The news-sun ( June 7, 2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The news-sun
Uniform Title:
News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title:
Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Sebring Fla
Creation Date:
June 7, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates:
27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note:
Also published for Avon Park.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID:
UF00028423:01454

Related Items

Preceded by:
Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by:
Avon Park sun


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Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453 Online: www.newssun.com N EWS -S UNHighlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Friday-Saturday, November 15-16, 2013 Volume 94/Number 137 | 50 cents www.newssun .com WAUCHULA STATE BANK/Cheryl Hen; 11.25"; 1.5"; Black plus three; process, front strip; 0 0 0 3 3 3 3 8 079099401001 CelebrationsB6 Classifieds A7 Clubs B6 Crossword PuzzleB9 Dear Abby B9 Editorial & OpinionA3 Friends & NeighborsB8 Sudoku PuzzleB9 Whats CookingB10 Index Cloudy High 76 Low 67Details, A12 By ROD LEWIS News-Sun correspondentLAKE PLACID Threats to humanity have come in many forms. Martians,nuclear war,asteroids,and now man-eating plants. Little Shop Of Horrorstransforms Highlands Little Theatre into skid row,where a hapless florist named Seymour,played by Anthony Toler,finds a plant during a total eclipse. Seymour takes the plant to the skid row florist where he works,but the plant does not do well. Seymour tries everything he knows,but nothing works until he pricks his finger on a rose and the plant gets a taste. Seymour feeds the plant his blood until the plant needs more than he can give it. He is secretly in love with his co-worker,Audrey (he even named the plant Audrey II),and sees her boyfriend abusing her. The plant sees the opportunity and tells Seymour that he needs to kill the boyfriend for both of their benefits. Audreys boyfriend is a sadistic dentist,so Seymour makes an Unplanned Little Shop of Horrors opens Rod Lewis/News-S un Seymour (Anthony Toler) and Audrey (Melanie Boulay) as they make plans to destroy the plant and go someplace thats green. See PLANT,A8 By BARRY FOSTER News-Sun correspondentAVON PARK While h oliday decorations cont inue on the Mile-long M all in downtown Avon P ark,not everybody is h appy with some of the r ules and regulations for t he Candy Cane Lane C hristmas Tree Village p lanned for an area b etween Forest and Butler a venues. The one issue that I t ake is a statement in the f lyer I received as a busin ess owner in the city is t hat there are to be no relig ious decorations,George H all said. Hall is not only a local b usiness owner,but also a f ormer Avon Park city c ouncilman. He now s erves as pastor of Avon P ark Lakes Baptist C hurch. His intent is to go b efore the Avon Park City C ouncil and ask they r emove the prohibition c lause from the regulat ions. A flyer distributed to l ocal businesses lists the s ponsors for the display as t he City of Avon Park,the A von Park Chamber of C ommerce and the Avon P ark Main Street C ommunity R edevelopment Agency. Understanding politics i n Avon Park,the seated c ity council also sits as the C RA board,Hall said. They are the final say, w hether they want to wear t heir council hats or their C RA hats. They need to a ddress this immediately. Hall has been well Not everyone happy with Candy Cane Lane By PHIL ATTINGER phil.attinger@newssun.comSEBRING Jenny Fairfield doesnt worry what she and her husband spend on Internet service. Skype conversations keep them in touch every day. The expense is well worth it, said Jenny Fairfield,28. Pfc. Spec. E-4 Jordan Fairfield, 23,is so busy in Afghanistan,most conversations are only five to 10 minutes long,with only a handful more than 20 minutes,she said. Its his first deployment and their first as a couple. They got married 11 days before he deployed as a military police officer with the U.S. National Guard. Plans got moved up by the deployment. Skype keeps him up to date with their daughters gymnastics and soccer accomplishments. In the 2.5 years since they met,and approximately nine months since their wedding,Jordan Fairfield has jumped right into being a father to her 8year-old daughter,Jenny Fairfield said. He balances life out pretty well,she said,considering he also serves as a DeSoto City volunteer firefighter. He recently sent his department a souvenir:an American flag flown on a recent A-10 Warthog mission in honor of DeSoto City Volunteer Fire Department. Jenny Fairfield and her husbands family presented the flag to the station on Wednesday. The second is an American flag See WAR,A3Soccer funCounty teams take to the fields SPORTS,B1150 years agoPresident Lincoln famous Gettysburg Address LIVING,B12PerformingProwell family will perform Sunday RELIGION,A10In concertMatthew Wacaster joins stage cast PAGEA2 Another way to give back Firefighters devoted to family, county, country Katara Simmons/News-Sun Spc. Jordan Fairfield sent an American flag and a certificate to the Desoto City Volunteer Fire Department in Sebring that was flown in Afghanistan. Fairfield is a volunteer with the department, but is currently deployed to Afghanistan with the U.S. Air Force. Katara Simmons/News-Sun Mark Fairfield (from left), Simone and her mom Jenny Fairfield present an American flag from Spc. Jordan Fairfield on Wednesday evening to the Desoto City Volunteer Fire Department in Sebring. See ABILITY,A6 By SAMANTHA GHOLAR samantha.gholar@newssun.comSEBRING Relay for Life season is getting a good start in Highlands County with two upcoming kick of f celebrations early next wee k in Avon Park and Sebring. Lake Placid started off the season with its celebration this past Tuesday,but the two remaining cities hope to get the groove going and head into the holiday season with strong teams and great expectations for the spring events. Sebrings Relay for Life Kick Off Celebration is up first at 5:30 p.m. Monday a t Sebring Christian Church, 4515 Hammock Road. Team Developer Brandi Canada is excited about this years changes to the annual kick off celebration. This year our theme is Give Cancer the Boot. Its a country western theme. Everything will be western. Were going to have hay bails,cactus plants; everyo ne will be in western outfits. Its going to be great, Canada said. One of the biggest changes about the celebration this year,according to Canada,is that the coordinators have incorporated a lot more games,prizes and giv eaways into the event to keep attendees interested and excited about Relay. The Sebring Relay is already off to a decent start this year. Canada says they are about halfway to their team registration goal. We already have 15 teams signed up. We had a special,a $10 registration fee. Its normally $100,so that really helped a lot. Our goal is to have 35-40 teams; last year we had right at 30, I believe,Canada said. Though Sebring Relay didnt meet their goal at las t Relay for Life kick off celebrations few days away See AVON,A6

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Boy Scouts hold Bottle Water Drive SEBRING Boy Scout T roop 846 will have a B ottled Water Drive on S aturday to help the victims o f Typhoon Haiyan in the P hilippines. The local scouts are coll ecting cases of bottled water o r sealed gallon jugs of w ater from the community t hroughout the week and a sking the community to d rop off water at the collect ion site at Griffins Carpet M art,560 U.S. 27 North, f rom 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. S aturday. All donated water will be t urned over to the local The S alvation Army for distribut ion. Boy Scout Troop 846 is b ased out of First United M ethodist Church in S ebring. Gary King is Scout M aster. Groovus plays Music in the Park Concert Series SEBRING Groovus will p lay Saturday night during t he Music in the Park C oncert Series at Highlands H ammock State Park. Enjoy a n evening of jazz and class ic rock under the stars. Concert admission is $5 p er person (accompanied c hildren 12 and under are f ree).Bring lawn chairs, b lankets,and f lashlights.Concerts are outdoors in the picnic area from 7-9 p.m. Proceeds benefit park improvements via the Friends of Highlands Hammock.Regular park admission of $6 per vehicle is waived after 6 p.m. on concert nights.Circle of Truth returns tonightSEBRING Circle of Truth is putting on another concert tonight. Newworldson,which rocketed to international fame after the release of Salvation Station,will be making an appearance with special guests Matt Christian,Nuno Norberto, and Ashley Campbell. Newworldson was nominated this year for the fourth time for Contemporary Christian/Gospel Album of the Year. The free concert gets under way at 7 p.m. in Circle Park in Downtown Sebring. Concessions will be available. Bring a lawnchair.Dance Club hosts The SkylarksSEBRING The Highlands Social Dance Club will host the music of The Skylarks 10-piece dance band from 7-9:30 p.m. tonight at the Highlands Social Center,3400 Sebring Parkway. Dance to the big band sounds of the 40s,50s and 60s. Snacks and sandwiches will be avaialble. Admission is $5 for members and $7 for non-members. Dress is smart casual. Everyone is welcome,including singles. For information,call 386-0855.Music returns to Under the Oaks OprySEBRING Country, Page A2 News-SunFriday, November 15, 2013 www.newssun.com pub block; 5.542"; 4.5"; Black; publishers block; 0 0 0 2 6 4 0 3 This weeks question:Will FDOTs attempt to fix the channel between lakes Jackson and Little Jackson be a benefit? Yes 64% No 36% Total votes: 136 www.newssun .comPoll open through Friday. Make your voice heard at Nov. 13 2030324271MB:15x5Next jackpot $149 millionNov. 8 4142515765MB:7x2 Nov. 5 211426474MB:2x5 Nov. 13 51214284550x:2Next jackpot $30 millionNov. 9 91215213345x:2 Nov. 6 202529303637x:2 Nov. 13 1782133 Nov. 12 824253032 Nov. 11 15163435 Nov. 10 1523263536 Nov. 13 (n) 8577 Nov. 13 (d) 9164 Nov. 12 (n) 2247 Nov. 12 (d) 7137 Nov. 13 (n) 105 Nov. 13 (d) 216 Nov. 12 (n) 366 Nov. 12 (d) 188 Nov. 13 31219275 Nov. 8 57112218 Nov. 5 111317275 Nov. 1 41331422 Nov. 13 531505556 PB: 9Next jackpot $130 millionNov. 9 39374956 PB: 32 Nov. 6 15101549 PB: 22 Lottery Center Community Briefs Continued on page A5 By SAMANTHA GHOLAR samantha.gholar@newssun.comSEBRING The 34th annual Florida Classic is only a couple of weeks away and the Florida Sportsmans Association is seeking sponsors for local youth to attend the event in Orlando on November 23. Each year the Sportsmans Association rounds up dozens of youth from the community and hauls the students to the Florida Citrus Bowl to have a one-of-a-kind experience. FSA board member and president Robert Saffold has been heading the event for several years and looks forward to sharing the culture and excitement of a Historically Black College and University (HBCU) football classic with future potential students. This experience is something that these students will always remember. Its an opportunity for some of them to go to a city like Orlando. Even though its close by,some of these students dont ever get out of the area,Saffold said. The FSA charters six Annett buses each November to transport students,chaperones,parents and others to experience the classic Bethune Cookman University versus Florida A&M University football game. A picnic lunch is provided to each attendee of the game along with ticket entry into the football classic. Buses pick up youth attending the event from all over Highlands County and surrounding areas. The buses depart cities are Arcadia,Avon Park,Lake Placid,Sebring,Wauchula, Frostproof and Clewiston. Florida Sportsmans is asking for the communitys help to fund the annual trip to the Florida Classic to provide at-risk children and youth an experience they can always be thankful for for many years to come. Interested individuals, organizations and busines ses may contribute to the Florida Sportsmans Association annual Florida Classic trip in a number of different ways,Saffold said. Contributions can be made to the cost of the bus rental,which totals $4,800. Anyone may sponsor one or several children by purchasing a ticket or tickets for the game. Each ticket is $50. Contributions may Special to the News-SunSEBRING Talented young singer Matthew Wacaster has been added to the great lineup of performers for Tanglewoods Cancer Concert. The concert is being sponsored by Newsom Eye and will be held in the Tanglewood Clubhouse at 7 p.m. Thursday,Nov. 21. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased at Tanglewood from 9:30-10 a.m. Mondays,3-4 p.m. Thursdays,or at the Tanglewood show Phantom Phunny, Phabulouson Sunday evening. Wacaster,20,started singing on stage at the age of 3 and now performs full time with the Wacaster Family in music ministry. Singing is Wacasters passion. He was Christian Countrys young artist in 2007 and 2009,and has shared the stage with many big name performers. He has recently returned from Nashville where the family was filming a reality TV show. Wacaster joins Heartland Idol 2013 finalists Nala Price,Adam Meredith,Lindsey Sears, Ashley Elder and Gary Johnson plus the Sebring High School Show Choir. Everyone in the Heartland is invited to come out to enjoy our phenomenal local musicians and to support Tanglewoods efforts to battle cancer. This concert marks the start of the 15th year of the Tanglewood ResidentsCancer Benefit. To date,the community has donated more than $430,000 to the American Cancer Society for cancer research. Wacaster added to Tanglewood Cancer Concert lineup Courtesy photo Matthew Wacaster will be among the many talented local artists to perform at Tanglewoods Cancer Concert on Nov. 21. Tickets can be purchased at the Tanglewood Clubhouse or at the Nov. 17 show Phantom Phunny, Phabulous in the community. By BARRY FOSTER News-Sun correspondentSEBRING For the fourth consecutive year, The Week of the Family is being observed in Highlands County. The focus of activities to encourage families to spend more time together. The impetus of the event comes from resident Betty Prine,who inaugurated the event locally in 2010 after an experience with some of the youngsters in her family. My three grandchildren were all here for Christmas from different parts of the country. All of them were in the living room and every one of them did not seem to know the others were there,she said. One had a laptop computer,the other was playing a tennis game on TV,and the third was on their cell phone to a friend. I thought,This is Christmas! That was the beginning of the event. Prine said in the past there had been a different event for each day. This year,there is a single focus. A new tradition we have this year will be an evening at home,she said Prine is suggesting that families choose one night in the week that all family members can be home. The idea would be to prepare and eat a meal together. After dinner,play games, watch a movie,or pursue a hobby such as music,arts or crafts. Whatever you do,do it together!Prine said. The culmination for this years Week of the Family will be Saturday. Organizers have arranged a Celebration of the Family held at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agricultural Center from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Families are invited to come together for a day of fun and education. There will be music,special displays,activities and a kid friendlylunch. The event comes at no charge. We still have some roo m for vendors who want to set up,Prine said. There wont be any charge for those either. She said the event is designed to highlight the six steps to stronger families,which include being committed,expressing appreciation and affection sharing positive communication,the nurturing of spiritual well being,learning to cope with stress and planning a weekly night a t home with family member s together. Those who want additional information may vis it the groups website at www.highlandscountyweekofthefamily.org or ca ll Prine at 386-1791. Week of the Family wraps up Florida Sportsmans seek contributions for annual football classic By ROD LEWIS News-Sun correspondentLAKE PLACID Eva C ooper Hapeman was sworn i n Tuesday night as the new t own clerk for Lake Placid o n Tuesday. Hapeman takes o ver the post after the dism issal of former Town Clerk L McQueen Small. H apeman has held positions a tHighlands County E conomic Development C ommission,Heartland B usiness Services dba H & R Block,and Delray Lincoln Mercury, according to her Linked-in page. The Lake Placid Arts and Crafts Country Fair A ssociation asked for the u se of Devane Park on Feb. 1 -2. Public Works director J ohn Kamassa explained that a fter a letter is received,the t own sends paperwork within 6 0 days of the event,if it is a pproved by council.Town A dministrator Phil Williams s aid there is a place on the t owns website where one c an get information about p ark rentals. The council approved a g eneric resolution that reco gnizes the efforts of those w ho work with hospice,not a specific organization. N ovember is National H ospice and Palliative Care M onth. The council appointed t hree members of a newly f orming watershed committ ee. It was approved that c ouncil member Debra W orley would be the liaison f or the committee. The three m embers are Pam Fentress, B ob Howard,and John R uggiero. There was a request for f unds to help with the Green D ragon Drive tennis court r estrooms. Mayor John M. Lake Placid swears in new town clerk Hapeman See TOWN,page A6 See GREAT,page A7

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ANOTHERVIEWPOINT SCOTT DRESSELEditor editor@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor daniel.hoehne@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONlegals@newssun.com NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor publisher@newssun.com VICKIE WATSONvickie.jones@newssun.comMITCH COLLINSmcollins@newssun.com ADVERTISING Editorial & Opinion Page A4 News-SunFriday, November 15, 2013 www.newssun.com The world spins, the seasons change, someone breaks a sweat in November and the next thing we know, liberals find another excuse to grow the government. This time its about climate change; you know... that thing thats been happening four times per year since the dawn of creation, with rainy springs, hot summers, dry falls, and cold winters or, sometimes, dry springs, cool summers, wet falls, and warm winters. Liberals freak out over anything (or anyone) that doesnt neatly fit into their carefully controlled tight box of how things should be. Afew days of 100degree temperatures or an unseasonable snowstorm sends them into full panic mode. So things like the repressive climate change executive order President Obama signed Nov. 1 makes them feel as if theyve gained some semblance of control over us, that is. The executive order is really a whole lot to do about nothing, considering the Arctic sea ice is now recovering, the 17-year pause in global warming is expected to extend into the 2030s, and scientists now say recent warm weather trends are just part of a naturally recurring 300year cycle. I repeat, naturally recurring. Climate Depots Marc Morano says Obamas executive order is odd, considering this year is probably the least extreme weather year weve had in 100 years with declining trends in droughts, big tornadoes, hurricanes and heat waves. In fact, according to the Financial Post, there is a growing consensus among many scientists that we are actually entering a season of global cooling. Word of advice though for those who may be inclined to hold their breath waiting for an executive order to address global cooling; youre likely to pass out before that happens. Besides, the whole global warming nonsense is far too big a money-making scam to admit a reversal now. The fear factor goes a long way in this regard. I saw an article today in the UK Daily Mail which said, Global warming could lead to snakes as long as buses and horses shrinking to the size of cats. I think were already there; has anyone ever heard of an anaconda? Seriously, the facts are out there but truth is a painful experienc e for the closedminded. But here goes anyhow. Back in 2012, Peter Ferrara of the Heartland Institute told Forbes, Climate change itself is already in the process of definitively rebutting climate alarmist s who think human use of fossil fuels is causing ultimately catastrophic globa l warming. He goes on to make a great point that the 20th Centurys fluctuating temperatures didnt gel with the increased CO2 from the Industrial Revolution. Enter Georgia Institute of Technologys head of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Judith Curry and Marsha Wyatt from the University of Colorados Department of Geological Sciences who say the scorched earth hypothesis is inadequate in fundamental ways and describe the varying changes in the climate similar to a stadium wave a t a sporting event wherein certain natural events sel forganize into a collective tempo. Although Im sure Liberals perk up at the word collective, were talking about natural even ts combining together to produce natural results. Not: The exhaust from my Hummer produces snow clouds in May. Just like everything else in creation, there is rhyme and reason...push and pull...give and take. So heres some advice, free of charge from this blond columnist: Its November, so pull out your mittens, stock up on chopped wood and chill o ut as you inhale the beauty of Gods creation. Spring will be here before you know it. Susan Stamper Brown is an opinion page columnist who writes about politics, the economy and culture. Email Susan at writestamper@gmail.com or her website at susanstamperbrown.com/. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the News-Sun staff. The climate is changing (its fall!) Guest Column Susan Stamper Brown Make sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. We have to make room for everybody. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; or e-mail editor@newssun.com. can be submitted once every three months. Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the opinion of that author and not necessarily the opinion of the staff or editors of the News-Sun. EDITORIALPAGEPOLICY Its an energy source F lorida needs more of, as t he state will need another 1 0 gigawatts by 2030. U.S. nuclear power plants t end to be safer than plants f ueled by coal, oil or natural g as. Yet this clean power is t hreatened by a combination o f market forces and regulat ory hurdles that have sent c onstruction costs surging. T he 2011 earthquake and t sunami that hit Japan also hurt nuclear powers reputation, as three nuclear reactors at Fukushima melted down. The Fukushima disaster caused a worldwide reexamination of nuclear power. But casting aside nuclear power could have negative consequences in the long term, for the U.S. and the world. Nuclear power must be part of the American energy portfolio. This industry should be seeing a trend of more construction, but government regulation and market forces began working against nuclear power years ago. Natural gas emits about half of the carbon emissions of coal. Natural gas plants are also faster and cheaper to build. The average nuclear power plant takes about a decade to build, according to CNN. Only five new reactors are under construction in the U.S. The market is moving toward reliance on natural gas. No power source comes without risk. Coal sees many workers die in mines, and its the dirtiest fuel for electricity. Natural gas also carries with it the risk of explosion and leaks. U.S. nuclear power has a much better safety record than either gas or coal. Florida needs a diverse energy sector. By 2030, according to the Florida Chamber Foundation, 6 million new residents will call Florida home, and the state will need another 10 gigawatts of electricity. Nuclear power balanced against natural gas is the best way to meet the future Florida power demand. State needs more nuclear power N uclear power emits zero emissions into the atmosphere and generates a huge amount of elect ricity for cities and states to use. Sheesh, what did they expect? I speak of the backlash to the A ffordable Care Act of 2010, which p assed along purely partisan lines. Not o ne Republican in the House or Senate v oted in favor of it. More than half of t he American people were against it in 2 010. In fact, according to Politico, O bamaCare was the most partisan bill t o become law in the past 100 years. Politico points to a study conducted b y JPMorgans Michael Cembalest, w ho reviewed major legislation that b ecame law during the past century. Cembalest reviewed a variety of bills t hat covered civil rights, entitlement p rograms, welfare reform, labor relat ions, tax preferences and a variety of o ther monumental and sometimes cont roversial, issues. Consider: The Federal Reserve Act of 1913, w hich gave the federal government the a bility to create money, was controvers ial in its day but it was supported i n the House by 99 percent of D emocrats and 41 percent of R epublicans. The Social Security Act of 1935, w hich did plenty to transform America, r eceived support from 96 percent of H ouse Democrats and 81 percent of H ouse Republicans. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 r eceived House support from 80 perc ent of Republicans and 61 percent of D emocrats. Heck, even the Revenue Act of 1913, w hich established the income tax and w as, before ObamaCare, the most cont roversial bill in the last 100 years, r eceived support in the House from 5 p ercent of Republicans (and 98 percent of Democrats). Regardless of what anyone thinks about its merits and failings, Obamacare has an original sin problem, says Cembalest in his report. For the first time in 100 years, one party crammed down a bill with national implications without any agreement from the opposing party. And now our country has a real mess on its hands. Its not just because ObamaCare is hitting all kinds of obstacles as it is rolled out. Our incompetent government spent some $600 million on a website that still doesnt work. Its not just because the president promised Americans they could keep their policies and doctors as millions are seeing their policies canceled, forcing them to buy ObamaCare-compliant policies that cost two or three times as much. And its not just because Americans are worried that the worst is yet to come as ObamaCare disrupts and remakes one-sixth of the U.S. economy and that it is likely to continue to disrupt labor markets and inhibit economic growth. It is mainly because our political class in this case, the Democrats who had control of the House, Senate and White House in 2010 disregarded the will of the majority of the American people and rammed through a bill without the majoritys consent. Numerous polls show that more than half of Americans still do not like or want ObamaCare and those numbers will worsen as more people find out their policies are not eligible for grandfathering. Rage is growing among citizens, who are losing their policies. Many are speaking out to their elected representatives and demanding that ObamaCare be repealed or, at the very least, delayed. More Americans are coming to the conclusion that it took tremendous hubris and arrogance for politicians to think that the federal government could remake the health-care sector without causing the massive chaos we are now witnessing. And so the backlash not only continues, but is growing worse. Yet, despite the backlash, ObamaCares creators are doubling down. The president is saying he didnt say what he said what he said over and over again about keeping coverage and doctors. PR flacks are showing up on news programs, trying to convince average Americans they are not experiencing what they are experiencing. This is what happens when you ram through a massive bill that is one-sided from the start. Sheesh, what did they expect? Tom Purcell, author of Misadventures of a 1970s Childhood and Comical Sense: A Lone Humorist Takes on a World Gone Nutty! is a Pittsburgh Tribune-Review humor columnist and is nationally syndicated exclusively by Cagle Cartoons Inc. Send comments to Purcell@caglecartoons.com/. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the News-Sun staff. Obamacare backlash no surprise Guest Column Tom Purcell

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Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID Tuesday nights kickoff for Lake Placids Relay For Life event was attended by about 50 people who want to make a difference in the fight against cancer. This was the beginning of preparation for the American Cancer Societys fundraising event that will take place on April 4,2014. A lot of effort goes into making the April event a success,and the kickoff gets things rolling. The theme for next years Relay will be Racing For a Cure,so each team will have fun decorating their campsite with that motif. Event chairperson Chelsea Levine welcomed everyone and shared some details about both the American Cancer Society and Relay For Life. Team Development chairperson Cheryl Henderson provided everyone with details about the Cancer Prevention Study,also known as CPS3,with the hope that folks will participate in the sign up on Nov. 14. She also explained additional details about the Relay event. Other chairpersons explained various facets of what goes on to help wipe out cancer and to help folks dealing with the disease. A brave cancer survivor, Terri Koopman,spoke to the group about her journey with cancer,both as a caregiver for her husband,and then as a cancer patient herself. Every cancer patient has a unique story about their own journey,so it was interesting to hear Koopman speak. Jessica Keyser,the Luminaria chairperson, explained how this meaningful ceremony at sundown is a time of reflection. It is a time to honor those fighting cancer and to remember those who have lost their battles. With the lights turned off,and with mini-luminaria bags glowing,Keyser spoke about the significance of this program. With plenty of good food to enjoy and people to meet,it was an opportunity to recognize all of the 11 teams that have already registered. There are three more teams ready to sign up,and hopefully this kickoff will encourage others to join the fight against cancer,while having fun with the fundraising. To start a team or to join a team,go to www.relayforlife.org/lakeplacidfl. Fo r additional information,co ntact Chelsea Levine at 2439235,or email Cheryl Henderson at cheryl.henderson@lykesranch.com. B luegrass,Blues,and Gospel m usic will be played at U nder The Oaks Opry at 7 p .m. today and again at 2 p .m. Sunday,hosted by G.W. S aunders. This is an inside f amily venue. No alcohol is a llowed. Under the Oaks Opry is at 3 501 Beck Ave. Call 2530 771 for information,or l ook up Under The Oaks O pry on Facebook. V olunteers sought for Guardian ad Litem Program SEBRING The Guardian a d Litem program,which s erves abused and neglected c hildren across Highlands C ounty,is seeking volunt eers. Volunteer guardians h elp represent children who a re involved in court proc eedings. Guardians must be a t least 21 years old and u ndergo background checks a nd a certification process. For more information a bout the program,call D awn Shinskey at (863) 5344 597 or email D awn.Shinskey@gal.fl.gov. Legion hosts Oratorical contest AVON PARK The A merican Legion Post 69 w ill hold its 2014 Oratorical c ontest for all Avon Park H igh School students,grades n ine through 12. Each stud ent will be required to prese nt an 8to 10-minute prese ntation on a citizens r esponsibility to the United S tates Constitution,plus a 3t o 5-minute presentation on a n assigned topic. This contest will take p lace at 9 a.m. Jan. 11 at the A merican Legion Post 69, 1 301 W. Bell St. There is a p ossibility of winning $ 18,000 for first place, $ 16,000 for second place a nd $14,000 for third place a t the national level of the c ontest. Each stage of the c ontest also will have a mone tary reward. If any APHS student w ants to enter the contest, p ick up an entry form at the s chools guidance office or c all Earl Hershberger,chairm an of youth programs for t he Post,at 452-1431. Sebring Masons serve barbecue lunch SEBRING Sebring L odge No. 249 will serve an a ll-you-can-eat barbecue c hicken lunch from 11 a.m. t o 2 p.m. Saturday for an $8 d onation. The menu is chicke n,cole slaw,baked beans, p otato salad,dessert and b everage. The lodge is on the corner o f Home Avenue and S ebring Parkway. The public i s invited; take-out orders a re available. Audubon field trip to Lake Okeechobee Birding in the Lake Okeechobee area is a great, fun way to sharpen your birding skills. A favorite spot of Dr. Martin Stapleton,an outstanding birder/teacher, this annual trip is taken in memory of him. An easy trip for beginning and advanced birders,both water and land birds can be found. The lake is higher than last year,so the results should be very interesting. The search for birds will include the Lake Okeechobee Jaycee park with pier,Okeetontee, Harney Pond and 721. Everyone is welcome to attend on Saturday. Bring a lunch and plan to meet at the Lake Placid Tower at 8 a.m. or at the north rear of McDonalds on County Road 441 in Okeechobee at 8:45 a.m. For information and arrangements call 465-2468.Sons of the American Revolution meetLAKE PLACID The Highlands Chapter of the SAR (Sons of the American Revolution) meets the third Saturday of the month. Thenext meeting is at 12:30 p.m. Saturday in Lake Placid. Membership in the SAR is open to men whose ancestorsprovided active service in the cause for American independence. Visitors are welcome.Call 465-7345.LPHS Freshmen Leadership holds car washLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid High School Freshmen Leadership class will hold a car wash from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday in the Bank of America parking lot. The proceeds from the car wash will be donated to the Highlands County Humane Society. The students in Sandy Eidenbergers Teen Leadership classes voted to do this fundraiser for the Humane Society as it depends 100 percent on donations from the public. In addition to washing cars,the students will be collecting donations of dog and cat food.Lake Placid Ballroom Dance hosts Trukey TrotLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Ballroom Dancers will host a Turkey Trotdance on Saturday at the Elks Hall from 6:30-9 p.m. Allen will be the musician of the evening offering the soft sound of the s, s and s. The Ladies of the Elks will have sandwiches and desserts available. Bob Smart will oversee the free dance lesson in the lounge from 5:30-6:30 p.m.Walt and Susan Mirasky will be on hand as instructors for this lesson. There will be a box for non-perishable food items that will be donated to Manna Ministries for their Thanksgiving food shelves. Admission is $5 for LPBD members,and $7 for non-members.This dance is open to the public,and singles are most welcome. The Elks Hall is behind WinnDixie on County Road 621.Turkey Shoot benefits Nu-HopeSEBRING A Turkey Shoot,benefiting Nu-Hope Elder Care Services,will be held Saturday at Boom Booms Guns and Ammo, 330 US 27 North. Registration opens at 10 am.The cost is $5 per shot, with Boom Booms providing the ammo. Guns allowed for the competition include 22 LR handguns or 22 LR rifles, open sight only; loaner guns will be available. There will be male,female,and youth categories. Contact Laurie Murphy at 382-2134 or email MurphyL@Nuhope.orgAMVETS plan dinnerSEBRING AMVETS Post 21 Ladies Auxiliary will have a baked steak dinner from 5-7 p.m. Saturday for $7. Karaoke will BilDi from 6-9 p.m.Masons to serve pork dinnerLAKE PLACID Placid Lodge No.282 F&AM will hold a pulled pork dinner at the lodge,102 N. Maine Ave.,in from 4-7 p.m. Saturday. The dinner will consist of pulled pork,cole slaw,baked beans,roll,drink and dessert for the cost of $8. Call 461-8185 or 2431356.VFW serves dinnerLAKE PLACID VFW Post 3880 will serve a prime rib dinner for $12 on Saturday. Music will be by Todd Allen.Tomoka Heights plans saleLAKE PLACID Tomoka Heights Community in Lake Placid will hold its annual rummage and bake sale from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. The sale will take place at the clubhouse. Enter through the south gate. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, November 15, 2013 Page A5 BUTLER, FELLOWS & BRADEN ADVT.; 5.542"; 8"; Black; 11/13,15,17; 0 0 0 3 3 0 9 9 CENTRAL FLORIDA CASKET STORE &; 1.736"; 6"; Black; obit page fri. p/u; 0 0 0 3 3 3 3 3 ICS CREMATION; 1.736"; 3"; Black; obit page tv incl; 0 0 0 3 3 3 3 6 MARTIAL ARTS (pp); 3.639"; 4"; Black; main A rhr top of ad stack ; 0 0 0 3 3 4 3 8 RICHARD CARACAUS Richard James Caracaus,age 89, passed away Wednesday,Nov. 1 3,2013 in Sebring,Fla. He w as born in Bronx,N.Y.,to P eter B. and Rose (Giorno) C aracaus. Mr. Caracaus was a retired Miami-Dade police o fficer having served for m any years after his service w ith the United States Coast G uard during World War II. A fter moving to Avon Park i n 1988 he owned and opera ted a clock shop. He was a m ember of Our Lady of G race Catholic Church. He is survived by his wife, M ary E. Caracaus of Avon P ark,Fla.; sons,Peter C aracaus of Winter Haven, F la.,Charles Caracaus of A von Park,Fla. and Richard C aracaus Jr. of Maitland, F la.; step-children,Charles Young of Pennsylvania and Catherine Buhai of California; six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Visitation will be held Sunday,Nov. 17,2013 from 5-7 p.m. (with Rosary beginning at 6:30 p.m.) at the Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home in Avon Park,Fla. Funeral Mass will be held Monday,Nov. 18,2013 at 9:30 a.m. at Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church. Burial will follow in Lakeview Memorial Gardens. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Alzheimers Association,322 Eighth Ave. 7th Floor,New York,NY 10001. Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home Avon Park www.stephensonnelsonfh.com Obituary Continued from page A2 Community Briefs Courtesy pho to Kathy Alviano and Dawn Kaye represent the team from Florida Hospital in Lake Placid at the Relay for Life kick off meeting. Lake Placid kicks off 2014 Relay Courtesy pho to Terri Koopman spoke about her journey with cancer, both as a caregiver for her husband, and then as a patient herself.

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i n honor of his service,she s aid. DeSoto City Fire Lt. Scott K aplan said Jordan Fairfield a lways serves others. Hes k nown him ever since the y oung man was a 10-yearo ld boy scout and Kaplan w as assistant scoutmaster. If I call and say I need h im to help on a (Boy Scouts o f America) project,even t hough hes not involved in t he Scouts anymore,he s hows up,Kaplan said. Hes always ready to go. Thats not easy with 2 a .m. calls and a daughter to g et to school,Kaplan added. Still,with a department c overing 80 square miles and e xpecting to rack up 400 c alls this year,Kaplan said v eterans and active military p ersonnel bring a level of e xperience and wisdom to f ire crews no matter what a ge. Another member of his d epartment serves with the U .S. Marine Corps,although n ot deployed at this time, a nd Scott Watson with H ighlands Lakes Volunteer F ire Department is deployed o verseas,he said. Chief Adam Hess of Lake P lacid Volunteer Fire D epartment has two veterans o n call:Bobby Seeber,63, f ormerly of the U.S. Air F orce,and Herb Fyffe,78, f ormerly U.S. Navy. The willingness to serve a nd help the community is a lready there,said Lorida V olunteer Fire Chief Swen Swenson,who has three U.S. Army veterans:Jackie Graham,42,former drill sergeant and medic; Swensons 22-year-old son,Bradley, Pfc. E-4 Military Police; and a third firefighter whose mode of military service requires confidentiality. They have an innate ability to fit into an emergency response operation,he said: His son understands the need for public safety,Jackie Graham understands medical calls,and they all understand the importance of command structure. I was able to build from that and fit them into the structure we have,Swenson said. Graham said she spends her weekdays as a Veterans Service Officer with the Veterans of Foreign Wars,at an office at the Veterans Administration in St. Petersburg. On weekends, shes on call in Lorida, which is pretty busy,she said. It covers 256 square miles and has 210 calls per year, Swenson said. I dont always get to go to every call,but try to go as often as I can,Graham said. I dont take a break. I love what I do. I work with veterans. Volunteering with the fire department is a way to give back to the community, Graham said,but helping veterans with claims is her way of saying thank you for all theyve done. They paved the path for me. I see it as just a way of saying thank you,Graham said. Page A6 News-SunFriday, November 15, 2013 www.newssun.com TRAUTMAN, BOB; 9.347"; 11"; Black plus three; process, tv incl; 0 0 0 3 3 4 7 0 H olbrook said the funds w ould impact next years b udget. Councilman Ray R oyce suggested that the t own enter into an interlocal a greement not to exceed $ 12,000. A special meeting is p lanned for Tuesday to disc uss Lake Placid Utilities. M ore information on the m eeting will be available o nline before the meeting. Council announced plans t o annex Paradise Village w ithin a five-year time f rame. An annextion of R osewood A partments/Interlake C ondoes will be pursued as w ell. Many expressed opinions t hat the sign ordinance is a l iability to the towns busin esses. Williams suggested t hat a workshop be schedu led for January. Trash will be collected on t he regular schedule during t he holidays. Town looks an annexing property Continued from page A2 Katara Simmons/News-Sun T he Desoto City Volunteer Fire Department poses with Jenny Fairfield, her daughter Simone, Mark Fairfield and Cathy Raposa Bailey on Wednesday evening at the station in Sebring. Jordan Fairfield, a DCVFD volunteer, is currently serving with the U.S. Air Force in Afghanistan and sent home an American flag that was flown on Aug. 30 in honor of the department. Ability to fit into emergency response operation Continued from page A1 years event (which was canceled early due to weather),the relay teams still managed to collect a whopping $78,000 for the American Cancer Society. Sebring Relays goal this year is set at $75,000. The celebration is going to be great. We will have computers on site so that teams can register. Well have all types of food, music,games and even a few surprises for everyone throughout the night,Canada said. We also will be holding a luminary ceremony so that people can really get a feel of what goes on at Relay. Sebrings Relay for Life event will be held April 12-13,2014. For more information,contact Canada at mrsmattimore08@yahoo.com. Avon Park Relay for Life Team Recruiter Monica Kelly is in her first year on the job and is working diligently to create a unique,fun experience for the attendees and visitors at this years Avon Park Relay kick off celebration. The football theme Tackling for the Cureevent is slated to be at the Avon Park Rotary House,20 S. Verona Ave.,at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. Kelly wants Avon Park to succeed this year better than they ever have before. Avon Park has always been kind of at the bottom of the stack compared to the other teams Wauchula,Sebring,Lake Placid so we are working to change tha t, Kelly said. Currently,the Avon Park Relay has eight teams registered; the goal is 25 registered teams. Kelly revealed that the Relay has set a goal to raise $45,000,a massive increase from last years goal of $20,000. If each of the 25 teams can raise approximately $2,000 that would put us close to or at the goal this year. It is doable,Kelly said. Kelly and the rest of the Avon Park Relay members,volunteers and employee s invite the public out for wings,chicken, other foods and refreshments during the kick off celebration. Everyone is welcome; anybody who wants to come should come. Come start a new team and get registered. Were lookin g for sponsors still. Theres going to be lots going on and we are excited,Kelly said. We have a new county director,Leann Hinskey,so were also excited about the new leadership here in Highlands County. Its always good to get some new,fresh blood. It gives us hope for a lot of great things to come. Avon Parks Relay for Life event is scheduled for May 2-3,2014. For more information,contact Kelly at mon.kelly@hotmail.com. Avon Park Relay will be Tackling for a Cure Continued from page A1 Associated PressDUNEDIN Residents of several Florida homes have been evacuated due to a possible sinkhole that opened in a backyard in Pinellas County on Thursday. Dunedin Deputy Fire Chief Trip Barrs said the hole appeared to be about 12 feet wide when officials arrived on the scene. Residents of the neighboring houses also were evacuated as a precaution. The Tampa Bay Times reports (http://bit.ly/1g Oqlel) that the ground is so unstable that two homes must be demolished. Television footage showed part of a patio caved in and a boat on the edge of the hole. Tampa area television stations reported that a neighboring pool appears to have cracks. The affected neighborhood is in Dunedin,a small city in northern Pinellas County,about 20 miles north of St. Petersburg. Sinkholes are common in Florida because the peninsula is made up of porous carbonate rocks such as limestone that store and help move water underground. Over time,the rocks can dissolve. Possible sinkhole reported in yard

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By KEVIN McGILL Associated PressNEW ORLEANS Enter N ew OrleansFrench Q uarter on the uptown end o f Bourbon Street,and the l egacy of Owen E. Brennan S r. becomes immediately c lear. On your left is Ralph B rennans Red Fish Grill. A f ew doors down is Dickie B rennans Steakhouse and, n earby,his Bourbon House s eafood eatery. Dickies late st,Tableau,sits near St. L ouis Cathedral. Mr. Bs Bistro (managing p artner:Cindy Brennan) is at t he corner of Iberville and R oyal,while SoBou,another B rennan project,has opened n ext to the tony W hotel. T heres also the venerable C ommanders Palace,over in t he Garden District. Of course,you could a lways drop by the spiritual b ase of the dynasty at 417 R oyal Street,home of b ananas Foster,sumptuous c ourtyard breakfasts and dinn ers of fresh seafood or p rime meats awash in what o ne glowing review called a N iagara of familiar sauces hollandaise,meuniere, m archand de vin,biarnaise a nd choron. But you wont get in. Not e ven with a reservation. Brennans Restaurant A New Orleans Tradition S ince 1946 is closed,the l atest shoe to fall in 40 years o f headline-grabbing family d iscord and costly litigation o ver matters of control, m oney and use of the family n ame. Golden lettering that once s pelled out Brennanshas b een pried from the 18th c entury pink town house on R oyal,leaving gray gashes i n the stucco and,perhaps, a n even deeper wound in the p syche of a city keen on its c ulinary history. It diminishes New O rleans in a way that we c annot afford to be dimini shed,says local food writer P oppy Tooker,as the latest c ase of Brennan v. Brennan d rags on in federal court. Brennans the restaurant and the Brennans thems elves have always been a bout more than dining. T heir establishments l aunched celebrity chefs s uch as Emeril Lagasse. F amily members founded the star-filled Mardi Gras parade Bacchus,and have worked to promote the citys tourism industry as a whole. That there have been quarrels is hardly news in New Orleans. But when word of the closure at 417 Royal hit websites and social media,it raised anew questions about the future of the hallowed site and the Brennan legacy. The fact that it closed amid family squabbles is just kind of unseemly,says Bret Thorn,food editor of Nations Restaurant News magazine. Its just such a great, great institution,says Tim Zagat,co-founder of the Zagat restaurant guide. With the spaces inside,the famous dishes that they created. It would be a shame to lose it. The gastronomic dynasty began in the 1940s on Bourbon Street. Owen E. Brennan owned the Old Absinthe House bar when, according to New Orleans lore,he opened his namesake restaurant in part to answer a challenge:Fellow restaurateur CountArnaud Cazenave jokingly questioned the ability of an Irishman to run anything better than a hamburger joint. Owen succeeded with fine cuisine,powerful cocktails, imported wines and promotional savvy. He pushed chef Paul Blange to create a banana-based dessert because New Orleans was a major importer of the fruit. While other establishments focused on the dinnertime experience,Owen promoted Breakfast at Brennans, featuring a courtyard view and rich egg creations. It was a truly important restaurant in the national scheme of things,says Zagat. It was also a family affair. When Owen died in 1955,as the restaurant was relocating from Bourbon to Royal Street,the running of the business fell to his five siblings Ella,Adelaide, John,Dick and Dottie and,as they grew older,sons Ted,Jimmy and Owen Jr., known as Pip. They expanded,opening restaurants in Mississippi and Texas and acquiring Commanders Palace. And,famously,they feuded. There were disagreements,says Ralph Brennan, Johns son and a successful developer of restaurants in his own right,who was in college when the cracks developed. There are obviously different sides to the story. The problems started in 1973 as Owens sons voiced worries that expansions were spreading the business too thin. Ultimately,Owens widow and sons assumed control of the original Brennans while his siblings and their children took over Commanders Palace and other family restaurants. Since then,the original Brennans has survived a 1975 fire,ups and downs in the economy and damage from Hurricane Katrina. All the while the feuding continued. One expensive battle pitted Owens sons against cousin Dickie Brennan over the right to use the family name at his steakhouse. Further rifts have developed among the relatives who ran the flagship restaurant,spawning complicated litigation involving,among other things,who owns controlling shares of the business. This spring,as that dispute played out in court, police were called to the original Brennans when one family member tried to call a staff meeting against the wishes of other relatives. Court records state that the confrontation ended peacefully. But it generated new headlines,and portended the end for Brennans. This past spring,Ralph Brennan and a business partner bought the building in foreclosure. Ralph says he first reached across the family divide in 2011 to talk with Ted about saving the original Brennans. A takeover,he says,is not what he had planned. I wanted to help my cousins keep the restaurant, he says,adding:Were still family ... Attempts this past spring to reach a lease agreement with his squabbling cousins failed. Brennans Restaurant was evicted,and in June waiters and staff arrived for work to find the doors to Brennans locked. Around town,the jokes and jeers came quickly, along with laments over the loss of the landmark. A real shame,wrote one reader on NOLA.com. Greed knows no bounds, opined another. Someone suggested the feud could be fodder for a new reality TV show,about a bunch of rich privileged kidswho want more ... Pip Brennan is trying to reverse the foreclosure in court. In filings,he faults his brother Ted and a niece for doing nothing to stop the sale. Neither brother responded to interview requests,but Pip issued a brief statement Wednesday: Though we no longer own the Royal Street location,it is our hope to open a new Brennans Restaurant to continue our familys tradition of fine dining and impeccable service. Ralph Brennan hopes by spring to open a new restaurant in the Royal Street space,a building he practically grew up in but had rarely visited since the family schism of He remains mum on whether hes willing,or legally able,to use the Brennan name for it. I dont know how different it will be yet,he says, but it will certainly be representative of the family. No matter what happens with the original Brennans or the endless family feuds the Brennan legacy will survive,says local magazine publisher and historian Errol Laborde. There may b e older restaurants in New Orleans Antoines,for instance,goes back to the 1800s but Brennans influence is undeniable. If Antoines was closed thered be no legacy, Laborde says. Brennans has legacies all over the place. I dont think there was any permanent damage, adds food editor Thorn. I think there was some embarrassment for the family,but an understanding that there had been a longstanding rift among the Brennans. They still are great restaurateurs ... Besides,Thorn says:I think everybody understands family feuds. We all have them. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, November 15, 2013 Page A7 DCW ADVERTISING; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; main A 11/8,10,15,17; 0 0 0 3 3 4 8 6 Special to the News-SunSEBRING Heartland Food Reservoir will continue the Elementary Food Pack Program,while reducing cost,expanding to all three communities,and using child-friendly products. The agencys first attempt last year allowed organizers to revise and improve the program in a positive way. The program will now be run for 52 weekends,not just the weekends during the nine-month school year. Costs will be reduced per week from $5.50 per student to $4 per student. The program expansion will include the following elementary schools:Avon Elementary School in Avon Park; Fred Wild Elementary and Memorial Elementary schools in Sebring; and Lake County Elementary School in Lake Placid. The food distributed to the elementary students will also change from canned good s to food that children like an d can fix themselves without having to heat the food. The beginning targeted number is 50 elementary st udents per school and this will depend upon available funds secured from grants, industry,churches,social clubs,and the general public. The general public can support a Highlands County student for one year with a $208 donation for the Elementary Food Pack Program.Make checks payable to the Heartland Food Reservoir,but write Elementary School Food Pack Programon the chec k. Heartland Food Reservoir continues Elementary Food Pack Program Courtesy photo Heartland Food Reservoir is not only continuing its food pack program this year for elementary school children, but it is expanding it to include more children. Closure of landmark eatery spotlights family feuds By PHIL ATTINGER phil.attinger@newssun.comLAKE PLACID A man w ho arranged to pay for sex w ith a Facebook contact f ound himself facing a f irearm late Sunday night. Highlands County sheri ffs deputies tracked down t he woman in question 2 0-year-old Naisha Tyesha A shakee Johnson and c harged her with armed robb ery. She is still in H ighlands County Jail in l ieu of $25,000 bond. Arrest reports state that t he Sheriffs Office got a call a t 11:35 p.m. Sunday for an a rmed robbery in Sun N L akes of Lake Placid. The victim,a 23-year-old white male living in Lake Placid,told deputies he had made arrangements with an unknown black female later identified as Johnson to pay for sex. He had met her through Facebook posts and had asked her to contact him in the future when she would be willing to meet with him. Arrest reports state that she called him on Sunday and they agreed to meet on Orange Street,a dirt road in Lake Placid. The man waited several minutes at the agreed location,reports said. When she arrived,he told her he was not going to pay her until after sex. At that point,reports said, she removed a revolver from her waistband,pointed it at his head and demanded he give her the money or she would shoot him. In fear for his life,the man handed her the money $140 in cash left the area and called sheriffs deputies. When found and questioned,Johnson told deputies she did not want the man to touch her,so she lifted her shirt so he could see the revolver. She then said he stepped back and told her he would call law enforcement, reports said. Man robbed by Facebook pickup also be made for the event as a whole in any amount a contributor wishes. We encourage you and your group to c ontinue to make a difference in our commun ity by supporting and encouraging our y oung people,Saffold said. This wholes ome,motivating event is a great opportunity for the communitys at-risk youth. Checks may be made payable to Florida Sportsmans Association,Inc. (Attention: Robert Saffold),608 Bowman Ave.,Sebring, FL 33870. The contributions are tax deductible. For more information contact Saffold at 214-7700 or Barbara Walker at 385-6622. Continued from page A2 Great opportunity for young people rf

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Page A8 News-SunFriday, November 15, 2013 www.newssun.com BROWN, JEN; 3.639"; 2"; Black; tv p/u; 0 0 0 3 3 3 8 2 GRIFFIN'S CARPET MART; 7.444"; 10"; Black; 11/15/13; 0 0 0 3 3 6 0 7 Audreys boyfriend is a sadistic dentist,so Seymour makes an appointment to kill him. When he gets to the office,however,he cant do it. The dentist,however, puts on a mask with laughing gas and asphyxiates himself. Seymour feeds him to Audrey II. The plant thrives,Seymour gets the girl,and becomes a celebrity because of the plant. Act one ends with everything falling into place for the lovers. Act II opens with the flower shop thriving. The shop owner,Mr. Mushnik, confronts Seymour about the dentists disappearance, his relationship with Audrey,and the red spots that are on the floor of the shop. He wants Seymour to give a statement to the police. Seymour thinks quickly and tells Mushnik that he needs to go to the bank first to make the deposit. Mushik is livid when Seymour tells him that the deposit is hidden inside of Audrey,and goes inside the plants mouth to find the deposit. He figures out that he is in trouble too late and Audrey eats him. Seymour seems to be on top of the world. When he finds out that Audrey will love him even if he is poor, he decides to end it all and kill the plant the next day, right after an interview with Life Magazine. He reveals his plan to Audrey and tells herto run home,and he will see her tomorrow. Little Shop of Horrors is directed by Laura Wade. She said,This production was not originally slated, and I was originally not supposed to direct it,but the cast fell into place and it was meant to be. Part of the challenges of the production involved the plant. Plants that eat people are always a challenge to put on stage,Wade said. The plant is $5,000 to rent but a group said they could build the plant themselves, and here it is! In addition to an alien plant,the music is also memorable with songs such as Skid Row, Somewhere Thats Green, and Suddenly Seymour. Tracey Schuknecht,one of the Doo Wap girls,said her,mom directed Little Shop22 years ago,when I was 11,and I have always wanted to be in the play. Melanie Boulay plays Audrey. She said,In this play,everybody makes it work. Everybody feeds off of everybody else to make it perfect. This show is a joy to do and everybody makes it like a family; it is a great place to go after working all day. The nerdiness of Seymourdrew Anthony Toler to this,his third play. The show came together Monday night. Vanessa Logsdon,executive director of the Theatre,said,This is a good way to kick off the new season. The questions still remain. Do Seymour and Audery get to be together and go someplace thats green? Will the plant take over the planet? What will happen to the flower shop on skid row? Find the answers to these questions and more at Highlands Little Theatres production of Little Shop Of Horrors,playing now through Nov. 24. This play may not be suitable for ve ry young children. Highlands Little Theatre is at 356 W. Center Ave. The website is www.highlandslittletheatre.org,and the phone number is 3822525. Continued from page A1 Plant worked out for Little Shop of Horrors Rod Lewis/News-S un The Doo Wap girls. Rod Lewis/News-S un Seymour (Anthony Toler) pricks his finger on a rose and the plant goes wild. Special to the News-SunSEBRING Ais, F ootprints to Oblivionwill b e presented by David R. M cDonald at 7 p.m. T hursday,Nov. 21 in B uilding G,Room 101,at t he South Florida State C ollege Highlands Campus. T he presentation is part of t he Kissimmee Valley A rchaeological and Historic C onservancys (KVAHC) S peaker Series. The public is i nvited at no cost. Ais,Footprints to O blivionis an overview of t he Ais Civilization with part icular emphasis on their m aterial culture through artif acts and replication. The A is were a prehistoric tribe f ound on the Eastern A tlantic Florida Coast from C ape Canaveral to St. Lucie. What we know about the t ribe comes from the writi ngs of Jonathan Dickenson a fter being shipwrecked in t heir territory. The survivors w ere stripped of all possessions and clothing and were taken to the town of Hobe, where Fontenada,a Spanish captive of the Indians, described the Jeaga Indians. From Hobe,the Indians allowed the surviving passengers to travel to St. Augustine. As a former president of the Indian River Anthropological Society and amateur archaeologist, McDonald's major focus has been on education. One of his passions is experimental archaeology and the replication of native technologies, particularly the atlatl (spear thrower). To date,he has conducted more than 500 classes for public and private organizations from elementary through high school and in counties around Brevard. McDonald is a graduate of the University of Central Florida. For more information, contact Anne Reynolds at 840-3995 or 465-3637. KVAHC Speaker Series presents Ais, Footprints to Oblivion By THOMAS J. SHEERAN Associated PressCLEVELAND A myst erious defendant in a $100 m illion,cross-country Navy v eterans charity fraud case w as convicted Thursday of r acketeering,theft,money l aundering and other c harges. Jurors deliberated for a bout three hours Wednesday b efore reaching guilty verd icts on all 23 counts. They h eard nothing from the exf ugitive,who changed his m ind and decided against t estifying. His attorney said h e wanted to tell his story b ut worried about his mental s tate if he faced aggressive c ross-examination by prosec utors. The defendant identifies h imself as 67-year-old B obby Thompson,but a uthorities say hes Harvardt rained attorney John Donald C ody. He was indicted in 2 010,disappeared for nearly t wo years and was arrested l ast year in Portland,Ore. He faces up to 67 years in p rison at his sentencing, w hich was scheduled for D ec. 16. The defendant rolled his e yes toward the ceiling and r ocked on his feet as the verd icts were read. Deputies c uffed his wrists after the f irst guilty verdict was a nnounced. Unlike the last t wo days of his trial,the d efendant showed up with h is shirt buttoned and his h air combed. He was charged with looti ng the United States Navy V eterans Association,a chari ty he ran in Tampa,Fla. As h is five-week trial wound d own,he had appeared d isheveled in court,so much s o that the judge suggested a b reak Tuesday to allow him t o get a clean shirt and comb h is hair. The defense rested witho ut calling anyone to the s tand because there is no d efense for the scam that J ohn Donald Cody pulled on Americans in the name of our countrys veterans,said Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine,whose office handled the trial. Defense attorney Joseph Patituce said after the verdict that ineffective legal representation issues stemming from limited preparation time and his clients cooperation might be a basis for a planned appeal. Patituce said he doubts other states will seek to prosecute his client at this point. He also said he had questions about his clients mental health and asked the judge to order an assessment before sentencing. The judge agreed and urged the defendant to be honest with the mental health review team. Patituce said earlier that the defendant had bloodied himself last week while pounding his head against the wall in a holding cell. The judge said the defendant was checked by the jail medical staff. Authorities believe he defrauded donors of up to $100 million in 41 states. A fraction of that money was found. When he was arrested, authorities found fake IDs and a suitcase with $980,000 in cash. Records show the defendant had showered politicians,often Republicans, with political donations. The judge rejected a defense request to subpoena testimony from leading Ohio Republicans,including U.S. House Speaker John Boehner. Authorities said they traced the name Bobby Thompson to a man who wasnt connected to the charity case and had his identity stolen,including his Social Security number and date of birth. The defendant was identified through military fingerprint records. Ohio jury convicts ex-fugitive in $100M fraud case

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, November 15, 2013Page A9 rffntbffnfn frnffnf ffnfffnnnnn nnnfnffnnnbnf bfffnffbf fnbfnbf fn rff nt bf t f tf f rf ntbn rfntfrb btbfntf fbtbf tff fbftbfbnbfb bbbbbbnrbtn brfbbbnbbrftrfb fbbbttnbbtnftfbfrrb ntftffbfntftbbnb trfnt Classifiedtn bfbrbrnfnbnbffbftrb bbttnbbntbntrnbrffbb fnrfntntftbnrfbrfb bfbtbfbf bbfbtntftrfbntnbnn nnntnrnfftnbrbbbrnnf nntnfrbnrrbrbn btfrftrbfntrfbtftb bbtnntbbnftftb bffbnrftrbfrftrbbnnrbb bfntfbbbnrnbbttbf tbrftbnb rfffntbtbt ttn tbnnbbtnfntbntn nbn ttf IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.2012-CA-000919-GCS NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC Plaintiff(s), vs. KENNETH E.MARION,et al, Defendant(s)/ NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY TO:Any and All Unknown Parties Claiming By,Through,Under or Against Kenneth E. Marion A/K/A Kenneth Marion A/K/A Ken Marion deceased,who are not known to be dead or alive,whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses,heirs,devisees,grantees,assignees,lienors,creditors,trustees,or other claimants.ADDRESS IS UNKNOWN,BUT LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS 17506 BROADLAND LN.,OKEECHOBEE, FL 34974 Residence unknown and if living,including any unknown spouse of the Defendant,if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs,devisees, grantees,assignees,creditors,lienors,and trustees,and all other parties claiming by, through,under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown named Defendant as may be infants,incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property,to-wit: LOT 10,BLOCK 86 SECTION 2,TOWN OF HARDING,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 104 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. more commonly known as 17506 BROADLAND LN,OKEECHOBEE,FL 34974 This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense,if any,to it on Plaintiff's attorney,GILBERT GARCIA GROUP,P.A., whose address is 2005 Pan Am Circle,Suite 110,Tampa,Florida 33607,on or before 30 days after the date of first publication and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 4th day of November,2013. ROBERT W.GERMAINE HIGHLANDS County,Florida ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLER K By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Cler k ``In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act,persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in the proceeding shall,within seven (7) days prior to any proceeding,contact the Administrative Office of the Court,HIGHLANDS County,590 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE,SEBRING,FL 33870.County Phone:863-402-6594 TDD 1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service''. 469549.003022ST/lsantiago November 8,15,2013 NOTICE OF SALE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO Destiny Richbon that on 11/21/2013 at 11am at Dwight's Mini Storage at 1112 Persimmon Ave.Sebring,FL 33870.The personal property in Unit #18 of Destiny Richbon will be sold or disposed of PURSUANT TO F.S.83.806(4). November 8,15,2013 This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act,if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to provisions of certain assistance.Please contact the Court Administrator at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,FL 33870,Phone No. (863)534-4690 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired,call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired,call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 1st day of November,2013. ROBERT W.GERMAINE As Clerk of the Court By:/s/ Toni Kopp As Deputy Cler k November 8,15,2013 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.282012CA000481 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (``FNMA''), Plaintiff, vs. EYAL SAR-SHALOM; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF EYAL SAR-SHALOM; LYNNE ELIZABETH FLANNERY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LYNN ELIZABETH FLANNERY; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): EYAL SAR-SHALOM (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF EYAL SAR-SHALOM (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 4,BLOCK 3,LAKE AND RANCH CLUB FIRST ADDITION,ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8,PAGE 50,PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. a/k/a 1438 CLUB LANE,LORIDA,FLORIDA 33857 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses,if any,to it,on Kahane & Associates, P.A.,Attorney for Plaintiff,whose address is 8201 Peters Road,Ste.3000,Plantation, FLORIDA 33324 on or before December 10, 2013,a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in THE NEWS SUN and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NUMBER:13-307-CA HEARTLAND NATIONAL BANK,a national banking association, Plaintiff, vs. ALEXANDER TORRES and KELLY LYNN TORRES a/k/a KELLY L.TORRES a/k/a KELLY TORRES,UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final decree of foreclosure entered in the above-entitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County,Florida,I will sell the property situated in Highlands County,Florida, described as: Lots 1 through 7,HERON POINT,according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 15,Page 92,Public Records of Highlands County,Florida. at public sale,to the highest and best bidder for cash,in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida,in accordance with Section 45.031,Florida Statutes (2004),at 11:00 a.m.,on the 4th day of December, 2013. NOTICE:Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. SIGNED this 1st day of November,2013. (SEAL) ROBERT W.GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk November 8,15,2013 tem,you should contact the Office of the Court Administrator at (863)534-4686 (voice),(863)534-7777 (TDD) or (800)955-8770 (Florida Relay Service),as much in advance of your court appearance or visit to the courthouse as possible.Please be prepared to explain your functional limitations and suggest an auxiliary aid or service that you believe will enable you to effectively participate in the court program or service. Dated this 1st day of November,2013. Robert W.Germaine Clerk Of The Circuit Court By:/s/ Toni Kopp 10-08258 November 8,15,2013 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.:282010CA000282AOOOXX BANK OF AMERICA,N.A., Plaintiff, vs. GENE A.HENDRIX,JR.; JODI L. HENDRIX; MIDFLORIDA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 31st day of October,2013,and entered in Case No. 282010CA000282AOOOXX,of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County,Florida,wherein BANK OF AMERICA,N.A.is the Plaintiff and GENE A. HENDRIX,JR.,MIDFLORIDA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION,JODI L.HENDRIX and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants.The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE,430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE,SEBRING,FL 33870,11:00 AM on the 10th day of January,2014,the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment,to wit: LOT 8,BLOCK M,SPRING LAKE VILLAGE II, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9,PAGE 43,PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE,IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs assistance in order to participate in a program or service of the State Courts SysING BY,THROUGH,UNDER,AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address:Unknown Current Address:Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County,Florida: LOT 14,BLOCK 4,HIGHLANDS PARK ESTATES,SECTION P,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5,PAGE 59,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. A/K/A 1023 BRECKINRIDGE AVE LAKE PLACID FL 33852-7555 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication,if any,on Albertelli Law,Plaintiff's attorney,whose address is P.O.Box 23028, Tampa,FL 33623,and file the original with this Court either before December 4,2013 service on Plaintiff's attorney,or immediately thereafter; otherwise,a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the News-Sun WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 8th day of November,2013. Clerk of the Circuit Court By:/s/ Brenda Jimenez Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law P.O.Box 23028 Tampa,FL 33623 EF 014438F01 **See the Americans with Disabilities Act If you a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled,at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,(863)534-4690,within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice of Action; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call TDD (863)534-7777 or Florida Relay Service 711.To file response please contact Highlands County Clerk of Court, 590 S.Commerce Ave.,Sebring,FL 33870-3867,Tel:(863)402-6591; Fax: (863)402-6664. November 15,22,2013 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.:28-2013-CA-000067 DIVISION: PNC BANK,NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHY V.WHITE,ET AL, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,LIENORS,CREDITORS, TRUSTEES,OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY,THROUGH,UNDER,OR AGAINST, TIMOTHY V.WHITE ALSO KNOWN AS TIMOTHY JAMES VAN WHITE ALSO KNOWN AS TIMOTHY JAMES WHITE ALSO KNOWN AS TIMOTHY J.WHITE Last Known Address:Unknown Current Address:Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.28-2012-CA-000409 WELLS FARGO BANK,N.A. Plaintiff, v. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS,GRANTEES, DEVISEES,LIENORS,TRUSTEES,AND CREDITORS OF JAMES JONES,DECEASED; AVA DELOIS MOORE; JAMES J.JONES,JR.; KATIE JONES MCGILL; SAMUEL LEE JONES; HARVEY LEE JONES,SR.A/K/A HARVIE LEE JONES,SR.; BECKY SUE DAVIS BROWN; MARGIE WILLIAMS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF AVA DELOIS MOORE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAMES J.JONES,JR.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KATIE JONES MCGILL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAMUEL LEE JONES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HARVEY LEE JONES,SR.A/K/A HARVIE LEE JONES,SR.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BECKY SUE DAVIS BROWN; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,THROUGH,UNDER OR AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S),WHO (IS/ARE) NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,LIENORS, CREDITORS,TRUSTEES,SPOUSES,OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that,pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on October 31,2013,in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida,the clerk shall sell the property situated in Highlands County,Florida,described as: LOT 10,BLOCK ``E'',OF MARSH'S SUBDIVISION,BEING A RESUBDIVISION OF LOTS 1,2 AND 3,BLOCK ``F'',OF PRICE AND GORHAMS' SUBDIVISION,SITUATED IN THE TOWN OF AVON PARK,IN SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH,RANGE 28 EAST, HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. a/k/a 1026 S.DELANEY AVE.,AVON PARK, FL 33825-4128 at public sale,to the highest and best bidder, for cash,in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse,located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,FL 33870-3867,Highlands County,Florida,at eleven o'clock a.m.,on January 9,2014. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale,you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale.If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Dates this 1st day of November,2013. ROBERT W.GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice,please contact the Court Administration Office at (863) 534-4690.If you are hearing or voice impaired,call TDD 1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 (V),via Florida Relay Service. 888120630 November 8,15,2013 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.28-2011-CA-000719 US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, v. TERRY K.COLLIER; OK C.COLLIER; LEE J. COLLIER; BENJAMEN K.COLLIER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LEE J.COLLIER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BENJAMEN K. COLLIER; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,THROUGH,UNDER OR AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S),WHO (IS/ARE) NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,LIENORS, CREDITORS,TRUSTEES,SPOUSES,OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; SYLVAN SHORES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION,INC. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that,pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on October 30,2013,in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida,the clerk shall sell the property situated in Highlands County,Florida,described as: LOT 16,IN BLOCK 10,OF SYLVAN SHORES ESTATES,SECTION A,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4,PAGE 81,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. a/k/a 1727 LAKE CLAY DRIVE,LAKE PLACID,FL 33852-6993 at public sale,to the highest and best bidder, for cash,in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse,located at 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,FL 33870-3867,Highlands County,Florida,at eleven o'clock a.m.,on January 9,2014. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale,you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale.If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Dates this 1st day of November,2013. ROBERT W.GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice,please contact the Court Administration Office at (863) 534-4690.If you are hearing or voice impaired,call TDD 1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 (V),via Florida Relay Service. 665112415 November 8,15,2013 highest and best bidder for cash at 430 S. COMMERCE AVENUE,SEBRING,FL 33870 AT 11:00 A.M.on January 10,2014,the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment,to wit: LOT 16,HICKORY RIDGE SUBDIVISION UNIT 11,ACCORDING TO MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 15, PAGE 6,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA,AND THAT CERTAIN 1985 FUQUA DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME WITH VIN #'S FH3610695A & FH3610695B 7 REAL PROERPTY #R90 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 1st day of November,2013. Robert Germaine As Clerk of the Court By:/s/ Toni Kopp As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator,(863) 534-4690, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance,or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; Notice of Foreclosure Sale; if you are hearing or voice impaired,call TDD (863) 534-7777 or Florida Relay Service 711. 13-07538 November 8,15,2013 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.28-2013-CA-000544 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE,LLC D/B/A CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. PERRY TOWLES AND LINDA K.LEE,et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31,2013,and entered in Case No. 28-2013-CA-000544 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County,Florida,wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE,LLC D/B/A CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY,is the Plaintiff and PERRY TOWLES; LINDA K.LEE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF PERRY TOWLES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LINDA K.LEE N/K/A JOHN DOE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s).Robert Germaine as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.:2013-CA-000141 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -vs.A shley Dixon; Unknown Spouse of Ashley Dixon; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living,and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through,under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive,whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse,Heirs,Devisees, Grantees,or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2,If living,and all Unknown Parties claiming by,through,under and against the above named not known to be dead or alive,whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse,Heirs,Devisees, Grantees,or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated October 31,2013,entered in Civil Case No.2013-CA-000141 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County,Florida,wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK,NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,Plaintiff and Ashley Dixon are defendant(s),I,Clerk of Court,ROBERT W. GERMAINE,will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash,AT THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE,SEBRING,FLORIDA AT 11:00 A.M.,January 10,2014,the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment,to-wit: LOT 18,BLOCK S,SUN N LAKES ESTATES SECTION-3,ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF,AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8,PAGE 31,PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. A NY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE,IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,you are entitled, at no cost to you,to the provision of certain assistance.Please contact Court Administration at 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring, Florida 33870,telephone (863) 534-4690, within two (2) working days of receipt of this Notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. OCTOBER 3,2013. ROBERT W.GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Highlands County,Florida By:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk of Court A TTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO,FISHMAN & GACHE',LLP 2424 North Federal Highway,Suite 360 Boca Raton,Florida 33431 (561)998-6700 (561) 998-6707 12-253635 FC03 CHE November 8,15,2013

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Page A10News-SunFriday, November 15, 2013www.newssun.com PUBLIC NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY TO THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS TO CLOSE A ROAD Notice is hereby given that the Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County, Florida,upon petition of Lionel E.LaGrow will on the 17th day of December,2013,at 9:00 A .M.,in the Board of County Commissioner's Meeting Room at 600 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida,consider and determine whether the county will close the road described below and renounce and disclaim any rights of the County and the public in and to the road and land in connection therewith.The road is described as: Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 1, Block 10,LAKE BLUE ESTATES according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4 at Page 59 of the Public Records of Highlands County,Florida; thence North 31 degrees 50'30'' East,along the Westerly right of way of Lake Clay Drive,being a 50 foot right of way,a distance of 38.64 feet to a point on the South line of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 30; thence North 89 degrees 30'00'' West,along said South line,a distance of 9.37 feet to the Westerly right of way line of Lake Clay Drive,being a 66 foot right of way; thence North 31 degrees 50'30'' East,along said Westerly right of way line,a distance of 158.06 feet to the South line of a 66 foot right of way; thence North 89 degrees 30'00'' West,along said South right of way line,a distance of 282.23 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING,said point also being the Point of Curvature of a circular curve to the left,having for its elements,a radius of 117.00 feet and a central angle of 63 degrees 53'33''; thence in a Southwesterly direction,along the arc of said curve,an arc distance of 130.47 feet to a point of reverse curvature,of a circular curve to the right,having for its elements,a radius of 183.00 feet and a central angle of 13 degrees 38'17''; thence in a Southwesterly direction,along the arc of said curve,an arc distance of 43.56 feet to a point on the Northerly line of the aforesaid 66 foot right of way; thence North 89 degrees 30'00'' West, a distance of 140.72 feet to a point,said point being on a curve concave to the Northwest and having a radial bearing of North 00 degrees 30'00'' East and a radius of 117.00 feet; thence in a Northeasterly direction, along the arc of said curve,through a central angle of 63 degrees 53'46'',an arc distance of 130.48 feet to the point of reverse curvature of a circular curve to the right,having for its elements,a radius of 183.00 feet and a central angle of 63 degrees 53'45''; thence in a Northeasterly direction,along the arc of said curve,an arc distance of 204.09 feet to a point; thence South 00 degrees 30'25'' West,a distance of 66.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 15631 square feet or 0.3588 acres,more or less Persons interested may appear and be heard at the time and place specified above.Any person who might wish to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County,Florida,in public hearing or meeting is hereby advised that he will need a record of the proceedings,and for such purpose,he may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which will include the testimony and evidence upon which such appeal is to be based. The Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County,Florida,does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status.This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to,participation,employment or treatment in its programs or activities.``Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes,should contact Melissa Bruns,ADA Coordinator at:863-402-6509 (Voice),863-402-6508 (TTY),or via Florida Relay Service 711,or email: mbruns@hcbcc.org.Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting to permit coordination of the service.'' BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CHAIRMAN ATTEST:Robert W.Germaine,Clerk November 15,2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.282011CA000756XXAXMX BANK OF AMERICA,N.A. Plaintiff, vs. FRANKLIN S.CARDEN AKA SHANE CARDEN; DENISE M.CARDEN AKA DENISE CARDEN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CHRISTY L.OTTO NKA CHRISTY SINGLETARY; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; A NY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES,CLAIMING BY,THROUGH,UNDER,AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR A LIVE,WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that,pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause,in the Circuit Court of HIGHLANDS County,Florida,I will sell the property situated in HIGHLANDS County,Florida,described as: THE NORTH 1/2 OF LOT 1141 AND ALL OF LOTS 1142 AND 1143,AVON PARK LAKES UNIT 3,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF A S RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4,PAGE 90, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. a/k/a 2182 N MORNINGSIDE ROAD,AVON PARK,FL 33825 A/K/A 2182 N Morningside Rd Avon Park,FL 33825 at public sale,to the highest and best bidder, for cash,In the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring,Florida at 11:00 A.M.on January 9, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any,other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendents,must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness,my hand and seal of this court on the 1st day of November,2013. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT ROBERT W.GERMAINE,CLERK By:/s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs assistance in order to participate in a program or service of the State Courts System,you should contact the Office of the Court Administrator at (863) 534-4686 (voice),(863) 534-7777 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (Florida Relay Service),as much in advance of your court appearance or visit to the courthouse as possible.Please be prepared to explain your functional limitations and suggest an auxiliary aid or service that you believe will enable you to effectively participate in the court program or service. 157048 jjp November 8,15,2013 1050LegalsDUMMY 2013 SERVICE DIRECTORY DUMMY 5X21.5 AD # 00026404

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, November 15, 2013Page A11 WE BUYALL AUTOS with or without Title. Any Year / Make / Model / Condition. We will pay up to $20,000. Free Towing. Call Cindy 813-505-6935 9400Automotive WantedANTIQUE --WANTED: BODY PARTS FOR 55-59 CHEVROLET PICK-UP. 863-453-5514. 9350Automotive Parts& Accessories 9000 Transportation WEIGHT SETComplete with Adjustable Bench w/ Preacher Post Olympic Bar w/ (2) 45lb plates (2) 35lb plates (4) 25lb plates. $225. 863-471-3456 BOWFLEX ULTIMATE2. $2400 new. All Accessories included. Like New! $500. Call 863-314-9711 8150Fitness & ExerciseEquipment 8000 RecreationNOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eigh t weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & Supplies SPRING LAKEMulti Christmas Sale Nice Gifts! 501 Spring Lake Blvd. Fri/Sat, Nov 15/16, ONLY! 8am/5pm. Rooster statues, Bird baths, Lg. wind chimes, V-Tech phones, Torchiere floor lamps. Lots Lots MORE! SEBRING *MULTIFAMILY SALE* 310 Aston Martin Drive ( off of Thunderbird Rd ). Fri & Sat Nov. 15 & 16, 8AM ?. LOTS & LOTS of MISCELLANEOUS! SEBRING *NICE SALE 3345 Sparta Rd., Sat. Nov 16, 8am 2pm. BIRD HOUSES & Much More! SEBRING SAT.11/16. 8 2. 5341 Lime Rd. off Lakewood Rd. & Gardenia. SEBRING MOVINGSale! Fri. 11/15 Sat. 11/16. 8 1pm. Behind 310 Thrush Ave on Howey Rd. Tools, clothing, household, collectibles & misc. SEBRING HUGEINDOOR SALE!! Thur. Sat. 7 5pm. 1500 Lancia CT. Something for Everyone! 7320Garage &Yard Sales SEBRING FRI.SUN. 9 3pm. 27 Delores St. Dresser, armoir, TV's, fridge & more! SEBRING FRI.SAT. 8 4pm. 3501 Sebring Parkway. Housewares, furn, glassware, craft supplies & much more! SEBRING -SAT. 11/16, 8AM-2PM, 5711 Wolf Lake Rd., Orange Blossom. Lots of household items, clothing, PLUS lighting from closed lighting store: chandeliers, bath fixtures, light bulbs, much more! SEBRING *MULTIFAMILY SALES 4017 Elson Ave., Fri & Sat, Nov.15 & 16, 7am ? Furn., Christmas decor, Household items, Clothes, Tools & Much Much More! SEBRING *MULTI FAMILY SALE 251 Pelican Ave., Fri, Sat & Sun, Nov. 15. 16 & 17, 8am ? Lots of children's clothing, Household items. Too Much To List! SEBRING *MOVING SALE 1905 Bignonia Dr. Fri & Sat, Nov. 15 & 16, 8am 3pm. Sm. appliances, Furn., Linens, Household items & Dishes. Too Much To List! SEBRING *HARDER HALL AREA 4326 Seawood Ave. Fri & Sat Nov. 15 & 16, 7am ? Lots of Furniture, Household Items, Appliances & More! SEBRING *BIG SALE 4216 Elson Ave. Fri & Sat, Nov15 & 16, 8am-? Lots of electronics, Baby Items (highchair, playpen, clothes,etc) Tools, furn., Sm appliances, Bike, Exercise equip., & Much More! SEBRING *3 FAMILY SALE Pinedale Estates (off 98) 208 Revson Ave. Sat. 11/16. 8am/3pm. SEBRING GREAT SALE 5349 Oak Rd. ( behind Harder Hall off Lakewood ). FRI & SAT, NOV. 15 & 16, 8am 2pm. LAKE PLACIDSat. Only! 11/16. 8 1:30pm. 779 Lake August Dr. Furn., clothing & more! Something for Everyone!! LAKE PLACIDTomoka Heights Annual Rummage & Bake Sale, Sat. November 16, 8am 1pm At Clubhouse. Furn, Household Items, Yard Equipment, Jewelry, Christmas Decorations, Linens & LOTS MORE !! LAKE PLACID*SYLVAN SHORES* 2 Family Sale! 1538 & 1605 Cedarbrook St., Sat. 8am 3pm. 8' & 12' Christmas trees, ornaments, lamps, children's & teen items, shoes, bikes, books, strollers, household iems & MORE. LAKE PLACID* 3 Family Sale! 113 DANBA DR. off 29E. Thur Sat, 11/14 11/16, 8am-3pm. China cabinet, refrigerators, wicker desk, bar chairs & so much more! AVON PARK-Large Estate Sale Fri 11/15 Sat 11/16 from 8am to 2pm. Many household items, furniture, collectibles, medical equipment, Christmas items and more! 1275 Lake Lotela Dr AVON PARK-Large Estate Sale Fri 11/15 Sat 11/16 from 8am to 2pm. Many household items, furniture, collectibles, medical equipment, Christmas items and more! 1275 Lake Lotela Dr. 7320Garage &Yard Sales AVON PARKA HUGE SALE: 8am-1pm Saturday 11/16/13. Avon Park. Take SR 17 to Claradge, left to 3224 Redwater Dr. Clothes, household items, furniture, tools, craft items, and much more. AVON PARKAVON PINES Neighborhood Yard Sale. Rte 64 east to Avon Pines, follow signs. Sat. 11/16, 9am-2pm. Movies, books, toys, clothing, furn., table saw, household, crafts, tools. welder, shower door, golf clubs, baby items & misc. AVON PARK*MUTI FAMILY SALE* 203 Tulane Cir. Sat. Nov. 16, 8am 12pm. Furniture, Household items, Lots of Baby Things. AVON PARK* HUGE SALE 1730 N Morningside Rd. Thur & Fri. Nov. 14 & 15, 7:30 am 3pm. Toys Clothing, Household items. Too Much To List! 7320Garage &Yard Sales ZENITH VINTAGEConsole with Record Player. $75. 863-443-6470 WASHER &DRYER Good Condition. Both for $75. OBO 863-253-7080 TV CROSLEY19" with Remote. Excellent condtion. $15. (Golf Hammock Area) 269-830-2500 TIGER OAKChair Straight Back Old but in Excellent Condition, $50. 863-402-2285 TABLE -RATTAN BASE / Beveled Glass Top. $75. (Goldf Hammock area). 269-830-2500 ROCKING HORSEChildren's, Seat 18" high & Head 26" high. Looks like a Stuffed Pony. $20. 863-402-2285 LIFT CHAIR/ Neutral Fabirc. $40 OBO 863-243-8643 FURNITURE -ANTIQUE dresser chest, halltree, 2 with mirrors, needs restoring, $125 all. 863-449-0765. EXERCISE BIKE/ Schwinn Good condition. $30. OBO 863-243-8643 DISPLAY CASEGlass / Top & Front Middle Shelf Lighted. $50. 863-402-2285 COFFEE TABLE,rectangle, dark wood, glass top. Good cond. $75. Call 863-453-3104. COFFEE TABLEand 2 end tables. Glass tops, cream color, lacquer finish. $90. 385-8815 after 5pm or leave msg. BRACELET -Silver 1880's Egyptian Revival with paste Sea Rabs in original box. $50. 863-402-2285 7310Bargain Buys TOW BARRoadmaster Tracker 2" w/all cables. $200. Value $400. Call Richard 740-398-2449 SLEEPER SOFAQueen Size Excellent Condition / Love Seat Tread Mill / Exercise Bike / Oreck Cleaner. Call for Prices & more info. 863-385-8532 BRAKE SYSTEMfor Tow Vehicle. Brake Buddy. Like new. $550. Priced new $980. Call Richard 740-398-2449. 7300Miscellaneous 7000 MerchandiseMATURE COUPLESeeking a place to live. Willing to share home and to assist with Care taking and running errands. Call Lynda 302-258+5617 6650Wanted to RentFOR RENT:Lg furnished room w/private bath & entrance. Full house privileges, wi-fi. Non smokers only. $400/month + $200 security. Home is private residence on quiet St. Close to Lake Jackson & Downtown Sebring. Contact Johna jvogler1916@yahoo.com 446-0354. 6400Rooms for Rent SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3 BR, 2 1/2 BA, 1 CG $800/Monthly No Smoking, No pets. 863-402-1142 NICE 3bedroom 2 bath house. new paint carpet & tile. near mall, $850. (561)662-7172 LAKE PLACIDon 2 lots. 3/2.5, 2 master bedrooms. Partially furn. Patio, 1 car gar. Walking distance to Golf course, close to 2 Lakes. $850/mo. 863-699-2444 AVON PARK2/2, 1 car garage LARGE Kitchen, dining room, living room-bedrooms w/walk in closets, front & back porches, shed, appliances & lawn care provided. $650/mo + $650 sec. RENTED!!!! AVON PARKNice 2BR/2BA House w/Garage. No pets. Deposit required. 419-722-0179 6300Unfurnished HousesCOME ENJOYthe lifestyle on beautiful Lake June Available for either seasonal or annual rental (minimum of two months). Call Tony at 561-339-1859 6250Furnished Houses SEBRING -SILVER SANDS APTS. NOVEMBER SPECIAL 1BR. Move in for $155. 1st. mo. plus $595 Security Dp. with 1 year lease @ $595. Includes water & electric. 863-991-4347 SEBRING -Cable TV Free. Reduced 1st mo. rent. Large clean 1/1. New paint, mini blinds, vertical, tile floors. A/C. Quiet/safe. No last month.863-385-1999 SEBRING *DINNER LAKE AREA 1 & 2 BR Apartments for Rent. Large rooms, Fresh paint & Tile, Includes water. $400 $550/mo. Call Gary Johnson @ 863-381-1861 AVON PARKCute 1/1, Clean, beautiful landscape. Includes W/D, microwave, ice maker. Centrally located, walking distance to shopping & dining. Move In Special!! No Deposit $495/mo. Incl. water & sewer. Call 863-368-1915 6200UnfurnishedApartmentsLAKE PLACIDDuplex $475/MO. 2/1, Screened Patio overlooking beautiful Lake June. Available Dec. 1st. Call 863-655-0595. 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 Rentals SEBRING *VERY NICE 2BR, 1.5 BA, 2 Fla. Rooms, 2 Carports, Garage, 2 Sheds. 150' X 110' Own Lot / All Fenced. Call for Appointment. 863-385-2979 LAKE PLACID64' Single-wide Mobile Home. 55+ Park. 2/2, 2 enclosed sun rooms. Appliances & some furnishings incl. $5500. 609-540-4170 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesLAKE PLACID* Nice / Furnished 2BR/2BA/2 CG. All Carpet, w/ Vinyl Kit. Quiet Neighborhood. Boat Slip avail. 16 Lake Side Trl. / Country Walk Sub. $110,000. Call to view 863-465-1321 4100Homes for SaleLake Placid SEBRING 3/2/1.Brick home w/metal roof. Florida room, sprinkler system. On 1/2 acre lot. For Sale By Owner. Call 863-273-1913 FROSTPROOF 4BR,2BA, on Lake Clinch, where a yearly bass fishing tournament is held. Completely remodeled, new roof, bathroom, kitchen, tile floor, French door, patio, very flexible Lease-Option, or sell price $117,500. Owner financing. 954-270-5242 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial WEST PALM& OKEECHOBEE, F/T Therapist, OT, $50/hr. COTA, $30/hr. 561-262-7522 Ask for Paul Winters. paulwinters3@comcast.net VERABAY -Looking to engage a business Sales/Marketing Association for Sebring. Flexible days and hours. Call 407-641-1688 or email resume to jobs@verabay.com. TRUCK DRIVERClass A CDL, Fork lift certified. Clean driving record. Work is local also includes Warehouse activity. Call 863-735-2233 SEVERAL TUTORSNEEDED Monday Thursday after 3 for students in 9-12 grade. $25.00 $30.00 per hr. Please email resume to inspired2think@aol.com Must be able to do higher level math and AP courses. Position to start immediately. RN SUPERVISOR Looking for RN Supervisor 40 + hrs. a week to help oversee care for 24 bed ICF in Avon Park. Duties may include occasional shift work. Benefit flexible schedule, casual attire and home like atmosphere. Please apply online www.jobs.thementornetwork.com/fl orida pick Avon park. if questions please call 863-452-5141 ask for Angelina PEST CONTROLTECH NEEDED Must be 18yrs. or Older, with Clean Driving record. Full Time. Fax resume to 863-465-1513. LPN LOOKINGfor LPN full-time 32hrs. float (11p-7a, 3 shifts and one 3p-11p shift) for 24 bed ICF in Avon Park. We have a casual work environment with home-like setting. If interested please apply online at www.jobs.thementornetwork.com/fl orida pick Avon Park. If any questions please call 863-452-5141 ask for Angelina. GENERAL LABORWORKERS for Meat Plant. Call 863-735-2233 2100Help WantedEXPERIENCE THEJOYS AND REWARDS Of Being A Comfort Keeper. If you have a passion for improving the quality of life for others while helping people live independently and happily in their own homes, you could be a Comfort Keeper! We are now hiring CNA, HHA and Homemaker Companion Positions in the Highlands County area. We offer flexible full-time or part-time hours. Contact us to learn more about how you can develop a rewarding career enriching the lives of others with Comfort Keepers. Apply online today at: http://ck381.ersp.biz/employment 863-385-9100 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:314-9876 News-Sun Classified 1100AnnouncementsNotice is hereby given that Downtown Mini Storage LLC will sell at public auction at 195 S.Railroad Ave.,Avon Park,Florida 33825 at 1:00 P.M.Saturday 23rd November 2013 to the highest bidder. Items held for Theresa Baker:Air conditioner,lamp,suitcases,boxes & bags of unknown contents. Items held for Yamila Escalett:File cabinet, office chair,computer,stereo,file box,air conditioner,battery charger,refrigerator, pac-man arcade cabinet,flags,fishing rods, pool cues,slate pool top,lamps,trash can, insulation,xmas tree,tv wall mount,lion, boxes & bags of unknown contents. Items held for Leonardo Latorre:Reese carrier,gas stove,nightstand,computer,ironing board,weight bench,xmas tree,engine, weights,3 propane tanks,,boxes & bags of unknown contents. Items held for Lacy Faircloth:Bassinet, nightstands,gate,king box spring,microwave,bike,vase,tv,clothing,table,chairs. November 15,17,2013 1050LegalsSUBSCRIBE T0 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER, AND PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED ADS, IN THE NEWS-SUN TODAY! CALL 385-6155 TO SUBSCRIBE AND 314-9876 FOR ADVERTISING CLASSIFIED ADS GET FAST RESULTSPLACE YOUR GARAGE SALE ADS IN THE NEWS-SUN TODAY! CALL 314-9876DUMMY 2013 SALES REP 2X4 AD # 00033573***PLEASE USE FILLER*******AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 AD # 00033436 AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 AD # 00033437

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Page A12 News-SunFriday, November 15, 2013 www.newssun.com HIGHLANDS LITTLE THEATRE PP; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, 11/10-11/22; 0 0 0 3 3 6 8 2 Call 385-6155 and a Sales Representative will be glad to assist you!

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By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comIt was certainly a mixed b ag of results Tuesday night a s county teams took to their v arious soccer pitches. Sebring came away winn ers on the night as both the b oys and girls notched wins i n their district openers. On the road at new district o pponent Poinciana, the B lue Streak boys stepped up t heir game and grounded the E agles by a 6-0 count. Sebring got a pair of goals f rom Larry Gilchrist and one e ach from Josh Lester, Neil W ilson, Brian Dixon and W esley Koning. Back home at Firemens F ield, the Lady Streaks had a t ougher battle on their h ands, falling behind at the 3 1:02 mark when a P oinciana forward came in o ne-on-one with goalkeeper S hannon Bloemsma and b ooted it past. But on their very next p ossession, less than one m inute later, Haylee Peters b roke free and came chargi ng in from the left. She then zipped it across t he front of the goal into the o pposite corner for the g ame-tying score. It stayed tied until halft ime and the Sebring defense h eld tight through the final 4 0 minutes, with Bloemsma c ollecting six saves on the n ight. And it was in the second h alf that Kiersten Waldron s cored the difference maker t hat netted the win to move t he Lady Streaks overall r ecord to 5-1 and 1-0 in D istrict 11-3Astandings. Lake Placids night was as e ven as it could get, with both squads ending up tied in their matches against Frostproof in their District 10-2Aopeners. In Frostproof, the Dragon boys were down to the Bulldogs 1-0 for most of the match, and the clock was ticking down. But with less than one minute to play, Yoyi Gomez took a pass from Carlos Santana and put in the equalizer to knot the score just before the final whistle. The final score may have been a tie, but Lake Placid had the edge in shots on goal, nearly tripling Frostproofs attempts, 14-5. The Lady Dragons also batteld to a tie in another defensive battle as neither they nor the visiting Bulldogs could get a shot past their respective goalies, ending in a 0-0 deadlock. This comes after a 3-0 Monday night win against Okeechobee in which That was the headline in the February 1985 issue of BASS Master Magazine. I joined B.A.S.S. in 1972 as a Life Member and I have almost every issue of the magazine since then, and from time to time I enjoy browsing through some of the older issues just to remind myself of things Ive read and forgotten. This headline caught my eye, and after reading the article by Tim Tucker, I thought my readers might enjoy hearing about it as well. Abig-blade spinnerbait, called the Okeechobee Special, has a knack for taking BIG BASS. Its a winner of a spinner. Tucker stated, and its one of the strangest-looking lures ever to hit the water. It doesnt resemble anything a bass would ever pay attention to. Its actually a little gaudy. But this bait has impeccable credentials. Roland Martin and Hank Parker, just to name a couple of the pros who knew about the lure, kept it quiet as long as they could. Martin, who had been in a slump on the tournament trail used the lure to win two national events and place in the top ten in the next three. Parker, who caught 15 bass in a single practice day on the St. Johns River in Florida, lead the pack for the first two days at the BassMaster Invitational, only to finish third on the final day. Big Blade Humongous Bass The Okeechobee spinnerbait is a regular spinnerbait (3/8 to 5/8 ounce) rigged with a large willow-leaf blade. There are many versions of the bait but the key to its effectiveness is the willowleaf blade a number 6 or 8 Hildebrandt. In the article, Martin states its a great big lure that gives off a tremendous flash. Its a big mouthful. Its just like using a shiner. I fish a lot of shiners and one thing youll always find is if you fish nothing but small shiners, youll catch nothing but small fish. But if you use nothing but monstrous shiners, youll catch fewer fish, but more big fish. Its the same with this big spinnerbait. About two months ago, a customer told me about his success using a white spinnerbait that hed replaced t he standard blades with a large r willow leaf on Lake Glenada. Since I like to tweak baits, I took a couple of my favorite spinnerbaits and replaced the Colorado blad es with a size 5 willow leaf blade. The next day on Lake Glenada, I caught a fourpounder on my third cast an d a feisty 3 pounder a few casts later. Although the blades werent the size referred to in this article, they were larger than normally found on a spinnerbait and the flash was pretty impressive. After reading this article last week, I went on the internet to see if I could find any of these Okeechobee Specials, and I was surprised at the information th at was available. Hildebrandt makes the lure, but only using a size 6 blade. I ordered a dozen of the baits and continued my search. No one, it appears, makes a spinnerbait using a number 8 willow leaf blade, so I decided to make my own. Finding the larger blades was not too difficult, and when they arrived in the mail, I was surprised at jus t how big a size 8 blade actually is. I ordered gold and silver in both hammered and bright, as well as white, yellow and black. Agood pair of needle nose pliers is all you really need to make the change on a regular spinnerbait, since you only change the outsid e blade. Some of the spinnerbaits use a stronger wire than others, so unbending the wire and bending it back can be a bit of a challenge. I finally built up a half News-Sun Friday, November 15, 2013 BSection Sports Fishin Around... Don Norton Page B3 Secret Bait of the Pros Courtesy pho to Norman Lee with his 10.6-pounder that won the Big Bass at the Istokpoga Tournament See BASS, B4 Dan Hoehne/News-Sun files Larry Gilchrist scored twice Tuesday in Sebrings 6-0 win at Poinciana to open up the District 11-3A schedule. Dan Hoehne/News-Sun files Tamija Douglas kept the goal safe early this week as Lady Dragon opponents were held scoreless in Mondays 3-0 win and Tuesdays 0-0 tie. County soccer smorgasbord See SOCCER, B3 Courtesy photo The 2013 Sebring boys Cross Country team that advanced to the State Finals with nary a senior on the squad. The final result wasnt quite what head coach Jayson Bass may have hoped for, as the team took 15th with an average running time of 17:28, 10 seconds slower than their regional pace. I think it was a combination of a tougher course and doubting themselves against the top runners in the state, Bass said. The course at regionals was all grass and flat, as were most of the courses this season. At State the course had a hill they call The Wall and they had to run up it twice. But next year, they will be ready. Blue Streaks learn lessons at State Special to the News-SunSEBRING Competitors i n the new IMSATUDOR U nited SportsCar C hampionship series will m eet this weekend at the S ebring International R aceway for their inaugural w ork out. The series is the combin ation of the once-rival A merican Le Mans and G rand-Am Road Racing s eries under a single banner. This is the first time t eams from both series will b e running together, said M anager of IMSA C ommunications JJ O Malley As many as 20 teams c ould be in for the private t esting session at the hist oric Sebring circuit. The IMSA/TUDOR s chedule is a simple one, w ith the track open for p ractice for all classes from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. save for an hour-long break for lunch at Noon both Saturday and Sunday. Although the deadline for sign-up will be this coming Friday, there have been a number of early entries announced. Prototypes will include; Extreme Speed Motorsports Honda ARX, the Radical Ford SR9 of Project Libra as well as a pair of Chevrolet Coyotes one from Marsh Racing, the other from Action Express Racing. We also have received word that the Deltawing coupe will be there. That will be their first time on track at Sebring, OMalley said. Awide array of GTteams also plan to be here including Vipers from SRT Motorsports and Riley Motorsports, Porsches from Alex Job Racing, Muehlner Motorsports and Flying Lizard Racing, the Rahal Letterman BMWas well as an Aston Martin Vantage entered by The Racers Group. The Aston Martin factory team is going to be there, and thats the first time for them as well, OMalley said. The event is expected to draw autosports media from across the country to the track in search of the first look at the newly conjoined series and its competitors. In addition, fans will be allowed in to the racway to see the cars on track. The general admission area will be open for a $10 fee each day, said Sebring International Raceway Press Officer Ken Breslauer. The paddock will be closed and there will be no overnight camping, but they will be able to see these cars on the track many of them will be here for the first time. Breslauer said he expected a few of the teams might also be making some announcements about the upcoming racing season. Following the Sebring session, the teams will move to the high-banked oval at Daytona for another two day session. Sebring to host first Tudor Series tests IMSACommunicationsWe also have received word that the Deltawing coupe will be there.

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NU-HOPE Turkey ShootSEBRING ATurkey Shoot, benefiting NU-HOPE Elder Care Services, will be held on Saturday, Nov. 16, at Boom Booms Guns and Ammo, located at 330 US Hwy 27 N in Sebring. Registration opens at 10 a.m. The cost is $5 per shot, with Boom Booms providing the ammo. Guns allowed for the competition include 22 LR handguns or 22 LR rifles, open sight only; loaner guns will be available. There will be male, female, and youth categories. So come on down and enjoy a great event, while helping to support services for seniors! For more information, please contact Laurie Murphy at (863) 382-2134 or MurphyL@Nuhope.org.Arc Volleyball ChallengeAVON PARK The public is invited to test their serving skills and take the South Florida State College Volleyball Challenge to win prizes. The Lady Panther volleyball team will be serving up a competition from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 23, at Ridge Area Arcs Fall Festival Howedown at 120 W. College Dr., Avon Park. It will be at the outdoor volleyball net on Arcs main campus. Participants can try their serving skills to try to win a $100 Wal-Mart gift card or other prizes. Individuals pay $5 for three balls that they serve over the net to hit targets on the other side to win a prize. Each target will be worth a prize. Those who serve all three balls consecutively into three different targets will win the $100 prize. Proceeds benefit Special STARS, a sports and recreational program for children and adults with disabilities in Highlands County. This fundraiser will kick off Special STARS effort to raise money to build a better volleyball surface for its athletes. The Xcel Volleyball Club will also be selling items to raise money to help local volleyball players. There will be music, food and drinks and various vendors selling crafts and other items. The festival is free to the public. For more details, call Cindy Marshall at 452-1295, ext. 124.Jingle Bell runAVONPARK The 2nd Annual Jingle Bell Fun 5K Run/Walk and 1-Mile Fun Run will take place Friday, Dec. 13, at 6 p.m. at the Union Church, 106 Butler Ave., Avon Park. Adult entry fee, by Nov. 30 its $20 and up to Dec. 12, $25. There will be no race day registrations. Childs entry fee for the 5K is $10, for the 1-Mile Fun Run, $5. All proceeds will benefit the five Avon Park area schools as they partner together to develop leadership skills in the children of our community. Email questions to Karin Doty at dotyk@highlands.k12.fl.us. Checks should be made payable to Jingle Bell Run, Attn: Lisa Jarrett and sent to 1305 US North 27, Avon Park, FL, 33825.Blue Streak Tennis CampSEBRING The Sebring High School girls tennis team is hosting a 10 and Under Tennis Camp on Saturday, Nov. 16, from 9 a.m. to Noon at the Thakkar Tennis Center located in the Country Club of Sebring. The camp is open to girls and boys ages 4 to 10. Instruction will be given by members of the SHS tennis teams along with Highlands County Tennis Association volunteers. Lunch will be provided and all participants will receive a camp T-shirt. Cost is $25 per student with family discounts available. For registration and/or more information call Coach Jane Hollinger at Sebring High School 471-5513.19th Annual Bill Jarrett Ford 5K/10K Run/WalkSEBRING Join the Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center Foundation as they host the 19th Annual Bill Jarrett Ford 5K Run/Walk and 10K Sunday, Nov. 17, at Florida Hospital Sebring and everyone is invited to register. Race registration opens at 6:30 a.m. and the run will start at 7:30 a.m. The tax deductible registration fee is $20 for all participants. Kids six and under are free. The first 400 registrants will receive a dri-fit long sleeve shirt. To register for the 5K/10K, log on to http://bit.ly/Gala5K. Registrations received after Novembe r 13 and on the day of the race will not b e timed. Join us for this fundraiser benefiting the Florida Hospital Sebring Pediatric Unit and Florida Hospital Wauchula Linda Adler Mammography Center. For more information about this event or to donate, please contact the Foundation at (863) 402-5525.LP Elks Hoop ShootLAKEPLACID Lake Placid El ks Lodge 2661 announces their annual loc al Hoop Shoot on Saturday, Dec. 14, whe re Lake Placid youth ages 8-13 can sho w their free-throw talents. The competition is free. Acopy of the childs birth certifica te will be required at registration. Registration forms can be obtained in advance at the Lake Placid Elks Lodge b y calling 465-2661. Registration will also be held at 8 a.m ., prior the contest at the Lake Placid Hig h School. Boys and girls participate in separa te contest/divisions and three age categori es per division: ages 8-9; 10-11, and 12-13 Contestants must be 8-years old and n o more than 13-years old as of April 1, 2013, to participate. For state contests and beyond, the El ks National Foundation covers all progra m costs, including participant transport ation, food and housing expenses. Lake Placid local winners of each div ision and age category advance through to the Florida District, State, Regional an d National competitions. Names of the national winners will be inscribed on the Elks National Hoo p Shoot plaque, on permanent display in t he Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, MA. Registration is at 8:30 a.m. and the co ntest begins at 9 a.m. Any questions, contact John Holbroo k at 465-5941. Meals on Wheels Golf TournamentSEBRING The 14th Annual Mea ls on Wheels Golf Tournament will be te eing off on Saturday, Dec. 14, at 8:30 a.m at the host Sun N Lakes Golf Course. The tournament will be a four-perso n scramble format and will include a $20,000 putting contest, Hole-in-One o n all holes with a car sponsored by Alan J ay Automotive. The entry fee of $75 per player, $30 0 per team, includes golf, continental brea kfast, lunch and awards. Proceeds from the event go to bene fit Sebrings Meals on Wheels. For more information, call 202-6094. AMERICAN CONFERENCEEast WLTPctPFPA New England720.778234175 N.Y. Jets540.556169231 Miami450.444193209 Buffalo370.300199259 South WLTPctPFPA Indianapolis630.667222193 Tennessee450.444200196 Houston270.222170248 Jacksonville180.111115291 North WLTPctPFPA Cincinnati640.600234186 Cleveland450.444172197 Baltimore450.444188189 Pittsburgh360.333179218 West WLTPctPFPA Kansas City9001.000215111 Denver810.889371238 San Diego450.444212202 Oakland360.333166223NATIONAL CONFERENCEEast WLTPctPFPA Dallas550.500274258 Philadelphia550.500252244 N.Y. Giants360.333165243 Washington360.333230287 South WLTPctPFPA New Orleans720.778265163 Carolina630.667214115 Atlanta270.222186251 Tampa Bay180.111146209 North WLTPctPFPA Detroit630.667238216 Chicago540.556259247 Green Bay540.556245212 Minnesota270.222220279 West WLTPctPFPA Seattle910.900265159 San Francisco630.667227155 Arizona540.556187198 St. Louis460.400224234 ___ Thursdays Game Indianapolis at Tennessee, late Sundays Games Baltimore at Chicago, 1 p.m. Oakland at Houston, 1 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. Detroit at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. Arizona at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. San Diego at Miami, 4:05 p.m. Minnesota at Seattle, 4:25 p.m. San Francisco at New Orleans, 4:25 p.m. Green Bay at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m. Kansas City at Denver, 8:30 p.m. Open: Dallas, St. Louis Mondays Game New England at Carolina, 8:40 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA Tampa Bay1350265643 Boston1151234830 Toronto1161235242 Detroit955234751 Montreal982204942 Ottawa774185356 Florida4114124066 Buffalo415193663 Metropolitan Division WLOTPtsGFGA Pittsburgh1170225142 Washington1081216155 N.Y. Rangers990184149 Carolina774183449 New Jersey675173846 N.Y. Islanders793175461 Philadelphia7101153345 Columbus6101134450WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA Colorado1430285530 Chicago1224286649 Minnesota1144265041 St. Louis1123255437 Dallas972204952 Winnipeg992205357 Nashville882183857 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA Anaheim1541316848 Phoenix1342286358 San Jose1125276643 Vancouver1172245454 Los Angeles1161235244 Calgary693154964 Edmonton4142104878 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. ___ Tuesdays Games Buffalo 3, Los Angeles 2, SO Tampa Bay 2, Montreal 1, SO Winnipeg 3, Detroit 2, SO N.Y. Islanders 3, Nashville 1 New Jersey 3, N.Y. Rangers 2 Washington 4, Columbus 3, OT Carolina 2, Colorado 1 Philadelphia 5, Ottawa 0 Florida 3, Anaheim 2 Phoenix 3, St. Louis 2, OT San Jose 3, Calgary 2, OT Wednesdays Games Minnesota 2, Toronto 1, SO Philadelphia 2, Pittsburgh 1 Dallas 3, Edmonton 0 Thursdays Games Columbus at Boston, late Los Angeles at N.Y. Islanders, late Anaheim at Tampa Bay, late Phoenix at Chicago, late Colorado at St. Louis, late Dallas at Calgary, late San Jose at Vancouver, late Fridays Games Toronto at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at New Jersey, 7 p.m. Nashville at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Anaheim at Carolina, 7 p.m. Montreal at Columbus, 7 p.m. Boston at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m. Washington at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Florida at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at Winnipeg, 8 p.m. San Jose at Edmonton, 10 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB Philadelphia54.556 Toronto 45.4441 Boston 45.4441 New York34.4291 Brooklyn25.2862 Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami 53.625 Atlanta 44.5001 Charlotte44.5001 Orlando 45.4441.5 Washington26.2503 Central Division WLPctGB Indiana 801.000 Chicago 33.5004 Cleveland36.3335.5 Milwaukee25.2865.5 Detroit 25.2865.5WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio81.889 Dallas 53.6252.5 Houston54.5563 Memphis35.3754.5 New Orleans36.3335 Northwest Division WLPctGB Portland62.750 Oklahoma City52.714.5 Minnesota63.667.5 Denver 34.4292.5 Utah 18.1115.5 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Clippers63.667 Golden State53.625.5 Phoenix 53.625.5 L.A. Lakers46.4002.5 Sacramento25.2863 ___ Tuesdays Games Miami 118, Milwaukee 95 Dallas 105, Washington 95 Golden State 113, Detroit 95 L.A. Lakers 116, New Orleans 95 Wednesdays Games Orlando 94, Milwaukee 91 Philadelphia 123, Houston 117, OT Charlotte 89, Boston 83 Minnesota 124, Cleveland 95 Toronto 103, Memphis 87 New York 95, Atlanta 91 San Antonio 92, Washington 79 Denver 111, L.A. Lakers 99 Utah 111, New Orleans 105 Portland 90, Phoenix 89 Sacramento 107, Brooklyn 86 L.A. Clippers 111, Oklahoma City 103 Thursdays Games Houston at New York, late Oklahoma City at Golden State, late Fridays Games Milwaukee at Indiana, 7 p.m. Chicago at Toronto, 7 p.m. Portland at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Charlotte at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Denver, 8 p.m. Brooklyn at Phoenix, 9 p.m. San Antonio at Utah, 9 p.m. Memphis at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Detroit at Sacramento, 10:30 p.m.KNOCKOUT ROUNDEastern Conference Houston 3, Montreal 0 Western Conference Seattle 2, Colorado 0CONFERENCE SEMIFINALSEastern Conference New York vs. Houston Leg 1Sunday: New York 2, Houston 2 Leg 2Wednesday: Houston 2, New York 1, (after extra time), Houston advances on aggregate 4-3 Sporting KC vs. New England Leg 1Saturday: New England 2, Sporting KC 1 Leg 2Wednesday: Sporting KC 3, New England 1, (aet), Sporting KC advances on aggregate 4-3 Western Conference Portland vs. Seattle Leg 1Saturday: Portland 2, Seattle 1 Leg 2Thursday: Portland 3, Seattle 2, Portland advanced on 5-3 aggregate Real Salt Lake vs. LA Galaxy Leg 1Sunday: LA Galaxy 1, Real Salt Lake 0 Leg 2Thursday: Real Salt Lake 2, LA Galaxy 0, OT, Real Salt Lake advanced on 2-1 aggregateCONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPEastern Conference Leg 1 Saturday, Nov 9: Sporting KC 0, Houston 0 Leg 2 Saturday, Nov. 23: Houston at Sporting KC, 7:30 p.m. Western Conference Leg 1 Sunday, Nov. 10: Real Salt Lake 4, Portland 2 Leg 2 Sunday, Nov. 24: Real Salt Lake at Portland, 9 p.m.MLS CUPSaturday, Dec. 7: at highest seed, 4:30 p.m. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid TODAY: Girls Basketball at Sebring,6/7:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Boys Soccer vs.Avon Park,8 p.m.; Girls Soccer vs.Avon Park,6 p.m. THURSDAY: Boys Basketball at McKeel,7:30 p.m.; Girls Basketball at McKeel,6 p.m. Sebring TODAY: Girls Basketball vs.Lake Placid,6/7:30 p.m. SATURDAY: Boys Basketball at Avon Park Preseason Tournament,vs.Lake Region,1 p.m.; Wrestling at Kowboy Classic,Osceola,9 a.m. MONDAY: Girls Basketball at Clewiston,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer vs.Mulberry,6:30 p.m. Avon Park TODAY: Girls Basketball at Lakeland,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer vs.Ft.Meade,8 p.m.; Girls Soccer vs.Ft.Meade,6 p.m. SATURDAY: Wrestling at McKeel Kickoff Classic,9:30 a.m. MONDAY: Boys Soccer at Okeechobee,8 p.m.; Girls Soccer at Okeechobee,6 p.m. N B A F R I D A Y 8 p m Minnesota at Denver . . . . . . . E S P N 1 0 : 3 0 p m Detroit at Sacramento . . . . . . . E S P N S A T U R D A Y 8 p m Indiana at Chicago . . . . . . . . W G N C O L L E G E B A S K E T B A L L F R I D A Y 9 p m Rice at Texas A&M. . . . . . . . . S U N S A T U R D A Y 1 p m Ohio State at Marquette . . . . . . . F O X 7 : 3 0 p m Arkansas-Little Rock at Florida . . . . S U N 1 0 p m Colgate at Syracuse . . . . . . . . S U N W O M E N S C O L L E G E V O L L E Y B A L L F R I D A Y 7 p m Missouri at Florida . . . . . . . . . S U N C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L F R I D A Y 9 p m Washington at UCLA . . . . . . . E S P N 2 S A T U R D A Y N o o n Ohio State at Illinois . . . . . . . . E S P N N o o n Indiana at Wisconsin . . . . . . . E S P N 2 1 2 : 2 1 p m Kentucky at Vanderbilt . . . . . . . . 3 8 3 p m Syracuse at Florida State . . . . . . A B C 3 : 3 0 p m Georgia at Auburn . . . . . . . . . C B S 3 : 3 0 p m Oklahoma State at Texas . . . . . . F O X 3 : 3 0 p m Michigan State at Nebraska . . . . E S P N 2 7 p m Texas Tech at Baylor . . . . . . . . F O X 7 p m Florida at South Carolina . . . . . E S P N 2 7 : 4 5 p m Alabama at Mississippi State . . . . E S P N 8 p m Stanford at USC . . . . . . . . . . A B C 1 0 : 1 5 p m Wyoming at Boise State . . . . . . E S P N 2 Times, games, channels all subject to change B O X I N G S A T U R D A Y 1 0 p m Edwin Rodriguez vs. Andre Ward . . . H B O A U T O R A C I N G F R I D A Y 1 : 3 0 p m NASCAR EcoBoost 400, Practice . . E S P N 2 6 p m NASCAR EcoBoost 400, Qualifying . E S P N 2 S A T U R D A Y 4 : 3 0 p m NASCAR Ford EcoBoost 300 . . . E S P N G O L F F R I D A Y 1 0 a m EuroPGA DP World Tour Championship G O L F 2 p m PGA OHL Classic . . . . . . . . G O L F S A T U R D A Y 1 0 a m EuroPGA DP World Tour Championship G O L F 2 p m PGA OHL Classic . . . . . . . . G O L F N H L S A T U R D A Y 8 p m Tampa Bay at Phoenix . . . . . . . . 4 4 LIVESPORTSONTV NFL NHL NBA MLS Playoffs Page B2 News-SunFriday, November 15, 2013 www.newssun.com

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, November 15, 2013 Page B3 SPRINGLAKE GOLF RESORT* NEW; 3.639"; 3"; Black; sports nov ads; 0 0 0 3 3 3 4 2 RACE-THRU KWIK LUBE; 1.736"; 3"; Black; sports, no chg tv incl; 0 0 0 3 3 3 4 4 Golf Hammock The Golf Hammock Queen Bee tournament was played Wednesday, Nov. 13. The winner and Queen Bee was Jeanie Fivecoat with a net score of 63 First Flight saw first place go to Ruth Harris with a score of 72 while second place went to Florence Towell with a score of 73 and third place Lorraine Friend with a score of 74 In the Second Flight Carol Troup took first with a score of 69, in second place was Joyce Stanley with a score of 70 and third place Trudy Stowe with a score of 73 Third Flight winners had Gladys Zitelli score a 79 for first, Alma Barefoot shot an 83 for second, and Mary Cripps came in third with a score of 84. Last Monday, Nov. 11, the Mezza Group played Individual Pro-Am golf at Golf Hammock Country Club. Don Brewer shot a 69, plus 13 in A group to take first place and Les Campbell came in second place with at even. In B group Bob Trier scored plus 6 for first place in B group and in second place Paul Brown II had a plus 3, Fred Latshaw had plus 8 that was good for first place in C group and Joe Hyzny came in second with plus 4 and third place was David Mulligan with plus 1. In D group Jim Hammond came in first with plus 7 and Terry Yandle in second place at even. Stan Griffis came in first place in E group with plus 4 and Billy Parr in second place with plus 3. There was a tie for 3rd place between Phil Raymond and Bill Alesi at plus 1. Ken Porter scored plus 4 to take the lead in F group and Jerry Hodges came in second place with plus 2. Ken Granger came in with plus 8 to take the lead in G group and Bob Wimmers had plus 6 for second place. Jim Reed had a plus 6 for first place in H group and Karl Mellor in second place with plus 2. There was a tie for first place in I group between Billy Ringo and Ev Weeks at minus 1 and a tie for second place at minus 2 between Bill Young and Bill Wouderberg. Next week the Mezza Group will play at Golf Hammock beginning at 7:45 a.m. Please arrive early to register. The Mezza Group will play at Harder Hall on Friday, Nov. 15, beginning at 8:a.m. For more information, call Pete at 382-1280.SpringLakeOn Tuesday, Nov. 12, the SpringLake Mens Golf Association relaxed with a game called Schambles. This was a four-man team event held on Cougar Trail golf course. On Par 5 holes, only the 2 Best Balls counted for score; on Par 4 holes, the 3 Best Balls were used for score, and on Par 3 holes, all 4 teammate scores counted. Teams were balanced with A, B, C, and D players involved on a net of hole handicap basis. There was a tie for first place between Jim Temple, Dave Kamish, Bob Berg and Charlie Keniston and the team of Joe Austin, Gerry Esty, Larry Miesner and Gale Monda with both teams scoring 187 net strokes. Third place, at 189 net strokes, went to Pat Jaskowski, Joe Troia, Les Greenlee and Dan Porter. Fourth place was taken by the team of Gene Hearn, Larry Colclasure, Ed Griffith and a Blind, with a net score of 198 strokes. On Thursday, Nov. 7, the SpringLake Mens Golf Association finished a twoday Pick Your Partner tournament on the Panther Creek golf course. There were three flights of two-man teams. On Tuesday, only the Best Ball counted, but on Thursday, Both Balls (net of handicap) counted for score. In the A Flight, Gary Behrendt and Jan Hard finished in first place with 206 strokes 62 on Day 1 and 144 on Day 2. Second place went to Jim Temple and Pat Shatney, who scored 207 strokes 66 and 141. Coming in third place was Joe Austin and Gene Hearn with 211 strokes 62 and 149. In the B Flight, Bob Rogers and Bo Bohanon took first with 196 strokes 64 on Day 1 and 132 on Day 2. Second place went to Don Cunning and Vern Hoffman who shot 211 64 and 147. Kirby Gann and Jerry Terrell got third place with 213 (65 and 148). C Flight was won by Jay Payne and Ray McKenzie with 207 strokes 65 and 142. Second went to Jim Foote and Dave Docherty, who scored 212 (63 and 149). Third place went to Ed Clay and John Schroeder with 215 strokes 67 and 148, while fourth place was taken by Larry Miesner and Larry Colclasure with 218 strokes 67 on Day 1 and 151 on Day 2. H annah Waller, Stephanie B ennett and Brittany F raginals each scored for the D ragons. We scored all our goals i n the first half, Waller said. With the lead, coach (John M erlo) substituted a lot in t he second half to rest the s tarters for the game against F rostproof. Things were a bit tougher o n the night for Avon Park a s both the boys and girls f ell against a pair of strong M cKeel squads. After playing Hardee m uch closer Monday night, i n 3-1 and 3-0 losses for the b oys and girls, respectively, t hey fell 7-1 and 9-1 to the W ildcats Tuesday night. But while it has been a r ough time the last few seas ons for the Red Devils, t heir competitiveness is on t he upswing, both on the f ield and in their mentality. After the loss to McKeel t hat saw the Lady Devils s core their first goal, in their t hird match of the season, s ophomore forward Alyssa C loud was optimistic looki ng ahead. They are a real strong t eam, she said. But I know t he next time we play them, w ell be playing much bett er. Sebring and Lake Placid w ere set to continue their d istrict schedules with T hursday matches. The Blue Streak boys h osted Hardee, while the g irls were on the road to f ace the Lady Wildcats. The Dragons had an away d oubleheader at McKeel. Similarly, Avon Park is b ack in action tonight as t hey host Fort Meade in a t win bill, with the Lady D evils starting a 6 p.m. and t he boys at 8 p.m. Continued from B1 Dan Hoehne/News-S un Scheele Grimes goes up to attempt a header on this corner kick Tuesday night in Sebrings 2-1 win over Poinciana. Dan Hoehne/News-Sun Mariana Becker rears back to clear this ball out of the Sebring zone Tuesday night. Dan Hoehne/News-Sun files Alyssa Cloud and the Lady Devils were downed early in the week, but see things as looking up as the season progresses. Soccer results run the gamut By RONALD BLUM Associated PressORLANDO Alex Rodriguez is tentatively scheduled for an investigatory interview with Major League Baseball on Friday in New York, according to a person familiar with the process, which would enable the New York Yankees third baseman to testify at his grievance next week. The interview could be called off, the person said Wednesday, speaking on condition of anonymity because no statements were authorized. Rodriguez was suspended for 211 games by MLB on Aug. 5 for alleged violations of the sports drug agreement and labor contract, and the playersassociation filed a grievance to overturn the penalty. The case, being heard by arbitrator Fredric Horowitz, is scheduled to resume Monday. The three-time ALMVP said four years ago that he used performance-enhancin g drugs while with the Texas Rangers from 2001-03, but he has denied using them since. At the time of his suspension, MLB said the penalty was for use and possession of numerous forms of prohibited performance-enhan cing substances, including testosterone and human growth hormone over the course of multiple years. AP source: A-Rod scheduled for interview with MLB

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Page B4 News-SunFriday, November 15, 2013 www.newssun.com wild game dinner; 5.542"; 5"; Black; lp rotary wild game dinner; 0 0 0 3 3 5 5 5 Saturday, Nov. 16 Activity: Day Hike, a pprox. 6 7 miles. Location: Tenoroc Fish M anagement Area, L akeland. This former phosphate m ining area consists of l akes, marshes, grasslands a nd wooded hills, and is an i mportant refuge for w ildlife. Meet at Derby Lake l ocated behind the office at e ntrance to park. Bring water, snacks, and l unch to eat on the trail. Wear sturdy walking or h iking shoes, sun and insect p rotection. Contact Monika Hoerl at 8 63-858-3106 for meet-up t ime, and to RSVPyour a ttendance Monika Hoerl at 8 63-858-3106 for meet-up t ime, and to RSVPyour a ttendance. Also, please RSVPto the c hapter online Meet-up p age at w ww.meetup.com/Heartland FTA/calendar Sunday, Nov. 17, 9 a.m. Activity: Nature Walk Location: Circle B Bar P reserve, SR 540 (Winter L ake Road), Lakeland Description: Approximately 3-mile walk to view birds and other wildlife at this scenic wildlife preserve which is home to an oak hammock, freshwater marsh, hardwood swamp and lake shore, a tremendous bird population, including a variety of wading birds, waterfowl, ospreys and bald eagles. Alligators inhabit Lake Hancock and may be observed from a distance. Pets are not allowed. Bring walking or hiking shoes, water, snacks, sun and insect protection. Contact Liane Plumhoff 646-2398 or lplum@verizon.net. Also, please RSVPto the chapter online Meet-up page at www.meetup.com/Heartland -FTA/calendar Friday, Nov. 22, 9 a.m. Activity: Trail Care Location: Green Swamp, Lakeland. Meet at Rock Ridge Rd. gate. Directions: From US-98 in north Lakeland turn east on Rock Ridge Rd., at fork bear left and continue 4.2 miles to gate on your left. From SR-33 in Polk City travel north, turn left (west) on Dean Still Rd., turn left on Rock Ridge Rd., after 2 or 3 miles gate will be on your right. Bring sturdy shoes or boots, recommend long sleeves and pants, water, sun and bug protection. Contact Janice Scroggie Anderson, phone 813-3451609 or email scroggie@aol.com for meet-up time and other information. Also, please RSVPto the chapter online Meet-up page at www.meetup.com/Heartland -FTA/calendar Saturday, Nov. 23, 9:30 a.m. Activity: Kayaking Location: Cockroach Bay, 3709 Gulf City Rd., Ruskin 33570 Description: Spend the day out on the water among the mangroves along the shores of Tampa Bay. Bring Kayak, water, snacks, lunch, sun and insect protection. Contact Teresa Newgent at (813) (813) 882-9558 or email newgt7@yahoo.com Heartland Trail Association November activities d ozen, and curious about t heir action, I rigged one up o n my spinnerbait rod and w alked back to the lake b ehind my house to try it o ut. Roland Martin was a bsolutely correct. The flash from a size 8 w illow leaf blade is blindi ng. And the wake, when r etrieved near the surface is t remendous. It actually looks like a l arge baitfish swimming near t he surface. I can easily see how a big b ass might be attracted to t his lure. The real test for me will b e next Sunday when Kyle K ing and I fish the Lake P lacid Team Tournament on L ake Okeechobee. I have two tournaments s cheduled on the Big O on t he next two Sundays so I p lan to have a number of the b aits tuned up and ready to g o. Ill let you know how well t hey worked in my next colu mn. Istokpoga/Okeechob ee Team Trail John Woods tournament o n Lake Istokpoga had 42 b oats entered last Sunday a nd Mike Simpson/Jonathon Joles won the event with five fish weighing in at 27.42 pounds. Second-place honors went to the team of Bryan Vesormier/Ben Miller with 26.60 lbs, followed by Sherril and Tamera Brown with 22.66 lbs. Amonster bass weighing 10.60 caught by Norman Lee at 1p.m. was worth $540. First place paid out $890, second was worth $470 and third was $315. Congratulations to all the winners. The tournament paid down to sixth place. Nick DeSanta and I fished the tournament but just couldnt find any big fish. Our biggest, a fourpounder actually blew up on my crawfish as I lifted the bait out of the water, missing it of course, only to strike Nicks plastic worm seconds later. We finished with only four fish weighing just less than 10 pounds. But it was a great event. John runs a good tournament, and were looking forward to fishing at Lake Okeechobee on Sunday, Nov. 24.REDS King of the Hill Saturday, Dec. 7, were fishing a Big Bass tournament on Lake Lotela with a $25 entry fee, per fisherman, one or two anglers per boat. You only weigh in one bass, your biggest, and winner takes all. Our last Big Bass Tournament on Lake Jackson, following a cold front, proved to be a tough day for all 13 anglers as Mike Woods won the $325 pot with a 2.6 pound bass. Hopefully the results will be better on Lake Lotela. For more information or to sign up, stop by REDS II.FOI Fall MeetingThe Friends of Istokpoga Lake Association, Inc., will hold its fall general membership at the Lorida Community Center on Thursday, Nov. 21, at 7 p.m. It is the start of a new season on Lake Istokpoga. We would like to see you, all your neighbors and friends at this kickoff meeting for the 2013-2014 season. Our main speaker for the evening will be Gary Ritter, SFWMD Okeechobee Office Service Director. He will give you insight into how they handle all the water that we have had this summer and give us a progress report on the northern everglades project. Director Bill Dwinell will give an update on our new Lake istokpoga Emergency Response Program that we have been working on. We will also have some representatives from some of the local agencies who will bring you the latest on projects happening on Lake Istokpoga. Refreshments will be served beginning at 6:45 p.m., so mark your calendar for this informative evening. We will also have a table set up to pay your 2014 dues. Your 2013 dues expire on Tuesday, Dec. 31. Don Norton is a professional tournament bass fisherman, bass fishing guide, and custom rod builder. He lives in the Golf Hammock area of Sebring with his wife Lexie, and is the owner of a custom rod building company appropriately named The American Fisherman. He is also the owner of REDS II, a full-service fishing tackle store located at 3603 Sebring Parkway, in Sebring, FL. You can reach him at 863-273-4998 or by email at donorton13@gmail.com. Visit his American Fisherman Facebook page or his website at theamericanfisherman.com. or stop by the store to see him anytime. Continued from B1 Bass tourney sees whopping winner Special to the News-Sun SEBRING The Annual B rand and Aaron Doty M emorial Childrens C hristmas Golf Classic will b e held Saturday, Dec. 7, at S un N Lakes Golf and C ountry Club. The event will be a fourp erson scramble format, w ith an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Entry fee is $65, which includes greens fee and cart, lunch, beverages on and off the course, raffle and door prizes, range balls and lots of fun. The Cohan Radio Group will provide Hole-in-One prizes. Sponsorships are available, starting at just $100. The tournament benefits the Champions for Children foundation, helping less fortunate, local children during the Christmas season and throughout the year. For additional information, contact Kip Doty at 446-4008. Doty Memorial Golf Tournament rf By RONALD BLUM Associated PressORLANDO Scott Boras had some words for the New York Mets, Chicago Cubs and Houston Astros, and they were far from kind. And he also backed the Tampa Bay Raysdesire for a new ballpark. On the third day of the general managersmeetings, the baseball agent with the highest profile stood in the hotel lobby for a questionand-answer session that gathered an amount of media so large that hotel security told him to move to a remote corridor. Boras wants to goad teams into spending more on free agents. When he focused on the Mets, he pointed out their concentration on captain David Wright and young pitchers such as Matt Harvey his client and Zack Wheeler. The Mets are like NASA, Boras said. They have big rockets, a lot of platforms and very few astronauts. Astronauts are hard to find. Theyve got one guy with the Wrightstuff, thats for sure. And theyve got a lot of Arm-strongs, too. But theyre certainly a club that Im sure thats in pursuit of a higher level of talent. Boras has been stepping up his criticism of large-market teams lacking lofty payrolls. Following the collapse of Bernard Madoff Ponzis scheme, the Mets have cut payroll by about one-third over the past two seasons and were 17th at about $95 million in the latest 2013 figures. I think the ability to spend and actually spending are two different things. And thats only for the Mets to diagnose, Boras said. Certainly their franchise value has gone through the roof theyre well over $2 billion. Theyre a very successfully run business operation. The Mets have the ability to do pretty much what they want to do. But its hard to find astronauts. The Cubs were 15th in payroll this year at about $101 million. Boras said the Rickets family, which bought the team four years ago, has put too much emphasis on the redevelopment of Wrigley Field and not enough on major league payroll. Youre developing the infrastructure, but fans dont come to see seats, grass, cement. They come to see players, he said. Theyve done a great job in the draft and development and theyve got a really good core of young players coming, but i t is just not whats expected when you have a (family) buy a major-market club. Boras compared the Tampa Bay Rayssituation to Charles DickensTale of Two Cities, saying there w as the one theyre in and the one they should be in. The Rays repeatedly have said Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg is inadequate, and they drew a major league-lo w 1.5 million at home despite reaching the playoffs for the fourth time in six years. They need a new ballpark. They need to address that, he said. But certainly the bells been answered by the organization as far as pu tting a product on the field that would normally attract fans. He joked about the Astros, who traded veterans and cut payroll to around $29 millio n $13 million less than any other big league team. Houston went a team-wor st 51-111 and the Astros324 losses over three years matched the 1917 Philadelphia Athletics for third most in major league history. The Astros, he said, theyre like Disneyland. If the kids come, its a great attraction. Boras bashes Mets, Cubs and Astros By DOUG FERGUSON Associated PressJACKSONVILLE Carson Palmer wants to make sure the Arizona Cardinals are prepared for a trip to Jacksonville and the empty seats. The Arizona quarterback said that a game in Everbank Field presents an interesting atmosphere because the Jaguars havent had a sellout all year and arent expecting one at 1-8 heading into the homestretch. Theres a totally different energy when a stadium is full if every seat is sold out, Palmer said. And when the stadium is empty, theres a different energy. You cant worry about any of those outside distractions. Youve just got to focus on doing your job each and every play and do what it takes to win the game, regardless of how many people are watching or who is in the stands. The capacity for NFL games at Everbank Field is 67,246. The largest official attendance for a Jaguarshome game this year was 59,695 against the Indianapolis Colts on Sept. 29. That was tickets distributed. Actual attendance was estimated in the 50,000 range. I personally love playing on the road when its loud and its sold out, Palmer said. You make it quieter. And Ive played in stadiums where there wasnt a home field advantage and it wasnt real loud. Theres good and bad in both. The crowd noise isnt a factor when its empty, but you just dont have that same energy in the stadium, he continued. When the crowd is full and you ve got to fight that crowd noise, theres a great energy in there that gets you going. The Cardinals are 5-4 going into a critical stretch if they want to stay in the NFC playoff hunt. The Jaguars havent given their home fans much to cheer. Not only are they winle ss at home in nearly a year the last win was against Tennessee on Nov. 25, 201 2 they havent scored a touchdown since the final home game last season. The largest home crowd in Jaguarshistory was 83,559, a record that was set this year at Wembley Stadium in London. Palmer prepares for Jags crowd or lack of one

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Stroke Recovery Group meets TuesdaySEBRING Anew self help group for people in the community who have had a stroke and are living with the effects has started. The purpose of the group is to provide an informal, confidential space to share experiences, support and information. Meetings will feature speakers, occasional outings and exercise. The group will meet from 1-2:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road. Guests will be Tim Wheaton, massage therapist and certified personal trainer from Heal by Touch. Wheaton will explain the Mental and Physical Sides of Stroke Recovery and Jow Massage Therapy and Personal Training is Important to Overcome Both Sides. Sally McDougall will also demonstrate Tai Chi. Those who would like to participate, but can not follow the exercise standing, can do so sitting in a chair. The new Stroke Recovery Group is through H.A.L.L.O. (Handicapped Americans Love of Life Organization). To be on the email list for notification of the meetings and guest speakers, call HALLO at 385-1196, email halloinc@embarqmail.com, or write H.A.L.L.O., P.O. Box 7082, Sebring, FL 33872.Outreach events plannedAce Homecare will have the following community outreach activities next week: Monday 9 a.m., Avon Park Nu-Hope Elder Care meal site, health fair. Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Lake Placid Nu-Hope Elder Care meal site, health fair. Wednesday 9 a.m., Faith Pentacostal House of God in Avon Park, health fair. Thursday 9 a.m., Fair Haven Villages Nu-Hope Elder Care meal site in Sebring, health fair; 2:30 p.m., Castle Hill Apartments in Avon Park, health fair. Friday 9:30 a.m., The Groves at Victoria Parks Nu-Hope Elder Care meal site in Sebring, health fair. All programs are free of charge and open to the pub lic. For information, call ACE Homecare at 385-7058.Low Vision Group,TheRedCane Club meet Nov. 21SEBRING The Low Vision Group and The Red Cane Club will meet at 11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 21 at Highlands Community Church a for introductions, sharing experiences, tips and announcements. The purpose of the group is to encourage people with low vision or those that are legally blind to share their experiences and to understand that there are many ways to help keep ones independence and continue to do nearly all of their daily activities that they have done in the past. Take the time to visit Highlands Community Church on New Life Way. T o be on the mailing list for notification of the meetings and guest speakers, call HALLO at 385-1196, email halloinc@embarqmail.com, or write H.A.L.L.O., P.O. Box 7082, Sebring, FL 33872. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, November 15, 2013 Page B5 DR. ROTMAN, DARRIN; 1.736"; 3"; Black; healthy living tv incl; 0 0 0 3 3 3 3 7 Bulb Bin; 1.736"; 2"; Black; no chg tv incl; 0 0 0 3 3 3 4 6 Healthy Living When the winter visitors a re here, so many people h ave carpal tunnel sympt oms of night pain, numbn ess and tingling that one c ould easily get the mistake n idea that carpal tunnel ( pinching of the median n erve at the wrist) is contag ious. The real reason it is so c ommon is that people are l iving longer and are more a ctive in retirement. We are a lso getting better at diagn osing it. Electrodiagnostic testing s uch as nerve conductions ( NCS) is relatively new. W hen I was in high school, m y uncle, who had one of t he earliest NCS labs (Mayo w as first), was always fighti ng with the cyclotron radia tion therapy) doc as even t he university could not run b oth without blowing a few c ircuit breakers. Now the m achinery for NCS comes i n a lightweight case and r adiation therapy machines a re no longer power hogs. The classic carpal tunnel s ymptoms are numbness a nd tingling in the thumb, i ndex and middle fingers t hat is worse at night. Other c ommon complaints are burning, changes in handwriting, weakness in grip, pain while driving, and holding a book or telephone. It can also cause pain to radiate to the shoulder or to the back of the hand. NCS can differentiate between carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and other causes of hand and arm pain. NCS also stages the irritation of the nerve from mild (nerve irritated but healthy) to severe (nerve beginning to show damage). Originally, CTS was thought to be purely mechanical due to thickening of the ligament over the top of the carpal canal, scar tissue from wrist injuries or years of hard work. More recently a pressure component has been recognized. Pressure in the carpal canal is normally 0. In patients with CTS it is higher. If the pressure is too high, blood will flow in, but not out of the carpal canal. Surgery increases the volume (space) in the carpal canal and decreases the pressure. Symptoms may decrease as in more severe CTS, as the nerve is less healthy and less able to use pain to alert the body of the problem. Even in the earlier stages, the symptoms may come and go, probably because the nerve fatigues. The episodic nature of the symptoms makes evaluation of non-surgical treatments difficult. Vitamin B6, important to nerve health, may help recover from surgery, but will not reverse the problem. Steroid injections give temporary relief, but it is only long-lasting in the 30and-under age group. Splinting helps symptoms, but does not cure the problem except in mild cases. Squeezing a ball for strength makes CTS worse because gripping increases the pressure on the nerve. What to do if you think you have CTS? Check with your doctor about correctable risk factors such as diabetes and thyroid problems. Your doctor may recommend nerve conductions. The length of your symptoms, your age and other hand problems, such as trigger finger in the same hand, will determine what treatment is best. Generally, in the over-50 age group with moderate or worse CTS, only surgery will be effective. Surgery is becoming easier and more predictable and the downtime less, but that is a column for another day. Dr. Diana D. Carr treats patients at The Hand & Shoulder Specialistswith a concentration on healing shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand problems. She is certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery and a Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Dr. Carrs long list of achievements include being the areas only Orthopaedic Surgeon certified as a hand specialist. For more information, please visit http://hand-shoulder-specialist.com or call (863) 382-7777. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat or cure your condition. Is carpal tunnel syndrome contagious? Metro Carpal tunnel syndromes symptoms are numbness and tingling in the thumb, index and middle fingers that is worse at night. Guest Column Dr. Diana Carr DearPharmacist: I have a bedr oom problem. I took Viagra for seve ral years, and it stopped working, so I was put on Cialis. Sometimes that h elps, sometimes not. Im too embarr assed to ask my doctor again; she s ays this is a part of aging because I a m 58. Any suggestions? T.M., Bethesda, Md. Answer: I have many. Im stunned that shes never ment ioned bio-identical hormone replacem ent for you, as in testosterone or T. The reason most men develop erect ile dysfunction in the first place is b ecause they are low in their natural manlyhormone, which starts to d ecline with age. The declining T c auses a relative increase in circulati ng estrogen, a hormone found in h igher concentrations in women. R estoring testosterone or T puts b alance back, so its my best recomm endation for increasing mojo. Giving a man one of those super s ex pills like Viagra, Levitra or Cialis i s the equivalent of jump starting the c ar every two miles, rather than just f ixing the battery. Why do men medi cate themselves every weekend, when t hey can fix the root cause by balanci ng hormones? Its a good question i snt it? Agood physician should evaluate your hormones and neurotransmitters and decipher if its low testosterone, low dopamine, high cortisol, high estrogen, low progesterone, high insulin, low DHEAor oxytocin. If youre a man or a woman, and youve lost that lovinfeelinthats what you need to evaluate and replenish. Prescribed sex pills, as useful as they are, cant balance hormones. Theres another reason I get hot under the collar about this topic. Men are dying every day from heart attack and stroke that may have been prevented. The clue that youre headed for trouble is erectile dysfunction. Think that out, its not hard to understand ... if the blood isnt effectively flowing down south to your penis, it isnt flowing up north either, to your heart. The blood vessels are clogged and that could cause erectile dysfunction years before a massive heart attack occurs. What does conventional medicine do? Prescribe a quick fixer upper, so you can have a night of fun, instead of helping you clear your arteries, improve vessel flexibility, correct hormonal imbalances and manage cholesterol (they dont even measure it correctly but thats another column). I think there is an incomplete knowledge or understanding of physiology or hormones because sex pills should not be your go-to drug for erectile dysfunction. You think its just me saying that to alarm you? Not a chance, I would never scare you, thats not how I roll. Astudy published in March 2010 in Circulation concluded, Erectile dysfunction is a potent predictor of allcause death and the composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, and heart failure in men with cardiovascular disease. Theres no doubt, low testosterone is a risk factor for heart attack. Replacement therapy is controversial. Some studies suggest the very use of testosterone increases heart attack risk, but I find flaws with those studies. Balance is key. Suzy Cohen is a registered pharmacist and the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and Real Solutions. For more information, visit www. DearPharmacist. com. This information is not intended to treat, dia g nose or cure y our condition. Erectile dysfunction could be predictor of heart attack Dear Pharmacist Suzy Cohen Snapshots WASHINGTON (AP) The ugly duckling of government health care programs has turned into a rare early success story for President Barack Obamas technologically challenged health overhaul. Often criticized for byzantine rules and skimpy payments, Medicaid has signed up 444,000 people in 10 states in the six weeks since open enrollment began, according to Avalere Health, a market analysis firm. Twenty-five states are expanding their Medicaid programs. Meanwhile, private plans offered through troublesome online markets are expected to have enrolled a far smaller number of people. The Obama administration plans to release October enrollment statistics this week, but publicly available figures already provide a contrast between a robust start for Medicaid expansion and lukewarm early signups for new, government-subsidized private plans offered separately under the law. Abig reason for the disparity: In 36 states, the new private plans are being offered through a malfunctioning federal website that continues to confound poten tial customers. And state-run websites have not been uniformly glitch-free. Obamas health care law melded two approaches to advance its goal of broader insurance coverage. Middleclass people with no access to job-based coverage are offered subsidized private plans, while low-income people are steered to an expanded version of Medicaid in states accepting it. Starting Jan. 1, the law expands Medicaid eligibility to those with incomes up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level $15,856 fo r an individual or $32,499 for a family of four. The Supreme Court gave states the right to opt out of the expansion, which is fully financed by Washington for the first three years, gradually phasing down to a 90 per cent federal share. At present, 25 states and the District of Columbia hav e accepted the Medicaid expa nsion, which is strongly supported by state hospital associations, medical groups and advocates for the poor. Medicaid is health overhauls early success story

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Page B6 News-SunFriday, November 15, 2013 www.newssun.com SHAMBLIN, SHIRLEY; 9.347"; 2"; Black; main A; 0 0 0 3 3 4 3 9 Healthy Living By MARILYNN MARCHIONE APChief Medical WriterThe nations first new guidelines in a decade for preventing heart attacks a nd strokes call for twice as many A mericans one-third of all adults to consider taking cholesterol-lowe ring statin drugs. The guidelines, issued Tuesday by t he American Heart Association and A merican College of Cardiology, are a b ig change. They use a new formula f or estimating someones risk that i ncludes many factors besides cholest erol, the main focus now. They take a im at strokes, not just heart attacks. A nd they set a lower threshold for u sing medicines to reduce risk. The definition of high cholesterol i snt changing, but the treatment goal i s. Instead of aiming for a specific n umber, using whatever drugs get a p atient there, the advice stresses s tatins such as Lipitor and Zocor and i dentifies four groups of people they h elp the most. The emphasis is to try to treat m ore appropriately, said Dr. Neil S tone, the Northwestern University d octor who headed the cholesterol g uideline panel. Were going to give s tatins to those who are the most likel y to benefit. Doctors say the new approach will l imit how many people with low heart r isks are put on statins simply because o f a cholesterol number. Yet under the n ew advice, 33 million Americans 4 4 percent of men and 22 percent of w omen would meet the threshold t o consider taking a statin. Under the c urrent guidelines, statins are recomm ended for only about 15 percent of a dults. Some doctors not involved in writi ng the guidance worry that it will be t ough to understand. It will be controversial, theres no q uestion about it. For as long as I r emember, weve told physicians and p atients we should treat their cholest erol to certain goal levels, said the C leveland Clinics Dr. Steven Nissen. There is concern that there will be a l ot of confusion about what to do. The governments National Heart, L ung and Blood Institute appointed e xpert panels to write the new guidel ines in 2008, but in June said it w ould leave drafting them to the Heart A ssociation and College of C ardiology. New guidelines on l ifestyle and obesity also came out T uesday, and ones on blood pressure a re coming soon. Roughly half the cholesterol panel m embers have financial ties to makers o f heart drugs, but panel leaders said n o one with industry connections c ould vote on the recommendations. It is practically impossible to find a large group of outside experts in the f ield who have no relationships to i ndustry, said Dr. George Mensah of t he heart institute. He called the g uidelines a very important step forw ard based on solid evidence, and s aid the public should trust them. Heart disease is the leading cause o f death worldwide. High cholesterol leads to hardened a rteries that can cause a heart attack o r stroke. Most cholesterol is made by t he liver, so diet changes have a limite d effect on it. Millions of Americans take statins, w hich reduce cholesterol dramatically a nd have other effects that more b roadly lower the chances of heart t rouble. The patents on Lipitor, Zocor and o ther statins have expired, and they a re widely available in generic vers ions for as little as a dime a day. One t hat is still under patent protection is A straZenecas Crestor, which had s ales of $8.3 billion in 2012. Despite a small increased risk of m uscle problems and accelerating diab etes in patients already at risk for it, s tatins are remarkably safe drugs w hose benefits outweigh their risks, s aid Dr. Donald Lloyd-Jones, prevent ive-medicine chief at Northwestern. Current guidelines say total cholesterol should be under 200, and LDL, or bad cholesterol, under l00. Other drugs such as niacin and fibrates are sometimes added to statins to try to reach those goals, but studies show they dont always lower the chances of heart problems. Chasing numbers can lead us to using drugs that havent been proven to help patients. You can make someones lab test look better without making them better, said Yale University cardiologist Dr. Harlan Krumholz, who has long urged the broader risk approach the new guidelines take. They say statins do the most good for: People who already have heart disease. Those with LDLof 190 or higher, usually because of genetic risk. People ages 40 to 75 with Type 2 diabetes. People ages 40 to 75 who have an estimated 10-year risk of heart disease of 7.5 percent or higher, based on the new formula. (This means that for every 100 people with a similar risk profile, seven or eight would have a heart attack or stroke within 10 years.) Aspirin widely used to lower the risk of strokes and heart attacks is not addressed in the guidelines. And many drugs other than statins are still recommended for certain people, such as those with high triglycerides. Patients should not stop taking any heart drug without first checking with their doctor. The guidelines also say: Adults 40 to 79 should get an estimate every four to six years of their chances of suffering a heart attack or stroke over the next decade using the new formula. It includes age, sex, race, cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes and smoking. If risk remains unclear, doctors can consider family history or three other tests. The best one is a coronary artery calcium test, an X-ray to measure calcium in heart arteries. For those 20 to 59, an estimate of their lifetime risk of a heart attack or stroke can be considered using traditional factors like cholesterol and blood pressure to persuade them to change their lifestyle. To fight obesity, doctors should develop individualized weight loss plans including a moderately reduced calorie diet, exercise and behavior strategies. The best ones offer two or three inperson meetings a month for at least six months. Web or phone-based programs are a less-ideal option. Everyone should get at least 40 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise three or four times a week. People should eat a dietary pattern focused on vegetables, fruits and whole grains. Include low-fat dairy products, poultry, fish, beans and healthy oils and nuts. Limit sweets, sweet drinks, red meat, saturated fat and salt. I dont like the concept of good foodsand bad foods,said Dr. Robert Eckel, a University of Colorado cardiologist who worked on the guidelines. We really want to emphasize dietary patterns. US doctors urge wider use of cholesterol drugs to prevent strokes, heart attacks Metro New guidelines call for twice as many Americans one-third of all adults to consider taking cholesterol-lowering statin drugs. Dr. Neil Stone head of new guideline panelThe emphasis is to try to treat more appropriately. Were going to give statins to those who are the most likely to benefit.Whats newThe guidelines take aim at strokes, not just heart ized for men and women, and blacks and whites. They novel way and change the terol.Estimating riskAnew formula includes sure, cholesterol, diabetes and smoking. People ages mate every four to six years. If risk is still unclear, family history or three other tests can be considered. The best ure calcium in heart arteries.CholestorolHigh cholesterol leads to hardened arteries, which can cause a heart attack or stroke. Most cholesterol is made by the liver, so diet changes have a limited effect, and many people need medicines to lower their risk. change the definition of high cholesterol, but they say doctors should no longer aim for a specific number with whatever drugs can get a patient there. The new advice stresses statins such as Lipitor and Zocor; most are generic and cost as little as a dime a day.Who needs treatment?Four groups are targeted: People who already have heart disease (clogged arteries). Those whose LDL, or bad cholesterol, is 190 or higher, usually because of genetic risk. People ages 40 to 75 with Type 2 diabetes. People ages 40 to 75 year risk of heart attack or stroke of 7.5 percent or higher, based on the new formula. (This means that for every 100 people with a similar risk profile, seven to eight would have a heart attack or a stroke within 10 years.)The bottom lineAbout 33 million Americans 44 percent of men and 22 percent of women would have enough risk to consider a statin. Only 15 percent of adults do now.The role of lifestyle ate to vigorous exercise three to four times a week. etables, fruits and whole dairy products, poultry, fish, beans and healthy oils and nuts. Limit sweets, sweet drinks, red meat, saturated fat and salt. To fight obesity, doctors including a moderately cise and behavior strategies. The best plans offer two to month for at least six based programs are a less ideal option. Quick read OKLAHOMACITY (AP) The U.S. Supreme Court declined Tuesday to intervene in an overturned Oklahoma law that wouldve required women seeking abortions to first view an ultrasound image of the fetus, one of several such restrictions approved by legislatures across the country. It was the second time in just over a week that the nations highest court declined to hear arguments over a proposed Oklahoma abortion restriction. It previously let stand an Oklahoma courts decision that struck down a separate law restricting druginduced abortion. Under the ultrasound measure, approved by the Legislature in 2010 and struck down by the Oklahoma courts, women seeking an abortion would have been required to have an ultrasound exam and then have the image placed in front of them while the provider described the fetus. Twenty three states had approved laws regulating ultrasounds and abortions, including three with laws similar to the Oklahoma one struck down. Those states are Texas, Louisiana and Wisconsin, according to the Guttmacher Institute a research group that supports abortion rights. The high courts decision not to hear Oklahomas case wont impact any of the other states, and it wasnt clea r whether the justices would eventually decide to hear arguments on one of the other state laws. Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin said she was disappointed by the court sys tem in this case. The U.S. Supreme Court has prohibited states like Oklahoma from banning abortion, despite the fact that our citizens are overwhelmingly pro-life, she said in a statement. Now the courts have taken their hostility to pro-life legis lation a step further, prohibiting the state from providing more information to women about their unborn children. The Center for Reproductive Rights filed the lawsuit in April 2010 challenging the ultrasound law on behalf of the Oklahoma Coalition for Reproductive Justice ; Nova Health Systems, a non-profit reproductive health care facility locat ed in Tulsa; and an abortion doctor. Adistrict court judge granted a temporary restraining order against the law in May 2010 and a permanent injunction in March 2012. In December 2012, the Oklahoma Supreme Cou rt upheld the lower courts ruling. High court wont hear Oklahoma ultrasound law case

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Page B8 News-SunFriday, November 15, 2013 www.newssun.com P l a c e s t o W o r s h i p i s a p a i d a d v e r t i s e m e n t i n t h e N e w s S u n t h a t i s p u b l i s h e d F r i d a y a n d S u n d a y T o f i n d o u t m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n o n h o w t o p l a c e a l i s t i n g i n t h i s d i r e c t o r y c a l l t h e N e w s S u n a t 3 8 5 6 1 5 5 e x t 5 9 6 A N G L I C A N N e w L i f e A n g l i c a n F e l l o w s h i p 10 N. Main Ave. (Womans Club), Lake Placid, FL 33852. Rev. Susan Rhodes, Deacon in Charge, (863) 243-3191; strhodes1020@yahoo.com. Sunday Worship, 10 a.m. Teaching, Holy Communion, Music, Fellowship, Healing Prayer. Pastoral and Spiritual.A S S E M B L Y O F G O D C h r i s t F e l l o w s h i p C h u r c h ( A s s e m b l y o f G o d ) 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. F i r s t A s s e m b l y o f G o d 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431.B A P T I S T A v o n P a r k L a k e s B a p t i s t C h u r c h 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL 33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. B e t h a n y B a p t i s t C h u r c h ( G A R B C ) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C17A (truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m. On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. F a i t h M i s s i o n a r y B a p t i s t C h u r c h off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. F e l l o w s h i p B a p t i s t C h u r c h 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 4534256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site, www.apfellow ship.org. F i r s t B a p t i s t C h u r c h o f A v o n P a r k 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 453-6681. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Rev. Johnattan Soltero, Hispanic pastor; Joy Loomis, director of music. Sunday Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:45 a.m.; Youth Choir, 4:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for both services. Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper, 5:15 p.m.; Childrens Choir, 5:45 p.m.; Youth Activities, 6 p.m.; Prayer Meeting/Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Worship Choir Practice, 6 p.m.; Mission Programs for Children, 6:45 p.m. Hispanic Services: Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., worship service at 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. To watch services online, go to the website at www.fbcap.net. In the heart of Avon Park, for the hearts of Avon Park. F i r s t B a p t i s t C h u r c h o f L a k e J o s e p h i n e 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. F i r s t B a p t i s t C h u r c h o f L a k e P l a c i d Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm St., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Website: www.fbclp.com. Email: information@fbclp.com. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. The church is at 119 E. Royal Palm St., Lake Placid. For information, call 465-3721 or go to www.fbclp.com. F i r s t B a p t i s t C h u r c h o f L o r i d a located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 655-1878. F i r s t B a p t i s t C h u r c h S e b r i n g 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Rev. Matthew D. Crawford, senior pastor; Rev. Nuno Norberto, associate pastor, minister of music and senior adults; and Dixie Kreulen, preschool director. Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.; Blended Service, 10:30 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Call 385-4704. Website www.fbsebring.com F l o r i d a A v e n u e B a p t i s t C h u r c h 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. I n d e p e n d e n t B a p t i s t C h u r c h 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, missionminded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. L e i s u r e L a k e s B a p t i s t C h u r c h 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 6 p.m. Call the church at 6990671 for more information. M a r a n a t h a B a p t i s t C h u r c h ( G A R B C ) 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. P a r k w a y F r e e W i l l B a p t i s t C h u r c h 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-theMonth-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. S p a r t a R o a d B a p t i s t C h u r c h ( S B C ) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Mark McDowell, Pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 382-0869. S o u t h s i d e B a p t i s t C h u r c h ( G A R B C ) 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-ofhearing. Office phone, 385-0752. S p r i n g L a k e B a p t i s t C h u r c h Where the Bible is Always Open. Pastor Richard Schermerhorn, 7408 Valencia Road; 6552610. Assistant Pastor Ronald Smith, 386-1610. On U.S. 98 at the Spring Lake Village II entrance. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. for all ages; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Mid-week Bible Study and Prayer Service, 6:30 p.m. Nursery available for all services. S u n r i d g e B a p t i s t C h u r c h ( S B C ) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695.C A T H O L I C O u r L a d y o f G r a c e C a t h o l i c C h u r c h 595 E. Main St., AvonPark, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English. Sunday Life Teen Mass at 6 p.m. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. English confession at 3:30 p.m. Saturday; Spanish confession at 6:30 p.m. Religious Education Classes (September to May) are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 5th. Grades 6th through Youth Bible Study are from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. S t C a t h e r i n e C a t h o l i c C h u r c h 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Parrish office/mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049, 385-6762 (Spanish); fax, 385-5169; email, office@stcathe.com; website, www.stcathe.com. School Office/Mailing, Principal Dr. Anna V. Adam, 747 S. Franklin St., Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7300; fax, 385-7310; email school@stcathe.com. School office hours 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. Clergy: Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F., frjose@stcathe.com or 385-0049; Parochial Vicar, Rev. Victor Caviedes, 385-3993; Assisting Priest (retired), Rev. J. Peter Sheehan; Decons, Rev. Mr. James R. McGarry and Rev. Mr. Max M. Severe. WEEKEND MASS SCHEDULE: Saturday: 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 and 10 a.m., 12 p.m. (Spanish), 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center), every third Sunday of the month at 2 p.m. (French Mass). Daily Mass: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m. Sacrament of Reconcilliation: 7:15-7:45 a.m. first Friday, 2:30-3:15 p.m. Saturday and 99:45 a.m. Sunday. Office Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. S t J a m e s C a t h o l i c C h u r c h 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m.C H R I S T I A N C o r n e r s t o n e C h r i s t i a n C h u r c h (Saxon Hall)1850 US 27 South, Avon Park, FL 33825. Love Christ Love People. Bill Raymond, Preaching Minister. Jon Carter, Music Minister. Sunday, 9 a.m. Bible Study; 10 a.m. Worship; Communion available each week. Wednesday, 7 p.m. Home Fellowship Group. For more information call 453-8929 or 449-0203. E a s t s i d e C h r i s t i a n C h u r c h 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, pianist; and John Thomas, organist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life! Alive and Worth the Drive! S e b r i n g C h r i s t i a n C h u r c h 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Josh Knabel (812618-7118), Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Changing Seasons, a mens grief support group, meets at 1:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets at 1 p.m. Thursdays. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. F i r s t C h r i s t i a n C h u r c h ( D i s c i p l e s o f C h r i s t ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-0358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m.C H R I S T I A N & M I S S I O N A R Y A L L I A N C E The A l l i a n c e C h u r c h o f S e b r i n g 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL 33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m.C H R I S T I A N S C I E N C E C h r i s t i a n S c i e n c e C h u r c h 154 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. A free public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lessonsermons.C H U R C H O F B R E T H R E N C h u r c h o f t h e B r e t h r e n 700 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m. Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-1597.C H U R C H O F C H R I S T A v o n P a r k C h u r c h o f C h r i s t 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, FL 33825. Minister: Don Smith. Sunday Worship Services, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available at every service. Bible Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered classes for all ages. Church phone: 453-4692. L a k e P l a c i d C h u r c h o f C h r i s t 1069 Hwy 27 North, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Mailing address is P.O. Box 1440, Lake Placid, FL 33862. Sunday morning worship is at 10 a.m. Sunday evening worship is 6 p.m. Bible class 9 a.m. Sundays and Wednesday evenings at 7 p.m. All are invited to join us. For more information, call the church at 863-465-4636 or visit the website www.thelordsway.com/lakeplacidcofc/. S e b r i n g P a r k w a y C h u r c h o f C h r i s t 3800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7443. Minister: Kevin Patterson. Times of service are: Sunday Bible Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Bible Class, 7 p.m. C H U R C H O F G O D C h u r c h o n t h e R i d g e Church of God, Anderson, Ind.; 1130 State Road 17 North, Sebring, FL 33870. Worship Service Sunday, 10 a.m.; Bible Study and Prayer, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Pastor Dr. Collet Varner, (863) 382-0773.C H U R C H O F N A Z A R E N E F i r s t C h u r c h o f t h e N a z a r e n e o f A v o n P a r k P.O. Box 1118., AvonPark, FL 33825-1118. 707 W. Main St. Sunday: Sunday school begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning worship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening service at 6 p.m. Wednesday evening service is at 7 p.m. with special services for children and adults. If you need any more information, call 4534851. L a k e P l a c i d C h u r c h o f t h e N a z a r e n e o f L a k e P l a c i d 512 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852. Adult Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday evening: All church meal, 6 p.m.; Christian Life Study, 6:45 p.m. Winter Life groups pending. Call 4461339. Pastor Tim Taylor.C H U R C H E S O F C H R I S T I N C H R I S T I A N U N I O N C o m m u n i t y B i b l e C h u r c h C h u r c h e s o f C h r i s t i n C h r i s t i a n U n i o n (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17A North (truck route), AvonPark. Presenting Jesus Christ as the answer for time and eternity. Sunday morning worship service, 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided. Junior Church activities at same time for K-6 grade. Sunday School Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m. (Transportation available.) Sunday evening praise and worship service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and youth activities at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Everyone is welcome, please come worship with us. Tom Schwankweiler, Pastor. Phone 453-6052.PLACESTOWORSHIP Religion A von Park Christian Church AVON PARK The pastor h as been bringing messages a bout Amazing Grace the l ast two weeks and this week t he congregation will be b lessed by being reminded a bout bountiful blessings. Avon Park Christian C hurch is at 1016 W. C amphor (behind the Wells F argo Bank). Call 453-5334 o r email a pcc.2014@yahoo.com/. The c hurch website is w ww.firstcchristianap.com. Christ Lutheran Church LCMS SEBRING Pastor Scott M cLean will preach a serm on titled Do Not Grow W eary in Doing Good on S unday. The church is at 1320 C ounty Road 64, east of the A von Park High School past t he four-way stop sign. For i nformation call 471-2663 or s earch online at christluthera navonpark.org.Christian Science ChurchSEBRING The lesson sermon on Sunday morning is titled Mortals and Immortals. The keynote is from I Thessalonians 5:5, Ye are all the children of light, and the children of the day: we are not of the night, nor of darkness. The church is at 154 N. Franklin St.Christian Training Church SEBRING Rev. Linda M. Downing will bring the message titled The Millennium Kingdom: Part 3 at the Sunday morning service. The Wednesday night Bible study is the Book of John.Church of the BrethrenSEBRING Sunday, Pastor Dave Smalley will preach from 2 Corinthians 8:1-9 and the title of his sermon will be Locking Away Generosity. Sunday school theme for Sunday is ANew Creature in Christ and will be looking at scripture of 2 Corinthians 5:11-21. For more information, call 385-1597.Church of Buttonwood BaySEBRING The Church of Buttonwood Bay meets for worship in the recreation hall. Pastor Cecil Hess is preaching on Come Before Winter. The choir will present Bless This House. Location is U.S. 27, four miles south of Highlands Regional Medical Center. For information, call 3821737.Faith Baptist ChurchLAKE PLACID This Sunday, Pastor Howard Leman will fill in while Pastor Cole is absent.He will preach from the Book of John, chapter 1, on Jesus, the Word of God. Sunday evening he will preach Jesus, the Son of Man from John 2. For more information about the church, visit the website atwww.faithbaptistchurchLP .com or call the church office at 465-0060.Faith Lutheran ChurchSEBRING ThisSunday,thechurchcelebrates26th Sunday after Pentecost.GuestPastor Tony Doucheswill deliver hissermon at Faith Lutherantitled The Best Is Yet To Come. The church will again host a free Thanksgiving dinner on Thanksgiving Day. This meal is for those of any age group singles, couples and families that are alone or in need. Meals can also be delivered to shut ins. No monetary donations will be accepted on Thanksgiving Day from those who are eating. This is not a fundraiser. There is only one requirement to qualify for the church dinner, make a reservation by Nov 25.Call the church to tell how many will attend or how many meals need to be delivered. Dinner will be servered from noon till 3 p.m. Call the church from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Thursday at 385-7848.First Baptist Church Avon ParkAVON PARK Rev. Jon Beck, senior pastor, will preach Sunday morning from James 1: 19 27. The church is at 100 N. Lake Ave. For more information call 453-6681 or email info@fbcap.net.First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)SEBRING The pastors sermon is titled One in Christ from the book of Ephesians 2:11-14. Assisting during the Communion service will be elders Sharron Campbell and Dick Campbell, deacons Carol Chandler and Catherine Baker, and servers Fran Goff and Roger Sands. Greeting the congregation will be Timothy Wheaton. First Presbyterian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK On Sunday, Pastor Bob Johnsons sermon is titled Seven Things the Lord Hates based on Proverbs 6:1-19. The choirs introit will be His Name is Wonderful and the anthem God of Grace. Atown hall meeting will be held immediately after worship service to discuss the 2013-2014 budget. Tickets to the Womens Ministries Christmas luncheon on Dec. 7 will be available before and after worship service beginning today, Nov. 24 and Dec. 1. Continued on B9 Church News

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, November 15, 2013 Page B9 E P I S C O P A L S t A g n e s E p i s c o p a l C h u r c h 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Father Scott Walker. Sunday Services: Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek service on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always welcome. Church office 385-7649, for more information. S t F r a n c i s o f A s s i s i A n g l i c a n E p i s c o p a l C h u r c h 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-0051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Nelson, Rector. Worship: Sunday, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday Bible study at 9:15 a.m. Sunday School at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Worship 6 p.m. and Thursday 9 a.m. Holy Communion with Healing. Call the thrift store for hours open 699-0221.E V A N G E L I C A L F R E E C H U R C H O F A M E R I C A T h e C h u r c h o f t h e W a y E F C A 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way A place for you. Office Phone: 471-6140, Church Cell Phone: 273-3674. Email: thewaychurch@ hotmail.com Web site: www.TheWayChurch.org G R A C E B R E T H R E N G r a c e B r e t h r e n C h u r c h 3626 Thunderbird Road, (863) 835-0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday services at 7 p.m. We offer Kid City Childrens Ministry throughout all services, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married couples, primetimers, and Bible studies in Spanish. Kid City Day Care, Preschool and AfterSchool Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For registration call: 385-3111). Check us out on the Web at www.sebringgrace.org .I N D E P E N D E N T F i r s t C h r i s t i a n C h u r c h 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church. Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events.I N T E R D E N O M I N A T I O N A L W o r l d H a r v e s t a n d R e s t o r a t i o n M i n i s t r i e s (non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-3771. Sunday service: Sunday School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rogers.L U T H E R A N A t o n e m e n t L u t h e r a n C h u r c h ( E L C A ) 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen will be the Spiritual Leader every Sunday for the next two months. Jim Helwig, organist. Worship service with the Holy Eucharist is at 9:30 a.m. every Sunday. Birthday Sunday is the first Sunday of each month after the service. Council meeting is on the first Tuesday of each month. WELCA meets at noon second Tuesday of the month with a light lunch. Labyrinth Prayer Garden is open to the public 24 hours a day, seven days a week. When in need of prayers or to talk to God, come to the Garden. Come and grow with us; we would love to meet you and your family. Dont worry about how you look. Jesus went to the temple in a robe and sandals. Quilting classes every Monday at 6 p.m. Looking for quilters or people willing to learn. Call 840-3303. C h r i s t L u t h e r a n C h u r c h A v o n P a r k L C M S 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School past the four-way stop sign. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at (863) 471-2663 or see christlutheranavonpark.org. F a i t h L u t h e r a n C h u r c h L C M S 2740 Lakeview Dr, Sebring Church phone: 385-7848 Faith Child Development Center: 3853232. Summer Sunday Worship Service: 10 a.m. Communion served 1st, 3rd & 5th Sunday. Sunday School & Bible Classes: 9:00 a.m. Worship Svc. Broadcast at 10 a.m. on WITS 1340AM each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies, Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. G o o d S h e p h e r d L u t h e r a n C h u r c h ( A A L C ) A m e r i c a n A s s o c i a t i o n o f L u t h e r a n C h u r c h e s 3240 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 9 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3852346. N e w L i f e E v a n g e l i c a l L u t h e r a n C h u r c h 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Luke Willitz at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlifesebring.com R e s u r r e c t i o n L u t h e r a n C h u r c h E L C A 324 E. Main St., at Memorial Drive, Avon Park. Pastor Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Sunday worship at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School at 8:30 a.m. Fragrance Free Service Wednesdays at 7 p.m. Open Communion celebrated at all services. Gods Work, Our Hands. T r i n i t y L u t h e r a n C h u r c h L C M S 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL 33852; 4655253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots Pre-School director Education Hour, 8:45 a.m.; Worship service, 10 a.m. Holy Communion each first and third Sunday. Childrens Church scheduled during worship service, 4-year-olds through fifth grade. Nursery provided during worship service for infants to 3-year-olds. Seasonal Mid-Week Services each Wwednesday evening during Advent and Lent. Call church office at 465-5253 or visit the website at www.Trinitylutheranlp.com. Other activities and groups include: Choir; Ladies Guild and LWML; Mens Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies; Trinity Tots Pre-school, and Youth Group.N O N D E N O M I N A T I O N A L B i b l e F e l l o w s h i p C h u r c h 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 yrs through 5th grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. C a l v a r y C h u r c h 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening service, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small friendly church waiting for your visit. C h r i s t i a n T r a i n i n g M i n i s t r i e s I n c on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. A nursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister, lindadowning@live.com. Casey L. Downing, associate minister, caseydowning@hotmail.com. Church phone: 314-0482. Web site: www. ctm forme.com C r o s s r o a d s o f L i f e 148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852; Tel. 863655-9163. The place of your Divine appointment. We expect our supernatural God to transform our lives through His power and grace. Come, learn of His plan and destiny for you. With His plan we receive His provision along with His perfect timing and opportunity. What you have longed for, but have been missing, can now be received. The direction you have been thirsty for will suddenly quench your parched soul. Come to experience what you have been missing for so long empowerment in every area of life. We teach, train and send forth to win souls. You dont speak English no problema. We have a Spanish interpreter. We look forward to fellowship and worship with you at 7 p.m. every Wednesday. Pastoers Gil and Rosa Benton (Faith Never Fails). G r a c e B i b l e C h u r c h 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone, 382-1085. Dustin Woods, lead pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Monday, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry. www.GBCconnected.org F a i t h C e n t e r W e s t M i n i s t r y Restoring Lives, Families &Communities. In the Banyan Plaza at 2349 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. Pastors Leroy and JoAnn Taylor the public to worship on Sundays at 11 a.m. for Praise & Worship and on Wednesdays at 7 p.m. for Bible study and prayer. Children classes are available for all services. Ministries for youth, men and women are held throughout the month. Please attend these Spiritfilled services. Moving Forward in Unity. Church office, 385-1800 or 655-2748. H i g h l a n d s C o m m u n i t y C h u r c h a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. N e w B e g i n n i n g s C h u r c h o f S e b r i n g worshiping at The Morris Chapel, 307 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Pastor Gary Kindle. Bible study every Sunday, 9 a.m. Blended Church Service, 10:15 a.m. Phone (863) 835-2405. newbeginningschurchofsebring.com Begin your week with us. T h e L o r d s S e n t i n e l F e l l o w s h i p C h u r c h 148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid (at Lake Placid Christian School), Pastor Juanita Folsom. Sunday morning service, 10:30 a.m.; Monday, Sentinel School of Theology, 7 p.m.; Church service, Tuesday, 7 p.m. More information at www.juanitafolsomministries.com. U n i o n C h u r c h 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday traditional worship service is at 7:45 a.m. (October through Easter) and 9 a.m. Contemporary Sunday worship service is at 10:45 a.m. Nursery and childrens church available. Wednesday night worship with Pastor Tiger Gullett and CrossTalk with Pastor Bill Breylinger at 6 p.m. Breakfast and lunch menus at Solid Grounds. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. U n i t y L i f e E n r i c h m e n t C e n t r e new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. P R E S B Y T E R I A N C o v e n a n t P r e s b y t e r i a n C h u r c h ( P C A ) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 338722113. Pastor Tom Schneider. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Sunday morning worship: Traditional service, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday school, 9:15 a.m. Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Childrens/Youth Group, 5:30-7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; email: covpres@strato.net ; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Office hours: 8:30-12:30 a.m. Monday-Friday. F i r s t P r e s b y t e r i a n C h u r c h A R P 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), AvonPark, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Children Ministry and Youth Group, 6 p.m. each Friday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. F i r s t P r e s b y t e r i a n C h u r c h A R P 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. 3850107. Email: faith@strato.net, Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Fellowship Time, 10:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m. Tuesday: Youth Groups meet for devotions/Bible study, crafts, sport activities and dinner. Middle and high school, 3:30-6:30 p.m. Elementary School, 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m. Choir Rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. A nursery is available during worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. F i r s t P r e s b y t e r i a n C h u r c h A R P www.fpclp.com, 117 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday Traditional Worship, 9 a.m.; Contemporary Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday School, 10:10 a.m. Wednesday evenings: Adult small group Bible Study 7 p.m. (Nursery available), Youth Group 6-12th grades) 7 p.m., nursery and childrens ministry, 7 p.m. Family Biblical Counseling available by appointment. S p r i n g L a k e P r e s b y t e r i a n C h u r c h ( U S A ) 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail, springlakepc@embarqmail.com, Web site, http://slpc.embarqspace.com.S E V E N T H D A Y A D V E N T I S T A v o n P a r k S e v e n t h d a y A d v e n t i s t C h u r c h 1410 West Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com, Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. A sale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Frank Gonzalez. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALL ARE WELCOME. Associate Pastor is Ryan Amos. Website is www.discoverjesus.org S e b r i n g S e v e n t h D a y A d v e n t i s t C h u r c h 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 3852438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Nathan Madrid.T H E C H U R C H O F L A T T E R D A Y S A I N T S T h e C h u r c h o f J e s u s C h r i s t o f L a t t e r D a y S a i n t s 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-1p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 78:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 811 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m.T H E S A L V A T I O N A R M Y T h e S a l v a t i o n A r m y C e n t e r f o r W o r s h i p Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. U N I T E D M E T H O D I S T F i r s t U n i t e d M e t h o d i s t C h u r c h 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL 33870. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays with Rick Heilig, youth director. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. F i r s t U n i t e d M e t h o d i s t C h u r c h 200 S. Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. (863) 453-3759, Rev. John Bryant, Pastor. Sunday School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Bible study every Wednesday at 6 p.m. Visit us at our church website: www.fumcap.org. M e m o r i a l U n i t e d M e t h o d i s t C h u r c h 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL, 33852. Rev. Tim Haas, pastor. Rev. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral assistant. Rev. Jerry McCauley, visitation pastor. Sunday worship services: Worship Service, 8:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m. We offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth programs, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship. We are a congregation that wants to know Christ and make Him known. Check out our church website at www.memorialumc.com or call the church office at 465-2422. Lakeview Christian School, VPK to Grade 5, 4650313. S t J o h n U n i t e d M e t h o d i s t C h u r c h 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Adult Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all services. Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring.org S p r i n g L a k e U n i t e d M e t h o d i s t C h u r c h 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church office phone: 655-0040.U N I T E D C H U R C H O F C H R I S T E m m a n u e l U n i t e d C h u r c h o f C h r i s t Jesus didnt reject people, neither do we. Join us for worship every Sunday at 9:30 a.m. and youll be embraced by a compassionate congregation that is all-inclusive. Were at the corner of Hammock and Hope. Choir and Bell Choir practice on Wednesday; Bible studies throughout the week. 471-1999; sebringemmanuel ucc.com. PLACESTOWORSHIP Religion In the adult Sunday school c lass, Johnson is now teachi ng from the denominational q uarterly. This unit is The G od of Our Salvation. S undays lesson is titled The Merciful and Gracious G od. Wednesday Bible study w ill have Johnson teaching f rom the book What is D iscipleship? Family p otluck is at 6 p.m. and will b e a Thanksgiving meal. S ign up to bring designated i tems.Turkey, gravy, rolls, t able service and beverages w ill be furnished. The W omens Ministries are h osts. The program is titled Pearls of Great Price and w ill tell of some of the g reatest blessings we r eceive. The church is at 215 E. Circle St. (with two entrances on Lagrand Street). For questions, call 453-3242 or check the website at avonparkapchurch.com, or on the new Avon Park Chamber of Commerce website atwww.avonparkchamber.com. Click on the Chamber for Good logo or tab.First United Methodist Church of Sebring SEBRING Rev. A.C. Bryant will continue with the study of Acts for his sermon topic. The Youth Choir will provide the special music. The church is downtown at 126 S. Pine St.Grace Pointe MinistriesSEBRING Tuesday Home Bible Study series continues with Messiah: Shadow To Image. Call 658-2534 for location anddirections. For information, visit www.gracepointecog@comcast.net. The church meets at 200 Lark Ave., Sebring Hills Association clubhouse.Heartland Christian ChurchSEBRING Pastor Ted Moores sermon Sunday will be Five Signs you are Spiritually Alive with scripture from Colossians 2:1315. The service will include singing by Gail Brockett and a reading by Karla Morrissettee. The church is at 2705 Alternate Route 17 South (behind Publix). Call 3149693.Memorial United Methodist ChurchLAKE PLACID Pastor Tim Haasmessage will be Your Heart Will Follow Your Treasure using Luke 12:32-40. Devotions to prepare for the sermon and recent sermons are available at www.memorialumc.com. Activities are open to anyone interested. For more information, call 465-2422. The church is at 500 Kent Ave.New Beginnings ChurchSEBRING On Sunday, Pastor Gary Kindles sermon is titled Make a Joyful to the Lord based on Psalm 98. The churchs present location isThe Morris Chapel, 307 S. Commerce Ave. For more information, call 8352405.New Life Lutheran Church (ELS)SEBRING Pastor Luke Willitzs sermon on Sunday is Saints Triumphant What Comes Next? Jesus Tells us from Luke 20:2738. The church is at 3725 Hammock Road. Visit our website: www.newlifesebring.com. Call 385-2293.St. John United Methodist ChurchSEBRING On Sunday, Pastor Shiela Swangers message will be Does God Have a Most Faithful List? Biblical reference is from Hebrews 11:1-3, 13-1 6. Spring Lake United Methodist ChurchSEBRING The pastors sermon on Sunday will be Biblical Words and Meanings.Potluck follows the service. The church is at 8170 Cozumel Lane. Continued from B8

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By MIKE HOUSEHOLDER Associated PressHIGHLAND PARK, Mich. Mitch Alboms best-selling memoir, Tuesdays with Morrie, gave him the literary chops to try his hand at fiction, so its fitting that he returns to the books central theme the struggle to understand ones own mortality for his fourth novel. The First Phone Call From Heaven, which came out Tuesday, mines the same death-and-afterlife material that transformed Albom 16 years ago from an awardwinning sports columnist into a best-selling author. Acloser look, though, shows its not quite like his other novels. At 323 pages, its about 100 pages longer than his other fictional works, and he devotes the extra space to fuller character development. Plus, its a bit of a thriller, according to Albom, who said some people close to him expressed surprise he had a mystery novel in him, but he realized: Ive been writing sports my whole life, and sports is exactly that. The book follows several residents of a fictional northern Michigan town, Coldwater, who start receiving regular Friday phone calls from deceased loved ones. (There is a real Coldwater, Mich., but its in the south of the state.) Soon, the town is overrun by out-of-towners dead-set on getting the story (media), celebrating the phenomenon (religious zealots) or disproving it (skeptics). Theres a fundamental question: Did this really happen or not? At the core of that question is belief, Albom said. The book to me, if you had to pick a one-word theme, its belief. Albom said belief is what gets us through life and carries us through terrible situations when they happen to us. Much like the one that happened to him. Aseries of strokes robbed his mother of the ability to speak. Ive not heard her voice since 2010, basically. I miss her voice something terribly, Albom said. Morrie Schwartzs voice also is one of those Albom has lost over the years. The 1997 chronicle of his mentors deathbed seminars provided Albom with the springboard he has used to delve into the world of fiction. Albom said Schwartz asked him to visit his grave periodically to continue their conversations. He said, When Im dead, you talk. Ill listen, Albom said, referring to his friends request that, despite an initial reluctance, Albom has honored. Theres nothing creepy about it, he said of his visits to Schwartzs final resting place in Massachusetts. I have conversations with people who have passed all the time. They dont talk back, but I sit and I talk to them myself. Schwartz also challenged Albom to do more charitable work. Anybody can write a check, Albom remembers him saying. As with the graveside chats, Albom has honored Schwartzs call for charity. He has founded six charities in his hometown of Detroit, and since the devastating 2010 earthquake in Haiti, he has operated an orphanage in Port-Au-Prince that he visits monthly. I do the charity work because I should, because I can, he told The Associated Press during an interview at the medical clinic for homeless children and their mothers that he set up in the Detroit enclave of Highland Park. Moments earlier, Albom strolled through the S.A.Y. Detroit Family Health Clinic greeting patients, doctors, nurses and others with hug s and handshakes. One of those who received an embrace from Albom was Dr. Chad Audi, the president and CEO of Detroit Rescue Mission Ministries and a frequent partner of Alboms on various charitable endeavors. Despite Albom shooing him away, Audi refused to stop singing the praises of his friend, who he said is much more hands-on than many believe. You will see him painting on his knees. You will see him cleaning, cuddling with the homeless people, Audi said. He slept in their bed, literally. If it wasnt fo r him, we wouldnt be able to raise the funds ... to help those guys. OK, OK. Now go away , said Albom, whose critics have derisively dubbed him the king of hope because of the syrupy-sweet nature of his books. Albom embraces the nickname. Ill take that any day, he said. I just try to tell stories that when youre done, you feel a little hopeful. Its really not any more complicated than that. Page B10 News-SunFriday, November 15, 2013 www.newssun.com E.O. KOCH CONSTRUCTION CO.; 5.542"; 4"; Black; nov ads p/u; 0 0 0 3 3 3 4 0 Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID The Church of the N azarene in Lake Placid invites the public t o an inspiring service of music with the P rowell family at 10:45 a.m. Sunday. The c hurch is at 512 W. Interlake Blvd. The Prowells have a unique sound of b lended Gospel, bluegrass and country music, all of which express a message of confidence and hope based on faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. Come and see a family ministry with unusual talent to play many different instruments, and blend their voices in beautiful harmony. For more information, call Pastor Tim Taylor at 446-1339. Prowell family to perform at Church of the Nazarene Religion Courtesy photo T he Prowell family will be in concert Sunday at Church of the Nazarene in Lake Placid. Asmall dog had been s truck by a car and was l ying injured on the side of t he road. Agood doctor h appened to drive by. N oticing that the little dog w as still alive, he stopped h is car, picked up the anim al, and took it home with h im. There, he discovered t hat the dog had suffered m inor cuts and abrasions b ut was otherwise fine. The d octor cleaned the dogs w ounds and was carrying t he animal from the house t o the garage when suddenl y it jumped from his arms a nd scampered away. What an ungrateful little d og, he thought to himself. The doctor thought no m ore about the incident u ntil the next evening. He w as going over some medi cal reports when he heard a scratching noise at the b ack door. Wondering what c ould be making the noise, h e went to the door, opened i t, and found the little dog s itting there, awaiting the g ood doctors arrival. However, it was not the p resence of the injured litt le dog treated the night b efore that caught the doct ors attention. No, it was t he presence of another i njured little dog that c aught his eye. Evidently, t he injured dog from the p revious night had brought a little friend who was also in need of the good doctors help. The doctor smiled, picked up the little dogs friend, and started healing its wounds. There is a great similarity between the little dogs in the story and us. We, too, have been struck and injured, but our wounds are not physical. Our wounds are spiritual wounds caused by sin. This is why we are in need of spiritual healing by the only one who can make us spiritually well. It is not the good doctor in the story. It is the Great Physician, Jesus Christ. Luke, who by profession was a doctor, wrote of the Great Physician in Luke 5:30-32. The Pharisees and their scribes began grumbling at His disciples, saying, Why do you eat and drink with the tax collectors and sinners?And Jesus answered and said to them, It is not those who are well who need a physician, but those who are sick. I have not come to call the righteous but sinners to repentance. Jesus saw the need to spiritually heal those who needed spiritual healing. But, who today is spiritually in need of Christs healing touch? Romans 3:23 teaches us that ... all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. That means each one of us has been hurt by the deadly blow of sin. Yet, Jesus can make the hurt go away, if only we will let Him. So, how does one go about finding the spiritual healing of Jesus Christ? I would suggest following the example of our tailwagging friends from earlier: Go knocking on the door of the Great Physician today, and bring a friend with you. You will both be glad you did. Kevins Komments, by Kevin Patterson, is presented by the Sebring Parkway church of Christ, assembling at 3800 Sebring Parkway.Find the church on the internet at www.sebringcoc.com, or e-mail sebringparkway@sebringcoc.co m/. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the News-Sun staff. Are you knocking at the Doctors door? Family, Church, Charity Workshop SEBRING It doesnt m atter if youre a M idwestern farmer, Pacific c oast fisherman, or a S outhern belle. If there are p eople of causes you care a bout, there are ways to h elp unleash your generosit y. On Saturday, Nov. 23 at 1 0 a.m., Faith Lutheran C hurch will host a one-hour p resentation by Thrivent F inancial for Lutherans repr esentative Michael Noel, M BA, FIC. Space is limited. To r eserve your place, call the c hurch office, (863) 3857 848 or Michael Noel at 8 63-465-2783. W acaster Family to be in concert SEBRING The W acaster Family will be in c oncert at Calvary Church on Hammock Road. Join Darren, Hope and Matthew at 10 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 24. Their music and ministry will touch your heart. Everyone is invited and welcomed.Faith Lutheran to host Thanksgiving dinnerSEBRING Faith Lutheran Church will again host a free Thanksgiving dinner on Thanksgiving Day. This meal is for those of any age group singles, couples and families that are alone or in need. Meals can also be delivered to shut ins. No monetary donations will be accepted on Thanksgiving Day from those who are eating; this is not a fundraiser. There is only one requirement to qualify for the church dinner, make a reservation by Nov 25.Call the church to tell many will be attending or how many meals need to be delivered. Dinner will be servered from noon till 2 p.m. Call the church from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Thursday at 385-7848.Church of Buttonwood Bay helps organizationsSEBRING The Church of Buttonwood Bay has contributed $6,000 to various local organizations that provide assistance for needy persons. Gifts in the amount of $1,000 each were made to the New Testament Mission, Good Shepherd/Cornerstone Hospice, Meals on Wheels, NuHope of Highlands Count the Potters House, and Heartland Horses and Handicapped. Kevins Komments Kevin Patterson Snapshots Mitch Albom hopes latest novel is Heaven-sent By MIKE HOUSEHOLDER Associated PressHIGHLAND PARK, Mich. Mitch Alboms best-selling memoir, Tuesdays with Morrie, gave him the literary chops to try his hand at fiction, so its fitting that he returns to the books central theme the struggle to understand ones own mortality for his fourth novel. The First Phone Call From Heaven, which came out Tuesday, mines the same death-and-afterlife material that transformed Albom 16 years ago from an awardwinning sports columnist into a best-selling author. Acloser look, though, shows its not quite like his other novels. At 323 pages, its about 100 pages longer than his other fictional works, and he devotes the extra space to fuller character development. Plus, its a bit of a thriller, according to Albom, who said some people close to him expressed surprise he had a mystery novel in him, but he realized: Ive been writing sports my whole life, and sports is exactly that. The book follows several residents of a fictional northern Michigan town, Coldwater, who start receiving regular Friday phone calls from deceased loved ones. (There is a real Coldwater, Mich., but its in the south of the state.) Soon, the town is overrun by out-of-towners dead-set on getting the story (media), celebrating the phenomenon (religious zealots) or disproving it (skeptics). Theres a fundamental question: Did this really happen or not? At the core of that question is belief, Albom said. The book to me, if you had to pick a one-word theme, its belief. Albom said belief is what gets us through life and carries us through terrible situations when they happen to us. Much like the one that happened to him. Aseries of strokes robbed his mother of the ability to speak. Ive not heard her voice since 2010, basically. I miss her voice something terribly, Albom said. Morrie Schwartzs voice also is one of those Albom has lost over the years. The 1997 chronicle of his mentors deathbed seminars provided Albom with the springboard he has used to delve into the world of fiction. Albom said Schwartz asked him to visit his grave periodically to continue their conversations. He said, When Im dead, you talk. Ill listen, Albom said, referring to his friends request that, despite an initial reluctance, Albom has honored. Theres nothing creepy about it, he said of his visits to Schwartzs final resting place in Massachusetts. I have conversations with people who have passed all the time. They dont talk back, but I sit and I talk to them myself. Schwartz also challenged Albom to do more charitable work. Anybody can write a check, Albom remembers him saying. As with the graveside chats, Albom has honored Schwartzs call for charity. He has founded six charities in his hometown of Detroit, and since the devastating 2010 earthquake in Haiti, he has operated an orphanage in Port-Au-Prince that he visits monthly. I do the charity work because I should, because I can, he told The Associated Press during an interview at the medical clinic for homeless children and their mothers that he set up in the Detroit enclave of Highland Park. Moments earlier, Albom strolled through the S.A.Y. Detroit Family Health Clinic greeting patients, doctors, nurses and others with hug s and handshakes. One of those who received an embrace from Albom was Dr. Chad Audi, the president and CEO of Detroit Rescue Mission Ministries and a frequent partner of Alboms on various charitable endeavors. Despite Albom shooing him away, Audi refused to stop singing the praises of his friend, who he said is much more hands-on than many believe. You will see him painting on his knees. You will see him cleaning, cuddling with the homeless people, Audi said. He slept in their bed, literally. If it wasnt fo r him, we wouldnt be able to raise the funds ... to help those guys. OK, OK. Now go away , said Albom, whose critics have derisively dubbed him the king of hope because of the syrupy-sweet nature of his books. Albom embraces the nickname. Ill take that any day, he said. I just try to tell stories that when youre done, you feel a little hopeful. Its really not any more complicated than that. Page B10 News-SunFriday, November 15, 2013 www.newssun.com E.O. KOCH CONSTRUCTION CO.; 5.542"; 4"; Black; nov ads p/u; 0 0 0 3 3 3 4 0 Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID The Church of the N azarene in Lake Placid invites the public t o an inspiring service of music with the P rowell family at 10:45 a.m. Sunday. The c hurch is at 512 W. Interlake Blvd. The Prowells have a unique sound of b lended Gospel, bluegrass and country music, all of which express a message of confidence and hope based on faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. Come and see a family ministry with unusual talent to play many different instruments, and blend their voices in beautiful harmony. For more information, call Pastor Tim Taylor at 446-1339. Prowell family to perform at Church of the Nazarene Religion Courtesy photo T he Prowell family will be in concert Sunday at Church of the Nazarene in Lake Placid. Asmall dog had been s truck by a car and was l ying injured on the side of t he road. Agood doctor h appened to drive by. N oticing that the little dog w as still alive, he stopped h is car, picked up the anim al, and took it home with h im. There, he discovered t hat the dog had suffered m inor cuts and abrasions b ut was otherwise fine. The d octor cleaned the dogs w ounds and was carrying t he animal from the house t o the garage when suddenl y it jumped from his arms a nd scampered away. What an ungrateful little d og, he thought to himself. The doctor thought no m ore about the incident u ntil the next evening. He w as going over some medi cal reports when he heard a scratching noise at the b ack door. Wondering what c ould be making the noise, h e went to the door, opened i t, and found the little dog s itting there, awaiting the g ood doctors arrival. However, it was not the p resence of the injured litt le dog treated the night b efore that caught the doct ors attention. No, it was t he presence of another i njured little dog that c aught his eye. Evidently, t he injured dog from the p revious night had brought a little friend who was also in need of the good doctors help. The doctor smiled, picked up the little dogs friend, and started healing its wounds. There is a great similarity between the little dogs in the story and us. We, too, have been struck and injured, but our wounds are not physical. Our wounds are spiritual wounds caused by sin. This is why we are in need of spiritual healing by the only one who can make us spiritually well. It is not the good doctor in the story. It is the Great Physician, Jesus Christ. Luke, who by profession was a doctor, wrote of the Great Physician in Luke 5:30-32. The Pharisees and their scribes began grumbling at His disciples, saying, Why do you eat and drink with the tax collectors and sinners?And Jesus answered and said to them, It is not those who are well who need a physician, but those who are sick. I have not come to call the righteous but sinners to repentance. Jesus saw the need to spiritually heal those who needed spiritual healing. But, who today is spiritually in need of Christs healing touch? Romans 3:23 teaches us that ... all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. That means each one of us has been hurt by the deadly blow of sin. Yet, Jesus can make the hurt go away, if only we will let Him. So, how does one go about finding the spiritual healing of Jesus Christ? I would suggest following the example of our tailwagging friends from earlier: Go knocking on the door of the Great Physician today, and bring a friend with you. You will both be glad you did. Kevins Komments, by Kevin Patterson, is presented by the Sebring Parkway church of Christ, assembling at 3800 Sebring Parkway.Find the church on the internet at www.sebringcoc.com, or e-mail sebringparkway@sebringcoc.co m/. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the News-Sun staff. Are you knocking at the Doctors door? Family, Church, Charity Workshop SEBRING It doesnt m atter if youre a M idwestern farmer, Pacific c oast fisherman, or a S outhern belle. If there are p eople of causes you care a bout, there are ways to h elp unleash your generosit y. On Saturday, Nov. 23 at 1 0 a.m., Faith Lutheran C hurch will host a one-hour p resentation by Thrivent F inancial for Lutherans repr esentative Michael Noel, M BA, FIC. Space is limited. To r eserve your place, call the c hurch office, (863) 3857 848 or Michael Noel at 8 63-465-2783. W acaster Family to be in concert SEBRING The W acaster Family will be in c oncert at Calvary Church on Hammock Road. Join Darren, Hope and Matthew at 10 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 24. Their music and ministry will touch your heart. Everyone is invited and welcomed.Faith Lutheran to host Thanksgiving dinnerSEBRING Faith Lutheran Church will again host a free Thanksgiving dinner on Thanksgiving Day. This meal is for those of any age group singles, couples and families that are alone or in need. Meals can also be delivered to shut ins. No monetary donations will be accepted on Thanksgiving Day from those who are eating; this is not a fundraiser. There is only one requirement to qualify for the church dinner, make a reservation by Nov 25.Call the church to tell many will be attending or how many meals need to be delivered. Dinner will be servered from noon till 2 p.m. Call the church from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Thursday at 385-7848.Church of Buttonwood Bay helps organizationsSEBRING The Church of Buttonwood Bay has contributed $6,000 to various local organizations that provide assistance for needy persons. Gifts in the amount of $1,000 each were made to the New Testament Mission, Good Shepherd/Cornerstone Hospice, Meals on Wheels, NuHope of Highlands Count the Potters House, and Heartland Horses and Handicapped. Kevins Komments Kevin Patterson Snapshots Mitch Albom hopes latest novel is Heaven-sent

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By JOCELYN NOVECK AP National WriterIt seems quite apt that The Best Man Holiday,a f ilm about a reunion of old f riends,feels just like going t o an actual reunion. In ways b oth bad and good. A reunion,you see,is o nly fun if you went to the s chool and recognize your f riends. Its certainly not fun i f you didnt,but were d ragged along anyway. In t hat case,youll likely end u p drinking white wine in a p aper cup alone by a wall, w atching everyone else get s illy. Likewise,The Best Man H oliday,Malcom D. Lees s equel to his (much better) 1 999 The Best Man,will p robably be fun and pleasant f or those who saw the first f ilm. Those who didnt may f eel like theyve been d ragged to someone elses r eunion. And thats too bad, b ecause the cast,reunited h ere,is largely excellent,led b y the ever-charismatic Taye D iggs as Harper,an author w ith a fatal flaw:he cant s eem to stop writing about h is friends and lovers. Its not the fault of the c ast that these characters s eem less fully formed the s econd time around. Its the f ault of a script (also by Lee) t hat takes shortcuts,goes for s entimental overload,gets a l ittle too swept up in holiday t rappings,and telegraphs p lot developments in often g roan-worthy ways. (A chara cter inadvertently leaves an i Pad containing secret mater ial sitting on a counter. Do w e really then need an omin ous close-up of that iPad l ying there? Give us a little c redit!) Those who saw the charming and refreshing The Best Manwill remember that the plot centered on a wedding. This time,its Christmas that brings everyone together. If you like Christmas soundtracks,youre in luck:there at least 15 Christmas songs here. If you dont like your Christmas music so early in the season,thats another matter. The setting is the suburban mansion of Lance and Mia,who married in the first movie. Lance (Morris Chestnut) is a star with the New York Giants playing his last season,and chasing an NFL record for rushing,with time running out. Mia (Monica Calhoun) is still sweet and thoughtful,and decides to hold a Christmas reunion. That includes Harper (Diggs) and Robyn (the lovely Sanaa Lathan),married and expecting their first child. Harpers first book,a novel that caused all sorts of trouble in the first film,was a huge success,but as this movie begins,hes under financial pressure. His agent suggests a winner:An autobiography with his friend the big football star. Cue more trouble. Then theres Jordan (an appealing Nia Long),the single and ambitious TV producer who carried a torch for Harper. Shes now dating a white man,Brian (Eddie Cibrian),a relationship that her friends comment on,but is not explored much in the movie. Julian (Harold Perrinau),who had freed himself from the vampy and manipulative Shelby (Melissa de Sousa) by the end of the first film,is now married to the sweet-hearted former stripper Candace (Regina Hall). And happily,Terrence Howard is back to reprise his role of the rascally but somehow wise Quentin. And the hijinks begin. There are,of course,old scores to settle. Theres also a tragic twist that becomes a major plot point. You will very likely cry at certain moments. But again,its like a reunion. If you already know these characters,youre good. If you dont,youll be standing against that wall, alone,with that wine in a paper cup. The Best Man Holiday, a Universal Studios release. Rating: R Running time: 122 minutes Review: (of 4) Dear Abby: This is my w ifes second marriage. W hen we were dating,she l ed me to believe that I was t he second sexual partner s he had ever had. Shortly a fter our wedding,I found o ut through some mutual a cquaintances she had a ttended college with that s he had been very promiscuo us during her college years a nd that the number of men s he has been with is far g reater than two. I feel lied to and trapped i n my marriage. (If I had k nown this,I would not have m arried her.) She knows I k now. She dismissed it by s aying the past doesnt matt er,but what she fails to reco gnize is that it matters to m e. I cant help but wonder i f she has lied to me about s omething this important, w hat else will she lie to me a bout? I love her and want to stay w ith her,but I feel betrayed a nd,frankly,embarrassed by h er now. What do I do? Confounded in the South Dear Confounded: P eople lie when they feel t hreatened,when they want t o impress someone or when t heyre ashamed of somet hing. The lie your wife told y ou may fall into the latter c ategory. She wasnt honest a bout the number of men she h ad been with because she k new you would react the w ay you have. You say you love her,but i f you truly feel embarrassed b y the fact that youre not t he second man she has slept w ith,then you either need to c hange your attitude or do h er a favor and think about e nding your marriage. From m y perspective,the number o f lovers she has had since the wedding is far more important than the number she had before. Please be aware that many women in our society have had multiple partners,so if youre looking to replace your wife anytime soon,you may be hard pressed to find a woman with no experience. If you want to salvage your marriage,I strongly recommend you talk to a therapist,but dont spend your money unless you can forgive your wife for being afraid to tell you the truth. Dear Abby: Im a 16year-old guy,and I have a problem. I recently met a girl in a chat room,and we seemed to hit it off pretty well. As weve been talking, she has told me she is suicidal,and in the past three days she has made three attempts to take her life. (As Im writing this,she is in the hospital.) Being a sensitive person,I try to talk her out of it,but she keeps shutting me out,and once shes OK,she is a completely different person. I still want to be her friend,but this is getting to be too much for me. Please help. Worried in Vermont Dear Worried: You are a caring person,but you must recognize that the girl you are corresponding with is emotionally fragile. Right now she is unable to respond to you and,frankly,you are not equipped to help her. Its good that she is in the hospital because that is where she needs to be until she can be stabilized. If you continue to stay in touch with her and she tells you again that she is suicidal,you should ask her where she is and if she has done anything to herself. Then call 911 and report it so she can get help quickly. Dear Abby: What do you do with a husband who is loud and rude,who curses constantly and argues with you and the TV,and is a bully to you and your daughter? Thats It In a Nutshell Dear Thats It: As little as possible! Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. To receive a collection of Abbys most memorable and most frequently requested poems and essays, send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby Keepers Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. Shipping and handling are included in the price. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, November 15, 2013 Page B11 Solution,B10 Diversions/Puzzles Wifes wild past puts future of her marriage in jeopardy Dear Abby Best Man Holiday, an overly gooey sequel Michael Gibson/MCT Robin (Sanaa Lathan, left) and Harper (Taye Diggs) in The Best Man Holiday. Movie Review Movie Title

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Page B12 News-SunFriday, November 15, 2013 www.newssun.com Living FOURSCORE AND SEVEN YEARS AGOour fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition thatALL MEN ARE CREATED EQUAL.Now we are engaged in a great civil war, TESTINGwhetherTHAT NATIONor any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting-place for those who here gave their lives thatTHAT NATION MIGHT LIVE. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground.THE BRAVE MEN, LIVING AND DEAD WHO STRUGGLED HEREhave consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it canNEVER FORGETwhat they did here. It is for us the living rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us that from these honored dead WE TAKE INCREASED DEVOTION TO THAT CAUSEfor which they gave the last full measure of devotion that we here highly resolve that THESE DEAD SHALL NOT HAVE DIED IN VAIN,that this nation under God shall have a new birth of freedom, and that GOVERNMENT OF THE PEOPLE, BY THE PEOPLE, FOR THE PEOPLE shall not perish from the earth. President Abraham Lincoln, Nov. 19, 1863President Abraham Lincoln drew inspiration from the Declaration of Independence when he penned his famous speech, the Gettysburg Address,delivered Nov. 19, 1863, at National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pa. Focusing on the hallowed words all men are created equal, Lincoln equated the catastrophic suffering caused by the Civil War with the efforts of the American people to live up to such an ideal. Before Lincoln gave his speech, prominent orator Edward Everett spoke to the crowd for two hours. The next day he wrote to Lincoln, Permit me also to express my great admiration of the thoughts expressed by you, with such eloquent simplicity and appropriateness ... I should be glad, if I could flatter myself that I came as near to the central idea of the occasion, in two hours, as you did in two minutes.MYTHS AND MISCONCEPTIONSOn the 150th anniversary of Lincolns brief but straightforward Gettysburg Address, there still remains many myths surrounding it.Lincoln himself said no one would remember the speech: FALSE Weber: There is so much packed into 272 words. Its so short and so eloquent ... (Lincoln) sums up what the war is about, what the goals of the war are ... and he also really lays out in some ways the American mission. He was a big fan of the Declaration of Independence but he put a twist on it. He thought that all men are created equal.The speech was written on an envelope: FALSE Vorenberg: We will never know the exact origins of this myth, but its clear that Mary Raymond Shipman Andrews is the key player. Her (widely read) fictional story involving the Address, The Perfect Tribute,appeared in 1906 and had Lincoln drafting the speech on some brown mail-package paper while on the train to Pennsylvania. ... Another mystery is how Andrews came up with the story.People instantly cherished the speech: FALSE Vorenberg: It took some weeks before leading intellectuals and politicians recognized it as a great speech, and then a few years before Americans in general saw its greatness.An unimaginable number of men died: TRUE Vorenberg: It had a devastating human toll nearly 10,000 dead and more than 25,000 wounded with no objective achieved. (Confederate Gen. Robert E.) Lees goal of terrorizing Washington, D.C., was thwarted, and President Lincolns goal of capturing Lees army went unmet. Weber: Its really unimaginable to the modern American mind, really unfathomable that you would lose so many men in three days. I cant imagine what the American public would say about losses like that now.Gettysburg ghosts: FALSE (or is it?) The ghost stories are entirely an invention to pry money out of the wallets of tourists, said Lincoln biographer James McPherson. From phantom cries of the wounded to apparitions of soldiers, many tourists and ghost hunters claim to have proof of paranormal activity on the Gettysburg Battlefield. Beyond the killing fields, there are various inns who claim their own specters. The Farnsworth House Inn claims to be among the most haunted locations in America with ghosts ranging from civil war soldiers to a young woman who is thought to be Mary Virginia Jennie Wade, the only civilian causality of the battle. David Oliver and Jennifer Pritchard, MCTSOURCES: LIBRARYOF CONGRESS, FARNSWORTHHOUSEINN.COM TIMOTHYH. O'SULLIVAN/LIBRARYOF CONGRESSDead Confederate soldiers gathered for burial following the Battle of Gettysburg, July 5, 1863. LIBRARYOF CONGRESSThe Nicolay Copy is the earliest known draft of the Gettysburg Address. The first page is on White House (then Executive Mansion) stationery, supporting the theory it was drafted in Washington, D.C. The second page, written on common lined paper, suggests Lincoln rewrote the final paragraph in Gettysburg, Pa.