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The news-sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01222
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 10-21-2012
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:01222
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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C M Y K By CHRISTOPHER T UFFLEY c hristopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Friday,the S ebring Historical Society and the Noon Sebring R otary Club buried a time capsule in Circle Park. Tucked behind a park b ench,the site is just down the path from the town cat Mistys burial spot. In front of a crowd filled with local dignitaries,MikeH oward,of Highlands Independent Bank,Terell Morris (who donated the capsule) and city councilors Scott Stanley and JohnG riffin carried the capsule to the spot where it will rest f or the next 100 years. When the capsule at first d idnt sit just right,Griffin told people not to worry digging it up would be another generations challenge. A ll the contents were doubled sleeved in plastic and sealed inside a pretty mottled pink and white ceramic burial urn. T he contents included the books printed for the 50th, 75th,and 100-year anniversaries,copies of officiald ocuments,flyers of past fund raising events,busin ess cards,a program from the Founders Day celebration in 1935,newspaper reports about the 9/11 attack and how it affectedt he people of Sebring,slide photographs of Highlands Hammock from the 1960s, the Centennial Notebook columns written by committ ee member Jen Brown and printed in the News-Sun,a music CD,coins and a dollar bill,a Bible,anA merican flag,an Army 7.26 cartridge brought back f rom Europe in 1941,a copy of the citys 20122013 budget and Police Chief Tom Dettmans badge. A fter the formal burial ceremony,the crowd relaxed and danced in the streets. NEWS-SUNHighlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, October 21, 2012www.newssun.comVolume 93/Number 130 | 75 cents www.newssun .com H ighLow 83 62C omplete Forecast PAGE 14A Mostly sunny and beautiful F orecast Question: Who won the second presidential debate? Next question: Would you be more likely to eat in a restaurant that banned the use of cell phones at tables? www.newssun .comMake your voice heard at Online O bituaries R onald Bass Age 59, of Lake Placid Richard Bootier Age 93, of Lake Placid Elizabeth Prescott Age 87, of Lorida O bituaries, Page 5A Phone ... 385-6155Fax ... 385-2453Online: www.newssun.com Obama 32.6% Romney 67.4% 099099401007 Total votes: 135 Arts & Leisure6B Books8B Business8A Classifieds9A Community Briefs2A Crossword Puzzle13B Dear Abby13B Editorial & Opinion4A Fitness5B Horoscope13B Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times13B Sports On TV2B Unknown Soldiers12B Index Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and HEARTLAND NATIONAL BANK***; 11.25"; 1.5"; Black plus three; process, front strip; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 3 3 9 9 5 5 2 2 By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comLAKE PLACID Paula House is a Democrat running for the state senate District 26 seat. Like many people in Highlands County,she moved here when a parent needed her help in 2007. I came to take care of Dad,she said. I tried to take him to Maine,but it was his fondest wish to live in Florida. House said she grew up in a small Illinois farming community where people were neighborly and cared about one another. Highlands County has a familiar feel, she said. After college,House became a public school teacher,then went to law school and served as a county and public prosecutor. She developed her own private practice and is a certified mediator. She is a member of the Florida Bar and still practices law. House said she has always been involved in politics. My sense of Florida (before I arrived) was that it was not a serious place to live. Its government,she added,does not have a good reputation outside the state. Then she became involved locally,especially on environmental and conservation issues. She got to know Democrats and Republicans, farmers and ranchers who shared her concerns. I was surprised to find we hit it off,she said. We want to preserve endangered species House: no quick fix for state financial problems Courtesy photo Paula House is running for the District 26 seat in the Florida Senate. C ANDIDA TE P ROFILE B y BARRY FOSTER News-Sun correspondentSEBRING Highlands County commissioners Tuesday got a nice gift as Highlands County Tax Collector Eric Zwayer gave them a check for $650,654. It came from $688,726 in unspent revenues from his office,with the balance going to the water management districts and other governmental agencies. Zwayer pointed out that his operation is not run by tax dollars but instead gets its revenue from fees and charges for services ranging from motor vehicle and vessel registrations to hunting licenses and even garage sale permits. Our office is the most businesslike government activity there is,he told commissioners,noting that like the Highlands County Property Appraisers Office,his budget is not approved by the commission, but gets its authorization from the Florida Department of Revenue. This years check was less than last years,and Zwayer cautioned that next years check could be down again. He cited a $4 million decrease in overall revenue since 2007,with declines in line items such as tax certificate sales. This makes the job more difficult,he said. We continually have to look for increased efficiencies. He also showed the commission how his expenses had increased after taking over the issuance of drivers Tax Collectors office to take on more duties Booker . . . .41 A von Park . .0 Clewiston . .43 Lake Placid . .6 Winter Haven .42 Sebring . . . .0 DETAILSINSPORTS, 1BF ridays Scores See HOUSE,page 9A Zwayer See TAX,page 9A News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS Terel Morris of Morris Funeral Chapel, Scott Stanley of the Sebring City Council, Sebring Mayor George Hensley, Dean Hollenberg of Sebring Noon Rotary, Allen Altvater of the Sebring Historical Society and John Griffin of the Sebring City Council gather Thursday evening to bury the centennial time capsule at Circle Park. Hensley spoke about the ceramic urn that was donated by Morris Funeral Chapel. B B u u r r y y i i n n g g t t h h e e p p r r e e s s e e n n t t f f o o r r t t h h e e f f u u t t u u r r e e Time capsule filled with history for next century By BARRY FOSTER News-Sun correspondentSEBRING It should be a j am-packed meeting Tuesday evening as Highlands County commissioners consider a contract to hire Interim County Administrator JuneF isher to that post full time, again take up the subject of c ounty-assisted housing and hear a presentation on a major television pro-d uction taking place in Lake P lacid. Highlands County comm ission chairman Jack Richiehas indicatedpublished reportslast week detailingan ew county administrator contract mayhave beenpremature. Richie,who was assigned to oversee negotiations with Fisher,said that ana greement was reachedFriday morning but t he salaryfigure and an accompanying compensationp ackage will be different thanpublished numbers. Richie said the entire package wont be available to the public until Monday. Its in the hands of theattorney now,he said. e wanted to make sure it was laid out the way Rick Helmscontract was laid out Fisher contract on BOCC agenda FisherMore photos of Centennial festivitesPAGE6A See COUNTY,page 9A On the issuesU pdated look at where t he candidates stand LIVING, 14BBreak-ins investigatedH CSOprobing string of b urglaries in Leisure Lakes PAGE3 A

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C M Y K Staring Your Business class setAVON PARK Youve got the idea. Now you need to know how to get on yourw ay. Starting Your Business i s a class that teaches just that. F rom how to determine feasibility and legal structure to the type of license you will need,this class covers all the essentials thatw ill help you get started. Starting Your Businessis a free seminar presented by the Small Business Development Center atU niversity of South Florida. It is designed for persons thinking of starting a small business or who have starteda business and want to make sure they did it correctly. The class will be held on Wednesday,Oct. 31 at South Florida State College Corporate and Continuing Education Room T24 from 12:30-3 p.m. The seminar will be presented by David Noel,certified business analyst with the SBDC. Seating is limited,so call Noel at 784-7378 to reserve a seat in the seminar or for further information.Sons of the American Revolution meet SaturdayLAKE PLACID The Sons of the American Revolution,Highlands Chapter meets at 12:30 p.m. on the third Saturday of the month at the Heartland National Bank. Visitors are welcome. Membership in the SAR is open to men who can demonstrate that their ancestor provided active service in the cause of American independence either by serving in the military or in some other significant role. Goals of the 118-year-old patriotic organization include promoting patriotism,and building respect for American history and the founding fathers. For more information,call 465-7345.Sebring Masons serve BBQ lunchSEBRING Sebring Lodge No 249 will serve an all-you-can-eat barbecue chicken lunch from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday for an $8d onation. The menu is chicken,coleslaw,baked beans, potato salad,dessert and beverage. The lodge is on the corner of Home Avenue and Sebring Parkway.The public is invited; take out orders are available.GFWC Womans Club takes items for marketSEBRING GFWC Womans Club of Sebring is accepting contributions for its fall flea market. D onations can be dropped o ff at the clubhouse,4260 L akeview Drive,between 911 a.m. Monday,Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday. If you need help with a large item that needs pickup,call Toni Goff at 382-0706. The flea market will be held from 8 a.m. to noon Friday and Saturday,Nov. 23 at the Womans Club. Proceeds help to support many projects and activities, which improve the quality of life in the community.Brooks, Mowery speak at Tea PartySEBRING County commission candidates Jim Brooks and Sal Mowery, who are running for the Highlands County Board of County Commission District1 seat,will speak to the Highlands County Tea Party on Tuesday. The meeting is at Homers Restaurant,1000 Sebring Square. There is a 5:30 p.m. buffet followed by the meeting at 6 p.m.Gold to speak about HolocaustSEBRING Abraham Gold,a Holocaust survivor and author of Darkness to Light with Hope,will givea presentation of the story and fate of his entire family, trapped in the horror of the Nazi regime of the late 1930s. He will make the presentation at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 23-24,at the Sebring Public Library. The book describes their suffering at the hands of the b rutal Romanian Iron Guard, the Hungarian gendarme and Page 2ANews-SunSunday, October 21, 2012www.newssun.com pub block; 5.542"; 4.5"; Black; publishers block dummy; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 5 5 5 5 5 5 9 9 KAYLOR & KAYLOR; 5.542"; 1.5"; Black; below lottery social security; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 3 3 9 9 3 3 7 7 K AYLOR & KAYLOR; 5.542"; 1.5"; Black; above lotto, nursing; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 1 1 6 6 0 0 Oct. 17 2916183446x:3N ext jackpot $12 millionOct. 13 41136374551x:3 Oct. 10 111929313750x:4 Oct. 19 310142932 Oct. 18 1622232531 Oct. 17 29112935 Oct. 16 59111536 Oct. 19 (n 4025 Oct. 19 (d 5140 Oct. 18 (n 0720 Oct. 18 (d 3137 Oct. 19(n 301 Oct. 19 (d 139 Oct. 18(n 570 Oct. 18 (d 47 4 Oct. 19 202630409 Oct. 16 1523323312 Oct. 12 222326283 Oct. 9 1737414422 Oct. 17 17102342 PB: 35Next jackpot $80 millionOct. 13 25252649 PB: 18 Oct. 10 1826293543 PB: 28 Note:Cash 3 and Play 4 drawings are twice per day:(d daytime drawing,(n nighttime drawing. PB:Power Ball Lottery Center By SAMANTHA GHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comS EBRING The homeless population in Highlands County has become a growing problem over the past few years. With individuals and families f inding themselves in less than desirable conditions and situations, the problem has become a more realistic picture in the community and especially the local schools. H ighlands County School District Coordinator of Student Services Marcia Davis has recently become more proactive about the growing problem in the communitya nd is taking steps to make improvements. Davis has created a homeless campaign that will benefit a number of students enrolled in HighlandsC ounty schools. According to Davis,the Highlands County School District homeless student population has grown from 98 students in the2 010/2011 school year to 424 year last (2011-12 This years homeless student population in the county already tops 300 students. B y definition,homeless students are those who lack a regular and adequate place to sleep. A large percentage of students who are classified as homelesss hare homes with non-immediate family members,friends and others homes. Highlands County School Board does not receive the federal Title Xt hree-year grant because to qualify the district had to have 100 identified homeless students for the 20102011 school year. The grant will not become availa ble again until 2015,so the district has to rely on Title I funds,which have been drastically cut in the last few years,Davis explained. Davis has set out to make the l ives of these students somewhat easier with her new campaign. HCSB will be accepting donations from individuals,businesses and anyone in the community will-i ng to support the cause. Donations are being accepted that will go directly to help the homeless students in the school district. Items needed are school supplies, clothing,gift cards or monetary d onations for food,shoes and h ygiene products. H ighlands County students will b enefit in a major way from the help received by donations and gifts. Checks may be made payable to HCSB (with homelessin the memo line) and mailed to Marcia Davis,Coordinator of Student Services,426 School St.,Sebring, FL 33870. School district reaches out to help homeless students S pecial to the News-SunS EBRING The Sebring Community Redevelopment A gency has budgeted $100,000 in the 2012-2013 budget for its Restaurant Incentive Program,which is designed to assist newr estaurants locating or relocating in the Sebring CRA d istrict,which encompasses a total of 650 acres.With the addition of new restaurants,r etail,attractions and events in the past two years,it is e stimated that 200,000 pedestrians visit the Downtown Sebring areae ach year bringing foot traffic and a sense of community that highway and strip m all locations dont offer. Incentive funds can be u sed to make the leasehold improvements necessary to license and permit a restaurant. e know that restaurants a re a huge draw for downtowns,so we have created this Restaurant Incentive P rogram to attract established restauranteurs to rel ocate or establish another location in Downtown Sebring,CRA chair Kelly Cosgrave said. Downtown Sebring is a beautiful,his-t oric location that is ideal for fine dining establishments, c offee shops,bakeries,wine bars and other specialty food retailers. T he CRA has already helped fund several successf ul restaurants,including McLanes Garden Cafe that won the 2012 HighlandsC ounty Economic Development Commission (EDC t he Year. Contact Robin Hinote at 4 71-5104 or email RobinHinote@MySebring.c om. For more information about the CRA and Downtown Sebring,visitw ww.DowntownSebring.org for more information. Sebring CRA budgets $100,000 to attract new restaurants Courtesy photo W illiam Brunner of Boy Scout Troop 808 finished his Eagle Scout project this week with t he help of fellow scouts and sponsors. Thanks to the community for all the support. He b uilt an open shower and horse wash station on the Florida Trail. Brunner completes Eagle Scout project COMMUNITYBRIEFS Continued on page 5A T his weeks article is certainly different from all the others articles wew ere able to write since J anuary 2012 and we thank the News-Sun for their sponsorship and p ermitting us the necessary newspaper space to keep the public informed on Centennial events andh appenings. The News-Sun has been Highlands Countyh ometown paper since 1927,and the fact they have provided us with t his article space for a full year is a testament to t hat. I personally want to thank all of you,the w eekly readers,for the tremendous response tot he articles,the wonderful comments and encouragement througho ut the year. All of the Centennial Notebook articles written sinceJ anuary have been placed in the Sebring 100 Time Capsule,and that is quite an honor,and Sebring Historical Society hase ncouraged me to become a proud new board member. It is now that we realize the main focus celebration week has come to an end,and we hope everyone had the opportunity to enjoy some,if not all of the events planned by the Centennial Committee. Some of you have asked if I was to continue writing these articles after the focus week ... and I was unsure ... until the News-Sun said yes, they would like me to continue for remainder of this year. I am so thrilled about that,and still have much more to let you know about. There are organizations that will be having their Centennial Celebrations in the next few months, and if you know of any, please let me know; I wouldnt want to inadvertently miss anyone in this lovely town we are lucky enough to call home. There are a few remaining Centennial items left complete with the official logo,including T-shirts,cups, bumper stickers,grocery tote bags and a few Christmas ornaments. Some items are sold out; were not ordering more, so be sure to get yourself an item to remember this incredible time in Sebring. Notebook to continue through years end C entennial Notebook By Jen Brown See MORE,page 9A

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C M Y K www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, October 21, 2012Page 3A N ational Newspaper Placement S; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; main news, rhp, 12112450; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 2 2 1 1 0 0 AFFORDABLE CARE-C/O VALASSIS; 3.639"; 8"; Black; IO26399 affordable care; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 3 3 6 6 1 1 S pecial to the News-SunSEBRING,1912 S ometime shortly after sunset,everyone at JohnnyCake Lodge was shocked to hear the repeated screams of Jeb Taylors daughter,Pearl.T he cantankerous old skinflint had been brutally m urdered stabbed while counting his money.The murder remains unsolved.U ntil now. The challenge of the p articipants is to meet and talk to the spirits of those who were there that fateful evening. Using what they learn,these historicald etectives will determine who was the murderer. O nly then will the restless spirits be allowed their final reward. P articipants will be given a clue kit and a c hance to submit who they think did the deed. A prize winner will be drawn froma ll correct submissions. Additionally,HLT is offering a Sebring C entennial special a gift worth more than $100 to t he person buying the 100th Ghost Tour ticket. There will be two tours nightly,at 6:30 and 8 p.m. for three nights,Oct. 26-2 8. The Ghost Host will lead each group around the historic district,stopping along the way to meet the friendly ghosts and hear their version oft he events. Each tour is approxim ately one mile long and will take 60-90 minutes to complete. Tours are limited to 25 participants. In the case of inclement w eather,the ghosts will present their stories in the Drs. Thakkar Pavilion. Beth Norman will be entertaining before thes hows as a gypsy fortune teller. Adults 13 and older are $12 in advance,$15 at the door. Youth tickets are $7 in advance,$10 at the door. Children under 5 are free. The Box Office is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday-Friday and an hour before show times. Tickets may be purchased in the Box Office at 356 W. Center Ave.,by phone at 382-2525 or online at www.highlandslittletheatre.org. Highlands Little Theatre is seeking Box Office volunteers. Several shifts are available, including Tuesdays or Thursdays 9:30 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. and before events. Training will be provided. You must be or become a member of the organization. Call 3852175 for details. HLT to present unique murder mystery Ghost Tours set for Oct. 26-28 By BARRY FOSTER News-Sun correspondentS EBRING The Florida unemployment numbers are out for the month of September and although the numbers locally are bettert han they have been in the past,they still are significantly above the statewide and national averages. Figures released by the U .S. Department of Labors Bureau of Labor Statistics show in Highlands County there were 4,054 people offthe jobhere last month, out of a labor force of 43,922i ndividuals making for a 9.2 percent unemployment rate. The September numbers weredown a half pointf romthe August unemployment rate of 9.7 percent and nearly two full percentage points better than September of 2011,when 11.1 percento f the labor force was out of work here. Highlands Countysunemployment rate wasbetter than Polk County. Our neighbor to the northstood at 9.9 percento ut of workwhile to the west,Hardee had a September unemployment of 10.1-percent last month. All three were above the s tatewide September figure of 8.7 percent and the announced national average of 7.8 percent. The number of jobs in F lorida last month reportedly totaled7,349,000. That was up by 63,500 compared to the same time a year ago. Professional and business services showed the greatesti ncreases in employment along with private education, health services,trade,transportation. leisure and hospitality services among others. T here also were some job losses in both the governmental and construction sectors. Hendry County had F loridas highest unemployment rate for September at 14.2 percent. That was attributed to seasonal weakness in agriculture a nd related industries. In all there were a dozen counties with double digit unemployment in the Sunshine State. M onroe County at 5 percent was the lowest unem-p loyment in the state. Many of the counties with the lowest unemployment rates were said to be those with relatively high proport ions of government employees. Jobless rate dips, but still higher than average News-Sun staffThe Highlands County Sheriffs Office is looking into a string of home bur-g laries in the Leisure Lakes area of Lake Placid. A ccording to a press relase,there have been nine burglaries since Oct. 8 onL ake June in Winter Road, Locust Avenue,Peachtree D rive and Lagoni Lane. Detective Lieutenant Darin Hood of the HCSOs aid the perpetrators have forced entry into the residences most of which w ere vacation homes or belong to seasonal residents and stolen numerous items of value. HCSO Criminal Investigations Unit detectives,with the assistance oft he HCSO Safe Neighborhood Unit and Uniform Patrol Division are following up on leads regarding these burglaries. The detectives are requesting assistance in identifying potential suspects or suspect vehicles related to these burglaries. The HCSOu rges anyone that may have seen anyone or anything s uspicious during the past two weeks to contact the sheriffs office. T he HCSO also urges all residents to report suspic ious activities or persons immediately. In particular, residents are asked to reporta ny unusual activity at the residences of seasonal residents or homes that are v acant a majority of the time. A nyone having information relating to these burglaries is asked to contact Highlands County Sheriffs Detective Bret Hinkle at8 63-402-7250 or call Heartland Crime Stoppers at 1-800-226-TIPS (8477) or www.heartlandcrimestoppers.com/. Anonymity is guaranteed. HCSO probes burglaries in Leisure Lakes N ews-Sun photos by B RIANA WASHINGTON Avon Elementary School teacher Laura Richardson watches while kids reach in for some Icky Fun during Saturdays Harvest Festival, sponsored by Avon Elementary and Park Elementary schools, at Donaldson Park. Harvest Festival on Main Dominic Lawrence gives a baby alligator a little hug at the Florida Game and Wildlife Commission tentd uring the Harvest Festival i n Avon Park on Saturday. Children lined up for an opportunity to touch the wild animal. The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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C M Y K TODAYSEDITORIALTODAYSLETTERS 2 227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155S COTT DRESSELEditor E xt. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comD AN HOEHNESports Editor E xt. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION N EWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com V ICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.comM ITCH COLLINSExt. 507mcollins@newssun.com A DVERTISING Page 4ANews-SunSunday, October 21, 2012www.newssun.com You know times are tough when BigB ird is threatened with eviction by a presidential candidate. We envision that feathery,up-beat, over-sized canary moving in with Oscar the Grouch and becoming roomies in his garbage can. Talk about your odd couple. In a way public television and America have been an odd couple from the very beginning. The idea of nonp rofit,commercial-free,publicly funded t elevision has always been alien in an i ndustry that makes a profit through advertising. Public television has a long and honorable history,with its main purpose to p rovide an alternative to typical television fare. While profit-driven broadcast and cable stations make decisions based on audience share and demographics, PBS has had the luxury of making deci-s ions based on quality programming like Masterpiece Theater,Wall Street Week and Nova. The idea of cutting off public funding to the network is not a new one. Fory ears,critics of public television have protested supporting what they see as an elite institution with a liberal bias, watched by only a few Americans. In fact,funding has already been cut over time witness the mini-infomercialst hat have been inserted between programs,and the ever more frequent,ever l onger fundraising drives. The News-Sun supports PBS. Its programs open the world to us,make us t hink and prepare our young children for school. Unfortunately,the economy being what it is today,we do have to add,but ... T elevision,public or commercial,is a luxury in life,not a necessity,and at this time luxury is something most of us cannot afford,including the federal government. G iven the deficit,we may have to accept money spent on public television is an extravagance for the time being, certainly when compared to programs essential to the publics future well being,like Head Start and Pell Grants. I s tough living through a time of sacrifice and want,but the fact is we do. U nderstand,we do not advocate cutting funding to PBS. We just think it may be the least harmful choice. Odd couples and painful choices House is like a jackknifed tractor trailerEditor: W e have all seen those warnings about highway I-4 being closed because of a t ractor trailer jackknifed across the road,blocking all movement and backing up traffic for miles. So why dont we see a similar warn-i ng about the Republican House of Representatives blocking all of President Obamas programs? The Republicans then turna round and say see,we have a do-nothing P resident. The Romney campaign h as negativeTV commercials with Obama stating 8.2 percent unemployment is OK. Well it is,considering that it was 11.3 percentu nder the previous Republican administration. Romnes convoluted theory of economics that he delivered in the first debate isn othing more than a Romney recycled version of Reagan trickledown economics. Thats supposed to mean that the more money the wealthy (Romney and the rest of the 1 percent) have,the more will trickle down to the peons (the 99 percent didnt work in the latter part of the 19th century when the Robber Barons were in power,it didnt work with Reagan,and it certainly wont work now. Romnes version of the middle class:Mitt Romney is promising to reduce taxes on middle-income Americans. But how does he define middle-income? His comments came during an interview on ABCs Good Morning America:No one can say my plan is going to raise taxes on middleincome people,because principle number one is (to keep the burden down on middle-income taxpayers, Romney told host George Stephanopoulos. Is $100,000 middle income?Stephanopoulos asked. No,middle income is $200,000 to $250,000, Romney responded. Thats just a bit over $4,808 per week or $121 an hour for someone working a 40-hour week. This shows how out of touch Romney is with the real world. Republican Jason Chaffetz,on the committee that held hearings on Benghazi this week, acknowledged voting to cut embassy security funding: Absolutely,Chaffetz said. Look we have to make priorities and choices in this country. Wehave15,000 contractors in Iraq,a privatea rmy there. Can we get two dozen or so people into Libya to help protect our forces? No! When youre in tough economic times,youh ave to make difficult choices. B ush brought this country to the edge of disaster;R omney will push it over. Sandy Oleesky SebringJust asking to look into statementsEditor: Thank you,Anthony DAngelo for responding tom y letter. I cherish the freedom of speech and press that we have in this great country. Your time would have been better spent trying to defend Barack Hussein Obama than attacking me. I have presented over the past several months ample evidence to justify the conclusion that Mr. Obama is a moderate Muslim and has more respect for Islamic/Sharia law than U.S. law/constitution. And what is so distributing is that millions share your dangerous mindset,It is so ridiculous as to not be worthy of a comment. Sir,I do not listen to Sean Hannity or Fox News but to Barack Hussein Obama. He alone gives me all the evidence I need. The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadershipby John C. Maxwell is an excellent study of successful leadership. I share with you a few of those laws in light of the present discussion:No. 6 The Law of Solid Ground Trust is the foundation of leadership; No. 9 The Law of Magnetism Who you are is who you attract; and No. 11 The Law of the Inner Circle A leaders potential is determined by those closet to him. Why is Mr. Obamas past such a secret and hidden from the public? Who does he run with? Who have been his advisers and models? If you dont know,you had better find out before election day. I have never asked anyone to accept what I say,but rather check it out. We have the freedom and resources to do just that ... if you reallyw ant to know.And one more time before its too late ... Wake up America. Frank Parker SebringCox is the best choiceE ditor: I had the privilege to serve the citizens of Highlands County as a member of the school board from 1998-2 010. During those 12 years, I worked with both of the candidates for Superintendent of Schools. I was able to observe ande valuate their strengths. Wally Coxs professionalism,dedication,knowledge and ability to work with others are some of the reasons I am endorsing him. Mr. Cox is a problem solver as well as a visionary. The main reason I support Wally Cox for Superintendent of Schools is because I have three grandchildren enrolled in public schools and they desrve the very best. Wally Cox is the best choice. Please join me in re-electing Wally Cox. Wally Randall Former school board member Avon ParkMany thanks to Cox for what hes doneEditor: Please accept this letter to Wally Cox:I would like to express my appreciation to you for the wonderful job that you are doing as our Superintendent of Schools. In a very difficult time you have given leadership in our schools that is most appreciated. When much of our society has given up on our young people,you have given positive leadership by what you say and do. I have shared my feelings with my family and friends, that if you were not in my family I would vote for you. I have known you for 30 years and I have observed you through the years and there are many reasons that deserve our trust and appreciation. The fact that you are a strong family man and you have a wonderful marriage is t o be admired. You and Tricia have set a great example for your children and for the community. Katie and Charlie were brought up in ah ome where parental guidance led them to put value o n things that would lead them to be the valuable adults that they are. I t is people like your children that gives up hope for o ur nation. Your strong leadership in your home makes you strong as a leader of our s chool system. The fact that you have been a strong leader in our community through many years and have given timea nd strength to help our community to be a great place to live and to bring up children,is greatly appreciated. Thank you for the timea nd leadership you have given our county because y ou love the people of our county. T he fact that you love Christ and His church is a strength that many people in leadership positions have not experienced. Thank you fory our Christian testimony that is a strength in your leadership experience. I have noticed how gracious and kind you are to all people,n o matter how they feel about you. Your example is greatly admired. The fact that you have given super leadership to our school system in a most difficult time deserves our appreciation. The expertise of your leadership,the jobs that you have saved and the leadership model that you have lived is a great benefit to us all. James McCall Sebring Sebring Animal Hospital came to rescueEditor: I am very thankful for Dr. Larry Jernigan,Dr. Hinds, Sue,and the rest of the staff at Sebring Animal Hospital. I was dog sitting for my sister while she was on vacation when one of her dogs, Mighty Jo,suffered an injury. It was a Friday evening,and I didnt think that any animal clinics would be open. I called Sebring Animal Hospital,and they said to bring the dog right in. They were all very patient and kind,even after a long day. They were not able to contact my sisters veterinarian in Port Charlotte,so I returned on Saturday to get Mighty Jo some further treatment. He is doing great and is on his way to recovery. Thank you Sebring Animal Hospital for going above and beyond for Mighty Jo. The Daff and Atherton families Sebring Editors note: Wednesday i s the last day before the election that letters endorsing a political candidate will be printed. The deadline for submitting letters is noon onM onday. If you look at a sample b allot for Florida,you will notice that we have no less than 11 amendments to vote on for the states constitution. Thats right. Elevenc hances to tweak our governing document. Arent y ou excited? For those who arent a part of our fair state,let mee xplain. WeFloridians LOVE to amend our state c onstitution. We put anything and everything into it, including (I am not kidding p regnant pigs. If we cant get the legislature to pass it, we go for the constitutional amendment. Its how we roll. I nterestingly enough,all 11 of the amendments we are voting on this time were put on the ballot by the state legislature. Lookingo ver some of them,this seems to be a lazy way to d o business. Some of these could have been voted ona nd made into law,but no. Wre Florida! We want to see just how many amendments we can cram into our Constitution! Maybe wells et a record for longest state constitution,if we havent done so already! (Actually,according to an Internet search,Alabamac urrently clocks in with the longest state constitution. But were working on it!) One of the problems I run into when discussing or looking at possible amendments to our state constitution is that they are rarely written in everyday English. No,they are written in that obscure language known as Legalese,which makes my eyes glaze over and confuses me to no end. This is most likely intentional, because I suspect that confusing voters is what writers of these amendments do for fun. Nevertheless,I managed to find two websites that broke down the amendments into words even I could understand without the help of massive amounts of caffeine. I direct my fellow voters to both sites: http://ricksblog.biz/mixedweird-bag-of-tricks-inamendments/ and http://www.krisannehall.co m/index.php/blog/135-florida-voter-guide and encourage you to check them out yourselves. I dont have the space or inclination to go over all the amendments,so I am going to focus on just a few of them. I will point out that a vote on amendments 2,4,9,10,and 11 will i mpact not the state monies but county and local funds t he state legislature has no problems telling counties to cut taxes but cant seem toa pply that standard to themselves. How about tinkering w ith the states budget and leaving the local ones alone for a change? A mendment 1 is pretty much a symbolic vote against Obamacare,since the Supreme Court declared the individual mandate con-s titutional. It would prevent the state from putting in an individual mandate for health care as well. If youre against having theg overnment telling you what you have to buy,you m ight want to vote for this amendment. A mendment 8 is a tricky one. On the surface,it looks good it allows the state to fund religious institutions. Supporters of this bill say itw ill provide money to religious run prison ministries, after-school care and the like. It might even allow school vouchers to bea pplied to religious schools. I am a Christian who believes in the good religious institutions can do for a community. But I dont support this amendment. As written,it is an open door for government to walk in and regulate how said religious institutions conduct themselves you take their money,they have a say. Also,it means that my tax dollars would go to support ALL religious institutions, not just the ones I agree with. Do I want my government to support a madrassa? No? Then I cant vote for this amendment,sorry. In fact,I will probably vote noon most of the amendments as they stand. But I will continue to do my homework. Please do yours as well. And keep this in mind having the longest state constitution may not be the goal we should be aiming for. Laura Ware is a Sebring resident. She can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady@ embarqmail.com Visit her website at www.laurahware.com. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the staff of the News-Sun. Do we need all these amendments? Lauras Look Laura Ware EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number.Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected.Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words.Letters of local concern take priority.Send your letter to 2227 U.S.27 South, Sebring, FL 33870;drop it off at the same address;fax 385-1954;or e-mail editor@newssun.com

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C M Y K the bestial followers of Hungarys Arrow CrossP arty are never repeated in the history of mankind. Its a story of how this family held onto hope in order to survive.Orchid Society meets MondaySEBRING The O rchid Society of Highlands County will hold its monthly meeting at7 p.m. Monday. Due to renovations at the Jack R.S troup Center,the meeting will be at the Womans Club of Sebring,4260L akeview Drive. The speaker is Jim Williams, who will present a topic onE ncyclia tampensis. There will be a silent a uction after his presentation. Guests are welcome and k nowledge of orchids is not needed to attend. For a dditional information, contact Lori Thompson at 382-7924,by e-mail at oshc9@aol.com or go to the website http://orchidso-c ietyhighlands.org/.Road closed for constructionS EBRING Golfside Lane off Hammock Road w ill be closed during daytime and nighttime hours Tuesday for construction. F or further information, contact Excavation Point Inc. at 471-1997.SFSC Dental Hygiene offers free oral cancer screenings AVON PARK South F lorida State Colleges Dental Hygiene program w ill hold oral cancer screenings from 3-6 p.m.T hursday in Building T, SFSC Highlands Campus. The screening is by appointment only,is open to the public and is free. We dont hear much about oral cancer and it is one of the top least detected cancers until it is in advanced stages,said Dr.D eborah Milliken,department chair,Dental Education. It is also common in rural areas because there is often less access to care in these locations. The screening is a simple process that only takes about 15-20 minutes. After a brief medical history, patients will undergo a head and neck evaluation, followed by a VELscope examination in which a fluorescent light is shown into the mouth and detects cells that are not visible to the naked eye. According to the Oral Cancer Foundation and Oral Cancer Consortium, oral cancer is more deadly than Hodgkins lymphoma, cervical,thyroid and skin cancers and kills one person every hour of the day, but when found early,oral cancer patients have a 90 percent survival rate. Oral cancer risk factors include alcohol and tobacco use,age,sun exposure,a diet low in fruits and vegetables and the human papilloma virus (HPV which presents a five-times increase in occurrence in people under the age of 40. There has been a surge in diagnosis in people under the age of 40 who have never used tobacco products and the HPV virus has been linked to these cases,Dr. Milliken said. It is recommended that all patients over the a ge of 17 be screened annually. To make an appointment, call SFSC Dental Education at 784-7020.Events planned at lodges, postsAVON PARK T he Combat Veterans M emorial VFW Post 9853 will have NASCAR on the screen at 1 p.m. today. Music by Uptown Country from 5-8 p.m. Friday. Karaoke by Peg and Perry from 5-8 p.m. Satruday. H alloween Haunted House for $2 from 6 p.m. to midn ight Friday and Saturday. F or details,call 452-9853. The American Legion P ost 69 will have karaoke b y Naomi at 4 p.m. today. K araoke by Double D on Thursday; music by Patsy o n Friday. Call for times. SAL breakfast will be from 8 -11 a.m. Saturday. For details,call 453-4553. C ombat Veterans Memorial VFW Post 9853 w ill host a Haunted House from 6 p.m. to midnight F riday and Saturday. Cover charge is $2 per personw ith candy for the kids. Public welcome. For details,call 453-9853. LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Moose Lodge 2 374 will have NASCAR and football on the screen t oday. Karaoke with Wild Bill; call for time. Moose L egion meets at 7 p.m. Monday. Karaoke with J.B.o n Wednesday; music by Frank E. on Thursday; m usic by Larry Musgrave on Friday. Call for time.H alloween party from 6:30-10:30 p.m. Saturday;m usic provided by TJ and the Cruisers. For details,c all 465-0131. The Lake Placid Elks L odge 2661 BPOE Board meets at 7:30 p.m. Monday. Music by Chrissy; call for time.B POE Initiation is at 7 p.m. Tuesday. Blood Drive from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday in parking lot. Get tickets now for the Christmas Dinner/Dance on Saturday,Dec. 8 with music by Don and Allen; cost $15 per person; (social 5:30 p.m. dinner 6:30 p.m.). Tickets for the New YearsEve Dinner/Dance (social 6:30 p.m.,dinner 7:30 p.m.),on Monday, Dec. 31; cost $25 per person with champagne and party favors at midnight. Music by Jimmy Black. For details,call 465-2661. The Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 will host music by Tom; call for time on Friday. Breakfast will be from 8-11 a.m. Saturday. For details,call 699-5444. SEBRING The Sebring Elks Lodge will recognize Red Ribbon Week for Drug Awareness from Oct. 21-28. Wacky Wednesday activities will be from 5-6:30 p.m.; dinner for $6.50. Dance to music by Franke from 4:30-7:30 p.m.,for $3. Orientation is from 6 p.m. Thursday. PER meeting is at 6 p.m. Lodge meets at 7 p.m. Friday buffet is from 5-6:30 p.m. Dance to DoinIt Rights music is from 6:30-9:30 p.m. for only $3. October is National Elks Foundation month. For details,call the lodge at 471-3557. R ONALD BASS Ronald Benton Bass,59, of Lake Placid died Oct. 19. 2012. He was born Aug. 9, 1953. H e is the son of Lillian Sheppard Hartsfield (Irving a nd the late R.C. Bass. He is survived by his children, Rhonda Garrison (JohnA ngie Bass,Kelly Thomas (Bruce B ass (Kenny Newton); stepchildren,Eric Bennett (KimberleeyB ennett; 10 grandchildren, Mya Rodriguez,Emily Haines,Lillian Thoms, N ikayla Newton,Kenneth Newton,Xander Bennett, G abrielle Bennett, Alexsandra Wade,Beth Garrison and John Garrison Jr.;t wo greatgrandchildren,Zoey and Allen Moore; and three brothers,Robert Clinton Bass andR aymond Bass (Saundra He was preceded in death by a brother,Edward DWayne Bass. Ronnie enjoyed family barbecues and dinners with his family at his mothersh ouse,hog hunting and raising puppies. Ronnie was a successful businessman; he owned Chem-Dry and Advantage Floor Coveringf or 20 years. A memorial service will be Tuesday,Oct. 23 in Venus,Fla. at Venus United Methodist Church at 10 a.m. Dinner will be in the social hall at Venus United Methodist Church. In lieu of flowers,donations can be made to Good Shepherd Hospice or Venus United Methodist Church,926 County Road 731,Venus FL 33690. RICHARD BOOTIER Richard was born in Saratoga Springs on March 24,1919 to the late Frederick and Frances Bootier. He attended Saratoga Springs schools, graduating from high school in June 1936. He attended Delhi Agricultural and Technical College (todays SUNY Delhi) to study mechanical drafting and building trades. World War II interrupted his studies and he enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Force in 1942. He was promoted to second lieutenant as a motor transportation specialist,and received an honorable discharge in 1946. Richard completed his bachelors degree in teaching at the New York University at Oswego,where he met his f uture wife,Emily J. Dzedzej. Richard and Emily were married on Aug. 9,1947 in New York Mills,N.Y. Mr.B ootier was hired as a teacher at Middletown High S chool in New York State, where the couple lived until 1994. R ichard retired from Middletown High School in 1 975. After retirement,he taught driver's education in Washingtonville,N.Y. I n 1994,they moved permanently to Lake Placid, Fla. R ichard and Emily are members of the St. James C atholic Church in Lake Placid and belonged to the Placid Lakes Golf Club and Golf Hammock. Mr. Bootier was an avid golfer. T he funeral service was held at St. James Catholic Church,Lake Placid,on Saturday,Oct. 13,2012 at 11 a.m. Memorial contributions may be made to the GoodS hepherd Hospice,1110 Hammock Road,Sebring,FL 3 3872 Richard passed away Thursday,Oct. 4,2012 at 12:15 a.m. at Florida Health Center in Lake Placid. Hew as 93 years old. Richard Bootier is survived by his wife of 65 years,Emily; their three daughters,Nancy Geyer,C heryl Andersen and Susan Humeston; four grandchildren,Jennifer,Rebecca, Alfred and Ashley; and several great-grandchildren. Words of comfort to the f amily and a video tribute of Richards life can be seen by visiting www.scottfuneralservices.com. Arrangements entrusted withS cott Funeral Home,Lake Placid,FL,465-4134. ELIZABETH PRESCOTT Elizabeth NellAshton P rescott,age 87,of Lorida, Fla.,passed away Friday, O ct. 19,2012 in Sebring, Fla.She was born on Sept. 25,1925 in Avon Park,Fla.t o Rudy and Iva (Bass Ashton. She was a cattle rancher, m ember of the First Baptist Church of Lorida,and has b een a lifelong resident of Highlands County. She is survived by her nephews,Gene Tomlinson (GlenellenTexas,MikeA shton and Quinn Ashton (Dinaboth of Lorida,Fla.; nieces,Jerry Bryan and Carol Smith (George),both of Lorida,Fla.,andRhonda Brown of Missouri; and m any more great-nieces and great-nephews. She is preceded in death by her husband,M.F. Prescott; brother,JulianM iles Ashton; and sister, Ruby Tomlinson. A funeral service will be held Monday,Oct. 22,2012 at 10 a.m. at First BaptistC hurch of Lorida with Rev. Marcus Marshall and Rev. W ayne Godwin officiating. She will be laid to rest in Basinger Cemetery.V isitation will be held on Sunday,Oct. 21,2012 from 3-5 p.m. at StephensonN elson Funeral Home. Memorial contributions m ay be made to Good Shepherd Hospice,1110 Hammock Road,Sebring,FL 33870 or First Baptist Church of Lorida,P.O. Box2 67,Lorida,FL 33857. Funeral arrangements by: Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home Sebring,Fla. www.stephensonnelsonfh.com www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, October 21, 2012Page 5A BIG GREEN LAWN MAINTENANCE; 5.542"; 3"; Black; main a; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 3 3 7 7 0 0 9 9 MARTIAL ARTS (pp of page; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 3 3 8 8 7 7 0 0 DAILY COMMERCIAL; 3.639"; 1"; Black; cornerstone hospice; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 2 2 9 9 9 9 E.O. KOCH CONSTRUCTION CO.; 5.542"; 4"; Black; seam p/u; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 3 3 6 6 6 6 C ontinued from page 2A Bass OBITUARIES CO MMUNITYBR IEFS Classified Ads 385-6155 NEWS-SUN Special to the News-SunSEBRING Highlands Little Theatre w ill hold auditions for the classic American comedy Auntie Mame beginning at 6 p.m. Wednesday. Auditions will also be held at 6 p.m. Friday and Wednesday,Oct. 31. T he play is scheduled to open in January 2013. Auntie Mamehas a large cast of characters with parts ranging in age from 10 years old on up and is an excel-l ent opportunity for anyone who may be interested in becoming involved with live theatre for the first time. There are 41 characters in the play, with parts ranging from one or two linest o major roles,according to Pete Pollard,the director of the play. If youve ever thought about becomingi nvolved with community theatre,this is a great place to start. e are also looking for carpenters, a rtists and other volunteers who may be interested in working behind the scenes. It should be a lot of fun for all thosei nvolved,he said. Auntie Mameis the story of Mame Dennis,an eccentric but lovable character,which began as a novel written by her nephew Patrick Dennis. It was thena dapted into a long-running Broadway play by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee. The 1958 film version permitted Rosalind Russell to recreate her stager ole as Mame Dennis,the flamboyant, devil-may-care aunt of young,impressionable Patrick Dennis. Left in Mames care when his millionaire father drops dead,young Patrick is quickly indoctri-n ated into his aunts philosophy that Life is a banquet and some poor suckers are starving to death. T he social-climbing executor of his fathers estate,Dwight Babcock,does his best to raise Patrick as a stuffyA merican aristocrat,but Mame battles Babcock to allow the boy to be as freespirited as she is,introducing the audi-e nce to a variety of colorful characters and hilarious situations along the way. This is the 30th anniversary of Highlands Little Theatres five-play season in its home at the Altvater CulturalC enter on Lake Jackson. Auntie Mamewill be opening 30 years to the day since it was last produced by the theatre in January 1983. It was the first play I directed in S ebring,Pollard said. So,it seemed appropriate to celebrate that anniversary with a revival of this wonderful comedy. Anyone desiring additional informat ion about the auditions or a list of the parts available should contact Pollard at 991-2737,or email him atp ete@petepollard.com. Information can also be obtained by contacting Vanessa Logsdon,executive director ofH ighlands Little Theatre,at 385-2175. HLT seeks Auntie Mame cast In lieu of flowers, consider a gift to support Hospice care. 888-728-6234 Cornerstonehospice.orgNo. 5019096

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C M Y K Page 6ANews-SunSunday, October 21, 2012www.newssun.com C ENTRAL SECURITY; 3.639"; 2"; Black plus three; process, #1; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 1 1 1 1 3 3 Chen Dental 6x10.5 color 00024450 News-Sun photo by SAMANTHA GHOLAR Highlands County School District Superintendent Wally Cox (left a l local ministers Friday afternoon. Over a dozen churches were represented during the Blessing of the Business luncheon at Kenilworth Lodge. Cox and other local dignitariesi ncluding Mayor George Hensley and his wife Nancy received prayers for leadership and strength. The pastors continue to pray for each field of the workforce following the d ignitaries including agriculture, banking, medical and military. News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY R ob Hummel, who has lived in Sebring for 1 1 of the last 100 years, got into the mood o f the luau, wearing his Hawaiin best. News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS The Sebring centennial time capsule makes for a good photo op Thursday evening before being buried at Circle Park in Sebring. News-Sun photo by KATARA SIMMONS A large crowd gathers Thursday evening to watch as the centennial time capsule is buried at Circle Park in Sebring. Created as part of the Sebring centennial celebration, the capsule will remain in the ground for the next 100 years. P hoto by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY S ebring Historical Societys president A llen Altvater prepares the time capsules contents in the Sebring Chambers reopened office on Circle Street. SE BRINGCE NTENNIALCE LEBRATION News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY A crowd of about 200 people enjoyed electric sliding and limbo dancing in celebration of Sebring Friday night.

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C M Y K www.newssun.com N ews-Sun l S unday, October 21, 2012 Page 7A

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C M Y K Page 8ANews-SunSunday, October 21, 2012www.newssun.com PAGE, WILLIAM J.; 5.542"; 3"; Black; main a; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 4 4 0 0 1 1 EDWARD JONES/ED BURNSIDE***; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; 10/21/12; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 4 4 0 0 5 5 A re you ordering far fewer checks for your bank account these days? Does a roll of postage stamps seem to last a lot longer? Likem ost people,youre probably performing many more financial transactions electronically,either by choice or because companies andg overnment agencies have increasingly made it all but mandatory. For example,most gyms require automatic deductionsf rom a checking or credit card account. Utilities,mortgage lenders,insurance com-p anies and others strongly encourage electronic payments. And many states nowd istribute benefits like unemployment,child support and d isability assistance using prepaid cards instead of paper checks. E lectronic transactions have caught on because: There cheaper. Businesses save on the costs of printing,processing and mailing millions of paper checks and statements; andw ith first-class postage costing 45 cents,customers rack u p savings over time. And they save millions of tons of paper. There faster. Bill payments,funds transfers a nd direct deposits to your bank account or prepaid card occur the same day (often i nstantly),versus being delayed in the mail. And,if you sometimes forget to mail payments on time,auto payment protects against latef ees and overdraft charges. There convenient. You can choose one-time bill pay,where you first review y our bill and then authorize payment; or recur-r ing bill pay, where your bills are paida utomatically at a scheduled time for either for the full amount( usually mandatory with utilities),the minimum payment due,or an amount youc hoose. You can usually have funds drawn from either your checking or credit carda ccount (be sure to ask There safer. Even in t hese high-tech times,oldfashioned mail theft remains a major problem. For examp le,in 2010 more than 540,000 mailed federal benef it checks were reported lost or stolen and had to be replaced. That doesnt mean electronic transactions are risk-f ree. As with email or any kind of online activity,you s hould take precautions to protect your computer (and cell phone) from beingh acked. For example: Make sure your anti-virus a nd anti-spyware software is up-to-date. When making online paym ents,look for safety symbols like a padlock icon in the browsers status bar,an after httpin the URL, or the words SecureS ockets Layer(SSL Review credit card and bank account statements regularly and report duplicate b ill payments or s uspicious/unauthorized charges to the card issuer. Ask whether your credit or debit card offers zero liability,which means you wont be responsible for unauthorized or fraudulent purchases. Regularly order your credit reports from the three major credit bureaus (Equifax,Experian and T ransUnion),and review for e rrors or fraudulent activity. Y ou can order one free r eport annually from each at w ww.AnnualCreditReport.co m ,or more frequently for a small fee from each bureau. C reate complex,random p asswords and change them r egularly. Be a savvy consumer w henever using a bill-paying s ervice: A sk if any fees are involved. Before signing the agreement,make sure you understand and accept the terms. To stop service,you must notify the merchant as well as the bank/credit card company. Cancellation may take a month or two to become effective,so plan ahead. If your payment card expires,the merchant willn eed new card information t o ensure uninterrupted service. T rack expenses carefully and keep your budget up to date. J ason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter.com/PracticalMoney The ins and outs of ePayments BUSINESS Personal Finance Jason A lderman Special to the News-SunS EBRING Heartland Real Estate Corp. announces the addition of the Lovett Team,which includes Will Lovett and his wife Rachel,b oth licensed real estate agents and long-time residents of Highlands and Hardee counties. e are thrilled to have Will and Rachel join the HREC family,Jimmy Wohl, HREC president/broker, said.As realtors who are dedicated to their clients and the South Central region of the state,the Lovett Team is a perfect fit for our compans business model. Will Lovett was born and raised in Hardee County. After high school he attended South Florida Community College while working at a local ranch. He worked for the phosphate industry for seven years before moving to Highlands County to help run the family business,Beef OBradys. He worked for his family about 10 years and then started his real estate career. Rachel Lovett has lived in Highlands County for more than 25 years. She moved here as a child when her parents decided to begin her dads medical practice in Sebring. After graduating from Palm Beach Atlantic University in 2005,she moved back to Sebring and began her career in real estate. In 2006 she was nominated as the Heartland Association of Realtors Rookie of the Year.She is a board member for the Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce and a 2011 graduate of Leadership Highlands. The Lovetts attend Grace Bible Church and enjoy fishing,boating and spending time with their three children.To contact the Lovetts, call 781-0610 or email Lovettteam@aol.com. Whether you are buying or selling any type of property anywhere in the Heartland Region area,our team is not only committed to helping you accomplish your real estate goals,but we treat you like family because we are family,Wohl said.The addition of the Lovett Team continues to enhance what we can do for our clients. Heartland Real Estate Corporation is a real estate brokerage and development firm located in Sebring for more than 20 years. With extensive knowledge in all areas of real estate investment,HREC specializes in development,agricultural, commercial and residential properties. For more information,visit www.heartlandre.net or call 382-3887. Lovett Team joins Heartland Real Estate Courtesy photo Will and Rachel Lovett have joined Heartland Real Estate Corp. in Sebring. Associated PressN EW YORK Gasoline prices have begun their seasonal slide. Better late than never,drivers say. The national average r etail price has fallen for ten straight days and is now $3.74 per gallon. It could mark the beginning of the usual autumn decrease thatw as delayed this year because of refinery problems and high oil prices. T om Kloza,chief oil analyst at the Oil Price Information Service,pre-d icts drops of 5 cents to 15 cents per week for the next t hree weeks. Over the next several weeks the national average could be at or beloww here it was last year. Theres some nice relief c oming,he said. It cant come soon enough for Mary Hess,who commutes 40 miles each way from her home in SodusP oint,N.Y. to Oswego, N.Y.,where she teaches E nglish. She hasnt noticed much of a drop shes still paying $4.04 per gallon tof ill up her Buick Century. Gasoline is among the b iggest parts of her budget and she doesnt think it should be. Im frustrated more than anything,she said. Gasoline prices typically decline in the fall as refiners switch to cheaper fuelb lends and drivers take a break from road trips. This year a series of refinery and pipeline problems sent gasoline supplies plummet-i ng. That sent wholesale gasoline buyers and traders s crambling to purchase whatever they could,at ever h igher prices,to secure supply. It was a cluster of random coincidental events and the buying had a panicn ature to it,Kloza said. Gasoline prices were already steep they were on track to set an annual record by mid-summer b ecause of relatively high global crude oil prices. Brent,the type of crudem ost important in determining the price of gasoline, has averaged $112 per bar-r el this year. Global oil demand is on track to set a r ecord this year despite economic uncertainty. And the standoff over Irans nuclearp rogram has raised fears that oil supplies could be d isrupted if tensions escalate. Against that backdrop, the nations gasoline infrastructure got slammed. I n August,ruptures to pipelines that serve the G reat Lakes and refinery outages in Indiana and Illinois sent gasoline pricesh igher in the Midwest. Then a fire at a Chevron refinery i n Richmond,Calif. crippled a major contributor to Californias gasoline supp lies. Then Hurricane Isaac forced several Gulf Coast refineries to shut or slow down operations. As those refineries r amped back up,California saw more trouble. A pipeline that serves Bay Area refineries closed,two refineries were offline form aintenance and an Exxon Mobil Corp. refinery in T orrance,Calif.,near Los Angeles shut down because o f a surprise power outage. The national average price kept rising after Labor Day,when prices normally start to fall. It topped out fort he season at $3.87 on Sept. 14 and California prices hit a record $4.67 per gallon on Oct. 7. On the East Coast, gasoline supplies dipped toa four-year low,keeping prices stubbornly high. Then finally the m arket began to stabilize. The government reported Wednesday that gasolines upplies are heading back up. They had fallen for 10 of t he last 11 weeks. That led to a dramatic drop in wholesale gasolinep rices in regional spot markets,according to Kloza, t hat will soon translate into lower prices at the pump. California spot prices are down 30 percent over two weeks. Prices elsewhere int he country have declined between 15 percent and 27 p ercent. In Chicago,wholesale prices have fallen to $2.36 per gallon. That couldb ring retail gasoline prices in some parts of the M idwest to near $3 per gallon in the coming weeks. The average price at the p ump fell 22 cents in Ohio and 16 cents in Wisconsin in the past week. Those are two key battleground states in the presidential election,w ith 18 and 10 electoral votes,respectively. The rest of the nations drivers wont be quite so lucky. But,still,the nationala verage could be on its way to $3.50 per gallon,or b elow. Gasoline prices finally begin to slide back

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C M Y K www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, October 21, 2012Page 9A Your Hometown PaperDelivered the same way for the past 85 years. licenses. Those operations b egan in Lake Placid and Avon Park last year with the t hird to start in Sebring in July 2013. In preparation for that eventuality,the taxc ollectors offices at the Highlands County Government Center were r emodeled. Zwayer said they were able to keep that u nder a planned $100,000 budget,saying the new configuration would be both more efficient and more convenient for customers. N ext,Zwayer told the commission,he will look at t he notion of issuing birth certificates and concealed weapons permits. I n fact,the Highlands County Tax Collector a lready has signed a memorandum of understanding with the Highlands CountyH ealth Department to take over the issuance of birth certificates. That could take e ffect by the start of 2013. The concealed weapons p ermitting could commence next July,shortly after the target date for the opening of the Sebring drivers license location. I n an effort to make operations go more smoothly and e venly,Zwayer called for i ncreased collaboration and cooperation between the constitutional officers,noting t hat agreements with the H ighlands County Clerk of Courts and the Highlands C ounty Sheriffs Office had increased the Tax Collectors information technology and security. Zwayer made what he t ermed a paperless presentation,directing commis-s ioners and citizens to his website at www.hctaxcollect or.com/ where they could view the entire PowerPoint presentation. Continued from page 1A The HistoricalSociety h as the commemorative coffee table book Years of Sebringstill available as well and they make great holiday gifts. I f you have any centennial news,questions regarding Celebration events,or know of someone that deserves recognition for doing something in honor o f our Centennial year, please let me know. Im a vailable at 655-5554,or via email at JenBrown@email.com ,and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SebringCentennial Thanks to the News-Sun for being a sponsor and the opportunity to keep everyone informed on Sebrings Centennial Celebration. Reference this article every S unday for continued Celebration updates throughout the remainder of the year. Jen Brown is a member of the Sebring Centennial Committee and the Sebring Historical Society. Continued from page 2A and the last frontiers of wilderness. W hile becoming active with the Highlands County Democratic Womens Club she is a past president she hadnt seriously thoughta bout running for office. Then she discovered no one had challenged State Senator Bill Galvano,who is running for re-election. T he lack of an alternative,as more than I could bear,House said. I asked the (Democratic who was going to step up.N o one was. Well,I really care,she said she told herself,and whats wrongw ith running for office? You just cant sit on the sidelines holding your head in yourh ands. Her first concern,House s aid is housekeeping in the legislature. They passed a batch of bad laws,like man-d ated ultrasound for w omen,voter suppression laws and drug testing poor people. It costs $30 just toa pply for the test.She added the legislature is wasting money and courtt ime in defending appeals to law suits brought about b ecause of those decisions. s just mean-spirited, she said. What we need is ap redictable,responsible guarantee of the future,like land use that makes sense. Right now its the oppositeo f what be happening. Theve failed miserably in managing development Florida. She is concerned about t he charter school movement and opposes school vouchers. There bleeding public schools,taking tax dollars and putting it into af ew private pockets. They have also interfered with teacher contracts. Legislators are not educators. Why are they eveni nvolved?she said. The states finances are a major concern. There is noq uick fix,she said. We have to start doing things right and not take the shortt erm view.The legislature has never attended to the e conomy,theve just let it happen. Obviously,that shouldnt be the templatef or the future. Continued from page 1A H ouse running for state senate IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA P ROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.PC 12-402 I N RE:ESTATE OF ANNA JEAN PRESCOTT Division PROBATE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ANN A JEAN PRESCOTT,deceased,whose date of death was August 30,2012,and whose social security number is xxx-xx-9070,is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County,Florida,Probate Division,the address of which is 430 S.Commerce Avenue,Sebring,FL 33870.The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is October 14,2012. Personal Representative: /s/ Patti C.Godwin 720 E.Cornell Street Avon Park,Florida 33825 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ David F.Lanier E-Mail Address:lanier30@embarqmail.com Florida Bar No.045399 DAVID F.LANIER P.O.Box 400 Avon Park,Florida 33826-0400 Telephone:(863 October 14,21,2012 I N THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.:2009-CA-000703 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,L.P.F/K/A COUNT RYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING,L.P. P laintiff, vs.R ACHEL WELLER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RAC HEL WELLER IF ANY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,THROUGH,UNDER,AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEF ENDANT(SWHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD O R ALIVE,WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES M AY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,HEIRS, D EVISEES,GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; J OHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION Defendant(s A MENDED NOTICE OF SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Ord er rescheduling foreclosure sale dated July 9, 2 012 entered in Civil Case No.2009-CA-000703 o f the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County,Florida,wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,L.P.F/K/A COUNTRYW IDE HOME LOANS SERVICING,L.P.,Plaintiff and R ACHEL WELLER are defendant(sI will sell to t he highest and best bidder for cash,ATTHE J URY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF T HE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE,SEBRING,FLORIDA AT11:00 A.M.,November 14, 2 012,the following described property as set f orth in said Final Judgment,to-wit: B EING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS UNIT 14 IN A VALON PARK LAKES,A CONDOMINIUM,ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINI UM FOR AVON PARK LAKES,A CONDOMINIUM, RECORDED IN THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY CLERK'S REGISTER'S OFFICE IN DEED/RECORDED BOO K 1 781 PAGE 3,TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT THERETO AS THE SAME MAY NOW OR HEREAFTER BE L AWFULLY AMENDED. A NY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE S URPLUS FROM THE SALE,IF ANY,OTHER THAN T HE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at SEBRING,Florida,this 10th day of July, 2 012. R OBERT W.GERMAINE C LERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT H ighlands County,Florida By:/s/ Priscilla Michala k D eputy Clerk ROBERT W.GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Highlands County,Florida October 21,28,2012 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA CASE NO.28-2012-CA-000646 W ELLS FARGO BANK,N.A. Plaintiff, v T HE UNKNOWN HEIRS,GRANTEES DEVISEES,LIENORS,TRUSTEES,AND C REDITORS OF SYLVIA HENDRICKSON,DECEASED,ET AL. D efendants. N OTICE OF ACTION T O:THE UNKNOWN HEIRS,GRANTEES,DEVIS EES,LIENORS,TRUSTEES,AND CREDITORS OF SYLVIA HENDRICKSON,DECEASED,AND ALL C LAIMANTS,PERSONS OR PARTIES,NATURAL OR CORPORATE,AND WHOSE EXACT LEGAL S TATUS IS UNKNOWN,CLAIMING BY,THROUGH, U NDER OR AGAINST SYLVIA HENDRICKSON,DECEASED,OR ANY OF THE HEREIN NAMED OR DES CRIBED DEFENDANTS OR PARTIES CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT,TITLE OR INTEREST IN AND T O THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED C urrent residence unknown,but whose last k nown address was: 2 605 MONZA DRIVE,SEBRING,FL 33872 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County,Florida,to-wit: L OT 22,BLOCK 265,SUN N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING,UNIT 13,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9,AT P AGE 71,OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA. h as been filed against you and you are required to s erve a copy of your written defenses,if any,to it o n DOUGLAS C.ZAHM,P.A.,Plaintiff's attorney, w hose address is 12425 28th Street North,Suite 200,St.Petersburg,FL 33716,on or before No-v ember 27,2012 or within thirty (30 the first publication of this Notice of Action,and f ile the original with the Clerk of this Court at 590 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,FL 33870-3867,either before service on Plaintiff's a ttorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise,a default will be entered against you for the relief d emanded in the complaint petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on this 11th day of October,2012. ROBERT GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court B y:/s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Cler k IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO N EEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING,YOU ARE ENT ITLED,AT NO COST TO YOU,TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE.WITHIN TWO (2 W ORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOT ICE,PLEASE CONTACT THE COURT ADMINISTRATION OFFICE AT (863IF YOU A RE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED,CALL TDD 1-800-955-8771 OR 1-800-955-8770 (VVI A FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE. O ctober 21,28,2012 Tax collector to add services More Centennial Notebook coming so it would be easy for commissioners to compare thems ide by side. Attorney for the Highlands County Board of County Commission,Ross MacBeth,was asked to par-t icipate on the negotiating team with Fisher. He reportedly is the one going over and preparing the contract. Fisher has been serving as i nterim county administrator since the abrupt termination of her predecessor Rick Helms. Helms also was vaulted into the post when his predecessor MichaelW right was abruptly let go. H ighlands County commissioners earlier this month voted to offer the jobt o Fisher without considering other candidates A s part of their meeting, commissioners also are slated to hear a presentation on the Local Housing Assistance Program. Am emo from Fisher indicates a number of recommended c hanges in the State Housing Initiatives Partnership program wouldi ncrease revenue and interest in the program,which w ould allow many more clients to be servedin the county. I t was in March oflast year that county commissionersturned backmore t han $1 million in funds for assisted housing from the F ederal Stimulus Act, administered through the Community Redevelopment Block Grants. Fisher,who was the countys servicesd irector at the time,had pushed the idea for revamping foreclosed homes. Only commissioner Greg Harris voted to go after the funding. Commissioners had been dismayed over repeat-e d last-minute requests from staff indicating that if they c ould not get immediate approval,programs would fail or fall through the cracks. In July of 2011,commiss ioners voted to give up the leadership of a five county grant consortium turning that role over to Hendry County. Later,Human Services Director Mary Foy retired and the housing authority board went all but dormant. When asked last week if Highlands County was getting back into the subsidized housing business,Richie responded,The countys housing authority is down to one person if that tells you anything. That one person is housing program specialist Lucy Castillo. However,it appears the program is not quite dead. In July,commissioners proclaimed that they never said they wanted to stop subsidizing housing in the county,only that they wanted to get out of the free housing business.With that they agreed to have a workshop on the matter. At Tuesday nights meeting,commissioners will hear a pitch on a Technicala nd Clarifying Program, w hich purportedly would i mprove the SHIP program by revising criteria for part icipants,increase the home b uyers participation and add an interest rate to the loan. S imilar changes reportedly w ould come with an Emergency Home Repair Program with provisions that would decrease the amounts of money allocated for repairs and decrease the amount of years for the loan. I n other action,commissioners are slated to hear a bout a major television p roduction slated to be shot i n Lake Placid. The program is entitled Major League F ishing and is a staple of the Outdoor Channel. The program is described as a made-for-television tournament series that highlights the fierce competition found in competitive bass fishing, with more emphasis on personalities,the struggles,the strategies,the conflicts and the emotions of the anglers. Representatives of the p rogram reportedly were w ith Highlands County Tourist Development C ommission Executive Director John Scherlacher late last week surveying the area. Continued from page 1A County commission has plenty on agenda What we need is a predictable, responsible guarantee of the future, l ike land use that makes sense. Right now i s the opposite of what be happening. Theyve failed miserably in m anaging development F lorida.P AULAHOUSE state senate candidate

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C M Y K Page 10ANews-SunSunday, October 21, 2012www.newssun.com IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA P ROBATE DIVISION F ILE NO. PC 12-406 I N RE: ESTATE OF N ORMAN JAMES ELLIOTT, D eceased. N OTICE TO CREDITORS T he name of the decedent, the designation of the court in which the administration of this estate is pending, and the file number are indicated above. The address of the court is 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The name and address of the personal representative and t he personal representative's attorney are indic ated below. I f you have been served with a copy of this not ice and you have any claim against the deced ent's estate, even if that claim is unmatured, c ontingent or unliquidated, you must file your claim with the court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF A DATE THAT IS 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER YOU RECEIVE A COPY OF THIS NOTICE. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against dec edent's estate, including unmatured, contingent o r unliquidated claims, must file their claims with t his court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE O F THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. E VEN IF A CLAIM IS NOT BARRED BY THE L IMITATIONS DESCRIBED ABOVE, ALL CLAIMS W HICH HAVE NOT BEEN FILED WILL BE BARRED TWO YEARS AFTER DECEDENT'S DEATH. The date of death of the decedent is November 7, 2011. The date of first publication of this Notice is O ctober 21, 2012. P ersonal Representative: JOANNE WILLIS ELLIOTT 2720 N. Camden Road A von Park, FL 33825 Attorney for Personal Representative: CLIFFORD R. RHOADES, P.A. F lorida Bar No.: 308714 C lifford R. Rhoades, P.A. 2 141 Lakeview Drive S ebring, Floirda 33870 (863 O ctober 21, 28, 2012 s ons having claims or demands against deced ent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is r equired to be served must file their claims with t his court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. A ll other creditors of the decedent and other p ersons having claims or demands against deced ent's estate must file their claims with this court W ITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE F IRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. A LL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME P ERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. T he date of first publication of this Notice is O ctober 21, 2012. P ersonal Representative: / s/ Glen C.Bowman 5 425 Tipperary F lint, Michigan 48506 Attorney for Personal Representatives: /s/ Charlotte Stone Charlotte C. Stone Attorney for Glen C. Bowman Florida Bar Number: 21297 S tone & Walder, P.L. 3 200 US Highway 27 South, Suite 304 S ebring, FL 33870 T elephone: (863 F ax: (863 E -Mail: Charlotte@StoneandWalder.com October 21, 28, 2012 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT F OR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA P ROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 12CP-2201 IN RE: ESTATE OF LOLA M. BOWMAN Division: Probate Deceased. N OTICE TO CREDITORS T he administration of the estate of Lola M. B owman, deceased, whose date of death was August 5, 2012, and the last four digits of whose s ocial security number are 5412, is pending in the C ircuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Prob ate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. The names a nd addresses of the personal representative a nd the personal representative's attorney are s et forth below. A ll creditors of the decedent and other perI N THE CIRCUIT COURT F OR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 12-424 IN RE: ESTATE OF Fern Joan M. Winter D eceased. N OTICE TO CREDITORS T he administration of the estate of Fern Joan M Winter, deceased, whose date of death was J uly 7, 2012, and whose social security number i s XXX-XX-XXXX, is pending in the Circuit Court f or Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 540 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. A ll creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against deced ent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is r equired to be served must file their claims with t his court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFT ER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. A LL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME P ERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF T HE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER B ARRED. N OTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is October 21, 2012. P ersonal Representative: / s/ Margo W. Ostrowski 8 24 Geranium Drive W arrington, PA 18976 A ttorney for Personal Representative: / s/ Susan T. Rhodes Florida Bar No. 321151 The Rhodes Law Firm, LLC 370 East Interlake Blvd. Lake Placid, FL 33852 Telephone: 863-465-2899 October 21, 28, 2012 J onathan M. Jones 4 09 Sorrento Knolls Drive B lowing Rock, NC 28605 B REED & NUNNALLEE, P.A. Attorneys for Personal Representative 325 NORTH COMMERCE AVENUE SEBRING, FL 33870 T elephone: (863 B y: /s/ E. Mark Breed III F lorida Bar No. 338702 E -mail Address: service@bnpalaw.com O ctober 21, 28, 2012 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA P ROBATE DIVISION F ILE NO. PC 12-404 I N RE: ESTATE OF B ARBARA FRILEY JONES a /k/a BARBARA F. JONES Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BARBARA FRILEY JONES a/k/a BARBARA F. JONES, deceased, whose date of death was April 11, 2012, and whose social security number is 4 38-54-7331, is pending in the Circuit Court for H ighlands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the add ress of which is 590 South Commerce Avenue, S ebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of t he personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court W ITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOT ICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLIC ATION OF THIS NOTICE. A LL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF T HE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER B ARRED. N OTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET F ORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE O F DEATH IS BARRED. T he date of first publication of this Notice is Oct ober 21, 2012. P ersonal Representative: I N THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT O F FLORIDA IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 2012CA732 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, acting through the United States Department of Agriculture, Rural D evelopment, f/k/a Farmers Home Administration, a /k/a Rural Housing Service P laintiff, v s. N ANCI WEAVER WIMPEY, et al., D efendants. N OTICE OF ACTION STATE OF FLORIDA COUNTY OF HIGHLANDS TO: Any and all unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, or other claimants claiming by, through, under or against the Estate of MARY G. WEAVER, A/K/A M ARY GROVES WEAVER, Deceased. Y OU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage regarding the following property in H IGHLANDS County, Florida: L ot 7, Block 1, SEBRING VILLAS FIRST ADDITION, according to the map or plat thereof as re-c orded in Plat Book 4, page 83, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on: FREDERICK J. MURPHY, JR., Esquire, Attorn ey for Plaintiff, Boswell & Dunlap LLP, 245 South C entral Avenue, Post Office Drawer 30, Bartow, F L 33831, within thirty (30 p ublication of this Notice of Action, and file the o riginal with the Clerk of this Court either before s ervice on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. DATED on this 20th day of September, 2012. ROBERT W. GERMAINE C lerk of Circuit Court 4 30 S. Commerce Avenue S ebring, FL 33870 ( SEAL) BY: /s/ Toni Kopp D eputy Clerk O ctober 21, 28, 2012 1050Legals******WELLS MOTORS ROP AD********* **PROCESS COLOR** 6X10.5 DUMMY 2012 **PROCESS COLOR** PUMPKIN CONTEST 3X10.5 AD # 00024294

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C M Y K www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 21, 2012Page 11A NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER AMENDMENT TO SCHOOL DISTRICT RULE 7.31 AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is developing an amendment to Rule 7.31, School Food Service Funds. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to amend the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed amendment is to make changes to the policy in accordance with requirements set forth in recent Florida legislation. A summary of the proposed rule or amendment is as follows: Funds shall be collected and expended in compliance with United States Department of Agriculture and Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services rules. The specific legal authority includes Sections 1001.41 and 1001.43, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $150. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary October 21, 2012 N OTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE S CHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO C ONSIDER AMENDMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT RULE 5 .80 AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING N OTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highl ands County is developing an amendment to Rule 5.80, Athletics. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to a mend the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesd ay, November 13, 2012, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeti ng Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 S chool Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, S uperintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed amendment is make changes to the policy in accordance with requirem ents set forth in recent Florida legislation. A summary of the proposed rule or amendment is as follows: No student shall be a candidate for an athletic team or a participant in a thletic competition without filing an informed consent s igned by his/her parent(s nature and risk of concussion and head injury as required b y law. The consent must be filed annually prior to participating in any physical activity related to athletic competit ion or candidacy for an athletic team. A student athlete who is suspected of sustaining a concussion or head injury i n a practice or competition shall be removed from play immediately. The athlete may not return to play without a clearance from appropriate medical personnel. The spec ific legal authority includes Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes t hat the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the p roposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will n ot result in significant adverse effects on competition, e mployment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulat ory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the p roposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $150. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing t he proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration B uilding (Attn. Connie Scobey bring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, B Y: Wally Cox S uperintendent & ex officio secretary October 21, 2012 N OTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER AMENDMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT RULE 5.60 AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING N OTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highl ands County is developing an amendment to Rule 5.60, S tudent Injuries. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to amend the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, at 5:30 p.m. in the B oard Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration B uilding, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to W ally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 3 3870. The purpose and effect of the proposed amendm ent is to make changes to the policy in accordance with requirements set forth in recent Florida legislation. A summary of the proposed rule or amendment is as follows: A student who is suspected of sustaining a concussion or head injury shall be immediately removed from physical activity. Approved guidelines contained in the Health Serv-i ces Manual shall be followed. The specific legal authority i ncludes Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The S chool District believes that the proposed rule or amendm ent will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in signifi-c ant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $150. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents off ice, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey), 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. T HE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, B Y: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary O ctober 21, 2012 N OTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE S CHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER DEVELOPMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT RULE 4 .71 AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING N OTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highl ands County is amending Rule 4.71, Participation of H ome Education, Private School and Virtual School Students in Extracurricular Activities. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regul ar meeting of the Board on Tuesday, November 2012, at 4 :00 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Flori da. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development work-s hop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request m ust be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 S chool Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed amendment is to make changes tot he policy in accordance with requirements set forth in rec ent Florida legislation. A summary of the proposed a mendment is as follows: A full time Florida Virtual School student is eligible to participate in extracurricular activities at the school to which he/she would be assigned or could c hoose to attend under District enrollment policies. The s tudent must meet all Florida Statutes and academic and c onduct requirements of the District. The specific legal authority includes Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business.T he School District believes that the proposed rule or a mendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in signifi-c ant adverse effects on competition, employment, investm ent, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or a lternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $150. The estimated ann ual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule o r amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Con-n ie Scobey), 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between t he hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. T HE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, B Y: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary O ctober 21, 2012 and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or a mendment is estimated to be $150. The estimated ann ual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule o r amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey), 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between t he hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. T HE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, B Y: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary O ctober 21, 2012 1050L egals NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER A NEW SCHOOL DISTRICT RULE 4.117 AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is developing a new Rule 4.117, Early High School Graduation. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to amend the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed new rule is to make changes to the policy in accordance with requirements set forth in recent Florida legislation. A summary of the proposed rule or amendment is as follows: I. A student who completes a minimum of twenty-four (24 credits and meets the graduation requirements stated in Florida Statutes in less than eight (8 equivalent, may elect early graduation. The District shall notify the parent and the student who qualifies for early graduation. II. Procedures for the implementation of this policy and relevant law shall be established. The specific legal authority includes Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE S CHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER AMENDMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT RULE 4 .11 AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that The School Board of Highl ands County is developing an amendment to Rule 4.11, Student Progression Plan. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to amend the rule at a regular meeting o f the Board on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Admini stration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days o f the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will b e noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School S treet, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed amendment is to modify the plan to update in a ccordance with annual review and implementation of statutory and district changes and other corrective measu res as deemed necessary. The plan shall include options for academic acceleration and early high school graduat ion. The specific legal authority includes Sections 1 001.41 and 1001.45, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will h ave no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist a nd/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $150. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary October 21, 2012 N OTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE S CHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER AMENDMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT RULE 2.21 AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is developing an amendment to Rule 2.21, O rganization and Officers of the Board. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to amend the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass A dministration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request m ust be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed amendment is to include the revised p olicy as set forth in recent legislation. A summary of the proposed rule or amendment is as follows: In an election year, the organizational meeting shall be held on the second Tuesday following the general election. The specific legal authority includes Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small b usiness. The School District believes that the proposed r ule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in s ignificant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective e ither do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or a mendment is estimated to be $150. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule o r amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents off ice, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Conn ie Scobey), 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through F riday. T HE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, B Y: Wally Cox S uperintendent & ex officio secretary October 21, 2012 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. GC 12-610 OASIS HOMEOWNERS' ASSOCIATION, I NC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs DONALD TRUMP EMIG, and spouse, if married, or if any of the aforesaid persons is dead, then his or her unknown heirs, devisees, legatees or grantees, and any and all other persons or parties claiming by, through, under or against them; and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status if unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described defendants or parties or claiming to have any rights, title or interest in and to the lands hereafter described Defendant NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final decree of foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Highlands County, Florida, described as: Tract #1, of Lot 16, Block 255, of SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING UNIT 13, more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE at the Southwest Corner of Lot 16, Block 255, Sun 'N Lake Estates of Sebring, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 9, Page 71, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida; thence run North 24 degrees 54'52'' West along the Westerly Line of Lot 16 for a distance of 29.12 f eet; thence run North 65 degrees 05'08'' East for a distance of 21.65 feet for POINT OF BEGINNING; thence run North 26 degrees 15'19'' West for a distance of 18.835 feet; thence run North 63 degrees 44'41'' East for a distance of 49.33 feet; t hence run South 26 degrees 15'19'' East for a distance of 18.835 feet; thence run south 63 degrees 44'41'' West for a distance of 49.33 feet to POINT OF BEGINNING. Also Known as Unit 1, of the OASIS, of SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, UNIT 13, as recorded in Plat Book 9, Page 71, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. on the 14th day of November A.D., 2012. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk Circuit Court (Seal Deputy Clerk October 21, 28, 2012 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Highlands County Courthouse. Telephone 863-386-6565 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Sebring, Florida, on October 8, 2012. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk, Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak AS DEPUTY CLERK October 14, 21, 2012 1050L egals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 282012CA000448XXXXXX FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs ROBERT L. OAKES; et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated October 4, 2012, entered in Case No. 282012CA000448XXXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and ROBERT L. OAKES; PAULINA OAKES; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. at Highlands County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 1st day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: THE NORTH 25 FEET OF LOT 39 AND THE SOUTH 30 FEET OF LOT 40, BLOCK 426, SEBRING SUMMIT, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 62, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION C ASE NO. 282011CA000398XXXXXX FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs PATRICK BRAY A/K/A PATRICK W. BRAY, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated October 4, 2012, entered in Case No. 282011CA000398XXXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and PATRICK BRAY A/K/A PATRICK W. BRAY; SHAWN KERNS A/K/A SHAWN N. KERNS; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Jury Assembly Room in the b asement of the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. at Highlands County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 1st day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final J udgment, to-wit: LOT 30, BLOCK 2, ORANGE BLOSSOM ESTATES, UNIT NO. 5, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 40, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Highlands County Courthouse. Telephone 863-386-6565 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Sebring, Florida, on October 8, 2012. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk, Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak AS DEPUTY CLERK October 14, 21, 2012 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 282010CA000617XXXXXX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS, CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-HY7C MORTGAGE P ASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-HY7C, Plaintiff, vs ANTHONY S. CASERTA; 3 TEAM HOLDINGS, LLC; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated October 4, 2012, entered in Case No. 282010CA000617XXXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS, CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-HY7C MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-HY7C, is Plaintiff and ANTHONY S. CASERTA; 3 TEAM HOLDINGS, LLC; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. at Highlands County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 5th day of December, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 8, IN BLOCK 46, OF PLACID LAKES, SECTION FIVE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, AT PAGE 65, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Highlands County Courthouse. Telephone 863-386-6565 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Sebring, Florida, on October 9, 2012. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk, Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak AS DEPUTY CLERK October 21, 28, 2012 Relay Service. DATED at Sebring, Florida, on October 8, 2012. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk, Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak AS DEPUTY CLERK October 14, 21, 2012 1050L egals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 282011CA000780XXXXXX DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF ISAC 2006-3, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-3, Plaintiff, vs JOHN C. DEAN, II; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated October 4, 2012, entered in Case No. 282011CA000780XXXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF ISAC 2006-3, MORTGAGE PASS-THORUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-3 is Plaintiff and JOHN C. DEAN, II; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. at Highlands County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 1st day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 18 AND THE FOLLOWING PORTION OF LOT 19, TO-WIT: BEGIN AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE COMMON LINE BETWEEN SAID LOTS AND THE RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF EDGEMOOR AVENUE, RUN THENCE IN A NORTHERLY DIRECTION ALONG THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF EDGEMOOR AVENUE A DISTANCE OF 25 FEET, RUN THENCE IN A WESTERLY DIRECTION AND PARALLEL TO THE COMMON LINE BETWEEN SAID LOTS 18 AND 19 A DISTANCE OF 150 FEET TO THE REAR LINE OF SAID LOT 19, RUN THENCE IN A SOUTHERLY DIRECTION ALONG SAID REAR LINE OF SAID LOT 19 TO THE COMMON LINE OF SAID LOTS 18 AND 19, RUN THENCE ALONG SAID COMMON LINE TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, BLOCK 187, WOODLAWN TERRACE, LESS A TEN FOOT STRIP FOR ALLEYWAY EASEMENT TO THE REAR THEREOF, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 96, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Highlands County Courthouse. Telephone 863-386-6565 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-000468 SEC.: CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, v. KELLY CONNER; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; U NKNOWN SPOUSE OF KELLY CONNER NKA KYLA ELLERBEE. Defendant(s NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Ord er of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 3, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 28-2010-CA-000468 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 2nd day of November, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. in the Jury Assembly Room, Courthouse Basement, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 22 AND THE SOUTH 1/2 OF LOT 21, BLOCK 145, LAKEWOOD TERRACES, SHEET 3, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 94, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. Commonly Known As: 4225 SEBRING AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33872 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Office of the Court Administrator Phone: (863 TDD: (863 or (800Florida Relay Service much in advance of your court appearance or visit to the courthouse as possible. Please be prepared to explain your functional limitations and suggest an auxiliary aid of service that you believe will enable you to effectively participate in the court program or service. DATED AT SEBRING, FLORIDA THIS 9th DAY OF October, 2012. By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA October 14, 21, 2012SEBRING AIRPORT AUTHORITY FINANCIAL SERVICES Notice to Proposers/Request for Proposals R FP #12-08 Sebring Airport Authority (hereafter referred to as SAA H ighlands County, Sebring, Florida, requests written s ealed proposals for financial services. The services may i nclude (but not limited to s cribed in more detail in the Request for Proposals (RFP G ENERAL CONDITIONS C opies of the RFP are on file and available for public ins pection at the office of Beverly Glarner, Sebring Airport Authority, 128 Authority Lane, Sebring, FL. 33870 you may reach Beverly Glarner at 863-655-6444 x 120 or e mail at bev@sebring-airport.com or you may go to w ww.sebring-airport.com and click on Projects to Bid. All q uestions regarding this Notice to Proposers should be in writing and directed to Beverly Glarner at b ev@sebring-airport.com (the words RFP #12-08 must be in the subject line of email). P ROPOSALS: Sealed proposals must be received by SAA o n or before 2:00 p.m., local time, on the 19 th day, November, 2012. Proposals must be sent to the following a ddress: Sebring Airport Authority Attn: Marcia Lee 1 28 Authority Lane S ebring, FL 33870 P roposals will be promptly opened at 2:00 p.m. in the B oard Room of SAA at the above-mentioned address and date and time. EXECUTION OF PROPOSAL: Proposals must be typed or p rinted in ink and contain an original signature of an indiv idual authorized to bind the proposer. Submit three (3 original and one (1 proposal. (go to www.sebring-airport.com click on Projects t o Bid for example. T hose submitting proposals are requested to show their n ames and address on the envelope as well as the followi ng: FINANCIAL SERVICES R FP #12-08 DO NOT OPEN UNTIL: 2:00 p.m. N ovember 19, 2012 S ebring Airport Authority B y: /s/ Mike Willingham, Executive Director O ctober 21, 28, 2012 1050L egals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 282011CA000820XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs QUENTIN A. PARRISH AKA QUENTIN ALBERT PARRISH; et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated October 4, 2012, entered in Case No. 282011CA000820XXXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and QUENTIN A. PARRISH AKA QUENTIN ALBERT PARRISH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE QUENTIN A. PARRISH AKA QUENTIN ALBERT PARRISH; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. at Highlands County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 1st day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 26, BLOCK 160, SUN 'N LAKES ESTATES, SECTION 15, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF. RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 84. OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Highlands County Courthouse. Telephone 863-386-6565 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Sebring, Florida, on October 8, 2012. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk, Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak AS DEPUTY CLERK October 14, 21, 2012 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 282011CA000758XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs NEILYS CORZO, et al Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated October 4, 2012, entered in Case No. 282011CA000758XXXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and NEILYS CORZO; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. at Highlands County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 1 st day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 21, BLOCK 39, SEBRING HILLS SOUTH, UNIT NO. 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 7 OR THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Highlands County Courthouse. Telephone 863-386-6565 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Sebring, Florida, on October 8, 2012. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk, Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak AS DEPUTY CLERK October 14, 21, 2012 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 282011CA000857XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs GRISEL MCKERNAN; ENRIQUE M. LANTIGUA; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED. D efendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated October 4, 2012, entered in Case No. 282011CA000857XXXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and GRISEL MCKERNAN; ENRIQUE M. LANTIGUA; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. at Highlands County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 1st day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 11, IN BLOCK 6, OF ORANGE BLOSSOM ESTATES UNIT NO. 4, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 44, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE S URPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disa bilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Highlands County Courthouse. Telephone 863-386-6565 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Sebring, Florida, on October 8, 2012. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk, Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak AS DEPUTY CLERK October 14, 21, 2012 1050L egals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 282010CA000325XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs ALEXANDRA MORALES; et al., Defendants. N OTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated October 4, 2012, entered in Case No. 282010CA000325XXXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and ALEXANDRA MORALES; ALEJANDRO MORALES; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. at Highlands County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 1st day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 20, BLOCK 71, OF SEBRING COUNTRY ESTATES SECTION 3, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE(S LANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Highlands County Courthouse. Telephone 863-386-6565 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Sebring, Florida, on October 8, 2012. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk, Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak AS DEPUTY CLERK October 14, 21, 2012 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 28-2011-CA-000662 BANK OF AMERICA N.A., Plaintiff, vs. AROOJ AHMED; RAFAT AHMED; UNKNOWN TENANT; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judg-m ent of Foreclosure dated the 11th day of July, 2012, and entered in Case No. 28-2011-CA-000662 of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and AROOJ AHMED; RAFAT AHMED and UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 4 30 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33870, 11:00 AM on the 14th day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 8 LESS THE SOUTH HALF, BLOCK 42, AVON PARK ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 15, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs assistance in order to participate in a program or service of the State Courts System, you should contact the Office of the Court Administrator at (863voice863TDD (800Florida Relay Service i n advance of your court appearance or visit to the courthouse as possible. Please be prepared to explain your functional limitations and suggest an auxiliary aid or service that you believe will enable you to effectively participate in the court program or service. Dated this 11th day of July, 2012. Robert W. Germaine Clerk Of The Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk October 21, 28, 2012 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NUMBER: 11-935 GCS STEVE COLTHARP and SARAH M. COLTHARP, Husband and Wife, Plaintiff, vs. LUCIO CASIO LOPEZ, if alive and if not, the UNKNOWN SPOUSE, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming by, through, under or against LUCIO CASIO LOPEZ and all claimants under any of such party; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final judgment of foreclosure entered in the abovetitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida described as: The Property: 1603 Golden Age Villas, Avon Park, FL 33825 Dwelling Unit No. 1603, Building F-1, GOLDEN AGE VILLAS, AVON PARK, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest corner of Lot 20, Block 62, Avon Park, Section 22, Township 33 South, Range 28 E ast, Highlands County, Florida, as show by map or plat thereof recorded in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit court in and for DeSoto County, Florida (of which Highlands County was formerly a part) in Plat Book 1, Page 58; thence in a Southerly direction along the Easterly right of way line of DeSoto Avenue a distance of 60 feet to the Northwest corner of a closed park; thence in an Easterly direction along the North boundary of a closed park, a distance of 99.61 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue along the North boundary of a closed park, a distance of 28.24 feet to a point; thence in a Southerly direction and parallel to DeSoto Avenue, through the center line of a partition wall and continue a distance of 70 feet to a point on the center line of a closed park; thence in a Westerly direction along the center line of a closed park a distance of 28.24 feet to a point; thence in a Northerly direction through the center line of a partition wall and continue a distance of 70 feet to the Point of Beginning, as per plat recorded in O.R. Book 277, Page 438 and 439, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Real Property Tax I.D. # A-22-33-28-010-0601-6030 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, in Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M. on the 14th day of November, 2 012. SIGNED this 17th day of October, 2012. (SEAL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: /s/ Priscilla Michalak D eputy Clerk October 21, 28, 2012 1050L egals

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C M Y K Page 12ANews-SunSunday, October 21, 2012www.newssun.com NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER NEW SCHOOL DISTRICT RULE 8.44 AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is developing new Rule 8.44, Summer Nutrition Program. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to develop the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed new rule is to create guidelines for the Summer Nutrition Program in accordance with requirements set forth in recent Florida legislation. A summary of the proposed rule or amendment is as follows: Paragraph II: Any reference to the Commissioner of Education shall be deleted and replaced with commissioner. The specific legal authority includes Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $50. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE S CHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER AMENDMENT TO SCHOOL DISTRICT RULE 8.42 AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING N OTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is developing an amendment to Rule 8.42, F ree and Reduced Price Meals. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to amend the rule at a regul ar meeting of the Board on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass A dministration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development works hop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 S chool Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed amendment is to make changes to the p olicy in accordance with requirements set forth in recent Florida legislation. A summary of the proposed rule or a mendment is as follows: Any references to the Florida Department of Education or Florida Department of Educ ation as adopted by the State Board of Education shall be deleted and replaced with Florida Department of Agric ulture and Consumer Services. The specific legal authority includes Sections 1001.42 and 1001.43, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. T he School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state o r local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investm ent, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the S chool District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $150. The estimated ann ual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey), 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary October 21, 2012 N OTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER AMENDMENT TO SCHOOL DISTRICT RULE 8 .40 AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is developing an amendment to Rule 8.40, G eneral Food Service Requirements. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to amend the rule at a regular m eeting of the Board on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Flori da. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 S chool Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed amendment is to make changes to the policy in accordance with requirements set forth in recent Florida legislation. A summary of the proposed rule or amendment is as follows: Any references to the State B oard of Education shall be deleted and replaced with Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Servi ces. The specific legal authority includes Sections 1001.42 and 1001.43, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result i n substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, inn ovation or international trade and/or alternative app roaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist a nd/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School Dist rict of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $150. The estimated annual cost of imp lementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendm ent is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment c an be obtained at the Superintendents office, George D ouglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey 4 26 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8 :00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, B Y: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary October 21, 2012 N OTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE S CHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER AMENDMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT RULE 7.70 AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING N OTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highl ands County is developing an amendment to Rule 7.70, P urchasing, Bidding and Selecting Professional Services. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to amend the r ule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesday, Novemb er 13, 2012, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, G eorge Douglass Administration Building, 426 School S treet, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule d evelopment workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Super-i ntendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The p urpose and effect of the proposed amendment is to make changes to the policy in accordance with requirements set forth in recent Florida legislation. A summary of the proposed rule or amendment is as follows: Florida Statutes, S tate Board of Education rules, Florida Department of Agric ulture and Consumer Services rules, School Board rules and administrative procedures shall be carefully observed when making any purchases. The District shall recognize p urchasing terms as defined by law and rule. The specific l egal authority includes Sections 337.11(5a 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial i ncrease in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual i ndustries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or inter-n ational trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulat ory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $150. T he estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing t he proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the p roposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey bring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox S uperintendent & ex officio secretary O ctober 21, 2012 NOTICE OF LANDOWNERS MEETING AND T HE ELECTION OF ONE SUPERVISOR FOR THE S PRING LAKE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT T he Spring Lake Improvement District will conduct a Landowners Meeting on Wednesday, November 14, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. at the District Office, 115 Spring Lake Boulevard, Sebring, Florida 33876. An election shall be held for t he purpose of electing ONE Supervisor to a Board of five S upervisors for a term expiring on the regular meeting d ate in November, 2015 in accordance with the Florida Statutes, Chapter 90-434. The Landowners may vote in p erson or by proxy, in writing; Proxies are available at the D istrict Office. At said meeting each landowner shall be e ntitled to cast one vote per acre of land owned and located within the District. Fractions of an acre shall be t reated as one acre, entitling the landowners to one vote w ith respect thereto. The person receiving the highest n umber of votes for the office of Supervisor shall be dec lared elected. In addition any other business relating to t he Spring Lake Improvement District as may properly c ome before the meeting will be heard. EACH PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION M ADE BY THE BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER C ONSIDERED AT MEETINGS IS ADVISED THAT PERSON M AY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, INCLUDING THE TESTIMONY A ND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH SUCH APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. Joseph DeCerbo D istrict Manager O ctober 21, 28, and November 4, 2012 1050L egalsDUMMY 2012 SERVICE DIRECTORY DUMMY 5X21.5 AD # 00015557

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C M Y K www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 21, 2012Page 13A 9350Automotive Parts& AccessoriesGMC SONOMATRUCK 2001. 148K mi. Runs good, looks sporty, clean, economical, good cond. Has Extras! $3800. obo. Call 863-763-0410 or 863-381-4942 9200Trucks 9000 Transportation** JETSKI** KAWASAKI 650 SC / SPORT CRUISER Side By Side Seat Low Hours COME & SEE Noon to 6PM 2203 Pasco Dr Sebringor Call 863-382-0110 BEST OFFER! 8400RecreationalVehiclesBIG GUNSHOWHighlands County Fair Grounds Sebring, FLOCTOBER 27TH & 28THSAT. 9-5; SUN. 9-4 Concealed Course At Show! Call 321-777-7455 8350Sporting Goods 8200Bikes & CycleEquipment 8000 RecreationNOTICEF lorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate a nd proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & SuppliesSNAP ONROLLING TOOL BOX. 2 Piece Loaded w/tools. $5500. Call 863-655-3556 or 863-446-0609. 7380M achinery & Tools SEBRING -Fri., Sat.,Sun.Oct. 19, 20, 21, 7am-?. 1310 Kerry Dr. Awakening Youth Fundraiser Sale! Lots of Stuff! SEBRING **MOVING SALE ** 2939 Roger St. (off Hammock Rd. & 27, Fri. 8am-4pm & Sat. 8am-2pm. Furn., Sm. appliances, VCR's, garden tools, lawn furn., Household items. Everything Must Go! SEBRING *Huge Carport / Yard Sale 2454 Lakeview Dr. Fri-Sat-Sun, 19-2021 & Fri-Sat-Sun, Oct 26-27-28, 8am3pm. Lots of unique & very nice items. Halloween, Valentine & Christmas decor., Power tools. metal frame head & foot boards, wicker head board, kids John Deer peddler w/ trailer, bikes to antiques and Much Much More! LAKE JUNEPT. Community Sale, Sat 10-27, 8am-3pm. Furn., Tools, SportsStuff Inflatable, 10 PC. Teak Patio set, clothing, collectibles, generator, household & more. US 27S to Interlake Blvd. West 2 miles. Lake June Pointe Sub. Lake Placid G IANT YARDSALE At Storage Facility. SAT SUN. 8-4PM. Household, furn., appliances, tools & some really nice jewelry. 1866 South Wilburn Dr. Located off US 27, across from College, towards Reflections. 7320Garage &Yard Sales RECLINER -SMALL BLUE $30. 863-699-0352 PRO -FORM Treadmill 835QT 10 SPS, F ull read outs. Looks New $65. 863-382-4137 P OLO SHIRTSMen's 11 size med. St John's Bay (J.C.Penny $30. the lot. Call 863-453-3104 LUGGAGE RED,never used. 28", duffel bag & tote. Must sell! $75 8 63-446-0972 BEDSPREAD -Full / Queen size P EACH / BLACK / WHITE. $20. 863-699-0352 ** BIRDCAGE ** Large with Complete Contents. $45. 863-214-1555 7310Bargain Buys SHED 8X12Wooley Custom Built Shed. Has Shelves and 5000 BTU AC. New $3400. Yours for $1750. obo You Move. 863-386-4444 MICROWAVE WHIRLPOOLGold. new! Table 42" glass top & 4 Chairs. $395. Call 717-682-2188. GAS GRILLA Commercial Infrared Char Broil w/ cover, gas bottle & gas, Very Good Condition. Must See!! $ 175. 863-453-7027 7300Miscellaneous 7180FurnitureMAYTAG FREEZER-20 C.F. Upright Work great $250. obo / Lg. French door refrigerator 17.7C.F. Bottom freezer 7.3 C.F. Ice maker. Good condition $800. Washer & Dryer (elec capacity. Top condition. $250 pair. 863-386-4444 7040Appliances 7000 MerchandiseDOWNTOWN SEBRINGON THE CIRCLE, STORE FRONT FOR RENT 1500 sq. ft. $1,000/mo. Great for Thrift Store, Art Gallery, Antique store. Pieces of the Past Building, Circle 313. Call 863-386-9100 6750Commercial RentalFAIRMOUNT SELFSTORAGE UNITS FOR RENT. Behind Love Bugs & US. 27. Starting at $45. 5 x 10/10 x 10. Call 863-386-9100 6550W arehousesfor Rent SEASONAL RENTALFURNISHED, 1BR./1 BA., Living, Dining, Kitchen, walk in closet, utility room w/washer & dryer. All utilities include: electric, water, cable & internet. Nice neighborhood behind Harder Hall. Fenced in back yard. $950/mo. Call 863-381-4213. L AKE PLACIDCovered bridge. Beautiful 2/2. Sun Porch, 1 block to Club House, heated pool, fully equipped kitchen. Available Dec. 1st. $1200/mo. Call 239-821-4730 6320Seasonal Property AVON PARK,BEAUTIFUL 3/2 All appliances included. Immediate occupancy. 206 E. Thomas St. Close to Elementary, Middle & High School. $800/mo. For details call 863-452-6112 AVON PARK3BR, 1BA. All Appliances Included. Immediate occupancy. Close to US 27/WalMart. $650 per mo. Call for Details. 863-449-0429 or 301-245-4619 6300Unfurnished Houses LAKE PLACIDNear Lake Placid Boat Ramp with lake access. Furnished 2/1, appliances, A/C. $550/mo. + $50 water. 863-465-1354. AVON PARK2BR./1BA. Country Living, on Lake. Newly renovated. Furnished. Washer/Dryer. $600/mo. + deposit, first & last. Call 863-453-6469 6250Furnished Houses AVON PARKNW APARTMENTS 2/2 $450 mo. New 1/1 $395 mo. Plus 1st & Sec. Central Heat & Air. No Dogs Or Cats. 863-449-0195 AVON PARK* LEMONTREE APTS 1BR $520 mo. + $350 Sec. Deposit, available immediately. Washer/Dryer & WSG included. Pets OK! Call Alan 386-503-8953 SEBRING -1 & 2 BR,1BA. T ile floors, fresh paint. I ncludes water. $395 $ 600/mo. Gary Johnson, 8 63-381-1861. R ELAX ATLake Isis Villas** Luxurious ** 1 BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. 863-453-2669 6200U nfurnishedApartments SEBRING FURNISHED/UNFURNISHED 1BR or Studios, on the circle. $450.-600. Some Utilities incl. Attn: Vets, Special programs for rentals, subsidized payments, call to see if you qualify. 863-386-9100. 1 BEDROOMFURN. APT. FOR RENT AVON MOBILE HOME PARK 55 PLUS PARK. SORRY NO PETS. 863-453-3415 1350 N. LAKE AVE. 6150FurnishedApartments SEBRING **GREAT LOCATION! ** Beautiful 2BR / 1BA/ 2CP Close to mall & US 27. W/D, screen porch, new carpet Appl's incl., ceiling fans. A/C, No Smoke. CALL 305-490-5399 SEBRING 2BR./2BA., 1 car garage, 2000sq.ft., $650/mo. No pets, No smoke. 863-402-1142 SEBRING -2BR, 1BA. Newly Remodeled. $425. per mo. 1648 Penny Ave. Call for details. 863-381-0357 or 863-446-2838. LAKE PLACIDPlacid Lakes, Unfurnished 2BR, 2BA. $500/mo. + $200 security. 863-699-0897 or 863-840-2013 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 Rentals 5200Mobile HomeLots for Rent PALM HARBORHOMES Red Tag Sale Over 10 Stock Units Must Go New Homes Start at $39,900 800-622-2832 ext 210 MOBILE HOMESFOR SALE AFFORDABLE LOT RENT AVON MOBILE HOME PARK 55 PLUS PARK SORRY NO PETS 863-453-3415 5050M obile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile Homes 4200Income &Investment Prop.SEBRING **NEW LARGE HOME ** 3BR, 2BA. 2 1/2 CG, Family Room, Screened Lanai. Manor Hill 2728 Manor Dr. Open Daily 9AM 4PM. $194,900. 863-471-3207 Or 863-202-0785 4080Homes for SaleSebringOUT OFSTATE / Hartford, Indiana. 3BR, 2BA, 2CG, Storage bldg., Deck, Privacy fence, Waterfront view, All appliances, Vinyl windows, All window coverings. $74,900. Call Barb Office 765-664-6923 Cell 765-661-6934 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 2150P art-timeEmployment STANLEY STEEMER Now accepting applications for CLEANINGTECHNICIAN Good Driving Record / People Person 863-655-2158 For Instructions. Drug Free Work Place PEDIATRIC OFFICElooking for bilingual MA/LPN with Certification. Experience with Blood draws, giving shots, triaging patients required. Contact office at (863 MEDICAL ASSISTANTNEEDED Immediately for Family Medical Practice. Experienced in taking patients history, medications, vitals, phlebotomy, EKG, and assisting Doctor or Nurse practitioner. F/T. Fax resume to: 863-382-3533. INSTITUTIONAL PLANNING AND ASSESSMENT SPECIALIST Application Deadline: 11/8/12. Please visit http://sfsc.interviewexchange.com for detailed position posting. 863-784-7132. EA/EO EXPERIENCED TREECLIMBER or Bucket Operator Needed. Call 863-414-2492 EXPERIENCED PLOWFOREMAN 3 years plus a must. Experienced in plowing & locating telephone and fiber optics. Call 863-443-6250 EXPERIENCED LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE LABORER NEEDED Call 863-381-3570. EXPERIENCE THEJOYS AND REWARDS Of Being A Comfort Keeper If you have a passion for improving the quality of life for others while helping people live independently and happily in their own homes, you could be a Comfort Keeper! We are now hiring CNA, HHA and Homemaker Companion Positions in the Highlands County area. We offer flexible full-time or part-time hours. Contact us to learn more about how you can develop a rewarding career enr iching the lives of others with Comfort Keepers. Apply online today at: http://ck381.ersp.biz/employment 863-385-9100 CUSTOMER SERVICEASSOCIATES Full Time & Part Time $9.00 per hour. *Spanish and French Differential. AGERO A Geat Place to Work C all 863-402-2786 CARPENTER W/ALUMINUMExp. Minimum of 10 years & Construction laborers. F/T. Clean DL, DFWP. E-mail to: josh@stewart-construction.net BUSY EYECLINIC has openings in all positions, F/T & P/T. Send resume to: P.O. Box 991 Lake Placid Fl. 33852 2100H elp WantedNATURAL GASPipeline Technician Training, Uniforms, 401K, Paid vacations Sebring Gas System, Inc. 3515 US Hwy. 27 S. Sebring, Fl. 33870 POSITION FILLED! Drug Free Workplace 2100Help Wanted 2000 E mployment 1450Babysitters 1100Announcements N OTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER AMENDMENT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT RULE 8 .45 AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING N OTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highl ands County is developing Rule 8.45, School Breakfast Program. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to a mend the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on Tuesd ay, November 13, 2012, at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeti ng Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 S chool Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, S uperintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. T he purpose and effect of the proposed new rule is to make changes to the policy in accordance with requirements set forth in recent Florida legislation. A summary of t he proposed rule or amendment is as follows: Paragraph V : Delete Beginning with the 2010-2011 school year. T he remainder of the policy remains the same. The spec ific legal authority includes Sections 1001.41 and 1001.42, Florida Statutes. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect o n small business. The School District believes that the p roposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial i ncrease in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, e mployment, investment, productivity, innovation or intern ational trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulat ory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the p roposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $150. T he estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing t he proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Sup erintendents office, George Douglass Administration B uilding (Attn. Connie Scobey b ring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. T HE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, B Y: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary O ctober 21, 2012 A dministration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey S treet, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. T HE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, B Y: Wally Cox S uperintendent & ex officio secretary O ctober 21, 2012 1050L egalsCHECK YOUR AD P lease check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can o ccur. If this happens to you, p lease call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:314-9876 News-Sun Classified DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 314-9876 Classified ads get fast results AGERO 3X10.5 AD # 00024367THERAPAIN DIRECT 2X2 AD # 00024147AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 AD # 00023845NORTHGATE FURNITURE 1X3 AD # 00023951

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C M Y K Page 14ANews-SunSunday, October 21, 2012www.newssun.com W ARREN'S AUTO SALES #2; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, weather page; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 3 3 7 7 7 7 M edia Gistic (Longs blu; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 4 4 0 0 2 2

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C M Y K SPORTS B SE CTION Inside This Section Prep Football Scores . . .3B FTA Activities . . .3B P anthers to Dig Pink . . .3B News-Sun Sunday, October 21, 2012 News-Sun photo by BRITTANYWHITTINGTON Bella Caraballo looks to hammer this shot past Ashley C hacon Thursday in Sebrings sweep at Avon Park. By BRITTANY WHITTINGTON News-Sun correspondentAVON PARK Avon Park hosted Sebring Thursday night in their final home game of the season. After coming off a victory Tuesday night against Lake Placid, the Lady Streaks were on the hunt to wreck yet another Senior Night mission accomplished. To top off Sebrings junior varsity defeat of what would have been an undefeated Avon Park JVsquad, Sebrings varsity added icing to their cake by sweeping the Devils in three sets. To contradict Tuesdays five-set match, Thursday was very quick. e expected this to be a tough match, said Avon Park head coach Stephanie Devlin. Sebring came with their game tonight. That is exactly what the Blue Streaks did. Once the hype from Senior Night died down a little and the match was ready to begin, so were the Streaks. Sebring jumped out to a quick 8-3 lead over the Devils and had shocked the fans and spectators rooting for Avon Park. Coach Devlin called a timeout immediately to try and get her team settled back down and under control. The rest of the set, the Lady Red Devils continued to use little communication and stayed in minor disorientation. The final score of the first set finished at 25-13 in Sebrings favor. Between the sets and side switching, coach Devlin knew she had to get her team pumped up to get back in the game. Fortunately for the Streaks, they came out with Lady Streaks spoil another Senior Night See SEBRING, Page 4B News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Green Dragon Foster Walker, while making a valiant effort on this deflected pass, was unable to corral it in Fridays loss to visiting Clewiston. Photo courtesy of PAULCRATE, LEDGER MEDIAGROUP A host of Winter Haven defenders bring down Sebring running back A.J. Gayle during the first half of the Blue Devils 42-0 victory over the Blue Streaks on Friday night. By RYAN E. LITTLE THE LEDGERWINTER HAVEN Winter Havens Luke Borders threw four touchdown passes as the Blue Devils defense kept Sebring in clear focus in a 42-0 District 10-6Astomping at Denison Stadium on Friday night. Touchdown runs of 14 and 51 from Winter Haven running back Eric Atmore added up to a fourth quarter running clock in a game where the Sebring defense took Blue Devil star running back Adam Lane out of the game. They did a good job of lining up on Adams plays, so it was lets make it look like Adams getting it but give it to Eric, Winter Haven coach Charlie Tate said. Eric did a nice job of taking advantage of that. So did Borders, who ended the game 9-of-19 in the air with 160 yards. I have to give all the credit to the (Offensive) line, they blocked tremendously, Borders said. It was a great game for them and the receivers managed to get open. Latmore finished with 144 yards on 5 carries and Lane had 74 on 11 carries. The defense held Sebring under 100 yards of total offense and forced two turnovers with two second-quarter interceptions. The win keeps Winter Haven (6-1, 2-1 of their playoff destiny after a tough loss to district rival Lake Gibson two weeks ago Winter Havens only loss in two years. Ashutout and six touchdowns can go a long way to keep the team on track. Sebring (1-6, 0-2 returns to district action when it hosts Bartow Friday. Streaks no match for Blue Devils B y TOM BALOG tom.balog@heraldtribune.comSARASOTA Booker had no trouble with Avon P ark, rolling to a 41-0 victory in a District 6-4A game, which ended with a running clock Friday night. The Tornadoes, who improved their record to 3-4 and 3-1 in the district with their third straight victory, appear to be turning the corner after opening the season with four straight losses. Scoring six touchdowns and forcing six turnovers ino ne game represents 12 signs that Booker is a different team than it was after a rocky start to the season under a new head coach. The Tornadoes will get plenty of chances to confirm that assumption over the next several games when their schedule gets much morec ompetitive t han Avon Park (1-7, 0-4 which was shut out for the fifth time. e knew we could shut this team out and thats what we went out a nd did, said senior defensive back Rashad Jones, who had two interceptions. e finally came together after those four losses and were ready to win. The score could have been approaching 60 points had Bookerc ashed in on at l east three other scoring opportunities. eah, it was a sloppy win, said Booker coach Johnnie Jones. We were in the red z one two or three times but we didnt score. However, there were plenty of explosive, electric moments from the Tornadoes. Junior running back Marlon Mack scored three of the Tornadoessix touchdowns on runs of 60 and 31 yards and also took a pass from quarterback AlexR iddle for a 74-yard touchd own. Junior wide receiver Shamyren Waters caught a pair of touchdown passers, a 39-yarder from Riddle and a 26-yarder from sophomore backup Brandon Brown, who briefly replaced Riddle due to Tornadoes storm over Red Devils See AP, Page 4B By DAN HOEHNE d aniel.hoehne@newssun.comLAKE PLACID Being able to physically match upw ith the likes of the Clewiston Tigers is one thing, matching their effort is another. A nd while Lake Placid came up short in the former d uring Fridays 43-6 loss at R oger Scarborough Memorial Stadium, there is no question they passed the test on the latter. With an offensive line that averaged in the 260-pound range and a host of capable running backs, lead by Division I recruit Virthavious Robinson, Clewiston was going to get itspoints. But the Dragons made them work for it. They are deep in the backfield and they are all the real thing with speed and power, Lake Placid head coach Jason Holden said. Our guys played their assignments, but their frontline size dominated and created holes for them. Astalled early drive got the ball to the Tigers at the Lake Placid 44 and a pass from Tyler Clemmons to Derrick Jackson quickly netted 22 yards. Robinson then rattled off runs of seven and 10 yards to bring it to the five. Backs against the wall, the Tigers run past Dragons News-Sun photo courtesy of CFLSports.com Above: Dominique Juliano powers through the water in the 100-meter Butterfly in Sebrings Thursday win over Okeechobee. Below: Greg Rawlings comes up for a breath on his way to winning the 100-meter breaststroke in Thursdays Senior Night meet. Further results had not been made available to the News-Sun as of press time. Swimmin Blue Streaks See LP, Page 4B

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C M Y K Tennis Rally for the CureSEBRING The Highlands County Tennis Association is hosting the third Rally tennis event at the Thakkar Tennis Center in the Country Club of Sebring, Saturday, Oct. 27. T his mens and womens doubles fun tennis event includes goodie bags, drawings, prizes and an annual subscription to a magazine of your choice with lunch prov ided by Chicanes. Each eight-game match will be played w ith a different partner against different o pponents. This event is a great way for men and women of all ages and levels to enjoy their game, meet other tennis players and support the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation, for a registration fee of $25. To register or for more information, call Lynda at 471-0389.F ranza inductionAVON PARK Its never too early to secure a spot to take in Joe Franzas induction into the Florida Athletic Coaches Association Hall of Fame. Tickets are not available at the door. The 37th FACAHall of Fame induction ceremonies will be on Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013 at the Hilton Daytona Beach Oceanfront Resort, beginning with a Noon luncheon. The luncheon and induction are open to all friends and family, at $35 per person if purchased prior to Friday, Dec. 21. Tickets after this dates will be $50 each, and no tickets will be sold after Friday, Jan. 4. Luncheon tickets can be purchased by contacting FACAat (85017, or PO Box 13805, Tallahassee, FL32317. Tickets are not mailed, but held at the door for pick up. Hotel reservations are available at (386 FACAGroup rate of $99. The Hall of Fame is the highest honor given by the FACA. The award is designed to recognize FACAmembers for years of coaching tenure in Florida high schools, for dedication to the FACAand for outstanding coaching accomplishments. Dont miss out on seeing one of Highlands Countys own bestowed with this great honor.Plenty going on at YMCASEBRING The Highlands County Family YMCAis in need of donated bicycles and helmets for ages 5-12 in good working condition for a bicycle safety class. The Highlands County Family YMCA is signing up youth from ages 4-14 years for the Winter Basketball League. Cost for embers is $45 and non-members $65. The YMCAhas partnered with the Champion for Children Foundation to offer Free Drowning Prevention classes for children and parents every Saturday morning from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Pre registration required. The YMCAhas not one, but two heated pools and a splash pad for your family to enjoy. Pool Hours Mon.-Thur. 6 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday 6 a.m.-7:45 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Master Val Henry and Master Hank Henry, who are bringing authentic tradi-t ional martial arts Karate training to the YMCA. Master Henry will be offering family martial arts training at the YMCAand c lasses will be on Tuesdays and Thursdays for both adults and children. C ome try a free martial art karate class a t the YMCA. The fee thereafter is only $50 per month for YMCAmembers and $60 per month for non members. For questions contact the Y at 3829622.Halloween 5KSEBRING Ridge Area Arc and MIDFLORIDAwill present a Halloween 5K Run/Walk and 1-Mile Fun Run on Saturday, Oct. 27, at 8:30 a.m. in Highlands Hammock State Park. This fourth annual event, being coordinated by Chet Brojek, will benefit Ridge Area Arc, providing opportunities for individuals with developmental and other disabilities. This event welcomes the serious runners, the casual walkers, as well as Arcs special athletes. Prizes will be awarded to the overall male and female winners as well as the first, second and third place finishers in each age category and for the participants with the most money raised for the Arc. Early entry fee is $17 which includes a Dri-Fit shirt. After October 22, through race day, the fee is $25. Tee shirts can be guaranteed for early registrations only. Children 10 and under may participate for $10, but a shirt is not included. The registration fee includes admission to the park. Checks should be made payable and mailed to Ridge Area Arc, 120 W. College Drive, Avon Park, FL33825. Donations raised may be turned in the day of the race. Entry forms and pledge sheets are available at www.ridgeareaarc.org or by calling Rhonda Beckman at 452-1295, ext. 112, or rbeckman@ridgeareaarc.org .EXCEL VolleyballSEBRING Team XCEL, the Highlands County AAU travel volleyball squad, will be holding a parents meeting on Monday, Nov. 5 at 7 p.m. in the Sebring High School Smith Center. The AAU Junior National Volleyball Program offers opportunities for boys and girls, ages 10 to 18, in all skill levels to participate in indoor and beach volleyball. Events are held throughout the country, including local leagues, District Championships, Grand Prix tournaments, Super-Regionals and National Championships. For more information, contact either Venessa Sinness at 214-9633, or by email at vsinness@yahoo.com or Kim Crawford at 835-2377, volley2befit@yahoo.com LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES(Best-of-7; x-if necessary) American League Detroit 4, New York 0 Saturday: Detroit 6, New York 4, 12 innings Sunday: Detroit 3, New York 0 Tuesday: Detroit 2, New York 1 Wednesday: New York at Detroit, ppd., rain Thursday: Detroit 8, New York 1 National League St. Louis 3, San Francisco 2 Sunday: St. Louis 6, San Francisco 4 Monday: San Francisco 7, St. Louis 1 Wednesday: St. Louis 3, San Francisco 1 Thursday: St. Louis 8, San Francisco 3 Friday: San Francisco 5, St. Louis 0 Sunday, Oct. 21: St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:45 p.m. x-Monday, Oct. 22: St. Louis at San Francisco, 8:07 p.m.WORLD SERIES(Best-of-7; x-if necessary) All games televised by Fox Wednesday, Oct. 24: Detroit at National League Thursday, Oct. 25: Detroit at National League Saturday, Oct. 27: National League at Detroit Sunday, Oct. 28: National League at Detroit x-Monday, Oct. 29: National League at Detroit x-Wednesday, Oct. 31: Detroit at National League x-Thursday, Nov. 1: Detroit at National LeagueA MERICAN CONFERENCEEast WLTPctPFPA N.Y. Jets330.500133141 New England330.500188137 Miami330.500120117 Buffalo330.500137192 South WLTPctPFPA Houston510.833173115 Indianapolis230.400100145 Tennessee240.333114204 Jacksonville140.20065138 North WLTPctPFPA Baltimore510.833161118 Cincinnati330.500149163 Pittsburgh230.400116115 Cleveland150.167134163 West WLTPctPFPA Denver330.500170138 San Diego330.500148137 Oakland140.20087148 Kansas City150.167104183NATIONAL CONFERENCEEast WLTPctPFPA N.Y. Giants420.667178114 Philadelphia330.500103125 Washington330.500178173 Dallas230.40094119 South WLTPctPFPA Atlanta6001.000171113 Tampa Bay230.400120101 Carolina140.20092125 New Orleans140.200141154 North WLTPctPFPA Chicago410.80014971 Minnesota420.667146117 Green Bay330.500154135 Detroit230.400126137 West WLTPctPFPA San Francisco520.714165100 Arizona420.66711097 Seattle430.571116106 St. Louis330.500110111 ___ Thursdays Game San Francisco 13, Seattle 6 Sundays Games Arizona at Minnesota, 1 p.m. Green Bay at St. Louis, 1 p.m. Baltimore at Houston, 1 p.m. Washington at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m. Dallas at Carolina, 1 p.m. New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. Cleveland at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. Tennessee at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Oakland, 4:25 p.m. N.Y. Jets at New England, 4:25 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:20 p.m. Open: Atlanta, Denver, Kansas City, Miami, Philadelphia, San Diego Mondays Game Detroit at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 25 Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 28 Jacksonville at Green Bay, 1 p.m. Indianapolis at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Carolina at Chicago, 1 p.m. Miami at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. San Diego at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. Seattle at Detroit, 1 p.m. Washington at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. New England vs. St. Louis at London, 1 p.m. Oakland at Kansas City, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 4:25 p.m. New Orleans at Denver, 8:20 p.m. Open: Baltimore, Buffalo, Cincinnati, Houston Monday, Oct. 29 San Francisco at Arizona, 8:30 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEWLTPtsGFGA x-Sporting KC1778594026 x-Chicago17105564539 D.C.16106544940 New York1598535446 Houston13811504538 Columbus14117494040 Montreal12155414550 Philadelphia10156363537 New England7178293744 Toronto FC5207223560WESTERN CONFERENCEWLTPtsGFGA x-San Jose1967646940 x-Real Salt Lake17115564635 x-Seattle14711534831 x-Los Angeles15125505645 Vancouver11129423540 FC Dallas91211383942 Colorado9194314050 Portland7169303255 Chivas USA7178292254 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. xclinched playoff berth ___ Saturdays Games Montreal at Toronto FC, late Sporting Kansas City at New York, late Columbus at D.C. United, late Chicago at New England, late Philadelphia at Houston, late Colorado at Chivas USA, late Sundays Games Los Angeles at San Jose, 7 p.m. Portland at Vancouver, 7 p.m. FC Dallas at Seattle FC, 9 p.m.CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS EASTERN CONFERENCEConnecticut 2, New York 0 Indiana 2, Atlanta 1WESTERN CONFERENCEMinnesota 2, Seattle 1 Los Angeles 2, San Antonio 0CONFERENCE FINALS(Best-of-3EASTERN CONFERENCEIndiana 2, Connecticut 1WESTERN CONFERENCEMinnesota 2, Los Angeles 0FINALS (Best-of-5 Indiana 2, Minnesota 1Sunday: Indiana 76, Minnesota 70 Wednesday: Minnesota 83, Indiana 71 Friday: Indiana 76, Minnesota 59 Sunday, Oct. 21: Minnesota at Indiana,8 p.m. x-Wednesday, Oct. 24: Indiana at Minnesota, 8 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB Philadelphia41.800 Toronto31.750.5 New York21.6671 Brooklyn32.6001 Boston13.2502.5 Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami22.500 Atlanta23.400.5 Charlotte13.2501 Orlando14.2001.5 Washington14.2001.5 Central Division WLPctGB Chicago32.600 Indiana22.500.5 Milwaukee22.500.5 Cleveland23.4001 Detroit23.4001WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio21.667 Houston32.600 New Orleans32.600 Memphis22.500.5 Dallas11.500.5 Northwest Division WLPctGB Denver31.750 Utah32.600.5 Minnesota22.5001 Oklahoma City22.5001 Portland23.4001.5 Pacific Division WLPctGB Golden State41.800 Sacramento31.750.5 L.A. Clippers22.5001.5 Phoenix22.5001.5 L.A. Lakers05.0004 ___ Thursdays Games Atlanta 97, New Orleans 68 Miami 105, Detroit 78 Memphis 97, Milwaukee 94 Boston 115, Brooklyn 85 Fridays Games Toronto 107, New York 88 Orlando 112, Indiana 96 Philadelphia 106, Brooklyn 96 Chicago 92, Minnesota 81 Oklahoma City 107, Phoenix 97 Sacramento 103, L.A. Lakers 98 Golden State 101, Portland 97 Saturdays Games San Antonio at Miami, late Dallas at Atlanta, late Memphis at Indiana, late New York vs. Boston at Albany, NY, late Charlotte at Detroit, late Washington at Milwaukee, late L.A. Clippers at Utah, late Sundays Games San Antonio at Orlando, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Sacramento at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.BASEBALLAmerican League TEXAS RANGERSNamed Dave Magadan hitting coach. National League HOUSTON ASTROSNamed John Mallee hitting coach and Dave Trembley coach. Announced pitching coach Doug Brocail and coach Dave Clark will also return for 2013.BASKETBALLNational Basketball Association BROOKLYN NETSExercised the thirdyear contract option on G MarShon Brooks. CLEVELAND CAVALIERSExercised the third-year contract options on G Kyrie Irving and F Tristan Thompson. WASHINGTON WIZARDSExercised the fourth-year contract options on G John Wall, F Trevor Booker, F Kevin Seraphin and G Jordan Crawford and the thirdyear contract options on F Jan Vesely and F Chris Singleton. Women's National Basketball Association WNBAFined Minnesota coach Cheryl Reeve an undisclosed amount for her coat-throwing outburst following a technical foul during Game 2 of the WNBA Finals against Indiana.FOOTBALLNational Football League NFLFined the Washington Redskins and Buffalo Bills $20,000 each for violating league procedures on reporting injuries. Fined Detroit DE Lawrence Jackson $15,750 for hitting Philadelphia QB Michael Vick below the knees and Detroit WR Nate Burleson $10,000 for simulating shooting a gun during a touchdown celebration during their game last weekend. Fined Minnesota S Harrison Smith $15,750 for a horse-collar tackle on Washington QB Robert Griffin III in a game last weekend. Fined New York Jets DE Quinton Coples $10,000 and LB Aaron Maybin $7,875 for separate hits on Indianapolis QB Andrew Luck during a game last weekend. BUFFALO BILLSPromoted OL David Snow from the practice squad. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid TUESDAY: Volleyball hosts District Tournament,vs.Avon Park,7:30 p.m.; Swimming at District Championships,Rowdy Gains Pool,Winter Haven,TBA THURSDAY: JV Football at Sebring,7 p.m.; Volleyball hosts District Tournament, Championship Game,if neccessary,7 p.m. Sebring TUESDAY: Volleyball at District Tournament,at Kathleen,vs.Lake Gibson,7 p.m. THURSDAY: JV Football vs.Lake Placid,7 p.m.; Volleyball at District Tournament,at Kathleen,Championship Game,if neccessary; Swimming at Districts,Diving,TBA SFSC TUESDAY: Volleyball vs.Indian River,Dig Pink Night,7 p.m. THURSDAY: Volleyball at Florida College,7 p.m. Avon Park TUESDAY: Volleyball at District Tournament,at Lake Placid,vs.Lake Placid,7:30 p.m.; Swimming at District Championships,Rowdy Gains Pool,Winter Haven,TBA T HURSDAY: JV Football at LaBelle,7 p.m.; Volleyball at District Tournament,at Lake Placid,Championship Game,if neccessary,7 p.m. M M L L B B P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 4 4 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . St. Louis at San Francisco, Game 5, if nec F F O O X XM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . S t. Louis at San Francisco, Game 5, if nec F F O O X X C C O O L L L L E E G G E E F F O O O O T T B B A A L L L L T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . A rkansas State at Louisiana-Lafayette . E E S S P P N N 2 2Times, games, channels all subject to change W W N N B B A A F F I I N N A A L L S S S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . Minnesota at Indiana, Game 4, if nec.. E E S S P P N N 2 2A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . A LMS Petit Le Mans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A A B B C C 2 2 p p . m m . NASCAR Hollywood Casino 400 . . . . . E E S S P P N NG G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Perth International . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 2 2 p p . m m . PGA McGladrey Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 5 5 p p . m m . PGA Winn Dixie Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . LPGA KEB HanaBank Championship . G G O O L L F FN N F F L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Baltimore at Houston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 6 6 1 1 p p . m m . Regional Baltimore at Houston, Tennessee at Buffalo or Cleveland at Indianapolis . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 1 1 0 0 1 1 p p . m m . R egional Washington at N.Y. Giants, Green Bay at St. Louis or New Orleans at Tampa Bay . . . . . . F F O O X X 4 4 p p . m m . Jacksonville at Oakland . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 6 6 4 4 p p . m m . N.Y. Jets at New England . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 1 1 0 0 8 8 : : 2 2 0 0 p p . m m . P ittsburgh at Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 8 8 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Detroit at Chicago . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NM M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E S S O O C C C C E E R R S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 p p . m m . Dallas at Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N LIVESPORTSONTV MLB Playoffs WNBA Playoffs Transactions National Football League Major League Soccer NBA Preseason Page 2BNews-SunSunday, October 21, 2012w ww.newssun.com The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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C M Y K w ww.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 21, 2012Page 3B r otary apple; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; rotary apple; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 3 3 8 8 0 0 Special to the News-SunAVON PARK This fall, thousands of volleyball teams around the country will part icipate in the Dig Pink National Breast Cancer Awareness Rally. High school and college teams will promote breast health education as well as raise funds to help eradicate this disease. Dig Pinkattendees will support the cause by donating funds and wearing pink to the match on Tuesday, Oct. 23, at7 p.m. in the SFSC Panther G ym. We hope this event involves a large number of individuals i n the community. The proceeds from all donations will benefit the S ide-Out Foundation, a n ational 501(c3 organization located in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area (Tax ID # 202 510044). We need your help to make this rally successful and to reach our goal of $1,500. The players, coaches and school administrators sincerel y thank you for your donation consideration and hope to see y ou at our Dig Pinkevent I f you are unable to attend the match, you can donate online at www.sideo ut.org/application/ous/fundr a ising_page/45412 For a check or money order donation please send to: SFSC Volleyball, 600 West College D r., Avon Park, FL33875. Make checks payable to: The Side-Out Foundation. Please reference SFSC on the memo/for line of the check or in a note with the c heck. Lady Panthers Dig Pink Sunday, Oct. 21 Nature Walk at the Circle B Bar Preserve, SR 540 (Winter Lake Rd), Lakeland. Approx. 3-mile walk to view birds and other wildlife at this scenic wildlife preserve which is home to an oak hammock, freshwater marsh, hardwood swamp and lake shore, a tremendous bird population, including a variety of wading birds, waterfowl, ospreys and bald eagles. Alligators inhabit Lake Hancock and may be observed from a distance. P ets are not allowed. Bring walking or hiking shoes, water, snacks, sun and insect protection. Contact Liane Plumhoff 646-2398 or lplum@verizon.net. Saturday, Oct. 27 Chapter Meeting, nature walk and potluck lunch at the Circle B Bar Reserve Lakeland Area. Entrance south side of SR 540 (Winter Lake Road) between US 98 and Thornhill Road Description: Oak hamm ock, freshwater marsh, hardwood swamp and lake shore. Tremendous bird population, including a variety of wading birds, waterfowl, ospreys and bald eagles. Alligators inhabit Lake Hancock and may be observed from a distance. Bring water, insect repellent sun protection, and a dish based on last names beginning with A-H Dessert, I-Q Salad, R-Z Main Dish. RSVPDavid Waldrop at 605-3587 for meet-up time a nd details. FTA October activities Admiral Farragut 63, Bradenton Christian 24 Agape Christian 50, Mount Dora Bible 18 American 7, Miami Springs 0 Anclote 49, Gulf 10 Andrew Jackson 26, Ribault 12 Atlantic Coast 33, R.E. Lee 6 Auburndale 19, Mulberry 3 Baker County 42, Terry Parker 20 Baker School 48, Jay 21 Barron Collier 12, Immokalee 9 Bell 16, Hawthorne 14 Benjamin 43, St. Andrews 12 Bishop Kenny 36, Clay 22 Bishop Moore 35, Eustis 10 Boca Raton Christian 49, Central Florida Christian 12 Bolles School 24, Raines 21B ooker 41, Avon Park 0 B oyd Anderson 30, Monarch 6 Bozeman School 49, Chipley 14 Bradford 56, Weeki Wachee 28 Buchholz 48, Chiles 28 Calvary Christian 67, Keswick Christian 26 Cape Coral 24, Mariner 21 Cardinal Gibbons 27, Dillard 26 C arrollwood Day 45, Cambridge Christian 24 Chaminade-Madonna College Prep 42, Champagnat Catholic 8 Charles Flanagan 45, Western 0 Charlotte 40, Lemon Bay 0 Chiefland 31, Williston 21 Choctawhatchee 31, Mosley 20 Christs Church 49, Duval Charter 6 Clearwater Central Catholic 35, Berkeley Prep 21 Cocoa 31, Jones 24 Cocoa Beach 56, Lake Highland 34C ountryside 44, Clearwater 7 Crescent City 34, The Villages 14 Cypress Bay 35, West Broward 7 Dade Christian 48, South Florida HEAT0D eerfield Beach 36, Piper 7 Delray American Heritage 42, Cardinal N ewman 0 Deltona Trinity Christian 23, Florida Air A cademy 7 Dunnellon 42, Belleview 10 E ast Gadsden 26, Taylor County 0 East Lake 41, Sarasota Riverview 20 East Lee County 35, Lehigh 21 Eastside 26, Crystal River 24 Episcopal 48, Bishop Snyder 7 Estero 49, Cypress Lake 0 Evans 21, Leesburg 0 Fleming Island 41, Ed White 7 Fletcher 41, Flagler Palm Coast 3 Forrest 38, Paxon 13 Fort Meade 37, Lakeland Christian 34 Fort Myers 41, North Fort Myers 7 Fort Pierce Central 40, Martin County 7 Fort White 31, Fernandina Beach 14 Foundation Academy 54, Santa Fe Catholic 13 Franklin County 16, West Gadsden 14 Frostproof 30, Cardinal Mooney 19 Gainesville 34, Ocala Vanguard 19 Glades Central 48, Fort Pierce Westwood 0 Godby 46, Rickards 3 Golden Gate 10, Lely 5 Graceville 49, Vernon 6 Gulf Breeze 31, Bay 6 Hallandale 33, Stranahan 0 Hamilton County 98, Branford 14 Heritage 22, Bayside 20 Hilliard 54, Bronson 8 Hollywood Hills 30, Archbishop McCarthy 27 Holmes County 46, South Walton 16 Hudson 17, Wesley Chapel 14 Ida S. Baker 38, Riverdale 17 Inlet Grove 25, Somerset Academy 6 Jensen Beach 43, Boynton Beach 36 John Paul II Catholic 55, Munroe Day 14 Key West 35, Hialeah-Miami Lakes 18 Lafayette 21, Jefferson County 20 Lake Brantley 37, Hagerty 10 Lake Gibson 33, Bartow 29 Lake Mary Prep 47, Orlando Christian 14 Lake Placid 6, Clewiston 3 Lake Wales 38, Tenoroc 7 Lake Weir 37, Lecanto 34 Lakeland 30, George Jenkins 27 Lakewood 20, Jesuit 17 Lakewood Ranch 20, Dixie Hollins 3 Landmark Christian 53, Victory Christian 28 Largo 42, Boca Ciega 7 Leesburg The First Academy 48, Peniel Baptist 0 Leon 31, Orange Park 29 Liberty County 20, Blountstown 0 Lyman 25, Sanford Seminole 23 Maclay 35, Aucilla Christian 7 Madison County 29, Pensacola Catholic 28, OT Mainland 47, Pine Ridge 0 Manatee 56, Venice 27 Mandarin 17, Spruce Creek 10 Marianna 42, Walton 7 Matanzas 14, Creekside 7 Merritt Island 35, Astronaut 12 Miami Edison 20, Monsignor Pace 14 Miami Norland 22, Miami Jackson 3 Miami Washington 71, Doral Academy Charter 14 Milton 24, Pensacola Washington 3 Miramar 34, Everglades 6 Moore Haven 35, St. John Neumann 21 Mount Dora 42, Umatilla 14 Naples 64, Palmetto Ridge 7 Nature Coast Tech 32, Mitchell 0 Navarre 13, Crestview 8N ease 43, Menendez 13 N ewberry 21, Dixie County 20 Niceville 34, Ft. Walton Beach 3 North Marion 48, Santa Fe 7 Northview 42, Freeport 0 Ocala Christian Academy 42, Cornerstone 12 Orangewood Christian 31, Trinity Prep 15 O rlando The First Academy 36, Holy Trinity Episcopal 7 Out-of-Door Academy 52, Southwest Florida Christian 16 Pace 34, Tate 14 Palm Beach Central 35, John I. Leonard 25 Palm Harbor University 28, North Port 13 Palmetto 42, Hardee 0 Pasco 54, Fivay 20 Pine Crest 31, John Carroll Catholic 21 Pinellas Park 35, St. Petersburg Northeast 14 P lantation 54, McArthur 14 Ponte Vedra 31, Palatka 14 Pope John Paul II 39, Florida Christian 14 Port Charlotte 34, Gulf Coast 13 P ort Orange Atlantic 37, Tavares 21 Port St. Joe 7, FAMU Developmental Research 0 P ort St. Lucie 35, Viera 28 Ransom Everglades 49, Miami Country D ay 27 Ridge Community 34, Lake Region 7 R iver Ridge 61, Brooksville Central 6 Rockledge 34, Titusville 7 Royal Palm Beach 23, Lake Worth 8 Sarasota 28, Braden River 0 Satellite 29, Space Coast 12 Sebastian River 35, Palm Beach Lakes 0 Seffner Christian 24, Merritt Island Christian 23 Seminole Osceola 35, Tarpon Springs 25 Seminole Ridge 31, Palm Beach Gardens 21 Shorecrest Prep 42, Bishop McLaughlin 15 Sneads 55, Wewahitchka 16 South Dade 24, Miami Palmetto 6 South Fork 10, Okeechobee 7 South Fort Myers 41, Island Coast 17 South Plantation 35, Coral Springs 0 South Sumter 53, Interlachen 0 Southeast 25, Bayshore 14 Springstead 28, Hernando 7 St. Augustine 27, Bartram Trail 26 St. Edwards 39, St. John Lutheran 0 St. Francis 44, St. Johns Country Day 7 St. Joseph Academy 27, Oak Hall 21 St. Petersburg Catholic 42, Montverde Academy 9 St. Petersburg 27, Seminole 6 St. Thomas Aquinas 63, Nova 13 Summit Christian 7, Zion Christian 0 Sunlake 18, Land OLakes 6 Taravella 30, Douglas 17 Temple Christian 16, Seacoast Christian 6 Trenton 54, P.K. Yonge 28 Trinity Christian-Jacksonville 36, Providence 20 Union County 38, Baldwin 18 University Christian 48, Eagles View 8 University School 27, Westminster Christian 0 Varela 23, Miami Sunset 3 Vero Beach 24, St. Lucie Centennial 14 Village Academy 54, Coral Springs Christian 12 Wakulla 37, Suwannee 14 Warner Christian 63, Ormond Beach Calvary Christian 0 Westminster Academy 42, Coral Springs Charter 14 Winter Haven 42, Sebring 0 Wolfson 55, Stanton College Prep 21 Yulee 56, West Nassau County 30 Zephyrhills 37, Ridgewood 35 POSTPONEMENTS AND CANCELLATIONS Wellington vs. Jupiter, ppd. to Oct. 20 Fridays Prep Football Scores A ssociated PressO RLANDO Glen Davis scored 22 points and Jameer N elson had 15 points and seven assists to help the O rlando Magic to a 112-96 victory over the Indiana Pacers on Friday night. Reserves Andrew Nicholson and ETwaun Moore had 13 points apiece as the Magic won for the first time in five exhibition games under rookie coach Jacque Vaughn. J J Redick added 12 points and eight assists. R eserve Tyler Hansbrough led Indiana with 23 points in 2 0 minutes. Indiana got 14 points from David West and 13 points each from Paul George and Gerald Green. Orlando controlled the entire second half, leading by as many as 19 points and shooting 54.9 percent from the field. Indiana shot only 40.4 percent, going 2 of 19 from 3point range. Despite Hansbroughs big night, the Magic reserves outscored Indianas bench 51-46. DeQuan Jones came off the bench to score 10 points for Orlando, and 13 of the 15 Magic players got at least one field goal. Magic get first preseason victory Classified Ads 385-6155 NEWS-SUN

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C M Y K Page 4BNews-SunSunday, October 21, 2012w ww.newssun.com AMERICAN GOLF CARTS; 5.542"; 5"; Black; 10/21/12; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 3 3 6 6 0 0 the same fire and momentum that they left the first set with jumping out to a very quick 6-1 lead. Little were they aware, however, that the Red Devils were not going to go down without a fight. Avon Park was starting to make a comeback when Sebring head coach Venessa Sinness decided to call a timeout with her team up just2 0-16. M aking adjustments is very crucial when it comes to winning and timeouts are key elements of the game. The Devils continued to make adjustments on their side, putting the Streaks back more and more on their heels, s crambling to try and fix their mess. When Sebring had a chance to end the set and stress at 24-23, there was a side out and Avon Park tied the score 24-24. At this point, the crowd gave a lot of enthusiasm and cheering possibly causing the delay of an immediate victory for Sebring. But they were able to pers evere and finished the set at a nail-biting 26-24, putting them up two sets. Knowing their senior night w as at stake, the Red Devils were aware that the third set m ust be won if they were to have any chance of survival t o turn the night around. The Lady Streaks and head c oach Sinness were chomping at the bit with the thought of being just one more win away from wrecking, not only another Senior Night, but the second one of the week. This was clear motivation and the Blue Streaks jumpeda head for the start of the third set. The Streaks were able to hold off the Devils 25-19 ands tole the excitement of the night. T he difference in play for Sebring was their ability to p lay as one team instead of six individual players. P laying as one team instead of individuals granted them the honor of being queens of the county. I sometimes dont really know what team of mine is going to show up, said Sinness jokingly. If that team comes, we can beata nybody Both Avon Park and Sebring are taking the weekend and early next week top repare for their respective District Tournaments. A von Park will be traveling down to Lake Placid to t ake on the Lady Dragons in a semi-final match Tuesday n ight. Sebring will travel up to Kathleen to take on Lake Gibson in another semi-final match on Tuesday night. Continued from 1B Sebring stymies Devils, District Tourneys on tap N ews-Sun photo by BRITTANYWHITTINGTON M aria Tataris and the Lady Devils will look to regroup as they head into the District 10-4A Tournament at Lake Placid Tuesday. SFSC 3x10.5 #00024449 injury. This is Shamyrens first year playing football, Jones s aid. Hes athletic, hes elusive. Were just trying to build around those guys. Junior defensive tackle Ladarius Bowman recoveredt wo fumbles, one for a touchdown in the end zone, which gave Booker a 28-0 halftime lead. He (Bowman another one, Johnnie Jones said. The guys were fighting over a loose ball like it was a lunch meal, free ball, free food. Junior linebacker Corey Williams intercepted a pass and nearly returned it for a touchdown but was tackled at the Avon Park 8 yard-line as the first half expired. Booker also wasted a scoring opportunity from the Avon Park 17 after Bowmans first fumble recovery. Defensive back George Swan also made an interception. Mike Jones broke up a couple passes Jones said, and Kevin Stalker also batted down a pass. But the defense also had its letdowns such as the fourthquarter play where Avon Park quarterback Ryan Dick ran 65 yards, before Williams ran him down at the Booker 6 yard-line. From there, the Red Devils had eight cracks at the end zone in the final sequence but were turned back by penalties, mistakes and Bookers pressure defense. The Tornadoes also lost a pair of fumbles, one on offense and one on a punt return. ere good, but we have to keep pushing, Mack said. ere going good, we just have to cut down on a few mistakes and turnovers, Mack said. Booker was also penalized five times for personal fouls, most of which Jones disputed. Some of the penalties, I didnt appreciate, Jones said. Some of the personal fouls he called were in the midst of a play. Were form tackling and (he helmet-to-helmet.We got a hat on the ball and its (called. Were getting blocked in the back and youre not calling it. Avon Park returns home next week, but the road doest get any easier with a visit from District leading Dunbar. Continued from 1B AP cant keep up with Booker Dragon defense held their ground for two plays before John Gonzalez bulled it in to open the scoring for a 7-0 Clewiston lead with 8:13 left in the first quarter. Another short Lake Placid drive and a 68-yard Robinson run on the Tigers next play doubled the lead just over one minute later. Atrade-off of possessions, however, saw the Dragons stop Clewiston ona fourth-and-three as well as t he offense start to get on track. Some positive gains near the end of the first quarter were stymied by a penalty and two incompletions and gave the ball back near midfield. Robinson then carried the load, bridging into the second quarter, rushing three times for 53 yards to up the lead to 21-0. But then Lake Placid stepped up and started to move. Clewiston aided the effort early, offsetting a Dragon holding penalty with an offside, a roughing the passer and a five-yard facemask to get the ball to the 50. After an incompletion, Robert Walton lofted a pass toward Ricky Miller whoh ad gotten past his defender. There was almost a little too much loft, however, as the Tiger cornerback recove red enough to make a leaping deflection. B ut Miller never lost his c oncentration and, as he was falling backward to the ground, hauled it in for a 34yard gain to the Clewiston 16. Foster Walker then carried six yards to the 10 and Eldon McKenzie found his way for six more yards to the four. McKenzie then kept his legs churning, pulling Tiger tacklers along with him to cross the goal line and make it a 21-6 game with 9:20 left in the half. But Robinson would have an answer barely over one minue later, carrying twice for 40 yards, giving him more than 200 for the half, before Karlos Perez took it for the final 20 yards to up the lead back to 21 at 27-6. Even at this stage, with the grasp of the game slipping away, the Dragond efense showed plenty of fight. On Clewistons next possession, two Clemmons p asses went for 48 yards and got it to the Lake Placid f ive. ARobinson run got it to t he one, but the Dragons knocked Gonzalez for a loss on the next carry, and stuffed Robinson for no gain on the next. On fourth-and-goal from the two, Perez got the handoff and was met by La ke Placid defenders almost immediately. It seemed for a moment that the scoring opportunity had been squashed, but an extra surge prompted an initially hesitant touchdown signal that would stand for a 33-6 lead that would carry into halftime. The Tigers would add a field goal and another Perez score in the second half to provide for the final margin. We did put together some plays and had the one scoring drive, Holden said. It was good for the kids not t o be shutout and get one in the end zone, that is always g ood for morale. T he contest marked the Dragons last home date of the season. They play at LaBelle in a district tilt Friday before taking their bye week and finishing the season in a non-district game at Lemon Bay on Friday, Nov. 9. Continued from 1B LP game, but overmatched News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Ricky Miller was able to make this miraculous reception to set up Lake Placids lone score Friday night.

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C M Y K B y MICHAEL FELBERBAUM AP Business WriterRICHMOND,Va. Many of us know firsthand that losing weight and staying fit can be tough. For me,I started a journey a little over a year ago to get in better shape before my 30th birthday.While diet and exercise were the ultimate keys to my success,technology played an important role in keeping me accountable, tracking my progress and making my workouts more effective. N ow that Ive reached s ome of my fitness goals,d like to share the tools I used. T hese will be more important to me than ever as I try to maintain my weight loss and improve my strength and endurance. (Cue the Rock theme song). AccountabilityDiet and exercise are the m ost important parts of losing weight or staying in s hape. Technology helped m e keep tabs on what I was e ating and how many calor ies I was burning. I used MyFitnessPal,a free service that lets youm aintain a digital diary of y our food choices,cardio work and strength training. T he service is very simple to use. Because you can u pdate entries using a phone app or a website,you have almost no excuse not to enter the information no matter where you are. Apps are available for the iPhone, the iPad and Android, BlackBerry and Windows Phone devices. When first using the program,youre prompted for such information as weight, height,age and activity level. Thats used to create a plan for how many calories you should eat and what percentage should come from protein,fat or carbohydrates. Y ou can also set your own parameters. You then enter what y oure eating (and drinking for breakfast,lunch and dinn er,as well as snacks, t hroughout the day,and the app records the calories,fat, p rotein,carbs and vitamins. MyFitnessPal has an extensive list of fresh and packaged foods to choose from. Choose an apple or a can of Campbells soup,and MyFitnessPal will add the nutritional information to your count. The database also includes popular recipes found in magazines,so you dont have to enter the ingredients individually. You can even copy an entire meal to another day if youre a creature of habit like me. Or use your phones camera to take a picture of a barcode and have the app look up the nutritional information for you. But food is half the battle. MyFitnessPal also lets you enter your workouts and strength training. Just as you do with food,you simply select the activity,such as cleaning,walking the dog, taking a spinning class or,f or me,playing ice hockey. Based on your personal health information,the service calculates the number of calories burned. While then umbers are only estimates, they provide a pretty solid g uideline. Once youre done entering y our information,you can look at charts,graphs and lists of your diet and exercise to get a better view of your day or week. T he app will project your weight in five weeks and tell you whether youre eating too few or too many calories on any given day.You cane ven connect with friends and relatives who also are using the service to help keep you even more accountable and get ideas of different foods to try or activities to do.ProgressWhile recording my food and exercise choices became part of my daily routine, tracking my progress helped motivate me to stay on track to getting in better shape. For this,I enlisted the use of the Withings WiFi Body Scale ($159.99 This is no ordinary scale. It not only measures your weight,body fat,lean muscle and Body Mass Index, but it also connects to the Internet so you can keep track of your measurements through its website or an iPhone app (iPad and Android versions are coming soon). You can see how you comp are to your personal goals and recommended health z ones. You can have the scale automatically share your data with other online health coaching programs,or post results to a blog,F acebook or Twitter. There are no subscription fees. The scale can track up to eight different people,with separate accounts for each. A new version of the scale will be able to connectd irectly to your phone via Bluetooth. For those with i Phones or iPads,there also is a companion blood pressure monitor that hooks directly to your device and lets you know how yourr ates compare with normal ranges.Effective workoutsLogging how many calories you burned during any activity can be a constant guessing game. Many gymgoers rely on general numbers that the treadmill,bicycles or elliptical machines provide,but those arent always accurate. There are several options to help track your daily exercise routines. After trying a few different wearable monitors,including the Nike+ FuelBand,I found the most helpful tool was a heart rate monitor. Basic monitors in the $100 price range can encourage people to get active, while options costing more than $400 are available with accessories that can measure how far youre running or how fast youre cycling. I tested a Polar RCX5 ($349.95 for a basic set,with a ccessories for GPS and cycling available). After entering my height, weight and age,I strapped on the elastic band around my chest and clipped in the heart rate monitor that transm its data wirelessly to a unit on my wrist. After you choose a sport for that workout,such as running,cycling or swimming,the Polar times your workout and tracks your calories burned based on your heart rate. It also estimates what percentage of th e burned calories came from fat. I found that moderate activities seem to burn mor e fat,but fewer calories,while higher-intensity workouts burn more calories,but less fat. Some of the machines at my gym picked up the info rmation from my monitor and displayed my heart rate. When running outside orp laying ice hockey,the hea rt rate monitor also gave me a better idea of how many calories I was burning (mor e than 1,000 calories in oneh ockey game). When youre done with a w orkout,all of the exercise information you record can b e transferred through your computer to Polars persona l t raining website,where its a nalyzed and tracked to help you reach fitness goals and train more effectively. Knowing about how many calories I burned during a given activity helped make my workouts more effective and understand how I neede d t o fuel my body accordingly.ExtrasLets face it:Going to the gym can get kind of boring.B ut listening to music,or w atching movies and TV shows on your mobile devices,can help keep you motivated while working ou t at the gym,jogging with the dog or getting pumped up for a hockey game. And even then,its impo rtant to have the right equipment. For me,the PowerBeats by Dre ($149.95 s weat test and still provided g reat sound and the option t o answer phone calls and control volume from the earphones. In the locker room,I paired my iPhone to the Jawbone Jambox ($199.99 to stream music via Bluetooth before and after ice hockey games. This sea sons postgame song is Closing TimebyS emisonic,as our games typically end after midnigh t. Michael Felberbaum can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/MLFelbe rbaum www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, October 21, 2012Page 5B church page; 5.542"; 7.1"; Black; church page dummy; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 5 5 5 5 5 5 8 8 COCHRAN BROTHERS ROOFING; 5.542"; 3"; Black; 10/7,14,21,28; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 3 3 8 8 6 6 0 0 MCT photos Listening to music or even a book (aboveunning or d oing other exercises can help the time go by faster. T raining at the right intensity is key to reaching fitness g oals, and a heart-rate monitor (right common types have a "watch" and a transmitter chest strap w orn against the skin. FITNESS Technology helps with fitness goals R eview GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCE

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C M Y K Page 6BNews-SunSunday, October 21, 2012www.newssun.com gala tickets; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, gala tickets; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 3 3 9 9 4 4 3 3 WELLS MOTOR COMPANY; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, used cars; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 4 4 0 0 4 4 S pecial to the News-SunSEBRING The Florida D epartment of Environmental Protections H ighlands Hammock State Park and the Friends of Highlands Hammock wel-c ome the community to join together for the 27th annual Civilian Conservation Corps F estival at Highlands Hammock State Park from 9 a .m. to 3 p.m. Saturday,Nov. 3. e will have antique cars and tractors,arts and crafts vendors,live entertainmentb y Weatherbees Magic & Comedy,Sebring Model Railroads expansive model train exhibit and new this year is wildlife from Gatorland of Orlando,says Dorothy Harris,Park Services specialist. T ram tours and hayrides will be available for just $1 a nd Florida Forest Services Smokey Bear as well as Highlands County FireS ervicesSparky the Fire Pup will be greeting visitors throughout the day. Promise A cres Equine Rescue will have pony rides for $3 and a b ounce house will be available,too. The second Annual Hike & Seek Geocaching Event will also take place with 100 newg eocaches. The festivities begin at 9 a.m.at N 27 28.600 W 08131.700 (parks Rec Hall). Type GC3W3QG into any search engine and be taken to geocaching event page. Activities and contests,asw ell as geocaching activities throughout the Highlands County area will continue all w eekend. Park admission fees are j ust $6 per vehicle (up to eight people per carload) and theres plenty to enjoy for the whole family. Plan on great festival foods like barbecue s andwiches,gator tail,handcut fries,burgers,hot dogs, brauts and kielbasa,cotton candy,popcorn,ice cream, funnel cakes and more. For more information a bout Highlands Hammock State Park visit www.FloridaStateParks.org/h ighlandshammock. Geocaching, much more planned for CCC Festival Courtesy photo Paul Weatherbee will perform his magic and comedy shows at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. at the Saturday, Nov. 3 CCC Festival at Highlands Hammock State Park. ARTS& LEISURE

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C M Y K S pecial to the News-SunSEBRING The 46th a nnual Fine Arts and Crafts Festival will take place Saturday,Nov. 3 and featurea rtists from around the United States,displaying t heir arts in several mediums including painting,photography,wood working,ceramics pottery,fabric,metal and garden art. We are thrilled to host the 46th annual art festival that is w ell known for bringing fine arts and crafts to Floridas Heartland and DowntownS ebring,said Jeri Wohl, Highlands Art League Board m ember and Festival director. e are expecting a full show with amazing art at the p erfect time of year to purchase holiday gifts. The festival is a mustattend eventfor everyone as they offer a Childrens Streetw ith kidsactivities,as well as a Culinary Street filled with food vendors. A limited number of booths are still available forq ualified artists to show. If interested,call 385-6682 or v isit www.HighlandsArtLeague.org The Highlands Art Leagues Village Where Art Livesis at the Allen Altvater Cultural Center in DowntownS ebring,on the shores of Lake Jackson. The Village consists of four buildings: The Yellow House Gallery & Gift Shop features studioa rtists and membersgallery; the Visual Arts Center houses art classes for children and adults; MOTA features curate d exhibits,art competitions a nd receptions; and the Clovelly House that is undergoing final renovations and will house visiting artists,as w ell as art business classes f or high school students. For more information about H ighlands Art League,visit w ww.HighlandsArtLeague.or g HALs mission is to promote the appreciation,study a nd development of the arts, i n their many forms and to provide various adult and childrens programs whereby the Highlands County comm unity will prosper as a center of culture. S pecial to the News-SunSEBRING The Heartland Cultural Alliance will open its October/November show at the HCA Art & MusicG allery in the Kenilworth Lodge on Thursday. Highland County artists will be showing new and classic works in a variety of medi-u m. Two original oil on wood paintings by Florida Master Artist Peter Powell Roberts will be shown for the firstt ime and two new Giclee p rints on canvas of his work will be available.Roberts work is highly valued and only available through the Heartland Cultural Alliance. L ocal artist Fred Leavitt will introduce the first piece in a new Dimensionsseries he is working on. There will also be a disp lay of handmade jewelry by Denny Swing available to purchase. There will be an artistsreception from 6-8p .m. with classical guitar m usic by Kenny Summers. Wine and snacks will be served during this free event, which is open to the public. Contact Fred Leavitt at 4 02-8238,or email info@heartlandculturalalliance.org or visit www.heartlandculturalalliance.org. www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, October 21, 2012Page 7B RAINTREE PET GROOMING; 3.639"; 6"; Black plus three; process, adopt a shelter; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 1 1 6 6 2 2 R EPUBLICAN PARTY HIGHLANDS; 9.347"; 13"; Black plus three; process, voters guide; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 3 3 6 6 8 8 Limited space left for Fine Arts & Crafts Festival HCA preparing for its next show C ourtesy photo Dimensions 101 by Fred Leavitt will be one of the pieces showcased Thursday at the opening of the October/November show at the HCA Art & Music Gallery. ARTS& LEISURE C ourtesy photo Moonlight Palms by Roy McLendon Jr., an oil artist from V ero Beach. The work is done in the Highwayman tradition. Courtesy photo A piece of art by Gina Kyle, an acrylic artist from Clermont. Associated PressLONDON Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie Wood says the legendary band could possibly play more new shows after they perform a series of concerts in Britain and the U.S. Attending the premiere Thursday of Crossfire Hurricane,a new film documenting the bands career, Wood said he couldnt believe how well the band is soundingin rehearsals. Shows are scheduled for Nov. 25 and 29 at Londons O2 Arena,followed by gigs on Dec. 13 and 15 at the Prudential Center in Newark, New Jersey,just outside of New York. Wood: Rolling Stones could play more shows

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C M Y K Page 8BNews-SunSunday, October 21, 2012www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sun that is published Friday and Sunday.To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory,call the News-Sun at 3856155,ext.502. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly o f God), 2935 New Life Way.Bearing His Name;Preaching His Doctrine;and Awaiting His Coming.orshiping God in Spirit and in Truth.Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.;Evening Worship, 6 p.m.Wednesday:Worship, 7 p.m.Pastor Eugene Haas.Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring.The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor.Sunday School, 10 a.m.;Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.;Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m.Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N.Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL 33825. George Hall, Pastor.Christ centered and biblically based.Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m.and 6 p.m.Nursery facilities are available.Bible studies at 9:45 a.m.Sunday and 7 p.m.Wednesday.Prayer Time 6:30 p.m.on Wednesday.Bible classes at 9:45 a.m.are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m.Sunday.Church phone:452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A (truck route) in Avon Park.Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30.Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., and evening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+ PM.The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m.For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave.Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.;Evening Worship, 6 p.m.Wednesday Service, 7 p.m.Deaf interpretation available.Ken Lambert, Pastor.Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825.Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.;Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.;Wednesday:Evening Service, 7 p.m.;Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone:453-4256.Fax:453-6986.Email: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site, www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvonPark 100 N.Lake Ave., Avon Park.Rev.Jon Beck, pastor;Charlie Parish, associate pastor/youth and families;Joy Loomis, music director;Rev.Johnattan Soltero, Hispanic pastor.Sunday Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.;Worship, 10:45 a.m.;Childrens Church, 10:45 a.m.;Youth 445, 4:45 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m.Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper, 5:15 p.m.; Childrens Choir, 6 p.m.;Youth Activities, 67:30 p.m.;Prayer Meeting/Bible Study, 6 p.m.;Worship Choir Practice, 6 p.m.; Mission Programs for Children, 6:45 p.m. Hispanic Services:Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., worship service at 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m.Sunday broadcast on Cable TV Channel 6.Call 453-6681 for details.In the heart of Avon Park, for the hearts of Avon Park. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S.27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid).Your place for family, friends and faith.Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m.Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m.Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the y outh in their quest to become more like Christ.Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m.along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children.Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E.Royal Palm St., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863Website: www.fbclp.com.Email:information@ fbclp.com.Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m.Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Wednesday Activities:Family dinner at 5 p.m.($4 per person, reservations required).Prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m.The church is at 119 E.Royal Palm St., Lake Placid.For information, call 465-3721 or go to www.fbclp.com. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S.98 in Lorida.Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.for all ages.Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m.and 6:30 p.m.Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m.worship service.Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love.For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church,Sebring, 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone:385-5154.Dr.David E. Richardson, senior pastor;and Rev.Nuno Norberto, associate pastor, minister of music and senior adults.Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.;Blended Service, 10:30 a.m.;Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old.Call 3854704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park.Mailing address is 710 W.Bell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Telephone, 453-5339.Rev.John D.Girdley, pastor.Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.;Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.;11 a.m.Childrens Church;Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL 33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m.Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m.Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church.Larry Ruse, pastor.Phone 655-1899.Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached.Sunday School begins at 9:30 a.m.;Sunday Worship service at 10:45 a.m.;Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m.Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 6 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL 33870 (A half mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.;Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m.Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m.Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall.Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle.Phone 3824301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870. Welcome to the church where the always shines.Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.;Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.;and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m.End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m.on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev.J.S.Scaggs, pastor.Church phone:382-3552.Home phone:214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church,(SBC 4400 Sparta Road.Rev.Mark McDowell, Pastor.Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.;Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.;Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.Wednesday:Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m.Nursery provided.For information, call 382-0869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC 379 S.Commerce Ave., Sebring.David C. Altman, Pastor.Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.;Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.;Evening Worship, 6 p.m.Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.;Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 6:30 p.m.;Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m.A nursery for under age 3 is available at all services.Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing.Office phone, 385-0752. Spring Lake Baptist Church, Where the Bible is Always Open.Pastor Richard Schermerhorn, 7408 Valencia Road;6552610.Assistant Pastor Ronald Smith, 3861610.On U.S.98 at the Spring Lake Village II entrance.Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.for all ages;Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Mid-week Bible Study and Prayer Service, 6:30 p.m.Nursery available for all services. Sunridge Baptist Church,(SBC 3704 Valerie Blvd.(U.S.27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring.Tim Finch, pastor.Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.;Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.;and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m.Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided.For information, call 382-3695 CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., AvonPark, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m.in English and 7 p.m.in Spanish;Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m.in English.Weekday mass at 8 a.m.Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday.Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m.Sunday for grades K through 8th.Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday.Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m.Wednesday. St.Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring.Mailing address:882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049;fax, 385-5169;email, office@stcathe.com ; website, www.stcathe.com .Very Rev.Jo Gonzlez, V.F., frjose@stcathe.com; Parochial Vicar, Rev.Victor Caviedes, 3853993;Assisting Priest (retiredv.J. Peter Sheehan;Decons, Rev.Mr.James R. McGarry and Rev.Mr.Max M.Severe. Parish office hours, 8:30 a.m.to 1:30 p.m. Monday-Friday.CONFESSION:First Friday 7:15-7:45 a.m.;Saturday 3-3:45 p.m.;Or by appointment with any priest.WEEKEND MASS SCHEDULE:Saturday Vigil:4 p.m.; Sunday:8 and 10 a.m.;Sunday Spanish Mass:noon;Last Sunday of the month:2 p.m.(Creole/French);Sunday Family Mass 5 p.m.(Holy Family Youth Center).DAILY MASS SCHEDULE:Monday through Friday:8 a.m.and noon;Saturday:9 a.m. St.James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J.Cannon.Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct.31) Saturday Vigil,4 p.m.;Sunday 8 a.m.and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m.December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.;Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.;Weekdays 9 a.m.;and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m.and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Cornerstone Christian Church (Saxon Hall)1850 US 27 South, Avon Park, FL 33825.Love Christ Love People.Bill Raymond, Preaching Minister.Jon Carter, Music Minister.Sunday, 9 a.m.Bible Study; 10 a.m.Worship;Communion available each week.Wednesday, 7 p.m.Home Fellowship Group.For more information call 453-8929 or 449-0203. Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S.27 on County Road 621), 4657065.Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday:Bible classes, 9 a.m.;Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m.Thelma Hall, organist;and Pat Hjort, pianist.Wednesday:Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.;Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone.Jesus Christ, the Way,Truth and Life!Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872.Tod Schwingel, Preacher;David Etherton, Youth Pastor.Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.;S unday School, 11 a.m.;Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m;Evening service at 6:30 p.m.Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m.followed by classes at 6:30 p.m.Changing Seasons, a mens grief support group, meets at 1:30 p.m.Wednesdays. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets at 1 p.m.Thursdays.Office hours, 9 a.m.to 1 p.m.Monday-Friday.Phone 3826676. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL 33870.Phone:385-0358 or 385-3435.The Rev.Ronald Norton, Pastor;Sunday School, 9 a.m.;Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.;Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m.Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m.Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.;Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL 33875.Call 3821343.Rev.Steve Hagen, pastor.Sunday services:Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.;Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.;Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m.(off siteWednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St.Sunday:10:30 a.m.morning worship and Sunday school.Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m.each second and fourth Wednesday.A free public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services.The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers.All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, sup port and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S.Pine St., Sebring, FL 33870.Sunday:Church School, 9 a.m.;Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.Wednesday:Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Christ, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, FL 33825. Minister:Don Smith.Sunday Worship Services, 10:30 a.m.and 6 p.m.Nursery facilities are available at every service. Bible Study:Sunday, 9:30 a.m.and Wednesday, 7 p.m.Bible centered classe s for all ages.Church phone:453-4692. Lake Placid Church of Christ, 1069 Hwy 27 North, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Mailing address is P.O.Box 1440, Lake Placid, FL 33862.Sunday morning worship is at 10 a.m.Sunday evening worship is 6 p.m.Bible class 9 a.m.Sundays and Wednesday evenings at 7 p.m.All are invited to join us.For more information, call the church at 863-465-4636 or visit the website http://www.thelordsway.com/lakeplacidcofc/. Sebring Parkway Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL 33870; 385-7443.Minister:Kevin Patterson.Times of service are:Sunday Bible Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m.;Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m.;Wednesday Bible Class, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazarene of Avon Park, P.O.Box 1118., AvonPark, FL 33825-1118.707 W.Main St.Randall Rupert, Pastor.Sunday:Sunday school begins at 9:45 a.m.for all ages;morning worship at 10:45 a.m.;and evening service at 6 p.m.Wednesday evening service is at 7 p.m.with special services for children and adults.Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) and Ladies ministries.If you need any more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazarene of Lake Placid, 512 W.Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852.Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship, 10:45 a.m.;Evening service, 6 p.m.Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children and youth.Call 465-6916.Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christian Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17A North (truck route), AvonPark.Presenting Jesus Christ as the answer for time and eternity.Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m.Nursery provided.Junior Church activities at same time for K-6 grade.Sunday School Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m.(Transportation available.) Sunday evening praise and worship service, 6 p.m.Wednesday evening prayer service, 7 p.m.Children and youth activities at 7 p.m.Wednesday.Everyone is welcome, please come worship with us.Tom Schwankweiler, Pastor.Phone 453-6052.PLACESTOWORSHIP By BASSEM MROUE and ELIZABETH A. KENNEDYA ssociated PressBEIRUT Militants carrying assault weapons clear the area around a street,shouting in Arabic for people to get out of the way.Aj eep pulls up:The worlds No. 1 jihadi has arrived for a meeting with top Hezbollah commanders. On rooftops,U.S. snipers crouch unseen,the kingpin in theirc rosshairs at last. The scene,from a recent episode of the hit U.S. Showtime series Homeland,is supposed to be Beirut. But it is really in Israel,ac ountry similar enough in some areas to stand in for Lebanon,yet a world away in most other respects. T he show about Arab terrorists and American turncoats has inadvertently become a tale of twoc ities. Some Beirutis are angry because the depiction of their city a s swarming with militiamen is misleading and because they see Israel as the enemy.And in Israel,s ome are peeved that Haifa and even Tel Aviv a self-styled n ightlife capital and high-tech hub apparently appear,to outsiders at least,to be Middle Eastern after all. Lebanese Tourism Minister Fadi A bboud told The Associated Press on Thursday that hes so upset a bout the portrayal of Beirut that hes considering a lawsuit. The information minister is studying media laws to see whatc an be done,he said. Abboud pointed to the scene with the snipers. Hamra Street in West Beirut is portrayed as a hotbed of violence,but it is actual-l y a lively neighborhood packed with cafes,book shops and pubs. It showed Hamra Street with militia roaming in it. This does not reflect reality,he said. It was notf ilmed in Beirut and does not portray the real image of Beirut. Twentieth Century Fox Television refused to comment. Several Lebanese interviewed by t he AP said they have never heard of the show.When a reporter described the plot and said it wass hot in Israel,the reactions ranged from anger to blithe acceptance that filmmaking is an imperfect art. H amed Moussa,an engineering student at the American University o f Beirut,said its not a problem that Israelis are portraying Lebanese. In fact,he said,L ebanese often play Israeli characters in Lebanese soap operas. B ut Ghada Jaber,a 60-year-old housewife,said Israel should never stand in for Lebanon. It is very insulting,she said as she walked along Hamra Street. Israel destroyed our country. Israel invaded and occupied our c ountry. Homeland,based on the Israeli series Prisoners of War,is about a U.S Marine named Nick Brody who was a POW for years in the M iddle East. The federal government and the public see Brody as a war hero,but a CIA operativep layed by Claire Danes believes he was turned by the enemy and is n ow a threat to the U.S. The second season began last month,and some of the urban scenes are shot in Tel Aviv,the Israeli metropolis about 250 kilo-m eters (150 miles Jaffa,a popular mixed Jewish and A rab neighborhood of Tel Aviv, was an Arab town before Israel gained independence in 1948,and its Levantine architecture,mosquesa nd minarets,situated along the Mediterranean,allowed the creators of Homelandto present a plausible version of Beirut. To the average viewer,the Beirut s cenes may appear authentic. But to the discerning viewer,hints of Israel are everywhere:cars with blurred yellow Israeli license plates,red-and-white curbs thatd esignate no-parking zones,an Israeli-style traffic circle,and a well-known minaret and clock tower in Jaffa. In one rooftop scene,parts of the T el Aviv skyline,with hotels lining the Mediterranean and the iconic Shalom Towerskyscraper,can bes een in the distance. In one publicity shot released by Showtime from the recent Back toB eirutepisode,Danescharacter is walking through a Beirut open m arket and passes a stall selling two Israeli T-shirts:one red with the white Coca-Cola logo in largeH ebrew letters,the other a yellow jersey of a Jerusalem soccer team w ith the name in Hebrew,Beitar Yerushalayim,and a menorah. In a fast-paced chase that actually aired, however,there were no traces of Israel. T he reactions to the show in Lebanon and Israel reflect the t remendous divergence of narratives between the two peoples each seeing the other as aggressor, each seeing itself as a victim. M any Lebanese cannot forget the massive destruction Israel inflicted on Beirut during a 1982 invasion when it succeeded in routing the Palestine Liberation Organizationf rom the country.They resent the 18-year occupation of south Lebanon that followed,and their leaders in any case reject the existence of the Jewish state. B ut to Israel,Lebanon has been a perennial staging ground for missile strikes and other attacks on Israel,more than justifying the massive Israeli operations theret hat have occurred in every decade since the 1970s. Eytan Schwartz,a spokesman for T el Avivs mayor,said the Lebanese should,if anything,be pleased at the TV shos choicef or a stand-in. If I were Lebanese,with all due r espect,d be very flattered that a city,and a world heritage site, thanks to its incredible architec-t ure,and residents who were named among the top 10 most b eautiful people in the world (ranked by Travelers Digest magazine in 2012) could pass as Lebanese,he said. All we can do is pray for a day w hen the Lebanese regime will allow our Lebanese friends to visit u s and see for themselves, Schwartz said. Hit TV show Homeland irks Lebanese, Israelis MCT D amian Lewis stars as Marine Nick Brody in Homeland.

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C M Y K www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, October 21, 2012Page 9B EPISCOPAL St.Agnes Episcopal Church 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870.Sunday Services:Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m.Midweek service on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m.The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends.Wednesday:Adult Bible study, 9:30 a.m.Visitors are always welcome.Church office 385-7649, for more information. St.Francis of Assisi Anglican Episcopal Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL 33852. P hone:465-0051.Rev.Elizabeth L. Nelson, Rector.Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m.and 6 p.m. Wednesday evening:Holy Communion with Healing Service, 6 p.m.Thursday:Holy Communion with healing service, 9 a.m.Child care available at the 8 a.m.and 10:30 a.m.Sunday service. EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA The Church of the Way EFCA, 1005 N.Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m.and 10:30 a.m.Youth activities, 6:30 p.m.Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship.Come early and stay after for fellowship time.Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor.The Way A place for you.Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:273-3674.Email: theway church@hotmail.com .Web site: www.TheWayChurch.org GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 Thunderbird Road, (863 0869.Dr.Randall Smith, senior pastor.Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m.and 6 p.m.;Wednesday services at 7 p.m.We offer Kid CityChildrens Ministry throughout all services, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married couples, prime-timers,and Bible studies in Spanish.Kid CityDay Care, Preschool and After-School Monday-Friday:7 a.m.-6 p.m.(For registration call:385-3111).Check us out on the Web at www.sebringgrace.org INDEPENDENT First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com.Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church. Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister;Bible School 9 a.m.;Worship 10 a.m.;Wednesday studies for all ages, 6 p.m.Nursery provided for all events. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration Ministries, (non-denominational 2200 N.Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 33825.Phone:452-9777 or 4533771.Sunday service:Sunday School, 10 a.m.and worship, 11 a.m.Wednesday services:7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study.Pastor: W.H.Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church (ELCA 1178 S.E.Lakeview Drive., Sebring.David Thoresen, Deacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, third and fifth Sunday each month, and Rev.Jefferson Cox on the second and fourth Sunday of each month.Jim Helwig, organist/choir director.Worship service at 9:30 a.m.;Holy Eucharist is every Sunday.Coffee hour on the first and third Sunday of each month. Council meeting on the first Tuesday of month;Ladies Group WELCA meets at noon second Tuesday of month with lunch.Bring a dish to pass.Labyrinth Prayer Garden open seven days a week to congretation and community.Come grow with us.Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park LCMS, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School past the four-way stop sign. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m.Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise.Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship.Come worship and fellowship with us.For information call Pastor Scott McLean at (863 see christlutheranavonpark.org Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring.Reverend Robert Reinhardt, Pastor.Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232.Sunday Traditional Worship Service, 8 a.m. ;Sunday Praise Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.Communion is served the first, third and fifth Sunday of the month.Sunday school and Bible classes, 9:15 a.m.Worship service is broadcast at 8 a.m.on WITS 1340 AM each Sunday. Educational opportunities include w eekly adult Bible studies.Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782 open from 10 a.m.to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday.All are warmly welcome in the Faily of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC Association of Lutheran Churches, 3240 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872.James Weed, pastor.Worship Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday.Bible Study, 9 a.m.Nursery provided.Social activities:Choir, Missions, Evangelism.Phone 3852346. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELSellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELSSunday Worship at 10 a.m.;Bible Study, 9 a.m.For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E.Main St., Avon Park.Pastor:Rev.John C. Grodzinski.Sunday school at 8:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 9:30 a.m.. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service.Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m.Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL 33852;465-5253.The Rev.Richard A.Norris, pastor; Susan C.Norris, Trinity Tots PreSchool director;and Noel Johnson, minister of youth and family life. Worship schedule after Easter through December:Worship service 10 a.m., and Education Hour, 8:45 a.m.Worship schedule for January through Easter:Worship service, 8:30 and 11 a.m., Education Hour 9:45 a.m. Traditional Service with Holy Communion each first and third Sunday.Non-Traditional Service each second, fourth and fifth Sunday.Seasonal mid-week services Wednesday evenings during Lent and Advent.Call church office for additional Worship times and special holiday services.Other activities and groups include: Choirs;Ladies Guild and LWML; Mens Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies as scheduled;T rinity Tots Pre-school, Youth Group activities (call for meeting times and dates).Visit us online at: www.Trinitylutheranlp.com NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872.Sunday:American Sign Language:First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services.First Worship service, 9 a.m.;Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m.Nursery (up to2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours.BFC Youth, 6 p.m.;Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday:Children, ages 4 yrs through 5th grade, 6 p.m.;Youth, 67:30 p.m.;Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor;Andy McQuaid, associate pastor.Web site www.bfcsebring.com.Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872;386-4900.An independent community church.Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.;Bible study, 11:15 a.m.;Sunday evening service, 6 p.m.Pastor Lester Osbeck.A small friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway.Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue.Sunday service is at 10 a.m.;Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m.A nursery and childrens church are provided.The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry.Linda M.Downing, minister, lindadowning@live.com. Casey L.Downing, associate minister, caseydown ing@hotmail.com.Church phone: 314-0482. Web site:www. ctm forme.com Crossroads of Life, 148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL 33852;Tel.863-655-9163.The place of your Divine appointment. We expect our supernatural God to transform our lives through His power and grace.Come, learn of His plan and destiny for you.With His plan we receive His provision along with His perfect timing and opportunity.What you have longed for, but have been missing, can now be received.The direction you have been thirsty for will suddenly quench your parched soul.Come to experience what you have been missing for so long empowerment in every area of life.We teach, train and send forth to win souls.You dont speak English no problema. We have a Spanish interpreter.We look forward to fellowship and worship with you at 7 p.m.every Wednesday.Pastoers Gil and Rosa Benton (Faith Never Fails). Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL 33872.Phone, 382-1085.Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor.Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m.Tuesday 6 p.m.Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth;first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.;Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry. www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.;Worship at 10 a.m.Nursery and Kids World classes.Small groups meet throughout the week.Church phone is 4021684;Pastor Bruce A.Linhart. The Lors Sentinel Fellowship Church 148 E.Interlake Blvd., L ake Placid (at Lake Placid Christian School), Pastor Juanita Folsom.Sunday morning service, 10:30 a.m.;Monday, Sentinel School of Theology, 7 p.m.;Church service, Tuesday, 7 p.m.More information at www.juanitafolsom ministries.com. Union Church 106 N.Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Contemporary worship service is at 6:30 p.m.Saturday with Pastor Tiger Gullett.Sunday traditional worship service is at 7:45 a.m.and 9 a.m.Contemporary Sunday worship service is at 10:45 a.m. Nursery and childrens church on Saturday nightes and 9 and 10:45 a.m.Sundays.Breakfast and lunch menus at Solid Grounds.Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger.Office:4533345.Web page at www.weareunion.org Unity Life Enrichment Centre, n ew location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd.S., Sebring, FL 33875;471-1122;e-mail unity@vistanet.net.Web site, www.unityofsebring.org.10:30 a.m.Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church.Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups.Rev.Andrew C.Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113.A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America.Sunday morning worship:Traditional service, 10:30 a.m.;Sunday school, 9:15 a.m.Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.;Childrens/Youth Group, 5:30-7 p.m.;choir practice, 7:15 p.m.Phone:385-3234;Fax: 385-2759;e-mail: covpres@strato.net;Web site: www.cpcsebring.org .Office hours: 8:30-12:30 a.m.Monday-Friday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E.Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL 33825.Phone:453-3242. The Rev.Robert Johnson is the pastor.Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.;Potluck dinner, 6 p.m.third Wednesday;choir practice, 6:30 p.m.each Wednesday;Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m.second Wednesday;Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m.second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m.third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL 33870.385-0107.Email: faith@htn.net, Rev.Darrell A.Peer, pastor.Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.;Worship Service, 11 a.m. Youth Group (middle school and high school age), 3:30-6:30 p.m. Tuesdays.Wednesday:Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.Nursery available during worship.Call the church office for more information and other classes. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com, 117 N.Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742.The Rev.Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev.Drew Severance, associate pastor.Sunday Traditional Worship 9 a.m., Contemporary Worship 11 a.m., Sunday School 10:10-10:50 a.m.Wednesday evenings:Adult Bible Study 7 p.m. (Nursery available), Youth Group (middle and high school.m., RockSolid (kindergarten through fifth grade) 7 p.m.Family Biblical Counseling available by appointment. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA 5887 U.S.98, Sebring, FL 33876.Sunday School,9 a.m.;Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m.the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune.Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m.first Monday of the month.Choir rehearses at 7 p.m.each Wednesday, September through April.Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m.the third Thursday of the month.Organist:Richard Wedig. Choir Director:Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713;e-mail, springlakepc@embarqmail.com, Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark.Phone:4536641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com, Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday.Church Service 10:45 a.m.Saturday.Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m.Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday isf rom 9:00 a.m.till 2 p.m.A sale takes place the first Sunday of each month.Senior Pastor Paul Boling. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades.ALL ARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N.State Road 17, Sebring;385-2438. Worship Services:9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m.Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m.Community service:every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr.Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m.Pastor Nathan Madrid. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872;(863 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor;Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor.Family History Center (863 Sunday Services:Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.;Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m.to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.;Primary for children, 11:15 a.m.to 1 p.m.;Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m.Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m.Activity Days:8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center f or Worship .Sunday:Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.;Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.;and Praise meeting and lunch, noon.Tuesday:Bible study, 6:30 p.m.;and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m.Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m.All meetings are at 120 N.Ridgewood Ave., Sebring.For more information, vis it the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext.110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church, 105 S.Pine St., Sebring,FL 33870. The Rev.A.C.Bryant, pastor. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m.in the sanctuary, ContemporaryWorship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m.Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m.Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m.Sundaysw ith Rick Heilig, youth director.The 10:55 a.m.Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial.There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church, 200 S.Lake Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825.(863von Jarrett, Pastor.Sunday School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m.Bible study every Wednesday at 6 p.m. Visit us at our church website: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL, 33852.The Rev.Fred Ball.pastor. Claude H.L.Burnett, pastoral assistant.Sunday schedule:Heritage Worship Service, 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.;Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.;New Song worship service at 10:45 a.m.Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning.Middle School Youth, 4 p.m.;High School Youth, 5:30 p.m. We offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth programs, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship.Church office, 465-2422 or www.memorialumc.com .Lakeview Christian School, VPK to grade 5; 465-0313. St.John United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL 33872.The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.;Adult Sunday School, 11 a.m.;Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.Nursery provided for all services.Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98ing.The Rev.Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor.Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m.Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m.on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m.on Thursday.Church office phone: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church of Christ, Jesus didnt reject people, neither do we.Join us for worship every Sunday at 9:30 a.m.and youll be embraced by a compassionate congregation that is allinclusive.Wre at the corner of Hammock and Hope.Choir and Bell Choir practice on Wednesday; Bible studies throughout the week. 471-1999;sebringemmanuel ucc.com.PLACESTOWORSHIP Publishers WeeklyHARDCOVER FICTION 1. The Casual Vacancy b y J.K. Rowling (Little, Brown) 2 NYPD Red by James Patterson, Marshall Karp ( Little, Brown) 3. Winter of the World by K en Follett (Dutton 4. Gone Girl by Gillian F lynn (Crown 5. Mad River by John Sandford (Putnam 6. The Time Keeper by Mitch Albom (Hyperion 7. A Wanted Man by Lee Child (Delacorte 8. Live by Night by Dennis Lehane (William Morrow) 9. Low Pressure by Sandra Brown (Grand Central) 10. This Is How You Lose Her by Junoit Diaz( Riverhead) HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. Killing Kennedy by Bill OReilly (Henry Holt) 2. No Easy Day by Mark Owen (Dutton 3. Who I Am by Peter Townshend (Harper 4. America Again by Stephen Colbert (Grand Central) 5. God Loves You by David Jeremiah (FaithWords) 6. Guinness World Records 2013 by Guinness World Records (Guinness World Records) 7. I Declare: 31 Promises to Speak by Joel Osteen( FaithWords) 8. Waging Heavy Peace by Neil Young (Blue Rider Press) 9. Total Recall by Arnold Schwarzenegger (Simon & Schuster) 10. Mugged by Ann C oulter (Sentinel M ASS MARKET P APERBACKS 1 Shock Wave by John S andford (Berkley 2 Dead or Alive by Tom Clancy (Berkley 3. Micro by Michael Crichton (Harper 4 Victims by Jonathan Kellerman (Ballantine 5. D.C. Dead by Stuart W oods (Signet 6 What Doesnt Kill You by Iris Johansen (St. M artins) 7. Fall of Giants by Ken Follett (Signet 8. Ill Be Home for C hristmas by Fern Michaels (Zebra Books 9. A Day Away by Nora R oberts (Silhouette Books 10. Thanksgiving Prayer by Debbie Macomber (HarlequinWall Street JournalFICTION 1. The Mark of Athena by Rick Riordan (Hyperion Books) 2. The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling (Little, Brown) 3. NYPD Red by James Patterson, Marshall Karp (Little, Brown 4. Dork Diaries 5: Tales F rom a Not-So-Smart Miss Know-It-All by Rachel ReneeR ussell (Aladdin 5. Winter of the World by Ken Follett (Dutton Books 6. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn (Crown Publishing Group) 7 Mad River by John Sandford (Putnam 8. The Time Keeper by Mitch Albom (Hyperion Books) 9. Mockingjay by S uzanne Collins (Scholastic P ress) 10. Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins (Scholastic Press) NONFICTION 1. Killing Kennedy by Bill OReilly, Martin Dugard (Henry Holt & Co.) 2. No Easy Day by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer ( Dutton Books) 3. Who I Am by Pete T ownshend (Harper 4. Jesus Calling: Enjoying P eace in His Presence by Sarah Young (Integrity Publishers) 5. America Again by Stephen Colbert (Grand Central Publishing) 6. Killing Lincoln by Bill OReilly, Martin Dugard (Henry Hold & Co.) 7 God Loves You by David Jeremiah (FaithWords) 8. Guinness World Records 2013 by Guiness Book Records (Guiness Book Records) 9. I Declare by Joel Osteen (FaithWords) 1 0. StrengthsFinder 2.0 by Tom Rath (Gallup Press FICTION E-BOOKS 1. Reflected in You by Sylvia Day (Penguin Group 2. NYPD Red by James Paterson, Marshall Karp (Little, Brown 3. The Mark of Athena by Rick Riordan (Disney Publishing Worldwide) 4. Gone Girl by Gillian F lynn (Crown Publishing Group) 5. Fifty Shades Freed by E.L. James (Vintage 6 Fifty Shades of Grey by E.L. James (Vintage 7 Fifty Shades Darker by E .L. James (Vintage 8 The Casual Vacancy b y J.K. Rowling (Little, Brown) 9 Down to You by M. L eighton (M. Leighton 1 0. Bared to You by S ylvia Day (Penguin Group N ONFICTION E-BOOKS 1 Killing Kennedy by Bill O Reilly, Martin Dugard (Henry Holt & Co.) 2 Heaven Is For Real by Todd Burpo with Lynn V incent (Thomas Nelson P ublishers) 3 No Easy Day by Mark O wen with Kevin Maurer (Penguin Group 4 To Heaven and Back b y Mary C. Neal (Doubleday R eligious Publishing Group) 5 Home by Julie A ndrews (Hyperion 6 Killing Lincoln by Bill O Reilly, Martin Dugard (Henry Holt & Co.) 7. Who I Am by Pete Townshend (HarperCollins 8 Official and Confidential by Anthony Summers (Open Road Publishing) 9 The Master of D isguise by Antonio J. M endez (HarperCollins 1 0. Unbroken by Laura H illenbrand (Random House BOOKS BE ST-SE LLERS

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C M Y K By LEANNE ITALIE A ssociated PressNEW YORK Cant figu re out how to dress as a binder full of women forH alloween? Theres always Big Bird,the other star of the presidential debates. The Yellow One is flying off the shelves after MittR omnes threat to do away with government support for PBS. President Barack Obama kept the Halloween dreama liveTuesday night when be brought up the bird again during their second debate. At 6 feet,Angela Betancourt volunteered for Big Bird duty among a group of friends riffing on Sesame Street for a couple of Halloween parties and a meander along Lincoln Road in Miami Beach. Shell likely carry a suitcase as she passes out the popular kid characters resume. I grew up on Sesame Street and I think that PBS deserves all the funds it can get,said Betancourt,30. e all feel the same way. Halloweencostumes.com sold out of several takes on Big Bird almost overnight after Romnes remark during the first presidential debate Oct. 3,said a company spokesman,Marlon Heimerl. In the past this hasnt been a very popular costume, so when Big Bird flew the coop in such high numbers,it was definitely a big surprise,said Heimerl,who would not provide specific sales figures. Disguise Inc.,Sesame Workshops official costume maker,said interest is up among the thousands of retailers it services. The sellers of unlicensed Big Bird, especially sexed-up versions, beware. The only costumes authorized by Sesame Workshop are with our licensee,Disguise,and we are working with our legal team on having the others removed from the market, said Ellen Lewis,a spokeswoman from over there on Sesame Street. Betancourt went for sanct ioned,sassy Big Bird in a yellow,flapper-style feathe red dress and a dainty head piece. Shannon Ziegler ofs uburban Detroit will be Big Birdesque in a sexier mini with mesh cutouts,ringed thigh-highs and a fluffy hat that has google eyes. Z iegler,another 6-footer, hadnt decided between a sign that reads:Big Bird for Presidentor one imploring: t Use Me.AnA merican flag may also be involved. When I saw that costume,said the 27-year-old Ziegler,I thought,how perfect is that? For the record,Zieglers a Republican who said shell probably vote for Romney. Big Bird is not getting fired,she said. Big Bird is big and strong and he will be able to stand his ground. I think that Sesame Street will be strong no matter what. Kimberly Wick,vice president of Costume World based in Deerfield Beach,Fla.,also saw sleepy seller Big Bird become a hot seller overnight. The company sells and rents costumes of all kinds and has four stores around the country. e had Big Bird dancing in front of our Deerfield Beach store and people were honking and going crazy, Wick said. Its been 20 years since Big Bird was popular. Wick was madly trying to replenish sold-out Big Bird looks among several the company carries for infants to adults. So whos buying Democrats,Republicans or those pesky undecideds? Does Big Bird have a left wing and a right wing? I dont know,she said. I guess well find out. Sara Gaugl,a spokeswoman at the Bellevue, Wash.,headquarters for the large thrift store chain Savers and Value Village,said sales of all Sesame Street character costumes picked up significantly after the first debate on Oct. 3. Managers of the nearly 300 secondhand stores across t he United States and Canada were also busy helping cust omers put together DIY Big Bird,she said. Last year we were seeing a trend in nostalgia,such as Candy Land and Twister, G augl said. Big Bird was selling but it w as not as hot of a commodity. People are not ignoringt he conversation around the election. Page 10BNews-SunSunday, October 21, 2012www.newssun.com GRIFFIN'S CARPET MART; 7.444"; 10"; Black; 10/21/12; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 3 3 6 6 3 3 Its that eerie, spooky time ofy ear again when things go bump in the night. But what makes Halloween sos pine-chilling? Stories of fierce nocturnal creatures,of course; spiders,bats,o wls ravens,and toads are the critters that terrifying legends are made of. Hundreds of years ago,before p eople had the resources to educate themselves on wildlife,many creatures were misunderstood. If folksd idnt understand something or if it looked a bit strange,they made up stories and myths about it. Throught he years,many of these tall tales have developed into traditional t hemes for Halloween and other scary events. Take spiders,for example. No g ood haunted house is without plenty of sticky,gooey web materia l draped on every corner. In reality,spiders spin webs to house themselves and catch insects. But with eight legs and multiple eyes staring out,its no wonder thatt heir image causes alarm. In the minds of many,spiders bring of v isions of horrible creatures with venom dripping fangs. Spiders have a reputation of being danger-o us and evil. The truth of the matter is that very few spiders are dang erous to humans and they are,in fact,extremely beneficial creatures. Spiders serve as natural pest cont rol and will entrap and consume many insects that may otherwise cause damage to lawn and garden plants. Bats are another creature that have received a bad reputation overt he years. One myth is that bats were the souls of sleeping people. This ridiculous theory was derived simply because bats are nocturnal creatures and are rarely seen dur-i ng the day. Bats also give rise to the idea of vampires since they often are seen coming out of caves and sleeping with their wings wrapped aroundt heir bodies. Vampire bats from South America drink the blood of many small animals and this has given rise to the exaggeration of a bloods uckingcreatures such as vampires. In truth,bats are very beneficial creatures who feed mainly onn ectar and insects. The reason they are seen only at night is simply because that is the nature of thea nimal being nocturnal. They use sound waves to navigate and do not g et tangled in clothes or hair as seen on many television shows and movies. Vampire bats are far toos mall to feed on anything as large as a human; they generally make a s mall incision and suck blood from a small mammal or bird to get the nutrients they require. Another winged creature associated with night,darkness andm alevolent characteristics is the owl. These birds are also nocturnal a nd are said to be souls wandering the earth. The fact that owls can rotate their heads 270 degrees ine ither direction hasnt helped their spooky reputation. With huge yell ow eyes and a twisting head,its no wonder they send chills down the spines of the fearful. T he truth about owls is that they are nocturnal and hunt mostly at night. The turning of the head enables them to hunt effectively w ithout making a lot of noise. Owls are extremely beneficial birds for many reasons,one of which isk eeping the rodent population under control. E ver since Edgar Allen Poe penned The Raven,crows and ravens have been associated with wickedness and darkness. Since crows and ravens feed on dead ani-m als and carrion,many associate them with death and evil. One s uperstition about the crow is that if one lands on a roof,death or misfortune will befall the homesi nhabitants. The raven has the distinction of having the call made up o f the voices of murdered people who were not buried properly. In fact,crows and ravens are v ery intelligent birds and are common sites near urban neighborhoods. They have the good fortune of being able to adapt in most any s ituation. These birds will eat practically anything including garbage. Although they continually strikef ear in the minds and hearts of many,these birds are simply creat ures trying to survive in a crowded world. Although perhaps not quite as popular,toads are recognized as a Halloween symbol. Their famec omes from association with witches,who allegedly used them in t heir brew. Another reason toads have been the source of anxiety for many,is that when handled,manyw ere inflicted with runny eyes and a sore nose. Others believe toads a re familiars,which means a low-ranking demon who assists witches. T oads do sometimes produce a substance that when contacted causes irritation to the skin. This serves as a means of protection for the animal. As with all creatures,scary or not,toads serve an important function in the natural world. They are important environmental indicators and are very susceptible to toxins because of their sensitive skin. They are usually the first to die out in a polluted area. In addition, toads are excellent pest predators and an important part of the food chain. This Halloween instead of getting creeped out by these creature s, why not think of all the benefits they provide to our natural world? And remember,these stories and myths originated from a time when folks were mostly uneducateda bout things. Halloween hullabalooIn ancient Greece,the owl was s acred and was believed to be a f amiliar of the Goddess of W isdom,Athene. But in Rome, owls were harbingers of evil. During the middle ages,the S creech Owl was the most feared a nd it was believed that witches c ould turn into owls and trick u nsuspecting travelers. Spiders were believed to hide i n a witchs cloak and whisper instructions in her ear. Some believed that to dream o f a spider meant betrayal,to see one in the morning was bad luck and to kill one summoned rain. C orine Burgess is and Environmental Specialist for the Highlands County Parks and Natural Resources Department. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily t hose of the News-Sun. Creepy creatures of Halloween arent really so scary News From T he W atershed Corine Burgess Courtesy photo E specially near Halloween, spiders have a reputation of being dangerous and evil. The truth of the matter is that very few spiders are dangerous to humans and they are, in fact, extremely beneficial creatures. M CT M itt Romneys statements about cutting funding f or PBS has l aunched a wave o f protests, and a wave of desire for Big Bird costumes this H alloween. Big Bird costumes hot sellers for Halloween

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C M Y K Associated PressLOUISVILLE,Ky. Lane Goodwin,a small-town boy who won a huge Facebook following for his thumbs-up attitude about his cancer,has lost his battle with the disease. The 13-year-old Kentuckian died Wednesday night,eliciting an outpouring from his heartbroken followers. The announcement of Lanes death came on his Facebook page,which had 369,000 followers as of Thursday. The announcement said the boy from Beech Grove who loved fishing and soccer had gained his angel wings. University of Kentucky basketball coach John Calipari was among the many whose thoughts and prayers were with Lanes family. s all give one more thumbs up for Lane, Calipari tweeted. Lane was an avid St. Louis Cardinals fan,and some Cardinals fans held up signs in support of Lane during the baseball playoffs. Lane was diagnosed with Alveolar Rhabdo-myosarcoma,a rare form of cancer,in 2010. He completed chemotherapy treatments late that year,but had a relapse in the summer of 2011. The Thumbs-up for Lane campaign,started as a way to encourage the boy and his family,spread worldwide on social media. His followers included country music stars, athletes,politicians and Ernie Brown the cable television star known as The Turtleman. Brown was Lanes favorite celebrity. The homespun star known for getting rid of unwanted reptiles and other critters with his bare hands had visited Lanes home in western Kentucky a few weeks ago. They hit it off from the start,Brown recalled Thursday. Lane told Brown how he once hooked a shark. He showed Brown his room, filled with pictures of urtleman. e sat there and talked and talked and just had a good old time,said Brown, who choked up with emotion while remembering his young friend. We got up and did the Turtlemandance until he got worn out. Brown said Lane was an inspiration to others. People really looked up to him,he added. He sure made his mark in the world and hell never be forgotten. Lanes familys issued a statement remembering his beautiful smileand his Christian faith. By JENNIFER FORKER Associated PressT hink you know the latest tricks for carving a creepy pumpkin? The pros continue to push the barriers. A handful of people b ecome professional pumpkin carvers each fall,specializing in fantastical designs. Among them are Alex Wer, self-styled Pumpkin Geek,w ho lives near Sacramento, Calif.; Scott Cummins,a Perryton,Texas,middle-s chool art teacher; and Marc Evan and Chris Soria,the Maniac Pumpkin Carvers ofN ew York City. Wer does his carving b etween insurance sales and an evening package-delivery route. He works with thef ake,foam pumpkins sold at craft stores,so his intricate w ork has longevity. Evan and Soria drop their jobs as illustrators for a few months to carve pumpkins for festivals, parties and individual clients.T he long hours leave the two childhood friends battling s ore wrists and aching backs by late November. s a labor of love,says E van,who also carves pumpkins on the Food Networks Halloween Warsthis season. Pumpkin carving is definitely not the easiest way t o make money. Its not a get rich quickscheme. For inspiration,scroll through these carverswebsites The Pumpkin Geek,P umpkin Gutter,Maniac Pumpkin Carvers. Or check out the creepy,three-dimensional portraits at Villafane Studios. H ere are some of their tips of the trade:Choose Your Pumpkin Wiselyou want to have a stem, and you want it to be a healthy stem because thats tem is still providing nutrients for the pumpkin,says Soria. Dont cut into your pumpkin around that perfect stem.I nstead,access the pumpkin from its backside to help preserve freshness. Cutting out a stem cap weakens the Jacko-lantern,says Evan. Andh iding the opening in the back gives the pumpkin more visual punch. s aesthetically more pleasing seeing the glowf rom (onlynot creeping out from where we might have cut the hole at the top,says Evan. 1. Preparing Your PumpkinB efore carving a face, scrape and clean the inside of the pumpkin. The cleanery ou get it,the longer it will last. I always tell people,Gut i t out twice as much as you think you need to,says Wer. It should be very dry inside.The CarveFolks,there are two kinds of pumpkin carve:the lighted Jack-o-lantern face and thet hree-dimensional sculpture, in which a pumpkin is treated l ike a block of wood only stinky and less permanent. The Maniac team carves boths tyles. Cummins carves in creepy 3-D. The tools are the s ame,but there used in different ways. Take either carve up a n otch by adding depth and texture. Wer carves up to five layers in his faux pumpkins t o get a mix of light and shadow for a photorealistic q uality. Learn this skill,called shading,by scraping part of your design into the gourd. It just creates this new l ayer and this multi-level depth,says Wer. Need more help? Visit pumpkin-carving tutorials, such as those posted by The Pumpkin Lady,on YouTube.More About ToolsThe Maniac team favors tools from the kitchen or garage,primarily paringk nives,graters and saws. They tout linoleum cutters and sculpting tools. Linoleum cutters have several gouge tips. Evan likest he V-gouge for making precise cuts,whether shallow or deep. Ceramistssculpting tools are metal loops on a s tick in various shapes and sizes that can be purchased at art supply and craft stores.T hey slice smoothly through pumpkin rind. T hose cheap pumpkincarving kits? All four of our expert carvers love them. T he Maniac team uses the orange plastic scoop to clean out hundreds of pumpkins fast. Cummins uses the scoop too,and praises the kitsf limsy,serrated blade. t underestimate that little saw,Cummins says. Sometimes there is a need to cut slowly and deliberately,a nd that is when the little saw is indispensable.PreservationOnce a pumpkin is carved, it begins to deteriorate. ou will certainly notice a difference in 24 hours, s ays Cummins in his online tutorial. Says Evan:ou cant preserve a pumpkin. We recommend delaytactics. T hose include: When a Jack-o-lantern is not on display,Wer says, give it a bath. He has had as m any as eight pumpkins bobbing overnight in his bathtub. Preserve cut edges with a lemon juice-water mixture, says the Maniac team,then s eal them with vegetable oil or petroleum jelly. Store your carving in the refrigerator or w rap it in plastic wrap and store in a cool place. And quick,take a photo. Its the best and most essential way to preserve your cre-a tion,says Cummins. O nline: www.maniacpumpkincarvers.co www.pumpkingutter.com www.thepumpkingeek.com w ww.villafanestudios.com www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, October 21, 2012Page 11B DR. ROTMAN, DARRIN; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; october ads; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 3 3 9 9 5 5 3 3 DR. LEE, IKE; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 10/21/12; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 3 3 6 6 5 5 How to buy, prep, carve, preserve your pumpkin M CT Y ou can do more with your pumpkin than just carve the t raditional jack-o-lantern face. NEW YORK (AP T here was a time when the newsweeklies set the agenda for the nations conversation when Time and Newsweek would digest thee vents of the week and Americans would wait by their mailboxes to see what was on the covers. Those days have passed, a nd come the end of the year,the print edition of Newsweek will pass,too.C ause of death:The march of time. The tempo of the news a nd the Web have completely overtaken the news maga zines,said Stephen G. Smith,editor of the Washington Examiner andt he holder of an unprecedented newsweekly triple c rown nation editor at Time,editor of U.S. News and World Report,and executive editor of Newsweek from 1986 to1 991. Where once readers were c ontent to sit back and wait for tempered accounts of domestic and foreigne vents,they now can find much of what they need a lmost instantaneously,on their smartphones and tablet computers. Where o nce advertisers had limited places to spend their dollars to reach national audiences,they now have seemingly unlimited alterna-t ives. So on Thursday,when Newsweeks current owners announced they intended to halt print publication ande xpand the magazines Web presence,there was little s urprise. But there was a good deal of nostalgia for w hat Smith called the shared conversation that the nation used to have,when the networks,the newsweeklies and a fewn ational newspapers reigned. Before Newsweek,there was Time the brainchild of Henry Luce and BritonH adden. The first issue of the first newsweekly came out in 1923,and the formu-l a,from the first,was to wrap up the weeks news and tie it with a bow,tellingi t with a singular voice. Newsweek or as it was o riginally called,Newsweek came along in 1933. The founding editorw as Thomas Martyn. The first foreign editor of Time, h e was British-born and had a single leg,having lost the other in World War I. His magazine sold for 10 cents and was advertised as ani ndispensable complement to newspaper reading, b ecause it explains, expounds,clarifies. The magazine struggled f or four years,until it merged with another magaz ine,Today,lost the hyphen,and emerged under the ownership of Averill H arriman and Vincent Astor,two of the countrys wealthiest men. The modern era at Newsweek began in 1961,w hen it was purchased by the Washington Post Co. Benjamin Bradlee,who was Newsweeks Washington bureau chief at the time andl ater executive editor of the Post,helped negotiate the s ale. Going out of print, Newsweek ends an era Social media sensation dies of cancer at age 13

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C M Y K By MICHAEL HILL Associated PressALBANY,N.Y. The digital divide is wider thane ver between diners who talk,tweet and snap pictures mid-meal and those who wish thed just shut up,shut down and be pres-e nt. Caught at the center of the discord are restaurant owners and chefs,who must walk the careful lineo f good customer service for both those who dine under the influence ofs mart phones,and those who wont. But as the devices have morphed intoa n unrelenting appendage for texting,photography a nd games,more restaurateurs are challenged to keep the peace. O wners who once relied mostly on no cell phones, p leasesigns,increasingly are experimenting with everything from penalties for using phones,discounts for not and outright bans onp hotography. Theres no place to get a way from the chatter,said Julie Liberty of Miami, who started the Facebookp age Ban Cell Phones From Restaurantsearlier t his year. Everything has a soundtrack,including when you go into the ladies room. T hats just not right. Its a touchy issue. Consider the crush of news coverage Eva Restaurant in Los Angeles generatedw hen it began offering patrons a 5 percent discount if they leave their phone at the door. Online comments ranged from cheers of YES!to others who said their phones would have to b e pried from their cold, dead hands. T he policy is working, though. Evs Rom Toulon said about 40 percent of our customers will leave their cell phones at the door. After a few cocktails and glasses of wine,it can be challenging to remember that you left the phone behind,he said. T he burst of headlines for Eva came after a Burlington,Vt.,deli took on cyber-folk hero status for posting a sign informing customers that $3 will be added to their bill if you fail to get off your phone while at the counter. Its rude.Disgusted diners are doing their part too with games like phone stack, in which everyone places their phones in a stack in the middle of the table. The first person who reaches for their phone pays the bill for all. These are more creative approaches to the no cellphone signs now common in restaurants ranging from highbrow to quick-eats. The landmark Boston restaurant Locke-Ober asks diners in language appropriate fora place with a dress code to kindly refrain from using cellular phones.In Albany,N.Y.,the Hamilton Street Cafe has a more direct,hand-drawn No cell phones at the countersign with a phone with a red through it. Owner Sue Dayton said the sign by the counter helps keep the lunch line moving. ou get a half-hour for lunch. You walk up here and you have to stand behind someone not paying attention enough to say what kind of bread they want on their BLT because there on their cell phone, Dayton said. I rritation over distracted dining has broadened with the rise of photo-sharing apps like Instagram. The popular online scrapbookP interest is clogged with pictures of everything from p an fried noodles to poutine snapped moments befored igestion. Chefs who,as a rule,put a premium on control dont always take kindly to their dining rooms becoming shootingg alleries. Grant Achatz,the famous Chicago-based molecular gastronomist,wrote a much-forwarded post sever-a l years ago grousing about diners who snap the meal away and even try to video his staff without asking permission. I cant imagine how celebrities feel,he wrote. No wonder they punch the paparazzi out when they get the chance. Some restaurateurs go with the digital flow. Sarabeth Levine,of New York City-based Sarabeths, said shes perfectly fine with people chatting,playing games or even taking pictures. Its free advertising,after all. Im happy to have our customers,Levine said. They come,they tweet, they Facebook,they bring their children. Its high energy to begin with. I mean,people are noisy even in the way they speak today. Other restaurants go as far as to bar picture taking, like David Changs Ko in Manhattan. Others take a middle ground,like the high-end Washington,D.C., restaurant Rogue 24,where hostesses politely tell guests that if they do take pictures,please do so without a distracting flash. I mean you cant fight it,said owner R. J. Cooper. Why fight a losing battle? Actually,the battle might already be lost. The use of hand-held devices at the table is i mplicitly encouraged at the growing number of restaur ants that offer Wi-Fi access or accept payment via smartphone. TheM anhattan restaurant Comodo even encourages g uests to upload pictures of their dishes to Instagram with the hashtag( hash)comodomenu to create a user-generated Instagram menu.Sharing t rends are likely to accelerate as the generation who h as no memory of a world before cell phones comes of age. Already,about one in five U.S. adults say theys hare online when eating a meal with others,and more than a third of teens do the same,according to the 2012 State of Mobile Etiquette Survey for Intel Corp. The same survey found 8 1 percent of U.S. adults believe mobile manners are g etting worse,up 6 percentage points from last year. A Zagat survey this month found most respondents disapproving of texting,t weeting and emailing when eating out,but a majority accepted picture taking. I think its about having more time under our beltw ith what the new normal is,said etiquette expert Anna Post,the great-greatgranddaughter of Emily Post. While the technology is new,the rules of etiquette are old-fashioned common sense. Silence your phone in restaurants and dont answer unless theres a very good reason,like a sick kid back home. And if you do answer,excuse yourself from the table. Try to keep your phone off the table,it signals to your companions that you waiting for something better. As for taking pictures, Post said consider the sort of place youre in busy pub or cloistered bistro? and who youre with. Ask yourself,Just because I want to take a photo of my food,is this the right place? Am I with the right people for this to be OK?Post said. The answer cant always be yes. If you lost both your legs, would you be smiling lesst han a year later? For me,the answer to that q uestion is no. Thats why meeting a seriously wounded U.S. Army soldier named 1st Lt. Nick Vogt is an experience I will always cherish. W hat struck me most during my Oct. 12 visit with the 2 4-year-old Afghanistan war veteran at the Walter Reed National Military MedicalC enter wasn't seeing a handsome young man with no l egs. It was 1st Lt. Vogts bright,optimistic smile. When the soldiers mother, S heila Vogt,introduced me to her son,Nick was lying on his couch beneath an American flag decoration and photos of his little niece andn ephew.While a beautiful fall day shined outside his window,stark reminders of our militarys continuing sacrifices filled his apartment. Thank you for your service,Lieutenant,I said while s haking Nicks hand. No problem,the wounde d warrior replied with a warm grin. While the Army Rangers mom and I sat comfortably, Nick spent most of the hour-l ong visit on his back. Even though its been 11 months since an enemy improvised explosive device took his legs,one stubbornly healingw ound forces Nick to avoid the sitting position. The quicker the wound heals,the faster the Crestline,Ohio, soldier can finally be fitted with prosthetics. Nicks left hand is missing its pinky finger,and a large scar engulfs his arm. Both legs are missing entirely.The soldier has no memory of the Nov. 12,2011,terrorist attack that nearly killed him, and said that in the weeks after the explosion,his mind underwent a full reboot. Still,as his mom described before we went upstairs to see Nick,there is no bitterness inside her sons heart. There is only the desire to live,heal and serve. Im staying in,Nick said about his military future. And mom,someday,Im going back. As Nick looked up at his mother,all she could do is smile back,look in my direction and crack a joke. Do you see what I have to deal with?Sheila said with an affectionate smirk. Before spending time with the Vogts,it was impossible t o comprehend the sacrifices made by a wounded warriors loved ones. I n the 11 months since their son was wounded, Sheila said she and Nicks f ather have been simultaneously inside in their Ohio h ome just three times. They alternate weeks at Walter Reed to help Nick,who nearly died in January after a crisis with his lung. T he morning after our visit,Sheila was scheduled to fly home and spend an evening with her husband, Steve. The couple was so excited that they both accidentally made reservations att he same restaurant. Still, before arranging the special t rip,Nicks mom and dad had to make sure their son was ready to be alone until Steve arrived in Bethesda,Md.,the next day. Cleaning a wound is not easy,especially when you cant see it,Sheila said. He had to prove to me that he could do it. Looking into Sheilas eyes, I could see the same optim ism her son projects. But I could also see exhaustion. F ew parents could imagine what Sheila and Steve have endured,yet through faith and unconditional love,they are still smiling. A s we sat with Nick,I asked the wounded warrior w hat it meant to recently travel to Fort Wainwright to see his fellow soldiers returnf rom Afghanistan. It meant everything,he s aid. Nicks mom said it took a grueling 12-hour flight from t he nations capital to Alaska in order for the platoon leader to see his fellow troops. He was in pain during the flight,and his parentsw orried one of his wounds would become infected. But nothing could stop Nick from greeting his brothers in arms. First Lt. Vogt is a young m an with no regrets. He chose to attend West Point d espite knowing he was joining the Army during a timeo f war. He was accepted to medical school upon graduation,yet chose to deploy to Afghanistan with an infantry platoon. Even though it costh im his legs,Nick would undoubtedly choose the same path all over again. When I asked the wounded soldier how he was doing,her esponded with his trademark smile. Im doing great,he said. Page 12BNews-SunSunday, October 21, 2012www.newssun.com SEBRING PAIN MANAGMENT; 3.639"; 4"; Black; 10/7,21; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 3 3 9 9 5 5 4 4 STANLEY STEEMER CARPET; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 10/21/12; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 3 3 6 6 2 2 CROSSWORDSOLUTION No regrets for wounded soldier C ourtesy photo U.S. Army 1st Lt. Nick Vogt holds up a shirt given to him by the Travis Manion Foundation on Oct. 12 at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md. The Army Ranger lost both his legs in Afghanistan on Nov. 12, 2011. Restaurant cell phone distractions still irritate MCT Taking pictures of your dinner has become a fad on Instagram, a popular smart phone photo sharing app. You get a half-hour for lunch. You walk up here and you have to stand behind someone not paying attention enough to say what kind of bread they want on their BLT because theyre on their cell phone.SUEDAYTON c afe owner The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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C M Y K www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, October 21, 2012Page 13B Dear Abby: I am 24 and graduated from college witha bachelors degree in criminal justice. I am currently living with my parents. They are a bit controlling and hate resistance from me. I grew up doing everything they told me with no personal opinions of my own,until I met my fiance a year ago. He has helped me gain the strength to speak up and let my thoughts be known. Wre trying to save enough money to live together. Mom has made it clear that she doesnt like that idea because were not married yet. She and Dad are also unhappy that I no longer want to work in the field my degree is in. (I worked for a sheriffs office for a couple of months and was treated horribly,then I was fired.) I have told my parents repeatedly that this is my life,but it seems to do no good. Do you have any suggestions on what I should say to them about these issues? Grown-Up Girl in Alabama Dear Grown-Up Girl: You appear to be a bright young woman who was raised to be submissive and compliant. That may be the reason working at the sheriffs office didnt work out for you. Rather than turn your back on the profession you trained for,you need to learn to be more assertive. That way you wont be dependent on anyone else for the strength to voice your opinions,or live your life according to the standards you set for yourself. Sometimes it isnt what you say,but the conviction with which the words are spoken that carries the most important message. P.S. Return to the college from which you graduated and talk to a counselor there about the various career options in your field for someone with your degree. Surely there are more opportunities than working at that sheriffs office. Dear Abby: Its a second marriage for my husband and me. Our children are all adults,and we all try to get along. My stepdaughter, Sharon,has invited us for Thanksgiving weekend and insists that we be her houseguests. As sweet as she is, she and her family live in a borderline hoarderhome. T he last time we visited our hometown,we stopped by to see them. After a struggle to get the front door open,Sharons first words were,e know its a mess. We dont clean or cook. When we returned to our car, my husband said he had never seen a house that filthy. But he insists we accept their invitation and not hurt their feelings. d rather get a motel room and take them out to dinner. I have strongly voiced my concerns for our safety and health to my husband. How can I address the subject of needing clean sheets and being able to cook a meal,and getting to the (dirty the night? Im already having anxiety issues. Having Nightmares in Tennessee Dear Having Nightmares: I sympathize with your husbands desire not to cause hurt feelings, but the invitation for you to be houseguests under these circumstances is not practical. Sharon should be told that you are a very private person and you would not feel comfortable getting up in the middle of the night and flushing a toilet; therefore you would be more at ease in a motel. If her kitchen and eating areas are filthy(your hus bands word),you should not eat in her house,either. Your husband should cheerfully assert his role as the patriarch and insist on taking the family out for Thanksgiving dinner. How can she argue? After all,ather knows best! Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. A few months ago,we received what felt like a death bloto ad ream that is yet to be fulfilled.Tearfully and earnestly I prayed releasingm y fears and confusion to the Lord. From an unexpected source,we receiveda card with an eagle soaring and the word dreamp rinted on it. Inside it said, or with God nothing will b e impossible. Since then,I have been lifted above the circum-s tance on his mighty wings of reaffirmation. B ut beware. Whenever we begin to feel strong and let our confidence shift from God to ourselves,Satans darts finda n opening and ensnare us in his web. O ur feelings are Godgiven.However,wishful thinking must not replaces trong faith in God. Recently,as I was soaring i n my imagination of how God might work out the details of this hope in myh eart,another knotted obstacle bewildered me. I felt surrounded like a m iddle strand in a skein of yarn that is so entangled, u nraveling it seems impossible.These negative feelings offered me a choice.Give in to fear and disillusionment or choose tot rust God. I sort of chose both. I stood on my firm foundation of faith; but with trembling legs.Satans darts had snagged me once again. Give up.oure defeated,admit it. While standing on faith with thisw eakened mindset,I was confused. I know God is not the author of confusion; yet,I seemed powerless to change my reaction. Until Through a precious reminder of someone elsesw ords,Gods voice spoke to me through Scripture in P roverbs 3:5-6,NKJV where it says,rust in the Lord with all your heart,a nd lean not on your own understanding; in all your w ays acknowledge Him, and He shall direct your paths. Thats what I had been doingleaning on my ownu nderstanding. I would not know Gods complete and a biding peace if I let my trust be conflicted with trying to figure everything out. G od has given me a creative,imaginative mind. A nd I know he wants me to use it for his glory. Therefore,as it says in TheM essage,in 2 Corinthians 10:5,I must be tearing down barriers erected a gainst the truth of God,fitting every loose thought a nd emotion and impulse into the structure of life shaped by Christ. Humbled and thankful for how God came soq uickly to me in my distress,I know that unraveling the dilemma belongs to him.His all-encompassing peace is mine.Selah Jan Merop of Sebring is a News-Sun correspondent. DIVERSIONS Dear Abby P ause And C onsider Jan Merop AL PHABETICALPA IRINGSBy ALAN ARBESFELD A CROSS 1 Dominant theme 6 "... __ a puddy tat!" 10 Collectible game syst em 15 Confident words 19 MasterCard offering 21 Beset by delays 23 Catherine of Aragon's successor, marriagewise 24 High-volume pesticide deliverer 25 They could go either way 26 When many lunch 28 Plan 29 "Stay" singer Lisa 3 1 PBS benefactor 32 Ratio for 25-Across 34 "Cimarron" novelist 3 8 Physician's gp. 39 Brush fire op 40 Latin king 4 1 Best Picture of 1932 48 Fronton balls 52 Lenin's successor5 4 Entertain with extravagance5 5 Lively folk dances 5 7 Classical lead-in 58 Citrusy pie flavor 59 Rival of Cassio 6 0 Oil used in paint 62 "Lordy!" 63 Units in nutrition 67 Attempts to smooth ruffled feathers 69 __ fatty acid 7 0 Russian wheels 7 1 Emit 72 Tach measures: Abbr.7 4 Crankcase components 76 "Dude!" 77 Page-turner 82 Belgian lager, familiarly83 Browning's "How Do I Love Thee?" e.g. 85 In a stuffed-up way 8 6 Cardiologist's exam 8 8 It fell after about 15 y ears 9 0 Pet food brand 9 1 Landlocked Afr. land 92 Burkina Faso, once 96 Adds moisture to 1 02 Batman after Michael 103 Sweetheart 104 Gold compound 105 Civil War battle site 108 Took in, say 113 Procedures for detecting carpal fractures 115 Restricted parking area, in some cases 117 Avoids a confrontation1 18 Go through 1 19 Swedish actress P ersson 1 20 Marketing data 1 21 Brown and Patrick 122 Took a shot D OWN 1 Hurdle for a would-be d oc 2 "Just answer yes __!" 3 Place in math class? 4 "Et tu, Brute?" day 5 Bone below the femur 6 "Let me get back to y ou" 7 Reason for sudden death 8 "Dragonwyck" author Seton9 Followed 10 Metal giant 11 Picador's target 12 Without dissent 13 Mending target1 4 Non-studio pic 15 "__ die for!" 1 6 Credited in a note 1 7 Improve 18 Unhip types 20 Riding, with "on" 22 "Project Runway" mentor Tim 27 __ Tamid: synagogue l amp 3 0 "Crank up the heat!" 3 3 Carpooling convenience 34 At all 35 Catalan surrealist 36 Sgts., e.g. 3 7 First lady before M amie 3 8 Melodic segments 39 Dermal opening 41 Headly of "Dick Tracy" 42 Stowe novel 43 "Ahem" relative 44 Lustful looker 4 5 Subarctic forest 46 Jazz trumpeter Ziggy 47 British city whose natives are called Loiners 49 "I'm holding it!" 50 Multi-platinum Steely Dan album 51 Odysseus trio, to Homer 53 "The Good Girl" star 5 6 Use spurs on 5 8 Not cut 6 0 Picked up 6 1 Beige shade 6 3 Lip protection 64 "Nick of Time" singer6 5 Freud contemporary 66 Colorful autumn tree 6 8 Put the __ on: s quelch 69 Impatient sounds 71 Genetic chains 7 3 '70s Lynyrd Skynyrd label 75 Racing's Unsers 7 7 Canal-cleaning device 78 Way to travel 7 9 Israeli port city 80 __ mater 81 Peptic opening? 83 Leaves the harbor 84 Working 87 Shirt prohibited at most golf courses, ironically 89 Yank's foe 9 2 Initials at O'Hare 93 Old Spanish coins9 4 Knight's quality 9 5 Stay one step ahead of 9 6 Anchor cable opening 97 Mongolian tents 98 Hangs on a line 99 Rough, in a way 100 Court figs. 101 State with a panhandle 102 Shop class holders 106 __ Park: FDR home site 107 Twice tri-1 09 Israeli statesman W eizman 1 10 Package word with a cable car in its "o" 1 11 Suffix with defer 112 Monopoly card 114 Pretoria's land: Abbr. 116 Hosp. staffer Solution on page 12B My own understanding Special to the News-SunAries (March 21-April 20) Aries,do not be discouraged if a few things don ot go right for you this week. Most people learn from their mistakes or challenges,and you will find a silver lining in this. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Taurus,reflect on special times in your life because they can bring happiness. Whenever you feel a tad stressed this week,think positively and know that this,too,shall pass. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Gemini,you may be a party animal this week if the social opportunities arise. Just keep your head at all times and remember to celebrate in a responsible way. Cancer (June 22-July 22) Cancer,many ideas are floating through your head,but nothing will come to fruition unless you write something down and start some action. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Leo,when you have doubts about making purchases or splurging financially,trust your gut instinct and you will be alright. You will have a good meeting on Tuesday. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Virgo,it can be hard to concentrate when you are being pulled in so many directions. You need to designate special times to handle all tasks so you can stay organized. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23 Sometimes taking a risk is necessary to get ahead, Libra. Now is not the time to take risks,however,Play it very conservatively for the next few weeks and then rethink your options. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Just when you seem to be coasting along successfully,a few minor bumps may spring up, Scorpio. They wont be enough to derail your plans, however. Sagittarius (Nov. 23Dec. 21) Sagittarius,there will be plenty of times for laughter this week,as you seem to cause giggles everywhere you go. It feels good to boost peoples spirits. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) Capricorn,a large purchase has been on your mind,but until now you may not have been able to do anything about it. Put out feelers and test the water in the next few days. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) Plenty of opportunities for social gatherings arise now that you have made a few new friends, Aquarius. Show them youre always willing to have a good time. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) You dont have to share every detail to be an honest person,Pisces. It is sometimes advantageous to keep some things personal.FAMOUS BIRTHDAYSOct. 21,Kim Kardashian, socialite,32; Oct. 22,Zac Hanson,musician,27; Oct. 23,Ryan Reynolds,actor, 36; Oct. 24,Kevin Kline, actor,65; Oct. 25,Katy Perry,singer,28; Oct. 26, Jon Heder,actor,35; Oct. 27,Scott Weiland,musician,45. Taurus should just keep thinking positively College graduate living at home wants more control of her life Snapshots GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCE FAIRMONT CINEMA; 1.736"; 6"; Black; Movie Listings 10/1910/24; 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 4 0 0 6 6 3 3

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C M Y K LIVING 14B PA GE News-Sun Sunday, October 20, 2012 D EFICITPledged soon after he took office to cut the nations deficit in half by the end of his first term,but said this spring that he was unable to because the depth of the economic downturn was much worse than expected. Has said any efforts to trim the deficit will have to come through new taxes mostly on the wealthy and through endi ng tax breaks and trimming health care costs. Aims to bring spending down to 20 percent of gross domestic product,instead of last years 24 percent,by the end of his first term. Hed cut nonsecurity discretionary spending,which includes many domestic programs,by 5 percent,and cap such spending below 2008 levels. All that would be difficult in a Congress where lawmak e rs have long been reluctant to find consensus on serious spending cuts. Signed trade deals in 2011 with Colombia,Panama and Korea,although Republicans accused him of slowing approval of the Colombia deal because of resistance from unions. Theve also accused him of not being tough enough on China,but he maint ains his administration has gone after China at the World Trade Organization more aggressively than the previous administration. Would get tougher with China,including promoting all unilateral actions within ou r power to ensure the Chinese adhere to existing agreements.Hed designate China a currency manipulatorand impose penalties. Critics contend that a policy that gets too tough could cause a dangerous schism in diplomatic relations.T RADEIn 2010,signed into law the most sweeping overhaul of the nations financial regulatory system since the Great Depression,and earlier this year sidestepped Republican opposition to appoint a new consumer watchdog whose post was created by the legislation. Democrats say it will prevent a repeat of the 2008 financial industry meltdown,but Republicans warn it creates a new,unwieldy bureaucracy. Would repeal Dodd-Frank Wall Street regulatory changes and replace them with streamlined,modern regulatory framework.Hed also review and eliminate all Obama-era regulations that unduly burden the economy.Romney,who cofounded the Bain Capital private investment firm,has been blasted for being too cozy withW all Street. Promised on the campaign trail to cut taxes for the middle class and raise them for the richest. He has raised some taxes including on indoor tanning bed services and cigarettes and cut others. He angered his progressive base in late 2010 by agreeing t o extend all of the George W. Bush-era tax cuts for two years. But hes not been able t o convince Congress to raise taxes on the wealthiest. W ants to cut marginal income tax rates 20 percent across the board and eliminate taxes on dividends,interest and capital gains for taxpayers with adjusted gross i ncomes of less than $200,000. Hed cut the corporate rate,now 35 percent,to 25 percent. Critics say Romney would be increasing already-record deficits; Republica n s c ounter that the cuts would spur economic activity and produce more revenue. Campaigned on ending the war in Iraq and said hed focus more attention on Afghanistan,where he sent a troop surge after taking office. He announced a gradual troop withdrawal in June 2011,months after a successful Navy Seal raid that killed Osama bin Laden. Afghans are worried about continued unrest. Obama says the U.S. i s prepared to help with military training and counter-terrorism operations,but will shift into a support role. U.S. troop withdrawal from Afghanistan in a Romney administration would be based on conditions on the ground as assessed by our military commanders, a position critics say is too open-ended. In return for a U.S. commitment, Afghanistan must take strong steps to rid the government of corruption and hold fre e e lections. Has insisted that he wouldnt hesitate to use force to stop Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon,although he has said he believes there is time yet for diplomacy and the economic sanctions the administration has enacted to bring Iran to terms before resorting to force. Hes accused his Republican challengers of politicizing worries over Irans nuclear aspirations and beating the drums of war. Says he would keep the military option on the table,a stance thats drawn strong criticism from many Democrats. But if elected president,Romney says,Iran will not have a nuclear weapon.Wants crippling sanctionsand advocates working with insurgents to promote regime change.W ALL STREET REGULATION T AXES AFGHANISTAN I RAN IMMIGRATIONFavors comprehensive immigration reform and passage of the Dream Act to give children of undocumented immigrants a chance to become U.S. citizens. Issued an executive order in June that will give hundreds of thousands of young illegal immigrants a two-year deferment to remain and work legally in the U.S. But has frustrated activists for not making immigration reform a priority and for increasing the number of deportations. Would complete U.S.-Mexico border fence or high-tech system to keep illegal imm igrants out. Would offer no amnesty for illegal immigrants now in U.S. and opposes any policy that would permit undocumented aliens to cut in line.Says hed honor deferments granted under Obamas executive order for young illegal immigrants but would not issue new ones. Supports giving undocumented immigrants a chance to become citizens if they serve in the military. Granted 10 states relief from the most restrictive requirements of the No Child Left Behind law,following complaints from teachers and schools. His Race to the Top initiative rewards schools for enacting education practices that the administration supports,including using innovation to improve struggling schools. Insists parents should not be required to send children to a failing school,and wants increased choice.Teachers should be rewarded for better performance,and colleg e education should be available to anyone who wants it. EDUCATIONThe signature achievement of Obamas first term was a goal that eluded Democrats for decades. The sweeping health care law that requires most individuals either purchase insurance or pay a fee helped fuel the rise of the tea party and the Republican landslide in congressional elections in 2010. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the health care law in June.Signed the Massachusetts health care law considered a model for the 2010 federal health care law. But Romney rails against the federal measure,saying he would push for repeal. Hed issue an executive order immediately allowing any state to waive the las requirements and urge each state to adopt its own health care overhaul. Consumers would be allowed to buy coverage across state lines. Said during debt ceiling negotiations that he would be open to modest modificationsto the federal entitlement programs,but hes not proposed a plan for long-term solvency of the two programs. Would slowly increase the Social Security retirement age and institute a lower benefit growth rate for wealthier recipients for future generations. On Medicare,no change for current beneficiaries or those nearing retirement. For others,backs a premium supportplan,or vouchers,that gives consumers benefits they can use to buy insurance coverage. Traditional Medicare plans would be offered. Democrats pounce on the plan,saying it would end the program as its known,and jeopardize the econom ic wellbeing of seniors.HEALTH CARE SOCIAL SECURITY/ MEDICAREWould give homeowners current on mortgage payments the opportunity to refinance their home loans at current low rates. The plan would be financed by a proposed fee on the largest financial institutions and calls for streamlining the refinancing process. Has also put forward a Homeowners Bill of Rightsthat includes full disclosure of fees and penalties and right of foreclosure appeal. For homeowners facing foreclosure,the current Making Home Affordable programs offer a variety of mortgage modification options,from foreclosure alternatives to mortgage refinancing. Calls for selling 200,000 vacant,foreclosed homes owned by the government,a pilot of which the Federal Housing Finance Agency began in February.Also proposes making it easier for struggling homeowners to get foreclosure that would preserve their credit and to help keep those who cannot afford to pay their mortgages in their homes,yet he offers no specifics on how to do that. Promises to revamp housing reg ulations and reform government-sponsored enterprises Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.HOUSINGWould create up to 1.9 million new jobs through short-term efforts to stimulate hiring,pushing jobs in green technologiesand providing better education for future workers. Proposes cutting payroll taxes for businesses,extending a payroll tax holiday for employers who add jobs or raise wages beyond the prior years payroll and allowing companies to deduct the full value of new equipment. Would spend $30 billion to renovate schools and $50 billion to repair critical infrastructure in order to create new construction jobs. Would also provide $5 billion to help localities hire or retain public safety workers and first responders. Promises 12 million new jobs over four years through a revamp of government taxation and spending,plus an easing of federal regulations. Would eliminate taxes on capital gains,interest and dividends for individuals with adjusted gross income below $200,000 and repeal the estate tax. Proposes reducing the corporate tax rate from 35 to 25 percent,raising visa caps for high-skilled foreign workers and grantin g permanent residency to foreigners pursuing advanced degrees in math,science and engineering. Advocates more aggressive exploitation of energy resources on public lands.JOBS Where Obama and Romney stand as we head into the 2012 electionO LIVIER DOULIERY/ A BACA PRESS/MCT On the issuesBarack Obama Mitt Romney vs.CHUCK KENNEDY/MCT By Lesley Clark and David Lightman,McClatchy Newspapers