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The news-sun ( June 7, 2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The news-sun
Uniform Title:
News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title:
Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Sebring Fla
Creation Date:
June 7, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates:
27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note:
Also published for Avon Park.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID:
UF00028423:01335

Related Items

Preceded by:
Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by:
Avon Park sun

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The news-sun
Uniform Title:
News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title:
Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Sebring Fla
Creation Date:
June 7, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates:
27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note:
Also published for Avon Park.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID:
UF00028423:01335

Related Items

Preceded by:
Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by:
Avon Park sun


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

C M Y K By ROD LEWIS S pecial to the News-SunLAKE PLACID Artist Keith Goodson is dodging rain and wiping sweat to give Lake Placid its 44th mural. T he artist is busy painting his latest creation his 12th m ural in Lake Placid on the Walgreens building at U.S. 27 and Interlake Boulevard. Thep ainting will incorporate elements that help make Lake P lacid the interesting place that it is. Celebrate Lake Placidwill i nclude an alligator,a blue heron,a bass,an eagle,a Florida panther,oranges,the f ounding fathers of Lake Placid,a NativeAmerican in a c anoe and,of course,a caladium. When asked which was his favorite Goodson,quipped the next one that I dobeforea dmitting his favorite is the one called Bassin. Goodson said that his biggest challenge in doing a mural is Mother Nature. The rain as well as the heat,he said. Stucco wallsa bsorb heat,so you get a lot more heat when you are on the wall then when you are off the wall. The reflection is also a challenge so you get a goodp air of polarized glasses. Height can be a challenge because everything has to be OSHA compliant,he added. Celebrate Lake Placidwill n ot be the first mural at that location. When Walgreens came to town,the building that was on the property had to be NEWS-SUNH ighlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 S unday, July 14, 2013Volume 94/Number 84 | 75 cents www.newssun .com Phone ... 385-6155Fax ... 385-2453Online: www.newssun.com 099099401007 HEARTLAND NATIONAL BANK***; 11.25"; 1.5"; Black plus three; process, front strip; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 8 8 1 1 6 6 Rain, T-storms High 88 Low 72Details, A1S BusinessB5 ClassifiedsA9 Community BriefsA2 Crossword PuzzleB11 Dear AbbyB11 Editorial & OpinionA3 ObituariesA5 Sports on TVB2 Sudoku PuzzleB9 Index By BARRY FOSTER N ews-Sun correspondentA VON PARK Private investigator and former Avon Park police officer Dan Burke is questioning whether city officials have improperly used their city-owned vehicles,charges that City Manager JulianD eleon said are pettiness. Burke was supposed to be on the agenda f or Thursdays city council meeting,but Deleon pulled him from it. B urke apparently followed Deleon, Administrative Services Director Maria Sutherland and Administrative Services Coordinator Brenda Sliva to a Polk County Former AP cop, city at odds over trips AP city manager denies city vehicles used improperlyDueling bannersSigns made by both backers of Anderson and D eleon are presented INSIDE, A2 LIVING, B12 A celebration of heritage Artist Keith Goodson working on Lake Placids 44th mural Rod Lewis/News-Sun Artist Keith Goodson works on his new mural, Celebrating Lake Placid, which is on theW algreens building at U.S. 27 and Interlake Boulevard. Above is a rendering of the final scene. SNL fire crew sent home 11 days early Special to the News-SunLAKELAND The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) issued its final forecast Thursday pegging the 2012-2013 Florida orange crop at 133.4 million boxes,down 9 percent from last season. To arrive at the total,the USDA cut Valencias by 700,000 boxes to 66.3 million boxes while early-mid varieties climbed 100,000 boxes to 67.1 million. This years crop really shows the devFlorida orange crop drops 9% Metro By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING While threatening black clouds gathered in the east Friday afternoon,about 10 students at Cracker Trail Elementary Schools summer program happily dug holes. They were planting a butterfly garden with the help of the 4-H and the countys master gardener program. It was a part of a larger,4-H countywide effort. Deputy sheriffs and a school custodian sparked the idea,said Jackie Harris,a teacher at Avon Elementary School and the 4-H leader who came up with the project. She had never thought about butterfly gardens until one day the deputies arrived at Avon Elementary regarding an overgrown,unkempt garden that created line-ofsight issues. That was when she discovered it had been a butterfly garden. A school custodian told Harris each elementary school had one in the past,but now they were mostly neglected and overrun with weeds. Harris explained that every year the 4-H organizes a countywide community service project for its stuButterflies are elementary 4-H, Master Gardners team up on butterfly garden project S ee MURAL,A4 See VEHICLE,A4 See ORANGE,A4 New head StreakJasone DeWitt will take o ver the Sebring b aseball p rogram SPORTS, B1 See BUTTERFLIES,A4 West Sebring VFD now handling fire duties for district KATARA SIMMONS/News-Sun South Florida State College student volunteer Guliette Perez and Owen Harris, 5, work together to plant flowers Friday afternoon at Cracker Trail Elementary School. By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Firefighters for the Sun N Lake district arrived at work Friday morning to discover their jobs were being terminated as of 3 p.m. Closing the station has been discussed for about a year as the district and county looked to save money by shifting responsibilities to the West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department,but the last day was apparently set as July 23 until Fridays announcement. This should not be a surprise to anyone,except that we moved up the date,District Administrator Michael Wright said Friday afternoon. When asked why the date was moved up,Wright only said,It was just a decision we made. Sun N Lake has been hiring full-time,paid firefighters from other departments to work part time for eight-hour daytime shifts, See SUN N LAKE,A5

PAGE 2

C M Y K APHS Pool opens to publicAVON PARK The pool at Avon Park High School has set Open Swim Datesa nd Times beginning Tuesday. The pool will be open from 9-11:30 a.m. MondayFriday,as well as 1-3 p.m.a nd 4-6 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The cost is $2 per swimmer.Sunny Serafino headlines Scribes Night OutSEBRING Todays Featured Reader at ScribesN ight Out (SNOy Serafino,well known for her m any award-winning books, especially her Christian novels about women,coura-g eous women. Serafino also conducts w riting classes and workshops. Asked if an award makes a book special,she said,I like to think it was special because it reachedt he heart and soul of the reader; that there was somet hing real,unique or compelling about the story and the characters which made its pecial. SNO starts at 6 p.m. today a t Brewsters Coffee House, just south of Home Depot on U.S. 27. The groups sched-u le is to gather on the second and fourth Sundays of the month at 6 p.m. at B rewsters. The event is free of charge and is open to the p ublic. Serving as the moderator for July is Art Lefkowitz, who invites local writers, published or not,to partici-p ate in the Open Mik portion of the session. This allows other authors to briefly share their works. e also invite folks whoj ust want to listen,he says. Refreshments will be on sale. For more information, call Lefkowitz at 385-1554. Barbecue benefits Humane SocietyLAKE PLACID A pulled pork dinner will bes erved from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. today at the Lake Placid Masonic Lodge,102N Main Ave.,with proceeds going to the Highlands Humane Society. The cost is $8 and includes cole slaw,b aked beans,bread,drink and desert. There will be musical entertainment provided by Jake Riley. Donations of dog and cat f ood,cleaning supplies and donations of cash will also be accepted. For information call Devin Wilson at 243-1356 or JimM cQuigg at 465-8185.FHREDI meets MondayS EBRING The Florida Heartland Regional Page A2News-SunSunday, July 14, 2013www.newssun.com pub block; 5.542"; 4.5"; Black; publishers block; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 6 6 4 4 0 0 3 3 KAYLOR & KAYLOR; 5.542"; 1.5"; Black; below lottery workers comp; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 1 1 0 0 3 3 3 3 KAYLOR & KAYLOR; 5.542"; 1.5"; Black; above lottery social security; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 1 1 0 0 3 3 5 5 This weeks question: Do you think that the Obama Administrations decision to delay a major part of the Obamacare system for a year is an attempt to influence the 2014 elections? O nline Yes 80.3% No 19.7% Total votes: 239 www.newssun .comPoll open through Friday. Make your voice heard at July 12 45252751MB:10x:3Next jackpot $20 millionJuly 9 321434548MB:14x:2 July 5 223414754MB:42x:4 J uly 9 131720232430x:2Next jackpot $36 millionJ uly 6 1735394347x:3 July 3 31342475253x:4 July 12 16222336 July 11 713172132 July 10 611123133 July 9 79222831 July 12 (n 9426 July 12 (d 4274 July 11 (n 4491 July 11 (d 5299 July 12 (n 137 July 12 (d 978 July 11 (n 033 July 11 (d 589 July 12 219374313 July 9 1218283922 July 5 617394115 July 2 192324432 July 10 3031455559 PB: 27Next jackpot $94 millionJuly 6 213353652 PB: 11 July 3 36294051 PB: 4 Lottery Center Next question: Do you think cable news channels have spent too much time talking about the Zimmerman case and not enough time covering o ther important issues? Community Briefs DAYTONA BEACH (AP) Two central Florida grandmothers lost money ina scamwhen someone c alled pretending to be a grandchild in need of cash to get out of trouble. A 78-year-old Deltona woman recently lost $50,500 and an 82-year-old New Smyrna Beach woman lost $1,500 in the grandparent scam,according to the Volusia County Sheriffs Office. Sheriffs spokesman Brandon Haught is warning the public not to fall victim to such phone calls. The fake grandchild asks for money to be sent to him or her in another country or state where the person was supposedly arrested or in a car crash,according to Haught. Once the money is wired, the money and the suspect disappear. Then the victim later finds out that the real grandchild was never in trouble or even in the place the money was sent to,he added. The Deltona grandmother received a call in June from someone who claimed to be her grandson. The Daytona Beach NewsJ ournal reports the caller said he had been in a car verses house accident and needed $5,000 to bond out of a jail in South America. She wired the money to South America. Over the next few weeks, a man claiming to be the grandsons lawyer called the victim for more money to cover mounting legal expenses and to pay the homeowner whose house was damaged. Finally she called her grandson directly and learned that he wasnt the one who had called her, Haught said. In the second case,a man claiming to be the victims grandson called,saying he had been in an accident and had been arrested for driving under the influence in New York. According to authorities, the woman said the young man sounded exactly lik her grandson. She believed him when he asked for $1,800 to cover fees. She sent the money order and later that day contacted her grandson to find out how he was. She learned he had never been in New York. The sheriffs office is warning people not to fall victim to scammers. They encourage anyone who is a victim of a scam to report it to authorities. Before even thinking about sending money anywhere,contact the grandchild or other relative to see if the emergency story can be verified or debunked, Haught said. eep in mind that once money is sent through wire transfer,its gone. There is no getting it back. Deputies warn about grandparent scam Continued on A8 By BARRY FOSTER News-Sun correspondentAVON PARK There were two banner presentations at the Thursday nights pecial meeting of the Avon Park City Council. The first came from resident Doris Millier,the wife of former city councilman PaulM iller. Saying there had been a lot of talkabout Avon Park City Manager Julian Deleon that simply,simply is not true,Miller said she andh er friend Doris Smith had a banner made in support of t he city manager. Miller presented the banner noting Deleons accom-p lishments,including lower municipal debt,annexation o f property into the city, reduced taxes and a recycling program. She said there were many new businesses thath ad opened their doorsto sign the banner. T he two had taken the banner around to have it signed by local citizens.S ome agreed,some did not. However,Miller assured the c ouncil that the signatures represented many of the business and communityl eaders of the City of Charm. Miller was thanked by D eputy Mayor Brenda Gray Giles,who officiated at the m eeting in the absence of Mayor Sharon Schuler,who was recovering from surgery. Later,a similar banner w as presented in support of Avon Park city councilman Garrett Anderson. The poster was made by citizens w ho had heard about Miller and Smiths effort in support of Deleon and wanted to make their side of the issue known I nstead of having the banner signed before giving it to Anderson,it was suggested that he hang it in his p lace of business so that those who wanted to come by and express their support could do so. Anderson and Deleon h ave had several disagreements both inside and outside council chambers. Dueling banners at AP council meeting Courtesy photo Avon Park City Manager Julian Deleon and city A dministrative Services Director Maria Sutherland pose under a banner presented Thursday in support of Deleon. B arry Foster/News-Sun C ity Councilman Garrett Anderson (right A nderson hold up the banner presented Thursday to G arrett Anderson by his supporters. Brandon Haught Volusia County SOThe fake grandchild asks for money to be sent to him or her in another country or state where the person was supposedly arrested or in a car crash. Metro Law enforcement officials are warning of a scam where someone pretending to be a grandchild in trouble calls and asks for money.

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C M Y K TODAYSEDITORIAL 2 227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155S COTT DRESSELEditor E xt. 516editor@newssun.comD AN HOEHNESports Editor E xt. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com N EWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515publisher@newssun.com V ICKIE WATSONExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.comM ITCH COLLINSExt. 507mcollins@newssun.com A DVERTISING Editorial & Opinion www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, July 14, 2013Page A3 Elwell uses the time to explain issues facing the commission and listen to citi zen opinions, ideas and complaints. Elwell is different in another way he speaks on the record, something it is e xtremely difficult to get elected officials to do. A democratic government only works if its citizens are informed and i nvolved. The more they are informed, the more involved people get. Elwell understands this. Unfortunately, few other elected officials do. W e dont just mean the other county c ommissioners. We mean the constitutional officers and municipal mayors and city council members, too. T he Sheriffs Office, for example, would benefit by stepping out from behind its curtain of secrecy. The Supervisor of Elections could help vote rs before the next election by holding a town meeting to explain how it w orks. The Property Appraiser and Tax Collector should hold annual meetings t o explain their responsibilities, what state or federal mandates they have too bey, how this year compares with the o ne just past and what is expected in the near future. Mayors and city councils should have informal gatherings with their constituents on a regular basis mainly to listen, but also to answer questions. Should specific controversial situations arise, governments and their agencies should have meetings on just the topic, like the county commission had regarding Swamp Hammock. We know the first thing the cynics a mong you will say Oh thats all v ery well and good, but do you really e xpect people to leave their homes to come to these meetings? Yes. In fact, we do. Not because we are hopelessly naive weve seen enough official meetings where we are the only member of the audience but because more and more citizens have b een coming to Elwells meetings. F rom only a handful of people at the f irst meeting, more than 100 took part Tuesday night. OK, so there was free pizza and s oda. But that doesnt mean the audience was there for the food. These individuals turned out so they c an be better voters and citizens. They are doing what every American should be doing, paying attention and holding their elected officials to account. TheN ews-Sun admires and honors their c ommitment. We urge our officials to open up and reach out. The public will reach back. Talk to us ... we are ready to listen Highlands County Commissioner Don Elwell is a breath of fresh air. Were not saying he walks on water. We dont agree with him on all issues. We do, however, admire him for reaching out to his constituents through bi-annual town hall meetings. Overseas, the Arab Spring is turning into the Arab Nightmare that everyone but the Obama administration always saw coming. At home the Obama Crew is fighting to socialize all of Americas health care system, strangling the energy industry with new emissions regulations, and being exposed for ordering federal employees to spy on each other. And what do our mainstream media think is the most important issue of the day? The minute-by-minute play-by-play of the Zimmerman trial. Yes sir,America. Dont worry your little heads about the coming chaos in the Middle East. Or how the Obama administrations neutral position in the Egyptian coup is going to make it a virtual certainty Egypt will explode into a long and bloody religious civil war. Dont worry about revelations that the federal government has been merrily intercepting our email, scanning the envelopes of our snail mail, and collecting communications data traveling on our undersea cables. And dont worry about the weekly slaughter of dozens of young blacks by other young blacks in the streets of Chicago. What the TVmedia think is really important to all of us is whether white Hispanic George Zimmerman killed a young black kid in self defense, as he says he did, or whether Zimmerman stalked and shot Trayvon Martin because hes a racist creep and a wanna-be cop. It doesnt matter to the TV media what the evidence is. It doesnt even matter to them whether Zimmerman is guilty of second-degree murder or manslaughter or nothing at all. The TVmedia found the perfect white-on-black crime to exploit, and it exploited it to the max, stirring up racial passions and getting the ratings they wanted. Of course, the TVmedia which have exaggerated the case far beyond its social or political importance are saying they sure hope an innocent verdict for Zimmerman doesnt create riots in the streets. Yeah, right. If riots come, you can bet the TVmedia will be on hand en masse to fan the flames and spike their ratings as long as they can. The Zimmerman trial has been covered to death by TV, but theres little about the trial thats important to us in the long run. Its a tragic and rare case that has been cynically milked and exploited by TV and professional race-baiters such as Al Sharpton. Whats important is whats happening in Egypt. Michael Reagan is the son of President Ronald Reagan, a political consultant, and the author of The New Reagan Revolution (St. Martins Press). Visit his websites at www.reagan.com and www.michaelereagan.com. Send comments to Reagan@caglecartoons.com/. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the News-Sun staff. We should be watching Egypt, not Zimmerman Making Sense Michael Reagan A s I type this, Im sitting in my hotel room in Las V egas, Nevada. Yes, the same Las Vegas, Nevada, thats known for its gam-b ling and fun. Well, fun according to some peoples d efinitions. I am here because Don and I are attending a confer-e nce called Freedomfest. Freedomfest, according to its printed materials, is the w orlds largest gathering of free minds. It focuses on a l ot of different things, but they can probably be boiled down to two categories: financial and political. I would tell you more a bout the conference except that it just started this evening and aside from mentioning how crowded the cocktail reception was (it was incredibly crowded, Don and I didnt stay) therei snt a lot to share yet. Next week I will have more to s ay about it. What I do want to talk about is Vegas. This is my third visit to the city, the last one being a number ofy ears ago. Some things have changed for example, I dont think the hotel were staying in, Planet Hollywood Resort andC asino, existed in its current form when I was here before. Others remain the same, such as casinos everywhere you look. To be honest, Las Vegas isnt my favorite city. say this not wanting to offend any of my readers who might have fond feelings for the place. I especially do not want to offend the former mayor of the city, who before he was mayor defended members of the mob in court (I am not kidding). So let me start off by saying something nice about the place. Okay, give me a minute Theres ... oh, no, not that Hmmm Okay, that was just me being funny. Truth be told we are in a very nice room here in Vegas which is far away from all the noise of downstairs. They have some shows that could be entertaining if Don and I had time to go to them. And the food is great, albeit expensive. Vegas is an expensive p lace to visit. I admit I wonder why the F reedomfest people, who are very concerned with the financial mess our countryi s in, picked an expensive place like Vegas. Wouldnt Orlando work out just as w ell? It wouldnt have cost as much, Ill tell you that. U nfortunately, Planet Hollywoods shows are not things Don and I would attend. One of them is advertised as a striptease.T he other seems to be offering naughty comedy. This is not my kind of entertainment. And did they have to advertise the striptease on their elevator doors? Im ean, youre standing there, waiting for your elev ator and have the image of three scantily clad women staring back at you. For me, a Christian, it wasnt something I found very enjoy-a ble. Vegas, to no ones surprise, is hot. It is, I grant you, a dry heat, as opposed to Florida, which is humid.B ut both will suck the energy right out of you. We did some walking on the Strip, and Don and I grew very appreciative of things like air conditioning and gelatos. It doesnt help that while youre walking in the heat people are trying to get you to go to some sort of presentation. They offer tickets to shows and money if youll just give them some of your time. Don and I are not fond of hard sells. We had to say no a lot on this walk we took. So you probably wont find me moving to Vegas any time soon. But if you like it, thats great. Im happy for you. Please dont tell the former mayor about this column. Laura Ware is a Sebring resident. She can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady@ embarqmail.com Visit her website at www.laurahware.com. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the staff of the NewsSun. A trip to Sin City Lauras Look L aura Ware EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. We have to make room for everybody. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; or e-mail editor@newssun.com.

PAGE 4

C M Y K Page A4News-SunSunday, July 14, 2013www.newssun.com DR. ROTMAN, DARRIN; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; july ads; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 8 8 1 1 8 8 E.O. KOCH CONSTRUCTION CO.; 5.542"; 4"; Black; 7/14/13 p/u; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 8 8 2 2 2 2 torn down to make way for the new building. W hen the old building was demolished,so was the mural entitled,Scrub Jays.Goodson said Walgreens was approached to be involved in what the town was doing. The management of the store liked the idea ande ven funded the new mural. The process for a new mural is complex, Goodson said. First you have to have a neutral idea that all of the businesses will accept. Then we do a rendering,or a picture of what it will look like when it is finished. We want images Lake P lacid,and what makes the t own unique,which has to b e approved by the mural s ociety. And finally we have to h ave the funding. Then we s tart the process. Once it is painted we coat it with a U VC sealer that has to be repeated every few years. The mural should be c ompleted in two to three w eeks,Goodson said. For more information a bout Keith Goodson or to view his other projects, check out his web page atw ww.KeithGoodson.com/ Continued from A1 a stating effects of HLB,or citrus greening disease, said Michael W. Sparks,e xecutive VP/CEO of Florida Citrus Mutual. We h ad severe fruit drop and a lot of citrus from stressed trees with HLB ended up o n the ground. If anything,this season provides stark evidence that growers,scientists and the state and federal govern-m ents need to work together to beat this disease and save the $9 billion Florida citrus industry and the 76,000 jobs it supports. The ongoing research looks positive and I'm optim istic it will ultimately find a solution to HLB but at t his time there is no cure. T he USDA makes its init ial estimate in October of each year and revises itm onthly as the crop takes s hape until the end of the s eason in July. The USDAs i nitial October orange estimate for 2012-2013 was 154 million boxes. During the 2011-2012 season, Florida produced 146.7 mill ion boxes of oranges V isit www.nass.usda.gov/Statistic s_by_State/Florida/Publicati o ns/Citrus/cpfp.htm for the complete USDA estimate. The 2012-2013 Florida grapefruit crop stayed at 18.4 million boxes. Tangerines and tangelos a lso remained steady at 3 .35 million and 1 million respectively. The yield for from concentrate orange juice (FCOJ slightly to 1.59 gallons pe r 90-pound box. T he Florida citrus industry creates a $9 billion a nnual economic impact, employing nearly 76,000 p eople,and covering about 550,000 acres. Florida Citrus Mutual is the states largest citrus grower organization. For more information,visit www.flcitrusmut ual.com. To receive winter weather updates follow F CM on Twitter. Continued from A1 dents. Resurrecting the gardens at the elementary schools is that project for 2013. At least four elementary schools are already involved. Harris wants to hear from others as well. If youre interested,we are willing to help,she said. Kate Stewart,assistant 4H director for the county, Charlie Reynolds,who is with the master gardener program and head of community gardens,and Guliette Perez,a college student and 4-H alumnae,joined Harris a nd Stewart helping the children get the mostly native plants safely into the ground. Butterfly gardens are excellent projects for elementary schools,Harris explained. The second-grade science curriculum studies the different animalscycles of life. Because butterflies go through three distinct changes as they grow,students can see a life cycle up close. Its a perfect learning lab,Harris said. It began to rain and the group moved indoors. Reynolds brought a soft net cage. It was filled with plant cuttings on which zebral ongwing caterpillars were chomping away. One or two were already in cocoons. Reynolds lifted out caterpillars,putting them on the childrens palms. Hanna Allison,who will be going into fifth grade,made a face. s ticklish,she said. Reynolds only smiled. Thats the official butterfly of Florida,he said. Hanna still put the caterpillar down. Continued from A1 Rod Lewis/News-Sun Artist Keith Goodson says the weather is the biggest chall enge to painting murals in Lake Placid. M ural celebrates Lake Placid Orange crop hit by greening By BARRY FOSTER N ews-Sun correspondentAVON PARK It was a r eluctant Avon Park City Council that passed its new fortune teller regulatory ordinance at a special Thursday night meeting. O nly one speaker appeared before the council during the public hearing portion of the second reading of the measure. FormerA von Park mayor Tom Macklin told the council he understood why they weret aking the action but lamented the circumstances surrounding it. As a Christian I dont appreciate the fact that we f ind ourselves in the position in society that we cannot make this type of choice foro ur community,he said. Councilman Parke S utherland echoed those sentiments,again saying that he had received more citizen feedback on the fortune teller ordinance than any other issue with the excep-t ion of last years discussion on police protection in the City of Charm. That ultimately led to the leasing out of law enforcement duties tot he Highlands County Sheriff's Office. I dont know that any of us as council people are in support of this kind of busi-n ess in our community,he said. The efforts that we take are to limit the liabilitya nd exposure to the city. The new municipal ordinance is a re-write of theH ighlands County ordinance that regulates such things as f ortune tellers,clairvoyants and soothsayers. The Highlands County ordinancew as selected from a dozen such statutes enacted by vari ous cities and counties throughout the state of Florida,presented to council for its consideration earlier this year. At an earlier meeting, M ayor Sharon Schuler liked the Highlands County regulations,saying they are both very specific and very time consuming for anyone who a ctually is interested in doing a such a business the city. She noted there are a lot of things an applicant is g oing to have to do. M andates include such things as fingerprinting, background checks and other information as part of the p ermitting process. C ity Attorney Gerald Buhr said the point of the ordinance was to make certain the city does its best to prevent fraud. Even so,the passage measure was not a unanimous vote. Councilman G arrett Anderson cast a lone novote. Avon Park adopts county fortune teller rules KATARA SIMMONS/News-Sun Master gardener Charlie Reynolds teaches youngsters Friday about butterflies and their habitat. Butterflies will be in attendance at Cracker Trail next year Find hundreds of local cars in Highlands County. Centralfloridawheels.com

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C M Y K Wright said. After hours, the firefighters worked off the clock as volunteers. The departments afterhours response rate,Wright said,was only 40 percent, because many of the firefighters are on duty elsewhere or live outside the district. The West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department has been covering the district after hours through mutual aid for a long time as a result,Wright said. re just extending their coverage to 24 hours. The paid firefighters, however,are very upset. Lt. Craig Maranas said that everyone knew the closing was coming July 23,but were taken by surprise when it occurred 11 days early. Im so upset,Maranas said. Im at a loss. Its really about how they did it (closing the stationThere was no warning. We were blindsided. I feel so bad for those guys. Maranas said 11 men were affected. The News-Sun has not been able to confirm the exact date when the new radio system replaces the old. Lt. J. P. Fane,representing the sheriffs office in the transition,said no date has been set,although it should be soon. News-Sun staffAVON PARK A man and a woman were booked on several felony drugc harges after a search turned up large stash of drugs and a gun in an Avon Park home. Deputies executed a search warrant at 1442 S.G eorgia Ave. at 4:24 p.m. on Thursday. Inside,they found Clifton Bernard Hall,39, and 24-year-old Davina Andrea Bellamy. They also reportedly f ound 12.7 grams of crack cocaine,248.2 grams of m arijuana,86 MDMA pills and a stolen .357 pistol. The cocaine was broken i nto small pieces and some was found stored in a small t ube in Halls pocket,while more of it was found on an electronic scale and also in a large piece that is known asa crack cookie,the report s aid. The marijuana was packaged in individual bags k nown as dime bags. Both were charged with possession of a weapon by ac onvicted felon,grand theft of a firearm,possession of cocaine with intent to sell, possession of marijuana with intent to sell,felony-levelp ossession of cocaine and marijuana charges and possession of drug equipment. Bellamy was also charged with possession of a con-t rolled substance without a prescription and trafficking in phenethylamines of 10 grams or more. S eat belt leads to drug arrestA VON PARK A traffic stop for an unbuckled seat belt led to a man beingc harged with marijuana distribution charges on T hursday. According to a Highlands County Sheriffs Office report,a blue Mercury was stopped at 7:59 p.m. atC anberra Circle and Marble Avenue in Avon Park when it w as noted the passenger was not wearing his safety belt. While talking to the drive r,24-year-old Ranaldo Jaquar Walker of Avon Park, deputies noticed a smell ofm arijuana coming from the vehicle. A search of the car and Walker turned up a total of 128/4 grams of marijuana. The report said 3.7 grams w as found in Walkers pocket,6.8 grams was found in plain view and another 114.4 grams was found in a bag under the passengers seat. W alker was charged with marijuana distribution, felony possession of mari-j uana and possession of drug e quipment www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, July 14, 2013Page A5 CENTRAL FLORIDA CASKET STORE &; 1.736"; 6"; Black; obit page july ads; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 7 7 7 7 5 5 DR. LEE, IKE; 1.736"; 3"; Black; 7/14/13; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 8 8 2 2 1 1 M ARTIAL ARTS (pp 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 9 9 9 9 0 0 POLK, CAROLE; 5.542"; 5"; Black; listing rhr top of ad stack; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 1 1 0 0 6 6 8 8 Stephenson Nelson ****; 7.444"; 5"; Black; vets ad; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 6 Two arrested after raid on AP home Classified ads get results! Call 314-9876 Continued from page 1A Sun N Lake fire protection now belongs to West Sebring EDMOND MOSSER E dmond A Mosser,80, of Clyde,Ohio,formerly of Avon Park,Fla.,passed away on Tuesday,June 25, 2013,at the Willows ofB ellevue. Ed was born in Sandusky,Ohio,on April 25,1933. On Oct. 29, 1971,he married Fran E. (Bowers) Dick. H e is survived by his wife,Fran,of 41 years; stepdaughters,Sandra Gray and Suzanne (Harry Newsome,all of Clyde,O hio; and sisters,Rosalyn (Jerome Madelene (Robert Hershey,all of Freemont, Ohio. Memorials may be made to Stein Hospice,Sandusky,O hio,or St. Paul Lutheran Church,Clyde,Ohio.O nline condolences may be made to www.auxterfuneralhms.com. Cards and letters to be mailed to Fran Mosser at The Willows of B ellevue,101 Auxillary Drive,Bellevue,OH 4 4811. ROBERT PFEIFFER Jr. Robert Fredrick Pfeiffer Jr.,age 93,ofI ndianapolis, formally of Lake Placid, F la.,passed away Monday, July 8,2013. He was born to the late Robert Sr. andE sther (Kahntfer in Louisville,Ky.,on Feb. 23, 1 920. Bob married Ruth Byrer on Dec. 20,1941. Bob served in the U.S. Army Infantry during World War II. He partici-p ated in the Battle of the Bulge under the leadership o f Gen. George Patton. Bob was a Boy Scout troop leader and earned the dis-t inguished Silver Beaver award for his dedication to S couting. He was an avid model railroader and he loved to carve animal fig-u res. He also loved golfing. He worked for United Telephone Company for 37 years,retiring in 1982. He was active in the American Legion and served as a commander of Post 49 inW arsaw,Ind. He is survived by a son, F red Pfeiffer,and his wife, Jan; twin brother,Frank Pfeiffer; granddaughter,T heresa Reames; and niece, Sally Woidich. He also has t wo great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild. Bob was preceded in death by his wife; Ruth; daughter,Sandra LeaR eames; and grandson, Bryan Alan Reames. A private service was held. Leppert Mortuary & Crematory,Nora Chapel,a ssisted during Roberts passing. Memorial contrib utions may be made to either The American Cancer Society or TheA merican Heart Association. BETTY SUE TAYLOR B etty Sue Taylor,79,of Sebring,Fla. died July 11, 2013. She was born July 6, 1934 in Hartford,Ala., moving to Sebring in 1957f rom Alabama. She was a graduate of Geneva County High School. Her employments included sales clerk at Kahns Department S tore; secretary for John Carson, Realtor; and working int he office of Sebring High School for more than 20 years. Betty had been a member of theS ebring Jr. Womens Club and the Sebring Historical S ociety. For many years she played bridge in both the ladiesand couples clubs.S he was a long-time faithful member of First United M ethodist Church of Sebring where for a while she served as a Sunday school teacher in the elementary department and fory ears she served on the Communion Committee. A fter retirement she volunteered for 12 years at Highlands RegionalH ospital in the Auxiliary as a front desk Pink Lady r eceptionist. She also,along with her good friend Louise Sauls,delivered Meals onW heels for more than 15 years. Betty was preceded in d eath by her parents, Charles and Eura Bottoms, a nd brothers,Earl,Paul and Junior,and her first husband,Billy R. Galloway. She is survived by her loving husband of 52 years,H aywood Taylor; son, Michael Taylor (Alice daughter,Alison. Also sisters-in-law,Kate Bottoms, Jo Commander (BillReba Taylor (O.L.and Christine Taylor. Other survivorsi nclude many dear cousins, nieces,nephews and a host o f friends. The family will receive friends Sunday from 4-6 p.m. at Morris Funeral Chapel. Funeral service willb e at 11a.m. Monday,July 15,2013 at First United Methodist Church with Rev. A.C. Bryant officiating. Memorials may be madeF irst United Methodist Church Building Fund,136 S. Pine St.,Sebring,FL 33870 or Sebring Historical Society,321 W. Center Ave.,Sebring,FL 33870. Morris Funeral Chapel www.morrisfuneralchapel.com. Morris Funeral Chapel 307 S. Commerce Ave. Sebring,FL 33870 Obituaries MARY WORDEN M ary Lucille Worden, age 80,passed away Wednesday,July 10,2013 in Avon Park,Fla. Mrs. Worden was born inS ebring,Fla. to Frank I. and Inez (Geigergan. She was a homemaker and worked at the family business,W orden Realty,as a r eceptionist in her earlier years. A faithful member of the First Baptist Church in Avon Park,she taughtC hildrens Sunday School for many years; she loved her church. She enjoyed spending time with her grandkids,rose gardening,c ooking,playing piano and organ; she loved music. She was a giving and sharing person who enjoyed doing things for others. She was a lifelong resident of Highlands County having lived in Avon Park since 1954. Mrs. Worden is survived by her husband of 59 years, Harold BudWorden of Avon Park,Fla.; sons,Hal W orden of Avon Park,Fla. and Gary (Tracy) Worden of Avon Park,Fla.; daughter-in-laws,Anita Worden and Tammy Worden; sis-t ers,LaQuida Dover of Eau Gallie,Fla. and Edith Tolar of Sebring,Fla.; grandchildren,Lindsey,Grant and Danielle; grandchildren by marriage,Shasta,Darla, Mandie and Josh; andm any nieces and nephews. Mrs. Worden was preceded i n death by her parents, son,Frank Worden,and a sister,Ellen Morgan. Visitation was to be held Saturday,July 13,2013,atF irst Baptist Church in Avon Park. A memorial service was held with Pastor Jon Beck and Dr. Vernon Harkey officiating.M emorial contributions may be made to the Florida Baptist Childrens Home, 1015 Sikes Boulevard, Lakeland,FL 33815 or the First Baptist Church in Avon Park,Florida. Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home Avon Park,Fla. 33825 www.stephensonnelsonfh.com Taylor W orden Follow the News-Sun on www.facebook.com/newssun

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C M Y K Sams Club in a city-owned D odge Durango on Friday, May 10. Burke said there had been other trips,as well. Burke voiced concern over the length of the trip on aw orking day and how the items were distributed once the trio returned to Avon Park. Burke said Sutherland put a box of items into herp ersonal car,items that Deleon said Sutherland paid for with her own money. Is this city business activity?Burke asked. Were these items not available from a local vendor? Under current IRS mileageg uidelines,that 100-mile trip c ost taxpayers $56.10 and t hat does not count the cost of what they purchased ... he said. D eleon explained to the News-Sun that the trips to buy supplies were also team-building tripsthat s erved as brainstorming and creative thinking strategy session meetings. The e mployees included in the trips are in a managerial and coordination capacity,he said. These individuals and I often discuss high-level thoughts. Many great ideash ave materialized on the road with in-depth discussions regarding the city b eing debt free by this December and reducing property taxes by 39 percent,Deleon said. I n a May 28 city council meeting,Deleon told council members they could check the gas use and mileage on city vehicles to decide for themselves if there had been any abuse. B urke said he had done just such calculations on the city-owned Jeep assigned to Deleon. Burke said public records show that between April 2012 and May 14,2013 there had been 55 fuel transactions recorded for the v ehicle assigned to the city m anager. Excluding weeke nds,holidays and days off in the 270 business days that r emained,Deleon had logged j ust short of 23,000 miles on the car. Burke alleged that when the 54-mile round-trip between the city hall and Deleons home in Lake Placid was deducted,his calc ulations showed the city manager drove an average of 31.5 miles a day,which hes aid added up to $4,488 in fuel costs. Deleon said his city vehicle has been used for 99p ercent business and 1 percent incidental useand said B urks accounting failed to take into account the fact that Deleon was serving as the citys public works director during that period,over-s eeing multiple projects. Deleon said his engineering field duties are signifi-c ant and require repeated field driving from his office to the field work site in designing,supervising con-s truction and certifying more than 20,000 feet of pipe constructed by Avon Park e mployees and contractors along with lift station improvements,and various other city projects. D eleon also pointed to numerous out-of-town meetings for mediations and depositions. He said those had included a number of trips to Tampa to meet with the c itys labor attorney,Brian Koji. He has also attended dep ositions in Sebring and Bartow. All of this mileage adds up,and it is all city busines s r elated,Deleon said. As to the issue of Burke being pulled from the July1 1 agenda,the city manage r said,I could care less whatM r. Burke thinks or wants, so I opted not to put him on the city council agenda. Th is was my call as city manage r. Page A6News-SunSunday, July 14, 2013www.newssun.com CHICANES; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, package incentive; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 9 9 1 1 6 6 W ELLS MOTOR COMPANY; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, new cars; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 1 1 1 1 4 4 0 0 Continued from A1 Vehicle usage sparks point-counterpoint in Avon Park W ASHINGTON (AP President Barack Obama says overhauling the nations immigration system can provide a big boost to the eco-n omic recovery. In his weekly Internet and r adio address,Obama cites former President George W. Bushs support for a compre-h ensive solution on immigration. He says if Democrats a nd Republicans can agree on something,its a good place to start. T he Senate has already passed a bipartisan bill. Obama says now the House must act. He says Americans should use email andF acebook and phone calls to tell their representatives to take action. In the Republican address, Sen. Mike Enzi of Wyomings ays Americans are paying the price for Obamas health c are law. Obama: Immigration overhaul can boost recovery

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C M Y K www.newssun.com N ews-Sun l S unday, July 14, 2013 Page A7

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C M Y K Economic Development I nitiative,known as FHRED I,will meet at 10 a.m. M onday at Heartland Workforce,5901 U.S. 27 South. F or information,call 3854 900.Sponsors/donors needed for programSEBRING Sponsors and d onors are needed for the children enrolled in The Salvation Armys Back to School Clothing Program. S top by the office at 3135 Kenilworth Blvd. to pick up a childs apple with all the i nformation needed for shopping. The deadline for r eturning the items back to The Salvation Army is F riday,Aug. 2. F or more information,call 3 85-7548,ext. 100.NARFE meets TuesdaySEBRING NARFE C hapter 288 of Highlands C ounty will meet Tuiesday at Homers Buffet,Sebring Square. Lunch is at 11:30a .m. There will not be a business meeting for the m onths of July and August (summer schedule only M embers will meet for an informal luncheon get together. The business/luncheon m eetings will resume Sept. 17. All meetings are open to active and retired federal employees and their spouses. For information,call L.R. CorkDabe,president,at 382-9447.LPPD offers first aid, CPR classesLAKE PLACID The next First Aid class will be offered at 5:30 p.m. W ednesday and the next regular CPR class will be o ffered at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. Private classes for medical o ffices and businesses are also offered. F or information visit the website at www.lppd.com or call 699-3757 Highlands Tea Party meets TuesdaySEBRING Cheryl Couture,field coordinator for Americans for Prosperity,will be the guest speaker at The Highlands Tea Party meeting at 6 p.m. Tuesday at Homers Restaurant. The group will gather at 5 p.m. for a buffet dinner. Couture will give a 20to 2 5-minute presentation on economic freedom that begins at the international level,rating the United States today and then bringsi t down to the state level,as well as about the upcoming AFP Conferences in Orlando. Defending the American D ream is usually held in Washington,D.C. However, Florida has the opportunity to host the event this year at the Loews Pacific atU niversal Studios Aug. 3031. In addition,AFP will host the Right Online Conference simultaneously at the Loews Portofino nearby. The focus of RightO nline will be new media and technology for limited g overnment activists. A few of the speakers who have been announced are TedC ruz,Michelle Malkin,Greg Gutfeld (comedian Fox N ews) and author Arthur Brooks (The Road to Freedom). There will be many more announced as the time gets closer. T here is a special room rate and conference rates for s enior citizens and families. Visit www.thehighlandsteaparty.com for more details.Events planned at posts, lodgesAVON PARK A merican Legion Post 69 will have karaoke by DoubleD from 4-7 p.m. Wednesday. K amikaze Karaoke will be Thursday. Music by Lora P atton from 4-6 p.m. Friday. Installation of Post officers will be at 4 p.m. Saturday. Call 453-4553. Tickets available now for the July 25 din-n er and music videos. Cost for the filet mignon dinner is $14. Music will be The Grand Ole Oprey. VFW 9853 will have a fish and shrimp dinner on Friday for $7 from 5-7 p.m.B ig Freddie will provide music. Johnny B will have k araoke from 5-8 p.m. Saturday. Call 452-9853. LAKE PLACID VFW Post 3880 meeting at 8 p.m. Thursday. Primer ib dinner at 5:30 p.m. Saturday. Music by Todd Allen. For information,call 699-5444. Moose Lodge 2374 will h ost Jays Karaoke today and have NASCAR on the screen. There will be a Loyal Order of the Moose meeting at 6:30 p.m.,followed by meetings of the House Committee and Women of the Moose at 7 p.m. and a general meeting at 7:30 p.m. BobKat Karaoke is set for Wednesday. Frank E plays Thursday,and Red Neck Joe Band plays Friday. Big F reddie plays Saturday. Music times from 6:30-9:30 p.m. American Legion Post 25 will have Gary and Shirleyp laying from 5-8 p.m. today. Lou and Connie will play from 5-8 p.m. Wednesday. Steak Nite is Friday with Buddy Canova playing from6 :30-9:30 p.m. Installation is at 10 a.m. Saturday. Call 465-0975 for details. SEBRING VFW Post 4300 will have K araoke by BilDi from 5-8 p.m. today.VFW Post meeting at 7 p.m. Monday. Frank will play music from 6-9 p.m. Tuesday. Lora Patton will play music from 5-8p .m. Wednesday.Frank will play music from 6-9 p .m. Friday. Gary & Shirley will play from 6-9 p.m. Saturday. For information,c all 385-8902. Elks Lodge 1529 will have W acky Wednesday from 5-6 p.m for $6.50. Dance only for $3 to music by Frank E. from 4:30-7;30 p.m. Friday buffet is $10 with dance onlyf or $3 to music by Gary & Shirley from 6:30-9:30 p.m. C all 471-3557. Moose Lodge 2259 will have a Women of the Moosem eeting at 6 p.m. Monday. Music by Big Freddie from 6 -9 p.m. Wednesday. On Thursday,the Women of the Moose Chapter 893 ofM oose Lodge 2259 will have a country fried steak dinner for $6 from 5-7 pm with DD K araoke starting at 6. Bar Games and a 50/50 will be o ffered.Music by Todd Allen from 7-10 p.m. Friday. Poker Tournament at 9 a.m. Saturday. Music by Billy Glades from 7-10 p.m. Call6 55-3920. AMVETS Post 21 Ladies Auxiliary will have a bean and ham dinner for a $5 donation from 5-7 p.m. Saturday,July 20. Music will be with ThomasM cGannon from 6-9 p.m. Saturday. Page A8News-SunSunday, July 14, 2013www.newssun.com DR. PALOSKY, D.D., ERIC; 3.639"; 3"; Black; main A 7/7,14,21,28; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 7 7 1 1 7 7 GRIFFIN'S CARPET MART; 7.444"; 10"; Black; 7/14/13; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 8 8 2 2 0 0 Continued from A2 Community Briefs By GARY FINEOUT A ssociated PressTALLAHASSEE S eeking to ease the transition to tough new education s tandards,Florida could make last-minute changes to the annual school gradesu sed by parents to evaluate how well their childs public school is performing. F lorida Education Commissioner Tony B ennett on Friday said that he wants to alter the formula used to calculate annual school grades. The A-to-F grades have been a hall-m ark of the sweeping education changes first put into place by then-Gov. Jeb Bush back in 1999. The grades are used to reward top schools with additional money and sanc-t ion those that get failing marks. B ennett recommended keeping in place a temporaryrule first adopted lasty ear that would limit a school grade from dropping m ore than one letter at a time. The state Board of Education will consider thec hange at a special meeting scheduled for next week. The commissioner is r esponding to worries from school superintendents that r ecent changes to the grading system would create a large drop in the grades. The grades are based primarily on student perform-a nce on a series of highstakes tests,but also other factors such as learning gains made by students. Florida is currently in the middle of a transition away from the tests and standardst hat have been in place. The state is scheduled to s hift over to what is known as common core standards during the 2014-15 schooly ear. But at the same time the state has also been r evising its tests and graduation requirements even before the shift toc ommon core takes place. Bennett said that in order to protect the credibility o f the states standards and create a glidepathto the c ommon core standards he was willing to make some alterations to this years school grading formula. o be clear,my recomm endations ... are made not to soften the blow of higher standards or to reduce the number of failing schools, but rather to advance the best policy for Floridas students and position ours tate for a successful transition,Bennett wrote. Courtesy photo AMVETS Ladies Auxiliary members Bonnie Berdelle (leftaggert (right p resent a check to Brittny Olds for the Boys and Girls Club summer program. AMVETS supports Boys & Girls Club Schools could get a break from FCAT standards LAGOS,Nigeria (AP The leader of Nigerias extremist Islamic sect threatens to burn down more schools and kill teachers. But he denies his fighters are killing children. Islamic radical Abubakar Shekau speaks in a video released Saturday and denies his Boko Haram group is negotiating a peace with the Nigerian government. He says he supports fighters who have burned down several schools in northeastern Nigeria in recent weeks but that the Quran teaches one must not kill children, women and elderly people. Dozens of children have been killed. But he says School teachers who are teaching Western education? We will kill them! We will kill them. Nigerian extremist: Burn schools, kill teachers

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C M Y K www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, July 14, 2013Page A9 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 13-293 IN RE: ESTATE OF HARRIET LOUISE BADALATO aka HARRIET BADALATO, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of HARRIET LOUISE BADALATO aka HARRIET BADALATO, deceased, whose date of death was June 22, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME P ERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 O F MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is July 14, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ Lea King P.O. Box 48681 Sarasota, FL 34230 Attorney for Personal Representative: CLIFFORD M. ABLES III, P.A. 551 SOUTH COMMERCE AVE. SEBRING, Florida 33870 Telephone: (863 Fax: (863 E-mail: cmables@cmablespa.net /s/ Clifford M. Ables III Florida Bar Number: 178379 July 14, 21, 2013 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: GC-12-000936 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. WALTON PEART; SHEENA PEART; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, will on the 11th day of September, 2013, at 11:00 o'clock A.M. at the in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Highlands County, Florida: LOT 7, OF OAK LANE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 38, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, mus file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 9th day of July, 2013. A MERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N. Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863 least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk (COURT SEAL B&H #307201 July 14, 21, 2013 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C IVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2013-CA-000160 DIVISION: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR J.P. MORGAN MORTGAGETRUST 2006-S2 Plaintiff, vs. DEBBIE HEARIN ALSO KNOWN AS DEBORAH J. HEARIN ALSO KNOWN AS DEBORAH HEARIN, et al, Defendant(s NOTICE OF ACTION To: Debbie Hearin also known as Deborah J. Hearin also known as Deborah Hearin The Unknown Spouse of Debbie Hearin also known as Deborah J. Hearin also known as Deborah Hearin Last Known Address: 4416 Medina Way, Sebring, FL 33875-5045 C urrent Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County, Florida: LOT 9, LESS THE SOUTH 10 FEET THEREOF AND THE SOUTH 15 FEET OF LOT 10, SCENIC ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 63, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 108 Karola Dr, Sebring, FL 33870-1078 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before July 24, 2013 service on Plaintiff's attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the News-Sun WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 1st day of July, 2013. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 016345F01 **See the Americans with Disabilities Act If you a person with a disability who needs assistance in order to participate in a program or service of the State Courts System, you should contact the Office of the Court Administrator at (863voice863TDD (800Florida Relay Service in advance of your court appearance or visit to the courthouse as possible. Please be prepared to explain your functional limitations and suggest an auxiliary aid or service that you believe will enable you to effectively participate in the court program or service. July 7, 14, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 28-2012-CA-000361 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP Plaintiff, vs. GRAHAM W. HAYES, BRANDI R. HAYES A/K/A BRANDI R. MELTON, FRANCES L. JOHN A/K/A FRANCES L. GAARZ, DAN JOHN, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on January 8, 2013, in the Circuit Court of HIGHLANDS County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida described as: LOTS 3 AND 4, BLOCK 219, OF CARVA HILLS SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 110, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 6316 CAMBRIDGE DR, SEBRING, FL 33876; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, on August 7, 2013 at 11 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 9th day of July, 2013. Clerk of the Circuit Court ROBERT W. GERMAINE By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk July 14, 21, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 282012CA000288GCAXMX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff, vs. CARLOS PENA, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 282012CA000288GCAXMX of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, wherein, NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, and CARLOS PENA, et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Highlands County Courthouse, in the Jury Assembly Room, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870 at the hour of 11:00 AM, on the 30th day of July, 2013, the following described property: LOT 636, SEBRING HILLS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 2, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO, THE RIGHT TO USE IN COMMON WITH OTHERS LOT 1, OF BLOCK L, OF LAKE JACKSON BOULEVARD SUBDIVISION, HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 1st day of July, 2013. BOB GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, (863 534-4690, within two (2 ceipt of this Notice of Foreclosure Sale; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call TDD (863 534-7777 or Florida Relay Service 711. July 7, 14, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 28-2012-CA-000293 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-2, Plaintiff, vs. CHERYL L. WARD A/K/A CHERYL WARD A/K/A CHERYL LYNN WARD A/K/A CHERYL LYNN RAY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CHERYL L. WARD A/K/A CHERYL WARD A/K/A CHERYL LYNN WARD A/K/A C HERYL LYNN RAY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN TENANT(S D efendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 3, 2013, and Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated July 3, 2013, both entered in Case No. 28-2012-CA-000293, of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida. THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-2 is Plaintiff and CHERYL L. WARD A/K/A CHERYL WARD A/K/A CHERYL LYNN WARD A/K/A CHERYL LYNN RAY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CHERYL L. WARD A/K/A/ CHERYL WARD A/K/A CHERYL LYNN WARD A/K/A CHERYL LYNN RAY; UNKNOWN TENANT(S JESSICA WARD; are defendants. The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM, BASEMENT, 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, bidding begins at 11:00 A.M., Eastern Time, on the 12th day of August, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 25, BLOCK 54, OF SEBRING COUNTRY ESTATES SECTION THREE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE(S LANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 4316 Talbot Street, Sebring, FL 33872 Dated this 8th day of July, 2013. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of said Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak As Deputy Clerk In accordance with requirements of Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA Highlands County will not discriminate against qualified individuals with disabilities on the basis of disability in its services, programs, or activities. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact Melissa Bruns, ADA Coordinator, at 863-402-6509 (Voice 711, by e-mail mbruns@hcbcc.org, by regular mail at 600 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870 request for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the services. 11826.1845 July 14, 21, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13000264GCAXMA RESURGENT CAPITAL SERVICES, LP Plaintiff, vs. JOHN E. STEFFNER, III A/K/A JOHN STEFFNER, III A/K/A JOHN EMERY STEFFNER, III, et al Defendant(s NOTICE OF ACTION TO: JODIE L. STEFFNER A/K/A JODIE STEFFNER A/K/A JODIE LEE STEFFNER RESIDENT: Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 4235 Cremona Drive, Sebring, FL 33872 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in HIGHLANDS County, Florida: Lot 5253 and 5254, Avon Park Lakes, Unit No. 17, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 10, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action on Phelan Hallinan, PLC, attorneys for p laintiff, whose address if 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, either before or immediately thereafter, July 24, 2013 o therwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This notice shall be published one a week for two consecutive weeks in The News-Sun. DATED: Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk of the Court Movant counsel certifies that a bona fide effort to resolve this matter on the motion notice has been made or that, because of time consideration, such effort has not yet been made but will be made prior to the scheduled hearing. If you are a person with a disability who needs assistance in order to participate in a program or service of the State Courts Systems, you should contact the Office of the Court Administrator at (863voice863TDD (800Florida Relay Service in advance of our court appearance or visit to the courthouse as possible. Please be prepared to explain your functional limitations and suggest an auxiliary aid or service that you believe will enable you to effectively participate in the court program or service. PH#18051 July 7, 14, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 12000047GCS CitiMortgage, Inc. successor by merger to First Nationwide Mortgage Corporation, Plaintiff, vs. Clayton D. Colquitt; Tonya F. Colquitt, et al Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 2, 2013, entered in Case No. 12000047GCS of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc. successor by merger to First Nationwide Mortgage Corporation is the Plaintiff and Clayton D. Colquitt; Tonya F. Colquitt; United States of America on behalf of the Secretary of H ousing and Urban Development, are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, beginning at 11:00 AM on the 4th day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 430, SEBRING HILLS SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 2, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. Dated this 8th day of July, 2013. Robert Germaine As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs assistance in order to participate in a program or service of the State Courts System, you should contact the Office of the Court Administrator at (863voice863TDD (800Florida Relay Service in advance of your court appearance or visit to the courthouse as possible. Please be prepared to explain your functional limitations and suggest an auxillary aid or service that you believe will enable you to effectively participate in the court program or service. July 14, 21, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 11-631-GCS WORLD O WORLD CORPORATION, a New York corporation in good standing, authorized to do business in the State of Florida, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES E. HILL, SERENA T. HILL, a/k/a JANE T. HILL, a/k/a SERENA JANE HILL, n/k/a SERENA JANE SOTTILE, HEARTLAND NATIONAL BANK, N.A., SHOWCASE PUBLICATIONS, INC., and THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY, AMERICAN EXPRESS BANK, FSB, and any unknown heirs, devisees, g rantees, creditors and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under the Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION T o: Serena Jane Sottile 126 Lake Ridge Drive Lake Placid, FL 33852 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to forec lose a mortgage on real property has been filed against you in Circuit Court Case No. 11-631-GCS and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to Plaintiff's Complaint, on the Plaintiff's attorney, Rickey L. Farrell, Attorney at Law, P.A., 1595 S.E. Port St. Lucie Boulevard, Port St. Lucie, FL 34952, on or before July 31, 2013 and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida either before service on the Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a Default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Dated: July 2, 2013. As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak As Deputy Clerk July 7, 14, 2013 1050Legals Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under the Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (22o list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed under our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be placed under the Bargain Buy category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR W EBSITE AT: n ewssun.com 8 63-314-9876 DEADLINES P ublication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday F riday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, r eclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept o nly standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since t he News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the f irst day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 314-9876. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of thatp ortion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL n umber can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO F or Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! A D RATESGARAGE S ALE6 lines 2 days $115 03 days$14( additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 eachREAL ESTATE E MPLOYMENT T RANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 1050LegalsSubscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 Classified ads get fast results Having something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what youre doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 314-9876CITY OF SEBRING 3X5 AD # 00031028

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C M Y K Page A10News-SunSunday, July 14, 2013www.newssun.com 1050L egals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 13-269 Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF BARBARA BRONSING LANGDON a.k.a. BARBARA MARGARET LANGDON a.k.a. BARBARA M. BRONSING LANGDON a.k.a. BARBARA B. LANGDON a.k.a. BARBARA M. BRONSING a.k.a. BARBARA BRONSING Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BARBARA BRONSING LANGDON a.k.a. BARBARA MARGAR ET LANGDON a.k.a. BARBARA M. BRONSING LANGDON a.k.a. BARBARA B. LANGDON a.k.a. BARBARA M. BRONSING a.k.a. BARBARA BRONSING, deceased, whose date of death was June 4, 2013, and whose social security number is XXX-XX-1181, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET F ORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. T he date of first publication of this Notice is July 14, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ Robert Bronsing 623 Puffin Drive Sebastian, Florida 32976 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ David F. Lanier E-Mail Address: lanier30@embarqmail.com Florida Bar No. 045399 DAVID F. LANIER P.O. Box 400 Avon Park, Florida 33826-0400 Telephone: (863 July 14, 21, 2013 I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA J UVENILE DIVISION CASE NO. JP13-000029-XX IN THE INTEREST OF:H ., R. 11/13/2000 S., N. 01/22/2002 Minor childred DOB SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS A ND GUARDIANSHIP THE STATE OF FLORIDA TO: J EFFREY SPENCER HARRELL D OB: 02/27/73 Address unknown YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Petition for Termination of Parental Rights under oath has been filed in the a bove styled Court by the Department of Children & Famil ies, seeking the termination of your parental rights to: R H. a white female child b orn November 13, 2000 m other Ruth Vermillion and you are hereby commanded to personally appear before the Honorable Sheryl D. Snodgrass, a M agistrate/hearing officer in the Juvenile Division of the Circuit Court in and for Highlands County, State of Florida, o n the 7th day of August, 2013 at 10:00 A.M., at the H ighlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Aven ue, Sebring, Florida, Courtroom 1A. Y OU MUST PERSONALLY APPEAR O N THE DAY AND TIME S PECIFIED OR YOU WILL LOSE ALL RIGHTS AS A PARENT T O THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION. YOUR FAILURE T O PERSONALLY APPEAR WILL BE DEEMED TO BE YOUR C ONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF YOUR PARENTAL R IGHTS TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION.YOU H AVE THE RIGHT TO HAVE AN ATTORNEY REPRESENT Y OU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD AN ATTORNEY, YOU MUST BE PRESENT AND REQUEST THAT T HE COURT APPOINT AN ATTORNEY FOR YOU IF YOU WANT ONE.In accordance with the Americans with Disa bilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should cont act the individual or agency sending the notice at 1968 Sebring Parkway, Sebring FL 33870, Telephone (8637p roceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD o r Voice (V R OBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK DATED THIS 1ST DAY OF JULY, 2013. By: /s/ Anita E. Reiley Deputy Clerk (Clerk's Seal IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 13-239 IN RE: ESTATE OF PERRY L. RICE, SR. Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of PERRY L. RICE, SR., deceased, File Number PC 13-239, by the Circuit Court for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Clerk of the Court, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870; that the decedent's date of death was February 1, 2013; that the total value of the estate is less than $75,000.00 and the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Kay Ann Rice, 3902 Sunrise Drive, Sebring, Florida 33872. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is July 14, 2013. Person Giving Notice: Kay Ann Rice 3902 Sunrise Drive Sebring, Florida 33872 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: John K. McClure Attorney for Petitioner Florida Bar No. 286958 MCCLURE & LOBOZZO 211 S. Ridgewood Drive Sebring, Florida 33870 Telephone: (863 Fax: (863 E-Mail: jkmpleadings@mllaw.net Secondary E-Mail: johnmc@mllaw.net C lassified ads g et fast results DUMMY 2013 SERVICE DIRECTORY DUMMY 5X21.5 AD # 00026404

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C M Y K www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, July 14, 2013Page A11 1997 ESCORTWAGON 5 Speed 90K miles. New Tires and Other Parts. A Must See! $2200. obo 863-202-6394 9450Automotive for Sale2011 KAWASAKI900 CLASSIC LT LIKE NEW! 4,200 miles, LOADED WITH EVERYTHING. $5850. obo 863-202-6394 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 TransportationCAMPING TRAILER,30' in excellent condition "Kingsport by Gulf Stream 2008. Location: Lake Placid, Fl. For more information call at: 863-840-2311 or 863-840-2209. Price: $6,000.00 8400RecreationalVehicles 8000 Recreation SEBRING **ESTATE SALE ** 1709 Valencia Ave. Sebring, Fl. 33870 July 12, 13 & 14 8AM-4PM Rain or Shine! Sun. 1/2 price Wheelchair lift (needs repair storage shelving, very large collection of vintage high power CB equipment and antennae, lovely glassware, lots of king sized sheets, blue and white Bavarian service for twelve dishes. Visit our 50 cent table! King bed/ headboard (Sears-a-Pedic Frigidaire dryer, recliner black metal rocker, double pedestal mahogany table with fold-away leaf, matching china cupboard and large sideboard, nice collection Vision Ware, 2pc. Cut glass compote, coin glass, 2 motorized chairs sold AS IS. Miniature dogs, miniature Toby's (2 vintage lunchbox, girl scout uniform, baby doll anatomically correct, lg. souvenir dolls, lots of yarn, electric, balance scale clock, Forestville domed clock w/ china face, electric blankets & elec. mattress pads in exc. cond. Betty Boop bedcover, Betty Boop cookie jar, toaster oven, blender glass jar, electric meat slicer, pots, pans, chenille king bedspread, flatware, Twin mattress & spring (no frame organ, Spinet Piano. Round 3-legged table w/ claw feet, tension pole lamp, table lamps, cleaners, stereo, Vtg. record player & AM radio, large area rug; dark floral. Sterling chain and setting with gorgeous peridot, and more not listed. No Early Bird Sales! www.estatesles.net Donna Collins Estate Sales AVON PARKFri. Sun. 8 3pm. 2656 N. Labelle Rd. Clothes, girls & women, housewares, electronics, DVD's, movies, WII games, DS games, collectibles, TV & toys. Too much to list! 7320Garage &Yard Sales SONY CDCHANGER Holds 200 CD's includes manual, remote, hooks to your stereo. 863-441-2443 SEWING MACHINESinger table top. $50. obo. Call 863-835-1734 ANTIQUE BREAKFASTSET W/Pitcher. $50. obo. Call 863-835-1734 7310Bargain Buys TOOLS -Sm. Compressor, New Victor torch set-in pkg., Tanks etc., New 5HP Lawnmower-push, New Snapper 4 stroke, Weedeater, Black & Decker 18 volt tools. Many-Must See Golf Clubs Name Brands! 863-202-6394 *QUEEN SIZEBED* Complete with Frame, Mattresses White Headboard. Also, Mattress cover, Coverlet in Tan Design with 3 Decorative Pillows. $200. 863-382-9289 7300M iscellaneous 7000 Merchandise SEBRING 3BR/2BA Lakefront home w/pool. Many upgrades. Nice yard. Boating, fishing & swimming, in your back yard! $1100 per mo 1st./2mo. sec. 863-446-1861 or 321-452-7090 SEBRING ** COTTAGE * 1BR / 1BA, W/ Carport, Nice,Private Woodlawn area. Air & Heat, W/D hookup. No Pets. Lawn Service included. $375/mo plus $ 250 Security Deposit. Call 863-465-9100 LAKE PLACIDTownhouse, 2/2, washer/dryer, screen room, remodeled, close to town. No pets, no smoking i nside. $650/mo., + utilities. 1st., last & security. 863-441-4899. LAKE PLACID3/2 131 Loquat Rd. Screened patio. $700/mo. + $1,000. security. Call 305-804-5464 6300U nfurnished HousesLAKE PLACID2bdrm., 1.5 bath, Screen room, Family room, 1 car g arage. Very clean. No pets, no smoking inside. $650/mo., + utilities. 1st., last & security. 863-441-4899 SEBRING -DINNER LAKE AREA 1BR, 1BA Apartments for Rent. $425.00 / mo. Includes water. Large rooms, fresh paint & tile floors. Call Gary Johnson @ 863-381-1861 LAKE PLACID* Placid Lakes Nice, Lg. split plan, 2BR, 2BA, W/D hookup, Screen porch, Fenced yard. Near Golf. Water incl. $550 mo. C/H/A. Excellent Cond. 954-695-8348 AVON PARK* LEMONTREE APTS 1BR $520 mo. + $350 Sec. Deposit, available immediately. Washer/Dryer & WSG included. Pets OK! Call Alan 386-503-8953 SUMMERSPECIALS 1BR & 2BR Avon Park / Lake Placid / Sebring $375 and Up. Call For More Info 863-243-9191 or 863-244-2577 Or Visit www.mylakeplacid.com 6200UnfurnishedApartments SUN-N-LAKES, L.P.2/2 Duplex 226 Deerwalk Ave, Patio, tile floors, W/D, A/C, sm. dog ok, no cats. $475 mo. + $500 sec. Text 954-829-1641/email: tlb2go@aol.com to apply PLACID LAKESNice, Lg. split plan, 2/2, W/D hookup, screen porch, fenced yard. Near Golf. Water incl. $500 mo. C/H/A. Excellent Cond. 954-695-8348 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 R entals NEW PALMFACTORY LIQUIDATION SALE TEXT STORE 126A TO: 313131 Call John Lyons @ 800-622-2832 ext 210 for details MOBILE HOMESFOR SALE AFFORDABLE LOT RENT AVON MOBILE HOME PARK 55 PLUS PARK SORRY NO PETS 863-453-3415 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 M obile HomesSPRING LAKE2/2 Villa Central Air/Heat, Washer Dryer Hook Up, Dishwasher, Fridge w/ice maker, Range & Cable incl. in rent. 863-381-8069. 4120Villas & CondosFor SaleIN 55+COMMUNITY-BEAUTIFUL2 bedroom 2 bath home in Village Setting with all of the amenities and security for an active and serene senior lifestyle on the historic Suwannee RIVER. A few amenities are: *Planned Activities, Social Clubs Church Groups *Medical Pharmacy available *Fitness and Wellness Center Nature Trail *Village Square Shops and Services *Conference Retreat Center *Village Lodge/Other Guest Accommodations *Artist Series Please visit www.acfillage.net for a complete list of amenities. CALL TODAY! Hallmark Real Estate, Janet Creel @ 1-877-755-6600 or visit www.hallmarklakecity.com 4040H omes For Sale 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate SEEKING WELLExp. Medical office help. Exc. billing/collection, communication, typing, computer skills & medical terminology are a MUST Fax resume to: 866-593-0635 or email to: medicalofficebilling@yahoo.com SEBRING HALOSHAIR DESIGNS has moved to a Big Beautiful New Salon. Needs Stylist. Booth Rental $120 per week. Call 863-385-2728 or 863-414-6903 ROYAL CAREOF AVON PARK Is expanding its Rehab Department, With our New Rehab Building do to open in August CURRENT POSITIONS AVAILABLE Physical Therapist Physical Therapist Assistant Come and be a part of an experienced and dynamic rehab team. SNF experience a plus! Competetive Salaries, benefits and f lexible schedules. Contact Maria Perez, HR Director (863 QC MANAGERneeded for local precast hollowcore company. Experience with p recast, quality control & concrete testing required. PCI Level I&II & ACI Certified REQUIRED.Email resume/salary requirements to jmachia@spancrete.com, Fax: 863.655.1215 PHYSICAL THERAPYDIRECTOR An opportunity for a strong therapist looking to run a rehab department in Avon Park, Fl. This position requires a minimum of 1 year of SNF experience and management experience is preferred. Ideal candidate will have strong interpersonal skills and a desire to grow with this department. Candidate also n eeds to have an understanding of the rules and regulations of medicare as they pertain to therapy. If you are interested in this great opportunity, please send resume with salary requirements to hr@rcavonpark.com or apply in person at Royal Care of Avon Park, 1213 W. Stratford Rd., Avon Park, Fl. 33825 EOE/MF/DFWP P/T DRIVERWanted for local deliveries with small dump truck, also, some lifting and use of small loader. Must have clean driving record. Apply at Butwell Stone & Soil Inc. 300 W. Lake Isis Ave. Avon Park. FL. 33825 LPN F/T3-11 & PRN P/T Avon Park Intermediate Care Facility serving disabled adults is seeking nurses for all shifts. Casual work environment, benefit package and paid training. Call Melissa or Angelina 863-452-5141 LAWN MAINTENANCEworkers needed to run mowers & trimmers. 863-385-6768 FLORIDA MENTORis looking for an Area Director/Administrator for the Avon Park Intermediate Care Facility for the Developmentally Disabled. This 24-bed residential facility serves people with developmental disabilities with medically complex needs in a quiet park like setting. Candidates must have at a minimum a Bachelor's degree in Human Services, 5 years of Managerial experience, 1 year of experience working with people with developmental disabilities and knowledge of ICF/DD regulations is preferred. Florida MENTOR offers full benefits including health insurance, dental, vision, matching 401k, short/long term disability, life insurance and more. Please apply at http://jobs.thementornetwork.com/florida/healthcare-management/jobid3776067-area-director-jobs EEO/AAE FARM SUPERVISORwith exp. & knowledge of running and operations of a Citrus Grove. Send resumes to tdurbin@cutrale.com 2100H elp WantedEXPERIENCE THEJOYS AND REWARDS Of Being A Comfort Keeper. If you have a passion for improving the quality of life for others while helping people live independently and happily in their own homes, you could be a Comfort Keeper! We are now hiring CNA, HHA and Homemaker Companion Positions in the Highlands County area. We offer flexible full-time or part-time hours. Contact us to learn more about how you can develop a rewarding career enriching the lives of others with Comfort Keepers. Apply online today at: http://ck381.ersp.biz/employment 863-385-9100 2100H elp Wanted DIRECT SUPPORTPROFESSIONALS w anted for Avon Park Intermediate Care Facility serving disabled adults. HS diploma or 1 year associated experience, valid FL Drivers License and clean criminal background req. Please complete application at w ww.jobs.thementornetwork.com/florida863-452-5141 DAWG HOUSEPET RESORT Has 2 p/t openings for "Kennel Assistant". D uties include feeding, walking, and general care of our pets. Successful candidate must have reliable transportation, enthusiastic attitude and ability to work with pets. Weekend and holiday hours will be expected. 25-30 hours per week minimum. $9.00 p/h. Send resume to: finchmichael69@gmail.com ACCOUNTANT (F/T Application review begins: 7/18/13. Please visit http://sfsc.interviewexchange.com for detailed position posting. 863-784-7132 EA/EO/VETEREN'S PREF 2100H elp WantedINTERVIEWERS WESTATseeks motivated, detail-oriented individuals to work part time on an important study, the National Study of Health-Related Behaviors (NSHB lect information from respondents about tobacco use and its effects on health. Interviewers will show respondents how to collect cheek cells and urine samples using a self-collection kit and coordinate appointments for a blood sample to be taken by a trained health professional. To learn more a bout this position and apply, go to www.westat.com/fieldjobs and enter Job ID 6345BR. WESTAT EOE 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentCHECK YOUR AD P lease check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us: 314-9876 News-Sun C lassified 1 100AnnouncementsSATELLITE PROLINK 2X2 AD #00031027HIGHLANDS CO. SHERIFFS DEPT. 3X4 AD # 00031064 AGERO 3X10.5 AD # 00030819DAWN DELL 1X5 AD # 00030823 AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 AD # 00030703 AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 AD # 00030702 Classified ads get fast results Having something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what youre doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 314-9876 LOOKING FOR THAT SPECIAL HOME? Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. Classified ads get fast results

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C M Y K Page A12News-SunSunday, July 14, 2013www.newssun.com H IGHLANDS LITTLE THEATRE PP; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, double your fun; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 1 1 0 0 4 4 7 7 WARREN'S AUTO SALES #2; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, weather page; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 5

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C M Y K By DAN HOEHNE d aniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING It didnt take long for Sebring High School to fill itsvacant, varsity baseball head coaching job. And they didnt have to look very far. Fresh off an extended and successful run as the head man at Lake Wales, Jasone DeWitt has accepted the job to now lead the Blue Streaks. Im real excited, he said. Between the support from the community, the feeder programs and what this means for my family, its a great opportunity. e live in Highlands County and my son is about to start T-ball next year, my daughter is at EDGE cheerleading, and there were too many days where Id leave in the morning, and with games, not see them until the next day, he continued. This allows me to be closer, with my family more and still be able to do what I love. That love is, of course, baseball. And DeWitt sure brings with him quite an impressive resume. After a strong playing career at Avon Park, DeWitt graduated in 1991 and stuck around to play in the last season of the first incarnation of the baseball program at South Florida Community College. After that, his college playing career continued at Polk and Embry-Riddle, and then it was on to two years in the independent Frontier League in Newark NJ and Kalamazoo, MI. And when his playing career ended DeWitt jumped right into coaching, first as an assistant at Sebring in -98 and at SFCC from -02. Also working as an associate scout for the Colorado Rockies, he took the head coaching job at Lake Wales in where he lead the pr og ram to being a perennial power. I was fortunate to continue the successful path at Lake Wales, and thats my goal for the program at Sebring as well, DeWitt said. Given the coaches hes played for and worked under, his success shouldnt be surprising. At Avon Park, he played under legends Ronnie and Mort Jackson, as well as Clay Gooch during his year at SFCC. I am also fortunate to have been in contact with some great baseball minded people throughout the state and country, DeWitt said. Coach Tyus at Polk State, the Guilliam brothers at Embry-Riddle, along with the Jacksons and coach Gooch, gave me a mixture of different coaching styles and personalities. Coach Hitt then provided me the opportunity to begin my coaching career and I have had some great assistants at Lake Wales. And it is great to be SPORTS B SE CTION Inside This Section MLB first half . . .B3 Marlins sign Moran . . .B3 N o amnesty plans for Heat. . .B4 News-Sun Sunday, July 14, 2013 DAN HOEHNE News-Sun Jasone DeWitt, the new head coach of the Sebring High School baseball Blue Streaks. DeWitt tapped to lead Blue Streak baseball See DEWITT, Page B3 By LAUREN WELBORN News-Sun correspondentSEBRINGGolf Hammock played host to what would have been the fifth Sertoma event of the summer this Thursday. Rather, after the seemingly endless rains washed away the July 1 event scheduled for The Bluffs, Thursdays outing became the fourth event of the summer season. As usual, stiff competition kept things interesting as these golfers battled through the course and Floridas summer heat. Cole Berger swept the boys 17-18 division with Sertoma hammers through Hammock LAURENWELBORN News-Sun Beckham Donovan follows through on his drive T hursday morning and won his age group in the Sertoma Junior Tours event at Golf Hammock. DAN HOEHNE News-Sun Nearly a dozen teams gathered at Don Joses Saturday morning for a four-onfour beach volleyball tournament, organized by the Highlands County YMCA. Under sunny skies and in the sand along the edge of Lake Jackson, all sorts of sets, spikes, dives and digs were seen as players of all ages enjoyed a day of friendly and fun competition. Diggin up a good time at Dons By JAKE PEARSON Associated Press and JON GERBERG Associated PressNEWYORK They run w ith a little less speed, hit with a little less power and worry less about shattering nearby windows, but a graying crew of stickball enthusiasts is keeping the urban sport alive and honoring the legends who shaped the game. Six players from around the country were being added Friday to the 144 people already in the Stickball Hall of Fame, selected by a committee of so-called oldtimers who have followed the sport since its heyday in t he 1940s and s. Their grading scale is not exactly scientific. The games lore is passed on in stories and arguments about whether the Pleasant Avenue Boys were better than the 100th Street Boys and which pitcher was harder to hit, which batter most feared at the plate. e dont have statistics; we have bragging rights, said Carlos Diaz, 64, a hospital administrator who hel d the first induction ceremony a dozen years ago and now runs the Stickball Community Gallery out of a n old storefront in East Harlem. When we were playing, if you broke a window, you ran or the cop would come and take the stick away fro m you and put it down the manhole covers, Diaz said. Aging NYC stickballers keeps street game alive See BALL, Page B4 A ssociated Press Carlos Diaz, president of the Stickball Hall of Fame, hits during a game of stickball in East Harlem, N.Y., Friday, July 12, 2013. Six players are being inducted into the Stickball Hall of Fame by a committee of so-called old timers who have been following the famous urban s port since its heyday in the 1940s and 50s. See GOLF, Page B3

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C M Y K S HS SwimSEBRING Sebring High School will be offering swimming lessons with three more sessions to choose from. The first two sessions are complete with the third session July 8-July 19 and the fourth from July 22-August 2. Registrations are being taken at the front office of Sebring High School during the day from 9 a.m.-2 p.m., where office secretaries can sign you up. Emails can also be sent to catonp@highlands.k12.fl.us The Sebring High School pool is currently open Monday through Friday from 6-7:30 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from 1-3 p.m. Additional hours will be added once s chool is out for the summer. C ost is $2 per swimmer, and family passes are available at $50 for first family member and $15 for each additional. Water aerobics are also underway, meeting on Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6:30-7:30 p.m. at $2 per class. Those with a summer pass can take the c lass for $1 per. Sebring Summer Swim Program The Summer Swim Program will again offer four (4 Each will last two weeks and the swim class meets each weekday, Monday through Friday. The Program will offer eight (8 of instruction: Adult Beginner: Adults Only. For the novice-no experience necessary. Parent and Tot: Water Orientation. Mother/Father must partici-p ate with child. (6 months to 2 years of age.) Level I: Introduction to Water Skills. Students first water orientation without Mother/Father. P art A--Preschool Aquatics (2-4 years of age) Part B-School Age (4-5 years of age L evel II: Fundamental Aquatic Skills. Students do not need M other/Father in pool. (4-5 years of age. Level III: Stroke Development. S tudents must be comfortable in water. Level IV:Stroke Improvement. Students must be able to swim 10 yards, do a front dive, and float on their backs. Level V:Stroke Refinement. Students must be able to swim 50 yards, tread water 30 seconds, and elementary back stroke 25 yards. Level VI:Part APersonal Water Safety/Diving Fundamentals. Students must be able to swim 100 yards, tread water for 3 minutes, backstroke 100 yards. Will learn basics of diving. Part B Fitness Swimmer/Diving Fundamentals. Students will learn necessary skills to make swimming part of their exercise program. Will learn basics of diving. There will be a $50 fee for the twoweek session and students will be enrolled on a first come, first served basis. For questions, call 471-5500, ext. 229, or 381-7092 and leave a message for Ms. Pat.SFSC Volleyball CampsAVON PARK Lady Panther Volleyball is again offering summer camps, both indoor and out on the sand courts, for players from Grade 6 and up who wish to learn the game and sharpen their skills for the upcoming fall seasons. For the indoor camps, there is just one four-day session left to take advantage of, with separate times for those from grades 6-8 and those from grades 9-12. The remaing session will run July 1518, with the same time frames. Cost is $100 per session, or $30 per daily session. Out on the sand volleyball courts at SFSC, there will be one more Friday session, meeting from 9:30-11:30 a.m., witha cost of $30 for the daily session. The meeting date for the sand camp is Friday, July 19. For both indoor and sand camps, there is a limit of 20 athletes per session. For more information, contact Lady Panther head coach Kim Crawford at Kimberly.Crawford@southflorida.edu or (863NAACP GolfSEBRING The Highlands County NAACPinvites the community to take part in its first golf tournament on Saturday, July 20 at the Golf Hammock Golf and Country Club. Registration will begin at 7 a.m. with a shotgun start time of 8 a.m. The event will include closest to the pin, hole in one, raffle and door prizes. An awards ceremony and lunch will follow. The tournament is a four-person scramble. Registration is $60 per player/$240 per foursome includes green fees, golf cart, post eent luncheon, prizes, beverages on the course and more. For more information, to register, sponsor or donate to this event, contact Art Williams at 873-5031, Jim Windsor at 414-8471 or Leon Thomas at 414-4005.STR8 UP seeks helpLAKE PLACID As STR8 UPYouth Ministry in Lake Placid celebrates its oneyear anniversary as a ministry, they are looking for ways to enhance their programs in order to maintain and challenge the influx of teenagers that enter the ministry. Mr. Greg Foster of GSF Enterprises has been gracious enough to incorporate his lot into our lease, on which we would l ike to construct a NBA-regulation size basketball court, STR8 Up president Sammy Telesco said. This will be a oneo f-a-kind, outdoor, regulation-sized court in Lake Placid. The youth currently play basketball on the back parking lot area and have long since outgrown it. They need the challenge of a full court and higher goals. William E. Lewis and Associates have donated the NBA-style fiberglass goals. Bevis Construction and Concrete has once again partnered with the program to provide the labor for this considerable project. STR8 UPis seeking to raise $7,500 for 80 yards of concrete. STR8 UPis asking for donatio ns towards the goal one quarter of a yard of concrete is $25, half a yard is $50, and one yard of concrete is $100. All donations are welcome. Please make checks payable to STR8 UPYouth Ministry P.O. Box 654 Lake Placid, FL33862 or PayPal can be used from their website www.str8up.org .14th Annual Firemen MemorialSEBRING As one of their biggest fundraisers of the year, Sebring Firemen, Inc. will hold the 14th Annual Memorial Golf Classic on Saturday, Aug. 10, at the Sun NLake Golf and Country Club. Presented by AXAAdvisors, LLC and Home Depot, the day-long tournament will begin with registration at 7:30 a.m. and cannon start at 8:30 a.m. The format is a 4-person Scramble, flighted by handicap, utilizing both the Deer Run and Turtle Run courses, and the entry fee remains at $75 per player. And though the fee has not gone up, it still includes golf cart, one mulligan, range balls and prizes, while food and beverages will be provided on the courses. There will also be contests for Longest Drive, Closest to the Pin and Hole in One, with unbelieveable prizes attached. As is their nearly 90-year old custom, the Firemen seek to raise funds to help all area student-athletes and athletic programs. And in so doing, make it a fun an d memorable event for all those involved. The festivities, in fact, begin the night before at the Pre-Tournament Mixer on Friday, Aug. 9, at 6:30 p.m. in the Sun N Lake restaurant for early registration anda heavy dose of hors doeuvres. Deadline for entry is Thursday, Aug. 8, and checks should be made payable and remit to Sebring Firemen, Inc., P.O Box 1981, Sebring, FL33871, (8635. Team entry agreements can also be faxed to Sebring Firemen, Inc. at (863 385-7773. Last years field of more than 250 golfers set a new high for the everexpanding fundraiser, so make sure to get those entries in to be part of a great day of helping the Firemen give back. American Legion Baseball TripSEBRING American Legion Post 25 will be hosting its5th Annual Baseball Trip on Sunday, Aug. 25, to Tropicana Field to see the Rays vs. Yankees. Cost is $45 per person for tickets and bus trip, with money due by Wednesday, July 24. For more information, call Robert at the American Legion between 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at 465-0975.APHS Pool ScheduleAVONPARK Beginning Tuesday, July 16, the Avon Park High School Pool will be open Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m.11:30 a.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday 1 -3 p.m. and 4-6 p.m. The cost is $2 per swimmer. AMERICANLEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB Boston5837.611 Tampa Bay5341.5644.5 Baltimore5242.5535.5 New York5142.5486 Toronto4448.47812.5 Central Division WLPctGB Detroit5141.554 Cleveland4944.5272.5 Kansas City4347.4787 Minnesota3753.41113 Chicago3653.40413.5 West Division WLPctGB Oakland5439.581 Texas5340.5701 Los Angeles4447.4849 Seattle4152.44113 Houston3359.35920.5 ___ Thursdays Games Cleveland 4, Toronto 2 Tampa Bay 4, Minnesota 3 N.Y. Yankees 8, Kansas City 4 Chicago White Sox 6, Detroit 3 Boston 8, Seattle 7, 10 innings Baltimore 3, Texas 1 Fridays Games Cleveland 3, Kansas City 0 N.Y. Yankees 2, Minnesota 0 Baltimore 8, Toronto 5 Chicago White Sox at Philadelphia, ppd., rain Detroit 7, Texas 2 Houston 2, Tampa Bay 1 Boston 4, Oakland 2 Seattle 8, L.A. Angels 3 Saturdays Games Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, late Chicago White Sox at Philadelphia, late Toronto at Baltimore, late Houston at Tampa Bay, late Kansas City at Cleveland, late Texas at Detroit, late Boston at Oakland, late L.A. Angels at Seattle, late Sundays Games Kansas City (Shields 4-6 (U.Jimenez 7-4 Minnesota (Gibson 1-2. Yankees (Sabathia 9-7 Texas (M.Perez 3-1 (Verlander 9-6), 1:08 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Quintana 4-2 Philadelphia (Hamels 4-11 Toronto (Jo.Johnson 1-4 (Feldman 0-1 Houston (Bedard 3-5ampa Bay (Archer 3-3), 1:40 p.m. Boston (Workman 0-0) at Oakland (Colon 12-3 L.A. Angels (Blanton 2-11 (Iwakuma 7-4LEAGUELEADERSBATTING ABRHBA Cabrera, DET35772131.367 Trout, LAA36264117.323 Ortiz, BOS2794990.323 Mauer, MIN34549110.319 Pedroia, BOS36857117.318 HOME RUNS Davis, BAL35 Cabrera, DET30 Ibanez, SEA24 Encarnacion, TOR24 Dunn, CHW24 RUNSBATTEDIN Cabrera, DET95 Davis, BAL88 Fielder, DET69 Encarnacion, TOR69 Cruz, TEX68 WON-LOST Scherzer, DET13-0 Moore, TB13-3 Colon, OAK12-3 Tillman, BAL11-3 Masterson, CLE10-7 STRIKEOUTS Darvish, TEX157 Scherzer, DET146 Masterson, CLE137 Hernandez, SEA136 Sale, CHW131 SAVES J. Johnson, BAL32 Nathan, TEX30 Rivera, NYY30 Balfour, OAK24 Reed, CHW23NATIONALLEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB Atlanta5340.570 Washington4746.5056 Philadelphia4647.4957 New York4049.44911 Miami3457.37418 Central Division WLPctGB St. Louis5635.615 Pittsburgh5536.6041 Cincinnati5241.5595 Chicago4150.45115 Milwaukee3755.40219.5 West Division WLPctGB Arizona4944.527 Los Angeles4646.5002.5 Colorado4549.4794.5 San Francisco4250.4576.5 San Diego4153.4368.5 ___ Thursdays Games Philadelphia 3, Washington 1 Atlanta 6, Cincinnati 5 Chicago Cubs 3, St. Louis 0 Arizona 5, Milwaukee 3 L.A. Dodgers 6, Colorado 1 San Francisco 4, San Diego 2 Fridays Games St. Louis 3, Chicago Cubs 2 Pittsburgh 3, N.Y. Mets 2, 11 innings Chicago White Sox at Philadelphia, ppd., rain Miami 8, Washington 3 Cincinnati 4, Atlanta 2 Arizona 2, Milwaukee 1 Colorado 3, L.A. Dodgers 0 San Francisco 10, San Diego 1 Saturdays Games Chicago White Sox at Philadelphia, late Cincinnati at Atlanta, late Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, late N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, late St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, late Washington at Miami, late Milwaukee at Arizona, late San Francisco at San Diego, late Sundays Games Washington (Jordan 0-2 (Slowey 3-6 Chicago White Sox (Quintana 4-2 Philadelphia (Hamels 4-11 Cincinnati (Cingrani 3-1 (Teheran 7-4), 1:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Gee 6-7 (Locke 8-2 Colorado (Chacin 8-4 (Nolasco 6-8 Milwaukee (W.Peralta 6-9) at Arizona (Kennedy 3-5 San Francisco (Zito 4-6 (Stults 7-7 St. Louis (Wainwright 12-5) at Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 6-6), 8:05 p.m.LEAGUELEADERSBATTING ABRHBA Molina, STL31637106.335 Cuddyer, COL2774392.332 Craig, STL33848111.328 Segura, MIL36552117.321 Carpenter, STL35071112.320 Posey, SF31635101.320 HOME RUNS Gonzalez, COL25 Alvarez, PIT24 Brown, PHL23 Goldschmidt, ARI21 Beltran, STL19 RUNS BATTED IN Goldschmidt, ARI77 Craig, STL72 Phillips, CIN713 tied with64 WON-LOST Zimmermann, WAS12-4 Wainwright, STL12-5 Corbin, ARI11-1 Lynn, STL11-3 Lee, PHL10-3 STRIKEOUTS Harvey, NYM147 Kershaw, LAD139 Samardzija, CHC128 Latos, CIN127 Wainwright, STL126 SAVES Grilli, PIT28 Mujica, STL26 Kimbrel, ATL25 Soriano, WAS24 Chapman, CIN21 Romo, SF21NATIONAL CONFERENCECentral Division WLTPctPFPA Chicago870.533802808 San Antonio870.533642737 Iowa690.400700719 West Division WLTPctPFPA x-Arizona1320.867998716 x-Spokane1140.733998783 x-San Jose1140.733847752 Utah5110.313793901AMERICAN CONFERENCESouth Division WLTPctPFPA x-Jacksonville1050.667791728 Tampa Bay780.467836812 New Orleans5100.333700861 Orlando5100.333777884 Eastern Division WLTPctPFPA y-Philadelphia1150.688959754 Cleveland3120.200704869 Pittsburgh3120.200615838 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division ___ Fridays Game Philadelphia 69, Utah 39 Saturdays Games Spokane at Jacksonville, late Iowa at Orlando, late San Jose at Pittsburgh, late Cleveland at Chicago, late Tampa Bay at San Antonio, late New Orleans at Arizona, lateEASTERN CONFERENCEWLPctGB Atlanta102.833 Chicago104.7141 Washington77.5004 New York67.4624.5 Indiana48.3336 Connecticut39.2507WESTERN CONFERENCEWLPctGB Minnesota103.769 Los Angeles94.6921 Phoenix86.5712.5 Seattle58.3855 San Antonio49.3086 Tulsa312.2008 ___ Thursdays Games Minnesota 69, Indiana 62 Los Angeles 94, Tulsa 78 Fridays Games Chicago 83, Connecticut 70 Washington 83, San Antonio 73 Saturdays Games Indiana at New York, late Minnesota at Tulsa, late Sundays Games San Antonio at Connecticut, 5 p.m. Los Angeles at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Seattle, 9 p.m.BASEBALLAmerican League BALTIMORE ORIOLESOptioned RHP Josh Stinson to Norfolk (IL Designated RHP Jair Jurrjens for assignment. Selected the contract of RHP Jairo Asencio from Norfolk. BOSTON RED SOXSigned RHP Myles Smith, SS Mauricio Dubon, OF Nick Longhi, 3B Rafael Oliveras, RHP Pat Goetze and RHP K.J. Trader. Acquired LHP Matt Thornton and cash considerations from the Chicago White Sox in exchange for OF Brandon Jacobs. NEW YORK YANKEESAgreed to terms with OF Aaron Judge on minor league contract. National League ATLANTA BRAVESSent C Evan Gattis to Gwinnett (IL CHICAGO CUBSAgreed to terms with 3B Kris Bryant on minor league contract. MIAMI MARLINSAgreed to terms with SS Colin Moran on minor league contract. NEW YORK METSSent RHP Scott Atchison to Binghamton (EL rehab assignment. PITTSBURGH PIRATESTraded RHP Tim Alderson to Baltimore for 1B/OF Russ Canzler, and optioned Canzler to Indianapolis (ILranferred RHP James McDonald to the 60-day DL. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTSOptioned LHP Mike Kickham to Fresno (PCL Recalled RHP Jean Machi from Fresno. WASHINGTON NATIONALSSent RHP Ryan Mattheus to the GCL Nationals for a rehab assignment.BASKETBALLNational Basketball Association BOSTON CELTICSTraded Fs Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce and D.J. White and G Jason Terry to Brooklyn for Fs Gerald Wallace, Kris Humphries and Kris Joseph, Gs MarShon Brooks and Keith Bogans and 2014, 2016 and 2018 firstround draft picks. LOS ANGELES LAKERSSigned C Chris Kaman. MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVESAgreed to terms with Fs Chase Budinger and Corey Brewer on three-year contracts and F Shabazz Muhammad on a twoyear contract. OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDERSigned C Steven Adams and G/F Andre Roberson.FOOTBALLNational Football League DALLAS COWBOYSReleased FB Lawrence Vickers. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERSClaimed WR Charly Martin off waivers. SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . W orld Cup Puerto Rico vs. U.S.A. . . . . E E S S P P N N 3 3 p p . m m . Slow Pitch Showdown United States vs. . United States Futures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 p p . m m . World Cup Final Teams TBA . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 0 0 p p . m m . All-Star Legends and Celebrity Game. . . E E S S P P N NM M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Texas at Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T B B S S 1 1 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Houston at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 1 1 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Chicago White Sox at Philadelphia . . . . . W W G G N N 8 8 p p . m m . S t. Louis at Chicago Cubs . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . 2013 Home Run Derby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . 2013 All-Star Game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X XTimes, games, channels all subject to change A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . NASCAR New Hampshire 300 . . . . . . . T T N N T TG G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 a a . m m . E uroPGA Scottish Open . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F N N o o o o n n EuroPGA Scottish Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C C 1 1 p p . m m . PGA John Deere Classic . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . L PGA Manulife Financial Classic . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA John Deere Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 3 3 p p . m m . U.S. Senior Open Championship . . . . . . . N N B B C C 7 7 p p . m m . P GA Utah Championship . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F FM M I I N N O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 2 2 p p . m m . A ll-Star Futures Game . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 LI VESPORTSONTV Major League Baseball WNBA Arena Football Transactions Page B2News-SunSunday, July 14, 2013w ww.newssun.com

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C M Y K Associated PressMIAMI North Carolina third baseman Colin Moran, the sixth overall pick in baseballs amateur draft, finalized an agreement with the Miami Marlins before Fridays deadline. Moran agreed to a signing bonus of $3,516,500, which was the slot value assigned to the selection. Anative of Rye, N.Y., Moran hit .345 with 13 homers and an NCAA-high 91 RBIs as a junior for the Tar Heels, who lost to UCLA in the final of the College World Series. The Marlins signed 29 of their 42 selections. Third-round pick Ben Deluzio, an infielder from Windermere, Fla., taken with the 80th selection, did not sign and plans to attend Florida State. Moran, a nephew of former big leaguer B.J. Surhoff, is expected to begin his professional career with Class AGreensboro on Monday. BEN WALKER Associated PressNEWYORK Just for fun, lets turn back the b aseball clock a few months. Awell-rested Stephen Strasburg and the Washington Nationals are destined to face Josh Hamilton and the Los Angeles Angels in the World Series. The Houston Astros have the best record in baseball, Manny Ramirez is playing in Taiwan and no one isq uite sure how to pronounce the name of this Puig guy. Well, a few things are s till the same: Homer Bailey remains the last guy t o throw a no-hitter, Miguel Cabrera swings the most d evastating bat in the majors and, well, the drug c loud isnt going away anytime soon. As the All-Star game approaches next week at Citi Field, a look at the first half of the season: EXTRA! EXTRA! By the time Matt Harvey and the New York Mets let the hovering seagulls take over AT&TPark well past midnight, they were wiped out. This weeks win at San Francisco took 16 innings the Mets already had lost a 20-inning game and a pair of 15-inning contests. Ive never heard of anything like this. Its unbelievable, manager Terry Collins said. At least were used to it. All over, fans are getting way more than their moneys worth. Going into this weekend, 19 games had lasted at least 14 innings; there were a total of 20 last year, according to STATS. Is a lunar eclipse coming? Oakland outfielder Josh Reddick wondered. I have no idea. Probably more of a coincidence than anything. Thats how the game goes sometimes. WACKYWEATHER Even in ski country, this was a bit extreme: When the Atlanta Braves and Colorado Rockies started up at Coors Field in late April, it was 23 degrees. That made it the coldest game-time temperature in STATSrecords, dating back more than two decades. Braves pitcher Mike M inor threw six innings and won in short sleeves. He figured long sleeves wouldnt help much. H e also got a trainer to rub his arms, back and thighs with a heating ointm ent. I was burning up there, h e said, smiling. Snow at Target Field, hail a t Yankee Stadium and buckets of rain from coast to coast. More than 30 games postponed so far, going in the weekend. Last year? Just 21, the whole season. The crummy conditions have wreaked havoc with the schedule. With interleague games most every day, theres nota lot of wiggle room for makeups. So theres been a push to get the games in Tampa Bay waited out almost five hours of rain delays in Cleveland to win a game that started on a Friday night in May and finished on an early Saturday in June. The Mets, meanwhile, played in three different time zones in three days. In St. Louis, there was a 4 1/2-hour rain delay in the ninth inning before Kansas City outlasted the Cardinals. The game ended at 3:14 a.m. at Busch Stadium, and created travel trouble for the umpires, too they worked at Wrigley Field in Chicago the next afternoon. e worry about that game when we get to that one, crew chief Joe West said. We had to worry about this game tonight. And recently, a GiantsReds rainout in Cincinnatih ad the teams talking about making it up at Coors Field, of all places. Aneutral site in Denver m ight indeed be the most convenient spot for both clubs later this year. NEWWAVE Be it Manny Machado, Bryce Harper or Mike Trout, the face of baseball is changing. Young stars are dominating, and also revving up the debate: Should Dodgers sensation Yasiel Puig thats Pweeg be on the AllStar team? Jeff Locke is trying to pitch Pittsburgh toward its first playoff spot in two decades, Shelby Miller is dealing in St. Louis and Wil Myers is finding his stroke in Tampa Bay while Paul Goldschmidt and Patrick Corbin are leading Arizona. They were all excelling at the same time former perennial All-Stars Derek Jeter, Alex Rodriguez and Ramirez were toiling in the minors. Oh, and lets salute Orioles slugger Chris Davis, whos proven HR-or-K hitters can learn the strike zone. Davis hit his major league-best 35th homer inB altimores 8-5 victory ov er Toronto on Friday night. SUMMER SURPRISES Overhauled Toronto and R.A. Dickey, the powerized Angels and Hamilton, plus the revamped Dodgers have all struggled to reach the. 500 mark. The Nationals also hit a wall rather, Harper did while chasing a ball and landed on the disabled list. Houston moved to the American League and got off a terrific start, beating Texas in the major league opener. Reality quickly set in, however. Their next time out, the overmatched Astros came within one out of having Yu Darvish throw a perfect game against them. Much harder to figure, Matt Cain and the World S eries champion San Francisco Giants. Ayear ago, Cain pitched a perfect game. This year, he had one start when he gave up nine runs in an inning, another start when he permitted n ine hits in an inning and, earlier this week, he was chased in the first inning. Added up, the pitchingrich Giants fell far below the break-even point as the All-Star neared. For the way we think w e are as a group and the team that we are, we feel like this is really, really funky, Cain said. AP Baseball Writer Janie McCauley contributed to this report. w ww.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, July 14, 2013Page B3 church page; 5.542"; 7.1"; Black; church page dummy; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 6 6 4 4 0 0 0 0 COCHRAN BROTHERS ROOFING; 5.542"; 3"; Black; july ads; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 7 7 6 6 8 8 STANLEY STEEMER CARPET; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 7/14/13; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 8 8 2 2 4 4 coming in after a coach with the baseball knowledge of Buck Rapp, the program is in good shape. Which he has a definite plan to continue with an ingrained philosophy that has served him and his teams well. e will play the game the way it is supposed to be played, he said. We will be prepared for teams and hustle on and off the field, whether were up 10 runs or down 10 runs. I want my passion and energy for baseball to cross over to my players, DeWitt continued. And they will continue to work hard in the classroom and represent the school, community and family in a first-class manner. These are the things we are able to control every day, no matter the outcome of a game. And while he will be pushing to get the best out of his players for the benefit of the program, DeWitt also aims for those efforts to be pushed to benefit the players themselves. Getting guys to the next level, whether it is Juco, Division I, II or III, or NAIA, will also be a goal for myself and our staff, he said. He has done that quite well at Lake Wales, with former Highlander Justin Shafer coming off a strong second season with the Florida Gators. And its with those strong feeder programs he referenced that he sees those p ossibilities at Sebring as w ell. From T-ball on up, thes e guys here learn the fundamentals at a very young age, DeWitt said. I was just out at some of the state t ournaments here and could s ee that, and just seeing the support and enthusiasm of the community there, I was really impressed and it made me all the more excited for the opportunity to coach here. Continued from B1 LAUREN WELBORN News-Sun J ackson Griffin powers through his downswing Thursday at G olf Hammock during Sertoma Junior Tour play. Golf tour heads to match play event DeWitt set to begin with Blue Streaks h is score of 74, coming in just before Rhett Pooleys 76 f ollowed by Colin Walkups 83. T he 15-16 boys were led by a 75 from Colin Kresl, a 79 from Nic Staffeiri, and an 81 from Sam Rogers. The Hamilton twins topped the boys 13-14 division, with Seth carding 48 and Scott not far behind with a 50. They were trailed by Julian Crozier who came in with a 54. Beckham Donovan set the pace for the 11-12 boys with a score of 49. Coming in behind him was Will Redding with a 54 and David Herbert with a 58. Around of 49 from Zach Doorlag gave him first place in the 9-10 boys division. Billy Carol was not far behind with a 54, and Jaxon Davis was nipping at his heels with a 55. Taking the girls 14-18 division this week was Morgan Bacendales 71, six strokes under Kendall Griffins 77 and still ahead of Sarah Likes83. The 11-13 girls division was won with Ashley Engles round of 55, shy of Hannah Revells 68 and Alyssa Armentrouts 70. The 6-8 year old boys and girls group was led by P arker Griffins 33, with J ack DuPriest and Brody H all both turning in a 38 to t ie for second. Moving on to what is now the fifth event of the Sertoma slate, Thursday and Friday, July 18-19, will be the two-day, Bill Jarrett Ford Match Play Championship at River Greens. Continued from B1 Puig, Pirates and Harper highlight 1st half Marlins sign Moran

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C M Y K Page B4News-SunSunday, July 14, 2013w ww.newssun.com Get The BEST Coverage in Highlands County Subscribe to the The game is played on city streets in New York Citys neighborhoods and took off around the turn of the 20th century. Its a form of baseball with a twist: Instead of bats, hitters use broomsticks; instead of baseballs, pink rubber balls; instead of three strikes, each batter gets just one swing to hit the ball off the bounce; and instead of a baseball diamond, the field is determined by street lamps, manhole covers and parked cars. Teams were largely reflections of the neighborhoods where they played: Italian p layers from Queens, black players from Harlem, Spanish players from East Harlem. Professional baseball playe rs such as Rusty Torres and former New York Yankees manager Joe Torre played growing up in Brooklyn. The game was more than a diversion, said Alfred Jackson, who was still shagging fly balls barehanded at age 78. He proudly identified himself as from 112th and Lexington, recalling a time w hen every block had a team. Every Sunday youd see the kids out playing stickball i n the street, and the cops chasing us, he said. We played for money. Its how we got money to pay for w hatever we needed food, clothes, rent. And not every Sunday was a winning S unday George Lolin Osorio, a Hall of Famer from Puerto Rico who moved to Manhattan in 1945, told of watching the older guys play when he was a kid. They would play for big money, and give the kids a quarter to run up on the roof and fetch the balls. But the game has lost popularity with time, said Diaz. Players moved away, first to fight in wars overseas and later as the ravages of drugs and crime stripped city neighborhoods of their safety, their populations and their sense of community. Asmall group of followers including George Vega,w ho was being inducted Friday, kept the game alive by playing in the late 1970s, s and s. Im getting inducted because of the way I used to p lay, not the way I play n ow, said Vega, now 58, who grew up playing stickball on 104th Street in East Harlem but now resides in Bayonne, N.J. The cataracts are getting in there. Im a little slower, but I still run and I still hit. Diaz estimates there are probably around 2,000 active competitive stickball players, playing in leagues in the Bronx and Manhattan; Miami; Tampa, Fla.; San Diego; Puerto Rico; the Dominican Republic and Panama. At a game prior to Fridays induction ceremony, a dozen old-timers gathered in a weed-choked, concrete schoolyard in Spanish Harlem. T hey jovially talked trash in a mix of Spanish (Ay! Que macho!), Brooklynese (Fugghedaboutit! g eneral profanity-laced New York City English. T heir laughter was often s ealed with a hacking cough. At 76, Osorio was still one of the fastest guys out there. s not like any other sport, he said. You dont really have fans and reporters and announcers. What you have is a small community. Wedont forget. We have our memories that keep us going. Continued from B1 Ball game of the streets living on Associated Press S tickball Hall of Famer George Osorio, from Puerto Rico, bats during a game in East Harlem, N.Y., Friday, July 12, 2013. A ssociated PressMIAMI For now, the prospects of paying a big luxury-tax bill next year is not enough to dissuade Miami from its plan to keep the Heats current championship core intact. Heat President Pat Riley said Friday that the team does not currently plan to use its one-time amnesty option as a way of lightening its looming tax load, with the teams focus instead being on simply finding ways to get better. Right now, were not using amnesty, no, Riley said. Amnesty would allow the Heat to essentially cut one player and pay whatever is left on his contract, but without that salary counting against the teams cap space or add to future luxury-tax bills. Miami is currently in line to pay more than $30 million in tax for the coming season, though could shave off at least one-quarter of that by parting with someone like Joel Anthony or Mike Miller. In a conference call Friday, Riley made clear that the teams plan is to add and not subtract, especially coming off two straight NBA championships. e want to win and we want to win again next year and were going to try to do everything we can to do that, Riley said. What I said at the end of the season is what I meant. I want to try to keep this team intact as long as we can because we have a championship basketball team here and continuity being, I think the most important thing to when it comes to winning championships ... I would hate to break it up. Riley said team officials will meet next week before this summers amnesty window ends, so a change of plans is possible. Still, Miami is expected to be the favorites heading into next season, even though several teams in the Eastern Conference should be better than they were this past season. Brooklyn, most notably, made a huge splash this summer by acquiring Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce and Jason Terry from the Boston Celtics a move that helped drive the Netspotential luxury-tax bill for this coming season well past the $70 million mark. e understand the economic-slash-basketball ramifications of where we are in the game today, Riley said. ere very diligent when it comes to the economicslash-basketball decisions that you have to make. What one other team does, it doest have any bearing on what were thinking about. Were a three-time finalist, weve won back to back championships, weve got our entire core back, signed, opted-in and were tickled to death with that. As of now, all players from Miamis rotation this past season are expected back. Ray Allen exercised his player option to return, and Chris Andersen signed a one-year deal to stay in Miami, a move that Riley said was huge. Hell be even better for us next year, Riley said. It was crucial to keep him and were very fortunate that he stayed. Riley also said the team tried to land a perimeter player by offering the taxpayer mid-level during free agency, to no avail. He has also remained in contact with the camp of free agent center Greg Oden, who is attempting a comeback after years of serious knee issues and hopes to be with an NBAclub in time for training camp this fall. Riley: Heat not planning to use amnesty FINDThe Best Car Deals On Centralfloridawheels.com

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C M Y K By BETH J. HARPAZ A ssociated PressNEWYORK When Kitty Ws eldest daughters tarted at Scripps College in California in 2002, we t hought a liberal arts education would be a wonderful thing, she said. There was n o pressure. Her two younger daughters graduated from Scripps in 2008 and 2012, and with each successive child, wevet hought more about their career path and what field of study would be best, said Wo, who lives in Honolulu. Each girls experience ledt he next one to being a lot more proactive, with interns hips and other job-related experiences. W s middle daughter, an economics major, even worried that her younger sisters media studies major wasnt practical. Her sister wast hinking, Oh my God, youre watching movies? Wo recalled with a laugh. All of Ws daughters landed jobs, but their shift ina ttitudes tells a bigger story. While some top-tier schools can still attract students by promising self-discovery and intellectual pursuits, many colleges have changed their emphasis in the years since the recession hit. Instead of Follow your passion, the mantra has become more like, Well help you get a job. Schools have revamped career centers, expanded internship programs and pushed alumni to serve as mentors. The changes are not only in response to a tough job market, but because parents are demanding that graduates be prepared for the workplace. Parents and students questions and concerns have changed just as much as society has changed, said John Fraire, vice president for student affairs and enrollment at Washington State University in Pullman, Wash. Questions about job security, income, graduation rates its to be expected. When Stephanie Albano worked as a student tour guide at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa., she was equipped with a fact sheet on job placement rates, average salaries for graduates and other statistics. High school kids on the tours didt ask about jobs, said Albano, whos now in law school, but parents always did. It was the first question out there from parents. They want to make sure their kids are not going to end up moving back into their basements. Between 1966 and 2010, bachelors degrees in the humanities halved, from 14 p ercent of all degrees awarded to 7 percent, according to the American Academy of A rts & Sciences. Sally Rubenstone, who writes CollegeConfidential.coms Ask the Dean column,s ays there is certainly concern, particularly at the liberal arts schools where theyre worried that theyre notg oing to be perceived as pragm atic in a competitive jobm arket. But a few colleges have benefited from the shift in values. Colleges like Northeastern and Drexel are really coming up in the worldb ecause they offer co-op programs, where students spend several semesters in fulltime jobs related to their studies, usually with pay, Rubenstone noted. In the last six years, Northeastern Universitys ranking on U.S. News & World Reports college survey has soared from 98 to 56. And even though Northeasterns tuition now tops $40,000 a year, applications have increased more than 40 percent since 2009, while SATscores of incoming students have steadily risen. While Northeasterns coo p model is a century old, many other schools proudly point to career prep prog rams theyve created since the recession began at the end of 2007. Many colleges also now offer funding for unpaidi nternships so that students of limited means can afford to take them. And careerbuilding is now a topic in freshmen s eminars. Gone are the d ays when a second-semesters enior can come into a career center for career assistance and expect to find aj ob immediately, said Kathy Williams, director of Gettysburg Colleges Centerf or Career Development in Gettsyburg, Pa., which encourages students to take externships and do job shadowing in freshman and sophomore year. Even schools that train students for specialized industries are stepping up their game. Haemoon Oh, who joined the Hospitality and Tourism Management department at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst in 2008, used its alumni network to create a program in which students could meet industry leaders. When hotel CEOs in New York and Boston were reluctant to travel to the campus i n western Massachusetts, Oh told them, Ill bring my students to you if you spon-s or the trip.The concept was embraced by their corp orate headquarters. But Ohs goals were broader than just connecting s tudents to potential employers. If our kids can have an opportunity to interact with a chairman or CEO or industryi con in an informal setting, and ask whatever they want, thats a worthwhile experience, he said. I wanted to inspire stud ents and give them hope and ambition, especially in a t ime of recession. He also began a mentoring p rogram, handpicking students to match with alumni in senior positions. I asked them to coach the students over the phone orb y email, but many have taken it further, he said, offering job shadowing and sometimes jobs. The number of employers t aking part in the programs career fair has more than doubled, and many seniors are getting multiple job offers. Andrew Speno of Edmond, Okla., whos looking at colleges with his teenage son, says the expanded emphasis on jobs is a practicality. I was a political science major in college, my wife has a piano performance degree. We had absolutely no practical workplace skills when we graduated. And we struggled. He added: Education for educations sake is a luxury that middle-class families like us dont have any more. www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, July 14, 2013Page B5 AFFORDABLE CARE; 3.639"; 8"; Black; 7/14/13; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 7 7 1 1 8 8 AMERICAN GOLF CARTS; 5.542"; 5"; Black; 7/7,14,21; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 9 9 0 0 2 2 Business M andi Wright/Detroit Free Press/MCT Henry Ford Community College physical therapy major and student assistant in the Job Placement Office Amanda Warren, 25, of Detroit, works with HFCC Job Placement Officer Chad Austin, right, on a project. Preparing for the workplace Andrew Speno father of a teenagerEducation for educations sake is a luxury that middle-class families like us dont have any more. Many colleges offering more help with career prep Special to the News-SunWASHINGTON, DC As highlighted in Change the Equations 2012 Florida Vital Signs report, only 22p ercent of Florida eighth graders have a math teacher who majored in the subject they teach. Only 43 percent of eighth-graders have as cience teacher who majored in the subject they teach. Florida school districts continue an uphill battle to improving student out-c omes in science, said Shawn Arevalo M cCollough, a former superintendent, principal and teacher who nows erves as president and CEO of the American B oard for Certification of Teacher Excellence. This summer the American Board, a teacher certification nonprofit, is aiming toa lleviate this issue in Florida by helping careerc hanging professionals bring their experience and expertise to local class-r ooms. For those who are looki ng for a career change, the teaching profession is a great option and extremely r ewarding, McCollough said. Youre part of building the future. A ccepted by the Florida Department of Education in 2004, the American Board assists career-changers, subject area experts, recentc ollege graduates, and others with a Bachelor's degree to earn full teacher certification. The American Board certifies teachers int he science, technology, engineering and math (STEMm athematics, biology, chemistry, and physics, in addition to English lan-g uage arts, special education, elementary education, a nd history. For community members who wish to make a differ-e nce in the classroom, the American Board provides a n affordable, accessible, and accelerated route to teaching. The program is offered online, and candidates can work at their ownp ace and on their own time. The American Board will b e hosting informational sessions this July and August. Lauren Schubel,t he boards local representative, will provide materia ls and answer questions about how to become a certified teacher in Florida. R SVPat http://www.abcte.org/drupal/teach/events. Professionals can make a difference through teaching CR OSSWORDSO LUTION

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C M Y K B y ROD LEWIS News-Sun correspondentAVON PARK It was getting harder to make a livingi n Rantoul, Ill., for Greg and Laura Henderson. Business was dropping off, and it seemed their business of almost 30 years was in jeop-a rdy. On a visit to Avon Park to visit Springtime on the Mall,t hey knew they had found a new place to live and to revitalize their business. OnJ une 10, Avon Park welcomed two new businesses u nder one roof. Satori (which means to enlighten or enhance) CustomM erchandise, and Greg Hendersons Traditional M artial Arts studio, at 121 W. Main St. Greg mentions his struggle with Aspergers syndrome, or autism, and howc oping with that challenge has made him what he is t oday. When he was 4 years old, he began his training of martial arts in Okinawa. Martial Arts helped him develop himself, says L aura. Greg talks about the confidence that the training has p rovided him, and the ability to cope with the pressures of life. He also talks about the journey of the arts. He teaches in a very tradit ional style. Focusing on child development, he said, e feel that Judo is a wonderful way for children to grow physically, mentally,a nd socially and for that reason we include a healthy d ose of life skills in our lesson plans. G reg has been teaching the martial arts for more than 40 years and teaches classes in Karate, Judo, Kendo, Iaido, Jujitsu, andA ikido. In addition to teaching the art, he also teaches students to read and write in Japanese. Satori Custom M erchandise came by necessity, Laura said. Greg started a video production company that stemmed out of his college career of marketing. Laura said, He needed b usiness cards and could not afford tobuy them, so he made them himself. He also did martial arts tournaments and needed awards, so hem ade the awards himself. Everything that is done was s elf taught. They have been running t he businesses successfully since 1992, until recently, when the economic downturn made it necessary to make a change. That changew as relocating to Avon Park. e love it here; everyone is so inviting and welcoming, Laura said. She thinks the quality p roducts with the low prices will allow more people to take advantage of professional quality printing on a budget they can afford. A vailable services include web design, digital printing, a wards that include trophies and plaques, embroidery,s igns and banners, screenprinting, full-color photo gift items, and advertising specialties. For more information on S atori Custom, view its web page at Satoricustom.com, or check them out on Faceook and see samples of what they have done. F or Hendersons Martial Arts, check out http://www.hendersonsmartialarts.com/ Page B6News-SunSunday, July 14, 2013www.newssun.com biz spotlight; 5.542"; 8"; Black plus three; process, heartland biz spotlig; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 LEUPSCHEN, LAWRENCE; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, package incentive; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 9 9 8 8 0 0 Business Two for one: Couple opens pair of businesses in AP Rod Lewis/News-Sun Greg and Laura Henderson have opened two businesses under the same roof Satori Custom Merchandise and Greg Hendersons Traditional Martial Arts Studio at 121 W. M ain St. in Avon Park. Special to the News-SunSEBRING ERA Advantage Realty recentlya nnounced the addition of Andreja Cranmer to its team of real estate sales professionals serving consumers in the HighlandsC ounty area. Cranmer has more than 20 years in sales experience working in the construction and automotivei ndustries. Being a native Floridian, Cranmer grew up in WestP alm Beach and moved to Highlands County in 2007. Cranmer will be working a longside with her sister and mentor, Anita Zahn, R ealtor. e first started coming to Highlands County in1 994 and immediately fell in love with the area. We w ere pleased to be able to move to the area in order to be closer to family and raise three children in a community with a smallt own atmosphere, Cranmer said. In todays market, growth is the only option, and attracting top talent isa surefire way to achieve that goal, said Greg K arlson, broker-owner. e are thrilled to have a professional of Andreja C ranmers caliber join our firm. Unwavering commitment to clients has been critical to my success, andE RAAdvantage Realtys culture of collaboration, i nnovation and knowledge sharing combined with its reputation for superiors ervice will not only enhance my career, it will e nhance the experience of my clients as well, Cranmer said. A s part of ERA Advantage Realty, Cranmer w ill be able to offer homebuyers and sellers global exposure plus a wide variety of innovative and market-relevant products ands ervices, as well as robust online marketing programs, e xtensive listings distribution partners, and related services including mort-g age, title and home warranty. C ontact Cranmer by calling ERAAdvantage Realtys office at 386-1111, d irectly at 451-6400, email acranmerrealtor@gmail.co m, or stop by the office at 743 U.S. 27 South, Sebring. The agency web-s ite is www.erahighlands.com. Cranmer joins ERA Advantage Realty Satori Custom Merchandise, Hendersons Martial Arts both at 121 W. Main St. Andreja Cranmer GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCE

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C M Y K www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, July 14, 2013Page B7 U NION CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH=re; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, main A revival p/u; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 1 1 0 0 7 7 0 0 Outdoors Human beings need roads to getw here they are going. Without these asphalt wonders, we would still be tra-v ersing in covered wagons over the dusty and rugged terrain. Animals alson eed paths and open areas where they can travel safely from one natural space to another. Thousands of animals are killed every year by vehicles travel-i ng along the many roads in Florida. Wildlife corridors are one s olution to this huge problem for animals. By connecting green spaces or natural areas, animalsh ave safe passage to move from one area to another without the danger o f being hit by a passing car. More and more people move to Florida every day. Many of the natural and agricultural areas are being converted into urban development.A s a result, the land that once housed many species of wildlife is n ow paved or developed in some way and the wildlife can no longer exist in those places. If you thinka bout the needs of wildlife, you can well imagine that they would rather b e in a wooded area of fairly large size. Also, most wild animals will move from one area to anothert hroughout their lives in search of water, food or mates. Animals would prefer to move through prot ective cover, hidden from predators. That is where connecting corrid ors come in to play. Connecting corridors are the strips of grass and/or shrubs and trees that connect larger habitat areaswhether they are wetlands,n ative grasses, woodlands, or other habitat. In recent years, interest in connecting corridors has grown because wildlife corridors are seen as ways to allow wildlife and plants t o spread across natural landscapes that have been cut into pieces by roads, development, logging oro ther land disturbances. This cutting into pieces is r eferred to as fragmentation. The dangers to wildlife are plentiful when this occurs. One of the nega-t ive effects of fragmentation is that it dramatically decreases the diversity of wildlife. It is critical to many s pecies to have large areas of habitat for a variety of reasons such as m igration patterns, species dispersion and gene flow. (National Wildlife Federation) The corridors allow animals to find new resources and prevent iso-l ation of species. Studies have shown that wild areas connected by corridors have more wildlife or greater biodiversity than disconnected fragments. There is some c oncern about corridors entrapping some wildlife species, since predators can more easily find their preyi n a narrow strip of habitat. For that reason, the wider the corridor, the b etter. In most situations, landowners creating corridors may want to con-s ider a design that is edge feathered, which includes zones of grasses, shrubs and trees all in the same c orridor. The center of the corridor would be planted with trees, with s trips of shrubs on each side, bordered on the outside by zones of grasses and legumes. This combination offers habitat for wildlife that may use all three types for food andc over, as well as wildlife that needs only one of the habitat types. Many species have either disappeared or been drastically reduced in number because of habitat fragm entation. It is important to look to the future for the purposes of including these wildlife corridors inl and management planning. If we want to enable wildlife to exist a longside of development, it is essential that future planning include these areas in an effort toa llow wild animals and vegetation a place to travel and exist. It is critical that species are a llowed to move to new areas and travel to provide for their needs r egarding diet, reproduction and protection. Their survival depends on it. C orine Burgess is and Environmental S pecialist for the Highlands County Parks and Natural Resources Department. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the News-Sun. Wildlife corridors the highways for fauna N ews From T he W atershed Corine Burgess Courtesy photo W ildlife corridors give animals a way to move around without becoming a danger on roadways. 11-foot, 700pound croc found i n Lake TarponTARPON SPRINGS (AP Wildlife officials say a 700pound, 11-foot-long crocodilew ill likely be released back into the wild after it was captured in Tarpon Springs. The Tampa Bay Times reports it took trapper MikeA myx and three crew members more than four hours to capture the crocodile. Homeowner Wanda Vekasi called the trapper on Monday evening. F lorida Fish and Wildlife officials told the Times no other crocodile has been cap-t ured as far north as Tarpon Springs, in Pinellas County. In 2011, a croc was photographedi n St. Petersburg. Rumors of the crocodile circ ulated for more than a year. American crocodiles are an endangered species. Expertss ay there are about 2,000 in Florida.SFWMD hires new executive directorW ESTPALM BEACH Theres a new executive director at the state agency oversee-i ng water supply, flood control and Everglades restoration b etween Orlando and Key West. The South Florida Water M anagement Districts governing board on Thursday approved hiring Blake Guillory t o replace Melissa Meeker. Board chairman Daniel O Keefe says Guillory brings more than two decades of water resource experience to the position. Since 2011, Guillory has b een executive director of the district managing water resources in west-central Florida, roughly from Williston to Port Charlotte.

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C M Y K Page B8News-SunSunday, July 14, 2013www.newssun.com P P l l a a c c e e s s t t o o W W o o r r s s h h i i p p i i s s a a p p a a i i d d a a d d v v e e r r t t i i s s e e m m e e n n t t i i n n t t h h e e N N e e w w s s S S u u n n t t h h a a t t i i s s p p u u b b l l i i s s h h e e d d F F r r i i d d a a y y a a n n d d S S u u n n d d a a y y . T T o o f f i i n n d d o o u u t t m m o o r r e e i i n n f f o o r r m m a a t t i i o o n n o o n n h h o o w w t t o o p p l l a a c c e e a a l l i i s s t t i i n n g g i i n n t t h h i i s s d d i i r r e e c c t t o o r r y y , c c a a l l l l t t h h e e N N e e w w s s S S u u n n a a t t 3 3 8 8 5 5 6 6 1 1 5 5 5 5 , e e x x t t . 5 5 9 9 6 6 .A A N N G G L L I I C C A A N N N N e e w w L L i i f f e e A A n n g g l l i i c c a a n n F F e e l l l l o o w w s s h h i i p p , 1 0 N. Main Ave. (Womans Club), Lake Placid, F L 33852. Rev. Susan Rhodes, Deacon in Charge, (863 strhodes1020@yahoo.com. Sunday W orship, 10 a.m. Teaching, Holy Communion, Music, Fellowship, Healing P rayer. Pastoral and Spiritual.A A S S S S E E M M B B L L Y Y O O F F G G O O D D C C h h r r i i s s t t F F e e l l l l o o w w s s h h i i p p C C h h u u r r c c h h ( ( A A s s s s e e m m b b l l y y o o f f G G o o d d ) ) , 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710 924. F F i i r r s s t t A A s s s s e e m m b b l l y y o o f f G G o o d d , 4 301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers,M issionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431.B B A A P P T T I I S S T T A A v v o o n n P P a a r r k k L L a a k k e e s s B B a a p p t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h , 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL 33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. B B e e t t h h a a n n y y B B a a p p t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h ( ( G G A A R R B B C C ) ) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C17A (truck routePark. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m. On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+ begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. F F a a i i t t h h M M i i s s s s i i o o n n a a r r y y B B a a p p t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h , off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. F F e e l l l l o o w w s s h h i i p p B B a a p p t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h , 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 4534256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site, www.apfellow ship.org. F F i i r r s s t t B B a a p p t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h o o f f A A v v o o n n P P a a r r k k 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Charlie Parish, associate pastor/youth and families; Joy Loomis, music director; Rev. Johnattan Soltero, Hispanic pastor. Sunday Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:45 a.m.; Youth, 4:45 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper, 5:15 p.m.; Childrens Choir, 6 p.m.; Youth Activities, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer Meeting/Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Worship Choir Practice, 6 p.m.; Mission Programs for Children, 6:45 p.m. Hispanic Services: Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., worship service at 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Morning and evening services available at www.fbcap.net. Select Media, select Sermon Library, select Date. Call 4 53-6681 for details. In the heart of Avon Park, for the hearts of Avon Park F F i i r r s s t t B B a a p p t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h o o f f L L a a k k e e J J o o s s e e p p h h i i n n e e , 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Sunday night worship a t 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and P rayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth w orship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. F F i i r r s s t t B B a a p p t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h o o f f L L a a k k e e P P l l a a c c i i d d , Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm St., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863, Website: www.fbclp.com. Email: information@fbclp.com. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and1 0:30 a..m., Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. The church is at 119 E. Royal P alm St., Lake Placid. For information, call 465-3721 or go to www.fbclp.com. F F i i r r s s t t B B a a p p t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h o o f f L L o o r r i i d d a a located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups m eet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 655-1878. F F i i r r s s t t B B a a p p t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h , S S e e b b r r i i n n g g , 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. T elephone: 385-5154. Rev. Matthew D. Crawford, senior pastor; Rev. Nuno Norberto, associate pastor, minister of music and senior adults; and Dixie Kreulen, preschool director. Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.; Blended Service, 10:30 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Call 385-4704. Website www.fbsebring.com F F l l o o r r i i d d a a A A v v e e n n u u e e B B a a p p t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h , 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. I I n n d d e e p p e e n n d d e e n n t t B B a a p p t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, missionminded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. L L e e i i s s u u r r e e L L a a k k e e s s B B a a p p t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 6 p.m. Call the church at 6990671 for more information. M M a a r r a a n n a a t t h h a a B B a a p p t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h ( ( G G A A R R B B C C ) ) , 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 3 82-4301. P P a a r r k k w w a a y y F F r r e e e e W W i i l l l l B B a a p p t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h , 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-theM onth-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home p hone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. S S p p a a r r t t a a R R o o a a d d B B a a p p t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h , ( ( S S B B C C ) ) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Mark McDowell, Pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 382-0869. S S o o u u t t h h s s i i d d e e B B a a p p t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h ( ( G G A A R R B B C C ) ) , 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. A nursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-ofhearing. Office phone, 385-0752. S S p p r r i i n n g g L L a a k k e e B B a a p p t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h , Where the Bible is Always Open. Pastor Richard Schermerhorn, 7408 Valencia Road; 6552610. Assistant Pastor Ronald Smith, 386-1610. On U.S. 98 at the Spring Lake Village II entrance. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. for all ages; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Mid-week Bible Study and Prayer Service, 6:30 p.m. Nursery available for all services. S S u u n n r r i i d d g g e e B B a a p p t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h , ( ( S S B B C C ) ) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695 .C CA A T T H H O O L L I I C C O O u u r r L L a a d d y y o o f f G G r r a a c c e e C C a a t t h h o o l l i i c c C C h h u u r r c c h h , 595 E. Main St., AvonPark, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes (September to May Sunday for grades K through 5th. Grades 6th through Youth Bible Study are from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 9th and up, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. S S t t . C C a a t t h h e e r r i i n n e e C C a a t t h h o o l l i i c c C C h h u u r r c c h h , 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Parrish office/mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049, 385-6762 (Spanish fax, 385-5169; email, office@stcathe.com ; website, www.stcathe.com School Office/Mailing, Principal Dr. Anna V. Adam, 747 S. Franklin St., Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7300; fax, 385-7310; email school@stcathe.com School office hours 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. Clergy: Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F., frjose@stcathe.com or 385-0049; Parochial Vicar, Rev. Victor Caviedes, 385-3993; Assisting Priest (retired), Rev. J. Peter Sheehan; Decons, Rev. Mr. James R. McGarry and Rev. Mr. Max M. Severe. WEEKEND MASS SCHEDULE: Saturday: 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 and 10 a.m., 12 p.m. (Spanish.m. (Holy Family Youth Center), every third Sunday of the month at 2 p.m. (French Mass Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m. Sacrament ofR econcilliation: 7:15-7:45 a.m. first F riday, 2:30-3:15 p.m. Saturday and 99:45 a.m. Sunday. Office Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. S S t t . J J a a m m e e s s C C a a t t h h o o l l i i c c C C h h u u r r c c h h , 3380 P lacidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31 Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru E aster Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m.C C H H R R I I S S T T I I A A N N C C o o r r n n e e r r s s t t o o n n e e C C h h r r i i s s t t i i a a n n C C h h u u r r c c h h (Saxon H all)1850 US 27 South, Avon Park, FL 33825. Love Christ Love People. Bill Raymond, Preaching Minister. Jon Carter, Music Minister. Sunday, 9 a.m. Bible Study; 10 a.m. Worship; Communion available each week. Wednesday, 7 p.m. Home Fellowship Group. For more information call 453-8929 or 449-0203. E E a a s s t t s s i i d d e e C C h h r r i i s s t t i i a a n n C C h h u u r r c c h h , 1 01 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each w eek 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and LifAlive and Worth the Drive! S S e e b b r r i i n n g g C C h h r r i i s s t t i i a a n n C C h h u u r r c c h h , 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Josh Knabel (812618-7118), Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Changing Seasons, a mens grief support group, meets at 1:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets at 1 p.m. Thursdays. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. F F i i r r s s t t C C h h r r i i s s t t i i a a n n C C h h u u r r c c h h ( ( D D i i s s c c i i p p l l e e s s o o f f C C h h r r i i s s t t ) ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL 33870. Phone: 385-0358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m.C C H H R R I I S S T T I I A A N N & & M M I I S S S S I I O O N N A A R R Y Y A A L L L L I I A A N N C C E E The A A l l l l i i a a n n c c e e C C h h u u r r c c h h o o f f S S e e b b r r i i n n g g , 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL 33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m.C C H H R R I I S S T T I I A A N N S S C C I I E E N N C C E E C C h h r r i i s s t t i i a a n n S S c c i i e e n n c c e e C C h h u u r r c c h h , 154 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. A free public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lessonsermons.C C H H U U R R C C H H O O F F B B R R E E T T H H R R E E N N C C h h u u r r c c h h o o f f t t h h e e B B r r e e t t h h r r e e n n 700 S. Pine S t., Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m. Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-1597.C C H H U U R R C C H H O O F F C C H H R R I I S S T T A A v v o o n n P P a a r r k k C C h h u u r r c c h h o o f f C C h h r r i i s s t t , 200 S. F orest Ave.,Avon Park, FL 33825. Minister: Don Smith. Sunday Worship Services, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available at every service. Bible Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered classes for all ages. Church phone: 453-4692. L L a a k k e e P P l l a a c c i i d d C C h h u u r r c c h h o o f f C C h h r r i i s s t t , 1069 Hwy 27 North, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Mailing address is P.O. Box 1440, Lake Placid, FL 33862. Sunday morning worship is at 10 a.m. Sunday evening wors hip is 6 p.m. Bible class 9 a.m. Sundays a nd Wednesday evenings at 7 p.m. All are invited to join us. For more information, call the church at 863-465-4636 or visit the website www.thelordsway.com/lakeplacidcofc/. S S e e b b r r i i n n g g P P a a r r k k w w a a y y C C h h u u r r c c h h o o f f C C h h r r i i s s t t , 3 800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7443. Minister: Kevin Patterson. Times of service are: Sunday Bible Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service,6 p.m.; Wednesday Bible Class, 7 p.m. C C H H U U R R C C H H O O F F G G O O D D C C h h u u r r c c h h o o n n t t h h e e R R i i d d g g e e , C hurch of God, Anderson, Ind.; 1130 State Road 17 North, Sebring, FL 33870. Worship Service Sunday, 10 a.m.; Bible Study and Prayer, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Pastor Dr. Collet Varner, (863C C H H U U R R C C H H O O F F N N A A Z Z A A R R E E N N E E F F i i r r s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h o o f f t t h h e e N N a a z z a a r r e e n n e e o o f f A A v v o o n n P P a a r r k k , P.O. Box 1118., AvonPark, FL 33825-1118. 707 W. Main St. Randall Rupert, Pastor. Sunday: Sunday school begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning worship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening service at 6 p.m. Wednesday evening service is at 7 p.m. with special services for children and adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) and Ladies ministries. If you need any more information, call 453-4851. F F i i r r s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h o o f f t t h h e e N N a a z z a a r r e e n n e e o o f f L L a a k k e e P P l l a a c c i i d d , 512 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852. Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children and youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor.C C H H U U R R C C H H E E S S O O F F C C H H R R I I S S T T I I N N C C H H R R I I S S T T I I A A N N U U N N I I O O N N C C o o m m m m u u n n i i t t y y B B i i b b l l e e C C h h u u r r c c h h C C h h u u r r c c h h e e s s o o f f C C h h r r i i s s t t i i n n C C h h r r i i s s t t i i a a n n U U n n i i o o n n , (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17A North (truck routePark. Presenting Jesus Christ as the answer for time and eternity. Sunday morning worship service, 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided. Junior Church activities at same time for K-6 grade. Sunday School Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m. (Transportation available.) Sunday evening praise and worship service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and youth activities at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Everyone is welcome, please come worship with us. Tom Schwankweiler, Pastor. Phone 453-6052.PLACESTOWORSHIP S potifyMost streamed tracks 1. Robin Thicke, Blurred Lines (Star Trak LLC) 2 Miley Cyrus, We Cant S top (RCA Records 3. Imagine Dragons, Radioactive (KIDinaKORNER/Interscope Records) 4 Macklemore & Ryan Lewis feat. Ray Dalton, Cant Hold Us (Macklemore 5. Daft Punk, Get Lucky Radio Edit (Columbia R ecords) 6 Daft Punk, Get Lucky (Columbia Records 7. Bruno Mars, Treasure (Atlantic Records 8 Macklemore & Ryan Lewis feat. Wanz, Thrift Shop (Macklemore 9 Justin Timberlake, Mirrors (RCA Records 10. J. Cole, Power Trip ( Roc Nation/Columbia) Most viral tracks 1. Avicii, Wake Me Up (Avicii Music AB) 2 Krewella, Live for the Night (Columbia Records 3 Lorde, Royals (Lava Music/Republic Records) 4. Martin Garrix, Animals Original Mix (Spinnin R ecords) 5. Lorde, Tennis Court ( Lava Music/Republic Records) 6. Atmosphere, Bob Seger (Rhymesayers 7. Robin Thicke, Blurred Lines (Star Trak, LLC) 8 Lee Greenwood, God B less the U.S.A. (Capitol Nashville) 9. Robin Thicke, Give It 2 U (Star Trak, LLC) 1 0. Smallpools, Dreaming (RCA Records I TunesTop songs 1. Blurred Lines (feat. T.I. & Pharrell), Robin Thicke 2. We Cant Stop, M iley Cyrus 3. Radioactive, Imagine Dragons 4. Get Lucky (feat. Pharrell Williams), Daft Punk 5. Treasure, Bruno Mars 6. Cant Hold Us (feat. Ray Dalton R yan Lewis, M acklemore 7. Cruise (Remix (feat. Nelly G eorgia Line 8 Same Love (feat. Mary Lambert), Macklemore & Ryan Lewis 9. Cups (Pitch Pefects When Im Gone Pop Version), Anna Kendrick 10. Come & Get It, Selena Gomez Top albums 1. Magna Carta Holy Grail, Jay-Z 2. Born Sinner, J Cole 3. The Gifted, Wale 4. Night Visions, I magine Dragons 5. Yeezus, Kanye West 6. Pitch Perfect, V arious Artists 7 Random Access Memories, Daft Punk 8 The Heist, Macklemore & RyanL ewis 9. Heres to the Good Times, Florida Georgia Line 10. Glorious Ruins (Live i Phone & iPadTop Paid iPhone Apps 1 WhatsApp Messenger (WhatsApp Inc. 2 Wheres My Mickey? (Disney 3. Heads Up! (Warner Bros.) 4. Minecraft Pocket Edition (Mojang 5. LEGO Batman: DC Super Heroes (Warner Bros.) 6 iTranslate Voice (Sonico GmbH) 7 Contra: Evolution (PunchBox Studios 8 AfterLight (Simon Filip 9. LIMBO Game (Playdead 1 0. Rhonna Designs (Rhonna Farrer Top Free iPhone Apps 1. Despicable Me: Minion Rush (Gameloft 2. Candy Crush Saga, ( King.com Limited) 3 True or False Test Your W its! (Games for Friends G mbH) 4 Google Maps (Google Inc. 5. Instagram (Burbn Inc. 6. Snapchat (Snapchat Inc. 7. YouTube (Google Inc. 8. Ask.fm (Ask.fm9 Facebook (Facebook Inc. 10. Escape If You Can (Kaarel K irsipuu) T op Paid iPad Apps 1. LEGO Batman: DC Super Heroes (Warner Bros.) 2. Minecraft Pocket Edition ( Mojang) 3. LIMBO Game (Playdead 4. Wheres My Mickey? XL (Disney 5. SpongeBob Moves In ( Nickelodeon) T op Free iPad Apps 1 Despicable Me: Minion Rush (Gameloft 2 Candy Crush Saga, (King.com Limited 3 Secret Passages: Hidden Objects (Pocket Gems Inc. 4. Can You Escape (Kaarel K irsipuu) 5. Design It! Outfit Maker f or Fashion Girls Makeover : Dress Up Make Up and Tailor (TabTale LTD) The Lists

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C M Y K www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, July 14, 2013Page B9 E E P P I I S S C C O O P P A A L L S S t t . A A g g n n e e s s E E p p i i s s c c o o p p a a l l C C h h u u r r c c h h 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday Services: Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. M idweek service on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always welcome. Church o ffice 385-7649, for more information. S S t t . F F r r a a n n c c i i s s o o f f A A s s s s i i s s i i A A n n g g l l i i c c a a n n E E p p i i s s c c o o p p a a l l C C h h u u r r c c h h , 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Phone: 465-0051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Nelson, Rector. Summer Sunday schedule, 9 a.m. and 6 p.m., June 2-Sept. 1, 10 a.m. Bible study. 6 p.m. Wednesday: Holy Communion with healing service, 9 a.m. Thursday. St. Francis Thrift Shop, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday, and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. (863 3715.E E V V A A N N G G E E L L I I C C A A L L F F R R E E E E C C H H U U R R C C H H O O F F A A M M E E R R I I C C A A T T h h e e C C h h u u r r c c h h o o f f t t h h e e W W a a y y E E F F C C A A , 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a .m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fell owship time. Child care and childrens c hurch are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way A place for you. Office Phone: 471-6140, Church Cell Phone: 273-3674. Email: thewaychurch@ h otmail.com Web site: w ww.TheWayChurch.orgG G R R A A C C E E B B R R E E T T H H R R E E N N G G r r a a c c e e B B r r e e t t h h r r e e n n C C h h u u r r c c h h , 3626 Thunderbird Road, (863. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday services at 7 p.m. We offer Kid City Childrens Ministry throughout all services, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married couples, primetimers, and Bible studies in Spanish. Kid City Day Care, Preschool and AfterSchool Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For registration call: 385-3111). Check us out on the Web at www.sebringgrace.org .I I N N D D E E P P E E N N D D E E N N T T F F i i r r s s t t C C h h r r i i s s t t i i a a n n C C h h u u r r c c h h , 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church. Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events.I I N N T T E E R R D D E E N N O O M M I I N N A A T T I I O O N N A A L L W W o o r r l l d d H H a a r r v v e e s s t t a a n n d d R R e e s s t t o o r r a a t t i i o o n n M M i i n n i i s s t t r r i i e e s s , (non-denominational Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 453-3771. Sunday service: Sunday School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rogers.L L U U T T H H E E R R A A N N A A t t o o n n e e m m e e n n t t L L u u t t h h e e r r a a n n C C h h u u r r c c h h ( ( E E L L C C A A ) ) , 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen, Deacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, third and fifth Sunday each month, and Rev. Jefferson Cox on the second and fourth Sunday of each month. Jim Helwig, organist/choir director. Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee hour on the first and third Sunday of each month. Council meeting on the first Tuesday of month; Ladies Group WELCA meets at noon second Tuesday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Labyrinth Prayer Garden open seven days a week to congretation and community. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. C C h h r r i i s s t t L L u u t t h h e e r r a a n n C C h h u u r r c c h h A A v v o o n n P P a a r r k k L L C C M M S S , 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School past the f our-way stop sign. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at (863 471-2663 or see christlutheranavonpark.org F F a a i i t t h h L L u u t t h h e e r r a a n n C C h h u u r r c c h h L L C C M M S S , 2740 Lakeview Dr, Sebring Church phone: 385-7848 Faith Child Development Center: 3853232. Summer Sunday Worship Service: 10 a.m. Communion served 1st, 3rd & 5th Sunday. Sunday School & Bible Classes: 9 :00 a.m. Worship Svc. Broadcast at 10 a.m. on WITS 1340AM each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies, Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782 p .m. Tuesday-Friday and 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. G G o o o o d d S S h h e e p p h h e e r r d d L L u u t t h h e e r r a a n n C C h h u u r r c c h h ( ( A A A A L L C C ) ) A A m m e e r r i i c c a a n n A A s s s s o o c c i i a a t t i i o o n n o o f f L L u u t t h h e e r r a a n n C C h h u u r r c c h h e e s s , 3240 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. James Weed, pastor. Worship S ervice, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 9 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3852346. N N e e w w L L i i f f e e E E v v a a n n g g e e l l i i c c a a l l L L u u t t h h e e r r a a n n C C h h u u r r c c h h , 3 725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELSorship a t 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Luke Willitz at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlifesebring.com R R e e s s u u r r r r e e c c t t i i o o n n L L u u t t h h e e r r a a n n C C h h u u r r c c h h E E L L C C A A 324 E. Main St., at Memorial Drive, Avon Park. Pastor Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Sunday worship at 8 and 10:30 a.m.;S unday School at 9:15 a.m. Fragrance Free Service Wednesdays at 7 p.m. Open Communion celebrated at all services. Gods Work, Our Hands. T T r r i i n n i i t t y y L L u u t t h h e e r r a a n n C C h h u u r r c c h h L L C C M M S S , 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL 33852; 4655253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots Pre-School director; and Noel Johnson, minister of youth and family life. Worship schedule after Easter through December: Worship service 10 a.m., and Education Hour, 8:45 a.m. Worship schedule for January through Easter: Worship service, 8:30 and 11 a.m., Education Hour 9:45 a.m. Traditional Service with Holy Communion each first and third Sunday. NonTraditional Service each second, fourth and fifth Sunday. Seasonal mid-week services Wednesday evenings during Lent and Advent. Call church office for additional Worship times and special holiday services. Other activities and groups include: Choirs; Ladies Guild and LWML; Mens Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies as scheduled; Trinity Tots Preschool, Youth Group activities (call for meeting times and dates). Visit us online at: www.Trinitylutheranlp.com .N N O O N N D D E E N N O O M M I I N N A A T T I I O O N N A A L L B B i i b b l l e e F F e e l l l l o o w w s s h h i i p p C C h h u u r r c c h h , 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 yrs through 5th grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. C C a a l l v v a a r r y y C C h h u u r r c c h h , 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening service, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small friendly church waiting for your visit. C C h h r r i i s s t t i i a a n n T T r r a a i i n n i i n n g g M M i i n n i i s s t t r r i i e e s s I I n n c c . , on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. A nursery and childrens church are p rovided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister, lindadowni ng@live.com. Casey L. Downing, associate minister, caseydowning@hotmail.com. Church phone: 314-0482. Web site: www. ctm forme.com C C r r o o s s s s r r o o a a d d s s o o f f L L i i f f e e , 1 48 E. Interlake B lvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852; Tel. 863655-9163. The place of your Divinea ppointment. We expect our supernatural God to transform our lives through His power and grace. Come, learn of His plan and destiny for you. With His plan we receive His provision along with His perfect timing and opportunity. What you h ave longed for, but have been missing, can now be received. The direction youh ave been thirsty for will suddenly quench your parched soul. Come to experience what you have been missing for so long e mpowerment in every area of life. We teach, train and send forth to win souls. You dont speak English no problema. We have a Spanish interpreter. We look forward to fellowship and worship with you at 7 p.m. every Wednesday. Pastoers G il and Rosa Benton (Faith Never Fails G G r r a a c c e e B B i i b b l l e e C C h h u u r r c c h h , 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL 33872. Phone, 382-1085. Dustin Woods, lead pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer G athering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; W ednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry. w ww.GBCconnected.org F F a a i i t t h h C C e e n n t t e e r r W W e e s s t t M M i i n n i i s s t t r r y y , Restoring L ives, Families &Communities. In the Banyan Plaza at 2349 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. Pastors Leroy and JoAnn Taylor the public to worship on Sundays at 11 a.m. for Praise & Worship and on Wednesdays at 7 p.m. for Bible s tudy and prayer. Children classes are available for all services. Ministries for youth, men and women are held througho ut the month. Please attend these Spiritfilled services. Moving Forward in Unity. C hurch office, 385-1800 or 655-2748. H H i i g g h h l l a a n n d d s s C C o o m m m m u u n n i i t t y y C C h h u u r r c c h h a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. N N e e w w B B e e g g i i n n n n i i n n g g s s C C h h u u r r c c h h o o f f S S e e b b r r i i n n g g meeting at The Morris Chapel, 307 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Pastor Gary Kindle. Bible study every Sunday, 9 a.m. Blended Church Service, 10:15 a.m. Phone (863 beginningschurchofsebring.com Begin your week with us. T T h h e e L L o o r r d d s s S S e e n n t t i i n n e e l l F F e e l l l l o o w w s s h h i i p p C C h h u u r r c c h h 148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid (at Lake Placid Christian School), Pastor Juanita Folsom. Sunday morning service, 10:30 a.m.; Monday, Sentinel School of Theology, 7 p.m.; Church service, Tuesday, 7 p.m. More information at www.juanitafolsomministries.com. U U n n i i o o n n C C h h u u r r c c h h 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Contemporary worship service is at 6:30 p.m. Saturday with Pastor Tiger Gullett. Sunday traditional worship service is at 7:45 a.m. and 9 a.m. Contemporary Sunday worship service is at 10:45 a.m. Nursery and childrens church on Saturday nightes and 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sundays. Breakfast and lunch menus at Solid Grounds. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org U U n n i i t t y y L L i i f f e e E E n n r r i i c c h h m m e e n n t t C C e e n n t t r r e e , new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary.P P R R E E S S B B Y Y T T E E R R I I A A N N C C o o v v e e n n a a n n t t P P r r e e s s b b y y t t e e r r i i a a n n C C h h u u r r c c h h ( ( P P C C A A ) ) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 338722113. Pastor Tom Schneider. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Sunday morning worship: Traditional service, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday school, 9:15 a.m. Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Childrens/Youth Group, 5:30-7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; em ail: covpres@strato.net ; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org Office hours: 8:30-12:30 a.m. Monday-Friday. F F i i r r s s t t P P r r e e s s b b y y t t e e r r i i a a n n C C h h u u r r c c h h A A R R P P , 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), AvonPark, FL 33825. Phone: 453-3242. T he Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. S unday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. thirdT hursday. Be a part of a warm, caring c hurch family with traditional services, foll owing biblical truth. F F i i r r s s t t P P r r e e s s b b y y t t e e r r i i a a n n C C h h u u r r c c h h , A A R R P P , 319 P oinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. 3850 107. Email: faith@strato.net, Rev. Darrell A Peer, pastor. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m. Youth Group (middle school and high school age), 3:30-6:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m. Nursery available during worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. F F i i r r s s t t P P r r e e s s b b y y t t e e r r i i a a n n C C h h u u r r c c h h , A A R R P P , w ww.fpclp.com, 117 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday Traditional Worship, 9 a.m.; Contemporary Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday School, 10:10 a.m. Wednesday evenings: Adult small group Bible Sstudy 7 p.m. (Nursery available), Youth Group 6-12th grades) 7 p.m., nursery and childrens ministry, 7 p.m. Family Biblical Counseling available by appointment. S S p p r r i i n n g g L L a a k k e e P P r r e e s s b b y y t t e e r r i i a a n n C C h h u u r r c c h h ( ( U U S S A A ) ) , 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail, springlakepc@embarqmail.com, Web site, http://slpc.embarqspace.com.S S E E V V E E N N T T H H D D A A Y Y A A D D V V E E N N T T I I S S T T A A v v o o n n P P a a r r k k S S e e v v e e n n t t h h d d a a y y A A d d v v e e n n t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h 1410 West Avon Blvd., Avon Park. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com, Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. A sale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Frank Gonzalez. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALL ARE WELCOME. Associate Pastor is Ryan Amos. Website is www.discoverjesus.org S S e e b b r r i i n n g g S S e e v v e e n n t t h h D D a a y y A A d d v v e e n n t t i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h , 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 3852438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Nathan Madrid.T T H H E E C C H H U U R R C C H H O O F F L L A A T T T T E E R R D D A A Y Y S S A A I I N N T T S S T T h h e e C C h h u u r r c c h h o o f f J J e e s s u u s s C C h h r r i i s s t t o o f f L L a a t t t t e e r r D D a a y y S S a a i i n n t t s s 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863 Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863vices: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:10-1p.m.; P rimary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8 :20 p.m. Scouts: first and third W ednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 811 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m.T T H H E E S S A A L L V V A A T T I I O O N N A A R R M M Y Y T T h h e e S S a a l l v v a a t t i i o o n n A A r r m m y y C C e e n n t t e e r r f f o o r r W W o o r r s s h h i i p p Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. U U N N I I T T E E D D M M E E T T H H O O D D I I S S T T F F i i r r s s t t U U n n i i t t e e d d M M e e t t h h o o d d i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h , 1 05 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL 33870. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the F LC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 a nd 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth F ellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays with Rick Heilig, youth director. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. F F i i r r s s t t U U n n i i t t e e d d M M e e t t h h o o d d i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h , 200 S. L ake Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. (863 4 53-3759, Devon Jarrett, Pastor. Sunday S chool 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Bible study every Wednesday at 6 p.m. Visit us at our church website: www.fumcap.org. M M e e m m o o r r i i a a l l U U n n i i t t e e d d M M e e t t h h o o d d i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h , 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay Lake Placid, FL, 33852. Rev. Tim Haas, pastor. Rev. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral assistant. Rev. Jerry McCauley, visitation pastor. Sunday worship services: Worship Service, 8:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m. We offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth programs, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship. We are a congregation that wants to know Christ and make Him known. Check out our church website at www.memorialumc.com or call the church office at 465-2422. Lakeview Christian School, VPK to Grade 5, 4650313. S S t t . J J o o h h n n U U n n i i t t e e d d M M e e t t h h o o d d i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h , 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Adult Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all services. Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring.org S S p p r r i i n n g g L L a a k k e e U U n n i i t t e e d d M M e e t t h h o o d d i i s s t t C C h h u u r r c c h h , 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98 The Rev. Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church office phone: 655-0040.U U N N I I T T E E D D C C H H U U R R C C H H O O F F C C H H R R I I S S T T E E m m m m a a n n u u e e l l U U n n i i t t e e d d C C h h u u r r c c h h o o f f C C h h r r i i s s t t , Jesus didnt reject people, neither do we. Join us for worship every Sunday at 9:30 a.m. and youll be embraced by a compassionate congregation that is all-inclusive. Were at the corner of Hammock and Hope. Choir and Bell Choir practice on Wednesday; Bible studies throughout the week. 471-1999; sebringemmanuel ucc.com.PLACESTOWORSHIP The Lists C oncertsPollstars top tours Ranks artists by avera ge box office gross per city and includes the a verage ticket price for shows in North America.T he previous weeks ranking is in parentheses. 1. (1 S tones; $7,969,276; $346.09. 2. (2aylor Swift; $2,188,099; $85.18. 3. (3 $ 1,919,435; $74.36. 4. (4 $1,612,999; $104.13. 5. (5 $1,390,010; $108.91. 6. (6 T he Block; $838,510; $66.69. 7 (7 $780,014; $51.47. 8. (8im McGraw; $ 575,811; $36.47. 9. (9 $566,551; $36.20. 10. (11 Carrie Underwood; $495,724; $62.39. 1 1. (13 Panic; $416,309; $46.05. 12. (14y Manilow; $354,265; $57.72. 13. (15 $ 329,571; $75.99. 14. (16 S peedwagon / Ted Nugent; $221,234; $38.78. 1 5. (17 $211,902; $48.20. B est-SellersWall Street Journal FICTION 1 Inferno by Dan Brown (Doubleday 2 Second Honeymoon by James Patterson, HowardR oughan (Little, Brown 3. And the Mountain Echoed by Khaled Hosseini (Riverhead 4. Middle School: How I survived Bullies, Broccoli, and Snake Hill by James Patterson, Chris Tebbetts and Laura Park (Little, Brown 5. Tales From a Not-SoHappy Heartbreaker by RachelR enee Russell (Aladdin 6 Affliction by Laurell K. H amilton (Berkley 7 The Heist by Janet Evanovich, Lee Goldbert ( Bantam) 8. The Fault in Our Stars b y John Green (Dutton Books 9. Bad Monkey by Carl Hiaasen (Knopf 10.The Ocean at the End of t he Lane by Neil Gaiman ( William Morrow) N ONFICTION 1. Happy, Happy, Happy: My Life and Legacy as the Duck Commander by Phil Robertson and Mark Schlabach (Howard Books) 2. Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg (Knopf 3. Jesus Calling: Enjoy Peace in His Presence by S arah Young (Thomas Nelson P ublishers) 4 The Duck Commander Family by Willie Robertson (Howard Books 5. StrengthsFinder 2.0 by Tom Rath (Gallup Press 6. American Gun by Chris Kyle with William Doyle (William Morrow & Co. 7 Lets Explore Diabetes with Owls by David Sedaris ( Little, Brown 8. Unbreakable: My Story, My Way by Jenni Rivera (Atria 9 The Wimpy Kid Do-itYourself Book by Bill OReilly (Crown-Archetype) 10.Life Code: The New Rules for Winning in the Real W orld by Phil McGraw (Bird S treet Books) FICTION E-BOOKS 1. This Man Confessed by Jodi Ellen Malpas (Grand Central Publishing) 2. Second Honeymoon by James Patterson, Howard Roughan (Little, Brown 3 Out of Breath by R ebecca Donovan (Skyscape 4 Inferno by Dan Brown (Doubleday 5. And the Mountains E choed by Khaled Hosseini ( Riverhead) 6. Affliction by Laurell K. H amilton (Berkley NONFICTION E-BOOKS 1. Forever, Erma: BestLoved Writing From Americas Favorite Humorist by Erma Bombeck (Open Road Publishing) 2. The Rise and Fall of the T hird Reich: A History of Nazi G ermany by William L. Shirer a nd Ron Rosenbaum (Rosetta Books) 3. Proof of Heaven by Eben Alexander (Simon & Schuster 4. Unbreakable: My Story, My Way by Jenni Rivera (Atria 5. Lean In by Sheryl S andberg (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group) 6 Bossypants by Tina Fey (Little, Brown 7. Born Standing Up: A Comics Life by Steve Martin( Scribner)

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C M Y K Page B10News-SunSunday, July 14, 2013www.newssun.com WELLS MOTOR COMPANY; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, used cars; 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 L ocal student graduates from Union CollegeLINCOLN, Neb. Kirsten Megan Johnson of Avon Park graduated with a Bachelor ofS ocial Work in Social Work during the Union College Commencement ceremonies on May 5. Union College awarded 166 degrees to 155 students. J ohnson graduated with the honors designation of Summa Cum Laude with a grade-point average of 3.9-4.0. Union College offers active l earning in a vibrant Christian atmosphere where students are empowered to lead. Founded in 1891 by the Seventh-day Adventist church, Union is an accredited, comprehensive col-l ege and a member of the Nebraska Independent College F oundation. Union enrolls 900 students from 46 states and 31 countries. The campus, 50 acreso f tree-covered property in southeast Lincoln, Neb., is a site o f the statewide arboretum system. With a focus on undergraduate students, Union's nurturing environment offers a traditional liber-a l arts education combined with practical experiences such as i nternships, academic and career counseling, study abroad and volunteer opportunities. In thec omfortable campus atmosphere where professors, not graduate s tudents, teach classes, Union students can choose from more than 50 majors, emphases andm inors in 27 fields of study, including a Master of Physician Assistant Studies, or a personali zed degree. For more information, visit www.ucollege.edu.Local resident graduates from William& MaryWILLIAMSBURG, Va. Bradley Stayton from LakeP lacid recently graduated from the College of William & Mary w ith a bachelors degree. Founded by royal charter in 1693, William & Mary is the second oldest educational institutioni n the nation. During the past 300 years, the college has educated three U.S. presidents Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe and John Tyler numerous sena-t ors and members of congress and other national and international leaders. William & Mary is currently ranked among the nations top 10 public universi-t ies and has been designated a Public IvyL ocal youth groups attend program at Walt Disney World AVON PARK Walker M emorial Academy of Avon Park traveled to Epcot at Walt Disney World Resort on May 14 to takep art in the Disney Youth Education Series Program(s ( Y.E.S.) Introduction to Global Citizenship. Each year, individuals and g roups from around the world travel to Walt Disney World R esort to take part in one of several Disney Y.E.S. programs. Most of the programs take place in and behind the scenes of the resorts world-famous themep arks. Areas of study include career d iscovery, life management, physical science, natural science, history, and art and humanities.T he programs use varied resources onstage and backstage t o bring real world examples to the learning experience. These twoto three-hour interactive e ducational experiences are available at both the Walt Disney World Resort in Florida and Disneyland Resort in California. They are led by professionalD isney facilitators who help guide the students and assist them in understanding the key lessons. For more information on D isney Y.E.S. Programs, visit www.DisneyYES.com or call 8 00-603-0552. Chalk Talk C ourtesy photo Dr. Icky Nicky (Dr. Nick Reed) and C-note (Carol Heausler) visit Florida Hospital Lake Placid with a multitude of gags and gimmicks, including a guitar made out of a bedpan. Join the fun of being a clown in the next clown class being held Aug. 2-4 at The American Clown Museum School, and Gift Shop in Lake Placid at 109 W. Interlake Blvd. Learn face painting ballooning, magic and skit production. Call 465-2920 or 2438 473. Clown classes begin Aug. 2 N EWYORK (AP Joseph Heller satirized the madness of war in Catch-22, he told a seri-o us tale about the tragedy of racism. Almost Like Christmas, to a ppear next week in Strand Magazine, is a grim short story about the stabbing of a Southern w hite, the towns thirst for revenge and the black man who has resigned himself to blame. Written in the late 1940s or early s, after Heller had returned from World War II, thes tory has rarely been seen and offers a peek at the early fiction of one of the 20th centurys most famous writers. Heller was to a large extent a g uy who saw through hypocrisy, greed, and the backward nature of a m ob better than most writers so i s no wonder that he turned his pen to a racist mob in a small southern town, said Andrew Gulli, managinge ditor of the Strand, a publication based in Birmingham, Mich., that h as unearthed little known works by Mark Twain, Graham Greene and others. F rom the start, Almost Like Christmas is a portrait of a worn out community. One character has the hopeless, stupid, waxen look ofa drunkard. Awindows coarse p atterns of grime reminds another character of diseased tissue, while the voice of a third man has a shrill, whinnying, malicious hysteria. I n this unnamed place, a terrible fight (the primordial brutality of an a lley fracas) has left a white man i n a coma, local residents seething and a young black man, Jess Calgary, as the prime suspect. Aw hite school teacher, identified as Carter, has the awful task of conv incing Calgary that he should come into town for questioning. Almost Like Christmas is as b leak as any of Hellers novels, but without the dark humor he would become famous for. Heller biographer Tracy Daugherty said that at the time Heller had yet to developh is own literary voice and was instead mimicking the style of magazine stories. illiam Saroyan was a huge influence on Heller at the time s tories of Depression-era hardships, written in a hard-boiled style, said D augherty. Early Heller story to be published this month

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C M Y K DearAbby: I am a 58y ear-old woman who would like your take on a problem I have with several married female friends and my married sister. During the many years I have been close to these couples, the women seem unable to have one-onone conversations, outings or a lunch date with me without including their husbands. Several times after making a lunch date, one friend, unbeknownst to me, has called her husband and invited him as well. Another friends husband never seems to allow her to talk to me alone, and will even be on speaker or another phone listening again, unbeknownst to me until he suddenly says something. My sister will not read her emails from me, but instead has her husband read them aloud to her while shes doing something else and then dictates a few words to reply to me with. Consequently, I stopped emailing her and told her why. There is nothing I would say to these ladies that I wouldnt want their husbands to hear, but can you tell me why certain women feel a need to include their spouses in their female relationships in this manner? At the very least, I feel it is extremely rude. Frustrated With My BFFs DearFrustrated: Your friends may assume that you like their husbandscompany as much as they do. They may feel that because they tell their spouses everything, their menfolk might as well hear what you have to say directly from you. Or their husbands may be retired or semi-retired and have no social lives of their own. Of course, the way to get a direct answer to your question would be to ask them why they do this, and because you feel it is rude, you should tell them. As to your sister, she may be too busy with household chores to read your emails and reply to them, which is why she has her husband read them to her, or you may have sent more than she can handle. Not sending her any more emails is not the solution; telling her how you feel might be. DearAbby: Last year a neighbor confided to me that she had been sexually assaulted. In an effort to both show and invite compassion,I told her I empathized with her because I had been assaulted on multiple occasions as a child and teen decades ago. I have now learned that this woman has told other neighbors that I had sex with a lot of men, but she failed to put it in the context that I was a child victim of multiple predators. How should I respond to this? Should I ignore the situation or explain the truth to the neighbors? I dont know whether or not to confront t he woman who divulged the information. I am shocked that shed do such a thing. I have no shame or guilt issues over what happened to me because I worked through that long ago. But Im at a loss about what, if anything, I should do. I have already learned the painful lesson that she wasnt worthy of my trust and has serious issues of her own. What are your thoughts on this matter? Re-Victimized DearRe-Victimized: You h ave every right to be angry with the blabbermouth. Because the word is out, set the record straight with the neighbors who were kind enough to tell you your confidence wasnt respected. And in the future, I wouldnt blame you if you avoided the woman who started the rumors whenever possible, and let her know why. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, July 14, 2013Page B11 BO RDERST ATESB y R. NORRIS & J. NICHOLS LEWIS ACROSS 1 Filled fast food 5 Orange County city 12 Picks, with "for" 16 Improv piece 1 9 Algerian seaport 2 0 Brand formerly marketed as Philishave outside the U.S. 21 __-mutuel 22 Fruity finish? 23 Way off the highway 24 Land on the Red Sea 27 Pick up the tab for 29 Homeowner's burden 3 0 They include skateb oarding and snowboarding3 1 "__ Angel": doo-wop classic32 __ about 3 6 Genus subdivision 3 8 Mall unit 39 Eponymous Italian educator 44 Yule quenchers 46 Ben Gurion airline 47 '60s activist gp. 48 Fancy pitcher 4 9 Laura Bush's birth c ity 52 Turow work about first-year law students 5 4 About to come up 5 6 "I'd like to buy __" 57 Time Warner, to CNN 62 Driller's deg. 63 Diagnostic test 65 Sling spirits 66 Rise dramatically 68 Driver's license word, maybe 70 "Horton Hears a W ho!" villain 73 "Don't change that" 74 New Zealand exports 78 Wrongly left the base8 1 Russian fighter 8 3 Rain block 84 MC's aid 87 Periodic "Top Chef"j udge with a restaurant in Manhattan 91 Wee 92 Orbital extreme 94 Una y __ vez: time a fter time 9 5 Grabbed the chance 97 Golfer Aoki 98 Yukon winter hrs. 101 Smaller serving 103 Learned 104 Rioter's weapon 109 City on the Po 1 12 California city associated with the founding o f Hells Angels 1 13 Normandy river 114 "Friend __?" 115 Not vulnerable (to 118 Score symbol 120 Ford and others 1 22 Macro, e.g. 1 27 Bedtime in Burgundy 128 Music-licensing o rg. 1 29 Affectedly quaint, in Colchester 130 "Great show!" in h eadlines 131 Theater 132 Utmost 1 33 Word often written d iagonally on signs 134 Taboo 135 River in central Germany D OWN 1 Linzer treats 2 Biblical landfall 3 She voiced Princess F iona in "Shrek" 4 Policing the area 5 Future MD's course 6 Bad news at the inn 7 Altar constellation 8 N.T. epistle 9 Actor Wallach 10 Myth ending 11 Philosophy espous-i ng a single reality 12 Like some auto leases 13 Kitchen cooker 14 Upstairs neighbor ofR alph and Alice 1 5 Sears 1 6 "Queen Zixi of Ix" author 17 Not going1 8 Brews for parties 25 Gourd fruits 26 Got fresh with2 8 Thing to mind, on train platforms 33 Captain Kidd's negative3 4 DuPont acrylic 35 Cheerful 3 7 Amt. after a period 40 Smart ones?4 1 Due 42 Stamp on a packingl ist 43 Peeves4 5 Catch 49 Sour __5 0 Worshipper of the sun god Inti 5 1 Hooey 53 Hacks 54 CN Tower prov. 55 Stooge chuckle 5 8 Zhou of China 59 He played Clubber Lang in "Rocky III" 60 Vichy verse 6 1 Temple Grandin's disorder6 4 Below zero: Abbr. 67 Stomach part? 6 9 Actor Rob 71 Bowl over 7 2 Lamebrain 75 Under-the-hood c leaner 76 Culinary author R ombauer 77 Fix, as a pet 7 9 TV's "Science Guy" 80 Ukraine city 82 Eat away 84 Seriously injure 85 __ facto 86 Stove fuel8 8 It can be dipped in dip 8 9 Meteorologist's tool 90 73-Across writer 93 Err 9 6 Allstate online subs idiary 98 Many a GI9 9 Like Capone's face 100 Moderates, with down" 102 A, in Augsburg 1 05 From soup __ 106 Punch combo 107 Make bread from chips? 108 "Earthsea" series author Ursula 110 First-aid kit staple 111 Empty __1 15 SALT weapon 1 16 NYC cultural center 117 International Year of Astronomy year 119 Dog who reveals he can speak in "Tik-Tok of Oz"1 21 Kitchen add-on? 123 Sushi selection 124 What U can follow 125 Mite 126 Sulu player John Solution on page B5 Diversions/Puzzles Oh, oh!We need to make a Uturn, my husband Ken exclaimed.ea re definitely going the wrong way The U-turn is probably just upa head, I responded as I looked at the map and referred to ourp rinted directions again. We pondered how we could have missed our turno ff with all the guidance we had in our hands. But, s ometimes while traveling in unfamiliar places, distractions, unclear signs (orl ack of them) or misjudgment causes us to fly right b y our exit or turn. As we traveled further along in the wrong direction, signs that said No Uturn frustrated our effortst o get turned around. Ill keep driving.Surely t here must be some place we can turn around, Ken said. Keeping a close watchf or signs (and glancing at the clock for the time we f elt we were wasting), we finally came to a place where it was safe and perm issible to turn around. At last we were heading in the right direction to correct our wrong choice. And then, up ahead, just a couple of blocks from our destination, traffic came to a standstill while they cleared accident vehicles from a railroad track. Soc lose, yet so far away. After what seemed like h ours (but actually took only minutes), the accidentw as cleared.We proceeded t o locate our destination with time to spare. Isnt it good to know that Goda llows U-turns in lifes choices too?Or maybe we should call them You-turns. N ext to being a wife and mom, I had always wanted to be at eacher. But, I let fear of the unknown (being away at college) keep me fromp ursuing my dream. Instead I became an executive secr etary. With God, however, nothing is ever wasted. T hrough motherhood and church, the teacher in me n ever ceased to exist. Then God placed on my heart a passion to write. In that calling and through that craft, he gave me a U-turnw hile keeping my original desire in tact and using my s ecretarial skills, too. Actually, it was a youturn. God knew when Iw as ready. Like the travel obstacles we faced on that d ay, I came up against bumps in lifes journey that seemed to delay progress. B ut, a you-turn embraces submission and perseverance so the Lord can lead us step by step. Psalm 119: 105, NKJV, r eminds us that Gods Word will never lead us astray when it says, Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path. I s God trying to turn you around?Selah J an Merop of Sebring is a News-Sun correspondent. U-turn or you-turn? Pause And Consider Jan Merop Metro News ServicesA ries (March 21-April 20) Aries, work to strengthen a relationship with a coworker or acquaintance. Developing this relationship now will bear fruit down the road. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Taurus, take some time for quiet contemplation this week. You have a lot of things on your mind and need to work through them before you can focus on other things. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Gemini, you may find yourself on a spending spree and it may be difficult to know when to put your credit cards away. Bring a friend along to help you reign in your spending. Cancer(June 22-July 22) Cancer, with so many big decisions looming on the horizon, you may be thinking of running away from it all. But all of your problems will still be waiting for you when you get back. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23 Leo, people have been coming at you from all angles and youre ready for a break. Retreat to a quiet place sometime this week and pamper yourself. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22 Achange of scenery breathes new life into your daily routine, Virgo. Although it may be temporary, you will embrace the opportunities to recharge for a while. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23 Libra, a new job may give you a new perspective on life. Make the most of this new perspective and apply it to both your personal and professional lives. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Scorpio, sometimes people just do not get your sense of humor, so dont be upset if a joke doesnt garner the laughs you anticipated. Your closest companions will still share a laugh. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Sagittarius, you will host a house full of guests this week. This role suits you well, so dont worry as the party draws closer and the pressure begins to mount. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) Capricorn, the final countdown until big changes are in store has begun. Are you ready for all of the things you still have to get done? If not, get busy and enlist a few helpers. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) Aquarius, you are often supportive of those around you and they appreciate that support. Continue to be a valued friend and confidante, and you'll be happy you did. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Pisces, you may have to ask for some help this week. Accept this support and recognize its necessary to get the job done. Famous birthdaysJuly 14 Jane Lynch, actress (53Lana Parrilla, actress (36 Jayma Mays, actress (34 July 17 -Luke Bryan, singer (37Wendy Williams, TVhost (49 19 Campbell Scott, actor (52 Hough, actress (25 You have a lot on your mind, Taurus Woman irked that married friends cant seem to leave spouses at home Horoscope Dear Abby

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C M Y K Page B12News-SunSunday, July 14, 2013www.newssun.com Photos courtesy of Getty ImagesGoodnutritioniskeyThere are many factors involved when it comes to choosing a pet food for your dog or cat. Keep in mind if your pets arent digesting the ingredients properly, nutrition is not being absorbed. Get maximum nutrition from every bite by purchasing a natural, high quality food with a digestive health support system, such as Holistic Select Natural Pet Food. Ingredients to look for include:Probiotics or good bacteria help keep your pets immune system healthy. Holistic Select contains live probiotics that are added to the food after it has been cooked and cooled. This process assures maximum survival of the probiotics, so that your pet reaps the full benefits of their food. Prebiotics stimulate the growth and maintenance of good bacteria, like probiotics, in your pets digestive tract. Fiber plays an important role in human digestive health, a nd it also plays an integral role in your pets digestive health. Look for foods with fiber-rich ingredients, such as oatmeal, flaxseed, pumpkin and papaya to promote digestive regularity. Digestive enzymes help your pets body break down proteins, fiber and carbohydrates. This ensures your pet is getting the nutrients from their food, while reducing stress on their organs. This is especially crucial for aging pets.Getpetsmoving everydayDogs and cats used to have to work for a living. Many were bred to be mousers, hunters, herders or protectors. Most pets today have a much more sedentary lifestyle. They spend their days lying around, waiting for their human companions to come home and are rewarded for their patience with a big bowl of food. However, regular exercise supports healthy circulation of both nutrients and waste and is essential for a pet to have a happy and long life. Experts recommend cat owners plan a daily play session. Toys that mimic the actions of their natural prey birds, mice or bugs should get them up and moving. Dogs need to be walked for 20 to 30 minutes each day, while larger breeds often need much more. At your next veterinarian visit, ask if your pooch is healthy enough for an exercise program and ask for recommendations based on breed. Adequate exercise is an important step toward good health. Its also a great way to reduce such unwanted behaviors as chewing, digging, scratching or whining. To learn more about the importance of digestive health for your pet, visit www.HolisticSelect.com. FAMILYFEATURES Pe t parents do everything they can to ensure their dogs and cats are around as long as possible. Pets, much like h umans, need a healthy diet and plenty of exercise to h elp them live a long and happy life. Living