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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01150
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 05-22-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:01150
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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C M Y K By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING — The Highlands County Tea Party got a real treat when Congressman Thomas Rooney made an appearance during the organization’s luncheon Friday. Rooney is the Republican representative of Florida’s 16th Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives. He also currently serves on the House Armed Services Committee, the Agriculture Committee, and the Select Committee on Intelligence. The current term marks Rooney’s second as congressman. Rooney began his speech with words directly for the crowd. “I just want to thank you for all that you are doing. What we need for you is to maintain the message and spread it strong and loud,” Rooney said. His message could be heard loud and clear — the government is too involved in the everyday life of its citizens. “We don’t want the government getting too large and out of control,” said Rooney, who focused on the issues of Obamacare, the country’s deficit and taxes. “The federal government is getting involved where they never have before. We need to work to keep the government out of our lives, except when it involves national defense, and NEWS-SUN Highlands County’s Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, May 22, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 60 | 75 cents www.newssun .com HighLow 92 70Complete Forecast PAGE 14A Mostly sunny Forecast Question: Do you wait for large jackpots before you buy lottery tickets? Next question: Are you prepared for Hurricane Season? www.newssun .com Make your voice heard at Online Obituaries Rosemarie Fitzpatrick Age 79, of Sebring Charles Kozelski Age 77, of Sebring Clarence Prescott Age 70, of Sebring Wendy Wrede Age 41, of Sebring Jacqueline Wheary Age 86, Lancaster, Pa. Obituaries, Page 5A Phone ... 385-6155Fax ... 385-2453Online: www.newssun.com Yes 51.7% No 48.3% 099099401007 Total votes: 58 Arts & Entertainment6B Business10B Chalk Talk8B Community Briefs2A Community Calendar5B Crossword Puzzle11B Dear Abby13B Editorial & Opinion4A Horoscopes13B School Menus7B Index HEARTLAND NATIONAL BANK***; 11.25"; 1.5"; Black plus three; process, front strip Over$250in coupons inside! Down & DirtyDirty Dozen draws crowd to Raceway PAGE3A PAGE14B Lighting up the night Get paddledPaddleboard rental coming to Lake Jackson PAGE2A By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING — County Administrato r Rick Helms had lunch on Thursday with the Group for Better Government and answered questions about the upcoming budget season. “The budget is on everyone’s mind right now,” Helms said. “We are taking a look at both 5 percent and 10 percen t reduction in revenue scenarios, and we are having discussions about service delivery.” Helms laid out the deadlines that the county had to meet by Florida statute, and said that county staff was on the way to making its deadlines without too may problems. “We get the letter on June 1 from Raymond McIntyre, the tax appraiser, Helms talks to Group about budget process A blown transformer started a brush fire Thursday night in Sebring. West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department firefighters fought the blaze for close to an hour. A West Sebring volunteer firefighter (above) works to put out a fully involved brush fire late Thursday evening along Meadowlark Avenue and Puffin Road in Sebring Hills South. The quarter-acre fire started after a transformer exploded near a wooded area and sparked the dried brush beneath the power pole. The fire threatened several structures, but was extinguished before any damage was done. News-Sun photos by KATARASIMMONS See HELMS, page 8A Rooney tells Tea Party government too involved News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Florida Congressman Thomas Rooney speaks to World War II Veteran Berry Smith. Smith was a pilot during WWII and taught male pilots how to fly but was not allowed to fly due to her sex. See ROONEY, page 6A By JENNIFER KAY Associated PressFORTLAUDERDALE — Florida’s new emergency management chief wants the private sector to be more involved in the state’s disaster preparedness efforts so that local economies can recover quickly after hurricanes. “They want their employees to be safe and well and they want the communities in which they operate to remain viable. It is our responsibility to ensure they have the tools necessary to do so,” said Bryan Koon, the new directo r of the Division of Emergency Management, at the annual Governor’s Hurricane Conference in For t Lauderdale. “They need to State stresses storm prep as hurricane season nears See STORM, page 8A By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING — Faced with the mandates of Senate Bill 736 — which requires detailed evaluations of every teacher and school based administrator, and sets individual pay based on those evaluations — Wally Cox and the members of The School Board of Highlands County choose to be philosophical. “We need to develop a better evaluation system, not just to meet the law,” Cox said. “I want this to enhance, no t just teacher effectiveness, but administration effectiveness as well. I didn’t ask for SB 736, but it’s a reality.” While there is general agreemen t between Cox and the school board that a new evaluation system will be benefiDifficult, expensive decisions See SCHOOL, page 8A Structures threatened, no damage done Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun Search for The News-Sun and Heartland National Bank

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C M Y K By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING — The day dawns with a crisp blue sky and gentle breeze. It’s the perfect kind of day to be outdoors and doing something. The question is — doing what? Ever heard of paddleboards? They are the newest evolution of surfboards — only they are designed to be propelled by paddles, not waves. One stands on the board and uses a long-handled paddle. With only short fins and no keel, paddleboards can maneuver in very shallow water, allowing an individual to explore shorelines or reach areas a boat simply can’t. Being quiet, the paddleboard is ideal for exploring. Aperson can float up to easily spooked birds or fish on a paddle board and get close enough to see a heron’s feather patterns or the elongated snout of a gar fish without scaring either off. Coming in a range of sizes, one can even fish on the larger ones. Joshua and Sandy Sizemore were taking time off in Sarasota when they saw paddleboards for the first time. Being for rent, the Sizemores experimented and were hooked from the beginning — an hour stretching into an afternoon. Watching the boards being used in the Gulf of Mexico, Joshua Sizemore immediately thought of the lakes in Highlands County. He went to the Sebring City Council and negotiated an agreement to rent paddleboards on Lake Jackson. “We have the weather and the water,” he said, standing ankle deep at Veterans Beach, right where he will be set up for business on the shoreline to the right of the boat ramp. Memorial Day marks the opening of Big Board, Sizemore’s paddle board rental company. In time, Sizemore hopes to expand beyond simply renting boards to having fitness classes conducted on them and providing field trips, for example, down the Peace River. “Apaddleboard provides an ideal core workout,” he said, although it can used leisurely too. He is asking $25 for the first hour and offers an extra hour for $10. He is also willing to rent boards for an entire weekend so people may go to other lakes or on local rivers and creeks. Life vests will be provided to all renters. “This is so new and fresh it is still a novelty,” Sizemore said, adding that paradoxically, it is a direct descendant of the earliest attempts to cross the sea. “The Calusa Indians paddled to Cuba using dug out cypress with paddles like the ones used today. Many people think this is brand new, it’s just a matter of better materials.” Sizemore’s 6-year-old son, Bonny Boy, is as crazy about the boards as his dad. In fact, Sizemore said, he had to get his son a paddleboard of his own. “You can definitely stand on it, and do stuff,” Bonny said. “But you have to be in the middle (of the board). The only thing is you can’t drag your fin in the sand because you could break it. And you have to stay away from boats and jet skis because they could knock you out of the water.” He climbed onto his board and gave a demonstration of different strokes. “It’s easy to get back on,” Sandy Sizemore said, watching her son, “and as you can see, it’s fun to fall in.” Joshua Sizemore nodded. “But the best thing is that it is so intimate and quiet,” he said. Big Board will be open 8 a.m. to almost dark Memorial Day weekend. Call 368-0651, or visit BigBoardSUP.com. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011www.newssun.com DUMMY 09; 5.542"; 4.5"; Black; publishers block KAYLOR & KAYLOR; 5.542"; 1"; Black; ss ad, adj to lotto May 18 152329404348x:5Next jackpot $31 millionMay 14 568112639x:2 May 11 158293046x:3 May 20 1216272933 May 19 25151928 May 18 1819243034 May 17 816272833 May 20 (n) 1740 May 20 (d) 4836 May 19 (n) 1554 May 19 (d) 2584 May 20(n) 545 May 20 (d) 613 May 19 (n) 538 May 19(d) 952 May 20 413374011 May 17 3814219 May 13 418222919 May 10 101128316 May 18 712134249 PB: 16 PP: 2Next jackpot $120 millionMay 14 817184044 PB: 16 PP: 2 May 11 917324345 PB: 31 PP: 3 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawings are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Play Lottery Center News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Six year old Bonny Boy Sizemore masters the art of the paddle board on Lake Jackson while his three year old sister McKenna and his mother Sandy Sizemore admire his technique. Different strokes for different folks Paddleboard rental to begin at Veterans Beach on Memorial Day weekend The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Thursday, May 19: Mayte Nohemi Almaguer-Avalos, 21, of Frostproof, was sentenced to 30 days for operating a motor vehicle without a valid license. Ramon Luis Archeval, 34, of Avon Park, was sentenced to 25 days reference violation of conditional release reference purchase of cannabis. Ashley Lauren Campbell, 26, of Sebring, was charged with criminal mischief, burglary of an unoccupied dwelling and grand theft. Heidy Gonzalez, 20, of Sebring, was sentenced to 30 days for driving while license suspended. Houston Windell Keen, 19, of Avon Park, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference possession of cannabis. Ronald Edward Lozier, 49, of Avon Park, was charged with violation as a sex offender for failure to report name or residence change. Roberto Carlos Martinez Badill, 19, of Lake Placid, was charged with violation of a municipal ordinance. Gabriel Valencia Mora, 44, of Lake Placid, was sentenced to 30 days for operating a motor vehicle without a valid license. Branden Ricart, 22, of Sebring, was charged with grand theft and trafficking dru gs. POLICEBLOTTER COMMUNITYBRIEFS SHS plans Spring ConcertSEBRING – The Sebring High School Choral Department will present its Spring Concert at 7 p.m. Tuesday in South Florida Community College’s auditorium. The public is invited to come enjoy a variety of musical selections including classical, pop and spirituals performed by six choirs. The program will also feature performances by senior vocal and piano students that qualified for State Festival this year. Senior choral students will be recognized at the concert. The choirs are under the choral direction of Luanne Hawk. Tent event raises funds for food pantrySEBRING – Mattress Firm, in front of Walmart, is having a “tent event” Sunday afternoon to benefit the food pantry at Sebring Church of the Nazarene. There will be griled hot dogs served for free from 1-5 p.m. The pantry currently assists about 200 families per month and depends on donations. All hot dogs and drinks will be free, but donations will be accepted to benefit the pantry. Continued on page 5 By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK — More than 150 people came together for The Arc’s Annual Awards Celebration and Luncheon on Friday at the Grogan Center in Avon Park. Introducing a new logo, and now know as just “The Arc,” the group celebrated the support and the successes of the community by presenting awards to several community and clients. County music was provided by Lee Alcorn and Dave McDonald, whose upbeat cords caused spontaneous dancing to break out several times. Top honors went to Community Partner of the Year, John Lovette, owner of Duffer’s Sports Grille. “John has been a support of the Arc for quite sometime, his efforts helped to raise money during our rally and he has hosted several events that have really made a difference. People like John help make The Arc successful,” Arc CEO Rhonda Beckman said. Dr. Prixit Sharma was named Arc Hero of the Year for his medical care. “Dr. Sharma takes the time to follow up on the consumers and to provide them with more than jus t health care. He talks thei r treatments over with them and communicates with them,” Beckman said. Sharma was not presen t to accept his award. Volunteer of the Yea r went to Ralph Meyers. “Ralph is always there with a helping hand and has moved plenty of tables and chairs. He was kind of wondering why he didn’t need to help out today,” Beckman said. Adult Day Training consumer of the Year went to Angela Luft, who has helped with almost every project that the Arc put on over the past year and wrote for the newsletter, among other duties. Adult Day Training Intense Consumer of the Year went to Richard Roffner and Residential Consumer of the Year was awarded to James Kenfield. Community Services Consumer of the Year wen t to Rodney Walker. Community Employmen t Consumer of the Year was earned by Ilana Levy fo r her hard work and gainful employment at Winn-Dixie. Arc honors community and consumers News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE President of The Arc Board of Directors Victor Divitro presents a Community Partner of the Year Award to John Lovelette during a luncheon on Friday. Dummy publisherblock 3x4.5 Kaylor& Kaylor3x1 By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comAVON PARK — On May 12, interim city manager Julian Deleon released a letter he wrote to Highlands County Sheriff Susan Benton. In the letter he said he had received five written complaints and one verbal complaint regarding Police Chief Michael Rown. He did not reveal any specifics, although he did write, “These complaints are critical of the police procedures and judgment employed by the City’s Chief of Police.” Deleon requested that the sheriff’s office conduct an investigation of the complaints. Because Rowan had once run for office against Benton, if she wished to “outsource” (sic) the investigation, Deleon wrote, he would defer to her judgment. In a follow-up communication on Friday with Nell Hayes, the sheriff’s public information officer, the News-Sun was told that the sheriff’s office is not currently conducting an investigation. “We have no detectives assigned to the case,” Hayes said in a recorded message. “We’re considering our options.” Saturday morning Deleon told the News-Sun that a private detective agency, Paragon Investigation Services, has been contracted by the city “to help us develop a chronological time-time regarding the complaints we’ve had (against Rowan).” Deleon also said Benton is considering asking Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd to conduct an investigation. Rowan investigation going private

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C M Y K Down & Dirty By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING – The first ever D irty Dozen obstacle course e vent was a hit and pulled in m ore than 200 participants a nd guests Saturday morning. The Dirty Dozen was held a t the Sebring International R aceway “Party Zone” and s pread out along a small s tretch of the racetrack itself. The two-mile course i nvolved lots of water, mud a nd 12 obstacles designed to c hallenge even the biggest g ym-head. Rope swings, rope a nd wall climb, and tires are j ust a few of the challenges t he 150 participants had to o vercome before sliding h ome free to the finish line. The last stretch of the c ourse was a hand-made w ater slide nearly 30 feet w ide. The water from the W est Sebring Fire Engine s prayed through the air s preading cool water from t he start of the slide to the f inish. The course included indiv iduals as young as 12 years, a s well as groups of fitnessm inded ladies giving it all t hey had to out-run their husb ands. The course was unique, a llowing many spectators to s top along points of the c ourse to cheer on loved o nes. Lisa Celentano, Crossfit S ebring owner and Sebring I nternational Raceway proje ct manager, was the lady b ehind the event and was t hrilled about the turnout S aturday. “Last night when pre-regi stration closed we had 125 e ntrants. This morning we h ad 25 walk-ups that entered. I ’m thrilled; we were hoping for 100,” Celentano said. Amidst the music, fire engine sirens and shouts, participants congratulated one another on completing the race. First place winner, 17year-old David Scheck completed the two-mile, 12obstacle course in just under 15 minutes. Second place winner was Adam Smehyl, 34, and third place went to 16-year-old Grey Lawrence. Scheck also found one of the hidden ducks in the muddy waters on the course. Throughout the course five rubber ducks were scattered waiting to be found. Participants who found one of the little quackers were eligible for one of the five prizes: two LCD televisions, two mountain bikes, or a cash prize. The Dirty Dozen brought participants as far away as Jupiter to the raceway. The Neon Ninjas (Brady Atwater, Devon O’Neil, Autumn Wiles, Ashley Widmann) caught wind of the competition from Widmann’s family member. “My step-dad is doing the adventure races, he was the one who told me about Dirty Dozen so I told them and we signed up and drove up,” Widmann said. The group all enjoyed the course and each of the members all finished in the top 100. Atwater, who finished in eighth place, especially enjoyed the finish. “The slip and slide at the end was great. When I saw it I was like ‘Awesome. I can do this, I can finish strong now.’It was really refreshing,” Atwater said. The group also was curious about the future of the event. “I heard there might be another later this year in the fall. That’d be awesome, it’d be a lot cooler then,” O’Neil said. The rumor was confirmed by Celentano. “We will be having a second Dirty Dozen in October. It’ll be all Halloween theme. It’s going to be even bigger,” Celentano said. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011Page 3A MUSSELMAN APPLIANCES; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, 05/22/11 UNIVERSAL CENTER OF NATURAL MA; 3.639"; 5"; Black; 05/22/11 Hundreds get grimy at Dirty Dozen News-Sun photos by KATARASIMMONS Participants use their muscles to muck through a mud pit Saturday morning during The Dirty Dozen fun mud run at the Sebring International Raceway. About 150 people competed in the event, which involved running two miles and doing 12 dirty obstacles. News Sun photo by ROBYN BAKALUS David Scheck, 17, and Adam Smehyl, race through one of the final obstacles on Saturday in an effort to win The Dirty Dozen. Scheck won first place; Smehyl placed second. Small rubber ducks were hidden throughout the course and turned in for cash and prizes. universal center 2x5 musselman’s appliance 6x10.5

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C M Y K Page 4ANews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011www.newssun.comTODAYSEDITORIALTODAYSLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION First, let me thank everyone who responded to last week’s column. I got many tips on getting rid of fleas and at least one very funny story about bugs. I appreciate your input as always and hope we are all less bugged in the future. But today I want to turn to a subject that will only grow in terms of annoying us, in ways far worse than even lovebugs. I am talking, of course, of the 2012 presidential campaign, which typically has started over a year and a half ahead of the actual election. The past few days have been filled with news about the race. As I type this, Mike Huckabee and Donald Trump are out of the race; Ron Paul, Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich are in. Others are hemming and hawing, not committing themselves either way. As I contemplate this news, I want to first look at those who’ve decided to bow out this time around. I admit that Donald Trump’s leaving the race is a disappointment from an entertainment point of view. I’m not sure how good a president he would make – something tells me there would be issues with his temper. But one thing you have to admit about his campaign – it wasn’t boring. I am not surprised that Mike Huckabee bowed out. I think he gave it a lot of thought, but realized he liked his life the way it was. I can’t really blame him for that. I think he’s a good person, and will do well in the future. So, with these two heavy hitters out of the game, what of those who are left? Let me go out on a limb here and say I suspect that for all the buzz Sarah Palin will not run. It’s not that she wouldn’t do a good job, and she may even want the job. But I think she got burned badly in 2008. It may well be that for the sake of her family she will sit back and work for whoever the candidate turns out to be. I am not a Republican anymore, so you might wonder why I’m focusing on that side of the deal. Simply put, there’s no one who’s going to challenge Obama for the Democratic nomination, so there’s no point in discussing that side of it. And to be honest, I’m not planning on voting for the President, so I have an interest in who’s running against him. So, what do I think of the current slate of candidates? Is there anyone who excites me, who makes me want to run out and work for them? Sadly, no. Newt Gingrich is already in trouble, thanks to a bad case of foot in mouth disease. I’m not sure that he has the temperament to be leader of the free world, either. Maybe I’m wrong, but I think Newt should stick to whatever he’s doing when he’s not running for President. And Ron Paul … I know that Ron Paul supporters are numerous and enthusiastic. I risk a flood of email with my comments, but he puts me off. I’m not sure why – it may in part be due to his foreign policy, which worries me. I will try to keep an open mind about him, but I’m just not sure. There are of course others running for the Republican nod. I don’t have time to list them all. Frankly, none have raised themselves to the level of my interest. No one has broken out yet. Of course, it’s very early in the race. So there’s time for someone to catch fire with me. One thing is for sure: whoever they are, I will like them better than lovebugs. Laura Ware is a Sebring resident. She can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady@embarqmail.com 2012 election in 2011 Lauras Look Laura Ware ACRAis a tool used by local governments to feed tax increases directly back into a specific district in order to eliminate slum and blight. The money is used in the form of grants or low-interest loans in order to stimulate other stakeholders into investing in business or residential properties. It is a system that works, and has been tried and tested over the years. CRAs are used to focus tax money like laser surgery, cutting away problems within a district in order to halt an economic downturn in an area in order to renovate. It stimulates business activity within that district and can be a boon to a local economy by directing taxes that were typically spread out over a whole municipality and concentrating, and restricting, those dollars into one defined area. The money is collected from tax increases and uses both the city and county tax dollars, putting more at hand on the hyper-local area. The idea being that as the renovation happens, so does the amount of funds available. Taxes increase with the renovations, making more available for the CRAto use. It creates sort of a feedback loop of tax revenue. The money collected must be used inside the district and on specific items such as building renovations, faade grants, promotions, design aspects, training, consulting and investments. Even paint. Other costs, like items normally maintenanced by the muncipality or projects at the edges of the district, cannot be paid for with those tax dollars. But you start with identifying an area that needs special attention, and then you develop a plan that will eliminate the problems in that area. Then you establish your CRAand select individuals within that district to sit on a board to direct and oversee the work. After a set amount of time, your efforts pay off, and the CRAis dissolved, releasing the tax money back into the general municipality coffers. Lake Placid has not identified an area that needs assistance, but town officials are looking at a CRA, skipping the first step of recognizing a need. It is not clear why the city of Lake Placid is proposing a CRA, but it is clear that before deciding it needs one, officials need to assess areas of possible slum and blight. Otherwise, the city is trying to use a tool without having identified the need for its use. Cart. Horse. Putting the cart before the horse The Lake Placid Town Council may be well intentioned, but their idea to develop a Community Redevelopment Agency, and its associated area, may be putting the cart before the horse. Its the people who need to changeEditor: There were comments made recently about the city of Avon Park was making positive changes concerning increased salary for the city administrator, the annexation in progress, and the revenue concerning the water treatment plant. They state it takes strong leadership to get us out of the situation. Yes, I agree strong leadership, but strong leadership will only come with new, strong leaders. The so-called changes they are making have nothing to do with or is making changes to what the people’s grievances are about. The city council and city leaders can make all the changes in the world, but if they do not treat the people right, it is still wrong. “Operation Save Avon Park” is dedicated to seeking justice for the “people” of Avon Park who have been wrongfully treated by the city government. Their mean-spirited, controlling, don’t care, it’s our way or no way, intimidating attitude towards the community, their fellow employees and themselves must go. It’s all about doing the humane thing. The true colors of the wolves in sheep’s clothing will be surfacing soon and we will have the facts to back them. The old saying, what goes around will come around, is very true. People have come forward and it will all surface soon. Also, the “Recall Petition Signing” is a lengthy process and will continue for some time. We will follow through till the end. As for the recent encounter involving Jack Agard when approached by Councilmen (Terry) Heston and (Parke) Sutherland, I feel these two were very unprofessional. Anyone approached in this manner would have been scared and worried. You never know one’s real colors or what they are capable of doing. How many times do we hear of terrible situations and neighbors, friends, and family say, “but I thought he was a nice person.” From looking at the picture in the paper, Jack was surrounded and should have been worried. Heston and Sutherland were acting like the lynch mob. Pictures don’t lie. Don’t be discouraged Avon Park, we will continue to fight for you, for justice. Patricia Austin Avon ParkPreparing for the electionEditor: The first presidential debate was held recently; though only five hopefuls participated, I found it very interesting. We all need to be as informed about the candidates as possible. Without being informed, there’s no way to vote intelligently. I’m sure there will be others joining the campaign. Mr. Obama doesn’t miss an opportunity to spread all possible publicity. This is what he does best and I’m sure many will be impressed with his very personable demeanor and deceptive tongue but let’s all consider the facts. His most recent exhibition was on immigration. He was making a joke about it, declaring all the opposition had asked for had been accomplished which is not true, saying they would not be satisfied no matter what was done. Immigration is no joke. It is contributing greatly to the deficit. We are a generous, compassionate people but when you are borrowing to achieve these things, that is not very smart. We cannot be responsible for these people’s needs. We have to have a limit on what we can afford and I don’t mean raising taxes. We are already paying too much taxes. He is not performing satisfactorily. This high-priced oil is affecting every area of life from food to medicine; there is little, if anything, that is not increased in price. Yet, we are making no effort to use the resources we have. This green effort is not working. I think we are scraping the bottom of the barrel when we start counting McDonald’s and other fast-food jobs as meaningful employment. They provide wonderful opportunities, but are not sufficient to supply the needs of a family – even so, unemployment is much too high and borrowing money to keep paying unemployment and other welfare programs is only prolonging the problem and then there are other issues he endorses, gay marriage, forced unionism. He has recently stopped a Boeing plant from manufacturing in South Carolina because it is a national right-to-work state, addressing a large number of relatives of the 911 fiasco because of the demise of Bin Laden, at the same time affirming the building of a humongous mosque over the graves of their loved ones. Our deficit is already trillions of dollars and he is holding the opposition hostage because his partners still have control of the Senate. If there was ever a time we needed to seek God’s intervention, it is most assuredly now. Won’t you join me in prayer for both the nation and each one of us that we might seek His blessed will for our lives. I’m sure we can do some cleaning around our own doors. May God guide and keep us in His will. Willie Clyde (Toole) Cloud SebringTax welfare must come to an endEditor: As you now know from the news that they have shut down barges hauling grain to the Gulf of Mexico for shipment overseas. We need to stop this administration from giving subsidy to the farmers that ruin our air and use our crop land on “our dollars” through tax welfare. The same goes for the oil companies making billions of dollars and getting tax welfare while we, the out-of-work Americans and the elderly, do without the basic things to sustain our life, while sending ethanol and our oil to other countries. Call your state representative and ask him why. Governor Mitch of Indiana wants to run for President when he can’t run Indiana except to raise taxes and to let good jobs leave the state, like Whirlpool and auto parts makers. While like all, except Jan Brewer of Arizona, is sued by our government and the ACLU plus both parties to rid our land of criminals and an illegal work force while bringing work to Arizona. With the borders not manned by our administration, they are coming here like a plague in the hope for amnesty from Obama. It is past time to stand up America a be loud about it. C.F. Neeley Lake Placid EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 3851954; or e-maileditor@newssun.com. To make sure the editorial pages aren't dominated by the same writers, letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months. Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the opinion of that author and not necessarily the opinion of the staff or editors of the News-Sun.

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C M Y K CHARLES KOZELSKI Charles Kozelski, 77, died Sunday, May 16, 2011 in Lake Worth, Fla.,after surviving a stroke and bravely battling cancer and heart disease. Chuck was born in Akron, Ohio.He was the oldest son of a proud Polish, American family.His childhood passion was baseball and a lifelong fan of the Indians and later the Rays.Chuck served in Korea with the U.S. Army.He went on to spend a great career serving food and beverage as the owner of the Brigadoon, North Hill Cafe and Chili Dog Macin Akron and then Charlie’s inSebring.It was j ust like him to always be taking care of others. He enjoyed boating, fishing, hunting, and especially playing golf at Pinecrest Country Club in his retirement years. He loved and cared forhis family and friends above all. And, you wouldoften find him flashing a smile and giving a wink with his blues eyes as he nodded his head letting you know all is well. Many will miss Kozy and remember him fondly. Chuck was preceded in death by his parents, Charles and Katherine Kozielski. He is survived by his wife, Zita Kozelski; daughter, Michele Rivera (Pedro); grandson, Mark Rivera; brothers and sisters, Louise Todd (Lawrence), Marian Cocklin (Art), Pauline Twigg (Bill), Thomas Kozielski (Debbie), Richard Kozielski(Laurie); and an extended loving family. Private service held at VA Cemetary Lake Worth, Fla. CLARENCE PRESCOTT Clarence Prescott, 70, of Sebring, Fla. died May 19, 2011. Clarence was born June 29, 1940 in Sebring and was raised in Okeechobee, moving back to Sebring in 1981, when he married Betty Sizemore. He was a cattleman all his life and was foreman of several large ranches in Fort Pierce and Okeechobee and was a Baptist by faith. He was preceded in death by Wilford and Emma (Tomlinson) Prescott and a daughter, Angela Stokes. He is survived by his wife, Betty; and sons, Robert Prescott of Sebring, Steve Prescott of Georgia, Walter Smith of Bronson, and Rusty Smith of Charlotte, Mich.; daughters, Cheryl Whidden of Avon Park and Michelle Johnston of Sebring; several grandchildren and great grandchildren; sisters, Dorothy Killette of St. Cloud, Marilyn Terry of Okeechobee and Sherlyn Hughes; and a brother, Larry Prescott, both of Murphy, N.C. Visitation will be from 1:30-2:30 p.m. Sunday, May 22, 2011 at Morris Funeral Chapel with services following at 2:30 p.m. with Rev. Gene Smith and Rev. Wilmont McCrary officiating. Burial will be at Pinecrest Cemetery, Sebring. Condolences to www.morrisfuneralchapel.com. MORRIS FUNERAL CHAPEL 307 S. Commerce Avenue Sebring, Florida 33870 WENDYWREDE Wendy Sue Wrede, 41, a former Sebring resident, died May 1, 2011 in Pittsburgh, Pa. She was born in Portsmouth, Va., a graduate of Sebring Middle School and attended Sebring High School. She graduated from St. Augustine School for the Deaf and Blind. Wendy is survived by her sons, Zachery and Anthony; parents, David and Karen Wrede of Wrede’s Wildlife Rehabilitation Center, Sebring; and sister, Helen Borem, Sebring. Acelebration of her life will be held at 5 p.m. Saturday, May 28 at Morris Funeral Chapel with Rev. Jeff Endsley officiating. Visitation will be from 3-5 p.m. Memorials may be made to Wrede's Wildlife Rehabilitation Center, 4820 Wilderness Trail, Sebring, FL33875 to honor Wendy. Morris Funeral Chapel JACQUELINE WHEARY Formerly of Shamokin, Pa., Lancaster, Pa. and Sebring, Fla., Jacqueline Snyder Wheary left this world on May 19, 2011 to be with her Lord God in heaven. She was born in Shamokin, Pa. to the late Daniel and Theresa Tyson Snyder on Aug. 29, 1924. Her husband, Thomas J. Wheary Sr., preceded her in death in 1993. The funeral will be at 11 a.m. Tuesday, May 24, 2011 at the Calvary Baptist Church, 530 Milton Road Lancaster, Pa. 17602. The viewings will be Monday, 6-8 p.m. and Tuesday, 10-11 a.m. at the church. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made to the Calvary Baptist Church; kindly designate the Missionary Fund or the Building Fund. Furman’s – Leola. FurmanFuneral Home.com Death noticeRosemarie Fitzpatrick, 79, of Sebring died May 19, 2011. Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011Page 5A MARTIAL ARTS (pp); 3.639"; 3"; Black; main ff top rhp only Zeno's Italian Restaurant; 3.639"; 3"; Black; main only Stephenson Nelson ****; 7.444"; 5"; Black; obit page AARP Driver Safety class setLAKE PLACID — AARPDriver Safety Program Class will be from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., on Tuesday at the Lake Placid Town Hall, 51 Park Drive, Lake Placid. To register, call Chuck Fortunato at 699-6060.Royal Arch Masons to meetSEBRING — The Highlands Chapter of the Royal Arch Masons No. 64 and Heartland Council 43 Royal and Select Masons will hold their regular meeting at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday at the Sebring Masonic Temple. There will be no degree work done that evening. The social hour will be at Homer’s restaurant at 6 p.m. All York Rite Masons and their ladies are invited to attend. For more information, call Alvin Hill Sr. at 615504-0109 or Steven Steele at 465-2720.Orchid Society meets MondaySEBRING — The Orchid Society of Highlands County will hold their monthly meeting on Monday at 7 p.m. at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agricultural Center located at 4509 George Blvd. The speaker this month will be Jim Roberts, owner of Florida Suncoast Orchids in Myakka City. His program will be on “Summer Time and the Growing is Easy” which is about getting your orchids outside to take advantage of Florida’s summer. It will be for the beginner to intermediate level grower. He will have plants for sale. Guests are always welcome and participants do not have to be knowledgeable of orchids to attend. For additional information, contact Ed at 465-2830 or by e-mail at oshc9@aol.com or go to orchidsocietyhighlands.org. Scrub habitat group to meetSEBRING — There will be a Multi-Species Scrub Habitat Conservation Plan technical advisory committee meeting in the Sam Polston Auditorium located at the Bert Harris Agri Civic Center Monday at 10 a.m. The public is invited to attend. Shrine ladies to play bunco AVON PARK – The public is invited (men, too) to play bunco at the Highlands Shrine Club, 2604 SR 17 South on Tuesday, May 24 at 11:30 a.m. The event is open to new or experienced players; cost is $2/person. Phone 471-2425 for information.Events at local lodges, postsAVON PARK — Combat Veterans Memorial VFW Post 9853 in Avon Park will host the following events this week: Today No NASCAR Monday Happy hour all day. Bar menu served from 4-7 p.m. LAKE PLACID —The Lake Placid Moose 2374 will host the following events this week: Today Karaoke with Wild Bill from 3-6 p.m. Monday Lodge open 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. The Veterans of Foreig n Wars 3880 in Lake Placid, will serve hamburgers from 4-5:30 p.m. today. Continued from page 2A COMMUNITYBRIEFS NEWS-SUN Kozelski OBITUARIES By ROMONAWASHINGTON editor@newssun.comAVON PARK – Each year the teams participating in Relay for Life vote on what next year’s theme will be. That chosen theme for this year’s event was ‘Cureopoly,’a spin-off from the popular classic boardgame Monopoly. Tina Gilbert-Schenck, game organizer and committee member, said, “Everything had to do with finding a cure for cancer, the City of Avon Park, because it was Avon Park’s Relay, and the teams that were involved.” Each of this year’s teams came up with a lifesize game piece – Highlands Lakes Volunteer Fire Department made a small fire truck out of a shopping cart and CenturyLink used an old pay phone. Those pieces were used to move from property to property – or in this case, campsite to campsite – around the track at Avon Park High School’s Joe Franza Stadium. Each team started the game by owning their own campsite, but could “buy” other campsites through the 18-hour Relay event. Gilbert-Schenck explains that the utility properties on the gameboard became Avon Park utilities; the railroads were national and regional cancer hospitals. Instead of Go to Jail cards, there were Go to the Doctor’s Office cards. There is no Free Parking in Cureopoly, but there is Free Cancer Screening, and instead of Just Visiting cards, players were Waiting in the Doctor’s Office. The modified game game board and all of its pieces are now available to the highest bidder. “We are still raising money for Relay and we weren’t sure what to do with the board. It is unique and I have all of the pieces. We will give it to someone who makes a donation or if I need to, I’ll take a couple of bids and we’ll sell it to the highest bidder.” She hopes to present the Cureopoly gameboard to its new owner at the Avon Park Relay for Life wrap-up party at 5:30 p.m. Monday at the Rotary Building. To make a donation or place a bid on the game, call Gilbert-Schenck at (863) 444-0600 or email her at tina@centerforgreatapes.org. A twist on a favorite classic Photo courtesy of Mountain Top Photography A CenturyLink team member throws the life-sized dice from the stage at Avon Park Relay for Life. The dice were made from cardboard boxes. Courtesy photo Cureopoly was one of the most popular games to be played at Avon Parks Relay for Life earlier this month. The gameboard and all of the pieces are being sold as another fund raiser for the event. Martial Arts 2x3 Stephenson-Nelson 4x5 zeno’s 2x3

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Page 6ANews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011www.newssun.com WELLS MOTOR COMPANY; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, used keep the taxes low,” said Rooney. Guests began to clap and cheer loudly and became enthusiastic as Rooney continued. Rooney said Highlands County unemployment rate is at 10 percent, just above the national of 9 percent. The $14 trillion federal deficit is weakening the economy. “The revenue is fine, it is the spending that we have to be worry about,” Rooney said. “It’s time to play offense now. We’ve been playing defense long enough. Even when we’ve been the majority we were playing defense.” The congressman believes that the country is in peril and soon enough there won’t even be much of a country to leave to the children and grandchildren of the upcoming generations. “America is on the path that every other great power before us has been. That is the bad news. The good news is that we still have a little bit of time to fix this. Our founding fathers saw these other countries rise and then go away, that is why they wrote the Constitution. It allows limited federal involvement,” Rooney said. Rooney said he hopes to see the country take a turn and claimed Highlands County as a “second home to me.” “I’ve been in this position for a while now and I’ve still got some work to do. It is an honor being your congressman,” Rooney said. Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Florida Congressman Thomas Rooney speaks to Highlands County resident Jerry Heausler. Rooney made a stop at the Highlands County Tea Party luncheon Friday. Rooney speaks to Tea Party News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Congressman Tom Rooney speaks to a room of Tea Party members during their luncheon Friday. Rooney explained the countrys growing deficit as well as gave his thoughts on how it can be turned around. By MARCIADUNN APAerospace WriterCAPE CANAVERAL— Pope Benedict XVI had a direct line to the heavens Saturday, with NASA’s help. Speaking from the Vatican, the pontiff bestowed a historic blessing upon the 12 astronauts circling Earth during the firstever papal call to space, wishing a swift recovery for the shuttle commander’s wounded congresswoman wife and condolences for a station astronaut mourning his mother’s death. The “extraordinary” conversation, as Benedict described it, occurred after the Endeavour astronauts inspected a small gash in the shuttle’s belly, to ensure their safe return to Earth after departing the International Space Station in just over a week. It is the next-to-last flight in NASA’s 30-year shuttle program. Seated at a table before a television set tuned to NASA’s live broadcast from orbit, Benedict told the space travelers that “you are our representatives spearheading humanity’s exploration of new spaces and possibilities for our future.” He said he admired their courage, discipline and commitment. “It must be obvious to you how we all live together on one Earth and how absurd it is that we fight and kill each one,” the pontiff said, reading from prepared remarks. “I know that Mark Kelly’s wife was a victim of a serious attack, and I hope her health continues to improve.” Kelly, who’s of IrishCatholic descent, thanked the pope for his kind words. His wife, U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, had surgery to repair her skull Wednesday, four months after being shot in the head at a political event in Tucson, Ariz. She was nearly killed, yet managed to attend her husband’s launch last Monday. Kelly told the pope that borders cannot be seen from space and noted that down on Earth, people usually fight for resources. At the space station, solar power provides unlimited energy, “and if those technologies could be adapted more on Earth, we could possibly reduce some of that violence,” he said. Benedict asked about the future of the planet and the environmental risks it faces, and wanted to know what the astronauts’most important message would be for young people when they return home. Space station astronaut Ronald Garan Jr. spoke of the paper-thin layer of atmosphere “that separates every living thing from the vacuum of space.” And shuttle crewman Mike Fincke described how he and his colleagues “can look down and see our beautiful planet Earth that God has made.” “However, if we look up, we can see the rest of the universe, and the rest of the universe is out there for us to explore,” Fincke said. “The International Space Station is just one symbol, one example, of what human beings can do when we work together constructively.” Near the end of the 18minute conversation, Benedict expressed concern for astronaut Paolo Nespoli, whose 78-year-old mothe r died in northern Italy at the beginning of May while he was serving on the space station. “How have you been living through this time of pain on the International Space Station?” the pope asked. “Holy Father, I felt you r prayers and everyone’s prayers arriving up here where outside the world ... we have a vantage point to look at the Earth and we feel everything around us,” Nespoli replied in Italian. Nespoli will end his fivemonth space station mission Monday, returning to Earth aboard a Russian Soyuz capsule. He will bring back with him a silver medal that shuttle astronaut Roberto Vittori took up with him on Endeavour, that was provided by the pope. It depicts Michelangelo’s “Creation o f Man,” the painting on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Vittori floated the commemorative coin in front o f him, then gently tossed it to Nespoli, positioned on the opposite end of the fron t row of astronauts. “I brought it with me to space, and he will take down on Earth to then give back to you,” Vittori told the pontiff. The astronaut said he prays in space “for me, fo r our families, for our future.” The long-distance papal audience was arranged by the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. NASAprovided technical support from Mission Control in Houston. Pope blesses astronauts in first papal call to space wells motorused 6x10.5 color C M Y K

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C M Y K www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, May 22, 2011Page 7A

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C M Y K and that will give us a better idea what we have to work with,” Helms said. Earlier in the year, McIntyre predicted a 10 percent cut in county ad valorem revenue from the residential sector, but Helms felt that was just part of the equation. “He is usually very conservative, and there are commercial properties, agriculture and other revenue streams. I think the number will be significantly less that 10 percent. I think that we will be around a 6 percent reduction based on past figures,” Helms added. The other constitutional officers have their budgets due to Helms on June 1, then his job is to put it all together for the July 15 state-mandated deadline. “We will have a lot of workshops on this, and we will have everything together by July 12. That’s our goal,” he said. Questions led Helms to discuss the level of involvement from the Board of County Commissioners and the public concerning the overall budget process. Helms added that the current commissioners were very involved in understanding how the whole budget process works. “The workshops have been very informative, everyone is agrees on that, and the presentations from the department heads have been very beneficial. This was something new we tried, and I think that we should continue to do those,” he said. One of the topics discussed was the idea of a two-year budget. “Other counties do it, like Hillsborough, and it is something to look at. One of the drawbacks is that the initial workload to get that started is huge. It is a lot of work, but there are tweaks you can make every year once it is started,” Helms said. Page 8ANews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011www.newssun.com CREATIVE FLOORS; 3.639"; 3"; Black; main, 05/20, 05/22, 05/25 EDWARD JONES/ED BURNSIDE***; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; main a, 05/22/11 Continued from page 1A Helms talks about budget process know how to engage, where to engage and how they can tie into our emergency management structure.” Koon spent the previous five years overseeing the emergency management operations for Wal-Mart Stores Inc.’s more than 8,500 stores and more than 2 million employees worldwide. Aformer Naval officer, he also spent several years in the White House Military Office where he developed and maintained programs to ensure the continuity of government and operations after a disaster. Koon told reporters that he brings a global perspective to the state’s emergency management team, with experience gleaned from hurricanes, wildfires, volcanic eruptions and tsunami risks. “Because we were a worldwide company — we’re in 50 states and 28 countries — there was never a day that something didn’t happen,” Koon said. The best way Florida can prepare for hurricanes is to ensure that private citizens and businesses are prepared to take care of themselves in a storm’s immediate aftermath, so that the state government can focus on restoring infrastructure and other vital services, he said. While officials worry that residents have grown complacent about their disaster risk after five years without a major hurricane making a U.S. landfall, Koon said advances in mobile technology over the same period of time mean that people are getting more information faster than before. Plus, recent disasters such as the Japan earthquake, tornadoes in Alabama and flooding along the Mississippi River have highlighted how vulnerable communities can be, he added. “I think what you have is a heightened awareness for the potential for any person to be impacted by disaster in their community,” Koon said. Along with taking personal responsibility to be a survivor and not a victim — an idea promoted by Federal Emergency Management Agency Craig Fugate — Koon emphasized the need for the state to help businesses prepare to get back to work as quickly as possible after a hurricane so they can provide services the government does not, such as groceries or home repair materials. The Florida Division of Emergency Management has hired a private sector coordinator to engage companies in disaster training, improve communication and ensure that smalland medium-sized businesses have as many resources as larger corporations, Koon said. “We want to make sure we can restore the economic tax base in a community — that people are able to get back to work, that children are able to get back to school, that we’re able to pull the government back out and get that community back on its feet,” he said. The state also was working to streamline communication among Florida’s counties and to improve support for smaller counties with tighter budgets and fewer resources, Koon said. More than 1,740 emergency managers, meteorologists, first responders and government officials from 59 Florida counties, 31 states and three foreign countries are attending the weeklong conference focused on preparations fo r the upcoming storm season. Addressing the conference’s general session, Gov. Rick Scott praised Koon’s leadership at Wal-Mart. “I chose Bryan to lead ou r state emergency operations because he understands tha t a rapid and coordinated response to an emergency can safeguard our state’s economy and the people o f our state,” said Scott, who campaigned last year on promises to create jobs and boost Florida’s lagging economy. Scott announced Koon’s appointment in December. He also has moved the Division of Emergency Management into the executive office of the governor to streamline communication and reduce costs across all the federal, state and local agencies involved in Florida’s disaster readiness and response. The six-month Atlantic hurricane season begins June 1. As government officials do this time of year, Scott urged Florida residents to prepare for storms well before any develop in the tropics. He awkwardly joked tha t he’s so prepared, he has an extra roof. To some polite laughter, Scott explained that he had had to replace the roof on his Naples mansion after the storms of 2004 and 2005. Continued from page 1A Storm prep stressed by state leaders We want to make sure we can restore the economic tax base in a community.BRYANKOON state director of emergency management cial, there is division of opinion as to how the process would work and who should be a part of it. Experienced teachers, given advanced training in evaluation, are thought by everyone to be the best suited to be the actual evaluators. But the school board has to decide if evaluators should be part time or full time. In other words, if classroom teachers should be paid for extra duty, or if individuals should be specifically assigned to do evaluations only. There are other questions: How should evaluators be trained and in what method; if classroom teachers become evaluators, who will take over in the classroom when a teacher leaves it to do an evaluation; and finally, SB 736 comes without funding support — where will the needed money come from after federal Race to the Top dollars and funds from a portion of a Gates Grant, which are being used now to pay for the training, additional salaries and other costs, run out. Whatever is decided, a system has to be up and running by the middle of August in order to be sure teachers are briefed on the new system before the start of the school year. That means the training of evaluators has to begin by June 13. There are also deadlines tied to the federal and Gates funds. They must be met or the dollars go elsewhere. “The first year is critical,” Cox said. “We have to start the process so it is consistent.” For that Cox wants to create a one year position, Coordinator on Special Assignment, with a salary of $86,120. This individual would be responsible for getting the new system up and running. Cox recommended Derrel Bryan, principal of Lake Placid Middle School, for the job. While Cox, the principals in the audience, and every board member expressed great confidence in Bryan as a person and professional, several board members were opposed to creating a one year position with such a lucrative salary at a time when 29 teaching positions have been removed from the district. Board chairperson Donna Howerton, for example, said, “Right now I can’t support a Coordinator on Special Assignment at $86,120. I just can’t support it. I want to help Mr. Cox, but we’re losing good people I hate to lose.” School board member Andy Tuck said, “I guess I struggle a little too — cutting media specialists, asking everybody to do with less, I just (can’t see) adding another position to the district office.” “When I was a teacher did I think the district was top heavy? Hell yes,” said board member Ronnie Jackson, but added that in this case he could understand the need for a central coordinating figure to set up the process. He said evaluations can be a very good thing; that supportive, constructive criticism is useful and helps improve performance. The general consensus of attending principals was in favor of creating the coordinator’s position and asking Bryan to fill it. For example, Andrew Lethbridge, principal of the Kindergarten Learning Center and the only school head without an assistant principal, said, “I think Bryan is a good choice because of the respect and familiarity, and of the consistent message. He can get us all on the same page.” Members of the school board will have to make a decision Tuesday night at its regular meeting. Continued from page 1A School board faces difficult decisions By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING — The task of managing a classroom — imparting knowledge, encouraging debate, nurturing talent, providing opportunities to practice new skills, and making sure every individual’s needs are met, as well as the group’s needs as a whole — requires mastery of human psychology, human development, subject content, time management, and the ability to work with statistics and technology, all while working in a bureaucracy. Despite the fact that teachers work with children, it is a fact that their profession is a sophisticated one. Evaluating an individual’s work in the classroom, therefore, is not easy to measure. At the same time, while most fair-minded people agree teachers alone are not the problem in the public school system, most people also agree unsatisfactory teachers need to be weeded out. The question currently being debated is how to do that. Currently principals evaluate their teachers; school superintendents evaluate their principals. That idea as a best practice, however, has changed. Most people now think a more formal, standardized and consistent evaluation method is needed, done by third parties. Educators have been discussing and studying the issue for some time, but with Senate Bill 736 — which mandates permanent evaluation systems for teachers and school administrators — deadlines have been established that force an end to discussion and the beginning of action. Here are some of the aspects of the evaluation process proposed by school superintendent Wally Cox and district administrators. Cox emphasizes that evaluations are meant to be productive and supportive, not simply critical. Ateacher’s standing will be built around four ratings: Highly effective; effective; needs improvement; and ineffective. Cox told the school board at a recent workshop that because the cost of assessing all teachers every year is simply too expensive, only some teachers will be evaluated regularly. He suggests dividing all teachers into three categories: Those who have 10 years or more of experience and a good record for at least three years; those with more than four years of experience and a good record; and a final category of those who have less than four year in the classroom, are a new hire, or are struggling with a low rating. These last teachers will be the focus of attention. Regarding how the ratings are determined — the state Legislature has mandated that 50 percent of a teacher’s evaluation be based on his/her student’s Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test scores, or other standardized or end of course test. The other 50 percent has to come from a variety of other sources, like selfappraisal and the formal evaluation — which is to based on a combination of observation, documentation and conversation. How to grade teachers edward jones/ed burnside 3x10.5 creative floors 2x3

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C M Y K www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011Page 9A MARTIAL ARTS (pp); 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; main ff top right only Orchid Hill Stable PP; 5.542"; 5"; Black; main a top, 7 of 16 DR. ROTMAN, DARRIN; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; 05/22/11 By MIKE STOBBE APMedical WriterATLANTA— “Zombie apocalypse.” That blog posting headline is all it took for a behind-the-scenes public health doctor to set off an Internet frenzy over tired old advice about keeping water and flashlights on hand in case of a hurricane. “You may laugh now, but when it happens you’ll be happy you read this, and hey, maybe you’ll even learn a thing or two about how to prepare for a real emergency,” wrote Dr. Ali Khan on the emergency preparedness blog of the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Above the post is a photo of what appears to be a dirtyfingered female zombie. Khan’s postings usually draw 1,000 to 3,000 hits in a week. This one — posted Monday — got 30,000 within a day. By Friday, it had gotten 963,000 page views and was the top item viewed on the agency’s Web site, thanks in part to media coverage that began mid-week. As of Friday morning, the traffic showed no signs of abating. “The response has been absolutely excellent. Most people have gotten the fact that this is tongue-andcheek,” Khan said. More important, CDC officials said, it is drawing interest from teens and young adults who otherwise would not have read a federal agency’s guidance on the importance of planning an evacuation route or how much water and what tools to store in case a major storm rolls in. The idea evolved from a CDC Twitter session with the public earlier this year about planning for disasters. Activity spiked when dozens of tweets came in from people saying they were concerned about zombies. Dave Daigle, a veteran communications specialist, proposed the idea of using a zombie hook to spice up the hurricane message. Khan, director of emergency preparedness, approved it immediately and wrote it himself. “Most directors would have thrown me out of their office,” Daigle laughed. “Ali has a good sense of humor.” In the blog, Khan discussed what fiction has said about flesh-eating zombies and the various infectious agents that different movies have fingered as the cause. His favorite zombie flick is “Resident Evil,” but his interest in unpredictable terrors is driven more by his decades of work tracking real-life infections like Ebola hemorrhagic fever, bird flu and SARS. CDC officials said the feedback they’ve gotten is almost completely positive, including a nice note from the boss, Dr. Tom Frieden. Almost as rewarding was a nice comment Daigle said he received from his 14-year-old daughter, who has shown little interest in her dad’s work but saw the zombie post and said, “This is cool!” There have been few comments asking whether this is the best way for the government to spend tax dollars. The agency is under a tight budget review at the moment and facing potentially serious budget cuts. But the zombie post involved no extra time or expenditure, CDC officials said. “We have a critical message to get out and that is CDC saves lives while saving money. If it takes zombies to help us get that message out, then so be it,” said agency spokesman Tom Skinner. Whether the message sticks still has to be determined. The agency is planning a follow-up survey to see if people actually did prepare emergency kits or follow Khan’s other advice. CDC deserves credit for trying something like this, said Bill Gentry, director of the community preparedness and disaster management program at the University of North Carolina’s school of public health. But that doesn’t mean the agency should start using vampires to promote vaccinations or space aliens to warn about the dangers of smoking. “The CDC is the most credible source out there for public health information,” he said. “You don’t want to risk demeaning that.” Online: CDCs emergency preparedness blog: http://bit.ly/ikth7k CDCs zombie apocalypse advice an Internet hit We have a critical message to get out and that is CDC saves lives while saving money. If it takes zombies to help us get that message out, then so be itTOMSKINNER CDCspokesman By BRUCE SMITH Associated PressMYRTLE BEACH, S.C. —The tallest Ferris wheel in the eastern United States, a 200-foot-tall, $12 million wheel with a million LED lights and 42 air-conditioned gondolas, started spinning Friday in this beach resort on the South Carolina coast. The SkyWheel is expected to help draw visitors to center of the downtown Myrtle Beach where a new 1.2-mile oceanfront boardwalk opened last year but which five years ago lost the oceanfront Pavilion amusement park. The wheel takes riders for a 12-minute spin above the beach and each night will feature a computerized light show. “This really going to be an icon for our city and I think we’re going to be able to use it as a tremendous commercial tool,” said Myrtle Beach Mayor John Rhodes. The Myrtle Beach attraction is of the same design as a wheel on the Canadian side of Niagara Falls and dominates the skyline along the beach district in a resort that is the heart of South Carolina’s $18.4 billion tourism industry. “Myrtle Beach was the right audience for the attraction,” said David Busker, the president of Koch Development, which developed the wheel along with Pacific Development. “Niagara Falls has a similar profile to Myrtle Beach, 14 million visitors, natural attractions — they have the falls and we have the beach — and they have been very successful.” One of the first riders on the wheel was 10-year-old Tad McCord of North Myrtle Beach, S.C. He’s not scared of heights, having been much higher — his dad is an airline pilot and also flies smaller planes. “I loved it. I liked the going-around part,” Tad said, and, asked to compare it to an airplane ride, added, “I think they’re both equally as fun.” The wheel is 12 feet shorter than the Ferris wheel at the Texas State Fair in Dallas, the tallest wheel in the nation, and smaller the first world’s first Ferris wheel, a 264-foot wheel built for the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago. Tallest Ferris wheel in eastern United States starts spinning Martial Arts 3x10.5 Dr. Rotman 3x10.5 Orchid Hill Stable 3x5

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C M Y K Page 10ANews-Sun Sunday, May 22, 2010www.newssun.co m Call 385-6155 and a Sales Representative will be glad to assist you!

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C M Y K www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, May 22, 2010Page 11A CLASSIFIEDS C C H H A A R R L L E E S S K K O O Z Z E E L L S S K K I I Charles Kozelski, 77, died Sunday, May 16th in Lake Worth, FL, after surviving a stroke and bravely battling cancer and heart disease. C huck was born in Akron, Ohio. He was the olde st son of a proud Polish, American family. His c hildhood passion was baseball and a lifelong f an of the Indians and later the Rays. Chuck s erved in Korea with the US Army. He went on to spend a great career serving food and beverage as the owner of the Brigadoon, North Hill Cafe and Chili Dog Mac in Akron and then Charlies in Sebring, FL. It was just like him to always be taking care of others. He enjoyed boating, fishing, hunt-i ng, and especially playing golf at Pinecrest Country Club in his retirement years. He loved a nd cared for his family and friends above all. And, you would often find him flashing a smile and giving a wink with his blues eyes as he nodded his head letting you know all is well. Many will miss Kozy and remember him fondly. Chuck was preceded in death by his parents, Charles and Katherine Kozielski. He is survived by his wife, Zita Kozelski; daughter, Michele Rivera (Pedro grandson, Mark Rivera; brothers and sisters, Louise Todd (LawrenceArt Pauline Twigg (BillDebbie Richard Kozielski (Laurie loving family. Private service held at V A Cemetary Lake Worth, Florida. 1050LegalsL OST W ALLETBrown ladies. $1000. R eward, no questions asked if found a nd returned. Call 863-385-0587 1200Lost & FoundCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first da y your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us: 385-6155 News-Sun Classified 1100Announcements H IGHLANDS COUNTYBOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERSGENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING NOTICE OF INTERNET AUCTIO START DATE: Friday May 13, 2011 at 9:00 A.M.END DATE: Monday May 23, 2011 at 6:00 P.M. through 10:00 P.M. LOCATION / WEBSITE: GOVDEALS.COMPursuant to Florida Statutes and Board adopted policies, the Highlands County Board of County Commissioners (HCBCC lands County; Sebring, Florida, has declared various items as surplus property and have therefore authorized an Internet Auction to be conducted for the purpose of disposing of all said property.A list of specific surplus items may be obtained from the following locations and/or by requesting a list by fax (863 sbutler@hcbcc.org or kbaker@hcbcc.org 1) HC Purchasing Department; 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803. Contacts: Sandra Butler at (863 or Kelley Baker at (863)402-6511.2) HC Government Center, 600 S. Commerce Ave., 2nd Floor BCC Receptionist; Sebring, FL 33870 at (863 mation can be obtained Monday through Friday from 7:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. about the Countys Internet Auction process by contacting Highlands County BCCs General Services/Purchasing Department at the following numbers. (863863 be sold on an as is, where is basis. The HCBCC reserves the right to add or delete items from GovDeals Website at anytime during the Internet bidding dates above.Board of County CommissionersPurchasing DepartmentHighlands County, Florida M ay 13, 15, 20, 22, 2011 ***************************************** HIGHLANDS COUNTY LEGAL NOTICES ***************************************** The following legal notices are from the Highlands County Board of County Commissioners and are being published in the font, size, and leading as per their specifications. 1055HighlandsCounty LegalsU S. DISTRICT COURT SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA A ppointment of New U. S. Magistrate Judge (Two Positions The Judicial Conference of the United States has a uthorized the appointment of a full-time United S tates Magistrate Judge for the Southern District of Florida at West Palm Beach. The current annuals alary for the magistrate judge position is $160, 080 per year. The term of office is eight years. A full public notice for the magistrate judge posit ion is posted on the Courts Internet website at: www.flsd.uscourts.gov I nterested persons may contact the clerk of the d istrict court for additional information and application forms. The application form is also availa ble on the Courts website w ww.flsd.uscourts.gov. Applications must be subm itted electronically to: Flsd_magistratejudgerec ruitment@flsd.uscourts.gov by May 31, 2011. May 15, 22, 29, 2011 1050Legals V acancy For A dministrative Assistant S pring Lake Improvement District The Spring Lake Improvement District is accepting applications for a full time Administrative Assistant. The primary functions of this position are to assist with the business operations of the District and to manage the daily function of the District off ice, with emphasis on the water department. App licants are required to minimally have a High S chool degree and be fully knowledgeable and s killed with: Microsoft Office Professional softw are; Excel spreadsheets; using Access for export and mail merge; Power Point; uploading documents and photo's to web sites; ability to use water billing system; and possession of a notary license is preferred. Additionally, at least five years o f demonstrated fund accounting basics and experience is a high priority for this position. The D istrict offers a benefit package that includes hospitalization and major medical. Resumes meeting the above requirements should be mailed to: Diane Angell, District Administrator, Spring Lake Improvement District, 115 Spring Lake Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33876. Applicants should also include their compensation requirements. Deadline for submitting resumes will be the close of District business on Friday, Jun 17, 2011. Joe DeCerbo District Manager Spring Lake Improvement District May 22, 25, 29, 2011 June 5, 12, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL C IRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:28-2008-CA-001322 A URORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC, Plaintiff, v s. KEVIN R. CHEATWOOD; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF K EVIN R. CHEATWOOD, IF ANY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, U NDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR O THER CLAIMANTS; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.; JOHN DOE AND J ANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, D efendant(s NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 9, 2011, entered in Civil Case No.: 28-2008-CA-001322 of the Circuit Court of the T enth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein AURORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC, Plaintiff, and KEVIN R. CHEATWOOD; MORTGAGE E LECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.; are Defendants.I will sell to the highest bidder for cash, in the Jury A ssembly Room in the basement of the, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870 at 11:00 AM, on the 8th day o f June, 2011, the following described real prope rty as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, t o wit: L OT 9, BLOCK 44, SEBRING LAKES, UNIT 4A, ACC ORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN P LAT BOOK 8, PAGE 32, OF THE PUBLIC REC ORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS A 10 FOOT STRIP RUNNING ADJACENT AND A LONG ROAD RIGHT OF WAY FOR ADDITIONAL R OAD RIGHT OF WAY. I f you are a person claiming a right to funds rem aining after the sale, you must file a claim with t he clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If y ou fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to a ny remaining funds. After 60 days, only the o wner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on May 10, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE C LERK OF THE COURT B y: /s/ Priscilla Michalak D eputy Clerk A ttorney for Plaintiff: B rian L. Rosaler, Esquire P opkin & Rosaler, P.A. 1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard Suite 400 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442T elephone: (954954 4 20-5187 M ay 22, 29, 2011 K NOWN PARTY WHO MAY CLAIM AS HEIR, DEVIS EE, GRANTEE, ASSIGNEE, LIENOR, CREDITOR, TRUSTEE, OR OTHER CLAIMANT, BY, THROUGH, U NDER OR AGAINST WILLIAM COLE; COLE; PAULA LAMAR; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF PAULA L AMAR N/K/A MIKE LAMAR, and CITY OF SEBRING are the Defendants, that I will sell to the h ighest and best bidder for cash, on the front steps of the Highlands County Courthouse located a t 590 South Commerce Ave., Sebring, Florida 3 3870-3867 on June 7th, 2011, at 11:00 a.m., t hethe following described real property as set forth in the Final Judgment: Legal: LOT 5, BLOCK 1 22, LA PALOMA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, P AGE 44, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS C OUNTY, FLORIDA N OTICE: ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER T HAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 6 0 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED this 10th day of May, 2011. ( SEAL) Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak D eputy Clerk May 22, 29, 2011 1050Legals I N THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 10-602-GCS WALKHAMPTON CAPITAL CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. ANY UNKNOWN PARTY WHO MAY CLAIMA S HEIR, DEVISEE, GRANTEE, ASSIGNEE, LIENOR, CREDITOR,, TRUSTEE, OR OTHER CLAIMANT, BY, THROUGH, UNDER ORA GAINST WILLIAM COLE; COLE/ PAULA LAMAR; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF PAULA LAMAR N/K/A MIKE LAMAR, and CITY OF SEBRING, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment dated May 9, 2011, entered in Case No.: 10-602-GCS of the Circuit Court in and for Highlands County, Florida wherein ANY UNI N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 10-CA-000787 SUNCOAST SCHOOLS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, P laintiff, v. MICHELLE R. RICHMOND; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF M ICHELLE R. RICHMOND; HAMILTON R. RICHM OND; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OR HAMILTON R. RICHMOND; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES C LAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST T HE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM A N INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, G RANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1; T ENANT #2, Defendants. N OTICE OF SALE N otice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgm ent of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this c ause, in the Circuit Court of HIGHLANDS County, F lorida; I will sell the property situated in HIGHL ANDS County, Florida described as: L OT 8, BLOCK 59, PLACID LAKES, SECTION S IX, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF RECORDED I N PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 68, PUBLIC RECORDS OF H IGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. a nd commonly known as: 114 Fox Ridge Road, L ake Placid, FL 33852, at public sale, to the highe st and best bidder, for cash, in the basement of the courthouse in the Jury Assembly Room, 430 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870, on May 31, 2011, at 11:00 A.M. A NY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE S URPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN T HE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE L IS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 D AYS AFTER THE SALE. D isability Language: If you are a person with a disability who needs assistance in order to participate in ta program or service of the State Courts System, you should contact the Office of the Court Administrator at ( 863) 534-4686 (voice), (863) 534-7777 (TDD) or ( 800) 955-8770 (Florida Relay Service), as much i n advance of your court appearance or visit to the C ourthouse as possible. Please be prepared to exp lain your functional limitations and suggest an a uxiliary aid or service that you believe will enable you to effectively participate in the court program or service. Dated this May 3, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court B y: /s/ Lisa Tantillo D eputy Clerk M ay 15, 22, 2011 I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH J UDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C ASE No.: 10-949 GCS Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC, P laintiff, vs. S hane D. Fugate a/k/a Shane Fugate, Amanda Fugate and Sylvan Shores Homeowners Associat ion, Inc., D efendants. N OTICE OF SALE P URSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summ ary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 9th, 2011, and entered in Case No. 10-949 GCS o f the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein Ocwen L oan Servicing, LLC, is Plaintiff and Shane D. Fugate a/k/a Shane Fugate, Amanda Fugate and S ylvan Shores Homewoners Association, Inc., are D efendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Jury Assembly Room, Basem ent 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL at 11:00 o'clock A.M. on the 7th day of June, 2 011, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: L ot 42, Sylvan Shores Estates Section D, according to the plat therof as recorded in Plat Book 7 Page 13, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. L ocated: 1503 Black Bear Avenue, Lake Placid, FL 33852 a nd all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security i n Plaintiff's mortgage. A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property o wner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. D ated at Sebring, Highlands County, Florida, this 10th day of May, 2011. B ob Germaine Clerk of said Circuit Court B y: /s/ Prisicilla Michalak A s Deputy Clerk May 22, 29, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C ASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-000694 SEC.: CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff,v G UILDA J. DESRAVINS; JEAN H. DESRAVINS; ANY A ND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, T HROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN N AMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S N OT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER S AID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; LAKE PROPERTY ASSOCIATION INC.; D efendant(s N OTICE OF SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Ord er of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure d ated May 9, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2 8-2010-CA-000694 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 7th day of June, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. in the Jury Assembly Room, Courthouse Basement, 430 South Com-m erce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, relative to t he following described property as set forth in the F inal Judgment, to wit: L OT 8, BLOCK C, OF SPRING LAKEVILLAGE III, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 54, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus f rom the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED AT SEBRING, FLORIDA THIS 10TH DAY OF May, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak DEPUTY CLERK If you are a person with a disability who need any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Office of the Court AdministratorPhone: (863 534-4686 TDD: (863 or (800Florida Relay Service much in advance of your court appearance or visit to the courthouse as possible. Please be prepared to explain your functional limitations and suggest an auxiliary aid of service that you believe will enable you to effectively participated in the court program or service. May 22, 29, 2011 HIGHLANDS COUNTYBOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERSGENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING INVITATION TO BID (ITB The Board of County Commissioners (BCC County, Sebring, Florida, (COUNTY in the County Purchasing Department for:ITB 11-044 US-27 FROM NORTH OF RAILROAD OVERPASS TO SOUTH OF TOMOKA BOULEVARD NORTH INCLUDING LAKE JUNE ROAD AND S.W. VISTA DRIVE STREET LIGHTING PROJECT, PROJECT No. 08020, FM No. 412644-1-58-01& ITB 11-045 66 AT THE INTERSECTION OF CR 635 STREET LIGHTING PROJECTPROJECT No. 08018, FM No. 414509-2-58-01Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, Assistant Director, Highlands County General Services / Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 Telephone: 863-402-6524, E-Mail: dgilbert@hcbcc.orgA NON-MANDATORY Pre-Bid meeting will be held at 11:00 A.M. on T uesday, May 24, 2011 in the Engineering Conference Room, 505 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 3 3870. All potential bidders are encouraged attend this meeting.Submit one (12 bid form, bid security and other required data in a sealed envelope and marked with the bid number and name so as to identify the enclosed bid submittal. Bids must be delivered to Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., Thursday; June 9, 2011 at which time they will be opened. Bids received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The County will not be responsible for the late deliveries of bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service.One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at either or both of the above meetings.Vendors submitting responses must submit bids on all work to receive consideration. A B id Bond or Cashiers Check in an amount of five percent (5% $100,000.00. If the successful bid is greater than $200,000.00, a Public Construction Bond will be required. An Irrevocable Letter of Credit may be considered in lieu of the Public Construction Bond depending on its verbiage. Bid must be accompanied by evidence of bidder's qualifications to do business in the State of Florida, in accordance with F.S. 489.The principal features of the Project are:To provide all labor, materials and equipment to install highway lighting system at US-27 FROM NORTH OF RAILROAD OVERPASS TO SOUTH OF TOMOKA BOULEVARD NORTH INCLUDING LAKE JUNE ROAD AND S.W. VISTA DRIVE STREET & at SR 66 AT THE INTERSECTION OF CR 635 in accordance with the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT Bridge Construction (2010 Edition dards for Design, Construction, Maintenance and Utility Operations on the State Highway System (2010 Edition and highway lighting construction plans. The COUNTY reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsive and responsible BIDDER whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of Highlands County. The COUNTY reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. The COUNTY does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the COUNTY's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John Minor, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice or by e-mail: jminor@hcbcc.org. Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service. Board of County Commissioners; Purchasing Department, Highlands County, Florida Website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net May 15, 22, 2011N OTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is hereby given that ON 6/15/11 at 10:30 am t he following vehicles will be sold for towing & storage charges pursuant to F.S. 713.78. 1989 F ORD SUV # 1FMCU14T3KUB97796 ALL Sales to be held at Alan Jay Automotive N etwork 441 US 27N Sebring, Fl 33870 ( 863) 402 4210 1050Legals HIGHLANDS COUNTYBOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERSGENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASINGINVITATION TO BID (ITB The Board of County Commissioners (BCC County, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed bids in the County Purchasing Department for:ITB No. 11-042 LAKE CHARLOTTE LATERAL CANAL CROSSING PROJECT No. 09040Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, Assistant Director, Highlands County General Services / Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 Telephone: 863-402-6524, E-Mail: dgilbert@hcbcc.orgA NON-MANDATORY Pre-Bid meeting will be held at 10:00 A.M. on Tuesday, May 24, 2011 in the Engineering Conference Room, 505 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. All potential bidders are encouraged attend this meeting. Submit one (13 rity and other required data in a sealed envelope and marked with the bid number and name so as to identify t he enclosed bid submittal. Bids must be delivered to Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., Thursday, June 9, 2011 at which time they will be opened. Bids received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The Board will not be responsible for the late deliveries of bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service. One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at either or both of the above meetings. Highlands County Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this bid. BIDDER'S submitting responses must submit bids on all work to receive consideration. A Bid Bond or Cashiers Check in an amount of five percent (5% $100,000.00. If the successful bid is greater than $200,000.00, a Public Construction Bond will be required. Bid must be accompanied by evidence of BIDDER'S qualifications to do business in the State of Florida, in accordance with F.S. 489. The principal features of the Project are:To provide all labor, materials and equipment to construct a crossing with dual 43x68 CMP across the Lake Charlotte Lateral Canal of the Upper Josephine-Jackson Creek watershed. All workmanship and materials shall meet the requirement of the Florida Department of Transportation Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge Construction (dated 2010 permits issued.The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners (HCBCC / COUNTY accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsive and responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of Highlands County. The Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid.The Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Highlands County is an equal opportunity employer, a fair housing advocate and a handicap accessible jurisdiction. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John Minor, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: jminor@hcbcc.org. Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service.Board of County CommissionersPurchasing DepartmentHighlands County, Florida Website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net May 15, 22,2011 S S T T . J J O O H H N N U U N N I I T T E E D D M M E E T T H H O O D D I I S S T T C C H H U U R R C C H H D D e e m m o o l l i i t t i i o o n n a a n n d d S S i i t t e e R R e e s s t t o o r r a a t t i i o o n n o o f f 1 1 3 3 2 2 6 6 C C o o r r v v e e t t t t e e A A v v e e . , S S e e b b r r i i n n g g , F F l l I I N N V V I I T T A A T T I I O O N N T T O O B B I I D D D D E E R R S S T he St John UMC, Sebring, from hereon referred to as "Owner" will receive bids until 2:00 p.m. on J une 22, 2011 for demolition and removal of all structure(st ank(s asphalt at 1326 Corvette Ave., Sebring, FL. The b uilding(s inside. The existence, quantity and location of any m aterials made from asbestos are unknown to the Owner. However, the age of the structure is approximately 53 years, and it is known that asbes-t os was commonly used in building materials during that time. If asbestos is found, removal and d isposal of asbestos material(s eral, state, and local requirements. The Contractor i s responsible for all notifications and fees for the demolition and asbestos removal, if applicable. S S c c o o p p e e o o f f W W o o r r k k : : Demolition includes removal of the following: all s tructures on property, miscellaneous debris associated with the structure, septic system(s in-ground swimming pool, all foundations and slabs, sidewalks, driveways, fences and gates. C ontractor shall be responsible for empyting the swimming pool and septic tank(s a nd legally disposing of materials. Materials from swimming pool and septic tank(s posed of on Owner's property or within the neighborhood. Any costs for landfill tipping fees are the responsibility of the Contractor and shall meet all f ederal, state, and local requirements. The existing trees on the property are to remain and shall not be damaged or removed. Property shall be res eeded with Bahia grass upon completion of b ackfilling and grading. A mandatory pre-bid meeting, followed by a mand atory site visit, is scheduled for 1:00 pm on June 8 2011 to be held in the Owner's Fellowship b uilding. Only Contractors that have attended the m andatory pre-bid meeting and site visit, signed the sign-in sheet and submitted a bid on the appropriate forms shall be considered a responsive bidder and will have their bid evaluated for possi-b le award. A ll project related questions/requests for clarificat ion shall be submitted in writing and forwarded to t he Owner's office as noted below. All a nswers/clarifications shall be provided to all p lanholders of record as addenda to the project documents. Only questions answered by formal written addenda shall be binding. Oral and other interpretations or clarifications shall be without leg al effect. Requests for additional information s hall be accepted until June 10th at 12:00 pm. T he Contractor shall have proper licenses and c ertification for the project. The Contractor shall b e responsible for any permits and all utility disc onnections. B ids are to be addressed to the Owner and mailed or delivered to St. John UMC, 3214 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, FL 33870. Bids shall be privately reviewed and there will not be a public opening of the bids. P roject documents may be obtained from the O wner's Office, 3214 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, FL 3 3870, telephone (863 MENT AT COURTHOUSE, 430 S. COMMERCE A VENUE SEBRING, FL 33870, at the hour of 11 A.M. on the 7th day of June, 2011, the following d escribed property: LOT 31, BLOCK 30, HIGHLANDS PARK EST ATES, SECTION P, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT T HEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 5 9, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, F LORIDA. To be published on 05/22/2011 and 0 5/29/2011. A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus f rom the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a c laim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 10th day of May, 2011. R OBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk Circuit Court B y: /s/ Priscilla Michalak May 22, 29, 2011 1050Legals I N THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 28-2010-CA-000049 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. LOGAN, CHRISTOPHER E., et. al., D efendants. N OTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Ord er or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 2 8-2010-CA-000049 of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, wherein, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, and, LOGAN, CHRISTOPHER E., et. al., are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEI N THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION F ile No. PC 11-169 Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OFTHOMAS E. BRUCHDeceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS T he administration of the estate of THOMAS E. BRUCH, deceased, whose date of death was September 12, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, t he address of which is Clerk of the Court, Highl ands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce A venue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and a ddresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other p ersons having claims or demands against deced ent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is req uired to be served must file their claims with this c ourt WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER T HE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS N OTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVI CE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All o ther creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 M ONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLIC ATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT F ILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN S ECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE C ODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHS TANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH I S BARRED. The date of first publication of this n otice is May 22, 2011. P ersonal Representative: S teven T. Bruch4367 40th St.. SWGrandville, M ichigan 49418 A ttorney for Personal Representative:John K. McClureAttorney for Steven T. BruchFlorida Bar Number: 286958MCCLURE & LOBOZZO211 S. Ridgewood DriveSebring, Florida 33870Telephone: (863863 4 02-0751E-Mail: kelly@mllaw.net M ay 22, 29, 2011 I N THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA P ROBATE DIVISION File No. PC 11-39 Division Probate I N RE: ESTATE OFCOLLEEN SUSAN LOSADeceased. N OTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of COLLEEN S USAN LOSA, deceased, whose date of death w as October 28, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Divis ion, the address of which is Clerk of the Court, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Comm erce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representat ive and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent a nd other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this n otice is required to be served must file their c laims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLIC ATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE O N THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands a gainst decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE D ATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME P ERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERI-O DS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 D ATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is May 22, 2011. P ersonal Representative: Robert Duncan1707 Divot LaneSebring, Florida 3 3872 A ttorney for Personal Representative:John K. McClureAttorney for Robert DuncanFlorida Bar Number: 286958MCCLURE & LOBOZZO211 S. R idgewood DriveSebring, Florida 33870Telephone: (863863 4 02-2436E-Mail: kelly@mllaw.net May 22, 29, 2011 1050Legals 1000 AnnouncementsCall 314-9876 to place y our classifiedHighlands County Sheriff 3x4 The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 314-9876

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C M Y K Page 12ANews-Sun Sunday, May 22, 2010www.newssun.com AVON PARKLarge Retail/Office Building, 100 E. Main St. A MUST SEE! 863-295-9272 6750Commercial RentalSEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, W/D, Satellite, full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for RentSEBRING 1/1Cottage. $325. month. + $325 security. No Pets www.620bowm an.itgo.com or Call 863-382-4655. 6350Cottages for Rent S PRING LAKE3BR, 2BA, 2CG, CHA, p atio, ceramic tiled liv. room, din. room, k itchen, bath & halls, SS appliances, r efrigerator has water on door, micro., W /D hook up. No pets. 863-655-0136 SEBRING 3or 4 BR, 1BA block home near YMCA, newly remodeled bath, new flooring in kitchen, 4 energy effic ient A/C units recently installed. Paid o ff, no fear of foreclosure, no credit c heck. $700/mo + $700 security. Call 8 63-513-0050. SEBRING -3BR/ 2BA, Dining room, living room, Florida room. Tiled floors. Refrigerator, stove, W/D. Fenced back yard. $600 monthly. 863-381-6229 S EBRING -2111 Colmar Ave. 3BR, 2BA. No pets or smokers. $700 monthly. !st / last / plus $300 deposit. 561-965-4458 or 561-379-6823 L AKE PLACID3/2 house in Sylvan S hores. $700. per month plus first & l ast. $350. security, no pets, no smoki ng. LAKE PLACID2BR, 1BA, new f loors/paint, fenced yard, close to boat ramp, nice landscape, quiet area, no s moke/dogs, $575/mo. 863-699-1119 L AKE PLACED3/1. Close to Schools & Shopping. $600. mo. + utilities. $500 d ep. For more info. RENTED!!! 6300Unfurnished Houses KEY LAKEVILLASL AKEFRONT LIVING IN SEBRING 2 Bedroom townhouse unit. Clean & q uiet, Screen porch, Outside patio, C entral air, Washer/Dryer hookup, $590/mo., first & security. No Pets. 8 63-465-2740 A VON PARKClean, Quiet: Studios 1 BR, 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., form $ 375/mp. New tile & appliances, s creened patios & W/D hook up. Students/Seniors Discount C all 863-602-4683 6200U nfurnishedA partments A VON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL : $325/mo. 8 63-453-8598 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1 680 North Delaware 1 BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 **NOW LEASING** PARK PLAZA A BRAND NEW R ENTAL COMMUNITY LOCATED IN AVON PARK, FL S PACIOUS 2BR 2BA APARTMENT HOMES. **ONLY $575/mo.** A MUST SEE! ************************Please Call 305-932-4800 for more information. SEBRING -1BR, 1BA. Fresh paint. Includes water. $ 395 / mo. Call Gary Johnson, 863-381-1861. 6200UnfurnishedApartmentsS EBRING LOVELY,furnished 1BR on L akefront Estate. No Pets. Utilities & cable included $425/mo 863-655-1068 6150FurnishedApartments SEBRING 1or 2 bedroom. Spacious l iving area. Very clean, Like new. Laundry facilities. A/C. Close to Downtown. L awn Services Incl. $540. per month + security dep. Call 941-773-7523 D UPLEX LEASE2/2/1 1300 Schlosser Rd. Sebring. All appliances, no pets. L awn maintenance incl. $550.mo. + security. Call 863-452-0996 for appt. 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 RentalsS EBRING RENTw/option to buy. 2/2 Double Wide Mobile Home. $525. 3303 H ighlander. Call 863-446-2414 5150Mobile HomesFor RentSEBRING MOBILEHome for sale! 55+ p ark. Low lot rent incl. water. 2/1,large k itchen/dining area with pantry, att ached Florida room completely inside l iving. Storage shed. Very reasonably priced. Call 912-492-6867 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesL AKE VIEWMEMORIAL GARDENS. M ausoleum, Interment, name plate, c asket & tray, placement on bottom r ow level 1. $5000. Call 863-385-4927 4280Cemetery Lots 4000 Real Estate 3000 FinancialSEBRING MEDICALoffice seeking Part t ime Receptionist. Exp. only. Fax Res ume to: 863-299-4352 2150Part-timeEmployment YMCA -INSTRUCTORS needed for (Zumba, Water aerobics, Fitness, etcM ust be energetic and outgoing. Must be willing to work. Certification and E xperience preferred. Will trail. Please apply in person at 100 YMCA Lane, S ebring, FL. SUN NLAKE Subway is now hiring for a ll positions. Must be avail. to work anytime. Go to subway.com and fill out t he application, and return to the Sun N Lakes location. S UMMER HOUSE-KEEPING Lake Placid Camp now hiring house k eepers. Motel or Hotel cleaning experience a Plus flexible hours. C all 863-465-2197 9-5, M-F. S TAFF ASST. (PT viding clerical support to the Human R esources Dept. Secretarial/Clerical e xp. proficient typing skills and exp. in word processing required. $8.60/hr. D eadline 5pm., 5/24/11. Visit www.southflorida.edu /hr for detailed p osition announcement. (863 784-7132. EA/EO/VET'S PREF. S IMPLY SOLDeBay Store needs eBay sales specialists. Must be computer lite rate, detail oriented, highly motivated a nd have computer. Full-Time positions available. Compensation based o n input. Unlimited potential. Email resume to: simplysoldonebay@gmail.com o r drop off resume at 330 U 27 N Ste. 1 Sebring. S EEKING DIALYSIS R N with experience or will train the right p erson for a state-of-the-art dialysis c linic. We offer an excellent salary a nd benefit package. Please call o r fax resume to: Peggy Phone: 863-382-9443 or Fax: 863-382-9242 Q C MANAGER needed for local precast hollowcore company. E xperience with precast, quality c ontrol & concrete testing required. P CI Level I & II & ACI Certified p referred, NOT REQUIRED. Email r esume/salary requirements to: j uliem@floridaprecastind.com Fax: 863-655-1215 P UBLICATIONS SECRETARYP/T n eeded. Must h ave experience in P ublisher and Microsoft Word. To obtain an application and for more i nformation, Call 863-453-6681 M AINTENANCE TECHNICIAN n eeded for local apartment community. S uccessful candidate will possess s kills in all areas of apartment turnkey & maintenance. Must have own tools. G ood benefits! Salary will depend on experience. Please call for application a nd appt. No drop-ins please. Phone; 863-385-4078 EOE DFWP 2100Help Wanted 2100Help Wanted 2100Help Wanted FIRST BAPTISTPreschool is hiring for a P T Pre School Teacher, Christian, and fun loving. Apply at First Baptist Pre S chool. 200 E Center Ave, or call 863-385-4704. C ERTIFIED PATIENTCARE TECH Part Time / per Diem wanted for State o f the Art Dialysis Facility. Call Peggy at (863 ( 863) 382-9242. B USY SEBRINGMedical office. Exp. only. Full time. Front office duties. C omputer input, insurance, collections & patient contact. Fax resume to: 8 63-299-4352 A SSOCIATE REPS SUMMER WORK G REAT PAY Immediate FT/PT openings, Customer s ales/services, no exp. necessary. Conditions apply. All ages 17+. C all 863-658-4391 A MIKIDS LASTChance Ranch has positions for FT Administrative Asst. A lso 1 FT RN or 2 PT RN's. Applications accepted on site. C all 863-699-3788 EOE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT F /T or P/T. Highly experienced in m edical office procedures. Computer l iterate, multi-tasked oriented, records management and possess good public r elation skills. Excellent benefits, salary commensurate with experience. Fax r esume to 471-9340 or call 382-0566, e mail resume: bettyamburn@gmail.com 2000 EmploymentDummy sales rep wanted 3x5 Dummy circ carriers 2x5 Cross Country Auto 3x10.5 dummy page design 2x4 SFCC Human Resour/std srv adv 2x3 Millers Central Air 2x2AP housing authority 1x3 AP housing authority 1x4 The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Classified ads get fast results Having something to sell a nd not advertising i s like winking in the dark. You know what youre doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 314-9876

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C M Y K www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, May 22, 2010Page 13 A 1996 FORDRANGER $3000 OBO 863-386-4220 1995 ISUZUHydraulic Low Rider, one owner garage kept, Dayton rims gold & chrome, mahogany gold steering wheel, 10 switches & 5 new batteries, 38.000K. 863-381-4948 9450Automotive for Sale FORD '89F-250. New motor w/4,000 mi. New battery, good tires. Work box, staked body. Good running work horse. $1975. obo. Call 863-269-8743 CHEVROLET TRUCKExtended Cab '94. A/C, pw/pl/ps/pb, tilt wheel AM/FM & CD player. Alum. wheels, tow package. 4 wheel drive, auto, bed liner & cruise. $6,500 obo. 863-655-4483 9200Trucks 9000 TransportationPOOL ABOVEGround, 4' x 18', ladder & filter. $150. Call 863-655-0881 8300Pools & SuppliesSEA DOOGTX '03 3 seater 59 hrs. 185hp. $4700. Mint cond. 863-385-5425 8050Boats & Motors 8000 RecreationFRESH PICKEDBlack eyed peas. $25. un-shelled bushel. $35. for a shelled bushel. Call 863-235-0271. 7540Fresh Fruits &Vegetables SHIH TZUPUPPIES FOR SALE Boys and girls, $300. Home number 863-382-3808, cell 863-446-1402 or 446-4218.NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & SuppliesCENTRAL AIRSYSTEM New. 10 year factory warranty. $1495. Call 863-455-4040 7420Heating &Air ConditioningLOOKING FORa Water Pump Windmill. Call 863-655-2166 or 239-494-2059. 7340Wanted to Buy A VON PARKSun. Mon. 8 ?. 1419 W. Silver Oak Dr. Huge Yard Sale. Something for everyone! 7320Garage &Yard Sales VACUUM -Upright bagless, completely clean, new belt, works like new! $25 863-402-2285 TIRES W/RIMS $75 863-529-2220 OLD RAILROADTOOL very good condition, could be a tie puller. $50. 863-402-2285 MEN'S SHIRTSsizes 3X. Like new / some never worn. 10 for $30 863-386-0936 MEN'S SHIRTSSize 4X. Like new / some never worn. 10 for $40 863-386-0936 LAZY BOYRecliner / Rocker, good condition. Light teal w/ fine stripe. $45 863-655-3552 FUTON W/BEIGEremovable cover, and 2 pillows. Good cond. All $60. Call 863-655-1644 ENTERTAINMENT CENTERDark wood, 3 sections. 74" X 30". $100 863-453-9612 CHAIRS (2)FABRIC Living room. mauve w/ rattan backs. $80 863-453-9612 BOW SAW30 inch. $20. 863-529-2220 BASKETBALL GOALLifetime brand. Up to 12' adjustable. $100.obo Call 863-202-0364 7310Bargain BuysBEDROOM SETDark wood, 2 dressers / night stand / Queen bed complete. $225. Matching Sofa & Loveseat, floral print (gray & mauve). $200 Tables / 2 end, 1 coffee, 1 sofa table. $110. Lounge chair w/ matching sitting chair (bedroom). $85.863-453-9612. 7300Miscellaneous SOFAS (2)Robb & Stucky. Excellent Cond. Includes accent pillows. $400. Call 863-446-2414 ROCKER GREEN.$50. Call 863-471-3587 7180Furniture 7000 MerchandiseProfessional Services Directory 5x21.5 North gate/ High Point 1x3

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C M Y K Page 14ANews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011www.newssun.com WELLS MOTOR COMPANY; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, new pg 3a TODAYMostly sunny92 / 70Winds: ESE at 6-12 mphSunny to partly cloudy90 / 68Winds: E at 6-12 mphMONDAYMostly sunny92 / 68Winds: ESE at 7-14 mphTUESDAYSunshine mixing with some clouds91 / 69Winds: ESE at 8-16 mphWEDNESDAYMostly sunny90 / 68Winds: ESE at 8-16 mphTHURSDAY City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. Washington Washington 84/68 84/68 New York NewYork 65/57 65/57 Miami Miami 88/76 88/76 Atlanta Atlanta 92/66 92/66 Detroit Detroit 81/64 81/64 Houston Houston 89/73 89/73 Chicago Chicago 84/62 84/62 Minneapolis Minneapolis 78/57 78/57 Kansas City KansasCity 82/63 82/63 El Paso ElPaso 92/69 92/69 Denver Denver 76/48 76/48 Billings Billings 68/47 68/47 Los Angeles LosAngeles 68/58 68/58 San Francisco SanFrancisco 60/48 60/48 Seattle Seattle 60/46 60/46 Washington 84/68 New York 65/57 Miami 88/76 Atlanta 92/66 Detroit 81/64 Houston 89/73 Chicago 84/62 Minneapolis 78/57 Kansas City 82/63 El Paso 92/69 Denver 76/48 Billings 68/47 Los Angeles 68/58 San Francisco 60/48 Seattle 60/46 A storm system pressing into the Upper Midwest will keep the Midwest unsettled today. Scattered showers and thunderstorms will roam across much of the region, reaching eastward as far as the western portions of New York to North Carolina. Strong thunderstorms will erupt along the systems cold front from Missouri into central Texas. These hit-or-miss storms will be capable of producing ” ash ” ooding, damaging winds, large hail and even a tornado or two. Meanwhile, periods of rain will drench North Dakota. U.S. Cities National Forecast for May 22Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. World Cities National SummaryCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. Weather (W):ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Albuquerque 80/54/pc 79/52/s 76/51/s Atlanta 92/66/s 88/66/pc 89/68/s Baltimore 83/62/pc 86/64/t 87/64/pc Birmingham 92/67/s 91/69/pc 88/69/s Boston 58/49/c 67/59/pc 77/62/pc Charlotte 90/63/pc 91/62/pc 91/66/pc Cheyenne 72/44/pc 64/44/t 55/41/r Chicago 84/62/t 80/48/t 59/45/c Cleveland 80/62/t 78/60/t 72/49/sh Columbus 86/65/t 83/63/t 79/56/t Dallas 88/73/t 88/73/pc 93/73/pc Denver 76/48/pc 69/45/t 62/43/r Detroit 81/64/t 81/56/t 70/47/c Harrisburg 82/60/t 86/61/t 84/61/t Honolulu 87/75/s 89/74/s 88/74/s Houston 89/73/pc 90/75/pc 90/73/pc Indianapolis 86/67/t 83/62/t 75/56/t Jackson, MS 90/69/pc 87/69/pc 88/70/s Kansas City 82/63/t 81/65/t 75/58/t Lexington 86/66/t 82/63/t 84/62/t Little Rock 86/68/t 87/69/pc 87/69/pc Los Angeles 68/58/pc 68/55/sh 68/56/pc Louisville 86/69/t 84/66/t 83/65/t Memphis 89/72/t 87/71/pc 86/70/pc Milwaukee 82/60/t 75/46/t 54/42/pc Minneapolis 78/57/t 71/49/sh 64/49/pc Nashville 86/67/t 87/67/pc 85/69/pc New Orleans 88/72/pc 87/73/pc 88/74/s New York City 65/57/c 74/64/t 82/67/pc Norfolk 86/67/s 88/70/pc 88/69/pc Oklahoma City 88/68/pc 91/66/t 88/62/pc Philadelphia 74/59/pc 80/66/t 86/66/pc Phoenix 93/72/s 91/70/s 90/67/s Pittsburgh 82/62/t 82/62/t 77/60/t Portland, ME 56/47/c 59/54/t 74/55/pc Portland, OR 63/48/c 63/47/sh 67/48/pc Raleigh 91/65/s 92/67/pc 91/67/pc Rochester 76/58/t 82/60/t 73/50/pc St. Louis 86/69/t 86/68/t 83/65/t San Francisco 60/48/pc 61/48/pc 63/49/s Seattle 60/46/c 64/48/pc 64/48/pc Wash., DC 84/68/pc 89/68/t 88/69/pc Cape Coral 92/71/s 89/68/s 90/69/s Clearwater 91/73/s 90/73/s 90/72/s Coral Springs 87/75/s 86/74/s 86/74/s Daytona Beach 90/68/s 87/68/s 90/68/s Ft. Laud. Bch 88/77/s 84/76/s 86/76/s Fort Myers 92/72/s 90/70/s 92/70/s Gainesville 94/65/s 92/66/s 91/65/s Hollywood 89/75/s 87/74/s 88/73/s Homestead AFB 86/74/s 85/73/s 84/75/s Jacksonville 92/66/s 93/66/s 90/65/s Key West 87/78/s 87/77/s 86/77/s Miami 88/76/s 87/75/s 87/76/s Okeechobee 87/71/s 85/70/s 86/68/s Orlando 92/69/s 90/67/s 90/68/s Pembroke Pines 89/75/s 87/74/s 88/73/s St. Augustine 88/69/s 85/68/s 86/66/s St. Petersburg 92/73/s 90/73/s 90/72/s Sarasota 89/71/s 90/71/s 89/69/s Tallahassee 92/61/s 93/68/s 94/66/s Tampa 92/72/s 89/72/s 89/72/s W. Palm Bch 88/75/s 85/73/s 85/74/s Winter Haven 93/71/s 91/70/s 91/69/s Acapulco 90/77/t 88/76/t 88/75/pc Athens 80/64/pc 78/66/pc 78/66/r Beirut 76/64/s 79/66/s 81/68/pc Berlin 77/54/sh 67/53/s 71/48/pc Bermuda 75/67/pc 76/69/s 76/70/pc Calgary 68/44/pc 58/46/pc 56/42/sh Dublin 58/45/sh 61/38/r 57/46/pc Edmonton 72/51/c 67/42/c 60/41/sh Freeport 87/70/s 86/70/s 86/71/s Geneva 70/53/r 75/56/pc 79/55/s Havana 91/70/t 89/71/t 87/71/t Hong Kong 84/77/r 83/76/r 83/76/sh Jerusalem 74/53/s 76/55/s 77/56/s Johannesburg 69/49/s 68/48/pc 68/49/pc Kiev 75/58/pc 77/59/pc 70/51/sh London 64/46/pc 64/48/pc 66/48/pc Montreal 70/59/t 75/57/t 66/50/pc Moscow 71/51/s 69/52/s 71/50/sh Nice 79/65/r 81/68/s 82/67/s Ottawa 72/60/t 79/59/t 69/50/pc Quebec 68/52/pc 68/54/t 64/48/pc Rio de Janeiro 78/69/s 82/69/s 76/68/pc Seoul 77/53/pc 79/58/pc 85/60/s Singapore 85/78/t 89/79/t 85/79/t Sydney 73/53/c 71/47/s 65/46/sh Toronto 78/59/t 78/55/t 67/48/pc Vancouver 60/48/c 58/50/sh 61/50/pc Vienna 78/61/pc 75/57/sh 78/62/s Warsaw 72/56/pc 63/49/sh 72/49/s Winnipeg 66/48/r 58/39/pc 63/42/s A lmanac Readings at Palm Beach High ............................................ 12:59 a.m. Low ............................................... 6:59 a.m. High .............................................. 1:15 p.m. Low ............................................... 7:19 p.m. Mostly sunny today. Partly cloudy tonight. Sunny to partly cloudy tomorrow. Tuesday: mostly sunny. Wednesday: sunshine mixing with some clouds. Thursday: mostly sunny. On May 22, 1804, a tornado ripped through New Brunswick, N.J. A hotel, two barns and three houses were destroyed. Mostly sunny today. Winds east 6-12 mph. Expect more than 10 hours of sunshine with relative humidity 75% early, 40% in the afternoon and good drying conditions. € Even addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday. € Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and Saturday. € All watering should take place before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. LastNewFirstFull May 24June 1June 8June 15 Today Monday Sunrise 6:37 a.m. 6:36 a.m. Sunset 8:09 p.m. 8:09 p.m. Moonrise 12:13 a.m. 12:51 a.m. Moonset 11:30 a.m. 12:25 p.m. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2011Jacksonville 92/66 Gainesville 94/65 Ocala 93/67 Daytona Beach 90/68 Orlando 92/69 Winter Haven 93/71 Tampa 92/72 Clearwater 91/73 St. Petersburg 92/73 Sarasota 89/71 Fort Myers 92/72 Naples 91/72 Okeechobee 87/71 West Palm Beach 88/75 Fort Lauderdale 88/77 Miami 88/76 Tallahassee 92/61 Apalachicola 90/65 Pensacola 88/72 Key West Avon Park 92/70 Sebring 92/70 Lorida 90/70 Lake Placid 91/69 Venus 91/69 Brighton 90/69 TidesReadings at St. Petersburg High .............................................. 8:40 a.m. Low ............................................. 12:49 a.m. High .............................................. 5:22 p.m. Low ............................................. 10:48 a.m. UV Index TodayThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, 0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m. 6 11 11 6 Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional SummaryShown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Five-Day forecast for Highlands County 87/78 Lake Levels Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 10.48 Normal ...............................................14.51 Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterdayTemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHigh Tuesday ......................................... 86 Low Tuesday .......................................... 51 High Wednesday .................................... 87 Low Wednesday .................................... 48 High Thursday ..................................... N.A. Low Thursday ...................................... N.A.Heat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayRelative humidity .................................. 40% Expected air temperature ....................... 90 Makes it feel like .................................... 92BarometerTuesday ...............................................29.83 Wednesday .........................................30.00 Thursday ...............................................N.A.PrecipitationTuesday ...............................................0.00Ž Wednesday .........................................0.00Ž Thursday .............................................0.00Ž Month to date ..................................... 3.55Ž Year to date ....................................... 13.58Ž wells motornew 6x10.5

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C M Y K SPORTS B SECTION News-Sun Sunday, May 22, 2011 News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Trey Frazier lead off Thursdays game with a home run to set the tone for Pool Paradises 13-0 win over Rotary to stay undefeated on the season. By LAUREN WELBORN Special to the News-SunSEBRING –Pool Paradise continues to power through their Dixie Ozone league schedule, piling up a baker’s dozen worth of runs Thursday night in their 13-0 win over Rotary at the Max Long Recreational Complex. Starting pitcher Josh Crouch would start the game strong with three staight strikeouts to get through the top of the first. Keeping the flow going, leadoff hitter Trey Frazier set the pace for the bottom of the inning with a home run. Apop fly on the infield j ust barely missed the diving reach of third baseman Dayvon Terry, granting Jimmy Peck the base. Later, a walk from Crouch put two runners on base as Daniel Simons stepped up to the plate. He responded to this opportunity with a ground ball up the middle to score Peck. One more hit, a double to right, was blasted by Jan Martinez to end the first inning at 4-0. However, Rotary pitcher Justin Bickman would not be discouraged just yet. The next inning of play was scoreless for both sides of the field as Bickman and Crouch both showed strong efforts on the mound. But as the bottom of the fourth rolled around, so did the bats of Pool Paradise. Seth Cannady, Peck and Crouch led off the inning with back-to-back-to-back home runs – not the first time the trio has turned that feat this season. Rotary continued in their efforts to fight back, but while there were few mistakes on the field, it was their tight defense versus the wellplaced and numerous hits of Pool Paradise. “We were on track; both our hitting and our pitching was on tonight,” explained coach Dean Frazier. Indeed it was. With one final hit, a Cannady grand slam, Pool Paradise settled the score at 13-0. Rotary persisted, however their efforts fell just a little short as with runners left on, the final outs were soon made and the game ended. In Dixie action for the 1314-year olds Thursday Publix came back from an early 4-0 deficit to top JWB Logistics 10-5 and keep its’own perfect record intact at 9-0 on the season. News-Sun Sports Editor Dan Hoehne contributed to this story. Pool Paradise puts on power show News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE Lake Placid head coach Jason Holden looks on as AJ Gayle hits the hole in Thursdays annual Green and White game. And Another Thing... Dan Hoehne My superstition knows no bounds when it comes to watching my favorite sports teams. We all do, to varying degrees, as sports fans, but we of the Chi-town ilk take ours from the pessimistic standpoint. Such as, by writing the column I did before the initial game of the Bulls, Heat series in the Eastern Conference Finals, I was writing it from the stance that, while there was some hope, the experts seemed to be jumping on the Miami bandwagon. But that I could take solace in the fact that at least the Chicago basketball team looked to be relevant again. Come time for game one, I had to have my balancing act, a show to watch and bounce back and forth from with the game. Started with the game, but the Heat went up big early – so it was back to the other show. Check back in a little while later, Miami was still up, but the Bulls were coming back and tied it at the half. Back to the other show for a while, then it was onto the Internet to play some of my favorite word games on Facebook. Would click over to Chicago fan logic MCTphoto The intensity that Udonis Haslem brought to the Heat in game two of the Eastern Conference Finals was key to Miamis win over Chicago. See HEAT, Page 3B MICHAELMAROT Associated PressINDIANAPOLIS — IndyCar drivers can’t afford to make a mistake Saturday. Otherwise, they might not get a second shot at the coveted Indianapolis 500 pole. With more than three dozen driver-car combinations lining up for two days of qualifications and rain in the forecast both days, drivers will have to take their best shot on their first, and perhaps, only attempt at the top qualifying spot. “You might only get one run,” said Scott Dixon, who won the 500 from the pole in 2008. “So you’re really going to have to focus on preparing yourself well, making sure that your first run is a good one. With 40 cars trying to qualify, it’s going to be a complete mess.” That would certainly fit with this month’s theme. Rain completely washed out practice Sunday and Wednesday, kept all but one car off the track Tuesday and cut last Saturday’s practice short by 2 1/2 hours. The limited track time — and the potential for more rain to eliminate any additional practice between qualifying attempts this weekend — has teams revising their schedules and recalculating to see how they can safely make the field Saturday. Team Penske president Tim Cindric, for instance, used most of Friday’s sixhour practice session to work on race setup for the team’s three drivers. When they finally switched to qualifying setup late in the day, threetime winner and four-time pole-sitter Helio Castroneves vaulted to the top of the speed chart with a fast lap of 228.611 mph. No surprise there. Castroneves, the former “Dancing With The Stars” champ acknowledged he did get a tow on that lap. But in Indy’s unique qualifying format, one good lap simply isn’t enough. Cars are positioned on the 33-car starting grid based on four-lap averages. The nine fastest cars Saturday can then participate in a 90-minute shootout at the end of the day. None of those nine will start lower the No. 9 spot — the outside of Row 3 — Indy drivers gear up for wild qualifying weekend See INDY, Page 4B APphoto by Michael Conroy IndyCar driver Alex Tagliani, of Canada, drives into the first turn during practice for the Indianapolis 500 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Friday. News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE Demetrius Moore tries to break out of the horse-collar grasp of Devonta Chisolm Thursday night during Lake Placids annual Green and White game at Roger Scarborough Memorial Stadium. By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comLAKE PLACID – The Green Dragons held their annual Green and White spring scrimmage on Thursday at Roger Scarborough Memorial Field, and the evening held little in the way of surprises. “We need to work on conditioning, we have only had three weeks at this, but other than that, we are where I Green and White kicks off Spring season See DRAGONS, Page 4B

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C M Y K SFCC Summer Youth CampsAVONPARK – South Florida Panther Baseball will be holding Summer Youth Camps from June 13-16 and June 20-23 for children aged 6-13. Camps run from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and cost $80 per camp or $150 for both. Registration and sign-in begin at 8 a.m. with the camp to follow, including baseball fundamentals, position instruction, station rotation, games, swimming pool time and a camp T-shirt. SFCC head coach Rick Hitt will serve as camp director with Panther assistant coach Andy Polk and members of the Panther baseball team will be on hand as instructors. Campers should bring their individual baseball attire as well as a bathing suit and towel. The camps will be held at the SFCC Panther field at the Highlands County campus in Avon Park. For more information, call Coach Hitt at the following campus phone numbers at extension 7036: Avon Park/Sebring, 453-6661; Lake Placid, 465-5300; Arcadia, 494-7500; Wauchula, 773-2252.SFCC Fun CampsAVON PARK – SFCC Athleticswill host a Two Day Fun Sport Selection camp on Thursday and Friday, June 9 and 10 for girls and boys aged 6-16. Each day the camp runs from 9 a.m.-3 p.m., with campers choosing their own sport, whether Beach Volleyball, Basketball, Baseball, Softball or Soccer. During the morning portion each day, campers will stretch, do plyometrics, agility drills, work on strength and flexibility, learn arm and body care and get introduced to the Fitness Center. Lunch is then provided with the campers then delving into the sport they chose and wrapping it up with activities in the SFCC pool. Registration and check-in from 8:158:55 a.m., and pre-registration is not necessary as walk-ups are accepted. The rate for one day is $50 and $95 for both days. The camp will be aministered by SFCC head and assistant coaches, with help from SFCC student-athletes. For questions or more information, contact Camp Director and SFCC Athletic Director Rick Hitt at 7847036.Dragon Summer HoopsLAKEPLACID – Green Dragon Basketball will be holding its’annual summer camp from June 13-17 at the Lake Placid High School Gymnasium for boys and girls in grades 2-8. Camp will run each day from 8 a.m.-4 p.m., with the final day ending at Noon. Cost of the camp is $65 and all campers will receive a Dragon Basketball camp Tshirt. Campers can bring lunch or purchase lunch items at camp concessions each day. Drinks and other snacks will be available at a reasonable cost. Half-day options are also available. Call or text Linda Veley for details and other information at 441-0299, or email veley131@comcast.net.Help for Haiti 5KSEBRING – A5K run/walk to support Haiti Bible Mission’s outreach to provide educational support, orphan care and humanitarian assistance in Haiti will be held Saturday, May 28 at Highlands Hammock State Park. Entry fee is $20 through May 22 and $25 the day of the race. The run will start at 8 a.m. For more information, contact Tim Baker at 381-0701 or Chet Brojek at 3854736, or cbrojek@comcast.net to pre-register.Lake Placid Youth BowlingLAKE PLACID – The Royal Palms Youth Bowling League, for ages 7 and up, begins its’new season Saturday, Sept. 3. The sign-up fee is $25, which includes a shirt, and new bowlers are welcome. Bowling is every Saturday morning at 9 a.m. through December 10. Weekly cost is $11 and includes three games of bowling, shoes and prize fund. All Youth Bowlers are also eligible for reduced rate open bowling, though some restrictions may apply, and free bowling with instruction on Friday’s from 4-6 p.m. – must be accompanied by an adult. For more information, call Frank Peterson at 382-9541, or Donna Stanley at 441-4897.A.P. Fishing DerbyAVONPARK – The Avon Park Air Force Range Fish, Wildlife and Outdoor Recreation Program and the Winter Haven Kiwanis Club are having their 7th Annual Fishing Derby Saturday, June 4 for boys and girls aged 16 and under, accompanied by parent or legal guardian. Registration will be from 7-8:30 a.m., at the Outdoor Recreation office in building 600, with fishing from 9-11 a.m. with weigh-in, contests, lunch and awards immediately following. Trophies will be awarded in four age classes with hot dogs, chips and soda provided by the Breakfast Rotary of Avon Park and the Winter Haven Kiwanis Club. For more information, call 452-4254 o r visit www.avonparkafr.net .Firecracker 5KSEBRING – The 17th Annual Firecracker 5K Run/Walk is set fo r Monday, July 4 at the Highlands Hammock State Park at 7:30 a.m. The annual run to celebrate the nation’s birthday will feature plaques for overall, master and grand master male and female winners, age group awards in 5-year age divisions, technical tee shirts and plenty of ice-cold watermelon and other refreshments for runners. Entry fee is $20 thru June 27 and $25 from June 28 thru race day registration. Tee shirts guaranteed to only the firs t 200 entrants, so sign up early! Those desiring an entry form may email cbrojek@comcast.net or call Chet Brojek at 385-4736. Mail your checks made payable to Central Florida Striders, along with the signed application, to Chet Brojek, 3310 Par Road, Sebring, FL33872. Each year we urge runners and walkers to wear red, white and blue on race day and to entry early as we always have a large turnout for our nation’s birthday celebration. The race benefits the boys’and girls’ cross country teams at Avon Park High School.Panther Volleyball CampsAVONPARK – This summer the South Florida Community College volleyball program has more camps to offer than ever before. If there is a camp date that you could attend but the age group is different than yours please call and special arrangements could be made. Individual private sessions for indoo r and sand are available year-round. Call/Email to schedule today! June 2011 Sand:13-16 (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:30-10:30 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor:1316 (4 days) MondayThursday, 11:30-1:30 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 –Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps June 13-16: $100 July 2011 Sand:11-14 (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:30 -10:30 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor:11-14 (4 days) MondayThursday, 11:30-1:30 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 –Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps July 11-14: $100 Indoor: 25-28 (4 days) MondayThursday Morning Session (Grades 5-8) 9:3011:30 a.m. $60 Afternoon Session (Grades 9-12) 24:30 p.m. $75 Contact Coach Crawford with any questions a t kim.crawford@southflorida.edu cell: 863-835-2377, or Office: 863-784-7037.Sebring Summer SwimSEBRING– The summer season fo r swimming is upon us as the Sebring High School pool is open to the public. Pool hours for open swim will be 67:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1-3 p.m. Saturday’s and Sunday’s – additional hours will be added once school is out. Cost is $2 per swimmer with big savings for frequent swimmers. Afamily pass can be bought for $50 fo r the first swimmer and $15 for each additional family member. Swimming lessons will also be available with four separate sessions throughout the summer for eight differents levels o f instruction, ranging from Adult Beginner, Parent and Tot, Fundamentals, Introduction to Water Skills, Pre-School Aquatics, Fundamental Aquatic Skills, Stroke Development, Improvment and Refinement, Personal Water Safety and Diving Fundamentals and Fitness. Session I runs from June 13-24, session II from June 27-July 8, session III from July 11-22 and session IVfrom July 25August 5. Water aerobics return as well, with certified instructor Ricki Albritton, Tuesday’s and Thursday’s from 6:30-7:30 p.m. Cost is just $2 per workout, or just $1 i f you have the Summer Swim Pass – the firs t class is Thursday, May 5. Summer swim lesson sign up will be Monday May 23 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. and Saturday, May 28 from 9-10:30 a.m. in the front office at Sebring High School. For questions call 471-5500 ext. 228 and leave a message for Pat Caton. FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEChicago 4, Indiana 1 Miami 4, Philadelphia 1 Boston 4, New York 0 Atlanta 4, Orlando 2WESTERN CONFERENCEMemphis 4, San Antonio 2 L.A. Lakers 4, New Orleans 2 Dallas 4, Portland 2 Oklahoma City 4, Denver 1 ___ CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7)EASTERN CONFERENCEChicago 4, Atlanta 2 Miami 4, Boston 1WESTERN CONFERENCEDallas 4, L.A. Lakers 0 Oklahoma City 4, Memphis 3 CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7)EASTERN CONFERENCEChicago 1, Miami 1 Chicago 103, Miami 82 Wednesday: Miami 85, Chicago 75 Sunday: Chicago at Miami, 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 24: Chicago at Miami, 8:30 p.m. x-Thursday, May 26: Miami at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. x-Saturday, May 28: Chicago at Miami, 8:30 p.m. x-Monday, May 30: Miami at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.WESTERN CONFERENCEDallas 1, Oklahoma City 1 Dallas 121, Oklahoma City 112 Thursday: Oklahoma City 106, Dallas 100 Saturday: Dallas at Oklahoma City, late Monday, May 23: Dallas at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 25: Oklahoma City at Dallas, 9 p.m. x-Friday, May 27: Dallas at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, May 29: Oklahoma City at Dallas, 9 p.m. FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEWashington 4, New York Rangers 1 Philadelphia 4, Buffalo 3 Boston 4, Montreal 3 Tampa Bay 4, Pittsburgh 3WESTERN CONFERENCEVancouver 4, Chicago 3 San Jose 4, Los Angeles 2 Detroit 4, Phoenix 0 Nashville 4, Anaheim 2 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7)EASTERN CONFERENCETampa Bay 4, Washington 0 Boston 4, Philadelphia 0WESTERN CONFERENCEVancouver 4, Nashville 2 San Jose 4, Detroit 3 CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7)EASTERN CONFERENCEBoston 2, Tampa Bay 1 Tampa Bay 5, Boston 2 Tuesday: Boston 6, Tampa Bay 5 Thursday: Boston 2, Tampa Bay 0 Saturday: Boston at Tampa Bay, late x-Monday, May 23: Tampa Bay at Boston, 8 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 25: Boston at Tampa Bay, 8 p.m. x-Friday, May 27: Tampa Bay at Boston, 8 p.m.WESTERN CONFERENCEVancouver 2, San Jose 1 Vancouver 3, San Jose 2 Wednesday: Vancouver 7, San Jose 3 Friday: San Jose 4, Vancouver 3 Sunday, May 22: Vancouver at San Jose, 3 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 24: San Jose at Vancouver, 9 p.m. x-Thursday, May 26: Vancouver at San Jose, 9 p.m. x-Saturday, May 28: San Jose at Vancouver, 8 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUEEAST WLPCTGB Tampa Bay2520.556„ Boston2420.5451‡2New York2320.5351 Toronto2222.50021‡2Baltimore1924.4425 Central Division WLPctGB Cleveland2715.643„ Detroit2222.5006 Kansas City2222.5006 Chicago2026.4359 Minnesota1528.349121‡2West Division WLPctGB Texas2322.511„ Los Angeles2323.5001‡2Oakland2223.4891 Seattle2024.45521‡2___Thursdays Games Minnesota 11, Oakland 1 Seattle 2, L.A. Angels 1 N.Y. Yankees 13, Baltimore 2 Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 2 Boston 4, Detroit 3 Chicago White Sox 8, Cleveland 2 Kansas City 2, Texas 1, 10 innings Fridays Games Cleveland 5, Cincinnati 4 Pittsburgh 10, Detroit 1 N.Y. Mets 2, N.Y. Yankees 1 Philadelphia 3, Texas 2 Washington 17, Baltimore 5 Houston 5, Toronto 2 Boston 15, Chicago Cubs 5 Florida 5, Tampa Bay 3 L.A. Dodgers 6, Chicago White Sox 4, 10 innings Kansas City 3, St. Louis 0 Arizona 8, Minnesota 7 L.A. Angels 9, Atlanta 0 Seattle 4, San Diego 1 San Francisco 2, Oakland 1, 10 innings Saturdays Games Houston at Toronto, late L.A. Dodgers at Chicago White Sox, late St. Louis at Kansas City, late Cincinnati at Cleveland, late Washington at Baltimore, late Tampa Bay at Florida, late Detroit at Pittsburgh, late Chicago Cubs at Boston, late N.Y. Mets at N.Y. Yankees, late Oakland at San Francisco, late Texas at Philadelphia, late Atlanta at L.A. Angels, late Seattle at San Diego, late Minnesota at Arizona, late Sundays Games Cincinnati at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m. Houston at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. Tampa Bay at Florida, 1:10 p.m. Detroit at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m. Texas at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m. Washington at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. St. Louis at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m. Atlanta at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m. Oakland at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Seattle at San Diego, 4:05 p.m. Minnesota at Arizona, 4:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Boston, 8:05 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST WLPCTGB Philadelphia2717.614„ Florida2518.58111‡2Atlanta2522.53231‡2New York2222.5005 Washington2123.4776 Central Division WLPctGB St. Louis2620.565„ Cincinnati2520.5561‡2Milwaukee2223.48931‡2Pittsburgh2123.4774 Chicago1924.44251‡2Houston1629.35691‡2West Division WLPctGB San Francisco2519.568„ Colorado2320.53511‡2Arizona2123.4774 Los Angeles2125.4575 San Diego1926.42261‡2___ Thursdays Games Pittsburgh 5, Cincinnati 3 N.Y. Mets 1, Washington 0 St. Louis 4, Houston 2 Colorado 7, Philadelphia 1 Chicago Cubs 5, Florida 1 Arizona 2, Atlanta 1 San Diego 1, Milwaukee 0 San Francisco 3, L.A. Dodgers 1 Fridays Games Cleveland 5, Cincinnati 4 Pittsburgh 10, Detroit 1 N.Y. Mets 2, N.Y. Yankees 1 Philadelphia 3, Texas 2 Washington 17, Baltimore 5 Houston 5, Toronto 2 Boston 15, Chicago Cubs 5 Florida 5, Tampa Bay 3 Milwaukee 7, Colorado 6, 14 innings L.A. Dodgers 6, Chicago White Sox 4, 10 innings Kansas City 3, St. Louis 0 Arizona 8, Minnesota 7 L.A. Angels 9, Atlanta 0 Seattle 4, San Diego 1 San Francisco 2, Oakland 1, 10 innings Saturdays Games Houston at Toronto, late L.A. Dodgers at Chicago White Sox, late St. Louis at Kansas City, late Cincinnati at Cleveland, late Washington at Baltimore, late Tampa Bay at Florida, late Detroit at Pittsburgh, late Chicago Cubs at Boston, late Colorado at Milwaukee, late N.Y. Mets at N.Y. Yankees, late Oakland at San Francisco, late Texas at Philadelphia, late Atlanta at L.A. Angels, late Seattle at San Diego, late Minnesota at Arizona, late Sundays Games Cincinnati at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m. Houston at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. Tampa Bay at Florida, 1:10 p.m. Detroit at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m. Texas at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m. Washington at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m. Colorado at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. St. Louis at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m. Atlanta at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m. Oakland at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Seattle at San Diego, 4:05 p.m. Minnesota at Arizona, 4:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Boston, 8:05 p.m.BASEBALLAmerican League TAMPA BAY RAYS…Reinstated LHP J.P. Howell from the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of OF Justin Ruggiano from Durham. Optioned RHP Rob Delaney to Durham. Designated INF Dan Johnson for assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS…Placed RHP Jesse Litsch on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 19. SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD A U T O R A C I N G SU N D A Y 2 2 p m NASCAR … Iowa 250. . . . . . . . . A B C 6 : 3 0 0 p m NHRA … America Pro Modified Series. E S P N 2 7 7 p m NHRA Summer Nationals . . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 2N H L L P L A Y O F F S SU N D A Y 3 3 p m Vancouver at San Jose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N B CM A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L SU N D A Y 1 1 p m Tampa Bay at Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S U N 1 1 p m N.Y. Mets at N.Y. Yankees . . . . . . . . . . . . . T B S 2 2 p m L.A. Dodgers at Chicago White Sox . . . . W G N 8 8 p m Chicago Cubs at Boston . . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P NMO N D A Y 7 7 p m Boston at Cleveland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 2 7 7 p m Tampa Bay at Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S U NTU E S D A Y 7 7 p m Tampa Bay at Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S U N 8 8 p m N.Y. Mets at Chicago Cubs . . . . . . . . . . . W G NT E N N I S SU N D A Y 1 1 p m French Open, First Round . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 2TU E S D A Y N o o n French Open, First Round . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 2 1 0 : 3 0 0 p m NCAA Team Championship . . . . . . . . . E S P N 2 Times, games, channels all subject to change C O L L E G E B A S E B A L L SU N D A Y 9 9 a m Kentucky at Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S U NG O L F SU N D A Y 9 9 a m EuroPGA … Volvo World Match Play . . . . G O L F 1 1 p m PGA … BMW Charity Pro-Am . . . . . . . . . G O L F 2 2 p m Junior Invitationa at Sage Valley . . . . . . . C B S 3 3 p m PGA … Crowne Plaza Invitational . . . . . . . C B S 4 : 3 0 0 p m LPGA … Sybase Match Play . . . . . . . . . . . G O L FN B A A P L A Y O F F S SU N D A Y 8 : 3 0 0 p m Chicago at Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T N TMO N D A Y 9 9 p m Dallas at Oklahoma City . . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P NTU E S D A Y 8 : 3 0 0 p m Chicago at Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T N TP R E M I E R L E A G U E S O C C E R SU N D A Y 1 0 : 5 5 5 a m Manchester United vs. Blackpool . . . . . E S P N 2C O L L E G E S O F T B A L L SU N D A Y 1 1 p m NCAA Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 3 : 3 0 0 p m NCAA Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P P N LIVESPORTSONTV NBA Playoffs NHL Playoffs Transactions Major League Baseball Page 2BNews-Sun Sunday, May 22, 2011www.newssun.co m

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C M Y K www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011Page 3B DUMMY 09; 11.25"; 7"; Black plus one; spot green,golf page DUMMY 09; 11.25"; 7"; Black plus one; spot green,golf page By HARRYR. WEBER Associated Press Randy “Macho Man” Savage, a larger-than-life personality from professional wrestling’s 1980s flyingelbow heyday known for his raspy voice, brash style and the young woman named Miss Elizabeth who often accompanied him, died in a car crash Friday in Florida. He was 58. AFlorida Highway Patrol crash report said the former wrestler — whose legal name was Randy Mario Poffo — was driving a Jeep Wrangler when he lost control in Pinellas County around 9:25 a.m. The Jeep veered over the raised concrete median divider, crossed over the eastbound lanes and crashed head-on into a tree. Police said he may have suffered a “medical event” before the accident, but the report did not elaborate, and it said officials would need to perform an autopsy to know for sure. The report said a woman in the vehicle, identified as Barbara L. Poffo, 56, suffered minor injuries. Astatement from Stamford, Conn.-based World Wrestling Entertainment said the passenger was the wrestler’s current wife. Both were wearing their seatbelts, according to the police report. “Poffo will be greatly missed by WWE and his fans,” the statement said. Savage was a charismatic wrestler made famous for his “Macho Man” nickname and his “Oooh Yeah!” catchphrase. He was a champion in Vince McMahon’s World Wrestling Federation, and later Ted Turner’snowdefunct World Championship Wrestling. Poffo was under contract with WWE from 1985 to 1993 and held both the WWE and Intercontinental Championships. “Our sincerest condolences go out to his family and friends. We wish a speedy recovery to his wife,” WWE said. Savage defined the megawatt personalities of the 1980s World Wrestling Federation (now WWE). He wore sequined robes bejeweled with “Macho Man” on the back, rainbowcolored cowboy hats and colorful bandanas and oversized sunglasses, part of a unique look that helped build the WWF into a mainstream phenomenon. For most of his career, his valet, Miss Elizabeth, was by his side. The woman, Elizabeth Hulette, was his real-life wife at the time. They later divorced, and Hulette died in 2003 at 42 in what was later ruled a prescription drug overdose. Savage’s death was not the first to catch the wrestling world by surprise. Chris Benoit killed his wife and son and then committed suicide in their Georgia home in 2007; Benoit was 40. Eddie Guerrero was 38 when he died of a heart attack in 2005 after a history of alcohol and drug problems. Curt “Mr. Perfect” Hennig died of a cocaine overdose in 2003 at 44. That same year, Michael “Road Warrior Hawk” Hegstrand died from a heart attack at 46. He had battled alcohol and drugs, as well as steroids. In 1999, wrestler Owen Hart, 33, was killed when he fell from an apparatus as he was being lowered into the ring from the ceiling of Kemper Arena in Kansas City, Mo. The WWF made Savage their champion after a win over Ted DiBiase in the main event at WrestleMania in 1988. Savage had not appeared for a major wrestling organization since 2004, when he performed for Total Nonstop Action. He was at times both the most popular and most hated wrestler in entertainment. His flying elbow off the top rope was mimicked by basement and backyard wrestlers everywhere. Savage made good use of his deep, raspy voice as a corporate pitchman as well, for years ordering Slim Jim fans to “Snap into a Slim Jim!” He’s most known for his legendary rivalries with Hulk Hogan, Ricky Steamboat and Ric Flair. Wrestlers took to Twitter to let fans know Savage won’t be forgotten. “There’s probably five or six of us, with Andre (the Giant) and Hogan and thankfully myself and Flair, that, when their names pop up, even if you’re not a fan, you know who in the hell these people are,” said former wrestler and WWE Hall of Famer Dusty Rhodes. “You say, ‘I know this guy. I know Macho Man Randy Savage.’ He was part of that breed. We lost a good one.” Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson hailed Savage as one of his childhood inspirations and heroes, while Mick “Cactus Jack” Foley called Savage “one of my favorite performers.” Hogan said he and Savage had just started talking again after 10 years. “He had so much life in his eyes and in his spirit, I just pray that he’s happy and in a better place and we miss him,” Hogan wrote. While so many personalities who left the WWF forWCWlike Hogan, Roddy Piper and Mean Gene Okerlund were welcomed back to the company and even inducted into the Hall of Fame, Savage never returned. Rhodes said Savage had prudently saved his money and was content to remain out of the spotlight. “He was a recluse, almost,” Rhodes said by phone. “Whatever he was doing, he wanted that privacy. Yeah, he was out of the picture for 10 years, but he didn’t want to be in the picture.” Savage was a minor league catcher in the 1970s for St. Louis and Cincinnati before turning in the uniform for tights. His father, Angelo Poffo, was a longtime wrestler, and his brother, “Leaping” Lanny Poffo, was also a 1980s WWF mainstay. Condolences from fans poured in to Lanny Poffo’s Facebook page on Friday. Funeral arrangements were not immediately available. Follow Harry R. Weber at http://www.facebook.com/Harry RWeberAP AP Sports Writer Dan Gelston in Philadelphia contributed to this report. Photo courtesy of www.mediaman.com.au Known for his flying elbow drops and rivalry with Hulk Hogan, Randy Macho ManŽ Savage was a mainstay of professional wrestling in the 80s. Wrestler known as Macho Man dies in Fla. wreck ESPN.com every so often to check on the score. Saw the Bulls up a few midway through the third. Great news, but way too early to commit myself to go watch and perhaps jinx them. Checking back again later, the lead was now in double digits with over seven minutes left in the game – still WAYtoo early in my book. When I saw they were up 18 around the twominute mark, then I felt safe and went back to the TVto happily watch Taj Gibson’s thunderous putback dunk. I didn’t write a followup column after the win, which of course, now I think jinxed the team in the second game of the series, which I also sporadically watched until giving up early in the fourth quarter. It will be tough, getting a game or two down here though the Miami crowds haven’t exactly been all that loud, but the Heat are tough at home. And with Udonis Haslem back and providin g the hard-nosed intensity that the team seemed to b e lacking in game one, things could get very diff icult for the Bulls. Of course, I say this with the full expectation o f the experts being right, that the Heat are fulfilling their pre-season predictions and my Chicago team is a mere stepping stone at this point. All in the hopes that this pessimistic outlook will work in a reverse-psychology sort of fashion. And there I will be Sunday, taking it all in as I watch – sporadically. Dan Hoehne is the Sports Editor of the News-Sun. He can be reached at daniel.hoehne@newssun.com Continued from 1B Heat a lock for Finals … apparently Associated PressMIAMI — Left-hander J.P. Howell returned to the mound Friday for the Tampa Bay Rays, one year and one day after he underwent surgery to repair a left shoulder injury that sidelined him all of last season. Hours after being activated, Howell pitched a scoreless sixth inning in the Rays’5-3 loss at Florida. “It’s not as fun when you lose, but it’s still a great time,” he said. Howell led all majorleague relievers with 13 wins in 2008-09. He was a key member of Tampa Bay’s ALchampionship team in 2008 and had 17 saves in 2009. “He’s very valuable to us,” manager Joe Maddon said. “I can visualize him pitching like he did a couple of years ago and being that crucial to our success.” The Rays also optioned right-hander Rob Delaney to Triple-ADurham. Outfielder Justin Ruggiano’s contract was selected from Durham, and infielder Dan Johnson was designated for assignment. Maddon said the Rays hope to keep Johnson in the organization. Ruggiano hit .301 with six homers and 11 stolen bases in 37 games fo r Durham. Howell prepared for his return by pitching nine times during a rehabilitation stint, most recently Tuesday for Class A Charlotte. After pitching against the Marlins, he said his shoulder felt fine. “I’ve still got a little adrenaline,” he said. “I think it’s a good sign what I feel right now, but the nex t day tells you a lot more.” Howell bolsters a bullpen that already ranked fourth in the ALwith a 3.20 ERA heading into the start of a weekend series against the Florida Marlins. LHP Howell activated by Rays

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C M Y K Page 4BNews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011www.newssun.com JOHN PALMER ELECTRIC; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 05/20, 05/22, 05/25 YMCA; 3.639"; 5"; Black; 05/22/11 E.O. KOCH CONSTRUCTION CO.; 5.542"; 4"; Black; 05/22/11 p/u JOHN PALMER ELECTRIC; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 05/20, 05/22, 05/25 YMCA; 3.639"; 5"; Black; 05/22/11 E.O. KOCH CONSTRUCTION CO.; 5.542"; 4"; Black; 05/22/11 p/u MyFWC.comFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) K-9 Gauge used his keen sense of smell to alert officers that an illegal catch was onboard a vessel. Gauge, a 3-year-old black Labrador certified in wildlife detection, sniffed out 15 undersized lobster tails and other illegal catch hidden inside a boat’s console during a recent joint law enforcement detail at the Blackpoint Marina in MiamiDade County. On May 7, FWC officers were inspecting boats returning to the marina. During one inspection, Gauge indicated that there was something suspicious in the boat's center console. Officers opened the console door and found a canvas bag with lobster tails sticking out. Officers inventoried the contents of the bag and found 15 undersized spiny lobster tails, three undersized red grouper, three punctured blue crabs and 11 undersized hogfish. Orlando Guerra (DOB 09/22/50) of Miami is facing eight misdemeanor charges. “The FWC is fortunate to have three K-9 teams in South Florida,” said Lt. Jay Marvin, who organized the detail. “The specially trained K-9s work closely with officers, allowing us to track down fish and wildlife law violators.” FWC K-9 sniffs out lobster poacher at Miami marina MyFWC photo K-9 Gauge sniffed out this illegal catch May 7 at a Miami marina. for the May 29 race. The remaining nine starting spots will be filled Sunday. Once 33 cars are in the field, non-qualified cars can begin bumping their way in. Add more rain to the mix, and it could make for the wildest, wackiest qualifying weekends seen in Indy in years. “All my experience here, I never had this type of a scenario with so many cars going around the track,” said three-time winner and fourtime pole sitter Helio Castroneves. Who’s in position to take the pole at this centennial celebration? Of course, Castroneves is one of the favorites. He’s qualified in the top 10 each of his last eight years and among the top five in six straight years. Some of the other usual suspects are there, too. New Zealand’s Dixon was third fastest Friday at 228.181 — one of six drivers over 228. Castroneves’teammates — Ryan Briscoe and Will Power — also should compete for the pole. Power, of Australia, has won all four poles this season, leads the point standings and turned the fastest lap Thursday at 227.778. Briscoe, another Aussie, was fourth-fastest Friday at 228.029. But there are plenty of potential surprises lurking. Three lesser-known drivers — Canada’s Alex Tagliani and Americans Ed Carpenter and Townsend Bell — have consistently run among the leaders all week. At one point Friday, those three had the three best laps. Tagliani, driving for Sam Schmidt Motorsports, finished just behind Castroneves at 228.327. Bell, his teammate, slid to eighth 227.927. Carpenter, driving for Sarah Fisher Racing, was sixth at 228.017, while Belgium’s Bertrand Baguette was fifth at 228.028. Defending champion Dario Franchitti, Dixon’s teammate with Target Chip Ganassi, takes the 11th fastest car into the weekend after clocking a 227.432. And Michael Andretti’s team has struggled most of this week. Of his five drivers, his son, Marco, was only 15th at 226.851. Danica Patrick was 20th at 226.267. What does all this mean? “I think it’s going to be very difficult to do a 228.3 average lap, but it will have to be up there on a one-lap go,” Tagliani said. “We feel like we’re strong, but it looks like on a no-tow chart, there’s a lot of cars that are quite strong. So it’s very difficult to have a pretty good read.” The other big factor could be the draw. Taglinai will be the fourth car on the track. Baguette will be the No. 7 car out. Bell drew the 46th spot and Castroneves at 53. Dixon has the 57 spot and Carpenter drew No. 73. Those going out in the first hour could have a big advantage with a slightly cooler track. Temperatures are forecast to hit 80 degrees on Saturday. That means drivers will be fine-tuning during the morning practice and will likely continue making changes during the one-hour break between the end of practice and the start of qualifying a t 11 a.m. HVM Racing is still trying to figure out whethe r Switzerland’s Simona De Silvestro will be able to drive after burning both of he r hands in a crash Thursday. She has not yet been cleared to drive, though the team has not hired a replacement driver. All of it has created complexity to an already nerveracking weekend. “I think with 41 or 42 cars, it takes about 6 minutes pe r car, so if we start at 11 o’clock sharp, it could be 3 o’clock without a break,” said Roger Penske, who has won 16 poles and 15 races a t Indy as an owner, both records. “You’re not going to have a chance to go back out. The top 24 will end up being selected tomorrow, and you want to be sure you’re in the field.” Or have a chance at making history on the race’s centennial anniversary. “This place is fantastic, it’s awesome, it’s tough,” said Castroneves, who is trying for an unprecedented third straight pole. “I’m going to focus on what I need to make it work so that we can put the Shell V-Power in the No. 1 spot.” Continued from 1B Indy 500 field is revving up for race Packing a punch News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Jan Martinez powers this pitch to the right field wall for a double in Pool Paradises 13-0 win over Rotary in Dixie Ozone action Thursday night. ‘The top 24 will end up being selected tomorrow, and you want to be sure you’re in the field.’RogerPenske IndyCarowner expected us to be,” said Lake Placid head coach Jason Holden. The teams, according to Holden, were a mix of varsity and junior varsity, divided as evenly as possible, and was so matched that neither side could seem to get an advantage during the full-game scrimmage. The three scores came solely from field goals. “Our passing was what I expected. I am happy with our execution,” said Holden about the new triple-option offense. Holden changed the Dragon offense to the triple-threat option this season to take advantage of a deep backfield led by A.J. Gayle. Gayle seemed to start off slow, but picked up momentum near the end of the scrimmage bursting for 10 yards at a time. “The guys seem to be picking it up. We ran our assignments pretty well. I am very happy with the performance tonight,” Holden added. “We made smart choices when it came to the option, and we are reading well.” “We have only had three weeks of practice for this, but I think we are coming along nicely. Everyone wants to be out here and they have worked hard. I think we need a little more work in some areas, but we are ready for next week,” Holden continued. “I saw some really good things tonight, and we looked pretty solid all the way around.” The Dragons face-off against Avon Park on Friday, May 27 in a fullout spring game in Lake Placid. The game starts at 7 p.m. Continued from 1B Dragons set to face Devils Friday News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE Nick Tuason, #23, tries his best to bring down Travarian W illiams in Thursdays Green and White game. The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN By TIM REYNOLDS Associated PressMIAMI — They were bloodied, bruised and battered. Just about everyone had icepacks strapped to various regions of their bodies, and many all but limped toward the bus out of the arena. That was the Miami scene after Game 2 of the Eastern Conference finals. Imagine what the losing team must have felt like. The East finals resume with Game 3 in Miami on Sunday night, when the Heat host the Chicago Bulls with a 2-1 series lead at stake. Nearly 96 hours will have passed without a game by tipoff and both sides likely could use the rest after such a physical Game 2, when Miami knotted the series with an 85-75 win. Bulls guard and reigning NBAMVPDerrick Rose says Sunday is a must-win for Chicago, “no matter what.” Heat, Bulls expect another physical test in Game 3

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C M Y K The Community Calendar provides a brief listing of local clubs and organizations who meet on a regular basis. It is the responsibility of the group to update the News-Sunon any changes in this listing by calling 385-6155, ext. 516; send any changes by e-mail toeditor@newssun.com;or mail them to News-SunCommunity Calendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870. S UNDAY American Legion Post 25 Lake Placid has lounge hours from 1-9 p.m. Live music is from 5-8 p.m. For details, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Members and guests only. Post is at 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Call 471-1448. Inerstate chapter of A.B.A.T.E. meets the last Sunday of every month at The Blue Crab, 825 Ridgewood Dr., Sebring at 11 a.m. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 lounge is open from 1-7 p.m. Card games start at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has karaoke in the pavilion. Horseshoes played at 9:30 a.m. Food available at 4 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Cards start at 4 p.m. Music outside Tiki Hut at 3 p.m. Lodge phone number 452-0579. Overeaters Anonymous, meets from 4-5 p.m. in second floor conference roomNo. 3 at Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center, 4200 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring. For details, call 382-7731. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. For details on the organization, go to www.oa.org. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves lunch at 2 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 offers NASCAR racing in the pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar open and kitchen open from 25 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 655-3920. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 serves hamburgers from 4-5:30 p.m. and plays poker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 Karaoke is from 5-8 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 385-8902. MONDAY Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN WITH ME family group meets at 10:30 a.m. every Monday at the Heartland Christian Church on Alt. 27 in Sebring. The church is behind Southgate Shopping Center where Publix is. For more information call 3855714. Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal Church, Lakeshore Drive, Sebring. For more details, call 385-8807. Alcoholics Anonymous One Day At ATime group meets for a closed discussion at 9:30 a.m. Monday and Friday at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 4500 Sun N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. For details, call 314-0891. Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 6:30 p.m. at Rosewood Center, 517 U.S. 27 South, Lake Placid. Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 202-0647. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 12-9 p.m. For details, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. Call 4711448. AmVets Post 21 plays darts at 7:30 p.m. for members and guests. For details, call 3850234. Avon Park Lakes Association has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m. The clubhouse is at 2714 Nautilus Drive in Avon Park. Boy Scout Troop 482 meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave., Lake Placid. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. For details, call 385-8118. Diabetes Support Group meets the second and fourth Monday from 1-2:30 p.m. in Florida Hospital Conference Room 3 in Sebring. Call 4020177 for guest speaker list. Dual Diagnosed (Addiction and Mental Health) Support Group meets from 7-8:30 p.m. the fourth Monday at 4023 Sun 'N Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 386-5687. Florida Association Home and Community Education meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly on Mondays at The AgriCenter. The group of sewers and crafters make items for residents of adult congregate living facilities. Call Penny Bucher at 385-0949. Garden Club of Sebring meets noon, fourth Monday, Sebring Civic Center. Grand Prix Cloggers EZ Intermediate and Intermediate Clogging class are held at 9 a.m. every Monday at Reflections on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club meets the second and fourth Monday at the Sebring Country Estates Civic Association clubhouse, 3240 Grand Prix Drive (down the street from Wal-Mart). Dancing will be held every month until April 2008. Classes are being started now in the Sebring and Lake Placid area. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or visit the Web site at www.samdun.net.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September.Heartland Pops rehearses at 7 p.m. Mondays at Avon Park High School Band Room, 700 E. Main St., under the direction of Anthony Jones. Musicians of all ages are welcome. For information, call 314-8877. Highlands County Concert Band rehearses 7-9 p.m. every Monday at Sebring High School band room. All musicians are welcome. Vic Anderson, musical director. Call Bill Varner at 386-0855. Highlands County Democratic Executive Committee meets 7 p.m. fourth Monday in the Democratic Party Headquarters, 4216 Sebring Parkway, Sebring. For details, call 699-6052. Highlands County Sewing Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Highlands County AgriCivic Center in the 4-H laboratory, Sebring. For details, call 402-6540. Highlands Sertoma Club meets noon, Takis Family Restaurant, Sebring. Highlands County Senior Squadron, Civil Air Patrol the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary meets the second and fourth Monday nights at the Sebring Airport Terminal Building. All are welcome. For further information, call 471-1433 between 4 and 7 p.m. Lake Placid American Legion Post 25 meets 8 p.m., Legion hall. Lake Placid Art League will have classes in Drawing and Painting, conducted by Anne Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart will teach Fabric Painting at the center. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2 p.m. Sign up for darts is at 6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m. It is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m. Let It Begin With Me Alanon Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Monday at Heartland Christian Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South, Sebring. For details about Alanon, a self-help group for families and friends of alcoholics, call 385-5714. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. National Association for the Advancement of the Colored People, Highlands County Branch meets 7:30 p.m., 401 Tulane, Avon Park. Orchid Society of Highlands County meets 7 p.m. on the fourth Monday at the Highlands County AgriCivic Center, 4509 George Blvd., Sebring. Call Ed Fabik at 465-2830 for details. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 12-4:30 p.m. second and fourth Monday in Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. No meetings from end of May to October. For details, call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Highlands County meets at 6:15 p.m. at Beef O Brady's, Sebring. Sebring AARP meets 1:30 p.m., The Palms, Pine Street, Sebring. Sebring Bridge Club has Bridge, ACBLDuplicate at the clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Mondays. For details or info on lessons, call 385-8118. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 has pizza and darts at 7:30 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has the lounge open from 12-7 p.m. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Historical Society open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Located in back side of Sebring Public Library building on Lake Jackson. For information, call 471-2522. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 plays Texas Hold em at7 p.m. the second and fourth Monday at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing. For details, call 6553920. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL632, Sebring meets at 3:30 p.m. at the fellowship hall at the First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, Sebring. For details, call Judy O'Boyle at 260-0831. Veterans of Foreign Wars Ladies Auxiliary Post 4300 meets 2 p.m. fourth Monday, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Volunteers of America of Florida is a nonprofit organization in Sebring that specializes in assisting person's with mental illness. We are pleased to announce our Drop in Center is open to individuals with a mental illness 6 days a week from 11am to 3 pm. The center offers a welcoming environment where individuals are accepted and feel comfortable. For more information please contact Wendy at 863382-2022.TUESDAY Al-Anon Family Groups meet for discussion and Twelve Step study at noon, Union Congregational Church, 105 N. Forest Ave., AvonPark. Parking available south of old church. 8 & 40 Salon 687 Call Betty Darmer, 465-2272, for details. Alzheimer's/Dementia Seminar held at 11 a.m. every fourth Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid. Also sponsored by Nurse on Call. Covers common signs of dementia, coping and care giving tips, disease management, organizations, etc. Call 465-0568. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard and euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For details, call 4657940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Audubon Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Masonic Lodge, downtown Lake Placid on the corner of Main and Park. Bring a covered dish to share, utensils and plates, at 6:30 p.m. or come at 7:30 p.m. for presentations by guest speaker. The public is invited. Avon Park Boy Scout Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30 p.m. in the Scout Lodge, 202 Robert Britt St., AvonPark. Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to join. For details, call 452-2385. AvonPark Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Beta Sigma Phi, Xi Nu Sigma Chapter of Avon Park, meets the second and fourth Tuesday each month in the members home. Call president Mary Joinerr at 382-4488 or vice president Linda Webster at 385-1124. Busy Bee Craft Club meets 9-11 a.m., Fairway Pines, Sun N Lakes Boulevard, Sebring. Everyone is welcome. For more details, call 382-8431. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday night at "The Rock," Union Congregational Church, 28 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park. Abarbecue meal is served at 6 p.m. for a donation. At 6:45 p.m., members meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group breaks up into small groups for men and women. The program is designed for drug and alcohol addiction, divorce, death or illness grief, low or lost selfesteem or identity due to dysfunctional relationships, depression/anxiety, or any other need for healing. For details, contact Celebrate Recovery coordinator Pam Sim by calling 453-3345, ext. 106. The Computer Club at Buttonwood Bay meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month November through March. We invite anyone interested in expanding their computer knowledge to attend the Buttonwood Bay Bytes Computer Club meeting. Fletcher Music Club meets every Thursday and Tuesday at Fletcher Music Center in Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. For more details, call 385-3288. G2G (Grandparent to Grandparent) a support group to help grandparents raising grandchildren, meets at 10 a.m. Tuesdays at One Hope United, 7195 S. George Blvd., Sebring. Call 214-9009. Heartland Harmonizers Barbershop Chorus meets from 7-9:30 p.m. in the Sebring High School Music Room, Sebring. All men who enjoy singing are invited. Reading music is not required. Call 471-2294 or 386-5098. Highlands County Quilt Guild meets first and third Tuesday, St. Agnes Episcopal Church, Sebring. Call Lynn Ullinn for meeting times at 314-0557 or e-mail luckyduck@mymailstation.com. Highlands Tea Party has an educational and informational meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Quality Inn, 6525 U.S. 27 in Sebring. Call 699-0743. Hope Hospice grief support group meets at 11 a.m. at 319 W. Center Ave., Sebring; and 4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle ALF, across U.S. 27 from Florida Hospital Lake Placid. Call 382-0312. Knights of Columbus Council 5441 meets 8 p.m. every second and fourth Tuesday at Knights of Columbus Hall, 900 U.S. 27 N., Sebring. For details, call 385-0987. Lake Placid Art League has classes in Parchment Embossing from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant. For information, call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Happy hour is from 2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Grief Support (Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, with Charlie Stroup. Refreshments served. Door prize given. Call 465-0568. Lake Placid Jaycees meets 7:30 p.m., Jaxson's. Board meeting, 6:30 p.m. Call Joe Collins, 655-5545, for details. Lake Placid Lions Club meets at 7 p.m. (6 p.m. for dinner)the second Tuesday each month at Herons Garden, 501 US 27 North, Lake Placid. Call Jeanne at 699-0743. Lake Placid Women of the Moose has a business meeting at 7:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday at the lodge. Lorida Community Club meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Lorida Community Center to plan events. Masonic Lodge meets 8 p.m., 106 N. Main St., Lake Placid. Nar-Anon Support Group for family members or friends of someone with a drug problem or addiction. Nar-Anon helps attain serenity and a more normal life for those affected by the addictions of loved ones, regardless of whether or not he/she has stopped using. 6 p.m. every Tuesday at First Baptist Chuch of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 W.Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup.c om. For details, call 382-7731. Visit www.oa.org for more information on OA. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. For details, call 4654888. Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) offers a full range of voluntee r opportunities for people age 55 and over. RSVPmeets on the fourth Tuesday each month, 10 a.m., at the Highlands Little Theatre. Please join us for coffee and to learn more about current volunteer opportunities in Highlands County. Any interested and enrolled volunteers are invited to attend. For mor e information call Kris Schmidt, coordinator, RSVP, at 7847189. Rotary Club of Sebring (Noon) meets at noon at the Sebring Civic Center, near th e library in downtown Sebring. For information, call 385-3829 or 471-9900. Sebring Bridge Club will have Duplicate Bridge games every Tuesday evening. If interested in playing Duplicate Bridge, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 plays darts, beginning with sign in at 6 p.m. Games start at 6:30 p.m. No experience necessary. Cost is $2. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves soft shell tacos 5 7 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing. Euchre is played at 6:30 p.m. For details, call 6553920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. an dtable tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. For details, call 385-2966 or leave a name, number and message. SertomaClub meets at 7 a.m. at Dee's Restaurant, Sebring. For details, call Scot t Albritton at 402-1819. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL99 meets from 6 -7 p.m. at the Atonement Lutheran Church, 1744 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Cal l 655-1743. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL618 has weigh in from 4-430 p.m. at Communit y Bible Church, 1400 CR-17A N., AvonPark. Meeting is at 4:45 p.m. For details, call 452 1093. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, plays darts 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 has sandwiches at 5 p.m. and Franke from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 385-8902. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011Page 5B DUMMY 09; 7.444"; 4"; Black; residence inn COMMUNITYCALENDAR Did YouKNOW?When an authorized emergency vehicle making use of any visual signals is parked or a wrecker displaying amber rotating or flashing lights is performing a recovery or loading on the roadside, the driver of every other vehicle, as soon as it is safe: Shall vacate the lane closest to the emergency vehicle or wrecker when driving on an interstate highway or other highway with two or more lanes traveling in the direction of the emergency vehicle or wrecker, except when otherwise directed by a law enforcement officer. If such movement cannot be safely accomplished, the driver shall reduce speed to a speed that is 20 miles per hour less than the posted speed limit when the posted speed limit is 25 miles per hour or greater; or travel at 5 miles per hour when the posted speed limit is 20 miles per hour or less, when driving on a two-lane road, except when otherwise directed by a law enforcement officer. FLORIDAHASA MOVEOVERŽLAWFORMOTORISTS APPROACHINGEMERGENCY VEHICLESANDWRECKERS. Residence Inn 4x4

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By NANCYDALE Special to the News-SunThe founding fathers of Florida are the pioneer “cow hunters” who migrated south in the 1800s when the government opened up new territories after the Seminole Indian Wars. In search of wide open prairies and water, daring young pioneers loaded up their families in covered wagons, gathered up their cattle, and ventured south. It was a long and arduous journey into an unforgiving environment. Ben Hill Griffin III (Frostproof( said, “My grandfather migrated from Georgia after the Civil War to work in the phosphate mines in Fort Meade. He had nothing more than a few dollars and meager belongings but he had ‘perseverance.’They cleared the land with gripping hoes and hauled water up from the lake for the land and personal needs.” Sixth generation cattle rancher and former Chief Justice of the Florida Supreme Court Jim Alderman (Okeechobee), says his great grandfather, Streaty Parker migrated from North Carolina. At Fort Meade, he led the “Hickory Boys” to stop cattle rustling. Margaret Alderman’s life (Mims) spans more than six generations of cattle ranchers. E.O. Morgan, her husband’s granddaddy, was the “Cattle King of the South.” Gene Crosby, cattle manager of the Deseret Ranch, was raised in Holopaw, a former timber town. When the industry went under, his daddy got a job at the Deseret Ranch where Crosby grew up. But times have changed as creeping urbanization threatens the once vast rangelands of Florida. Today, many small ranchers cannot support their family raising cattle. One of the largest “micropolitan” cities in the United States covers Oxford rancher Mann Bailey’s birthplace. He said, “Sometimes people stare at me in my everyday working cowboy clothes but I don’t think they realize I am the Native not the oddity.” These are true stories of struggle, survival, courage, fortitude and foresight as told by the pioneer “cow hunters” in their own words. “The Legacy of the Florida Pioneer ‘Cow Hunters’In Their Own Words” will be released at the Florida Cattlemen’s Convention in Marco Island in June, where a book signing will also take place. To order personally signed inscriptions, call 214-8351 or visit www.nancydalephd.com on the Web. She can also be contacted by email at nancydalephd@gmail.com. Softbound editions are $20; hardbound editions are $29.95. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK – Hotel California “ASalute to the Eagles” takes the stage at South Florida Community College’s Theatre for the Performing Arts at 7:30 p.m. Friday, June 24 as a part of its Summer Series. For more than two decades, Hotel California has touched the hearts of fans all over the world by faithfully and accurately reproducing the Grammy award winning sounds of the Eagles. Hotel California has risen to a level of international recognition normally reserved only for gold and platinum recording artists. The band of five incorporates their world-renowned vocal harmony and authentic instrumentation, including all specialty instruments, in a stage spectacle that is both modern and exciting. Each concert presents a showcase of the Eagles’megahits such as “Take it Easy,” “Heartache Tonight,” “Hotel California,” “Life In the Fast Lane,” “Desperado,” and “Get Over It.” It also features select titles from the solo works of Don Henley, Glen Frey, and Joe Walsh. The magic and mystique of this timeless music is as powerful as it is captivating. The performance is a benefit concert for the Junior Achievement of Highlands County and SFCC Performing Arts. The major sponsor is Bill and Lisa Jarrett. Tickets range from $25 to $35 and may be purchased online 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at http://performances.southflorida.edu. Tickets may also be purchased by calling the SFCC Box Office at 784-7178 or by visiting the SFCC Box Office from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday, in the front of the SFCC Theatre for the Performing Arts, 600 W. College Drive, Avon Park. Hotel California: A Salute to the Eagles coming to SFCC Page 6BNews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011www.newssun.com CENTRAL SECURITY; 5.542"; 5"; Black plus three; process, 5/1,8,15,22,29 LAKE COUNTRY JEWELERS; 9.347"; 6"; Black plus three; process, gold rush Courtesy photo Hotel California A Salute to the Eagles takes the stage at South Florida Community Colleges Theatre for the Performing Arts at 7:30 p.m. Friday, June 24. ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Special to the News-SunHeart of Highland Show Chorus, an affiliate of Sweet Adelines International, recently awarded the “Swee t Adeline of The Yea r Award” to Gail Johnson, a lead in the chorus. Johnson wears many “hats” and wears them well. She is chairperson for the Costume Committee, chairperson for the Choreography Committee, conducts the physical warm-ups for the chorus and is the chairperson for the chorus’ 2012 show. She is a great asset to the chorus and well-deserving of this prestigious award. She and her husband, Larry, reside in Tanglewood. If you are interested in barbershop music, visi t the group on a Thursday night at 7 p.m. at the Avon Park Rotary, 20 S. Verona Ave. For information, call 452-1927 or 699-0743. The chorus is also available to perform for you r church, business, organization, or special event. Call 699-1288. Johnson named Sweet Adeline of Year Johnson Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID – The Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative is pleased to announce it will be holding an exciting Children’s Art Experience this summer. Class hours will be from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. each day. Classes include China Painting with Chris Filip with a maximum of 10 students, ages 10-plus for a two-day class, June 7 and 8. Cost is $6 per day. Acrylic Painting with Jean Gragert with a maximum of 10 students, ages 8-plus, from June 1-3, 7-10, and 14-17. Each week students will paint until their picture is finished. Any additional paintings will have additional costs for materials only. Cost is $25 per week. Critter Painting on Wood with Joyce DeSmet with a maximum of 10 students, ages 8-plus, from June 14-17. Cost is $6 per half day. Jewelry Making with Lee Ann Hinskey with a minimum of four students, ages 8-plus, on June 7 and 8. Cost is $10 per half day. Mommy and Me with Lee Ann Hinskey for students ages 4-8. Cost is $10 per half day. All classes must be paid in the office upon sign up. There will be no refunds as teachers pay for all materials used in class. The Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative is at 132 E. Interlake Blvd. in Lake Placid. Call 699-5940 or visit the Web site at www.caladiumarts.com for further information. Childrens Summer Art Experience class lineup set Special to the News-SunSEBRING – Area teens are encouraged to participate in “You Are Here,” the Sebring Public Library’s teen summer library program from June 25 to Aug. 13. Teens are invited to come to the library and read for prizes as well as to take part in special events offered throughout the summer. Special events this summer will include a blogging workshop, a geocaching program, and an anime film showing. Beginning June 1, teens in junior high and high school can register to attend these free events at the circulation desk of the Sebring Public Library. Teens can also sign up to read for 50 hours between June 25 and August 13; those who succeed will receive a reading award and their names will be entered into a drawing for an mp3 player. The “You Are Here” teen summer library program is sponsored by the Sebring Public Library. Sebring Library to offer teen summer program Nancy Dale to release new book at Florida Cattlemens Convention Central Security 3x5 color Lake Country Jewelers 4x6 color C M Y K

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C M Y K Breakfasts and lunches being served in the Highlands County School District for the upcoming week of May 23-27 include: HIGH SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast „ Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. Lunch „ Managers choice or chili, saltine crackers, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked french fries, corn cobbettes, tossed salad, Colby Jack cheese stick, glazed berries and cherries, diced pears, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk Tuesday Breakfast „ Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, applesauce, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. Lunch „ Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias cheeseburger pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, dried blueberries, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. Wednesday Breakfast „ Breakfast pizza, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. Lunch „ Pressed Cuban sandwich, burger, cheeseburger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, grilled chicken sandwich, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, mixed vegetables, carrots and dip, vanilla clodhoppers, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. Thursday Breakfast „ Breakfast burrito, salsa, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. Lunch „ Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias cheeseburger pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked beans, cheddar cheese stick, rosy applesauce, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. Friday Breakfast „ Maple waffle stick, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. Lunch „ Asian chicken nuggets, salsa, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, chicken patty on bun, PBJ sandwich meal, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, chef salad meal, baked french fries, corn, carrots and dip, tossed salad, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. ACADEMY SCHOOLS Monday Lunch „ Managers choice or chili, saltine crackers, corn cobbettes, tossed salad, glazed berries and cherries, assorted juice, assorted milk. Tuesday Lunch „ Baked chicken, dinner roll, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, dried blueberries, assorted juice, assorted milk. Wednesday Lunch „ Pressed Cuban sandwich, baked buffalo chips, carrots and dip, vanilla clodhoppers, assorted juice, assorted milk. Thursday Lunch „ Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, baked beans, rosy applesauce, cut fresh fruit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Friday Lunch „ Chicken tenders, dinner roll, Sun Chips, tossed salad, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, assorted juice, assorted milk. MIDDLE SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast „ Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch „ Managers choice or chili, saltine crackers, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, corn cobbettes, tossed salad, Colby Jack cheese stick, glazed berries and cherries, diced pears, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. Tuesday Breakfast „ Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, applesauce, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch „ Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, dried blueberries, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. Wednesday Breakfast „ Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Breakfast pizza, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch „ Pressed Cuban sandwich, burger, cheeseburger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, grilled chicken sandwich, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, mixed vegetables, carrots and dip, vanilla clodhoppers, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. Thursday Breakfast „ Breakfast burrito, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch „ Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked beans, cheddar cheese stick, rosy applesauce, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. Friday Breakfast „ Maple waffle stick, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, assorted milk. Lunch „ Mama Sofias cheeseburger pizza, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, burger, cheeseburger, chicken tenders, salsa, dinner roll, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, chef salad meal, PBJ sandwich meal, corn, carrots and dip, tossed salad, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast „ Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Maple waffle stick, string cheese, orange juice, chocolate milk. Lunch „ Chicken nuggets, dinner roll, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich, turkey chef salad, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green peas, rosy applesauce, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Tuesday Breakfast „ Breakfast burrito, salsa, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, applesauce, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Chicken biscuit, strawberry cup, chocolate milk, very berry bread, apple juice, chocolate milk. Lunch „ Spaghetti, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, green beans, vanilla clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, apple juice, orange slushy, fruit juice slushy, assorted milk. Wednesday Breakfast „ Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Very berry bread, apple juice, chocolate milk, chicken biscuit, strawberry cup, chocolate milk. Lunch „ Managers choice or macaroni and cheese, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, broccoli, diced pears, fruited Jell-O, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Thursday Breakfast „ Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Sausage biscuit, apricot cup, chocolate milk, Ultimate Breakfast Round, apple juice, chocolate milk. Lunch „ Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, corn, baked beans, fruit cocktail cup, veryberry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Friday Breakfast „ Maple waffle stick, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Ultimate Breakfast Round, apple juice, chocolate milk, sausage biscuit, apricot cup, chocolate milk. Lunch „ Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, carrots and dip, salsa, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, assorted milk. KINDERGARTEN LEARNING CENTER Monday Lunch „ Chicken nuggets, dinner roll, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green peas, rosy applesauce, assorted milk. Tuesday Lunch „ Spaghetti, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, green beans, vanilla clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit, assorted milk. Wednesday Lunch „ Macaroni and cheese, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, broccoli, diced pears, fruited Jell-O, assorted milk. Thursday Lunch „ Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, baked beans, fruit cocktail cup, assorted milk. Friday Lunch „ Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, carrots and dip, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, assorted milk. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011Page 7B COUNTRY CLUB REALTY; 7.444"; 10"; Black plus one; spot yellow, open house SEBRING PEDIATRICS, LLC; 3.639"; 4"; Black; 05/22/11 SCHOOLMENUS Country Club Realty 3x10 color Sebring Pediatrics 2x4 WHOS MAKING NOISE IN TOWN?Subscribe today and “nd out! Call 863-385-6155 for home deliverywww.newssun.com

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C M Y K and that will give us a better idea what we have to work with,” Helms said. Earlier in the year, McIntyre predicted a 10 percent cut in county ad valorem revenue from the residential sector, but Helms felt that was just part of the equation. “He is usually very conservative, and there are commercial properties, agriculture and other revenue streams. I think the number will be significantly less that 10 percent. I think that we will be around a 6 percent reduction based on past figures,” Helms added. The other constitutional officers have their budgets due to Helms on June 1, then his job is to put it all together for the July 15 state-mandated deadline. “We will have a lot of workshops on this, and we will have everything together by July 12. That’s our goal,” he said. Questions led Helms to discuss the level of involvement from the Board of County Commissioners and the public concerning the overall budget process. Helms added that the current commissioners were very involved in understanding how the whole budget process works. “The workshops have been very informative, everyone is agrees on that, and the presentations from the department heads have been very beneficial. This was something new we tried, and I think that we should continue to do those,” he said. One of the topics discussed was the idea of a two-year budget. “Other counties do it, like Hillsborough, and it is something to look at. One of the drawbacks is that the initial workload to get that started is huge. It is a lot of work, but there are tweaks you can make every year once it is started,” Helms said. Page 8ANews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011www.newssun.com CREATIVE FLOORS; 3.639"; 3"; Black; main, 05/20, 05/22, 05/25 EDWARD JONES/ED BURNSIDE***; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; main a, 05/22/11 Continued from page 1A Helms talks about budget process know how to engage, where to engage and how they can tie into our emergency management structure.” Koon spent the previous five years overseeing the emergency management operations for Wal-Mart Stores Inc.’s more than 8,500 stores and more than 2 million employees worldwide. Aformer Naval officer, he also spent several years in the White House Military Office where he developed and maintained programs to ensure the continuity of government and operations after a disaster. Koon told reporters that he brings a global perspective to the state’s emergency management team, with experience gleaned from hurricanes, wildfires, volcanic eruptions and tsunami risks. “Because we were a worldwide company — we’re in 50 states and 28 countries — there was never a day that something didn’t happen,” Koon said. The best way Florida can prepare for hurricanes is to ensure that private citizens and businesses are prepared to take care of themselves in a storm’s immediate aftermath, so that the state government can focus on restoring infrastructure and other vital services, he said. While officials worry that residents have grown complacent about their disaster risk after five years without a major hurricane making a U.S. landfall, Koon said advances in mobile technology over the same period of time mean that people are getting more information faster than before. Plus, recent disasters such as the Japan earthquake, tornadoes in Alabama and flooding along the Mississippi River have highlighted how vulnerable communities can be, he added. “I think what you have is a heightened awareness for the potential for any person to be impacted by disaster in their community,” Koon said. Along with taking personal responsibility to be a survivor and not a victim — an idea promoted by Federal Emergency Management Agency Craig Fugate — Koon emphasized the need for the state to help businesses prepare to get back to work as quickly as possible after a hurricane so they can provide services the government does not, such as groceries or home repair materials. The Florida Division of Emergency Management has hired a private sector coordinator to engage companies in disaster training, improve communication and ensure that smalland medium-sized businesses have as many resources as larger corporations, Koon said. “We want to make sure we can restore the economic tax base in a community — that people are able to get back to work, that children are able to get back to school, that we’re able to pull the government back out and get that community back on its feet,” he said. The state also was working to streamline communication among Florida’s counties and to improve support for smaller counties with tighter budgets and fewer resources, Koon said. More than 1,740 emergency managers, meteorologists, first responders and government officials from 59 Florida counties, 31 states and three foreign countries are attending the weeklong conference focused on preparations fo r the upcoming storm season. Addressing the conference’s general session, Gov. Rick Scott praised Koon’s leadership at Wal-Mart. “I chose Bryan to lead ou r state emergency operations because he understands tha t a rapid and coordinated response to an emergency can safeguard our state’s economy and the people o f our state,” said Scott, who campaigned last year on promises to create jobs and boost Florida’s lagging economy. Scott announced Koon’s appointment in December. He also has moved the Division of Emergency Management into the executive office of the governor to streamline communication and reduce costs across all the federal, state and local agencies involved in Florida’s disaster readiness and response. The six-month Atlantic hurricane season begins June 1. As government officials do this time of year, Scott urged Florida residents to prepare for storms well before any develop in the tropics. He awkwardly joked tha t he’s so prepared, he has an extra roof. To some polite laughter, Scott explained that he had had to replace the roof on his Naples mansion after the storms of 2004 and 2005. Continued from page 1A Storm prep stressed by state leaders We want to make sure we can restore the economic tax base in a community.BRYANKOON state director of emergency management cial, there is division of opinion as to how the process would work and who should be a part of it. Experienced teachers, given advanced training in evaluation, are thought by everyone to be the best suited to be the actual evaluators. But the school board has to decide if evaluators should be part time or full time. In other words, if classroom teachers should be paid for extra duty, or if individuals should be specifically assigned to do evaluations only. There are other questions: How should evaluators be trained and in what method; if classroom teachers become evaluators, who will take over in the classroom when a teacher leaves it to do an evaluation; and finally, SB 736 comes without funding support — where will the needed money come from after federal Race to the Top dollars and funds from a portion of a Gates Grant, which are being used now to pay for the training, additional salaries and other costs, run out. Whatever is decided, a system has to be up and running by the middle of August in order to be sure teachers are briefed on the new system before the start of the school year. That means the training of evaluators has to begin by June 13. There are also deadlines tied to the federal and Gates funds. They must be met or the dollars go elsewhere. “The first year is critical,” Cox said. “We have to start the process so it is consistent.” For that Cox wants to create a one year position, Coordinator on Special Assignment, with a salary of $86,120. This individual would be responsible for getting the new system up and running. Cox recommended Derrel Bryan, principal of Lake Placid Middle School, for the job. While Cox, the principals in the audience, and every board member expressed great confidence in Bryan as a person and professional, several board members were opposed to creating a one year position with such a lucrative salary at a time when 29 teaching positions have been removed from the district. Board chairperson Donna Howerton, for example, said, “Right now I can’t support a Coordinator on Special Assignment at $86,120. I just can’t support it. I want to help Mr. Cox, but we’re losing good people I hate to lose.” School board member Andy Tuck said, “I guess I struggle a little too — cutting media specialists, asking everybody to do with less, I just (can’t see) adding another position to the district office.” “When I was a teacher did I think the district was top heavy? Hell yes,” said board member Ronnie Jackson, but added that in this case he could understand the need for a central coordinating figure to set up the process. He said evaluations can be a very good thing; that supportive, constructive criticism is useful and helps improve performance. The general consensus of attending principals was in favor of creating the coordinator’s position and asking Bryan to fill it. For example, Andrew Lethbridge, principal of the Kindergarten Learning Center and the only school head without an assistant principal, said, “I think Bryan is a good choice because of the respect and familiarity, and of the consistent message. He can get us all on the same page.” Members of the school board will have to make a decision Tuesday night at its regular meeting. Continued from page 1A School board faces difficult decisions By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING — The task of managing a classroom — imparting knowledge, encouraging debate, nurturing talent, providing opportunities to practice new skills, and making sure every individual’s needs are met, as well as the group’s needs as a whole — requires mastery of human psychology, human development, subject content, time management, and the ability to work with statistics and technology, all while working in a bureaucracy. Despite the fact that teachers work with children, it is a fact that their profession is a sophisticated one. Evaluating an individual’s work in the classroom, therefore, is not easy to measure. At the same time, while most fair-minded people agree teachers alone are not the problem in the public school system, most people also agree unsatisfactory teachers need to be weeded out. The question currently being debated is how to do that. Currently principals evaluate their teachers; school superintendents evaluate their principals. That idea as a best practice, however, has changed. Most people now think a more formal, standardized and consistent evaluation method is needed, done by third parties. Educators have been discussing and studying the issue for some time, but with Senate Bill 736 — which mandates permanent evaluation systems for teachers and school administrators — deadlines have been established that force an end to discussion and the beginning of action. Here are some of the aspects of the evaluation process proposed by school superintendent Wally Cox and district administrators. Cox emphasizes that evaluations are meant to be productive and supportive, not simply critical. Ateacher’s standing will be built around four ratings: Highly effective; effective; needs improvement; and ineffective. Cox told the school board at a recent workshop that because the cost of assessing all teachers every year is simply too expensive, only some teachers will be evaluated regularly. He suggests dividing all teachers into three categories: Those who have 10 years or more of experience and a good record for at least three years; those with more than four years of experience and a good record; and a final category of those who have less than four year in the classroom, are a new hire, or are struggling with a low rating. These last teachers will be the focus of attention. Regarding how the ratings are determined — the state Legislature has mandated that 50 percent of a teacher’s evaluation be based on his/her student’s Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test scores, or other standardized or end of course test. The other 50 percent has to come from a variety of other sources, like selfappraisal and the formal evaluation — which is to based on a combination of observation, documentation and conversation. How to grade teachers edward jones/ed burnside 3x10.5 creative floors 2x3

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C M Y K www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011Page 9B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the Redeemer .Service time is 9:30 with Holy Communion. Coffee hour following services. Newcomers welcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mailredeemer1895@aol.com Web site:redeemeravon.com. The church is at 839 Howe's Way,Avon Park (two miles north of Sun 'N Lake Boulevard, across from Wells Dodge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday Services: Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek service on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always welcome. The Rev. Jim Kurtz, rector. Church office 3857649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL33852. Phone: 4650051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday evening: Holy Communion with Healing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child care available at the 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come see what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 Thunderbird Road, (863) 8350869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday services at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid City" Children's Ministry throughout all services, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married couples, "prime-timers," and Bible studies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day Care, Preschool and After-School Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For registration call: 385-3111). Check us out on the Web atwww.sebringgrace.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration Ministries, (non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533771. Sunday service: Sunday School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church (ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen, Deacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, third and fifth Sunday each month, and Rev. Jefferson Cox on the second and fourth Sunday of each month. Jim Helwig, organist/choir director. Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee hour on the first and third Sunday of each month. Council meeting on the first Monday of month; Ladies Group WELCAmeets at noon second Monday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable Garden Club meets as needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden open seven days a week to congretation and community. Like to sing? Come join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park LCMS, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots PreSchool director; and Noel Johnson, minister of youth and family life. Worship schedule after Easter through December: Worship service 10 a.m., and Education Hour, 8:45 a.m. Worship schedule for January through Easter: Worship service, 8:30 and 11 a.m., Education Hour 9:45 a.m. Traditional Service with Holy Communion each first and third Sunday. Non-Traditional Service each second, fourth and fifth Sunday. Seasonal mid-week services Wednesday evenings during Lent and Advent. Call church office for additional Worship times and special holiday services. Other activities and groups include: Choirs; Ladies Guild and LWML; Men's Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies as scheduled; Trinity Tots Pre-school, Youth Group activities (call for meeting times and dates). Trinity Tots Preschool (3-4years old): 7:15 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Visit us online at:www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and children's church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Children's & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kid's World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 8:45 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. in the Millennium Church. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer a Saturday service at 6 p.m. with Pastor Tiger Gullett in the Millennium Church. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturer's Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Children's Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of God's Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and children's church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Women's Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m. in the sanctuary. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Children's Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL33870. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays with Rick Heilig, youth director. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church, 200 South Lake Avenue, Avon Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R. James Weiss, Pastor, Sunday School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Prayer Shawl Ministry on the second and fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m. for women who love God and crocheting. Visit us at our church Web site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodist Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pastor. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral assistant. Sunday schedule: Heritage Worship Service, 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worship service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m. Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m. (October-May only). We offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth programs, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship. We are a congregation that want to know Christ and make Him known. Call the church office at 465-2422 or check out our church Web site at www.memorialumc.com. St. John United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL33872. The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all services. Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodist Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church office phone: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church of Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 27 and Hammock Road). Sunday worship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion with worship first Sunday of month; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. all other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For more information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@eart h link.net or check theWeb sitesebringemmanuelucc.com. No matter who you are or where you are on life's journey, you're welcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP One of the childhood memories that I cherish is my siblings and I picking berries. My dad was an avid outdoorsman and he used to take us to all sorts of places and have us pick every kind of berry until we thought our fingers would fall off. I seem to recall rolling of eyes and grumping and complaining, but now that I look back, I realize what a special time it was. The whole family would jump in the truck and our mission was to find a “gold mine” of berries. Once we collected enough to satisfy my dad, we would head home with a relieved sigh. It is tough work picking all those plump fruits. But it certainly was worth while when mom made her delicious blueberry cobbler or muffins for us to eat fresh and hot out of the oven. Summer is fast approaching and with the heat comes the berries. Blueberries originated in eastern North America. Many areas of Florida including pine flatwoods and swamps are laden with several varieties of this juicy fruit. And picking them isn’t just for the memories; berries are generally high in vitamins and very good for you. Wild blueberries have the highest antioxidant capacity per serving when compared to more than 20 other types of fruit. But what, you ask, is an antioxidant? According to Wikipedia, an antioxidant is “a molecule capable of inhibiting the oxidation of other molecules. Oxidation is a chemical reaction that transfers electrons from a substance to an oxidizing agent. Oxidation reactions can produce free radicals. In turn, these radicals can start chain reactions. When the chain reaction occurs in a cell, it can cause damage or death.” Basically, antioxidants help our bodies protect against disease and age related health problems. They neutralize the free radicals and help prevent our cells from being damaged. Some claim that these miraculous molecules protect against Alzheimer’s disease and other age related ailments. Nutrition experts claim that when you eat healthy foods, such as blueberries and other colorful fruits and vegetables, it will help with weight management, reduce risk of cancer, diabetes and other diseases. It’s great to eat healthy. But these berries are just plain scrumptious. They grow just about everywhere and they are free. And wild blueberries are a bit different from their tamer, cultivated relations. Wild blueberries are not planted and you may find several different varieties in one area. Wild blueberries contain more of the antioxidants per serving than cultivated varieties. They are usually sweeter and taste more intense. Of course, they are much smaller than the planted type, but they hold less water so you are getting a lot more “berry” per fruit. The wild berries hold their shape, color and texture better when using them for cooking. They also freeze very well. Blueberries usually start blooming and producing fruit in midMay. They generally stop producing around September. Although the fruit may be the reason for seeking out the plant, the bush itself is quite attractive. In the fall, the foliage turns a brilliant reddish color and is quite beautiful as a landscape plant. Since this plant is native to Florida, it makes an excellent, hardy choice when planning for your landscaping needs. Check with your local nurseries for the native variety. So, now you may be ready to journey out on your own adventure and find some berries. Where do you start? Look for the right area. Blueberry plants love the sun, so you will need to find a sunny patch. Look in the summer months; that’s when you’ll see the dark blue berries on the branch tips. You can find blueberry bushes in the scrub communities, pine flatwoods and even in some wetlands. Just remember not to damage nearby vegetation while you’re hunting for those blue berries. And watch where you step, blueberry bushes are often found near Prickly Pear cactus plants. Ouch! Perhaps its time to create some memories for your kids or grandkids and take them out “berry pickin.” I know I intend to take my son out and share that childhood experience with him this summer. I may get the eye roll and the “I’d rather play on the computer” speech, but I feel sure that once we’re out in nature together, picking the bluish black berries, we’ll share a great experience that he will hopefully share some day with his children. Corine Burgess is the Natural Resources Specialist for the Highlands County Natural Resources Department assisting the Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District (www.highlandsswcd.org). Try your hand at berry picking this summer News From The Watershed Corine Burgess Courtesy photo Wild blueberries have the highest antioxidant capacity per serving when compared to more than 20 other types of fruit. Nutrition experts claim that when you eat healthy foods, such as blueberries and other colorful fruits and vegetables, it will help with weight management, reduce risk of cancer, diabetes and other diseases.

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C M Y K Would you risk being hit by lightning for $100? Seems a bit ludicrous, but desperate times cause folks to do foolish things and some people will intentionally put themselves in harm’s way by stealing wire from live power lines or equipment. Thefts of copper and aluminum are on the rise, at abandoned commercial buildings, empty homes, and — most dangerously —at power substations near neighborhoods. Peace River Electric Cooperative needs your help to keep our equipment safe, prevent outages, and save lives. The cost for scrap copper goes up and down, but recently it’s been on the rise, and so have robbery attempts. In January 2011, scrap copper sold for five times the amount it went for in 2001. It’s hard to understand why folks would put their life on the line for a few dollars, but many law enforcement officials believe that methamphetamine users are responsible for much of the problem. And the damage done to our system packs a big punch, since equipment can be ruined without the protection copper wires provide. There’s also the potential for loss of life. In 2010 alone, power substations that were invaded by copper thieves resulted in the loss of nearly $100,000 in stolen wire. Many times when wire is stolen from a substation, it causes our member/ consumers to experience voltage problems or a power outage until repairs are made. To address this problem, we are systematically replacing the copper wire in our substations with “copper clad” conductor, a steel wire with a thin copper coating which has almost no scrap value. Across our system, copper is used to ground our equipment, protecting it from electrical surges and lightning by giving electricity a safe path to ground. It’s used in our substations, on power lines, on transformers, and is even used to protect the electric meter on your home. Copper is an essential component along every step of the power pathway. Our line personnel are highly trained professionals who understand the dangers of working with electricity and take proper safety precautions. To protect the public, we surround our substations with secure fencing and post warning signs. But some thieves will not be deterred. As in every business, losses caused by thieves hit honest consumers in the pocketbook. Electric rates are impacted by copper theft and the damage it causes. That’s why we need your help to spot these crooks. Please help us prevent these thefts. If you notice anything unusual, such as an open substation gate, open equipment, or hanging wire, call Peace River Electric Cooperative immediately at 1-800-282-3824. If you see anyone other than our utility personnel or contractors around substations or other electric facilities, call the police. William T. Mulcay Jr. is CEO of Peace River Electric Cooperative Inc. in Wauchula. Metal theft from power stations threatens safety, lives Guest Column William T. Mulcay Jr. Page 10BNews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011www.newssun.com COCHRAN BROTHERS ROOFING; 5.542"; 3"; Black; 5/1,8,15,22,29 CHATHAM POINTE; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; senior scene if available CROSSWORDSOLUTION BUSINESS Courtesy photo Despite the danger, thieves still invade power substations in search of copper wire to sell for scrap. Starting Your Business seminar W ednesdayAVON PARK — Starting Your Business is a free seminar presented by the Small Business Development Center at USF. It will be held on Wednesday at South Florida Community College Corporate and Continuing Education Room T05 from 2-4:30 p.m. It is designed for persons thinking of starting a small business or who have started a business and want to make sure they did it correctly. Licenses, marketing, entity selection, and business planning are among the items discussed. The seminar will be presented by David Noel, Certified Business Analyst with the SBDC. Seating is limited, so please call Noel at 7847378 to reserve a seat in the seminar or for further information.Christian joins RE/MAXSEBRING — RE/MAX Realty Plus is pleased to announce its newest agent is Matthew Christian. Matthew is a Sebring native and Sebring High School graduate. He received his bachelor’s degree in marketing from the University of Central Florida in 2008. Upon graduation, he went to work as a property and casualty agent for Bayless Insurance Agency as well as assistant director of marketing and sales for Sebring International Raceway. On Sunday morning, he serves as director of worship for Grace Bible Church. “His background in marketing gives him a strong advantage in helping you sell your property even in a tough economy. His extensive knowledge of the area will help you find the perfect home or investment property,” the agency said in a press release. Call Christian at 3850077 or stop by the RE/MAX office in Sebring. Snapshots Christian The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN By JANE WARDELL APBusiness WriterLONDON — BPsaid Friday that one of its minority partners in the blownout Gulf of Mexico well agreed to cover about $1.1 billion in costs. That’s raising hopes the oil giant can get money from other companies involved and reduce its bill for the disaster. BPsaid that MOEX Offshore 2007 LLC, which had a 10 percent interest in the Macondo well, agreed to recognize findings by the U.S. Presidential Commission that the accident resulted from “oversights and outright mistakes by multiple parties and a number of causes.” As a minority partner, MOEX was obligated to pay a percentage of the cleanup costs. But it had refused to pay BPon the grounds that the incident was the result of BP’s negligence. MOEX’s about-face is important because it’s the first time another company has agreed that BPwasn’t solely responsible for the disaster. MOEX, a unit of Japanese trading house Mitsui & Co., agreed to pay $1.065 billion to settle all claims between the companies. BPsaid MOEX also acknowledged a U.S. Coast Guard investigation that placed some blame on Transocean, owner of the Deepwater Horizon rig that exploded and sank in April 2010. BPshares rose 91 cents to $44.80 in New York. Analysts said the deal puts pressure on BP’s othe r minority partner, Anadarko Petroleum Corp., to reach a similar deal. Argus Research analys t Phil Weiss said the settlement should benefit each o f the well owners. Tha t includes Anadarko, which has maintained that BPis responsible for all spillrelated costs because it was grossly negligent in its handling of the well. Weiss said MOEX seems to be getting off easy. Afai r contribution would have been about four times more than what MOEX agreed to pay, since the spill cost BP about $40 billion so far and MOEX owned 10 percent o f the well. He said the settlemen t increases the odds that BPcan collect from Anadarko and other companies involved. That includes Transocean and oil services contractor Halliburton Co. And it signals to shareholders that BPmay not face tougher fines for gross negligence under the Clean Water Act. Anadarko was on the hook for as much as $10 billion, Weiss said, because of its 25 percent stake in the well. Now it knows BPmay accept much less. If it gets the same deal as MOEX, that payment could be abou t $2.5 billion, Weiss estimated. “This is going to accelerate the pace of talks between them, and I’ll be t they’ll settle within the nex t few months,” Weiss said. BP gets $1 billion settlement from Gulf well partner Chatham Pointe 3x10.5 Cochran Brothers 3x3

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C M Y K Special to the News-SunIt’s the time of year when college grads transition into the real world as “Pomp and Circumstance” plays in the background. And if you’re a recent college grad (or are about to be), that means you’re probably already knee-deep in a difficult job search. There’s no avoiding the fact that today’s employment market can be brutal, especially for those looking for their first big opportunity. But being young and technologically savvy does have its advantages. You are very likely a pro at using social media, and having that working knowledge can certainly help you cast a wider, more productive net in your job hunt. But remember, your social media presence can make you (as you tweet your way to a new job) or break you (as that regrettable Facebook photo sends your crumpled rsum sailing into the trash). Maribeth Kuzmeski suggests that you check and double-check your online presence before responding to that next promising job inquiry. “The good news for college grads is that they have a better understanding of how to use social media to their advantage in the job search than many of the older (and even just slightly older) job seekers out there right now,” notes Kuzmeski, author of The Connectors: How the World’s Most Successful Businesspeople Build Relationships and Win Clients for Life. “But it’s a bit of a double-edged sword for them, because, for the most part, they haven’t had to consider the ‘professional’side of their social media presence until now. Those pictures of college parties and tailgating might seem okay when your main concern is making friends and good grades, but they become very worrisome when you enter the job market. “If you have the right kind of online presence, it can greatly improve your chances of getting hired, but one wrong move — a photo of you while intoxicated or an ill-advised tweet about a difficult professor— and employers might shun you. You have to remember the connections you make online define you. When you’re trying to get your first ‘real’job, you have to be careful of what they say.” Kuzmeski knows all about making the right impression. An expert on the art of connecting, she teaches her clients how to connect with their customers in order to win business and build loyalty. These same relationshipbuilding skills can help young job seekers make the right kind of connections via social media. Read on for Kuzmeski’s advice on how to start your career off right using social media.Mine your social networking connectionsIn your job search, you should always look to the fruit closest to the ground. Is anyone in your social network working for or connected to a company that would be a good fit for you? If so, ask them to put in a good word for you. “Also, keep in mind the focus of your networking— social and otherwise— should not be on gaining an immediate job offer from those in your network,” says Kuzmeski. “In fact, that tactic almost never works. The goal should, instead, be to build a mutually beneficial relationship with someone who may never be able to give you a job, but might know someone who can. “For example, maybe someone in your network is in a completely different industry from the one you’re interested in, but has a huge network of friends on Facebook,” she adds. “He might not be able to help you in your immediate search, but someone in his network—for example, maybe you’re looking for a teaching job and his mom heads up the local school board—might have the perfect opportunity for you. Don’t count anyone out of your networking efforts, especially those who are the closest to you and therefore the most willing to help.”Put your best Face(book) forwardAccording to Jobvite.com’s 2010 Social Recruiting Survey, 83 percent of employers plan to use social networks to recruit this year. Will you be someone they hire or someone they avoid? To find out about the “real” side of potential employees, some employers are Googling them as well as checking out their Facebook and Twitter pages. Before you kick off your job search, make sure your Facebook page and other social media profiles are clean and professional. “If you have any embarrassing or inappropriate material on your profile, it could be quite off-putting to your potential employer,” Kuzmeski advises. “Do yourself a favor and remove those materials. You’re not in college anymore, so from now on when you’re engaging in social media activity, think of yourself as a public figure who may have your every word scrutinized. “And if you think that simply making your profiles private will solve the problem, beware,” she warns. “Atwenty-something job searcher recently told me about a new tactic that some employers are using. The interviewer asked the candidate to pull up his Facebook page—right there in the interview, leaving him no time to clean anything up! Yes, social media is a lot of fun, but make sure if you’re looking for a job that your social media sites help, not hurt, your cause.”Monitor your online reputationAs mentioned above, companies are checking up on people before they even invite them for an interview, and given young job seekers’propensity for using social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter, it’s quite possible today’s college grads will be under even more scrutiny. Sure, you know what you and your friends have posted about you, but is it possible that others have posted unpleasant photos or information — true or not — about you online? One of the easiest ways to monitor your reputation is by setting up Google Alerts that will inform you of anything that has www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011Page 11B DUMMY 09; 5.542"; 7.1"; Black; church page dummy DR. LEE, IKE; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 5/1,22 BUSINESS Social media tips to help college grads make a spash in todays job market Parents, if your high-school senior is about to graduate, you have my heartfelt congratulations – and my sympathy. As your checkbook can attest, this has been an expensive year and it’s not over yet. You’re probably still facing senior prom, graduation gifts and many other expenses. For those whose children are juniors, start planning and budgeting now for next year. Senior prom can be one of the year’s biggest expenditures. According to a recent national survey conducted by Visa Inc., families expect to spend an average of $807 on prom-related expenses this year. These might include: New prom dresses often cost $100 to $500 or more. Another couple hundred for shoes, accessories, flowers and professionally styled hair, nails and make-up. New tuxedos cost several hundred dollars, not to mention formal shirt, tie, studs and shoes. Even renting them could run over $150. Figure at least $100 an hour plus tip to rent a limousine for a minimum of four hours. Prom tickets typically cost $50 to $150 per person, depending on venue, entertainment, meals, etc. Budget at least $40 for a nice meal. After-parties can run anywhere from a few bucks at the bowling alley to hundreds for group hotel suites. Prom is only one component of the senior-year experience. Talk to recent graduates and their parents about expenses they faced and their lessons learned. Decide early on which expenses are essential and which ones you can do without. For example, if your child is college bound, entrance exams, study guides and tutoring are important, but can quickly add up:. The Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) costs $47 each time it’s taken, plus an additional $10 to $21 per individual subject test. American College Testing (ACT) costs $33, plus another $15 for the writing test. Acomprehensive online SATreview course from the Princeton Review will set you back $599. Personalized individual and small group tutoring sessions can cost thousands of dollars. Other common senior year expenses include: —College application fees, often $40 to $80 per institution. — For site visits at schools outside the area, costs can vary widely. Don’t forget airfare, gas, lodging, meals, local transportation, etc. —Senior portraits and prints often cost hundreds of dollars. —Graduation announcements, thank-you notes and postage – could be $100-plus. —Senior class dues. —Yearbooks can run $35 to $85, plus additional fees if you take out a congratulatory ad. — Class rings. Different styles often run $100 to $500 or more. —Cap and gown, usually $25 to $50. —Graduation gift and party. It’s up to you to manage expectations. You want to ensure your child has a memorable senior year, but not at the expense of your overall budget. Before the school year begins, create a senior-year budget and get your kid involved in the tough decisions, prioritizing expenses from vital to non-essential. Learning the importance of setting and sticking to a budget is a valuable life lesson for your kids. If you need help making a budget, numerous online tools are available online at sites such as the U.S. Financial Literacy and Education Commission’s MyMoney.gov (www.mymoney.gov), the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (www.nfcc.org) and Practical Money Skills for Life (www.practicalmoneyskills.c om), a free personal financial management program run by Visa Inc. Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. www.practicalmoneyskills.com Senior year sticker shock Personal Finance Jason Alderman Metro Services W hat you do online can come back to haunt you when its time to look for a job. See TIPS, page 12B DrIke Lee 2x3 church page dummy 3x7.1

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C M Y K appeared about you online. Just go to www.Google.com/ Alerts and set up a free alert of your name and any organizations or activities that you were heavily involved in while at college (if relevant). Whenever anything appears online that you or someone else has posted about you, an email will be sent to you with a link to the online occurrence. “Ultimately, the best way to manage your online reputation is by generating positive search results through your online posts and profiles that will rank as highly as possible on any list of search results,” says Kuzmeski. “But by monitoring these search results closely, you can get out in front of any problems that might arise from something negative someone else has said about you online. That way, at least you’ll be prepared with an explanation. Bottom line, protect your most important assets—your personal brand and online reputation.”Clean up your online presence or be ready to explain itFor many college grads, neatening up their social media profiles will simply mean deleting a couple of questionable photos or asking friends to un-tag them in theirs. Others, however, might have a bigger task on their hands. For example, what do your tweets say about you? Do they paint you as a thoughtful young person, or are they riddled with spelling errors, pointless comments, or worse, pejorative or offensive language? Or what comes up when someone Googles your name? If the first things they see are negative news articles about your failed student body president campaign, you might have some explaining to do. “The reality is you might have to go through and delete any of your tweets, blog posts, etc. that don’t portray you in a positive light,” says Kuzmeski. “And if you truly have a problem with communicating intelligently via Twitter or your blog, you might want to delete those accounts altogether. If you aren’t prepared to clean up your online presence, or, as in the case of the news articles, if there’s simply very little you can do about it, be prepared to explain the situation. You don’t want to be caught off guard and stumble through an explanation that doesn’t make any sense. Own up to mistakes you’ve made and explain what you learned from those situations.” Use proactive posting to stand out (in a good way)While there is a lot to be cautious about when it comes to communicating via social media, that doesn’t mean you should pull back altogether on your online presence. The reality is you should do whatever you can, when you can, to build your credibility. That’s right: You can, and should, consciously and deliberately craft a positive online image. “For example, if you have a well-written blog about something you are passionate about or if you are a conscientious tweeter informing your followers about interesting news stories, you can actually build a very respectable reputation online,” says Kuzmeski. “You should also consider joining the commenting communities on the Web sites or blogs of companies that interest you. By doing so, you can add to their dialogue, and the suggestions and comments you post just might catch the right someone’s eye. “Taking these steps shows you know how to use the Web wisely and that you are well rounded, well informed, and a great communicator— factors that every company wants in an employee,” she adds.Build your online rsum using LinkedInIf you aren’t already on business-focused social media sites like LinkedIn, take the time to set up a profile. In fact, LinkedIn is especially important because it is the most commonly viewed source for job seekers and employers. Setting up a profile is simple: Just go to www.LinkedIn.com, add your picture and a summary of your past job responsibilities, and state what you’re looking for. “Remember, if you haven’t had a ‘real’job yet, it is AOK to include your internship or volunteer experiences and past responsibilities,” notes Kuzmeski. “As a LinkedIn member, you can also join groups, review books, and proactively connect with potential employers.” Check out your interviewerSocial media isn’t all about what you do online. It’s also important that you know what your potential future employer is doing online. If you know who you will be sending a rsum to or who will be interviewing you, conducting a little research in advance of your communication can provide you with a big advantage. “During an interview I conducted with a candidate for my company, the candidate began talking about how much he liked one of the books I had written,” recalls Kuzmeski. “He quoted from the book and offered a story of how he used the information in his career. He had me! I had spent a year writing that book, and the fact that he liked it and gave me information that proved he really read it made me remember him. And somehow he seemed smarter! After ten interviews in one day, people can start to blur. He never did. “We didn’t end up hiring him because he had little experience in the type of service marketing we needed, but I gave him a high recommendation to one of our firm’s clients, and he was hired within a week,” she adds.Make an impact by using videoIf you really want to capture the attention of a potential employer, record a quick video. Use it to get an interview or as a follow-up after an interview. Here’s how it works: Instead of just emailing a rsum or a post-interview thank-you note, include a link to a video of you. Carefully script your response and record the quick message using a Flip video camera or even a Webcam. Post it on YouTube or some other service and send a link for the video to your potential employer. Here are some helpful scripting tips for getting the interview: 1. The video should be no longer than one or two minutes. 2. Introduce yourself. 3. Identify the job you would like to be interviewed for. 4. Tell them three things about your background that may make them interested in interviewing you. 5. Thank them for watching the video and ask them for the interview. “Here’s my caveat,” says Kuzmeski. “Using a video is not an opportunity to show how funny you are. You absolutely have to be professional. And be mindful of the setting. Not only should you look professional, but so should the room where you are filming the video. In other words, don’t film it with your messy bedroom visible in the background. You want the recipient to focus on you and what you’re saying—not your dirty laundry!” Don’t be overly friendly Up until your graduation, you had quite a bit of freedom with how you could interact on social networking sites. But once you enter the job market, that changes. No longer should you think of your social media connections as your online “friends.” Now you have to think of them as potential professional connections. And that will likely mean changing the style in which you communicate. For example, just because a potential employer responds to you using informal language in a Facebook post or via Twitter, does not give you the go-ahead to do the same. It is never okay to use texting shorthand such as LOLor TTYLin any communication with potential employers, no matter how informal your contact at the company is with you. “Remember, just because your immediate contact has no problem sending informal emails to potential employees, doesn’t mean that his boss won’t mind it,” Kuzmeski points out. “Othe r people at the company might be reading those emails. And for that reason, you should stay professional at all times.” Remember, you have to give to getWhen you graduate college and enter the job market, you have to start thinking of yourself as a member of and contributor to a larger community. Each step up the social media ladder is earned by giving to the other members — whether that is in the form of a fresh, interesting piece of content of your own or by promoting someone else’s content. But the underlying rule is that you must give to get. “By adding value to the community, you are making more connections and, as a result, earning more friends more followers, and more trust,” says Kuzmeski. “So don’t hesitate to post job opportunities or other information that your network will find useful. Connect those in your network who might be able to benefit from one another. Just having a network isn’t good enough; you have to play a n active role in it if you want to get anything back from those you’re connecting with via social media.” “No matter where you are in your professional career— just starting out or moving up the ladder—relationships are the real secret to success,” says Kuzmeski. “If you can use social media to build strong relationships and connect with employer s, you can kick off your professional career by earning a great job opportunity.” Page 12BNews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011www.newssun.com GRIFFIN'S CARPET MART; 7.444"; 10"; Black; windows Continued from page 11B BUSINESS Online life can have an effect on your job prospects MCT The face you put forward on Facebook is important when it comes to making a good impression on potential employers. NEWS-SUN€ 385-6155 Griffins Carpet Mart 4x10

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Special to the News-SunAries (March 21-April 20) –Aries, there’s so much to get done but your mind just isn’t on the task at hand. Maybe some inspiration and encouragement from friends will do it. Taurus (April 21-May 21) –Taurus, it’s time to break out of your funk because there are many exciting things on the horizon. All you have to do is be a little patient. Gemini (May 22-June 21) – Gemini, your industrious nature earns you a new opportunity. You’re not quite sure what to make of the situation just yet. With time you could find it is the perfect fit. Cancer(June 22-July 22) – Silence is golden for you this week, Cancer. Without any distractions you can accomplish many things on a personal level. New relationships could be budding. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) – Don’t let others write off your abilities, Leo. Show them just what you are capable of this week. They will be surprised at what you can accomplish with your mind set. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) – Carefully consider your bank account, Virgo. The time has come to find ways to replenish the money that has been spent; otherwise, you could end up in a sticky situation. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) – Libra, try new things and you will be surprised at the results. An opportunity pops up at work, and it is something you just can’t pass up. Go full steam ahead. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) –Scorpio, work toward and hope for the best this week in the face of many challenges that lie ahead. With a little dedication you can pull through. Sagittarius (Nov. 23Dec. 21) –Make an honest assessment of your personal finances, Sagittarius. Now could be the time to make a few cuts and smarter decisions to work toward establishing that nest egg. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) –Capricorn, you will have a hard time concentra ting on one thing, which could prove troublesome a t school or work. When you need to focus, it’s importan t to clear your mind. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) – For an individual who is so personable, you may have trouble making new friends in the days to come. It could be due to closely guarded secrets that you’re hesitant to share. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) –Pisces, it’s time to make a change because the stars indicate discord and antipathy in your life. Think about the possibilities. Famous birthdaysMay 22 – Ginnife r Goodwin, actress, 33; May 23 –Jewel, singer, 37; May 24 –John C. Reilly, actor, 46; May 25 – Mike Myers, comic actor, 48; May 26 –Lenny Kravitz, singer, 47; May 27 – Chris Colfer, actor, 21; May 28 – Jesse Bradford, actor, 32. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 22, 2011Page 13B HIGHLANDS COUNTY FAIR ASSOC.; 3.639"; 3"; Black; flea market FAIRMONT CINEMA; 1.736"; 6"; Black; 05/20, 05/22, 05/25 STANLEY STEEMER CARPET; 3.639"; 4"; Black; 05/22/11 DIVERSIONS AND/ORBy VERGE ACROSS 1 Missouri range 7 Very friendly with 14 Legitimate 20 Incisor neighbor 21 Lost it 22 His team has an orange-and-black logo 23 Important meeting for Domingo and colleagues? 26 Cabin fever, e.g. 27 Salon supply 28 Hmm ...Ž 29 Glom 30 Hesitant sounds 32 A long time 33 Pulpit tirade? 43 Like a hawks perspective 44 __ agreement 45 Recipe amount 46 Carides of My Big Fat Greek WeddingŽ 49 Scottish psychiatrist R.D. __ 50 Sale of swampland? 55 Windows predecessor 56 Sharp sensation 57 Transfix 58 ... __ mention ...Ž 59 Ornamented, as curtains 62 Sharpness 63 Disloyal union member? 68 Half of vingt 69 Babe,Ž e.g.? 71 AnchormanŽ producer Judd 72 Place for a large E 74 Wine grape 75 Tournament break 77 Part of a roof 78 Boundary 83 Really conservative Conservatives? 87 Welsh breed 88 2010 Mark Twain Prize winner 89 Diving seabird 90 Didnt spoil 91 Meaningful interval 92 Comment about a recently razed vacation complex? 97 Region on the South China Sea 100 Lunch letters 101 Looney Tunes animator Avery 102 Might well 104 Plymouth passenger carrier 109 Self-congratulatory cries 114 Maine travel agencys come-on? 117 Online memos 118 Microsoft reference 119 Italian desserts 120 Out of fashion 121 Tough teammate to handle 122 Obeyed a canine command DOWN 1 Prefix with -hedron 2 Journalist Paula 3 Rare blood type: Abbr. 4 Cage components 5 Work with needles 6 Circ. part 7 Hardly top-of-the-line 8 Legal scholar Guinier 9 Stimulus used in aversion therapy 10 Puppeteer Tony 11 Behold, to Brutus 12 Prepare the factory 13 Hold ones __ 14 Early movie mogul 15 Gully 16 Cybernetics pioneer Norbert 17 1981 Hepburn costar 18 Gastric woe 19 Rude looks 24 God in a chariot 25 Rift 29 Grey Cup sports org. 31 Large-beaked talker 33 Soothing application 34 Green spans 35 Requiring irrigation 36 Chinese: Pref. 37 They may put players out 38 Poetic times 39 Play genre 40 Suffers from 41 Some city lines 42 Toll rd. 46 Cuban base, familiarly 47 Bury 48 Torment 50 Movie-rating org. 51 Beer-making aid 52 Magazine that began as a comic book 53 Some refs. 54 Build up 59 Experian, formerly 60 Its made up 61 Passage 62 Player rep. 63 __ luxury 64 Make __ of money 65 Exchange, as words 66 Onetime Siouan natives 67 Campus military prog. 69 Smooth, in a way 70 Ticks off 72 Snigglers target 73 2010 earthquake site 75 Historic Kentucky county 76 Simple country type 78 Scores 90+ on 79 Satirist Sahl 80 Liveliness 81 Borodin prince 82 Uncluttered 84 Possess, to a Scot 85 Ring ruling 86 Poetic contraction 91 Photos 92 __-CD conversion: music collection updating system 93 Breeding ground 94 Bad way to come on 95 Visit overnight 96 Legend subject 97 Acted quietly? 98 ... world will live __Ž: ImagineŽ 99 Bank 103 Facilitate an arrest, in a way 105 Oil acronym 106 __ first ...Ž 107 Actress Singer 108 LCD flat panel displays have replaced many of them 109 Bush overshadower 110 Up to it 111 Like a Jekyll and Hyde personality 112 Comdie part 113 Slide wildly 115 Hmm ...Ž 116 Word of disgust Solution on page 10B DearAbby: I met “Angie” on a dating site not long ago. She’s an intelligent, openminded woman. So when one of our first conversations turned to sexual preferences, I felt at ease revealing one of my “likes” to her even though I didn’t know her well. Today when we were talking, Angie mentioned that she had asked her girlfriend about her experiences with what I had discussed. Clearly her intent wasn’t to gossip, but nevertheless, I felt betrayed. I had discussed a personal part of myself in a private conversation, and she had divulged what I had said to someone without asking me. Now I’m not sure I want to continue talking to her. Confidence is an essential part of any relationship beyond a casual friendship, and I don’t want her friends being privy to everything that goes on between me and her, even on a “promise not to tell anyone” basis. On the other hand, Angie seemed concerned when she realized I was upset, and her intentions were not malicious. Should I move on? If not, how do I discuss my feelings with Angie without being confrontational? – Wants it Private in Texas DearWants it Private: Angie is not only open-minded, she is also open-mouthed when discussing intimate matters. She and her girlfriend talk about their sexual preferences and activities, or she wouldn’t have known that her friend has had the experience you discussed. If you prefer your sex life kept private, move on because Angie isn’t likely to change. If you are so attracted to her that you’re willing to have your private life become an open book – continue confiding in her because it will happen. Let this be a lesson about opening the door to your innermost secrets so quickly.. DearAbby: While going through some old greeting cards, I read the messages written by our children when they were kids. I thought I would send them back – one for each occasion – as a reminder of good things from the past. It seems some children blame their parents, but forget all the good that happened in their lives. Seeing an old card may be a positive reminder. – Recycling with a Twist DearRecycling: Maybe, maybe not. If you’re having problems with your adult children, my advice would be to resolve those issues in a forthright manner. Do not attempt to “guilt” them, because it’s manipulative and could backfire. However, if you are determined to send the cards, be sure to write something on each one about reconciliation that carries a positive message. DearAbby: It’s the time of year when preschool and elementary school teachers receive so many tokens of thanks we don’t know what to do with them. Why not give a gift that will really be appreciated – and from which everyone will benefit? Let your child help pick out a book for the teacher’s classroom library. The kids know what is already there and can be involved in finding something new and exciting. It will also help them understand how important reading is to you. Most teachers can always use a new addition to their bookshelf. – Reading is for Everyone DearR.I.F.E.: I love your suggestion. Reading is for everyone, and a way to convey that message is for parents of preschool and elementary schoolchildren to read to them and with them every day. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips. Womans loose lips sink ship of budding romance Time to break out of your funk, Taurus Horoscope Classified ads get results! The wooden high-top shoe has been a favorite of mine for 30 years. It had been carved by a friend. His master craftsmanship revealed itself through every object he designed. I had admired this particular artistic piece, and Ken gifted me with it one Christmas. So, when a short while back it fell and broke in two, I was very sad. But, my husband is the master of patiently mending broken things to appear flawless. Once again it holds a place of honor. I loved watching our friend take the wood in his big, burly hands. Then with a sharp knife, care and precision, lovingly turn nothing into something of beauty. Carving – such a wonderful gift of skill and creativity. On the other hand, I’ve seen shavings of wood fall to the ground as someone whittled on a piece of wood. I’m sure there are those who whittle creatively. But, one of the definitions in Webster’s Dictionary says, “To whittle wood with a knife … as a mere aimless diversion.” When a mom gets up early each morning to tend to the needs of her household is she whittling or carving?When she wipes runny noses, holds and comforts a fevered child, reads a book for the twentieth time to a toddler who never tires of hearing it … is she whittling or carving? The same questions could be asked of us in any endeavor. Sometimes we may feel like all we are doing is whittling away the hours. Perhaps some of the mundane tasks of life can become so monotonous we fail to see their importance in providing stability and security. But, if we view them as carving with faithfulness and design, what a different perspective we gain. As God works in us, we may feel like we’re being whittled as we see the shavings of what we perceived as important drop to the ground. However, a closer look will reveal that he is busy carving – developing our character with care and precision. Remember the truth as seen in Philippians 1: 6, NKJV, “Being confident of this very thing, that He who has begun a good work in you will complete it until the day of Jesus Christ.” Recently upon sharing about some of the ups and downs of investing in Christian education in our family, I was asked if we had ever been sorry we spent the money that way. Immediately, this analogy came to mind and I answered, “No, we were carving!” Selah Jan Merop of Sebring is a News-Sun correspondent and an award-winning writer. Are we carving or whittling? Pause And Consider Jan Merop Dear Abby Highlands Couny Fair2x3 Fairmount 1x6 Stanley Steemer 2x4 C M Y K

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C M Y K LIVING 14B PAGE News-Sun Sunday, May 22, 2011 Photos courtesy of Getty ImagesFAMILYFEATURES Homeowners all over the country take great pride in their lawns. But a lush, green lawn can do more than boost egos. Ahealthy lawn can reduce allergens and dust, increase the value of a home, and reduce erosion and runoff. ReducingallergiesOf all Americans who are allergic to pollenproducing plants, 75 percent are allergic to ragweed. While a single ragweed plant may only live for one season, it produces up to one billion pollen grains during that time. Awellmaintained lawn can help limit the amount of ragweed in the air, as it is typically free of many pollen-producing plants as well as other weed problems, such as poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac. More than one half of the U.S. population is allergic to these noxious weeds. Boostingyour realestatevalueNothing beats a first impression. When prospective buyers are searching for a new home, well-landscaped lawns and nearby parks are important factors. Astudy conducted by Virginia Tech University estimated that attractive landscaping can increase the value of a home anywhere from 5 to 11 percent, depending on location. It was also reported that landscape investments are recovered fully, and sometimes doubled by the increased home values. “Potential buyers can be immediately swayed by an unsightly yard, leaving them to wonder if the lack of care and attention to the lawn has been carried to the inside of the house,” said Gray Mattern, Realtor in St. Petersburg, Fla. “If the buyer doesn’t get past the negative first impression, he or she may decide to bypass the home completely without looking at the interior. In this buyer’s market, it’s important to appeal to a wide range of prospective buyers.”Reducingdust andsoilerosionHealthy grass holds soil in place and prevents runoff from being washed into lakes, rivers and streams. The University of Minnesota released results of a research study showing a lawn that is not fertilized actually has more runoff than a lawn that is properly fertilized, due to the increased health of the grass. “Proper lawn care practices will be rewarded by an aesthetically pleasing property and will result in a variety of environmental benefits,” explained Dr. Cathie Lavis, horticulture professor, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kan. “Akey factor to success is selecting the right grass variety for both your region and particular site conditions.”Howtomaintain ahealthylawn“Lawn maintenance includes timely mowing and watering. Additionally, grass quality is generally measured in terms of color, density and uniformity,” said Lavis. “Scheduled fertilization and an awareness of pests and their control will contribute to lawn quality.” Two elements of good lawn health are proper pesticide use when necessary and proper fertilizer use to ensure the grass has the nutrients it needs to thrive. Aproperly fertilized, healthy lawn helps prevent weeds, while pesticides control weed populations already present or before they emerge. Proper pesticide use also keeps grubs and insects at bay. The key differences between lawn and garden pesticides and fertilizers are:Apesticide is the generic term for insecticides, herbicides and fungicides. Pesticides are meant to kill or control weeds, harmful insects and fungal and other diseases. The benefit of pesticides is their ability to prevent and stop pest (weed, insect, or disease) problems before they become out of control and threaten your lawn’s health.Fertilizers provide the proper nutrients to your grass, plants and trees so they can thrive. Afertilization program should include fertilizers that are formulated to meet the needs of your lawn. To get more information on the benefits of a healthy lawn, visit www.debugthemyths.com.Tipsfor HomeownersWhen selecting and using pesticides and fertilizers, the product label directions must be followed to make sure the product works properly and is used in a safe and environmentally sound way. Product labels specify the amount of product that should be applied, how much is needed for your treatment conditions, and how to safely apply and store products. Ask yourself these questions before choosing the right lawn and garden products to meet your needs: What insect, weed or other pest are you trying to control? What is the problem in your lawn? The label will tell you which product best fits the needs of your lawn and where it can be used.How big is your lawn? What treatment are you applying? Select the product that meets the needs of your lawn, and buy only what you need.Do you need a spreader to apply the product? If you have a small, localized problem consider a ready-to-use spot treatment. Follow product label directions for spreader and spot applications. More is not better. Read the label and apply only the recommended amount.