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The news-sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01152
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 05-27-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:01152
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Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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C M Y K By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING — Robert Ernest Severino, 62, was arrested by Highlands County Sheriff’s Deputies for grand larceny, according to a press release on Wednesday. The former Sun ’N Lake of Sebring board of supervisors member, who lives at 4218 Columbus Blvd. in Sebring, was arrested on a warrant following a “lengthy investigation into allegations that Mr. Severino collected monies from residents and promised to clear up their bond issues with Sun ’N Lake of Sebring Improvement District,” the release stated. The fraudulent checks paid to Sun ’N Lake, 13 in all, bounced, according to the release. The amount was in excess of $100,000, which created a grand larceny in the first degree charge. The amounts of the worthless checks ranged from $5,445.53 to $28,738.43, according the HCSO. Severino was charged with 13 counts of fraud each with a $1,000 bond and one count of grand larceny with a $16,000 bond. The total bond is $28,000. Severino was booked into the Highlands County Jail without incident, the release stated. He was booked at 4:52 p.m. and was released on bond at 7:53 p.m., according to HCSO records. Severino served six years as a member of the district’s board but did not seek re-election in January of 2010. Severino’s attorney, Michael Keiber, was in Lakeland on Tuesday and not reachable by press time. By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING — Commissioners voted 3-1 to ban smoking on county campuses on Tuesday. The county currently prohibits the use of tobacco products in vehicles and buildings, but wanted to include the grounds around most county-owned office buildings. Commissioner Don Elwell voted against the motion, stating that he wished to just restrict smoking around entrances. “You’ve sold me,” said Commissioner Greg Harris who made the motion afte r hearing a presentation from Health Department Tobacco Coordinator Georgeann Singletary. “There are 70 chemicals in cigarettes that cause cancer,” said Singletary. “More than NEWS-SUN Highlands County’s Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 www.newssun .com 079099401001 HighLow 91 70Complete Forecast PAGE 10A Partly sunny with a storm possible Forecast Question: Should Lake Placid hire a town administrator? Next question: Should preacher Harold Camping have to repay followers who spent their money anticipating judgement day? www.newssun .com Make your voice heard at Online Inside Obituaries John A. Himler Age 75, of Bucyrus, Ohio Obituaries, Page 6A Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453Online: www.newssun.com Yes 26.2% No 73.8% Total votes: 61 Classifieds7A Community Briefs2A Dear Abby9B Editorial & Opinion4A Healthy Living5B Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times9B Religion6B Sports On TV2B Sudoku Puzzle9B Index WAUCHULA STATE BANK; 11.25"; 1.5"; Black plus three; process, front strip Alook back at Oprah's rise to fame PAGE10B Still kickingPo and the gang are back in Kung Fu Panda 2 REVIEW, PAGE9BFriday-Saturday, May 27-28, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 62 | 50 cents By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comLAKE PLACID — There are people in other parts of the country and the world who think because their neighborhood’s history runs back 200, 1,000 or 4,000 years their story is the more interesting or valuable — ever talked to a Bostonian, a Virginian, an Egyptian or a Greek? But the descendants of Lake Placid’s early settlers who gathered at the Masonic Lodge Saturday showed just how fascinating and essential even recent history is. The special occasion was the Centennial Celebration of the Homesteading Family of Lake Steams, presented by the Lake Placid Historical Society and the Mural Society. The earliest settlers to arrive in Highlands County — most in the years after the Civil War and turn of the century— came as a result of the state homestead policy, designed to bring people into the area. Families were given 40 acres to work, and the land became theirs after 10 years Truth is what they remember New-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Roy Henderson spoke at the centennial celebration for early lake Placid settlers Saturday. He was a member of Lake Placid High Schools first basketball team in 1938, and is the tall boy to the left in the Decades of Green Dragon Baskell mural at 307 E. Interlake Blvd. Stories of Lake Placids early settlers recalled News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Fifth graders from Fred Wild Elementary School, under the direction of Michelle Baxter, rehearse their musical tribute to Commitment outside the school district office Tuesday evening. They were waiting to sing in front of the school board. The students performed with energy and enthusiasm, receiving warm applause. We are the future, they sang. We are the instruments of change. We are the future See HISTORY, page 5A Severino County going smoke-free See COUNTY, page 3A Former SNL board member arrested for fraud, larceny HCSO: Severino collected money and wrote bad checks Future starsState's top prep baseball players in Sebring for FACAClassic SPORTS, 1BPark vandalized in LPNewly renovated Devane Park's flag damaged by vandals PAGE3A By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING — By a vote of 3-2, members of the school board voted to put a new teacher evaluation system into effect and hire Dr. Derrell Bryan, former principal of Lake Placid Middle School, to oversee its creation, including the training program necessary for it. The new approach to evaluating teachers and school-based administrators is different from what has come before. Traditionally, teachers were observed and evaluated by their administrators. No formal protocol existed, and each principal went about evaluating in her or his own way. Vivianne Waldron, director of human resources for the school district, explained it is that haphazard approach which is about to change, partly due to pressure from the state legislature and partly because a better method is expected be an improvement, helping everyone. Waldron said the new evaluation system, based on the Danielson Framework fo r Teaching, will result in a four-tie r rating for teachers. Each rating — highly effective, effective, needs improvement, unsatisfactory — is reached by observing an individual in four areas: planning and preparation, classroom management, instruction and professional responsibility. School board OKs evaluation system, picks Bryan to lead it See SCHOOL, page 3A Wauchula State Bank 6x1.5

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C M Y K T he News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyonel isted here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Wednesday, May 25: Octavio Adalberto Bamaca, 31, of Lake Wales, was sentenced to 10 days for operating a motor vehicle without a valid license. Kristeena Sadler Bozeman, 33, of Lorida, was charged with two counts of fraudinsufficient funds. Guillermo Luis Cruz, 40, of Sebring, was sentenced to 30 days for driving while license suspended. Timothy Allen Fanning, 46, of Sebring, was charged with violation of probation reference DUI. Romelio Santiago Garcia, 64, of Sebring, was charged with possession and or use of drug equipment, trafficking marijuana and producing marijuana. Angel Gabriel Gonzalez, 1 8, of Avon Park, was sentenced to 10 days for DUI. Marquis Charmaine Hendricks, 33, of Leesburg, was sentenced to 15 days for failure to appear reference failure to comply with court order for driving with license suspended/revoked. James Royce Hicks, 40, of Lorida, was sentenced to 180 days for DUI. Anita Marie Hollybrook, 36, of St. Petersburg, was charged with violation of probation reference vehicular homicide. Renee L. Mullenax, 21, of Sebring, was charged with violation of probation reference petit theft. Timothy Howard Neese, 51, of Sebring, was charged with cruelty toward a child. Samuel Jose Osorio, 30, of Avon Park, was charged with operating a motor vehicle without a valid license. Robert Ernest Severino, 62, of Sebring, was charged with grand larceny and fraudinsufficient funds. Marvalius Laclut Swift, 37, of Sneads, was charged with violation of a municipal ordinance. Marie Franklin Tomblin, 34, of Avon Park, was charged with violation of probation. Page 2ANews-SunFriday, May 27, 2011www.newssun.com DUMMY 09; 5.542"; 4.5"; Black; publishers block JOHN PALMER ELECTRIC; 3.639"; 3"; Black; toma May 25 1513242852x:4Next jackpot $35 millionMay 21 61923485152x:3 May 18 152329404348x:5 May 25 1415212431 May 24 27131625 May 23 1121252734 May 22 310263334 May 25 (n 2916 May 25 (d 8097 May 24 (n 5539 May 24 (d 3822 May 25(n 135 May 25 (d 643 May 24 (n 764 May 24(d 914 May 24 162126277 May 20 413374011 May 17 3814219 May 13 418222919 May 25 423314250 PB: 23 PP: 2Next jackpot $171 millionMay 21 28404950 PB: 36 PP: 3 May 18 712134249 PB: 16 PP: 2 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawings are twice per day: (d daytime drawing, (n nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Play Lottery Center By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comS EBRING Woodlawn Elementary School fifth g raders spent two weeks creating a unique project to participate in the Trash toT reasure Museum. Instructor Keranis Noble used the scie nce unit to integrate it to everyday use. All the students were a ssigned this project. They were to create or construct something from everyday t rash. The trick, though, was to turn it into something that c ould actually be used, said Noble. Everything from plant waterers to miniature houses were on display in Noblesc lass. The students were happy to show off the things they had created for the guests that day. The projects were displayed as well as an info card revealing all the dataa bout each studentscreation. They werent just making something and that was it. They had to fill out these sheets it tells what the project is, the use, howm any pounds of trash was used to make it, and how many pounds of trash they can save from going into the landfill, explained Noble. The class also received a visit from Highlands CountyR ecycling Center manager Christy Reed, who spoke to t he students about recycling and how they each can do their parts to make less trash in our county. Reed showed the students s ome recycled items that can also be used on an everyday basis. The students then voted on their favorite creation among their classmates. The winner was awarded one of the recycledi tems donated by the recycling center. Fifth graders participate in Trash to Treasure project News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Mrs. Nobles fifth grade science class showed off their Trash to Treasure Museum projects at Woodlawn last Thursday. The students all created projects using things that would normally be thrown away. News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLARFifth grader, Josue Sanchez, shows off his recycled miniature house at his science classs Trash to Treasure Museum. The fifth graders all created unique projects using only things that are usually thrown away and competed against one another last Thursday. B oil water notice in effectAVON PARK Residents along both sides of Hal McRae Boulveard from South Lake Boulevard up to Florida Avenue and over to W.L. Kirkland Street are under a precautionary boil water notice due to a break in a six-inch water main. It is advised that all water used for drinking, c ooking, making ice, b rushing teeth or washing d ishes be boiled for one minute or that bottled water be used as an alternative. The precautionary boil water notice will remain in effect until the problem h as been corrected and b acteriological survey shows that water is safe to drink. Call Public Works at 452-4427.County Memorial Day ceremony setLAKE PLACID Highlands County M emorial Day ceremony w ill be hosted by Placid Post 25 of the Lake Placid American Legion Post on the traditional Memorial D ay, May 30 at 2 p.m. The new 35-foot flag pole will be dedicated to a recently deceased World War II veteran, Gordon Spade, with the presentation of the flag to Nick and Jan Swanson. The presen-t ation will be highlighted b y a 21-gun salute and T aps by the Honor Guard from VFWPost 4300 from Sebring. The flag will then be raised to full staff with a pledge of allegiance ands alute directed by Fred Arbelo, commander of the area Purple Heart organization. Following the ceremony, the attendees will gather in t he Post hall for a present ation conducted by Ceasar Pinzon, president of the Highlands County Veterans Service Office, also featuring Jack Richie, Highlands County commissioner. For further information, call Commander J.P. Plunkett at 441-4103 or 465-0975. Whats Up Downtown? meeting is TuesdayS EBRING The Sebring Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA Whats Up Downtownm eeting at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at Still Chic Boutique (112 N. Ridgewood Drive). Agenda items include: Centenniela ctivities, themed events, updates on the proposed entertainment district and updates on the CRAs programs and marketing ini-t iatives. e encourage anyone who has an interest inD owntown Sebring to attend these informative meetings, said PeteP ollard, CRAexecutive director. If you have an i dea for Downtown Sebring, we want to hear it. T he mission of the CRA is to bring about the econ omic revitalization of an established target area. To create a re-investment environment that attracts private investors into thea rea. To promote improvements within the redevelo pment area through renovation and restoration of buildings, as well as toe ncourage new construction. To acquire the fundi ng necessary to make the infrastructure improvements necessary to attract i nvestment dollars and improve the assessed taxable value of district properties and to assist the chamber of commerce andD owntown Merchants in their efforts to market the downtown businesses.Events at local lodges, postsA VON PARK Combat Veterans M emorial VFWPost 9853 will host music by Uptown Country from 5-7 p.m. today. The U.S. Military Vets Motorcyle Club willh ave its annual barbecue on Saturday. Karaoke will be by Peg and Perry from 5-8 p.m. For details, call 452-9853. L AKE PLACID The Lake Placid Moose CO MMUNITYBR IEFS Continued on page 6A When Spc. Jameson Lindskog desperately tried to stay alive during a chaotic firefight in easte rn Afghanistan on Mar. 29, it wasnt for personal reasons. It was his job. When I found out hed be a medic in the Army, I w asnt surprised, Lindskogs mother, Donna Walker, told The Unknown Soldiers. Heh ad endless compassion f or anyone or anything that was helpless or in need. Shot while caring for a w ounded fellow 101st Airborne Division paratrooper, Lindskog simplyk ept going. Life was prec ious to this soldier of e mpathy, especially when it was someone elses. He was just incredib le, his mom said. Every time our dog had a seizure, hed be right there to help. While helping a sick f amily pet is different than caring for a wounded soldier on the battlefield, Lindskogs lifesaving i nstincts kicked in amid t he hellish violence of Afghanistans Konar province. It was his first time in c ombat, Walker said. I find it even more amazing that even though he had never experienced combat, he never hesitated. I nstead of celebrating his sister Candaces 27th birthday at home in Pleasanton, Calif., L indskog found himself covered in the blood of a brother in arms, not to mention his own. But if he was going to make the ultimate sacrifice, he wanted it to be this way. According to his mother, the medic had a recurring nightmare of stepping on an improvised explosive device, without getting the chance to care for his fellow wounded warriors in the aftermath. When I first heard something had happened, I thought, Oh, my gosh, he must have been blown up, and his own worst fear came true, Walker said. I was completely shocked to later find out the circumstances. Those circumstances are tragic, but also the stuff of legend. He was so weak, the soldiers mom said, breaking down in tears. He told the other guy who was there, Im sorry I cant help you anymore, but I cant continue. As Lindskog succumbed to his devastating injuries, he thought of the wounded comrade in his care. He asked another soldier to help before he died, Walker said. The murder of Lindskog is an outrage. Shooting at a medic on the battlefield is not onlya blatant violation of international law, but a despicable act of cowardice. In the almost 10 years since the terrorist atrocities of Sept. 11, 2001, we have come to expect only the lowest from our eneThe day he tried to live See MEDIC, page 3A POLICEBLOTTER Continued on page 3A John Palmer Electric 2x3 Pub block

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C M Y K Special to the News-SunSouthwest Florida Water Management District executive director David L. Moore resigned Thursday but has offered to continue temporarily in the role to help facilitate the successful transition of the next executive director. Moore, who was appointed executive director in March 2003, says he feels he is leaving the District at the right time. “The past eight years have been extremely rewarding,” said Moore. “From developing large-scale alternative water supplies and reclaimed water to dealing with droughts, hurricanes and an unprecedented freeze, I’m extremely proud of what the District has been able to accomplish. Now I’m ready to transition into the next chapter of my life, which will include spending more time with my family.” Moore began his career at the District in 1984 as a hydrologist, working his way up through the leadership ranks as a project manager, manager, director and deputy executive director. During Moore’s tenure he has played a key role in restoration and preservation of water bodies, establishment of minimum flows and levels and watershed assessments. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, May 27, 2011Page 3A Zeno's Italian Restaurant; 3.639"; 3"; Black; main only HIGHLANDS COUNTY FAIR ASSOC.; 3.639"; 3"; Black; flea market DESIGNER DENTAL; 3.639"; 4"; Black; tv incentive SEBRING DISCOUNT BEVERAGE; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 5/27,29;6/1 MARTIAL ARTS (pp); 3.639"; 3"; Black; main ff top rhp only mies, who, until the historic events of May 1, were led by Osama bin Laden. True to form, bin Laden acted “cowardly” at the moment of his demise, according to news reports quoting senior U.S. officials. “I imagine I feel the same way that most Americans feel: completely ecstatic and jubilant at the thought,” Walker said the week bin Laden was brought to justice by U.S. Navy SEALs. “When I heard he was living in that million-dollar compound, I hoped it would demoralize the people fighting for him.” Sgt. 1st Class Ofren Arrechaga, 28, and Staff Sgt. Frank Adamski III, 26, died in the same Mar. 29 battle as Lindskog, 23. Three more “Screaming Eagles” serving with the 2nd Battalion, 327th Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat team were also killed the same day in a separate battle nearby. Many of these fallen heroes, including Lindskog, were just weeks away from coming home. In war, men and women who would have lived even longer lives of consequence are taken from us, a possibility his mother said Lindskog acknowledged when he made his “first adult decision” to join the military. “He had a strong sense of right and wrong and what’s fair,” Walker said. “But of course, the world is never fair.” As Walker embarks on a lifetime of remembrance, she worries about remarkable human beings like her son being forgotten. “Usually, the kind-hearted people are the ones who are unappreciated,” she said. Not today. To find out more about Tom Sileo, or to read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com. Continued from page 2A The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Tuesday, May 24: Gerardo Ascencion-Galin, 34, of Lake Placid, was charged with violation of municipal ordinance. Jessica Lane Gavagni, 26, of Lake Placid, was charged with driving while license suspended. Jonathan Christopher Green, 18, of Avon Park, was charged with battery. James Whitfield Grover, 28, of Avon Park, was charged with burglary of an unoccupied dwelling, dealing in stolen property, grand theft, possession and or use of drug equipment and possession of a controlled substance without a prescription. Rickie Lee Massey, 30, of Sebring, was charged with burglary of an unoccupied dwelling, grand theft and dealing in stolen property. Joel Allen Nichols, 42, of Nokomis, was charged with withholding support. Samantha Marie Townsend, 22, of Naples, was charged with violation of probation reference possession of oxycodone with intent to sell/deliver. Susan Willis Trammell, 48, of Lake Placid, was charged with violation of condition of release reference possession of a controlled substance without prescription. Joseph Daniel Williams, 37, of Lake Wales, was charged with battery. Continued from page 2A Martial Arts 2x3 Highlands County Fair2x3 Designerdental 2x4 Sebring Discount Beverage 2x3 Zenos 2x3 18 percent of all deaths are attributable to smoking.” Although cautious about others’right to smoke, Commissioner Jack Richie, a former smoker himself, agreed with the ban. “Quite frankly, I don’t like walking into this building and have to walk through two or three people who are smoking. It annoys me,” Richie said. “I am leery of going too far and doing with their bodies what they wish, but I have no problem with restricting smoking,” said Richie. Board Chair Barbara Stewart agreed that smoking was a hazard, stating that she lost her father and several friends to health complications from smoking. Stewart directed staff to return with an appropriate ordinance or policy that would implement the tobacco ban, and to look at providing cessation programs to the county employees who wish to kick the habit. The ban would not prohibit smoking on the sidewalks or the right-of-ways surrounding county buildings. Sheriff Susan Benton, who was at the meeting to discuss a grant application, took the podium in support of a county campus ban. “Setting up a smoking area doesn’t work. We restric t employee smoking to the roof, and employees take longer breaks to smoke,” Benton said. “These are your buildings, so you can restrict the smoking if you want,” Benton added. Florida Hospital has already implemented a tobacco free campus policy, and South Florida Community College has plans to become smoke-free later in the year. Continued from page 1A By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comLAKE PLACID — Just days after the finishing touches were put on the gazebo at DeVane Park in Lake Placid, vandals struck and damaged the American flag. “Today we had to take the Flag down. Someone had taken down the flag and cut out four of the stars. I cannot believe someone would do something like this,” Town Clerk Arlene Tuck wrote in an e-mail on Thursday. The ribbon-cutting ceremony was held on Saturday, and the flag was a gift from a congressman, according to Tuck. “Saturday we put up a brand new American Flag that was bought from Congressman Tom Rooney, which had flown over the Nation’s Capitol,” Tuck wrote. During the renovations, the gazebo received a new roof and brick pavers were laid around the structure to serve as a memorial for Lake Placid citizens who wish to purchase a brick with an inscription. Anew 12-foot-wide sidewalk was installed through the park and the has 6-foo t spokes radiating to the outside of the circle park. New lights were installed to assist in night events and the new flag pole was christened over the weekend. The $750,000 project was funded by the Florida Department of Transportation through a grant. DeVane Park vandalized County to ban smoking on its property Medic died trying to give aid to others POLICEBLOTTER SWFWMD head Moore resigns Special to the News-SunLORIDA— Residents of Mallard Mobile Home Park and Palms Estates have something to smile about these days. The long-awaited Istokpoga canal maintenance dredging project is under way and residents that live along the canals that are being dredged couldn’t be happier. When Mark Colarusso and Paul Lawry of Adventure Environmental, the contractors that are performing the work, began dredging at Mallard Park, the residents came out and started clapping. “They were so excited that they can get to the lake via the canal now,” Colarusso said. The work crew was busy Tuesday dredging the longest canal located in Palms Estates. According to Calarusso, if all goes well, the canal should be completed in about a week. “We really have to take our time and scrape the layers off; keep everything organized and neat. We certainly don’t want to do any damage to homeowner’s docks or property. We took about 80 trips yesterday. It is slow going, but will be worth it when it is done.” The process includes two track hoes — one very large machine located on land and one smaller machine located on a barge at the other side of the canal. The smaller track hoe digs the muck off the bottom of the canal and scoops it into a huge container, which is then transported to the larger machine, which scoops it out and dumps it on land to dry out. The process begins at the lake and moves through the canals. “The residents are tickled,” Rich Appenzellar, executive director of Palms Estates, said. “Before this project the boats couldn’t get out to the lake because the canals had become too shallow. “The residents that are still here are very excited and come out to watch the crews work.” Istokpoga Canal dredging under way Courtesy photo Residents watch as crews dredge a canal leading into Lake Istokpoga. The project will improve access to the lake. To arrive at a rating, the observed evaluation result is combined with the results of the standardized test scores measuring a student’s academic progress — each weighted 50 percent. Students and parents may contribute to the observed evaluation, as may the teacher. Qualified classroom teachers, after intensive training, will act as the peer evaluators. The division in the board vote had nothing to do with evaluating teachers or hiring Bryan, who received strong words of support from everyone on the board. Instead, Donna Howerton, the chairperson, and Andrew Tuck were opposed to the plan as presented because they worried about future continuity, lack of precedent and the expense, especially because the outside funding runs out in four years. The three board members — J. Ned Hancock, Bill Brantley and Ronnie Jackson — in favor of the new plan all spoke of the need to help teachers and schools improve. Hancock said success of the new system depended on leadership. “I do think this is so dramatic, so different, you’ve got to have someone with the respect of his peers and who can wear a variety of hats,” said Hancock, referring to Bryan possessing the qualities needed to turn an idea into reality. “The success of this program is essential for our staff,” he said. Brantley and Jackson agreed. With something this important it was imperative, Jackson said, that “we start out and do the very best we can do.” Continued from page 1A Schools to start evaluation system

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C M Y K Do you find Christmas arriving quicker with every passing year?How about the start of the hurricane season? D id you know it begins in less than a week, on Wednesday, June 1. According to our Your Voice question in Wednesdays paper, 46.2 percent of you are not ready yet, w hile 53.8 percent say they are ready for what ever comes their way. With the Earth in an active p hase, the ground moving, weather patterns shifting and r ecords for devastation being s et left and right, the 46.2 percent may regret their procrastination. N ot that we are predicting a more than active season, or long for the excitement of C harlie, Frances and Jeanne, b ut the most important lesson weve learned over the last d ecade is to take nature serio usly. I s all well and good for author Carl Hiaasen to have o ne of his characters tie himself to a bridge and ride out a h urricane in the open, its another thing to face a real hurricane. If we have learned anything over the last several years its that there is no magic wand to be waveda fter disaster has struck. When trees block roads, cell towers collapse, and waters rise, it takes time for emergency workers to get tot he devastation. This means being prepared to fend for yourself for at least three days. Start now to store canned o r packaged food that can be eaten without cooking. Have gallons of water on h and. Any veterans of 2004 will tell you living without electricity is hot and uncom-f ortable. Hydration is essential. N ow is the time to think ahead, not when a storm is less than 24 hours away anda nxious people have formed into long, uncomfortable l ines. For example, now is the time to call the doctor to make arrangements for extra medications when the timec omes. Now is the time to figure o ut what you will do with your pets. Now is the time to find a s afe, dry place to store important papers. N ow is the time to make sure your home insurance is in order, or to purchase some. N ow is the time to create an evacuation plan, or make arrangements if youll want to leave before the storm. Someone recently said that d isasters are Gods way of bringing people together, so why not introduce yourself to your neighbors now. One thing is for sure, if a major hurricane does strike,w e will have to be our own f irst responders. It will help to know one another. Page 4AN ews-SunF riday, May 27, 2011www.newssun.comTODAYSEDITORIALTODAYSLETTERS 2 227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 N EWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com S COTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNES ports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGV ICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522a nthony.mccowan@newssun.com B USINESS OFFICEJ ANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION Avon Park needs a resetEditor: Avon Park has become crazy politics; the council and the city manager need to take a step back and reset the atmosphere. This means bringing the police chief back to full duty so we get what we are paying for. Of course, this will mean council members and Chief Rowen will have an uncomfortable relationship, but it just needs to be kept professional. Technically, the city manager is the only city employee that works directly for the council, which means no city employee needs to come to the council meetings. The only reason the city manager needs any department head at the council meeting is to explain a situation and/or request in detail. I really believe it is important for the council, city employees and citizens of Avon Park to understand how our city government works. In reality the city is operated by the city manager and the department heads, the city council is responsible for financial and policy decisions (I simplified this that some city council members have interfered with city operations and my answer is yes and this needs to be changed. One of the areas that concerns me the most is the situation of Mr. and Mrs. Sutherland; I believe it is totally unethical for Parke Sutherland to be on the council and Maria Sutherland to work directly for the city manager. Parke Sutherland has the responsibility to approve or disapprove Marias projects and being married does not make ethical sense. I also do not see how Parke can hire and supervise the city manager when his wife is supervised directly by the city manager. To make this right, one of them needs to change from their positions. My take would be Parke Sutherland should resign from council because Maria Sutherland can offer a lot to the city, which helps the city grow. The last thing I would like to comment on is contracts for city employees; why do we have them? I do see where maybe the city manager should have a contract, but why does the city need contracts for other city employees, this makes no sense to me. An employees contract should be you get paid, you do your job, if you do a good job you continue to be employed, if not you get terminated. I also believe that the probation period should be one year, not six months. Its important for city employees to be able to do their job and not worry about political issues. Ed Dickerson Avon ParkChiefs supporters should speak upEditor: Avon Parks Nancy Pitcher had it right in her letter to News-Sun editors in the May 20 edition of the paper. The chief (of police have more supporters than he knows, and its time they stopped being silent. Thanks, Nancy, for your courage in speaking out. It is also time for the State Attorneys office to do the investigating of those determined to get rid of the chief. It seems to me that what we have read about one in particular is not all shes hiding and that there is, at least, a little fire from all that smoke. She seems to look upon her financial and political indiscretion as an accident or mistake. Oh, yeah. Thats what we hear whenever a politician is caught playing that game. It would appear that for the present that game has been nipped in the bud. But the ugly facts prove that those who get away with it just become more clever with how they play the game. Washington is full of those who have gotten away with it and have gotten rich on it. The truth is that Avon Park has tremendous potential in so many ways, but it needs the interest and forthright determination of its finest to do the job. I know youre there. Come out, come out wherever you are. Cathey Fallows SebringImpeach ObamaEditor: Impeach Obama for: 1. Violating the American Tax Code, and 2. Aiding criminal acts against America. There is class war in America. The rest of the world has wised up to the fact that all nations worldwide, the rich are making serfs of their middle class. They are rising up and demanding change. The President of these United States should be wearing a striped suit for the abuse of the American tax system and misuse of Americas trust funds such as Social Security and all of our social programs. All career politicians and top CEOs of American companies should also be wearing striped suits. Examples: The hiring of illegals and guest workers who have overstayed their visas. There are 20 million plus jobs held by illegals. They, the illegals, are also destroying our electoral process. The giving of and rewarding the illegal is a criminal act. No amnesty. Ronald Reagans criminal act, with the help of many career politicians, has promoted the invasion of millions more illegal Mexicans asking for amnesty. The raising the tax at the gas pump to pay for the military protection to nations worldwide is a criminal act against all Americans. Of all items being considered by our leaders in Washington, the illegal immigration amnesty plan being hatched by the Obama Administration still presents the greatest threat to Social Security. Just five years ago, the U.S. Senate voted 50 to 49 in favor of making sure illegal aliens could collect their illegally earned Social Security benefits after they are given legal status. But if that isnt dangerous enough, theres this second plan: The so-called Social Security Totalization Agreement with Mexico. Because of a loophole in Social Security law, if this Social Securit y Treaty goes into effect, illegal workers would be able to count all of their earnings toward Social Security benefits, even for jobs worked without legal authorizations. And since a totalization agreement would cover not just Mexican workers, but also their spouses and their dependents, it is highly likely that, over time, millions of people would begin receiving U.S. Social Security benefits and the cost would be in the billions of dollars a year. Transparency? We tried to obtain copies of the totalization agreement that the government signed with Mexico and documents explaining the effect that agreement would have on Social Security. Finally we were forced to file lawsuits under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA simply refused to turn over what they have. After two and a half years, the federal government finally released to TSCLthe first known public copy of the Agreement with Mexico, with all these serious challenges to the stability of Social Security, none are more dangerous than an amnesty or the U.S./Mexico Social Security Treaty both of which award benefits to millions of Mexican nationals who worked here illegally. All Americans should contact their Congress and Senate. Impeach Obama. Social Security must not become a global welfare system. Billie E. Jewett Sebring Last season, fans may recall, many baseball telecasts began with announc-e rs reading the commercial line: Grab an ice cold Bud. This season, the pitch reads: Grab some Buds. W hether the purpose of the new blurb is to cleverly link friends buds with consuming multiple beers Buds during games iss omething only the folks at Anheuser-Busch and its ad agency know for sure. What is certain is that baseball, along with other pro sports, has a drinking problem. B eer has long been baseballs beverage of choice. A s a kid I listened to Yankee games and sang along with the jingle: Baseball and Ballantine...what a combin ation, all across the nation... The announcer, Mel Allen, referred to home runs as Ballantine Blasts. With due respect to apple p ie, nothing is more American than watching a b aseball game with a hot dog and a beer. But lately things have gotten outh and. The problems epicenter t his season is Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, where on Opening Day twou nidentified Dodger supporters attacked a fan of the visiting Giants, Bryan S tow, leaving him sprawled in the parking lot with critic al injuries from which he has yet to recover. One suspect has now been charged, and while it's not clear what role alcohol may havep layed, the Dodgers saw a direct link and immediately revised the stadiums alcohol policies. In recent years the Dodgers have been baseballs most cavalier fran-c hise when it comes to pushing alcohol sales and t olerating the rowdy behavior that resulted. Patrons were allowed to purchase two 24-ounce beers at a time the equivalent off our normal beers and the Dodgers began selling hard liquor as well. Following the Stow inci-d ent, the Dodgers cancelled plans for six half-price beer days. Rules regarding alcohol sales vary widely amongt he 30 Major League teams and at the hundreds of minor league venues. Some stadiums, such as AT&T Park in San Francisco, don ot permit beer sales by vendors in the stands. At other locations, such as Miller Park in Milwaukee named after a beer company vendors do hawk beer. M any minor league teams, such as the Fresno G rizzlies in California, have special one dollar beer nights. At a stadium Iv isited in New Jersey this month they call it Thirsty T hursday an invitation to over-indulgence. Research published recently by the University of Minnesota indicates thatr oughly 40 percent of fans leaving pro baseball and f ootball games have measurable alcohol levels in their systems, and 8 percento f fans are legally drunk. The proportion of drunken f ans rises dramatically among two groups: those under age 35, and thosew ho have tailgated before the game. At Boston's Fenway P ark, an increase in beer sales a few years back led t o complaints about intoxicated fans. This season, the Sox declared that alcoholrelated problems had subsided and obtained permis-s ion to sell hard liquor, but only after agreeing to keep it away from the bleachers. Many teams seem to believe that the best way to deal with alcohol abuse is to sell mixed drinks only int he luxury boxes and premium seats. T his approach is part of a larger trend to aggressively segregate fans according to economic considerations. True, box seats have alwaysc ost more than the bleachers. But at newer parks the higher-priced sections are built in such a way that fans with less expensive tickets cant so much as se t foot there, meaning they cant access the elite concession stands. Such policies may make wealthy fans feel safer, bu t they often lead to unrestricted rowdiness in the cheap seats, which, at Dodger Stadium were ove rtaken by beer-guzzling thugs. Baseballs drinking prob lem extends to the players as well. Already this year s ix Major Leaguers from five different teams have been arrested for drunk driving. The issue of drink ing by ballplayers has been of concern since the 2007 death of St. Louis Cardina ls pitcher Josh Hancock, who was legally drunk when he crashed his car following a game. Major League baseball, still attempting to recover from the scandal involving performance-enhancing drugs, is now said to be working on an alcohol pol icy for players. But C ommissioner Bud Selig n eeds to create an overarching alcohol policy for fans as well. Tailgating should be eliminated, as should beers ales by roving stadium vendors. Sales of alcohol should be halted after sixi nnings, and reduced-price b eer banned entirely. Hard l iquor policies need reeva luation. R ather than leaving alco hol controls to individualo wners, Major League baseball should acknowledge its responsibility toa ct before there are other serious incidents. In other w ords, Commissioner Seli g, t his Buds for you. Peter Funt is a writer and public speaker; he may be reached at www.CandidCamera.com he's also the long-time host of Candid Camera. Baseballs alcohol problem Storm warning Make sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. A nonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; or e-mail editor@newssun.com.

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Page 5ANews-SunFriday, May 27, 2011www.newssun.com NATIONAL NEWSPAPER PLACEMENT; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, Consumers Union SFCC performing arts 3x10.5 color National Newspaper Placement Consumers Union 6x10.5 color if they stayed and made improvements. Representatives of six homesteading families — all of whom settled in the area at least 100 years ago — long before Melvil Dewey renamed the town Lake Placid and dreamt of creating an upscale winter resort — told stories passed down over the generations, some still in living memory, some commemorated on murals around town. In general, the stories dealt with the primitive hardships men and women endured in an isolated world without telephones or refrigeration, but plenty of mosquitoes and wild bears. They spoke of how everyone knew everyone else and how the only responders in emergencies were the neighbors, none immediately next door. Kelsey Payne, whose family moved into the area from western Tennessee in the early 1900s, said, “They came by horse and wagon, leading cows. Think about what they did and what they did it with. “They needed strong backs, intelligence and a strong will. They had to plan ahead to live off the land.” In an example of how individuals had to rise to the challenges, Jerry Pendarvis said no one wanted to shake hands with his grandmother, Georgia Pendarvis. “Men would turn white and fall to their knees,” he said, her grip was so strong. Betty Ray Roberts’greatgrandfather, Joshua Lastinger, was the first to arrive into the then Lake Stearns area. He came from Arcadia, having crossed the plain with an ox and wagon. The trip took the better part of two days. Lastinger had been a Confederate soldier who left Georgia for Florida in the 1890s. He arrived with his wife, Louisa, and six little girls. They settled on the eastern shore of the lake, camping out under the trees until they built their house. Of course there was no indoor plumbing and no electricity — nor any easy shopping, Arcadia being the two day trip away. Not every homsteader succeeded. School was held under a tree at first. In later years Lake Placid students boarded in Sebring for the week, attended school there and came home on the weekends. Nancy Holland Lewis told how her grandmother, Edith Lewis, was new to homesteading and nature. One night when she first arrived she was chilled to hear a woman screaming in the woods, and not at all comforted to learn it was actually the sound of a panther cry. Don Bates, whose family have grown Easter lilies and then caladiums for generations, said his mother, Florence Nowling Booker, had two brothers. One of them, Earl Booker, was in the hospital with a ruptured appendix in September of 1931. Not a particularly historical moment outside the family, except that Earl Booker had a roommate in the hospital — the wounded robber whose attempted hold-up of the Tropical State Bank is depicted on the mural at North Main Avenue and West Interlake Boulevard. Caught, “he came to see the error of his ways,” Bates said of the robber. Pendarvis, whose greatgreat grandfather came to Florida in 1835, told a story about Russell Hartsfield who was chief of police in Lake Placid from 1979 to 1988. Adomestic disturbance was reported, Pendarvis said. When Hartsfield arrived he found the husband covered in blood claiming his wife had shot him. Come to find out the husband had killed a chicken and smeared its blood over his chest. “I’d better smell fried chicken the next time I stop by,” Pendarvis said Hartsfield told the man. Continued from page 1A History of Lake Placid recalled News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Betty Ray Roberts (left) is descended from Joshua and Louisa Lastinger, the first homesteaders to settle in the area. C M Y K

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C M Y K Page 6ANews-SunFriday, May 27, 2011www.newssun.com 64 WEST COLLISION; 3.639"; 3"; Black; tv incentive Ridge Area ARC; 1.736"; 3"; Black; **internet included** PUBLIX-National Newspaper Plac; 3.639"; 16"; Black; main a, publix liquor 2374 will host a Texas Holdem game at 2 p.m. today. Music with Big Freddie from 6-9 p.m. Bingo-bango is set for 2 p.m. Saturday. Music with Written in Red from 6-9 p.m. For details, call the lodge at 465-0131. LAKE PLACID — The Veterans of Foreign Wars 3880 will host music with LTtoday. Bingo is planned for 2 p.m. Saturday with horse races at 5:30 p.m. On Sunday, a memorial service will be at 5 p.m. Music with Tom. For details, call the lodge at 699-5444. SEBRING AMVETS Post 21 will have karaoke at 7 p.m. Saturday with Dan Musselman. The Post will also have a Memorial Day service at 11 a.m. Monday at the Post, 2029 U.S. 27 South. After the service, a traditional picnic lunch will be provided.Singing Under the Oaks is todaySEBRING – Singing Under the Oaks with Dave and Judy with country music and southern gospel is every second and fourth Friday of the month at 7 p.m. at 3414 Beck Ave. There is a $5 donation at the door. There will be door prizes. For more information, call 253-0771.Historical Society honors WWII veteranLAKE PLACID – There will be an open house reception at the Depot Museum from 3-5 p.m. today. Floyd Rider, retired U.S. Navy World War II veteran and long-time member and frequent host, will be honored at a reception. He was a participant of the recent “Honor Flight” to Washington, DC. Members of the Lake Placid High School ROTC have been invited to attend. Plan to enjoy light refreshments and good conversation. The museum is at 12 Park Ave. W. near the train mural. Several new displays honor all veterans as well as ancestors. Call 465-1771 for details. Regular museum hours are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday to Thursday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday. The museum will be closed Monday.A patriotic salute at Crown PointeSEBRING — Highlands Bagpiper David H. Batty will join the residents of Crown Pointe in celebrating a tribute to America’s Memorial Day 2011. Batty will appear in Highland regalia and is a nationally recognized Piper giving numerous performances and gaining recognition as the official Highland Bagpiper of Beltrami County, Minn. and Cumberland County, Tenn. The event will include patriotic melodies that Batty has selected for this special occasion including “This is My Country,” “God Bless America” and “Stars and Stripes Forever.”Red Hatters lunch canceledSEBRING – The Red Hatters Queen of Abundance luncheon meeting has been canceled for Monday, June 13. On Aug. 8 they will meet for lunch at Dot’s Restaurant meeting room at 11:30 a.m. For information call 4650161. Continued from page 2A COMMUNITYBRIEFS JOHN HIMLER John A. Himler, 75, of Bucyrus, Ohio died Monday, May 23, 2011 at his residence following a brief battle with cancer. He was born April 15, 1936 in Bucyrus to the late Erma Gertrude (Shull) Himler and Harold John Himler. He was married Sept. 6, 1956 to Susan Miller, who also preceded him in death on Nov. 19, 1957. John graduated from Bucyrus High School in 1954 and attended both The Ohio State University and Tiffin University. He worked many years with his father in the Smooth Kool Dairy. He then attended Ohio Northern University, graduating in 1966 with a degree in Education. He was a teacher and coach for seven years at Allen East Local Schools near Lima and at Bucyrus City Schools for 23 years retiring June 1995. John enjoyed playing cards and socializing with his friends in the AHPC. For the past 13 years, John enjoyed spending the winters in Sebring, Fla. where he was a member of Harder Hall Golf Club. While there, he enjoyed golfing with his friends and coordinating the men’s league, as well as working for the Harder Hall Women’s Invitational Golf Tournament as a starter. He is survived by his wife and best friend, Joyce (Welge) Himler, whom he married June 12, 1971; three daughters, Allison (Lon) McKeehen of Bucyrus, Pamela (John) Givens of Cambridge, Ohio, and Patricia Eicher of Bucyrus; five grandchildren, Chris Eicher of Bucyrus, Shannon McKeehen of Bowling Green, Ohio, Erica McKeehen of Chicago, Ill., Janelle and Michael Givens of Cambridge, Ohio. In addition, John leaves many good friends in Bucyrus and Sebring. His family will receive friends for a memorial gathering from 2-4 and 6-8 p.m. Friday, May 27 at Wise Funeral Service, 129 W. Warren St., Bucyrus, Ohio 44820. Masonic services will be held that evening at 5:45 p.m. Amemorial service will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday at Good Hope Lutheran Church with Pastor Dave Bliss officiating and burial of cremated remains will follow at Oakwood Cemetery. The family requests that in lieu of flowers, contributions be given to HomeCare Matters; Good Hope Lutheran Church or Shriners Hospitals for Children through the funeral home. Expressions of sympathy may be left at www.wisef uneral.com Himler OBITUARY Courtesy photo Local singer Billy Hamilton (left), of Sebring, joins Lee Allcorn, of Longshot Band, on stage at Duffers a couple weeks ago to sing a song. Longshot Band will be performing from 6-9 p.m. Friday at Duffers. Special to the News-SunSEBRING – It will be a Black & White Night Celebration at Duffer’s Sports Grille on Friday. The party will kick off from 6-9 p.m. with Longshot Band playing music during dinner hour. Lee Allcorn’s four-piece group will provide music to dine by and then later step it up a notch for everyone to dance. Allcorn has been known to bring some local celebrities up on stage to sing a long with them. A couple weeks ago, Billy Hamilton, of Sebring, joined them to sing “Sweet Home Alabama.” Later on Friday, Billy “Griff” Griffis of Southern Style Karaoke, of Hardee County, will be playing some tunes at 9 p.m. for everyone to sing until 1 a.m. Everyone is encouraged to dress in black and white attire. There will be black and white drink specials and party decorations. Everyone can sing songs related to black and white such as “Back In Black” by AC/DC or how about “White Wedding” by Billy Idol. On Saturday, the Loose Change Band will be performing at Duffer’s. They play a variety of rock, country and dance music that even a few line dances can be done to for those who like to step it up. The band plays from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. There is no cover charge for any musical entertainment at Duffer’s. The club is at 6940 U.S. 27 North, Sebring. For details, call 382-6339. Black & White Night planned Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID –The American Legion Post 25 in Lake Placid will host the County’s Memorial Day program at the 1490 U.S. Highway 27 Post on Monday. The program is to begin at 2 p.m. with a dedication of a flag. VFWHonor Guard from 4300 will assist. Cesar Pinzon is one of the featured speakers. Mark Manley is slated to the bagpiper. The American Legion Riders Association members are working with the American Legion Post 25 to make this a memorable program. Commander J.P. Plunkett can be contacted for more details at 4414103. Lake Placid Elks will hold a Memorial Day program at 11 a.m., with Lt. Col. Buck MacLaughlin from the Avon Park Ai r Force Range as speaker. The Lake Placid High School Junior ROTC will assist with the program. Bagpiper Bob Campbell, known with his work with the Highlands County Sheriff’s Department, will play the bagpipe at the program for the Elks. For more information contact Bud Wallen or Suzanne Krueger. VFWPost 3880 in Lake Placid will hold their annual Poppy Drive on today and Saturday. The members are also holding a “Boys Are Back” chicken barbecue on Sunday. Asmall Memorial Day program fo r the members will be held. Call 699-5444. Memorial Day to be observed Special to the News-SunWASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with STIHL Inc. of Virginia Beach, Va., has announced a voluntary recall of the following consumer product. Consumers should stop using recalled products immediately unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product. The products on recall are gas powered STIHLtrimmers, brushcutters, KombiMotors, hedge trimmers, edgers, clearing saws, pole pruners, and backpack blowers that utilize a toolless fuel cap. The level of ethanol and other fuel additives can distort the toolless fuel cap, allowing fuel to spill, posing a fire and burn hazard. STIHLhas received 81 reports of difficulty installing and/or removing the fuel caps and fuel spillage. No injuries have been reported. Visit STIHL, www.stihlusa.com, for details. STIHL recalls yard power products Special to the News-SunAVON PARK –South Florida Community College’s Corporate and Continuing Education is offering computer science workshops at the SFCC Highlands Campus. The Cloud Computing with Google Docs workshop will teach students how to create and save word processing documents, spreadsheets, online forms, and slide presentations on the Internet. The workshop meets 12:304:30 p.m. Friday, June 3. The Cloud Graphics with Sumo Paint will teach students about photos, create graphic art work, crop and resize photos, and create backgrounds. The workshop meets 12:30-4:30 p.m. Friday, June 10. Both classes cost $65. SFCC offers Computer Science workshops Publix 2x16 64 West Collision 2x3 Ridge Area Arc 1x3

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C M Y K www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday,May 27, 2011Page 7A IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 11-100-GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, Plaintiff, vs. TITO GARAY and JOSEFINA GARAY, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the ``Final Judgment on Verified Complaint'' (the ``Final Judgment''), entered in the above-styled action on April 11, 2011, the Clerk of Highlands County will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida, as described below at a Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, on June 13, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. Lot 8949, Lot 8950, and Lot 8951, of AVON PARK LAKES UNIT No. 27, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 27, ofthe Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Property address: 2602 North Hewlett Road, Avon Park, FL 33825-9439 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. BOB GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk May 27; June 3, 2011 S S T T . J J O O H H N N U U N N I I T T E E D D M M E E T T H H O O D D I I S S T T C C H H U U R R C C H H D D e e m m o o l l i i t t i i o o n n a a n n d d S S i i t t e e R R e e s s t t o o r r a a t t i i o o n n o o f f 1 1 3 3 2 2 6 6 C C o o r r v v e e t t t t e e A A v v e e . , S S e e b b r r i i n n g g , F F l l I I N N V V I I T T A A T T I I O O N N T T O O B B I I D D D D E E R R S S The St John UMC, Sebring, from hereon referred t o as "Owner" will receive bids until 2:00 p.m. on J une 22, 2011 for demolition and removal of all s tructure(s tank(s asphalt at 1326 Corvette Ave., Sebring, FL. The b uilding(s i nside. The existence, quantity and location of any m aterials made from asbestos are unknown to the O wner. However, the age of the structure is app roximately 53 years, and it is known that asbest os was commonly used in building materials duri ng that time. If asbestos is found, removal and disposal of asbestos material(s eral, state, and local requirements. The Contractor is responsible for all notifications and fees for the demolition and asbestos removal, if applicable. S S c c o o p p e e o o f f W W o o r r k k : : D emolition includes removal of the following: all structures on property, miscellaneous debris associated with the structure, septic system(s in-ground swimming pool, all foundations and slabs, sidewalks, driveways, fences and gates. C ontractor shall be responsible for empyting the s wimming pool and septic tank(s a nd legally disposing of materials. Materials from s wimming pool and septic tank(s p osed of on Owner's property or within the neighborhood. Any costs for landfill tipping fees are the responsibility of the Contractor and shall meet all federal, state, and local requirements. The property is to be graded to a level condition and any clean soil/fill shall be supplied by contractor. Any e xisting trees on the property are to remain and s hall not be damaged or removed. Property shall b e reseeded with Bahia grass upon completion of b ackfilling and grading. A mandatory pre-bid meeting, followed by a mandatory site visit, is scheduled for 1:00 pm on June 8, 2011 to be held in the Owner's Fellowship building. Only Contractors that have attended the mandatory pre-bid meeting and site visit, signed the sign-in sheet and submitted a bid on the ap-p ropriate forms shall be considered a responsive b idder and will have their bid evaluated for possible award. All project related questions/requests for clarification shall be submitted in writing and forwarded to the Owner's office as noted below. All answers/clarifications shall be provided to all planholders of record as addenda to the project documents. Only questions answered by formal written addenda shall be binding. Oral and other interpretations or clarifications shall be without legal effect. Requests for additional information shall be accepted until June 10th at 12:00 pm. The Contractor shall have proper licenses and certification for the project. The Contractor shall be responsible for any permits and all utility disconnections. Bids are to be addressed to the Owner and mailed or delivered to St. John UMC, 3214 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, FL 33870. Bids shall be privately reviewed and there will not be a public opening of the bids. Project documents may be obtained from the Owner's Office, 3214 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, FL 33870, telephone (863 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 28-2009-CA-000912 US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR RASC 2007KS3, Plaintiff, vs. LONGSTREET, CELESTINE, et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 28-2009-CA-000912 of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, wherein, Plaintiff, and, LONGSTREET, CELESTINE, et. al., are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT AT COURTHOUSE, 430 S. COMMERCE AVENUE SEBRING, FL 33870, at the hour of 11 A.M. on the 6th day of June, 2011, the following described property: LOT 7, BLOCK "B", OF A SUBDIVISION OF LOT 5 OFBLOCK "F" IN PROCE AND GORHAMS SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 27, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 6th day of May, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette Daff May 20, 27, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 10000836GCS RBC CENTURA BANK N/K/A RBC BANK (USA Plaintiff, vs. JAMES C. ANDERSON A/K/A JAMES C. ANDERSON, JR.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAMES C. ANDERSON A/K/A JAMES C. ANDERSON, JR., Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Uniform Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 9, 2011, entered in Civil CASE NO.: 10000836GCS of the Circuit Court in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 S. COMMERCE AVENUE, JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM, SEBRING, FL 33870, at 11:00 a.m. on the 7th day of June, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 9, BLOCK 50, PLACID LAKES, SECTION SIX,ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, AT PAGE 68, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. DATED this 10th day of May, 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk May 20, 27, 2011 I N THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA P ROBATE DIVISION F ILE NO. PC 11-215 D ivision I N RE: ESTATE OF B ERTA L. SAGER, A/K/A B ERTA G. SAGER D eceased. N OTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BERTA L. SAGER, a/k/a BERTA G. SAGER, deceased, whose d ate of death was January 11, 2011, is pending i n the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, P robate Division, the address of which is 590 S. C ommerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The n ames and addresses of the personal represent ative and the personal representative's attorney a re set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this c ourt WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER T HE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS N OTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVI CE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. A ll other creditors of the decedent and other p ersons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PER IODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET F ORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 Y EARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE O F DEATH IS BARRED. T he date of first publication of this Notice is M ay 20, 2011. P ersonal Representative: /s/ Lynette A. Kordos 5127 Corvette Drive Tampa, Florida 33624 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Pamela T. KarlsonF lorida Bar Number: 0017957 3 01 Dal Hall Boulevard L ake Placid, FL 33852 T elephone: (863 Fax: (863 E -Mail: info@KarlsonLaw.com M ay 20, 27, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA P ROBATE DIVISION F ILE NO. PC 11-232 I N RE: ESTATE OF M AUREEN C. JODELL a/k/a M AUREEN LORRAINE JODELL a /k/a MAUREEN CLARK JODELL, D eceased. N OTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of MAUREEN C. JODELL a/k/a MAUREEN LORRAINE JODELL a/k/a MAUREEN CLARK JODELL, deceased, w hose date of death was October 1, 2010, and w hose social security number 469-22-2327, is p ending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, F lorida, Probate Division, the address of which is 5 90 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. T he names and addresses of the personal repres entative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's est ate on whom a copy of this notice is required to b e served must file their claims with this court W ITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE T IME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOT ICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE O F A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. A ll other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. A LL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PER IODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE F LORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER B ARRED. N OTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET F ORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is May 27, 2011. Personal Representative: / s/ Patricia M. Evans 5 305 15th Avenue S. M inneapolis, MN 55417-1811 A ttorney for Personal Representative: / s/ Robert E. Livingston Florida Bar No. 0031259 445 S. Commerce Avenue S ebring, FL 33870 Telephone: (863 May 27; June 3, 2011 1050Legals I N THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA P ROBATE DIVISION F ILE NO. PC 11-231 I N RE: ESTATE OF B ONNIE BONEY, D eceased. N OTICE TO CREDITORS T he administration of the estate of BONNIE B ONEY, deceased, whose date of death was May 3, 2011, and whose social security number 263-58-4950, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the a ddress of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, S ebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of t he personal representative and the personal repr esentative's attorney are set forth below. A ll creditors of the decedent and other persons h aving claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOT ICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE O F A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. A ll other creditors of the decedent and other p ersons having claims or demands against deced ent's estate must file their claims with this court W ITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE F IRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. A LL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PER IODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE F LORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. T he date of first publication of this Notice is M ay 27, 2011. P ersonal Representative: / s/ Sara Etta Johns 3 621 Cowhouse Road Lorita, FL 33857 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Robert E. Livingston Florida Bar No. 0031259 445 S. Commerce Avenue S ebring, FL 33870 T elephone: (863 M ay 27; June 3, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF T HE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-254 GCS R. WILLIAM CLEMENTS, Plaintiff, v. CHERYL THOMAS, et al., Defendants CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 31,2011, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the public sale at the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse, 430South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida, at 11:00A.M. on June 8, 2011, the following described property: LOTS 6, 7 AND 8, BLOCK 30, DESOTO CITY SECOND SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING THE THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA, TOGETHER WITH A 1977 ALLA MOBILE HOME WITH IDENTIFICATION NUMBERS 2891A AND 2891B. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 Dated: May 10,2011 ROBERT GERMAINE Clerk of Court Highlands County By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak May 20, 27, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C ASE NO. 11000119GCS S UNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, v. D ELMAR R. RUNNER a/k/a DELMA R. RUNNER if l iving and, if dead, the unknown spouses, heirs, d evisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, t rustees, beneficiaries, or other persons claiming a n interest by, through, under, or against DELMAR R RUNNER a/k/a DELMA R. RUNNER; et al. D efendants. N OTICE OF ACTION T O: DELMAR R. RUNNER a/k/a DELMA R. R UNNER if living and, if dead, the unknown s pouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, l ienors, creditors, trustees, beneficiaries, or other persons claiming an interest by, through, under, or against DELMAR R. RUNNER a/k/a DELMA R. RUNNER("Ms. Runner" Y OU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to f oreclose the mortgage existing on property which y ou may have an interest has been filed against y ou.The real property address is commonly known a s 324 East Canfield Street, Avon Park, Florida 3 3825, and more particularly described as: L OT F OF LOT 11, BLOCK 3, IN SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH RANGE 28 EAST, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 131, PUBLIC RECORDS OF H IGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. Y ou are required to serve a copy of your writt en defenses, if any, to Stovash, Case & Tingley, P .A., c/o Rachel E. Scherwin, Esquire, whose add ress is SunTrust Center, 200 S. Orange Ave, S uite 1220 Orlando, Florida 32801, within thirty (30 which was on May 20, 2011, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for t he relief demanded int he Verified Complaint. D ATED this 2nd day of May 2011. C LERK OF THE COURT B y: /s/ Annette Daff Deputy Clerk May 20, 27, 2011 1050LegalsI N THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA P ROBATE DIVISION F ILE NO. PC-11-216 D ivision I N RE: ESTATE OF A UDRE P. SCHMIDT a/k/a AUDRE SCHMIDT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS ( Summary Administration) T O ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS A GAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: Y ou are hereby notified that an Order of Summ ary Administration has been entered in the est ate of Audre P. Schmidt a/k/a Audre Schmidt, dec eased, File Number PC-11-216, by the Circuit Court for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870; that the de-c edent's date of death was March 24th 2011; t hat the total value of the estate is $20,000.00 a nd that the names and addresses of those to w hom it has been assigned by such order are: N ame and Address E dward C. Schmidt, Successor Trustee 1 600 S. Meridian Road Mason, MI 48854 Theresa Schmidt Mori 3985 NW Walnut Place C orvallis, OR 97330 E ric Schmidt 5 793 Sandalwood Drive, #3B K alamazoo, MI 49048 Kevin Schmidt 2719 SE 65th Avenue Portland, OR 97206 J eff Schmidt 1 205 Cambridge Drive K alamazoo, MI 49001 A LL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED T HAT: A ll creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA P ROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED W ILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE T IME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is May 27, 2011. Person Giving Notice: Edward C. Schmidt, Successor Trustee 1600 S. Meridian Road Mason, MI 48854 Theresa Schmidt Mori 3985 NW Walnut Place Corvallis, OR 97330 Eric Schmidt 5793 Sandalwood Drive, #3B Kalamazoo, MI 49048 Kevin Schmidt 2719 SE 65th Avenue Portland, OR 97206 Jeff Schmidt 1205 Cambridge Drive Kalamazoo, MI 49001 BREED & NUNNALLEE, P.A. Attorneys for Personal Representative: 325 NORTH COMMERCE AVENUE SEBRING, FL 33870 Telephone: (863 By: /s/ E. Mark Breed III Florida Bar No. 338702 E-Mail Address: breednunn@bnpalaw.com May 27; June 3, 2011 1050Legals Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under t he Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (22o list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed under our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be placed under t he Bargain Buy category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR W EBSITE AT: newssun.com 863-314-9876 DEADLINES P ublication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday S unday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. I mportant: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept o nly standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since t he News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 314-9876. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors orf or omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. C ancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled e xpiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL n umber can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 eachMISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$175 0(additional lines $3 eachREAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 1050Legals 1050Legals 1050Legals Classified ads get fast results WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 314-9876. Then shop till you drop!

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C M Y K Page 8ANews-Sun Friday, May 27, 2011www.newssun.com FOUND CANOEon Lake Lotela. Call to ID. 863-381-3480 1200Lost & Found 1100Announcements N N O O T T I I C C E E T T O O T T A A X X P P A A Y Y E E R R S S You are hereby notified that the County Commission has just abated nuisances in the County of Highlands, and has determined the amount to be assessed against each of the lots, tracts or parcels of land to defray the cost thereof. A list of said nuisances and amount to be assessed against each of said properties is on file and open for inspection during regular business hours in the office of the County Administrator, Highlands County Government Center, 600 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida. You are furt her notified that the County Commission of Highlands County will hold a public hearing on the 7th day of June A.D., 2011 beginning at 9:00 A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible, at the County Commissioners Board Room, H ighlands County Government Center Building, 600 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida, for the purpose of hearing any complaints or protests that any affected party may wish to offer why said assessments should not be made final. Any person who might wish to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Commissioners in public hearing or meeting is hereby advised that he or she will need a record of the proceedings; and for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedi ngs is made which will include the testimony and evidence upon which such appeal is to be based. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John Minor, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6510 (Voice Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: jminor@hcbcc.org. Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at l east 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service. Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County, Florida Barbara A. Stewart, Chairperson ATTEST: Robert W. Germaine, Clerk M ay 27, 2011 The City of Sebring will receive sealed bids in the City Purchasing Department for: I I T T B B 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 8 8 : : C C u u r r r r o o t t o o C C a a n n s s Specifications & General Terms and Conditions may be obtained from our website at: mysebring.com or by contacting Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB by phone 863-471-5110, Fax 863-471-5168, or e-mail: kirkzimmerman@mysebring.com at the City purchasing office located at 368 South Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. If obtaining documents via the website, it shall be the bidders responsibility to check for amendments/changes made to the document. Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked with the bid number and name as to identify the enclosed bids. Bids m ust be delivered to the City of Sebring Purchasing Office Attn: Kirk Zimmerman so as to reach the said office no l ater than 2 2 : : 0 0 0 0 P P M M , M M o o n n d d a a y y , J J u u n n e e 1 1 3 3 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 o o f f t t h h e e o o f f f f i i c c i i a a l l t t i i m m e e c c l l o o c c k k i i n n t t h h e e p p u u r r c c h h a a s s i i n n g g o o f f f f i i c c e e Proposals received later than the date and time specified will be rejected. The City will not be responsible for the late delivery of any bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail, or any other type of delivery service. The submitting firm will be required to comply with all applicable laws, regulations, rules and ordinance of local, state and federal authorities having jurisdiction, including, but not limited to: all provisions of the Federal Government Equal Employment Opportunity clauses issued by the Secretary of Labor on May 21, 1968 and published in the Federal Register (41 CFR Part 60-1, 33 F.2 7804 visions of the Public Entity Crimes (Fla. Stat. 287.133, et seq, as amended) and the provisions in Fla. Stat287.134, et seq,as amended, regarding discrimination. The Sebring City Council reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts Thereof; and the award; if an award is made, will be made to the most responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of the City of Sebring. The council reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB Purchasing Agent Sebring, Florida May 25, 27, 2011 1055HighlandsCounty LegalsCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us: 314-9876 News-Sun Classified IN THE CIRCUIT COURT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C ASE NO. 10-602-GCS W ALKHAMPTON CAPITAL CORPORATION, P laintiff, vs. A NY UNKNOWN PARTY WHO MAY CLAIM AS HEIR, DEVISEE, GRANTEE, ASSIGNEE, LIENOR, C REDITOR, TRUSTEE, OR OTHER CLAIMANT, BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST WILLIAM COLE; C OLE; PAULA LAMAR; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF PAULA LAMAR N/K/A MIKE LAMAR, and CITY OF S EBRING, D efendants. NOTICE OF SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment dated May 9, 2011, entered in Case N o.: 10-602-GCS of the Circuit Court in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein ANY UNK NOWN PARTY WHO MAY CLAIM AS HEIR, DEVISEE, GRANTEE, ASSIGNEE, LIENOR, CREDITOR, T RUSTEE, OR OTHER CLAIMANT, BY, THROUGH, U NDER OR AGAINST WILLIAM COLE; COLE; P AULA LAMAR; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF PAULA L AMAR N/K/A MIKE LAMAR, and CITY OF SEB RING, are the Defendants, that I will sell to the h ighest and best bidder for cash, on the front steps of the Highlands County Courthouse located a t 590 South Commerce Ave., Sebring, Florida 33870-3867 on June 7th 2011, at 11:00 a.m., t he following described real property as set forth in the Final Judgment: Legal: LOT 5, BLOCK 122, L A PALOMA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 4 4, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA N OTICE: ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, O THER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE D ATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. D ATED this 10th day of May 2011. C LERK OF THE COURT By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak D eputy Clerk May 20, 27, 2011 Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 SERVICE DIRECTORY DUMMY 5X21.5

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C M Y K www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, May 27, 2011Page 9A 1995 ISUZUHydraulic Low Rider, one owner garage kept, Dayton rims gold & chrome, mahogany gold steering wheel, 10 switches & 5 new batteries, 38.000K. $5700 obo 863-381-4948 9450Automotive for Sale FORD '89F-250. New motor w/4,000 mi. New battery, good tires. Work box, staked body. Good running work horse. $1975. obo. Call 863-269-8743 CHEVROLET TRUCKExtended Cab '94. Z71 1500 Series, Silverado. Fully Loaded, has lots of extras. $5500.obo. Call 863-655-4483 9200Trucks 9000 Transportation 8000 Recreation SHIH TZUPUPPIES FOR SALE Boys and girls, $300. Home number 863-382-3808, cell 863-446-1402 or 446-4218. NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. C AT BEAUTIFULFemale, gray & white. 4 yrs. Free to a good, loving home. Call 863-382-7457 7520Pets & Supplies SEBRING -MULTI FAMILY 221 Lark Ave, Fri & Sat 5/27 & 28, 8am 3pm. Household items, woman's clothing, c offee table w/ glass top. Much More! SEBRING -Sat May 28, 7am ? Lots of B aby clothes & misc items, office supp lies, household items, books. L ots Of Treasurers! S EBRING -HUGE 2 Family Sale! 3607 G rand Prix Dr. Fri-Sat-Sun, 5/27-28-29, 8 am-? Riding mower, small furn., toddler bed, adult's & children's clothing, kids misc stuff, strollers & Much More! S EBRING -BIG COMMUNITY SALE! 8 20 MLK Blvd, Sat 5/28 7am 1pm. I nterested participants, Please call 863-385-8804 7320Garage &Yard Sales WIG-PAULA YOUNG,short, salt-pepp er, New/never worn, stand-cond shampoo.($65 W HEEL &TIRE (1 265/70 R17. $40. cash only please. 8 63-699-1119 V ACUUM -Oreck Upright. Good comdition, $30. 863-471-0098 T IRES W/RIMS $75 863-529-2220 M EN'S SHIRTSsizes 3X. Like new / some never worn. 10 for $30 8 63-386-0936 MEN'S SHIRTSSize 4X. Like new / s ome never worn. 10 for $40 863-386-0936 L AZY BOYRecliner / Rocker, good condition. Light teal w/ fine stripe. $45 8 63-655-3552 ENTERTAINMENT CENTERDark w ood, 3 sections. 74" X 30". $100 863-453-9612 C HAIRS (2FABRIC Living room. mauve w/ rattan backs. $80 8 63-453-9612 B OW SAW30 inch. $20. 863-529-2220 BOOKS -Mixture of paperback and h ardback. Box of 60 for $10 863-385-2605 B OAT ANCHOR25lbs,Plow type. $40, cash only please. 863-699-1119 7310Bargain Buys B EDROOM SETKing bed complete w/ mattresses, shelf headboard, 9 d rawer dresser w/ mirror, nightstand. M edium brown. $300 firm. 8 63-253-9838 BEDROOM SETDark wood, 2 dresse rs / night stand / Queen bed complete. $ 225. Matching Sofa & Loveseat, flor al print (gray & mauve 2 end, 1 coffee, 1 sofa table. $110. L ounge chair w/ matching sitting chair ( bedroom). $85.863-453-9612. 7300Miscellaneous T WIN BED& baby changing table. $50. C all 863-385-2967 D INING TABLE(round 48" c hairs. $250. Call 863-386-0765 7180FurnitureANTIQUES -Bed Small Walnut Wood / Small Spinning Wheel / Blue Currier and Ives Dishes (set or pieces excellent condition. 863-382-0993 7060Antiques -Collectible 7000 MerchandiseAVON PARKLarge Retail/Office Building, 100 E. Main St. A MUST SEE! 863-295-9272 6750Commercial RentalSEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, W/D, Satellite, full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for Rent S EBRING 3or 4 BR, 1BA block home n ear YMCA, newly remodeled bath, n ew flooring in kitchen, 4 energy efficient A/C units recently installed. Paid o ff, no fear of foreclosure, no credit check. $700/mo + $700 security. Call 8 63-513-0050. SEBRING -3BR/ 2BA, Dining room, living room, Florida room. Tiled floors. Refrigerator, stove, W/D. Fenced back yard. $600 monthly. 863-381-6229 S EBRING -2111 Colmar Ave. 3BR, 2 BA. No pets or smokers. $700 m onthly. !st / last / plus $300 deposit. 561-965-4458 or 561-379-6823 LAKE PLACID2BR, 1BA, new f loors/paint, fenced yard, close to boat ramp, nice landscape, quiet area, no s moke/dogs, $575/mo. 863-699-1119 6300Unfurnished Houses KEY LAKEVILLASL AKEFRONT LIVING IN SEBRING 2 Bedroom townhouse unit. Clean & q uiet, Screen porch, Outside patio, Central air, Washer/Dryer hookup, $ 590/mo., first & security. No Pets. 863-465-2740 A VON PARKClean, Quiet: Studios 1 BR, 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., form $ 375/mp. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook up. S tudents/Seniors Discount Call 863-602-4683 A VON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 1 00 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL : $325/mo. 8 63-453-8598 A VON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1 BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1 st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 **NOW LEASING** PARK PLAZA A BRAND NEW RENTAL COMMUNITY L OCATED IN AVON PARK, FL SPACIOUS 2BR 2BA A PARTMENT HOMES. **ONLY $575/mo.** A MUST SEE! ************************P lease Call 305-932-4800 f or more information. 6200U nfurnishedA partmentsSEBRING -1BR, 1BA. Fresh paint. Includes water. $ 395 / mo. Call Gary Johnson, 863-381-1861. 6200UnfurnishedApartments S EBRING 1or 2 bedroom. Spacious l iving area. Very clean, Like new. Laundry facilities. A/C. Close to Downtown. Lawn Services Incl. $540. per month + s ecurity dep. Call 941-773-7523 P LACID LAKESDUPLEX 2Br / 2Ba. Nicely furn. or unfurnished. C/H/A. I mmaculate. Lawn care included. Near g olf & fishing. Short term /mo./yearly. 8 63-699-0045 DUPLEX LEASE2/2/1 1300 Schlosser Rd. Sebring. All appliances, no pets. Lawn maintenance incl. $550.mo. + se-c urity. Call 863-452-0996 for appt. 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 RentalsSEBRING RENTw/option to buy. 2/2 Double Wide Mobile Home. $525. 3303 Highlander. Call 863-446-2414 5150Mobile HomesFor Rent 5000 Mobile HomesLAKE VIEWMEMORIAL GARDENS. M ausoleum, Interment, name plate, casket & tray, placement on bottom r ow level 1. $5000. Call 863-385-4927 4280Cemetery Lots 4000 Real EstateSEBRING RACEShop seeks partner. 1 /2 mi. from Sebring Raceway. 5000 s q. ft. w/4 lifts, compressor & plumbed. Chasis Dyno, Tire Machines, Mig W elder. previously used for a Race Team. Looking for funded partner for a uto repair/performance shop. Serious inquiries only. Call 305-797-0005 or e mail ed@egbrasswell.com 3050BusinessOpportunities 3000 FinancialS EBRING MEDICALoffice seeking Part time Receptionist. Exp. only. Fax Res ume to: 863-299-4352 2150Part-timeEmployment Y MCA -INSTRUCTORS needed for ( Zumba, Water aerobics, Fitness, etc) M ust be energetic and outgoing. Must b e willing to work. Certification and Experience preferred. Will trail. Please a pply in person at 100 YMCA Lane, Sebring, FL. S UN NLAKE Subway is now hiring for all positions. Must be avail. to work a nytime. Go to subway.com and fill out the application, and return to the Sun N L akes location. 2100Help Wanted S IMPLY SOLDeBay Store needs eBay s ales specialists. Must be computer lite rate, detail oriented, highly motivated a nd have computer. Full-Time posit ions available. Compensation based o n input. Unlimited potential. Email res ume to: simplysoldonebay@gmail.com or drop off resume at 330 U 27 N Ste. 1 Sebring. SEMI DRIVERPT, Lake Placid. Clean C DL. Drug Free Work Place. Call 8 63-699-5300, if no answer leave mess age. S EEKING DIALYSIS RN w ith experience or will train the right p erson for a state-of-the-art dialysis clinic. We offer an excellent salary and benefit package. Please call o r fax resume to: Peggy Phone: 8 63-382-9443 or Fax: 863-382-9242 RESIDENTIAL CLEANINGCo. Needs p art time help, 15-25 hrs., week days o nly. Good Pay. Must be reliable, outgoing & highly motivated. Call 8 63-414-2244. PUBLICATIONS SECRETARYP/T needed. Must have experience in P ublisher and Microsoft Word. To obtain an application and for more information, Call 863-453-6681 M AINTENANCE TECHNICIAN needed for local apartment community. S uccessful candidate will possess skills in all areas of apartment turnkey & maintenance. Must have own tools. Good benefits! Salary will depend on e xperience. Please call for application and appt. No drop-ins please. Phone; 8 63-385-4078 EOE DFWP H OUSEKEEPER PT.Needed to clean Condo's 1 to 2 days a week. Call 863-385-1263 Drug Free Work Place. FIRST BAPTISTPreschool is hiring for a P T Pre School Teacher, Christian, and fun loving. Apply at First Baptist Pre S chool. 200 E Center Ave, or call 863-385-4704. E XPERIENCED PROPERTYMANAGER wanted for a new Affordable Apartment C omplex in Sebring. Must have lease up experience and knowledge of One site software. Individual must be a self starter, organized, takes pride in their w ork and able to start immediately. D FWP/EOE 863-382-0044 BUSY SEBRINGMedical office. Exp. o nly. Full time. Front office duties. Computer input, insurance, collections & patient contact. Fax resume to: 863-299-4352 A MIKIDS LASTChance Ranch has positions for FT Administrative Asst. A lso 1 FT RN or 2 PT RN's. Applications accepted on site. C all 863-699-3788 EOE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT F /T or P/T. Highly experienced in medical office procedures. Computer l iterate, multi-tasked oriented, records management and possess good public r elation skills. Excellent benefits, salary c ommensurate with experience. Fax resume to 471-9340 or call 382-0566, e mail resume: bettyamburn@gmail.com 2100Help Wanted 2000 Employment Classified a ds get fast results PAGE DESIGNER DUMMY AD 2X4 CIRC CARRIERS DUMMY AD 2X5MILLERS CENTRAL AIR 2X2 AVON PARK HOUSING 1X4 AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 RIDGE AREA ARC 1X4

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C M Y K Page 10ANews-SunFriday, May 27, 2011www.newssun.com SFCC; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, 5/27/11 TODAYPartly sunny with a thunderstorm91 / 70Winds: SSW at 6-12 mphA couple of afternoon thunderstorms91 / 70Winds: ESE at 4-8 mphSATURDAYAn afternoon thunderstorm possible91 / 69Winds: E at 10-20 mphSUNDAYA t-storm possible in the afternoon91 / 68Winds: ENE at 15-25 mphMONDAYA t-storm possible in the afternoon91 / 69Winds: ENE at 15-25 mphTUESDAY City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. Washington Washington 90/69 90/69 New York NewYork 86/66 86/66 Miami Miami 87/76 87/76 Atlanta Atlanta 81/66 81/66 Detroit Detroit 66/54 66/54 Houston Houston 90/73 90/73 Chicago Chicago 60/52 60/52 Minneapolis Minneapolis 60/49 60/49 Kansas City KansasCity 70/56 70/56 El Paso ElPaso 97/73 97/73 Denver Denver 72/44 72/44 Billings Billings 54/41 54/41 Los Angeles LosAngeles 71/58 71/58 San Francisco SanFrancisco 63/50 63/50 Seattle Seattle 59/45 59/45 Washington 90/69 New York 86/66 Miami 87/76 Atlanta 81/66 Detroit 66/54 Houston 90/73 Chicago 60/52 Minneapolis 60/49 Kansas City 70/56 El Paso 97/73 Denver 72/44 Billings 54/41 Los Angeles 71/58 San Francisco 63/50 Seattle 59/45 A storm system pushing east will bring more thunderstorms to the Eastern Seaboard today. A few of the storms could become severe in parts of the mid-Atlantic and Northeast. Farther south, more scattered storms will rumble from Virginia and the Carolinas to Florida. Behind the storms, drier air will “ lter across the Mississippi and Ohio valleys, while warm, humid air across the southern Plains could fuel more gusty thunderstorms late in the day from Oklahoma to Missouri. Unsettled weather will continue over much of the Northwest. U.S. Cities National Forecast for May 27Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. World Cities National SummaryCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. Weather (W):ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Albuquerque 89/60/s 87/59/s 84/56/s Atlanta 81/66/t 88/68/pc 89/68/s Baltimore 91/64/t 87/66/t 89/66/pc Birmingham 83/61/pc 91/68/pc 90/69/s Boston 80/63/pc 79/63/pc 79/64/c Charlotte 82/63/t 86/64/pc 88/66/pc Cheyenne 72/40/pc 60/37/t 56/43/sh Chicago 60/52/pc 74/58/t 77/60/t Cleveland 70/55/c 76/62/pc 83/66/pc Columbus 72/57/c 84/66/pc 91/67/pc Dallas 92/74/pc 93/74/s 91/73/pc Denver 72/44/s 65/42/t 65/45/pc Detroit 66/54/c 76/63/pc 84/67/c Harrisburg 90/63/t 85/64/pc 86/65/pc Honolulu 88/74/s 88/74/s 89/74/s Houston 90/73/pc 90/74/pc 91/74/pc Indianapolis 68/56/pc 82/65/pc 90/69/pc Jackson, MS 85/63/pc 91/70/pc 91/68/s Kansas City 70/56/t 75/65/t 80/67/pc Lexington 74/56/c 85/65/pc 92/67/pc Little Rock 81/65/pc 88/69/pc 88/71/pc Los Angeles 71/58/s 72/57/s 73/56/pc Louisville 72/61/c 86/69/pc 93/73/pc Memphis 80/66/pc 92/71/pc 91/72/s Milwaukee 56/48/pc 70/53/t 70/54/t Minneapolis 60/49/c 72/55/t 75/56/c Nashville 76/60/c 90/67/pc 92/68/pc New Orleans 87/71/pc 86/73/pc 89/73/s New York City 86/66/t 83/66/t 85/68/pc Norfolk 84/68/pc 83/68/t 84/68/pc Oklahoma City 90/69/t 91/70/s 88/70/pc Philadelphia 90/68/t 86/66/t 88/68/pc Phoenix 99/78/s 100/76/s 94/68/s Pittsburgh 76/60/t 80/63/pc 88/66/pc Portland, ME 74/58/c 72/57/pc 74/58/c Portland, OR 58/45/r 59/47/sh 64/50/pc Raleigh 86/65/t 87/67/t 91/68/pc Rochester 76/58/sh 79/61/pc 88/64/t St. Louis 72/64/pc 84/69/pc 91/70/pc San Francisco 63/50/s 62/46/s 64/51/pc Seattle 59/45/r 61/46/sh 66/49/sh Wash., DC 90/69/t 84/69/t 88/69/pc Cape Coral 89/70/t 91/70/t 91/69/t Clearwater 89/72/t 89/73/t 90/74/t Coral Springs 87/73/t 88/75/t 86/75/pc Daytona Beach 85/69/pc 85/70/pc 86/70/pc Ft. Laud. Bch 86/77/t 87/77/t 86/77/pc Fort Myers 89/71/t 91/71/t 90/70/t Gainesville 89/65/t 89/66/t 89/66/pc Hollywood 88/73/t 88/75/t 88/75/pc Homestead AFB 86/74/t 86/74/t 85/74/t Jacksonville 88/66/t 88/67/t 86/66/pc Key West 87/77/t 87/79/pc 88/78/pc Miami 87/76/t 88/76/t 87/76/pc Okeechobee 86/71/t 86/72/t 85/72/pc Orlando 90/69/t 90/70/t 91/70/pc Pembroke Pines 88/73/t 88/75/t 88/75/pc St. Augustine 84/70/pc 84/70/t 84/70/pc St. Petersburg 89/73/t 89/73/t 91/75/t Sarasota 88/71/t 89/72/t 92/72/t Tallahassee 89/67/t 90/68/pc 93/66/s Tampa 88/72/t 90/73/t 91/73/t W. Palm Bch 85/75/pc 86/74/pc 87/74/pc Winter Haven 92/71/t 91/71/t 91/69/pc Acapulco 93/77/pc 93/77/s 88/75/s Athens 74/65/sh 78/66/sh 79/67/sh Beirut 80/72/c 75/65/sh 74/63/s Berlin 66/47/sh 66/53/c 70/57/sh Bermuda 76/70/sh 76/70/s 76/70/s Calgary 52/46/r 52/39/r 52/39/c Dublin 55/46/sh 54/48/pc 57/45/pc Edmonton 69/42/c 63/41/pc 61/41/pc Freeport 87/73/t 86/72/sh 86/72/pc Geneva 63/47/sh 71/51/pc 76/58/pc Havana 90/69/t 90/71/t 89/71/t Hong Kong 88/77/s 93/78/s 89/77/s Jerusalem 85/66/pc 76/58/c 75/55/s Johannesburg 58/40/s 57/42/s 63/42/s Kiev 74/54/s 80/58/s 83/59/pc London 61/48/sh 63/48/sh 67/54/sh Montreal 61/52/r 72/57/t 77/57/t Moscow 65/50/pc 74/52/pc 71/51/s Nice 75/60/sh 76/62/s 76/65/s Ottawa 60/50/sh 74/51/t 77/57/t Quebec 57/46/r 68/54/r 72/55/t Rio de Janeiro 73/63/r 71/60/sh 71/62/pc Seoul 78/58/c 87/63/pc 81/59/pc Singapore 87/78/t 88/78/t 87/79/t Sydney 64/48/s 64/52/sh 64/54/sh Toronto 60/53/sh 70/55/pc 81/55/t Vancouver 60/48/c 60/51/sh 61/50/sh Vienna 74/56/sh 70/57/c 76/62/pc Warsaw 73/55/sh 67/50/pc 72/53/c Winnipeg 56/42/sh 63/50/r 61/44/sh A lmanac Readings at Palm Beach High .............................................. 5:05 a.m. Low ............................................. 11:23 a.m. High .............................................. 5:49 p.m. Low ............................................. 11:50 p.m. Partly sunny today with a shower or thunderstorm around. A shower or thunderstorm around this evening. A couple of showers and a thunderstorm tomorrow afternoon. Sunday: an afternoon thunderstorm possible. A tornado struck the passenger train Empire BuilderŽ near Moorhead, Minn., on May 27, 1931. Of the 117 passengers, one died and 57 were injured. A shower or thunderstorm around today. Winds southwest 6-12 mph. Expect 8-12 hours of sunshine with a 55% chance of precipitation and average relative humidity 60%. € Even addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday. € Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and Saturday. € All watering should take place before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. NewFirstFullLast June 1June 8June 15June 23 Today Saturday Sunrise 6:35 a.m. 6:35 a.m. Sunset 8:11 p.m. 8:12 p.m. Moonrise 3:00 a.m. 3:32 a.m. Moonset 3:49 p.m. 4:41 p.m. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2011Jacksonville 88/66 Gainesville 89/65 Ocala 90/66 Daytona Beach 85/69 Orlando 90/69 Winter Haven 92/71 Tampa 88/72 Clearwater 89/72 St. Petersburg 89/73 Sarasota 88/71 Fort Myers 89/71 Naples 88/72 Okeechobee 86/71 West Palm Beach 85/75 Fort Lauderdale 86/77 Miami 87/76 Tallahassee 89/67 Apalachicola 85/68 Pensacola 85/70 Key West Avon Park 91/70 Sebring 91/70 Lorida 88/71 Lake Placid 91/69 Venus 91/69 Brighton 88/70 TidesReadings at St. Petersburg High ............................................ 11:06 a.m. Low ............................................... 4:31 a.m. High .....................................................none Low ............................................... 6:13 p.m. UV Index TodayThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m. 6 10 10 6 Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional SummaryShown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Five-Day forecast for Highlands County 87/77 Lake Levels Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 10.31 Normal ...............................................14.51 Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterdayTemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHigh Sunday .......................................... 94 Low Sunday ........................................... 63 High Monday ......................................... 88 Low Monday .......................................... 59 High Tuesday ......................................... 93 Low Tuesday .......................................... 62 High Wednesday .................................... 92 Low Wednesday .................................... 58Heat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayRelative humidity .................................. 47% Expected air temperature ....................... 90 Makes it feel like .................................... 94BarometerMonday ...............................................30.00 Tuesday ...............................................29.96 Wednesday .........................................29.97PrecipitationMonday ...............................................0.00Ž Tuesday ...............................................0.00Ž Wednesday .........................................0.00Ž Month to date ..................................... 4.11Ž Year to date ....................................... 14.14Ž sfcc 6x10.5 process

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C M Y K LIVING 10B PA GE News-Sun Friday, May 27, 2011 1 983Despite the fact that (A.M. Chicago) has been doing better without a host than it did with Robb Weller, Oprah Winfrey was named Thursday as the shows host. INC. column, Dec. 2, 19831 984Oprah Winfrey, who succeeded Robb Weller as the host of A.M.C hicagoon WLS, has pulled the show into a virtual dead heat with WBBMs Phil Donahue on the strength of several phenomenally popular episodes. Eric Zorn, March 5, 1984infrey is about as unspontaneous as, say, a charge up San Juan Hill. Onand off-screen, her presence is undeniable, despite her short Chicago track record: three months. She is greeted by strangers on the s treet, recognized in restaurants and once was driven to work by a policeman when she was late a nd couldnt get a cab. Jon Anderson, March 13, 19841 985Pulling off her first national TVouting with aplomb, WLS-TVs morning tornado Oprah Winfrey swept onto NBCs The Tonight Showand challenged designated guest h ostJoan Rivers to a duel. S hell lose 30 pounds if Joan loses 5. Jon Anderson, Jan. 31, 1985Saying Oprah Winfrey is h ot is like saying Refrigerator Perry is big. Everyone wants her, from Life magazine to Entertainment Tonight.Ande verything she wants, from her part in The Color Purpleto a p air of shoes, comes her way. Channel 7 may be surp rised at Winfreys phenomen al success, Phil Donahue may be in shock, but Winfrey? Not her. Her selfconfidence is as big as her, uh, heart. I was like a hit album waiting to be released,she says. I knew my day would come. Cheryl Lavin, Dec. 19, 19851986When I have children, I want to teach them: That you are responsible for your life. really great evening to me is: Ordering in some pasta, opening up a great bottle of wine and then getting into bed with a terrific book. If I could change one thing about myself, it would be: My hips. People who knew me in high school thought I was: An Oreo. It was to hate white people, but to me, color never mattered. I knew I was a grown-up when I: Started to pay my bills on time. The best time of my life: Now. Im comfortable with myself, and life is good and getting better Winfreys responses in ital Statistics column, Tribune Sunday magazine, Sept. 7, 19861987She can exhibit a giddy tendency towards shameless self-promotion; she is her own best fan. On a recent show featuring actor Danny Glover, Winfrey showed a film clip from The Color Purple.The clip featured Glover approximately 20 percent of the time; Winfrey the other 80 percent. And during a show on which short men talked about how insensitively they are treated by society, Winfrey just happened to drop the information that her current beau is 6-feet-6. Marcia F, Coburn, March 22, 19871988The new Oprah is authoritative rather than fun-loving. She still is loud and self-involved and overweight, but now gives the impression she has worked that out, and will interrupt almost any guest to tell us how much she has learned in the process. Of course, the new Oprah is as much an exhibitionist as the old, though her parading is now more high-toned, replacing talk of diets with how she sent Phil Donahue champagne or bought her mother a fur coat. Somebody probably told her she is a role model. So, instead of being natural,Oprah is being successful,and, my, she does let us knowAlan G. Artner, Jan. 10, 19881989The history of Harpo Productions waits to be written. Now it exists in blueprints of the handsome production facility on West Washington Boulevard, which also will house a new studio for her TV show. Rick Kogan, March 19, 19891 990Having bought, designed and taken charge of her own studio, Winfrey can now rightfully consider herself a mogul. She is certainly big enough that newspapers and magaz ines across the country would fly their writers here to get the first peek at Harpo Studios, despite a ban on photographers and limiting the writer s to a news conference instead of interviews. Mark Caro, March 18, 19901 992Oprah Winfrey has announced her engagement to longtime companion Stedman Graham, whom she has dat e d for six years. Tribune wire services, Nov. 8, 19921997 What began as Winfreys effort to p romote reading with a once-a-month s egment on her talk show has becom e a double-edged sword for public libraries and bookstores nationwide T heyre delighted with the influx of readers. But they often cant supply the books after Winfrey makes her a nnouncements. Carolyn Starks, May 1, 19971 998Legally, Oprah Winfrey cleaned the cattlemens clocks in their own feedlot. But does last w eeks jury verdict exonerating the talk show host of defamation charges give lasting comfort that free speech, as Winfrey declared Thursday, not only lives, it rocks Probably not. Tim Jones, March 1, 1998The variable-weight champio n of daytime talk is undergoing a rare period of public repudiation. Her beloved big-screen movie project is getting the cold shoulder from audiences, despite a fairly positive critica l reception. More starkly, her daily daytime talk show her power and popularity base seems to be alienating not only the predictably dyspeptic critics but even some long-t ime fans. They decry its new resemblance to a New Age revival tent, wi th Herself as the charismatic leader and a smug little coterie of self-help authors passing the collection plates and pocketing much of the proceeds. This is strange turf for Winfrey, w ho has enjoyed almost unchecked exaltation from public and press alike. Steve Johnson, Nov. 23, 19982000But free speech doesnt rock for everyone, notably employees at C hicago-based Harpo Inc., the corpo rate parent of Winfreys production s tudio operation. To work at Harpo, a ll employees must sign an agreement prohibiting them from talking or writ ing about Winfreys personal or business life and the affairs of her compa ny for the rest of their lives. Tim Jones, April 16, 2000ith so much of O, the person, on hand, O, the magazine, makes Martha Stewart look like a shrinking violet, which may be part of the plan. The magazine adds power to Winfreys challenge of Stewart for dominance i n the field of personality-driven lifestyle guidance. Steve Johnson, April 19, 20002007One of Americas best-known faces put her fame on the line in a ra re dip into partisan politics Saturday, as Oprah Winfrey brought her brand name and credibility to Sen. Barack Obamas presidential bid. The one woman media empire denied she is trying to do for Obama what her boo k club has done for authors. John McCormick, Dec. 9, 20072009Although she began Tuesdays show by shouting Greatest city in th e world,Winfrey became so big, so fast, that she transcended place. (Chicagos) celebrities are athletes an d newsreaders, the occasional musician. Our celebrities have two names. Winfrey is something else, the globa l brand that you forget is also a company with a headquarters somewhere specific. It was interesting to have he r on our big street for a day, but come Wednesday morning except on he r true home, television therell be little trace of her Steve Johnson, Sept. 9, 2009infrey plans to tell viewers on Fridays show that she will retire the Chicago-based syndicated gabfest at the end of her current contract, which runs through the 2010-11 season, her 25th on national TV. Its going to be a long goodbye. Phil Rosenthal, Nov. 20, 2009After 25 years, Oprah Winfrey has ended her popular syndicated talk show. Heres a look back on her rise to famet would be a fools errand to count the words the Chicago Tribune has devoted to Oprah Winfrey over the years. There have been many, as the woman shot from talk show host hired from Baltimore to one-name superstar. What follows is merely a selection from the papers Oprah chronicles, and what is clear is that those at the paper were kind of shocked by her meteoric ascent too. Compiled by Steve Johnson, Chicago TribuneCHICAGO TRIBUNE/MCTOprah Winfrey, then host of AM Chicago, in 1984. C OURTESYOF WARNER BROS.Winfrey as Sofia in the 1985 film The Color Purple. C. ALUKABERRY/THE STATE/MCTThen Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama addresses a crowd of 29,000 people with special guests, Michelle Obama and Oprah Winfrey, at Williams-Brice Stadium in Columbia, S.C., in 2007. HANDOUTO, The Oprah Magazine debuted in April 2000. PHOTO BYGEORGE BURNS/OPRAH WINFREYN ETWORK/PRNEWSFOTO. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BYERIC GOODWIN/MCT

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C M Y K SFCC Summer Youth CampsAVONPARK South Florida Panther Baseball will be holding Summer YouthC amps from June 13-16 and June 20-23 for children aged 6-13. Camps run from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and cost $80 per camp or $150 for both. Registration and sign-in begin at 8 a.m. with the camp to follow, including baseball fundamentals, position instruction, station rotation, games, swimming pool time and a camp T-shirt. SFCC head coach Rick Hitt will serve as camp director with Panther assistant coach Andy Polk and members of the Panther baseball team will be on hand as i nstructors. Campers should bring their individual baseball attire as well as a bathing suit and towel. The camps will be held at the SFCC Panther field at the Highlands County campus in Avon Park. For more information, call Coach Hitt at the following campus phone numbers at extension 7036: Avon Park/Sebring, 453-6661; Lake Placid, 465-5300; Arcadia, 494-7500; Wauchula, 773-2252.SFCC Fun CampsAVON PARK SFCC Athleticswill host a Two Day Fun Sport Selection camp on Thursday and Friday, June 9 and 10 for girls and boys aged 6-16. Each day the camp runs from 9 a.m.-3 p.m., with campers choosing their own sport, whether Beach Volleyball, Basketball, Baseball, Softball or Soccer. During the morning portion each day, campers will stretch, do plyometrics, agility drills, work on strength and flexibility, learn arm and body care and geti ntroduced to the Fitness Center. Lunch is then provided with the campers then delving into the sport they chose and wrapping it up with activities i n the SFCC pool. Registration and check-in from 8:158 :55 a.m., and pre-registration is not nece ssary as walk-ups are accepted. The rate for one day is $50 and $95 for both days. The camp will be aministered by SFCC head and assistant coaches, with help from SFCC student-athletes. For questions or more information, contact Camp Director and SFCC Athletic Director Rick Hitt at 784-7036.Dragon Summer HoopsLAKEPLACID Green Dragon Basketball will be holding itsannual summer camp from June 13-17 at the Lake Placid High School Gymnasium for boys and girls in grades 2-8. Camp will run each day from 8 a.m.-4 p.m., with the final day ending at Noon. Cost of the camp is $65 and all campers will receive a Dragon Basketball camp Tshirt. Campers can bring lunch or purchase lunch items at camp concessions each day. Drinks and other snacks will be available at a reasonable cost. Half-day options are also available. Call or text Linda Veley for details and other information at 441-0299, or email veley131@comcast.net.Help for Haiti 5KSEBRING A5K run/walk to support Haiti Bible Missions outreach to provide educational support, orphan care and humanitarian assistance in Haiti will be held Saturday, May 28 at Highlands Hammock State Park. Entry fee is $20 through May 22 and $25 the day of the race. The run will start at 8 a.m. For more information, contact Tim Baker at 381-0701 or Chet Brojek at 3854736, or cbrojek@comcast.net to pre-register.Lake Placid Youth BowlingLAKE PLACID The Royal Palms Youth Bowling League, for ages 7 and up, begins itsnew season Saturday, Sept. 3. The sign-up fee is $25, which includes a shirt, and new bowlers are welcome. Bowling is every Saturday morning at 9 a.m. through December 10. Weekly cost is $11 and includes three games of bowling, shoes and prize fund. All Youth Bowlers are also eligible for reduced rate open bowling, though some restrictions may apply, and free bowling with instruction on Fridays from 4-6 p.m. must be accompanied by an adult. For more information, call Frank Peterson at 382-9541, or Donna Stanley at 441-4897.A.P. Fishing DerbyAVONPARK The Avon Park Air Force Range Fish, Wildlife and Outdoor Recreation Program and the Winter Haven Kiwanis Club are having their 7th Annual Fishing Derby Saturday, June 4 for boys and girls aged 16 and under, accompanied by parent or legal guardian. Registration will be from 7-8:30 a.m., at the Outdoor Recreation office in building 600, with fishing from 9-11 a.m. with weigh-in, contests, lunch and awards immediately following. Trophies will be awarded in four age classes with hot dogs, chips and soda provided by the Breakfast Rotary of Avon Park and the Winter Haven Kiwanis Club. For more information, call 452-4254 or visit www.avonparkafr.net .Firecracker 5KSEBRING The 17th Annual Firecracker 5K Run/Walk is set for Monday, July 4 at the Highlands Hammock State Park at 7:30 a.m. T he annual run to celebrate the nations birthday will feature plaques for overall, master and grand master male and female winners, age group awards in 5-year age divisions, technical tee shirts and plenty of ice-cold watermelon and other refreshments for runners. Entry fee is $20 thru June 27 and $25 from June 28 thru race day registration. Tee shirts guaranteed to only the first 200 entrants, so sign up early! Those desiring an entry form may email cbrojek@comcast.net or call Chet Brojek at 385-4736. Mail your checks made payable to Central Florida Striders, along with the signed application, to Chet Brojek, 3310 Par Road, Sebring, FL33872. Each year we urge runners and walkers to wear red, white and blue on race day and to entry early as we always have a large turnout for our nations birthday celebration. The race benefits the boysand girls cross country teams at Avon Park HighS chool.Panther Volleyball CampsAVONPARK This summer the South F lorida Community College volleyball program has more camps to offer than e ver before. If there is a camp date that you could a ttend but the age group is different than yours please call and special arrangements could be made. Individual private sessions for indoor and sand are available year-round. Call/Email to schedule today! June 2011 Sand:13-16 (4 daysy, 8:30-10:30 a.m. (Grades 9-12 Indoor:1316 (4 daysyThursday, 11:30-1:30 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps June 13-16: $100 July 2011 Sand:11-14 (4 daysy, 8:30 -10:30 a.m. (Grades 9-12 Indoor:11-14 (4 daysyThursday, 11:30-1:30 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps July 11-14: $100 Indoor: 25-28 (4 daysyThursday Morning Session (Grades 5-8 11:30 a.m. $60 Afternoon Session (Grades 9-1224:30 p.m. $75 Contact Coach Crawford with any questions at kim.crawford@southflorida.edu cell: 863-835-2377, or Office: 863-784-7037.Sebring Summer SwimSEBRINGThe summer season for swimming is upon us as the Sebring High School pool is open to the public. Pool hours for open swim will be 67:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1-3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays additional hours will be added once school is out. Cost is $2 per swimmer with big savings for frequent swimmers. Afamily pass can be bought for $50 for the first swimmer and $15 for each additional family member. Swimming lessons will also be available with four separate sessions throughout the summer for eight differents levels of instruction, ranging from Adult Beginner, Parent and Tot, Fundamentals, Introduction to Water Skills, Pre-School Aquatics, Fundamental Aquatic Skills, Stroke Development, Improvment and Refinement, Personal Water Safety and Diving Fundamentals and Fitness. Session I runs from June 13-24, session II from June 27-July 8, session III from July 11-22 and session IVfrom July 25August 5. Water aerobics return as well, with certified instructor Ricki Albritton, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30-7:30 p.m. Cost is just $2 per workout, or just $1 if you have the Summer Swim Pass the first class is Thursday, May 5. Summer swim lesson sign up will be Monday May 23 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. and Saturday, May 28 from 9-10:30 a.m. in the front office at Sebring High School. For questions call 471-5500 ext. 228 and leave a message for Pat Caton. FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7 (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEChicago 4, Indiana 1 Miami 4, Philadelphia 1 Boston 4, New York 0 Atlanta 4, Orlando 2WESTERN CONFERENCEMemphis 4, San Antonio 2 L.A. Lakers 4, New Orleans 2 Dallas 4, Portland 2 Oklahoma City 4, Denver 1 ___ CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7EASTERN CONFERENCEChicago 4, Atlanta 2 Miami 4, Boston 1WESTERN CONFERENCEDallas 4, L.A. Lakers 0 Oklahoma City 4, Memphis 3 CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7EASTERN CONFERENCEMiami 3, Chicago 1 Chicago 103, Miami 82 Miami 85, Chicago 75 Sunday: Miami 96, Chicago 85 Tuesday: Miami 101, Chicago 93, OT Thursday: Miami at Chicago, late x-Saturday, May 28: Chicago at Miami, 8:30 p.m. x-Monday, May 30: Miami at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.WESTERN CONFERENCEDallas 4, Oklahoma City 1 Dallas 121, Oklahoma City 112 Oklahoma City 106, Dallas 100 Dallas 93, Oklahoma City 87 Monday: Dallas 112, Oklahoma City 105, OT Wednesday: Dallas 100, Oklahoma City 96 FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7 (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEWashington 4, New York Rangers 1 Philadelphia 4, Buffalo 3 Boston 4, Montreal 3 Tampa Bay 4, Pittsburgh 3WESTERN CONFERENCEVancouver 4, Chicago 3 San Jose 4, Los Angeles 2 Detroit 4, Phoenix 0 Nashville 4, Anaheim 2 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7EASTERN CONFERENCETampa Bay 4, Washington 0 Boston 4, Philadelphia 0WESTERN CONFERENCEVancouver 4, Nashville 2 San Jose 4, Detroit 3 CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7EASTERN CONFERENCEBoston 3, Tampa Bay 3 Tampa Bay 5, Boston 2 Boston 6, Tampa Bay 5 Boston 2, Tampa Bay 0 Tampa Bay 5, Boston 3 Monday: Boston 3, Tampa Bay 1 Wednesday: Tampa Bay 5, Boston 4 Friday: Tampa Bay at Boston, 8 p.m.WESTERN CONFERENCEVancouver 4, San Jose 1 Vancouver 3, San Jose 2 Vancouver 7, San Jose 3 San Jose 4, Vancouver 3 Sunday: Vancouver 4, San Jose 2 Tuesday: Vancouver 3, San Jose 2, 2OTAMERICAN LEAGUEEAST WLPCTGB New York2721.563 Boston2722.55112Tampa Bay2623.531112Toronto2425.490312Baltimore2324.489312Central Division WLPctGB Cleveland3017.638 Detroit2523.521512Kansas City2226.458812Chicago2328.4519 Minnesota1632.3331412West Division WLPctGB Texas2624.520 Los Angeles2625.51012Seattle2425.490112Oakland2327.4603___Tuesdays Games Boston 4, Cleveland 2 Baltimore 5, Kansas City 3 Detroit 7, Tampa Bay 6 N.Y. Yankees 5, Toronto 4 Chicago White Sox 8, Texas 6 Minnesota 4, Seattle 2 Oakland 6, L.A. Angels 1 Wednesdays Games Boston 14, Cleveland 2 N.Y. Yankees 7, Toronto 3 Tampa Bay at Detroit, ppd., rain Seattle 3, Minnesota 0 Texas 2, Chicago White Sox 1 Baltimore 9, Kansas City 2 L.A. Angels 4, Oakland 1 Thursdays Games Kansas City at Baltimore, late Boston at Detroit, late Oakland at L.A. Angels, late Chicago White Sox at Toronto, late Fridays Games Boston (Wakefield 1-1) at Detroit (Porcello 4-2), 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 4-3 Toronto (Drabek 3-3 Cleveland (Tomlin 6-1) at Tampa Bay (Price 5-4 Kansas City (Adcock 1-0exas (C.Lewis 4-5 L.A. Angels (Chatwood 3-2 Minnesota (S.Baker 2-3 Baltimore (Tillman 2-3) at Oakland (G.Gonzalez 5-2 N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 5-3 Seattle (Pineda 6-2NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST WLPCTGB Philadelphia3019.612 Florida2819.5961 Atlanta2823.5493 New York2325.479612Washington2128.4299 Central Division WLPctGB St. Louis3021.588 Milwaukee2723.540212Cincinnati2624.520312Pittsburgh2226.458612Chicago2126.4477 Houston1931.3801012West Division WLPctGB San Francisco2721.563 Arizona2524.510212Colorado2424.5003 Los Angeles2229.431612San Diego2030.4008 ___ Tuesdays Games Colorado 12, Arizona 4, 1st game Atlanta 2, Pittsburgh 0 Cincinnati 6, Philadelphia 3 L.A. Dodgers 5, Houston 4 Chicago Cubs 11, N.Y. Mets 1 Milwaukee 7, Washington 6 Arizona 5, Colorado 2, 2nd game St. Louis 3, San Diego 2, 11 innings Florida 5, San Francisco 1 Wednesdays Games Atlanta 4, Pittsburgh 2, 11 innings Milwaukee 6, Washington 4 Houston 2, L.A. Dodgers 1 San Diego 3, St. Louis 1 Philadelphia 5, Cincinnati 4, 19 innings N.Y. Mets 7, Chicago Cubs 4, 7 innings Arizona 2, Colorado 1 Florida 7, San Francisco 6, 12 innings Thursdays Games Cincinnati at Philadelphia, late N.Y. Mets at Chicago Cubs, late Florida at San Francisco, late Arizona at Colorado, late Fridays Games Pittsburgh (Correia 6-4 Cubs (D.Davis 0-2 San Diego (Richard 2-5ashington (Lannan 2-5 Philadelphia (Oswalt 3-2. Mets (Capuano 3-5 Cincinnati (LeCure 0-1 (Hanson 5-3 Arizona (D.Hudson 5-5 (Myers 1-4 San Francisco (Lincecum 4-4 Milwaukee (Marcum 6-1), 8:10 p.m. St. Louis (Westbrook 4-3) at Colorado (Jimenez 0-4 Florida (Vazquez 3-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Garland 1-4 EASTERN CONFERENCE WLTPtsGFGA Philadelphia5321787 New York425171710 Houston345141513 Columbus33413810 New England344131014 D.C.343121318 Toronto FC246121117 Chicago14581317 Sporting K.C.16141118 WESTERN CONFERENCE WLTPtsGFGA Los Angeles725261912 FC Dallas633211410 Portland532171314 Seattle445171412 Real Salt Lake5121792 Colorado435171412 Chivas USA343121110 San Jose343121212 Vancouver15581216 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ___ Wednesdays Games New York 2, Colorado 2, tie FC Dallas 1, Seattle FC 0 Los Angeles 1, Houston 0 Saturdays Games Philadelphia at Toronto FC, 12:30 p.m. New York at Vancouver, 5:30 p.m. Chivas USA at Columbus, 7:30 p.m. Los Angeles at New England, 8 p.m. FC Dallas at Houston, 8:30 p.m. San Jose at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Sporting K.C. at Colorado, 9 p.m. Seattle FC at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. SPORTSSNAPSHOTS TH ESC OREBOARD U U E E F F A A S S O O C C C C E E R R S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 2 2 p p . m m . FC Barcelona vs. Manchester United . . . . F F O O X X A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 0 0 a a . m m . N ASCAR Top Gear 300, Qualifying.. E E S S P P N N 2 2 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NASCAR Top Gear 300. . . . . . . A A B B C CM M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 2 2 p p . m m . Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs . . . . . . . . . . . W W G G N N 7 7 p p . m m . Cleveland at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Chicago White Sox at Toronto . . . . . . . . . W W G G N N 4 4 p p . m m . Cleveland at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 7 7 p p . m m . Regional Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, Boston at D etroit or Cincinnati at Atlanta . . . . . . . . F F O O X XB B O O X X I I N N G G F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 9 9 p p . m m . S teve Chambers vs. Josesito Lopez . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2T T E E N N N N I I S S F FR R I I D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n French Open, Third Round . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n French Open, Third Round . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CTimes, games, channels all subject to change C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 a a . m m . SEC Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . A CC Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NG G O O L L F F F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA BMW Championship . . . . . . G G O O L L F F N N o o o o n n P GA Senior Championship . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . P GA Byron Nelson Championship . . . . G G O O L L F FS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA BMW Championship . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . P GA Senior Championship . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C C 3 3 p p . m m . P GA Byron Nelson Championship . . . . . C C B B S SC C O O L L L L E E G G E E L L A A C C R R O O S S S S E E S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament Semifinal . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 6 6 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament Semifinal . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2N N B B A A P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 9 9 p p . m m Oklahoma City at Dallas, if necessary . . E E S S P P N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 8 8 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m Chicago at Miami, if necessary . . . . . . . . . T T N N T TC C O O L L L L E E G G E E S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament Super Regional . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 1 1 1 1 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . N CAA Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n NCAA Tournament Super Regional . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament Super Regional . . . . E E S S P P N N 5 5 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament Super Regional . . . . E E S S P P N N 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament Super Regional . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament Super Regional . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 LIVESPORTSONTV NBA Playoffs NHL Playoffs Major League Soccer Major League Baseball Page 2BNews-Sun Friday, May 27, 2011www.newssun.com

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C M Y K www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, May 27, 2011Page 3B GRIFFIN'S CARPET MART; 7.444"; 10"; Black; patio ABC APPLIANCE; 3.639"; 4"; Black; tv incentive GRIFFIN'S CARPET MART; 7.444"; 10"; Black; patio ABC APPLIANCE; 3.639"; 4"; Black; tv incentive August. Nests incubate in the beach sand from 45 to 60 days during peak nesting season, and hatching season extends through Oct. 31. As baby sea turtles start to hatch, a depression in the sand forms over the nest. The young turtles work their way to the surface and almost immediately head for the brightest horizon. Instinct tells these baby turtles that the sea reflects the greatest amount of light, and their only chance for survival lies in that direction – away from the darker shadows of the dunes that line the back of an undeveloped beach. Even when clouds obscure the stars and moon, the sea surface provides sufficient reflected light to lure the hatchlings – unless artificial light from beachfront homes and businesses interferes with Mother Nature’s grand plan. The bright light at the front door of people’s homes acts as an after-dark guidepost, welcoming them to a place of safety. But for baby sea turtles, bright, artificial lights splashing from a home or business toward the beach send them a false message – that the safety of the water lies in the direction of the building. It’s usually a deadly piece of misinformation for baby turtles. Adult female turtles also can suffer from light-disorientation when they come ashore at night to lay their eggs. Bright, artificial lights can cause adult turtles to head in the direction of a busy highway or toward other landbased dangers. Fortunately, there’s an easy and inexpensive fix to protect sea turtles from the disorienting effects of beach lighting: Simply shield your lights from shining toward the beach. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) recommends lights be shielded starting on March 1 in Brevard and Broward counties, and May 1 in all other counties, through Oct. 31 everywhere. If there is a need to light development landward of the sea turtle nesting beach, special lighting systems are available. They are designed to eliminate the turtle’s confusion as to which way the water really is. There’s still another common habit that can have very serious consequences for baby turtles. During sea turtle nesting season, furniture should be removed from the beach at night because it acts as a barrier to the hatchlings. The delay exposes them to a greater risk of predation. Sometimes furniture proves an impenetrable barrier that hatchlings can’t negotiate. Some of the simple things we do and take for granted on a daily basis can have serious consequences for wildlife. No matter where you live in Florida, be it on a rural dirt road or on the beachfront where sea turtles and shorebirds nest – take a little time to find out about the wildlife in your area and check local lighting ordinances if you live on the coast. Visit MyFWC.com or call your nearest FWC regional office for information about the simple and inexpensive things you can do in your daily routine to help conserve and ensure the future for Florida’s wildlife. And to those who already make these minor adjustments to help wildlife survive for future generations, a sincere thank you. Continued from 1B Turtles guided to light by instinct MCTphoto Baby sea turtles instinctually head for the reflected light of the ocean to survive, but can be drawn to other sources of light at their peril. awards. He’s won the Stanley Cup and he’s always been a big part,” the Lightning’s 21-year-old forward added. “He knows what to do and how to react in those situations. He stepped up before the game and said a few words, and just the respect he has from every single guy on the team, we take it to heart. ... He’s been our go-to guy, and he was again.” The Bruins are seeking their first trip to the Stanley Cup finals in 21 years, and the Lightning will try to clinch their first appearance on hockey’s biggest stage since they won their only league title in 2004. The Western Conferencechampion Vancouver Canucks await the winner. “We’ve been able to bounce back, but it’s going to be our toughest challenge. We need to put together a full 60 minutes and that’s going to be important going into the next game,” Boston forward Milan Lucic said. St. Louis assisted on a third-period goal that put the Lightning up 4-2. His second goal — and NHL-leading 10th of the playoffs — restored Tampa Bay’s two-goal lead after Boston pulled to 4-3 on one of two goals Krejci scored to keep the Bruins close in the closing minutes. Roloson, who didn’t play in Game 5 after being pulled from two of the previous three games because of ineffectiveness, also gave up a pair of first-period goals and finished with 16 saves. “It’s just one game now, and we’ve got to focus on what we’ve got to do and play 60 minutes or 120 or 420, whatever it’s going to take to win the game,” Roloson said. Boston’s Tim Thomas gave up another early goal, then struggled after Krejci and Milan Lucic scored to give the Bruins a 2-1 lead through one period. The Lightning took control when St. Louis, Purcell and Stamkos scored powerplay goals within a 12minute span of the second and third periods. “The fourth win, they don’t give it to you, as we learned once again. Not that we were looking for them to give it to us. It’s just more proof that’s the way it goes,” said Thomas, who stopped 21 shots after a superb performance in Game 5 moved the Bruins within one victory of their first Stanley Cup finals appearance since 1991. Roloson improved to 7-0 in elimination games during his career, including 4-0 this postseason. The Lightning rallied from a 3-1 deficit to beat Pittsburgh in the first round, with their 41-year-old goalie shutting out the Penguins in Game 7 on the road. “I wasn’t aware of it. It’s nothing. I don’t think it’s me. It’s the teams that I’ve played on. ... It’s not about individuals,” Roloson said. “It takes a whole team to win hockey games, and that’s what it’s all about in this locker room also.” Bruins coach Claude Julien said his team would need to play its best game of the series to clinch it, and the Bruins certainly had to have some doubt about how the night might go after Teddy Purcell scored the first of his two goals on Tampa Bay’s first shot of the game. Lucic countered for Boston less than 7 minutes later with a wrist shot from the slot that got past Roloson. Krejci’s third goal of the series, after he took a nice backhand pass from Daniel Paille, gave the Bruins a 2-1 lead with 3:30 remaining in the first period. But an inability to take advantage of three more power plays caught up with Boston in the middle of the second period when Tampa Bay, which hadn’t scored in man-advantage situations since Game 2, convert ed three within 12 minutes to regain the lead for good. Despite the loss, the Bruins are confident returning home. They faced a similar sit uation in the opening round, losing Game 6 on the road against Montreal before winning Game 7 at TD Garden. “I think our guys a re going to be fine for Game 7,” Julien said. “I know ou r guys will be ready and positive, and our job is to make it happen.” Notes: Krejci’s hat trick — giving him 10 goals this postseason to share the league lead with St. Louis — was Boston’s first in a playoff game since Cam Neely did it April 25, 1991 against Montreal. ... Tampa Bay’s “Big Three” of St. Louis, Stamkos and Lecavalier combined fo r three goals and five assists after contributing just one goal and two assists in the previous three games. Tha t goal was an empty-netter by St. Louis in Game 4. ... Purcell’s quick goal marked the fourth time in the series a team scored less than 2 minutes into a game. ... The Lightning played withou t injured LWSean Bergenheim, who missed the last two periods of Game 5 with an undisclosed injury. Continued from 1B Bolts hang on, face off in clincher tonight NEWS-SUN€ 385-6155

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C M Y K Associated PressNEWYORK — Afederal lawsuit filed in New York is seeking to force the government to reduce the use of antibiotics in animal feed on the grounds it diminishes the effectiveness of the drugs to treat people. The lawsuit was filed in Manhattan federal court on Wednesday. It accuses the federal Food and Drug Administration of failing to protect human health after concluding in 1977 that feeding animals low doses of certain antibiotics was potentially harmful to people’s health. The lawsuit says the antibiotics are sometimes given to healthy farm animals to promote faster growth and to protect them in unsanitary living conditions. It says the danger to humans occurs when the antibiotics promote antibiotic-resistant bacteria that can infect people. The FDAdid not immediately respond to a message for comment. With the summer and its heat approaching, almost everyone will be out in the sun more than they were during the winter. For 9 million Americans, being outside and in the sun is not just for summer fun – it’s a part of their job. Workers in farming, landscaping, construction, recreation and even postal workers will spend hours in the sun – and consequently be exposed to potentially harmful levels of ultraviolet radiation. Ultraviolet radiation, and specifically UVB, is the main environmental hazard to the outdoor worker. Most workers’shifts include the peak intensity hours of UV exposure – 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Since this type of radiation – UVB – easily penetrates clouds, it can reach worrisome levels even on days where little sun is visible. It easily passes through glass and can be reflected into areas of apparent shade. UVB penetrates through the tough, dead outer layers of skin, into the replicating layers. It is there that it interacts with the living tissue, not entirely in a negative fashion – UVradiation on unprotected skin produces Vitamin D. Many believe, and there is some evidence to back it up, that there are anti-cancer properties in this potent antioxidant vitamin. But radiation on living tissue also has a biologic cost. UVB radiation causes DNAdamage and is officially listed as a carcinogen.This damage is cumulative. Ultraviolet radiation and skin cancer share a similar relationship to that of cigarette smoking and lung cancer. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, those who work outside are twice as likely to contract skin cancer as indoor workers. To protect workers from this hazard, we need to reduce the dose of UVB radiation. The obvious solution for employers is to instruct workers to avoid sun exposure and seek shade when available. When possible, employers can rotate or stagger work shifts so that employees spend less time working during the sunniest parts of the day. While the suggestion that people wear long-sleeve shirts during high temperature periods usually is greeted with derision, in fact there are a variety of new fabrics with high Sun Protection Factor values that are light weight, breathable and durable. One of the oldest fabrics, cotton, has long been recognized for its skin protective value in the hottest climates. Cotton long-sleeved, loose-fitting shirts and pants, and broad-billed hats are some effective clothing options for outdoor workers. In dry climates, the fabric actually soaks up sweat and is an effective evaporative cooler. Sunblock provides UV protection, but the level of protection is almost universally overestimated. The most common error people make is using high Sun Protection Factor, sweat-proof sunblock and applying it only once. Sunblock generally loses effectiveness after about two hours due to sweating, the friction of clothing and deterioration due to sunshine. And too often, too little is applied. An ounce is recommended to get advertised protection. But remember, sunblock isn’t “liquid shade.” These common sense protective measures can help safeguard you and your employees year round, but particularly during the summer months when, in most parts of the country, exposure to UVB radiation is highest. With awareness and a few simple steps, we can help workers avoid the short-term sting of a sunburn and the long-term consequences of too much sun exposure. Dr. Donald Bucklin is the National Medical Review Officer for the Valencia, Calif.based U.S. HealthWorks, which has nearly 160 occupational medicine centers in 13 states. For more information, visit www.ushealthworks.com. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, May 27, 2011Page 5B HRMC; 3.639"; 3"; Black plus three; process, healthy living DR. ROTMAN, DARRIN; 3.639"; 3"; Black; healthy living LAMPE & KEIFFER; 5.542"; 4"; Black; healthy living HIGHLANDS SHEDS; 1.736"; 4"; Black; 05/27/11 HEALTHYLIVING 3 Days to Health seminar plannedAVON PARK — Most Americans are bombarded with enough information from many sources to know that lots of fruits and vegetables eaten daily provide the underpinnings of good health. Yet, the offerings out there seem to negate positive choices. Television and magazine advertisements, convenience foods and recipes sometimes often point one into high sugar foods, high fat foods and lots of food additives. If you are interested in learning how to balance meals by adding nutritious, healthy foods for yourself and your family, you are invited to a free event entitled “3 Days to Health” at the Avon Park (formerly Walker) Seventh-day Adventist Church (1410 West Avon Blvd.) from 6:308:30 Tuesday through Thursday. Chet and Bev Cook, director of Hallelujah Acres Lifestyle Center, will present lectures and video clips in addition to preparing recipes which will be sampled by those attending. Register by e-mail: p7vboling@wildblue.net or call Vicki Boling at (863) 635-6769.Amplified telephone distributionSEBRING — Hearing Impaired Persons will distribute amplified telephones to Florida residents who have a hearing or speech loss, in the conference room at Nu-Hope Elder Care Services, 6414 U.S. 27 South in Sebring, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., on Thursday June 2. Important: By appointment only. Call (941) 7438347.Outreach scheduleAce Homecare offers the following community outreach events this week: — Tuesday: 9 a.m. Healt h Fair, Groves, behind Sebring Diner, U.S. 27 Sebring. —Wednesday: 8 a.m. Health Fair, Villa Del Sol, behind Winn Dixie, U.S. 27, Avon Park; 9 a.m. Health Fair, Avon Park Meal Site, Main Street. —Thursday: 10 a.m. Caregiver training, Balmoral Assisted Living Facility 93 Balmoral Road, C.R. 621, Lake Placid; 10:30 a.m. Caregivers support group, Balmoral Assisted Living Facility. Dear Pharmacist: I started two new medications a few months ago, and suddenly my cholesterol is too high. It’s so bizarre because I had perfect numbers all my life, and I eat well and exercise. Can drugs raise cholesterol? — J.G. Breckenridge, Colorado Answer: Yes, hundreds of them can. Nowadays, people are are quick to take statins (like Zocor) and fibrate medications (like Tricor) to lower their cholesterol, but you are spot on. Something you take every day for one condition can cause your cholesterol to creep up. People are always shocked when they find out they are causing their own cholesterol problems (either with low carb diets, or with medications) but it’s true. Some dietary supplement can raise it too. Momentarily, I’ll list some popular items that cause hypercholesterolemia; some cause slight increases while others really spike it. The type of reaction is very individual and it takes weeks to months to occur. If you think that your medication is causing high cholesterol, speak to your doctor about discontinuing that medicine, or switching to something that doesn’t elevate your numbers quite so badly. I am not suggesting that people stop their medicine, that’s up to you and your doctor. Here goes, in no particular order: — Rosaglitazone (Avandia): Once upon a time, a blockbuster diabetes drug, this can raise cholesterol. That’s the least of it’s worries, as consistent reports of life-threatening reactions have led the United Kingdom and South Africa to both withdraw this drug from their countries. This drug is still FDAapproved for U.S. citizens. Hmm. — Vitamin D: I love this antioxidant, but some people are overdoing it. Excessive D can cause excessive calcium in the blood, and this can cause hypercholesterolemia. — Diuretics: These ‘water pills’help reduce blood pressure. The “thiazide” and “loop” diuretics are known to elevate total cholesterol, LDLand blood glucose. Hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) is sold as a drug itself, and also found in dozens of combo drugs sold under various brand names, usually ending in “HCT.” And furosemide (brand name Lasix) is quite possibly the world’s most popular loop diuretic. Any med that contains HCTZ or furosemide may contribute to high cholesterol. — Escitalopram (Lexapro): Apopular antidepressant, related to Celexa. The slight elevation was shown in post-marketing studies. — Fluoxetine (Prozac): Another popular antidepressant that may raise cholesterol, cause hypoglycemia and trigger gout episodes; it may reduce iron and potassium (sparking cardiac arrhythmias). — Creatine: Adietary supplement used primarily by sports enthusiasts, bodybuilders and people with muscle disorders and Lou Gehrig’s disease. It may cause a slight elevation in cholesterol if you take large doses. — Prednisone: This antiinflammatory drug and its cousins in the “corticosteroid” class can cause high cholesterol with chronic use; it doesn’t matter if you take the steroid orally, inject it or inhale it. — Olanzapine (Zyprexa): Used to treat schizophrenia, it has caused severe elevations in triglycerides (greater than 500 mg/dL) in some individuals. Did you know?New JAMAstudy finds that a low-salt diet may up your risk for heart attack. Suzy Cohen is a registered pharmacist and the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and Real Solutions. For more information, visit www. DearPharmacist. com. This information is not intended to treat, diagnose or cure your condition. Medicines and supplements can raise your cholesterol Dear Pharmacist Suzy Cohen Sun poses long-term dangers to people who work outdoors Guest Column Dr. Donald Bucklin Metro Services People who make their living outside need to be aware of the dangers of skin cancer. Snapshots Lawsuit seeks to curb animal feed antibiotic use www.newssun.com Highlands Sheds 1x4 HRMC 2x3 color Lampe & Keifer3x4 Dr. Rotman 2x3

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C M Y K Page 6BNews-SunFriday, May 27, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listingin this directory, call the NewsS una t 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Scott King youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. childrens choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. childrens mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863 www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and womens prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.; Blended Service, 10:30 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon P ark. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 8 08 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and B ible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil M ass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Saturday 3-3:45 p.m. or first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31 Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way,Truth and Life! Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Changing Seasons, a mens grief support group, meets at 1 p.m. Wednesdays. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets at 1 p.m. Thursdays. Office hours,9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863 Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church.Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL33870. Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m. Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Christ, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, FL 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts. Sunday Worship Services, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available at every service. Bible Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered classes for all ages. Church phone: 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. We would like to extend an invitation for you and your family to visit with us here at Sebring Parkway. Our hours of service are: Sunday Bible Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazarene of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W. Main St. Randall Rupert, Pastor. Sunday: Sunday school begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning worship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening service at 6 p.m. Wednesday evening service is at 7 p.m. with special services for children and adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) and Ladies ministries. If you need any more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazarene of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852. Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children and youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christian Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17A North (truck routeAvonPark. Presenting Jesus Christ as the answer for time and eternity. Sunday morning worship service, 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided. Junior Church activities at same time for K-6 grade. Sunday School Bible hour (all ages (Transportation available.) Sunday evening praise and worship service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and youth activities at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Everyone is welcome, please come worship with us. Don Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phone 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP RELIGION Atonement Lutheran Church, ELCAS EBRING The Sixth Sunday in Easter Celebration will be led by Deacon David Thoresen. Eucharist Assistant/Lector will be Ed Graff. Council meeting will be at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, June 7 in counting room. The Labyrinth Prayer Garden, on t he east side of the churchs premises, is open seven days per week for members as well as the public. It was designed after a famous one in France, in loving memory of a former member-Kaitlyn Gossett.Avon Park Church of ChristA VON PARK In All Things We Commend Ourselves asM inisters of God (II Corinthians 6:4-10) will be the message pres ented by Minister Larry Roberts on Sunday. The Lords Supper is served every Sunday. The Sunday evening service will b e a devotional in the fellowship h all followed by a fingerfood fell owship. Avon Park Church of Christ is at 200 S. Forest Ave. For information, c all 453-4692.Christ Lutheran Church, LCMSAVON PARK This Sunday ,Pastor Scott McLean will be preaching a sermon entitled By the Grace of God: Youre a Keeper! T he church is at 1320 C.R. 64, east the Avon Park High School. For more information, call 4712663 or visit www.christlutheranavonpark.org. This is an LCMS c ongregation.Christian Science ChurchSEBRING The lesson sermon on Sunday morning is titled Ancient and Modern Necromancy, alias Mesmerism and Hypnotism, Denounced. The keynote Psalms 9:6, The enemy is gone forever. . the LORD rules forever The church is at 146 N. Franklin St.Christian Training Church S EBRING Associate Minister Casey L. Downing will bring the message titled In Destinys Way: Part 2 at the Sunday morning s ervice. T he Wednesday night Bible study will continue the book ofH ebrews. Eastside Christian ChurchL AKE PLACID All are invited Sunday to help send-off Stepping Out in Faith on their Mission For the Master 201 tour. They will be sharing their program during the usual worshipt ime. Skook and Gayle Wright are some of the churchs Traveling Music Ministries, and though it is hard to say goodbye, this powerfulm essage with joys, praises, challenges and worship touches so many lives outside of our community. After services, members of thec hurch will join hands in a prayer c ircle around the RV. Wednesday evenings mid-week Bible study and discussion time is an informal setting with open dis-c ussion. E mmanuel United Church of ChristSEBRING The Rev. George M iller will deliver the Sunday morning sermon, Searching for G od with Scripture taken from Acts 17:22-23. The church is 1.7 miles west of U .S. 27 on County Road 634 (Hammock Road o r visit sebringemmanuelucc.com.First Christian Church of Avon ParkA VON PARK Believe It Or Not! (Part 2 J ohn 12:44-50. First Christian Church of Avon Park is at 1016 W. Camphor St. (behind the Wachovia Bank). Call 453-5334 or e-mail firstchristianap@embarqmail.com with anyq uestions or to request information. The church website is www.firstchristianap.com.First Christian Church (Disciples of ChristSEBRING At the Lords Table this Sunday morning will be Dick and Sharron Campbell.C ommunion will be served by Carol Chandler, Barbara Slinkard, Carol Graves and Mike Graves. Greeting the congregation will be Charles and Mary Ann Thomas.N oel and Juanita Roberts will be working with Childrens Church this month. L ighting the candles during the month of May will be Nina Kunsak. Adrienne Diaz will bew ith the children in the nursery during the month of May. T he Rev. Rons sermon is titled Love Must Be Sincere taken from Romans 12:9-17. The churchw ill have a brief memorial remembering loved ones who have gone t o be with the Lord since last year. The church is at 510 Poinsettia Ave. Call 385-0352.First Presbyterian Church of Avon ParkA VON PARK On Sunday, Pastor Bob Johnsons sermon is entitled How Will WeFinish? based on Ecclesiastes 12:1-4. Special music will be provided by Pastor Bob and MaxineJ ohnson. Sunday School is available for all ages. Maxine Johnson, adult teacher, continues the study of David in II Samuel 12 in whichN athan rebukes David. Wendy Garcia teaches the youth class and discusses issues of today and how the Bible instructs us. Wednesday morning, Pastor J ohnson will conclude the study of Revelation. There will be no Bible study during the summer months. It will resume in September. O n Thursday, June 2, the Mes Fellowship meets at the Depot for breakfast and then returns to thec hurch for a short Bible study and then to a members house for a work project. O n Saturday, June 4 the Womens Ministries will have their q uarterly luncheon at noon. Mary Circle is hostess. The theme is friendship. The d evotional Gods Garden will be given by Ginger Schmidt. W endy and April Garcia will provide special music. Installation of officers will also take place. The church is at 215 E. Circle S treet (with two entrances on Lagrande Street). F or more information, call the church office at 453-3242. C ontinued on page 7B Church News

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C M Y K www.newssun.comN ews-SunF riday, May 27, 2011Page 7B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the Redeemer .Service time is 9:30 with Holy Communion. Coffee hour following services. Newcomers welcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mailredeemer1895@aol.com Web site:redeemeravon.com. The church is at 839 Howes Way,Avon Park (two miles north of Sun N Lake Boulevard, across from Wells Dodge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday Services: Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek service on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always welcome. The Rev. Jim Kurtz, rector. Church office 3857649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL33852. Phone: 4650051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday evening: Holy Communion with Healing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child care available at the 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come see what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 Thunderbird Road, (863 0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday services at 7 p.m. We offer Kid City Childrens Ministry throughout all services, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married couples, prime-timers, and Bible studies in Spanish. Kid City Day Care, Preschool and After-School Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For registration call: 385-3111). Check us out on the Web atwww.sebringgrace.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration Ministries, (non-denominational 2200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533771. Sunday service: Sunday School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church (ELCA 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen, Deacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, third and fifth Sunday each month, and Rev. Jefferson Cox on the second and fourth Sunday of each month. Jim Helwig, organist/choir director. Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee hour on the first and third Sunday of each month. Council meeting on the first Monday of month; Ladies Group WELCAmeets at noon second Monday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable Garden Club meets as needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden open seven days a week to congretation and community. Like to sing? Come join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park LCMS, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALCAmerican Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Sunday service at 9:30 a.m. Sunday school will resume in the fall. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year roundfice phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots PreSchool director; and Noel Johnson, minister of youth and family life. Worship schedule after Easter through December: Worship service 10 a.m., and Education Hour, 8:45 a.m. Worship schedule for January through Easter: Worship service, 8:30 and 11 a.m., Education Hour 9:45 a.m. Traditional Service with Holy Communion each first and third Sunday. Non-Traditional Service each second, fourth and fifth Sunday. Seasonal mid-week services Wednesday evenings during Lent and Advent. Call church office for additional Worship times and special holiday services. Other activities and groups include: Choirs; Ladies Guild and LWML; Mens Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies as scheduled; Trinity Tots Pre-school, Youth Group activities (call for meeting times and dates). Visit us online at:www.Trinitylutheranlp.com. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson A venue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 8:45 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. in the Millennium Church. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer a Saturday service at 6 p.m. with Pastor Tiger Gullett in the Millennium Church. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturers Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church ( PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:30-7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m. in the sanctuary. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Childrens Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day A dventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863 Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL33870. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays with Rick Heilig, youth director. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church, 200 South Lake Avenue, Avon Park, FL33825. (863 James Weiss, Pastor, Sunday School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Prayer Shawl Ministry on the second andf ourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m. for women who love God and crocheting. Visit us at our church Web site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodist Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pastor. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral assistant. Sunday schedule: Heritage Worship Service, 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worship service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m. Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m. (October-May onlye offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth programs, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship. We are a congregation that want to know Christ and make Him known. Call the church office at 465-2422 or check out our church Web site at www.memorialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL33872. The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all services. Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodist Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98The Rev. Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church office phone: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church of Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 27 and Hammock Road). Sunday worship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion with worship first Sunday of month; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. all other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For more information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@earth link.net or check theWeb sitesebringemmanuelucc.com. No matter who you are or where you are on lifes journey, youre welcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP RELIGION First Presbyterian Church of SebringSEBRING To Live is Christ and to Do is Gain is the title of Sunday mornings sermon given byt he Rev. Darrell A. Peer. The church office will be closed Monday. Grief Support Group meets in the adult classroom on Tuesday.Y outh Group (ages 11-18) meets in fellowship hall. Adult Bible study in Wednesday morning in the adult classroom.F irst United Methodist Church of SebringS EBRING The Rev. A.C. Bryant will bring the message on Sunday morning with the youthp roviding the music for the service. Family fellowship dinner and B ible study is on Wednesday evening with dinner in the Family Life Center. Christian Comedy Night is Saturday in the Family Life Center. Vacation Bible School is June 13-17 for kindergarten through fifth grade from 9 a.m. until noon.R egister online. Listen Live on WITS-AM 1340 each Sunday to hear the worship service. Call the church office for inform ation at 385-5184. The church is downtown at 126 South Pine St. The website is www.sebringfirstumc.comHeartland Christian ChurchSEBRING Pastor Ted Moores sermon this week will be Freedom and Forgiveness are Never Free with Scripture from Luke 7:36-50. Communion iso ffered during the service weekly The service will also include Roland Bates singing This Land isY our Land and Flossi Moore singing I am Thankful to be an A merican. Tuesday nights adult Bible study will be taught by Pastor TedM oore. Wednesday night are the Young A dult and Childrens Programs taught by George Kelly, Jon and Amanda Armentrout and Toby Cribbs. It features a free meal. The church is at 2705 Alternate Route 17 South in Sebring (behind Publix). Look for the lighthouse. Call 314-9693.Memorial United M ethodist ChurchLAKE PLACID Claude Burnett, pastoral assistant, will p reach at the Heritage Worship S ervice and the Celebration Worship Service on the Memorial Day theme. The Sanctuary Choir will present music on this theme at t he second service. T he childrens sermon will be p resented in the Sanctuary and then they will proceed to the Sonshine Club House for their worship service. Rev. Fred Ball will preach at the New Song contemporary service in Rob Reynolds Hall. Nursery care isa vailable at the Creepy Crawly clubhouse for all morning events. There will be no Youth Group meeting Sunday and Bible Fellowship is discontinued for the summer. The Church office will bec losed on Monday. The Church is at 500 Kent Ave. C all 465-2422.Parkway Free Will Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Sunday morni ng Bible lesson, The Tree of L ife, is from Revelation 22 (King J ames Version). Pastor Jim Scaggs will bring the Sunday morning message. The evening service will be the end-of-the-month-sing and fellowship. The Wednesday evening service will be praise, prayer and Bibles tudy continuing in I Timothy.St. John United Methodist ChurchS EBRING On Sunday, the Rev. Ronald De Genaros sermon will be The Promise of the Spiri taken from John 14:15-21. Nursery is provided at all threes ervices. Bible Study is Tuesday. Mens Fellowship and Prayer Breakfast is Wednesday morning. St. John Youth meet Wednesday evening.S ebring Church of the BrethrenSEBRING This Sunday morning, Pastor Keith Simmons will bep reaching on Make Christ Your Lord! The Scripture reading will b e from I Peter 3:13-22. Sunday school will meet in the Fidelis Room. They will be study-i ng Tree of Life, taken from Revelation 22. C hildrens Sunday school is Continued from page 6B Church News R ELIGION GUIDELINES: The N ews-Sunp ublishes religion news on Fridays. T he submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday to be considered for publication in the following Fridas paper. Submit items to the News-Sunsfrom 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays; fax to 385-2453; send e-mail to editor@newssun.com; or m ail to Lifestyle Editor,N ews-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 South,Sebring, FL 33870. For information,call 385-6155,ext. 516. Continued on page 8B

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C M Y K I ve been reading a book about being a help meet. It suggests that there are three types of men. This and the next two columns will deal with those types of men and how to be the best help meet for them. The first type is the leadership, take charge type. This commanding personality is also one of Gods traits. This man tends to dominate and will often end up in a position of leadership. He goes above and beyond the call of duty, may be a workaholic. He needs a wife who is content to wait on him and his every whim. He is strong and resourceful, the protector of his family. He needs strong affirmation from his wife that he is her knight in shining armor. He needs to know she feels secure with him. He isnt much for small talk and doest seem to need anyone. He needs a wife who is patient, loyal and obedient. He will treasure such a wife. He may need to know your whereabouts every minute of the day. He is interested in your welfare. He worries about you and wants to know you are safe at all times. It may not come across that way, but if you want him to treasure you, learn to be thankful for his care. Let him know you appreciate his concern. He needs to be the leader of his family. He needs to be in c ontrol. God made him that way. You can end up divorced if you try to change him. He needs a wife who will share in his glory, be faithful and sit by his side in total admiration. If you do this you will become his closest, perhaps only confidante. Over the years he may become more gentle and less gruff. Ephesians 5:33 tells the wife to reverence (revere or respect) her husband. It is not an option. It is a command and will lead to a happy marriage. Most men of this type are not intentionally cruel or evil. When the wife doesnt treat him as he feels he deserves he reacts badly. He may not live up to all of your expectations, but if you treat him in the manner described above, youll have a wonderful life together. Aleta Kay can be reached at themarriagementor@yahoo.com Page 8BNews-SunFriday, May 27, 2011www.newssun.com INDIAN RIVER TRANSPORT/; 3.639"; 3"; Black; healthy living AVON PARK BINGO; 3.639"; 3"; Black; tv incentive DENTON CAMP/PAM ELDERS; 3.639"; 3"; Black; lk dent camp The Kids Zone. There is a nursery available. Also, on Wednesday evening, The Kids Zone meetsa fter the meal.Southside Baptist ChurchS EBRING The Rev. David Altman will speak o n Remember My Chains from Colossians4 :7-18 in the Sunday morning worship service. Childrens church and a nursery are available. The focus on prayer for alln ations will be observed in the evening worship service. Wednesday services include a student ministrya nd adult Bible study and prayer meeting. The church is at 379 S. Commerce Ave. Call 3850752.Spring Lake Presbyterian ChurchSEBRING The message for Sunday morning is Abraham the Awesome w ith Scripture taken from Genesis 12:1-3. I t will be given by the Rev. Don Davis.The Way ChurchSEBRING Pastor Reinhold Buxbaums message is NorthernC ampaign of Israel with Scripture from the book of J oshua. On Sunday evening, the W ay Church will be showing the film God of Wonders. Combining exquisite nature footage and scientific insights withS cripture, it examines the size of the universe, the symmetry of snow crystals, the complexity of DNA, and more. P astor Buxbaum will be leading another Evening of Prophecy at Homers Restaurant on Monday. The Way Church is at 1005 North Ridgewood Drive. The church phone is 471-6140 and the pastors cell phone 214-6190. For church information and the pastors messages go to www.thewaychurch.org. C ontinued from page 7B RELIGION Singing Under the Oaks is todayS EBRING Singing Under the Oaks with Dave and Judy, featuring country music and southern gospel, is every second and fourthF riday (today month at 7 p.m. at 3414 Beck Ave. There is a $5 donation at the door. There will be door prizes. Comeo ne, come all and enjoy. For more information, call 253-0771.N ew Day Quartet in concert SaturdayAVON PARK The N ew Day Quartet will be in concert at the Church of the Nazarene in Avon Parko n Saturday at 7 p.m. Their music blesses all who c ome to see them. Through the live music and smooth harmony the message oft he love of Jesus shines through. Awarm welcome i s extended to all. Afreewill offering will be taken for the group. The church is at 707 W. Main St. For more infor-m ation please call 4525165.Rev It Up at Bethany VBSAVON PARK Rev It Up at Bethany Baptist C hurch Vacation Bible School June 13-17. This race car-themed week will include Bible stories, snacks, games, crafts,s inging and a real race car will be on hand for the Friday night closing program. Times are Monday t hrough Friday from 6:308:30 p.m. for grades kindergarten through sixth. The church will also Rev It Up on Friday night withb arbecue for all who want to come. There is no cost, but any donations will got o Camp Sparta in Sebring. Bethany Baptist Church is on the corner of S.R. 17a nd C-17Ain Avon Park. If you have any questions, c all the office at 452-1136.Salute to Armed Forces setS EBRING Living Waters Church of God at 4751 Sparta Road will have a special Memorial Day service on Sunday at1 0 a.m. There will be songs and a dramatic battle scene will be presented. After the service, there will be ham-b urgers and hot dogs served. Church News Snapshots Classified ads get results! Call 314-9876 Preaching is highly regarded in the scriptures. Some of Jesuspartingw ords to the apostles were preach the gospel to every creature. (Mark 16:15The Holy Spirit through the apostle Paul proclaimed, For since, in the wisdom of God, the world through wisdom did not know God, it pleased God through the foolishness of the messagep reached to save those who believe. (1 Corinthians 1:21) Preaching the gospel is part of the wisdom of God. Therefore, that great beginning on Pentecost (Acts2 ) was centered around the preaching the word. Jesus h ad previously told the apostles (Luke 24:47 preach repentance and remis-s ion of sins to all nations beginning at Jerusalem. W hen their questions regarding the Holy Spirit were answered, Peter then declared, Men of Israel, hear these words... and pro-c eed to tell of Jesusdeath, burial and resurrection...amazing grace. (Acts 2:22-24 Pause for a moment and r ecall that the Word of God is identified as a sword (Ephesians 6:17 sharper than a two-edged sword. (Hebrews 4:12 Therefore, let all the h ouse of Israel know assuredly that God has made t his Jesus, whom you crucified, both Lord and Christ. (Acts 2:36With this sword, when they heard, they were cut to the heart a nd asked, Men and brethren, what shall we do? As believers, they were instructed by the Spirit via Peter, Repent, and let everyo ne of you be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins; and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. (verse 38F urther words of exhortation were given such as Be saved from this perverse generation. Remember that the audience was challengedt o hear these words because it was necessary for the following response. Then those who gladly received his word were baptized; and that day aboutt hree thousand souls were added to them. (verse 41 W ow, preach the Word for it has power to move and save...the foolishness ofp reaching, not the preaching of foolishness! H owever, a red flag must be raised as it was in Second Timothy 4:2-4, Preach the word! Be ready in season and out of season. Convince, rebuke, exhort w ith all longsuffering and teaching. For the time will come when they will not e ndure sound doctrine, but according to their own d esires, because they have i tching ears, they will heap up for themselves teachers a nd they will turn their ears away from the truth, and be turned aside to fables. This prophecy is fulfilled before our very eyes, therefore, take heed: Beware off alse prophets, who come to y ou in sheeps clothing, but inwardly they are ravenous wolves. (Matthew 7:15 Frank Parker is a Sebring resident and can be contacted at frankparker27@yahoo.com P reaching the word highly regarded in scripture Guest Column F rank Parker What just happened on Israeli borders on May 15? Itw as called day of Nakba, or day of Catastrophe. It was the d ay after Israel took possession of their land and declared it a nation. H i, my name is Pastor Reinhold Buxbaum from The Way, and I like to have a word with you. Gods word is clear that t he land belongs to Israel, and that they will return to it from all four directions. Do not be afraid, for I am with you; I will bring your chil-d ren from the east and gather you from the west. I will say to the north, give them up! and to the south, Do not hold them back, (Isaiah 43:5-6 NIV) Not only did God promise t o bring the Jews back to their homeland, he also p romised them that the wasteland would blossom again. The desolate land will be cultivated instead of lying in the sight of all whop ass through it. They will say, This land that was laid waste has become like the garden of Eden; the cities that were lying in ruins, desolate and destroyed, are now fortified and inhabited.( Ezekiel 36:34-35) As foretold, Israel currently exports o ver 800 million dollars worth of fresh produce each year! Even more specific, God t ells the Israelites that many types of trees will be planted i n the dessert. the cedar, the acacia, the myrtle and the olive, I will set pines in thew asteland, the fir and the cypress together, so that people may see and know, may c onsider and understand, that the hand of the Lord has done t his. Since 1900 more than 1 billion trees have been planted in Israel, after 2000 years of wasteland. And by the way, the one a nd a half million Arabs who choose to stay behind in Israel have a higher living standard then any other Arabs anywhere in the Middle East with voting rights and representation in the Knesset. T wo months ago, we discussed how the Moslem s tates around Israel will redirect their anger against Israel. The in-fighting within the countries will turn against their arch enemy Israel, ando n May 15 we saw this anger c oming from all sides against Israel. How long until it turns into an all-out war? (Psalm 83) Egypt is calling to nullify t heir peace agreement, Libya b lames the Jews, Gaza with Hamas wants war, Syria is also looking for a reason to fight, and it will soon havei s chance! Israel will be victorious, because God has more plans with the Jews! Yes, the stage is set for the second coming of Jesus! R einhold Buxbaum is Pastor of T he Way Church, he teaches An E vening in Prophecy at Homers R estaurant at 6:30 p.m. the first M onday of each month. Jerusalem, a cup of trembling Guest Column R einhold Buxbaum What kind of man is your husband? The Marriage Mentor Aleta Kay STANLEY STEEMER CARPET; 3.639"; 3"; Black; healthy living Associated PressDULUTH, Minn. For hundreds of years, people have gone to church services on Sundays. But at one church in Duluth this summer, Sunday will not be the day to congregate and celebrate the Lord. Instead, that day will be Wednesday. ouve got to do something bold and different once in a while, said the Rev. Peter Bagley. It started with one member of the congregation who reportedly said, I like church. I also like going to the cabin. That sentiment, plus an annual decrease in summer church attendance, got others thinking until they had a revelation. Our solution is to have our regular worship service at a time when our disciples can attend, Bagley said. While he knows some may question whether changing the day of worship is a biblically correct thing to do, Bagley points to a similar issue raised in the Roman church during the days of the Apostle Paul. According to Romans 14:56, he said, One person esteems one day above another; another esteems every day alike. Let each be fully convinced in his own mind. He who observes the day, observes it to the Lord; and he who does not observe the day, to the Lord he does not observe it. Minn. church with cabin habit scraps Sunday service Avon Park Bingo 2x3 Stanley Steemer2x3 Indian River Transport 2x3 Denton Camp 2x3

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C M Y K By CARYN ROUSSEAU Associated PressCHICAGO There were no free cars or vacations. No f avorite things or makeovers. No celebrity guests on stage though there were plenty in the audience. The finale of Oprah Winfreys talk show, tapedT uesday and aired W ednesday, was all about the one thing that made her a billion-dollar success: the unique connection she made w ith millions of viewers for 25 years. In what she called h er love letter to fans, she made clear that to her, all those TVfriendships wentb oth ways. Something in me connected with each of you in a w ay that allowed me to see myself in you and you inm e, Winfrey said. I list ened and grew, and I know you grew along with me. Winfrey was the only person on stage with little background music and short flashback clips. The show went to commercials with wenty-Five Years, a soft song that musician Paul Simon wrote and recorded for her. S he called fans her safe h arbor and became teary eyed when reflecting on heru pbringing in rural Mississippi. It is no coincidence that a l onely little girl, Winfrey said, choking up, who felt not a lot of love, even thoughm y parents and grandparents did the best they could, it is no coincidence that I grew upt o feel a genuine kindness, affection, trust and validation from millions of you all overt he world. Winfrey told viewers that sometimes she was a teacher, but more often her viewers instructed her. She called Wednesdays e pisode her last class from this stage. At one point she thanked v iewers for sharing her yellow brick road of blessings something she said ba ck in November 2009, when she announced that she would end her show. The program g ave rise to a media empire, i ncluding a magazine and Winfreys own cable network, which she launched in January. Wednesdays show was the l ast piece of a months-long sendoff, but as the hour wrapped up, Winfrey stopped short of saying farewell. I wont say goodbye. Ill just say, until we meet again, she said. She hugged and kissed her longtime partner Stedman Graham and shook hands with audience members b efore walking through the halls of Harpo Studios in C hicago, hugging and crying with her staff. She shouted, e did it! T he last shot of the finale s howed Winfrey walking away with her cocker spaniel, Sadie. Some fans across the country had parties for the finale.S haron Evans, 53, of Chicago had pancakes with her mother and girlfriends. She was very subdued today and I appreciated that she was taking that last hour not to showcase any celebrities or favorite things, Evans said. It was truly what she said, a love letter to us. Amy Korin, 32, of C hicago, was in the studio audience when the show taped on Tuesday. S he described Winfreys m onologue as having the feeling of a graduation com-m encement speech. It was just amazing to witness, she said. Celebrities in the audience included Tyler Perry, Maria Shriver, Suze Orman and Cicely Tyson. None of them joined Winfrey on stage. Aweek earlier, Hollywood A -listers and 13,000 fans bid W infrey farewell in a doubleepisode extravaganza atC hicagos United Center. B y CHRISTYLEMIRE APMovie CriticThe roly-poly Po is back in Kung Fu Panda 2, with high energy, some lovelyv isuals and peppy, playful voice work, as always, from star Jack Black. But the freshness and novelty that made the origi-n al film such a kick back in 2008 has been, well, kicked to bits. And the storyline of this sequel feels overstuffed with plotlines and charac-t ers, none of which gets its due individually. Parents also should be aware ofs ome violent, frightening imagery that may be too much for the littlest kids( were talking around age 4). E veryone else, though, will probably delight in the ani-m ated spectacle from director J ennifer Yuh Nelson, which is bright and tactile, bold and subtle. The 3-D you didt think it wouldnt be in3 -D, now did you? is generally unobtrusive but it d oesnt really add anything, either. The most beautiful parts actually come from theo ther kinds of visual styles that are worked in, including a delicate segment that features paper-style animation. Delicate probably isnt t he first word that comes to mind when pondering the portly Po, whos gone from the underdog dreaming of kung-fu greatness all day ath is dads restaurant to the Dragon Warrior himself. He must protect the Valley of Peace with the help of The Furious Five, the variousa nimal species who fight alongside him and happen to c ome with celebrity voices. One day, Po begins havi ng flashbacks to long-suppressed childhood memories, and he begins to wonder who his biological parents might have been. Asl ug-headed as Po can be, even he can figure out that Mr. Ping (lovingly voiced by James Hong), the d uck who runs the village noodle shop in the films version of ancient China,p robably didnt provide him with any DNA. And so Po goes on a quest as so many kung-fu warriors must in search of his p ast. At the same time, a megalomaniacal peacock named Lord Shen (Gary Oldman) is hell-bent on dominating the country withs ome serious firepower. These two story lines run parallel to each other and eventually collide but never truly gel. Its an admirable attempt to develop the characterb eyond the usual animated kidsmovie hero, but it also r esults in a crammed narrative thatll make you wish theyd stuck with one story or the other. In every way, it feels like t heres too much going on and that includes having too many characters. This is especially true when it comes to Pos posse, The Furious Five. Except forA ngelina Jolie as the fierce Tigress, the animals who c omprise Pos team Monkey (Jackie Chan M antis (Seth RogenViper (Lucy Liu (David Cross of fighting but only get a couple of lines here andt here, and theyre not fleshed out terribly well. Dustin Hoffman returns in a reduced role as Pos diminutive mentor, Master Shifu (and theres not nearly enough of him), with Jean-C laude Van Damme, Dennis Haysbert and Michelle Yeoh a mong the other actors joining the supporting cast. The way to true inner peace comes from knowing that more doesnt necessari-l y equal better. DearAbby: While I am not from the South, many of my relatives are. They all were raised in medium to large cities, not rural areas. Im embarrassed when they use crude terms and call their parents Ma and Pa in public. These are welleducated people, but they come across sounding like hicks and buffoons. They think its funny, but no one outside our family does. If someone laughs with them, its because of embarrassment or discomfort. No one else is willing to speak up and when I try to, they make me feel like Im a spoiled brat. If these people were from rural areas or uneducated/uncultured Id understand, but theyre not. The sound of their fake hickness is like fingernails on a chalkboard! Please help. Keeping It Real in Laguna Beach, Calif. DearKeeping It Real: Im sorry that visits from your relatives are so painful for you. However, I see nothing wrong with calling ones parents Ma and Pa if those are the names they have been called all their lives. Believe me, I have heard parents called much worse. The best advice I can offer would be for you to grow a thicker skin and, if that doesnt work, spend less time with your relatives. With your attitude, youll be doing them a favor. DearAbby: Should I be a bridesmaid in my best friend Carlas ex-husbands wedding? Im still friends with him, which is fine with Carla. I have also become quite close to his fiancee, Jenny. We have a lot in common and have been hanging out for some time. Jenny has asked me to be in her wedding. I havent talked to Carla yet to see how shed feel about it. I dont feel like shell be completely honest with me. Would I be stabbing her in the back if Im in the wedding? I need advice, and quick the wedding is soon! Friends With Everybody DearF.W.E.: Because youre concerned about Carlas reaction to your being a part of her ex-husbands wedding, you should address your question to her. My gut reaction is that if it feels to you like it could be stabbing her in the back, it might be perceived that way. DearAbby: What is the protocol for office romances? I have seen so many flings and love affairs go on. Sometimes its fine, but other times it has causeda big distraction. Asupervisor dating a subordinate is probably frowned upon, but what if theyre in different departments? Should an office romance be kept secret, or out in the open so rumors wont spread? I have never been a part of this, but I have seen plenty. Whats right and wrong? Curious In The Cubicle DearCurious: There is no protocol. Most companies discourage office romances because theyre a distraction and make workers less efficient. If they happen between a supervisor and a subordinate and it doesnt work out, it could lead to accusations of sexual harassment and an expensive lawsuit. So while the temptation may be there, whats right is to avoid them and whats wrong is to indulge in one because its risky business. DearAbby: When closing window blinds for the night, is it normal or proper to close them with the blades or slats in the upward or downward position? My wife and I disagree on this. I maintain they should be closed in the upward position. What do you or the experts say? In The Dark in Texas DearIn The Dark: I have never encountered this question, so my staff and I experimented with the mini-blinds in our office, which has many windows. Tilting the slats up blocked more light than when we tilted them down. However, this is not a question of what is normal or proper. Its a matter of what works best for you. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. To order How to Write Letters for All Occasions, send a business-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds Abby Letter Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 610540447. (Postage is included in the price.) www.newssun.comN ews-SunF riday, May 27, 2011Page 9B FAIRMONT CINEMA; 1.736"; 6"; Black;5 /27/11 E.O. KOCH CONSTRUCTION CO.; 5.542"; 4"; Black; 05/27/11 p/u DIVERSIONS Familys southern drawls are not music to California ears Dear Abby Movie Review Kung Fu Panda 2 Rating: PG (sequences of martial arts action and mild violence)R unning time: 90 minutes Review: (of 4 Panda 2 is lovely but lacks fresh kick MCT Winfrey finale devoted to fans, her safe harbor The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Fairmount 1x6 (Note: there wasa duplicate 1x4 highlands sheds on this page) EO Koch 3x4

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C M Y K LIVING 10B PA GE News-Sun Friday, May 27, 2011 1 983Despite the fact that (A.M. Chicago) has been doing better without a host than it did with Robb Weller, Oprah Winfrey was named Thursday as the shows host. INC. column, Dec. 2, 19831 984Oprah Winfrey, who succeeded Robb Weller as the host of A.M.C hicagoon WLS, has pulled the show into a virtual dead heat with WBBMs Phil Donahue on the strength of several phenomenally popular episodes. Eric Zorn, March 5, 1984infrey is about as unspontaneous as, say, a charge up San Juan Hill. Onand off-screen, her presence is undeniable, despite her short Chicago track record: three months. She is greeted by strangers on the s treet, recognized in restaurants and once was driven to work by a policeman when she was late a nd couldnt get a cab. Jon Anderson, March 13, 19841 985Pulling off her first national TVouting with aplomb, WLS-TVs morning tornado Oprah Winfrey swept onto NBCs The Tonight Showand challenged designated guest h ostJoan Rivers to a duel. S hell lose 30 pounds if Joan loses 5. Jon Anderson, Jan. 31, 1985Saying Oprah Winfrey is h ot is like saying Refrigerator Perry is big. Everyone wants her, from Life magazine to Entertainment Tonight.Ande verything she wants, from her part in The Color Purpleto a p air of shoes, comes her way. Channel 7 may be surp rised at Winfreys phenomen al success, Phil Donahue may be in shock, but Winfrey? Not her. Her selfconfidence is as big as her, uh, heart. I was like a hit album waiting to be released,she says. I knew my day would come. Cheryl Lavin, Dec. 19, 19851986When I have children, I want to teach them: That you are responsible for your life. really great evening to me is: Ordering in some pasta, opening up a great bottle of wine and then getting into bed with a terrific book. If I could change one thing about myself, it would be: My hips. People who knew me in high school thought I was: An Oreo. It was to hate white people, but to me, color never mattered. I knew I was a grown-up when I: Started to pay my bills on time. The best time of my life: Now. Im comfortable with myself, and life is good and getting better Winfreys responses in ital Statistics column, Tribune Sunday magazine, Sept. 7, 19861987She can exhibit a giddy tendency towards shameless self-promotion; she is her own best fan. On a recent show featuring actor Danny Glover, Winfrey showed a film clip from The Color Purple.The clip featured Glover approximately 20 percent of the time; Winfrey the other 80 percent. And during a show on which short men talked about how insensitively they are treated by society, Winfrey just happened to drop the information that her current beau is 6-feet-6. Marcia F, Coburn, March 22, 19871988The new Oprah is authoritative rather than fun-loving. She still is loud and self-involved and overweight, but now gives the impression she has worked that out, and will interrupt almost any guest to tell us how much she has learned in the process. Of course, the new Oprah is as much an exhibitionist as the old, though her parading is now more high-toned, replacing talk of diets with how she sent Phil Donahue champagne or bought her mother a fur coat. Somebody probably told her she is a role model. So, instead of being natural,Oprah is being successful,and, my, she does let us knowAlan G. Artner, Jan. 10, 19881989The history of Harpo Productions waits to be written. Now it exists in blueprints of the handsome production facility on West Washington Boulevard, which also will house a new studio for her TV show. Rick Kogan, March 19, 19891 990Having bought, designed and taken charge of her own studio, Winfrey can now rightfully consider herself a mogul. She is certainly big enough that newspapers and magaz ines across the country would fly their writers here to get the first peek at Harpo Studios, despite a ban on photographers and limiting the writer s to a news conference instead of interviews. Mark Caro, March 18, 19901 992Oprah Winfrey has announced her engagement to longtime companion Stedman Graham, whom she has dat e d for six years. Tribune wire services, Nov. 8, 19921997 What began as Winfreys effort to p romote reading with a once-a-month s egment on her talk show has becom e a double-edged sword for public libraries and bookstores nationwide T heyre delighted with the influx of readers. But they often cant supply the books after Winfrey makes her a nnouncements. Carolyn Starks, May 1, 19971 998Legally, Oprah Winfrey cleaned the cattlemens clocks in their own feedlot. But does last w eeks jury verdict exonerating the talk show host of defamation charges give lasting comfort that free speech, as Winfrey declared Thursday, not only lives, it rocks Probably not. Tim Jones, March 1, 1998The variable-weight champio n of daytime talk is undergoing a rare period of public repudiation. Her beloved big-screen movie project is getting the cold shoulder from audiences, despite a fairly positive critica l reception. More starkly, her daily daytime talk show her power and popularity base seems to be alienating not only the predictably dyspeptic critics but even some long-t ime fans. They decry its new resemblance to a New Age revival tent, wi th Herself as the charismatic leader and a smug little coterie of self-help authors passing the collection plates and pocketing much of the proceeds. This is strange turf for Winfrey, w ho has enjoyed almost unchecked exaltation from public and press alike. Steve Johnson, Nov. 23, 19982000But free speech doesnt rock for everyone, notably employees at C hicago-based Harpo Inc., the corpo rate parent of Winfreys production s tudio operation. To work at Harpo, a ll employees must sign an agreement prohibiting them from talking or writ ing about Winfreys personal or business life and the affairs of her compa ny for the rest of their lives. Tim Jones, April 16, 2000ith so much of O, the person, on hand, O, the magazine, makes Martha Stewart look like a shrinking violet, which may be part of the plan. The magazine adds power to Winfreys challenge of Stewart for dominance i n the field of personality-driven lifestyle guidance. Steve Johnson, April 19, 20002007One of Americas best-known faces put her fame on the line in a ra re dip into partisan politics Saturday, as Oprah Winfrey brought her brand name and credibility to Sen. Barack Obamas presidential bid. The one woman media empire denied she is trying to do for Obama what her boo k club has done for authors. John McCormick, Dec. 9, 20072009Although she began Tuesdays show by shouting Greatest city in th e world,Winfrey became so big, so fast, that she transcended place. (Chicagos) celebrities are athletes an d newsreaders, the occasional musician. Our celebrities have two names. Winfrey is something else, the globa l brand that you forget is also a company with a headquarters somewhere specific. It was interesting to have he r on our big street for a day, but come Wednesday morning except on he r true home, television therell be little trace of her Steve Johnson, Sept. 9, 2009infrey plans to tell viewers on Fridays show that she will retire the Chicago-based syndicated gabfest at the end of her current contract, which runs through the 2010-11 season, her 25th on national TV. Its going to be a long goodbye. Phil Rosenthal, Nov. 20, 2009After 25 years, Oprah Winfrey has ended her popular syndicated talk show. Heres a look back on her rise to famet would be a fools errand to count the words the Chicago Tribune has devoted to Oprah Winfrey over the years. There have been many, as the woman shot from talk show host hired from Baltimore to one-name superstar. What follows is merely a selection from the papers Oprah chronicles, and what is clear is that those at the paper were kind of shocked by her meteoric ascent too. Compiled by Steve Johnson, Chicago TribuneCHICAGO TRIBUNE/MCTOprah Winfrey, then host of AM Chicago, in 1984. C OURTESYOF WARNER BROS.Winfrey as Sofia in the 1985 film The Color Purple. C. ALUKABERRY/THE STATE/MCTThen Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama addresses a crowd of 29,000 people with special guests, Michelle Obama and Oprah Winfrey, at Williams-Brice Stadium in Columbia, S.C., in 2007. HANDOUTO, The Oprah Magazine debuted in April 2000. PHOTO BYGEORGE BURNS/OPRAH WINFREYN ETWORK/PRNEWSFOTO. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BYERIC GOODWIN/MCT