlands County, is seeking volunteers. Volunteer guardians help represent children who are involved in court proceedings. Guardians must be at least 21 years old and undergo background checks and a certication process. For more information about the program, call Dawn Shinskey at (863) 534-4597 or email Dawn. Shinskey@gal..gov.VFW provides T aste of ItalyAVON PARK VFW 9853 will have a Taste of Italy from 5-7 p.m. today as the theme for dinner. SNAP S HOT S L OC AL N EW S B Y SAMANT HA GHO LARStaff WriterSEBRING Sergeant Kyle Albritton and Dep uty Cory Tomblin of the Highlands County Sheriffs Ofce K-9 Unit showed up to the South Florida K9 Competition with their game faces on and came back winners. Albritton, accompa nied by his K-9 partner Mico, and Tomblin, accompanied by his K-9 Remco, represent ed Highlands County in a big way taking home three top 10 placements during the competi tion on Feb. 22 in Bonyton Beach. The competi tion, opened to any law enforce ment agency in the state of Florida, brought together some of the states most well known, and some of the less well known, units around. Teams from Bonyton Beach, Clewiston, Mi ami Police Department, Palm Beach County Sheriffs Ofce, Boca Ra ton Police Department and many more added up to nearly three dozen teams competing in this years event. No strangers to the competition, Albritton, Tomblin, Mico and Rem co were able to come away with top place ments, though the competition was no cake walk. Theres three events really. The main one is the obstacle course, Al britton explained. The handler and the K-9 compete in this course. It is a timed event and its not just your regular obstacle course; it is very physically demanding on the handler as well as the K-9. The nearly 100-yard course is based around a mock criminal pursuit. The handler and the dog must not only make their way through the rigorous course, but also apprehend a suspect. Theres shooting in volved, youre moving around the whole time and at the end you have to physically apprehend someone. The dog has to take them down, Albrit ton said. Mico and Albritton placed second in the ob stacle course. Their impressive efforts were denitely noticed as the duo nished only six seconds behind the rst place winner, which happened to be the new course record. The team that beat us came in at 1 minute and 39 seconds. We were only six seconds behind the course record. Dep uty Tomblin and Remco got high awards. They nished in sixth place with two minutes and three seconds, Albritton said. The Hard-Fast com petition displayed Micos skill alone. With the teams favorite mu sic getting them excited for the competition, the K-9 raced approximate ly 40 yards before taking down a suspect at the nish. They judge how hard your dog hits and bites. The fastest dog beat Mico by .02 seconds. Mico came in second with 2.44 seconds, Al britton said. It was a noteworthy day for the HCSOs K-9 Unit and something Al britton and Tomblin are both very proud to have accomplished. Albritton stated that next years event is denitely a pos sibility. It is a really fun event. The stands were full and Im looking for ward to doing it again next year. Our K-9 Unit is very tight knit here. A lot of us went to school together and patrolled together, so its fun to do these things, we get a lot of support, Albrit ton said. As far as the compe tition, Albritton knows that Highlands Coun ty isnt the biggest by any means but works to make his unit and his county one of the best. Anytime you put yourself under pressure to compete you will get those butteries, thats natural. But I welcome it. Not a lot of people know Highlands Coun ty so I look at it as an opportunity to showcase and put us on the map. I love showing everyone what Highlands Coun ty is all about, Albritton said.Samantha Gholar can be reached at samantha.gholar@newssun. com or 385-6155 ext: 526.HCS O s K9 teams heat up South Florida competition Photo by Katara SimmonsHighlands County Sheriffs Ofce Sgt. Kyle Albritton and K9 Mico received second place during South Florida K9 Competition in Boynton Beach. M C Y K

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A4 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927Romona Washington Publisher publisher@newssun.com Scott Dressel Editor editor@newssun.com VIEWPOINTS Michelle Obama had a laugh or two last week on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon while talking about ObamaCare and the silly and potentially dangerous things young folks do. She called them knuckleheads. But its starting to look like the joke may be on her and her husband. Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, young people can stay on their par ents insurance until they are 26, Obama said. But once they hit 26 theyre on their own. And a lot of young people think theyre invincible. But the truth is, young people are knuck leheads, you know? Theyre the ones who are cooking for the rst time and slice their nger open. Theyre danc ing on the bar stool. Maybe so but unfortunately for the rst lady and her husband, these knuckleheads are smart enough to know that ObamaCare isnt in their best interest. Yes, they may have occasional acci dents, but their collective doctor bills dont come to nearly as much as those of older folks. ObamaCare forces them to pay well more than their costs in or der to subsidize the older group. Without those subsidies, the system collapses. This explains why younger folks arent buying in. With little more than ve weeks left for open enrollment on the state and federal exchanges, only 24 percent of young adults between the ages of 18 and 34 have signed up, well below the White Houses target. These young adults dont want it, not from the man who promised them hope and change, and not from the rst lady. Maybe Mrs. Obama should look on the bright side: If these youth are dancing on bar stools, at least theyre participating in her Lets Move cam paign. Oh, wait: That might make them healthier and less in need of Obam aCare. Wholl be laughing then?An editorial from the New York Post.Young adults right not to buy into ObamacareANOTHER VIEWThe Florida Legislature is discussing whether to use political might to seize control of the management of Lake Okeechobee, and water reservoirs, from the US Army Corps of Engineers, and turn control over to the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD). This proposal is a bad idea; it overlooks the history of the manage ment of Lake Okeechobee, and relat ed water bodies, in regard to the Clean Water Act. First, Florida petitioned the Feder al government for the construction of the Herbert Hoover Dike, and the Cen tral and Southern Flood Control Project, to provide ood relief and water supply sources for agriculturaland ur ban development in southeast Florida. This expensive effort, in conjunction with navigation projects for the Kis simmee, St Lucie, and Caloosahatchee Rivers, resulted in a fair weather water management system that is unable to adapt to increasingly common drought and ood conditions. Second, Florida through its agency, now known as the South Florida Water Management District, managed water for the benet of agriculture and urban water supplies, a reasonable effort un til the effort abandoned any concept of environmental water supplies for es tuaries or preserved wetland systems such as Everglades National Park. Additionally, public waters were al lowed to be degraded, and were assisted to be degraded, by the actions of public agencies that were supposed to be adhering to the provisions of the Clean Water Act. The deterioration reached such extremes that the Federal Government sued the State of Florida, and its agent, the South Florida Water Management District to prevent fur ther degradation and restore national resources. The lawsuit dragged on for years until Governor Chiles sym bolically surrendered the States sword, which resulted in a Court overseen and monitored Settlement Agreement. Third, as part of the partnership, the State of Florida and Federal Govern ment agreed to a Federal/State restoration effort Task Force, which in turn developed a restoration plan that was agreed to by both parties. The plan calls for cost sharing, and joint consul tation in management. This is where we are, or should be, today. Unfortunately, in the years of bad management of Lake Okeechobee, wa ter levels were allowed to reach heights for water supply purposes that led to deterioration of the Herbert Hoover Dike. As a result, the Corps had to in stitute new regulation schedules to protect the Dikes primary purpose of ood prevention. Additionally, SFW MD practiced favoritism for water supply deliveries, while shunting ood waters to communities that were not normally in Lake Okeechobees ood zones. Only in these last few years have these adversely affected communities on the east and west sides of the Lake able to get the Corps of Engineers to consider their needs, often contrary to SFWMD recommendations. However, in fairness, SFWMD has been a responsive partner in many projects outside of the Corps domain or interest. The quality of the environment is key to the economies of east and west communities. Experience has demon strated that without the creative tension of the partnership, both partners receiving input from affected parties, that one agency will be swayed to the interests of favored stakeholders/lob byists, to the detriment of the other stakeholders, notably the silent stake holder, Nature. This is a situation that needs both the belt and the suspenders of State and Federal government, because otherwise, our pants have kept fall ing down. Trying to co-opt the Federal role, in management, while expecting the Federal dollars, indicates the les sons of the lawsuit have been forgotten. It is possible that some Florida in terests think they have gotten all they want from the effort to date, and thus the rest can be abandoned. We on the west coast know that our needs have not been addressed, except through temporary and discretionary relief, and that we need equitable at tention from both partners. Eliminating one will only result in harm to our communities, our economies, and our environments.Wayne Daltry of Fort Myers is president of the Caloosahatchee River Citizens Association (Riv erwatch). He is a former director of Lee Countys Smart Growth department and spent 27 years with the Southwest Florida Regional Plan ning Council, 20 as executive directorWho is the bad partner? GUEST COLUMNWayne DaltryRecently, I was sitting in my geometry class, wondering why I couldnt be a well-versed math ematician despite my current grade in that class. I felt like I was in molasses, slow and stuck. It just seems like no matter how hard I work in that class, I just stay in the same spot. In the midst of my self pity, I began thinking, if I could change one thing in my life it would be my ability to do math. Looking back it seems pretty shallow Nonetheless, as the days progressed on into weeks, I es tablish a new consensus about myself. or perhaps everyone in general if we were always good at everything wed never learn. So with that in mind, I decid ed if I wasnt ever bad, then Id never really be good, because in order to be good we must learn from our faults. I know that sounds a little vague, but Im pretty sure thats part of the meaning of life, at least to me. I suppose thats different for ev eryone, though. I feel as if I were a math per son, then that would mean Id end up being a not-so-adequate writer. So for everything we work for, there is a compensation. I have yet to meet an individ ual that is so competent and versatile that they can literally do everything with ease. And if there is a person with these ca pabilities, I am almost positive they are supernatural or some thing crazy like that. Honestly, whether you are ath letically or academically oriented, we all have something we are really bad at. And there is only one thing we can do when we are insufcient in an area work hard to get better. Its a pain, and I mean that from the bottom of my heart, but all the hard work put into things we are not naturally great at is well worth it. Even with the things you are good at there should always room for improvement. I am not going to be a decent writ er if I dont keep practicing, for without practice you can only get worse. Talent is cheaper than table salt. What separates the talented individual from the successful one is a lot of hard work, Stephen King once said. What is life without a little sweat, anyways? Live life and play fair, never look back, be cause there is there look for ward and youll see yourself doing whats right, as long as you put forth enough hard work, things will stay bright.Gauri Persad is a Sebring High School student. The News-Sun encourages stu dents to express their views, which are those of the writer, not necessar ily those of the News-Sun staff.Youve got to be bad before you can get better G UEST C OLUMNGauri Persad M C Y K

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www.newssun.comFriday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A5 he grew up in Pennsylvania and went to college there. He returned in 1968 with his wife Chris, hav ing been hired by the high school over the phone. Comfortable in his own skin, Brojek has a conta gious smile and easy manner that puts people, even wary young people, at ease. He radiates a energy and well being that brings out the best in people, and is passionate about his community. When youve had a good life and I found that here you owe something back, he said. Brojek is well known in the world of cross coun try running and track and eld for the high quality of the races hes organized and administered. For ex ample, Dorothy Harris, who used to work at High lands Hammock State Park and helped Brojek with the Turkey Trot and Fourth of July Firecracker 5K runs, said Brojek intro duced chip timing to local races. This means the re sults can be used to qualify for district, state and national races includ ing the Boston Marathon, which hes run 11 times as part of his 45 total mara thons. Harris said it was Bro jek who grew the Turkey Trot 5K from a small race of about 70 participants to the largest in the county with 700 runners. In 2013, when Reg gie Knighten, who teaches and coaches at APHS, looked for help in creating his after-school Champi ons Elite track and eld program for children 6-16, he turned to Brojek. Chet is a great guy, Knighten said. Hes al ways excited to help our youth and help coach track. Without him I dont know how far we would have gotten. He was a ma jor part of it. Twelve of the original 32 students in the program qualied for the nationals, and 10 of them went to Detroit to take part. Its the fun part of my day, said Brojek, talking about the time he spends with Knighten at the pro gram. The big differ ence between the younger and older students, he said laughing, is that (the younger ones) ask me to do extra, not sneak off like the high school students. Harris, who said she was biased because Brojek has coached her daughter, said, I can just go on and on. Hes mentoring the next generation so there will be people to take his place. Thats the sign of a true leader. Sebrings Taylor Tubbs is a freshman at the Univer sity of Florida. Coached by Brojek, she attends school on a cross-country schol arship. At this point in the season Tubbs has the fast est womens mile in the Southeastern Conference and is the third fastest freshman in the country. Chet is the reason I am where I am today, she told the News-Sun. He started helping me with my running going into my junior track season, and the improvement I saw was huge. Chet gave me the right training to be able to run for the Gators, which is great because he is such a big Gator fan too. He was not only my coach, but my inspiration to be the best person I can be. We thank Chet Brojek for his dedication, com passion, generosity and faith in our children. Unsung Heroes award sponsored by the heroes at Agero. BROJEK FROM PAGE A1 Courtesy PhotoChet Brojek presents a trophy to Hillary Swain during the 2004 Turkey Trot at Highlands Hammock State P ark. BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterSEBRING The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners sent a shot into the School Board of Highlands Coun tys court in January. They returned it with a spin: They agreed to give some money to a tennis court rehabilitation proj ect, but not more than $9,000. The vote was 3-1 with board member Jan Shoop dissenting. The school board has asked the county commis sion to install restrooms at the tennis courts at Lake Placid High School courts which are used by the community as much as, if not more than local students. The improvements will also include resurfacing the courts themselves and putting in parking spaces. The application for the $113,485 project was sub mitted in October 2013. It passed the Recreation and Parks Committee in De cember and was presented to the county commission in January, said Assistant Superintendent Mike Av eryt, head of operations. They didnt vote on it. They wanted some more information, Averyt said. One thing the county wanted was money from the school board, as much as 50 percent of the cost, Averyt said. The school boards origi nal RPAC funds request of fered in-kind donations in the form of the land, maintenance of the courts, paying to run the lighting at the courts and custodial services on the restrooms, once completed. However, board member Bill Brantley said county commissioners expressed concern that the school board didnt have skin in the game, meaning mon ey. Shoop said she played a lot of tennis in high school, college and as a young mother. She said the Lake Placid courts and they didnt look bad to her. She said $9,000 of school board funds to resurface the courts seemed a lux ury compared to some of the facilities needing re pairs that she saw when board members did a walk-through of campuses earlier this year. I think the $9,000 would be better spent where (its) needed, Shoop said. Board member Don na Howerton also noted that the community used the courts more than students. Shoop said many players use the high school or adjacent middle school restrooms. However, Brantley warned the school board to jump on this chance be fore the courts start degrading: Courts last 10 years and the Lake Placid courts are that old now. In a couple of years, there might not be RPAC funds, so it would cost $18,000 to do the courts, Brantley said. Board Attorney John Mc Clure said he understood that the parking improve ments and restrooms were far more important than the courts. Were trying to form a community school rela tionship, McClure said. Likewise, Brantley said that even without resur facing the courts, the county would want the school board to contribute money. Otherwise, the county would be inclined not to do it at all. Superintendent of Schools Wally Cox said un like the Avon Park and Sebring High School courts, Lake Placids has caught on as a community tennis court, and while the two other high school courts have parking, Lake Placids does not. Cox said that if the school board were to take resurfacing off the table, hed want school board money to only be used on the parking lot portion of the project, not the rest rooms. Well use them, but we can do without them Cox said. Averyt said he would work with County Engi neer Ramon Gavarrete to put together a presenta tion for the county.School Board OKs $9,000 for LPHS tennis courts With election day only 11 days away, Roepstorff is concentrating on his campaign and his main issue of local tax solu tions. I like the tax issue. I hope to help lower the taxes, Roepstorff said. If we could take a mil lion (dollars) off of the utility assessment, we could lower it. Same thing with the police and re, something needs to be addressed along the lines of re and police (nancially). Since arriving in Se bring in 1960, Roepstorff has worked his entire life and owns a home on Lakeview Drive. Ro epstorff has a strongminded attitude when it comes to many issues in the city including tax es, expansion and, of course, Harder Hall. I dont think Hard er Hall should be torn down. I think we should keep it, Roepstorff said. We owe $6 million on the thing I know, but if we can sell it for half of it I think we could be OK. Wed lose some of it (money) but thats the way it goes. Roepstorff doesnt want to see the pink el ephant go and has been around long to witness some of the fun times that have taken place there. The downtown area of Sebring is something Ro epstorff is very pleased with and spoke highly of Community Redevelop ment Agencys Robin Hinote and marketing guru Casey Wohl for putting so much time, effort and money into bringing the area to life. I think theyre do ing a good job. Casey and Robin have come up with some good game plans. Theyre doing well with everything down there. I hope we can move toward expansion as well, Roepstorff said. With only a few days left for Sebring resi dents to decide who the newest members of the council will be, Roep storff added his reason behind running for elec tion this year. I love the city of Se bring. I just do. Its been home to me for many years. I think it is a great city, Roepstorff said.Samantha Gholar can be reached at samantha.gholar@newssun. com or 385-6155 ext: 526. PROFILE FROM PAGE A1 M C Y K

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www.newssun.comFriday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A7Special to the News-SunSEBRING Singer, songwriter Carol Kline has been a popular vocalist in Florida since she and her husband rst performed in the Sunshine State more than 13 years ago. A long-time gospel and country singer, Klines rst show in Sebring was April 2001 at the Tanglewood Resort. By 2002, she and her husband, George, de cided to make their home here. Carol Kline has now written and recorded three gospel songs along with ve CDs, two of which highlight the cou ples inspirational oldtime gospel concerts. Over the years, Kline put to gether a tour venue that took them into many states, including numer ous shows at Bransons popular Treasure Lake Re sort and three show cruises with Carnival. Last year, howev er, Carol Kline added yet a whole new phase to her cre ative endeavors. She is now a published author. Kline had no clue how to go about writing a book, but it long been one of her greatest desires. She had been a correspon dent for a newspaper in their hometown of Leba non, Pa. for many years, so it was no surprise when Kline began writing fea tures and special interest stories for the News-Sun in February 2013. Her rst feature story was to intro duce Rhoda Ross, a local elementary school teach er who had written and illustrated a childrens book titled A Wildower for All Seasons. Through that inter view, Kline learned of a self-publishing company called Lighthouse24. She contacted the company seeking advice about writ ing a book of hope and inspiration, but decided to do a childrens book rst as she learned the ropes. That childrens book was based on a funny limer ick Kline would often recite while caring for her severely injured daughter out in Texas. With a daughter in re habilitation facilities for nearly four years, Kline said, it became my great est wish to write a book of hope documenting her ongoing struggle simply to survive. Our daughter is still learning to walk, talk, eat, and will hopefully be able to care for herself one day. Major Kristine Kline Ratliff, RN, USAF, was on her way home southeast of San Antonio when her compact car was T-boned by an F-350 pickup going about 60 miles per hour in April 2010. The right side of her head was crushed and she sustained a trau matic brain injury (TMI). She was airlifted to Brooke Army Medical Cen ter in San Antonio, and underwent in tensive surgery, but the prognosis was tenuous at best. Ratliff was not breathing on her own, and was being kept alive by machines. Two weeks prior to that fateful night, Carol and George Kline had just ar rived in southeastern Pennsylvania with a sum mer-long performance schedule ahead of them before heading west to Branson. Along with two other daughters, howev er, they ew immediately to Ratliffs side in the intensive care unit at Brooke Army Medical Center. Ironically, it was at that very hospital Ratliffs de partment had just been relocated, and where Ratliff herself served as a pediatric intensive care unit nurse. After two tours in Iraq and a stellar nurs ing career behind her, Ratliff was only three years from possible retirement or promotion to lieuten ant colonel. After ve days and some hopeful changes in their daughters prognosis, the Klines returned to Penn sylvania to work as many of their performance en gagements into one month, then hurried back to Texas where they stayed for six months. Ratliff was transferred to a neu ro-rehab facility in Austin where she remained in a coma for more than two months. With her parents by her side dai ly, Ratliff was declared out of a coma early in July and soon began to rally. Kline still sends out up dates to many people who have been praying for Ratliff. It became her greatest desire to write a book her struggle to sur vive. Even while Kris was still in a light coma, she would smile when I started recit ing a silly limerick I made up about a gnat and a gnu becoming friends, Kline said. It got longer and funnier as time went on, and it was that limerick that eventually became the story line for An Un likely Pair. Written and completely illustrated by Carol Kline, An Unlikely Pair is a hu morous tale set in rhyme about a g-nu named Stu and a g-nat named Pat. Once it was published in spring 2013, Kline imme diately began to illustrate and write a second chil drens book: Miss Maggie Down On Main Street. At that point, the Klines had returned to Texas, again to stay for another six months or more. The sec ond childrens book is also written in rhyme and lled with humor, an important message for children with disabilities in speech, and a happy ending. As time went by and we were with our daugh ter every day, I have been compiling information and researching various areas to be included in the book, Kline explained. But I wanted to be abso lutely certain of the important points and where the story line should go. Back in February, the News-Suns publisher/edi tor, Romona Washington, suggested I write a fourpart series for the paper to help me launch the book project. She believed in what I wanted to say and she was a huge encour agement. In March, April and May 2013, four separate feature stories appeared in the Se bring-based paper, which became the basis for four chapters in the book itself. But I still had to for mulate an ending to our daughters story, Kline. Back in Texas by early May, Kline had just started her third childrens book, this one directed to mid dle school and pre-teen children. Ananais and the Sawgrass Mysteries is an adventure ction sto ry about a 12-year-old boy who lives in the Texas Hill Country town of Dripping Springs, west of Austin. The boy nds himself in desperate peril, and many points of interest in the Dripping Springs area are used in the present day mystery story. When the mystery sto ry was published in September 2013, I knew it was time to nish the book about our daughter, said Kline, condent that she had all her ducks in a row now. I promised she would have the rst copy by Christmas. A true story based on their daughters dedica tion and erce determination, Kline hopes her book will be an inspiration and an encouragement to all who read it. While Ratliff remains in various stages of recovery and requires full care ev ery day, one thing has remained very important to Carol and George Kline: the faithful prayers of family and friends from all over the country. I dont know how we would have made it through all these months without the faithfulness of people who are praying for Kris and for us, said Kline. The miracle of it all is that her memory and her cognizance is totally intact, and she has a mar velous sense of humor. But I also want people to hear another impor tant message, Kline said, and that is we must do so much more to help all of our young veterans today. Carol Kline said she hopes her book will pro vide insight into the ur gent need for a new kind of rehabilitation facility, especially for the wound ed or disabled female veteran. There is a whole new concept of one-to-one nursing care, and its al ready working in a handful of facilities across the country. But more is needed, said Kline. An in depth advanced program for long term care is urgent ly needed for those young veterans who cannot re turn to a normal home life due to intensive brain or body injuries. Our wound ed simply cannot go to nursing homes. Look for Home Of the Brave, a story of hope, courage and determina tion, along with all of Car ol Klines childrens books on Amazon.com, and fol low Major Kristine Ratliffs ongoing rehabilitation on her website at: www.car olkline.net. Kline will be doing a book signing at the Lake Placid Memorial Library at 10 a.m. Wednesday, March 19.Local singer/songwriter writes story of hope, inspirationKLINE Courtesy photoMajor Kristine Ratliff is the subject of Home of the Brave, a story of hope, courage and determination.LAKELAND (AP) Central Florida authorities are reporting a rare death from a spider bite. Polk County Medical Ex aminer Stephen Nelson tells The Ledger that Ron ald Reese of Lakeland died Feb. 16 from complica tions of a spider bite. Nelson said the bite be came infected and developed into an abscess on the back of Reeses neck, which pressed on his spi nal cord. Reeses father says the 62-year-old had been bit ten in August by a brown recluse spider. H.K. Wil liam Reese says required lengthy hospital stays and numerous procedures for six months after the bite. He was working in an old house tearing out the existing walls and ceil ings and replacing them. Brown recluse spiders like to live in those old hous es, he said. Nelson said Reese was never tested to determine what type of spider bit him, but medical records show there were denite complications from a spi der bite wound on his neck. Few statistics on deaths attributed to spider bites are available. According to the American Association of Poison Control Cen ters, only two people died from spider bites between 2001 and 2005. Both were believed to be caused by brown recluse spiders. The brown recluse spi der, which is not native to Florida, is one of just a handful of spiders that are dangerous to humans, though all spiders carry venom as a way to kill and digest their prey, said Polk State College biology pro fessor Logan Randolph. According to the Cen ters for Disease Control and Prevention, a bite from a brown recluse spi der starts with two small puncture wounds and de velops into a blister. The venom can also cause a severe lesion by destroy ing skin tissue, which requires medical attention. However, the bites typ ically arent lethal, Randolph said. In most spider bites, complications arise most ly if theres some secondary factor. If the person has a specic allergic re action, if their health was compromised in some other manner, or if the bite causes an open wound with a secondary infection, Randolph said.Polk authorities report rare death from spider biteMan suffered effects for 6 months M C Y K A6 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com ALBERT NEWBERRYAlbert Byron Newberry, age 81, passed away Monday, Feb. 24, 2014 in Sebring. Newberry was born in Medulla to James Albert and Eva Mae (Hicks) Newber ry. He was the owner/operator of Cyclone Pump and Welding of Avon Park, director of Peace River Electric for 23 years and director of Florida Electric in Tallahassee for 15 years. He was a member and mu sic director of New Life Baptist Church in Fort Meade for many years. He attended schools in Me dulla and Mulberry. He loved to sh and hunt. He worked in the phosphate mines as a welder. He served in the Unit ed States Army during the Korean War and had been a resident of Fort Meade since 1970 coming from Lakeland. Newberry is survived by his wife of 52 years, Marjorie B. Newberry; sisters, JoAnn Still (Tom) of Lakeland and Teresa Bridges (Cecil) of Lakeland; brothers, Van Newberry (Judy) of Winter Haven, Von Newber ry (Joy) of Lakeland and Frank Newberry (Rita) of Lakeland; and many nieces and neph ews. Newberry was preceded in death by his parents, sons Steven and Jamie Newberry; and brothers Joe, Leslie and Gilbert Newberry. Visitation was held Thurs day, Feb. 27, 2014 from 1-2 p.m. with a funeral service beginning at 2 p.m. at Ste phenson-Nelson Funeral Home in Avon Park with Rev. Joe Par rish and Missionary Robert Heath ofciating. Burial was in Bougainvillea Cemetery. Me morial contributions may be made to Good Shepherd Hos pice, 1110 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33870. Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home, Avon Park www.stephensonnelsonfh.com AUDREY G A R N SEYAudrey McCord Garnsey died in Mount Sinai, N.Y., on Feb. 24, 2014 at the home of her daughter. Most recently she lived in Maranatha Village in Sebring, and previously in Chautauqua County, N.Y. She was married to David McCord from July 25, 1945 until his death on Dec. 20, 2003. She was married to Bruce Garnsey from Aug. 27, 2005 until his death on March 24, 2009. Audrey is survived by her son, Kenneth D. (Inge) Mc Cord of Hampton, Va., and her daughter, Janet M. (Richard) DAngelo of Mount Sinai, N.Y. Her grandchildren are: Shiela (Craig) Bailey, Jason McCord, Torrey DAngelo, Caroline DAngelo, and Tiffany (Jason) Dickert. Audrey is also sur vived by four great-grandchildren: Madison and Brett Bailey and Miriam and James Dickert. Audrey graduated from Cas sadaga Valley Central School in Sinclairville, N.Y. in 1945 and took both her undergrad uate and graduate studies at State University of New York at Fredonia. After having been employed by Chautauqua-Cat tarugus Electric Cooperative, Pine Valley Central School, and Brockton Central School, Audrey retired as assistant superintendent for business from Chautauqua County Board of Cooperative Educa tional Services at Fredonia in 1983. Church memberships included Cherry Creek Bap tist, and Dunkirk First Baptist and upon moving to Florida in 1983, she became a member of Maranatha Baptist Church in Sebring. Audrey was also a member of the Benja min Prescott chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution in Fredonia, N.Y. A funeral service is sched uled for Feb. 28 at Jordan Funeral Home in Sinclairville, N.Y. and a memorial ser vice in Sebring will be held at a date to be determined in March.SA R A MCILV AIN ESara M. (Carey) McIlvaine, age 81, passed away on Feb. 24, 2014 in Sebring She was born on Oct. 3, 1932, in In dependence Township, Pa., to the late Robert and Minnie (Mechling) Carey. She attend ed Southside Baptist Church in Sebring. She was active in the Highlands Social Center and the Senior Center in Bent leyville, Pa. She loved working outside in her yard, the garden and in her owers. She loved her cat, Dimitri, and also enjoyed RV camping and traveling. She especial ly loved spending time quietly rocking in her chair and watch ing the birds and squirrels. She is survived by her daughter, Grace Wilson (Jef frey) of Taylor Mill, Ky.; sister, Betty Myers of Bentleyville, Pa.; brother, Hugh Carey (Mil dred) of Monongahela, Pa.; and many other extended fam ily members. Along with her parents, she is preceded in death a brother, Robert Carey; husbands, Thomas Squirlock and Charles McIlvaine; and her companion, Claude Musik. There will be a funeral ser vice on Monday, March 3, 2014 at 10 a.m. at Stephen son-Nelson Funeral Home in Sebring. Family will receive friends beginning at 9 a.m. Burial will be at Lakeview Me morial Gardens immediately following service. Memorial contributions may be made in her memo ry to Highlands Social Center, 2400 Sebring Pkwy., Sebring, FL 33870 Arrangements entrusted to: Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home www.stephensonnelsonfh.comGRETEL ASHLEYGretel Ashley, age 88, passed away Friday, Feb. 14, 2014 in Avon Park Arrange ments entrusted to Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home Avon Park. www.stephenson nelsonfh.comOBITUARIES prepare the ground, do site work, put in a sep tic system and, of course, there is all the permit ting, she said. But when we get done it really is go ing to be quite nice. The rst phase will com prise units for large and small dogs. The quaran tine pens reportedly will then be put where the an imal housing currently is located. That will keep our quarantine dogs away from the general popula tion, she said. Spiegel said the rst part of the building would pro vide for about 40 dogs, about 15 more than they currently can house. She explained that although more space could be built, they did not want to house more animals they can care for on a daily basis. Humane Society mem bers and supporters have been contributing to the effort for a while now. A lot of people have done a lot of hard work and there have been some folks who have been ex tremely generous with the memorials they have be queathed to us, she said. Spiegel said that fund raising efforts will continue and that an ofcial groundbreaking ceremony will be announced soon. HUMANE FROM PAGE A1be engraved and placed between the two loca tions. We already have one brick done. That is ded icated to Phillip Weber. Hopefully that will be the rst one we lay, he said. Weber was in the Army during World War II and is well known in the com munity as a pharmacist both in downtown Avon Park and later at Walmart. He also was a past president of the Avon Park Noon Rotary and nished up at the breakfast Rota ry Mungall said. To help ensure unifor mity, all of the engraving is set to be done by Da rin MacNeill of Everlasting Memorials and Monuments in Sebring. He indicated all the bricks would be done in a stan dard brick font. Although the ofcial kickoff wont be until the Music on the Mall event set for March 29, Mungall said that those interested could nd out more be ginning today. If there are any ques tions, folks can contact me directly at 368-0286, he said. In the meantime. Mun gall said the clubs have started an outreach to meet with veterans groups let them know about the program. ROTARY FROM PAGE A1 BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterAVON PARK The latest spate of parcels annexed into Avon Park fell like lined-up dominos. As soon as the Avon Park City Council ap proved one parcel for annexation Monday, it opened the way for an adjacent parcel to come into the city. Each parcel owner had signed an agreement to be annexed into the city as soon as the city limits were adjacent with that property. The rst parcel to be annexed was 3.5 acres at 2450 U.S. 27 South, owned by the Florida State Firemens Associa tion Inc. Its located on the highway across from Lake Glenada and just south of the city limits. After that one, the City Council approved 2500 U.S. 27 South 19.1 acres owned by the city which sits just south of the Firemens Associ ation. After that, the city an nexed another cityowned parcel: 31 acres located just west of the other city-owned par cel at 2055 U.S. 27 South, followed by 3.6 acres at 2511 U.S. 27 South, owned by Guru Krupa Investment LLC. Avon Park has steadi ly been adding to its bor ders. It added Crystal Lake Golf Club manufac tured home park in December followed by a total 15.55 acres in midJanuary that included 50 dwelling units at Ban yan Woods Apartments, north of Lake Byrd, and 40 units at the Brent wood Mobile Home Park. While that made for 603 homes annexed in three months, Mondays annexations were either commercial property or vacant. The city has also been extending water lines into the Avon Park Lakes, Lake Lotela, Avon Park Estates and Lake Den ton areas 6,500 feet of pipe, or a little less than 1.25 miles. City Manager Julian Deleon hopes to have the project done within the next three to four weeks, pending nal certica tion on the Avon Park Lakes and Avon Park Es tates systems from the Environmental Protec tion Agency. However, providing garbage service to for mer county residents has been more tricky. City council members voted in January to have City Attorney Gerald Buhr seek a court ruling on who gets to provide garbage hauling at Crys tal Lake Golf Club: The city or Progressive Waste Solutions. The haulers contract is up for renewal in Sep tember 2015, but Deleon has estimated the city would miss out on an es timated $8,170 in sanitation hauling revenue per month from Crystal Lake. Buhr said the haul er claims to have a separate contract with Crystal Lake outside of its coun ty-issued franchise, but Buhr contends the fran chise overrules any contract with park owner, Mink L.L.C. The matter has to go before a judge, Buhr said.City plays dominos with annexationAvon Park expands borders south along U.S. 27 They are imaginative, frugal, and they know if they can save money on the budget, they can roll that money over the next year. Eures recently weighed in on rumors that Sun N Lake South Volunteer Fire Depart ment in Lake Placid would be closing. It wasnt, and neither were the paid reght ers there in any danger of losing their jobs, he said. Even if individual sta tion budgets were to get tight and re services had to move personnel, he would look to place them in other depart ments, like EMS. Highlands County Fire Services 10 depart ments function with volunteers even the chiefs, Eures said. Three of them have paid staff: DeSoto City, Highlands Lakes and Sun N Lake South. Those six re ghters two at each department cover daytime calls for those stations, Eures said. Thats because its not always very easy getting staff to cover the station. If the re department(s) can re cruit enough volunteers, they can handle daytime calls, Eures said. The county has 200225 volunteer reght ers on the rosters to cover 1,100 square miles and 98,000 people. Some districts, such as West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department, cover a lot of residential and commercial property, so recruiting young res idents or workers from that area is relatively easy. Venus Fire Depart ment is in a rural area, so the local residents are a little more scarce, Eures said. Fire depart ments help each other through mutual aid, but having re trucks near by ready to respond is the main goal. If getting enough peo ple is a challenge; so is getting assessments, Eures said. For example, Sun N Lake South should be getting $184,788 per year from unimproved lots and residential lots, and then $19,500 per year from commer cial lots, but Eures said those amounts are de pendent on all landowners paying assessments. Also, it depends on whether the assess ments most of which havent changed in 20 years can pay for de partments equipment and training needs. Once the county sug gested that volunteer reghters get 40 hours of training. Now, the state mandates 250 hours to become Fire ghter 1. The next rank, Fireghter 2, takes a to tal of 600 hours. Equipment costs have also gone up. A re en gine 20 years ago, fully furnished, cost $101,000. Today, its $450,00 or more. Self-contained breathing apparatus for entering a burning building used to have bells or whistles to alert reghters that air lev els were low. Later models used vibration alerts, but today the devices have heads-up displays in the face masks. Still, re chiefs have to weigh in the benets of equipment, training and even salaries when looking at providing good service. They have to be absolutely sure that they have tried ev ery option before asking to increase an assess ment, because that process by law must take a year. They also cant borrow from nearby re dis tricts, Eures said. They each must have their own budgets and opera tions plans. Eures also prefers having volunteer com munity re stations because they help dene a community, and the stations help maintain Highlands Countys sta tus and reputation of being a county of volun teers. You cant buy pride and dedication. They do the best with what they have, Eures said. FIRE FROM PAGE A1 Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Flor ida legislators this year arent worrying about budget cuts or how to bal ance the state budget. Instead the Republicancontrolled Florida Legis lature will spend the next nine weeks trying to gure out how to spend an ex pected budget surplus of more than $1 billion. Gov. Rick Scott wants legislators to use the sur plus to pay for tax and fee cuts of nearly $600 million including a roll back in auto registration fees. Legislative leaders are largely in agreement with the governor, although they have not endorsed every one of his proposals. Still splits are emerging over some of Scotts pro posals such as his push to increase spending on child protection investi gators. Funding for water restoration and other environmental programs could be a sticking point.Lawmakers have money to spend or give back M C Y K

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www.newssun.comFriday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A7 Special to the News-SunSEBRING Singer, songwriter Carol Kline has been a popular vocalist in Florida since she and her husband rst performed in the Sunshine State more than 13 years ago. A long-time gospel and country singer, Klines rst show in Sebring was April 2001 at the Tanglewood Resort. By 2002, she and her husband, George, de cided to make their home here. Carol Kline has now written and recorded three gospel songs along with ve CDs, two of which highlight the cou ples inspirational oldtime gospel concerts. Over the years, Kline put to gether a tour venue that took them into many states, including numer ous shows at Bransons popular Treasure Lake Re sort and three show cruises with Carnival. Last year, howev er, Carol Kline added yet a whole new phase to her cre ative endeavors. She is now a published author. Kline had no clue how to go about writing a book, but it long been one of her greatest desires. She had been a correspon dent for a newspaper in their hometown of Leba non, Pa. for many years, so it was no surprise when Kline began writing fea tures and special interest stories for the News-Sun in February 2013. Her rst feature story was to intro duce Rhoda Ross, a local elementary school teach er who had written and illustrated a childrens book titled A Wildower for All Seasons. Through that inter view, Kline learned of a self-publishing company called Lighthouse24. She contacted the company seeking advice about writ ing a book of hope and inspiration, but decided to do a childrens book rst as she learned the ropes. That childrens book was based on a funny limer ick Kline would often recite while caring for her severely injured daughter out in Texas. With a daughter in re habilitation facilities for nearly four years, Kline said, it became my great est wish to write a book of hope documenting her ongoing struggle simply to survive. Our daughter is still learning to walk, talk, eat, and will hopefully be able to care for herself one day. Major Kristine Kline Ratliff, RN, USAF, was on her way home southeast of San Antonio when her compact car was T-boned by an F-350 pickup going about 60 miles per hour in April 2010. The right side of her head was crushed and she sustained a trau matic brain injury (TMI). She was airlifted to Brooke Army Medical Cen ter in San Antonio, and underwent in tensive surgery, but the prognosis was tenuous at best. Ratliff was not breathing on her own, and was being kept alive by machines. Two weeks prior to that fateful night, Carol and George Kline had just ar rived in southeastern Pennsylvania with a sum mer-long performance schedule ahead of them before heading west to Branson. Along with two other daughters, howev er, they ew immediately to Ratliffs side in the intensive care unit at Brooke Army Medical Center. Ironically, it was at that very hospital Ratliffs de partment had just been relocated, and where Ratliff herself served as a pediatric intensive care unit nurse. After two tours in Iraq and a stellar nurs ing career behind her, Ratliff was only three years from possible retirement or promotion to lieuten ant colonel. After ve days and some hopeful changes in their daughters prognosis, the Klines returned to Penn sylvania to work as many of their performance en gagements into one month, then hurried back to Texas where they stayed for six months. Ratliff was transferred to a neu ro-rehab facility in Austin where she remained in a coma for more than two months. With her parents by her side dai ly, Ratliff was declared out of a coma early in July and soon began to rally. Kline still sends out up dates to many people who have been praying for Ratliff. It became her greatest desire to write a book her struggle to sur vive. Even while Kris was still in a light coma, she would smile when I started recit ing a silly limerick I made up about a gnat and a gnu becoming friends, Kline said. It got longer and funnier as time went on, and it was that limerick that eventually became the story line for An Un likely Pair. Written and completely illustrated by Carol Kline, An Unlikely Pair is a hu morous tale set in rhyme about a g-nu named Stu and a g-nat named Pat. Once it was published in spring 2013, Kline imme diately began to illustrate and write a second chil drens book: Miss Maggie Down On Main Street. At that point, the Klines had returned to Texas, again to stay for another six months or more. The sec ond childrens book is also written in rhyme and lled with humor, an important message for children with disabilities in speech, and a happy ending. As time went by and we were with our daugh ter every day, I have been compiling information and researching various areas to be included in the book, Kline explained. But I wanted to be abso lutely certain of the important points and where the story line should go. Back in February, the News-Suns publisher/edi tor, Romona Washington, suggested I write a fourpart series for the paper to help me launch the book project. She believed in what I wanted to say and she was a huge encour agement. In March, April and May 2013, four separate feature stories appeared in the Se bring-based paper, which became the basis for four chapters in the book itself. But I still had to for mulate an ending to our daughters story, Kline. Back in Texas by early May, Kline had just started her third childrens book, this one directed to mid dle school and pre-teen children. Ananais and the Sawgrass Mysteries is an adventure ction sto ry about a 12-year-old boy who lives in the Texas Hill Country town of Dripping Springs, west of Austin. The boy nds himself in desperate peril, and many points of interest in the Dripping Springs area are used in the present day mystery story. When the mystery sto ry was published in September 2013, I knew it was time to nish the book about our daughter, said Kline, condent that she had all her ducks in a row now. I promised she would have the rst copy by Christmas. A true story based on their daughters dedica tion and erce determination, Kline hopes her book will be an inspiration and an encouragement to all who read it. While Ratliff remains in various stages of recovery and requires full care ev ery day, one thing has remained very important to Carol and George Kline: the faithful prayers of family and friends from all over the country. I dont know how we would have made it through all these months without the faithfulness of people who are praying for Kris and for us, said Kline. The miracle of it all is that her memory and her cognizance is totally intact, and she has a mar velous sense of humor. But I also want people to hear another impor tant message, Kline said, and that is we must do so much more to help all of our young veterans today. Carol Kline said she hopes her book will pro vide insight into the ur gent need for a new kind of rehabilitation facility, especially for the wound ed or disabled female veteran. There is a whole new concept of one-to-one nursing care, and its al ready working in a handful of facilities across the country. But more is needed, said Kline. An in depth advanced program for long term care is urgent ly needed for those young veterans who cannot re turn to a normal home life due to intensive brain or body injuries. Our wound ed simply cannot go to nursing homes. Look for Home Of the Brave, a story of hope, courage and determina tion, along with all of Car ol Klines childrens books on Amazon.com, and fol low Major Kristine Ratliffs ongoing rehabilitation on her website at: www.car olkline.net. Kline will be doing a book signing at the Lake Placid Memorial Library at 10 a.m. Wednesday, March 19.Local singer/songwriter writes story of hope, inspiration KLINE Courtesy photoMajor Kristine Ratliff is the subject of Home of the Brave, a story of hope, courage and determination. LAKELAND (AP) Central Florida authorities are reporting a rare death from a spider bite. Polk County Medical Ex aminer Stephen Nelson tells The Ledger that Ron ald Reese of Lakeland died Feb. 16 from complica tions of a spider bite. Nelson said the bite be came infected and developed into an abscess on the back of Reeses neck, which pressed on his spi nal cord. Reeses father says the 62-year-old had been bit ten in August by a brown recluse spider. H.K. Wil liam Reese says required lengthy hospital stays and numerous procedures for six months after the bite. He was working in an old house tearing out the existing walls and ceil ings and replacing them. Brown recluse spiders like to live in those old hous es, he said. Nelson said Reese was never tested to determine what type of spider bit him, but medical records show there were denite complications from a spi der bite wound on his neck. Few statistics on deaths attributed to spider bites are available. According to the American Association of Poison Control Cen ters, only two people died from spider bites between 2001 and 2005. Both were believed to be caused by brown recluse spiders. The brown recluse spi der, which is not native to Florida, is one of just a handful of spiders that are dangerous to humans, though all spiders carry venom as a way to kill and digest their prey, said Polk State College biology pro fessor Logan Randolph. According to the Cen ters for Disease Control and Prevention, a bite from a brown recluse spi der starts with two small puncture wounds and de velops into a blister. The venom can also cause a severe lesion by destroy ing skin tissue, which requires medical attention. However, the bites typ ically arent lethal, Randolph said. In most spider bites, complications arise most ly if theres some secondary factor. If the person has a specic allergic re action, if their health was compromised in some other manner, or if the bite causes an open wound with a secondary infection, Randolph said.Polk authorities report rare death from spider biteMan suffered effects for 6 months M C Y K

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A8 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com SPORTS FISHIN AROUNDDon NortonLast Thursday I had the opportunity to attend the Friends of Istokpoga meeting at the Lorida Civic Center. The speakers were ter ric, providing updates on the condition of the lake as well as any treatment areas and excavation taking place. Anyone that shes this incredible shery should attend these meetings. Membership is only $7 and well worth it. Bill Pounder with the FWC gave a great presentation on the harvest, tagging and shocking of both largemouth bass and crappie. The detailed analysis of the FWC ndings on both crappie and bass has created quite a stir and they are now proposing changes to both the crappie size limit and the statewide size limits and slots on bass currently in place. Their ndings strongly suggest that although there are currently no size limits on crappie (only daily bag limits), 50-per cent of the shermen polled kept sh 9 and over while the other half returned the 9 sh back into the water. As a result, and based on their ndings, they are proposing a new size limit state-wide of 10 or more on crappies. Largemouth bass, on the other hand have differ ent size limits, as well as different slots in all three zones of Florida. Ask a sherman on any given lake in Florida what the size limit is for bass and you may get a dazed stare. Thats because the size limits are different in all three regions of the state; North Florida, Central Florida and South Florida. And if thats not enough, many lakes in these three regions also have slot limits. In saltwater shing you can only keep sh within the designated slot, while bass slots are just the opposite. So, whats the solution? Well Bill Pounder and the FWC want to hear from you. They are proposing a new state-wide regulation for largemouth bass. One that is simpler and encourages folks to remove the smaller bass so the larger bass have more forage, and hopefully, grow even larger.FWC proposed bass and crappie regulation change surveySEE FISH | A10 BY DAN HOEHNEdaniel.hoehne@newssun.comThough they didnt have quite as impressive a rst inning as Sebrings explosion at Lake Placid, Avon Park kept it going in their 13-5 win over Fort Meade Tuesday night. For while the Streaks did all their scoring early, the Devils put up a run in each and every inning to cruise to the win. With one out in the bottom of the rst, Alfred Brown singled for his rst of three hits on the night. He then stole second and third as Tyrone Perry walked, who soon stole second himself. Brown came in when Mykel Gordon reached on an error and both Perry and Gordon would eventually score on passed balls. But the rst-inning scoring wasnt done. With two outs, Alex Gomez drew a walk and J.C. Cobb singled to left. A double steal ensued, putting both runners in scoring position and another passed ball brought Gomez across. Trey Frazier then rocketed a triple to right, scoring Cobb, and Red Devils rout Fort Meade Miners Dan Hoehne/News-Sun lesAlfred Brown had three hits and scored three runs in Avon Parks 13-5 win over Fort Meade Tuesday. BY DAN HOEHNEdaniel.hoehne@newssun.comLAKE PLACID In the midst of a brutal season schedule, it may have been natural for Sebring to perhaps take Tuesday nights county tilt against the Dragons lightly. Which was the main thing rst-year head coach Jayson DeWitt was worried about. I made the schedule I did because I feel you only get better by playing against the best, he said. And I dont ever want our guys to underestimate any team. That mentality surely was in effect on this night, as the Blue Streaks all but locked this one up with a 10-run explosion in the opening inning. Seven runs were scored before the rst out was made as Jordan Austin and Cullen Lovett greeted Lake Placid starter Justin LaRosa with consecutive singles to start the game. Jimmy Peck ripped an RBI double to left before Seth Cannady and Matt Portis drew walks to load the bases and score Lovett. Josh Crouch hit a smash toward third that couldnt be handled, bringing two runs in, and David DeGenaro singled through the left side to load them up again. Justin Bickman then drew a walk to bring Por tis in and the call went to the Dragon bullpen as Justin Mason came on in relief. Ty Little then greeted him rudely as he blasted one high and deep to left. High enough, however, that the runners had to hold up and just one came in on the warningtrack single. Austin continued the parade in his second atbat of the inning by drawing a walk to score DeGenaro before Mason got Blue Streaks blow past Dragons Dan Hoehne/News-SunJimmy Peck had two doubles and three RBI in the Blue Streaks 13-3 win Tuesday. Special to the News-SunOn Wednesday, Feb. 26, Lake Ashton of Lake Wales played at Tanglewood in the nal match of the South Central Florida Pickleball League regular season. Tanglewood came out on top 49-18 to nish an undefeated season in the veteam league. Each team is comprised of four pairs ranked from A to D. They then play a roundrobin series with more points being awarded for games against the most evenly matched teams. Tanglewoods D team was anchored by Tom Stadler who played with three partners during the day. Against Lake Ashtons top team, Stadler and Dave Werry put up a strong ght, losing two games to one. Partnered with Betty Schleis, Stadler won a match then nished the day winning the nal two matches paired with Walt Snyder. Debi Yandell and Dennis Rowland, Tanglewoods C team, won their rst three matches of the day and came on very strong in the nal competition winning 11-8 and 11-5 over their Lake Ashton counterparts. In order to allow most of the Tanglewood subs a chance to play, team captain, Wayne Buck utilized a variety of pairings. At the B level, Tracy Ver nest and Gloria Soltes teamed up in the rst match, playing well but losing. The regular B team members, Randy Craws Tanglewood Picklers stay undefeated Courtesy photoWayne Buck reaches high to swat back this return as teammate Mark March looks on in recent Tanglewood Pickleball action. Special to the News-SunFORT MYERS In the midst of more than 200 swimmers, a local quartet impressed. Four members of the Highlands Hurricane swim team traveled to the coast for the Gulf Coast, Last Chance Short Course Swim Meet on Saturday, Feb. 22, and came home with some strong results as each swimmer had multiple top-10 nishes. Seven-year old Leila Henry of Sebring scored a 10th and fth in the 8-and-under, 50-yard Freestyle and Backstroke, respectively, while 11-year old Peyton Ming of Lake Placid added four top-10s. He got an eighth in the Senior 100-yard Backstroke, sixth in the 11-12 100 Individual Medley, a fth in the Senior 100 Buttery and fourth in the 1112 50 Back. Anna Sapp, 11 and from Lake Placid, earned a sixth in the 11-12 girls 50 Free, fth in the Senior 100 Back and got a win in the 11-12 50 Back. The biggest day came from 14-year old Grifn Chynoweth of Sebring. He nished ninth in the Senior 100 Free and fourth in the 50 free, before getting second in the 100 Breaststroke and moving on notch up in getting rst in the 200 Breaststroke. Some big waves churned up by this small group of Hurricanes.Hurricane foursome formidable at Ft. Myers Courtesy photoThe Highlands Hurricanes swam strong at Ft. Myers. Front row, left to right, Anna Sapp, Peyton Ming and Leila Henry. Back row, Hurricane coach Marvin Wolfe, Grifn Chynoweth and assistant coach Megan Wolfe. SEE DEVILS | A11SEE SEBRING | A11SEE PICKLE | A10 M C Y K

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www.newssun.comFriday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A9 TodayBoxing Friday Night Fights 9 p.m. ESPN2 College Basketball Iona at Manhattan 7 p.m. ESPN2 Golf EuroPGA Tshwane Open 9 a.m. GOLF PGA Honda Classic 2 p.m. GOLF NBA Golden State at New York 8 p.m. ESPN New Orleans at Phoenix 10:30 p.m. ESPNSaturdayAuto Racing NASCAR Nationwide Series 3:45 p.m. ABC Boxing Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. vs. Bryan Vera 9:45 p.m. HBO College Basketball Cincinnati at Connecticut Noon ESPN Vanderbilt at Tennessee Noon ESPN2 Mississippi State at Missouri 1:30 p.m. WTTA Louisville at Memphis 2 p.m. CBS Missouri State at Wichita State 2 p.m. ESPN Pittsburgh at Notre Dame 2 p.m. ESPN2 LSU at Florida 4 p.m. CBS Georgia at Arkansas 4 p.m. WTTA Illinois at Michigan State 4 p.m. ESPN Syracuse at Virginia 4 p.m. ESPN2 Kentucky at South Carolina 6 p.m. ESPN Saint Louis at Virginia Commonwealth 6 p.m. ESPN2 UC Santa Barbara at UC Davis 8 p.m. ESPN2 Kansas at Oklahoma State 9 p.m. ESPN Gonzaga at St. Marys 10 p.m. ESPN2 Golf PGA Honda Classic 1 p.m. GOLF PGA Honda Classic 3 p.m. NBC NBA Orlando at Miami 7:30 p.m. SUN NHL Tampa Bay at Dallas 3 p.m. SUN Pittsburgh at Chicago 8 p.m. NBCSPORTS ON TV SCORE BOARD COMING UPHigh School Baseball Today Avon Park vs. Frostproof, 7 p.m.; Lake Placid at DeSoto, 7 p.m.; Sebring vs. Berkeley Prep, 7 p.m. College Baseball Today SFSC vs. State College of Florida, 6 p.m. Saturday SFSC at State College of Florida, 1 p.m. High School Softball Today Avon Park at Mulberry, 6/7:30 p.m.; Lake Placid vs. All Saints, 6 p.m.; Sebring at DeSoto, 5:30/7:30 p.m. College Softball Saturday SFSC vs. Miami Dade, 1 p.m. Boys Tennis Monday Lake Placid vs. Clewiston, 4:30 p.m. Girls Tennis Monday Lake Placid at Clewiston, 4:30 p.m. Blue Streak Tennis CampSEBRING The Sebring High School girls tennis team will be hosting their 2nd Annual Tennis Camp on Saturday, March 8. The camp will run from 9 a.m. to Noon at the Thakkar Tennis Center located in the Country Club of Sebring. The camp is open to girls and boys ages 4 to 18. Instruction will be available for all levels of play. Lunch will be provided and all participants will receive a camp t-shirt. Cost is $25 per student with family discounts available. Pre-registration is en couraged. For registration and/ or more information call Coach Hollinger at 4715513.SFSC hosts Panther 5KAVON PARK On your mark, get set, go! Registration for the 5th annual Panther 5K Run/ Walk is now available online at www.southorida. edu/panther5k. This annual family event will take place on Saturday, March 1, and benets the South Florida State College (SFSC) Athletic Department. The Panther 5K Run/ Walk will take participants on a path through the beautiful SFSC Highlands Campus and along College Drive. Participants can choose to run the 5K as a race or to take a more leisurely, family-friendly walk four-legged friends and strollers are welcome. This event helps us to promote health among our community and raise funds to help support SFSC athletics, said Rick Hitt, SFSC athletic director and head baseball coach. We will earmark a portion of the raised funds to go toward the Panther Fieldhouse fundraising effort, which is our effort to supply the softball, baseball and future cross country team with a dressing facility located down on the athletic complex grounds. Other funds raised will be earmarked for things that may arise during the year outside of our normal budget. The entry fee for the SFSC Panther 5K Run/ Walk is $25 for adults, $20 for students with a current I.D., and $15 for children ages 6-12. Children under the age of 6 are admitted free with a completed form, but do not receive a shirt. The rst 200 registered runners receive a goody bag and an ofcial Panther 5K dri-t shirt for adults and students. Children receive a T-shirt. The entry fee remains the same through race day. Sizes cannot be guaranteed for those who enter on or after Feb. 9. Registration is 7 -7:45 a.m. on race day and the race begins at 8 a.m. Scrambled eggs and fruit will be available to participants after the race. A special awards ceremony will follow the race. Awards will be given to the rst three nishers in each age (6 and up) and gender category as well as Overall and Masters. The annual Panther 5K race is sponsored by the SFSC Foundation, Inc. and the Jarrett Family Foundation. Entry forms are available online at www.southorida.edu/panther5k. For information about the SFSC Panther 5K Run/Walk or to become a sponsor, call the SFSC Foundation at 863-453-3133.Sebring Elks Golf TournamentThe Sebring Elks Lodge No. 1529 monthly golf outing will be held at Golf Hammock Golf and Country Club on Monday, March 3, beginning at 8 a.m. Cost is $34, which includes golf, cart, lunch and prize fund. To sign up contact Jack McLaughlin at jacknjudy33872@gmail.com or leave a message on (863) 471-3295. Check in not later than 7:40 a.m. by the Pro Shop.Art League golf tournamentSEBRING The 4th Annual Highlands Art League (HAL) Golf Classic, sponsored by Barben Fruit Company, will be held on Saturday, March 8, at Pinecrest Golf Club in Avon Park. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. and the shotgun start will be at 8:30 a.m. Additional sponsors include a $2,000 HoleIn-One sponsored by Cohan Radio Group and a $250 Closest to the Pin sponsored by Alan Jay Automotive. The tournament is a four-person scramble. Entry is $60 per per son made payable to the Highlands Art League. The entry includes golf, cart, refreshments on the course, prizes and a post-golf meal in the clubhouse. Individuals welcome. There will be a 50/50, other contests, a great day of golf, rafe prizes, mulligans and fun for a good cause to support art education in our community. Proceeds benet HAL, which provides art classes, programs and workshops to youth and adult students, as well as art exhibits in the Highlands Museum of the Arts (MoTA). An application and entry form can be obtained online at www. HighlandsArtLeague.org, by emailing Manager@ HighlandsArtLeague. org, by calling Barb Hall at (863) 452-0512 or the Clubhouse at (863) 453-7555. Deadline for entry is Thursday, March 6. $100 hole sponsorships are available.LP Project GraduationLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid High School Project Graduation 2014 Golf Tournament will tee off on Saturday, March 29, at the Placid Lakes Golf Course. Registration begins at 7 a.m. before a shotgun start kicks off play at 8 a.m. Cost is $60 per person, $240 per team, and includes greens fee, cart and meal. There will be a 50/50 drawing, a rafe, straightest drive and closest to the pin contests and a $2,000 Hole in One prize sponsored by Cohan Radio Group. For more information, contact Charlotte McQuillen at 633-8450.Eagles looking for coachesAVON PARK The Highlands Youth Football and Cheer Organization is accepting applications for football and cheer coaches at all age divisions for the 2014 season. If you are interested in coaching, you may go to www.highlandseagles.com, click on the Registration tab, and select Coach/Volunteer tab to view requirements and submit application. If you have any questions, you may contact Cliff Howell at 863-2537070, or Melissa Lane at 863-381-9325.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING The Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center will be hosting their 4th Annual Scholarship Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 26, at Sun N Lake. Format is a four-per son scramble with handicapped ights. Entry fee is $65 per person, which includes greens fee, golf cart and lunch. Registration is at 7:30 a.m. the day of the tournament, with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Please submit entries by Thursday, April 24. Make checks payable to Wings of Faith CWC Scholarship Fund. All proceeds go to benet college-bound senior graduates for the class of 2014. For questions, call Alvin Walters at 381-5706 or 381-6578.Samaritans Touch Golf TournamentSEBRING Its Just What the Doctor Ordered! Samaritans Touch Care Center (STCC) presents the 2014 Charity Golf Tournament on Saturday, March 1, at the Sun N Lake Golf Club of Sebring. All proceeds will benet STCC, a faith-based, nonprot healthcare center, providing free comprehensive medical care to our uninsured, nancially struggling neighbors in Highlands County. Registration is at 7:30 a.m. and shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Four person-teams will be ighted by handicap. Entry fee includes continental breakfast, fabulous prizes, refreshments on the course, lunch and awards following play. There will be a $2,000 hole-in-one sponsored by Cohan Radio Group. Entry fee is $260 per team or $350 for team and hole sponsorship. Download entry form at www.samaritanstouch. org. For additional infor mation, please contact Heather Stephenson at (863) 471-1870 ext. 210 or (863) 214-0340, or by email at ops.director@samaritanstouch.org. For every $1 dollar collected during this golf tournament, STCC is able to provide patients with over $10, in health care services. Heres how far your support will go $100 hole sponsorship will provide a patient with $1,000 in health care services, a $260 team will provide a patient with $2,600 in health care services and a $350 team and hole sponsorship will provide a patient with $3,500 in health care services. SNAP S HOT S SPORTS National Basketball AssociationEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 32 25 .561 Brooklyn 26 29 .473 5 New York 21 36 .368 11 Boston 20 39 .339 13 Philadelphia 15 43 .259 17 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 40 14 .741 Washington 29 28 .509 12 Charlotte 27 30 .474 14 Atlanta 26 31 .456 15 Orlando 18 42 .300 25 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 43 13 .768 Chicago 31 26 .544 12 Detroit 23 35 .397 21 Cleveland 23 36 .390 21 Milwaukee 11 45 .196 32 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 41 16 .719 Houston 39 19 .672 2 Dallas 36 23 .610 6 Memphis 32 24 .571 8 New Orleans 23 34 .404 18 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 43 15 .741 Portland 40 18 .690 3 Minnesota 28 29 .491 14 Denver 25 31 .446 17 Utah 21 36 .368 21 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 40 20 .667 Golden State 35 23 .603 4 Phoenix 33 24 .579 5 Sacramento 20 37 .351 18 L.A. Lakers 19 39 .328 20 Wednesdays Games Orlando 101, Philadelphia 90 Boston 115, Atlanta 104 Chicago 103, Golden State 83 Dallas 108, New Orleans 89 Cleveland 114, Oklahoma City 104 Memphis 108, L.A. Lakers 103 San Antonio 120, Detroit 110 Utah 109, Phoenix 86 Portland 124, Brooklyn 80 L.A. Clippers 101, Houston 93 Thursdays Games Milwaukee at Indiana, late Washington at Toronto, late New York at Miami, late Brooklyn at Denver, late Fridays Games Utah at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m. Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Golden State at New York, 8 p.m. Chicago at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Charlotte at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Sacramento at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. New Orleans at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.National Hockey LeagueEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 58 37 16 5 79 180 130 Tampa Bay 58 33 20 5 71 168 145 Montreal 60 32 21 7 71 149 144 Toronto 60 32 22 6 70 178 182 Detroit 59 27 20 12 66 153 164 Ottawa 59 26 22 11 63 169 191 Florida 58 22 29 7 51 139 183 Buffalo 59 17 34 8 42 118 178 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 58 40 15 3 83 186 138 N.Y. Rangers 59 32 24 3 67 155 146 Philadelphia 59 30 23 6 66 162 167 Columbus 58 29 24 5 63 170 161 Washington 59 27 23 9 63 171 175 Carolina 58 26 23 9 61 146 161 New Jersey 59 24 22 13 61 135 146 N.Y. Islanders 60 22 30 8 52 164 200 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA St. Louis 58 39 13 6 84 196 136 Chicago 60 35 11 14 84 207 163 Colorado 59 37 17 5 79 178 159 Minnesota 59 31 21 7 69 145 147 Dallas 58 27 21 10 64 164 164 Winnipeg 60 28 26 6 62 168 175 Nashville 59 25 24 10 60 146 180 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 60 41 14 5 87 196 147 San Jose 59 37 16 6 80 175 142 Los Angeles 60 32 22 6 70 145 132 Vancouver 61 28 24 9 65 147 160 Phoenix 58 27 21 10 64 163 169 Calgary 58 22 29 7 51 137 179 Edmonton 60 20 33 7 47 153 199 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over time loss. Wednesdays Games Buffalo 5, Boston 4, OT Detroit 2, Montreal 1, OT Los Angeles 6, Colorado 4 Vancouver 1, St. Louis 0 Thursdays Games Columbus at New Jersey, late Toronto at N.Y. Islanders, late Chicago at N.Y. Rangers, late San Jose at Philadelphia, late Montreal at Pittsburgh, late Detroit at Ottawa, late Washington at Florida, late Tampa Bay at Nashville, late Phoenix at Winnipeg, late Carolina at Dallas, late Los Angeles at Calgary, late Minnesota at Edmonton, late Fridays Games San Jose at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Colorado, 9 p.m. Minnesota at Vancouver, 10 p.m. St. Louis at Anaheim, 10 p.m.Spring Training GlanceAMERICAN LEAGUE W L Pct Detroit 1 0 1.000 Oakland 1 0 1.000 Toronto 1 0 1.000 Baltimore 0 0 .000 Boston 0 0 .000 Chicago 0 0 .000 Houston 0 0 .000 Kansas City 0 0 .000 Los Angeles 0 0 .000 Minnesota 0 0 .000 Seattle 0 0 .000 Tampa Bay 0 0 .000 Texas 0 0 .000 Cleveland 0 1 .000 New York 0 1 .000 NATIONAL LEAGUE W L Pct Arizona 1 0 1.000 Cincinnati 1 0 1.000 Pittsburgh 1 0 1.000 Chicago 0 0 .000 Colorado 0 0 .000 Miami 0 0 .000 Milwaukee 0 0 .000 New York 0 0 .000 San Diego 0 0 .000 St. Louis 0 0 .000 Washington 0 0 .000 Atlanta 0 1 .000 Los Angeles 0 1 .000 Philadelphia 0 1 .000 San Francisco 0 1 .000 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. Wednesdays Games Detroit 6, Atlanta 5 Toronto 4, Philadelphia 3, 7 innings Pittsburgh 6, N.Y. Yankees 5 Oakland 10, San Francisco 5 Cincinnati 8, Cleveland 3 Arizona 4, L.A. Dodgers 1 Thursdays Games Philadelphia vs. Toronto, late Pittsburgh vs. N.Y. Yankees, late Atlanta vs. Detroit, late Texas vs. Kansas City, late Arizona (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs, late Arizona (ss) vs. L.A. Dodgers, late Milwaukee vs. Oakland, late Cleveland vs. Cincinnati, late San Diego vs. Seattle, late Fridays Games Minnesota vs. Boston at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Toronto at Dunedin, 1:05 p.m. Detroit (ss) vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees vs. Detroit (ss) at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. Baltimore vs. Tampa Bay at Pt. Charlotte, 1:05 p.m. Washington vs. N.Y. Mets at Pt. St. Lucie, 1:10 p.m. Seattle vs. San Diego at Peoria, Az., 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Az., 3:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs. San Francisco (ss) at Scottsdale, Az., 3:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Az., 3:05 p.m. San Francisco (ss) vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. CHUCK KINGAssociated PressJUPITER Miami Mar lins pitcher Henderson Alvarez will miss his rst scheduled start of spring training because of an infection in his right shin. Alvarez had the infection drained at a hospital Tuesday. He was at Roger Dean Stadium in street clothes Wednesday and walking with the aid of crutches as the Marlins went through their morning workouts. Of course it is better that it happens right now than later dur ing the season, Alvarez said through a translator. Im trying to do my best to get ready for the season. The 23-year-old righthander had been scheduled to start Sundays game against Washington. The Marlins did not provide a timetable for his return, but Alvarez said he could miss up to a week. Alvarez said he isnt feeling pain from the infection. This is the rst time ever something like this has come to me, Alvarez said. Alvarez went 5-6 with a 3.59 ERA last season. He pitched one of the most suspenseful no-hitters in baseball history on Sept. 29 when he held the Detroit Tigers hitless through nine innings before the Marlins scored on a wild pitch in the bottom of the ninth for a 1-0 win.Marlins Alvarez to miss turn SundayHenderson Alvarez to miss 1st turn in rotation due to shin infectionThis is the first time ever something like this has come to me.Henderson Alvarez Marlins pitcher M C Y K

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A10 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com The proposed change would be a ve sh daily bag limit, only one of which may be 16 inches in total length or longer. This means that each person would be allowed to keep ve largemouth bass less than 16 inches or four largemouth bass less than 16 inches and one 16 inches or longer each day. This is a huge change and considering it would be state-wide, with no spe cial slots on any lakes, it sure would simplify things for all Florida shermen, as well as our northern visitors. Not a day goes by that someone doesnt call or come into the store to ask what the regulations are for different lakes. Bill Pounder gave me copies of the proposed crappie and bass changes and were asking all of our customers to complete the questionnaire. Im all for growing our bass bigger and its going to happen under the present regulations. If the proposed change takes place, the next step will be to educate sher men to remove the smaller bass to free up the forage for the larger bass. If that happens, well see even bigger bass being caught and released in all of our lakes.Guide tripsI had four guide trips last week and we caught some really nice sh. The biggest, an 11+ was caught on a black ZOOM trick worm out in front of Mallards on the north end of the lake. A number of 5 and 6 pounders were caught on Rage Craws and Yum Dingers west of Arbuckle Creek along the reeds and on the east shoreline, north of the boat ramp off Cowhouse Rd. On Thursday, we caught a number of nice bass in the arrowhead beds. Every time we pitched into the center of the ar rowheads, regardless of the bait, a hefty vepounder would just crush it. It was a pretty good week on Lake Istokpoga.Friends of Istokpoga Big Bass TournamentOn Saturday, March 15, the Friends of Istokpoga are hosting a Big Bass Tournament on Lake Istokpoga. Entry fee is $25 per per son, up to three people per boat, live-bait or articial and limited to 25 boats. The tournament will go out of the State Park Boat Launch on Rt. 98 at rst light until 2 p.m. We currently have eight boats registered. Participants must be members of The Friends of Istokpoga ($7 annual membership fee until March 1, then $10). A 100-percent payback will have 60-percent going to rst place, 25 for second place and 15 for third. Only one sh can be weighed in per person and the three biggest win. Sign up now at REDS II Fishing Tackle at 3603 Sebring Parkway. Registration is limited to 25 boats and must be completed prior to Friday, March 14, at 5 p.m. I will be the tournament director, if you have any questions, give me a call.REDS Big Bass TournamentThe February Big Bass Tournament was held on Saturday, Feb. 22, at Lake June in Lake Placid. The team of Justin Owens and Daniel Patrick won the event with a nice 6 pound bass, receiving $475. Second place was a 5.8 pound bass caught by the team of Dean Martin and Ernie Lewis. Third place big bass was a 3.72 pounder caught by Greg Bachman and Richard Urbanowski.Gambler TournamentGambler held its second of three free tournaments on Lake Okeechobee Sunday, Feb. 23. There were approximately 163 boats with a to tal of 326 anglers. A bunch of guys from Sebring and Avon Park shed the tournament but did not place in the money. The team of Joe Kovic and Nick Dubois won big bass with a 10.8 pound wallhanger. The big bass pot was worth about $800. Gamblers next tournament is in March at Lake Kissimmee, going out of Camp Mack. The tournament is free; however you can only use Gambler baits. They pay $1000 to rst place and cash or mer chandise all the way to 10th place.Don Norton is a professional tournament bass sherman, bass shing guide, and custom rod builder. He lives in the Golf Hammock area of Sebring with his wife Lexie, and is the owner of a custom rod building company appropriately named The American Fisherman. He is also the owner of REDS II, a full-service shing tackle store located at 3603 Sebring Parkway, in Sebring, FL. You can reach him at 863-2734998 or by email at donorton13@ gmail.com. Visit his REDS FISHING facebook page or his website at theamericansherman.com. or stop by the store to see him anytime. FISH FROM PAGE A8Golf HammockThe Golf Hammock Ladies Played a two-day Scrub Jay Tournament on Wednesdays, Feb. 19 and 26. First Flight saw a rstand second-place tie with Jeannie Fivecoat and Ruth Harris each coming in with an 83. Third went to Helene Trembly with 87. Second Flight had a three-way tie with Roxie McMillon, Carol Troup and Trudy Stowe with 95s. Third Flight was a bit more clear cut as Mary Cripps stood alone in rst with a 95. But things tightened up quickly with a three-way tie for second between Audrey Walther Kayee Depolito and Jo Thornburg with 102s. Last Monday, Feb. 24, the Mezza Group played Individual Pro-Am Points and saw Ike Richards win A group with a +5, while shooting even par, and Don Brewer and Gary Towell tying for second at Even. B group was won by Fred Latshaw at +7, second was taken by Bob Trier at +1, and there was a tie for third between Ned Bauer and Luc Guerin at Even. C group was won by Pat Dells +8, followed by Mike Lajiness at +6, with third going to Dana Smith, and fourth to Gary Galle at -3. D group saw David Mulligan in rst place with +9, and there was a tie for second between Paul Brown II and Stan Grifs at +5, Danny Geier was third with +4. E group was won by Bob Watsons +4, second went to Carl Linsley at +3, and Jack Stafford took third at +2. F group had Ed Northrup in rst place with +2, Bob Culbert took second with +1, followed by a 3 way tie between Jim Reed, Delbert Nelson, and Wayne Meyer at Even. G group showed Dick Botelho in rst with +8, Billy Parr took second with +5, and Mark Campbell was third at -2. H group was won by Bob Hughes with +7, Ken Granger took second with +6, and Mark Floras +3 took third. I group was won by Paul Skidmores +7, followed by Doc Thomas at +3, and third went to Jerry Hodges and his +1. J group saw Bill Woudenberg win with +5, there was a 2 way tie for second at +4 between Bob Colandrea and Bill Young, and Alice Campbell fell into third with +3. K group had Jerry Edwards in rst with +5, second was a tie between Bill Catcher and Ron Geoque at +2, and third was taken by Dick Lindsay at Even. Next Monday, March 3, the Mezza Group will continue to play at Golf Hammock beginning at 7:45 a.m. Please arrive early due to a big eld of players. For more information, call Pete at 382-1280.Highlands RidgeThe annual Avon Park Rotary David Doc Owen tournament was held on Saturday, Feb. 22, and saw the First Flight go to the foursome of Kendall Grifn, Ben Tubbs, Jett Dexter and Kade Damboise with a 54. A three-way tie for second in the ight gave the nod to the team of Larry Kelly along with the Gentrys, Doug, Suzie and Greg with a 57. In the Second Flight, Chet Brojek, Chad Lund, Jay Jones and Tommy Todd took rst with a 60, while there was another match of cards needed to settle up a trio of 63s. Josh Curechy, Aaron Lewis, Eddy Torres and Nathan Coomes score came out the best, giving them second place. Third Flight honors went to the team of John ONeill, Larry Colley, Larry White and Bob Denney with a 63, with second going to the 66 brought in by Barry Bittner, Gary Hurtubise, Andrew Deierlein and Austin Weed. Grifn was closest to the pin on No. 8, while David Swantek was closest on No. 13 and Colley had closest to the line.Lake June WestA Couples Scramble was the event on Thursday, Feb. 27, with the Knishkas, Bob and Vern, and the Benzs, Harry and Pat, coming in with a 48 for the win. Tom and Margaret Schultz teamed with John and Kim Givens for second place with a 50, and Ralph and Betty Little joined Walt Navel and Wayne Eades to card a 54 for third. For closest to the pin, Chris Heath hit to 7-feet, 6-inches from No. 8, Harry Benz to 6-feet, 1-inch from No. 4 and Art Schmeltz to 4-feet, 11-inches from No. 2. A Couples Scramble was played on Thursday, Feb. 20, and saw three teams come in with 48s, moving it to a match of cards to determine the order of nish. The team of McGill, Eades, Schuenke, Bentz and the Swartzs got the nod for the top spot, while the team of the Coberts, Freemans and Knisaka nished second. The team of the Denharts, Littles, Houlihan and Jones settled for third. Mary McNamee had closest to the pin on No. 8, hitting to 8-feet, 1 1/2-inches, while Joanne McGill hit to 5-feet, 11-inches from No. 2. Rick Freeman shot to 5-feet, 10-inches from No. 4.Placid LakesA Little Lambs International Tournament was held on Saturday, Feb. 22, which saw 83 golfers take to the course. Winning the Low Gross was the team of Brent Sueppel, Scott Jovanelli, Butch Ward and Shane Ward. Getting Low Net on the day were Scott Honkala, Blair Ketola, David Somero and Daniel Valderrama. Second Low Net went to JU Tolson, Art Tolson, Craig Rosen and Tim Landers. Closest to the pin for the tour nament saw Terry Miller hit closest on No. 2, Rick Rankin on No. 6, Sam Rogers on No. 11 and Anthony Haney on No. 13. Rankin had the longest drive of the day and Debbie Boverhof had the straightest drive. The Mens Golf Association played a Two Best Ball tournament on Wednesday, Feb. 19. Bob Bauman, Jeff Harstine, Gene Ransom and Val Rodriguez lead a three-way tie of -26, after a match of cards. Settling for second was the team of Darrell Gardner, Jack Marceau, Bud Snyder and Terry Moss. Placing third were Bill Brinegar, Frank Fisher and Howard Ticknor. Ticknor did have closest to the pin on the day at No. 2. The Placid Lakes Womens Association played an Individual Points with Handicap event on Tuesday, Feb. 18. Carol Olsen claimed the top spot with 56 points, one ahead of the 55 totaled by Pat Haas for second. Karen Wallin took third with 49, Geri Bramos fourth with 45 and Pam Thomas fth with 44.SpringLakeOn Tuesday, Feb. 25, the SpringLake Mens Golf Association held a four-man team competition in which only the two best balls on the front nine and the three best balls on the back nine counted towards the score. This was held on the Panther Creek golf course. The team winning rst place, with a score of 157 net strokes, consisted of Pat Jaskowski, Richie Eastep, Ken Rohr and Bill Schauwecker. Second place went to the team of Gordon Reid, Gene Hearn, Bob Berg and Steve Hall, who scored 158 strokes. In third place, with 159 strokes, was Gerry Esty, Pat Shatney, Les Greenlee and Jay Payne. Fourth place, at 166 net strokes, went to Bob Hinde, Don Cunning, Joe Troia, and Larry Miesner. Closely following these were the teams of Ken Kirby (167) and Charlie Scoven (168). On Wednesday, Feb. 19, the SpringLake Ladies League played a 1-2-3 Net Team Event on the Cougar Trail course. The one best net score was used on par 5s, two best on par 4s and the three best on par 3s. The winning team with a Net 104 was Debbie Delaney, Carolyn Irvine, Sharon Warner and Jan Nelson. Coming in second place with a Net 111 are Teri Swisher, Barbara Stevens, Diana Ackling and Ann McWilliams. Third place with a Net 112 are Linda Peger, Judy Devries, Jean Donahue and Joann Deweese. and Gary Sewell, took to the courts for the remaining matches, winning two then losing a hard-fought nal 11-8, 9-11, 8-11. Once again, subs played the rst set in the A category with Sandi March and Ellen Nesbitt battling it out but coming up short. Mike March and Wayne Buck took over and won the next two sets handily. In the nal round, they lost 11-13 in game one then nished strong with 11-3 and 11-0 victories. The win puts Tanglewood on top of the league with an impressive 4 record. They earned 176 points this season. Riverbend Labelle (150 points), Highlands Ridge (117 points), Del Webb Orlando (104 points) teams ended the season with identical 2-2 records. Lake Ashton took 113 points but ended the season winless, having lost two of their outings by scores of 34-33. The nal Shootout will bring all ve teams to Tanglewood on Monday, March 3, for a round-robin series that will pit all of the similar level teams against one another. Highlands Ridge won the shootout in 2013 but Tanglewood is hungry for a victory this year. Play will start shortly after 10 a.m. on the Tanglewood courts. PICKLE FROM PAGE A8 M C Y K

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www.newssun.com Friday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A11 putting the Devils up 5-0 after one. Gordon would work through the rst two innings on the mound and kept the Miners scoreless, and helped his own cause by doubling home Brown in the bottom of the second. Kenny McGrath came on in relief and pitched a scoreless third before Avon Park added three more in the bottom of the frame. With one out, Frazier singled and with two out, Luis Martinez walked. Brown then brought Frazier in with a line-drive single to right, moving Martinez to third. Brown stole second and both runners came in on Perrys hot-shot single to right. Fort Meade did manufacture a run without a hit in the top of the fourth on a walk, two stolen bases and a wild pitch, but McGrath was also in the midst of striking out the side. And the Red Devils got that run back in their half as Kyle Kelley was hit by a pitch and brought around on singles by Frazier and Kyle Thompson for a 10-1 lead. The Miners did dig into the lead, scoring four in the top of the fth to make it a 10-5 game, but Gordon belted a two-run homer deep over the center-eld fence, with Perry on board, in the bottom of the frame, and Frazier scored in the sixth to provide for the nal margin. Im proud of the way our players came out and set the tone early, head coach Whit Cornell said. It was good to see our hitters being aggressive on good pitches. We executed on the base paths and it led to producing runs, he continued. And our pitchers did a good job of challenging their hitters. Now 5-1, Avon Park hosts Frostproof tonight. DEVILS FROM PAGE A8 the rst out of the inning on a strike out. But Peck hit a sacrice y to deep center and after an error loaded up the bases, Portis brought home two with a single to nish off the 10-run bar rage. Thats a tough hole to dig yourselves out of, Lake Placid head coach D.W. Daum said. And it would have been easy for our guys to get down, but they kept battling. That they did, though it already seemed too little to late. But with two out in the bottom of the rst, Ty ler Carr doubled to right and Laine Daum singled to left before a wild pitch brought Carr across the plate to get the Dragons on the board. Sebring added to their lead, however, in the top of the second as DeGenaro walked and one out later Little was hit by a pitch. With two out, Lovett singled to right to score DeGenaro and Peck doubled to left to score Little. Cannady ripped one to left, bringing Lovett in and the lead stood at 13-1 with Lake Placid just now coming up for their second at bat. A pair of singles and a bunt had runners at second and third for the Dragons, but the two were left stranded. Similarly, Sebring looked poised to add to their lead some more in the top of the third with Crouch walking, but getting erased in a 6-4-3 double play. Justin Bickman then drew a walk and Little singled to left, but Paul Cantwell came on to relieve Mason and retired the side with no further damage. Still looking to cut into the lead, Alex Miller started the bottom of the third by taking one for the team and Carr moved him alone with a single to right. With one out, Jacob Cram singled to center to load the bases and Mason beat out a potential double play to keep the inning alive and allowing Miller to score. Carr would soon come in on a wild pitch to make it 13-3, and while there would be various threats to get back on the scoreboard by both teams over the next few innings, the score would hold before ending the game by the mercy rule after ve innings. Ive seen the schedule Sebrings been playing and they are facing some top competition, Daum said. And tonight, they just came out swinging. That schedule the DeWitt put together going into his rst season, after a very successful tenure at Lake Wales, has already seen the Streaks take on the likes of Lakeland, twice, Okeechobee and Tampa Catholic, and sitting with a 4-1 record. We had some real good teams in for preseason with Faith Baptist and Bartow, and opened up with Lakeland, DeWitt said. They really put it to us, beating us 12-2, which was a quick slap in the face. They came back the next day and had a really good practice, which is exactly how I hoped theyd respond. Since then, they have beaten the Brahmans 5-1 and topped the Dreadnaughts in a rematch, 6-5, and recently shut out the Crusaders 6-0. The Lake Placid win behind them, the Streaks were to face Haines City Thursday at home before hosting Berkeley Prep tonight at Firemens Field. The Dragons, meanwhile, will look to put this one behind them as they travel to DeSoto tonight to face the Bulldogs. SEBRING FROM PAGE A8 Dan Hoehne/News-SunJosh Crouch res to the plate Tuesday night in Sebrings win at Lake Placid. Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID Dick Cook is from Springeld, Ohio, the former Softball Capital of the World. A lifelong Reds/Buckeyes fan, he retired from International Harvester, then moved to Lake Placid in 2005. He still works as a skilled handyman (863840-4291) while managing the Central Security team in the Lake Placid senior league. The best defensive player in the league, he patterns his aggressive style of play after his boyhood idol Pete Rose. Like Doran Quigg, he played many times in his younger days against The King and His Court. Coming to Florida and playing softball is second only to my daughter in my life, boasted Cook over the postgame BBQ grill run by his brother Alan. On Monday, Captain Cook and his Security men took on Yates Insur ance in a meeting of unbeaten teams. It was Cook and his crew, however, that walked the plank 11-8. For Central, Cook had three hits (two doubles) and Joe Hedges homered. For victorious Yates, Phil Lucas had three hits (double) on his 67th birthday. Bill Gallagher made the play of the day with a tumbling, shoestring catch in left to rob Larry Oser of extra bases. Schoonis Restaurant beat Seminole Tire 22-8. Winning pitcher Victor Rodriguez paced the Restauranteurs with ve hits (double, triple), while Norm Grubbs (double), Paul Brand (double), Kyle Saunders and Ron Wickman (two triples) formed the Four Hit Club. For The Noles, Skip Raller (two doubles) had four hits. Frank Hedges made a superlative stop at second base for the play of the game. On Wednesday, Yates (4-0) remained undefeated in second half play with a 19-6 win over Seminole Tire (0-4). The Noles took a 6-5 lead into the last two innings, only to have Yates rally for 14 unanswered runs. Bill Gallagher (three doubles) had four hits, while Cliff Bluml, Dar rel Richards, winning pitcher Don Ward (double) and Mike Wiltgen chipped in with three apiece. For Seminole Tire, Ray Wilson had a triple and a diving catch in left eld. In the most exciting game of the year, Central Security (3-1) almost blew a 14-run lead to topple Schoonis (1-3) 29-28. Cheering on the Securitymen was a contingent of 20 members spanning four generations of the Harlan Newby clan visiting from Wisconsin. With Central clinging to a one-run lead and two Schoonis runners on in the bottom of the last inning, Elston Hedges ripped a drive destined to plate the winning runs. Right elder Dave Londo made a running backhanded catch, then threw to rst to double up a wayward runner to end the game. For Central, the deadly tandem of Dick Cook and Joe Hedges combined for six doubles and a homer, while Mo Pier added four hits. The Schoonis attack saw home runs from Norm Grubbs and Rookie of the Year candidate Elston Hedges. Grubbs and Kyle Saunders had ve hits each, while Wild Bill DeStefano tallied four (two doubles). For further league information, visit lpsoftball.com.Yates overcomes Cook, Central BY BARRY FOSTERSpecial to the News-SunSEBRING It is March and that means cars on the track at the Sebring In ternational Raceway. This weekend it will be the Spring Vintage Racing Classic starting the action with 20 different compe titions scheduled over the three day weekend. We have more than 200 cars in the paddock for this event, said President and CEO of SVRA Tony Parella. That not only includes all of the vintage cars, but as many as 50 contem porary vehicles slated to compete in the Trans Am series opener. Ofcials from the series say it represents a modern day record, noting the last time there were that many cars in a single eld was over 30 years ago. Trans Am really started at Sebring, Parella said. We think its kind of neat to have todays cars mixed in with our vintage cars so a fan can come in and see both kinds of competition on the same weekend. There are more than a dozen different SVRA classes as well, starting with small-bore cars such as MGs and FIATs, to a class of Corvettes, Camaros, Mustangs and other American muscle cars, to a division of prototypes including World Sports Cars, GT and GTP cars. We are also bringing back the historic NASCARs, Parella said. We really have a pretty diverse eld. The SportsCar Vintage Racing Association actually was started at Sebring in 1976 and the historiuc airport circuit traditionally has served as the series opener. Sebring has such a rich history. This town and this track really is something special, he said. Parella said the impetus of the SVRA racing weekend is on fan involvement, with spectators having the opportunity to get up close and personal with the cars in the paddock. The entire grounds of the raceway also will be open with fans able to access both the general admission and Green Park areas, in addition to the stands in the Gurney and Fangio terraces on the front straight pit structure. For a fee, fans can even have an opportunity to take their cars on the track for a few laps, following the pace car in what are termed track touring sessions. Practice sessions for nearly all series will be held Friday morning at the raceway, with qualifying sessions to be held Friday afternoon. The rst big race of the weekend will be held Friday evening. The green ag will fall at 6 PMp.m. for a 90 minute endurance competition that will run into the night. Well have a modied LeMans start for that. The cars will be lined up against the wall, but the drivers wont be running to their cars, Parella said. We want to make sure everybody is strapped in before they start racing. Saturday will be packed with all day sprint qualify ing race sessions including a Trans-Am race, as well as a second endurance race for small bore cars. Sunday will be the big day, with a morning full of sprint races, an enduro for prototype cars starting at 12:50 and a 100-mile competition for the TransAm series. That will commence at 2:35 p.m. Tickets are $20 per day or $35 for the weekend which includes camping Youngsters under 12 are admitted at no charge. More information may be found on the groups web site at www.svra.comSpring Vintage Racing starts tonight It was good to see our hitters being aggressive on good pitches.Whit Cornell Avon Park head coach Courtesy photoThe Lady Blue Streaks put their Heartland Conference Tournament hardware on display after sweeping to seven titles. LADY STREAKS SHOW OFF HARDWARE M C Y K

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A12 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com TODAYPartly sunny and warmer76 / 53Winds: NE at 4-8 mphMostly sunny and nice80 / 56Winds: NW at 3-6 mphSATURDAYPleasant with periods of sun82 / 59Winds: ENE at 4-8 mphSUNDAYPartly sunny84 / 61Winds: SSW at 6-12 mphMONDAYPartly sunny, a t-storm possible83 / 56Winds: NW at 6-12 mphTUESDAY High .............................................. 7:40 a.m. Low ............................................... 1:03 a.m. High .............................................. 8:02 p.m. Low ............................................... 1:30 p.m. High ............................................ 12:32 a.m. Low ............................................... 7:37 a.m. High .............................................. 2:01 p.m. Low ............................................... 7:13 p.m. Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 13.98 Normal ............................................... 14.51 High Sunday .......................................... 88 Low Sunday ........................................... 56 High Monday ......................................... 84 Low Monday .......................................... 55 High Tuesday ......................................... 86 Low Tuesday .......................................... 50 High Wednesday .................................... 82 Low Wednesday ..................................... 57 Relative humidity .................................. 37% Expected air temperature ....................... 76 Makes it feel like .................................... 75 Monday ............................................... 29.97 Tuesday ............................................... 29.92 Wednesday ......................................... 29.81 Monday ............................................... 0.00 Tuesday ............................................... 0.00 Wednesday ......................................... 0.00 Month to date ..................................... 1.73 Year to date ......................................... 4.68Sunrise 6:51 a.m. 6:50 a.m. Sunset 6:27 p.m. 6:27 p.m. Moonrise 6:04 a.m. 6:49 a.m. Moonset 6:02 p.m. 7:06 p.m.Albuquerque 63/44/pc 63/39/pc 56/36/pc Atlanta 54/38/pc 62/46/pc 69/52/s Baltimore 26/15/s 40/31/c 38/28/c Birmingham 57/42/pc 65/50/pc 69/51/pc Boston 25/13/s 34/24/c 27/14/sn Charlotte 48/33/pc 52/35/r 67/49/pc Cheyenne 41/14/sn 30/9/sn 27/14/c Chicago 23/15/c 22/9/sn 18/11/sn Cleveland 21/20/pc 37/14/c 17/11/sn Columbus 30/24/pc 46/21/c 26/15/sn Dallas 78/43/pc 78/61/pc 70/26/t Denver 54/22/pc 39/13/sn 35/19/pc Detroit 17/15/pc 31/8/c 17/8/sn Harrisburg 21/12/pc 36/30/c 31/21/sn Honolulu 81/69/c 82/68/sh 77/67/sh Houston 70/60/c 78/62/c 77/46/t Indianapolis 32/25/pc 39/15/pc 21/10/sn Jackson, MS 63/48/pc 71/54/pc 70/50/pc Kansas City 42/16/c 27/0/c 7/-5/sn Lexington 39/29/pc 49/31/c 36/22/r Little Rock 51/40/r 60/44/pc 63/30/t Los Angeles 63/53/r 61/52/t 66/54/sh Louisville 39/32/pc 50/29/c 35/23/sn Memphis 52/42/r 61/42/c 60/32/c Milwaukee 20/10/c 21/0/sn 15/3/sn Minneapolis 14/-8/sn 7/-16/sn 5/-10/pc Nashville 48/37/pc 57/40/c 66/37/c New Orleans 65/56/pc 71/59/pc 71/62/pc New York City 23/15/s 35/29/c 32/26/sn Norfolk 30/27/s 44/39/c 55/43/pc Oklahoma City 64/33/pc 56/24/pc 29/9/i Philadelphia 21/16/s 37/30/c 36/26/sn Phoenix 75/59/c 70/54/sh 71/52/pc Pittsburgh 22/20/pc 43/22/c 25/18/sn Portland, ME 24/3/s 31/21/c 25/6/pc Portland, OR 59/39/pc 44/37/c 54/42/c Raleigh 43/28/pc 49/37/i 67/51/pc Rochester 14/12/sf 34/10/sn 13/7/s St. Louis 38/26/sn 39/13/c 21/9/sn San Francisco 60/48/r 61/48/sh 61/50/pc Seattle 55/38/pc 46/35/c 50/39/pc Wash., DC 29/24/s 43/37/c 44/31/c Cape Coral 76/56/pc 80/58/s 83/61/s Clearwater 70/55/s 75/59/s 78/60/s Coral Springs 78/64/t 82/64/s 81/67/s Daytona Beach 68/50/s 74/55/s 76/57/pc Ft. Laud. Bch 76/65/t 82/67/s 80/69/s Fort Myers 77/58/pc 82/60/s 84/62/s Gainesville 69/43/s 76/47/s 77/53/pc Hollywood 77/63/t 83/64/s 80/64/s Homestead AFB 77/63/t 81/65/s 79/66/s Jacksonville 65/44/s 71/49/s 74/54/pc Key West 75/67/t 79/69/s 79/70/s Miami 78/66/t 82/67/s 80/68/s Okeechobee 75/54/pc 80/57/s 78/58/pc Orlando 73/52/s 79/56/s 81/59/pc Pembroke Pines 77/63/t 83/64/s 81/64/s St. Augustine 63/50/s 70/54/s 71/58/pc St. Petersburg 70/55/s 75/59/s 79/60/s Sarasota 71/51/pc 75/57/s 79/60/s Tallahassee 65/35/s 73/43/s 75/50/s Tampa 71/55/s 75/58/s 80/60/s W. Palm Bch 77/61/t 82/64/s 80/68/pc Winter Haven 74/53/s 79/57/s 81/60/s Acapulco 91/68/t 89/70/pc 90/70/s Athens 61/54/r 59/49/r 63/56/pc Beirut 65/55/s 73/65/c 79/62/pc Berlin 46/35/pc 50/35/c 49/36/c Bermuda 67/63/r 68/66/sh 71/64/s Calgary -8/-24/c -6/-22/pc -7/-16/s Dublin 43/30/sh 43/31/sh 46/35/r Edmonton -10/-27/s -8/-26/s -4/-17/s Freeport 74/65/t 78/67/s 78/68/s Geneva 43/35/r 39/18/pc 37/26/sn Havana 84/61/t 85/63/pc 84/61/s Hong Kong 73/65/pc 75/65/c 76/64/c Jerusalem 59/47/s 71/56/pc 75/52/s Johannesburg 77/58/c 75/55/sh 75/57/t Kiev 38/31/c 41/35/c 44/39/c London 48/34/r 45/36/pc 48/37/sh Montreal 10/0/pc 21/0/sn 10/-4/s Moscow 36/19/pc 31/24/pc 32/28/c Nice 54/42/r 57/43/s 56/43/s Ottawa 10/4/pc 25/-3/sn 7/-3/s Quebec 7/-13/pc 14/-4/sn 10/-11/s Rio de Janeiro 88/77/pc 87/74/t 85/72/t Seoul 54/34/c 54/30/pc 50/27/s Singapore 87/75/pc 88/76/pc 89/76/pc Sydney 76/65/sh 77/62/sh 80/62/pc Toronto 12/11/pc 30/0/c 12/2/s Vancouver 46/29/pc 38/29/pc 39/36/pc Vienna 47/40/c 54/41/pc 50/38/r Warsaw 47/37/c 49/35/c 44/37/c Winnipeg -1/-20/sn -11/-26/s -6/-27/s Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. A frigid day is in store for many residents across the Northeast and Midwest today with arctic air in place over the regions. Morning lows will be at or below zero from North Dakota to the Ohio Valley and up into the mountains of New England, making it dangerous for some outdoor activities. Some snow will also fall west of the Great Lakes as low pressure forms over the area. A different area of low pressure will bring a bit of rain to the lower Mississippi Valley with some snow in Missouri. National Forecast for February 28 Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rrain, sf-snow urries, sn-snow, i-ice. Partly sunny and warmer today. Mainly clear tonight. Mostly sunny and nice tomorrow. Sunday: pleasant with times of clouds and sun. Monday: partly sunny. Tuesday: times of clouds and sun. On Feb. 28, 1900, a giant storm produced a state record 24-hour snowfall of 36 inches in Astoria, Ill. The storm moved on to drop 43 inches of snow on Rochester, N.Y. Partly sunny and warmer today. Winds north 4-8 mph. Expect 4-8 hours of sunshine with average relative humidity 50% and good drying conditions. Mainly clear tonight. Sunday. and Saturday. a.m. and after 4 p.m. New First Full Last Mar 1 Mar 8 Mar 16 Mar 23 Today SaturdayForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 65/44 69/43 69/43 68/50 73/52 74/53 71/55 70/55 70/55 71/51 77/58 75/60 75/54 77/61 76/65 78/66 65/35 60/40 60/49 75/53 76/53 76/54 76/53 77/53 76/54 75/67 TemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHeat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayBarometer PrecipitationFive-Day forecast for Highlands County Almanac U.S. Cities World Cities National Summary Tides UV Index Today Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional Summary Lake Levels Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows. Readings at Palm Beach Readings at St. Petersburg The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterday 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. Jacksonville Gainesville Ocala Daytona Beach Orlando Winter Haven Tampa Clearwater St. Petersburg Sarasota Fort Myers Naples Okeechobee West Palm Beach Fort Lauderdale Miami Tallahassee Apalachicola Key West Avon Park Sebring Lorida Lake Placid Venus Brighton PensacolaCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W M C Y K

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Use rags or sponges instead of paper towels for cleaning. Damp sponges may be zapped for a minute in the microwave to kill germs. LIVING BFriday, February 28, 2014 Drink Chilean or Australian wine. These regions are still deals in the wine world. Use the library. But return books on time to avoid nes.Do breakfast or lunch out instead of dinner.Sell the extra gym membership youre not using.Turn the thermostat way down at night.Cut your childrens hair yourself.SIGN UP FOR YOUR COMPANYS COMMUTER BENEFITS. Many employers allow you to purchase public transit at Drink before you go out (but dont drink at the bar, enjoy a pour at home with your dining companions.FALL BACK IN LOVE WITH PLASTIC BAGS. Pump regular instead of premium. Many In fact, engines designed for regular fuel may run worse on premium blends.ORDER THE BOTTLE. BE A GROUP PERSON. from your alumni association or any other things like Call your credit card issuers and ask for a better rate or to have that late fee removed. Credit card companies usually allow two courtesy removals of late fees (which can top $40) if you call right away and ask forgiveness. Ask for a better interest rate too you dont have to drive a hard bargain to do this. They dont want to see you taking your business elsewhere. CHALLENGE YOUR PROPERTY TAX ASSESSMENT. DOWNLOAD YOUR WORKOUTS. Put a coffee maker at your desk. Buy the best ground coffee available and treat yourself to a premium cup of joe.Skip the vending machine and buy soft drinks at the supermarket.Call your utilities and ask for a better plan/rate. Cell phone carriers will tell you if you can change your plan and get a better rate. Cable companies and other utilities may have cheaper plans too.STRETCH LEFTOVER TAKEOUT. Use your banks rewards program. You might be earning valuable points each time you use your debit card. Cash them in for air tickets, household goods and more.SHOP ONLY FOR WHAT YOULL EAT IN A DAY. Go to and get promotion codes for free shipping from 800 retailers.Look into your medical reimbursement plan. Talk with your employers beneon known medical expenses.Put your airline miles to use.Use the slow cooker and microwave more. They are much more the stove and the oven.MAXIMIZE YOUR BANK ACCOUNTS. interest or earn bank DRIVE LESS AGGRESSIVELY. Take advantage of theater deals. Second-run movie theaters show good run theaters offer discount nights. Look for deals on earlier-in-theday movies too. Accessorize. Give new life to last years frocks with cheap jewelry from teenybop per stores like Forever 21, or discounters like Wal-Mart and Target. Looking to shave a few dollars off your budget but dont know where to start? Here are some tips on stretching your funds during these challenging economic times. Shop resell before retail. From books to beds, clothing to cars, think used. M C Y K

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Friday, February 28, 2014 B2 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com PUZZLE CORNER Solution on B3Dear Abby: My wife of 45 years is having an on line affair with a man who is a former business cli ent. I found out when she inadvertently left an email message open on her lap top. Her phone records conrm daily long-dis tance conversations, as well. Although I know they have never met personal ly, they plan to meet dur ing a weekend convention at a hotel in his hometown next month. Despite problems in our marriage, neither of us has strayed, and Im con dent she doesnt want to lose me nor do I want to lose her. My dilem ma is whether to tell her I know whats going on pri or to her trip, or confront her when she returns with pictures taken by a private investigator. I cant let her betrayal continue. Conicted in the South Dear Conicted: Tell her sooner rather than later, so she can cancel her trip to the conven tion. If shes willing to do that and work on repair ing your marriage, there is a chance that your prob lems are xable. If she isnt, then face it your stressed marriage is over. Photos from a private in vestigator are beside the point. The email you read is proof enough. Dear Abby: I have re connected with my high school sweetheart. We plan to be married late this summer. My problem is she wants to keep her ex-husbands name as her middle name for the sake of her kids. I feel she shouldnt have another mans name if shes married to some one else. I have explained that it upsets me, but she doesnt care. What are your thoughts? Traditional Man Dear Traditional: I think her reason for wanting to retain her married name (and probably hyphen ate it with yours) is a valid one. It will prevent confusion for her children at school. However, one line in your letter concerns me. Its the one in which you say it upsets you, but she doesnt care. If she didnt care about you, she wouldnt be marrying you. But her children MUST come rst, and unless you can accept that fact, you shouldnt marry her. Dear Abby: Recently, my friend went to a wake and told me the person in the casket was holding a fork. My friend told me there is a story behind this cus tom. Can you tell me what it is? Daily Reader in West Palm Dear Daily Reader: The story, titled Keep Your Fork, has been wide ly shared on the Internet. It appeared in A Third Serving of Chicken Soup for the Soul and was au thored by Roger William Thomas. It concerns a young woman who had been giv en only a short time to live, and who instructed her pastor that she would like to be buried with a fork in her right hand. She went on to say, In all my years of attending church potluck dinners, when the dishes of the main course were being cleared, some one would say, Keep your fork. She said the main course was her favorite part of the meal because she knew something bet ter was coming ... something wonderful, and with substance. What she wanted was to convey to her loved ones at her fu neral her belief that something better was to come.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phil lips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. To order How to Write Letters for All Occasions, send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby Letter Book let, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. Shipping and han dling are included in the price.Open email exposes wifes secret plans for weekend rendezvous DEAR A BB YJeanne Phillips JAKE CO Y LEAP Film WriterSettling in for a lm that takes place almost entire ly on an airplane, as does the latest Liam Neeson action ick Non-Stop, ones instinct is to search for the nearest sleeping pill. The prospect of nearly two hours on an airliner, without the complimen tary peanuts, is not quite the sensory experience we typically seek in the mov ies. After federal air mar shal Bill Marks (Neeson) morosely guzzles some whiskey in his car outside JFK Airport, he boards the plane headed for Heath row that hes to protect, that will be the setting from here on out. If youre now hitting the call ight atten dant button for help, youll be pleased with the results. Things pick up when down the aisle strolls stewardesses Mi chelle Dockery and Lupita Nyongo. The plane populates with our cast: Julianne Moore (Marks chatty seatmate), a school teacher (Scoot McNairy), a tough New Yorker (Corey Stroll) and a Muslim doc tor (Omar Metwally). Neeson begins getting mysterious text messages from a hijacker on board a snake on the plane, if you will who says someone will die every 20 minutes until $150 million is sent to an off-shore ac count. The cabin pressure steadily rises. It could be anyone on the plane, a clever little conceit reec tive of todays air travel: Everyone is treated like a suspect. In the lms best image, Marks has all the passengers hold their hands up. But, as with so many high-concept lms, it takes an awful lot of im plausibility to keep the story airborne. The man ner of the deaths turns suspicion to Marks, him self, and even his boss (via phone) believes hes the terrorist. Most incred ulously, the plot is propelled by the live coverage of the incident by NY1, that cute little local New York cable channel. Moore breathes life into the claustrophobia, as does Dockery both helpful aids to Marks. Nyongo, the young Oscarnominated actress of Years a Slave, has bare ly a line, but sports a cool at top. But the question is as was with the similarly Eu ropean-backed, one-word titled thrillers Taken, Taken 2 and Unknown what to make of this unlikely action hero turn for Neeson at 61? NonStop is directed by the Spanish-born lmmaker Jaume Collet-Serra, who also helmed Unknown. Now theyre churning them out. The movies, NonStop included, are simple, mostly serviceable genre icks that are smart enough to dispense with exposition but not witty enough to put three acts together. Neesons presence wounded, intelligent, honorable is much sturdier than these lms, which he elevates with ease. Its not an issue of him lowering himself to them, but of these lms not raising themselves to Neeson. On Minutes recent ly, Neeson was himself bemused and rather sheepish about this career turn to movies he acknowl edged were straight-tovideo stuff. But his sug gestion that he came to Taken and the rest be cause it allowed him to busy himself after the death of his wife, Natasha Richardson, gives these movies a melancholy po etry: The weary Neeson, kicking butt to keep the demons at bay. Non-Stop, a Universal Pictures release, is rated PG-13 by the Motion Pic ture Association of Amer ica for intense sequences of action and violence, some language, sensual ity and drug references. Running time: 106 min utes. Two stars out of four.Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http:// twiter.com/jake_coyleN eeson keeps N on-Stop from crashingMOVIE REVIEW CRITI C S RATING: Universal PicturesLiam Neeson stars as air marshal Bill Marks in Non-Stop. M C Y K

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Friday, February 28, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 www.newssun.comFriday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B3 HEALTHY LIVING Health care experts are rediscovering an old-fash ioned concept that may help lower health care costs and improve the quality of health care: shared decision making. What is shared decision making? It is when you and your doctor work to gether as co-pilots as you travel through the health care system. And you have the right to ask your doc tor to use shared decision making whenever you need to decide among sev eral treatment options.What does shared decision making mean?Shared decision making can mean different things depending on the situa tion. But one of its central ideas is that we need to get patients (and, when appropriate, families) and caregivers more involved in health care decisions. The main goal of shared decision making is to give patients the knowledge and skills they need to take an active role in their health care. Using shared decision making is especially im portant when a patient has a medical condition that has more than one medically sound treat ment option. In these cases, there is no single, correct medi cal solutionthe best solution depends on the patients personal prefer ences and values.What are the elements of a shared decision making program?All shared decisionmaking programs should contain four fundamental elements: Information: Patients should receive clear and unbiased informa tion that describes their condition, that address es the pros and cons of different treatment op tions, and that helps them envision how their life might change based on their decision. Support: Patients should be well-supported dur ing the decision-making process. They should get help understand ing the information given to them and should feel free to discuss their values and preferences with their provider. Discussion: Patients and providers should share information and make a decision together that is based on the best med ical evidence and tailored to the specic needs and circumstanc es of the patient. Follow-through: Care should be delivered in the agreed upon man ner and in a way that respects patients preferences and values. Patients should stay in contact with their pro viders and continue to receive support for oth er health care decisions.What are patient decision aids?Patient decision aids are written, video, or webbased tools that are de signed to help patients do the following: Become more knowl edgeable about their health condition and treatment options Decide which risks and benets are most im portant to them Envision how the differ ent options would affect their daily lives When designed well, these decision aids can help patients make choic es that reect their prefer ences and values. Although shared deci sion making programs do not necessarily need pa tient decision aids to be effective, it is essential that patients be well-informed and feel empowered to participate in the decision-making process.An illustration of shared decision makingAbout 17 out of every 100 men in the United States will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime. Howev er, fewer than three of every 100 men will die from prostate cancer. The decision to test for localized prostate cancer in men older than 70 is not clear cut, and one medi cally sound option is to not screen at all. Men in this age group also have time to think about their options, since prostate cancer often progresses slowly. The decision by old er men to be screened for prostate cancer is a good example of an area where a patient decision aid can be helpful. Two good deci sion aids are the brochure and video developed by Health Crossroads (www. healthcrossroads.com). Families USA has writ ten an overview of shared decision making, Shared Decision Making: En gaging Patients to Improve Care, which answers key questions about how shared decision making works, how it can improve patient care, how it ts into a more patient-cen tered health system, how to design a good shared decision making program, and a list of links to other resources.Ron Pollack is executive director of Families USA. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not neces sarily those of the News-Sun. This information is not intended to diag nose, treat or cure your conditionShared decision making: How to be a co-pilot with your doctor MetroOne of the central ideas of shared decision making is getting patients and caregivers more involved with their doctor when it comes to making health care decisions. GUEST COLUM NRon Pollack Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID The Alzheimers Association, Florida Gulf Coast Chap ter, is starting a new support group in Lake Placid at the Southern Lifestyle ALF. The Alzheimers As sociations support group meeting will be held the rst Monday of every month starting March 3 from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Fam ily members, friends and caregivers are invited. Support groups are critical support networks to caregivers of family members with Alzheim ers disease and related memory disorders. Care givers nd comfort in sharing their experienc es with others in similar situations and learning from each other. Research shows that Alzheimer caregivers are at a much greater risk for a number of health problems including de pression, anxiety, car diovascular problems, high blood pressure and physical injury than non-caregivers in their age group. One in eight caregivers becomes ill or injured as a direct result of caregiving. By providing an envi ronment of support, education and acceptance support groups can in crease coping skills and empower caregivers. Further, support groups can improve the health of the caregiver, enhance the quality of care given to the individual with Al zheimers and possibly delay placement of the affected person into a residential facility. In addition, the Al zheimers Association is partnering with South ern Lifestyle in offer ing Caregiver Trainings from 3-4 p.m. every Fri day in March. There is no charge to attend. This Caregiver Training is for caregivers, fami ly members, and anyone else who is interested in learning more about de mentia or Alzheimers Disease and the services that may be needed. The schedule is: Care giver Training Series at Southern Lifestyle ALF March 7 Alzheimers Disease: The Basics of the Epidemic March 14 Commu nicating with the Per son with Dementia March 21 Dealing with Challenging Be haviors Southern Lifestyle ALF is at 1297 U.S. 27. For more information and to RSVP call 385-3444, email canalesc@alz gulf.org or call the library 699-3705.New support group for Alzheimers caregiversOne in eight caregivers becomes ill or injured as a direct result of caregiving Associated PressSAN DIEGO The death of a 10-year-old San Diego boy from a bacterial infection he re portedly got from his pet rat prompted his fam ily to sue retailer Petco, saying they want to raise awareness among par ents. Attorney John Gomez told The Associated Press on Tuesday that his rm led the lawsuit Mon day in San Diego County seeking an unspecied amount for the suffering endured by the Pankey family, whose son, Aidan, died June 12, 2013, hours after he was rushed to the hospital with severe stomach pains. The San Diego County medical examiners ofce ruled that the cause of death was streptobacillus moniliformis infection, commonly known as ratbite fever, after exposure to an infected rat. Gomez said the Pan key family was not giving interviews, but they are devastated by the death. Its a means to en sure this doesnt happen again, Gomez said of the lawsuit. Apparently there was some breakdown in procedures. They want tighter controls. According to the law suit, the rat appeared safe. But the lawsuit says Petco should have known about the rodents health and did not adequately test for the disease. It also says that negligence led to the boys death, which has caused his parents, Andrew Pankey and Van essa Sauer, emotional and economic hardship, and that the retailer did not post adequate warnings about the potential risks, especially for children. Petco Animal Supplies Inc. said it is in the pro cess of investigating these claims and will respond appropriately when we have more information. Meanwhile, the retailer in a statement expressed its condolences. We are deeply sad dened by the Pankey familys tragic loss, Pet co said. The health and safety of people and pets is always a top priority, and we take the familys concerns very seriously. The boys grandmoth er purchased the male rat, which Aidan named Alex, because her only grandson wanted a mate for his female rat, Gomez said. The boy took the rat home May 27, 2013, and woke up the night of June 11 in severe pain with a fever and stomach prob lems. He was pale, lethar gic and could barely walk, according to the lawsuit. He died at 1:09 a.m. the next day. He was a bright, ener getic, friendly, happy kid who actually had a pri or rat, who was a female, and he had this idea in his young head of having his female rat get mar ried, Gomez said. The lawsuit was not led until now because attorneys were awaiting the lab results from the federal Centers for Dis ease Control, which tested the rat to conrm it was infected, Gomez said. According to the CDC, people can contract ratbite fever from bites or scratches from infect ed rodents, such as rats, mice and gerbils, or even just by handling an an imal with the disease without a bite or scratch. Boys death from infected rat spurs suit vs. Petco M C Y K

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B4 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Handicap Americans Love of Live Organization (HAL LO) is partnering with lo cal doctors, nutritionists, tness professionals, ho listic medical practitio ners, foods experts and more to host its very rst Walk With The Docs to be held in conjunc tion with HALLOs annual Wellness Day on Saturday at the Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road. The Walk with the Docs will be a two-mile hike after a short yoga warm up. The walk start time is at 8:15 am. Spon sorships are available for $100 and can be as many people that would want to walk with their docs or ride in wheelchairs. Also available are indi vidual entries for $5 each. Morning refreshments will be available. An added feature will be a fresh produce stand from the Miller Farms in Lake Placid. Inside, the Wellness Day lecture series will also be starting at 8 am. Azure College students will be taking vitals at sign-in. The lectures continue un til 1 p.m. A complimentary brunch will be available mid-morning. Topics include: Awareness of Your Body, Mind & Spirit through Exercise, Breathing & Meditation by Beth Plank, certied yoga instructor; Stress Management and Rela tional Wellness by Felicia Coke, physical therapist and life coach; Advanced Isolated Stretching Thera py by Sean Snapp, L.M.T.; Customized Wellness by Amanda Lucero, ARNP-C. and Advanced MLS Ther apy Cold-Wave Laser Technology, by Steve Hise. To reserve your seat for the brunch, please R.S.V.P. by calling H.A.L.L.O. at 385-1196 or email halloinc@embarq mail.com/. Countys first Walk with Docs Saturday in Sebring Also HALLOs W ellness Day H EALTHY LIVING Dear Pharmacist: Two of my relatives have pan creatic cancer, and Im worried sick for myself. No symptoms yet, but is there anything I can share with them, or take myself? D.T., Sacramento, Calif. Answer: Im sorry to hear about your relatives. Pancreatic cancer is on the rise, certain medica tions and foods and beverages increase its risk. I wrote a book on the topic to help people. Squashing free radicals is helpful, as well as pan creatic enzymes. Any thing that slows growth or spreading is important. Detoxifying the body (par ticularly lymph) is probably number one on my list. As a natural-minded pharmacist, I love nd ing research about natural plant extracts that work like pharmaceuti cals. Theres a protein in your body called mTOR which plays a vital role in how each cell thrives, di vides, or dies. When this protein and associat ed metabolic pathway is turned on too high, it pro motes cancer spreading. If we interfere with the mTOR pathway, it helps stop the formation of new blood vessels which feed the tumor. These mTOR inhibitors help peo ple with pancreatic cancer and possibly induce remission, at least for awhile. This was shown in Feb ruary 2011, in the Jour nal of Clinical Oncology, entitled, mTOR Inhibi tor Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer in a Patient with PJS. The scientists used a drug called everolimus (Anitor). Other mTOR inhibitors available today include Certican and Torisel, and others in the pipeline. There are natural com pounds which are known to interfere with mTOR but to a lesser extent com pared to these cancer drugs. Resveratrol (you know, from grapes!) is one of them as reported in The Journal of Biological Chemistry (November 19, 2010). The scientists knew going into the study that resveratrol was a powerful herbal with strong antiox idant, anti-inammatory, and nerve-protecting ef fects on the body. Guess what other herb reduces mTOR activity? Curcumin, one of the ac tive compounds in tur meric spice, popular in Indian cuisine. Many studies prove curcumin slows down the growth of differ ent types of cancer. Curcumin may be helpful for pancreatitis because it reduces inammation in the pancreas and reduces inammatory pain-causing chemicals. Wonderful, but you may need special IVs or sup plements to get it to work. Saffron (Crocus sati vus) is amazing. This gor geous ower is available as a spice, and a supple ment (by Exir). Saffron supplements seem to help reduce chemotherapy-in duced cell damage (damage to the DNA). Crocetin, a carotenoid derived from saffron ap pears to compete with the drug gemcitabine which is one of the standard thera pies for pancreatic cancer. Remarkably, both the herb and the chemo drug com pete for the same receptor site, which is the doorway into your cell. Are they try ing to do the same good thing in there? The discussion of us ing resveratrol, curcumin or saffron is between you and your doctor. Even though these are natural herbs, with excellent safe ty proles, I have no idea whats right for you and your safety is my rst con cern. Ask a licensed practitioner about customizing your personal health regimen.Suzy Cohen is a registered pharmacist and the author of The 24Hour Pharmacist and Real Solu tions. For more information, visit www.suzycohen.com/. This infor mation is not intended to treat, diagnose or cure your condition. Three herbal supplements have anti-cancer activity DEAR PHARMACISTSuzy Cohen Change of Pace offers workshops SEBRING Change of Pace will host workshops taught by Charlie Stroup from 9:30-10:30 the next three Fridays. Todays workshop, My Rope is Dwindling to Threads, deals with an ticipatory grief. The March 7 topic is Wheres The Off Button? and deals with anger, sadness and fear. The March 14 topic is Stepping On My Last Nerve and deals with handling the activities of daily living. The workshops will be held at 4514 Hammock Road. No RSVP needed. Call 382-1188 for details.Outreach events planned Comprehensive Homecare offers the fol lowing community outreach events. Monday 8 a.m., Brookside Bluffs, Zolfo Springs; 10 a.m. Chatham Pointe, Wauchula; 1 p.m., Crown Pointe, Sebring, Alzheimers Support group. Tuesday 9 a.m., Groves, Sebring; 10:30 a.m., Fair Havens, Sebring; 1 p.m., Briarwood, Sebring. Wednesday 8 a.m. Villa Del Sol, Avon Park; 9 a.m. Meal Site, Avon Park Thursday 6:30 a.m. ARC Avon Park, Pleasant Avenue; 9:30 a.m., Meal Site, Lake Placid; 10:30 a.m., Balmoral Alzheimers Support Group, Lake Placid. All sites are spon sored by their facility with Comprehensive as guests. All events are open to the public. Call Barb, 214-6795.SNAP S HOT S LOCA L NEWS The news is just a click away! www.newssun.com N EWS -S UN Associated PressWASHINGTON Its not just about what Americas kids are getting in the lunch line. The Obama adminis tration is moving to phase out junk food advertis ing on football score boards and elsewhere on school grounds part of a broad effort to com bat child obesity and cre ate what Michelle Obama calls a new norm for to days schoolchildren and future generations. This new approach to eating and activity is not just a fad, Mrs. Obama said Tuesday as she de scribed the proposed rules at the White House. Promotion of sugary drinks and junk foods around campuses dur ing the school day would be phased out under the Agriculture Department rules, which are intend ed to ensure that mar keting is brought in line with health standards that already apply to food served by public schools. That means a score board at a high school football or basketball game eventually wouldnt be allowed to advertise Coca-Cola, for example, though it could advertise Diet Coke or Dasani wa ter, also owned by CocaCola Co. Same with the front of a vending ma chine. Cups, posters and menu boards that pro mote foods that dont meet federal standards would also be phased out. Ninety-three percent of such marketing in schools is related to beverages. And many soda compa nies already have started to transition their sales and advertising in schools from sugary sodas and sports drinks to other products they produce. Companies are spend ing $149 million a year on marketing to kids in schools, according to the Agriculture Department. The announcement at the White House was part of a week of events marking the fourth anni versary of the rst ladys Lets Move program. Mrs. Obama also trav eled to Miami Tuesday to announce that the Boys & Girls Clubs of Ameri ca and the National Recreation and Park Association will serve more fruits and vegetables at afterschool programs and en sure kids get 30-60 minutes of physical activity a day. NBCs Parks and Recreation star Amy Poehler introduced the rst lady. The proposed school marketing rules come on the heels of federal regu lations that now require food in school lunch lines to be more healthful than in the past. Separate rules, which are to go into effect in September, will cover oth er food around school as well, including in vending machines and a la carte lines in the lunch room. Calorie, fat, sugar and so dium limits now will have to be met on almost every food and beverage sold during the school day, as mandated by a 2010 child nutrition law. Even though diet sodas would be allowed in high schools under the pro posed rules announced Tuesday, the rules dont address the question raised by some as to whether those drinks are actually healthful alterna tives to sugary soda. Some healthful-food rules have come under re from conservatives who say the government shouldnt dictate what kids eat and from some students who dont like the new alternatives.Cut out junk food ads in schools, government says MCTCompanies are spending $149 million a year on marketing to kids in schools, according to the Agriculture Department. M C Y K

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www.newssun.comFriday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B5 R ELIGION Avon Park Christian ChurchAVON PARK Pastor Greg Ratliff will bring a message from Gods Word in the morning and also at the evening contemporary worship on Sunday. Wednesday evening will continue in the Ecclesiastes Bible study. Avon Park Christian Church is at 1016 W. Camphor (behind the Wells Fargo Bank). Call 453-5334 or email apcc.2014@yahoo.com with any questions or to request information. The church website is http:// www.avonparkchristian church.com/Christ Lutheran ChurchAVON PARK Pastor Scott McLean will be preaching a sermon en titled Here I Am on Sunday, The church is at 1320 C.R. 64, east of the Avon Park High School past the four-way stop sign. For more information, call 863-471-2663 or visit www.christlutheranavon park.org/.Christian Science Church{p class=p1}SEBRING The lesson sermon on Sunday morning is ti tled Mind. The keynote is from Isaiah 48:17 I am, . . I am the LORD your God, who teaches you what is good for you and leads you along the paths you should follow.{p class=p2}The church is at 154 N. Franklin St.Christian Training ChurchSEBRING Rev. Linda M. Downing will bring the message titled Restored and Loosed: Part 2 at the Sunday morning ser vice. The Wednesday night Bible study is the Gospel of John.Emmanuel United Church of ChristSEBRING Rev. George Miller will deliver the ser mon, Surprising Gifts of the Spirit, from 1 Corinthians 12:4-7 and Galatians 5:22-23. The church is 1.7 miles west of U.S. 27 on County Road 634 (Hammock Road). Call 471-1999 or visit www.sebringemman uelucc.com/.Faith Baptist Church of Lake PlacidLAKE PLACID This Sunday, Pastor Bill Cole will be preaching Holy Spirit Protocol from the book of Romans in the morning and in the eve ning he will preach The Beginning of the End from the Gospel of John. Mid-week prayer and Bible study is held on Wednesday. To listen to Faith Baptist Sunday morning ser mons or for more infor mation, visit www.faithbaptistchurchLP.com or call the church ofce at 863-465-0060. The church is at 660 Holmes Ave.Faith Lutheran ChurchSEBRING This Sunday, the church cel ebrates Transguration Sunday. Elder Bob Brumeld will be de livering his sermon at Faith Lutheran based on the readings of the day Exodus 24:8-18, 2 Peter 1:16-21, and Matthew 17:1-9. Lent Service starts on March 5. Ash Wednesday service is at 6:30 pm with Imposition of Ashes. Every Tuesday and Thursday, Senior Aerobics is offered by teacher Barbara. Classes are of nocharge, can be of varied level from Silver Snickers and Up. L.I.F.T. Ladies In Faith/Fellowship Togethers study is called Productive: Finding Joy In What We Do. Friday, March 7, they will study Good Work from Genesis 1:28, 2:8-9, 15-17. Work is a gift from God, not a curse.First Baptist Church Avon ParkAVON PARK Rev. Jon Beck will be preaching morning worship service out of James 4:10-17. Nursery is available for the morning and evening services. The Church is at 100 N. Lake Ave. For more infor mation call 863-453-6681 or email info@fbcap.netFirst Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)SEBRING Sundays message is from Philippians 4: 2-7 Rejoice in the Lord Always by Pastor Ron Norton. Elders at the Communion Table Sunday will be Diane Beidler and Howard Lewis. Deacons serving will be Catherine Baker, Carol Graves, Terry Ducar and Carol Chandler. The church is at 510 Poinsettia Ave.First Presbyterian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK Pastor Bob Johnsons sermon Sunday is entitled The Starting Line based on II Timothy 1:8-12. The choirs introit will be Thou Art Worthy and the anthem will be Days of Elijah. The adult Sunday school class is using the de nominational quarter ly. The theme this quarter is the Gospel of Matthew. Sundays lesson is entitled Teaching in Parables. Members are asked to bring non-perish able items for the Church Service Center. Youth Group meets at the Johnsons home Sunday evening for a meal, short Bible study, games and crafts. Wednesday morn ing, Pastor Johnson will lead Bible study from the book What is Spiritual Warfare? On Thursday, the Mens Fellowship meets at The Depot for breakfast and returns to the church for a short Bible study and a work project. The church is at 215 E. Circle Street (with two entrances on LaGrand St.). Call 453-3242 or visit www.avonparkapchurch. com/.First United Methodist Church of SebringSEBRING Pastor John A. Bryant will bring the message Sunday. The ser vice of Holy Communion will be observed. Ash Wednesday Services will be held on March 5 in the sanctuary. Sunday, March 9, guest speaker Jeff Steinberg, a tiny giant, will provide the message in all three church services. Everyone is invited to attend and hear this inspiring man. The church is downtown at 126 South Pine St. Call 385-5184.Grace Pointe MinistriesSEBRING The church meets at 200 Lark Ave. in the Sebring Hills Association Clubhouse. The message this week is on the month of Adar II on the Hebrew calendar. This is the year of Adar I and Adar II, a time of dou ble blessings. For the kids, Bible study and crafts. Tuesday Home Bible Studys Messiah: Shadow To Image continues this week with a study of how Jesus connects be tween the Old and New Testaments. Each weeks study is independent in it self, so just jump in any time. For directions, call 863-658-2534. Friday Night Study is with GoToMeeting. Let the pastor know if you would like to participate at www. gracepointecog@comcast. net and he will send you the link. Ustream available (live or 24/7) of all servic es. Log on to ustream.tv, and then enter gracepoin tetv in the search box. The church Website is www.gracepointeminis tries.net/. Pastor Zimmer has started a blog. Log on at Ron-gracepointes. blogspot.com. WOW Radio Jesus daily mo ments can be heard every day. Log on at wowradio network.com and click the Praise Him tab.Heartland Christian ChurchSebring Pastor Ted Moores sermon this week will be Abstain With scripture from: I Thessalonians 4:1-8 Communion is offered during the service weekly The service will include Beverly Nuske singing Just a Closer Walk With You, special music by Mary VanHooreweghe and Flossi Moore and a trum pet solo by Vic Anderson. Tuesday night Adult Bible Study is taught by Pastor Moore. Wednesday night supper is served by Barbra Kelly and Dorothy Newton. Young adult and childrens programs are taught by George Kelly, Amanda and Jon Armentrout and Toby Cribbs. The church is at 2705 Alternate Route 17 South in Sebring (behind Publix). Call 314-9693.Memorial United Methodist ChurchLAKE PLACID Pastor Tim Haas will preach on Your Life Changing Experience at the Sunday morning worship services. The scripture will be from II Peter 1:16-19. Communion will be served at each service. Opportunity for Healing, with the anointing of oil, will be available at both services. Youth Group will meet in the LIghthouse Sunday evening under the di rection of Pastor Claude Burnett. The Crossover Quartet from Pennsylvania will present Southern gos pel music family style at 6 p.m. Sunday. There is no admission charge and a free will offering will be received for the Quartet. The Church is at 500 Kent Ave. behind the Tower. Call 465-2422.New Beginnings ChurchSEBRING On Sunday, Pastor Gary Kindles is ti tled Eyewitnesses based on 2 Peter 1:16-21 New Beginnings Church of Sebring is a Bible-oriented, Nondenominational church led by Pastor Kindle. There is a blended service with contemporary and tradi tional music. Holy Communion is cel ebrated monthly. The church meets at the Morris Chapel, 307 S. Commerce Ave. Call 835-2405.New Life Evangelical Lutheran ChurchSEBRING Sundays sermon from Pastor Luke Jon Willitz will be We Have the Prophetic Word from 2 Peter 1:16-21. The church is at 3725 Hammock Road. Call 385-2293.St. John United Methodist ChurchSEBRING On Sunday, Pastor Ronald De Genaro Jr.s message will be About Mountains and Valleys. Biblical reference is from Matthew 17:19. Communion will be served. Nursery is provid ed at all services. The church is at 3214 Grand Prix Drive. Call 382-1736.Spring Lake United Methodist ChurchSEBRING Rev. Weavers sermon Sunday will be Accept Gods Invitation Fellowship fol lows the service. The church is at 8170 Cozumel Lane. SNAP S HOT S CHUR C H SERVI C E S NEWS-SUN M C Y K

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B6 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com PLACES TO WORSHI PPlaces to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sun that is published Friday and Sunday. To place a listing in this directory, call the News-Sun at 3856155, ext. 596.ANGLIC A NNew L ife A nglican Fellowship, 10 N. Main Ave. (Womans Club), Lake Placid, FL 33852. Rev. Susan Rhodes, Deacon in Charge, (863) 243-3191; strhodes1020@yahoo.com. Sun day Worship, 10 a.m. Teaching, Holy Commu nion, Music, Fellowship, Healing Prayer. Pas toral and Spiritual.ASSEMB L Y OF G ODC hrist Fellowship C hurch (A ssembly of God) 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Await ing His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morn ing Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 471-0924. First A ssembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Eve ning Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431.BAPT I STA von Park L akes Baptist C hurch, 22600 N. Highlands Blvd., Avon Park, FL 33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ cen tered and biblically based. Sunday wor ship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist C hurch (GARB C ) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C17A (truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., and evening worship service is at 6 p.m. On Wednes days, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20s+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www. bethanybaptistap.com or call the church of ce at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist C hurch, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Wor ship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist C hurch, 1000 Max well St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Wor ship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Ser vice, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Tele phone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: ofce@apfellowship.org; Web site, www.ap fellowship.org. First Baptist C hurch of A von Park, N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 453-6681. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Rev. Johnattan Soltero, His panic pastor; Joy Loomis, director of music. Sunday Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Wor ship, 10:45 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:45 a.m.; Youth Choir, 4:30 p.m.; Evening Wor ship, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for both ser vices. Wednesday Wednesday Night Sup per, 5:15 p.m.; Childrens Choir, 5:45 p.m.; Youth Activities, 6 p.m.; Prayer Meeting/Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Worship Choir Practice, 6 p.m.; Mission Programs for Children, 6:45 p.m. Hispanic Services: Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., worship service at 11 a.m. Wednes day Bible study at 7 p.m. To watch services online, go to the website at www.fbcap.net. In the heart of Avon Park, for the hearts of Avon Park. First Baptist C hurch of L ake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both ser vices with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meet ing at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist C hurch of L ake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm St., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Website: www.fbclp. com. Email: information@fbclp.com. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contem porary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Wednesday Activities: Fam ily dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reserva tions required). Prayer meeting, Youth Inter sections, and MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. The church is at 119 E. Royal Palm St., Lake Placid. For information, call 465-3721 or go to www.fbclp.com. First Baptist C hurch of L orida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School be gins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday wor ship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., fol lowed by adult choir rehearsal. From Septem ber the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the minis tries offered, call 655-1878. First Baptist C hurch, S ebring, 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Rev. Matthew D. Crawford, se nior pastor; Rev. Nuno Norberto, associ ate pastor, minister of music and senior adults; and Dixie Kreulen, preschool direc tor. Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.; Blend ed Service, 10:30 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Call 385-4704. Website www.fbsebring.com Florida A venue Baptist C hurch, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Gird ley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children and youth at 6 p.m. and for adults at 6:30 p.m. I ndependent Baptist C hurch, 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday wor ship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. L eisure L akes Baptist C hurch, 808 Gar denia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Wor ship service at 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 6 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist C hurch (GARB C ) 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Eve ning Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Mes senger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist C hurch, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 2143025. Afliated with the National Associa tion of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. S parta R oad Baptist C hurch, (S B C ) 4400 Sparta Road. Evangelist Roger Jaudon. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For infor mation, call 382-0869. S outhside Baptist C hurch (GARB C ) 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Awana kin dergarten through fth grade, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for under age 3 is avail able at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Ofce phone, 385-0752. S pring L ake Baptist C hurch, Where the Bible is Always Open. Pastor Richard Schermerhorn, 7408 Valencia Road; 6552610. Assistant Pastor Ronald Smith, 3861610. On U.S. 98 at the Spring Lake Vil lage II entrance. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. for all ages; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednes day Mid-week Bible Study and Prayer Service, 6:30 p.m. Nursery available for all services. S unridge Baptist C hurch, (S B C ) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695.C ATHO LICO ur L ady of Grace C atholic C hurch, 595 E. Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vig il Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English. Sunday Life Teen Mass at 6 p.m. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. English confession at 3:30 p.m. Saturday; Spanish confession at 6:30 p.m. Religious Education Classes (September to May) are 9-10:20 a.m. Sun day for grades K through 5th. Grades 6th through Youth Bible Study are from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. S t. C atherine C atholic C hurch, 820 Hick ory St., Sebring. Parrish ofce/mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 3850049, 385-6762 (Spanish); fax, 385-5169; email, ofce@stcathe.com; website, www. stcathe.com. School Ofce/Mailing, Princi pal Dr. Anna V. Adam, 747 S. Franklin St., Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7300; fax, 385-7310; email school@stcathe.com. School ofce hours 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. Clergy: Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F., frjose@ stcathe.com or 385-0049; Parochial Vicar, Rev. Victor Caviedes, 385-3993; Assisting Priest (retired), Rev. J. Peter Sheehan; De cons, Rev. Mr. James R. McGarry and Rev. Mr. Max M. Severe. WEEKEND MASS SCHED ULE: Saturday: 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 and 10 a.m., 12 p.m. (Spanish), 5 p.m. (Holy Fam ily Youth Center), every third Sunday of the month at 2 p.m. (French Mass). Daily Mass: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m. Sacrament of Reconcilliation: 7:157:45 a.m. rst Friday, 2:30-3:15 p.m. Satur day and 9-9:45 a.m. Sunday. Ofce Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. S t. James C atholic C hurch, 3380 Placid view Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Sum mer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Week days, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., rst Satur day at 9 a.m.C HR I ST I A NC ornerstone C hristian C hurch, (Saxon Hall) 1003 West Pine St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Love Christ Love People. Jon Carter, Music Minister. Sunday, 9 a.m. Bi ble Study; 10 a.m. Worship; Communion available each week. Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship Group. For more information call 453-7679. S ebring C hristian C hurch, 4514 Ham mock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Josh Knabel (812618-7118), Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sun day Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Changing Seasons, a mens grief support group, meets at 1:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Al zheimers Caregivers Support Group meets at 1 p.m. Thursdays. Ofce hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First C hristian C hurch (Disciples of C hrist), 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-0358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.C HR I ST I A N & M I SS I O N ARY A LLI A NC ET he A lliance C hurch of S ebring, 451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL 33875. Call 3821343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednes day Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m.C HR I ST I A N S CI E NC EC hristian S cience C hurch, 154 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. A free public reading room/ bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Sci ence and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons.C HUR C H OF BRETHRE NC hurch of the Brethren, 700 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m. Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-1597.C HUR C H OF C HR I STA von Park C hurch of C hrist, 200 S. Forest Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Minister: Don Smith. Sunday Worship Services, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available at every service. Bible Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered class es for all ages. Church phone: 453-4692. H eartland church of C hrist, Lakeshore Mall Suite 42 (outside entrance), 901 U.S. Highway 27 N, Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday worship, 9 a.m. to noon; Wednesday, Bible study, 7 p.m. Evangelist Carl Ford, (863) 4022159. L ake Placid C hurch of C hrist, 1069 Hwy 27 North, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Mailing address is P.O. Box 1440, Lake Placid, FL 33862. Sunday morning worship is at 10 a.m. Sunday evening worship is 6 p.m. Bi ble class 9 a.m. Sundays and Wednesday evenings at 7 p.m. All are invited to join us. For more information, call the church at 863465-4636 or visit the website www.thelord sway.com/lakeplacidcofc/. S ebring Parkway C hurch of C hrist, 3800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870; 3857443. Minister: Kevin Patterson. Times of ser vice are: Sunday Bible Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening Ser vice, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Bible Class, 7 p.m. C HUR C H OF G ODC hurch on the R idge, Church of God, Anderson, Ind.; 1130 State Road 17 North, Sebring, FL 33870. Worship Service Sun day, 10 a.m.; Bible Study and Prayer, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Pastor Dr. Collet Varner, (863) 382-0773.C HUR C H OF N AZARE N EFirst C hurch of the Nazarene of A von Park P.O. Box 1118., Avon Park, FL 338251118. 707 W. Main St. Sunday: Sunday school begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning worship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening service at 6 p.m. Wednesday evening service is at 7 p.m. with special services for children and adults. If you need any more information, call 453-4851. C hurch of the Nazarene of L ake Plac id, 512 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852. Adult Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednes day evening: All church meal, 6 p.m.; Christian Life Study, 6:45 p.m. Winter Life groups pending. Call 446-1339. Pastor Tim Taylor.C HUR C HES OF C HR I ST IN C HR I ST I A N U NI O N C ommunity Bible C hurch C hurches of C hrist in C hristian Union, (Orange Blos som Conference Center) 1400 C-17A North (truck route), Avon Park. Presenting Jesus Christ as the answer for time and eterni ty. Sunday morning worship service, 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided. Junior Church ac tivities at same time for K-6 grade. Sun day School Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m. (Transportation available.) Sunday eve ning praise and worship service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and youth activities at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Everyone is welcome, please come worship with us. Tom Schwankweiler, Pastor. Phone 453-6052.EP I S C OPA LE piscopal C hurch of the R edeemer A von Park, 910 W. Martin St., Avon Park, FL 33825 (U.S. 27 across from Wells Mo tor Co.). Rev. Canon George Conger. Sunday services: Holy Communion at 9:30 a.m.; Saturday Bible study at 2:15 p.m. Ev eryone is welcome. Come and worship with us; we would love to meet you. Church of ce, 453-5664; fax, 453-4853. Visit us at our website at redeemeravon park.com. Email redeemer1895@aol. com. Call the thrift store for hours open and donation pick up at 664-9668 or 4535664. S t. A gnes E piscopal C hurch, 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Father Scott Walker. Sunday Services: Holy Eucha rist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek service on Wednes day at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always welcome. Church ofce 385-7649, for more information. S t. Francis of A ssisi A nglican E pisco pal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-0051. Rev. Eliz abeth L. Nelson, Rector. Worship: Sunday, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday Bi ble study at 9:15 a.m. Sunday School at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Worship 6 p.m. and Thursday 9 a.m. Holy Communion with Healing. Call the thrift store for hours open 699-0221.EVA NG E LIC A L FREE C HUR C H OF AMER IC AT he C hurch of the Way E F CA, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunda1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednes days. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provid ed. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way A place for you. Ofce Phone: 471-6140, Church Cell Phone: 273-3674. Email: the waychurch@ hotmail.com. Web site: www. TheWayChurch.orgG RA C E BRETHRE NGrace Brethren C hurch, 3626 Thunderbird Road, (863) 835-0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday services at 7 p.m. We offer Kid City Chil drens Ministry throughout all services, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married couples, prime-timers, and Bible studies in Spanish. Kid City Day Care, Preschool and After-School Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For registration call: 3853111). Check us out on the Web at www. sebringgrace.org.INDEPE N DE N TFirst C hristian C hurch, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 4535334; on the Web at www.rstchristianap. com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church. Greg Ratliff, Senior Min ister; Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Wednesday studies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events.IN TERDE N OM IN AT I O N A L World H arvest and R estoration Ministries, (non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd.,(non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd., Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 4529777 or 453-3771. Sunday service: Sun day School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meet ing/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rogers.L UTHERANA tonement L utheran C hurch (ELCA) 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. David Tho resen will be the Spiritual Leader every Sunday for the next two months. Jim Helwig, organist. Worship service with the Holy Eucharist is at 9:30 a.m. every Sunday. Birthday Sunday is the rst Sunday of each month after the service. Council meeting is on the rst Tuesday of each month. WELCA meets at noon second Tuesday of the month with a light lunch. Labyrinth Prayer Garden is open to the public 24 hours a day, seven days a week. When in need of prayers or to talk to God, come to the Garden. Come and grow with us; we would love to meet you and your family. Dont worry about how you look. Je sus went to the temple in a robe and sandals. Quilting classes every Monday at 6 p.m. Look ing for quilters or people willing to learn. Call 840-3303. C hrist L utheran C hurch A von Park LCM S 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School past the four-way stop sign. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrat ed every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellow ship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at (863) 471-2663 or see christlutheranavonpark.org. Faith L utheran C hurch LCM S ,2740 Lakeview Dr, Sebring; Church phone: 3857848; Faith Child Development Center: 3853232. Sunday Traditional Worship Service: 8 a.m.; Sunday Praise Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.; Communion served 1st, 3rd & 5th Sun day. Sunday School & Bible Classes: 9:15 a.m. Worship Svc. Broadcast at 8 a.m. on WITS 1340AM each Sunday. Educational op portunities include weekly adult Bible studies, Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good S hepherd L utheran C hurch (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Church es, 3240 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. James Weed, pastor. Worship Ser vice, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 9 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3852346. New L ife E vangelical L utheran C hurch, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fel lowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more in formation, call Pastor Luke Willitz at 3852293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. R esurrection L utheran C hurch ELCA, 324 E. Main St., at Memorial Drive, Avon Park. Pastor Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Sunday worship 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Sunday School at 9:15 a.m. Coffee and fellowship following 10:30 a.m. service. Wednesday Worship Ser vice is at 7 p.m. Open Communion celebrated at all services. Gods Work, Our Hands. T rinity L utheran C hurch LCM S 25 Lakev iew St., Lake Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots Pre-School director Edu cation Hour, 8:45 a.m.; Worship service, 10 a.m. Holy Communion each rst and third Sunday. Childrens Church scheduled dur ing worship service, 4-year-olds through fth grade. Nursery provided during worship ser vice for infants to 3-year-olds. Seasonal MidWeek Services each Wwednesday evening during Advent and Lent. Call church ofce at 465-5253 or visit the website at www.Trinity lutheranlp.com. Other activities and groups include: Choir; Ladies Guild and LWML; Mens Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies; Trinity Tots Pre-school, and Youth Group.N O N -DE N OM IN AT I O N A LBible Fellowship C hurch, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: Ameri can Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed rst and second Worship ser vices. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Ser vice, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 yrs through 5th grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church ofce 3851024. C alvary C hurch, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An indepen dent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sun day evening service, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small friendly church waiting for your visit. C hristian T raining Ministries I nc., on Se bring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. A nursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denomi national ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister, lindadowning@live.com. Casey L. Downing, associate minister, caseydowning@hotmail. com. Church phone: 314-0482. Web site: www.ctmforme.com C rossroads of L ife,148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852; Tel. 863-655-9163. The place of your Divine appointment. We ex pect our supernatural God to transform our lives through His power and grace. Come, learn of His plan and destiny for you. With His plan we receive His provision along with His perfect timing and opportunity. What you have longed for, but have been missing, can now be received. The direction you have been thirsty for will suddenly quench your parched soul. Come to experience what you have been missing for so long empowerment in every area of life. We teach, train and send forth to win souls. You dont speak English no problema. We have a Spanish interpret er. We look forward to fellowship and worship with you at 7 p.m. every Wednesday. Pasto ers Gil and Rosa Benton (Faith Never Fails). Grace Bible C hurch, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone, 382-1085. Dustin Woods, lead pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Monday, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Pro grams, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry. www.GBCconnected.org Faith C enter West Ministry, Restoring Lives, Families & Communities. In the Ban yan Plaza at 2349 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. Pastors Leroy and JoAnn Taylor the public to worship on Sundays at 11 a.m. for Praise & Worship and on Wednesdays at 7 p.m. for Bible study and prayer. Children classes are available for all services. Min istries for youth, men and women are held throughout the month. Please attend these Spirit-lled services. Moving Forward in Uni ty. Church ofce, 385-1800 or 655-2748. H ighlands C ommunity C hurch, a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. New Beginnings C hurch of S ebring, wor shiping at The Morris Chapel, 307 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Pastor Gary Kindle. Bible study every Sunday, 9 a.m. Blended Church Service, 10:15 a.m. Phone (863) 835-2405. newbeginningsch urchofsebring.com Begin your week with us. T he L ords S entinel Fellowship C hurch, 148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid (at Lake Placid Christian School), Pastor Juanita Fol som. Sunday morning service, 10:30 a.m.; Monday, Sentinel School of Theology, 7 p.m.; Church service, Tuesday, 7 p.m. More infor mation at www.juanitafolsomministries.com. Union C hurch, 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday traditional wor ship service is at 7:45 a.m. (October through Easter) and 9 a.m. Contemporary Sunday worship service is at 10:45 a.m. Nursery and childrens church available. Wednes day night worship with Pastor Tiger Gullett and CrossTalk with Pastor Bill Breylinger at 6 p.m. Breakfast and lunch menus at Sol id Grounds. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Ofce: 453-3345. Web page at www.wea reunion.org. Unity L ife E nrichment C entre,new loca tion, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@ vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring. org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Ser vice, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraor dinary.RELIGION M C Y K

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www.newssun.comFriday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B7 PRESBYTERIANCovenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. Pastor Tom Schneider. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Sunday morning worship: Traditional ser vice, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday school, 9:15 a.m. Wednes day evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Childrens/Youth Group, 5:30-7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato. net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Ofce hours: 8:3012:30 a.m. Monday-Friday.First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6 p.m. each Wednesday; Children Ministry and Youth Group, 6 p.m. each Sunday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. 385-0107. Email: faith@ strato.net, Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Fellowship Time, 10:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m. Tuesday: Youth Groups meet for devotions/Bible study, crafts, sport activities and dinner. Middle and high school, 3:306:30 p.m. Elementary School, 4-5:30 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m. Choir Rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. A nursery is available during worship. Call the church ofce for more information and other classes. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com, 117 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday Traditional Worship, 8 and 9:30 a.m.; Contemporary Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. Wednesday evenings: Adult small group Bible Study 7 p.m. (Nursery available), Youth Group (6-12th grades) 7 p.m., nursery and childrens ministry, 7 p.m. Family Biblical Counseling available by appointment. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September through June. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. rst Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 6550713; e-mail, springlakepc@embarqmail.com, Web site, http://slpc.embarqspace.com.SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTISTAvon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com, Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. A sale takes place the rst Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Frank Gonzalez. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALL ARE WELCOME. Associate Pastor is Ryan Amos. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Nathan Madrid.THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTSThe Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 3829092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-1p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: rst and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m.THE SALVATION ARMYThe Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www. salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODISTFirst United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., 105 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870. Pastor John A. Bryant. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church, 200 S. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759, Rev. Gary Pendrak, Pastor. Sunday School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Bible study every Wednesday at 6 p.m. Visit us at our church website: www.fumcap. org. Memorial United Methodist Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL, 33852. Rev. Tim Haas, pastor. Rev. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral assistant. Rev. Jerry McCauley, visitation pastor. Sunday worship services: Worship Service, 8:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m. We offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth programs, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship. We are a congregation that wants to know Christ and make Him known. Check out our church website at www.memorialumc.com or call the church ofce at 465-2422. Lakeview Christian School, VPK to Grade 5, 465-0313. St. John United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Adult Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all services. Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring. org Spring Lake United Methodist Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church ofce phone: 655-0040.UNITED CHURCH OF CHRISTEmmanuel United Church of Christ, Jesus didnt reject people, neither do we. Join us for worship every Sunday at 9:30 a.m. and youll be embraced by a compassionate congregation that is all-inclusive. Were at the corner of Hammock and Hope. Choir and Bell Choir practice on Wednesday; Bible studies throughout the week. 471-1999; sebringemmanuelucc.com.P LACES T O WO RS HI P RELIGION Special to the News-SunSEBRING Ucommon, a lm featuring Erik Estrada, Ja son Crabb, Ben Davies and Irma P. Hall, will be shown at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 13, at Faith Lutheran Church. Estrada and Crabb will be at the showing and Christian singer Brandy Allison will per form. What do we really know about religious liberties in pub lic schools? Can students pray? Can they have a bible study? Can they mention God or even wear a Christian-themed T-shirt? The prayer in pub lic school debate has caused a restorm in the past; but with this lm Liberty Counsel hopes to set the record straight. The setting of Uncommon is a public school where stu dents face unexpected challenges to their faith and freedoms. The movie will educate students, teachers, and parents about the fact that students do not lose their free speech and freedom of religion when they enter the schoolhouse. Estrada is best known for his leading role in the television series ChiPs. Estrada plays the role of a heroic high school janitor who volunteers to help the students salvage their dra ma and music programs. Estrada will attend over 200 church screenings across America in order to show this lm to help better educate church leaders, parents and teens on religious liberties in public education. Crabb is the 2012 Dove Artist of the Year, Male Vocalist of the Year and Grammy Award Win ner Jason Crabb. The lead teenage role was played by actor Davies, from the Christian blockbuster lm Courageous. Davies was just recently voted as one of the top 10 of Christian actors. Hall has appeared in numer ous lms and television shows since the 1970s. She is best known for playing matriarchal gures in the lms A Family Thing, Soul Food and The La dykillers. Faith Lutheran Church is at 2740 Lakeview Drive. Call 3857848.Uncommon to be shown at Faith Lutheran ChurchStar Erik Estrada to be at event set for March 13One day at a busy air port, the passengers on a commercial airliner were seated, waiting for the cockpit crew to show up so they could get under way. The pilot and co-pi lot nally appeared in the rear of the plane and began walking up to the cockpit through the cen ter aisle. Both appeared to be blind! The pilot was using a white cane, bumping into passengers right and left as he stumbled down the aisle; the co-pilot was us ing a guide dog. Both had their eyes covered with huge sunglasses. At rst, the passen gers did not react, thinking that it must have been some sort of practi cal joke. However, after a few minutes, the engines started revving and the airplane started moving down the runway. The passengers glanced at each other with some uneasiness, whispering among themselves and looking desperately to the stewardesses for re assurance. Then the air plane started acceler ating rapidly, and the people began panicking. Some passengers were praying, and as the plane got closer and closer to the end of the runway, the voices were becom ing more and more hysterical. Finally, when the air plane had less than 20 feet of runway left, there was a sudden change in the pitch of the shouts as everyone screamed at once. Then, at that mo ment, the airplane lifted off and was airborne. In the cockpit, the copilot breathed a sigh of relief and turned to the pilot. You know, one of these days the pas sengers arent going to scream, and were gonna get killed! None of us will proba bly ever choose to board an airplane with a pilot who cannot see. Howev er, many of us allow people or things to pilot our lives that are just as fool ish. Some allow friends or family to pilot their lives. Others allow a celebrity or hero to pilot their lives. Some will allow drugs or alcohol to be their pilot. Others will allow money or fame to be their pilot. The list is endless. Regardless of the choices of others, when it comes to the lives of those who want to be saved in an eternal home called Heaven, there can be One and only One in the pilots seat, and He is God. Jeremiah 10:23 reads, I know, O Lord, that a mans way is not in him self, nor is it in a man who walks to direct his steps. To allow anyone or anything other than God to direct the paths of our lives makes about as much sense as climb ing on board an air plane with a blind pilot. It would be absolute fool ishness! Ephesians 5:17 reads, So then do not be fool ish, but understand what the will of the Lord is. One cannot be wise if he does not know Gods will. And, one cannot know Gods will if he does not study His word. Studying and obeying the Bible is how one chooses to allow God to pilot his or her life. So, who is your pilot?Kevins Komments is written by Kevin Patterson and pre sented by the Sebring Parkway church of Christ assembling at 3800 Sebring Parkway. Guest columns are the opin ion of the writer, not necessarily those of the News-Sun staff.Who is your pilot? Courtesty photoSouthern Sound Quartet will be appearing in a live concert at Lake Placid Church of the Nazarene on Saturday, March 1, at 6 p.m. Southern Sound is a male quartet from Nashville, Tenn. They travel throughout the U.S. giving encouragement and inspiration with their southern gospel music. In the tradition of the Blackwoods, Statesmen, Cathedrals and other legendary quartets, Southern Sound brings a rich blend of quality voices that is sure to bring enjoyment to those who hear. Come early, and get a seat for this event. The Church is at 512 W. Interlake Blvd. in Lake Placid. For more information call 446-1339.SOUTHERN SOUND Q UARTET IN CONCERT MARCH 1 K EVIN S K OMMENTSKevin Patterson TRAVIS LOLLERAssociated PressThree days after pastor Jamie Coots died from a rattlesnake bite at church, mourners leaving the fu neral went to the church to handle snakes. Coots, who appeared on the National Geograph ic Channels Snake Salvation, pastored the Full Gospel Tabernacle in Je sus Name church founded by his grandfather in Middlesboro, Ky. The third-generation snake handler was bitten dur ing a service on Feb. 15 and died later at his home after refusing medical help. Now his adult son, Cody Coots, is taking over the family church where snakes are frequently part of services. People think they will stop handling snakes be cause someone got bit, but its just the opposite, said Ralph Hood, a pro fessor of psychology at the University of Tennes see, Chattanooga, who has been studying snake handlers for decades. It reafrms their faith. The practice of snake handling in the Unit ed States was rst documented in the mountains of East Tennessee in the early 20th Centu ry, according to Paul Williamson, a professor of psychology at Hender son State University who, along with Hood, cowrote a book about snake handlers called, Them That Believe. In the 1940s and 1950s, many states made snake-han dling illegal (its current ly illegal in Kentucky), but the practiced has contin ued, and often law enforcement simply looks the other way. The basis for the prac tice is a passage in the Gospel of Mark. In the King James Version of the Bible, Mark 16:17-18 reads: And these signs shall follow them that be lieve; In my name shall they cast out devils; they shall speak with new tongues; They shall take up serpents; and if they drink any deadly thing, it shall not hurt them; they shall lay hands on the sick, and they shall recov er. Snake handling gained momentum when George Hensley, a Pentecostal minister working in var ious Southern states in the early 1900s, recount ed an experience where, while on a mountain, a serpent slithered beside him. Hensley purported to be able to handle the snake with impunity, and when he came down the mountain he proclaimed the truth of following all ve of the signs in Mark. Kentucky snake handler death doesnt shake belief M C Y K

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B8 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com Ditchfield Family Singers performSEBRING The Ditcheld Family Singers will bring a night of up lifting worship to Leisure Lakes Baptist Church at 10:45 a.m. and then at Whispering Pines Baptist Church at 6 p.m. Sunday. Known as one of Americas most versa tile family ensembles, The Ditcheld Family is known for their close harmony, warmth, and wide variety of musical styles. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church is at the western end of Lake June. From U.S. 27, take Lake June Road to Miller, turning north on Wildower. Call 699-0671. Whispering Pines Baptist Church is at 303 White Pine Drive, next to Home Depot.Great Day concert March 9SEBRING Great Day Ministry is present ing a free concert with a mix of southern gospel and contemporary music at 6 p.m. on March 9. All are welcome. A love offering will be re ceived. For more infor mation please call the church ofce 655-1524. The church is at 111 Lake Josephine Drive.World Day of Prayer is March 7SEBRING The annual World Day of Prayer celebration of Church Women United will be held Friday, March 7, at First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 510 Poinsettia Ave. Registration is at 9:30 a.m., group activi ties begin at 9:45 a.m., and the worship cele bration will conclude by 11 a.m. The contact person for this event is the Rev. Juanita Roberts, 6552234. All church women and their friends are in vited and encouraged to attend this special Church Women United celebration.Heritage Quartet in concert SundayLAKE PLACID The Heritage Quartet from Winter Haven will be joining their voices in great harmony this Sunday evening at 6 p.m. at Community Church of God. The Heritage Quartet is composed of four gen tlemen who sing for the Love of the Lord and for the Love of singing. Youll nd the concert to be packed with favorite songs, many youll know. You may also recognize a couple of members from the Warner University Gospel Sing events that have taken place in our area. Community Church of God is at 735 S. Sun N Lake Blvd. south of Lake Placid off C.R. 29, di rectly across from Lake Country Elementary School. Call 465-3715.Jorgensen speaking at CrossroadsSEBRING Jim Jorgensen will speak at Crossroads Fellowship Saturday at 7 p.m. and again at 10 a.m. Sunday. Jorgensens sermons edify and empower the body of Christ, by bring ing forth the heart of God through the apostol ic, prophetic, and wor ship. This gifted prophet preaches with anoint ing to impart vision and develop the talents of others. He imparts both vi sion and direction to the body of Christ, on a cor porative and an individual basis. Invite your family, friends and neighbors to hear this anointed man of God. The church is at 605 S.R. 66. Call 655-0212. Timing is crucial. Not just in business and plea sure but also in biblical events. What do you know about the timing of the rapture? Hi, my name is Pastor Reinhold Buxbaum from The Church of the Way, and I like a word with you. The word rapture comes from the Latin word rapiemur which means to catch up or take away. In 2 Thessa lonians 2:3 we read: Let no one deceive you in any way. For it will not be, un less the departure comes rst, and the man of sin is revealed, the son of de struction. This is from the translation called: He brew Names Version. We learn an important timing lesson from this verse. Many Christians think that the word de parture refers to a depar ture from the faith. But the context is all about the timing of the rapture, the departure from this world. The Geneva Bible from 1587 uses the word de parting. The English Geneva Bible was the basis for the King James version of 1611. With other words, we are told that the rapture will take place just before the man of lawlessness, or the Anti-Christ is revealed. Since Anti-Christ is not re vealed until the beginning of the seven-year tribula tion period (the rider on the white horse, Revela tions 6:2) it becomes very clear that the church (all true believers) will be tak en out of here (raptured) just before the seven-year tribulation period. It also means that true believers will not get to know who this Anti-Christ really is. This is consistent with many other scrip tures that give us a timing revelation. Like 1 Thessalonians 1:10: And to wait for his Son, whom he raised form the dead, even Jesus, which delivered us from the wrath to come. (NIV) Or 1 Thessalonians 5:9: For God hath not ap pointed us to wrath, but to obtain salvation by our Lord Jesus Christ. (NIV) The wrath of God is al ways associated with the seven-year tribula tion time. But the true believers are not appointed to Gods wrath. Instead we are told For the Lord himself will come down from heaven, with a loud command, with the voice of the archangel and with the trumpet call of God, and the dead in Christ will rise rst. After that, we who are still alive and are left will be caught up to gether with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air. And so we will be with the Lord forever. (1 Thess.4:16-17 NIV) How is your timing? Are you a true believer in the Lord Jesus Christ? Are you ready for the departure? It can happen at any time. May be today? Yes, the stage is set for our rapture.Reinhold Buxbaum is Pastor of The Church of the Way, he teach es An Evening in Bible Prophecy at Homers Restaurant every rst Monday of the month at 6:30 p.m. No purchase is neces sary. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the News-Sun staff. RELIGION Its all about timing GUEST COLUMNReinhold Buxbaum Courtesy photoRockingham Male Chorus from Bridgewater, Va. will present a Sacred Concert at Church of the Brethren, 700 S. Pine St., at 7 p.m. Friday, March 7. A free will offering will be taken.RO CKINGHAM MALE CHOR US IN CONCERT SNAP S HOT S L OC AL RELI G ION NICOLE WINFIELDAssociated PressVATICAN CITY Retired Pope Benedict XVI has denied speculation that he was pressured to leave ofce, saying his decision was freely made and his alone. Benedict wrote to the Vatican correspondent for La Stampa news paper, Andrea Tornielli, amid a new round of speculation about his reasons ahead of Fri days rst anniversary of the rst resignation by a pope in 600 years. There isnt the slight est doubt about the validity of my resignation from the Petrine minis try, La Stampa quoted Benedict as writing. The only condition for the validity is the full freedom of the decision. Speculation about its in validity is simply absurd. Benedict, 86, also de fended his decision to continue wearing the white cassock of the pa pacy, saying that there were no other clothes available. Media are again specu lating about what drove Benedict from ofce. Italian journalist Anto nio Socci suggested last week in the conservative daily Libero that the res ignation may have been invalid, claiming Bene dict was pressured by a group of cardinals op posed to him. Benedict, however, had made clear from the start of his papacy that it might not end in his death. In the 2010 book Light of the World, Benedict wrote: If a pope clearly realizes that he is no longer physical ly, psychologically and spiritually capable of handling the duties of his ofce, then he has a right, and under some circumstances, also an obligation to resign. Benedict made a sur prise cameo at this weekends ceremony to formally install 19 new cardinals. It was the rst time he and Pope Francis had appeared together at a public liturgical cere mony and immediately raised questions about whether Benedict might occasionally be reinte grated back into the life of the church. British Cardinal Vin cent Nichols, one of the new cardinals, said Benedicts pres ence didnt represent a change. He says his vocation now is to pray for the church and to live that life of prayerful seclu sion, and he would appear to be very peaceful doing that, Nichols told reporters.Benedict denies he was pressured to resign M C Y K

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w ww.newssun.com Friday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B9 rffntbffnf n frnffn f ffnfffnn nnn nnnfnffnnnbn f bfffnffbf fnbfnb f fn rff nt bf t f tf f rf ntbn rfntfrb btbfntf fbtbf tff fbftbfbnbfb bbbbbbnrbtn brfbbbnbbrftrfb fbbbttnbbtnftfbfrrb ntftffbfntftbbnb trfnt Classifiedtn bfbrbrnfnbnbffbftrb bbttnbbntbntrnbrffbb fnrfntntftbnrfbrfb bfbtbfbf bbfbtntftrfbntnbnn nnntnrnfftnbrbbbrnnf nntnfrbnrrbrbn btfrftrbfntrfbtftb bbtnntbbnftftb bffbnrftrbfrftrbbnnrbb bfntfbbbnrnbbttbf tbrftbnb rfffntbtbt ttn tbnnbbtnfntbntn nbn ttf IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.28-2009-CA-001580 Division No. THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/ A THE BANK OF NEW YORK,AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWABS,INC. ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES,SERIES 2005-17 Plaintiff, vs. VANDA D.MARTIN,et al, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated February 6,2014,and entered in Case No.28-2009-CA-001580 of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:2009-CA-001818 REVERSE MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS,INC. Plaintiff, vs. CINDY G.JOHNSON AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF GAIL P.BAIRD; BRENT FRANCES HENRY; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; CINDY G.JOHNSON; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,will on the 17th day of March,2014,at 11:00 o'clock A.M.at the in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.,offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash,the following-described property situate in Highlands County,Florida: LOT 17,BLOCK 129,OF LAKE VIEW PLACE ADDITION,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA,LESS AND EXCEPT A STRIP OF LAND WITHIN LOT 17, BLOCK 129,OF LAKE VIEW PLACE ADDITION,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1,PAGE 58,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA,BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS THE WEST 57.81 FEET OF THE NORTH 7.5 FEET OF SAID LOT 17. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court,the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus,if any,resulting from the foreclosure sale,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens,mus file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 12th day of December,2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,255 N.Broadway Avenue,Bartow,Florida 33830,(863)534-4686,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled court appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing impaired,call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Priscilla Michala k Deputy Cler k (COURT SEAL) 296235 February 21,28,2014 you,to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,255 N.Broadway Avenue,Bartow,Florida 33830,(863)534-4686,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled court appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing impaired,call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Priscilla Michala k Deputy Cler k (COURT SEAL) 330549 February 21,28,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:2011-CA-000635 LIVE WELL FINANCIAL,INC. Plaintiff, vs. ADELINE M.WOLFGRAM and Unknown Spouse of ADELINE M. WOLFGRAM; JOHN DOE and MARY DOE; INDEPENDENCE RECEIVABLES CORPORATION; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,will on the 17th day of March,2014,at 11:00 o'clock A.M.at the in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.,offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash,the following-described property situate in Highlands County,Florida: THE EASTERLY 10 FEET OF LOT 8 AND ALL OF LOT 9 AND THE SOUTHEASTERLY 10 FEET OF LOT 10,BLOCK 269,LAKE SEBRING SUBDIVISION,A SUBDIVISION AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2,PAGE(S) 15,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA,MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AS A POINT OF BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 9 OF THE ABOVE BLOCK 269,THENCE WEST FOLLOWING THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 9 A DISTANCE OF 55.47 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE,THENCE CONTINUING WITH THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF LOTS 9 AND 8 ALONG A CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF 960 FEET AN ARC DISTANCE OF 59.53 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 05 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 66.45 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 8,THENCE NORTH 64 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 79.76 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 10, THENCE IN A SOUTHEASTERLY DIRECTION FOLLOWING THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOTS 10 AND 9 ALONG A CURVE TOT HE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF 380.28 FEET AN ARC DISTANCE OF 58.62 FEET TO A POINT OF TANGENT,THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST FOLLOWING THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 9 A DISTANCE OF 50.63 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.SAID LOTS LYING INA ND COMPRISING A PART OF LOTS 6 AND 7, BLOCK ``D'' OF LAKE SHORE PART SUBURBAN DEVELOPMENT OF LAKE JACKSON HOME AND GROVE COMPANY PER PLAT BOOK 1,PAGE 1,HIGHLANDS COUNTY RECORDS AND BEING A PART OF GOVERNMENT LOT 4,SECTION 13,TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH,RANGE 28 EAST,HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. BEING THE SAME REAL ESTATE CONVEYED TO ALSTON G.WOLFGRAM AND ADELINE M.WOLFGRAM,HUSBAND AND WIFE,BY WARRANTY DEED FROM EVERETT E.WHITTAKER AND ALMA WHITTAKER, DATED OCTOBER 24,1985,RECORDED NOVEMBER 12,1985,IN PUBLIC RECORDS, COUNTY OF HIGHLANDS,FLORIDA IN O.R. DEED BOOK 860,PAGE 832. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court,the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus,if any,resulting from the foreclosure sale,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens,mus file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 13th day of December,2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 12th day of February,2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court ROBERT W.GERMAINE By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk 327611/1024866/acc February 21,28,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.:28-2009-CA-001719 U.S.BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE Plaintiff, vs. CINDALEAH KOVARS A/K/A CINDALEAH A. KOVARS,UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CINDALEAH KOVARS A/K/A CINDALEAH A. KOVARS,ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,THROUGH,UNDER,AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,HEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS,BANK OF AMERICA,N.A.,JOHN DOE,JANE DOE, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given,pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on November 25,2013, in the Circuit Court of HIGHLANDS County, Florida,I will sell the property situated in Highlands County,Florida described as: LOT 14 & 15,BLOCK 4,SEBRING 98, SECTION ONE,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 1,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. and commonly known as:206 ANDRETTI AVE,SEBRING,FL 33876; including the building,appurtenances,and fixtures located therein,at public sale,to the highest and best bidder,for cash,Sales are held in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870,on March 13,2014 at 11 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.28-2012-CA-000806-GCAX-MX CITIMORTGAGE,INC., Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES, ASIGNEEES,CREDITORS,LIENORS,TRUSTEES OF RALPH E.MCADOW,DECEASED,et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that,pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause,in the Circuit Court of HIGHLANDS County,Florida,I will sell the property situated in HIGHLANDS County,Florida,described as: LOTS 7,8,9,10,13,14,15,16,17 AND 18,BLOCK 8,DESOTO CITY 2ND SUBDIVISION,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1,PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. Property address:5621 County Rd South 17,Sebring,FL 33876 at public sale,to the highest and best bidder, for cash,In the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.on March 13, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendents,must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness,my hand and seal of this court on the 12th day of February,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs assistance in order to participate in a program or service of the State Courts System,you should contact the Office of the Court Administrator at (863) 534-4686 (voice),(863) 534-7777 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (Florida Relay Service),as much in advance of your court appearance or visit to the courthouse as possible.Please be prepared to explain your functional limitations and suggest an auxiliary aid or service that you believe will enable you to effectively participate in the court program or service. 131038 dcs February 21,28,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:GC-12-000512 WELLS FARGO BANK,NA Plaintiff, vs. GILBERTO CASTILLO; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GILBERTO CASTILLO; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II; and any unknown heirs,devisees,grantees, creditors,and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by,through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,will on the 17th day of March,2014,at 11:00 o'clock A.M.at the in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.,offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash,the following-described property situate in Highlands County,Florida: LOT 18,IN BLOCK 54,OF SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING UNIT 5,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9,PAGE 51,PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court,the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus,if any,resulting from the foreclosure sale,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens,mus file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 12th day of December,2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,255 N.Broadway Avenue,Bartow,Florida 33830,(863)534-4686,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled court appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing impaired,call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk (COURT SEAL) 319038 February 21,28,2014 signed Clerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,will on the 17th day of March,2014,at 11:00 o'clock A.M.at the in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.,offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash,the following-described property situate in Highlands County,Florida: LOT 44,BLOCK 3,ORANGE BLOSSOM ESTATES,UNIT NO.11,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7,PAGE 48,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court,the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus,if any,resulting from the foreclosure sale,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens,mus file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 13th day of December,2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,255 N.Broadway Avenue,Bartow,Florida 33830,(863)534-4686,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled court appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing impaired,call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk (COURT SEAL) 314848 February 21,28,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:GC-12-001120 BANK OF AMERICA,N.A. Plaintiff, vs. NORMAN D.MCLARTY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF NORMAN D.MCLARTY; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II; and any unknown heirs,devisees,grantees, creditors,and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by,through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the underIN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:GC-12-001045 BANK OF AMERICA,N.A.,SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff, vs. DONNA R.HUBER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DONNA R.HUBER; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.FOR COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC.,and any unknown heirs,devisees, grantees,creditors,and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,will on the 17th day of March,2014,at 11:00 o'clock A.M.at the in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.,offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash,the following-described property situate in Highlands County,Florida: LOT 5,LAKE SEBRING ESTATES,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4,PAGE 79,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court,the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus,if any,resulting from the foreclosure sale,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens,mus file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 13th day of December,2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,255 N.Broadway Avenue,Bartow,Florida 33830,(863)534-4686,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled court appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing impaired,call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk (COURT SEAL) 312152 February 21,28,2014 are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,255 N.Broadway Avenue,Bartow,Florida 33830,(863)534-4686,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled court appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing impaired,call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk (COURT SEAL) 288134 February 21,28,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:GC-13-000229 REVERSE MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS,INC. Plaintiff, vs. PAUL D.LARIVIERE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF PAUL D.LARIVIERE; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; A VON PARK LAKES ASSOCIATION; and any unknown heirs,devisees,grantees, creditors,and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by,through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,will on the 17th day of March,2014,at 11:00 o'clock A.M.at the in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.,offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash,the following-described property situate in Highlands County,Florida: LOT 10191 THRU 10194,INCLUSIVE A VON PARK LAKES UNIT NO.31,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5,PAGE 33,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court,the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus,if any,resulting from the foreclosure sale,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens,mus file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 12th day of December,2013. A MERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT.If you 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.PC 14-08 IN RE:ESTATE OF PHYLLIS P.SMITH, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of PHYLLIS P.SMITH,deceased, File Number PC 14-08 by the Circuit Court for Highlands County,Florida,Probate Division,the address of which is 590 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,FL 33870; that the decedent's date of death was December 9, 2013; that the total value of the estate is equal to or less than $65,200.56,and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:1) Karen Sue Mydland,9514 Powerhouse Rd.,Cheyenne,WY 82009; and 2) Bruce Albert Smith,1219 N.Market St.,St. Louis,MO 63106. A LL INTERESTED PARTIES ARE NOTIFIED THAT All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER A PPLICABLE TIME PERIOD,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is February 21,2014. Petitioner: /s/ Karen Sue Mydland 9514 Powerhouse Road Cheyenne,WY 82009 A ttorney for Petitioner: / s/ Robert E.Livingston Florida Bar No.0031259 445 S.Commerce Avenue Sebring,Florida 33870 Telephone:(863) 385-5156 E-mail:Livingston@livingstonpa.com February 21,28,2014

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B10 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.282012CA000694GCAXMX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK,NATIONAL A SSOCIATION, PLAINTIFF, VS. LYNN MADISON,ET AL., DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 28th day of January,2014, and entered in Case No. 282012CA000694GCAXMX,of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County,Florida.I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Highlands County Courthouse,the Jury Assembly Room,Basement,430 South Commerce A venue,Sebring,FL 33870,at 11:00 A.M. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.:282013CA000215CAXMX VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC.,a Tennessee corporation authorized to transact business in Florida Plaintiff, vs. LANETTE CHERISOL,et al., Defendants. CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that,in accordance with the Plaintiff's Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on in the above-styled cause,I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on March 12,2014 at 11:00 a.m.(EST),at HIGHLANDS County Courthouse: LOT 7,PENNY HEIGHTS,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9,PAGE 68,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. Property Address:1523-1525 Penny Avenue,Sebring,FL 33870 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE,IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated:January 29,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK CLERK OF THE COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,(863) 534-4690,within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Final Judgment; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call TDD (863) 534-7777 or Florida Relay Service 711. February 21,28,2014 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE No.:2013CA000528 SPRINGLEAF HOME EQUITY,INC., FORMERLY KNOWN AS AMERICAN GENERAL HOME EQUITY,INC., Plaintiff, vs. MARSHA ANN ROCKWELL, CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA),N.A. A ND UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,THROUGH,UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF DAVID LEE ROCKWELL, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 28th 2014,and entered in Case No.2013CA000528 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County,Florida,wherein SPRINGLEAF HOME EQUITY,INC.,FORMLERY KNOWN AS AMERICAN GENERAL HOME EQUITY,INC.,is Plaintiff and MARSHA ANN ROCKWELL,CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA),N.A. A ND UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THORUGH,UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF DAVID LEE ROCKWELL,are Defendants,I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Jury Assembly Room,Basement 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,FL at 11:00 o'clock A.M.on the 12th day of March,2014,the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment,to wit: Lot 11,Block 2,Citrus Lake Colony,according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 8,Page 2,of the Public Records of Highlands County,Florida. Together with a mobile home situated thereon,described as a 1986 Cypress Mobile Home,Vehicle Identification Numbers 14602344A and 14602344B,which is affixed tot eh aforedescribed real property and incorporated therein. Street Address:120 Tidewater Drive,Lake Placid,FL 33852 and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon,which are included as security in Plaintiff's mortgage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Sebring,Highlands County,Florida,this 29th day of January,2014. Bob Germaine Clerk of said Circuit Court By:/s/ Toni Kopp As Deputy Clerk February 21,28,2014 for HIGHLANDS County,Florida,wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK,AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWABS,INC. A SSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES,SERIES 2005-17 is the Plaintiff and VANDA D.MARTIN,VANDA D.MARTIN,WOOD 'N IRONS OF SUN 'N LAKE OWNERS' ASSOCIATION,INC., CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES,INC., MANOR HILL OWNERS' ASSOCIATION,INC., the Defendants,I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Jury Assembly Room of the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida,at 11:00 a.m.on the 10th day of March, 2014,the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment,to wit: A ll That Certain Parcel Of Land Situated In The County Of Highlands And State Of Florida,Being Known And Described As Lot 9, Block 261,Sun 'N Lake Estates Of Sebring, Unit 13,According To The Plat Thereof As Recorded In Plat Book 9,Page 71,Of The Public Records Of Highlands County,Florida. IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE,YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS A FTER THE SALE.IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM,YOU WILL NOT BEEN TITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS.AFTER 60 DAYS,ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORDS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at HIGHLANDS County,Florida,this 6th day of February,2014. BOB GERMAINE,Clerk HIGHLANDS County,Florida By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk 972233.1426/NP February 21,28,2014 1050LegalsDUMMY 2014 SERVICE DIRECTORY DUMMY 5X21.5 AD # 00034894

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w ww.newssun.com Friday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B11 KAWASAKI VULCAN1500. 1988, Good condition, 20,000 miles, new tires, leather saddle bags. $1850.00 or best offer. 863-465-7112 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 TransportationTRACKER BASSPRO & Trailer, trim tilt, trolling motor. Many accessories. Excel cond. Custom cover included. $2750. SOLD!!!!! 8050Boats & Motors 8000 Recreation ROTTWEILER PUPPIES,8 wks. old. $400. Health certs & shots. Will email photos. 863-452-5001 PUG PUPPIES,Fawn color. One male and one female, pure bred pug with no papers. Born January 3. First shots and wormed. Reasonable price to good home only, both parents on site. Call 910-382-5660.NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eigh t weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & Supplies CUB CADETLTX1040 MOWER AS GOOD AS NEW. SERVICED WITH NEW BATTERY AND CARBURETOR. THE CLOCK HAS LESS THAN 35HRS. CONTACT VIJAY ON 863-699-6923 BETWEEN 10AM AND 7PM PRICE $1000 CRAFTSMAN 42''CUT LAWN TRACTOR Very good condition with bag attachments in excellent condition, $450 OBO. 863-446-0034 7400Lawn & GardenWANTED CHEVROLETS-10, 2 wheel drive, standard shift, in the 90's. Any engine, good or bad. Good body. 810-516-9152 7340Wanted to Buy SEBRING FALLSRyant Blvd. to 1541 Caribbean Rd., March 1, 8am-2pm. Coleman grill, edger, household, lots of misc. SEBRING -WOODHAVEN Estates off Brunns Rd. 22 homes, Feb. 28, 8am-5pm; March 1 8am-1pm. Furniture, crafts, jewelry, kids toys, power tools. Lots of misc. items. Something for everyone! SEBRING -LARGE MULTI-FAMILY sale, 1920 Brunns Rd. Lot 19 (of f Hammock Rd.) Fri.-Sat. Feb. 28 & March 1, 8am-2pm. Household goods, table & chairs, lamps, chairs, Xmas village houses, books. SEBRING -GREAT SALE Sat., March 1, 8400 Pine Glen Rd. Everything you could imagine! Pressure cleaner, baby beds, clothing for all ages! Something for the big girls too! Old toys! Bikes and hot wheels, Chevy truck engine. SEBRING -GARAGE SALE Fri. & Sat. Feb. 28th & March 1st, 8am-2pm, 2328 Glen Dr. (off Whispering Pines). Musical instruments, jewelry, ham radio antennas, ladies bike, misc. SEBRING -5218 LAFAYETTE AVE., Sat.-Sun., Mar. 1 & 2, 8am-2pm., Furniture, Knick Knacks, Household Items, Sm. Appliances, Sporting Goods. Much More! LAKE PLACIDThur. -Fri. 8 4. Sat. 8 12. 219 Kumquat Rd. NE. Tools, fishing equip., & household. LAKE PLACIDHuge Yard Sale!!! Fri. Sat, 8 ?. 1741 Citadel St. Household items, tools, electronics, collector plates, baseball cards & much much more! LAKE PLACIDFri. Sat. 1723 Cedarbrook St. Pre-Moving Sale! 2 patio sets, 4 porch rockers, grill, tools, crystal, Christmas decor, 2 old trunks & lots of household. AVON PARK2515 N. Arrowhead Rd. Furn., vintage items & jewelry, small appl., tools, kitchen ware, clothing & more! Fri. 2/28 Sat. 3/1. 8 ?. AVON PARK*MOVING SALE 307 E Canfield St (Betw. Memorial Dr & Middle School) Fri & Sat 2/28 & 3/1, 8am 4pm, Furn., Clothing, Household items, etc. Offers Welcome. Some Of Everything. SEBRING FALLSANNUAL Garage/Bake Sale "Sebring Falls" MHP Sat. Mar. 1ST., 8AM till noon. All kinds of items, electrical, linens, furniture, books, puzzles, glassware. Bake sale and concessions. Everyone welcome! 7320Garage &Yard Sales LEATHER SLACKSLadies Sizes 8 10 12. Brown Black Tan. Like New. $50. 863-385-4612 DOLL HOUSEFurni.,, Handmade from balsa wood, not for children. 5 rooms+ lots of acces. Includes doll house -needs special attention. $50. 863-402-2285 COLEMAN LANTERNNorth Star / Butane Fuel. Like New w/ extra Mantel. $20. 863-402-2285 CALLAWAY DRIVERLadies 10 degree $18. Golf Hammock Area. 269-963-7817 BIRD CAGE& brand new Stand, includes food, toys & access. for Parakeet. $40. 863-402-2495 BIFOLD DOORS2, 75" long. 2 Bifold doors 66" long. 3 passage doors 30" wide. $15. the lot. 863-453-3104 7310Bargain Buys ANTIQUEWICKERRocking Chair. Early 1900's, in good condition. Painted but needs special attention. $50. 863-402-2285 AIR BEDS1 Queen Deluxe, Double High NEW & 1 Twin Size. Like New $90. 863-385-4612 7310Bargain Buys PEDESTAL TABLELt wood, w/ 2 chairs $200 / 2 Bars Stools, Dk wood 28" $40 / Computer Desk $35 / High Chair $30 / Pack N Play $35 / Tricycle $15. Call 863-453-3398 HOT TUB Artesian, 4'9" x 6'7". Good cond. Original cost $6600. Now, $800. Call 863-991-0584 7300MiscellaneousBEAUTIFUL GENTLYused home theater organ/bench. New price near $60,000, purchased locally from Fletcher Music. Top line model, still one of the best home instruments on the market From estate of home in Highlands Village, proceeds to church ministry. $9800 obo, no trades. Call Pastor Gerald Webber at 863-214-4859 for appointment. 7260MusicalMerchandiseSECTIONAL SOFAMulti-color earth tones, La-Z-Boy, recliners on each end. Like new. $275. Call 863-452-2443 7180Furniture 7000 Merchandise SEBRING 2/1.5,garage, study room, new kitchen, tile floors, & basic appliances. CHA. $650/mo. 863-873-6099. 6300Unfurnished HousesRELAX ATLake Isis Villas** Luxurious ** 1 BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting.RENTED!!!! 6200UnfurnishedApartments 6000 RentalsPALM HARBORHOMES 2014 models are here! $8,500 Pre Construction Savings John Lyons @ 800-622-2832 ext 210 for details 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile Homes MAUSOLEUM UNITS.(2). Oak Hill Cemetery. Lake Placid. $900. Call 863-449-0101 LAKEVIEW MEMORIALGARDENS side by side Deluxe Companion External Crypts. $5,000. Call 863-452-5860 4280Cemetery LotsTHE BLUFFSOF SEBRING: For Sale by Owners: 55+, Amenities include stocked lake, heated pool spa, clubhouse, fitness room, tennis, chipping/putting area, library (books, videos, wi-fi stations). One unit is 2 BR/2BA, ground level, covered parking storage shed for $85K, second is 3 BR/2BA, ground level, lots of upgrades for $106K. Shown by appointment only, Phone 863-382-2853 or 863-385-4654 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial TREE COMPANYSEEKING F/T Employee. Experienced in Tree Work w/CDL. Call 863-655-1838 TESOL ADJUNCTINSTRUCTOR (P/T)Open until filled. Please visit http://sfsc.interviewexchange.com for detailed position posting. 863-784-7132.EA/EO. R &R Harvesting Inc 300 Temporary workers needed in Sebring, FL area from approximately April 1, 2014 July 13, 2014 Following Supervisors instructions, the worker will perform manual labor to hand cut and pack watermelons. Use hand tools such as shears and knives. Duties also include cleaning, loading and unloading harvested products. Grade and sort products according to factors such as color, species, length, width, appearance, feel and quality to ensure correct processing and usage. Discard inferior or defective products and/or foreign matter, and place acceptable products in containers for further processing. Weigh products or estimate their weight, visually or by feel. Place products in containers according to grade and mark grades on containers. Measure, weigh and count products and materials. Examine and inspect containers, materials and products to ensure that packing specifications are met. Clean and maintain work areas. Must assist with all Good Agricultural Practices policies. Perform prolonged bending, reaching, pushing, pulling, walking stooping and lifting up to 60 lbs. Exposure to extreme temperatures. Workers may be required to perform miscellaneous grove clean-up work. These activities may include removing debris, boxes, discarded fruit from fields to clean growing areas, pruning, painting trees, repair and or replace irrigation equipment, may maintain fence lines. The highest of $10.26 per hr, 3/4 guarantee, 35 hrs per week, housing and transportation provided at no cost to workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each work day, must be 18 years or older. Transportation and subsistence expenses to the worksite will be reimbursed upon completion of 50% of the work contract or earlier if appropriate. We participate in the E-Verify program and workers must have valid identification for I-9 preparation when they report to begin work. Apply for this job at the State Workforce/Job Center office in your area, please call for the nearest office in your area FL 239-252-7310, AL 256-259-1835, GA 404-656-6000, MS 662-842-2175 using job # FL9855239 NIGHT AUDITOR, HOTEL JACARANDA Part-time, primarily 10 p.m. 2 a.m. Please visit http://sfsc.interviewexchange.com for detailed position posting. Open until filled. 863-784-7132.EA/EO/VETERAN'S PREF. LOOKING FORLPN P/T for 24 bed ICF in Avon Park. We have a casual work environment with home-like setting. Apply online atwww.jobs.thementornetwork.com/floridaQuestions call 863-452-5141 ask for Angelina or Melissa LIL WIZARDSACADEMY Seeking F/T Child Care Teacher and a P/T Teacher from 12pm to 6pm. Call 863-381-9676 or Email jamesbox_3408 @yahoo.com LABORERS WITH CLEAN RECORD, Transportation, and No Wimps. Mid State Dewatering Call 863-385-2122 FULL TIMEExperienced Hospitalist ARNP Needed for Local Sebring Hospital Please send resume to s.dyal@achhospitalist.com EXPERIENCED RESIDENTIAL ROOFERS NEEDED Call 863-402-9161 2100Help WantedEXPERIENCE THEJOYS AND REWARDS Of Being A Comfort Keeper. If you have a passion for improving the quality of life for others while helping people live independently and happily in their own homes, you could be a Comfort Keeper! We are now hiring CNA, HHA and Homemaker Companion Positions in the Highlands County area. We offer flexible full-time or part-time hours. Contact us to learn more about how you can develop a rewarding career enriching the lives of others with Comfort Keepers. Apply online today at: http://ck381.ersp.biz/employment 863-385-9100 EXPANDING DAYSPA, Job Opportunity for a Massage Therapist, Stylist & Nail Tech. at a well Established & Successful Day Spa the Studio of Health & Beauty, MM21553. 1951 US 27 S. Sebring 33870. 863-386-0822. DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONALS P/T, wanted for Avon Park Intermediate Care Facility serving disabled adults. HS diploma or 1 year associated experience, valid FL Drivers License and clean criminal background req. Please complete application at www.jobs.thementornetwork.com/florida863-452-5141 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Independent Contractor wanted for FREE and established Mission Foods Direct Store Delivery (DSD) route in Avon Park, Sebring and Lake Placid areas. Product consists of tortillas and chips. Growth opportunity exists for qualified candidates with GOOD credit. If interested, please contact Robert Chencinski at (863) 640-3249 for more information. A/C INSTALLERw/at least 2yrs. experience. Electrician w/at least 3 yrs.+. Journeymen preferred. Pay negotiable. Bring resume to: Air & Electrical Services 4715 US HWY. 27S. Sebring 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:314-9876 News-Sun Classified 1100Announcements IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR POLK COUNTY,FLORIDA Case No.:Sec: 53-2014DR-00846-0000-LK Lydiann McClure & Roger McClure, Petitioners and Brooke Payne, Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PETITION FOR TEMPORARY CUSTODY TO:Brooke Payne,1015 W.Bell St.#36, Avon Park,FL 33825. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses,if any,to it on Lydiann McClure whose address is 3158 Galloway Oaks Dr., Lakeland,FL 33810 on or before March 18, 2014,and file the original with the clerk of this Court at 930 E.Parker St.,Lakeland,FL 33801,before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter.If you fail to do so,a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case,including orders,are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office.You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office notified of your current address.(You may file Notice of Current Address,Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerk's office. WARNING:Rule 12.285,Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure,requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information.Failure to comply can result in sanctions,including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Stacy M.Butterfield,Clerk of the Circuit Court Dated:2/18/2014.CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:Linsey Wright Deputy ClerkTHE BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT AND THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA,DOES NOT DISCRIMINATE UPON THE BASIS OF ANY INDIVIDUAL'S DISABILITY STATUS.THIS NON-DISCRIMINATORY POLICY INVOLVES EVERY ASPECT OF THE THE BOARD'S FUNCTIONS,INCLUDING ONE'S ACCESS TO,PARTICIPATION,EMPLOYMENT OR TREATMENT IN ITS PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES.ANYONE REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AS PROVIDED FOR IN THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT OR SECTION 286.26,FLORIDA STATUTES, SHOULD CONTACT MRS.MELISSA BRUNS,ADA COORDINATOR AT 863-402-6509 (VOICE),VIA FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE 711,OR BY E-MAIL: MBR UNS@HCBCC.ORG .REQUEST FOR CART OR INTERPRETER SERVICES SHOULD BE MADE AT LEAST 24 HOURS IN ADVANCE TO PERMIT COORDINATION OF THE SERVICE. ONE OR MORE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MAY BE PRESENT AT THE MEETING. Rick Ingler,Chairman February 23,28,2014 1050Legals NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING FOR A SPECIAL EXCEPTION REQUEST HEARING NO.1,746 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a PUBLIC HEARING will be held before the HIGHLANDS COUNTY Board of Adjustment on the 11th day of March,2014,beginning at 3:00 P.M.,or as soon thereafter as possible,in the County Commissioners Board Room,Highlands County Government Center Building,600 South Commerce Ave.,Sebring,Florida,to consider a Special Exception to allow commercial activity directly serving agricultural pursuits and limited to the service of agricultural pursuits,within the area described as follows:An approximate 20.28 acre parcel located approximately 5.8 miles south of the intersection of US 27 and SR 70,on Leisure Lane; the address being 193 Leisure Lane,Venus,Florida; and legally described as follows:Lots 14 and 15,Sandy Pines Estates Unrecorded Subdivision,plus interest in access road to subdivision,Highlands County,Florida. A ny person or persons interested or affected by this change are invited to attend this hearing.You may submit comments in writing to the attention of Linda Conrad,Zoning Supervisor,P.O.Box 1926, Sebring,Florida 33871-1926,or you may call (863) 402-6638,for further information.Please reference the above hearing number when calling or writing. A LL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE INVITED TO A TTEND. A LL INTERESTED PERSONS MAY APPEAR AND BE HEARD AT THE TIME AND PLACE SPECIFIED A BOVE.ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A NY DECISION MADE BY THIS COMMITTEE/GROUP,IN PUBLIC HEARING OR MEETING IS HEREBY ADVISED THAT HE OR SHE WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS,AND THAT,FOR SUCH PURPOSE,HE OR SHE MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE,WHICH RECORD WILL INCLUDE THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH SUCH APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. NOTICE OF LIEN SALE/DISPOSAL A CCORDING TO THE FLORIDA SELF STORAGE ACT,THE FOLLOWING STORAGE UNITS LOCATED AT FIRST SECURITY SELF STORAGE,1866 S.WILBURN DRIVE,AVON PARK,FL 33825,WILL BE DISPOSED/SOLD ON MARCH 3,2014 AT 10:00 AM.ALL UNITS ARE SAID TO CONTAIN HOUSEHOLD GOODS UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED: UNIT NUMBERS AND NAMES ARE AS FOLLOWS: A 004 Basil Makris A 010 Lewis Milton A 021 Darcel Dennis A 023 Kimberly Swindle B017 Cleo Pyatt B048 Ben Hunter B046 Donald C.Cook Jr. B067 Kimeko Billy D137 Treyvonne Wilson E028 Basil Makris E086 Apalinar Hernandez G003 Latoya Jacobs DISPOSITION BEING MADE TO SATISFY LANDLORD'S LIEN.MANAGEMENT RESERVES ALL RIGHTS UNDER FLORIDA LAW.ALL PAYMENTS MUST BE MADE IN CASH. February 21,28,2014 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.PC 14-49 IN RE:ESTATE OF VIRGINIA M.MCDANIEL, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The name of the decedent,the designation of the court in which the administration of this estate is pending,and the file number are indicated above.The address of the court is 590 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring, FL 33870.The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are indicated below. If you have been served with a copy of this notice and you have any claim against the decedent's estate,even if that claim is unmatured,contingent or unliquidated,you must file your claim with the court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF A DATE THAT IS 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS A FTER YOU RECEIVE A COPY OF THIS NOTICE. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against decedent's estate,including unmatured,contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. EVEN IF A CLAIM IS NOT BARRED BY THE LIMITATIONS DESCRIBED ABOVE,ALL CLAIMS WHICH HAVE NOT BEEN FILED WILL BE BARRED TWO YEARS AFTER DECEDENT'S DEATH. The date of death of the decedent is January 10,2014. The date of first publication of this Notice is February 28,2014. Personal Representative: ROBERT L.MCDANIEL 1015 West Bell St.,Apt.7 Avon Park,FL 33825 A ttorney for Personal Representative: CLIFFORD R.RHOADES,P.A. Florida Bar No.:308714 Clifford R.Rhoades,P.A. 2141 Lakeview Drive Sebring,Floirda 33870 (863)385-0346 service@crrpalaw.com cliff@crrpalaw.com February 28; March 7,2014 on the 13th day of March,2014,the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment,to wit: LOT 24,BLOCK 31,SEBRING COUNTRY ESTATES SECTION TWO,ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7,PAGE 34,PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens,must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator at (863) 534-4686,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call 711. Dated this 14th day of February,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK Clerk of The Circuit Court Highlands County Clerk of Court By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk File #:C301.2814 (Circuit Court Seal) February 21,28,2014 1050Legals rf CITY OF SEBRING 2X2 AD # 00036257 SFSC-HUMAN RESOURCES 2X3 AD # 00036283AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 AD # 00035576 AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 AD # 00035577

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Page 4 Metro News ServiceMany homeowners do not think twice about their roofs. But when leaks develop, roof repairs and the subsequent costs of such work shed light on how important it is for home owners to pay closer attention to the roofs over their heads. Though certain roof issues, like shingles lost to inclement weather, are unforeseeable, many problems can be avoided with routine roof in spection. Checking roof conditions twice a year can help homeowners avoid potentially costly repair work or even more expensive roof replace ment projects. Spring is a good time to inspect roofs, which are often at the mercy of harsh conditions throughout the win ter. Before breaking out the ladder and climbing up to the roof, inspect the homes interior, pinpointing poten tial problems that may indicate roof damage. Check for stains on the ceil ing which may indicate leaks that need to be addressed. Homeown ers with attics should enter their at tics and look for signs of water dam age, making note of any damp or wet insulation. This will let you know if water has been entering the attic all winter. Pay attention to the location of any wet spots or stains so you can match them up to the exterior of the roof later on. Musty smells also may be indicative of moisture problems, even if there are no visible leaks. Grab a set of binoculars and inspect the exterior of the roof. Look at the roof ashing, including around the chimney and other areas of pro truding pipes and vents. If the ash ing is warped or damaged, moisture might be settling underneath. Sealant around dormers or skylights can also degrade, resulting in leaks. Check for spalling on masonry, such as the mortar of chimneys. Porous areas will allow water to inltrate. Work with a partner and careful ly climb on the roof while someone holds the ladder below. Walk on the perimeter of the roof, looking for peeling or warped shingles, missing shingles, holes, or scrapes. If the roof is compromised in any way, it will need to be repaired. The problem will only grow more signicant and re pairs more expensive if damage is ignored. Sometimes a repair can be as simple as patching a leak with a new shingle and roong cement. Popped nails can be pounded down and any curled shingles can be nailed or ce mented back into place.If you are unsure if your roof has made it through the winter un scathed and would like a second opinion or if you nd there is con siderable damage, contact a roong contractor. This person will offer a professional assessment of what can be repaired or if the roof should be replaced. If your roof is metal or features clay tiles, you may not have the exper tise to make repairs yourself and will need to hire a professional.While you are up on the roof, inspect the gutters and downspouts as well. Cracked or damage gutters will cause water to leak down the side of the home, potentially damaging the foundation. Clear any debris or left over leaves from the gutters to ensure the rain can wash through unobstructed. A post-winter roof inspection can protect homeowners and their fami lies from the elements and reduce the likelihood of potentially costly repairs down the road. How to inspect for roof damage MetroSpring is a good time to inspect your roof for damage. The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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Page 6 Metro News ServiceOnce their kids have left the nest, many men and wom en over 50 begin to consid er downsizing their homes. Downsizing to a smaller home can be benecial for a vari ety of reasons, including less home to clean and main tain, more affordable utility bills and lower property taxes. But the decision to downsize is rarely black and white, and men and women often strug gle with that decision. Perhaps the most difcult part of the decision of whether or not to downsize to a smaller home concerns the sentimen tal attachment many home owners, especially those with children, have to their homes. The home might be too big for your current needs, but it also was the same place where your son took his rst steps and where your daughter lost her rst tooth. Saying goodbye to a place that was home to so many memories isnt easy. But theres more than just senti mental value to consider when deciding whether or not to downsize your home after the kids have grown up. Your nancial situation merits signicant consider ation when deciding if the time is right to downsize your home. If your retirement nest egg is not as substantial as you would like it to be, then it would seem as though down sizing to a smaller, more affordable home is a great opportunity for you to start catching up on your retire ment savings. But thats only true if your new home wont incur any additional expenses that are already taken care of in your current home. For ex ample, your current home may be fully furnished, while a new, smaller home may require you to buy all new furniture be cause your existing items simply wont t. The cost of such furnishings can be consider able. If you plan to move into a condominium, you can expect to pay monthly homeown ers association fees, and such fees are often substantial. So while the condo itself might be smaller, the additional expens es associated with the property may end up making the small er home more expensive and prevent you from saving more money for retirement.There are sellers markets and there are buyers markets, and ideally you would like to sell your home in a sellers market. But keep in mind that this might be the same mar ket in which you hope to buy a new home. The nature of the real estate market depends on a host of factors, including ge ography. If the city or town where you currently live is in the midst of a sellers market and you are planning on mov ing to a location where buy ers have the upper hand, then now might be a great time to move. But if you current ly live in a buyers market and hope to move to a sellers mar ket, then you may end up pay ing a steep price, even when downsizing to a smaller home. Things may even themselves out if you want to downsize to a smaller home within your current community, but do your homework nonetheless, researching the time of year when youre most likely to get the most for your home and nd the best deal on your next place. The advantage men and women considering downsiz ing have is that they are rarely in a rush to move out of their current home and into their next one. This gives them am ple time to make the real estate market work for them.SpaceHow much space do you really need? Once the kids have moved out, couples may feel like all of that extra space is go ing to waste. But that can be a knee-jerk reaction, and upon a more thorough examination of the space and your needs you may just nd that you can put all of that extra square foot age to good use after all. If you have always wanted your own art studio, then now might be the perfect time to make that a reality. Always wanted a room devoted to home theater? Get to work on converting your basement from an all-pur pose game room to your own private movie theater. If, after considering the space in your home, you nd that the extra square footage really is just up keep you arent especially interested in doing, then you would no doubt like a cozier home thats less of a responsi bility to maintain. Downsizing a home is some thing many men and women over 50 consider after their children have moved out. Such a decision is rarely easy, so homeowners should take as much time as they need be fore making a nal decision to move or stay put. MetroMany empty-nesters are faced with the decision of whether or not to move into a smaller home.

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Page 7 Metro News ServiceHomeowners are often inter ested in projects to improve the aesthetic appeal of their homes, particularly those that may in crease the curb appeal of their properties. But some projects, including improving attic venti lation, can benet a home even when they arent especially eyecatching. Attic venting preserves the life of a roof while improving the en ergy efciency of a home. Al though it may seem counter productive to let air into the attic when you are sealing drafts elsewhere in the home, there is rhyme and reason to venting an attic throughout the year.What is attic ventilation? Attic ventilation is a system of air intake and exhaust that cre ates a ow of air through the at tic. In the summertime, air ow ing through the attic will cool temperatures within the attic, preventing damage to the un derside of roong shingles and preventing ambient heat from traveling inside of a home. In the winter, air ow helps to keep the attic cool and dry. This prevents moisture that can l ead to mold and rot issues from building up inside of the attic. Attic ventilation also pre vents warm indoor temper atures and rising heat from warming up roofs during the winter, creating the freeze-thaw pattern that results in ice dams. Many attics already contain passive ventilation in the form of vents or ventilation strips built into the edge of the roof. Other vents may appear in ga bles or eaves. Some homeown ers prefer the addition of an attic fan to work in concert with ex isting venting. The spring season is an ideal time to have an attic fan in stalled because the weather is temperate, making it easier to work up in the attic. According to Natural Light En ergy Systems, attic temperatures can exceed 160 F on hot sum mer days. Proper attic ventilation can reduce those temperatures by up to 40 F, prolonging the life of the roof. Attic ventilation also reduces the load on heating and cooling systems. No matter how much insulation is in an attic, some transfer of attic air will occur be tween the home and the attic, and that transfer makes heat ing and air conditioning systems run longer and harder to com pensate. Homeowners who notice their HVAC systems running endless ly to keep the home comfortable can benet from improved attic ventilation, as can those home owners whose attics feature moisture damage in the way of rusty nails or moldy wood fram ing. An attic fan is often an effective remedy to these issues. The installation of an attic fan is best left to a profession al, as it requires running wiring to the fan and it may necessitate cutting into the roof for vent ing. Many fans work with a ther mostat and will turn on when the air temperature in the attic reaches a certain temperature. The fan will circulate the air, helping to keep the attic cooler and dryer. Also, the fan can help expel fumes from cooking or appli ances from the home. Canada Go Green notes that attic fans can reduce energy bills considerably by making HVAC systems work more efcient ly. Keeping attics cool and dry may also reduce how frequently HVAC systems need to be turned on or at which temperatures thermostats in the home are set. Improving attic ventilation may not add much to a homes curb appeal, but such a project can save homeowners money and provide year-round benets Improving attic ventilation benefits the roof and more Metro Passive and active venting systems for attics help keep homes comfortable and energy-efcient all year long.

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35 easy ways to save money right now NEWS-SUNHighlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 192750 Red Devils roll to win; Streaks do, too## B1Avon Park adds to city limitsA8Pair of K-9 teams from HCSO shine in big competitionA2 www.newssun.com Friday-Saturday, February 28-March 1, 2014 VOL. 95 NO. 23 Partly sunny and warming up High 76 Low 53 Details on A12Classieds .............. B8 Dear Abby ................ B2 Healthy Living ......... B3 Obituaries .............. A6 Lottery Numbers ...... A2 Movie Review ......... B2 Puzzle Corner ......... B2 Religion ................. B5 Sports on TV ........... A9 facebook.com/ newssun twitter.com/ thenewssun BY CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEYSpecial to the News-SunIn gratitude for his untir ing work on behalf of our children, teens and elderly citizens, the News-Sun is pleased to announce Chet Brojek, retired Avon Park High School teach er and track and eld coach, is our Unsung Hero for February. Brojek spent 35 years at Avon Park High School, mentoring, educating and inspiring young people to make the most of their lives. He estimates hes taught and coached upwards of 8,000 students two of whom, in the interest of full disclosure, are our own publisher Romo na Washington and editor Scott Dressel. Since retiring in 2003, he continues to mentor students and run track meets, provid ing young people with an opportunity for athletic scholar ships. He also serves on seven volunteer boards including MidFlorida Credit Union, Habi tat for Humanity, the Avon Park Housing Authority, the Highlands County Education Foundation, Nu-Hope and Friends of Highlands Hammock and is a member of the Champions Club and Avon Park Noon Rotary. He is well known as a fund raiser for charitable causes I know people who grab their wallets when they see me coming, Brojek said with a grin. Over the years he guesses he has helped raise hundreds of thousands of dollars. While Brojek was born in Avon Park with Floridian roots, Chet Brojek has coached and helped thousands Katara Simmons/News-SunChet Brojek with his prized possession, a 2014 red Corvette. Brojek, a longtime teacher and running coach who also gives countless hours to community service was named the News-Sun Unsung Hero for the month of February.Need some help? Hell come runningUnsung Heroes BY BARRY FOSTERNews-Sun CorrespondentAvon Park The Avon Park Rotary Club has proposed an ambitious project to help raise money for local service personnel while decorating Veterans Square in the City of Charm. We want to put commemorative bricks both around both the Veterans Memorial and at the ag pole there on the Mall, said spokesman Dr. Dennis Mungall. The program is a cooperative effort involving both the Avon Park Rotary and the Avon Park Noon Rotary clubs as well as the Avon Park Community Redevelopment Agency. The idea would be to get the bricks engraved and use the money to help nance several projects including a Gold Star/Blue Star Christmas tree and to assist in the funding of Honor Flights for veterans so they might see the World War II Memorial in Washington. Our plan is to charge $65 each for the engraved bricks that will go around the Veterans Memorial and $55 for those around the ag pole, he said. The plan calls for bricks to be grouped by the branch of service in the wedges that surround the veterans memori al, with civilians placed around the base of the ag pole. By his count, Mungall said there are about 2,500 bricks that might BY BARR Y FOSTERNews-Sun CorrespondentSEBRING It is a project that has been years in the making. Now, ofcials of the Hu mane Society of Highlands County say they are ready to break ground on their new dog kennels. We signed the contract Tuesday and plan to hand it in by the end of the week, said Hu mane Society President Judy Spiegel. The facility will be built in two phases. First will be the dog kennels, with a second unit to house cats, a medical unit for the animals and administrative space. This is not going to be a small facility, it is going to provide for a very professional opera tion, she said. We are looking to take the Humane Society here to the next step. Bevis Construction will be handling the work. The plan is to put down the footprint for the entire building, then develop it as funds be come available. We want to do as much as possible up front. We have to Humane Society ready to expand When youve had a good life and I found that here you owe something back.Chet BrojekSEE BROJEK | A5SEE HUMANE | A6Avon Park Rotary plans to honor veterans with bricksProject for Veterans Square launching soon Katara Simmons/News-Sun leThe Avon Park Rotary Club wants to sell commemorative bricks to be placed around Veterans Square and the ag pole on Main Street in Avon Park. BY SAMANTHA GHOLARStaff WriterSEBRING Though he enjoys his nearly daily golf outings and all the other things that come with retirement, Sebring City Council candidate Mar ty Roepstorff is ready to share his time with the city of Sebring in a more proactive way. Roepstorff, former Sebring utilities director for 15 years, retired in late December only to nd himself back at city hall ling his paperwork in hopes of becoming one of the three new members of the city council.C AN DIDATE PRO F ILERoepstorff has experience with city, departments Katara Simmons/News-SunMarty Roepstorff answers questions recently during a City of Sebring Candidate Forum hosted by the News-Sun. SEE PROFILE | A5SEE ROTARY | A6 A6 BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterSEBRING Getting enough volunteers to cover re calls or enough money to cover operational costs has long been a challenge for Highlands Countys volunteer re departments. Some have paid staff, whose jobs depend on the departments annual assessments in their districts. But whether a department has paid staff or all-volunteer, with brand new re engines or older ones, the service they provide can never waver and must only get better, said Tim Eures, emergency operations director. Ive gotta give a lot of credit to these departments, Eures said: Eures says county fire services up to challenge Katara Simmons/News-Sun leVolunteer reghters handle a lot of the calls in Highlands County, which has more than 200 volunteer reghters. SEE FIRE | A6 M C Y K

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A2 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com http//:www.newssun.com The News-Sun (USPS ISSN 0163-3988) is published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday. Peri odical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry ofce(s). All material contained herein is the property of the News-Sun, which is an afliate of Halifax Media Group. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the writ ten permission of the publisher. All material submitted for publication becomes the property of the newspaper and may be edited for clarity and space, as well as reprinted, published and used in all media. Postmaster: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870.COMMITMENT TO A CC URACYThe News-Sun promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its news stories. If you believe we have made an error, call the newsroom at (863) 385-6155, ext. 516. If you have a question or comment about coverage, write to Scott Dressel, editor, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; email editor@newssun.com.; or call (863) 385-6155.O FFI CE Location: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday Phone: (863) 385-6155 Main Fax: (863) 385-1954 Newsroom Fax: (863) 3852453SUB SC RIPTION RATE SHome 12 mos. Tax Total $72.22 $5.06 $77.28 In Florida mail 12 mos. Tax Total $107.24 $7.51 $114.75 Out of Florida mail 12 mos. Tax Total $122.41 $8.57 $130.98 Your newspaper is delivered by an independent contractor. If you do not receive your home deliv ered newspaper by 6 a.m. on any publication date, please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday, and before 11 a.m. Sunday. A replacement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after said times will be issued an account credit. Deadlines for subscription changes are noon Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon Thursday for the Friday edition and noon Fri day for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date.O BITUARIE S AN D A NNOUN C EMENT SEmail all obituaries and death notices to obits@newssun.com Email all other announcements to editor@newssun.comP LA C E A CLA SS IFIE D ADFrom 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. M-F (863) 386-6155, ext. 505 or (863) 314-9876RETAIL AD VERTI S INGMitch Collins 386-5626 mitch.collins@newssun.com Vickie Watson 386-5631 vickie.watson@newssun.com Terri Lee 386-5628 terri.lee@newssun.comL EGAL AD VERTI S INGJanet Emerson 385-6155, ext. 596 legals@newssun.comNEW S ROOM Call 385-6155 Scott Dressel, Editor, ext. 516 or scott.dressel@newssun.com Phil Attinger, Staff Writer, ext. 541 or phil.attinger@newssun. com Samantha Gholar, Staff Writ er, ext. 526 or samantha.gholar@ newssun.com Dan Hoehne, Sports Editor, ext. 528 or daniel.hoehne@newssun. com Katara Simmons, Photographer, ext. 538 or katara.simmons@ newssun.com. ROMONA W A SHINGTON Publisher and Executive Editor romona.washington@newssun.com 385-6155, ext. 515 NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927LOTTERYL OTTOWednesday, Feb. 26 3-36-37-41-47-48 X-5 Saturdays Jackpot: $15 millionP OWERBALLWednesday, Feb. 19 11-12-17-38-42 PB-2 X-2 Saturdays Jackpot: $60 millionMEGA M ONEYTuesday, Feb. 25 2-22-27-40 PB-22 Todays Jackpot: $550,000MEGA M ILLION STuesday, Feb. 25 12-18-25-35-66 PB-15 X-5 Todays Jackpot: $216 million CAS H 3 Tuesday, Feb. 25 Day: 9-4-3 Night: 1-2-5 Wednesday, Feb. 26 Day: 8-3-1 Night: 1-2-2 P LAY 4Tuesday, Feb. 25 Day: 1-9-9-2 Night: 9-2-1-1 Wednesday, Feb. 26 Day: 3-3-8-1 Night: 0-4-1-1 F ANTA SY 5 Monday, Feb. 14 8-19-25-26-31 Tuesday, Feb. 25 14-16-20-32-34 Wednesday, Feb. 26 8-11-27-32-33 Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Five South Florida State College students had the opportunity to at tend the eighth annual Black, Brown, and College Bound (BBCB) Summit recently in Tampa. The summit is a national effort sponsored by Hillsborough Community College to encourage more AfricanAmerican and Latino young men to push through perceived obstacles and earn a college degree that is wor thy of their aspirations and career goals. This years theme was, Setting the Record Straight: Demystifying the Perception of African-American and Latino Males in Higher Education, and featured NBA legend and entrepreneur Earvin Magic Johnson as the keynote speaker. Participants also had the chance to inter act with nationally renowned speakers and researchers who shared empirical data, best practices and model programs. The networking opportunity and the measure of success by some of the key note speakers at the conference such as Earvin Magic Johnson and Tampa Bay Rays pitcher Cesar Ramos was an encouragement for the students to work hard towards achieving their goals, said Eddie Cuencas, advisor for the international student organization at SFSC. For me personally, SFSC being one of the sponsors of the summit is an indication of the effort made by the institution to motivate more African-American and Latino students to enroll in postsecondary education and pursue their dreams of becom ing successful.SFSC students attend Black, Brown, and College Bound SummitWalker Academy accepting PreK applicationsAVON PARK Walker Memorial Academy is now accepting applications for PreK School Year 20142015. Walker Memorial Academy has dual term accreditation with the highest level awarded. Space is limited in the full-day PreKindergarten program to 21 children. There are two teachers per classroom. The student must be 4 years old before Sept. 1, 2014. To request an enroll ment application or schedule a tour, call 4533131, ext. 201. Florida State VPK funding available, visit www.elcoridasheartland.org.Maryland Day is SaturdaySEBRING If you were born in Maryland, lived in Maryland, passed through or want to visit Maryland, you are invited to Maryland Day on Saturday. The event will be at Homers restaurant, 1000 Sebring Square, from 2-5 p.m. Just pay for your buffet and ask for the Maryland Day room. For more information, contact Annette (after 5 p.m.) at 382-3891 or 3811739 or call Darlene or Bill at 382-3101.Elks plan trip to Hard R ockSEBRING Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has a bus going to Tampa Hard Rock on Monday, March 17. The cost is $20. Anyone interested should contact Angie Warchak at 471-2150.Sebring Village plans trip to dinner theatreSEBRING Sebring Village has a bus going March 22 to the Ed Fletcher Dinner Theatre for a hilarious comedy, A Bad Year for Tomatoes. Cost is $58 and Includes transportation, din ner, show, all taxes and gratuity. Contact Angie Warchak at 471-2150.Skylarks plays at Dance ClubSEBRING The Highlands Social Dance Club will host the music of the Skylarks 10piece dance band from 7-9:30 p.m. today at the Highlands Social Center, 3400 Sebring Parkway. Dance to the big band sounds of the 50s, 60s and 70s. Snacks and sandwich es will be available. Admission is $7 for non-members, and $5 for members. Dress is smart casual. Everyone is welcome, in cluding singles. BYOB. For more information, call 386-0855 or visit www. highlandsdanceclub.org.Sweet Thang and StringBean at Under the O aksSEBRING It is rumored that SweetThang and StringBean will be at Under The Oaks Opry, 3501 Beck Ave., to offer country, bluegrass, gospel, blues at 7 p.m. today and 2 p.m. Sunday. The events are hosted by singer/songwriter G.W.. Saunders. Call 253-0771.Y MCA hosting Christian ConcertSEBRING The Highlands County Family YMCA will be hosting their third annual Christian Concert from 6-8 p.m. Saturday at the Champions For Children Circle Theatre. This years show will feature The Jayc Harold Band, The Wacaster Family, and Nala Price. Tickets will be avail able for purchase at YMCA through Saturday. Call 382-9622 for information.Democratic Party dinner is SaturdaySEBRING The annual Democratic Party JJ Dinner will take place at 6 p.m. Saturday at the Sun N Lake Community Center, 3500 Edgewater Drive. The featured speaker will be Dr. Joyce Hamilton Henry, the Mid-Florida regional director of the ACLU. Also speaking will be Charlene Edwards, candidate for school board. Dinner will be catered. Tickets may be purchased online at http://hcdem. org/events.html, or by calling 382-9961 or party headquarters at 385-8601. Ticket cost is $50.1st Saturday Breakfast servedAVON PARK Avon Park 1st Saturday Breakfast, formerly the Avon Park Airport Fly-in Breakfast, will be served at Christ Lutheran Church, 1320 County Road 64 East (Main Street), a half mile past Avon Park High School. Enjoy fresh pancakes, scrambled eggs, hash browns, sausage, as well as homemade break fast casseroles and sticky buns as long as they last. Serving is from 8-10:30 a.m. on the rst Saturdays of the month through April. Cost is $5 for one serv ing of each item. For information, call Rev. Scott McLean at 446-0911.Volunteers sought for Guardian ad Litem ProgramSEBRING The Guardian ad Litem program, which serves abused and neglected children across Highlands County, is seeking volunteers. Volunteer guardians help represent children who are involved in court proceedings. Guardians must be at least 21 years old and undergo background checks and a certication process. For more information about the program, call Dawn Shinskey at (863) 534-4597 or email Dawn. Shinskey@gal..gov.VFW provides T aste of ItalyAVON PARK VFW 9853 will have a Taste of Italy from 5-7 p.m. today as the theme for dinner. SNAPSHOTS LOCAL N EW S BY SAMANT HA GHO LARStaff WriterSEBRING Sergeant Kyle Albritton and Deputy Cory Tomblin of the Highlands County Sheriffs Ofce K-9 Unit showed up to the South Florida K9 Competition with their game faces on and came back winners. Albritton, accompa nied by his K-9 partner Mico, and Tomblin, accompanied by his K-9 Remco, represented Highlands County in a big way taking home three top 10 placements during the competition on Feb. 22 in Bonyton Beach. The competition, opened to any law enforcement agency in the state of Florida, brought together some of the states most well known, and some of the less well known, units around. Teams from Bonyton Beach, Clewiston, Mi ami Police Department, Palm Beach County Sheriffs Ofce, Boca Raton Police Department and many more added up to nearly three dozen teams competing in this years event. No strangers to the competition, Albritton, Tomblin, Mico and Rem co were able to come away with top placements, though the competition was no cake walk. Theres three events really. The main one is the obstacle course, Albritton explained. The handler and the K-9 compete in this course. It is a timed event and its not just your regular obstacle course; it is very physically demanding on the handler as well as the K-9. The nearly 100-yard course is based around a mock criminal pursuit. The handler and the dog must not only make their way through the rigorous course, but also apprehend a suspect. Theres shooting in volved, youre moving around the whole time and at the end you have to physically apprehend someone. The dog has to take them down, Albritton said. Mico and Albritton placed second in the obstacle course. Their impressive efforts were denitely noticed as the duo nished only six seconds behind the rst place winner, which happened to be the new course record. The team that beat us came in at 1 minute and 39 seconds. We were only six seconds behind the course record. Dep uty Tomblin and Remco got high awards. They nished in sixth place with two minutes and three seconds, Albritton said. The Hard-Fast competition displayed Micos skill alone. With the teams favorite music getting them excited for the competition, the K-9 raced approximately 40 yards before taking down a suspect at the nish. They judge how hard your dog hits and bites. The fastest dog beat Mico by .02 seconds. Mico came in second with 2.44 seconds, Al britton said. It was a noteworthy day for the HCSOs K-9 Unit and something Albritton and Tomblin are both very proud to have accomplished. Albritton stated that next years event is denitely a possibility. It is a really fun event. The stands were full and Im looking for ward to doing it again next year. Our K-9 Unit is very tight knit here. A lot of us went to school together and patrolled together, so its fun to do these things, we get a lot of support, Albrit ton said. As far as the competition, Albritton knows that Highlands County isnt the biggest by any means but works to make his unit and his county one of the best. Anytime you put yourself under pressure to compete you will get those butteries, thats natural. But I welcome it. Not a lot of people know Highlands Coun ty so I look at it as an opportunity to showcase and put us on the map. I love showing everyone what Highlands County is all about, Albritton said.Samantha Gholar can be reached at samantha.gholar@newssun. com or 385-6155 ext: 526.HCS Os K9 teams heat up South Florida competition Photo by Katara SimmonsHighlands County Sheriffs Ofce Sgt. Kyle Albritton and K9 Mico received second place during South Florida K9 Competition in Boynton Beach. M C Y K

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A4 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927Romona Washington Publisher publisher@newssun.com Scott Dressel Editor editor@newssun.com VIEWPOINTS Michelle Obama had a laugh or two last week on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon while talking about ObamaCare and the silly and potentially dangerous things young folks do. She called them knuckleheads. But its starting to look like the joke may be on her and her husband. Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, young people can stay on their par ents insurance until they are 26, Obama said. But once they hit 26 theyre on their own. And a lot of young people think theyre invincible. But the truth is, young people are knuck leheads, you know? Theyre the ones who are cooking for the rst time and slice their nger open. Theyre danc ing on the bar stool. Maybe so but unfortunately for the rst lady and her husband, these knuckleheads are smart enough to know that ObamaCare isnt in their best interest. Yes, they may have occasional acci dents, but their collective doctor bills dont come to nearly as much as those of older folks. ObamaCare forces them to pay well more than their costs in or der to subsidize the older group. Without those subsidies, the system collapses. This explains why younger folks arent buying in. With little more than ve weeks left for open enrollment on the state and federal exchanges, only 24 percent of young adults between the ages of 18 and 34 have signed up, well below the White Houses target. These young adults dont want it, not from the man who promised them hope and change, and not from the rst lady. Maybe Mrs. Obama should look on the bright side: If these youth are dancing on bar stools, at least theyre participating in her Lets Move cam paign. Oh, wait: That might make them healthier and less in need of Obam aCare. Wholl be laughing then?An editorial from the New York Post.Young adults right not to buy into ObamacareANOTHER VIEWThe Florida Legislature is discussing whether to use political might to seize control of the management of Lake Okeechobee, and water reservoirs, from the US Army Corps of Engineers, and turn control over to the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD). This proposal is a bad idea; it overlooks the history of the manage ment of Lake Okeechobee, and relat ed water bodies, in regard to the Clean Water Act. First, Florida petitioned the Feder al government for the construction of the Herbert Hoover Dike, and the Central and Southern Flood Control Project, to provide ood relief and water supply sources for agriculturaland ur ban development in southeast Florida. This expensive effort, in conjunction with navigation projects for the Kissimmee, St Lucie, and Caloosahatchee Rivers, resulted in a fair weather water management system that is unable to adapt to increasingly common drought and ood conditions. Second, Florida through its agency, now known as the South Florida Water Management District, managed water for the benet of agriculture and urban water supplies, a reasonable effort un til the effort abandoned any concept of environmental water supplies for estuaries or preserved wetland systems such as Everglades National Park. Additionally, public waters were allowed to be degraded, and were assisted to be degraded, by the actions of public agencies that were supposed to be adhering to the provisions of the Clean Water Act. The deterioration reached such extremes that the Federal Government sued the State of Florida, and its agent, the South Florida Water Management District to prevent fur ther degradation and restore national resources. The lawsuit dragged on for years until Governor Chiles symbolically surrendered the States sword, which resulted in a Court overseen and monitored Settlement Agreement. Third, as part of the partnership, the State of Florida and Federal Government agreed to a Federal/State restoration effort Task Force, which in turn developed a restoration plan that was agreed to by both parties. The plan calls for cost sharing, and joint consul tation in management. This is where we are, or should be, today. Unfortunately, in the years of bad management of Lake Okeechobee, water levels were allowed to reach heights for water supply purposes that led to deterioration of the Herbert Hoover Dike. As a result, the Corps had to institute new regulation schedules to protect the Dikes primary purpose of ood prevention. Additionally, SFW MD practiced favoritism for water supply deliveries, while shunting ood waters to communities that were not normally in Lake Okeechobees ood zones. Only in these last few years have these adversely affected communities on the east and west sides of the Lake able to get the Corps of Engineers to consider their needs, often contrary to SFWMD recommendations. However, in fairness, SFWMD has been a responsive partner in many projects outside of the Corps domain or interest. The quality of the environment is key to the economies of east and west communities. Experience has demonstrated that without the creative tension of the partnership, both partners receiving input from affected parties, that one agency will be swayed to the interests of favored stakeholders/lobbyists, to the detriment of the other stakeholders, notably the silent stakeholder, Nature. This is a situation that needs both the belt and the suspenders of State and Federal government, because otherwise, our pants have kept falling down. Trying to co-opt the Federal role, in management, while expecting the Federal dollars, indicates the lessons of the lawsuit have been forgotten. It is possible that some Florida interests think they have gotten all they want from the effort to date, and thus the rest can be abandoned. We on the west coast know that our needs have not been addressed, except through temporary and discretionary relief, and that we need equitable at tention from both partners. Eliminating one will only result in harm to our communities, our economies, and our environments.Wayne Daltry of Fort Myers is president of the Caloosahatchee River Citizens Association (Riverwatch). He is a former director of Lee Countys Smart Growth department and spent 27 years with the Southwest Florida Regional Plan ning Council, 20 as executive directorWho is the bad partner? GUEST COLUMNWayne DaltryRecently, I was sitting in my geometry class, wondering why I couldnt be a well-versed math ematician despite my current grade in that class. I felt like I was in molasses, slow and stuck. It just seems like no matter how hard I work in that class, I just stay in the same spot. In the midst of my self pity, I began thinking, if I could change one thing in my life it would be my ability to do math. Looking back it seems pretty shallow Nonetheless, as the days progressed on into weeks, I es tablish a new consensus about myself. or perhaps everyone in general if we were always good at everything wed never learn. So with that in mind, I decid ed if I wasnt ever bad, then Id never really be good, because in order to be good we must learn from our faults. I know that sounds a little vague, but Im pretty sure thats part of the meaning of life, at least to me. I suppose thats different for ev eryone, though. I feel as if I were a math per son, then that would mean Id end up being a not-so-adequate writer. So for everything we work for, there is a compensation. I have yet to meet an individual that is so competent and versatile that they can literally do everything with ease. And if there is a person with these ca pabilities, I am almost positive they are supernatural or something crazy like that. Honestly, whether you are athletically or academically oriented, we all have something we are really bad at. And there is only one thing we can do when we are insufcient in an area work hard to get better. Its a pain, and I mean that from the bottom of my heart, but all the hard work put into things we are not naturally great at is well worth it. Even with the things you are good at there should always room for improvement. I am not going to be a decent writ er if I dont keep practicing, for without practice you can only get worse. Talent is cheaper than table salt. What separates the talented individual from the successful one is a lot of hard work, Stephen King once said. What is life without a little sweat, anyways? Live life and play fair, never look back, be cause there is there look for ward and youll see yourself doing whats right, as long as you put forth enough hard work, things will stay bright.Gauri Persad is a Sebring High School student. The News-Sun encourages students to express their views, which are those of the writer, not necessar ily those of the News-Sun staff.Youve got to be bad before you can get better G UEST C OLUMNGauri Persad M C Y K

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www.newssun.comFriday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A5 he grew up in Pennsylvania and went to college there. He returned in 1968 with his wife Chris, having been hired by the high school over the phone. Comfortable in his own skin, Brojek has a contagious smile and easy manner that puts people, even wary young people, at ease. He radiates a energy and well being that brings out the best in people, and is passionate about his community. When youve had a good life and I found that here you owe something back, he said. Brojek is well known in the world of cross coun try running and track and eld for the high quality of the races hes organized and administered. For example, Dorothy Harris, who used to work at Highlands Hammock State Park and helped Brojek with the Turkey Trot and Fourth of July Firecracker 5K runs, said Brojek introduced chip timing to local races. This means the results can be used to qualify for district, state and national races including the Boston Marathon, which hes run 11 times as part of his 45 total marathons. Harris said it was Brojek who grew the Turkey Trot 5K from a small race of about 70 participants to the largest in the county with 700 runners. In 2013, when Reg gie Knighten, who teaches and coaches at APHS, looked for help in creating his after-school Champions Elite track and eld program for children 6-16, he turned to Brojek. Chet is a great guy, Knighten said. Hes always excited to help our youth and help coach track. Without him I dont know how far we would have gotten. He was a major part of it. Twelve of the original 32 students in the program qualied for the nationals, and 10 of them went to Detroit to take part. Its the fun part of my day, said Brojek, talking about the time he spends with Knighten at the pro gram. The big differ ence between the younger and older students, he said laughing, is that (the younger ones) ask me to do extra, not sneak off like the high school students. Harris, who said she was biased because Brojek has coached her daughter, said, I can just go on and on. Hes mentoring the next generation so there will be people to take his place. Thats the sign of a true leader. Sebrings Taylor Tubbs is a freshman at the Univer sity of Florida. Coached by Brojek, she attends school on a cross-country scholarship. At this point in the season Tubbs has the fastest womens mile in the Southeastern Conference and is the third fastest freshman in the country. Chet is the reason I am where I am today, she told the News-Sun. He started helping me with my running going into my junior track season, and the improvement I saw was huge. Chet gave me the right training to be able to run for the Gators, which is great because he is such a big Gator fan too. He was not only my coach, but my inspiration to be the best person I can be. We thank Chet Brojek for his dedication, com passion, generosity and faith in our children. Unsung Heroes award sponsored by the heroes at Agero. BROJEK FROM PAGE A1 Courtesy PhotoChet Brojek presents a trophy to Hillary Swain during the 2004 Turkey Trot at Highlands Hammock State Park. BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterSEBRING The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners sent a shot into the School Board of Highlands Coun tys court in January. They returned it with a spin: They agreed to give some money to a tennis court rehabilitation project, but not more than $9,000. The vote was 3-1 with board member Jan Shoop dissenting. The school board has asked the county commis sion to install restrooms at the tennis courts at Lake Placid High School courts which are used by the community as much as, if not more than local students. The improvements will also include resurfacing the courts themselves and putting in parking spaces. The application for the $113,485 project was sub mitted in October 2013. It passed the Recreation and Parks Committee in December and was presented to the county commission in January, said Assistant Superintendent Mike Averyt, head of operations. They didnt vote on it. They wanted some more information, Averyt said. One thing the county wanted was money from the school board, as much as 50 percent of the cost, Averyt said. The school boards original RPAC funds request of fered in-kind donations in the form of the land, maintenance of the courts, paying to run the lighting at the courts and custodial services on the restrooms, once completed. However, board member Bill Brantley said county commissioners expressed concern that the school board didnt have skin in the game, meaning mon ey. Shoop said she played a lot of tennis in high school, college and as a young mother. She said the Lake Placid courts and they didnt look bad to her. She said $9,000 of school board funds to resurface the courts seemed a lux ury compared to some of the facilities needing repairs that she saw when board members did a walk-through of campuses earlier this year. I think the $9,000 would be better spent where (its) needed, Shoop said. Board member Don na Howerton also noted that the community used the courts more than students. Shoop said many players use the high school or adjacent middle school restrooms. However, Brantley warned the school board to jump on this chance be fore the courts start degrading: Courts last 10 years and the Lake Placid courts are that old now. In a couple of years, there might not be RPAC funds, so it would cost $18,000 to do the courts, Brantley said. Board Attorney John Mc Clure said he understood that the parking improve ments and restrooms were far more important than the courts. Were trying to form a community school relationship, McClure said. Likewise, Brantley said that even without resur facing the courts, the county would want the school board to contribute money. Otherwise, the county would be inclined not to do it at all. Superintendent of Schools Wally Cox said un like the Avon Park and Sebring High School courts, Lake Placids has caught on as a community tennis court, and while the two other high school courts have parking, Lake Placids does not. Cox said that if the school board were to take resurfacing off the table, hed want school board money to only be used on the parking lot portion of the project, not the rest rooms. Well use them, but we can do without them Cox said. Averyt said he would work with County Engineer Ramon Gavarrete to put together a presentation for the county.School Board OKs $9,000 for LPHS tennis courts With election day only 11 days away, Roepstorff is concentrating on his campaign and his main issue of local tax solutions. I like the tax issue. I hope to help lower the taxes, Roepstorff said. If we could take a million (dollars) off of the utility assessment, we could lower it. Same thing with the police and re, something needs to be addressed along the lines of re and police (nancially). Since arriving in Se bring in 1960, Roepstorff has worked his entire life and owns a home on Lakeview Drive. Roepstorff has a strongminded attitude when it comes to many issues in the city including taxes, expansion and, of course, Harder Hall. I dont think Harder Hall should be torn down. I think we should keep it, Roepstorff said. We owe $6 million on the thing I know, but if we can sell it for half of it I think we could be OK. Wed lose some of it (money) but thats the way it goes. Roepstorff doesnt want to see the pink elephant go and has been around long to witness some of the fun times that have taken place there. The downtown area of Sebring is something Ro epstorff is very pleased with and spoke highly of Community Redevelopment Agencys Robin Hinote and marketing guru Casey Wohl for putting so much time, effort and money into bringing the area to life. I think theyre doing a good job. Casey and Robin have come up with some good game plans. Theyre doing well with everything down there. I hope we can move toward expansion as well, Roepstorff said. With only a few days left for Sebring resi dents to decide who the newest members of the council will be, Roep storff added his reason behind running for election this year. I love the city of Sebring. I just do. Its been home to me for many years. I think it is a great city, Roepstorff said.Samantha Gholar can be reached at samantha.gholar@newssun. com or 385-6155 ext: 526. PROFILE FROM PAGE A1 M C Y K

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www.newssun.comFriday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A7Special to the News-SunSEBRING Singer, songwriter Carol Kline has been a popular vocalist in Florida since she and her husband rst performed in the Sunshine State more than 13 years ago. A long-time gospel and country singer, Klines rst show in Sebring was April 2001 at the Tanglewood Resort. By 2002, she and her husband, George, de cided to make their home here. Carol Kline has now written and recorded three gospel songs along with ve CDs, two of which highlight the cou ples inspirational oldtime gospel concerts. Over the years, Kline put together a tour venue that took them into many states, including numer ous shows at Bransons popular Treasure Lake Resort and three show cruises with Carnival. Last year, however, Carol Kline added yet a whole new phase to her creative endeavors. She is now a published author. Kline had no clue how to go about writing a book, but it long been one of her greatest desires. She had been a correspon dent for a newspaper in their hometown of Lebanon, Pa. for many years, so it was no surprise when Kline began writing features and special interest stories for the News-Sun in February 2013. Her rst feature story was to introduce Rhoda Ross, a local elementary school teacher who had written and illustrated a childrens book titled A Wildower for All Seasons. Through that inter view, Kline learned of a self-publishing company called Lighthouse24. She contacted the company seeking advice about writ ing a book of hope and inspiration, but decided to do a childrens book rst as she learned the ropes. That childrens book was based on a funny limer ick Kline would often recite while caring for her severely injured daughter out in Texas. With a daughter in rehabilitation facilities for nearly four years, Kline said, it became my greatest wish to write a book of hope documenting her ongoing struggle simply to survive. Our daughter is still learning to walk, talk, eat, and will hopefully be able to care for herself one day. Major Kristine Kline Ratliff, RN, USAF, was on her way home southeast of San Antonio when her compact car was T-boned by an F-350 pickup going about 60 miles per hour in April 2010. The right side of her head was crushed and she sustained a trau matic brain injury (TMI). She was airlifted to Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, and underwent in tensive surgery, but the prognosis was tenuous at best. Ratliff was not breathing on her own, and was being kept alive by machines. Two weeks prior to that fateful night, Carol and George Kline had just ar rived in southeastern Pennsylvania with a summer-long performance schedule ahead of them before heading west to Branson. Along with two other daughters, however, they ew immediately to Ratliffs side in the intensive care unit at Brooke Army Medical Center. Ironically, it was at that very hospital Ratliffs department had just been relocated, and where Ratliff herself served as a pediatric intensive care unit nurse. After two tours in Iraq and a stellar nursing career behind her, Ratliff was only three years from possible retirement or promotion to lieutenant colonel. After ve days and some hopeful changes in their daughters prognosis, the Klines returned to Pennsylvania to work as many of their performance en gagements into one month, then hurried back to Texas where they stayed for six months. Ratliff was transferred to a neuro-rehab facility in Austin where she remained in a coma for more than two months. With her parents by her side daily, Ratliff was declared out of a coma early in July and soon began to rally. Kline still sends out updates to many people who have been praying for Ratliff. It became her greatest desire to write a book her struggle to sur vive. Even while Kris was still in a light coma, she would smile when I started recit ing a silly limerick I made up about a gnat and a gnu becoming friends, Kline said. It got longer and funnier as time went on, and it was that limerick that eventually became the story line for An Un likely Pair. Written and completely illustrated by Carol Kline, An Unlikely Pair is a humorous tale set in rhyme about a g-nu named Stu and a g-nat named Pat. Once it was published in spring 2013, Kline immediately began to illustrate and write a second childrens book: Miss Maggie Down On Main Street. At that point, the Klines had returned to Texas, again to stay for another six months or more. The second childrens book is also written in rhyme and lled with humor, an important message for children with disabilities in speech, and a happy ending. As time went by and we were with our daugh ter every day, I have been compiling information and researching various areas to be included in the book, Kline explained. But I wanted to be absolutely certain of the important points and where the story line should go. Back in February, the News-Suns publisher/edi tor, Romona Washington, suggested I write a fourpart series for the paper to help me launch the book project. She believed in what I wanted to say and she was a huge encour agement. In March, April and May 2013, four separate feature stories appeared in the Sebring-based paper, which became the basis for four chapters in the book itself. But I still had to for mulate an ending to our daughters story, Kline. Back in Texas by early May, Kline had just started her third childrens book, this one directed to middle school and pre-teen children. Ananais and the Sawgrass Mysteries is an adventure ction story about a 12-year-old boy who lives in the Texas Hill Country town of Dripping Springs, west of Austin. The boy nds himself in desperate peril, and many points of interest in the Dripping Springs area are used in the present day mystery story. When the mystery sto ry was published in September 2013, I knew it was time to nish the book about our daughter, said Kline, condent that she had all her ducks in a row now. I promised she would have the rst copy by Christmas. A true story based on their daughters dedica tion and erce determination, Kline hopes her book will be an inspiration and an encouragement to all who read it. While Ratliff remains in various stages of recovery and requires full care ev ery day, one thing has remained very important to Carol and George Kline: the faithful prayers of family and friends from all over the country. I dont know how we would have made it through all these months without the faithfulness of people who are praying for Kris and for us, said Kline. The miracle of it all is that her memory and her cognizance is totally intact, and she has a mar velous sense of humor. But I also want people to hear another impor tant message, Kline said, and that is we must do so much more to help all of our young veterans today. Carol Kline said she hopes her book will provide insight into the ur gent need for a new kind of rehabilitation facility, especially for the wounded or disabled female veteran. There is a whole new concept of one-to-one nursing care, and its already working in a handful of facilities across the country. But more is needed, said Kline. An in depth advanced program for long term care is urgently needed for those young veterans who cannot re turn to a normal home life due to intensive brain or body injuries. Our wounded simply cannot go to nursing homes. Look for Home Of the Brave, a story of hope, courage and determination, along with all of Car ol Klines childrens books on Amazon.com, and follo w Major Kristine Ratliffs ongoing rehabilitation on her website at: www.car olkline.net. Kline will be doing a book signing at the Lake Placid Memorial Library at 10 a.m. Wednesday, March 19.Local singer/songwriter writes story of hope, inspirationKLINE Courtesy photoMajor Kristine Ratliff is the subject of Home of the Brave, a story of hope, courage and determination.LAKELAND (AP) Central Florida authorities are reporting a rare death from a spider bite. Polk County Medical Examiner Stephen Nelson tells The Ledger that Ronald Reese of Lakeland died Feb. 16 from complications of a spider bite. Nelson said the bite became infected and developed into an abscess on the back of Reeses neck, which pressed on his spinal cord. Reeses father says the 62-year-old had been bitten in August by a brown recluse spider. H.K. William Reese says required lengthy hospital stays and numerous procedures for six months after the bite. He was working in an old house tearing out the existing walls and ceil ings and replacing them. Brown recluse spiders like to live in those old houses, he said. Nelson said Reese was never tested to determine what type of spider bit him, but medical records show there were denite complications from a spider bite wound on his neck. Few statistics on deaths attributed to spider bites are available. According to the American Association of Poison Control Cen ters, only two people died from spider bites between 2001 and 2005. Both were believed to be caused by brown recluse spiders. The brown recluse spider, which is not native to Florida, is one of just a handful of spiders that are dangerous to humans, though all spiders carry venom as a way to kill and digest their prey, said Polk State College biology pro fessor Logan Randolph. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a bite from a brown recluse spi der starts with two small puncture wounds and develops into a blister. The venom can also cause a severe lesion by destroy ing skin tissue, which requires medical attention. However, the bites typically arent lethal, Randolph said. In most spider bites, complications arise mostly if theres some secondary factor. If the person has a specic allergic reaction, if their health was compromised in some other manner, or if the bite causes an open wound with a secondary infection, Randolph said.Polk authorities report rare death from spider biteMan suffered effects for 6 months MCYK A6 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com ALBERT NEWBERRYAlbert Byron Newberry, age 81, passed away Monday, Feb. 24, 2014 in Sebring. Newberry was born in Medulla to James Albert and Eva Mae (Hicks) Newber ry. He was the owner/operator of Cyclone Pump and Welding of Avon Park, director of Peace River Electric for 23 years and director of Florida Electric in Tallahassee for 15 years. He was a member and mu sic director of New Life Baptist Church in Fort Meade for many years. He attended schools in Me dulla and Mulberry. He loved to sh and hunt. He worked in the phosphate mines as a welder. He served in the United States Army during the Korean War and had been a resident of Fort Meade since 1970 coming from Lakeland. Newberry is survived by his wife of 52 years, Marjorie B. Newberry; sisters, JoAnn Still (Tom) of Lakeland and Teresa Bridges (Cecil) of Lakeland; brothers, Van Newberry (Judy) of Winter Haven, Von Newberry (Joy) of Lakeland and Frank Newberry (Rita) of Lakeland; and many nieces and nephews. Newberry was preceded in death by his parents, sons Steven and Jamie Newberry; and brothers Joe, Leslie and Gilbert Newberry. Visitation was held Thurs day, Feb. 27, 2014 from 1-2 p.m. with a funeral service beginning at 2 p.m. at Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home in Avon Park with Rev. Joe Par rish and Missionary Robert Heath ofciating. Burial was in Bougainvillea Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to Good Shepherd Hospice, 1110 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33870. Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home, Avon Park www.stephensonnelsonfh.com AUDREY G ARN SEYAudrey McCord Garnsey died in Mount Sinai, N.Y., on Feb. 24, 2014 at the home of her daughter. Most recently she lived in Maranatha Village in Sebring, and previously in Chautauqua County, N.Y. She was married to David McCord from July 25, 1945 until his death on Dec. 20, 2003. She was married to Bruce Garnsey from Aug. 27, 2005 until his death on March 24, 2009. Audrey is survived by her son, Kenneth D. (Inge) Mc Cord of Hampton, Va., and her daughter, Janet M. (Richard) DAngelo of Mount Sinai, N.Y. Her grandchildren are: Shiela (Craig) Bailey, Jason McCord, Torrey DAngelo, Caroline DAngelo, and Tiffany (Jason) Dickert. Audrey is also sur vived by four great-grandchildren: Madison and Brett Bailey and Miriam and James Dickert. Audrey graduated from Cassadaga Valley Central School in Sinclairville, N.Y. in 1945 and took both her undergraduate and graduate studies at State University of New York at Fredonia. After having been employed by Chautauqua-Cattarugus Electric Cooperative, Pine Valley Central School, and Brockton Central School, Audrey retired as assistant superintendent for business from Chautauqua County Board of Cooperative Educa tional Services at Fredonia in 1983. Church memberships included Cherry Creek Baptist, and Dunkirk First Baptist and upon moving to Florida in 1983, she became a member of Maranatha Baptist Church in Sebring. Audrey was also a member of the Benjamin Prescott chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution in Fredonia, N.Y. A funeral service is sched uled for Feb. 28 at Jordan Funeral Home in Sinclairville, N.Y. and a memorial service in Sebring will be held at a date to be determined in March.SA RA MCILV AINESara M. (Carey) McIlvaine, age 81, passed away on Feb. 24, 2014 in Sebring She was born on Oct. 3, 1932, in Independence Township, Pa., to the late Robert and Minnie (Mechling) Carey. She attended Southside Baptist Church in Sebring. She was active in the Highlands Social Center and the Senior Center in Bentleyville, Pa. She loved working outside in her yard, the garden and in her owers. She loved her cat, Dimitri, and also enjoyed RV camping and traveling. She especially loved spending time quietly rocking in her chair and watching the birds and squirrels. She is survived by her daughter, Grace Wilson (Jeffrey) of Taylor Mill, Ky.; sister, Betty Myers of Bentleyville, Pa.; brother, Hugh Carey (Mildred) of Monongahela, Pa.; and many other extended family members. Along with her parents, she is preceded in death a brother, Robert Carey; husbands, Thomas Squirlock and Charles McIlvaine; and her companion, Claude Musik. There will be a funeral ser vice on Monday, March 3, 2014 at 10 a.m. at Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home in Sebring. Family will receive friends beginning at 9 a.m. Burial will be at Lakeview Me morial Gardens immediately following service. Memorial contributions may be made in her memory to Highlands Social Center, 2400 Sebring Pkwy., Sebring, FL 33870 Arrangements entrusted to: Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home www.stephensonnelsonfh.comGRETEL ASHLEYGretel Ashley, age 88, passed away Friday, Feb. 14, 2014 in Avon Park Arrangements entrusted to Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home Avon Park. www.stephensonnelsonfh.comOBITUARIES prepare the ground, do site work, put in a septic system and, of course, there is all the permitting, she said. But when we get done it really is going to be quite nice. The rst phase will comprise units for large and small dogs. The quaran tine pens reportedly will then be put where the animal housing currently is located. That will keep our quarantine dogs away from the general population, she said. Spiegel said the rst part of the building would provide for about 40 dogs, about 15 more than they currently can house. She explained that although more space could be built, they did not want to house more animals they can care for on a daily basis. Humane Society mem bers and supporters have been contributing to the effort for a while now. A lot of people have done a lot of hard work and there have been some folks who have been ex tremely generous with the memorials they have bequeathed to us, she said. Spiegel said that fundraising efforts will continue and that an ofcial groundbreaking ceremony will be announced soon. HUMANE FROM PAGE A1be engraved and placed between the two locations. We already have one brick done. That is dedicated to Phillip Weber. Hopefully that will be the rst one we lay, he said. Weber was in the Army during World War II and is well known in the community as a pharmacist both in downtown Avon Park and later at Walmart. He also was a past president of the Avon Park Noon Rotary and nished up at the breakfast Rota ry Mungall said. To help ensure unifor mity, all of the engraving is set to be done by Darin MacNeill of Everlasting Memorials and Monuments in Sebring. He indicated all the bricks would be done in a standard brick font. Although the ofcial kickoff wont be until the Music on the Mall event set for March 29, Mungall said that those interested could nd out more be ginning today. If there are any questions, folks can contact me directly at 368-0286, he said. In the meantime. Mun gall said the clubs have started an outreach to meet with veterans groups let them know about the program. ROTARY FROM PAGE A1 BY PHIL ATTINGERStaff WriterAVON PARK The latest spate of parcels annexed into Avon Park fell like lined-up dominos. As soon as the Avon Park City Council approved one parcel for annexation Monday, it opened the way for an adjacent parcel to come into the city. Each parcel owner had signed an agreement to be annexed into the city as soon as the city limits were adjacent with that property. The rst parcel to be annexed was 3.5 acres at 2450 U.S. 27 South, owned by the Florida State Firemens Associa tion Inc. Its located on the highway across from Lake Glenada and just south of the city limits. After that one, the City Council approved 2500 U.S. 27 South 19.1 acres owned by the city which sits just south of the Firemens Associ ation. After that, the city annexed another cityowned parcel: 31 acres located just west of the other city-owned par cel at 2055 U.S. 27 South, followed by 3.6 acres at 2511 U.S. 27 South, owned by Guru Krupa Investment LLC. Avon Park has steadily been adding to its bor ders. It added Crystal Lake Golf Club manufactured home park in December followed by a total 15.55 acres in midJanuary that included 50 dwelling units at Banyan Woods Apartments, north of Lake Byrd, and 40 units at the Brentwood Mobile Home Park. While that made for 603 homes annexed in three months, Mondays annexations were either commercial property or vacant. The city has also been extending water lines into the Avon Park Lakes, Lake Lotela, Avon Park Estates and Lake Den ton areas 6,500 feet of pipe, or a little less than 1.25 miles. City Manager Julian Deleon hopes to have the project done within the next three to four weeks, pending nal certica tion on the Avon Park Lakes and Avon Park Es tates systems from the Environmental Protec tion Agency. However, providing garbage service to for mer county residents has been more tricky. City council members voted in January to have City Attorney Gerald Buhr seek a court ruling on who gets to provide garbage hauling at Crys tal Lake Golf Club: The city or Progressive Waste Solutions. The haulers contract is up for renewal in September 2015, but Deleon has estimated the city would miss out on an estimated $8,170 in sanitation hauling revenue per month from Crystal Lake. Buhr said the hauler claims to have a separate contract with Crystal Lake outside of its county-issued franchise, but Buhr contends the franchise overrules any contract with park owner, Mink L.L.C. The matter has to go before a judge, Buhr said.City plays dominos with annexationAvon Park expands borders south along U.S. 27 They are imaginative, frugal, and they know if they can save money on the budget, they can roll that money over the next year. Eures recently weighed in on rumors that Sun N Lake South Volunteer Fire Depart ment in Lake Placid would be closing. It wasnt, and neither were the paid reght ers there in any danger of losing their jobs, he said. Even if individual station budgets were to get tight and re services had to move personnel, he would look to place them in other departments, like EMS. Highlands County Fire Services 10 departments function with volunteers even the chiefs, Eures said. Three of them have paid staff: DeSoto City, Highlands Lakes and Sun N Lake South. Those six re ghters two at each department cover daytime calls for those stations, Eures said. Thats because its not always very easy getting staff to cover the station. If the re department(s) can re cruit enough volunteers, they can handle daytime calls, Eures said. The county has 200225 volunteer reghters on the rosters to cover 1,100 square miles and 98,000 people. Some districts, such as West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department, cover a lot of residential and commercial property, so recruiting young res idents or workers from that area is relatively easy. Venus Fire Department is in a rural area, so the local residents are a little more scarce, Eures said. Fire departments help each other through mutual aid, but having re trucks near by ready to respond is the main goal. If getting enough people is a challenge; so is getting assessments, Eures said. For example, Sun N Lake South should be getting $184,788 per year from unimproved lots and residential lots, and then $19,500 per year from commer cial lots, but Eures said those amounts are dependent on all landowners paying assessments. Also, it depends on whether the assessments most of which havent changed in 20 years can pay for departments equipment and training needs. Once the county suggested that volunteer reghters get 40 hours of training. Now, the state mandates 250 hours to become Fireghter 1. The next rank, Fireghter 2, takes a total of 600 hours. Equipment costs have also gone up. A re engine 20 years ago, fully furnished, cost $101,000. Today, its $450,00 or more. Self-contained breathing apparatus for entering a burning building used to have bells or whistles to alert reghters that air lev els were low. Later models used vibration alerts, but today the devices have heads-up displays in the face masks. Still, re chiefs have to weigh in the benets of equipment, training and even salaries when looking at providing good service. They have to be absolutely sure that they have tried ev ery option before asking to increase an assessment, because that process by law must take a year. They also cant borrow from nearby re dis tricts, Eures said. They each must have their own budgets and operations plans. Eures also prefers having volunteer community re stations because they help dene a community, and the stations help maintain Highlands Countys status and reputation of being a county of volunteers. You cant buy pride and dedication. They do the best with what they have, Eures said. FIRE FROM PAGE A1 Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Flor ida legislators this year arent worrying about budget cuts or how to balance the state budget. Instead the Republicancontrolled Florida Legislature will spend the next nine weeks trying to gure out how to spend an expected budget surplus of more than $1 billion. Gov. Rick Scott wants legislators to use the sur plus to pay for tax and fee cuts of nearly $600 million including a roll back in auto registration fees. Legislative leaders are largely in agreement with the governor, although they have not endorsed every one of his proposals. Still splits are emerging over some of Scotts proposals such as his push to increase spending on child protection investigators. Funding for water restoration and other environmental programs could be a sticking point.Lawmakers have money to spend or give back M C Y K

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www.newssun.comFriday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A7 Special to the News-SunSEBRING Singer, songwriter Carol Kline has been a popular vocalist in Florida since she and her husband rst performed in the Sunshine State more than 13 years ago. A long-time gospel and country singer, Klines rst show in Sebring was April 2001 at the Tanglewood Resort. By 2002, she and her husband, George, de cided to make their home here. Carol Kline has now written and recorded three gospel songs along with ve CDs, two of which highlight the cou ples inspirational oldtime gospel concerts. Over the years, Kline put together a tour venue that took them into many states, including numer ous shows at Bransons popular Treasure Lake Resort and three show cruises with Carnival. Last year, however, Carol Kline added yet a whole new phase to her creative endeavors. She is now a published author. Kline had no clue how to go about writing a book, but it long been one of her greatest desires. She had been a correspon dent for a newspaper in their hometown of Lebanon, Pa. for many years, so it was no surprise when Kline began writing features and special interest stories for the News-Sun in February 2013. Her rst feature story was to introduce Rhoda Ross, a local elementary school teacher who had written and illustrated a childrens book titled A Wildower for All Seasons. Through that inter view, Kline learned of a self-publishing company called Lighthouse24. She contacted the company seeking advice about writ ing a book of hope and inspiration, but decided to do a childrens book rst as she learned the ropes. That childrens book was based on a funny limer ick Kline would often recite while caring for her severely injured daughter out in Texas. With a daughter in rehabilitation facilities for nearly four years, Kline said, it became my greatest wish to write a book of hope documenting her ongoing struggle simply to survive. Our daughter is still learning to walk, talk, eat, and will hopefully be able to care for herself one day. Major Kristine Kline Ratliff, RN, USAF, was on her way home southeast of San Antonio when her compact car was T-boned by an F-350 pickup going about 60 miles per hour in April 2010. The right side of her head was crushed and she sustained a trau matic brain injury (TMI). She was airlifted to Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, and underwent in tensive surgery, but the prognosis was tenuous at best. Ratliff was not breathing on her own, and was being kept alive by machines. Two weeks prior to that fateful night, Carol and George Kline had just ar rived in southeastern Pennsylvania with a summer-long performance schedule ahead of them before heading west to Branson. Along with two other daughters, however, they ew immediately to Ratliffs side in the intensive care unit at Brooke Army Medical Center. Ironically, it was at that very hospital Ratliffs department had just been relocated, and where Ratliff herself served as a pediatric intensive care unit nurse. After two tours in Iraq and a stellar nursing career behind her, Ratliff was only three years from possible retirement or promotion to lieutenant colonel. After ve days and some hopeful changes in their daughters prognosis, the Klines returned to Pennsylvania to work as many of their performance en gagements into one month, then hurried back to Texas where they stayed for six months. Ratliff was transferred to a neuro-rehab facility in Austin where she remained in a coma for more than two months. With her parents by her side daily, Ratliff was declared out of a coma early in July and soon began to rally. Kline still sends out updates to many people who have been praying for Ratliff. It became her greatest desire to write a book her struggle to sur vive. Even while Kris was still in a light coma, she would smile when I started recit ing a silly limerick I made up about a gnat and a gnu becoming friends, Kline said. It got longer and funnier as time went on, and it was that limerick that eventually became the story line for An Un likely Pair. Written and completely illustrated by Carol Kline, An Unlikely Pair is a humorous tale set in rhyme about a g-nu named Stu and a g-nat named Pat. Once it was published in spring 2013, Kline immediately began to illustrate and write a second childrens book: Miss Maggie Down On Main Street. At that point, the Klines had returned to Texas, again to stay for another six months or more. The second childrens book is also written in rhyme and lled with humor, an important message for children with disabilities in speech, and a happy ending. As time went by and we were with our daugh ter every day, I have been compiling information and researching various areas to be included in the book, Kline explained. But I wanted to be absolutely certain of the important points and where the story line should go. Back in February, the News-Suns publisher/edi tor, Romona Washington, suggested I write a fourpart series for the paper to help me launch the book project. She believed in what I wanted to say and she was a huge encour agement. In March, April and May 2013, four separate feature stories appeared in the Sebring-based paper, which became the basis for four chapters in the book itself. But I still had to for mulate an ending to our daughters story, Kline. Back in Texas by early May, Kline had just started her third childrens book, this one directed to middle school and pre-teen children. Ananais and the Sawgrass Mysteries is an adventure ction story about a 12-year-old boy who lives in the Texas Hill Country town of Dripping Springs, west of Austin. The boy nds himself in desperate peril, and many points of interest in the Dripping Springs area are used in the present day mystery story. When the mystery sto ry was published in September 2013, I knew it was time to nish the book about our daughter, said Kline, condent that she had all her ducks in a row now. I promised she would have the rst copy by Christmas. A true story based on their daughters dedica tion and erce determination, Kline hopes her book will be an inspiration and an encouragement to all who read it. While Ratliff remains in various stages of recovery and requires full care ev ery day, one thing has remained very important to Carol and George Kline: the faithful prayers of family and friends from all over the country. I dont know how we would have made it through all these months without the faithfulness of people who are praying for Kris and for us, said Kline. The miracle of it all is that her memory and her cognizance is totally intact, and she has a mar velous sense of humor. But I also want people to hear another impor tant message, Kline said, and that is we must do so much more to help all of our young veterans today. Carol Kline said she hopes her book will provide insight into the ur gent need for a new kind of rehabilitation facility, especially for the wounded or disabled female veteran. There is a whole new concept of one-to-one nursing care, and its already working in a handful of facilities across the country. But more is needed, said Kline. An in depth advanced program for long term care is urgently needed for those young veterans who cannot re turn to a normal home life due to intensive brain or body injuries. Our wounded simply cannot go to nursing homes. Look for Home Of the Brave, a story of hope, courage and determination, along with all of Car ol Klines childrens books on Amazon.com, and follow Major Kristine Ratliffs ongoing rehabilitation on her website at: www.car olkline.net. Kline will be doing a book signing at the Lake Placid Memorial Library at 10 a.m. W ednesday, March 19.Local singer/songwriter writes story of hope, inspiration KLINE Courtesy photoMajor Kristine Ratliff is the subject of Home of the Brave, a story of hope, courage and determination. LAKELAND (AP) Central Florida authorities are reporting a rare death from a spider bite. Polk County Medical Examiner Stephen Nelson tells The Ledger that Ronald Reese of Lakeland died Feb. 16 from complications of a spider bite. Nelson said the bite became infected and developed into an abscess on the back of Reeses neck, which pressed on his spinal cord. Reeses father says the 62-year-old had been bitten in August by a brown recluse spider. H.K. William Reese says required lengthy hospital stays and numerous procedures for six months after the bite. He was working in an old house tearing out the existing walls and ceil ings and replacing them. Brown recluse spiders like to live in those old houses, he said. Nelson said Reese was never tested to determine what type of spider bit him, but medical records show there were denite complications from a spider bite wound on his neck. Few statistics on deaths attributed to spider bites are available. According to the American Association of Poison Control Cen ters, only two people died from spider bites between 2001 and 2005. Both were believed to be caused by brown recluse spiders. The brown recluse spider, which is not native to Florida, is one of just a handful of spiders that are dangerous to humans, though all spiders carry venom as a way to kill and digest their prey, said Polk State College biology pro fessor Logan Randolph. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a bite from a brown recluse spi der starts with two small puncture wounds and develops into a blister. The venom can also cause a severe lesion by destroy ing skin tissue, which requires medical attention. However, the bites typically arent lethal, Randolph said. In most spider bites, complications arise mostly if theres some secondary factor. If the person has a specic allergic reaction, if their health was compromised in some other manner, or if the bite causes an open wound with a secondary infection, Randolph said.Polk authorities report rare death from spider biteMan suffered effects for 6 months M C Y K

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A8 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com SPORTS FISHIN AROUNDDon NortonLast Thursday I had the opportunity to attend the Friends of Istokpoga meeting at the Lorida Civic Center. The speakers were ter ric, providing updates on the condition of the lake as well as any treatment areas and excavation taking place. Anyone that shes this incredible shery should attend these meetings. Membership is only $7 and well worth it. Bill Pounder with the FWC gave a great presentation on the harvest, tagging and shocking of both largemouth bass and crappie. The detailed analysis of the FWC ndings on both crappie and bass has created quite a stir and they are now proposing changes to both the crappie size limit and the statewide size limits and slots on bass currently in place. Their ndings strongly suggest that although there are currently no size limits on crappie (only daily bag limits), 50-per cent of the shermen polled kept sh 9 and over while the other half returned the 9 sh back into the water. As a result, and based on their ndings, they are proposing a new size limit state-wide of 10 or more on crappies. Largemouth bass, on the other hand have differ ent size limits, as well as different slots in all three zones of Florida. Ask a sherman on any given lake in Florida what the size limit is for bass and you may get a dazed stare. Thats because the size limits are different in all three regions of the state; North Florida, Central Florida and South Florida. And if thats not enough, many lakes in these three regions also have slot limits. In saltwater shing you can only keep sh within the designated slot, while bass slots are just the opposite. So, whats the solution? Well Bill Pounder and the FWC want to hear from you. They are proposing a new state-wide regulation for largemouth bass. One that is simpler and encourages folks to remove the smaller bass so the larger bass have more forage, and hopefully, grow even larger.FWC proposed bass and crappie regulation change surveySEE FISH | A10 BY DAN HOEHNEdaniel.hoehne@newssun.comThough they didnt have quite as impressive a rst inning as Sebrings explosion at Lake Placid, Avon Park kept it going in their 13-5 win over Fort Meade Tuesday night. For while the Streaks did all their scoring early, the Devils put up a run in each and every inning to cruise to the win. With one out in the bottom of the rst, Alfred Brown singled for his rst of three hits on the night. He then stole second and third as Tyrone Perry walked, who soon stole second himself. Brown came in when Mykel Gordon reached on an error and both Perry and Gordon would eventually score on passed balls. But the rst-inning scoring wasnt done. With two outs, Alex Gomez drew a walk and J.C. Cobb singled to left. A double steal ensued, putting both runners in scoring position and another passed ball brought Gomez across. Trey Frazier then rocketed a triple to right, scoring Cobb, and Red Devils rout Fort Meade Miners Dan Hoehne/News-Sun lesAlfred Brown had three hits and scored three runs in Avon Parks 13-5 win over Fort Meade Tuesday. BY DAN HOEHNEdaniel.hoehne@newssun.comLAKE PLACID In the midst of a brutal season schedule, it may have been natural for Sebring to perhaps take Tuesday nights county tilt against the Dragons lightly. Which was the main thing rst-year head coach Jayson DeWitt was worried about. I made the schedule I did because I feel you only get better by playing against the best, he said. And I dont ever want our guys to underestimate any team. That mentality surely was in effect on this night, as the Blue Streaks all but locked this one up with a 10-run explosion in the opening inning. Seven runs were scored before the rst out was made as Jordan Austin and Cullen Lovett greeted Lake Placid starter Justin LaRosa with consecutive singles to start the game. Jimmy Peck ripped an RBI double to left before Seth Cannady and Matt Portis drew walks to load the bases and score Lovett. Josh Crouch hit a smash toward third that couldnt be handled, bringing two runs in, and David DeGenaro singled through the left side to load them up again. Justin Bickman then drew a walk to bring Por tis in and the call went to the Dragon bullpen as Justin Mason came on in relief. Ty Little then greeted him rudely as he blasted one high and deep to left. High enough, however, that the runners had to hold up and just one came in on the warningtrack single. Austin continued the parade in his second atbat of the inning by drawing a walk to score DeGenaro before Mason got Blue Streaks blow past Dragons Dan Hoehne/News-SunJimmy Peck had two doubles and three RBI in the Blue Streaks 13-3 win Tuesday. Special to the News-SunOn Wednesday, Feb. 26, Lake Ashton of Lake Wales played at Tanglewood in the nal match of the South Central Florida Pickleball League regular season. Tanglewood came out on top 49-18 to nish an undefeated season in the veteam league. Each team is comprised of four pairs ranked from A to D. They then play a roundrobin series with more points being awarded for games against the most evenly matched teams. Tanglewoods D team was anchored by Tom Stadler who played with three partners during the day. Against Lake Ashtons top team, Stadler and Dave Werry put up a strong ght, losing two games to one. Partnered with Betty Schleis, Stadler won a match then nished the day winning the nal two matches paired with Walt Snyder. Debi Yandell and Dennis Rowland, Tanglewoods C team, won their rst three matches of the day and came on very strong in the nal competition winning 11-8 and 11-5 over their Lake Ashton counterparts. In order to allow most of the Tanglewood subs a chance to play, team captain, Wayne Buck utilized a variety of pairings. At the B level, Tracy Ver nest and Gloria Soltes teamed up in the rst match, playing well but losing. The regular B team members, Randy Craws Tanglewood Picklers stay undefeated Courtesy photoWayne Buck reaches high to swat back this return as teammate Mark March looks on in recent Tanglewood Pickleball action. Special to the News-SunFORT MYERS In the midst of more than 200 swimmers, a local quartet impressed. Four members of the Highlands Hurricane swim team traveled to the coast for the Gulf Coast, Last Chance Short Course Swim Meet on Saturday, Feb. 22, and came home with some strong results as each swimmer had multiple top-10 nishes. Seven-year old Leila Henry of Sebring scored a 10th and fth in the 8-and-under, 50-yard Freestyle and Backstroke, respectively, while 11-year old Peyton Ming of Lake Placid added four top-10s. He got an eighth in the Senior 100-yard Backstroke, sixth in the 11-12 100 Individual Medley, a fth in the Senior 100 Buttery and fourth in the 1112 50 Back. Anna Sapp, 11 and from Lake Placid, earned a sixth in the 11-12 girls 50 Free, fth in the Senior 100 Back and got a win in the 11-12 50 Back. The biggest day came from 14-year old Grifn Chynoweth of Sebring. He nished ninth in the Senior 100 Free and fourth in the 50 free, before getting second in the 100 Breaststroke and moving on notch up in getting rst in the 200 Breaststroke. Some big waves churned up by this small group of Hurricanes.Hurricane foursome formidable at Ft. Myers Courtesy photoThe Highlands Hurricanes swam strong at Ft. Myers. Front row, left to right, Anna Sapp, Peyton Ming and Leila Henry. Back row, Hurricane coach Marvin Wolfe, Grifn Chynoweth and assistant coach Megan Wolfe. SEE DEVILS | A11SEE SEBRING | A11SEE PICKLE | A10 M C Y K

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www.newssun.comFriday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A9 TodayBoxing Friday Night Fights 9 p.m. ESPN2 College Basketball Iona at Manhattan 7 p.m. ESPN2 Golf EuroPGA Tshwane Open 9 a.m. GOLF PGA Honda Classic 2 p.m. GOLF NBA Golden State at New York 8 p.m. ESPN New Orleans at Phoenix 10:30 p.m. ESPNSaturdayAuto Racing NASCAR Nationwide Series 3:45 p.m. ABC Boxing Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. vs. Bryan Vera 9:45 p.m. HBO College Basketball Cincinnati at Connecticut Noon ESPN Vanderbilt at Tennessee Noon ESPN2 Mississippi State at Missouri 1:30 p.m. WTTA Louisville at Memphis 2 p.m. CBS Missouri State at Wichita State 2 p.m. ESPN Pittsburgh at Notre Dame 2 p.m. ESPN2 LSU at Florida 4 p.m. CBS Georgia at Arkansas 4 p.m. WTTA Illinois at Michigan State 4 p.m. ESPN Syracuse at Virginia 4 p.m. ESPN2 Kentucky at South Carolina 6 p.m. ESPN Saint Louis at Virginia Commonwealth 6 p.m. ESPN2 UC Santa Barbara at UC Davis 8 p.m. ESPN2 Kansas at Oklahoma State 9 p.m. ESPN Gonzaga at St. Marys 10 p.m. ESPN2 Golf PGA Honda Classic 1 p.m. GOLF PGA Honda Classic 3 p.m. NBC NBA Orlando at Miami 7:30 p.m. SUN NHL Tampa Bay at Dallas 3 p.m. SUN Pittsburgh at Chicago 8 p.m. NBCSPORTS ON TV SCORE BOARD COMING UPHigh School Baseball Today Avon Park vs. Frostproof, 7 p.m.; Lake Placid at DeSoto, 7 p.m.; Sebring vs. Berkeley Prep, 7 p.m. College Baseball Today SFSC vs. State College of Florida, 6 p.m. Saturday SFSC at State College of Florida, 1 p.m. High School Softball Today Avon Park at Mulberry, 6/7:30 p.m.; Lake Placid vs. All Saints, 6 p.m.; Sebring at DeSoto, 5:30/7:30 p.m. College Softball Saturday SFSC vs. Miami Dade, 1 p.m. Boys Tennis Monday Lake Placid vs. Clewiston, 4:30 p.m. Girls Tennis Monday Lake Placid at Clewiston, 4:30 p.m. Blue Streak Tennis CampSEBRING The Sebring High School girls tennis team will be hosting their 2nd Annual Tennis Camp on Saturday, March 8. The camp will run from 9 a.m. to Noon at the Thakkar Tennis Center located in the Country Club of Sebring. The camp is open to girls and boys ages 4 to 18. Instruction will be available for all levels of play. Lunch will be provided and all participants will receive a camp t-shirt. Cost is $25 per student with family discounts available. Pre-registration is en couraged. For registration and/ or more information call Coach Hollinger at 4715513.SFSC hosts Panther 5KAVON PARK On your mark, get set, go! Registration for the 5th annual Panther 5K Run/ Walk is now available online at www.southorida. edu/panther5k. This annual family event will take place on Saturday, March 1, and benets the South Florida State College (SFSC) Athletic Department. The Panther 5K Run/ Walk will take participants on a path through the beautiful SFSC Highlands Campus and along College Drive. Participants can choose to run the 5K as a race or to take a more leisurely, family-friendly walk four-legged friends and strollers are welcome. This event helps us to promote health among our community and raise funds to help support SFSC athletics, said Rick Hitt, SFSC athletic director and head baseball coach. We will earmark a portion of the raised funds to go toward the Panther Fieldhouse fundraising effort, which is our effort to supply the softball, baseball and future cross country team with a dressing facility located down on the athletic complex grounds. Other funds raised will be earmarked for things that may arise during the year outside of our normal budget. The entry fee for the SFSC Panther 5K Run/ Walk is $25 for adults, $20 for students with a current I.D., and $15 for children ages 6-12. Children under the age of 6 are admitted free with a completed form, but do not receive a shirt. The rst 200 registered runners receive a goody bag and an ofcial Panther 5K dri-t shirt for adults and students. Children receive a T-shirt. The entry fee remains the same through race day. Sizes cannot be guaranteed for those who enter on or after Feb. 9. Registration is 7 -7:45 a.m. on race day and the race begins at 8 a.m. Scrambled eggs and fruit will be available to participants after the race. A special awards ceremony will follow the race. Awards will be given to the rst three nishers in each age (6 and up) and gender category as well as Overall and Masters. The annual Panther 5K race is sponsored by the SFSC Foundation, Inc. and the Jarrett Family Foundation. Entry forms are available online at www.southorida.edu/panther5k. For information about the SFSC Panther 5K Run/Walk or to become a sponsor, call the SFSC Foundation at 863-453-3133.Sebring Elks Golf TournamentThe Sebring Elks Lodge No. 1529 monthly golf outing will be held at Golf Hammock Golf and Country Club on Monday, March 3, beginning at 8 a.m. Cost is $34, which includes golf, cart, lunch and prize fund. To sign up contact Jack McLaughlin at jacknjudy33872@gmail.com or leave a message on (863) 471-3295. Check in not later than 7:40 a.m. by the Pro Shop.Art League golf tournamentSEBRING The 4th Annual Highlands Art League (HAL) Golf Classic, sponsored by Barben Fruit Company, will be held on Saturday, March 8, at Pinecrest Golf Club in Avon Park. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. and the shotgun start will be at 8:30 a.m. Additional sponsors include a $2,000 HoleIn-One sponsored by Cohan Radio Group and a $250 Closest to the Pin sponsored by Alan Jay Automotive. The tournament is a four-person scramble. Entry is $60 per per son made payable to the Highlands Art League. The entry includes golf, cart, refreshments on the course, prizes and a post-golf meal in the clubhouse. Individuals welcome. There will be a 50/50, other contests, a great day of golf, rafe prizes, mulligans and fun for a good cause to support art education in our community. Proceeds benet HAL, which provides art classes, programs and workshops to youth and adult students, as well as art exhibits in the Highlands Museum of the Arts (MoTA). An application and entry form can be obtained online at www. HighlandsArtLeague.org, by emailing Manager@ HighlandsArtLeague. org, by calling Barb Hall at (863) 452-0512 or the Clubhouse at (863) 453-7555. Deadline for entry is Thursday, March 6. $100 hole sponsorships are available.LP Project GraduationLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid High School Project Graduation 2014 Golf Tournament will tee off on Saturday, March 29, at the Placid Lakes Golf Course. Registration begins at 7 a.m. before a shotgun start kicks off play at 8 a.m. Cost is $60 per person, $240 per team, and includes greens fee, cart and meal. There will be a 50/50 drawing, a rafe, straightest drive and closest to the pin contests and a $2,000 Hole in One prize sponsored by Cohan Radio Group. For more information, contact Charlotte McQuillen at 633-8450.Eagles looking for coachesAVON PARK The Highlands Youth Football and Cheer Organization is accepting applications for football and cheer coaches at all age divisions for the 2014 season. If you are interested in coaching, you may go to www.highlandseagles.com, click on the Registration tab, and select Coach/Volunteer tab to view requirements and submit application. If you have any questions, you may contact Cliff Howell at 863-2537070, or Melissa Lane at 863-381-9325.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING The Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center will be hosting their 4th Annual Scholarship Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 26, at Sun N Lake. Format is a four-per son scramble with handicapped ights. Entry fee is $65 per person, which includes greens fee, golf cart and lunch. Registration is at 7:30 a.m. the day of the tournament, with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Please submit entries by Thursday, April 24. Make checks payable to Wings of Faith CWC Scholarship Fund. All proceeds go to benet college-bound senior graduates for the class of 2014. For questions, call Alvin Walters at 381-5706 or 381-6578.Samaritans Touch Golf TournamentSEBRING Its Just What the Doctor Ordered! Samaritans Touch Care Center (STCC) presents the 2014 Charity Golf Tournament on Saturday, March 1, at the Sun N Lake Golf Club of Sebring. All proceeds will benet STCC, a faith-based, nonprot healthcare center, providing free comprehensive medical care to our uninsured, nancially struggling neighbors in Highlands County. Registration is at 7:30 a.m. and shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Four person-teams will be ighted by handicap. Entry fee includes continental breakfast, fabulous prizes, refreshments on the course, lunch and awards following play. There will be a $2,000 hole-in-one sponsored by Cohan Radio Group. Entry fee is $260 per team or $350 for team and hole sponsorship. Download entry form at www.samaritanstouch. org. F or additional infor mation, please contact Heather Stephenson at (863) 471-1870 ext. 210 or (863) 214-0340, or by email at ops.director@samaritanstouch.org. For every $1 dollar collected during this golf tournament, STCC is able to provide patients with over $10, in health care services. Heres how far your support will go $100 hole sponsorship will provide a patient with $1,000 in health care services, a $260 team will provide a patient with $2,600 in health care services and a $350 team and hole sponsorship will provide a patient with $3,500 in health care services. SNAPSHOTS SPORTS National Basketball AssociationEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB Toronto 32 25 .561 Brooklyn 26 29 .473 5 New York 21 36 .368 11 Boston 20 39 .339 13 Philadelphia 15 43 .259 17 Southeast W L Pct GB Miami 40 14 .741 Washington 29 28 .509 12 Charlotte 27 30 .474 14 Atlanta 26 31 .456 15 Orlando 18 42 .300 25 Central W L Pct GB Indiana 43 13 .768 Chicago 31 26 .544 12 Detroit 23 35 .397 21 Cleveland 23 36 .390 21 Milwaukee 11 45 .196 32 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB San Antonio 41 16 .719 Houston 39 19 .672 2 Dallas 36 23 .610 6 Memphis 32 24 .571 8 New Orleans 23 34 .404 18 Northwest W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 43 15 .741 Portland 40 18 .690 3 Minnesota 28 29 .491 14 Denver 25 31 .446 17 Utah 21 36 .368 21 Pacic W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 40 20 .667 Golden State 35 23 .603 4 Phoenix 33 24 .579 5 Sacramento 20 37 .351 18 L.A. Lakers 19 39 .328 20 Wednesdays Games Orlando 101, Philadelphia 90 Boston 115, Atlanta 104 Chicago 103, Golden State 83 Dallas 108, New Orleans 89 Cleveland 114, Oklahoma City 104 Memphis 108, L.A. Lakers 103 San Antonio 120, Detroit 110 Utah 109, Phoenix 86 Portland 124, Brooklyn 80 L.A. Clippers 101, Houston 93 Thursdays Games Milwaukee at Indiana, late Washington at Toronto, late New York at Miami, late Brooklyn at Denver, late Fridays Games Utah at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m. Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Golden State at New York, 8 p.m. Chicago at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Charlotte at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Sacramento at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. New Orleans at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.National Hockey LeagueEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 58 37 16 5 79 180 130 Tampa Bay 58 33 20 5 71 168 145 Montreal 60 32 21 7 71 149 144 Toronto 60 32 22 6 70 178 182 Detroit 59 27 20 12 66 153 164 Ottawa 59 26 22 11 63 169 191 Florida 58 22 29 7 51 139 183 Buffalo 59 17 34 8 42 118 178 Metropolitan GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 58 40 15 3 83 186 138 N.Y. Rangers 59 32 24 3 67 155 146 Philadelphia 59 30 23 6 66 162 167 Columbus 58 29 24 5 63 170 161 Washington 59 27 23 9 63 171 175 Carolina 58 26 23 9 61 146 161 New Jersey 59 24 22 13 61 135 146 N.Y. Islanders 60 22 30 8 52 164 200 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT Pts GF GA St. Louis 58 39 13 6 84 196 136 Chicago 60 35 11 14 84 207 163 Colorado 59 37 17 5 79 178 159 Minnesota 59 31 21 7 69 145 147 Dallas 58 27 21 10 64 164 164 Winnipeg 60 28 26 6 62 168 175 Nashville 59 25 24 10 60 146 180 Pacic GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 60 41 14 5 87 196 147 San Jose 59 37 16 6 80 175 142 Los Angeles 60 32 22 6 70 145 132 Vancouver 61 28 24 9 65 147 160 Phoenix 58 27 21 10 64 163 169 Calgary 58 22 29 7 51 137 179 Edmonton 60 20 33 7 47 153 199 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Wednesdays Games Buffalo 5, Boston 4, OT Detroit 2, Montreal 1, OT Los Angeles 6, Colorado 4 Vancouver 1, St. Louis 0 Thursdays Games Columbus at New Jersey, late Toronto at N.Y. Islanders, late Chicago at N.Y. Rangers, late San Jose at Philadelphia, late Montreal at Pittsburgh, late Detroit at Ottawa, late Washington at Florida, late Tampa Bay at Nashville, late Phoenix at Winnipeg, late Carolina at Dallas, late Los Angeles at Calgary, late Minnesota at Edmonton, late Fridays Games San Jose at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Colorado, 9 p.m. Minnesota at Vancouver, 10 p.m. St. Louis at Anaheim, 10 p.m.Spring Training GlanceAMERICAN LEAGUE W L Pct Detroit 1 0 1.000 Oakland 1 0 1.000 Toronto 1 0 1.000 Baltimore 0 0 .000 Boston 0 0 .000 Chicago 0 0 .000 Houston 0 0 .000 Kansas City 0 0 .000 Los Angeles 0 0 .000 Minnesota 0 0 .000 Seattle 0 0 .000 Tampa Bay 0 0 .000 Texas 0 0 .000 Cleveland 0 1 .000 New York 0 1 .000 NATIONAL LEAGUE W L Pct Arizona 1 0 1.000 Cincinnati 1 0 1.000 Pittsburgh 1 0 1.000 Chicago 0 0 .000 Colorado 0 0 .000 Miami 0 0 .000 Milwaukee 0 0 .000 New York 0 0 .000 San Diego 0 0 .000 St. Louis 0 0 .000 Washington 0 0 .000 Atlanta 0 1 .000 Los Angeles 0 1 .000 Philadelphia 0 1 .000 San Francisco 0 1 .000 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. Wednesdays Games Detroit 6, Atlanta 5 Toronto 4, Philadelphia 3, 7 innings Pittsburgh 6, N.Y. Yankees 5 Oakland 10, San Francisco 5 Cincinnati 8, Cleveland 3 Arizona 4, L.A. Dodgers 1 Thursdays Games Philadelphia vs. Toronto, late Pittsburgh vs. N.Y. Yankees, late Atlanta vs. Detroit, late Texas vs. Kansas City, late Arizona (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs, late Arizona (ss) vs. L.A. Dodgers, late Milwaukee vs. Oakland, late Cleveland vs. Cincinnati, late San Diego vs. Seattle, late Fridays Games Minnesota vs. Boston at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Toronto at Dunedin, 1:05 p.m. Detroit (ss) vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees vs. Detroit (ss) at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m. Baltimore vs. Tampa Bay at Pt. Charlotte, 1:05 p.m. Washington vs. N.Y. Mets at Pt. St. Lucie, 1:10 p.m. Seattle vs. San Diego at Peoria, Az., 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Az., 3:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs. San Francisco (ss) at Scottsdale, Az., 3:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Az., 3:05 p.m. San Francisco (ss) vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. CHUCK KINGAssociated PressJUPITER Miami Mar lins pitcher Henderson Alvarez will miss his rst scheduled start of spring training because of an infection in his right shin. Alvarez had the infection drained at a hospital Tuesday. He was at Roger Dean Stadium in street clothes Wednesday and walking with the aid of crutches as the Marlins went through their morning workouts. Of course it is better that it happens right now than later dur ing the season, Alvarez said through a translator. Im trying to do my best to get ready for the season. The 23-year-old righthander had been scheduled to start Sundays game against Washington. The Marlins did not provide a timetable for his return, but Alvarez said he could miss up to a week. Alvarez said he isnt feeling pain from the infection. This is the rst time ever something like this has come to me, Alvarez said. Alvarez went 5-6 with a 3.59 ERA last season. He pitched one of the most suspenseful no-hitters in baseball history on Sept. 29 when he held the Detroit Tigers hitless through nine innings before the Marlins scored on a wild pitch in the bottom of the ninth for a 1-0 win.Marlins Alvarez to miss turn SundayHenderson Alvarez to miss 1st turn in rotation due to shin infectionThis is the first time ever something like this has come to me.Henderson Alvarez Marlins pitcher M C Y K

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A10 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com The proposed change would be a ve sh daily bag limit, only one of which may be 16 inches in total length or longer. This means that each person would be allowed to keep ve largemouth bass less than 16 inches or four largemouth bass less than 16 inches and one 16 inches or longer each day. This is a huge change and considering it would be state-wide, with no spe cial slots on any lakes, it sure would simplify things for all Florida shermen, as well as our northern visitors. Not a day goes by that someone doesnt call or come into the store to ask what the regulations are for different lakes. Bill Pounder gave me copies of the proposed crappie and bass changes and were asking all of our customers to complete the questionnaire. Im all for growing our bass bigger and its going to happen under the present regulations. If the proposed change takes place, the next step will be to educate sher men to remove the smaller bass to free up the forage for the larger bass. If that happens, well see even bigger bass being caught and released in all of our lakes.Guide tripsI had four guide trips last week and we caught some really nice sh. The biggest, an 11+ was caught on a black ZOOM trick worm out in front of Mallards on the north end of the lake. A number of 5 and 6 pounders were caught on Rage Craws and Yum Dingers west of Arbuckle Creek along the reeds and on the east shoreline, north of the boat ramp off Cowhouse Rd. On Thursday, we caught a number of nice bass in the arrowhead beds. Every time we pitched into the center of the ar rowheads, regardless of the bait, a hefty vepounder would just crush it. It was a pretty good week on Lake Istokpoga.Friends of Istokpoga Big Bass TournamentOn Saturday, March 15, the Friends of Istokpoga are hosting a Big Bass Tournament on Lake Istokpoga. Entry fee is $25 per per son, up to three people per boat, live-bait or articial and limited to 25 boats. The tournament will go out of the State Park Boat Launch on Rt. 98 at rst light until 2 p.m. We currently have eight boats registered. Participants must be members of The Friends of Istokpoga ($7 annual membership fee until March 1, then $10). A 100-percent payback will have 60-percent going to rst place, 25 for second place and 15 for third. Only one sh can be weighed in per person and the three biggest win. Sign up now at REDS II Fishing Tackle at 3603 Sebring Parkway. Registration is limited to 25 boats and must be completed prior to Friday, March 14, at 5 p.m. I will be the tournament director, if you have any questions, give me a call.REDS Big Bass TournamentThe February Big Bass Tournament was held on Saturday, Feb. 22, at Lake June in Lake Placid. The team of Justin Owens and Daniel Patrick won the event with a nice 6 pound bass, receiving $475. Second place was a 5.8 pound bass caught by the team of Dean Martin and Ernie Lewis. Third place big bass was a 3.72 pounder caught by Greg Bachman and Richard Urbanowski.Gambler TournamentGambler held its second of three free tournaments on Lake Okeechobee Sunday, Feb. 23. There were approximately 163 boats with a to tal of 326 anglers. A bunch of guys from Sebring and Avon Park shed the tournament but did not place in the money. The team of Joe Kovic and Nick Dubois won big bass with a 10.8 pound wallhanger. The big bass pot was worth about $800. Gamblers next tournament is in March at Lake Kissimmee, going out of Camp Mack. The tournament is free; however you can only use Gambler baits. They pay $1000 to rst place and cash or mer chandise all the way to 10th place.Don Norton is a professional tournament bass sherman, bass shing guide, and custom rod builder. He lives in the Golf Hammock area of Sebring with his wife Lexie, and is the owner of a custom rod building company appropriately named The American Fisherman. He is also the owner of REDS II, a full-service shing tackle store located at 3603 Sebring Parkway, in Sebring, FL. You can reach him at 863-2734998 or by email at donorton13@ gmail.com. Visit his REDS FISHING facebook page or his website at theamericansherman.com. or stop by the store to see him anytime. FISH FROM PAGE A8Golf HammockThe Golf Hammock Ladies Played a two-day Scrub Jay Tournament on Wednesdays, Feb. 19 and 26. First Flight saw a rstand second-place tie with Jeannie Fivecoat and Ruth Harris each coming in with an 83. Third went to Helene Trembly with 87. Second Flight had a three-way tie with Roxie McMillon, Carol Troup and Trudy Stowe with 95s. Third Flight was a bit more clear cut as Mary Cripps stood alone in rst with a 95. But things tightened up quickly with a three-way tie for second between Audrey Walther Kayee Depolito and Jo Thornburg with 102s. Last Monday, Feb. 24, the Mezza Group played Individual Pro-Am Points and saw Ike Richards win A group with a +5, while shooting even par, and Don Brewer and Gary Towell tying for second at Even. B group was won by Fred Latshaw at +7, second was taken by Bob Trier at +1, and there was a tie for third between Ned Bauer and Luc Guerin at Even. C group was won by Pat Dells +8, followed by Mike Lajiness at +6, with third going to Dana Smith, and fourth to Gary Galle at -3. D group saw David Mulligan in rst place with +9, and there was a tie for second between Paul Brown II and Stan Grifs at +5, Danny Geier was third with +4. E group was won by Bob Watsons +4, second went to Carl Linsley at +3, and Jack Stafford took third at +2. F group had Ed Northrup in rst place with +2, Bob Culbert took second with +1, followed by a 3 way tie between Jim Reed, Delbert Nelson, and Wayne Meyer at Even. G group showed Dick Botelho in rst with +8, Billy Parr took second with +5, and Mark Campbell was third at -2. H group was won by Bob Hughes with +7, Ken Granger took second with +6, and Mark Floras +3 took third. I group was won by Paul Skidmores +7, followed by Doc Thomas at +3, and third went to Jerry Hodges and his +1. J group saw Bill Woudenberg win with +5, there was a 2 way tie for second at +4 between Bob Colandrea and Bill Young, and Alice Campbell fell into third with +3. K group had Jerry Edwards in rst with +5, second was a tie between Bill Catcher and Ron Geoque at +2, and third was taken by Dick Lindsay at Even. Next Monday, March 3, the Mezza Group will continue to play at Golf Hammock beginning at 7:45 a.m. Please arrive early due to a big eld of players. For more information, call Pete at 382-1280.Highlands RidgeThe annual Avon Park Rotary David Doc Owen tournament was held on Saturday, Feb. 22, and saw the First Flight go to the foursome of Kendall Grifn, Ben Tubbs, Jett Dexter and Kade Damboise with a 54. A three-way tie for second in the ight gave the nod to the team of Larry Kelly along with the Gentrys, Doug, Suzie and Greg with a 57. In the Second Flight, Chet Brojek, Chad Lund, Jay Jones and Tommy Todd took rst with a 60, while there was another match of cards needed to settle up a trio of 63s. Josh Curechy, Aaron Lewis, Eddy Torres and Nathan Coomes score came out the best, giving them second place. Third Flight honors went to the team of John ONeill, Larry Colley, Larry White and Bob Denney with a 63, with second going to the 66 brought in by Barry Bittner, Gary Hurtubise, Andrew Deierlein and Austin Weed. Grifn was closest to the pin on No. 8, while David Swantek was closest on No. 13 and Colley had closest to the line.Lake June WestA Couples Scramble was the event on Thursday, Feb. 27, with the Knishkas, Bob and Vern, and the Benzs, Harry and Pat, coming in with a 48 for the win. Tom and Margaret Schultz teamed with John and Kim Givens for second place with a 50, and Ralph and Betty Little joined Walt Navel and Wayne Eades to card a 54 for third. For closest to the pin, Chris Heath hit to 7-feet, 6-inches from No. 8, Harry Benz to 6-feet, 1-inch from No. 4 and Art Schmeltz to 4-feet, 11-inches from No. 2. A Couples Scramble was played on Thursday, Feb. 20, and saw three teams come in with 48s, moving it to a match of cards to determine the order of nish. The team of McGill, Eades, Schuenke, Bentz and the Swartzs got the nod for the top spot, while the team of the Coberts, Freemans and Knisaka nished second. The team of the Denharts, Littles, Houlihan and Jones settled for third. Mary McNamee had closest to the pin on No. 8, hitting to 8-feet, 1 1/2-inches, while Joanne McGill hit to 5-feet, 11-inches from No. 2. Rick Freeman shot to 5-feet, 10-inches from No. 4.Placid LakesA Little Lambs International Tournament was held on Saturday, Feb. 22, which saw 83 golfers take to the course. Winning the Low Gross was the team of Brent Sueppel, Scott Jovanelli, Butch Ward and Shane Ward. Getting Low Net on the day were Scott Honkala, Blair Ketola, David Somero and Daniel Valderrama. Second Low Net went to JU Tolson, Art Tolson, Craig Rosen and Tim Landers. Closest to the pin for the tour nament saw Terry Miller hit closest on No. 2, Rick Rankin on No. 6, Sam Rogers on No. 11 and Anthony Haney on No. 13. Rankin had the longest drive of the day and Debbie Boverhof had the straightest drive. The Mens Golf Association played a Two Best Ball tournament on Wednesday, Feb. 19. Bob Bauman, Jeff Harstine, Gene Ransom and Val Rodriguez lead a three-way tie of -26, after a match of cards. Settling for second was the team of Darrell Gardner, Jack Marceau, Bud Snyder and Terry Moss. Placing third were Bill Brinegar, Frank Fisher and Howard Ticknor. Ticknor did have closest to the pin on the day at No. 2. The Placid Lakes Womens Association played an Individual Points with Handicap event on Tuesday, Feb. 18. Carol Olsen claimed the top spot with 56 points, one ahead of the 55 totaled by Pat Haas for second. Karen Wallin took third with 49, Geri Bramos fourth with 45 and Pam Thomas fth with 44.SpringLakeOn Tuesday, Feb. 25, the SpringLake Mens Golf Association held a four-man team competition in which only the two best balls on the front nine and the three best balls on the back nine counted towards the score. This was held on the Panther Creek golf course. The team winning rst place, with a score of 157 net strokes, consisted of Pat Jaskowski, Richie Eastep, Ken Rohr and Bill Schauwecker. Second place went to the team of Gordon Reid, Gene Hearn, Bob Berg and Steve Hall, who scored 158 strokes. In third place, with 159 strokes, was Gerry Esty, Pat Shatney, Les Greenlee and Jay Payne. Fourth place, at 166 net strokes, went to Bob Hinde, Don Cunning, Joe Troia, and Larry Miesner. Closely following these were the teams of Ken Kirby (167) and Charlie Scoven (168). On Wednesday, Feb. 19, the SpringLake Ladies League played a 1-2-3 Net Team Event on the Cougar Trail course. The one best net score was used on par 5s, two best on par 4s and the three best on par 3s. The winning team with a Net 104 was Debbie Delaney, Carolyn Irvine, Sharon Warner and Jan Nelson. Coming in second place with a Net 111 are Teri Swisher, Barbara Stevens, Diana Ackling and Ann McWilliams. Third place with a Net 112 are Linda Peger, Judy Devries, Jean Donahue and Joann Deweese. and Gary Sewell, took to the courts for the remaining matches, winning two then losing a hard-fought nal 11-8, 9-11, 8-11. Once again, subs played the rst set in the A category with Sandi March and Ellen Nesbitt battling it out but coming up short. Mike March and Wayne Buck took over and won the next two sets handily. In the nal round, they lost 11-13 in game one then nished strong with 11-3 and 11-0 victories. The win puts Tanglewood on top of the league with an impressive 4 record. They earned 176 points this season. Riverbend Labelle (150 points), Highlands Ridge (117 points), Del Webb Orlando (104 points) teams ended the season with identical 2-2 records. Lake Ashton took 113 points but ended the season winless, having lost two of their outings by scores of 34-33. The nal Shootout will bring all ve teams to Tanglewood on Monday, March 3, for a round-robin series that will pit all of the similar level teams against one another. Highlands Ridge won the shootout in 2013 but Tanglewood is hungry for a victory this year. Play will start shortly after 10 a.m. on the Tanglewood courts. PICKLE FROM PAGE A8 M C Y K

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www.newssun.com Friday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | A11 putting the Devils up 5-0 after one. Gordon would work through the rst two innings on the mound and kept the Miners scoreless, and helped his own cause by doubling home Brown in the bottom of the second. Kenny McGrath came on in relief and pitched a scoreless third before Avon Park added three more in the bottom of the frame. With one out, Frazier singled and with two out, Luis Martinez walked. Brown then brought Frazier in with a line-drive single to right, moving Martinez to third. Brown stole second and both runners came in on Perrys hot-shot single to right. Fort Meade did manufacture a run without a hit in the top of the fourth on a walk, two stolen bases and a wild pitch, but McGrath was also in the midst of striking out the side. And the Red Devils got that run back in their half as Kyle Kelley was hit by a pitch and brought around on singles by Frazier and Kyle Thompson for a 10-1 lead. The Miners did dig into the lead, scoring four in the top of the fth to make it a 10-5 game, but Gordon belted a two-run homer deep over the center-eld fence, with Perry on board, in the bottom of the frame, and Frazier scored in the sixth to provide for the nal margin. Im proud of the way our players came out and set the tone early, head coach Whit Cornell said. It was good to see our hitters being aggressive on good pitches. We executed on the base paths and it led to producing runs, he continued. And our pitchers did a good job of challenging their hitters. Now 5-1, Avon Park hosts Frostproof tonight. DEVILS FROM PAGE A8 the rst out of the inning on a strike out. But Peck hit a sacrice y to deep center and after an error loaded up the bases, Portis brought home two with a single to nish off the 10-run bar rage. Thats a tough hole to dig yourselves out of, Lake Placid head coach D.W. Daum said. And it would have been easy for our guys to get down, but they kept battling. That they did, though it already seemed too little to late. But with two out in the bottom of the rst, Ty ler Carr doubled to right and Laine Daum singled to left before a wild pitch brought Carr across the plate to get the Dragons on the board. Sebring added to their lead, however, in the top of the second as DeGenaro walked and one out later Little was hit by a pitch. With two out, Lovett singled to right to score DeGenaro and Peck doubled to left to score Little. Cannady ripped one to left, bringing Lovett in and the lead stood at 13-1 with Lake Placid just now coming up for their second at bat. A pair of singles and a bunt had runners at second and third for the Dragons, but the two were left stranded. Similarly, Sebring looked poised to add to their lead some more in the top of the third with Crouch walking, but getting erased in a 6-4-3 double play. Justin Bickman then drew a walk and Little singled to left, but Paul Cantwell came on to relieve Mason and retired the side with no further damage. Still looking to cut into the lead, Alex Miller started the bottom of the third by taking one for the team and Carr moved him alone with a single to right. With one out, Jacob Cram singled to center to load the bases and Mason beat out a potential double play to keep the inning alive and allowing Miller to score. Carr would soon come in on a wild pitch to make it 13-3, and while there would be various threats to get back on the scoreboard by both teams over the next few innings, the score would hold before ending the game by the mercy rule after ve innings. Ive seen the schedule Sebrings been playing and they are facing some top competition, Daum said. And tonight, they just came out swinging. That schedule the DeWitt put together going into his rst season, after a very successful tenure at Lake Wales, has already seen the Streaks take on the likes of Lakeland, twice, Okeechobee and Tampa Catholic, and sitting with a 4-1 record. We had some real good teams in for preseason with Faith Baptist and Bartow, and opened up with Lakeland, DeWitt said. They really put it to us, beating us 12-2, which was a quick slap in the face. They came back the next day and had a really good practice, which is exactly how I hoped theyd respond. Since then, they have beaten the Brahmans 5-1 and topped the Dreadnaughts in a rematch, 6-5, and recently shut out the Crusaders 6-0. The Lake Placid win behind them, the Streaks were to face Haines City Thursday at home before hosting Berkeley Prep tonight at Firemens Field. The Dragons, meanwhile, will look to put this one behind them as they travel to DeSoto tonight to face the Bulldogs. SEBRING FROM PAGE A8 Dan Hoehne/News-SunJosh Crouch res to the plate Tuesday night in Sebrings win at Lake Placid. Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID Dick Cook is from Springeld, Ohio, the former Softball Capital of the World. A lifelong Reds/Buckeyes fan, he retired from International Harvester, then moved to Lake Placid in 2005. He still works as a skilled handyman (863840-4291) while managing the Central Security team in the Lake Placid senior league. The best defensive player in the league, he patterns his aggressive style of play after his boyhood idol Pete Rose. Like Doran Quigg, he played many times in his younger days against The King and His Court. Coming to Florida and playing softball is second only to my daughter in my life, boasted Cook over the postgame BBQ grill run by his brother Alan. On Monday, Captain Cook and his Security men took on Yates Insur ance in a meeting of unbeaten teams. It was Cook and his crew, however, that walked the plank 11-8. For Central, Cook had three hits (two doubles) and Joe Hedges homered. For victorious Yates, Phil Lucas had three hits (double) on his 67th birthday. Bill Gallagher made the play of the day with a tumbling, shoestring catch in left to rob Larry Oser of extra bases. Schoonis Restaurant beat Seminole Tire 22-8. Winning pitcher Victor Rodriguez paced the Restauranteurs with ve hits (double, triple), while Norm Grubbs (double), Paul Brand (double), Kyle Saunders and Ron Wickman (two triples) formed the Four Hit Club. For The Noles, Skip Raller (two doubles) had four hits. Frank Hedges made a superlative stop at second base for the play of the game. On Wednesday, Yates (4-0) remained undefeated in second half play with a 19-6 win over Seminole Tire (0-4). The Noles took a 6-5 lead into the last two innings, only to have Yates rally for 14 unanswered runs. Bill Gallagher (three doubles) had four hits, while Cliff Bluml, Dar rel Richards, winning pitcher Don Ward (double) and Mike Wiltgen chipped in with three apiece. For Seminole Tire, Ray Wilson had a triple and a diving catch in left eld. In the most exciting game of the year, Central Security (3-1) almost blew a 14-run lead to topple Schoonis (1-3) 29-28. Cheering on the Securitymen was a contingent of 20 members spanning four generations of the Harlan Newby clan visiting from Wisconsin. With Central clinging to a one-run lead and two Schoonis runners on in the bottom of the last inning, Elston Hedges ripped a drive destined to plate the winning runs. Right elder Dave Londo made a running backhanded catch, then threw to rst to double up a wayward runner to end the game. For Central, the deadly tandem of Dick Cook and Joe Hedges combined for six doubles and a homer, while Mo Pier added four hits. The Schoonis attack saw home runs from Norm Grubbs and Rookie of the Year candidate Elston Hedges. Grubbs and Kyle Saunders had ve hits each, while Wild Bill DeStefano tallied four (two doubles). For further league information, visit lpsoftball.com.Yates overcomes Cook, Central BY BARRY FOSTERSpecial to the News-SunSEBRING It is March and that means cars on the track at the Sebring In ternational Raceway. This weekend it will be the Spring Vintage Racing Classic starting the action with 20 different compe titions scheduled over the three day weekend. We have more than 200 cars in the paddock for this event, said President and CEO of SVRA Tony Parella. That not only includes all of the vintage cars, but as many as 50 contem porary vehicles slated to compete in the Trans Am series opener. Ofcials from the series say it represents a modern day record, noting the last time there were that many cars in a single eld was over 30 years ago. Trans Am really started at Sebring, Parella said. We think its kind of neat to have todays cars mixed in with our vintage cars so a fan can come in and see both kinds of competition on the same weekend. There are more than a dozen different SVRA classes as well, starting with small-bore cars such as MGs and FIATs, to a class of Corvettes, Camaros, Mustangs and other American muscle cars, to a division of prototypes including World Sports Cars, GT and GTP cars. We are also bringing back the historic NASCARs, Parella said. We really have a pretty diverse eld. The SportsCar Vintage Racing Association actually was started at Sebring in 1976 and the historiuc airport circuit traditionally has served as the series opener. Sebring has such a rich history. This town and this track really is something special, he said. Parella said the impetus of the SVRA racing weekend is on fan involvement, with spectators having the opportunity to get up close and personal with the cars in the paddock. The entire grounds of the raceway also will be open with fans able to access both the general admission and Green Park areas, in addition to the stands in the Gurney and Fangio terraces on the front straight pit structure. For a fee, fans can even have an opportunity to take their cars on the track for a few laps, following the pace car in what are termed track touring sessions. Practice sessions for nearly all series will be held Friday morning at the raceway, with qualifying sessions to be held Friday afternoon. The rst big race of the weekend will be held Friday evening. The green ag will fall at 6 PMp.m. for a 90 minute endurance competition that will run into the night. Well have a modied LeMans start for that. The cars will be lined up against the wall, but the drivers wont be running to their cars, Parella said. We want to make sure everybody is strapped in before they start racing. Saturday will be packed with all day sprint qualify ing race sessions including a Trans-Am race, as well as a second endurance race for small bore cars. Sunday will be the big day, with a morning full of sprint races, an enduro for prototype cars starting at 12:50 and a 100-mile competition for the TransAm series. That will commence at 2:35 p.m. Tickets are $20 per day or $35 for the weekend which includes camping Youngsters under 12 are admitted at no charge. More information may be found on the groups web site at www.svra.comSpring Vintage Racing starts tonight It was good to see our hitters being aggressive on good pitches.Whit Cornell Avon Park head coach Courtesy photoThe Lady Blue Streaks put their Heartland Conference Tournament hardware on display after sweeping to seven titles. LADY STREAKS SHOW OFF HARDWARE MCYK

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A12 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com TODAYPartly sunny and warmer76 / 53Winds: NE at 4-8 mphMostly sunny and nice80 / 56Winds: NW at 3-6 mphSATURDAYPleasant with periods of sun82 / 59Winds: ENE at 4-8 mphSUNDAYPartly sunny84 / 61Winds: SSW at 6-12 mphMONDAYPartly sunny, a t-storm possible83 / 56Winds: NW at 6-12 mphTUESDAY High .............................................. 7:40 a.m. Low ............................................... 1:03 a.m. High .............................................. 8:02 p.m. Low ............................................... 1:30 p.m. High ............................................ 12:32 a.m. Low ............................................... 7:37 a.m. High .............................................. 2:01 p.m. Low ............................................... 7:13 p.m. Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 13.98 Normal ............................................... 14.51 High Sunday .......................................... 88 Low Sunday ........................................... 56 High Monday ......................................... 84 Low Monday .......................................... 55 High Tuesday ......................................... 86 Low Tuesday .......................................... 50 High Wednesday .................................... 82 Low Wednesday ..................................... 57 Relative humidity .................................. 37% Expected air temperature ....................... 76 Makes it feel like .................................... 75 Monday ............................................... 29.97 Tuesday ............................................... 29.92 Wednesday ......................................... 29.81 Monday ............................................... 0.00 Tuesday ............................................... 0.00 Wednesday ......................................... 0.00 Month to date ..................................... 1.73 Year to date ......................................... 4.68Sunrise 6:51 a.m. 6:50 a.m. Sunset 6:27 p.m. 6:27 p.m. Moonrise 6:04 a.m. 6:49 a.m. Moonset 6:02 p.m. 7:06 p.m.Albuquerque 63/44/pc 63/39/pc 56/36/pc Atlanta 54/38/pc 62/46/pc 69/52/s Baltimore 26/15/s 40/31/c 38/28/c Birmingham 57/42/pc 65/50/pc 69/51/pc Boston 25/13/s 34/24/c 27/14/sn Charlotte 48/33/pc 52/35/r 67/49/pc Cheyenne 41/14/sn 30/9/sn 27/14/c Chicago 23/15/c 22/9/sn 18/11/sn Cleveland 21/20/pc 37/14/c 17/11/sn Columbus 30/24/pc 46/21/c 26/15/sn Dallas 78/43/pc 78/61/pc 70/26/t Denver 54/22/pc 39/13/sn 35/19/pc Detroit 17/15/pc 31/8/c 17/8/sn Harrisburg 21/12/pc 36/30/c 31/21/sn Honolulu 81/69/c 82/68/sh 77/67/sh Houston 70/60/c 78/62/c 77/46/t Indianapolis 32/25/pc 39/15/pc 21/10/sn Jackson, MS 63/48/pc 71/54/pc 70/50/pc Kansas City 42/16/c 27/0/c 7/-5/sn Lexington 39/29/pc 49/31/c 36/22/r Little Rock 51/40/r 60/44/pc 63/30/t Los Angeles 63/53/r 61/52/t 66/54/sh Louisville 39/32/pc 50/29/c 35/23/sn Memphis 52/42/r 61/42/c 60/32/c Milwaukee 20/10/c 21/0/sn 15/3/sn Minneapolis 14/-8/sn 7/-16/sn 5/-10/pc Nashville 48/37/pc 57/40/c 66/37/c New Orleans 65/56/pc 71/59/pc 71/62/pc New York City 23/15/s 35/29/c 32/26/sn Norfolk 30/27/s 44/39/c 55/43/pc Oklahoma City 64/33/pc 56/24/pc 29/9/i Philadelphia 21/16/s 37/30/c 36/26/sn Phoenix 75/59/c 70/54/sh 71/52/pc Pittsburgh 22/20/pc 43/22/c 25/18/sn Portland, ME 24/3/s 31/21/c 25/6/pc Portland, OR 59/39/pc 44/37/c 54/42/c Raleigh 43/28/pc 49/37/i 67/51/pc Rochester 14/12/sf 34/10/sn 13/7/s St. Louis 38/26/sn 39/13/c 21/9/sn San Francisco 60/48/r 61/48/sh 61/50/pc Seattle 55/38/pc 46/35/c 50/39/pc Wash., DC 29/24/s 43/37/c 44/31/c Cape Coral 76/56/pc 80/58/s 83/61/s Clearwater 70/55/s 75/59/s 78/60/s Coral Springs 78/64/t 82/64/s 81/67/s Daytona Beach 68/50/s 74/55/s 76/57/pc Ft. Laud. Bch 76/65/t 82/67/s 80/69/s Fort Myers 77/58/pc 82/60/s 84/62/s Gainesville 69/43/s 76/47/s 77/53/pc Hollywood 77/63/t 83/64/s 80/64/s Homestead AFB 77/63/t 81/65/s 79/66/s Jacksonville 65/44/s 71/49/s 74/54/pc Key West 75/67/t 79/69/s 79/70/s Miami 78/66/t 82/67/s 80/68/s Okeechobee 75/54/pc 80/57/s 78/58/pc Orlando 73/52/s 79/56/s 81/59/pc Pembroke Pines 77/63/t 83/64/s 81/64/s St. Augustine 63/50/s 70/54/s 71/58/pc St. Petersburg 70/55/s 75/59/s 79/60/s Sarasota 71/51/pc 75/57/s 79/60/s Tallahassee 65/35/s 73/43/s 75/50/s Tampa 71/55/s 75/58/s 80/60/s W. Palm Bch 77/61/t 82/64/s 80/68/pc Winter Haven 74/53/s 79/57/s 81/60/s Acapulco 91/68/t 89/70/pc 90/70/s Athens 61/54/r 59/49/r 63/56/pc Beirut 65/55/s 73/65/c 79/62/pc Berlin 46/35/pc 50/35/c 49/36/c Bermuda 67/63/r 68/66/sh 71/64/s Calgary -8/-24/c -6/-22/pc -7/-16/s Dublin 43/30/sh 43/31/sh 46/35/r Edmonton -10/-27/s -8/-26/s -4/-17/s Freeport 74/65/t 78/67/s 78/68/s Geneva 43/35/r 39/18/pc 37/26/sn Havana 84/61/t 85/63/pc 84/61/s Hong Kong 73/65/pc 75/65/c 76/64/c Jerusalem 59/47/s 71/56/pc 75/52/s Johannesburg 77/58/c 75/55/sh 75/57/t Kiev 38/31/c 41/35/c 44/39/c London 48/34/r 45/36/pc 48/37/sh Montreal 10/0/pc 21/0/sn 10/-4/s Moscow 36/19/pc 31/24/pc 32/28/c Nice 54/42/r 57/43/s 56/43/s Ottawa 10/4/pc 25/-3/sn 7/-3/s Quebec 7/-13/pc 14/-4/sn 10/-11/s Rio de Janeiro 88/77/pc 87/74/t 85/72/t Seoul 54/34/c 54/30/pc 50/27/s Singapore 87/75/pc 88/76/pc 89/76/pc Sydney 76/65/sh 77/62/sh 80/62/pc Toronto 12/11/pc 30/0/c 12/2/s Vancouver 46/29/pc 38/29/pc 39/36/pc Vienna 47/40/c 54/41/pc 50/38/r Warsaw 47/37/c 49/35/c 44/37/c Winnipeg -1/-20/sn -11/-26/s -6/-27/s Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. A frigid day is in store for many residents across the Northeast and Midwest today with arctic air in place over the regions. Morning lows will be at or below zero from North Dakota to the Ohio Valley and up into the mountains of New England, making it dangerous for some outdoor activities. Some snow will also fall west of the Great Lakes as low pressure forms over the area. A different area of low pressure will bring a bit of rain to the lower Mississippi Valley with some snow in Missouri. National Forecast for February 28 Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rrain, sf-snow urries, sn-snow, i-ice. Partly sunny and warmer today. Mainly clear tonight. Mostly sunny and nice tomorrow. Sunday: pleasant with times of clouds and sun. Monday: partly sunny. Tuesday: times of clouds and sun. On Feb. 28, 1900, a giant storm produced a state record 24-hour snowfall of 36 inches in Astoria, Ill. The storm moved on to drop 43 inches of snow on Rochester, N.Y. Partly sunny and warmer today. Winds north 4-8 mph. Expect 4-8 hours of sunshine with average relative humidity 50% and good drying conditions. Mainly clear tonight. Sunday. and Saturday. a.m. and after 4 p.m. NewFirstFullLast Mar 1Mar 8Mar 16Mar 23 Today SaturdayForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 65/44 69/43 69/43 68/50 73/52 74/53 71/55 70/55 70/55 71/51 77/58 75/60 75/54 77/61 76/65 78/66 65/35 60/40 60/49 75/53 76/53 76/54 76/53 77/53 76/54 75/67 TemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHeat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayBarometer PrecipitationFive-Day forecast for Highlands County Almanac U.S. Cities World Cities National Summary Tides UV Index Today Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional Summary Lake Levels Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows. Readings at Palm Beach Readings at St. Petersburg The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterday 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. Jacksonville Gainesville Ocala Daytona Beach Orlando Winter Haven Tampa Clearwater St. Petersburg Sarasota Fort Myers Naples Okeechobee West Palm Beach Fort Lauderdale Miami Tallahassee Apalachicola Key West Avon Park Sebring Lorida Lake Placid Venus Brighton PensacolaCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W M C Y K

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Use rags or sponges instead of paper towels for cleaning. Damp sponges may be zapped for a minute in the microwave to kill germs. LIVING BFriday, February 28, 2014 Drink Chilean or Australian wine. These regions are still deals in the wine world. Use the library. But return books on time to avoid nes.Do breakfast or lunch out instead of dinner.Sell the extra gym membership youre not using.Turn the thermostat way down at night.Cut your childrens hair yourself.SIGN UP FOR YOUR COMPANYS COMMUTER BENEFITS. Many employers allow you to purchase public transit at Drink before you go out (but dont drink at the bar, enjoy a pour at home with your dining companions.FALL BACK IN LOVE WITH PLASTIC BAGS. Pump regular instead of premium. Many In fact, engines designed for regular fuel may run worse on premium blends.ORDER THE BOTTLE. BE A GROUP PERSON. from your alumni association or any other things like Call your credit card issuers and ask for a better rate or to have that late fee removed. Credit card companies usually allow two courtesy removals of late fees (which can top $40) if you call right away and ask forgiveness. Ask for a better interest rate too you dont have to drive a hard bargain to do this. They dont want to see you taking your business elsewhere. CHALLENGE YOUR PROPERTY TAX ASSESSMENT. DOWNLOAD YOUR WORKOUTS. Put a coffee maker at your desk. Buy the best ground coffee available and treat yourself to a premium cup of joe.Skip the vending machine and buy soft drinks at the supermarket.Call your utilities and ask for a better plan/rate. Cell phone carriers will tell you if you can change your plan and get a better rate. Cable companies and other utilities may have cheaper plans too.STRETCH LEFTOVER TAKEOUT. Use your banks rewards program. You might be earning valuable points each time you use your debit card. Cash them in for air tickets, household goods and more.SHOP ONLY FOR WHAT YOULL EAT IN A DAY. Go to and get promotion codes for free shipping from 800 retailers.Look into your medical reimbursement plan. Talk with your employers beneon known medical expenses.Put your airline miles to use.Use the slow cooker and microwave more. They are much more the stove and the oven.MAXIMIZE YOUR BANK ACCOUNTS. interest or earn bank DRIVE LESS AGGRESSIVELY. Take advantage of theater deals. Second-run movie theaters show good run theaters offer discount nights. Look for deals on earlier-in-theday movies too. Accessorize. Give new life to last years frocks with cheap jewelry from teenybop per stores like Forever 21, or discounters like Wal-Mart and Target. Looking to shave a few dollars off your budget but dont know where to start? Here are some tips on stretching your funds during these challenging economic times. Shop resell before retail. From books to beds, clothing to cars, think used. M C Y K

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B2 DAIL Y COMMERCIAL Friday February 28, 2014 B2 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com PUZZLE CORNER Solution on B3Dear Abby: My wife of 45 years is having an online affair with a man who is a former business client. I found out when she inadvertently left an email message open on her laptop. Her phone records conrm daily long-distance conversations, as well. Although I know they have never met personally, they plan to meet dur ing a weekend convention at a hotel in his hometown next month. Despite problems in our marriage, neither of us has strayed, and Im condent she doesnt want to lose me nor do I want to lose her. My dilemma is whether to tell her I know whats going on prior to her trip, or confront her when she returns with pictures taken by a private investigator. I cant let her betrayal continue. Conicted in the South Dear Conicted: Tell her sooner rather than later, so she can cancel her trip to the conven tion. If shes willing to do that and work on repair ing your marriage, there is a chance that your problems are xable. If she isnt, then face it your stressed marriage is over. Photos from a private investigator are beside the point. The email you read is proof enough. Dear Abby: I have reconnected with my high school sweetheart. We plan to be married late this summer. My problem is she wants to keep her ex-husbands name as her middle name for the sake of her kids. I feel she shouldnt have another mans name if shes married to some one else. I have explained that it upsets me, but she doesnt care. What are your thoughts? Traditional Man Dear Traditional: I think her reason for wanting to retain her married name (and probably hyphen ate it with yours) is a valid one. It will prevent confusion for her children at school. However, one line in your letter concerns me. Its the one in which you say it upsets you, but she doesnt care. If she didnt care about you, she wouldnt be marrying you. But her children MUST come rst, and unless you can accept that fact, you shouldnt marry her. Dear Abby: Recently, my friend went to a wake and told me the person in the casket was holding a fork. My friend told me there is a story behind this cus tom. Can you tell me what it is? Daily Reader in West Palm Dear Daily Reader: The story, titled Keep Your Fork, has been wide ly shared on the Internet. It appeared in A Third Serving of Chicken Soup for the Soul and was authored by Roger William Thomas. It concerns a young woman who had been given only a short time to live, and who instructed her pastor that she would like to be buried with a fork in her right hand. She went on to say, In all my years of attending church potluck dinners, when the dishes of the main course were being cleared, someone would say, Keep your fork. She said the main course was her favorite part of the meal because she knew something better was coming ... something wonderful, and with substance. What she wanted was to convey to her loved ones at her funeral her belief that something better was to come.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phil lips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. To order How to Write Letters for All Occasions, send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby Letter Book let, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. Shipping and handling are included in the price.Open email exposes wifes secret plans for weekend rendezvous DEAR A BB YJeanne Phillips JAKE CO Y LEAP Film WriterSettling in for a lm that takes place almost entirely on an airplane, as does the latest Liam Neeson action ick Non-Stop, ones instinct is to search for the nearest sleeping pill. The prospect of nearly two hours on an airliner, without the complimen tary peanuts, is not quite the sensory experience we typically seek in the movies. After federal air marshal Bill Marks (Neeson) morosely guzzles some whiskey in his car outside JFK Airport, he boards the plane headed for Heathrow that hes to protect, that will be the setting from here on out. If youre now hitting the call ight attendant button for help, youll be pleased with the results. Things pick up when down the aisle strolls stewardesses Michelle Dockery and Lupita Nyongo. The plane populates with our cast: Julianne Moore (Marks chatty seatmate), a school teacher (Scoot McNairy), a tough New Yorker (Corey Stroll) and a Muslim doc tor (Omar Metwally). Neeson begins getting mysterious text messages from a hijacker on board a snake on the plane, if you will who says someone will die every 20 minutes until $150 million is sent to an off-shore ac count. The cabin pressure steadily rises. It could be anyone on the plane, a clever little conceit reective of todays air travel: Everyone is treated like a suspect. In the lms best image, Marks has all the passengers hold their hands up. But, as with so many high-concept lms, it takes an awful lot of im plausibility to keep the story airborne. The manner of the deaths turns suspicion to Marks, himself, and even his boss (via phone) believes hes the terrorist. Most incredulously, the plot is propelled by the live coverage of the incident by NY1, that cute little local New York cable channel. Moore breathes life into the claustrophobia, as does Dockery both helpful aids to Marks. Nyongo, the young Oscarnominated actress of Years a Slave, has bare ly a line, but sports a cool at top. But the question is as was with the similarly European-backed, one-word titled thrillers Taken, Taken 2 and Unknown what to make of this unlikely action hero turn for Neeson at 61? NonStop is directed by the Spanish-born lmmaker Jaume Collet-Serra, who also helmed Unknown. Now theyre churning them out. The movies, NonStop included, are simple, mostly serviceable genre icks that are smart enough to dispense with exposition but not witty enough to put three acts together. Neesons presence wounded, intelligent, honorable is much sturdier than these lms, which he elevates with ease. Its not an issue of him lowering himself to them, but of these lms not raising themselves to Neeson. On Minutes recent ly, Neeson was himself bemused and rather sheepish about this career turn to movies he acknowledged were straight-tovideo stuff. But his suggestion that he came to Taken and the rest because it allowed him to busy himself after the death of his wife, Natasha Richardson, gives these movies a melancholy poetry: The weary Neeson, kicking butt to keep the demons at bay. Non-Stop, a Universal Pictures release, is rated PG-13 by the Motion Picture Association of America for intense sequences of action and violence, some language, sensuality and drug references. Running time: 106 minutes. Two stars out of four.Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http:// twiter.com/jake_coyleN eeson keeps N on-Stop from crashingMOVIE REVIEW CRITI CS RATING: Universal PicturesLiam Neeson stars as air marshal Bill Marks in Non-Stop. M C Y K

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Friday, February 28, 2014 DAIL Y COMMERCIAL B3 www.newssun.comFriday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B3 HEALTHY LIVING Health care experts are rediscovering an old-fashioned concept that may help lower health care costs and improve the quality of health care: shared decision making. What is shared decision making? It is when you and your doctor work to gether as co-pilots as you travel through the health care system. And you have the right to ask your doctor to use shared decision making whenever you need to decide among sev eral treatment options.What does shared decision making mean?Shared decision making can mean different things depending on the situation. But one of its central ideas is that we need to get patients (and, when appropriate, families) and caregivers more involved in health care decisions. The main goal of shared decision making is to give patients the knowledge and skills they need to take an active role in their health care. Using shared decision making is especially im portant when a patient has a medical condition that has more than one medically sound treatment option. In these cases, there is no single, correct medical solutionthe best solution depends on the patients personal prefer ences and values.What are the elements of a shared decision making program?All shared decisionmaking programs should contain four fundamental elements: Information: Patients should receive clear and unbiased informa tion that describes their condition, that addresses the pros and cons of different treatment options, and that helps them envision how their life might change based on their decision. Support: Patients should be well-supported dur ing the decision-making process. They should get help understanding the information given to them and should feel free to discuss their values and preferences with their provider. Discussion: Patients and providers should share information and make a decision together that is based on the best med ical evidence and tailored to the specic needs and circumstances of the patient. Follow-through: Care should be delivered in the agreed upon manner and in a way that respects patients preferences and values. Patients should stay in contact with their providers and continue to receive support for other health care decisions.What are patient decision aids?Patient decision aids are written, video, or webbased tools that are designed to help patients do the following: Become more knowledgeable about their health condition and treatment options Decide which risks and benets are most important to them Envision how the differ ent options would affect their daily lives When designed well, these decision aids can help patients make choices that reect their prefer ences and values. Although shared decision making programs do not necessarily need patient decision aids to be effective, it is essential that patients be well-informed and feel empowered to participate in the decision-making process.An illustration of shared decision makingAbout 17 out of every 100 men in the United States will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime. Howev er, fewer than three of every 100 men will die from prostate cancer. The decision to test for localized prostate cancer in men older than 70 is not clear cut, and one medically sound option is to not screen at all. Men in this age group also have time to think about their options, since prostate cancer often progresses slowly. The decision by old er men to be screened for prostate cancer is a good example of an area where a patient decision aid can be helpful. Two good decision aids are the brochure and video developed by Health Crossroads (www. healthcrossroads.com). Families USA has written an overview of shared decision making, Shared Decision Making: Engaging Patients to Improve Care, which answers key questions about how shared decision making works, how it can improve patient care, how it ts into a more patient-centered health system, how to design a good shared decision making program, and a list of links to other resources.Ron Pollack is executive director of Families USA. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not neces sarily those of the News-Sun. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat or cure your conditionShared decision making: How to be a co-pilot with your doctor MetroOne of the central ideas of shared decision making is getting patients and caregivers more involved with their doctor when it comes to making health care decisions. GUEST COLUMNRon Pollack Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID The Alzheimers Association, Florida Gulf Coast Chap ter, is starting a new support group in Lake Placid at the Southern Lifestyle ALF. The Alzheimers Associations support group meeting will be held the rst Monday of every month starting March 3 from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Family members, friends and caregivers are invited. Support groups are critical support networks to caregivers of family members with Alzheimers disease and related memory disorders. Caregivers nd comfort in sharing their experiences with others in similar situations and learning from each other. Research shows that Alzheimer caregivers are at a much greater risk for a number of health problems including de pression, anxiety, car diovascular problems, high blood pressure and physical injury than non-caregivers in their age group. One in eight caregivers becomes ill or injured as a direct result of caregiving. By providing an envi ronment of support, education and acceptance support groups can increase coping skills and empower caregivers. Further, support groups can improve the health of the caregiver, enhance the quality of care given to the individual with Al zheimers and possibly delay placement of the affected person into a residential facility. In addition, the Alzheimers Association is partnering with Southern Lifestyle in offer ing Caregiver Trainings from 3-4 p.m. every Friday in March. There is no charge to attend. This Caregiver Training is for caregivers, family members, and anyone else who is interested in learning more about dementia or Alzheimers Disease and the services that may be needed. The schedule is: Caregiver Training Series at Southern Lifestyle ALF March 7 Alzheimers Disease: The Basics of the Epidemic March 14 Communicating with the Per son with Dementia March 21 Dealing with Challenging Behaviors Southern Lifestyle ALF is at 1297 U.S. 27. For more information and to RSVP call 385-3444, email canalesc@alzgulf.org or call the library 699-3705.New support group for Alzheimers caregiversOne in eight caregivers becomes ill or injured as a direct result of caregiving Associated PressSAN DIEGO The death of a 10-year-old San Diego boy from a bacterial infection he reportedly got from his pet rat prompted his family to sue retailer Petco, saying they want to raise awareness among par ents. Attorney John Gomez told The Associated Press on Tuesday that his rm led the lawsuit Monday in San Diego County seeking an unspecied amount for the suffering endured by the Pankey family, whose son, Aidan, died June 12, 2013, hours after he was rushed to the hospital with severe stomach pains. The San Diego County medical examiners ofce ruled that the cause of death was streptobacillus moniliformis infection, commonly known as ratbite fever, after exposure to an infected rat. Gomez said the Pan key family was not giving interviews, but they are devastated by the death. Its a means to ensure this doesnt happen again, Gomez said of the lawsuit. Apparently there was some breakdown in procedures. They want tighter controls. According to the law suit, the rat appeared safe. But the lawsuit says Petco should have known about the rodents health and did not adequately test for the disease. It also says that negligence led to the boys death, which has caused his parents, Andrew Pankey and Van essa Sauer, emotional and economic hardship, and that the retailer did not post adequate warnings about the potential risks, especially for children. Petco Animal Supplies Inc. said it is in the pro cess of investigating these claims and will respond appropriately when we have more information. Meanwhile, the retailer in a statement expressed its condolences. We are deeply sad dened by the Pankey familys tragic loss, Petco said. The health and safety of people and pets is always a top priority, and we take the familys concerns very seriously. The boys grandmother purchased the male rat, which Aidan named Alex, because her only grandson wanted a mate for his female rat, Gomez said. The boy took the rat home May 27, 2013, and woke up the night of June 11 in severe pain with a fever and stomach prob lems. He was pale, lethar gic and could barely walk, according to the lawsuit. He died at 1:09 a.m. the next day. He was a bright, ener getic, friendly, happy kid who actually had a prior rat, who was a female, and he had this idea in his young head of having his female rat get mar ried, Gomez said. The lawsuit was not led until now because attorneys were awaiting the lab results from the federal Centers for Dis ease Control, which tested the rat to conrm it was infected, Gomez said. According to the CDC, people can contract ratbite fever from bites or scratches from infected rodents, such as rats, mice and gerbils, or even just by handling an animal with the disease without a bite or scratch. Boys death from infected rat spurs suit vs. Petco M C Y K

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B4 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Handicap Americans Love of Live Organization (HAL LO) is partnering with lo cal doctors, nutritionists, tness professionals, ho listic medical practitio ners, foods experts and more to host its very rst Walk With The Docs to be held in conjunction with HALLOs annual Wellness Day on Saturday at the Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road. The Walk with the Docs will be a two-mile hike after a short yoga warm up. The walk start time is at 8:15 am. Spon sorships are available for $100 and can be as many people that would want to walk with their docs or ride in wheelchairs. Also available are individual entries for $5 each. Morning refreshments will be available. An added feature will be a fresh produce stand from the Miller Farms in Lake Placid. Inside, the Wellness Day lecture series will also be starting at 8 am. Azure College students will be taking vitals at sign-in. The lectures continue un til 1 p.m. A complimentary brunch will be available mid-morning. Topics include: Awareness of Your Body, Mind & Spirit through Exercise, Breathing & Meditation by Beth Plank, certied yoga instructor; Stress Management and Relational Wellness by Felicia Coke, physical therapist and life coach; Advanced Isolated Stretching Therapy by Sean Snapp, L.M.T.; Customized Wellness by Amanda Lucero, ARNP-C. and Advanced MLS Ther apy Cold-Wave Laser Technology, by Steve Hise. To reserve your seat for the brunch, please R.S.V.P. by calling H.A.L.L.O. at 385-1196 or email halloinc@embarq mail.com/. Countys first Walk with Docs Saturday in Sebring Also HALLOs Wellness Day H EALTHY LIVING Dear Pharmacist: Two of my relatives have pancreatic cancer, and Im worried sick for myself. No symptoms yet, but is there anything I can share with them, or take myself? D.T., Sacramento, Calif. Answer: Im sorry to hear about your relatives. Pancreatic cancer is on the rise, certain medica tions and foods and beverages increase its risk. I wrote a book on the topic to help people. Squashing free radicals is helpful, as well as pancreatic enzymes. Any thing that slows growth or spreading is important. Detoxifying the body (par ticularly lymph) is probably number one on my list. As a natural-minded pharmacist, I love nding research about natural plant extracts that work like pharmaceuticals. Theres a protein in your body called mTOR which plays a vital role in how each cell thrives, divides, or dies. When this protein and associated metabolic pathway is turned on too high, it promotes cancer spreading. If we interfere with the mTOR pathway, it helps stop the formation of new blood vessels which feed the tumor. These mTOR inhibitors help peo ple with pancreatic cancer and possibly induce remission, at least for awhile. This was shown in February 2011, in the Jour nal of Clinical Oncology, entitled, mTOR Inhibi tor Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer in a Patient with PJS. The scientists used a drug called everolimus (Anitor). Other mTOR inhibitors available today include Certican and Torisel, and others in the pipeline. There are natural com pounds which are known to interfere with mTOR but to a lesser extent compared to these cancer drugs. Resveratrol (you know, from grapes!) is one of them as reported in The Journal of Biological Chemistry (November 19, 2010). The scientists knew going into the study that resveratrol was a powerful herbal with strong antiox idant, anti-inammatory, and nerve-protecting effects on the body. Guess what other herb reduces mTOR activity? Curcumin, one of the active compounds in tur meric spice, popular in Indian cuisine. Many studies prove curcumin slows down the growth of differ ent types of cancer. Curcumin may be helpful for pancreatitis because it reduces inammation in the pancreas and reduces inammatory pain-causing chemicals. Wonderful, but you may need special IVs or supplements to get it to work. Saffron (Crocus sativus) is amazing. This gor geous ower is available as a spice, and a supplement (by Exir). Saffron supplements seem to help reduce chemotherapy-induced cell damage (damage to the DNA). Crocetin, a carotenoid derived from saffron appears to compete with the drug gemcitabine which is one of the standard therapies for pancreatic cancer. Remarkably, both the herb and the chemo drug compete for the same receptor site, which is the doorway into your cell. Are they try ing to do the same good thing in there? The discussion of using resveratrol, curcumin or saffron is between you and your doctor. Even though these are natural herbs, with excellent safety proles, I have no idea whats right for you and your safety is my rst concern. Ask a licensed practitioner about customizing your personal health regimen.Suzy Cohen is a registered pharmacist and the author of The 24Hour Pharmacist and Real Solutions. For more information, visit www.suzycohen.com/. This information is not intended to treat, diagnose or cure your condition. Three herbal supplements have anti-cancer activity DEAR PHARMACISTSuzy Cohen Change of Pace offers workshops SEBRING Change of Pace will host workshops taught by Charlie Stroup from 9:30-10:30 the next three Fridays. Todays workshop, My Rope is Dwindling to Threads, deals with an ticipatory grief. The March 7 topic is Wheres The Off Button? and deals with anger, sadness and fear. The March 14 topic is Stepping On My Last Nerve and deals with handling the activities of daily living. The workshops will be held at 4514 Hammock Road. No RSVP needed. Call 382-1188 for details.Outreach events planned Comprehensive Homecare offers the fol lowing community outreach events. Monday 8 a.m., Brookside Bluffs, Zolfo Springs; 10 a.m. Chatham Pointe, Wauchula; 1 p.m., Crown Pointe, Sebring, Alzheimers Support group. Tuesday 9 a.m., Groves, Sebring; 10:30 a.m., Fair Havens, Sebring; 1 p.m., Briarwood, Sebring. Wednesday 8 a.m. Villa Del Sol, Avon Park; 9 a.m. Meal Site, Avon Park Thursday 6:30 a.m. ARC Avon Park, Pleasant Avenue; 9:30 a.m., Meal Site, Lake Placid; 10:30 a.m., Balmoral Alzheimers Support Group, Lake Placid. All sites are spon sored by their facility with Comprehensive as guests. All events are open to the public. Call Barb, 214-6795.SNAPSHOTS LOCAL NEWS The news is just a click away! www.newssun.com N EWS -S UN Associated PressWASHINGTON Its not just about what Americas kids are getting in the lunch line. The Obama administration is moving to phase out junk food advertis ing on football score boards and elsewhere on school grounds part of a broad effort to com bat child obesity and cre ate what Michelle Obama calls a new norm for to days schoolchildren and future generations. This new approach to eating and activity is not just a fad, Mrs. Obama said Tuesday as she de scribed the proposed rules at the White House. Promotion of sugary drinks and junk foods around campuses dur ing the school day would be phased out under the Agriculture Department rules, which are intend ed to ensure that mar keting is brought in line with health standards that already apply to food served by public schools. That means a scoreboard at a high school football or basketball game eventually wouldnt be allowed to advertise Coca-Cola, for example, though it could advertise Diet Coke or Dasani wa ter, also owned by CocaCola Co. Same with the front of a vending ma chine. Cups, posters and menu boards that pro mote foods that dont meet federal standards would also be phased out. Ninety-three percent of such marketing in schools is related to beverages. And many soda companies already have started to transition their sales and advertising in schools from sugary sodas and sports drinks to other products they produce. Companies are spending $149 million a year on marketing to kids in schools, according to the Agriculture Department. The announcement at the White House was part of a week of events marking the fourth anni versary of the rst ladys Lets Move program. Mrs. Obama also traveled to Miami Tuesday to announce that the Boys & Girls Clubs of America and the National Recreation and Park Association will serve more fruits and vegetables at afterschool programs and ensure kids get 30-60 minutes of physical activity a day. NBCs Parks and Recreation star Amy Poehler introduced the rst lady. The proposed school marketing rules come on the heels of federal regulations that now require food in school lunch lines to be more healthful than in the past. Separate rules, which are to go into effect in September, will cover oth er food around school as well, including in vending machines and a la carte lines in the lunch room. Calorie, fat, sugar and sodium limits now will have to be met on almost every food and beverage sold during the school day, as mandated by a 2010 child nutrition law. Even though diet sodas would be allowed in high schools under the pro posed rules announced Tuesday, the rules dont address the question raised by some as to whether those drinks are actually healthful alternatives to sugary soda. Some healthful-food rules have come under re from conservatives who say the government shouldnt dictate what kids eat and from some students who dont like the new alternatives.Cut out junk food ads in schools, government says MCTCompanies are spending $149 million a year on marketing to kids in schools, according to the Agriculture Department. MCYK

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www.newssun.comFriday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B5 R ELIGION Avon Park Christian ChurchAVON PARK Pastor Greg Ratliff will bring a message from Gods Word in the morning and also at the evening contemporary worship on Sunday. Wednesday evening will continue in the Ecclesiastes Bible study. Avon Park Christian Church is at 1016 W. Camphor (behind the Wells Fargo Bank). Call 453-5334 or email apcc.2014@yahoo.com with any questions or to request information. The church website is http:// www.avonparkchristian church.com/Christ Lutheran ChurchAVON PARK Pastor Scott McLean will be preaching a sermon entitled Here I Am on Sunday, The church is at 1320 C.R. 64, east of the Avon Park High School past the four-way stop sign. For more information, call 863-471-2663 or visit www.christlutheranavon park.org/.Christian Science Church{p class=p1}SEBRING The lesson sermon on Sunday morning is ti tled Mind. The keynote is from Isaiah 48:17 I am, . . I am the LORD your God, who teaches you what is good for you and leads you along the paths you should follow.{p class=p2}The church is at 154 N. Franklin St.Christian Training ChurchSEBRING Rev. Linda M. Downing will bring the message titled Restored and Loosed: Part 2 at the Sunday morning ser vice. The Wednesday night Bible study is the Gospel of John.Emmanuel United Church of ChristSEBRING Rev. George Miller will deliver the ser mon, Surprising Gifts of the Spirit, from 1 Corinthians 12:4-7 and Galatians 5:22-23. The church is 1.7 miles west of U.S. 27 on County Road 634 (Hammock Road). Call 471-1999 or visit www.sebringemman uelucc.com/.Faith Baptist Church of Lake PlacidLAKE PLACID This Sunday, Pastor Bill Cole will be preaching Holy Spirit Protocol from the book of Romans in the morning and in the eve ning he will preach The Beginning of the End from the Gospel of John. Mid-week prayer and Bible study is held on Wednesday. To listen to Faith Baptist Sunday morning ser mons or for more infor mation, visit www.faithbaptistchurchLP.com or call the church ofce at 863-465-0060. The church is at 660 Holmes Ave.Faith Lutheran ChurchSEBRING This Sunday, the church celebrates Transguration Sunday. Elder Bob Brumeld will be delivering his sermon at Faith Lutheran based on the readings of the day Exodus 24:8-18, 2 Peter 1:16-21, and Matthew 17:1-9. Lent Service starts on March 5. Ash Wednesday service is at 6:30 pm with Imposition of Ashes. Every Tuesday and Thursday, Senior Aerobics is offered by teacher Barbara. Classes are of nocharge, can be of varied level from Silver Snickers and Up. L.I.F.T. Ladies In Faith/Fellowship Togethers study is called Productive: Finding Joy In What We Do. Friday, March 7, they will study Good Work from Genesis 1:28, 2:8-9, 15-17. Work is a gift from God, not a curse.First Baptist Church Avon ParkAVON PARK Rev. Jon Beck will be preaching morning worship service out of James 4:10-17. Nursery is available for the morning and evening services. The Church is at 100 N. Lake Ave. For more infor mation call 863-453-6681 or email info@fbcap.netFirst Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)SEBRING Sundays message is from Philippians 4: 2-7 Rejoice in the Lord Always by Pastor Ron Norton. Elders at the Communion Table Sunday will be Diane Beidler and Howard Lewis. Deacons serving will be Catherine Baker, Carol Graves, Terry Ducar and Carol Chandler. The church is at 510 Poinsettia Ave.First Presbyterian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK Pastor Bob Johnsons sermon Sunday is entitled The Starting Line based on II Timothy 1:8-12. The choirs introit will be Thou Art Worthy and the anthem will be Days of Elijah. The adult Sunday school class is using the de nominational quarter ly. The theme this quarter is the Gospel of Matthew. Sundays lesson is entitled Teaching in Parables. Members are asked to bring non-perish able items for the Church Service Center. Youth Group meets at the Johnsons home Sunday evening for a meal, short Bible study, games and crafts. Wednesday morn ing, Pastor Johnson will lead Bible study from the book What is Spiritual Warfare? On Thursday, the Mens Fellowship meets at The Depot for breakfast and returns to the church for a short Bible study and a work project. The church is at 215 E. Circle Street (with two entrances on LaGrand St.). Call 453-3242 or visit www.avonparkapchurch. com/.First United Methodist Church of SebringSEBRING Pastor John A. Bryant will bring the message Sunday. The ser vice of Holy Communion will be observed. Ash Wednesday Services will be held on March 5 in the sanctuary. Sunday, March 9, guest speaker Jeff Steinberg, a tiny giant, will provide the message in all three church services. Everyone is invited to attend and hear this inspiring man. The church is downtown at 126 South Pine St. Call 385-5184.Grace Pointe MinistriesSEBRING The church meets at 200 Lark Ave. in the Sebring Hills Association Clubhouse. The message this week is on the month of Adar II on the Hebrew calendar. This is the year of Adar I and Adar II, a time of dou ble blessings. For the kids, Bible study and crafts. Tuesday Home Bible Studys Messiah: Shadow To Image continues this week with a study of how Jesus connects be tween the Old and New Testaments. Each weeks study is independent in itself, so just jump in any time. For directions, call 863-658-2534. Friday Night Study is with GoToMeeting. Let the pastor know if you would like to participate at www. gracepointecog@comcast. net and he will send you the link. Ustream available (live or 24/7) of all servic es. Log on to ustream.tv, and then enter gracepointetv in the search box. The church Website is www.gracepointeministries.net/. Pastor Zimmer has started a blog. Log on at Ron-gracepointes. blogspot.com. WOW Radio Jesus daily moments can be heard every day. Log on at wowradionetwork.com and click the Praise Him tab.Heartland Christian ChurchSebring Pastor Ted Moores sermon this week will be Abstain With scripture from: I Thessalonians 4:1-8 Communion is offered during the service weekly The service will include Beverly Nuske singing Just a Closer Walk With You, special music by Mary VanHooreweghe and Flossi Moore and a trum pet solo by Vic Anderson. Tuesday night Adult Bible Study is taught by Pastor Moore. Wednesday night supper is served by Barbra Kelly and Dorothy Newton. Young adult and childrens programs are taught by George Kelly, Amanda and Jon Armentrout and Toby Cribbs. The church is at 2705 Alternate Route 17 South in Sebring (behind Publix). Call 314-9693.Memorial United Methodist ChurchLAKE PLACID Pastor Tim Haas will preach on Your Life Changing Experience at the Sunday morning worship services. The scripture will be from II Peter 1:16-19. Communion will be served at each service. Opportunity for Healing, with the anointing of oil, will be available at both services. Youth Group will meet in the LIghthouse Sunday evening under the di rection of Pastor Claude Burnett. The Crossover Quartet from Pennsylvania will present Southern gospel music family style at 6 p.m. Sunday. There is no admission charge and a free will offering will be received for the Quartet. The Church is at 500 Kent Ave. behind the Tower. Call 465-2422.New Beginnings ChurchSEBRING On Sunday, Pastor Gary Kindles is titled Eyewitnesses based on 2 Peter 1:16-21 New Beginnings Church of Sebring is a Bible-oriented, Nondenominational church led by Pastor Kindle. There is a blended service with contemporary and tradi tional music. Holy Communion is celebrated monthly. The church meets at the Morris Chapel, 307 S. Commerce Ave. Call 835-2405.New Life Evangelical Lutheran ChurchSEBRING Sundays sermon from Pastor Luke Jon Willitz will be We Have the Prophetic Word fr om 2 Peter 1:16-21. The church is at 3725 Hammock Road. Call 385-2293.St. John United Methodist ChurchSEBRING On Sunday, Pastor Ronald De Genaro Jr.s message will be About Mountains and Valleys. Biblical reference is from Matthew 17:19. Communion will be served. Nursery is provid ed at all services. The church is at 3214 Grand Prix Drive. Call 382-1736.Spring Lake United Methodist ChurchSEBRING Rev. Weavers sermon Sunday will be Accept Gods Invitation Fellowship fol lows the service. The church is at 8170 Cozumel Lane. SNAPSHOTS CHUR CH SERVICES NEWS-SUN M C Y K

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B6 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com PLACES TO WORSHI PPlaces to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sun that is published Friday and Sunday. To place a listing in this directory, call the News-Sun at 3856155, ext. 596.ANGLIC ANNew L ife A nglican Fellowship, 10 N. Main Ave. (Womans Club), Lake Placid, FL 33852. Rev. Susan Rhodes, Deacon in Charge, (863) 243-3191; strhodes1020@yahoo.com. Sun day Worship, 10 a.m. Teaching, Holy Commu nion, Music, Fellowship, Healing Prayer. Pas toral and Spiritual.ASSEMB L Y OF G ODC hrist Fellowship C hurch (A ssembly of God) 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Await ing His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morn ing Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 471-0924. First A ssembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Eve ning Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431.BAPT I STA von Park L akes Baptist C hurch, 22600 N. Highlands Blvd., Avon Park, FL 33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ cen tered and biblically based. Sunday wor ship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist C hurch (GARBC ) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C17A (truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., and evening worship service is at 6 p.m. On Wednes days, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20s+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www. bethanybaptistap.com or call the church of ce at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist C hurch, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Wor ship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist C hurch, 1000 Max well St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Wor ship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Ser vice, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Tele phone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: ofce@apfellowship.org; Web site, www.ap fellowship.org. First Baptist C hurch of A von Park, N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 453-6681. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Rev. Johnattan Soltero, His panic pastor; Joy Loomis, director of music. Sunday Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Wor ship, 10:45 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:45 a.m.; Youth Choir, 4:30 p.m.; Evening Wor ship, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for both ser vices. Wednesday Wednesday Night Sup per, 5:15 p.m.; Childrens Choir, 5:45 p.m.; Youth Activities, 6 p.m.; Prayer Meeting/Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Worship Choir Practice, 6 p.m.; Mission Programs for Children, 6:45 p.m. Hispanic Services: Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., worship service at 11 a.m. Wednes day Bible study at 7 p.m. To watch services online, go to the website at www.fbcap.net. In the heart of Avon Park, for the hearts of Avon Park. First Baptist C hurch of L ake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both ser vices with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meet ing at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist C hurch of L ake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm St., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Website: www.fbclp. com. Email: information@fbclp.com. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contem porary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Wednesday Activities: Fam ily dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reserva tions required). Prayer meeting, Youth Inter sections, and MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. The church is at 119 E. Royal Palm St., Lake Placid. For information, call 465-3721 or go to www.fbclp.com. First Baptist C hurch of L orida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School be gins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday wor ship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., fol lowed by adult choir rehearsal. From Septem ber the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the minis tries offered, call 655-1878. First Baptist C hurch, S ebring, 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Rev. Matthew D. Crawford, se nior pastor; Rev. Nuno Norberto, associ ate pastor, minister of music and senior adults; and Dixie Kreulen, preschool direc tor. Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.; Blend ed Service, 10:30 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Call 385-4704. Website www.fbsebring.com Florida A venue Baptist C hurch, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Gird ley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children and youth at 6 p.m. and for adults at 6:30 p.m. I ndependent Baptist C hurch, 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday wor ship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. L eisure L akes Baptist C hurch, 808 Gar denia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Wor ship service at 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 6 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist C hurch (GARBC) 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Eve ning Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Mes senger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist C hurch, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 2143025. Afliated with the National Associa tion of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. S parta R oad Baptist C hurch, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Evangelist Roger Jaudon. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For infor mation, call 382-0869. S outhside Baptist C hurch (GARBC) 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Awana kin dergarten through fth grade, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for under age 3 is avail able at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Ofce phone, 385-0752. S pring L ake Baptist C hurch, Where the Bible is Always Open. Pastor Richard Schermerhorn, 7408 Valencia Road; 6552610. Assistant Pastor Ronald Smith, 3861610. On U.S. 98 at the Spring Lake Vil lage II entrance. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. for all ages; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednes day Mid-week Bible Study and Prayer Service, 6:30 p.m. Nursery available for all services. S unridge Baptist C hurch, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695.C ATHO LICO ur L ady of Grace C atholic C hurch, 595 E. Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vig il Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English. Sunday Life Teen Mass at 6 p.m. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. English confession at 3:30 p.m. Saturday; Spanish confession at 6:30 p.m. Religious Education Classes (September to May) are 9-10:20 a.m. Sun day for grades K through 5th. Grades 6th through Youth Bible Study are from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. S t. C atherine C atholic C hurch, 820 Hick ory St., Sebring. Parrish ofce/mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 3850049, 385-6762 (Spanish); fax, 385-5169; email, ofce@stcathe.com; website, www. stcathe.com. School Ofce/Mailing, Princi pal Dr. Anna V. Adam, 747 S. Franklin St., Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7300; fax, 385-7310; email school@stcathe.com. School ofce hours 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. Clergy: Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F., frjose@ stcathe.com or 385-0049; Parochial Vicar, Rev. Victor Caviedes, 385-3993; Assisting Priest (retired), Rev. J. Peter Sheehan; De cons, Rev. Mr. James R. McGarry and Rev. Mr. Max M. Severe. WEEKEND MASS SCHEDULE: Saturday: 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 and 10 a.m., 12 p.m. (Spanish), 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center), every third Sunday of the month at 2 p.m. (French Mass). Daily Mass: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m. Sacrament of Reconcilliation: 7:157:45 a.m. rst Friday, 2:30-3:15 p.m. Satur day and 9-9:45 a.m. Sunday. Ofce Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. S t. James C atholic C hurch, 3380 Placid view Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., rst Satur day at 9 a.m.C HR I ST IANC ornerstone C hristian C hurch, (Saxon Hall) 1003 West Pine St., Avon Park, FL 33825. Love Christ Love People. Jon Carter, Music Minister. Sunday, 9 a.m. Bi ble Study; 10 a.m. Worship; Communion available each week. Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship Group. For more information call 453-7679. S ebring C hristian C hurch, 4514 Ham mock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Josh Knabel (812618-7118), Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sun day Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Changing Seasons, a mens grief support group, meets at 1:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Al zheimers Caregivers Support Group meets at 1 p.m. Thursdays. Ofce hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First C hristian C hurch (Disciples of C hrist), 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-0358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.C HR I ST IAN & M I SS ION ARY A LLI A NC ET he A lliance C hurch of S ebring, 451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL 33875. Call 3821343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednes day Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m.C HR I ST IAN S CI E NC EC hristian S cience C hurch, 154 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. A free public reading room/ bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Sci ence and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons.C HUR C H OF BRETHRE NC hurch of the Brethren, 700 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m. Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-1597.C HUR C H OF C HR I STA von Park C hurch of C hrist, 200 S. Forest Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Minister: Don Smith. Sunday Worship Services, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available at every service. Bible Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered class es for all ages. Church phone: 453-4692. H eartland church of C hrist, Lakeshore Mall Suite 42 (outside entrance), 901 U.S. Highway 27 N, Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday worship, 9 a.m. to noon; Wednesday, Bible study, 7 p.m. Evangelist Carl Ford, (863) 4022159. L ake Placid C hurch of C hrist, 1069 Hwy 27 North, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Mailing address is P.O. Box 1440, Lake Placid, FL 33862. Sunday morning worship is at 10 a.m. Sunday evening worship is 6 p.m. Bi ble class 9 a.m. Sundays and Wednesday evenings at 7 p.m. All are invited to join us. For more information, call the church at 863465-4636 or visit the website www.thelord sway.com/lakeplacidcofc/. S ebring Parkway C hurch of C hrist, 3800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870; 3857443. Minister: Kevin Patterson. Times of ser vice are: Sunday Bible Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Bible Class, 7 p.m. C HUR C H OF G ODC hurch on the R idge, Church of God, Anderson, Ind.; 1130 State Road 17 North, Sebring, FL 33870. Worship Service Sun day, 10 a.m.; Bible Study and Prayer, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Pastor Dr. Collet Varner, (863) 382-0773.C HUR C H OF N AZARE NEFirst C hurch of the Nazarene of A von Park P.O. Box 1118., Avon Park, FL 338251118. 707 W. Main St. Sunday: Sunday school begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning worship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening service at 6 p.m. Wednesday evening service is at 7 p.m. with special services for children and adults. If you need any more information, call 453-4851. C hurch of the Nazarene of L ake Plac id, 512 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852. Adult Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednes day evening: All church meal, 6 p.m.; Christian Life Study, 6:45 p.m. Winter Life groups pending. Call 446-1339. Pastor Tim Taylor.C HUR C HES OF C HR I ST IN C HR I ST IAN U NI ON C ommunity Bible C hurch C hurches of C hrist in C hristian Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17A North (truck route), Avon Park. Presenting Jesus Christ as the answer for time and eterni ty. Sunday morning worship service, 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided. Junior Church ac tivities at same time for K-6 grade. Sunday School Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m. (Transportation available.) Sunday evening praise and worship service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and youth activities at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Everyone is welcome, please come worship with us. Tom Schwankweiler, Pastor. Phone 453-6052.EP ISC OPA LE piscopal C hurch of the R edeemer A von Park, 910 W. Martin St., Avon Park, FL 33825 (U.S. 27 across from Wells Mo tor Co.). Rev. Canon George Conger. Sunday services: Holy Communion at 9:30 a.m.; Saturday Bible study at 2:15 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Come and worship with us; we would love to meet you. Church ofce, 453-5664; fax, 453-4853. Visit us at our website at redeemeravon park.com. Email redeemer1895@aol. com. Call the thrift store for hours open and donation pick up at 664-9668 or 4535664. S t. A gnes E piscopal C hurch, 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Father Scott Walker. Sunday Services: Holy Eucha rist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek service on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always welcome. Church ofce 385-7649, for more information. S t. Francis of A ssisi A nglican E pisco pal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-0051. Rev. Eliz abeth L. Nelson, Rector. Worship: Sunday, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday Bible study at 9:15 a.m. Sunday School at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Worship 6 p.m. and Thursday 9 a.m. Holy Communion with Healing. Call the thrift store for hours open 699-0221.EVA NG E LIC AL FREE C HUR C H OF AMER IC AT he C hurch of the Way EF CA, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunda1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednes days. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provid ed. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way A place for you. Ofce Phone: 471-6140, Church Cell Phone: 273-3674. Email: the waychurch@ hotmail.com. Web site: www. TheWayChurch.orgG RA C E BRETHRE NGrace Brethren C hurch, 3626 Thunderbird Road, (863) 835-0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday services at 7 p.m. We offer Kid City Chil drens Ministry throughout all services, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married couples, prime-timers, and Bible studies in Spanish. Kid City Day Care, Preschool and After-School Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For registration call: 3853111). Check us out on the Web at www. sebringgrace.org.INDEPE N DE NTFirst C hristian C hurch, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 4535334; on the Web at www.rstchristianap. com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church. Greg Ratliff, Senior Min ister; Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Wednesday studies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events.INTERDE N OM IN AT IONAL World H arvest and R estoration Ministries, (non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd.,(non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd., Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 4529777 or 453-3771. Sunday service: Sun day School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rogers.L UTHERANA tonement L utheran C hurch (ELCA) 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen will be the Spiritual Leader every Sunday for the next two months. Jim Helwig, organist. Worship service with the Holy Eucharist is at 9:30 a.m. every Sunday. Birthday Sunday is the rst Sunday of each month after the service. Council meeting is on the rst Tuesday of each month. WELCA meets at noon second Tuesday of the month with a light lunch. Labyrinth Prayer Garden is open to the public 24 hours a day, seven days a week. When in need of prayers or to talk to God, come to the Garden. Come and grow with us; we would love to meet you and your family. Dont worry about how you look. Je sus went to the temple in a robe and sandals. Quilting classes every Monday at 6 p.m. Looking for quilters or people willing to learn. Call 840-3303. C hrist L utheran C hurch A von Park LCMS 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School past the four-way stop sign. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrat ed every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellow ship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at (863) 471-2663 or see christlutheranavonpark.org. Faith L utheran C hurch LCMS ,2740 Lakeview Dr, Sebring; Church phone: 3857848; Faith Child Development Center: 3853232. Sunday Traditional Worship Service: 8 a.m.; Sunday Praise Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.; Communion served 1st, 3rd & 5th Sun day. Sunday School & Bible Classes: 9:15 a.m. Worship Svc. Broadcast at 8 a.m. on WITS 1340AM each Sunday. Educational op portunities include weekly adult Bible studies, Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good S hepherd L utheran C hurch (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Church es, 3240 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. James Weed, pastor. Worship Ser vice, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 9 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3852346. New L ife E vangelical L utheran C hurch, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fel lowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more in formation, call Pastor Luke Willitz at 3852293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. R esurrection L utheran C hurch ELCA, 324 E. Main St., at Memorial Drive, Avon Park. Pastor Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Sunday worship 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Sunday School at 9:15 a.m. Coffee and fellowship following 10:30 a.m. service. Wednesday Worship Ser vice is at 7 p.m. Open Communion celebrated at all services. Gods Work, Our Hands. T rinity L utheran C hurch LCMS 25 Lakev iew St., Lake Placid, FL 33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots Pre-School director Edu cation Hour, 8:45 a.m.; Worship service, 10 a.m. Holy Communion each rst and third Sunday. Childrens Church scheduled dur ing worship service, 4-year-olds through fth grade. Nursery provided during worship ser vice for infants to 3-year-olds. Seasonal MidWeek Services each Wwednesday evening during Advent and Lent. Call church ofce at 465-5253 or visit the website at www.Trinity lutheranlp.com. Other activities and groups include: Choir; Ladies Guild and LWML; Mens Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies; Trinity Tots Pre-school, and Youth Group.NON -DE N OM IN AT IONALBible Fellowship C hurch, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed rst and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Ser vice, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 yrs through 5th grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church ofce 3851024. C alvary C hurch, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An indepen dent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening service, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small friendly church waiting for your visit. C hristian T raining Ministries I nc., on Se bring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. A nursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denomi national ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister, lindadowning@live.com. Casey L. Downing, associate minister, caseydowning@hotmail. com. Church phone: 314-0482. Web site: www.ctmforme.com C rossroads of L ife,148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852; Tel. 863-655-9163. The place of your Divine appointment. We ex pect our supernatural God to transform our lives through His power and grace. Come, learn of His plan and destiny for you. With His plan we receive His provision along with His perfect timing and opportunity. What you have longed for, but have been missing, can now be received. The direction you have been thirsty for will suddenly quench your parched soul. Come to experience what you have been missing for so long empowerment in every area of life. We teach, train and send forth to win souls. You dont speak English no problema. We have a Spanish interpret er. We look forward to fellowship and worship with you at 7 p.m. every Wednesday. Pastoers Gil and Rosa Benton (Faith Never Fails). Grace Bible C hurch, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone, 382-1085. Dustin Woods, lead pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Monday, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Pro grams, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry. www.GBCconnected.org Faith C enter West Ministry, Restoring Lives, Families & Communities. In the Ban yan Plaza at 2349 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. Pastors Leroy and JoAnn Taylor the public to worship on Sundays at 11 a.m. for Praise & Worship and on Wednesdays at 7 p.m. for Bible study and prayer. Children classes are available for all services. Min istries for youth, men and women are held throughout the month. Please attend these Spirit-lled services. Moving Forward in Uni ty. Church ofce, 385-1800 or 655-2748. H ighlands C ommunity C hurch, a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. New Beginnings C hurch of S ebring, wor shiping at The Morris Chapel, 307 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Pastor Gary Kindle. Bible study every Sunday, 9 a.m. Blended Church Service, 10:15 a.m. Phone (863) 835-2405. newbeginningsch urchofsebring.com Begin your week with us. T he L ords S entinel Fellowship C hurch, 148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid (at Lake Placid Christian School), Pastor Juanita Fol som. Sunday morning service, 10:30 a.m.; Monday, Sentinel School of Theology, 7 p.m.; Church service, Tuesday, 7 p.m. More infor mation at www.juanitafolsomministries.com. Union C hurch, 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday traditional wor ship service is at 7:45 a.m. (October through Easter) and 9 a.m. Contemporary Sunday worship service is at 10:45 a.m. Nursery and childrens church available. Wednes day night worship with Pastor Tiger Gullett and CrossTalk with Pastor Bill Breylinger at 6 p.m. Breakfast and lunch menus at Sol id Grounds. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Ofce: 453-3345. Web page at www.wea reunion.org. Unity L ife E nrichment C entre,new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@ vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring. org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Ser vice, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraor dinary.RELIGION MCYK

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www.newssun.comFriday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B7 PRESBYTERIANCovenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. Pastor Tom Schneider. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Sunday morning worship: Traditional ser vice, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday school, 9:15 a.m. Wednes day evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Childrens/Youth Group, 5:30-7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato. net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Ofce hours: 8:3012:30 a.m. Monday-Friday.First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6 p.m. each Wednesday; Children Ministry and Youth Group, 6 p.m. each Sunday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. 385-0107. Email: faith@ strato.net, Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Fellowship Time, 10:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m. Tuesday: Youth Groups meet for devotions/Bible study, crafts, sport activities and dinner. Middle and high school, 3:306:30 p.m. Elementary School, 4-5:30 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m. Choir Rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. A nursery is available during worship. Call the church ofce for more information and other classes. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com, 117 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday Traditional Worship, 8 and 9:30 a.m.; Contemporary Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. Wednesday evenings: Adult small group Bible Study 7 p.m. (Nursery available), Youth Group (6-12th grades) 7 p.m., nursery and childrens ministry, 7 p.m. Family Biblical Counseling available by appointment. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September through June. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. rst Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 6550713; e-mail, springlakepc@embarqmail.com, Web site, http://slpc.embarqspace.com.SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTISTAvon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com, Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. A sale takes place the rst Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Frank Gonzalez. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALL ARE WELCOME. Associate Pastor is Ryan Amos. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Nathan Madrid.THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTSThe Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 3829092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-1p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: rst and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m.THE SALVATION ARMYThe Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www. salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODISTFirst United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., 105 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870. Pastor John A. Bryant. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church, 200 S. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759, Rev. Gary Pendrak, Pastor. Sunday School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Bible study every Wednesday at 6 p.m. Visit us at our church website: www.fumcap. org. Memorial United Methodist Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL, 33852. Rev. Tim Haas, pastor. Rev. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral assistant. Rev. Jerry McCauley, visitation pastor. Sunday worship services: Worship Service, 8:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m. We offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth programs, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship. We are a congregation that wants to know Christ and make Him known. Check out our church website at www.memorialumc.com or call the church ofce at 465-2422. Lakeview Christian School, VPK to Grade 5, 465-0313. St. John United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Adult Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all services. Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring. org Spring Lake United Methodist Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church ofce phone: 655-0040.UNITED CHURCH OF CHRISTEmmanuel United Church of Christ, Jesus didnt reject people, neither do we. Join us for worship every Sunday at 9:30 a.m. and youll be embraced by a compassionate congregation that is all-inclusive. Were at the corner of Hammock and Hope. Choir and Bell Choir practice on Wednesday; Bible studies throughout the week. 471-1999; sebringemmanuelucc.com.P LACES T O WO RS HI P RELIGION Special to the News-SunSEBRING Ucommon, a lm featuring Erik Estrada, Jason Crabb, Ben Davies and Irma P. Hall, will be shown at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 13, at Faith Lutheran Church. Estrada and Crabb will be at the showing and Christian singer Brandy Allison will per form. What do we really know about religious liberties in public schools? Can students pray? Can they have a bible study? Can they mention God or even wear a Christian-themed T-shirt? The prayer in public school debate has caused a restorm in the past; but with this lm Liberty Counsel hopes to set the record straight. The setting of Uncommon is a public school where students face unexpected challenges to their faith and freedoms. The movie will educate students, teachers, and parents about the fact that students do not lose their free speech and freedom of religion when they enter the schoolhouse. Estrada is best known for his leading role in the television series ChiPs. Estrada plays the role of a heroic high school janitor who volunteers to help the students salvage their dra ma and music programs. Estrada will attend over 200 church screenings across America in order to show this lm to help better educate church leaders, parents and teens on religious liberties in public education. Crabb is the 2012 Dove Artist of the Year, Male Vocalist of the Year and Grammy Award Win ner Jason Crabb. The lead teenage role was played by actor Davies, from the Christian blockbuster lm Courageous. Davies was just recently voted as one of the top 10 of Christian actors. Hall has appeared in numer ous lms and television shows since the 1970s. She is best known for playing matriarchal gures in the lms A Family Thing, Soul Food and The Ladykillers. Faith Lutheran Church is at 2740 Lakeview Drive. Call 3857848.Uncommon to be shown at Faith Lutheran ChurchStar Erik Estrada to be at event set for March 13One day at a busy air port, the passengers on a commercial airliner were seated, waiting for the cockpit crew to show up so they could get under way. The pilot and co-pilot nally appeared in the rear of the plane and began walking up to the cockpit through the center aisle. Both appeared to be blind! The pilot was using a white cane, bumping into passengers right and left as he stumbled down the aisle; the co-pilot was us ing a guide dog. Both had their eyes covered with huge sunglasses. At rst, the passengers did not react, thinking that it must have been some sort of practical joke. However, after a few minutes, the engines started revving and the airplane started moving down the runway. The passengers glanced at each other with some uneasiness, whispering among themselves and looking desperately to the stewardesses for re assurance. Then the air plane started acceler ating rapidly, and the people began panicking. Some passengers were praying, and as the plane got closer and closer to the end of the runway, the voices were becom ing more and more hysterical. Finally, when the air plane had less than 20 feet of runway left, there was a sudden change in the pitch of the shouts as everyone screamed at once. Then, at that moment, the airplane lifted off and was airborne. In the cockpit, the copilot breathed a sigh of relief and turned to the pilot. You know, one of these days the pas sengers arent going to scream, and were gonna get killed! None of us will proba bly ever choose to board an airplane with a pilot who cannot see. However, many of us allow people or things to pilot our lives that are just as foolish. Some allow friends or family to pilot their lives. Others allow a celebrity or hero to pilot their lives. Some will allow drugs or alcohol to be their pilot. Others will allow money or fame to be their pilot. The list is endless. Regardless of the choices of others, when it comes to the lives of those who want to be saved in an eternal home called Heaven, there can be One and only One in the pilots seat, and He is God. Jeremiah 10:23 reads, I know, O Lord, that a mans way is not in him self, nor is it in a man who walks to direct his steps. To allow anyone or anything other than God to direct the paths of our lives makes about as much sense as climb ing on board an air plane with a blind pilot. It would be absolute foolishness! Ephesians 5:17 reads, So then do not be foolish, but understand what the will of the Lord is. One cannot be wise if he does not know Gods will. And, one cannot know Gods will if he does not study His word. Studying and obeying the Bible is how one chooses to allow God to pilot his or her life. So, who is your pilot?Kevins Komments is written by Kevin Patterson and presented by the Sebring Parkway church of Christ assembling at 3800 Sebring Parkway. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the News-Sun staff.Who is your pilot? Courtesty photoSouthern Sound Quartet will be appearing in a live concert at Lake Placid Church of the Nazarene on Saturday, March 1, at 6 p.m. Southern Sound is a male quartet from Nashville, Tenn. They travel throughout the U.S. giving encouragement and inspiration with their southern gospel music. In the tradition of the Blackwoods, Statesmen, Cathedrals and other legendary quartets, Southern Sound brings a rich blend of quality voices that is sure to bring enjoyment to those who hear. Come early, and get a seat for this event. The Church is at 512 W. Interlake Blvd. in Lake Placid. For more information call 446-1339.SOUTHERN SOUND QUARTET IN CONCERT MARCH 1 KEVINS K OMMENTSKevin Patterson TRAVIS LOLLERAssociated PressThree days after pastor Jamie Coots died from a rattlesnake bite at church, mourners leaving the fu neral went to the church to handle snakes. Coots, who appeared on the National Geographic Channels Snake Salvation, pastored the Full Gospel Tabernacle in Jesus Name church founded by his grandfather in Middlesboro, Ky. The third-generation snake handler was bitten dur ing a service on Feb. 15 and died later at his home after refusing medical help. Now his adult son, Cody Coots, is taking over the family church where snakes are frequently part of services. People think they will stop handling snakes be cause someone got bit, but its just the opposite, said Ralph Hood, a pro fessor of psychology at the University of Tennessee, Chattanooga, who has been studying snake handlers for decades. It reafrms their faith. The practice of snake handling in the United States was rst documented in the mountains of East Tennessee in the early 20th Century, according to Paul Williamson, a professor of psychology at Hender son State University who, along with Hood, cowrote a book about snake handlers called, Them That Believe. In the 1940s and 1950s, many states made snake-han dling illegal (its current ly illegal in Kentucky), but the practiced has continued, and often law enforcement simply looks the other way. The basis for the practice is a passage in the Gospel of Mark. In the King James Version of the Bible, Mark 16:17-18 reads: And these signs shall follow them that be lieve; In my name shall they cast out devils; they shall speak with new tongues; They shall take up serpents; and if they drink any deadly thing, it shall not hurt them; they shall lay hands on the sick, and they shall recov er. Snake handling gained momentum when George Hensley, a Pentecostal minister working in var ious Southern states in the early 1900s, recounted an experience where, while on a mountain, a serpent slithered beside him. Hensley purported to be able to handle the snake with impunity, and when he came down the mountain he proclaimed the truth of following all ve of the signs in Mark. Kentucky snake handler death doesnt shake belief MCYK

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B8 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com Ditchfield Family Singers performSEBRING The Ditcheld Family Singers will bring a night of up lifting worship to Leisure Lakes Baptist Church at 10:45 a.m. and then at Whispering Pines Baptist Church at 6 p.m. Sunday. Known as one of Americas most versa tile family ensembles, The Ditcheld Family is known for their close harmony, warmth, and wide variety of musical styles. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church is at the western end of Lake June. From U.S. 27, take Lake June Road to Miller, turning north on Wildower. Call 699-0671. Whispering Pines Baptist Church is at 303 White Pine Drive, next to Home Depot.Great Day concert March 9SEBRING Great Day Ministry is presenting a free concert with a mix of southern gospel and contemporary music at 6 p.m. on March 9. All are welcome. A love offering will be received. For more infor mation please call the church ofce 655-1524. The church is at 111 Lake Josephine Drive.World Day of Prayer is March 7SEBRING The annual World Day of Prayer celebration of Church Women United will be held Friday, March 7, at First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 510 Poinsettia Ave. Registration is at 9:30 a.m., group activi ties begin at 9:45 a.m., and the worship celebration will conclude by 11 a.m. The contact person for this event is the Rev. Juanita Roberts, 6552234. All church women and their friends are in vited and encouraged to attend this special Church Women United celebration.Heritage Quartet in concert SundayLAKE PLACID The Heritage Quartet from Winter Haven will be joining their voices in great harmony this Sunday evening at 6 p.m. at Community Church of God. The Heritage Quartet is composed of four gen tlemen who sing for the Love of the Lord and for the Love of singing. Youll nd the concert to be packed with favorite songs, many youll know. You may also recognize a couple of members from the Warner University Gospel Sing events that have taken place in our area. Community Church of God is at 735 S. Sun N Lake Blvd. south of Lake Placid off C.R. 29, di rectly across from Lake Country Elementary School. Call 465-3715.Jorgensen speaking at CrossroadsSEBRING Jim Jorgensen will speak at Crossroads Fellowship Saturday at 7 p.m. and again at 10 a.m. Sunday. Jorgensens sermons edify and empower the body of Christ, by bring ing forth the heart of God through the apostolic, prophetic, and wor ship. This gifted prophet preaches with anointing to impart vision and develop the talents of others. He imparts both vision and direction to the body of Christ, on a cor porative and an individual basis. Invite your family, friends and neighbors to hear this anointed man of God. The church is at 605 S.R. 66. Call 655-0212. Timing is crucial. Not just in business and plea sure but also in biblical events. What do you know about the timing of the rapture? Hi, my name is Pastor Reinhold Buxbaum from The Church of the Way, and I like a word with you. The word rapture comes from the Latin word rapiemur which means to catch up or take away. In 2 Thessa lonians 2:3 we read: Let no one deceive you in any way. For it will not be, unless the departure comes rst, and the man of sin is revealed, the son of destruction. This is from the translation called: He brew Names Version. We learn an important timing lesson from this verse. Many Christians think that the word de parture refers to a depar ture from the faith. But the context is all about the timing of the rapture, the departure from this world. The Geneva Bible from 1587 uses the word de parting. The English Geneva Bible was the basis for the King James version of 1611. With other words, we are told that the rapture will take place just before the man of lawlessness, or the Anti-Christ is revealed. Since Anti-Christ is not revealed until the beginning of the seven-year tribulation period (the rider on the white horse, Revela tions 6:2) it becomes very clear that the church (all true believers) will be taken out of here (raptured) just before the seven-year tribulation period. It also means that true believers will not get to know who this Anti-Christ really is. This is consistent with many other scrip tures that give us a timing revelation. Like 1 Thessalonians 1:10: And to wait for his Son, whom he raised form the dead, even Jesus, which delivered us from the wrath to come. (NIV) Or 1 Thessalonians 5:9: For God hath not ap pointed us to wrath, but to obtain salvation by our Lord Jesus Christ. (NIV) The wrath of God is always associated with the seven-year tribulation time. But the true believers are not appointed to Gods wrath. Instead we are told For the Lord himself will come down from heaven, with a loud command, with the voice of the archangel and with the trumpet call of God, and the dead in Christ will rise rst. After that, we who are still alive and are left will be caught up to gether with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air. And so we will be with the Lord forever. (1 Thess.4:16-17 NIV) How is your timing? Are you a true believer in the Lord Jesus Christ? Are you ready for the departure? It can happen at any time. May be today? Yes, the stage is set for our rapture.Reinhold Buxbaum is Pastor of The Church of the Way, he teach es An Evening in Bible Prophecy at Homers Restaurant every rst Monday of the month at 6:30 p.m. No purchase is necessary. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the News-Sun staff. RELIGION Its all about timing GUEST COLUMNReinhold Buxbaum Courtesy photoRockingham Male Chorus from Bridgewater, Va. will present a Sacred Concert at Church of the Brethren, 700 S. Pine St., at 7 p.m. Friday, March 7. A free will offering will be taken.RO CKINGHAM MALE CHORUS IN CONCERT SNAPSHOTS LOCAL RELIG ION NICOLE WINFIELDAssociated PressVATICAN CITY Retired Pope Benedict XVI has denied speculation that he was pressured to leave ofce, saying his decision was freely made and his alone. Benedict wrote to the Vatican correspondent for La Stampa news paper, Andrea Tornielli, amid a new round of speculation about his reasons ahead of Fridays rst anniversary of the rst resignation by a pope in 600 years. There isnt the slightest doubt about the validity of my resignation from the Petrine ministry, La Stampa quoted Benedict as writing. The only condition for the validity is the full freedom of the decision. Speculation about its invalidity is simply absurd. Benedict, 86, also defended his decision to continue wearing the white cassock of the papacy, saying that there were no other clothes available. Media are again specu lating about what drove Benedict from ofce. Italian journalist Antonio Socci suggested last week in the conservative daily Libero that the res ignation may have been invalid, claiming Bene dict was pressured by a group of cardinals opposed to him. Benedict, however, had made clear from the start of his papacy that it might not end in his death. In the 2010 book Light of the World, Benedict wrote: If a pope clearly realizes that he is no longer physical ly, psychologically and spiritually capable of handling the duties of his ofce, then he has a right, and under some circumstances, also an obligation to resign. Benedict made a sur prise cameo at this weekends ceremony to formally install 19 new cardinals. It was the rst time he and Pope Francis had appeared together at a public liturgical cere mony and immediately raised questions about whether Benedict might occasionally be reintegrated back into the life of the church. British Cardinal Vincent Nichols, one of the new cardinals, said Benedicts pres ence didnt represent a change. He says his vocation now is to pray for the church and to live that life of prayerful seclusion, and he would appear to be very peaceful doing that, Nichols told reporters.Benedict denies he was pressured to resign M C Y K

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w ww.newssun.com Friday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B9 rffntbffnfn frnffnf ffnfffnnnnn nnnfnffnnnbnf bfffnffbf fnbfnbf fn rff nt bf t f tf f rf ntbn rfntfrb btbfntf fbtbf tff fbftbfbnbfb bbbbbbnrbtn brfbbbnbbrftrfb fbbbttnbbtnftfbfrrb ntftffbfntftbbnb trfnt Classifiedtn bfbrbrnfnbnbffbftrb bbttnbbntbntrnbrffbb fnrfntntftbnrfbrfb bfbtbfbf bbfbtntftrfbntnbnn nnntnrnfftnbrbbbrnnf nntnfrbnrrbrbn btfrftrbfntrfbtftb bbtnntbbnftftb bffbnrftrbfrftrbbnnrbb bfntfbbbnrnbbttbf tbrftbnb rfffntbtbt ttn tbnnbbtnfntbntn nbn ttf IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.28-2009-CA-001580 Division No. THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/ A THE BANK OF NEW YORK,AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWABS,INC. ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES,SERIES 2005-17 Plaintiff, vs. VANDA D.MARTIN,et al, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated February 6,2014,and entered in Case No.28-2009-CA-001580 of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:2009-CA-001818 REVERSE MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS,INC. Plaintiff, vs. CINDY G.JOHNSON AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF GAIL P.BAIRD; BRENT FRANCES HENRY; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; CINDY G.JOHNSON; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,will on the 17th day of March,2014,at 11:00 o'clock A.M.at the in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.,offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash,the following-described property situate in Highlands County,Florida: LOT 17,BLOCK 129,OF LAKE VIEW PLACE ADDITION,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA,LESS AND EXCEPT A STRIP OF LAND WITHIN LOT 17, BLOCK 129,OF LAKE VIEW PLACE ADDITION,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1,PAGE 58,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA,BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS THE WEST 57.81 FEET OF THE NORTH 7.5 FEET OF SAID LOT 17. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court,the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus,if any,resulting from the foreclosure sale,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens,mus file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 12th day of December,2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,255 N.Broadway Avenue,Bartow,Florida 33830,(863)534-4686,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled court appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing impaired,call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Priscilla Michala k Deputy Cler k (COURT SEAL) 296235 February 21,28,2014 you,to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,255 N.Broadway Avenue,Bartow,Florida 33830,(863)534-4686,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled court appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing impaired,call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Priscilla Michala k Deputy Cler k (COURT SEAL) 330549 February 21,28,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:2011-CA-000635 LIVE WELL FINANCIAL,INC. Plaintiff, vs. ADELINE M.WOLFGRAM and Unknown Spouse of ADELINE M. WOLFGRAM; JOHN DOE and MARY DOE; INDEPENDENCE RECEIVABLES CORPORATION; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,will on the 17th day of March,2014,at 11:00 o'clock A.M.at the in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.,offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash,the following-described property situate in Highlands County,Florida: THE EASTERLY 10 FEET OF LOT 8 AND ALL OF LOT 9 AND THE SOUTHEASTERLY 10 FEET OF LOT 10,BLOCK 269,LAKE SEBRING SUBDIVISION,A SUBDIVISION AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2,PAGE(S) 15,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA,MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AS A POINT OF BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 9 OF THE ABOVE BLOCK 269,THENCE WEST FOLLOWING THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 9 A DISTANCE OF 55.47 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE,THENCE CONTINUING WITH THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF LOTS 9 AND 8 ALONG A CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF 960 FEET AN ARC DISTANCE OF 59.53 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 05 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 66.45 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 8,THENCE NORTH 64 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 79.76 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 10, THENCE IN A SOUTHEASTERLY DIRECTION FOLLOWING THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOTS 10 AND 9 ALONG A CURVE TOT HE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF 380.28 FEET AN ARC DISTANCE OF 58.62 FEET TO A POINT OF TANGENT,THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST FOLLOWING THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 9 A DISTANCE OF 50.63 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.SAID LOTS LYING INA ND COMPRISING A PART OF LOTS 6 AND 7, BLOCK ``D'' OF LAKE SHORE PART SUBURBAN DEVELOPMENT OF LAKE JACKSON HOME AND GROVE COMPANY PER PLAT BOOK 1,PAGE 1,HIGHLANDS COUNTY RECORDS AND BEING A PART OF GOVERNMENT LOT 4,SECTION 13,TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH,RANGE 28 EAST,HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. BEING THE SAME REAL ESTATE CONVEYED TO ALSTON G.WOLFGRAM AND ADELINE M.WOLFGRAM,HUSBAND AND WIFE,BY WARRANTY DEED FROM EVERETT E.WHITTAKER AND ALMA WHITTAKER, DATED OCTOBER 24,1985,RECORDED NOVEMBER 12,1985,IN PUBLIC RECORDS, COUNTY OF HIGHLANDS,FLORIDA IN O.R. DEED BOOK 860,PAGE 832. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court,the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus,if any,resulting from the foreclosure sale,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens,mus file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 13th day of December,2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 12th day of February,2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court ROBERT W.GERMAINE By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk 327611/1024866/acc February 21,28,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.:28-2009-CA-001719 U.S.BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE Plaintiff, vs. CINDALEAH KOVARS A/K/A CINDALEAH A. KOVARS,UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CINDALEAH KOVARS A/K/A CINDALEAH A. KOVARS,ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,THROUGH,UNDER,AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,HEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS,BANK OF AMERICA,N.A.,JOHN DOE,JANE DOE, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given,pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on November 25,2013, in the Circuit Court of HIGHLANDS County, Florida,I will sell the property situated in Highlands County,Florida described as: LOT 14 & 15,BLOCK 4,SEBRING 98, SECTION ONE,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 1,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. and commonly known as:206 ANDRETTI AVE,SEBRING,FL 33876; including the building,appurtenances,and fixtures located therein,at public sale,to the highest and best bidder,for cash,Sales are held in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870,on March 13,2014 at 11 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.28-2012-CA-000806-GCAX-MX CITIMORTGAGE,INC., Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES, ASIGNEEES,CREDITORS,LIENORS,TRUSTEES OF RALPH E.MCADOW,DECEASED,et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that,pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause,in the Circuit Court of HIGHLANDS County,Florida,I will sell the property situated in HIGHLANDS County,Florida,described as: LOTS 7,8,9,10,13,14,15,16,17 AND 18,BLOCK 8,DESOTO CITY 2ND SUBDIVISION,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1,PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. Property address:5621 County Rd South 17,Sebring,FL 33876 at public sale,to the highest and best bidder, for cash,In the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.on March 13, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendents,must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness,my hand and seal of this court on the 12th day of February,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs assistance in order to participate in a program or service of the State Courts System,you should contact the Office of the Court Administrator at (863) 534-4686 (voice),(863) 534-7777 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (Florida Relay Service),as much in advance of your court appearance or visit to the courthouse as possible.Please be prepared to explain your functional limitations and suggest an auxiliary aid or service that you believe will enable you to effectively participate in the court program or service. 131038 dcs February 21,28,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:GC-12-000512 WELLS FARGO BANK,NA Plaintiff, vs. GILBERTO CASTILLO; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GILBERTO CASTILLO; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II; and any unknown heirs,devisees,grantees, creditors,and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by,through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,will on the 17th day of March,2014,at 11:00 o'clock A.M.at the in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.,offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash,the following-described property situate in Highlands County,Florida: LOT 18,IN BLOCK 54,OF SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING UNIT 5,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9,PAGE 51,PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court,the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus,if any,resulting from the foreclosure sale,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens,mus file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 12th day of December,2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,255 N.Broadway Avenue,Bartow,Florida 33830,(863)534-4686,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled court appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing impaired,call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk (COURT SEAL) 319038 February 21,28,2014 signed Clerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,will on the 17th day of March,2014,at 11:00 o'clock A.M.at the in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.,offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash,the following-described property situate in Highlands County,Florida: LOT 44,BLOCK 3,ORANGE BLOSSOM ESTATES,UNIT NO.11,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7,PAGE 48,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court,the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus,if any,resulting from the foreclosure sale,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens,mus file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 13th day of December,2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,255 N.Broadway Avenue,Bartow,Florida 33830,(863)534-4686,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled court appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing impaired,call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk (COURT SEAL) 314848 February 21,28,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:GC-12-001120 BANK OF AMERICA,N.A. Plaintiff, vs. NORMAN D.MCLARTY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF NORMAN D.MCLARTY; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II; and any unknown heirs,devisees,grantees, creditors,and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by,through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the underIN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:GC-12-001045 BANK OF AMERICA,N.A.,SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff, vs. DONNA R.HUBER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DONNA R.HUBER; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.FOR COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC.,and any unknown heirs,devisees, grantees,creditors,and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,will on the 17th day of March,2014,at 11:00 o'clock A.M.at the in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.,offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash,the following-described property situate in Highlands County,Florida: LOT 5,LAKE SEBRING ESTATES,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4,PAGE 79,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court,the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus,if any,resulting from the foreclosure sale,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens,mus file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 13th day of December,2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT.If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,255 N.Broadway Avenue,Bartow,Florida 33830,(863)534-4686,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled court appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing impaired,call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk (COURT SEAL) 312152 February 21,28,2014 are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,255 N.Broadway Avenue,Bartow,Florida 33830,(863)534-4686,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled court appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing impaired,call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk (COURT SEAL) 288134 February 21,28,2014 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.:GC-13-000229 REVERSE MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS,INC. Plaintiff, vs. PAUL D.LARIVIERE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF PAUL D.LARIVIERE; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; A VON PARK LAKES ASSOCIATION; and any unknown heirs,devisees,grantees, creditors,and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by,through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,will on the 17th day of March,2014,at 11:00 o'clock A.M.at the in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.,offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash,the following-described property situate in Highlands County,Florida: LOT 10191 THRU 10194,INCLUSIVE A VON PARK LAKES UNIT NO.31,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5,PAGE 33,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court,the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus,if any,resulting from the foreclosure sale,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens,mus file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 12th day of December,2013. A MERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT.If you 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.PC 14-08 IN RE:ESTATE OF PHYLLIS P.SMITH, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of PHYLLIS P.SMITH,deceased, File Number PC 14-08 by the Circuit Court for Highlands County,Florida,Probate Division,the address of which is 590 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,FL 33870; that the decedent's date of death was December 9, 2013; that the total value of the estate is equal to or less than $65,200.56,and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:1) Karen Sue Mydland,9514 Powerhouse Rd.,Cheyenne,WY 82009; and 2) Bruce Albert Smith,1219 N.Market St.,St. Louis,MO 63106. A LL INTERESTED PARTIES ARE NOTIFIED THAT All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER A PPLICABLE TIME PERIOD,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is February 21,2014. Petitioner: /s/ Karen Sue Mydland 9514 Powerhouse Road Cheyenne,WY 82009 A ttorney for Petitioner: / s/ Robert E.Livingston Florida Bar No.0031259 445 S.Commerce Avenue Sebring,Florida 33870 Telephone:(863) 385-5156 E-mail:Livingston@livingstonpa.com February 21,28,2014

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B10 | NEWS-SUN | Friday, February 28, 2014 www.newssun.com IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.282012CA000694GCAXMX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK,NATIONAL A SSOCIATION, PLAINTIFF, VS. LYNN MADISON,ET AL., DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 28th day of January,2014, and entered in Case No. 282012CA000694GCAXMX,of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County,Florida.I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Highlands County Courthouse,the Jury Assembly Room,Basement,430 South Commerce A venue,Sebring,FL 33870,at 11:00 A.M. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.:282013CA000215CAXMX VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC.,a Tennessee corporation authorized to transact business in Florida Plaintiff, vs. LANETTE CHERISOL,et al., Defendants. CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that,in accordance with the Plaintiff's Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on in the above-styled cause,I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on March 12,2014 at 11:00 a.m.(EST),at HIGHLANDS County Courthouse: LOT 7,PENNY HEIGHTS,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9,PAGE 68,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. Property Address:1523-1525 Penny Avenue,Sebring,FL 33870 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE,IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated:January 29,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK CLERK OF THE COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,(863) 534-4690,within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Final Judgment; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call TDD (863) 534-7777 or Florida Relay Service 711. February 21,28,2014 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE No.:2013CA000528 SPRINGLEAF HOME EQUITY,INC., FORMERLY KNOWN AS AMERICAN GENERAL HOME EQUITY,INC., Plaintiff, vs. MARSHA ANN ROCKWELL, CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA),N.A. A ND UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,THROUGH,UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF DAVID LEE ROCKWELL, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 28th 2014,and entered in Case No.2013CA000528 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County,Florida,wherein SPRINGLEAF HOME EQUITY,INC.,FORMLERY KNOWN AS AMERICAN GENERAL HOME EQUITY,INC.,is Plaintiff and MARSHA ANN ROCKWELL,CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA),N.A. A ND UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THORUGH,UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF DAVID LEE ROCKWELL,are Defendants,I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Jury Assembly Room,Basement 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,FL at 11:00 o'clock A.M.on the 12th day of March,2014,the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment,to wit: Lot 11,Block 2,Citrus Lake Colony,according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 8,Page 2,of the Public Records of Highlands County,Florida. Together with a mobile home situated thereon,described as a 1986 Cypress Mobile Home,Vehicle Identification Numbers 14602344A and 14602344B,which is affixed tot eh aforedescribed real property and incorporated therein. Street Address:120 Tidewater Drive,Lake Placid,FL 33852 and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon,which are included as security in Plaintiff's mortgage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Sebring,Highlands County,Florida,this 29th day of January,2014. Bob Germaine Clerk of said Circuit Court By:/s/ Toni Kopp As Deputy Clerk February 21,28,2014 for HIGHLANDS County,Florida,wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK,AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWABS,INC. A SSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES,SERIES 2005-17 is the Plaintiff and VANDA D.MARTIN,VANDA D.MARTIN,WOOD 'N IRONS OF SUN 'N LAKE OWNERS' ASSOCIATION,INC., CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES,INC., MANOR HILL OWNERS' ASSOCIATION,INC., the Defendants,I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Jury Assembly Room of the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida,at 11:00 a.m.on the 10th day of March, 2014,the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment,to wit: A ll That Certain Parcel Of Land Situated In The County Of Highlands And State Of Florida,Being Known And Described As Lot 9, Block 261,Sun 'N Lake Estates Of Sebring, Unit 13,According To The Plat Thereof As Recorded In Plat Book 9,Page 71,Of The Public Records Of Highlands County,Florida. IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE,YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS A FTER THE SALE.IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM,YOU WILL NOT BEEN TITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS.AFTER 60 DAYS,ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORDS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at HIGHLANDS County,Florida,this 6th day of February,2014. BOB GERMAINE,Clerk HIGHLANDS County,Florida By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk 972233.1426/NP February 21,28,2014 1050LegalsDUMMY 2014 SERVICE DIRECTORY DUMMY 5X21.5 AD # 00034894

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w ww.newssun.com Friday, February 28, 2014 | NEWS-SUN | B11 KAWASAKI VULCAN1500. 1988, Good condition, 20,000 miles, new tires, leather saddle bags. $1850.00 or best offer. 863-465-7112 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 TransportationTRACKER BASSPRO & Trailer, trim tilt, trolling motor. Many accessories. Excel cond. Custom cover included. $2750. SOLD!!!!! 8050Boats & Motors 8000 Recreation ROTTWEILER PUPPIES,8 wks. old. $400. Health certs & shots. Will email photos. 863-452-5001 PUG PUPPIES,Fawn color. One male and one female, pure bred pug with no papers. Born January 3. First shots and wormed. Reasonable price to good home only, both parents on site. Call 910-382-5660.NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eigh t weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & Supplies CUB CADETLTX1040 MOWER AS GOOD AS NEW. SERVICED WITH NEW BATTERY AND CARBURETOR. THE CLOCK HAS LESS THAN 35HRS. CONTACT VIJAY ON 863-699-6923 BETWEEN 10AM AND 7PM PRICE $1000 CRAFTSMAN 42''CUT LAWN TRACTOR Very good condition with bag attachments in excellent condition, $450 OBO. 863-446-0034 7400Lawn & GardenWANTED CHEVROLETS-10, 2 wheel drive, standard shift, in the 90's. Any engine, good or bad. Good body. 810-516-9152 7340Wanted to Buy SEBRING FALLSRyant Blvd. to 1541 Caribbean Rd., March 1, 8am-2pm. Coleman grill, edger, household, lots of misc. SEBRING -WOODHAVEN Estates off Brunns Rd. 22 homes, Feb. 28, 8am-5pm; March 1 8am-1pm. Furniture, crafts, jewelry, kids toys, power tools. Lots of misc. items. Something for everyone! SEBRING -LARGE MULTI-FAMILY sale, 1920 Brunns Rd. Lot 19 (of f Hammock Rd.) Fri.-Sat. Feb. 28 & March 1, 8am-2pm. Household goods, table & chairs, lamps, chairs, Xmas village houses, books. SEBRING -GREAT SALE Sat., March 1, 8400 Pine Glen Rd. Everything you could imagine! Pressure cleaner, baby beds, clothing for all ages! Something for the big girls too! Old toys! Bikes and hot wheels, Chevy truck engine. SEBRING -GARAGE SALE Fri. & Sat. Feb. 28th & March 1st, 8am-2pm, 2328 Glen Dr. (off Whispering Pines). Musical instruments, jewelry, ham radio antennas, ladies bike, misc. SEBRING -5218 LAFAYETTE AVE., Sat.-Sun., Mar. 1 & 2, 8am-2pm., Furniture, Knick Knacks, Household Items, Sm. Appliances, Sporting Goods. Much More! LAKE PLACIDThur. -Fri. 8 4. Sat. 8 12. 219 Kumquat Rd. NE. Tools, fishing equip., & household. LAKE PLACIDHuge Yard Sale!!! Fri. Sat, 8 ?. 1741 Citadel St. Household items, tools, electronics, collector plates, baseball cards & much much more! LAKE PLACIDFri. Sat. 1723 Cedarbrook St. Pre-Moving Sale! 2 patio sets, 4 porch rockers, grill, tools, crystal, Christmas decor, 2 old trunks & lots of household. AVON PARK2515 N. Arrowhead Rd. Furn., vintage items & jewelry, small appl., tools, kitchen ware, clothing & more! Fri. 2/28 Sat. 3/1. 8 ?. AVON PARK*MOVING SALE 307 E Canfield St (Betw. Memorial Dr & Middle School) Fri & Sat 2/28 & 3/1, 8am 4pm, Furn., Clothing, Household items, etc. Offers Welcome. Some Of Everything. SEBRING FALLSANNUAL Garage/Bake Sale "Sebring Falls" MHP Sat. Mar. 1ST., 8AM till noon. All kinds of items, electrical, linens, furniture, books, puzzles, glassware. Bake sale and concessions. Everyone welcome! 7320Garage &Yard Sales LEATHER SLACKSLadies Sizes 8 10 12. Brown Black Tan. Like New. $50. 863-385-4612 DOLL HOUSEFurni.,, Handmade from balsa wood, not for children. 5 rooms+ lots of acces. Includes doll house -needs special attention. $50. 863-402-2285 COLEMAN LANTERNNorth Star / Butane Fuel. Like New w/ extra Mantel. $20. 863-402-2285 CALLAWAY DRIVERLadies 10 degree $18. Golf Hammock Area. 269-963-7817 BIRD CAGE& brand new Stand, includes food, toys & access. for Parakeet. $40. 863-402-2495 BIFOLD DOORS2, 75" long. 2 Bifold doors 66" long. 3 passage doors 30" wide. $15. the lot. 863-453-3104 7310Bargain Buys ANTIQUEWICKERRocking Chair. Early 1900's, in good condition. Painted but needs special attention. $50. 863-402-2285 AIR BEDS1 Queen Deluxe, Double High NEW & 1 Twin Size. Like New $90. 863-385-4612 7310Bargain Buys PEDESTAL TABLELt wood, w/ 2 chairs $200 / 2 Bars Stools, Dk wood 28" $40 / Computer Desk $35 / High Chair $30 / Pack N Play $35 / Tricycle $15. Call 863-453-3398 HOT TUB Artesian, 4'9" x 6'7". Good cond. Original cost $6600. Now, $800. Call 863-991-0584 7300MiscellaneousBEAUTIFUL GENTLYused home theater organ/bench. New price near $60,000, purchased locally from Fletcher Music. Top line model, still one of the best home instruments on the market From estate of home in Highlands Village, proceeds to church ministry. $9800 obo, no trades. Call Pastor Gerald Webber at 863-214-4859 for appointment. 7260MusicalMerchandiseSECTIONAL SOFAMulti-color earth tones, La-Z-Boy, recliners on each end. Like new. $275. Call 863-452-2443 7180Furniture 7000 Merchandise SEBRING 2/1.5,garage, study room, new kitchen, tile floors, & basic appliances. CHA. $650/mo. 863-873-6099. 6300Unfurnished HousesRELAX ATLake Isis Villas** Luxurious ** 1 BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting.RENTED!!!! 6200UnfurnishedApartments 6000 RentalsPALM HARBORHOMES 2014 models are here! $8,500 Pre Construction Savings John Lyons @ 800-622-2832 ext 210 for details 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile Homes MAUSOLEUM UNITS.(2). Oak Hill Cemetery. Lake Placid. $900. Call 863-449-0101 LAKEVIEW MEMORIALGARDENS side by side Deluxe Companion External Crypts. $5,000. Call 863-452-5860 4280Cemetery LotsTHE BLUFFSOF SEBRING: For Sale by Owners: 55+, Amenities include stocked lake, heated pool spa, clubhouse, fitness room, tennis, chipping/putting area, library (books, videos, wi-fi stations). One unit is 2 BR/2BA, ground level, covered parking storage shed for $85K, second is 3 BR/2BA, ground level, lots of upgrades for $106K. Shown by appointment only, Phone 863-382-2853 or 863-385-4654 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial TREE COMPANYSEEKING F/T Employee. Experienced in Tree Work w/CDL. Call 863-655-1838 TESOL ADJUNCTINSTRUCTOR (P/T)Open until filled. Please visit http://sfsc.interviewexchange.com for detailed position posting. 863-784-7132.EA/EO. R &R Harvesting Inc 300 Temporary workers needed in Sebring, FL area from approximately April 1, 2014 July 13, 2014 Following Supervisors instructions, the worker will perform manual labor to hand cut and pack watermelons. Use hand tools such as shears and knives. Duties also include cleaning, loading and unloading harvested products. Grade and sort products according to factors such as color, species, length, width, appearance, feel and quality to ensure correct processing and usage. Discard inferior or defective products and/or foreign matter, and place acceptable products in containers for further processing. Weigh products or estimate their weight, visually or by feel. Place products in containers according to grade and mark grades on containers. Measure, weigh and count products and materials. Examine and inspect containers, materials and products to ensure that packing specifications are met. Clean and maintain work areas. Must assist with all Good Agricultural Practices policies. Perform prolonged bending, reaching, pushing, pulling, walking stooping and lifting up to 60 lbs. Exposure to extreme temperatures. Workers may be required to perform miscellaneous grove clean-up work. These activities may include removing debris, boxes, discarded fruit from fields to clean growing areas, pruning, painting trees, repair and or replace irrigation equipment, may maintain fence lines. The highest of $10.26 per hr, 3/4 guarantee, 35 hrs per week, housing and transportation provided at no cost to workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each work day, must be 18 years or older. Transportation and subsistence expenses to the worksite will be reimbursed upon completion of 50% of the work contract or earlier if appropriate. We participate in the E-Verify program and workers must have valid identification for I-9 preparation when they report to begin work. Apply for this job at the State Workforce/Job Center office in your area, please call for the nearest office in your area FL 239-252-7310, AL 256-259-1835, GA 404-656-6000, MS 662-842-2175 using job # FL9855239 NIGHT AUDITOR, HOTEL JACARANDA Part-time, primarily 10 p.m. 2 a.m. Please visit http://sfsc.interviewexchange.com for detailed position posting. Open until filled. 863-784-7132.EA/EO/VETERAN'S PREF. LOOKING FORLPN P/T for 24 bed ICF in Avon Park. We have a casual work environment with home-like setting. Apply online atwww.jobs.thementornetwork.com/floridaQuestions call 863-452-5141 ask for Angelina or Melissa LIL WIZARDSACADEMY Seeking F/T Child Care Teacher and a P/T Teacher from 12pm to 6pm. Call 863-381-9676 or Email jamesbox_3408 @yahoo.com LABORERS WITH CLEAN RECORD, Transportation, and No Wimps. Mid State Dewatering Call 863-385-2122 FULL TIMEExperienced Hospitalist ARNP Needed for Local Sebring Hospital Please send resume to s.dyal@achhospitalist.com EXPERIENCED RESIDENTIAL ROOFERS NEEDED Call 863-402-9161 2100Help WantedEXPERIENCE THEJOYS AND REWARDS Of Being A Comfort Keeper. If you have a passion for improving the quality of life for others while helping people live independently and happily in their own homes, you could be a Comfort Keeper! We are now hiring CNA, HHA and Homemaker Companion Positions in the Highlands County area. We offer flexible full-time or part-time hours. Contact us to learn more about how you can develop a rewarding career enriching the lives of others with Comfort Keepers. Apply online today at: http://ck381.ersp.biz/employment 863-385-9100 EXPANDING DAYSPA, Job Opportunity for a Massage Therapist, Stylist & Nail Tech. at a well Established & Successful Day Spa the Studio of Health & Beauty, MM21553. 1951 US 27 S. Sebring 33870. 863-386-0822. DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONALS P/T, wanted for Avon Park Intermediate Care Facility serving disabled adults. HS diploma or 1 year associated experience, valid FL Drivers License and clean criminal background req. Please complete application at www.jobs.thementornetwork.com/florida863-452-5141 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Independent Contractor wanted for FREE and established Mission Foods Direct Store Delivery (DSD) route in Avon Park, Sebring and Lake Placid areas. Product consists of tortillas and chips. Growth opportunity exists for qualified candidates with GOOD credit. If interested, please contact Robert Chencinski at (863) 640-3249 for more information. A/C INSTALLERw/at least 2yrs. experience. Electrician w/at least 3 yrs.+. Journeymen preferred. Pay negotiable. Bring resume to: Air & Electrical Services 4715 US HWY. 27S. Sebring 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:314-9876 News-Sun Classified 1100Announcements IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR POLK COUNTY,FLORIDA Case No.:Sec: 53-2014DR-00846-0000-LK Lydiann McClure & Roger McClure, Petitioners and Brooke Payne, Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PETITION FOR TEMPORARY CUSTODY TO:Brooke Payne,1015 W.Bell St.#36, Avon Park,FL 33825. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses,if any,to it on Lydiann McClure whose address is 3158 Galloway Oaks Dr., Lakeland,FL 33810 on or before March 18, 2014,and file the original with the clerk of this Court at 930 E.Parker St.,Lakeland,FL 33801,before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter.If you fail to do so,a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case,including orders,are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office.You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office notified of your current address.(You may file Notice of Current Address,Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerk's office. WARNING:Rule 12.285,Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure,requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information.Failure to comply can result in sanctions,including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Stacy M.Butterfield,Clerk of the Circuit Court Dated:2/18/2014.CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:Linsey Wright Deputy ClerkTHE BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT AND THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA,DOES NOT DISCRIMINATE UPON THE BASIS OF ANY INDIVIDUAL'S DISABILITY STATUS.THIS NON-DISCRIMINATORY POLICY INVOLVES EVERY ASPECT OF THE THE BOARD'S FUNCTIONS,INCLUDING ONE'S ACCESS TO,PARTICIPATION,EMPLOYMENT OR TREATMENT IN ITS PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES.ANYONE REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AS PROVIDED FOR IN THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT OR SECTION 286.26,FLORIDA STATUTES, SHOULD CONTACT MRS.MELISSA BRUNS,ADA COORDINATOR AT 863-402-6509 (VOICE),VIA FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE 711,OR BY E-MAIL: MBR UNS@HCBCC.ORG .REQUEST FOR CART OR INTERPRETER SERVICES SHOULD BE MADE AT LEAST 24 HOURS IN ADVANCE TO PERMIT COORDINATION OF THE SERVICE. ONE OR MORE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MAY BE PRESENT AT THE MEETING. Rick Ingler,Chairman February 23,28,2014 1050Legals NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING FOR A SPECIAL EXCEPTION REQUEST HEARING NO.1,746 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a PUBLIC HEARING will be held before the HIGHLANDS COUNTY Board of Adjustment on the 11th day of March,2014,beginning at 3:00 P.M.,or as soon thereafter as possible,in the County Commissioners Board Room,Highlands County Government Center Building,600 South Commerce Ave.,Sebring,Florida,to consider a Special Exception to allow commercial activity directly serving agricultural pursuits and limited to the service of agricultural pursuits,within the area described as follows:An approximate 20.28 acre parcel located approximately 5.8 miles south of the intersection of US 27 and SR 70,on Leisure Lane; the address being 193 Leisure Lane,Venus,Florida; and legally described as follows:Lots 14 and 15,Sandy Pines Estates Unrecorded Subdivision,plus interest in access road to subdivision,Highlands County,Florida. A ny person or persons interested or affected by this change are invited to attend this hearing.You may submit comments in writing to the attention of Linda Conrad,Zoning Supervisor,P.O.Box 1926, Sebring,Florida 33871-1926,or you may call (863) 402-6638,for further information.Please reference the above hearing number when calling or writing. A LL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE INVITED TO A TTEND. A LL INTERESTED PERSONS MAY APPEAR AND BE HEARD AT THE TIME AND PLACE SPECIFIED A BOVE.ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A NY DECISION MADE BY THIS COMMITTEE/GROUP,IN PUBLIC HEARING OR MEETING IS HEREBY ADVISED THAT HE OR SHE WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS,AND THAT,FOR SUCH PURPOSE,HE OR SHE MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE,WHICH RECORD WILL INCLUDE THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH SUCH APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. NOTICE OF LIEN SALE/DISPOSAL A CCORDING TO THE FLORIDA SELF STORAGE ACT,THE FOLLOWING STORAGE UNITS LOCATED AT FIRST SECURITY SELF STORAGE,1866 S.WILBURN DRIVE,AVON PARK,FL 33825,WILL BE DISPOSED/SOLD ON MARCH 3,2014 AT 10:00 AM.ALL UNITS ARE SAID TO CONTAIN HOUSEHOLD GOODS UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED: UNIT NUMBERS AND NAMES ARE AS FOLLOWS: A 004 Basil Makris A 010 Lewis Milton A 021 Darcel Dennis A 023 Kimberly Swindle B017 Cleo Pyatt B048 Ben Hunter B046 Donald C.Cook Jr. B067 Kimeko Billy D137 Treyvonne Wilson E028 Basil Makris E086 Apalinar Hernandez G003 Latoya Jacobs DISPOSITION BEING MADE TO SATISFY LANDLORD'S LIEN.MANAGEMENT RESERVES ALL RIGHTS UNDER FLORIDA LAW.ALL PAYMENTS MUST BE MADE IN CASH. February 21,28,2014 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.PC 14-49 IN RE:ESTATE OF VIRGINIA M.MCDANIEL, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The name of the decedent,the designation of the court in which the administration of this estate is pending,and the file number are indicated above.The address of the court is 590 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring, FL 33870.The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are indicated below. If you have been served with a copy of this notice and you have any claim against the decedent's estate,even if that claim is unmatured,contingent or unliquidated,you must file your claim with the court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF A DATE THAT IS 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS A FTER YOU RECEIVE A COPY OF THIS NOTICE. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against decedent's estate,including unmatured,contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. EVEN IF A CLAIM IS NOT BARRED BY THE LIMITATIONS DESCRIBED ABOVE,ALL CLAIMS WHICH HAVE NOT BEEN FILED WILL BE BARRED TWO YEARS AFTER DECEDENT'S DEATH. The date of death of the decedent is January 10,2014. The date of first publication of this Notice is February 28,2014. Personal Representative: ROBERT L.MCDANIEL 1015 West Bell St.,Apt.7 Avon Park,FL 33825 A ttorney for Personal Representative: CLIFFORD R.RHOADES,P.A. Florida Bar No.:308714 Clifford R.Rhoades,P.A. 2141 Lakeview Drive Sebring,Floirda 33870 (863)385-0346 service@crrpalaw.com cliff@crrpalaw.com February 28; March 7,2014 on the 13th day of March,2014,the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment,to wit: LOT 24,BLOCK 31,SEBRING COUNTRY ESTATES SECTION TWO,ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7,PAGE 34,PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens,must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator at (863) 534-4686,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call 711. Dated this 14th day of February,2014. ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK Clerk of The Circuit Court Highlands County Clerk of Court By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk File #:C301.2814 (Circuit Court Seal) February 21,28,2014 1050Legals rf CITY OF SEBRING 2X2 AD # 00036257 SFSC-HUMAN RESOURCES 2X3 AD # 00036283AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 AD # 00035576 AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 AD # 00035577

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Page 4 Metro News ServiceMany homeowners do not think twice about their roofs. But when leaks develop, roof repairs and the subsequent costs of such work shed light on how important it is for home owners to pay closer attention to the roofs over their heads. Though certain roof issues, like shingles lost to inclement weather, are unforeseeable, many problems can be avoided with routine roof in spection. Checking roof conditions twice a year can help homeowners avoid potentially costly repair work or even more expensive roof replace ment projects. Spring is a good time to inspect roofs, which are often at the mercy of harsh conditions throughout the win ter. Before breaking out the ladder and climbing up to the roof, inspect the homes interior, pinpointing poten tial problems that may indicate roof damage. Check for stains on the ceil ing which may indicate leaks that need to be addressed. Homeown ers with attics should enter their at tics and look for signs of water dam age, making note of any damp or wet insulation. This will let you know if water has been entering the attic all winter. Pay attention to the location of any wet spots or stains so you can match them up to the exterior of the roof later on. Musty smells also may be indicative of moisture problems, even if there are no visible leaks. Grab a set of binoculars and inspect the exterior of the roof. Look at the roof ashing, including around the chimney and other areas of pro truding pipes and vents. If the ash ing is warped or damaged, moisture might be settling underneath. Sealant around dormers or skylights can also degrade, resulting in leaks. Check for spalling on masonry, such as the mortar of chimneys. Porous areas will allow water to inltrate. Work with a partner and carefully climb on the roof while someone holds the ladder below. Walk on the perimeter of the roof, looking for peeling or warped shingles, missing shingles, holes, or scrapes. If the roof is compromised in any way, it will need to be repaired. The problem will only grow more signicant and re pairs more expensive if damage is ignored. Sometimes a repair can be as simple as patching a leak with a new shingle and roong cement. Popped nails can be pounded down and any curled shingles can be nailed or cemented back into place.If you are unsure if your roof has made it through the winter unscathed and would like a second opinion or if you nd there is considerable damage, contact a roong contractor. This person will offer a professional assessment of what can be repaired or if the roof should be replaced. If your roof is metal or features clay tiles, you may not have the exper tise to make repairs yourself and will need to hire a professional.While you are up on the roof, inspect the gutters and downspouts as well. Cracked or damage gutters will cause water to leak down the side of the home, potentially damaging the foundation. Clear any debris or left over leaves from the gutters to ensure the rain can wash through unobstructed. A post-winter roof inspection can protect homeowners and their families from the elements and reduce the likelihood of potentially costly repairs down the road. How to inspect for roof damage MetroSpring is a good time to inspect your roof for damage. The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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Page 6 Metro News ServiceOnce their kids have left the nest, many men and wom en over 50 begin to consid er downsizing their homes. Downsizing to a smaller home can be benecial for a vari ety of reasons, including less home to clean and main tain, more affordable utility bills and lower property taxes. But the decision to downsize is rarely black and white, and men and women often strug gle with that decision. Perhaps the most difcult part of the decision of whether or not to downsize to a smaller home concerns the sentimen tal attachment many home owners, especially those with children, have to their homes. The home might be too big for your current needs, but it also was the same place where your son took his rst steps and where your daughter lost her rst tooth. Saying goodbye to a place that was home to so many memories isnt easy. But theres more than just senti mental value to consider when deciding whether or not to downsize your home after the kids have grown up. Your nancial situation merits signicant consider ation when deciding if the time is right to downsize your home. If your retirement nest egg is not as substantial as you would like it to be, then it would seem as though downsizing to a smaller, more affordable home is a great opportunity for you to start catching up on your retire ment savings. But thats only true if your new home wont incur any additional expenses that are already taken care of in your current home. For ex ample, your current home may be fully furnished, while a new, smaller home may require you to buy all new furniture because your existing items simply wont t. The cost of such furnishings can be consider able. If you plan to move into a condominium, you can expect to pay monthly homeowners association fees, and such fees are often substantial. So while the condo itself might be smaller, the additional expenses associated with the property may end up making the smaller home more expensive and prevent you from saving more money for retirement.There are sellers markets and there are buyers markets, and ideally you would like to sell your home in a sellers market. But keep in mind that this might be the same mar ket in which you hope to buy a new home. The nature of the real estate market depends on a host of factors, including geography. If the city or town where you currently live is in the midst of a sellers market and you are planning on mov ing to a location where buy ers have the upper hand, then now might be a great time to move. But if you currently live in a buyers market and hope to move to a sellers mar ket, then you may end up pay ing a steep price, even when downsizing to a smaller home. Things may even themselves out if you want to downsize to a smaller home within your current community, but do your homework nonetheless, researching the time of year when youre most likely to get the most for your home and nd the best deal on your next place. The advantage men and women considering downsiz ing have is that they are rarely in a rush to move out of their current home and into their next one. This gives them ample time to make the real estate market work for them.SpaceHow much space do you really need? Once the kids have moved out, couples may feel like all of that extra space is go ing to waste. But that can be a knee-jerk reaction, and upon a more thorough examination of the space and your needs you may just nd that you can put all of that extra square foot age to good use after all. If you have always wanted your own art studio, then now might be the perfect time to make that a reality. Always wanted a room devoted to home theater? Get to work on converting your basement from an all-pur pose game room to your own private movie theater. If, after considering the space in your home, you nd that the extra square footage really is just up keep you arent especially interested in doing, then you would no doubt like a cozier home thats less of a responsi bility to maintain. Downsizing a home is some thing many men and women over 50 consider after their children have moved out. Such a decision is rarely easy, so homeowners should take as much time as they need before making a nal decision to move or stay put. MetroMany empty-nesters are faced with the decision of whether or not to move into a smaller home.

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Page 7 Metro News ServiceHomeowners are often inter ested in projects to improve the aesthetic appeal of their homes, particularly those that may in crease the curb appeal of their properties. But some projects, including improving attic venti lation, can benet a home even when they arent especially eyecatching. Attic venting preserves the life of a roof while improving the en ergy efciency of a home. Al though it may seem counter productive to let air into the attic when you are sealing drafts elsewhere in the home, there is rhyme and reason to venting an attic throughout the year.What is attic ventilation? Attic ventilation is a system of air intake and exhaust that cre ates a ow of air through the at tic. In the summertime, air ow ing through the attic will cool temperatures within the attic, preventing damage to the un derside of roong shingles and preventing ambient heat from traveling inside of a home. In the winter, air ow helps to keep the attic cool and dry. This prevents moisture that can l ead to mold and rot issues from building up inside of the attic. Attic ventilation also pre vents warm indoor temper atures and rising heat from warming up roofs during the winter, creating the freeze-thaw pattern that results in ice dams. Many attics already contain passive ventilation in the form of vents or ventilation strips built into the edge of the roof. Other vents may appear in ga bles or eaves. Some homeown ers prefer the addition of an attic fan to work in concert with ex isting venting. The spring season is an ideal time to have an attic fan in stalled because the weather is temperate, making it easier to work up in the attic. According to Natural Light Energy Systems, attic temperatures can exceed 160 F on hot summer days. Proper attic ventilation can reduce those temperatures by up to 40 F, prolonging the life of the roof. Attic ventilation also reduces the load on heating and cooling systems. No matter how much insulation is in an attic, some transfer of attic air will occur be tween the home and the attic, and that transfer makes heating and air conditioning systems run longer and harder to compensate. Homeowners who notice their HVAC systems running endlessly to keep the home comfortable can benet from improved attic ventilation, as can those homeowners whose attics feature moisture damage in the way of rusty nails or moldy wood framing. An attic fan is often an effective remedy to these issues. The installation of an attic fan is best left to a professional, as it requires running wiring to the fan and it may necessitate cutting into the roof for venting. Many fans work with a ther mostat and will turn on when the air temperature in the attic reaches a certain temperature. The fan will circulate the air, helping to keep the attic cooler and dryer. Also, the fan can help expel fumes from cooking or appli ances from the home. Canada Go Green notes that attic fans can reduce energy bills considerably by making HVAC systems work more efciently. Keeping attics cool and dry may also reduce how frequently HVAC systems need to be turned on or at which temperatures thermostats in the home are set. Improving attic ventilation may not add much to a homes curb appeal, but such a project can save homeowners money and provide year-round benets Improving attic ventilation benefits the roof and more Metro Passive and active venting systems for attics help keep homes comfortable and energy-efcient all year long.

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