<%BANNER%>
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01276
 Material Information
Physical Description: Unknown
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00028423:01276


This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

C M Y K By SAMANTHAGHOLAR s gholar@newssun.comSEBRING It was an emotion filled afternoon Thursday as 325 soldiers were honored during the 3rd Battalion 116th Field Artillery Deployment Ceremony. The brigade will depart from Highlands and surrounding counties thisw eekend, The soldiers will spend nine months in Qatar. Approximately 1,200 family members, friends and supportersf illed the Highlands County Fair and Convention Center to show t heir respects and wish the soldiers well. S oldiers stood in formation throughout the ceremony listening t o the kind and encouraging words of guests speakers. The send-off featured half a dozen speakers who addressed the brave men and women, including Florida Congressman Tom Rooney. There is no greater service that what you and your families are about to do, Rooney said. Rooney offered many thanks and wellwishes to the soldiers as they venture out into the Middle East. Matthew Hearon, a former 116th artillery brigade commander during the units last deployment in 2005, spoke briefly to the soldiers, reminding them that they are fully capable of returning from their deployment safe and sound. Theyve known for a year that they are mobilizing and deploying.I have the utmost confidence that they will exceed expectations, Hearon said. As for your families, we are here for you while your soldiers are deployed. Do not hesitate to contact us. Lt. Col. David Pellet is the current brigade commander for this deployment. Pellet looks forward to supervising the 325 souls he is in charge of while deployed. I am truly honored to be your commander, Pellet said to the soldiers. Following the ceremony, soldiers were greeted throughout the center by familiar faces some smiling, some frowning. Plenty of hugs and kisses were given out and the soldiers had plenty to say regarding their deployment. Sanchia James of Orlando is a 12-year veteran in the military. Though this will be Jamesfirst deployment, she isnt feeling as nervous as she thought she would. Im not nervous, no. Im just ready to get over there, get it done and get back, said the mother of two. James works as a military police dispatcher. Her job is an important part of the daily operations of any unit. Though the career woman NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 S unday, February 24, 2013www.newssun.comVolume 94/Number 24 | 75 cents www.newssun .com H ighLow 85 63Complete Forecast PAGE 14A Morning fog, daytime heat Forecast Question: Do sidewalks in the Woodlawn subdivision of Sebring need to be replaced? Next question: Are you nervous about the automatic federal spending cuts due to begin Friday? www.newssun .comMake your voice heard at Online Obituaries Jimmy Conklin Age 42, of Avon Park Herbert Racke Age 83, of Avon Park Obituaries, Page 5A Phone ... 385-6155Fax ... 385-2453Online: www.newssun.com Yes 53.6% No 46.4% 099099401007 Total votes: 28 Arts & Entertainment10B Business5B Chalk Talk8B Classifieds10A Community Briefs2A Crossword Puzzle13B Dear Abby13B Editorial & Opinion4A Horoscope13B Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times13B Pause and Consider13B Sports On TV2B Index Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and HEARTLAND NATIONAL BANK***; 11.25"; 1.5"; Black plus three; process, front strip; 00027289 By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Heartland Idol fans packed the Highlands County YMCApavilion area Thursday night to watch the battle of the voices. The semi-final rounds of Junior and Teen Idol were exciting and jam-packed with talent. The six Idol judges were laying on the compliments as well as the constructive criticism for each of the 17 aspiring singers. Five contestants from each division were chosen to move on to the next round following Thursdays performances. The junior idol performers that were selected to move on to next weeks show were: Kalie Christian, 12, Sebring; Ashdone Dennison, 7, Avon Park; Mariah Finney, 12, Avon Park; Bella Marerro, 8, Sebring; and Caitlin Siness, 11, Sebring. Each of the five singers amped up their previous performances with the help of an instrumental music track which is brought in after the qualifying rounds. Songs ranging in genre from classic Disney ballads to current pop-chart hits were belted out by the five talented singers. The overly-talented teen division was also narrowed down to five Teen, Jr. Idol finalists chosen, adult qualifiers set County says goodbye to 325 N ational Guard u nit as they leave for Qatar A proper send off News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS M ore than 300 Florida National Guardsmen from across central Florida are being honored Thursday afternoon b efore leaving for a deployment to Qatar in southwest Asia. The soldiers will depart Saturday to take part in Operation Enduring Freedom. News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMON S Spc. Tuyet Vo-Le, of Vero Beach, cuddles her son Izaiah Buonomo as her brother Quan Vo-Le snaps a picture Thursday afternoon after the Third Battalion 116th Field Artillery deployment ceremony at the convention center at Firemens Field in Sebring. See UNIT, page 7A See ADULT, page 3A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Cammie Lester, left, makes her way to the stage Thursday evening as her fans cheer her on during Heartland Idol teen semi-finals. INSIDESpring is nearCleaning doesnt have to be a chore LIVING,14BSoaked StreaksSebring outlasts rain, DeSoto for win SPORTS,1BGame of lifeGroup presents play based on bingo INSIDE,8A

PAGE 2

C M Y K By JIM KUHNHENN and TRACIE CONE A ssociated PressWASHINGTON W idespread flight delays and shuttered airports,offlimit seashores and unprot ected parks. The Obama administration is painting a dire portrait of the many ways the public will feel the effectso f automatic federal spending cuts due to begin March 1. The grim picture is emerging as the WhiteH ouse and lawmakers count down the days until the gove rnment is forced to trim $85 billion in domestic andd efense spending with hardly any leeway to save some programs from the budget knife. In detailing the costs of t he cuts,President Barack Obama is seeking to raise the publics awareness while also applying pressure on congressionalR epublicans who oppose his blend of targeted savings and tax increases to tackle federal deficits. ve been very clear that these kinds of arbitrary, automatic cuts would have an adverse impact on families,on teachers,on parents who are reliant on Head Start programs,on our military readiness,on mental h ealth services,on medical research,Obama said Friday. This is not a smartw ay for us to reduce the deficit. Just in case those conseq uences didnt capture the publics attention,the White H ouse also had Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood spell out the impact on travelers,a frequent-flier nightmare of 90-m inute airport waits,limited flights and closed regional airports. Republican lawmakers dismissed LaHoods warnings as exaggerations. But LaHood said the cuts w ould require slicing more than $600 million from the F ederal Aviation Administration,resulting in furloughs of one day per pay period for a majority of the agencs 47,000 employees. Once airlines see the potential impact of these furloughs,we expect that they will change their schedules and cancelf lights,LaHood said. Moreover,he said,the Transportation Department is looking to likely close air traffic control towers at 100 airports that have fewer than 150,000 flight operations per year. re talking about places like Boca Raton, F la.; Joplin,Mo.; Hilton Head,S.C.; and San Marcos,Texas,he said. Alli n all,nearly two-thirds of the airports are concentrated in three states C alifornia,Florida and Texas. B ut in a statement, Airlines for America,an industry group,said the organization,the FAA and Page 2ANews-SunSunday, February 24, 2013www.newssun.com DUMMY 2013; 5.542"; 4.5"; Black; publishers block; 00026403 KAYLOR & KAYLOR; 5.542"; 1.5"; Black; social security, above lotto; 00027048 KAYLOR & KAYLOR; 5.542"; 1.5"; Black; auto accident, below lotto; 00027049 Feb. 20 182328364345x:4Next jackpot $3 millionFeb. 16 82126273040x:2 Feb. 13 51225293334x:2 Feb. 21 313152833 Feb. 20 23142433 Feb. 19 1025303536 Feb. 18 1315172024 Feb. 22 (n 4290 Feb. 22 (d 8513 Feb. 21 (n 2431 Feb. 21 (d 2127 Feb. 22 (n 195 Feb. 22 (d 699 Feb. 21 (n 282 Feb. 21 (d 866 Feb. 19 39173620 Feb. 15 614343517 Feb. 12 6824428 Feb. 8 315172917 Feb. 20 317192532 PB: 17Next jackpot $80 millionFeb. 16 1516465058 PB: 29 Feb. 13 1223252743 PB: 29 Note:Cash 3 and Play 4 drawings are twice per day:(d daytime drawing,(n nighttime drawing. PB:Power Ball Lottery Center News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY A mobile home on Howard Avenue was destroyed by fire Friday afternoon. Everyone in the home escaped safely. Three volunteer departments responded to the call, West Sebring, Desoto City and Leisure Lakes. The fire in under investigation. Unconfirmed reports by witnesses say the fire was electrical and started in the kitchen. By SAMANTHA GHOLAR s gholar@newssun.comSEBRING The Sebring F ire Department will have a f ew new faces soon since c ity staff approved the hiri ng of eight part-time firef ighters. T he ongoing issues b etween the city and SFD have yet to be resolved; m andatory overtime include d. Due to the hiring freeze t hat was placed on the fire d epartment as a result of t he contract negotiations, firefighters have beenf orced to work overtime each week to ensure that there is adequate coverage i n the community in the e vent of an emergency. City Administrator Scott Noethlich confirmed that the new hires will begin t heir employment very soon. We have hired eight individuals. They haveall been through their testing and we are finishing up with the final application process and drug testing, N oethlich said. The new hires will work in an effort to cut back on t he full-timers overtime. Complaints (non-formal have been vocalized by some of the SFD members regarding the long hours, though many employees understand the position they are currently in. N oethlich stated th at close to 30 applications had been submitted for the parttime positions. City staff will continue to review those qualified and keep t he applications on file in t he event more firefighters a re needed. By the end of this month well have them w orking,Noethlich said. Im not sure which of the e ight hired are local firef ighters. We did have severa l from outside of Highlands County apply, but we also had some from within Highlands County a pply as well. --As the end of the month approaches,both the city and the fire union will be submitting their briefs to a special magistrate in Tallahassee for his recommendations. The two sides s at down three weeks ago d uring a special meeting to hash out the issues within t he departments contract. The parties received the minutes from the court report last week to use for the brief preparing. Both the city and t he u nion were given until Thursday to submit briefs to the magistrate; the magistrate will then give his r ecommendation within 15 days of receiving the briefs. City hires 8 part-time firefighters Three departments respond Tax Collector continues to provide driver licenses servicesS pecial to the News-SunSEBRING The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles will close its driver licenseo ffice at 1205 U.S. 27 North in Sebring on Thursday. H ighlands County Tax Collector Eric Zwayer currently provides full driverl icense services at the Avon Park and Lake Placid locat ions and will begin full services at the Sebring office beginning Monday,March 4. Addresses for each location are:116 E. Main St.,AvonP ark; 11 N. Pine Ave.,Lake Placid; and 540 S. Commerce A ve.,Sebring. The phone number for all three locations is 402-6685. We are pleased to partner with the Highlands County T ax Collectors Office,said Division of Motorist Services Director Boyd Walden. TheD epartment is transitioning driver license services to most county tax collectors a cross the state,and the closure of the state-run Sebring o ffice will complete the transition for Highlands County. e are excited to strengthen our partnership with the department and con-t inue providing excellent customer service in offering driver license services in our downtown Sebring office. This will add to the services we currently provide in both of our Avon Park and LakeP lacid branch locations,said Tax Collector Eric Zwayer. T o reach the tax collectors website,go to www.hctaxcollector.com. Many customers can skip the trip to an office andr enew driver licenses,identification cards and vehicle tags,as well as conduct other driving-related business online atw ww.GoRenew.com. Customers who previously renewed their driver license online will be required to visit an office for the next renewal. Florida now requires additional documents to obtain a new or renewed driver license or ID card. If you visit an office to make any type of driver license transaction,you should prepare by bringing original documents to show proof of identification,Social Security number and residential address (two items). Customers who have ever changed their names legally must bring additional documentation. Tofind out exactly what you need to bring with you,visit www.GatherGoGet.com The Department also has a Facebook page where customers can inquire or keep up with news that affects Florida motorists at www.facebook.com/gathergoget The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles provides highway safety and security through excellence in service,education and enforcement. The department is leading the way to a safer Florida through the efficient and professional execution of its core mission:the issuance of driver licenses,vehicle tags and titles and operation of the Florida Highway Patrol. To learn more about DHSMV and the services offered,visit www.flhsmv.gov,follow on Twitter at @FDHSMV or find it on Facebook. DMV office closes Thursday Administration warns of impact of broad budget cuts See CUTS,page 9A COMMUNITYBRIEFS MOTA exhibit features Shoop and JohnsonSEBRING Highlands Museum of the Arts announces a new exhibit featuring the Wild & Wonderfulwood-carving and mixed media talents of local artists John Shoop and Beth Johnson. An array of sea-life themed pieces carved by Shoop and some natural and some wildly painted by partner artist Johnson will be on display through March with an opening reception from 5-8 p.m. Friday at MOTA,351 W.Center Ave.Reflections hosts two musical groupsAVON PARK Reflectionson Silver Lake is hosting two musical groups in the upcoming days. Today at 6:30 p.m.,the gospel group Sons of the Father will perform. The public is welcome.Rather than admission,a love offering will be taken. The Link Family will perform at 6:30 p.m. Monday.This show is also open to the public and tickets are only $8. The Link Union provides a musical experience of true Americana music,combining folk,rhythm,blues, jazz,swing,and gospel new grass. The eight-member Link family fuses oldtime musical instruments and stunning voices for a fresh new style. Call 452-5037.Legion Korea era vets honoredLAKE PLACID American Legion Placid Post 25 has received certificates from Secretary of Defense Leon Paneta thanking all those Korean era veterans who belong or did belong to the American Legion. Some have already been given out and the others are available at Post Commander Robert Moores office between 9 a.m. and noon MondayFriday. The Legion is presently maintaining about an 850Continued on page 5A

PAGE 3

C M Y K www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, February 24, 2013Page 3A SEBRING PAIN MANAGMENT; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, main A; 00027800 MUSSELMAN APPLIANCES; 5.542"; 21.5"; Black plus three; process, 2/24/13; 0 0027839 A von Park; Sareena Stoner, 13,Sebring; Nala Price,14, S ebring; Olivia Hitt,17, Sebring; and Cammie Lister, 13,Sebring,all gave mesmerizing performances that gained them entry into then ext round of competition. Judges were blown away by t he big voices and song selection of each of the teen competitiors but had a hard timen arrowing it down to just five. T he competition is so close in the teen division that emcee David Flowers r evealed that the scores between the teen winners were only four points separating first and second places. The Heartland Idol compet ition will continue next Thursday with the Jr. Idol Finale and the first round of the Adult Qualifier. The Teen division will w rap up two weeks from now on Thursday,March 7 for the T een Finale and second round of the Adult Qualifier. A ll shows kick-off at the Highlands County YMCA at 6 p.m. Adult qualifiers start this week News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS Ashdon Dennison, 7, of Avon Park throws a handful of glitter after his performance of Diamonds on Thursday evening during Heartland Idols junior semi-finals at the YMCA in Sebring. C ontinued from page 1A News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS Kiana Vassell, 15, of Avon Park, sings Rehab during the Heartland Idol teen semi-finals in Sebring.

PAGE 4

C M Y K We do,however,have serious concerns about the TDCs commitment to arts and culture. Having been overlooked and done out of its mandated allotment fory ears the money has since been given to the Heartland Cultural Alliance it w ill take time for the TDC to regain the art communitys trust,especially because no one with a cultural or artistic back-g round sits on the board. This rift comes at the worst possible t ime Highlands County is evolving into an exciting center for culture. This year Sebring and Lake Placid were each chosen to host significant historical displays one put together by theS mithsonian,the other by the state. We were selected because the county is c entrally located,has the necessary infrastructure,and the interested volunteers. Outsiders already see what the county has to offer. Central Florida attracts creative artists. D ozens of them collaborated on the Lake Ridge Project,for example an exhibit o f painting,drawings and photographs reflecting the nature and wild life that exist all around us. This free display,nowa t the Antigallery in Kenilworth Lodge,is so well received it will travel to public l ibraries throughout the state. With projects like these we have more to offer visitors every day. Lake Placid added yet another mural, four new art galleries opened in Sebringa nd three new restaurants are serving up Italian,Latin and Mexican cooking in A von Park. The Champion for Children Theater on the Circle in Sebring will o pen later this year and dont forget the organizations that have been highlighting art and culture for years:The Highlands Art League; the Highlands County Museum of the Arts; the Museumo f Florida Art and Culture at the college; the Depot Museums in Lake Placid and Avon Park,the Childrens Museum of the Highlands; the Military SEA Museum, and the Avon Park,Lake Placid andS ebring Historical Societies. Yes,we need to continue to let the world know about the countys fabulousf ishing lakes,many golf courses,and outdoor activities. But sporting opportunities bring in only one type of tourist. If wew ant to become a popular destination, with a cross section of visitors,we have t o offer more,especially if were going to attract new businesses into the county. After neglecting the arts for years,we h ope the council understands how important it is to take advantage of this change. A merican and foreign tourists are looking for the fresh and new,in addition to a good,old-fashioned time. We strongly believe the more we offer, the more people will come. Page 4AN ews-SunS unday, February 24, 2013www.newssun.comTODAYSEDITORIALTODAYSLETTERS We have no problem with the Tourist Development Councils plans to reorganize how it distributes tourist tax dollars in marketing the county. In fact,we think it makes sense. By allotting larger percentages in more general categories the council will have more flexibility. 2 227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155D AN HOEHNESports Editor E xt. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION N EWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com V ICKIE WATSONExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.comM ITCH COLLINSExt. 507mcollins@newssun.com A DVERTISING So Im cruising Facebook a nd I stumble on this story about a woman who went to t he hospital thinking she had a hernia and wound up with a 10-pound baby boy. Huh? I thought. How does that happen? S o I followed the link to the story on a bcnews.go.com. I read about Linda Ackley,44,who had been told she couldnth ave children. Shd also had surgery that removed s ome of her stomach muscles. Somehow she missed the f act that she was pregnant and was surprised when a CT scan revealed the news. The baby,a healthy girl,was delivered by emergency c-s ection. Her husband got the news over the phone.Needless to say,he was surprised. I wish someone would havet aken a picture of my face. I thought about this story f or a few days and decided it was worth a column. Since Ic ouldnt find the story on Facebook again I did a Google search for woman who didnt know she was pregnant.And got an educa-t ion. According to Google, there were about 158,000,000 results for the search. Even if you figureh alf of these are bogus results,thats a lot of stories. Not having time to read all of these,I tried to skim a few. The upshot is these women claim that there was no sign that they were pregnant. They say that they had their periods,no cravings, and didnt put weight gain down to pregnancy. Some of these women also didnt gain much weight during this time,which I admit makes me jealous. Theres even a television show on TLC called I Didnt Know I Was Pregnantthat features these stories.According to the website health.howstuffworks.com (which appears to be associated with the Discovery channel) one researcher estimated that 1 in 475 births 20 weeks along or more were the result of a denied pregnancy. ve been pregnant twice in my life. Both times I didt have to wonder about it. John and James made their existences in my body very apparent. Now with John I was expecting it. James I wasnt,but it didnt take me long to figure out what was g oing on. Sopart of me looks at t hese women and asks,how could you not know? There were no signs? No mornings ickness? Cravings? Weight gain?Movement? A pparently,some women go through pregnancy experiencing a minimum of theses ymptoms. Or if they had them,they put them down to other things,such as stress o r another medical condition. B ut surely a doctor wouldve been able to tell? If they went to the doctor the pregnancy wouldve been discovered,right? A ccording to an OB-GYN quoted in the abcnews article,maybe not.Dr. Kimberly Gecsi claimed that shed had patients sent to her by family practitioners who were convinced thep atient had cancer.This makes you wonder about s ome doctors. This same doctor says that the cases of denied pregnancies she sees in her practice are mostly young women ind enial. This to me seems to be the case a lot of times a woman thinks she cant be pregnant and so dismisses the signs. I t seems to me that in todays world,with the level of medical technology and information available, women should be able to know they are pregnant before the baby decides to be born. Not knowing might be a perfect storm of medical circumstances or maybe the woman just doest want to admit the possibility. Know your bodies,ladies. If you are of childbearing age and your body suddenly goes weird on you,dont discount the possibility of a new arrival. If youre my age (and lack certain female equipment) then sorry,our weight gain cant be blamed on a baby. Time to start exercising. They did not know? Laura Ware is a Sebring resident. She can be contacted by email at bookwormlady@embarqmail.com Visit her website at www.laurahware.com. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the staff of the News-Sun. Lauras Look L aura Ware Its not all about specs or sports Letters policyMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. We have to make room for everybody. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South,Sebring,FL 33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; or e-mail editor@newssun.com. To make sure the editorial pages arent dominated by the same writers,letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months. Opinions expressed in letters or columns,as well as any other opinion piece are solely the opinion of that author. TDC wants power the public didnt vote forEditor: The caption under a photograph in Wednesdays Flourishing Artstory is misleading. It states The Tourist Development Council is planning to create new arts and music festivals in an effort to attract tourists to Highlands County.I only wish that was true.In fact the Tourist Development Council (TDC create events.It only pays to advertise events that others have created and paid for. It uses tourist tax dollars to fund itself and reimburse advertising costs for created events that fall within the county ordinance governing bed tax expenditures.The public voted on this ordinance 2001. It set funding categories,and percentages of the tourist tax dollars allocated to promote each category. For 10 years the TDC has ignored the county ordinance and spent the tax monies to serve their own interests. Last year the state Joint Legislative Committee called them to task on it. TDC returned to the art & culture (A&C ciliation for the over $300,000 they took out of it thepast 10 years.They used that money to fund things other then A&C. Highlands County has suffered the consequences. Cultural tourism is 74.9 percent of the tourist market in Florida and is proven to turn around rural economies. In Highlands County there are significant assets to attract this huge market. We have museums, murals,live theatre,art galleries and a vibrant and growing art community. The cultural tourist is looking for outof-the-way cultural oasis like Highlands County. The county as a whole would have benefited if TDC followed the rules s et forth in the ordinance that established their existence. The public voted for them to spend 17 percent of the tourist tax dollars to target the cultural tourist. Not only did they redirect that money toward special interests in violation of the public trust but,they now want to change the rules to eliminate spending guidelines and cut the public out of the process altogether. On Thursday,Feb. 28 at 8:15 a.m. at the Ag-Center in Sebring,the TDC is voting to empower itself to change the ordinance the public voted for. They want to replace it,without a public vote,with one that allows them to lump categories into one pot. It further allows them to spend the tax dollars as they so choose without guidelines or public recourse. This gives TDC power the public never voted for. It is also an open door for special interests to control TDC spending,and leave the communitys well being hang out to dry,again. Fred Leavitt,President Heartland Cultural AllianceConsider disturbance not businessEditor: Swamp Hammock,if approved,I lose my rights to quiet,peaceful, serene neighborhood and so will all the other residents. If you think loud music,vehicles and 10,000 people in party setting until 2 a.m. every weekend equates to an occasional hoot owl or a pack of coyotes howling,you are grossly mistaken. Please consider the amount of traffic that will be on this little West Josephine Road that is already very busy with school buses, sod,fertilizer,fruit trucks and farm employees,oh,and 100-plus tax paying homes that drive to work every day. It will certainly change the lives of all in this area. D oes Big Government have the right to change so many peoples lives? Is it OK for them to steal our rights; our rights to easily access our homes,to sleep in a quiet peaceful neighborhood at night? If approved there will be many major problems,one will be emergency service to this area. It will be, at times,null due to backed up traffic on a narrow road with many 90 degree turns and blind curves. On any given weekend that the mud bog festivities would take place,driving down West Josephine Road will equate to driving on I-4 in rush hour traffic. The only difference? West Josephine Road is a two-lane road. The noise level will not be minimal. It will be similar to the Sebring race track during any race weekend. Ask any Spring Lake resident what that is like. The difference? We were here before the proposed Swamp Hammock Mud Bog. We purchased property out here for the serenity and quiet nature of the properties. We enjoy wildlife, and the peace that comes with living out of town. The activities and noise generated by a mud bog will directly affect everything within a 10-mile radius at best. This area is one of the last unique wildlife corridors of Florida. It contains bears,Florida panthers,deer, coyote,turkey,gopher tortoise,sand hill cranes,caracara and more. A mud bog placed in the direct path of this corridor will disrupt the nature of this unigue,last remaining wildlife corridor in Central South Florida for many endangered and protected species. I sincerely hope and pray the commissioners of this county care about this county and the detrimental effects allowing the Swamp Hammock will have on this area and dont just chalk it up to the cost of doing business. Dale R. Willard Sebring

PAGE 5

C M Y K v eteran membership,however due to change of address and phone numbers that are not reported,only 90 percent are back on board for 2013.C ontact the Post with any changes. Call 465-0975.Eagan to speak at Change of PaceSEBRING Change of Pace will hostAutumn Eagan from Cornerstone Hospice. She will talk on thet opics of advance directives and ethical decisions at 10 a.m. Monday. Call Change of Pace,4514 Hammock Road,at 3821188. Meeting focuses on GCBI campusSEBRING The Sebring C ommunity Redevelopment Agency will host its next m onthly Whats Up Downtown Sebring?meeting at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Sebring Historical Society,321 W.Center Ave.,w ith featured speakers David and Kirsten Nickisch from t he Great Commission Bible Institute (GCBIa college campus in DowntownS ebring. The Nickisches are the ons ite coordinators for the GCBI program and are both graduates of GCBI. David isa former math teacher from Montanta and Kirsten is a singer/ songwriter from M aui,Hawaii. They are coming off their first year of m arriage spent on the road in an RV sharing Kirstens music with churches around the United States. The couple live on campus w ith the full-time students. Logistically,they spend time creating meal plans and cleaning schedules,plugging students in to local churches, coordinating fundraisers,and organizing opportunities toe xpose students to various ministry e xperiences.Relationally, David and Kirsten have the specific privilege and responsibility of building intentional,discipleship rela-t ionships with the GCBI students throughout the yearScribes Night Out is tonightSEBRING At 6 p.m. today hostess Christine Yarbour will introduce Marilyn Johnson as the featured reader at Brewsters Coffee House in Sebring. Johnson came to Highlands County from Indiana in 1989 on the day her grandson was born. After composing many poems in her head,she finally began putting her writings on paper. Her poetry today will include the delights and dislikes of blind dates and other quirky tales (and wails). An Open Mike session follows. Anyone attending the evenings entertainment may read his/her original work (five minutes). Come before 6 p.m. to sign up for Open Mike time and get your refreshments. Buy tickets now for Red Hat FlingBRIGHTON Friday is the deadline for purchasing luncheon tickets for the RedH at Fling at Brighton on Tuesday,March 12. This event,held in the Casino Bingo Hall,is themed In your Easter Bonnet.Prizesw ill be awarded to the best decorated hats. The lunch tickets are $10.95 per person and will only be sold now. No tickets ales at the door. A special Red Hat Bingo will close out the day. BingoP ackets are $15 and will be sold by the Bingo Crew prior to the game starting immedi-a tely after lunch. Call 4650161 or email beckshel@em b arqmail.com for details.Ohio, Snowbird Flyin dinner setS EBRING The Knox County,Ohio and Apple Valley Snowbird Fly-in dinner will be held at 10 a.m. Monday at HomersS morgasbord. Social hour is 10-11 a.m.; eat at 11 a.m.Orchid Society hears about DendrobiumsSEBRING The Orchid S ociety of Highlands County will hold its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. Monday at the J ack R. Stroup Center,355 W. Center Ave. For this months meeting,Jim Roberts will present a topic on Dendrobiums. T here will be plants for sale. Guests are invited to attend and knowledge of orchids is not required toa ttend. For additional information,contact Lori T hompson at 382-7924,email at oshc9@aol.com or g o to the website at http://orchidsocietyhighlands.org/.Garden Club to meet MondaySEBRING The next general meeting of the Garden Club of Sebring willb e held at 10 a.m. Monday. Meetings are held at the Jack Stroup Civic Center behind the Sebring Library. The guest speaker this month will be Debbie Armstrong from Robbins Nursery. Armstrongs topic will be Heart Smart Herbs. Call 385-0759 or 471-0657. The next big event for the club will be the annual fundraiser card party and luncheon. All proceeds from this event will go towards providing a scholarship to one or two Sebring High School students interested in agriculture or any related field. The card party will be held on Thursday,March 7. Doors open at 10 a.m. and the event will conclude at 2 p.m. There will be lots of door prizes,50/50 drawing,a silent auction plus a delicious luncheon. Tickets are $8. To make a table reservation,call 4719979. All card games and board games allowed.AARP offers Driver Safety ProgramAVON PARK The next AARP Driver SafetyP rogram class will be from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday (complete class in one day, no driving,no tests). This class makes it possible to geta discount on car insurance, good for three years. The class will be at Union Congregational Church,106 N. Butler Ave. To register,c all 452-0335.A udubon program looks at Women Exploring NatureL AKE PLACID Come to a fascinating p rogram on Tuesday by Linda Taylor on famous women in Florida whosel ives have been influenced by nature. Taylor i s an author,naturalist and eco-entrepreneuer who has led many other adventure field trips to the Tampa Bay area( including the local chapter). Her company,s O ur Nature,features Healthy Wear for People Who Care. T he Highlands County Audubon Society meeti ngs are held beginning at 6:30 p.m. at 106 N. Main St.,with a covered d ish dinner,birding talk at 7:15 p.m.,followed by the program. Everyone is invited to come for dinner and/or the program. O ther activities include a field trip to South Lake Istokpoga on Saturday, March 2 and another to Circle B Bar Ranch onW ednesday,March 6. Call 465-2468.Monthly Bunco at Shrine Club AVON PARK The public is invited (men too) to play Bunco at theH ighlands Shrine Club, 2604 State Road 17 South at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday.The event is open to new or experi-e nced players. Cost is $4 per person. Call 3824111 for information.Celtic Concert at the LibrarySEBRING Celebrate Art,Heart & Soul month in Downtown Sebring at 3 p.m. Monday as theSebring Public Library hosts a free Celtic concert with Castlebay.This event is sponsored by Friends of the Sebring Public Library.Events planned at lodges, postsAVON PARK The American Legion Post 69 will host karaoke by Naomi today; call for time Karaoke by DoubleD from 4-7 p.m. Tuesday. For details,call 453-4553. LAKE PLACID The VFW Post 3880 in L ake Placid will host a poker tournament at 1:30 p.m. today. For more information, call 699-5444. The American Legion Post 2 5,2027 U.S. 27,will host music by Gary and Shirley from 5-8 p.m. today.A casino trip is planned for Tuesday; call 655-0232 fori nformation. Music by L & L from 5-8 p.m. Wednesday. For details,call 465-0975. The Lake Placid Moose Lodge 2374 will host Firemen Karaoke today; Bama Jam Karaoke on Wednesday; and Frank E. on Thursday.All music time is6 -10 p.m. For details,call 465-0131. SEBRING The Sebring Moose Lodge 2 259 will have NASCAR Daytona500 on the screen at 1 p.m. today. Music by Big Freddie from 6-10 p.m. Wednesday. The HouseC ommittee and Loyal Order of the Moose business meeting is at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, followed by a general meeting at 8 p.m. For details,call 655-3920. The Sebring Recreation Club,333 Pomegranate Ave.,w ill host Shuffleboard Tournament/Amateur/Any Doubles at 9 a.m. Monday. Shuffleboard League is at 1:15 p.m. Wednesday.Yards ale set up is Thursday. For information,call 385-2966. The Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 will host Wacky Wednesday from 5-6:30 p.m.w ith sandwiches for $6.50. Dancing to music by Franke is from 4:30-7:30 p.m.,(cost to only dance is $3). For details,call 471-3557. J IMMY CONKLIN Jimmy Eugene Conklin, 4 2,passed away at home on Thursday,Feb. 14,2013. Mr. Conklin was born in 1970 toT eresa S. Conklin in Tulsa, Okla.,and had been a resid ent of Avon Park,Fla. Jimmy is survived by his wife,Ramona Conklin of Avon Park,Fla; son,Michael Brownell of Michigan;d aughters,Sarah Logan of Tulsa,Okla,and Samantha B rownell of Tulsa,Okla; mother,Teresa Conklin; sister,Tracy Whittington ofO klahoma; and eight grandchildren. A memorial service will be held on Monday,Feb. 25, 2013 at 2 p.m. at the resi-d ence,465 S Roberta Drive, Avon Park. Fla. Arrangements entrusted b y Marion Community Funeral Chapel. HERBERT RACKE Herbert Edward Racke,83,son of the late Edwarda nd Mary Racke, was called home on Feb. 18, 2013. Herbert was raised in Claryville,Ky. and is survived by Edna May Thulin (sisterRuth Combs (sistera nd Freddie Racke (brother Herbert joined the United S tates Coast Guard and, while stationed in New York, met the love of his life, Joan Ann Giorgio. Joan will g reatly miss her companion and sweetheart of 62 years. H erberts life was accented by Gods goodness and unfailing grace. Herberts erved alongside his wife a s a missionary with Child Evangelism Fellowship,e stablishing the ministry i n the Dominican Republic. By Gods grace,this work continues reaching thousandso f children with the saving Gospel of Jesus Christ. F or 11 years Herbert served as CEFs regional director for all Latin Americaa nd their legacy lives on today. After 36 years of service, H erbert and Joan retired in Avon Park and continued to b e used by God serving their church and ministering to children. He was a prayer warrior who rose early each day to pray for his four chil-d ren,19 grandchildren,and 29 great-grandchildren. His surviving children are David Racke (married to Heidi),missionaries to Bolivia; Beth Vogel (married to Bill),missionaries withC EF Maryland; Susan Pineda (married to Abner),the CEF r egional director for Latin America; and Dwight (married to Ruth) who serves God in Salem,Ore. H erbert was a powerful testimony of how a humble l ife can be used by Gods might and goodness. A celebration of Herberts l ife will be held at 11 a.m. on March 30 at Bethany Baptist C hurch (798 C-17a South Avon Park). In lieu of flowers,memorial contributions may be made to CEF of Floridas Heartland,2110S ylvester Road,Ste. 2, Lakeland,FL 33803. www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, February 24, 2013Page 5A CENTRAL FLORIDA CASKET STORE &;1 .736"; 6"; Black; o bit page; 00027221 DAILY COMMERCIAL; 3.639"; 1"; Black; corners tone hospice; 00027273 DUMMY 2013; 11.25"; 4"; Black; revised click & buy; 00027747 E.O. KOCH CONSTRUCTION CO.; 5.542"; 4"; Black; seam p/u; 00027802 Racke OBITUARIES CO MMUNITYBR IEFS C ontinued from page 2A In lieu of flowers, consider a gift to support Hospice care. 888-728-6234 Cornerstonehospice.orgNo. 5019096

PAGE 6

C M Y K Page 6A N ews-Sun l S unday, February 24, 2013 www.newssun.com

PAGE 7

C M Y K www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, February 24, 2013Page 7A C ENTRAL SECURITY; 3.639"; 3"; Black plus three; process, ad #4; 00027479 WELLS MOTOR COMPANY; 9.347"; 12.5"; Black plus three; process, new cars; 00027797 focuses on the job in front of h er,Jamesgirls are always on her mind. The little things are what Im going to miss the most, James said. I drop them offa t school every day,take them to doctors appointments,pick them up. Im just sad because my smallest girl starts kindergarten this year.B eing there for one and not being there for the other one s tarting is going to be hard. James was accompanied by f riends and family members who gave her support. Though she wont be back home until early December, James knows that her girlsa re in the best hands. Scott Watson of Sebring w as sharing hugs with his mother,Sherri,and other friends and family.This deployment will make Watsons third trip overseas. Hes a pro now,Watson said jokingly of her son. The 3rd Battalion 116th Field Artillery will mobilize at Camp Shelby in South Mississippi for a short period of time before deploying to Qatar. These 325 brave men and women are commended on their bravery and service to not only this community but to the nation. Unit heads to Mississippi, then Qatar for 9-month deployment News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS I just came to show my support, said Thomas West of Avon Park, while standing along the fence line waving a flag following the deployment ceremony at the convention center at F iremens Field in Sebring. Continued from page 1A N ews-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS Congressman Thomas Rooney addresses Florida National Guardsmen on Thursday during the deployment ceremony in Sebring. The news is just a click away!w ww.newssun.com NEWS-SUN By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI A ssociated PressPROVIDENCE,R.I. Miami Beach police say aP rovidence elementary school teacher is facing a f elony criminal charge after allegedly taking a 15-yearold from Rhode Island to Florida without his parents knowledge. T he police report shows 56-year-old David Jones of Cranston was arrested Wednesday after the boy was reported missing in RhodeI sland. The report says the bos parents later learned he was in Miami Beach with Jones,and that authorities located the two walking along a road. Jones has been charged with interference with custody. The police report says Jones admitted taking the boy to Florida without his parentsknowledge or consent and exchanging sexually explicit text messages with him. The boy told authorities that his parents did not consent to his travel to Florida and that Jones had wanted to have a sexual relationship with him,according to police. Jones has been placed on administrative leave,according to a statement from Providence schools spokeswoman Christina OReilly. Given the nature of the charges,and that they involvea minor previously taught by the individual,we will be launching our own internal investigation in concert with law enforcement,OReilly said in the statement. It wasnt immediately clear whether Jones has a lawyer. Miami-Dade jail records showed Friday that Jones was being held on $9,000 bond. Mayor Angel Taveras said in a statement Friday he is ery concernedabout the arrest. He said Providence police are working with Florida law enforcement officials and the FBI to investigate. Associated Press writer David Fischer in Miami contributed to this report. Police: Teacher charged after taking boy to Florida

PAGE 8

C M Y K By NEIL SIMPSON S pecial to the News-SunSEBRING On Feb. 19, the 14th annual Tanglewood ResidentsCancer Benefit wrapped up with a gala eventi n the Tanglewood clubhouse. At the end of the day,it was a nnounced that this years Cancer Benefit had raised $54,055.10,bringing the totalc ontributed for cancer research to $430,000. M ore than 500 residents danced to the music of D.J. Bob Weed,ate Bob Evansb acon/turkey wraps and super sundaes prepared by Tanglewoods Red Hat g roups. They also quaffed free liquid refreshments prov ided by Hometown America. Partcipants bought tickets for three 50/50 draws, 35 raffle prizes and 37 door prizes as well as five premi-u m prize packages. The real winners were cancer patients everywhere who will benefit from new cancer research. The lucky 50/50 winners were Joyce Houck,Terry Athorn and Eric Hurst. T he premium prize packages (prize donors shown in b rackets) were taken home by: Ambrose Brooker Kindle Fire (Hometown America),John MadeirosB racelet (Steve & Company), $100 Gift Certificate (Turner Furniture) Carol and Don Phelps Gift Basket and Mammogram( Florida Hospital),Kindle Fire (Hometown America), Ladys Cancer Watch Barbara Mears Colonoscopy (Dr. VinodT hakkar & Dr. Pankaj Patel) and $100 Gift Basket. Don and Carol Phelps Galaxy 2 7-inch Tab( Tanglewood Computer Club),Colonoscopy (Dr. Vinod Thakkar & Dr. Pankaj Patel) Bev Race $500 Lot Rent ( Hometown America) This was the last of a series of events to raise funds for cancer research. Other events included:gold sale,H ighlands Little Theatre special presentation of Auntie Mame,Walk in the Park, Ride for the Cure,variety show,Heartland National Bank lasagna dinner,Bill Jarrett Fords Drive for theC ure,Golf Fore a Cure, luminary display,Cancer B ingo plus petanque,tennis and shuffleboard tourna-m ents. Page 8ANews-SunSunday, February 24, 2013www.newssun.com GRIFFIN'S CARPET MART; 7.444"; 10"; Black; 2/24/13; 00027806 News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFELY Marcie Taylor (leftfarth rehearse Wednesday night for the T anglewood Actors Guild production of The Bingo Queen. There are three shows, March 6, 7 and 8 (Wednesday, Thursday and Friday). B y CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comS EBRING Members of the Tanglewood Actors Guild bring The Queen ofB ingoto Highlands County March 6,7 and 8. T he play is a two-act straight up comedy; the lines laugh-out-loud funny. W hile an affectionate send up of bingo,the focus is on two hilarious women. Theres not much of a plot,but the audience getst o know two wonderful characters during a bingo session at St. Josephs Catholic Church. The two middle-aged sist ers bingo fanatics have arrived late. Instead of s itting in their usual chairs, there out in a spill-overh allway where they cant even see the bingo board. S is,the elder sister played by Marcie Taylor i s the calmer of the two,taking life as it comes. Babe played by S usanne Schiffarth is the opposite. Loud,boistrous, s ometimes crude,the younger sister is also vigorous and brimming with the l ove of being alive. While Sis complains of never winning,Babe always believes shell win the next pot. S chiffarth,who directed the production,had to step into Babes role at the last minute. (The play n ing and losing,she said. If you consider yourself a w inner,youll be a winner. Babe,especially,gains i nsight in the course of the evening. She does this at the s ame time as she haranges other bingo players,comm ents on life,and spars with her sister. Brian Leavy plays Father M ac and SteveWaitkus is the bingo caller. T ickets are $10. The price includes a desert,served during intermission. Tickets a re available from 3-4 p.m. Thursday at the Tanglewood Clubhouse,or at the door before a performance. The doors open at 6 p.m.; t he curtain rises at 7. The 50/50 raffle each show night is a a fundraiser for the Tanglewood Cancer ResidentsBenefit. F or more details go to diannelane@embarqmail.co m or call Dianne Lane at 471-1946. Who knew bingo was the game of life? Tanglewood wraps up Residents Cancer Benefit Courtesy photo Don and Carol Phelps won two of the premium prize packages during the wrap up party for the Tanglewood R esidents Cancer Benefit last week. Courtesy photo This group of Tanglewood residents are cancer survivors who are celebrating another birthday. Associated PressSANFORD Lawyers for neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman will not be allowed to question an attorney for the parents of slain Florida teenager Trayvon Martin,a judge said Friday. Lawyers for Zimmerman, who is charged with seconddegree in Martins shooting death,wanted to question attorney Benjamin Crump. The out-spoken attorney has said he talked to Martins girlfriend and she was on the phone with Martin in the minutes before Zimmerman shot the unarmed teenager to death on the night of Feb. 26, 2012. Zimmerman has pleaded not guilty. He has said Martin punched him,they fought and he shot Martin in selfdefense. Zimmermans attorneys wanted to question Crump in part to ask him about specifics on the circumstances surrounding his recording of the girlfriend, who was identified as witness eight in court. Circuit Judge Debra S. Nelson said Crump didnt have relevant information and questioning him would violate attorney-client privilege. Nelson also said the defense team has had 10 months to interview the witness and she,not Crump,is the only one who could provide testimony about the phone call. Crumps attorney,Bruce Blackwell,called the motion a side shoby the defense. Crump did not attend the hearing. Don West,an attorney representing Zimmerman,said Crump misrepresented the womans age as 16 when she was 18. She has been cloaked in mystery since the beginning of this,West said. Also,the judge denied a request to release the addresses of Martins parents,girlfriend and other witnesses. However,the judge said the defense could ask them for their address during depositions. The state had withheld the addresses to protect the witnesses from public scrutiny. Following the hearing, defense attorney Mark OMara said Zimmerman has talked to him about the oneyear anniversary of the shooting. No deposition for lawyer in Trayvon Martin case

PAGE 9

C M Y K B y MARK THIESSEN Associated PressANCHORAGE,Alaska T he U.S. Coast Guard has turned over its investigation of violations on a Royal Dutch Shell PLC Arctic drill ship to the Department ofJ ustice,officials said Friday. The violations were found after the drilling season when the Noble Discoverer was in dock in Seward,A laska. Shells other Arctic drill barge,the Kulluk, remains in a sheltered bay offAlaskas Kodiak Island, where it was towed afterg rounding on New Years Eve. The Coast Guard found 16 v iolations on the 571-foot Noble Discoverer after it completed drilling this summer in the Chukchi Sea off Alaskas northern coast. T he violations included fire hazards and problems with the propulsion system that didnt allow the ship to operate at a sufficient speeda t sea to safely maneuver in all expected conditions. Coast Guard Rear Adm. Thomas Ostebo,who oversees Alaska operations,rec-o mmended the investigation be forwarded to the U.S. attornes office,said Lt. Veronica Colbath,a Coast Guard spokeswoman. M essages left after business hours Friday with the Department of Justice inW ashington,D.C.,and ship owner Noble Corp. in Sugar Land,Texas,which leases the ship to Shell,were not immediately returned. U .S. Rep. Ed Markey,DMass.,detailed the violations Friday,as first reported by the Anchorage Daily News. M arkey also sent a letter to Shell President Marvin Odum asking how the company plans to address problems and what changes willb e instituted going forward. The reports that Shell may have been drilling this summer using a drill ship with serious deficiencies ini ts safety and pollution control equipment raise additional and continued ques-t ions about whether Shell is able to drill safely offshore in the Arctic,and raises seri-o us questions regarding the nature and adequacy of S hells compliance with applicable laws and regulations,Markey wrote in thel etter to Odum. Curtis Smith,a Shell s pokesman,said in an email to The Associated Press that many of the issues raised by the Coast Guard havea lready been addressed. Of course,we take any deficiency very seriously, including those associated with the main propulsions ystem that surfaced after the Noble Discoverer had transited out of the Chukchi Sea. At no time was the Noble Discoverer found orb elieved to be a danger to people or the environment while drilling in the Chukchi Sea in 2012. Had that been the case,we would havec eased all operations immediately,he said. Both the Noble D iscoverer and the Kulluk will be taken to Asia for further inspection and repairs. I t wasnt immediately clear how this will affect the c ompans drilling plans in the Arctic. e have not made any f inal decision on 2013 drilling in Alaska,Smith s aid. www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, February 24, 2013Page 9A MARTIAL ARTS (pp care, rhp, top; 00027030 D UMMY 2013; 7.444"; 15"; Black; chamber page feb dummy; 00027814 airline carriers would be meeting soon to plan for potential cutbacks. Airt ransportation is a key driver of our economy,and should n ot be used as a political football,the statement said. Paul Rinaldi,the president o f the National Air Traffic Controllers Association,said t he reductions will not just inconvenience passengers,it will also affect local e conomies and result in more lost jobs. The fact that they will not just be furloughing critical FAA personnel but closing air traffic controlt owers means the system will be even more compromised than anticipated,he added. Still,top Republicans on congressional transportationa nd aviation panels accused the administration of unnece ssary alarm. Before jumping to the c onclusion that furloughs must be implemented,the administration and the agency need to sharpen their pencils and consider all theo ptions, the lawmakers said in a joint statement issued by Rep. Bill Shuster,chairman of the House Committee on Transportation andI nfrastructure; Sen. John Thune,the top Republican on the Senate Committee on Commerce,Science and Transportation; and Frank LoBiondo,chairman of the House Subcommittee on Aviation. Throughout the administration,agency heads have been depicting an onerous after-effect to the cuts. The federal government is required to spell out the consequences to federal workers, but the details are also designed to warn lawmakers that the cuts could have a fearsome result:angry constituents. Some of the warnings: Defense Secretary Leon Panetta last week said that automatic cuts,known in Washington budget language as a sequester,would harm the readiness of U.S. fighting forces and he said the vast majorityof the Defense Departments 800,000 civilian workers would have to lose one day of work per week,or 20 percent of their pay,for up to 22 weeks,probably starting in late April. The biggest potential losses, in term of total civilian payroll dollars,would be in Virginia,California, Maryland,Texas and Georgia,according to figures provided by the Pentagon. On Friday,the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,said cuts of more than $300 million to his agency would mean less money to solve outbreaks,fight hospital infections and keep illnesses overseas from making their way here. For instance,Dr. Tom Frieden said,the cuts could limit the agencs investigation of a tuberculo-s is outbreak in Los Angeles. At the National Park S ervice,employees would be furloughed,hours would be cut and sensitive areas wouldb e blocked off to the public when there are staff shorta ges,according to a park service memo obtained by The Associated Press. T he giant sequoias at Yosemite National Park in California would go unprot ected from visitors who might trample their shallow r oots. At Cape Cod National Seashore,large sections of the Great Beach would close to keep eggs from being destroyed if natural resourcem anagers are cut. Programs on the chopping block include invasive species eradication in Yosemite and comfort stations on the Natchez Trace Parkway in Mississippi. G ettysburg would decrease by one-fifth the number of s chool children who learn about the historic battle that was a turning point in the Civil War.And in Yosemite, park administrators fear thatl ess frequent trash pickup would potentially attract bears into campgrounds. Over the years,budget threats have inevitably result-e d in grim warnings,no matter which administration, about calamitous consequences. Many have been avoided; others have been short-lived. But Obama administration officials say they are not exaggerating or bluffing. The cuts,with few exceptions,are designed to hit all accounts equally.The law gives Obama little leeway to ease the pain. Even if granted flexibility to apply the cuts with more discretion a legislative step Republicans say they might pursue White House officials say that would still require severe reductions. s essentially rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic,Obama senior adviser Dan Pfeiffer said of such a proposal in a recent interview. LaHood,in response to a question,denied that he was simply describing a worstcase scenario that would scare the public and put pressure on Republican lawmakers. What Im trying to do, he said,is wake up members of the Congress with the idea that they need to come to the table so we dont have to have this kind of calamity in air services in America. Cone reported from Sacramento, Calif. Associated Press writer Joan Lowy and AP Medical Writer Lauran Neergaard contributed to this report. Follow Jim Kuhnhenn on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jkuhnhenn Continued from page 2A Cuts will require severe reductions In a column that appeared i n Wednesdays edition,an unidentified letter was submitted reminiscing of a couple of friends who had recently passed. The letter,q uoted in the column,said Highlands County had the honor of being the resident county for the last two survivors of the Burma Road,aW orld War II project. William W. Kresge,a 31year resident of Highlands County,wrote in to say that h e was also a survivor of the Burma Road,having traveled over it in 1945 in a 148-vehicle convoy from Ledo, Burma to Kunming,China. Id rove a two and one half ton truck loaded with medical equipment. I was in the 95th Field Hospital and we set up Station Hospitals in Nanning,C hina and Liuchow,China. Mr. Kresge,we thank you for your service. Additional information Coast Guard finds 16 violations on Shell ship

PAGE 10

C M Y K Page 10ANews-SunSunday, February 24, 2013www.newssun.com NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A DATABASE(S AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is creating a new job description for a Database(s The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of this notice is to create a new job description for a Database(s mary of the proposed new job description is as follows: The minimum qualifications for a Database(s1 degree or two years of college credit/equivalent from an accredited educational institution; or five (5 priate/relevant area of experience. (2 tency in reading and mathematics testing as administered by an approved outsourced vendor with a minimum score of 80%. (3 ance of criminal history records check and drug screening. (4 essential functions and tasks which may include exerting up to 20 pounds of force occasionally and/or 10 pounds of force as frequently as necessary; lifting, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing, if required; may involve extended periods of time at a keyboard or work station: a. Dexterity: Ability to perform skilled coordinated movements. b. Sensory: Ability to perceive and discriminate sounds; some tasks require visual perception and discrimination as well as oral communications ability. c. Environmental Factors: Tasks may risk exposure to adverse environmental conditions, such as noise extremes, electric currents, or bright or dim lights. Additional desired qualifications: (1 from an accredited educational institution preferred. (25 NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A CLASSROOM TEACHING ASSISTANT (CTA NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is amending the job description for a Classroom Teaching Assistant (CTA The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of this notice is to amend the job description for a Classroom Teaching Assistant. A summary of the amendment to the minimum qualifications of the job description is as follows: Valid State of Florida Educators certificate or Florida Department of Education Statement of Status of Eligibility. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b 1012.22 and 1001.41, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary February 24, 2013 NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A FOOD & NUTRITION SERVICES SCHOOL CAFETERIA MANAGER AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is amending the job description for a Food & Nutrition Services School Cafeteria Manager. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of this notice is to amend the job description for a Food & Nutrition Services School Cafeteria Manager. A summary of the amendment to the minimum qualifications is as follows: Physical Ability: Exert up to 50 pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 30 pounds of force frequently, and/or up to 20 pounds of force constantly to move objects; ability to reach, stretch, bend, stoop or kneel to handle, lift or move objects from floor level to 6 feet above floor level; walk or stand for periods of four continuous hours. a. Environmental Factors: Ability to work under the following environmental conditions: a. Subject to inside environmental conditions where there is protection from weather conditions but not necessarily from temperature changes. b. Subject to extreme cold; temperatures are below 32 degrees for periods of more than one hour. c. Subject to extreme heat; temperatures are above 100 degrees for periods of more than one hour. d. Subject to noise; sufficient noise to cause the worker to shout in order to be heard above the ambient noise level. E. Subject to hazards; includes a variety of physical conditions, such as proximity to moving mechanical parts, electrical c urrent, working on scaffolding and high places, and exposure to high heat or chemicals. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b Constitution of the State of Florida; Sections 1012.22 and 1001.41, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary February 24, 2013 NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR AN ACCOUNTANT AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is amending the job description for an Accountant. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed new job description is to amend the minimum qualifications in the job description for an Accountant. A summary of the proposed amendment to the minimum qualifications is as follows: (1 credit/equivalent from an accredited educational institution; or five (5 formance in the appropriate/relevant area of experience. (2 matics testing as administered by an approved outsourced vendor with a minimum score of 80%. (3s ential functions and tasks which may include exerting up to 20 pounds of force occasionally and/or 10 pounds of force as frequently as necessary; lifting, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing, if required. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b stitution of the State of Florida; Sections 1012.22 and 1001.41, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on c ompetition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary February 24, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 13-47 IN RE: ESTATE OF RICHARD A. RIPLEY, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of RICHARD A. RIPLEY, deceased, whose date of death was January 6, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is February 24, 2013. Personal Representative: BRIAN R. RIPLEY 10 Elaine Court Prospect, CT 06712 Attorney for Personal Representative: CLIFFORD M. ABLES, III, P.A. 551 SOUTH COMMERCE AVE. SEBRING, FL 33870 Telephone: (863 Fax: (863 Email: cmables@cmablespa.net /s/ Clifford M. Ables III FLORIDA BAR NO. 178379 February 24; March 3, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 13-38 IN RE: ESTATE OF PATRICIA L. WRZALINSKI Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The name of the decedent, the designation of the court in which the administration of this estate is pending, and the file number are indicated above. The address of the court is 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are indicated below. If you have been served with a copy of this notice and you have any claim against the decedent's estate, even if that claim is unmatured, contingent or unliquidated, you must file your claim with the court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF A DATE THAT IS 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER YOU RECEIVE A COPY OF THIS NOTICE. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. EVEN IF A CLAIM IS NOT BARRED BY THE LIMITATIONS DESCRIBED ABOVE, ALL CLAIMS WHICH HAVE NOT BEEN FILED WILL BE BARRED TWO YEARS AFTER DECEDENT'S DEATH. The date of death of the decedent is November 21, 2012. The date of first publication of this Notice is February 17, 2013. Personal Representative: FRANK V. WRZALINSKI 8069 LaSalle Road Morgantown, IN 46160 Attorney for Personal Representative: CLIFFORD R. RHOADES, P.A. Florida Bar No.: 308714 Clifford R. Rhoades, P.A. 2141 Lakeview Drive Sebring, Floirda 33870 (863 service@crrpalaw.com: cliff@crrpalaw.com February 17, 24, 2013 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 13-50 PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF ELIZABETH S. KUNNECKE aka ELIZABETH ELVA KUNNECKE, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of ELIZABETH S. KUNNECKE aka ELIZABETH ELVA KUNNECKE, deceased, File Number PC 13-50, by the Circuit Court for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, Florida 33870; that the decedent's date of death was September 17, 2012; that the total value of the estate is $43,102.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address J ACQUELYN REESOR 544 ST. ANDREWS RD. BRANDENBURG, KY 40108 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is February 24, 2013. Person Giving Notice: JACQUELYN REESOR 544 ST. ANDREWS ROAD BRANDENBURG, KY 40108 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: CLIFFORD M. ABLES, III, P.A. CLIFFORD M. ABLES, III Florida Bar Number 178379 551 S. COMMERCE AVE. SEBRING, FL 33870 Telephone: (863 Fax: (863 Email: cmables@cmablespa.net /s/ Clifford M. Ables III February 24; March 3, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 13-28 Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF ROBERT W. JONES, SR., Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ROBERT W. JONES, SR., deceased, whose date of death was December 29, 2012, and whose social security number is XXX-XX-7408, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the co-personal representatives and the co-personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is February 17, 2013. Co-Personal Representatives: /s/ Joanna Darcy Vergiels Rua Japao 845, Centro 17700-0000 Osvaldo Cruz, SP, Brazil /s/ Melinda Virginia Rapelje 517 Monroe Street Charlotte, MI 48813 Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives: /s/ Robert E. Livingston Florida Bar No. 0031259 445 S. Commerce Avenue Sebring, Florida 33870 Telephone: (863 February 15, 22, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC13-2 IN RE: ESTATE OF CLAUDE E. MUSICK, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of CLAUDE E. MUSICK, deceased, File Number PC13-2, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is February 24, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ Donald Lee Musick Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Michael L. Keiber M ICHAEL L. KEIBER, ESQUIRE Law Office of Michael L. Keiber, P.A. 129 South Commerce Avenue Sebring, FL 33870 V. (863863 Florida Bar No. 620610 February 24; March 3, 2013 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2012-CA-000189 DIVISION: GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, Plaintiff, RAFAEL A. ALVARADO, et al, Defendant(s NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated February 15, 2013 and entered in Case No. 28-2012-CA-000189 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC is the Plaintiff and RAFAEL A. ALVARADO; ANGELICA M. ALVARADO; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 14th day of March, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 41, BLOCK 61, OF SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, UNIT 5, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 51, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 6223 ORDUNA DRIVE, SEBRING, FL 33872 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on February 10, 2013. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk Ronald R. Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F11039943 GREENTREEAZ-SPECFNMA-R-jbonin-Team 2-F11039943 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813 251-4766, not later than seven (7 the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V via Florida Relay Service. February 24; March 3, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2012-CA-000235 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. GREGG S. FOSTER et al, Defendant(s NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated February 8, 2013 and entered in Case No. 28-2012-CA-000235 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., is the Plaintiff and GREGG S. FOSTER; BRENDA M. FOSTER A/K/A BRENDA MARIE FOSTER; GSF ENTERPRISE, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 14th day of March, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 62 AND LOT 63, SYLVAN SHORES ESTATES, SECTION E, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 33, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, F LORIDA A/K/A 1558 CAMELLIA COURT, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on February 12, 2013. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F11028292 COUNTRY-CONV B/C-R-dpuhalla-Team 2 F11028292 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813 251-4766, not later than seven (7 the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V via Florida Relay Service. February 17, 24, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001300 DIVISION: CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. JARED ANDERSON, et al, Defendant(s NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated February 8, 2013 and entered in Case No. 28-2009-CA-001300 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, N ational Association, successor by merger to Chase Home Finance LLC1, is the Plaintiff and JARED ANDERSON; THE FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION, A PUBLIC CORPORATION; TENANT #1 N/K/A STANLEY NELSON are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the h ighest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 14th day of March, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment:1Plaintiff name has changed pursuant to order previously entered. LOT 10, IN BLOCK 2, OF HIGHLANDS PARK ESTATES, SECTION R, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 17, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 360 PERSHING AVENUE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court o n February 12, 2013. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F09087050 CHASEDIRECT-CONV---Team 3 F09087050 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813 251-4766, not later than seven (7 the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V via Florida Relay Service. February 17, 24, 2013 1050Legals Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under the Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (22o list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed under our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be placed under the Bargain Buy category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com 8 63-314-9876 DEADLINES Publication Place by: W ednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday F riday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday S unday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, r eclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept o nly standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified d epartment immediately at 314-9876. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of thatp ortion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number w ill be given to you. This number is very important and must be u sed if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 eachM ISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 eachR EAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$7 1 1050Legals 1050Legals Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155

PAGE 11

C M Y K www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, February 24, 2013Page 11A NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A MANAGER CONSTRUCTION/BUILDING INSPECTOR AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is amending the job description for a Manager Construction/Building Inspector. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed new job description is to amend the minimum qualifications in the job description for a Manager Construction/Building Inspector. A summary of the proposed amendment is as follows: The minimum qualifications for a Manager Construction/Building Inspector are NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A MANAGER ACCOUNTING AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is amending the job description for a Manager Accounting. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed new job description is to amend the minimum qualifications in the job description for a Manager Accounting. A summary of the proposed amendment to the minimum qualifications is as follows: (1 lege credit/equivalent from an accredited educational institution; or five (5 performance in the appropriate/relevant area of experience; (2 essential functions and tasks which may include e xerting up to 20 pounds of force occasionally and/or 10 pounds of force as frequently as necessary; lifting, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing, if required. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b stitution of the State of Florida; Sections 1012.22 and 1001.41, Florida Statutes. The School Dis-t rict believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary February 24, 2013 NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICES M ANAGER/AREA SUPERVISOR AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is amending the job description for a Food and Nutrition Services Manager/Area Supervisor. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of this notice is to amend the job description for a Food and Nutrition Services Manager/Area Supervisor. A summary of the amendment to the minimum qualifications is as follows: Physical Ability: Lift 30 pounds maximum with frequent lifting and/or carrying of objects weighing 20 pounds; reach, stretch, bend, stoop or kneel to handle, lift or move objects from floor level; walk or stand for periods of four (4 o us hours. a. Environmental Factors: Ability to work in a noisy, hot, humid environment and a fast-paced work place that contains hazardous equipment, supplies and situations. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b Constitution of the State of Florida; Sections 1012.22 and 1001.41, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary February 24, 2013 perience with Finance and/or Human Resources databases. (33 ing experience with a report writing tool. (4 termediate proficiency in writing a sequal/SQL statement. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b Florida; Sections 1012.22 and 1001.41, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey), 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida be-t ween the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary February 24, 2013 1050L egalsDUMMY 2013 SERVICE DIRECTORY DUMMY 5X21.5 AD # 00026404

PAGE 12

C M Y K Page 12ANews-SunSunday, February 24, 2013www.newssun.com NOW BOOKINGfor St. Patrick's Day, Mardi Gras Dances or Entertainment. Great Rates! Cocktail Parties, Dinners, All Occasions. Vocals Harmonica Guitar. 50"s 60's Blues Country Rock N Roll. Call THE STANMAN 863-414-5284 1550ProfessionalServices 1100Announcements NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A SUPERVISOR TRANSPORTATION AREA (AVON PARK, LAKE PLACID AND SEBRING) AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is amending the job description for a Supervisor Transportation Area (Avon Park, Lake Placid and Sebring). The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of this notice is to amend the job description for a Supervisor Transportation Area (Avon Park, Lake Placid and Sebring). A summary of the amendment to the minimum qualifications of the job description is as follows: Physical Ability: Ability to perform essential functions and tasks which may include exerting up to 20 pounds of force occasionally and/or 10 pounds of force as frequently as necessary; lifting, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing, if required. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b tion of the State of Florida; Sections 1012.22 and 1001.41, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey), 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary February 24, 2013 The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary February 24, 2013 1050L egals NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A MANAGER TRANSPORTATION GARAGE AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is amending the job description for a Manager Transportation Garage. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed new job description is to amend the minimum qualifications in the job description for a Manager Transportation Garage. A summary of the proposed amendment to the minimum qualifications is as follows: (1 years of college credit/equivalent from an accredi ted educational institution; or five (5 isfactory performance in the appropriate/relevant area of experience. (2 perform essential functions and tasks which may include lifting up to 100 pounds maximum with frequent lifting and/or carrying of objects weighing 50 pounds, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing: a. Dexterity: Ability to perform skilled coordinated movements that involve moderate manual dexterity and demonstrate a mastery of the particular tools, equipment, material, and techniques of the automotive repair trade. b. Environmental Factors: Ability to perform tasks in an environment that may risk exposure to adverse environmental conditions, such as dirt, dust, odors, wetness, humidity, fumes, temperature and noise extremes, machinery, vibrations, electric currents, compressed air sources or toxic agents; ability to perform tasks that require the ability to perceive and discriminate colors or shades of colors, sounds, odors, and depths. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b 1012.22 and 1001.41, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. qualifications is as follows: Associates degree or two years of college credit/equivalent from an accredited educational institution; or five (5 satisfactory performance in the appropriate/relevant area of experience. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b tion of the State of Florida; Sections 1012.22 and 1001.41, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be ob-t ained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey), 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary February 24, 2013 1050L egals NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A MANAGER TRANSPORTATION OPERATIONS AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is amending the job description for a Manager Transportation Operations. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed new job description is to amend the minimum qualifications in the job description for a Manager Transportation Operations. A summary of the proposed amendment to the minimum NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A MANAGER MIS NETWORK AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING N OTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is amending the job description for a Manager MIS Network. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed new job description is to amend the minimum qualifications in the job description for a Manager MIS Network. A summary of the proposed amendment is as follows: The minimum qualifications for a Manager MIS Network are amended as follows: (1 college credit/equivalent from an accredited educational institution; or five (5 performance in the appropriate/relevant area of experience. (2 mathematics testing as administered by approved outsourced vendor with a minimum score of 80%. (3 exert moderate, though not constant physical effort, involving some combination of climbing and balancing, stooping, kneeling, crouching, and c rawling; may involve some lifting, carrying, pushing and/or pulling of objects and materials of moderate weight (10-50 quirements: Most tasks require visual perception and discrimination; many tasks require oral communication ability. b. Environmental Factors: Tasks may risk potential exposure to electrical currents when servicing systems. The following additional desired qualifications are removed: (1 Minimum of two (2 network software support with appropriate supervision. (22 installing and maintaining microcomputer systems a pplication software. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b State of Florida; Sections 1012.22 and 1001.41, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey), 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary February 24, 2013 NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A MANAGER MIS COMPUTER REPAIR AND INSTALLATION AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is amending the job description for a Manager MIS Computer Repair and Installation. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, at 5:30 p .m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed new job description is to amend the minimum qualifications in the job description for a Manager MIS Computer Repair and Installation. A summary of the proposed amendment to the minimum qualifications is as follows: (1 lege credit/equivalent from an accredited educational institution; or five (5 performance in the appropriate/relevant area of experience; (2 quiring physical strength and endurance, to include lifting 80 pounds, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing, if required. The following shall be removed from additional desired qualifications: 1. Knowledge of data processing concepts and computer operations either by experience or formal education. 2. Verification of experience operating several types of computer equipment and local area networks as well as a proven ability to deal with user problems and needs. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b Florida; Sections 1012.22 and 1001.41, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey), 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary February 24, 2013 the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey), 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary February 24, 2013 1050L egals NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A MANAGER MAINTENANCE, HEALTH AND CASUALTY SAFETY AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is amending the job description for a Manager Maintenance, Health and Casualty Safety. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed new job description is to amend the minimum qualifications in the job description for a Manager Maintenance, Health and Casualty Safety. A summary of the proposed amendment is as follows: The minimum qualifications for a Manager Maintenance, Health and Casualty Safety are amended as follows: (1 lege credit/equivalent from an accredited educational institution; or five (5 performance in the appropriate/relevant area of experience. (2 quiring physical strength and endurance, to include lifting up to 100 pounds, bending, stooping, pulling, pushing, climbing and crawling. The following additional desired qualification is removed: (1 computer operations either from experience or education. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b Florida; Sections 1012.22 and 1001.41, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF T HE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A MANAGER HUMAN RESOURCES, RECRUITMENT AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is amending the job description for a Manager Human Resources, Recruitment & Professional Development. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed new job description is to amend the minimum qualifications in the job description for a Manager Human Resources, Recruitment & Professional Development. A summary of the proposed amendment to the minimum qualifications is as follows: (1 lege credit/equivalent from an accredited educational institution; or five (5 performance in the appropriate/relevant area of experience. (2 essential functions and tasks which may include exerting up to 20 pounds of force occasionally and/or 10 pounds of force as frequently as necessary; lifting, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing, if required. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b s titution of the State of Florida; Sections 1012.22 and 1001.41, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or a mendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary February 24, 2013 NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A MANAGER FOOD & NUTRITION SERVICES DEPARTMENT AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is amending the job description for a Manager Food & Nutrition Services Department. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed new job description is to amend the minimum qualifications in the job description for a Manager Food & Nutrition S ervices Department. A summary of the proposed amendment to the minimum qualifications is as follows: (1 of college credit/equivalent from an accredited educational institution; or five (5 tory performance in the appropriate/relevant area of experience. (2 form essential functions which may include exerting up to 20 pounds of force occasionally and/or 10 pounds of force as frequently as necessary; lifting, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing, if required. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b tion of the State of Florida; Sections 1012.22 and 1001.41, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not e xist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey), 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary February 24, 2013 1050L egals NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF T HE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A MANAGER FIRE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is amending the job description for a Manager Fire and Environmental Safety. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed new job description is to amend the minimum qualifications in the job description for a Manager Fire and Environmental Safety. A summary of the proposed amendment is as follows: The minimum qualifications for a Manager Fire and Environmental Safety are amended as follows: (1 years of college credit/equivalent from an accredited educational institution; or five (5 isfactory performance in the appropriate/relevant area of experience. The following shall be removed from additional desired qualifications: Verification of training or experience in interpreting construction drawings and design specifications. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b tions 1012.22 and 1001.41, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary February 24, 2013 NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB DESCRIPTION FOR A MANAGER FINANCE, STAFF AND STUDENT DATABASES AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is amending the job description for a Manager Finance, Staff and Student Databases. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed new job description is to amend the minimum qualifications in the job description for a Manager Finance, Staff and Student Databases. A summary of the proposed amendment is as follows: The minimum qualifications for a Manager Finance, Staff and Student Databases are amended as follows: (1 ates degree or two years of college credit/equivalent from an accredited educational institution; or five (5 appropriate/relevant area of experience; (2 cal Ability: Ability to perform essential functions and tasks which may include exerting up to 20 pounds of force occasionally and/or 10 pounds of force as frequently as necessary; lifting, crawling, kneeling, bending, stooping, pulling, and pushing, if required; may involve extended periods of time at a keyboard or work station: a. Dexterity: Ability to perform skilled coordinated movements. b. Sensory: Ability to perceive and discriminate sounds; some tasks require visual perception and discrimination as well as oral communications a bility. c. Environmental Factors: Tasks may risk exposure to adverse environmental conditions, such as noise extremes, electric currents, or bright or dim lights. The following shall be removed from additional desired qualifications: (1 Minimum of five (5 ment. (27 experience with Finance and/or Human Resources and/or student databases. (35 years of working experience with a report writing tool. (4 sequel/SQL statements. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b tion of the State of Florida; Sections 1012.22 and 1001.41, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries o r state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey), 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary February 24, 2013 amended as follows: (1 years of college credit/equivalent from an accredited educational institution; or five (5 isfactory performance in the appropriate/relevant area of experience; (2 required by the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulations. The following shall be removed from additional desired qualifications: 1. Bachelors degree in Building Construction, Architecture, or Engineering from an accredited educational institution preferred. 2. Verification of training or experience in interpreting construction drawings and design specifications. The specific legal authority includes Article IX Section 4(b Constitution of the State of Florida; Sections 1012.22 and 1001.41, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, p roductivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary February 24, 2013 1050L egals 2100Help Wanted 2100Help Wanted 2100Help WantedCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are m isunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first da y your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, p lease call us:314-9876 News-Sun Classified Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 AGERO 3X10.5 AD # 00027805

PAGE 13

C M Y K www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, February 24, 2013Page 13A Contact UsBy Phone( 863) 385-6155By Mail2227 US Hwy 27S Sebring, FL 33870By E-Mailwww.newssun.com/contact/ 2005 FORDTAURUS SE 4DR, Auto, Cruise Control, Cold A/C, Good Tires, Runs A-1, Looks Like New in & out, Regularly Serviced. Price Reduced to $5,000 To Sell! 863-465-1713 or 863-465-9100 2000 NISSANALTIMA GLE, 4DR., Cold A/C. Power seats & steering, Sunroof, Leather, Alloy Wheels & New Tires Very Clean & Reliable. Asking $4300 obo. 863-461-1713 of 863-465-9100 2000 FORDEXPLORER V-8 5.0 XLP White, Sunroof, Stock Tint, Leather Interior, Tow Package, Good A/C & Heat, CD/AM/FM. $2500 obo. 863-212-2413 9450Automotive for Sale 9000 T ransportationEXERCISE BIKENew, used 1 hr. Cost $ 296. Will sell for $175. Also a 3 wheel Bicycle $150. 1-877-243-2823-863-385-6007. 8150Fitness & ExerciseEquipment 8000 R ecreationNOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & SuppliesSEBRING WOODHAVENESTATES SPRING FAIR. Fri. March 1st. 8 12. 2122 Jacaranda Way off Bruns Rd. Crafts, Rummage sale, raffle, bake sale & misc. 7320Garage &Yard SalesSEBRING RECREATIONCLUB H UGE ANNUAL YARD SALE. 333 Pomegranate Ave,behind Sebring Police station. Fri-Sat, Mar 1-2, Fri 8am-5pm, Sat 9am-1pm. Clothing, decor, furniture, hardware, electroni cs. This is an exceptional sale! Something for Everyone! 7320Garage &Yard Sales WINDOWS /LAP TOP COMPUTER (five yrs. a ttach's.Need Money for Medical bills. Worth more/will sacrifice. $99. 863-471-0098 U PRIGHT VACUUMCompletely reconditioned with a 30 Day Guarantee. $20. 863-402-2285 SCULPTURED CONCRETEflowerbed garden edging, straight and curved pieces, painted beige, many pieces, good shape, $1 each, 863-385-1604. RV SURGEPROTECTOR-50 amps, RV Elect. Model PLM-50. Excel. cond., no longer need-$90. Call 863-991-5806 PUMP -Irrigation or Shallow Well, 1/2 HP Craftsman, Used only 6 weeks. $100. 863-465-0335 or 863-464-0027 PORTABLE SEWINGMACHINE Sears. $45. Call 863-385-6214 OAK DESK/ OLD / 36" X 60" 6 Drawers & 2 Sliding Pullouts. Good Condition. $50. 863-402-2285 METAL BED,Head & Foot board & Hollywood Frame. 76" wide, White. $20. 863-402-2285 ANTIQUE DRESSER/ 6 Drawer with Full Mirror / Maghoany. $75 obo. 863-835-1734 7310B argain Buys PIANO -ELBRIDGE WITH BENCH $450 OBO. CALL 863-658-2673 LOWREY DIRECTORORGAN Roll top desk closure. Insured @ $8000. Moving, $2500 obo. 863-314-0287 7260MusicalMerchandise 7000 MerchandiseLAKE PLACIDWAREHOUSES for rent from $47 / mo. & Commercial space for rent from $428 / mo. Contact Sara Rios, Compton Rental Properties. 863-465-4158 6550Warehousesfor Rent S EBRING SINGLEFAMILY HOUSE. 3br/2ba, 1 CG. Screened in Porch, No pets. $800/mo. + Utilities+Deposit. 571-248-8012 SEBRING 2BR/2BA1CG. $700/mo. 6530 Mattee Rd. Call 863-385-3101 SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3 BR, 2 1/2 BA, 1 CG $800/Monthly No Smoking, No pets. RENTED!!!!!! L AKE PLACID3/2 131 Loquat Rd. Screened patio. $700/mo. + $1,000. security. Call 305-804-5464 AVON PARKNice 2BR/2BA House. No pets. $700/mo. Deposit required. Call 419-722-0179 6300Unfurnished HousesLAKE PLACIDNear Lake Placid Boat Ramp, with Lake Access. Very Nice 2BR,1BA, Appliances, A/C. $550/mo. plus $50 water. 863-465-1354. 6250Furnished Houses 6200UnfurnishedApartments NORTH AVONPARK 1BR, 1BA, G/W/S paid, you pay electric. No pets, 1 yr. lease. Deposit $300. $380 Monthly. Call 863-873-5433 LAKE PLACIDAPARTMENTS & HOMES for rent from $350 / mo. Call Sara Rios @ CENTURY 21 Compton Realty 863-465-1458 AVON PARKNW APARTMENTS 2BR/2BA $450 mo. New 1BR/1BA $395 mo. Plus 1st & Sec. Central Heat & Air. No Dogs or Cats. 863-449-0195 6200U nfurnishedApartmentsSEBRING FURNISHED/UNFURNISHED 1BR or Studios, on the circle. Some U tilities incl. $450 600. Attn: Vets. Special programs for veterans, subsidize payments, call to see if you qualify. 863-386-9100. 6150F urnishedApartmentsAVON PARKBeautiful Lake View. 2BR/1BA. Includes Water & Garbage. Washer & Dryer connection. Safe neighborhood. Dead End St. Pets allowed. No Pitt Bulls. $450 + Deposit. 863-453-4914 or 863-414-2871 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 Rentals SEBRING RENTTO OWN 2/2 All Appliances, D/W, Washer/Dryer & Carport. 4526 Ferdinand. $1000 damage deposit, $600/mo. 863-446-2414 LAKE PLACID/ Sebring DW Mobile Home 2BR/ 2BA, Central A/C/Heat. Screened porch, Carport. W/D hook up. Large lawn, quiet area. No pets. 863-840-0494 or 863-465-1451 5150M obile HomesFor Rent SELECTION OF1 & 2 Bedroom Units For Sale in friendly/active 55+ Park, located near shopping, banks, & hospital. Reasonable lot rent incl. S/W/G & Lawn mowing. Call for more info. or to view units. No pets please. 863-385-7034 SEBRING 2005MOBILE HOME 2/2 & Own Lot. Never lived in. $39,900. Owner financing. 863-385-9134 SEBRING -Mobile Home / Double wide with 2 Lots. 3BR, 2BA Utility Room, Carport, Frt. Porch, Deed restrictions, 115 Sunbird Place. 55+ $39,900.00 863-382-4141 Or 863-414-7090 P ALM HARBORHOMES Demo your mobile home/free tear down at Palm Harbor New mobiles $39K off list John Lyons 800-622-2832 EXT 210 AVON PARK55+. 12 x 48 Mobile Home, 1BR/1BA w/Florida Room, Front porch, Carport. Sewer/Water & Garbage incl. $5500. 863-221-2447 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesSEBRING 4BR/1BA.New carpet & tile throughout. New Cabinets, Dishwasher, double pain windows & doors. Screen porch. Fenced yard. NICE! REDUCED $55,000. 863-202-0697 4080Homes for SaleSebring 4000 Real Estate 3000 F inancial SUNSHINE PAYDAY LOANS Full time clerk needed Must be organized and Have excellent Customer Service skills Fax resumes to: 863-678-2170 SEEKING WELLExp. Medical office help. Exc. billing/collection, communication, typing, computer skills & medical terminology are a MUST Part-time. Fax resume to: 866-593-0635 or email to: medicalofficebilling@yahoo.com RESIDENT MANAGERPOSITION Management Position Available. South Central Florida, 590 site, 55+ Mobile Home/RV Community is seeking a motivated, dependable person to serve as Resident Manager/mainten ance Supervisor. Qualified applicants should be experienced in all aspects of grounds and facilities operations and maintenance, coordination of maintenance employees, and be able to funct ion in a team oriented environment serving 1000+ residents. This salary position with excellent benefits package. (Salary commensurate w/exp. sume to: Andrew Fells 1850 US Hwy. 27 S. Avon Park, Fl. 33825 or email to : rosl@strato.net Job description available upon request. RECEPTIONIST PARTTIME RECEPTIONIST position available for weekends, Saturday and Sunday. Must have computer experience, knowledge of Word and Excel, switch board experience and a customer focused approach. Apply in person at Royal Care of Avon Park, 1213 W. Stratford Rd. Avon Park. 863-453-6674 EOE, M/F, DFWP. MEDICAL RECEPTIONISTSFOR BUSY OFFICE. Send reply to Box 125, The News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring FL,33870. MAINTENANCE MAN/MANAGER needed for 20 unit complex on Lake in Sebring. Perfect for retiree w/Handyman skills. Apartment is provided for your compensation. 954-584-3465 ext 208 or g reg@prestigepmm.com LIL WIZARDSACADEMY Is Looking for F/T & P/T Teachers. Please call 863-214-8639 or email jamesbox_3408@yahoo.com 2100H elp WantedEXPERIENCE THEJOYS AND REWARDS Of Being A Comfort Keeper If you have a passion for improving the quality of life for others while helping people live independently and happily in their own homes, you could be a Comfort Keeper! We are now hiring CNA, HHA and Homemaker Companion Positions in the Highlands County area. We offer flexible full-time or part-time hours. Contact us to learn more about how you can develop a rewarding career enriching the lives of others with Comfort Keepers. Apply online today at: http://ck381.ersp.biz/employment 863-385-9100 ESTIMATOR NEEDEDFor Local precast hollowcore company. Construction estimating experience required. Precast estimating experience preferred. Drafting experienced a plus. Please send resume and salary requirements to juliem@floridaprecastind.com. Fax: 863-655-1215 DIESEL MECHANICNEEDED for local hollowcore precast company. Welding/Electrical skills required. Competitive benefit package. Email resume/salary requirements to juliem@floridaprecastind.com. F ax: 863-655-1215 CLASS-A DRIVERS Join our Lakeland Team as a Route Delivery Driver and you could earn $56,000 avg. your 1st year, be Home EVERY Week, and receive a Generous Benefit Package! CDL-A 1 Yr. Exp. Req. Good Driving/Work History Apply Online TODAY: MBMcareers.comMBMCUSTOMIZED FOODSERVICE DISTRIBUTION 2100Help Wanted 2000 Employment Classified ads get fast results DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 314-9876CITY OF SEBRING 2X2 AD # 00027786DUMMY 2013 CIRCULATION MANAGER 2X3 AD # 00026405 DUMMY 2013 NEWS EDITOR 2X6 AD # 00026406 COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH CARE 2X5 AD # 00027792 MILLER ADVERTISING 2X5 AD # 00027840AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 AD # 00027029 AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 AD # 00027491

PAGE 14

C M Y K Page 14ANews-SunSunday, February 24, 2013w ww.newssun.com FLORIDA HOSPITAL HEARTLAND A/P; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, m ain, cardiac experie; 00027034 WARREN'S AUTO SALES #2; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, weather page; 0 0027798

PAGE 15

C M Y K B y DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING The rain came unexpected, and so was the r esolve of the visiting DeSoto Bulldogs in Sebrings l ate-night, 4-3 win at F iremens Field. DeSoto, scrambling into the season with one coaching change and then another unexpected one, were taking the field for just the second time and were facing Blue Streak flame-thrower Jordan Baker. But the Bulldogs scratched for a run in the top of the first with some errant fielding helping them along. Baker did strike out two to get out of it and his batmates answered back as some sloppy Bulldog fielding allowed for two errors and evened it up at 1-1. Some control problems plagued Baker in the second as he plunked the first batter and later saw a pick-off throw get away and send the runner all the way to third. An RBI single followed, but that would be it, for the moment. The next two half-innings went quickly, before the Streaks scored twice to take the lead in the bottom of the third. W ith one out, Wyatt Johnson singled up the middle and gave way to designated runner Landon Willey. Willey stole second and one out later, came around ona Dane Maddox double to right. Ty Little then drew a walk and when Brad Dotys grounder to third was thrown away, Maddox came in to score for a 3-2 lead. B ut the Bulldogs were let back in with an error to start the fourth, a sacrifice bunt and a wild pitch that evened it up at 3-3. Which was when the rains came, sure and steady, and caused a half hour delay as t he tarps to cover the mound and home plate were brought out. When play did resume in the bottom of the fourth, Justin Acevedo singled to right with one out, but was stranded. Baker mowed DeSoto down in order in the top of the fifth, but the rain came again, a bit more insistently this time around, and it was more than an hour later when play would resume. (Baker best outing of the year Sebring head coach Buck Rapp said. Still some control problems, but much better this time out. And after that long of a delay, I wasnt going to put him back out there. He got his work in and you cant bring a pitcher back after that kind of delay Matt Portis came in when the rain finally subsided and held DeSoto down over the next two innings, though the Streaks couldnt muster anything either, until the bottom of the seventh. Then, a lead-off walk got a runner on, with Willey coming in to take over on the basepaths. Apassed ball moved him to second and a pitch in the SPORTS B SE CTION News-Sun Sunday, February 24, 2013 News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Erika Cord helped the Lady Blue Streaks with a win in the high jump and a second in the triple jump Thursday at L ake Placid. News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE L andon Willey stands at second base as the first rains began to fall Friday. Two rain delays would stretch the contest late into the night, but Willey would score the winning run for the Streaks in the bottom of the seventh. Courtesy photo Torri Pringle and the Red Devils are off to a hot start, winning their first six games of the season. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comIts still early, but the Red Devils of the baseball diamond are already on a roll, winning three times this week to get out to a 60 start. Tuesday saw a 4-1 h ome win over Hardee behind an Anthony Carruthers two-run double and seven shining innings for Kenny McGrath. The southpaw McGrath s cattered four hits, allowed just one run while walking three and striking out five. Afirst-inning explosion paved the way to Thursdays 10-5 win over the Miners of Ft. Meade with the Devils sending 14 batters to the plate in their first at-bat. Josh Gomez got it started with a walk and movedt o third on an Alfred Brown single to right. Brown stole second and b oth runners came in on a Tyrone Perry single to right. Anthony Carruthers walked and one out later Torri Pringle walked to load the bases. Luis Martinez and Colton Brock then added RBI singles and Gomez and Brown drew walks to push two more runs across. Perry then pounded a bases-clearing double in to t he left-center field gap to give him five RBI in the inning and put the Devils up 9-0. T he Miners answered with two in their half of t he first off Avon Park s tarter Austin Stadie, and scored two more in the third. But the Devils added another in the fourth and Gio Gomez pitched the final four innings, allowing just one more run to provide for the final margin. And while Perry was the demolition man Thursday, it was a more rounded offensive effort Friday that got Avon Park an 8-2 win at McKeel Academy. The Red Devils were held down over the first three innings and the hosts scratched for on in the second for a 1-0 lead headed into the fourth. But Perry started another mini-explosion with a double down the rightfield line. Carruthers knocked him in with a double to leftcenter and Steven Flowers bunted Carruthers to third. Pringle then singled to bring him in and Mason Jahna later doubled to score Pringle and would come around himself on a Red Devils roll to 6-0 By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comLAKE PLACID The 2013 Track and Field season got underway Thursday with the inaugural meet at Lake P lacid High School. But it was the Lady Blue Streaks and Moore Haven Terrier boys that won their respective sides of the fourteam competition. The Sebring ladies topped t he field with a 103.83 total, w hile the Moore Haven boys accumulated 91.50 points. The Lady Terriers were second at 58.83, Lake Placid third with 34 and Avon Park fourth in the girls side of the meet with 33.33. S ebrings boys were seco nd with 83.50, the Green Dragons third at 36.50 and the Red Devils fourth with 30.50. The Lady Streaks got it started with a win in the 4X800-meter relay, as Katherine Stoll, Hannah K imber Harris, Cassandra Marentes and Hannah Schroeder came in with a time of 12.25:75. The Lady Devils took second in the event with Brittany Egan, Kelsa K nowles, Brandi Best and Aline Yline crossing the line in a time of 14:07.81. Sebring got a leg up in the f ield events, specifically the j umps, with Shalontay Rose winning the triple jump (31feet, 1-inch), Erika Cord winn ing the high jump (5-feetTrack season opens with Lady Streak win Streaks outlast rain, DeSoto Sebring4D eSoto3 See TRACK, Page 3B See AP, Page 3B See SEBRING, Page 3B Special to the News-SunSEBRING In the Thursday, Feb. 21, games in the Sebring 70s Softball League, the Silent Salesman had a big upset win over VFW4300 in mind when they led 3-2 after three innings and 6-2 after seven innings. Good defense kept the VFWTeam from scoring in four consecutive innings. That all changed in the bottom of the 8th inning when VFWs hot bats took over. The last man in the batting order led off with a base hit, then the top of the order took over, banging out six more hits and scoring five times to pull the 7-6 win out of the fire. Salesmans Cliff Sheane had another good game for a first-year player, going 3-for3. Norm Grubbs had 3-for-4 and rapping out two hits each were Don Day, Fred Moore, Richie Burkholz and Bobby Iott. VFW4300 reports Don Knowlton had a hit that started a late rally. Chuck Fluharty and Bob Fulcher had 3-for-4, which were key hits in the last inning. Doran Quinn drove in the winning run on a fielders choice. John Kloet was the winning pitcher. Royal Palms had a 12-7 victory over Highlands Independent Bank. Palms Bobby Floodine went 4-5 with a bases-loaded triple. Having two hits each were Curt Brown, Dale Demar, Gene Hanford, Kyle Saunders and Harley Smith. The Bank had the only home run of the day banged out by Bobby Fahnestock, who went 2-for-4. Gene Phillips, Jose Torres and Andy Timmermanis each had a double in their 2-for-3 times to bat. Don Cunningham and Do n Sheets were 2-for-4 and four other players followed with a one base hit each. Andrews Allsta te Insurance took control over Buttonwood Bay with an 119 win. Their John Pena went for a double in his 4-for-5 times up. Four players having 3-for4 were Jerry Kauffman, Marvin Knutilla, Rudy Pribble and John Smith. Having 2-for-4 were Mel Gross and Tom Royal. Buttonwood Bay made a good effort with their multiple hits. Tom Moose Morrissette banged out a 4-for-4 day, including a triple. John Degnen had two doubles in his 3-for-4 times at the plate. Wild finishes for Sebring 70s See SENIORS, Page 4B Heartland weekend for tennis teams News-Sun file photo by DAN HOEHNE After winning Thursday against Bartow, Nisha Patel and the Lady Blue Streaks saw their season mark improve to 6-1. Patel won out in a tough, three-set match before besting Lady YellowJacket Thinzar Zaw, 6-4, 3-6, 6-2, while the rest of her teammates won their matches in straight sets. Breaking from the regular season schedule this weekend, the Lady Streaks hosted the Heartland Conference Invite Friday and Saturday, with Avon Park and Lake Placid among the teams on hand. The boys side of the Heartland Tournament were playing their matches at Avon Park.

PAGE 16

C M Y K YMCA Spring SoccerSEBRING The Highlands County Family YMCAis having a sign up for their Spring Soccer Program, ages 3-14, which ends on Monday, Feb. 25. A ny questions, please call 382-9622.Youth OlympicsSEBRING The Highlands County Family YMCAis hosting a Youth O lympics on Saturday, March 2 from 9 a.m.-Noon to honor Bo Alvarez. T here will be both boy and girl divis ions for ages 6-14. Medallions will be awarded for six different events, includes lunch and t-shirt. Call 382-9622 for questions.Sebring Elks Golf SEBRING The Sebring Elks Lodge No. 1529 monthly golf outing will be held at Golf Hammock Golf and Country Club on Monday, March 4, beginning at 8 a.m. Cost is $32 which includes golf, cart, lunch and prize fund. To sign up contact Jack McLaughlin at jacknjudy33872@gmail.com or leave a message on 863 471-3295. Check in by 7:40 a.m. in the restaurant.SFSC Hosts Heartland GamesAVONPARK South Florida State College (SFSC Department announces Heartland Games for Active Adults 2013. The Heartland Games for Active Adults will run March 2 30 at various venues throughout Highlands County. The cost is a $15 Registration Fee and an additional $5 per event. The Heartland Games for Active Adults is sanctioned by the Florida Sports A Division of Enterprise Florida, Inc. The mission of the games is to promote healthy lifestyles for anyone over 50 and to provide them an opportunity to compete at the local, state and national levels. Events will be held throughout Highlands County in bowling, golf, basketball, billiards, shuffleboard, pickleball, cycling, swimming, horseshoes and tennis. Medals are awarded for first, second and third place, male and female, in each sport and age category. Register in Building B, Highlands Campus or any SFSC campus or center. For more information, contact Community Education (Lauren Redick 784-7388 or email CommunityEducation@southflorida.edu.LP Softball BBQLAKE PLACID Lake Placid High School Softball will be hosting an Alumni Game and Chicken Barbeque on Saturday, March 2, beginning at 10 a.m. Barbeque pick-up starts at 11 a.m. and runs until 4 p.m. and includes, for $10, chicken, baked beans, scalloped potatoes, roll and dessert. Water and soda will be available for $1. Alumni softball registration forms are available at the LPHS front office. For those former Dragons who wish to play, registration fee is $30 and all forms and money are due to coach Cheshire no later than Wednesday, Feb. 20. Alumni registration fee includes BBQ Dinner, drink, T-shirt and a days worth of fun on the field. Game admission is $2. For more information, call coach Cheshire at 699-5010, ext. 263.Florida DEP Trail RunsThe Florida Department of Environmental Protection is hosting the f ollowing Trail Runs in the State Parks listed below There are five weeks remaining in the Seven Trail Runs in Seven Weeks in Seven Award Winning State Parks. T he trail runs include both 5 and 10 K runs. Race awards for all age groups and Tshirts for everyone who registers. You can pre register at www.active.com or call (239 Pre race registration is $20 and day of race registration is $30. All the races start at 1:00 p.m. Bring the family and run together. Come early or stay late and enjoy the parks For more information please contact Terry Cerullo at (239or terry.cerullo@dep.state.fl.us. February 24 Highlands Hammock State Park, 5931 Hammock Road, Sebring, 33872 M arch 3 Charlotte Harbor Preserve State Park, 12301 Burnt Store Road, P unta Gorda, 33955 March 10 Charlotte Harbor Preser ve State Park, 12301 Burnt Store Road, Punta Gorda, 33955 March 17 Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park, 137 Coastline Drive, Copeland, 34137 March 24 Little Manatee River State Park, 215 Lightfoot Road Wimaum a, 33598.Hoops for H.O.P.E.SEBRING The Mary Toney H.O.P.E. (Helping Other People Elevate Foundation will be hosting its3rd Annual Community 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament on Saturday, March 9, in the Sebring High School Gym. The all-day event runs from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., with concessions, music and a guest speaker, with a cost of just $5 per player. The tournament will have male and female brackets consisting of threeto four-player teams in age groups ranging from 7-9, 10-12, 13-15 and 16-19. First and second place prizes will be awarded in each age group. The two younger age groups will start play at 8:30 a.m., with the older groups tipping off at Noon. All teams need to report to the gym 30 minutes prior to the first game of their division. Some age groups fill up fast, so register early to secure a spot. Registration deadline is Friday, March 8. To register, or for more information, contact LaVaar Scott at (8630, Nick Brooks at (850or Princeton Harris at (863 Proceeds for the fun and competitive event go to benefit the Mary Toney H.O.P.E Foundation. Come spend the first day of Spring Break hooping it up on the court for a worthy cause. EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB New York3220.615 Brooklyn3323.5891 Boston2926.5274.5 Philadelphia2230.42310 Toronto2333.41111 Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami3814.731 Atlanta3023.5668.5 Washington1637.30222.5 Orlando1540.27324.5 Charlotte1342.23626.5 Central Division WLPctGB Indiana3421.618 Chicago3223.5822 Milwaukee2627.4917 Detroit2235.38613 Cleveland1737.31516.5WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio4413.772 Memphis3618.6676.5 Houston3126.54413 Dallas2529.46317.5 New Orleans1937.33924.5 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City4015.727 Denver3422.6076.5 Utah3124.5649 Portland2530.45515 Minnesota2032.38518.5 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Clippers3918.684 Golden State3223.5826 L.A. Lakers2729.48211.5 Sacramento1937.33919.5 Phoenix1838.32120.5 ___ Thursdays Games Miami 86, Chicago 67 San Antonio 116, L.A. Clippers 90 Fridays Games Chicago 105, Charlotte 75 Toronto 100, New York 98 Indiana 114, Detroit 82 Washington 119, Denver 113 Atlanta 122, Sacramento 108 Houston 106, Brooklyn 96 Memphis 88, Orlando 82 Dallas 104, New Orleans 100 Oklahoma City 127, Minnesota 111 Boston 113, Phoenix 88 Golden State 107, San Antonio 101, OT L.A. Lakers 111, Portland 107 Saturdays Games Denver at Charlotte, late Cleveland at Orlando, late Houston at Washington, late Miami at Philadelphia, late Indiana at Detroit, late Atlanta at Milwaukee, late Utah at L.A. Clippers, late Sundays Games L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 1 p.m. Golden State at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m. Sacramento at New Orleans, 6 p.m. Cleveland at Miami, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at New York, 7 p.m. Memphis at Brooklyn, 7 p.m. San Antonio at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Boston at Portland, 9 p.m. Chicago at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m.LEADERSSCORING FGFTPTSAVG Durant, OKC5114651591 28.9 Anthony, NYK444269127728.4 James, MIA540261141527.2 Bryant, LAL5343451505 26.9 Harden, HOU4334701451 26.4 REBOUNDS OFFDEFTOTAVG Howard, LAL16942459311.9 Randolph, MEM22438360711.7 Asik, HOU19046565511.5 Vucevic, ORL19343963211.5 Noah, CHI19838057811.3 ASSISTS GASTAVG Rondo, BOS3842011.1 Paul, LAC454259.4 Vasquez, NOR565289.4 Holiday, PHL484238.8 Westbrook, OKC554448.1 STEALS GSTLAVG Paul, LAC451152.56 Conley, MEM521162.23 Westbrook, OKC551051.91 Jennings, MIL531001.89 Lin, HOU571071.88 Ellis, MIL53991.87 BLOCKED SHOTS GBLKAVG Sanders, MIL471533.26 Ibaka, OKC531572.96 Duncan, SAN471292.74 Hibbert, IND551442.62 Howard, LAL501152.30 3-POINT FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 3FG 3FGAPCT Korver, ATL133288.462 Calderon, DET101223.453 Webster, WAS89199.447 Novak, NYK101226.447 Ilyasova, MIL59133.444 FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE FGFGAPCT Chandler, NYK220334.659 Jordan, LAC212353.601 Splitter, SAN223376.593 Howard, LAL301 518.581 Hickson, POR288501.575 FREE THROW PERCENTAGE FTFTAPCT Durant, OKC465512.908 Collison, DAL161178.904 Curry, GOL159176.903 Martin, OKC166184.902 Redick, ORL115129.891EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA New Jersey1034244540 Pittsburgh1260246045 N.Y. Rangers862184141 Philadelphia8101175359 N.Y. Islanders791155060 Northeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Montreal1142244939 Boston1022224133 Ottawa1062224334 Toronto1170225141 Buffalo6111134859 Southeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Carolina861174444 Tampa Bay871176151 Winnipeg781154150 Florida584144161 Washington5101114354WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA Chicago1403315735 Nashville855213939 St. Louis962205351 Detroit773174551 Columbus5102123953 Northwest Division WLOTPtsGFGA Vancouver1034244940 Minnesota862183639 Colorado771153843 Edmonton673153744 Calgary573134054 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA Anaheim1221255339 San Jose853194036 Phoenix862184441 Dallas881174447 Los Angeles762163638 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. ___ Thursdays Games Ottawa 3, N.Y. Rangers 2, SO Toronto 3, Buffalo 1 Florida 5, Philadelphia 2 New Jersey 3, Washington 2 Winnipeg 4, Carolina 3 N.Y. Islanders 4, Montreal 3, OT Boston 4, Tampa Bay 2 Columbus 3, Detroit 2 Vancouver 4, Dallas 3 Minnesota 3, Edmonton 1 Fridays Games Pittsburgh 3, Florida 1 Vancouver 1, Nashville 0 Chicago 2, San Jose 1 Saturdays Games New Jersey at Washington, late Winnipeg at Philadelphia, late Phoenix at Edmonton, late Colorado at Los Angeles, late Nashville at Detroit, late Tampa Bay at Carolina, late Toronto at Ottawa, late N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, late N.Y. Islanders at Buffalo, late San Jose at Dallas, late Columbus at St. Louis, late Minnesota at Calgary, late Sundays Games Boston at Florida, 3 p.m. Vancouver at Detroit, 5 p.m. Winnipeg at New Jersey, 5 p.m. Columbus at Chicago, 7 p.m. Carolina at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. Colorado at Anaheim, 8 p.m. Phoenix at Calgary, 8 p.m.SCORING LEADERSGPGAPTS Vanek, Buf17121325 Crosby, Pit1871825 Stamkos, TB16111324 Kane, Chi1791423 Tavares, NYI17111122 Zetterberg, Det1751722 St. Louis, TB1641822 Elias, NJ1751621 Malkin, Pit1841721 Kunitz, Pit1871320 Moulson, NYI1791019 Voracek, Phi1971219 Ribeiro, Was16613192 tied with 18 pts.BASEBALLAmerican League CHICAGO WHITE SOXAgreed to terms RHP Dylan Axelrod, RHP Simon Castro, RHP Deunte Heath, RHP Nate Jones, LHP Charlie Leesman, RHP Jhan Marinez, RHP Nestor Molina, RHP Brian Omogrosso, LHP Jose Quintana, RHP Addison Reed, RHP Andre Rienzo, LHP Santos Rodriguez, LHP Chris Sale, LHP Hector Santiago, LHP Leyson Septimo, LHP Donnie Veal, C Tyler Flowers, C Hector Gimenez, C Josh Phegley, INF Brent Morel, INF Angel Sanchez, OF Jordan Danks, OF Jared Mitchell, OF Blake Tekotte and OF Dayan Viciedo on one-year contracts. SEATTLE MARINERSAgreed to terms with RHP Stephen Pryor, RHP Erasmo Ramirez, RHP Tom Wilhelmsen and C Jesus Montero on one-year contracts. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid MONDAY: Baseball at LaBelle,7 p.m.; JVBaseball vs.LaBelle,6 p.m.; Boys Tennis vs. Clewiston,4:15 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball at DeSoto,7 p.m.; JV Baseball vs.DeSoto,6 p.m.; Boys Weightlifting at Sebring,5 p.m.; Boys and Girls Tennis at DeSoto,4 p.m. THURSDAY: JV Baseball vs.Avon Park,6 p.m.; Softball vs.All Saints,6 p.m.; Track at Avon Park,4:30 p.m.; Boys and Girls Tennis at Okeechobee,4:30 p.m. Sebring MONDAY: Boys Tennis at Winter Haven,4 p.m.; Girls Tennis vs.Winter Haven,4 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball at Bartow,7 p.m.; JV Baseball vs.IMG Academy,7 p.m.; Boys Tennis vs.Hardee,4:30 p.m.; Girls Tennis at Hardee,4 p.m.; Boys Weightlifting vs.Lake Placid/DeSoto,5 p.m. THURSDAY: Baseball vs.Hardee,7 p.m.; Softball at Haines City,5:30/7:30 p.m.; Girls T ennis at George Jenkins,4 p.m.; Track at Avon Park,4:30 p.m. SFSC TUESDAY: Softball at Indian River,2 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball vs.State College of Florida,6 p.m. THURSDAY: Softball at Seminole State,2 p.m. FRIDAY: Baseball at State College of Florida,6 p.m. SATURDAY: Baseball vs.State College of Florida,1 p.m.; Softball vs.Sante Fe,1 p.m. Avon Park MONDAY: Softball vs.Booker,4 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball vs.Frostproof,7 p.m.,JV Baseball at Frostproof,6 p.m.; Softball at DeSoto,5:30/7:30 p.m.; Boys Tennis vs.Frostproof,4 p.m.; Girls Tennis at Frostproof,4 p .m. THURSDAY: Baseball vs.McKeel,7 p.m.; JV Baseball at Lake Placid,6 p.m.; Track hosts meet,4:30 p.m. B B O O W W L L I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p . m m . PBA USBC Masters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NW W O O M M E E N N S S C C O O L L L L E E G G E E G G Y Y M M N N A A S S T T I I C C S S S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 a a . m m . Florida at Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NN N B B A A S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . L.A. Lakers at Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A A B B C C 7 7 p p . m m . Memphis at Brooklyn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Chicago at Oklahoma City . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NC C H H E E E E R R L L E E A A D D I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n Cheerleading from Orlando . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2P P R R E E M M I I E E R R L L E E A A G G U U E E S S O O C C C C E E R R M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 2 2 : : 5 5 5 5 p p . m m . West Ham vs. Tottenham Hotspur . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2Times, games, channels all subject to change M M O O T T O O R R C C Y Y C C L L E E R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n Monster Energy Supercross . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S SW W O O M M E E N N S S C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Purdue at Minnesota. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 1 1 p p . m m . Miami at Georgia Tech. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 2 2 p p . m m . Tennessee at Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 8 8 3 3 p p . m m . D uke at Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 5 5 p p . m m . Texas A&M at Vanderbilt . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Baylor at Oklahoma. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n D aytona 500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X X 8 8 p p . m m . NHRA Arizona Nationals . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2G G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . PGA WGC Accenture Match Play . . . . G G O O L L F F 1 1 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . LPGA Honda LPGA Thailand . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 2 2 p p . m m . PGA WGC Accenture Match Play . . . . . N N B B C CN N H H L L T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Buffalo at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NC C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Illinois at Michigan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 p p . m m . Cincinnati at Notre Dame . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 2 2 p p . m m . B oston College at Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 4 4 4 4 4 p p . m m . Michigan State at Ohio State . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S SM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Syracuse at Marquette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 p p . m m . Kansas at Iowa State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Indiana at Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 7 7 p p . m m . M emphis at Xavier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 9 9 p p . m m . Florida at Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N LI VESPORTSONTV NBA NHL Transactions Page 2BNews-SunSunday, February 24, 2013www.newssun.com The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

PAGE 17

C M Y K w ww.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, February 24, 2013Page 3B AMERICAN GOLF CARTS; 5.542"; 5"; Black; 2/3,10,17,24; 00027334 SFCC-PERFORMING ARTS CENTER; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, matinee s eries; 00027692 even), with Cord also taking second in the triple and Rose second in the high. Destiny McCartney was in f ine hurdling form, also getting a leg up, and won both the 100and 300-meter heats with times of 17.31 and 52.51, respectively. Recent Florida Gator signee Taylor Tubbs got dual wins for Sebring as well, cruising to first-place finishes in the 800-meter run (2:23.80 (5:20.25 Also scoring some points for the Lady Streaks were Angela Dennard, who took second in the discus with a toss of 63-feet, 3-inches, while teammate Denise C onstant was third at 60-feet, 10-inches. Constant also took second i n the shot put, 26-feet, 8inches, with Alexxis Harris taking third with a distance of 24-feet, 3-inches. F or the Lady Dragons, Shaquavia Gayle won the 400-meter dash in 1:07.07, took second in the long jump at 13-feet, 11-inches and Quiahja Williams was second in the 100-meter dash with a time of 13.92. Lake Placid got another second in the 4X100 relay, with Dawn Barrett, Shonkeria Robinson, Shelby Dillon and Williams finishing in 58.87, and yet another when Alex Coyne was runner-up in the mile at 6:29.21 For Avon Park, Lashady Love took third in both the triple jump and 100-meter dash, Angelina Ligon wast hird in both the 100and 3 00-meter hurdles. Like the girls, the Sebring boys got things rolling with a win in the 4X800 relay, with Eric Foster, Elias Salgado, Damian Foster and Nathaniel Acosta crossing the line in a time of 9:12.31. L ake Placids Jorge Gomez, Evan Holden, Brandon Skeens and Dalton Shelton were second in the event at 9:31.30. Shelton would pick up a win for the Dragons in the 3,200-meter run with a time of 10:32.68, with Sebrings Wesley Koning a close second at 10:33.72. In the tosses, the Red Devils got a win from Masco Louis in the discus, 108-feet, 4-inches, with teammate Vassell Vinroy second at 107feet, 8-inches and Sebrings Gary Demarest third at 104feet, 9-inches. Green Dragon Dennis Johnson won the shot put at 38-feet, 11-inches, Demarest took second with a toss of 36feet, 6-inches and Vinroy was third at 34-feet, 4-inches. Blue Streak Jordyn Blount won both the high and long j umps, at 5-feet, 10-inches and 20-feet, 7-inches, respectively. Vinroy took third in the long jump at 19-feet, 8-inches and Sebrings Jarvis Bridges was second in the high jump at 5-feet, 8-inches. Avon Parks Steven Roberts earned a second in the triple jump at 38-feet and was fourth in the 110-meter hurdles at 17.38. Lake Placids Keplet Charite was third in that hurdle event at 17.21 and won the 400-meter dash in 52.18. Sebrings Carl Dassinger was third in the 400 in 53.74. The Streaks also got a 1,600-meter win from Tim Koning in 5:10.43 and a 200meter win from Brian Dixon at 22.80. Red Devil Logan Lashley was third in the 1,600 at 5:14.20. All in all, a decent start to the spring season, with some familiar names rising to the top and a host of newcomers making their own way up. The three county team s will be in action with the Red Devils hosting a meet on Thursday, Feb. 28, while the Streaks host their own meet on Tuesday, March 5. Continued from 1B News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Red Devil Steven Roberts took fourth in the 110-meter hurdles and second in the triple jump in Thursdays season-opening meet in Lake Placid. Track and Field season underway C olton Brock single to put the Devils up 4-1. M cKeel edged a little c loser with a run in the sixth, but Avon Park answered back again with another four-spot in the top of the seventh. Cody Pearlman lead it off with a single and moved up on a Brown base-knock. One out later, Perry and Carruthers drew back-tob ack walks with Pearlman coming in on a wild pitch. F lowers brought a run in w ith a single and Pringle reached on an error to bring two more in. In all, five different Devils had an RBI, seven scored run and all but one starter had at least one hit. Flowers and Brock combined on the mound to give up just two hits, two earnedr uns and struck out four. Looking to keep things rolling, Avon Park has a three-game homestand coming up this week with Frostproof at Head Field on Tuesday, McKeel in Thursday and Ridge Community on Friday. Continued from 1B AP off to smoking hot start dirt allowed him to steal t hird. Then it was just a matter of a fly ball just deep enough off Dotys bat to bring the w inning run in after a long night. eve still got things to work on and gave away too many runs, Rapp said. But were a young team with only one returning starter from last season. When we played Lake Placid the other night, I thought we were the better team, but realized that (the Dragons) have a lot more varsity experience, he continued. (CatcherWyatt (Johnson ing position starter from last year, so we have a lot of guys getting their first varsity experience as starters. But were working and getting better With the weekend to rest up, Sebring hits the road at Bartow Tuesday, hosts Hardee Thursday and travels to Lake Wales for a contest Friday. Continued from 1B News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Dane Maddox connects for an RBI double in the third inning Friday, though Sebring would have to wait out two r ain delays before taking a 4-3 win over DeSoto. Sebring gets rain-delayed win Weve still got things to work on and gave away too many runs. BUCKRAPP Sebringhead coach Find hundreds of local cars in Highlands County. Centralfloridawheels.com

PAGE 18

C M Y K Page 4BNews-SunSunday, February 24, 2013w ww.newssun.com COCHRAN BROTHERS ROOFING; 5.542"; 3"; Black; feb ads; 00027287 JOHNSON AND JOHNSON GROWERS; 5.542"; 4"; Black; 2/24/13; 00027754 Tony Christo was 1-2 with a double and Fred Boyd had his double in 2-for-4 times up. Tuesday, Feb. 19 was a troubling day for the Sebring Seventy and Over Softball League teams. The weather was good and the fields were up to par, but all three games played had unusual final scores. Silent Salesman and Highlands Independent Bank, two evenly matched t eams, played an exciting game that ended with a big come from behind win of 15-14 for the Salesman. The Salesman scored 11 runs in the last two innings. The bottom of the batting order did a fantastic job as they scored seven runs to put the Salesman back in the game. The deciding hit came off the bat of Don Goodwin, with the go-ahead run on second base. Don scorched a double down the left-field line to drive in the game winner. Don Day had an outstanding day, going 4-for-4 and three runs scored. Don Goodwin had 4-for-5 with a double and Bill Todd went 3-for-4. Norm Grubbs chipped in a d ouble and a single, while L arry Ambuel and Fred Moore rapped out two hits each. Highlands Independent Bank held the lead as long as possible with Bob Fahnestock having a double in his 4-for-5 times at bat. Don Cunningham had 5for-5. All hitting 3-for-4 were Harry Bell, Ross Moody, Gene Phillips and Bob Sheets. Lloyd Noaker went 2-for-4 at the plate. Andrews Allstate Insurances final score was an upset of 16-3 over Royal Palms. This was attributed to good p itching and very strong d efense for Allstate. Jose Torres had two triples in his 3-for-4 times at bat. Dick Ostrich, Rudy Pribble and Eddie Lindberg each had 3-for-4 including a double. Jerry Kauffman had a 4for-4 game. Having 3-for-4 were Gallo Gonzalez, John Pena and John Smith. M el Gross came up with 2for-4. Royal Palms also exhibit ed some good defensive plays by Harley Smith. J C. Brown had 2-for -3 including a double, and Kyle Saunders went 2-for-3. VFW4300 and Buttonwood Bay had a wide spread final score with VFW on top 15-5. For VFW, Bob Ross had a double in his 2-for-4 times at bat. Cal Bready and Bob Fulcher each had 4-for-4. Ross Spider McMin n and John Kloet each had three hits and Ron Lewis was the winning pitcher. Buttonwood Bays leading hitters were John Degnen with a triple in his 3-for-3 times at the plate. Rick Vancuren had 3-for-3. Tony Christo and Tom Moose Morrissette were 3for-4. Having 2-for-3 hits ea c h were Jim Delahunt, Jack Grasso, Diz Jones, Jim Moore, Fred and Nelson Richardson. The games are played at t he Highlands County Sports Complex each Tuesday and T hursday mornings at 10 a.m. Bleachers are furnished. Continued from 1B Seniors swinging away in 70s B y MARK LONG Associated PressDAYTONABEACH Johnny Sauter was taken out on the final lap at Daytona International Speedway last year. On Friday night, another late wreck helped him get to Victory Lane. Sauter caught a break when defending series champion James Buescher crashed on the final lap of t he Trucks Series opener, bringing out a caution that prevented veteran Kyle Busch from making a lastlap move on the leader. Instead, Sauter cruised to victory. I was having flashbacks of last year, said Sauter, who was turned by race winner John King in 2012. They always say you want to be second going into the last lap. It just didnt work out that way. ... Im not going to lie, I was happy to see that caution come out at the end. Just a wild race. Speedway racing is just crazy. ... Im just ecstatic to be in Victory Lane. Getting there wasnt easy, either. After Sauter performed a burnout, he got lost trying tof ind Victory Lane. I didnt have a clue where it was, Sauter said. I couldnt see. I was relyi ng on the spotter to tell me where to go. He told me to t urn into that entrance. It w as the wrong one. Nobody was more confused than I was. Maybe thats why just about everyone watching the 250-mile race figured Sauter was a sitting duck with Busch on his bumper. But before Busch could make his move, Buescher spun Jeff Agnew back in the pack. That brought out a final caution, and since the leaders had already taken the white flag, the race ended under caution. Thought I was in the perfect spot, Busch said. Was gonna somehow make a move on the last lap. Unfortunately, it was only a 99-lap race today. We didnt get the full 100 in and wast able to make a move coming down toward the end. Busch wound up second for the third time in the series opener. eah, its another year in waiting, said Busch, who has wins at Daytona in the Sprint Cup and Nationwide series. It was the 100th win in the series for Toyota and the manufacturers seventh straight at NASCARs most famous track. Ron Hornaday Jr. was third, followed by JustinL ofton, rookie Jeb Burton and TyDillon. Buescher finished 13th, one spot behind highly toute d rookie Darrell Wallace Jr. s a lot harder to win a r estrictor-plate race than y ou think, said Sauter, who failed to win in his first four races at Daytona. The race was clean for the first 26 laps, until Scott Riggsengine blew. That was minor compared to the next caution. Brendan Gaughan, trying to pull off one of the strangest moves of Speedweeks, tried to squeeze between pole-sitter Brennan Newberry and fellow rookie German Quiroga in turn three. It failed miserably. All three trucks slid into the outside wall, setting offa melee that collected about a dozen others. Burton, Ryan Truex, Tim George Jr., John Wes Townley and Jason White w ere among the 13 trucks i nvolved. A fter six laps of caution a nd lots of cleanup, the race r estarted but just briefly. White slammed into the wall shortly after the restart, bring out the third caution. The fifth yellow set up the frantic finish. Truex and Buescher were making a run toward the front on the outside lane when Truexs left-front tire started to go flat. Truex started to slow down and make his way to the bottom of the track, but he got sideways and collected several others. e saw a couple of crashes, Busch said. Thats part of the game. Everybody is fighting for the front, but theres only those guys up there that can be up there. Johnny Sauter wins NASCAR Trucks Series opener A ssociated PressPORTCHARLOTTE R ays third baseman Evan Longoria returned to camp after missing three days due to the birth of his daughter. Longoria, and girlfriend Jaime Edmondson, welcomed Elle Leona Longoria, who was born more than a month premature, on Feb. 20. T he All-Star 27-year-old returned to the Rays training f acility Saturday morning and spoke about become a first-time father. It was pretty miraculous, Longoria said. Ive experienced a lot of things in this game and that was like nothing Id ever experienced. Longoria did not play in t he split-squad game against the Pirates on Saturday, but manager Joe Maddon said he may make his spring debut Tuesday against Houston. Theres no rush, Maddon said. Longoria missed 13 wee ks in 2012 due to a hamstring injury. Longoria back in Rays camp after birth of daughter News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Amanday Byers and the Lady Panthers powered past Broward in Fridays doubleh eader to move their season mark to 12-9 with less than o ne month to go before the start of the Suncoast Conference schedule. TheS outh Florida State baseball t eam split their twin-bill Friday with visiting Baltimore-area Dundalk Community College. After winning the first game, 4-3, the Panthers squandered a 10-0 lead and fell in the nightcap 14-12. The baseball team hosted Broward in a Saturday doubleheader before getting their Suncoast Conference slate started Wednesday with a visit from the State College of Florida. Lady Panthers pawing, baseball scuffling GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCE A ssociated PressMESA, Ariz. The Chicago Cubs are convinced Starlin Castro can hit. They showed that much when they signed their AllStar shortstop to a sevenyear, $60 million contract last summer. The big question for the 23-year-old Castro to answer as he enters his fourth season in the major leagues is whether he can cut down on his errors and headline-making mental lapses in the field. I like the way hes been going about his business defensively, Cubs manager Dale Sveum said. Its one thing I challenged him to do: our next step now in all this is to win a Gold Glove. Obviously, that takes a lot of focus and hard work and being focused for 150 pitches a game and 162 games. Hes got the ability to do it. The rest is up to him. Castro, who has led the National League in errors each of the past two seasons, said that is his major goal this season to match the defensive achievement of teammate Darwin Barney, who won a Gold Glove at second base last year. Castro said he focused much time over the winter on his fielding. When I went (home to the Dominican (Republic worked hard every day on my defense, because I want to be better. I want to be like Barney and win a Gold Glove. And its going to be fun to win Gold Gloves at shortstop, second base and first base because (Anthony good, too, he said. Thats not only Castros view. Thats a vision the defensive-minded coaching staff has in mind for the infield. After Rizzo showed exceptional skills around the bag at first in his half-season debut for the Cubs last season, it might be up to Castro to make that threesome as formidable as he thinks it can be. I know I can be like those guys, Castro said. Last June in San Francisco, Castro forgot the number of outs on a possible double-play ball with the bases loaded and began jogging off the field after getting only the first out on the play. That was obviously a noticeable one, Sveum said, even as he defended Castro for general improvement in that area last season. Indeed, there were no repeats last season of the 2011 incident at Wrigley Field, when Castro was caught on camera daydreaming, with his back to the plate, spitting seeds, as the pitcher delivered the ball. I will eliminate those, eliminate everything, Castro said. This year its gonna be where those things dont happen that happened those couple of years ago. Each game, Ill concentrate, and (stick to Its going to be perfect. The Cubs dont need perfection. They say theyll settle for the improvement they saw last season. I wasnt here before (2012All I know is what other people have told me, Sveum said, that he improved tremendously throughout the season. And I saw it. So hopefully, he just keeps improving. Thats all were asking out of a guy like him, that he just keeps growing. If the seven-year deal wast enough to convince people of the Cubsfaith in their shortstop, team President Theo Epstein gave Castro a strong vote of defensive confidence as spring training opened this year. I thought he made significant strides defensively last year and still has more room for improvement in that area, Epstein said. Certainly, he has all the physical tools to play shortstop. Hes always going to be able to make plays at the extremities of his range. Hes very athletic. Hes got a strong arm. As we sat here last year, it was a bit of an open question in the organization whether he could stay at shortstop long term. And I think now we all feel he definitely can, and be a real good one. Hitting on deck for Cubs Castro

PAGE 19

C M Y K Associated PressSARASOTA Plans for a $2 million art installation at a veterans cemetery in Sarasota will include hand-tiled spires,granite-embedded photos dating back to the Civil War,massivebronze eagles and a 50-foot landscape mosaic embroidered with military service ribbons. The Herald Tribune ( http://bit.ly/YLt7n2 ) reports that the design for the Sarasota National Cemetery will be released Friday. The design includes Patriot Plaza,which is already under construction for $8 million and holds a 2,800-seat amphitheater. Its set for completion in 2014. The Patterson Foundation gave a total of $10 million for the project to the Department of Veterans Affairs National Cemetery Administration in hopes of making the cemetery the Arlington of the South. www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, February 24, 2013Page 5B DUMMY 2013; 5.542"; 7.1"; Black; church page dummy; 00026400 STANLEY STEEMER CARPET; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 2 /24/13; 00027807 DR. LEE, IKE; 3.639"; 4"; Black; 2/24/13; 00027808 BUSINESS Natural disasters are inevitable,u npreventable and often come without warning. No part of the world seems to bes pared,whether its a hurricane, earthquake,tornado,drought or flood. Event hough such catastrophes cant always be predicted,their likely aftermaths often can, including property loss, power or water service dis-r uption,scarcity of food and supplies or overtaxed r elief organizations. Superstorm Sandy was a powerful reminder of whyi t's vital to develop a family disaster plan. By planning a head and knowing what you might need under dire circumstances,you can save yourselves a lot of time,money and grief. T he Federal Emergency Management Agency ( FEMA) offers great suggestions for developing a family emergency plan,b uilding an emergency supply kit,and learning what t o do before,during and after emergencies even a plan for family pets (w ww.fema.gov ). Once your physical safety has been assured,youll i nevitably need to access important financial and l egal records,whether to file insurance claims,apply for loans or simply withdraw cash. Taking these few steps now will makea ccessing such information much easier when the time comes: Create a log of all account numbers,toll-free emergency numbers,contact information and passwords fory our bank and credit card accounts,loans, insurance policies, utilities and otheri mportant accounts. Update it regularly and save copies in secure, offsite locationss uch as a safety deposit box or with a trusted friend living in another area. You can also email the list to yourself in an encrypted,pass-w ord-protected file,save it on a CD or USB drive,or u se a cloud-based storage service like Dropbox that will let you access it froma ny Internet connection. Make PDF copies of t ax returns,insurance policies and legal documents and save offsite in the same manner as above,in case your files or computer ared estroyed by fire or flood. Also make digital copies of i nvaluable family photos, documents and memorabilia that money can't replace. Document your possessions. If you should ever n eed to file an insurance claim or claim a tax deduction for lost,stolen or dam-a ged property,itll be much easier if you have an inventory of everything you own photos or videotape are even better. A few available t ools: The IRSCasualty,Theft and Loss Workbook (IRS Publication 584) includes a worksheet for cataloginga nd estimating the value of your possessions. The Insurance Information Institute maintains a free,secure online home inventory software application that lets you access your home invento-r y,anywhere,anytime ( www.iii.org ). Your insurance compans website likely containsa downloadable inventory f orm. Make sure you fully understand what is and isnt covered by your insurance policies for natural disas-t ers. You may need additional coverage for damage associated with hurricanes, tornados,earthquakes and other weather conditions. Also: Document any damage with photos or video before y ou start cleanup or repairs. Keep track of expenses you incur to prevent furtherd amage,for temporary housing or to move your p ossessions for safekeeping,as they may be reimbursable under your insurance claim. Dont delay submitting y our claim,since insurers often settle claims in the o rder filed. FEMA provides information on how you might bea ble to get government assistance before,during a nd after a disaster at www.disasterassistance. gov B ottom line:Develop a family emergency plan now and make sure everyone k nows what to do when disaster strikes. This article is intended to provide general information ands hould not be considered legal, t ax or financial advice. It's always a good idea to consult a tax or financial advisor for specific information on how certain laws apply to your situa-t ion and about your individual financial situation. Prepare now for natural disasters Special to the News-SunW AUCHULA Two local 11th-graders were selected by Peace River Electric Cooperative (PRECO attend the national YouthT our to Washington DC event. Shakera Latimore, Southeast High School, Bradenton,and Savannah Miller,Hardee High School,W auchula,along with about 30 other students from Florida electric cooperatives,w ill enjoy the rich history of our nations Capitol firsthand. T he weeklong Youth Tour takes place each year in June, d rawing more than 1,500 students from electric co-ops in 46 states. The National RuralE lectric Cooperative Association (NRECAheadq uartered in Arlington,VA, has coordinated this event for nearly 50 years. I have always wanted to go to W ashington, D.C.,because I want to be in politics some day,M iller,a student at Hardee High School in Wauchula,said. PRECO promotes the prog ram to 16 high schools throughout its 10-county service territory.To be con-s idered,students are required to submit an application and a two-page essay. PRECO e nables quality students to explore Washington DC by s ending them all-expensespaid to Youth Tour,explains Nell McCauley,chief market-i ng and member services officer. Wre giving back to the c ommunity by helping our future leaders gain a greater understanding of our system of government. Latimore and Miller will m eet Florida legislators on Capitol Hill and visit many area points of interest,such as the White House,National Cathedral,WashingtonM emorial,Holocaust Museum,numerous war memorials and many more. These bright,young students will also learn aboutt he history and development of rural electrification and discover the value of electricc ooperatives in the economic development of rural areas, adds McCauley. T o learn more about Youth Tour online,visit P RECO.coop and YouthTour.coop. Peace River Electric Cooperative servesH ighlands,Brevard,DeSoto, Hardee,Hillsborough,Indian R iver,Manatee,Osceola, Polk and Sarasota counties. Peace River Electric selects students for Washington Miller Personal Finance Jason A lderman Special to the News-SunSEBRING On Feb. 4,the Sebring C ommunity Redevelopment Agency hosted its first Retail Academy Workshop at the Sebring Civic Center with nearly 20 attend ees. This workshop addressed customer service and merchandising and was free for a ny business in the 650-acre Downtown Sebring CRA District. e know how important good customer service and proper merchandising is to the success of a business,said Kathy Cosgrave,c hair of the Sebring CRA. With our unique retail mix of small businesses and organizations in Downtown Sebring,an important niche for Downtown merchants is that of exceptional customer service,which leads to positive word of mouth promotions. The CRAs Retail Academy is a series of workshops designed for small businesses in the Downtown Sebring CRA District and theya re presented by the CRA and the Small Business Development Center for Downtown Sebring business owners,managers,volunt eers and employees. Due to the success of this first workshop,additional seminars are b eing planned to address internet marketing, public relations and advertising. Hosting these educational opportunities for Downtown Sebring merchants and organizations is part of the CRAs active businessr ecruitment and retention efforts,Cosgrave said. The better informed our merchants are, the more successful their businesses will be. The next workshop will be held on Monday,April 22 and address marketing. For more information about these seminars,contact the CRA office at 471-5104. Sebring CRA plans more workshops Courtesy photoAgero Associates present a donation of $500 to each area high school for their project graduation. Those present are Project Graduation representatives Gail Stein (from left) of Sebring, Jeanna Evers of Avon Park, Michelle Jackson of Lake Placid, along with Agero AssociatesSandra Savage, vice president of Human Resources; Judy Stone, director of Human Resources; Barry Bittner, director of Operations; Carl Belcher, Connected Vehicle supervisor; and Cheryl Sharp, senior recruiter and Community Relations. The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Agero helps Project Graduation Plans for Sarasota National Cemetery announced

PAGE 20

C M Y K Page 6BNews-SunSunday, February 24, 2013www.newssun.com IMC CONCERTS; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, a or wthr, ernie haas; 00026289 HEARTLAND HARMONIZERS; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, main A; 0 0027483 BUSINESS Special to the News-SunSEBRING Local area residents met recently at TheP alms of Sebring to demonstrate their support for The Palms Foundation at the annual Palms Benevolent Dinner. Chef Mac Gentlemanp repared a five course dinner to delight the attendees palates. G reg Harris was invited to emcee the evening event that included remarks from HarryJ ohnson,The Palms Foundation president. Steve A ustin,executive director of The Palms of Sebring,welcomed the crowd and MollyM orand,vice president of the Palms organization,shared g reetings from the president, Ted McMullan. As in the past,McMullan will match all funds raised for this benevolent dinner.A lso it was a privilege to introduce Denise Grimsley, w ho represents District 21 in the Florida State Senate. The Palms Foundation was founded for the purpose of giving monetary assistance tot he senior population at The Palms of Sebring in their t imes of need,as well as seniors in the surrounding area of Highlands County. They have also assisted other organizations such as Nu-H ope Elder Services,Meals on Wheels,Change of Pace a nd Cornerstone Hospice. Benevolent D inner benefits The Palms Courtesy photo Guests at the annual Palms Benevolent Dinner enjoyed a meal prepared by Chef Mac while helping raise money to help the senior population at the facility during their times of need. Special to the News-SunH eartland for Children is the recipient of the State Farm Insurance 2013 Good Neighbor Citizen Grant,which was for $ 14,100. Heartland for Children is the community-based care organization that oversees foster care,adoption,case management,prevention and independent livings ervices in Highlands,Hardee,and Polk counties. Heartland for Children will coordinate car seat safety technician training classes,provide car seat safety check events in partnership with localS tate Farm Agency offices,and provide car seats to newly licensed foster families who are trained in car seat safety a nd to parents in the community who complete a car seat training class. The grant will also provide Heartland for C hildren funding to purchase very unique car seats that can be used by their providers to transport children with special needs. Motor vehicle crashes remain the l eading cause of death for children age 1-12. Three out of 4 children are not as secure in the car as they should be because their car seat is not being used correctly. Educating caregivers to cor-r ectly identify and install car seats will reduce the chance of fatal injury for an infant by 71 percent and for a toddler t he risk of a fatal injury is 54 percent. From 1975 to 2010 child restraints saved the lives of an estimated 9,611 c hildren age 4 and younger. Monthly check up events are scheduled throughout the community,to schedule your appointment please visit www.allkids.org/body.cfm?id=1340. F or more information,call (863 8900 ext. 204 or visit www.heartlandforchildren.org. For information on Heartland for Childrens Car Seat Safety initiative contact Jen Sweet atj sweet@heartlandforchildrne.org,or call (863xt. 294. Heartland for Children receives $14,100 State Farm Good Neighbor grant S pecial to the News-SunSEBRING CORA Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine of Sebringa nnounces that Dr. Jeff Ladinsky has joined the Sebring office to provide outpatient rehabilitation services for disorders andi njuries affecting the musculoskeletal system (muscles,bones,joints,liga-m ents and tendons),neurological dysfunction and post-operative orthopedicr ehabilitation needs. Ladinsky comes with m ore than 20 years of experience within the field of orthopedic and neurologi-c al rehabilitation,having spent the last five years p roviding care at Florida Hospital Sebring,where he provided a wide range of physical therapy patient services. L adinsky joins the CORA Rehabilitation team a s a Clinical Physical Therapist to continue CORAs tradition of pro-v iding clients with orthopedic,neurologic and workr elated injury rehabilitation. Ladinsky said,I am excited to bring my clinical s kills to CORA and am fortunate to join a respected team of clinicians who take pride in offering quality, patient-focused service. K im Price,area clinic director of the Sebring, Lake Placid and Haines City CORA offices,said, Dr. Ladinsks wealth ofe xperience and clinical knowledge has already made him a key addition to the CORA family.We view his appointment as a sign ofo ur commitment to being t he leading organization in t he rehabilitation field. With all of the current and future changes in healthcare,there is ani ncreasing demand from o ur patients and clients to make additions to our team that align with our ethos of clinical excellence. Web elieve that Dr. Ladinsky will play a key role in providing this type of care to our clientele. C ORA Rehabilitations m ission is to provide rehabilitation services in a professional and caring manner and to return patients tot heir jobs and lifestyles as s oon as possible. Delivering a broad range of clinical services with respect and consideration for the needs of ourp atients,CORA strives to assure the best outcomes using proven clinical practices and cost-effective treatment protocols,as wella s communicate regularly with patients,their physicians and case managers. Ladinsky joins CORA Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine

PAGE 21

C M Y K www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, February 24, 2013Page 7B S FCC-PERFORMING ARTS CENTER; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, artist series p/u; 00027695 F LORIDA HOSPITAL FOUNDATION; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, gift shop; 00027815 Special to the News-SunS EBRING The seven FFA chapters in Highlands County celebrated National FFAWeek in a variety of ways Feb. 16-23. This years theme is Grow,and it celebrates more than 80 years of F FA traditions while eagerly anticipating the organizat ions future. More than 550,000 memb ers nationwide participated in National FFA Week activities at local,state and national levels. These members c ame from rural,suburban a nd urban environments and a re interested in the diversity o f careers within agriculture. FFA members are the innovators and leaders of tomorrow. Through agricultural education and hands?on learning,they are preparing for the more than 300 career opportunities in the food, fiber and natural resources industry. N ational FFA Week is s ponsored by Tractor Supply C ompany as a special project of the National FFA Foundation and annually encompasses Feb. 22,George Washingtons birthday. FFA members celebrated National FFA Week by participating in the following a ctivities at schools around the county including: Students guessing a mount of FFA mints in a c ontainer during lunches FFA Facts on morning announcements everyday Teacher Kiss-A-Donkey Contest Teacher Appreciation Breakfast Attending the Sebring C hamber Luncheon Students have some activit ies that they would like the w hole school to participate in. They also wanted to do o ne charity event. In spirit of all the teachers dropping weight the students held ac lothes drive. The goal was to collect 1,000 pounds of c lothes. The top three participants received a Walmart gift card. F or each day of the week they chose Feb. 18 as twin day,Feb. 19 as spirit day or F FA colors,Feb. 20 as FFA official dress day,Feb. 21 as W estern Wear day and Feb. 22 as FFA T-shirt day.Also on FEb. 21 was hat day for $1 so the students could raise money for state convention. T he students also made a video about FFA to show to the school and hosted a teacher appreciation breakfast on Friday.They cut publ ic service announcements to run throughout the week. Two students appeared on Barry Fosters talk radio program. And helping make the w eek complete,Sebring Mayor George Hensley proclaimed FFA Week at the Feb. 19 city council meeting. County chapters celebrate 2013 National FFA Week Courtesy photo Shelby Ball (from left), president Avon Park Sr. FFA, joins Megan Stein, president ofS ebring Sr. FFA, and Brittany Palmerton, Sebring Sr. vice president, record public service a nnouncements for National FFA Week, Feb. 16-23. CHALKTALK C ourtesy photo Megan Stein and Brittany Palmerton appeared on Barry Fosters talk program on Feb. 18 to discuss National FFA Week activities. High school seniors nationwide are preparing to graduate,receiving collegea cceptance letters and possibly enrolling in a college or university.The challenging economy has made many of these young adultsa cutely aware of the important role their degree can play when they face commencement once again,this time entering the job market. S ome schools offer degree programs that a ddress the skills required to enter fast-growing fields, such as cyber security,c loud computing,health care and accounting U.S. N ews & World Report included accounting in its ranking of 25 Best Jobs in 2012. This strong connection to a promising careerp ath can be attractive to prospective students. Knowledge of projected industry growth is extremely helpful as studentsc hoose their major or area of study,says Dr. Chad K ennedy,chair and professor of biomedical engineering technology in theC ollege of Engineering and Information Sciences at DeVry University. Unlike s ome career fields where opportunities are shrinking, m any technology and engineering fields are expanding at double-digit rates. In fact,many employers cant find enough qualified appli-c ants to meet their needs. Careers in technology are growing up to three times faster than other fields. For students interested in pursuing employment in this thriving industry,ComputerWorld recent-l y outlined the hot IT skills for 2013.Cloud computing was among the most coveted skills. Though relatively unfamil-i ar to the average consumer,this data management knowledge drives the services that support many of todays businesses. Similarly,cyber security p rofessionals will play an integral role in keeping i nformation safe as the majority of companies assets move online.A ccording to Todays Engineer,the monthly Web p ublication of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers,the cyber security field is growing in leaps andb ounds. Employment in health c are fields is also on the rise. An aging population of baby boomers and expand-e d access to health care has placed growing pressure on t he health care industry. The workforce is rapidly evolving; some of the mostd esired professional roles of yesterday are shrinking today and will become o bsolete tomorrow.The class of 2013 will enter e merging career fields, managing the technologies that drive advanced hospital settings,leading development of the next cloud-b ased application and protecting companies and consumers from cyber and financial fraud alike. BPT Class of 2013: The future careers of this years h igh school graduates

PAGE 22

C M Y K Page 8BNews-SunSunday, February 24, 2013www.newssun.com DUMMY 2013; 11.25"; 14.72"; Black; church directory #1 dummy; 00026401Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sun that is published Friday and Sunday.To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory,call the News-Sun at 3856155,ext.502. ANGLICAN New Life Anglican Fellowship, 10 N. Main Ave.(Womans Club), Lake Placid, FL 33852.Rev.Susan Rhodes, Deacon in Charge, (863strhodes1020@ yahoo.com.Sunday Worship, 10 a.m. Teaching, Holy Communion, Music, Fellowship, Healing Prayer.astoral and Spiritual. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way.Bearing His Name;Preaching His Doctrine;and Awaiting His Coming.orshiping God in Spirit and in Truth.Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.;Evening Worship, 6 p.m.Wednesday:Worship, 7 p.m.Pastor Eugene Haas.Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring.The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor.Sunday School, 10 a.m.;Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.;Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m.Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N.Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL 33825. George Hall, Pastor.Christ centered and biblically based.Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m.and 6 p.m.Nursery facilities are available.Bible studies at 9:45 a.m.Sunday and 7 p.m.Wednesday.Prayer Time 6:30 p.m.on Wednesday.Bible classes at 9:45 a.m.are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m.Sunday.Church phone:452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A (truck route) in Avon Park.Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30.Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., and evening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+ PM.The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m.For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave.Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.;Evening Worship, 6 p.m.Wednesday Service, 7 p.m.Deaf interpretation available.Ken Lambert, Pastor.Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825.Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.;Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.;Wednesday:Evening Service, 7 p.m.;Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone:453-4256.Fax:453-6986.Email: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site, www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvonPark 100 N.Lake Ave., Avon Park.Rev.Jon Beck, pastor;Charlie Parish, associate pastor/youth and families;Joy Loomis, music director;Rev.Johnattan Soltero, Hispanic pastor.Sunday Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.;Worship, 10:45 a.m.;Childrens Church, 10:45 a.m.;Youth 445, 4:45 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m.Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper, 5:15 p.m.; Childrens Choir, 6 p.m.;Youth Activities, 67:30 p.m.;Prayer Meeting/Bible Study, 6 p.m.;Worship Choir Practice, 6 p.m.; Mission Programs for Children, 6:45 p.m. Hispanic Services:Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., worship service at 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m.Sunday broadcast on Cable TV Channel 6.Call 453-6681 for details.In the heart of Avon Park, for the hearts of Avon Park. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S.27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid).Your place for family, friends and faith.Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m.Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m.Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ.Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m.along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children.Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E.Royal Palm St., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863Website: www.fbclp.com.Email:information@ fbclp.com.Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m.Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Wednesday Activities:Family dinner at 5 p.m.($4 per person, reservations required).Prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m.The church is at 119 E.Royal Palm St., Lake Placid.For information, call 465-3721 or go to www.fbclp.com. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S.98 in Lorida.Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.for all ages.Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m.and 6:30 p.m.Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m.worship service.Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love.For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church,Sebring, 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone:385-5154.Dr.Allen Higginbotham, Interim Pastor;Rev.Nuno Norberto, associate pastor, minister of music and senior adults;and Dixie Kreulen, preschool director.Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.;Blended Service, 10:30 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.;Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m.Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old.Call 385-4704.Website www.fbsebring.com Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park.Mailing address is 710 W.Bell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Telephone, 453-5339.Rev.John D.Girdley, pastor.Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.;Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.;11 a.m.Childrens Church;Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m.Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m.Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church.Larry Ruse, pastor.Phone 655-1899.Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached.Sunday School begins at 9:30 a.m.;Sunday Worship service at 10:45 a.m.;Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m.Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 6 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.;Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.;E vening Service, 6 p.m.Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m.Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall.Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle.Phone 3824301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the church where the always shines.Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.;Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.;and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m.End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m.on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev.J.S.Scaggs, pastor.Church phone:382-3552.Home phone:214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church,(SBC 4400 Sparta Road.Rev.Mark McDowell, Pastor.Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.;Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.;Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.Wednesday:Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m.Nursery provided.For information, call 382-0869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC 379 S.Commerce Ave., Sebring.David C. Altman, Pastor.Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.;Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.;Evening Worship, 6 p.m.Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.;Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 6:30 p.m.;Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m.A nursery for under age 3 is available at all services.Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing.Office phone, 385-0752. Spring Lake Baptist Church, Where the Bible is Always Open.Pastor Richard Schermerhorn, 7408 Valencia Road;6552610.Assistant Pastor Ronald Smith, 3861610.On U.S.98 at the Spring Lake Village II entrance.Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.for all ages;Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Mid-week Bible Study and Prayer Service, 6:30 p.m.Nursery available for all services. Sunridge Baptist Church,(SBC 3704 Valerie Blvd.(U.S.27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring.Tim Finch, pastor.Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.;Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.;and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m.Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided.For information, call 382-3695 CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., AvonPark, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m.in English and 7 p.m.in Spanish;Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m.in English.Weekday mass at 8 a.m.Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday.Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m.Sunday for grades K through 8th.Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday.Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m.Wednesday. St.Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring.Parrish office/mailing address:882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049, 385-6762 (Spanishfax, 3855169;email, office@stcathe.com ;website, www.stcathe.com .School Office/Mailing, Principal Dr.Anna V.Adam, 747 S.Franklin St., Sebring, FL 33870;385-7300;fax, 3857310;email school@stcathe.com .School office hours 7:30 a.m.to 3:30 p.m.MondayFriday.Clergy:Very Rev.Jos Gonzlez, V.F., frjose@stcathe.com or 385-0049; Parochial Vicar, Rev.Victor Caviedes, 3853993;Assisting Priest (retiredv.J. Peter Sheehan;Decons, Rev.Mr.James R. McGarry and Rev.Mr.Max M.Severe. WEEKEND MASS SCHEDULE:Saturday:3:30 and 5 p.m.(vigilSunday 8 and 10 a.m., 12 p.m.(Spanish.m.(Holy Family Youth Center), every third Sunday of the month at 2 p.m.(French Mass).Daily Mass:Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.and 12 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m.Sacrament of Reconcilliation:7:15-7:45 a.m.first Friday, 2:30-3:15 p.m.Saturday and 9-9:45 a.m. Sunday.Office Hours:8:30 a.m.to 1:30 p.m.Monday-Friday. St.James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J.Cannon.Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct.31) Saturday Vigil,4 p.m.;Sunday 8 a.m.and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m.December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.;Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.;Weekdays 9 a.m.;and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m.and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Cornerstone Christian Church (Saxon Hall)1850 US 27 South, Avon Park, FL 33825.Love Christ Love People.Bill Raymond, Preaching Minister.Jon Carter, Music Minister.Sunday, 9 a.m.Bible Study; 10 a.m.Worship;Communion available each week.Wednesday, 7 p.m.Home Fellowship Group.For more information call 453-8929 or 449-0203. Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace A ve., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S.27 on County Road 621), 4657065.Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday:Bible classes, 9 a.m.;Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m.Thelma Hall, organist;and Pat Hjort, pianist.Wednesday:Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.;Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone.Jesus Christ, the Way,Truth and Life!Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872.Tod Schwingel, Preacher;David Etherton, Youth Pastor.Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.;Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m;Evening service at 6:30 p.m.Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m.followed by classes at 6:30 p.m.Changing Seasons, a mens grief support group, meets at 1:30 p.m.Wednesdays. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets at 1 p.m.Thursdays.Office hours, 9 a.m.to 1 p.m.Monday-Friday.Phone 3826676. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL 33870.Phone:385-0358 or 385-3435.The Rev.Ronald Norton, Pastor;Sunday School, 9 a.m.;Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.;Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m.Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m.Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.;Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL 33875.Call 3821343.Rev.Steve Hagen, pastor.Sunday services:Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.;Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.;Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m.(off siteWednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 154 N. Franklin St.Sunday:10:30 a.m.morning worship and Sunday school.Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m.each second and fourth Wednesday.A free public readingr oom/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services.The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers.All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S.Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.Sunday:Church School, 9 a.m.;Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.Wednesday:Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-1597. C HURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Christ, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, FL 33825. Minister:Don Smith.Sunday Worship Services, 10:30 a.m.and 6 p.m.Nursery facilities are available at every service. Bible Study:Sunday, 9:30 a.m.and Wednesday, 7 p.m.Bible centered classes for all ages.Church phone:453-4692. Lake Placid Church of Christ, 1069 Hwy 27 North, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Mailing address is P.O.Box 1440, Lake Placid, FL 33862.Sunday morning worship is at 10 a.m.Sunday evening worship is 6 p.m.Bible class 9 a.m.Sundays and Wednesday evenings at 7 p.m.All are invited to join us.For more information, call the church at 863-465-4636 or visit the website http://www.thelordsway.com/lakeplacidcofc/. Sebring Parkway Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7443.Minister:Kevin Patterson.Times of service are:Sunday Bible Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m.;Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m.;Wednesday Bible Class, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazarene of Avon Park, P.O.Box 1118., AvonPark, FL 33825-1118.707 W.Main St.Randall Rupert, Pastor.Sunday:Sunday school begins at 9:45 a.m.for all ages;morning worship at 10:45 a.m.;and evening service at 6 p.m.Wednesday evening service is at7 p.m.with special services for children and adults.Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) and Ladies ministries.If you need any more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazarene of Lake Placid, 512 W.Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852.Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship, 10:45 a.m.;Evening service, 6 p.m.Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children and youth.Call 465-6916.Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christian Union, (Orang e Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17A North (truck route), AvonPark.Presenting Jesus Christ as the answer for time and eternity.Sunday morning worship service, 10:30 a.m.Nursery provided.Junior Church activities at same time for K-6 grade.Sunday School Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m.(Transportation available.) Sunday evening praise and worship service, 6 p.m.Wednesday evening prayer service, 7 p.m.Children and youth activities at 7 p.m.Wednesday.Everyone is welcome, please come worship with us.Tom Schwankweiler, Pastor.Phone 453-6052.PLACESTOWORSHIP CHALKTALK More than 39 million Americans 16 and older lack a high school diploma, according to the 2010 U.S.C ensus. And while a new survey indicates their reasons for dropping out range from lack of parental support to becoming parents them-s elves,those seeking a second chance at an education often find hope in General Educational Development (GED Daily,about 7,000 students d rop out of high school about 1.3 million per year, a ccording to advocacy group Alliance for Excellent Education. Nearly a quartero f those who drop out cite a lack of parental support or e ncouragement as their chief reason for not completing high school,according to the 2012 High School Dropouts in America survey conductedb y Harris/Decima on behalf of Everest College. B ecoming a parent prompted 21 percent to drop out,and missing too many days of school influenced 17 percent. Americans without a high school diploma or GED testc redential face tremendous challenges,says John Swartz,regional director of career services at Everest College. Yet the obstaclest hat prompt students to drop out of high school,or that stand in the way of their GED pursuit,are solvable. We need to continue putting our dropout crisis under them icroscope and develop substantive solutions going forw ard. The Everest College survey indicates that droppingo ut of high school creates new issues for dropouts, i ncluding unemployment and a lack of career potential. Only a third of those surveyed were employed,either full-time,part-time or self-e mployed. And of those who were working,46 percent s aid they had little or no prospects for advancing in their current jobs. s certainly not surprising that almost half of young Americans without a highs chool diploma feel like their career prospects are on shaky ground,Swartz says. The unemployment rate for high school dropouts is signifi-c antly higher than those with a high school diploma. A dropouts access to post-secondary education and training a requirement for many jobs in todays competitivee conomy is severely restricted. A GED credential can be a second chance for dropouts, granting them access to high-e r education and better job prospects. However,more t han three quarters of those surveyed by Everest said they had not considered a GED credential or looked into it, and had yet to pursue enter-i ng the program. More than a third said lack of time prev ented them from pursuing a GED,and 26 percent said cost was an obstacle. Completing high school or a GED program is fundamental to our economy,andi s the first step toward receiving post-secondary education a nd training for the indemand jobs of the future, Swartz says. A ll 50 states recognize the General Educational D evelopment (GED tial,and GED testing is available year-round. In addition to thousands of testing centers,many states now makeG ED testing available online. The GED test covers five s ubject areas:social studies (which encompasses history, geography,civics and economics),science,language arts/reading,math and writing. In some states,you cant ake the test free of charge. Your local GED testing cent er can advise what the cost is in your state and help you register for the test. M any GED-seekers find value in preparation courses s uch as Everests recently launched GED Advantage. The GED test prep and credential completion program is free and open to the public.C all (888 more about the program. A fter completing a prep course and achieving their GED,students will be better poised to enter degree programs for high-demand fields such as health care or law. T o learn more about the GED program,visit w ww.yourged.org acenet.edu or your state department of educations website. Form ore information on Everests GED Advantage,a f ree GED program,log on to www.everest.edu Tolearn about high-growth employment fields,visit the Bureau of Labor Statisticswebsite( www.bls.gov ) and search the Occupational Outlook H andbook. BPT Insight and inspiration for GED seekers

PAGE 23

C M Y K www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, February 24, 2013Page 9B EPISCOPAL St.Agnes Episcopal Church 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870.Sunday Services:Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m.Midweek service on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m.The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends.Wednesday:Adult Bible study, 9:30 a.m.Visitors are always welcome.Church office 385-7649, for more information. St.Francis of Assisi Anglican Episcopal Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Phone:465-0051.Rev.Elizabeth L. Nelson, Rector.Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m.and 6 p.m. Wednesday evening:Holy Communion with Healing Service, 6 p.m.Thursday:Holy Communion with healing service, 9 a.m.Child care available at the 8 a.m.and 10:30 a.m.Sunday service. EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA The Church of the Way EFCA, 1005 N.Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m.and 10:30 a.m.Youth activities, 6:30 p.m.Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship.Come early and stay after for fellowship time.Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor.The Way A place for you.Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:273-3674.Email: theway church@hotmail.com .Web site: www.TheWayChurch.org GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 Thunderbird Road, (863 0869.Dr.Randall Smith, senior pastor.Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m.and 6 p.m.;Wednesday services at 7 p.m.We offer Kid CityChildrens Ministry throughout all services, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married couples, prime-timers,and Bible studies in Spanish.Kid CityDay Care, Preschool and After-School Monday-Friday:7 a.m.-6 p.m.(For registration call:385-3111).Check us out on the Web at www.sebringgrace.org INDEPENDENT First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com.Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church. Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister;Bible School 9 a.m.;Worship 10 a.m.;Wednesday studies for all ages, 6 p.m.Nursery provided for all events. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration Ministries, (non-denominational 2200 N.Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 33825.Phone:452-9777 or 4533771.Sunday service:Sunday School, 10 a.m.and worship, 11 a.m.Wednesday services:7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study.Pastor: W.H.Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church (ELCA 1178 S.E.Lakeview Drive., Sebring.David Thoresen, Deacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, third and fifth Sunday each month, and Rev.Jefferson Cox on the second and fourth Sunday of each month.Jim Helwig, organist/choir director.Worship service at 9:30 a.m.;Holy Eucharist is every Sunday.Coffee hour on the first and third Sunday of each month. Council meeting on the first Tuesday of month;Ladies Group WELCA meets at noon second Tuesday of month with lunch.Bring a dish to pass.Labyrinth Prayer Garden open seven days a week to congretation and community.Come grow with us.Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park LCMS, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School past the four-way stop sign. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m.Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise.Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship.Come worship and fellowship with us.For information call Pastor Scott McLean at (863 see christlutheranavonpark.org Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring.Reverend Robert Reinhardt, Pastor.Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232.Sunday Traditional Worship Service, 8 a.m. ;Sunday Praise Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.Communion is served the first, third and fifth Sunday of the month.Sunday school and Bible classes, 9:15 a.m.Worship service is broadcast at 8 a.m.on WITS 1340 AM each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies.Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782 open from 10 a.m.to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday.All are warmly welcome in the Faily of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC Association of Lutheran Churches, 3240 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872.James Weed, pastor.Worship Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday.Bible Study, 9 a.m.Nursery provided.Social activities:Choir, Missions, Evangelism.Phone 3852346. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELSellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELSSunday Worship at 10 a.m.;Bible Study, 9 a.m.For more information, call Pastor Luke Willitz at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E.Main St., at Memorial Drive, AvonPark.Pastor Rev.John C.Grodzinski.Sunday worship at 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Sunday School at 9:15 a.m. Fragrance Free Service Wednesdays at 7 p.m.Open Communion celebrated at all services.ods Work, Our Hands. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL 33852;465-5253.The Rev.Richard A.Norris, pastor; Susan C.Norris, Trinity Tots PreSchool director;and Noel Johnson, minister of youth and family life. Worship schedule after Easter through December:Worship service 10 a.m., and Education Hour, 8:45 a.m.Worship schedule for January through Easter:Worship service, 8:30 and 11 a.m., Education Hour 9:45 a.m. Traditional Service with Holy Communion each first and third Sunday.Non-Traditional Service each second, fourth and fifth Sunday.Seasonal mid-week services Wednesday evenings during Lent and Advent.Call church office for additional Worship times and special holiday services.Other activities and groups include: Choirs;Ladies Guild and LWML; Mens Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies as scheduled; Trinity Tots Pre-school, Youth Group activities (call for meeting times and dates).Visit us online at: www.Trinitylutheranlp.com NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL3 3872.Sunday:American Sign Language:First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services.First Worship service, 9 a.m.;Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m.Nursery (up to2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours.BFC Youth, 6 p.m.;Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday:Children, ages 4 yrs through 5th grade, 6 p.m.;Youth, 67:30 p.m.;Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor;Andy McQuaid, associate pastor.Web site www.bfcsebring.com.Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872;386-4900.An independent community church.Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.;Bible study, 11:15 a.m.;Sunday evening service, 6 p.m.Pastor Lester Osbeck.A small friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway.Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue.Sunday service is at 10 a.m.;Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m.A nursery and childrens church are provided.The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry.Linda M.Downing, minister, lindadowning@live.com. Casey L.Downing, associate minister, caseydown ing@hotmail.com.Church phone: 314-0482. Web site:www. ctm forme.com Crossroads of Life, 148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852;Tel.863-655-9163.The place of your Divine appointment. We expect our supernatural God to transform our lives through His power and grace.Come, learn of His plan and destiny for you.With His plan we receive His provision along with His perfect timing and opportunity.What you have longed for, but have been missing, can now be received.The direction you have been thirsty for will suddenly quench your parched soul.Come to experience what you have been missing for so long empowerment in every area of life.We teach, train and send forth to win souls.You dont speak English no problema. We have a Spanish interpreter.We look forward to fellowship and worship with you at 7 p.m.every Wednesday.Pastoers Gil and Rosa Benton (Faith Never Fails). Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL 33872.Phone, 382-1085.Dustin Woods, interim lead pastor.Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m.Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m.Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.;Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.;Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry. www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.;Worship at 10 a.m.Nursery and Kids World classes.Small groups meet throughout the week.Church phone is 4021684;Pastor Bruce A.Linhart. The Lors Sentinel Fellowship Church 148 E.Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid (at Lake Placid Christian School), Pastor Juanita Folsom.Sunday morning service, 10:30 a.m.;Monday, Sentinel School of Theology, 7 p.m.;Church service, Tuesday, 7 p.m.More information at www.juanitafolsom ministries.com. Union Church 106 N.Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Contemporary worship service is at 6:30 p.m.Saturday with Pastor Tiger Gullett.Sunday traditional worship service is at 7:45 a.m.and 9 a.m.Contemporary Sunday worship service is at 10:45 a.m. Nursery and childrens church on Saturday nightes and 9 and 10:45 a.m.Sundays.Breakfast and lunch menus at Solid Grounds.Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger.Office:4533345.Web page at www.weareunion.org Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd.S., Sebring, FL 33875;471-1122;e-mail unity@vistanet.net.Web site, www.unityofsebring.org.10:30 a.m.Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church.Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups.Rev.Andrew C.Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113.A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America.Sunday morning worship:Traditional service, 10:30 a.m.;Sunday school, 9:15 a.m.Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.;Childrens/Youth Group, 5:30-7 p.m.;choir practice, 7:15 p.m.Phone:385-3234;Fax: 385-2759;e-mail: covpres@strato.net;Web site: www.cpcsebring.org .Office hours: 8:30-12:30 a.m.Monday-Friday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E.Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL 33825.Phone:453-3242. The Rev.Robert Johnson is the pastor.Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.;Potluck dinner, 6 p.m.third Wednesday;choir practice, 6:30 p.m.each Wednesday;Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m.second Wednesday;Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m.second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m.third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL 33870.385-0107.Email: faith@htn.net, Rev.Darrell A.Peer, pastor.Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.;Worship Service, 11 a.m. Youth Group (middle school and high school age), 3:30-6:30 p.m. Tuesdays.Wednesday:Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.Nursery available during worship.Call the church office for more information and other classes. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com, 117 N.Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742.The Rev.Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev.Drew Severance, associate pastor.Sunday Traditional Worship, 8 and 9:30 a.m.; Contemporary Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. Wednesday evenings:Adult Bible Study 7 p.m.(Nursery available), Youth Group (middle and high school) 7 p.m., RockSolid (kindergarten through fifth grade) 7 p.m. Family Biblical Counseling available by appointment. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA 5887 U.S.98, Sebring, FL 33876.Sunday School, 9 a.m.;Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m.the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune.Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m.first Monday of the month.Choir rehearses at 7 p.m.each Wednesday, September through April.Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m.the third Thursday of the month.Organist:Richard Wedig. Choir Director:Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713;e-mail, springlakepc@embarqmail.com, Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark.Phone:4536641 or e-mail: avonparksda@ embarqmail.com, Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday.Church Service 10:45 a.m.Saturday.Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m.Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m.till 2 p.m.A sale takes place the first Sunday of each month.Senior Pastor Frank Gonzalez.Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALL ARE WELCOME.Associate Pastor is Ryan Amos.Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N.State Road 17, Sebring;385-2438. Worship Services:9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m.Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m.Community service:every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr.Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m.Pastor Nathan Madrid. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872;(863 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor;Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor.Family History Center (863 Sunday Services:Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.;Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m.to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.;Primary for children, 11:15 a.m.to 1 p.m.;Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m.Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m.Activity Days:8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship .Sunday:Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.;Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.;and Praise meeting and lunch, noon.Tuesday:Bible study, 6:30 p.m.;and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m.Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m.All meetings are at 120 N.Ridgewood Ave., Sebring.For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext.110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church, 105 S.Pine St., Sebring,FL 33870. The Rev.A.C.Bryant, pastor. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m.in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m.Sunday School at 9:30 a nd 10:30 a.m.Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m.Sundays with Rick Heilig, youth director.The 10:55 a.m.Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial.There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church, 200 S.Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825.(863von Jarrett, Pastor.Sunday School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m.Bible study every Wednesday at 6 p.m. Visit us at our church website: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodist Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL, 33852.Rev.John A.Bryant, pastor. Rev.Claude H.L.Burnett, pastoral assistant.Rev.Jerry McCauley, visitation pastor.Sunday worship services:Worship Service, 8:30 a.m.and 10:45 a.m.Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning.Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m.; Prayer Group, 6 p.m.We offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth programs, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship.We are a congregation that wants to know Christ and make Him known.Check out our church website at www.memorialumc.com or call the church office at 4652422. St.John United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872.The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.;Adult Sunday School, 11 a.m.;Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.Nursery provided for all services.Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodist Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98ing.The Rev.Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor.Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m.Bible Study meets at 10:00 a.m.on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m.on Thursday.Church office phone: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church of Christ, Jesus didnt reject people, neither do we.Join us for worship every Sunday at 9:30 a.m.and youll be embraced by a compassionate congregation that is allinclusive.Wre at the corner of Hammock and Hope.Choir and Bell Choir practice on Wednesday; Bible studies throughout the week. 471-1999;sebringemmanuel ucc.com.PLACESTOWORSHIP Although it is sad to hear of any endangered speciesa nd its fight to survive,at least most of these animals are well known and recognized. But if the package is small and little known,thep light may be even more challenging. Take the Florida grasshopper sparrow a small bird measuring only five inches in length andw eighing only about an ounce. These endangered birds are found only in Florida and at the rate they are disappearing,they mayn ot be around much longer. The bird has been rapidly vanishing since the 1970s.T he Florida grasshopper sparrow was first discovered by Major Edgar A. Mearns,aU nited States Army surgeon, in 1902. At that time,reports s tated that the creature was widespread in the south-central Florida region. About 70y ears later,the open prairie grasslands,where the bird m akes its home,were being rapidly convertedi nto cattle pastures, sod production and othera gricultural uses. Since those early days,a bout 85 percent of dry prairie habitat has been destroyed. In 1986,the ill-fated sparr ow was placed on the federal endangered species list. Unfortunately,even thoughe fforts have been made to help,continued habitat loss has nearly wiped out manyk nown breeding populations.Most of the r emaining sparrows are located on public lands and serious efforts are continual-l y being made to assist the little birds. F lorida grasshopper sparrows require large,treeless grasslands which are domi-n ated by bunch grasses,low shrubs and saw palmetto. They also need open areas to forage for food. These small feathered c reatures are often overlooked due to their small size and unusual habits. Usually they can be heard, but are rarely seen.Theya ppear somewhat awkward when flying and seem to prefer running along the ground,hidden by the grasses of the prairie. The soundt hey make is similar to a grasshopper and other insects with a tick,tick,b uzz. They also dine on grasshoppers as well as any other type of insect withint heir reach. Florida grasshopper sparr ows,while attractive,are not remarkable in appearance. They are small birdsw ith a fairly large,flat head and short tail. They sport a p aler stripe on the crown,an orange patch in front of their eyes,and their backs ares treaked with brown and black. They do have brighter colored yellow feathers at the bend of the wing. Adding to their challenges i s the fact that many folks may not know about these small creatures and they do not have the qualities that attract many birdl overs.They are not found in neighborhoods,bird feeders or birdhouses and therefore, are not on most peoples radar. T he Florida grasshopper sparrow nests on the ground in the spring time. Theys earch out grass clumps or palmettos to lay their three to five eggs,which appearc reamy white with reddish brown flecks. They use the s ame area to nest year after year. The ideal nest is made up of grass and is in thes hape of a dome. The eggs are incubated in about 12 d ays and the fledglings stay with the mother for another eight days or so. Less than5 0 percent of the nests are successful. Some of the reasons may be exotic fire ants killing the flightless chicks, diseases,genetic problems,p redators such as snakes, skunks and feral hogs. Some nests are destroyed by flooding or wildfires. Only seven breeding locat ions are known for this tiny creature.Their total population is estimated as less than 1,000. Many agencies as well as private land ownersh ave banded together to assist this tiny bird in peril.Their goals are to man-a ge the sparrowshabitat so that they can continue to exist and continue tor esearch the bird and its habitat to try to figure out w hy they are disappearing at such an alarming rate. Some of the concerns that will bea ddressed include disease, genetics and the effect that f ire ants are having on the n ests and young. Captive breeding efforts will also be studied. H opefully solutions will be found and the bird will continue to inhabit ourF lorida prairies.While it may not be as majestic as t he bald eagle or as picturesque as the Florida panther, the Florida grasshopper spar-r ow is important in its own right and needs to be prot ected. The Florida grasshoper sparrow a bird in peril N ews From T he W atershed Corine Burgess Courtesy photo The Florida grasshopper sparrows decline inpopulat ion is due partially to habitat loss.

PAGE 24

C M Y K Page 10BNews-SunSunday, February 24, 2013www.newssun.com W ELLS MOTOR COMPANY; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, used cars; 00027796 ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID It was the brain child of a National Education Association task force back in 1997. Theyf igured if schools hold pep rallies to excite kids about sports,why not do something funto excite kids about reading? And so onM arch 2,1998 NEAs Read Across America was born. March 2 was chosen becauset hats the birthday of an American author enjoyed by all age levels Dr. Seuss.( However,this year its being celebrated on March 1 a s March 2 is a Saturday.) C reating lifelong readers is not only critical in student achievement,it is paramount in empowering all our citizens. Today Read AcrossA merica is celebrated in schools,libraries,and homes. Government officials declare proclamations. Actors and pro athletes issuer eading challenges to kids. And if youve ever visited an elementary school on thiss pecial day,you may well have seen green-haired administrators and Seussc haracters parading around the campus. A ll families are urged to t ake part in Read Across America Day. Go to www.readacrossamerica.org and take the Reading Pledge. Then spend at leasto ne hour on Friday reading to yourself or to a child. It can be a book,a magazine, even a newspaper. Lake Placid Memorial L ibrary has an event planned for 7to 11-year-olds, including homeschoolers,at1 0:30 a.m. Friday.Author Millie Richmond will be presenting a special Dr.S euss activity. To reserve space or get more informat ion,call 699-3705. R ichmond also will have a book signing for her childrens book,Hildy,available at $8 per copy. Fifty percent of the sales will bed onated right back to the library. Remember,books can take us anywhere, from a mountaintop to a d entists chair, from a deep,dark cave that makes us shiver t o a pleasant trip down a winding river. To get to one of these w ondrous sites, just open a book and e njoy the delights. Local Read Across America event offers Dr. Seuss activity Courtesy photo See the different interpretations of trees in a variety of chosen mediums during ARTWORX in the Afternoon on Friday at Highlands Art League. Special to the News-SunSEBRING From 1-2 p.m. Friday,,join the talentedf iber artists of the Highlands Art League for ARTWORX i n the Afternoon in The Magic of Treesat the Yellow House Gallery. Meet thea rtists to see how they each interpret trees in their chosen mediums quilting,fabric c ollage,appliques and more. The artwork will be on disp lay at the Yellow House for the entire month of March. On hand each first Friday of the month for the ARTWORX in the Afternoons eries will be Mary Seigfreid, Sandy Spice,Bonnie Srnick, a nd Linn Shemick. They have been creating together for several years and are alwaysh appy to share their loveof fabric art and discuss their w ork. For additional information, contact linnshimek @ aol.com The Yellow House Gallery and Gift Shop is at 1989 L akeview Drive. The Yellow House hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p .m. Tuesday to Friday,and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Additional information may also be obtained by calling 385-5312 or visit www.highl andsartleague.org Join fiber artists in The Magic of Trees Special to the News-SunS EBRING Lora Patton will be singing a variety of music from7 -9 p.m. every Thursday at Highlands I nn Lounge. Patton,of Avon Park, sings songs from the 1 950s to 1970s,country and even a few line dancing tunes. This local soloist has been singing since1 999 in a band in Indiana. She moved to Florida in 2007 and has been performing at local veterans organizations,retirement parks a nd other club functions. She has even perf ormed at River Ranch and sings with the choir at First Baptist Churchi n Avon Park. She is married and has three children. T here is no admission fee and plenty of r oom for dancing in the lounge. Highlands Inn is at 6525 U.S. 27 North,in front of Sun N Lake and FloridaH ospital Heartland Medical Center. Local soloist takes stage on Thursdays Courtesy photo Lora Patton will perform from 7-9 p.m. every Thursday at H ighlands Inn Lounge, in front of Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center.

PAGE 25

C M Y K B y DERRIK J. LANG AP Entertainment WriterBEVERLY HILLS,Calif. In the animated feature film category at this yearsO scars,theres a film set in medieval Scotland,another that features old-school video game characters,one that relies heavily on dry British humor,while the other two take inspiration from the supernatural. Its not exactly kid stuff and thats how the directors like it. I think this year with these films and so many more the envelope for animation is being pushed,said Bravdirector Mark Andrews at an Academy Awards event Thursday night honoring the animated feature film nominees. We keep seeing more risky,deep films that we wouldnt have seen 10 years ago coming out. I wanna be one of those guys pushing it more and more and more because its not only an awesome medium,but theres so many more stories that we can tell. The Scotland-set Brave, a darker fable from Pixar about a rebellious red-headed princess named Merida,will face off against four other animated films at Sundays 85th annual Academy Awards. The category was first introduced at the 2002 ceremony,with Shrekwinning the inaugural trophy. Despite the less lighthearted tone of this years animated nominees,none cracked the best picture category for a spot alongside the likes of Argo,Lincolnand Zero Dark Thirty.(Only three animated films have ever been nominated for best picture at the Oscars:Beauty and the Beast,and Toy Story 3. Edward Scissorhands a nd The Nightmare Before Christmasmastermind Tim Burton could take home his first-ever Oscar at the Dolby Theatre ceremony for Frankenweenie,his blackand-white stop-motion film based on his 1984 live-action s hort film of the same name. Frankenweenieis among three of the five Oscar nominated films this year that employ stop-motion,thei ntricate and time consuming animation method that use miniature sculptures and sets. www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, February 24, 2013Page 11B DR. ROTMAN, DARRIN; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; feb ads; 00027212 SEBRING PAIN MANAGMENT; 3.639"; 4"; Black; 2/10,24; 00027546 CROSSWORDSOLUTION ARTS& ENTERTAIMENT By CHRIS TALBOTT A P Music WriterNASHVILLE,Tenn. The Songwriters Hall of Fame is saluting 1970s and 80s rock nroll with its 2013 induction class. Joe Perry and Steven Tyler of Aerosmith and Mick Jones and Lou Gramm of Foreignerw ill join the hall of fame this year along with the writers of iconic rock hits Love Is aB attlefieldand Heartache Tonight.The ceremony will be held June 13 in New York. A erosmith and Foreigner will get the attention here, b ut inductees Holly Knight, JD Souther and Tony Hatch also have distinguishedc areers that helped define the sound of rock nroll. K night wrote anthemic hits Love Is a Battlefieldand Invinciblefor Pat Benatar and The Warriorfor Patty Smyth. She also wrote sever-a l songs for Tina Turner, including The Bestand Better Be Good to Me,that became standards for the star. Souther,who has a role on t he music-inspired television show Nashville,had a partn ership with The Eagles that spawned several hits,including Heartache Tonight, Victim of Love,New Kid in Townand Best of My Love. Hatch made his mark during the British invasion,t eaming with Petula Clark on hits like Downtownand My Lovthat helped shaped the future of pop music. P erry and Tyler have survived a sometimes cont entious relationship to become one of rocks most successful songwriting teams o ver the last 40 years. The Rock and Roll Hall of Famers,staples of classic rock radio and pop culture icons,are known for hits like Sweet Emotion,Dream Onand Livinon the Edge,and released their 15th studio album last year. Jones and Gramm are cont emporaries of Perry and Tyler who also ruled radio for a time,but they sometimes came at it from a different angle. They could lay down a s traight-up rocker like Jukebox Heroor Feels Like the First Time.But they also could slow it down with hits like I Wanna KnowW hat Love Isand Cold as Icethat helped foreshadow the ballad-driven rock of the late s. O nline: http://songhall.org Follow AP Music Writer Chris Talbott: http://twitter.com /ChrisTalbott Tyler, Perry lead Songwriters Hall of Fame class Jaime Green/Wichita Eagle/MCT Steven Tyler guitarist Joe Perry perform at Intrust Bank Arena during the Global Warming Tour on Nov. 11, 2012, in Wichita, Kansas. B y LYNN ELBER AP Television WriterLOS ANGELES Tom S toppard is sitting on the patio of a Sunset Boulevard hotel,bathed in California winter sunshine,framed by bamboo landscaping andl ooking very much out of his element in Hollywood. The acclaimed British playwright professes to feeling that way as well,despite having pocketed a WritersG uild of America lifetime achievement award the night b efore for his screenplays, including the Oscar-winning Shakespeare in Love. I was always nervous coming here. The first time I w as terrified,he said. Im trying not to sound nauseatingly self-deprecating,but I dont think of myself as being a terrific screenwritero r even a natural screenwriter. C ombine that,he said, with the local entertainment industrys perception that Im some different kind of animal,a high-minded a rtist to whom the words intellectualand philosophyare freely applied. B ut if Hollywood can be forgiven anything,it should be that. Stoppard has create d a remarkable wealth of two dozen-plus plays, i ncluding Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, ravestiesand The Real Thing,and hes counting on more. H e looks like a proper man of letters,with unkempt gray hair,a comfortably unstylish cardigan and a delicately shaped mouth that hesitates,slightly,before dispensing exacting thoughts on the art ofw riting (without pretension: he relishes a snippet of Ghostbustersdialogue.) Stoppard also is the master behind Parades End,af ive-part HBO miniseries (airing Tuesday through Thursday,9 p.m. EST) that was lauded by U.K. critics as the thinking mans Downton Abbeafter itsB BC airing. Adapted by Stoppard f rom a series of novels by British writer Ford Madox Ford,arades Endfea-t ures rising stars Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock H olmesand the upcoming Star Trekmovie) and Rebecca Hall (Vicky Cristina Barcelona) in the juiciest of roles. L ike PBSDownton Abbey,its set in the early 2 0th century among aristocrats and encompasses World War s shatteringe ffect on the social order. Romance is provided by the t riangle of Cumberbatchs tradition-bound Christopher,his unfaithful wife,S ylvia (Halland a suffragette (Australian newcomer Adelaide Clemens). The u niformly impressive cast includes Janet McTeer, M iranda Richardson,Roger Allam and Rupert Everett. Stoppard rejects the oftmade comparison to PBS Downtonas unfair to ita nd its writer-creator,Julian Fellowes:I was embarrassed by it because its so condescending of Julians work. Hes a good writer and hes done a superlative job,he said. Its also a misguided comparison because Downtonis heading toward season four and arades Endis five episodes and thats it,forever. T he self-effacing Stoppard leaves it at that. But theres a wider gap between the two: Downtonis an easy-todigest soap opera,while Parades Endis a challenging,nuanced view of a s lice of British society and a set of singular characters, all dressed to the nines int he heady language of literature. Theres a wonderful richness to the language and a beauty,which I think is the brilliance of Tom Stoppard,and also this veryb eautiful language of Ford Madox Ford,said director S usanna White. The heedless,acidtongued Sylvia has dialoguet o relish,something Stoppard cannot resist. The line I like best comes straight from Ford: (the publices a whiff ofs ex coming off our crowd, like the steam on the water in the crocodile house at the z oo,he said,adding gleefully,What a line! A lthough careful to credit the novelist with that particular zinger,Stoppard said arades Endis the first adaptation in which his dia-l ogue and that from the original text have become intertwined in his memory. O nline: http://www.hbo.com Parades End keeps British TV invasion going Oscar animators ready to be taken seriously

PAGE 26

C M Y K Page 12BNews-SunSunday, February 24, 2013www.newssun.com DUMMY 2013; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black; idol 2013; 00027803 ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT By DAVID GERMAIN A P Movie WriterL OS ANGELES You think the Academy Awards are boring? Try the nominations. They only last a few minutes,but its generally a sleepy academy suit and a sleepy starletd roning a list of names at 5:30 in the morning. Except last time. Some baby-faced guy took the stage,advised people who dont know him to pretend hesD onny Osmond,then stood beside sleepy starlet Emma Stone and cut loose with this line about best-picture nominee Amour: I read Amourwas co-produced in Austria and Germany,right? Thel ast time Austria and Germany got together and co-produced somet hing,it was Hitler. For good or bad,Oscar host Seth MacFarlane already has enlivenedt he awards scene. As emcee of a broadcast notorious for its pred ictability and geezer audience, MacFarlane may bring a cheekiness that prods younger viewers to check out the Oscars just to see what he might pull. But given his Hitlerw isecrack,just how far will MacFarlane push it? Its a balance between not being completely dismissive of the ceremony,but at the same time,injectinga little bit of a lighter sensibility than maybe weve seen in the past,said M acFarlane,the impudent creator of Family Guyand last summers potty-mouthed blockbuster Ted. The Oscars does have a history of taking itself so deadly seriously.And while it obviously is a ceremony t hats important to the people involved,you know were not curing c ancer here. So if theres any subtle reminder that Ill try to inject into the show tonally,it would be that. The most-beloved Oscar hosts Billy Crystal,Johnny Carson,BobH ope are those who play it safe while managing to poke gentle fun at Hollywood,the awards and the nominees. With TV ratings generally declining over the last few decades, O scar overseers have tried shaking things up,trying out new hosts and d ifferent ways of handing out prizes. The results have been mixed. Jon Stewart and Ellen DeGeneres earnedp olite praise as Oscar hosts. Chris Rock ruffled feathers with a few tart j abs but was mostly respectful. Hugh Jackman was charming and energetic,while Steve Martin and AlecB aldwin were an able team as dual hosts. Another duo,Anne Hathaway and J ames Franco,were brought in two years ago to court young viewers. H athaway was cute and perky,but Franco seemed to sleepwalk through the show. So last year,Oscar organizers lured back old stand-by Crystal,the most-popular amongh osts of recent years. The shos audience has inched up from its all-time low five years ago,when 32 million people watched the Oscars. But ratings remain well below the Oscar heyday of decades ago,and no matter whost he host,the show has never been able to shed its image as a marathon broadcast where rich and famous people hand out trophies to other rich and famous people. E nter MacFarlane,whos not just a funny guy but a gifted singer,with a Frank Sinatra-style album of standards to his credit. What Im hoping for like e verybody else,the other billion people watching is just that its the best show of all time and hes the greatest host ever to have lived,said former emcee Jackman,a best-actor nominee for Les Miserables.sg oing to nail it. I think hes very funny. N ot everyones looking forward to a Seth-fest Oscars. Im not that big a fan of his,said A lan Arkin,a supporting-actor winner for Little Miss Sunshinewhos n ominated in the same category this time for Argo.I find him a little crude,more crude than necessary. MacFarlane gave a taste of things to come Jan. 10,when he becamej ust the second Oscar host to join the nominations announcement ( Charlton Heston was the first,for the 1972 show). His early-morning shtick lasted j ust 10 minutes a fraction of the often interminable Oscar show itself but it brought a backlash from people wondering what sort of show might be expected from a guy whosec hubby cartoon hero on Family Guyonce was forced to strip off his shirt and moo like a cow while a w oman pretended to milk his manbreasts. T he Hitler joke aside,critics said MacFarlane disparaged women with a comment that supporting-actress nominees no longer had to pretend there attracted to Oscar kingpinH arveyWeinstein; belittled writers by saying adapted-screenplay contenders just cut-and-pasted from their source material; and slammed the directing picks as the five people who are the very best at sitting in a chair watching other people makea movie. Edgy or insulting? Some feel its just the jolt the stodgy Oscars need to get younger, hipper fans the key audience forH ollywood films to tune in. The Oscars still remain the pinnacle of artistic achievement in film, and I think it will always be that, said Jim Gianopulos,studio chair-m an at 20th Century Fox,whose Fox network airs Family Guand MacFarlanes other animated series, American Dadand The Cleveland Show.At the same time, I think it needs to be able to have ac ertain level of irreverence to be culturally relatable at this point,and I t hink Seth is the absolute perfect host to bring that. Oscar producers Craig Zadan and N eil Meron said theres no leash on MacFarlane thell allow him to g et as edgy as he wants. If we hire him and we dont let him say anything,then were idiots, Zadan said. Then why do we even go to him? The question is always said,are the Oscars still relevant?Meron s aid. We believe the way weve put together the show this year,its completely relevant,especially havingS eth,who is kind of the voice of the current culture right now. M acFarlane who provides the voice of F-bomb-dropping stuffed bear Ted along with Family Guyc haracters Peter,Stewie and Brian Griffin also is an Oscar nominee himself best song,for a tune he c o-wrote for Ted. Thats kind of cool. I got nomin ated,MacFarlane said on nominations morning. I get to go to the Oscars. Hope he likes the host. AP writers Sandy Cohen, Anthony M cCartney and Michael Cidoni Lennox contributed to this report. By CARYN ROUSSEAU A ssociated PressC HICAGO In a family of vocalists,it was Cleotha Staplessmooth and velvety voice that helped set apart the sound of the influential andb est-selling gospel group The Staple Singers. Staples,the eldest sister a nd member of the group her father Roebuck Pop Staples started in the 1940s,d ied Thursday at age 78. She was at her Chicago home and h ad been suffering from Alzheimers disease for the past decade,said familyf riend and music publicist Bill Carpenter. T he group included sisters Pervis,Yvonne,Mavis and Cynthia,but Cleotha was the backbone,defining herself by being the strong,silentt ype,said Carpenter,author of Uncloudy Day:The G ospel Music Encyclopedia. When she was young they used to call her grannyb ecause she acted like a granny in terms of being wise a nd always sure of the best thing to do,Carpenter said. Staples,known as Cleedi,was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with her family in 1999 and received a lifetime achievement award from theG rammys in 2005. The Staple Singers gained a huge audience with their first No. 1 hit Ill TakeYou Therein 1972 and followed with top4 0 hits Respect Yourself, and Heavy Makes You H appy. Oscar guy MacFarlane aims to perk up stodgy awards MCT Oscar host Seth MacFarlane, the creator of Family Guy and last years blockbuster Ted, hopes to shake things up a bit for tonights Oscars. C leotha Staples of Staple Singers siblings dies

PAGE 27

C M Y K Dear Abby: I have beeni n love with Richard for 14 years. We broke up after we dated fora while because my alcoholic mother kept interfering. She kept telling me how he was for me and I, thinking my mother had my best interests at heart, believed her. After a divorce on my part and a breakup on his,we are now in a long-distance relationship. We hope to make our relationship permanent after getting to know each other again. My problem is,when Richard is unhappy or upset with someone else,he takes it out on me. It doesnt seem to matter what happened, hell pick a fight over something inconsequential. It drives me crazy. I know what hes doing; I just don't know how to stop it. The latest flare-up involved the fact that his dog was missing,so he picked a fight with me because I always tell him how nice the weather is where I live. He refuses to get counseling. What do I do? Pulling My Hair Out Dear Pulling: Your problem isnt that Richard uses you as a scapegoat for his frustrations; its that you tolerate it. Its possible thatb ecause of your mothers alcoholism and the unpredictable behavior you were subjected to during your formative years,you have accepted Richards behavior. Because he refuses counseling,you should get some. What hes doing is not acceptable. It is emotional abuse. From my perspective, the healthiest thing you could do for yourself besides break up with Richard would be to keep the romance longdistance. Dear Abby: I am a retired woman,active in my community and troubled by a recent incident involving a longtime friend. This is the third time it has happened, and it left me feeling embarrassed. When were out together meeting new people,she will introduce herself as being a secretary or a senior secretary and me as justa receptionist. The job title is true,but I hold a college degree. I have held other positions commanding greater respect. I am chair of the local Council on Aging,a town meeting member and on the cultural council. The last time it happened,I had brought her to a lunch at a very nice restaurant,and the people we were meeting were members of my community. Why does this make me feel so demeaned? Am I being petty or vainly preten-t ious? Right now I no longer want to continue the friendship. Can you help me understand and form a game plan? I think I may be too close to the forest to see the trees. More Than a Job Title in New England Dear More Than a Job Title: Your friendis insecure. That she describes you as justa receptionist is her attempt to make her own job designation appear more important. And thats what is offensive. You dont need a game planin dealing with her. Justtell her to cut it out or the friendship will be history. Whatever happens after that,your problem will be solved one way or another. Dear Abby: A good friend of mine gave me some books books she didnt like. My question:Why would you pass on something you did not enjoy reading? Theresa in San Diego Dear Theresa: Perhaps she thought you would like them. Because she didnt care for the books didnt mean you automatically wouldnt. Or,having paid for them,she didnt want the money she had spent to go to waste. My thought:Give her the benefit of the doubt and stop looking a gift horse in the mouth. D ear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline P hillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 6 9440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. To receive a collection of Abbys most memorable and most frequently requested poems and essays, send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $7 (U.S. funds to: Dear Abby Keepers Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. Shipping and handling are included in the price. Distance doesnt diminish mans misplaced anger www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, February 24, 2013Page 13B FAIRMONT CINEMA; 1.736"; 6"; Black; movie listings p/u; 00027360 EDITORIAL& OPINION EX CESSBA GGAGEB y MELANIE MILLER Across 1 Corn at a picnic 5 Proofers mark 9 Wind surge 13 Protozoa genus1 9 First Nations tribe 20 Kitchen aid 22 Elephant in the J ungle of Nool 23 Self-defense overkill? 25 Because 26 Secure 27 Orbital extremes 29 The ones right here3 0 Shocked, in a way 33 Red wines aged in a utos? 35 Water carriers 38 Garbage collectors 4 1 Rose to great heights 42 Dashboard Confessional music genre 43 Expanding concern? 46 Edible mollusks5 0 KEGO on your radio dial? 54 Get stuck (on t ally 55 Ocean gathering 5 6 Thread holder 57 Series of turns, usu-a lly: Abbr. 5 8 Secret alternative 59 Solar __ 63 Foreword, briefly6 5 Takes to the streets 67 Part of the Constitution thatd escribes Cong. powers 70 Direct route to Loserville?7 3 Stockings 74 They may have spurs 76 Unfamiliar 77 How chicken may be served 79 Bugler with horns8 0 Chicago-based superstation8 2 Growing business 84 California peak rumored to hide advanced beings called Lemurians 88 Giggle 9 0 Entertaining show in a run-down hotel? 94 Vending machine o ptions 97 After Effects and Final Cut Pro 9 8 Mount Rushmore prez 99 Pabst brand 101 Large green moth 102 Mythical enchantress 104 Consumer Reports first aid recommendations? 109 Rear-__ 111 Retail benchmark 112 Close enough 115 Shortly 119 Like some domestic help 1 21 Activist grocery c lerk? 124 The Human Condition writer Hannah 125 Contraption1 26 Italian capital 127 Theyre popular in J apanese gardening 1 28 Unusable, as a cellphone 129 It may be used to walk the dog 1 30 Obey a red light D own 1 Chamber bouncer 2 Many a Yemeni 3 Borrow for a price 4 Unflappable 5 Checks out, as groc eries 6 Hash attachment 7 H.S. course 8 __ Bora: Afghan region 9 Italys largest seaport 10 Eel, at sushi bars 11 Ritual meals 12 South Americana rboreal snake 13 Hawaiian tuna 14 Least populous state c apital 15 Traditional 16 Wild blue yonder1 7 Sing ones own praise s 1 8 Kitty starters 2 1 Verve 24 Leaning 2 8 Swedish import 3 1 Dies down 3 2 Plan to take off 34 Payola, e.g. 3 5 Correctly assesses 3 6 Apple variety 37 Elegant 3 9 Cryptologic govt. org. 40 Something to buildon 43 Checked out 44 Hair color immortalized by a Renaissance painter 45 In its early stages 47 Jar Jar Binkss home planet 48 Virginie et Floride 49 Horse __ 51 Hasbro reaction game 52 Email letters 53 Short blaster? 57 Revved engine sound 60 Capital of Shaanxi province 61 Modern search result 62 Strong, drinkwise 64 Small-government p roponent Paul 66 __ the train ac omin: Johnny Cash l yric 6 7 Covers for a crook, say6 8 Battle on a log 6 9 Tipped, as a dealer 7 1 Bluesy Memphis s treet 7 2 Some are compact 7 5 Brushed off 78 Vital life force, to acupuncturists 81 Storied officer __ Ludwig von Trapp 83 Junk __ 85 Gob 86 Den focus, familiarly 87 Sailing 89 Stars no longer shining 91 A/C measure 92 Unrivaled 9 3 Nana 9 5 1969 Arkin/Moreno c omedy 96 Soccer protection 100 Minor injury 1 02 Options list 103 Takes out mistakes 1 04 Faith of nearly a q uarter of Earths popul ation 105 Where Aida pre-m iered 106 Rivendell inhabit ants 107 Key letter1 08 Golf Begins at Forty author 110 Souse 113 Lab warning 114 Cybermarket since 1995 116 Latched, say 117 Designer Saarinen 118 Prune 120 Some Windows systems 122 From __ Z 123 Chap Solution on page 11B In the book of Proverbs in theB ible, we are given many words ofw isdom. I love Proverbs 3:5 and 6,which says (NKJVrust in the Lord with all your heart,andl ean not on your own understanding; in all your w ays acknowledge Him, and He shall direct your paths. T hese words are confirmed in other places in S cripture when we are admonished to wait on the Lord; to trust in the Lord do good and commit our way to Him; to rest inH im; to seek Him with all our heart; to ask,seek,and k nock; to pray believing and to thank Him right away even before wem ay see his answer. The Lord took me on a j ourney in 2012 in which he sought to impart that truth more deeply into myb eing. I have an inquisitive nature; creativity and i magination. But,these things can easily lead me o n rabbit trails that may take me away from trusting God implicitly.Without realizing it,Im leaning on my own understanding. P erplexity and uncertainty follow. Such was the case with our desire for a family reunion. No matter how I turned it around in my mind,I couldnt get us allt o select a firm date. One son was out of work; another in a lot of pain and awaiting surgery; yet,our other son hadi nsisted we meet over Christmas break and stick with it. He and his wife would travel the furthest and could possiblye ncounter weather-related flying issues; but they werent concerned.Their faith in setting a date encouraged us to trust the Lord and not try to figurei t all out. This remained a ball t ossed in the air and kept aloft while nothing firm (that I could sees hape. But,while I kept my hands off,God was at w ork. Suddenly,I was like a person watching a tennis match as I observed God pulling all of the detailst ogether (healthy recovery from surgery; the needed n ew job enabling the visit; and perfect traveling weather) to bless us witho ne sons family here for Christmas; and,everyone e lse joining us a few days later for our family reunion. N one of us would have dreamed it would occur here in Florida. God even s upplied extra sleeping space through a kind n eighbor lending us his house. God directed our path my own understanding resting in his amazingg race and making what seemed impossible possible! It is so much fun to watch God work. Selah Watching God work Pause And C onsider Jan Merop Jan Merop of Sebring is a N ews-Sun correspondent. Dear Abby The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Metro News ServiceAries (March 21-April 20) Aries,direct your efforts toward helping other people. You may find you are more energized when helping others,and your efforts will be much appreciated. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Surround yourself with friends and family this week,Taurus. You should have some downtime,and you can use this time to catch up and reconnect with your loved ones. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Gemini,some levels of communication may be compromised this week,so your messages may not reach the intended recipient. It could take a little longer to get your point across. Cancer (June 22-July 22) Cancer,your boundless energy keeps people happy and engaged and should be used as much as possible in the next few days. You also could be sought after to fix problems. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Leo,tap into your creative side to shake things up and stave off some boredom. Others may think your actions are suspect,but you know these efforts will help you achieve your ultimate goal. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) You have to accept that things change and you cannot preserve the present, Virgo. That said,start making plans for new things for this year starting with right now. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23 Libra,although you are able to think quickly,you much prefer to have things organized. If you have a presentation to make next week,start working on it now. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Scorpio,there has never been a better time to put romance in the forefront. If youre single,put all your cards on the table. If youre matched up, increase your amorous gestures. Sagittarius (Nov. 23Dec. 21) Sagittarius, some people you know may be caught up wondering about past decisions that might not have worked out. Help them to focus on the here and now. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) Capricorn,while you are glad to lend a helping hand when you are asked, the request that comes in this week could be so big that you may actually be caught off-guard. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) It is hard to make progress this week,especially since it could feel like youre going at a snails pace. Stick with it and everything on your list is likely to get done. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Pisces,although you can certainly use your share of the limelight,let another person shine this week and youll have your own glow. Gemini may have trouble with communications through the week

PAGE 28

C M Y K LIVING 14B SE CTION News-Sun Sunday, February 24, 2013 Photo courtesy of Getty ImagesFAMILY FEATURES Spring brings a sense of fresh beginnings,and for many,that includes the annual ritual of spring cleaning. A survey conducted by the American Cleaning Institute found that 62 percent of people engage in spring cleaning each year,and their top three priorities are the kitchen,bedroom and bathroom. This year,spring cleaning doesnt have to be a long,dreaded process. Follow these quick tips to not only get y our house clean in no time,but keep it clean in the long run.DealingwithDustDust buildup not only looks bad,but it can also be bad for allergies. Skip the feather duster it just spreads dust around. For fast dusting,use multi-surface cleaning wipes to pick up dust from furniture and electronics. When you dust,work from the top down.Cut back on dust by making sure your vacuum cleaner bags and filters are clean and in good working order. That will keep dust and debris from being blown out into the air as you vacuum.Change your furnace filter regularly and dust or vacuum vents to keep buildup to a minimum. CLEANING MUST-HAVESKeep these items handy to make spring cleaning and everyday cleaning a breeze. Adhesive lint roller Great for quickly sprucing up fabric and upholstery. You can also use it to remove dust from lamp shades.Baking soda Helps neutralize odors in sinks,refrigerators,upholstery and carpets. Windex Touch-Up Cleaner A convenient solution to tackle the frequent messes that happen in the bathroom and kitchen.Multi-surface wipes Make it easy to freshen up any room in the house.Sponges Good for removing scuff marks and smudges from walls and furniture.KitchenAs one of the busiest rooms in the house,the kitchen gets cleaned frequently,but there are some areas that may need a little more TLC.Use steam to clean the inside of the microwave. Bring two cups of water to a boil in the microwave,keep the door closed and let the water sit for a few minutes. The steam loosens dried-on food particles,making it easier to wipe them away. For a fresh scent,drop a slice or two of lemon in the water before boiling. Keep it clean by using food covers to prevent food splatters.Keeping the sink,counters and appliances clean and sanitized is fast and easy with a product such as Kitchen Windex Touch-Up Cleaner. A quick pump onto a paper towel,rag or sponge and you can wipe away messes and kill 99.9 percent of common household bacteria in no time. The bottle is designed to stay out where you need it,and the cleaner works on a variety of hard,non-porous surfaces. When you clean the sink,make sure to get behind the faucet and around the seals using an old toothbrush. Dont forget to clean the outside of the refrigerator and freezer. Clear off the clutter of notes,coupons and photos,and then clean the doors,handles and seals. Keep the inside of the refrigerator smelling fresh with an open box of baking soda.BathroomFrom make-up spills and toothpaste smudges to mildew and everything in-between,the bathroom needs touching-up on a daily basis.To keep the counter clean of little messes and smudges,use an antibacterial product. Windex also makes a Touch-Up Cleaner for the bathroom. Dab the cleaner onto a rag or tissue and wipe down the counter,faucet and any other hard,non-porous surfaces to clean and sanitize quickly.To get rid of soap scum,clean the tub and shower with a foaming cleanser that does most of the work for you,and simply rinse it off. Wash shower curtains and liners according to label instructions. To help prevent soap scum buildup in the future,try switching to a liquid shower gel. Bar soaps have binders that are a primary cause of soapy residue. You can also use a towel to quickly wipe down the tub and faucets after each shower.Combination mold and mildew cleaners can make fast work of those deep messes. Spray where needed,and rinse off following label instructions. Be sure the bathroom is well ventilated before spraying them on.To discourage mildew,use the bathroom fan during a shower and for about 30 minutes after.You can also use a dehumidifier or open the window. FloorsYoull be amazed at how much cleaner a room will look when the floors are done right.If you have the time and money to rent and use a carpet cleaner,nos the time to do it. If not,target stains with a carpet cleaner and give a ll your carpets a good vacuuming. Sprinkle baking soda on carpets and rugs to absorb odors.Steam mops are a great way to quickly clean multiple flooring surfaces without a mop and bucket. Yo u can do a whole room in just a few minutes.A lot of the dirt and dust in a home is brought inside on the soles of your shoes. To keep carpets and flooring clean,place doormats inside and outside each entrance and always take your shoes off when entering. Wiping floorboards of dust and dirt is often overlooked and makes a big difference in the appearanc e of your home. Get more cleaning tips and solutions at www.windex.com