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The news-sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01144
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 05-08-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:01144
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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News-Sun staffSEBRING Aman identified as a DeSoto County Sheriffs Depu ty reportedly beat up his wife, tried to ru n down a pair of Sebring Police Officers and another man with his car, then led law enforcement on a highspeed chase topping 100 mph in the early hours of Friday morning. According to an arrest report, 3 4year-old Luis Jabierr Barajas w as charged with three counts of aggravat ed NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, May 8, 2011 www.newssun.com Volume 92/Number 54 | 75 cents www.newssun.com HighLow 90 64Complete Forecast PAGE 6A Mostly sunny and warm Forecast Question: Should the death photo of Osama bin Laden be released? Next question: Will the death of Osama bin Laden help President Obama get re-elected? www.newssun.comMake your voice heard at Online Obituaries Joanne E. Delaney Age 79, of Lake Placid Obituaries, Page 5A Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453 Online: www.newssun.com Yes 52% No 48% 099099401007 Total votes: 98 Arts & Entertainment10B Business 9B Chalk Talk 7B Classifieds 11A Community Briefs2A Crossword Puzzle13B Dear Abby 13B Editorial & Opinion4A Horoscope 13B Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times 13B Senior Scene 5B Sports On TV 2B Index Earth-friendly household tips made easy PAGE14B Over$175in coupons inside! Courtesy photo Jennifer Buckalew surveys some of the tornado damage in Hackleburg, Ala. Pictures cant even begin to describe the devastation, she said. This was once a house. See who donated, page 8ABy CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRINGI was knocked off my feet, said Rob Bullock, an emergency medical technician with Highlands County. He was speaking metaphorically, referring to how quickly two coworkers and a friend volunteered to join him on a four-day rescue trip to the tornadoravaged area in Alabama. Bullock had simply mentioned he was going to check on his younger brother and step-mother, who live in Hackleburg, Ala. a small town devastated by tornadoes during the massive storm system of April 25-28. Before he knew it, however, paramedics Mike Tallent and Jennifer Buckalew insisted on coming with him, and Brandi McIntosh volunteered to travel as a gofer in support. But that wasnt all, Bullock said. He was stunned by the rapid and generous response from local individuals and businesses, who on hearing of the trip donated money and goods. The local community here was outstanding, Bullock said. People opened their hearts, their wallets and their pantries. In fact, so much was offered, including cash to pay for gas, that Bullock and his friends had to borrow a trailer. Gone with the wind Local EMT group stunned by trip to tornado-ravaged small town in Alabama Courtesy photo (From left) Jennifer Buckalew, Mike Tallent, Brandi McIntosh take a hydration break during their stay in Alabama, helping a devastated town. They stayed four days helping to distribute supplies and manning a first aid station. Barajas By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.com AVON PARK Citizens in Avo n Park are planning a Rally for Rowa n on Monday night just before the cou ncil meeting. The group plans to display signs an d chant just outside the city chambe rs from 4:30-6 p.m. to show their suppo rt for APPD Chief Michael Rowan. Rowan was placed on paid administrative leave on April 19, and is currently in negotiations with city officials to either settle his contract or to reinstate him as police chief. I have done nothing wrong, Row an said during an interview last week. Rowan was put on leave by Interi m City Manager Julian Deleon for inve stigating city officials and recordin g Deputy Mayor Brenda Gray during th at investigation. Rally for Rowan planned Monday Rowan News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLA R 4H team leader, Laura Vanlfleet and members (left to right) Katelyn Vanfleet, 10, Elisabeth Vanfleet, 8, and Julia Vanfleet, 12, secure a young pomegranate tree to a wooden rod on Friday at the University of Florida Highlands County Extension office. An area of land behind the office has been transformed into a mini orchard providing adequate space for the 46 plants. By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Highlands County 4H members have teamed up with the University of Florida Extension Office to take on a task that is the first of its kind. The idea is simple expand the produce production in the state of Florida beyond the typical citrus fruits. The Pioneers for Pomegranate Project is the brain child of Dr. John Alleyne, Community Horticulture Agent at the extension office. The second part of the project is headed by Kellie Duke, the extension offices 4H Agent. Together, Duke and Alleyne have created a project so unique that everyone involved is bursting at the seams with anticipation. The mission of the project is to grow pomegranates in Highlands County. Pomegranate is a widely popular fruit native to the regions of the Middle East. Close to 100 countries, including its native country of Persia Pioneers in pomegranate Local 4-H part of UFexperiment to attempt to grow the fruity locally SPD:DeSoto deputy tried to run over two officers Also charged with beating up his wife See LOCAL, page 7A See 4-H, page 3A See DeSOTO, page 8A See RALLY, page 8A Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and Serving it upSpecial STARStake part in tennis competition SPORTS, 1BLaw DayAbout more than just speeches, awards SPORTS, 2A

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Page 2ANews-SunSunday, May 8, 2011www.newssun.com May 4 61322273750x:3Next jackpot $23 millionApril 30 141628374551x:4 April 27 162026273753x:2 May 6 5892234 May 5 614202534 May 4 1323293335 May 3 410121727 May 6 (n) 5426 May 6 (d) 9848 May 5 (n) 0437 May 5 (d) 5113 May 6(n) 23 0 May 6 (d) 60 4 May 5 (n) 23 7 May 5(d) 45 4 May 6 22131413 May 3 718364119 April 29 3419215 April 26 151943441 May 4 315272941 PB: 24 PP: 4Next jackpot $50 millionApril 30 613153241 PB: 3 PP: 2 April 27 424404455 PB: 5 PP: 2 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.com SEBRING County commissioners will take a look at recreation agreements and tourism requests at their regular meeting on Tuesday. On the agenda for commissioners are the agreements with Avon Park, Sebring and Lake Placid for recreational funding. Commissioners decided to end the inter-local agreements with each city that gave them up to 50 percent of their recreation budget and went with a set amount for each city. All three municipalities received a base of $100,000 earlier in the year and now will receive the balance of the allotments handed out by commissioners. Avon Park had asked the commission for $256,732 while Sebring had asked originally for $187,632 and Lake Placid had only asked for $114,310. The city of Sebring will receive a total of $190,000, Avon Park will get a set $180,000 and Lake Placid will receive $130,000. Additionally, commissioners will again take a look at tourism funding for two Dixie Baseball tournaments to be held in Highlands County. Youth Baseball of Sebring Inc. is looking to get $12,000 for a tourney for Dixie Boys 13and 14-year-olds and Avon Park Baseball, Inc. is as king the commission for $6,080 for t he Dixie Youth. Sebring will hold their tourname nt July 8-14, and Avon Park will ho st their tournament July 15-21. Commissioners have recent ly taken a closer look at how touris m dollars are spent, asking the touris m council to focus more on bringin g dollars to local business rather th an paying for T-shirts. Commissioners to discuss recreation agreements By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.com AVON PARK The Avon Park City Council will take a look at paying off some debt at their next meeting at 6 p.m. on Monday, and will give the go ahead for important annexation projects. According to Interim City Manager Julian Deleon on Friday, council will have the option to take care of over $1.168 million in bonds, saving the city $383,338 in interest over the next six years. Council made paying down debts one of the priorities and thats what we are working on. Overall, some of these savings could lead to a decrease in ad valorem taxes in the long run, Deleon said. The money comes from the citys infrastructure fund, which has a balance of over $2 million, and the payoffs would leave $877,879 in that fund for future use. We are making less on the interest from the funds than we are being charged by the revenue bonds, this is a smart financial move for the city, Deleon said. Deleon also mentioned the opportunity to annex a key piece of land along U.S. 27 that could bring more annexations in the future. I met with Highlands Independent Bank Preside nt John Shoop last week an d the bank agreed to a volu ntary annexation of the pro perty at 2600 Highway 27 , Deleon said. The piece of land is currently a vacant l ot on the southwest banks of Lake Anoka. That piece of property is key to our annexation strat egy. It opens the option to exercise our covenant agre ements with Chaneys (a c ar dealership), which is acro ss the highway and with t he Race Trac (gas station) , Deleon said. The annexation will p ut an estimated $3,900 in t ax revenue into play and $16 5 in a fire assessment into t he citys coffers, Deleon said This is also a directio n set by the council, and I a m just following through. T he idea is to increase the city s revenues by exercising o ur utilities covenants where w e can, and that is happening , Deleon said. As more annexations ta ke place, Deleon also stat ed that the increased revenu es could lower the ad valore m rate inside the city limits. Lake Placid is at 3 .6 mills, Sebring is at 5.6 mi lls and we are at 5.85 mi lls because of the size of o ur tax base. As we continue to increase that tax base, w e could potentially lower o ur millage rate, Deleon said AP council to talk debt payments, annexation News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Judge Milton Hirsch, of the 11th Circuit in Miami-Dade, addresses the audience of fellow judges and attorneys during the 11th Law Day Luncheon Friday. He spoke eloquently about the difficulty of protecting unpopular, or even evil individuals, who are at the same time innocent of a particular crime. COMMUNITYBRIEFS Dirty Dozen Fun Mud Run May 21SEBRING Its time t o get dirty. The Dirty D ozen Fun Mud Run, b enefiting Ducks U nlimited, is set for 10 a .m. Saturday, May 21 at S ebring International R aceway. Its two miles of fun w ith lots of mud (thats t he dirty part) and 12 i nsane obstacles (thats t he dozen part). P articipants will crawl, c limb, jump, swing, run a nd giggle their way t hrough this crazy course. L ook for hidden rubber d uckies along the way; t heyre worth big bucks i n cash and prizes. Cost is $40 per person, o r $50 at the gate. P articipants can be ages 1 3 and up. All military p ersonnel, First R esponders, and county a nd school board employe es can save $10 off a dmission. Each particip ant gets an event T-shirt. T here will be music and b everages. Admission is free for s pectators, but there is a $ 5 parking fee. Visit S ebringraceway.com or d dozen.com for more i nformation.Free computer classes at librariesThe Heartland Library C ooperative continues its m ission to offer free w eekly computer classes t o citizens of Highlands C ounty. Currently, I ntroduction to PCs, I ntermediate PCs and W eb Based Email are b eing offered at Lake P lacid Memorial Library o n Wednesdays, Sebring P ublic Library on F ridays, and Avon Park P ublic Library on T uesdays. Internet B asics, and Word P rocessing will also be o ffered. Internet Basics will a llow users the chance f or hands-on experience i n surfing the World W ide Web (www) in a c ontrolled environment. T he Word Processing c lass will encompass text f ormatting, and teach u sers the cut, copy and p aste functions. For schedules and i nformation, call Lake P lacid Memorial Library a t 699-3705, Sebring P ublic Library at 4026 716 or Avon Park Public L ibrary at 452-3803.Sebring Elks plan special Mothers Day breakfast SEBRING From 9 a .m. to noon today, the P ast Exalted Rulers A ssociation and Lodge A ctivities Committee will b e offering a plated meal ( scrambled eggs, bacon, b iscuits and gravy, s ausage, hash browns, F rench toast, assortment o f muffins, fruit salad, o range juice, coffee, e tc.). Every lady will r eceive a carnation. Everyone is welcome. C ost is $6.Parkinsons support group meets MondaySEBRING The P arkinsons disease supp ort group for the H ighlands County area w ill meet at 10 a.m. M onday at First Baptist C hurch of Sebring (corn er of Pine and Lemon S treet). The program this m onth will be questions Continued on page 5A By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Students at Sebring Middle School have been participating in the Read Aloud reading project that has united the entire school in fun and learning. The students began reading author Gary Shmidts Wednesday Wars. The book is a historical fiction novel set in the late 1960s and was written in 2007. More than 800 students in grades sixth through eighth participated Monday, Tuesday and Thursday in multiple activities involving 1960s to enrich their reading material. Betty Ann Lee, SMS technology resource teacher, along with Candis Dean, literacy coach, created games and activities for the students to participate in throughout the week. They read the book and they have questions about the era, so these activities go along with the time. It makes the story come to life for them, said Dean. Thursday morning, students were busy getting their hands dirty or stained, rather in the SMS courtyard. We are making tie-dye shirts, explained Lee. Students spent their language arts period outside with Lee and Dean created the one-of-a-kind shirts. All the kids brought their own shirts and they just follow the instructions and make them. Then on May 20, they get to wear them to school and get into the car show, said Dean. The school will have a small car show on the campus in the upcoming weeks to continue on with the book activities. All of the cars will be parked on campus for students, parents and teachers to see. The cars will all be replicas of the vehicles mentioned in Wednesday Wars. It just touches different content areas. It is fun for them, it gets them involved and helps them get a better love of reading, said Dean. Read Aloud week brings fun back into reading for Sebring Middle students NEWS-SUN 385-6155 By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Law Day, which came into being during the Eisenhower administration, honors the rule of law, that foundation of American freedoms. It is more than simply a day of fine speeches and congratulatory applause, however. It culminates the effort by volunteer judges and attorneys who go out into the schools, introducing children of all ages to the basic principals and issues of law. For example, attorney Heather Beato made the Boston Massacre come alive in a school cafeteria this year, complete with red-coated soldiers, colonial mobs and dead bodies on the floor. This was particularly appropriate because 2011s Law Day theme was the legacy of John Adams: From Boston to Guantanamo. Adams, the first lawyer elected president also the second president was a complicated man. Late in his administration he was responsible for the Alien and Sedition acts four laws which curtailed dissent, made deporting foreigners easier and enhanced federal over state government. Ideals useless without the courage to live up to them Law Day See LAW, page 8A

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 8, 2011Page 3A a s well as Iran, Egypt, Saudi A rabia and India have cultiv ated this super fruit cent uries. The pomegranate is a v ery ancient fruit; use of the f ruit was mentioned as far b ack as the Book of Exodus. Many people have studied t he fruit, its been used for m any, many years. There is e vidence and many believe t hat it is the fruit Eve gave to A dam in the Bible, Alleyne s aid. The super fruit is high in a ntioxidants and has become a popular health food in r ecent years. The climate here is simil ar to what they have over t here. Very hot, very dry so w e believe that Florida could a lso cultivate pomegranate, e xplained Alleyne. Pomegranate is resilient p lant, needing little water a fter the initial planting. The t rees are able to withstand m uch heat yet still flourish a nd produce fruit. Some people around the c ounty have been able to g row them as ornamentals. T heres a few people that h ave them in their yards a lready, so we are hoping that w e can do this, said Duke. The plants were placed in t he soil on Thursday aftern oon. Nearly 20 4-H memb ers along with their team l eaders, were present and t ook the first step into what c ould be a history-making m oment. These kids are on the cutt ing edge of research. They w ill be contributing to the r esearch at UF, Duke said p roudly. The plants were purchased b y scientists, horticulturers a nd professors throughout m any travels in the Middle E ast and brought back to the u niversity. We have plants from T urkey, Iran, Iraq there are about 20 different countries that these have come from, Alleyne said. The 23 varieties of pomegranate plants were given to Alleyne by the University of Florida. There are two plants per each type, giving the cultivators ample opportunity to see what grows best and how. We can tell you everything you want to know about citrus. Everything. But pomegranate, well, we will see. We will learn so much with this project, Alleyne said. The kids dont seem to mind the weight of the project. They are just happy to be doing the things they love. Several of the students have gardened before through the 4H club as well as raise animals, but this is the first time they will raise a plant. For our first big gardening project, I think its great. I think they will grow and its fun that we get to do it, said 4-H member Julia Vanfleet. The plants are only about three months old now. Pomegranates in the Far East reach adulthood at three years of age, though they bear fruit well before then. Alleyne believes that the trees could bear some fruit as early as next year. The first year will be trying, though. Much is expected to be learned and much is needed to keep the project going. Mulch, fertilizer, gardening tools, and sun protection are all required in order to keep the project afloat. The 4-H members and the Extension Office gladly accept any type of donations for the project. Those interested in helping out can contact Duke at 4027147 or 4-H Team Leader Erin Sowards 381-9004. This (project) has tremendous potential and responsibility, said Alleyne. The growing of the plants is just part of it. Getting the kids involved and getting the kids interested in science and agriculture, that is the real reward. Continued from page 1A 4-H club planting pomegranates News Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Dr. John Alleyne, Horticulture agent at the University of Florida Highlands County Extension Office, is the brain power behind the Pioneers for Pomegranate Project. Alleyne with the help of Highlands County 4H members will attempt to grow 46 pomegranate plants. The project is the first of its kind in the state.

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Page 4ANews-SunSunday, May 8, 2011www.newssun.comTODAYSEDITORIALTODAYSLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.comBUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION Theyre locked down in violation of the law. Tied with ropes. Given tranquilizers without a doctors order. It has happened to Floridas most vulnerable, the elderly or mentally ill, at least 1,732 times since 2002 in homes licensed by the state. Most of those homes have been slapped with a relatively small fine and nothing more.Societys most important obligation is to protect the most vulnerable among us the elderly, infirm and children. Reasonable people may disagree on how best to meet that duty, but Floridians resoundingly look to their government for a minimum of protection. Yet our state government is failing miserably on that front failing to protect our poorest of seniors and the mentally ill from abuse and neglect. And it was failing long before Florida faced an economic tumble. Worse yet, these are folks living in homes that taxpayers finance through Medicaid, the federal-state partnership that puts Florida in charge of caring for the poorest sick residents. As detailed in Neglected to Death, The Miami Heralds yearlong investigation, Floridas assisted-living law once hailed as the most progressive in the nation is often ignored by the state agency charged with policing abuses. Year after year, the Agency for Health Care Administration gives violators in statelicensed homes pass after pass to keep operating, often after hundreds of violations have been racked up and even after the weak and defenseless die from abuse or neglect. Florida toughened penalties for abuse of elderly and disabled people in 2008, but whats the point if the states lax oversight of problematic homes continues? ... The Florida Legislature has been complicit. Even as Floridas elderly population has boomed with the Sunshine State leading the nation in the percentage of residents 85 and older we rank at the bottom of public spending on care for the oldest elders. AHCA, which oversees Floridas 2,850 assisted-living facilities, or ALFs, has the responsibility to care for more than 80,000 people living in them. Incredibly it doesnt inspect those facilities but once every two years! Thats because in 1993, the Legislature refused to increase funding for inspections. In 2001, legislators made it harder for ALF residents or their families to sue owners of troubled facilities and reduced the amount of liability insurance the homes would have to buy all an invitation for more abuse. Beyond shameful. An editorial from the Miami Herald. Day of Prayer photo speaks loudlyEditor: What a great picture in your News Sun dated Friday-Saturday, May 6-7 Day of Prayer. As a school guidance counselo r, this speaks volumes to ou r students, about a diverse community, praying toget her. On the same page, to th e lower right, Countys FCATwriting scores show improvement. Nothing happens by accident. Manny Losad a Sebrin g Truth is truthEditor: I, as a Christian, canno t rejoice over the death of Bin Laden or any person who dies out of Christ. Th e Lord God says, I have no pleasure in the death of th e wicked, but that the wicke d turn from his way and liv e (Ezekiel 33:11). Jesus proclaimed the same mindset in John 8:2 4, Therefore I said that you will die in your sins; for i f you do not believe that I am He, you will die in your sins. This truth did not sit well with those in the tim e of the Messiah as well as many today. But truth is truth. Civil authority as ordained by the Great I am (Romans 13) does not bear the sword in vain an d has a rightful place in His scheme of things. Frank Park er Sebrin g BouquetEaster Sunday event a big successEditor: I would like to offer a heartfelt thank you to everyone that contributed to making the recent even t held in the Highway Park Community a huge success. The occasion was Easter Sunday, where for the 10th consecutive year several streets in the Highway Park community were transformed into a huge social event. An estimated crowd of several hundred patrons were treated to a wide var iety of food and other goo ds offered by vendors from cities throughout Florida and many nearby communities as well. This event has grown larger each yea r and its success would not be possible without the cooperation and support o f some key people. Aspeci al thank you goes out to Sheriff Susan Benton and the Highlands County Sheriffs Department. The great group of deputies on site, led by Lt. Jim McGann, helped to ensure a safe, trouble free and fu n filled event for everyone. They were truly awesome Thanks to Leslie Portee of the Highway Park Neighborhood Preservatio n and Enhancement District Council and all the volun teers for all of your hard work to help make this event a success. And last but certainly not least, a very special thank you goes out to all residents of the Highway Park Community. Many o f you were inconvenienced by the street closures, detours and possibly the largest crowd to ever assemble in this communi ty, but you were all wonderful hosts. Selvin McGahee an d All Management an d Sta ff Highway Liquo rs Another viewpoint There is much that happens in g overnment that is not constitutional a nd many holding office that do not h old the American people or the C onstitution in high regard. We need t o educate ourselves in the C onstitution, so that we can hold our e lected officials responsible to that d ocument they swear to uphold. We have a right to be critical of e lected officials who are not doing t heir job according to our C onstitution. No criticism should be w ithheld of those we elect to serve t his country if their performance is s ubstandard. All assessment should b e about the performance of their a rea of responsibility, not the person. W e may have a personal dislike for a p ersonality trait of theirs, or their p ersonal habits; however we need to b e concerned with the job they are d oing; that is where we need to scrut inize. I have heard and read many object ions about our President and our V ice-President, as well as Senators a nd Representatives, and I agree w ith some of those objections. H owever, when they become persona l attacks on the person themselves I object to such slander. All that is accomplished with such rhetoric is division and animosity. How can we expect to move forward to accomplish the needs of this country and its people with words of hate? I am reminded of David in the Old Testament and his dealings with King Saul and how even though David had done nothing to earn the hatred of Saul he refused to raise his hand against Gods anointed. (I Samuel 24:6, 10; 26:9, 11, 23). This should be an example for us as Disciples of Christ. Though the passages cited above are about inflicting physical harm, we should see them as examples not to inflict any personal animosity on any of Gods creation. His word tells us, with humility of mind let each of you regard one another as more important than himself, (Php 2:3), NASB. Yes this verse is about the relationship of believers in Christ to other believers, but does that negate our relationship with our fellow man that is held in captivity by Satan and the world. President Obama has done many things that can be deemed unconstitutional and should be held accountable for those actions; and in time will be, yet we can talk about these things respectfully. Name calling, and any references to mental or physical abnormalities are childish and irresponsible. Yes, he himself has been irresponsible, but that is for him to answer for, and if history is any judge he will; then of course he has to answer to God who establishes government (Romans 13:1 7). We need to speak respectfully about all our leaders, for as the passage in Romans referenced above states, they are Gods agents; even when they are working for their own selfish interests. We have the opportunity to remove those who are not working for the interest of our country by exercising our rights and duties as citizens of this great country at the ballot box. We can write, call, or e-mail our elected officials and let them know we see and hear their actions and words, reminding them that they are representing the citizens of the United States of America. Letting them know they are in the position they are holding because we put them there, and we can remove them. They are also representing those who have gone before us, Presidents, Senators, Representatives, soldiers and patriots that gave their time, fortunes and lives to make this country what it is with the help of that Omnipotent, Almighty Being, whom Benjamin Franklin reminds us, governs in the affairs of men". Be respectful; be gracious, but above all honoring to our Founders, our sons and daughters, our ancestors who have given their all so that we can be that shining city of light on the hill to the rest of the world. We are a shining city that is beaming hope, freedom, and giving praise to the Creator whose hand was in the founding of this Republic of the United States of America. Larry J Overfield is a Sebring resident. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily that of the NewsSun. Be concerned with the job, not the person Guest Column Larry J. Overfield Make sure to sign your letter (400 words or less) and include your address and phone number. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870; fax 3851954; or e-mail editor@newssun.com. First, the few things a lmost everyone can agree u pon. First, Osama (or Usama, d epending on whos reporti ng) bin Laden was an evil m an who was responsible f or many deaths. Including t he horror that was 9/11. Also, most of us will a gree we have a great milit ary force which conducted t his mission with considera ble skill and bravery. They s hould get most of the credi t for the operation. And, I suspect thats a bout it when it comes to w hat we agree on when it c omes to the death of O sama bin Laden, who was s hot in the head last Sunday w hen American troops raide d his compound. I know a lot of people h ave celebrated his death. I w atched the scenes of c rowds chanting USA! a nd singing the national a nthem. While it is not my nature t o rejoice in the death of a nother human being, I will a dmit to feeling a sense of r elief when I heard that bin L aden had died. He is now u nable to harm anyone else w ith his hatred. He paid for h is crimes. Of course, there are peop le out there who dont b elieve he is actually dead. T hats the reason I think the p resident is wrong not to r elease pictures of bin L adens body. Of course, t here are those who wouldn t believe even if they saw t he body themselves. But t he pictures would surely h elp to lay these doubts to r est. One argument against r eleasing the pictures is that t hey will be used to incite certain people against us. My answer is, they dont hate us already? Does President Obama deserve any credit for bin Ladens death? He was in charge, it happened on his watch, so yeah, he gets some credit. If it had happened on President Bushs watch, he would get credit. Though if we are being honest, President Bush should get some credit anyway since many of the policies that helped to get the information regarding bin Ladens whereabouts were set in place during his administration. Did enhanced interrogation techniques play a role in finding bin Laden? Apparently so. Does that mean such techniques should be used with impunity? I admit as a Christian I am uneasy with such tactics. But I am forced to admit that in this case they were effective. Then there is the question of Pakistan. The leaders of that country are claiming to be shocked that Osama bin Laden was hiding there. They had no idea. There was this mysterious large compound near their equivalent of West Point, and they had no clue. This is one time you can count me as a skeptic. Pakistan has some explaining to do. Im not holding my breath for answers. I hear theyre mad at us for the operation we conducted in their country without telling them. My answer? Tough cookies. This does not mean, of course, that the war on terror is over. There are still people out there who want us dead, simply because we are Americans. Someone else will probably take bin Ladens place as the face of Al-Qaeda. The Taliban still exist. In fact, there is concern that there will be a backlash response to bin Ladens death. Were being warned to be vigilant just in case. But with the death of bin Laden, we have struck a serious blow in the War on Terror. Who knows? Maybe thats something else we can all agree on. Laura Ware can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady@ embarqmail.com Osama bin Laden dead and gone Lauras Look Laura Ware

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Special to the News-SunJudge Olin W. Shinholser w as recently honored with t he Silver Beaver award by t he Boy Scouts of America a t a presentation ceremony i n Tampa for his long-time d edication to aiding the l ocal Scouting movement in b oth Highlands and Hardee C ounties. The award is the h ighest honor that a volunt eer may receive from the C ouncil level and is recogn ition of service at both the D istrict and Council levels. Shinholser is a Florida n ative. He was born in T allahassee (closest hospital t o his parents home town of P erry). Judge Shinholser j oined Boy Scouting at an e arly age. He advanced to t he rank of Star Scout and w as a Senior Patrol Leader a s well as an Ordeal member o f the Order of the Arrow. H e graduated from Forrest H igh School in J acksonville. After receiving his both h is under graduate and law d egrees from the University o f Florida, he practiced law i n Lake Butler. As an EMT, h e served as a volunteer for t he Union County A mbulance Service. In 1 979 he became an assistant s tate attorney in Bartow, F lorida. In 1980, he transferred to S ebring as head of the local s tate attorneys office. In D ecember, 1989 Governor M artinez appointed him as H ighlands County Judge a nd in in 2002 Governor B ush appointed him as a circ uit judge. Judge S hinholser currently serves a s interim chair-elect/secret ary of the Florida C onference of Circuit J udges. In addition to his civic d uties, he serves as an elder a nd Bible teacher for S ebring Parkway Church of C hrist. He is a volunteer m entor for the Take Stock in C hildren Program. He meets with a high school student every week to mentor and give encouragement and support. He has been twice awarded Kiwanian of the year, is a distinguished past secretary and distinguished past president of the morning Kiwanis club. Shinholser served for three years in the past as the Calusa District Chairman and has continued to remain on the Gulf Ridge Councils Executive Board. He has served in various roles for the district including the nominating committee and the charter organizational representative for the units at Sebring Parkway Church of Christ. The judge was also instrumental in helping to get the J.A.K.E. youth diversion program up and running in Polk, Highlands and Hardee Counties. In 2008 he received the Boy Scouts of America Highlands County Friends of Scouting Distinguished Citizen Award. He is also a previous recipient of the District Award of Merit. His wife Brenda is a kindergarten teacher finishing her 36th year. His daughter Julie is a local CPAand daughter Rebecca is an assistant state attorney in Gainesville. His has two grandchildren, Joshua and Rachel Fowler. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 8, 2011Page 5A and answers. All persons with Parkinsons disease and their families are welcome to attend. There is no charge. For more information, call 453-6589 or 453-6419. The Highlands County Parkinsons Support Group is part of the national network of support groups affiliated with the American Parkinsons Disease Association.Tangelwood FMO meets WednesdaySEBRING Tanglewood FMO meets at 10 a.m. Wednesday in the bingo area. Guest speaker will be Bill Williams, state director of Division Five. Butterfly Friends meet Tuesday SEBRING The Butterfly Friends will meet at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agriculture Center in Conference Room 2. If you are interested in butterfly gardening you can learn more about butterfly gardening and promote the butterfly population. For more information contact Betty Podmore, 3852605 or Lucy Wheeler at 382-7465.Cruise benefits Hendersons effortsLAKE PLACID Everyone is invited to join Eddie Mae Hendersons friends and supporters on a fundraising cruise to the exotic western Caribbean. Every year for the past 31 years Henderson has cooked and served Christmas dinner to the needy in Lake Placid. Take a cruise and know that you are helping to support this worthy cause. For every booking made, the cruise line will donate money to help Henderson defray costs of that dinner. For more information call Sandy at 863-243-3097.Helms to speak at chamber luncheonLAKE PLACID The Greater Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce Membership Luncheon will be held at noon Wednesday at the Lake Placid Elks Lodge. The guest speaker will be Rick Helms, Highlands County administrator, who will give an update on the county. The luncheon is sponsored by the Palms of Sebring. RSVPthe chamber on or before Monday at chamber@lpfla.com or call 4654331. Cost is $8 per person. Southern Sound to perform at Dees SEBRING Southern Sound from North Carolina will bring their gospel music to Sebring for a dinner concert at 6 p.m. Saturday, May 14 at Dees Place Restaurant. Cost is by a donation only. Call 471-2228 for reservations. Seating is limited.Amateur Radio Club meets TuesdaySEBRING The Highlands County Amateur Radio Club will offer a class to teach the basics of HAM radio operations at 7 p.m. Tuesday at First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive. In this class, participants will learn everything neede d to ear a Technician Class Radio License (entry level) For information, call 464 0317.Gem and Mineral Club meetsSEBRING The Highlands Gem and Minera l Club will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway, in the rear fellow ship hall. The public is wel come and there are no dues or membership fees. An interest in any aspect of geology, mineralogy, or lap idary will allow attendees t o enjoy and learn about the interesting hobby of rockhounding and collecting, an d turning minerals, crystals and ores into works of art. Attendees will also have the opportunity to purchase and increase their personal collections and to learn how to look for certain types of rocks or minerals, whether in the field, at rock shops, shows, or even yard or esta te sales. The speaker for the May meeting will be David Senchaway, designer and repairer of jewelry. He will inform and advise members on the current situation in the every-increasing price o f gold and silver. He will als o discuss the various special deals and scams where citizens are being cheated when trying to convert thei r scrap, broken or unused jew elry for much-needed cash. The birthstone for May i s the emerald, a rich green variety of beryl. The information, call 453 7054. Continued from page 2A COMMUNITYBRIEFS JOANNE E. DELANEY Joanne E. Delaney, 79, of Lake Placid went to be with her Lord Friday morning May 6, 2011 at Florida Hospital Lake Placid. She was born on Dec. 27, 1931 in Washington, D.C. to parents James B. and Ella (Davis) Everett. Mrs. Delaney was a retired administrator with the Drug Enforcement Agency in Miami. Joanne loved spending time with her family, was an avid Miami Dolphin football fan, enjoyed bingo and fishing. Mrs. Delaney is survived by her loving husband John, son James Lopez, a sister and three step-daughters: Linda, Jacqueline and Patricia. The family will receive friends 57 p.m. Tuesday May 10, 2011 at the Scott Funeral Home 504 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid and prayer services at 6:45 p.m. AMass of Christian Burial to celebrate Joannes life will take place 11 a.m. Wednesday May 11, 2011 at the St. Jam es Catholic Church, 3380 Plac id View Drive, Lake Placi d, with Father Michael Canno n celebrating. Burial will follow at t he Oak Hill Cemetery. Words of comfort to t he family can be made by vis iting www.scottfuneralse rvices.com. Arrangemen ts entrusted to: Scott Funeral Home Lake Placid, 465-4134. OBITUARIES Courtesy photo T eam co-captains from Publix (from far left) Shae Harris, Cindy Robson, Sarah Partazzio and Tangey McCullors woof down some watermelon as they participate W ednesday in the Watermelon Crawl in the Fruit Fiesta at Ridge Area Arc in Avon Park. This was one of the activities businesses got to do during the United Way Day of Caring. Publix was keeping the consumers busy while some of their classrooms were being painted. Although Robson crawled across the floor and chowed down the bowl of w atermelon the fastest to score her team the Looney Lemons 100 points, it was McCullors who led the Wacky Watermelons to victory overall. Watermelon Crawl Courtesy photo Circuit Judge Olin W. Shinholser was presented the Silver Beaver Award of the Boy Scouts of America last month. This is the highest award presented at the Council Level. Shinholser honored by Scouts Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun Associated PressCUDJOE KEY Rescuers workers were treating and securing several pilot whales that have been stranded off the lower Florida Keys. Responders gathered eight of the stranded whales Friday in a temporary sea pen, where veterinarians examined them and performed medical tests. One whales condition deteriorated Friday, and the animal had to be euthanized. The whales were constantly supported in the water by volunteers standing alongside them. Marine mammal experts deemed t he whales in the sea pen are in stable, but guar ded condition. The pilot whales were found strand ed Thursday in multiple areas in shallow Gulf of Mexico waters and mangroves near Cudj oe Key. AFlorida Keys National Marine Sanctua ry spokeswoman says several others whal es were spotted in Atlantic Ocean waters Frida y. Responders say 13 whales are confirm ed dead, and necropsies are planned. Rescuers tend to stranded whales

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Afamily mission had t urned into the greatest t rip, Bullock said. Hackleburg, he explained, i s a small town in the northw est corner of the state and t he middle of nowhere, a bout 15 miles from the M ississippi border. Its set up a little like A von Park, Bullock said, with a main street running u p to the high school. The m ajority of the population l ives in a concentrated d owntown area. Of the approximately 1 ,500 Hackleburg residents, 2 9 were killed and dozens i njured, many seriously with f ractured skulls or broken b acks and necks. The town was hit twice. First, an EF-5 tornado t he strongest category a rrived without warning W ednesday, April 27, at a bout 5 p.m., plowing along t he main street pulverizing e verything in its path. The p olice department, the groc ery store, the post office a nd the gas station were carr ied completely away. The school was virtually f lattened and every church, s ave one, was destroyed. E ven the standing church w as heavily damaged and c onsidered unsafe. The fact t hat it was being used as a s taging center in the recove ry efforts, with tents raised a longside, is an example of h ow devastated the town w as. Students had been sent h ome early from school b ecause of the bad weather. Bullocks brother Ryan, 1 7, went to a friends house w ith several other teenagers. T he house, on the outskirts o f town, was a substantial t wo-story model with a basem ent. Hanging out, the young people noticed it had started to hail. That brought them to the windows to look out. What they saw was a big, black wall coming over the hill, right at them. They barely got to the basement when the twister arrived seconds later. The friends father was the last down the stairs. The winds, estimated at 207 mph, yanked the bridgework out of his mouth. Ryan told Jennifer Buckalew he had kept his eyes closed most of the time, except for one moment when he looked and saw a pair of legs pulled up into the air. A moment later the wall framing fell on top of everyone. The teens suffered cuts and bruises, and one girl suffered two broken ribs. The house around them was completely destroyed except for the steps leading to the front door. One woman told Bullock she had literally ridden out the storm, clinging to a pipe in her home while the house was torn from its foundation and flew through the air. The F-5 moved on. Just as people were beginning to crawl out from under the ruined buildings the second tornado hit, an F-2. This time there was a moment of warning when the siren was heard in the next town. Bullock, Tallent and Buckalew said looking at pictures of the destruction cannot bring home the reality and immensity of the loss, or how widespread that destruction was. Items from places 60 miles away were found in trees. One Hackleburg pastors certificate of ministry was found in Tennessee. That pastor, Clint Knowles of the Prophecy of God Church, also lost his Bible, which had been sitting on a small table with his reading glasses next to his recliner. After the tornado passed, the recliner, table and glasses remained, but the Bible was nowhere to be found. Before Bullock and his friends had left on their trip, Stephanie Hadwin, in addition to many other donations, gave them her beloved childhood Bible to pass on to someone who would need it more than she did. Bullock presented it to Knowles, who used it in the Sunday services the Highlands County team attended. Tallent, Buckalew and Bullock repeatedly said how overwhelmed they were at how the people of Hackleburg responded to the disaster. They were amazed at the hospitality, the positive outlook, the many acts of selfless kindness, how th e community came together, how calmly the towns peo ple looked forward to rebuilding. They told of residents in undamaged homes inviting them in to eat, and answering, No, no. We brought YOU food. Tallent described how th e high schools baseball team was sent off to its championship game in the middle of all the chaos, the town gath ering around the bus cheering the team on, the police providing a escort. The Highlands County crew stayed four days, doin g whatever needed to be done including distributing dona tions and working at the fir st aid station. One of the mos t important things, they said, was listening to people who needed to tell their stories. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 8, 2011Page 7A Continued from page 1A Local EMTs carry aid to Alabama town decimated by tornadoes Courtesy photo With the ruined church directly behind it, the tent area acts as Hackleburgs rescue and communications center. Sundays it is the center of worship as well, with members of all the towns churches gathering in united fellowship. Courtesy photo Rob Bullock (left) gives a Bible to Pastor Clint Knowles (right) of the Prophecy of God Church, during the first Sunday service after the tornado hit. Close to 500 people of all denominations gathered under a tent to worship and give thanks together. The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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B y CHRISTOPHERTUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comRob Bullock, Mike Tallent, J ennifer Buckalew and B randi McIntosh were so i mpressed with peoples gene rosity in responding to the d evastating tornadoes they a sked the News-Sun to a cknowledge them. In addition to those listed, p eople in three communities o n the route north reading about the rescue trip on Facebook arranged for meetings along the way to add to the donations. Cash for gasoline expenses, food, water, clothing, pet food and daily need items poured in. Primary donors were: The Lusby family, the Dross family, Stephanie and Damon Hadwin, Jimmy Ferrell, the Jason Floyd family, Sharon Bunker, Jennifer Santana, Dr. Art and Janet Patterson, the Lonnie Shields family, the Troy Granata family, Winn Dixie of Avon Park, Big-T Tire, The Avon Park Fire Department, and the staff of the Stephanie Sharrea Salon. Members of the Bullock, Buckalew and Tallent families also donated to the trip. I cannot have confidence in an executive meeting if I do not know if someone is recording the conversation, Deleon said at the last city meeting. Chip Thullbery, of the States Attorney Office in Bartow, stated last week that Rowan was within his rights as an officer to investigate city council. Our department was aware of the investigations. Every sworn officer has a duty to investigate potential criminal activity, Thullbery said. Rowan would not discuss his negotiations with the city on Friday, stating that he had to deal in good faith during the process, but Deleon stated the city was offering 26 weeks of severance to Rowan. Rowans contract states that he is currently due fou rand-a-half years of severan ce at his $68,000 rate of pay. I would like to return to service. I dont want to se ek another job. I like Avon Par k, and for 14 years have serv ed the citizens of this city to t he best of my ability, Row an said. Page 8ANews-SunSunday, May 8, 2011www.newssun.com assault with a deadly weapon two of those charges more severe because they were on law enforcement officers and one count of battery. The report said that SPD officers Raymond Rossy, Brandon Low and Jeff Reinhart were in uniform and working an extra duty detail outside of Don Jose restaurant for Cinco de Mayo. As the crowd was leaving at 1:52 a.m., a person approached the officers and told them that a man was beating up a woman in a car in the parking lot. Low and Rossy approached the car and it began to back out of its parking space as several people in the area yelled for the police to stop the vehicle. As the vehicle, a 2000 Mercury Grand Marquis, began to pull forward, it almost ran over a patron, who had to jump out of the way. Low was 10 feet in front of the car with his arm out, telling the driver to stop, when the car accelerated intentionally toward Ofc. Low, Rossy wrote in his report. I saw the Ofc. Low had less than a second to move out of the way to avoid being struck by the vehicle. The car then accelerated toward Rossy, who also had to step out of the way to avoid being struck, the report said. Rossy ran after the car and saw it speed down Flare Road and turn north on U.S. 27. SPD Commander Steve Carr said that SPD units, as well as Highlands County Sheriffs Office units and eventually Avon Park poli ce were involved in the pursu it, during which Carr sa id Barajas exceeded 100 mp h. Carr also said that Baraj as was involved in a wreck ne ar College Drive. The car w as abandoned at Barajasres idence in Avon Park and he reportedly fled the ar ea before being arrested aroun d 4 p.m. on Friday by a HCS O deputy. Rossy reported th at Barajaswife, who was left in the parking lot, was bleedin g from her nose and her fa ce was covered in blood. S he said that she couldnt remem ber the details and had n o idea what caused Barajas to hit her or how many tim es she had been struck. Barajas was being he ld without bail at the Highlan ds County Jail on Saturday. Continued from page 1A Continued from page 1A The acts were found to b e unconstitutional and w ere later rescinded. But this same man, in 1 770, when the colonies h ad begun their struggle for s elf-determination, stepped f orward in an act of singul ar bravery, defending B ritish soldiers who had o pened fire on rowdy civili ans, killing five in what is k nown as the Boston M assacre. It was this act of courage t hat guest speaker Judge M ilton Hirsch addressed F riday afternoon. The killing of the civili ans had so outraged B oston that not only did j urors have to be brought in f rom other towns, no l awyer was willing to act in t heir defense. The most difficult situat ion a lawyer faces, Hirsch s aid, is defending an indiv idual who is hated but not g uilty, or is guilty of a h einous act. We sometimes view the l aw, and its process, H irsch said, as an idealized f airy tale, with clearly d efined issues; the right a lways winning out. Real life is more complic ated. Hirsch spoke of John D emjanjuk, accused of b eing a particularly sadistic g uard in a German concent ration camp during World W ar II, and one of the I sraeli lawyers who defende d him, eventually securing h is acquittal. The lawyer committed s uicide immediately after t he court ruling. The emot ional toll of defending D emjanjuk, who had been a g uard in a concentration c amp but was innocent of t he particular charges, was t oo much to bear. Principles are easy to l ive by when they are popu lar, Hirsch said, but doing t he right thing when most p eople think it is the wrong t hing typically brings only p ain, alienation and sufferi ng. Alawyer devoted to the l aw will face this reality h is or her entire career. Hirsch reminded the a udience that causes, unlike p eople, are not created e qual. There is nothing heroic about a suicide bomber, he said. But there is everything heroic about a lawyer who defends someone (who is hated). If due process is denied to one of us, it leads to due process denied to all of us whether done subtly or brazenly. As a state judge, Hirsch said he could not comment directly on the countrys current moral dilemma Guantanamo, a concentration camp on a foreign shore where men are held in indefinite imprisonment, without ever being charged with a crime. It would be wrong for me to comment, he said. What is important is what lies in the future when we are threatened and put our liberties on hold. He said that the time to use the 4th, 5th and 6th Amendments is on the day a person is dragged away or forced to testify against himself, or is tortured for information. He told the story of Col. Abraham Davenport, a member of the Connecticut Council, or Senate. One spring day in 1780, as the government went about its business, the day grew increasingly dark, so ominous, in fact, that people believed Judgment Day had arrived. While colleague, in a panic, wanted to adjourn the session, Davenport counseled otherwise. Hirsch quoted him. The Day of Judgment is either approaching or it is not. If it is not, there is no cause for an adjournment; if it is, I choose to be found doing my duty. I wish therefore that candles be brought. Hirsch, leaning forward, lowering his voice to a whisper, looking directly into the audience said, Lets light candles. Continued from page 2A News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Nancy Thomas receives the Highlands County Bar Associations Law Day Award to enthusiastic applause. Thomas works in the countys law library where she is considered indispensable, and has been instrumental in organizing Law Day celebrations for years. News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY J. David Langford, chief judge, presents attorney Linda Rodriguez-Torrent with the Judge Clifton M. Kelly Award at the Law Day Luncheon Friday. Rodriguez-Torrent was one of the founders of the Teen Court. Law Day honors John Adams DeSoto deputy charged with assault Rally for Rowan set for Monday Get the paper delivered to you! NEWS-SUN-6155 Thank yous to the donors Classified ads get results! Call 314-9876 The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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Special to the News-SunSEBRING Dollar G eneral continues to make s hopping easier for cust omers in Sebring with the o pening of its new store at 1 04 Tanglewood Drive. The new store will provide c ustomers with the same v alue and convenience they h ave come to rely on, just in a different location. The new s tore will employ six to 10 p eople. Dollar General is comm itted to delivering a pleasa nt shopping experience that i ncludes a convenient locat ion, a well-edited assortment o f merchandise, great prices a nd an updated store design, s aid Gayle Aertker, Dollar G enerals senior vice presid ent of real estate and store d evelopment. We hope our Sebring cust omers will continue to enjoy s hopping at Dollar Generals n ew location. Dollar Generals new locat ion features a fresh layout, d esigned to make shopping e asier and simpler for cust omers. Some of the stores new f eatures include seasonal p roducts featured in the center of the store, easily recognizable departments with visible signage and coolers that are more conveniently located at the front of the store. Dollar General stores offer convenience and value to customers by providing a focused selection of national brands and private brands of food, housewares, seasonal items, cleaning supplies, basic apparel and health and beauty care products. Special to the News-SunMembers of the awardwinning Dell Realty Team, Dawn Dell and Chris Gillilan, recently attended a conference hosted by Tony Robbins to improve the level of service they provide their real estate clients in Highlands County and surrounding counties. After more than three decades helping millions of individuals, businesses and world leaders improve their lives, Unleash the Power Within is still Robbins' most sought-after program. It is the key to designing life blueprints, shifting perceived limitations, and learning how to take immediate action to get real results. With more than 46 years combined real estate and sales experience, the Dell Realty Team is always looking to improve their business and interpersonal skills to better serve their customers. As realtors who are truly dedicated to our clients, we feel the financial and personal investment into this course is important to helping our cu stomers fulfill their real esta te investment goals, Dawn De ll said. The Dell Realty Team is part of Heartland Real Esta te Corp. (HREC). www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 8, 2011Page 9A BUSINESS Dell Realty attends Robbins conference I learned lots of valuable i nformation in high school, b ut one subject that wasnt o n the curriculum was pers onal financial managem ent. We didnt learn how t o balance a checkbook, w hy budgeting is important o r how credit card interest w orks, among other life less ons. Fast forward a couple of d ecades and technological a dvances have resulted in a n exponential increase in f inancial products available t o consumers, making f inancial decision-making a ll the more difficult; yet f inancial literacy courses a re mandatory for high s chool graduation in only f our states. This was one of many i ssues tackled at the fifth a nnual Financial Literacy a nd Education Summit, h osted by the Federal R eserve Bank of Chicago a nd Visa Inc., on April 4, 2 011. Leading experts, i ncluding key members of P resident Obamas A dvisory Council on F inancial Capability ( ACFC), also discussed: Governments role in i mproving global financial l iteracy. How can financial lite racy levels be improved in t he current economy? How can government, t he private sector and educ ators implement an effect ive, coordinated strategy f or reaching consumers and e quipping them with the n ecessary tools and r esources to make wise f inancial decisions? Panelists shared insights, s uccess stories and personal e xamples gleaned from their endeavors in advancing financial literacy. Heres a brief sampling: The Financial Literacy and Education Commission, a consortium of 22 federal government agencies and bureaus, has developed the framework for an overarching financial literacy strategy, establishing concrete goals for public and private sectors. Parents should look for teachable moments. When kids clamor for a new Nintendo, use it as a springboard to discuss the relationship between money and time. Financial education is a continuous process, from childrens allowances to retirement decisions, but age-appropriate timing is the key: Yes, you can teach teenagers how mortgages work, but theyre much more interested in learning how to buy a car. Make it fun. Research by the University of Florida, among others, has shown that students who played educational video games like Visas Financial Football scored better on benchmark exams those who did not. Theres a huge opportunity for teachable moments in the workplace. Research shows that 70 percent of employees would like to have financial education provided by their employer. The ACFC currently is exploring ways to engage corporations in this effort. Many teachers feel they dont have the skills, background or classroom time to adequately teach financial literacy, yet 89 percent of teachers surveyed (and 85 percent of parents), feel that its important to have financial education programs in the schools, whether its part of the formal curriculum, afterschool programs, games, etc. Encourage local schools to offer relevant financial curriculum that will prepare students for financial challenges theyll face as adults. One panelist noted, I took years of French in high school and college but Ive only been to France three times in 30 years. I didnt take a single course teaching me anything about the stock market or compound interest or investing. Panelists urged employers to create meaningful part-time jobs for high school students so that they can begin to equate how long they have to work to pay for things. Research has shown that kids who have jobs are much more likely to be high savers. To watch a free webcast of the 2011 Financial Literacy and Education Summit, go to www.practicalmoneyskills.com/summit2011. Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. Financial literacy teachable moments come at all ages Personal Finance Jason Alderman Dollar General relocates to new store Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID 7LBrands, LLC, a divis ion of Lykes Bros. Inc., announces its partn ership with Extreme Makeover: Home E dition, a reality television series providing h ome renovations for less fortunate families. T he companys black eucalyptus mulch was s elected to create a Japanese garden during t he makeover and will be featured on the e pisode airing at 8 p.m. today on ABC. We were thrilled to have our product s elected for use on a TVshow that really h elps families in need restore and beautify t heir home, said Mike Waldron, 7LBrands Mulch sales manager. It was a thrill to be on the set, watch the renovations take place and witness the Big Revealfirsthand. 7LBrands, LLC, a division of Lykes Bros. Inc., manufacturers, distributes and markets premium mulch products (both pine and eucalyptus) from their 66,000-acre renewable forest, which is in South Central Florida and has been responsibly managed according to the highest environmental standards for more than 50 years. For more information, products or retail locations, visit www.7LBrands.com. Local companys product to be featured on Extreme Makeover Follow the News-Sun online on www.twitter.com/thenewssun

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, May 8, 2011Page 11 A The NewspaperAll Around Your World In the Classroomcurrent events vocabulary geography At the Officebusiness news networking Over Coffeegarage sales local advertising community Family Timetravel recreation family events Sunday Morningcomics games puzzles Onlinelocal events email highlights 24-hour updates Support your local newspaper and the continued tradition of quality journalism by renewing your subscription today,and well continue to deliver. Thanks,readers! Rain,Sleet,Hail,Heat,Potholes,Flat Tires...Nothing stops them from making their deliveries!www.newssun.comWe celebrate how the newspaper has evolved to meet our changing needs without sacrificing the quality coverage youve come to expect. Day after day, anywhere you go,the newspaper delivers. Whether in print or online,it brings us the latest headlines from across town and around the world,local events,lots of laughs, touching stories,money-saving offers and so much more. Call 863-385-6155 for home delivery! Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under the Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be placed under the Bargain Buy category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com 863-314-9876 DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 314-9876. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 M M E E S S O O N N M M A A D D R R I I D D T T A A S S C C A A B B A A R R . I I N N C C . 3 3 9 9 5 5 5 5 3 3 9 9 5 5 7 7 U U S S 2 2 7 7 S S O O U U T T H H , S S E E B B R R I I N N G G , F F L L 3 3 3 3 8 8 7 7 0 0 , T T E E R R E E S S I I T T A A D D J J B B A A R R R R E E R R A A / / P P R R E E S S I I D D E E N N T T h h a a s s s s o o l l d d t t h h i i s s b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s t t o o S S E E B B R R I I N N G G K K I I T T C C H H E E N N C C O O R R P P . 9 9 9 9 N N W W 2 2 7 7 t t h h A A V V E E N N U U E E , 2 2 n n d d F F L L O O O O R R A A , M M I I A A M M I I , F F L L 3 3 3 3 1 1 2 2 5 5 ( ( T T r r u u s s t t e e e e A A g g e e n n t t : : S S a a n n t t o o s s G G o o n n z z a a l l e e z z ) ) A A n n y y p p o o s s s s i i b b l l e e B B U U L L K K S S A A L L E E C C R R E E D D I I T T O O R R S S a a g g a a i i n n s s t t M M e e s s o o n n M M a a d d r r i i d d T T a a s s c c a a B B a a r r , I I n n c c . m m u u s s t t b b e e a a w w a a r r e e t t h h a a t t f f i i n n a a l l c c l l o o s s i i n n g g o o f f t t h h i i s s b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s d d e e a a l l w w i i l l l l b b e e h h e e l l d d o o n n M M a a y y 1 1 0 0 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 a a t t 1 1 : : P P M M a a t t t t h h e e b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s l l o o c c a a t t i i o o n n i i n n S S e e b b r r i i n n g g , F F L L F F o o r r a a n n y y r r i i g g h h t t f f u u l l c c l l a a i i m m s s , p p l l e e a a s s e e c c a a l l l l S S a a n n t t o o s s G G o o n n z z a a l l e e z z , T T r r u u s s t t e e e e A A g g e e n n t t a a t t 3 3 0 0 5 5 6 6 3 3 1 1 8 8 5 5 4 4 5 5 . A A p p r r i i l l 2 2 9 9 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 NOTICE OF SALE The following vehicles will be sold at public sale or auction to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78(2) of the Florida Statutes at 10:00 a.m. on 5/24/11 at 1118 WEIGLE AVE. Sebring, FL 33870 1990 FORD 2FTJW35H0LCB31994 SALE DATE 6/10/11 2003 CHEVY 2G1WX12K839197562 1998 CHRY 1C3EJ56H4WN312867 1994 TOY JT3VN29V6R0036245 1996 HYNU KMHJF34M0TU275636 May 8, 2011 1050Legals PUBLIC AUCTION FOR TOWING & STORAGE 1998 CHEVROLET 1GCCS1948W8127933 ON MAY 21, 2011, AT 9:00AM AT PRECISION AUTO BODY 734 CR 621 EAST LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 May 8, 2011 PUBLIC AUCTION FOR TOWING & STORAGE 1989 CHEVROLET 1GCGK14Z1KE126397 ON MAY 17, 2011, AT 9:00AM AT PRECISION AUTO BODY 734 CR 621 EAST LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 May 8, 2011 NOTICE OF SALE The following vehicles will be sold at public sale or auction to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78(2) of the Florida Statutes at 10:00 a.m. on 5/23/11 at 1118 WEIGLE AVE. Sebring, FL 33870 1997 CHEVY 2C1MR2299V6728684 May 8, 2011 Dated: April 26, 2011. BOB GERMAINE, CLERK HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) April 8, 15, 2011 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 10000815GCS CIVIL DIVISION VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee corporation authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. CESAR RODRIGUEZ, a single man; THE STATE OF FLORIDA; and EMELIA MORALES OBO, MARTHA MARTINEZ, Defendants. CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiff's Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered March 14, 2011 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on May 25, 2011 at 11:00 A.M. (EST), in the BASEMENT OF THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM of the HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 430 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, Florida, the following described property: Lot 1, Block 250, Sun 'N Lakes Estates of Sebring, Unit 13, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 9, Page(s) 71, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Property Address: 4937 Vilabella Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-953-GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, Plaintiff, vs. GEORGE N. JACOBS; DELORES A. JACOBS; Husband and Wife; THE GROVE ON LAKE FRANCIS PROPERTY OWNERS' ASSOCIATION, INC.; AND ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, AND TENANT #4, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 Notice is given that pursuant to a Final Judgment in Foreclosure Against Defendants, GEORGE N. JACOBS and DELORES A. JACOBS, dated the 20th day of April, 2011, in Case No. 10-953-GCS, of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK is the Plaintiff and GEORGE N. JACOBS and DELORES A. JACOBS are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on the 17th day of May, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure Against Defendants, GEORGE N. JACOBS and DELORES A. JACOBS, and described as follows: Lot 7 and 16, THE GROVE ON LAKE FRANCIS, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 16, Page 68, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Real Property Address: 2029 Jack Creek Drive, Lake Placid, FL 33852; and 2065 Jack Creek Drive, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Real Property Tax ID#: C-22-36-29-020-0000-0160. DATED on April 21, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of Said Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak As Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM OF LIEN WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. May 1, 8, 2011 file the original with the clerk of this Court at 590 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870, before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition.Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request.You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office.WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. DATED: April 20, 2011.CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Alice Perez Deputy Clerk April 24; May 1, 8, 15, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 11000469FCS BETTY L. CALVILLO, Petitioner and JOSE A. CALVILLO, Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE TO: JOSE A. CALVILLO LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWNYOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on, BETTY L. CALVILLO, whose address is 1307 Spinks Lane, Sebring, FL 33870 on or before May 20, 2011 and IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-181 IN RE: ESTATE OF EDITH C. CLARK NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of EDITH C. CLARK, deceased, whose date of death was December 23, 2010, and whose social security number is 265-36-2950, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is May 1, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Kevin D. Marsh 1532 N. Delaware Ave. Avon Park, Florida 33825 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ David F. Lanier E-Mail Address: lanier@embarqmail.com Florida Bar No. 045399 DAVID F. LANIER P.O. Box 400 Avon Park, Florida 33826-0400 Telephone: (863)453-4457 May 1, 8, 2011 PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any to it, on the Plaintiff's attorney, whose name and address is: Pamela T. Karlson, P.A. 301 Dal Hall Boulevard Lake Placid, Florida 33852 and file the original with the Clerk of the above styled Court on or before May 17, 2011, otherwise a judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint for Homestead Determination and Partition of Real Property. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court on April 12, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of Circuit Court By: /s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk May 8, 15, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NUMBER: 11-110 GCS DEBORAH S. SEXTON, Plaintiff, vs. KIMBERLY G. ANDREWS; TIFFANY D. LOWRY, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION PROPERTY TO: TIFFANY D. LOWRY LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 4395 Dana Road Labelle, Florida 33935 or if the aforesaid person is dead, then his unknown heirs, devisees, legatees, or grantees; and any and all other persons or parties claiming by, through, under or against him; and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status, if known, claiming under any of the above named or interest in and to the lands hereafter described. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action relating to homestead determination and partition of real property with respect to the following described property in Highlands County, Florida, to wit: LOT 10, BLOCK 10, LAKE BLUE ESTATES REPLAT, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 47, OF THE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE No. GC 10-1317 DEUTSCHE BANK TRUST COMPANY AMERICANS, A S TRUSTEE FOR TEH REGISTERED HOLDERS OF SAXON ASSET SECURITIES TRUST 2005-4 MORTGAGELOAN ASSET BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-4, Plaintiff, vs. MARIA A. PYLE, FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, UNKNOWN TENANT #1, AND UNKNOWN TENANT #2, Defendants. Notice of Action TO: Maria A. Pyle Residence Unknown If living: if dead, all unknown parties claiming interest by, through, under or against the above named defendant(s), whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, or other claimants; and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property herein described. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in Highlands County, Florida: LOT 1, BLOCK 59, SEBRING COUNTRY ESTATES, SECTION THREE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, A T PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. Street Address: 4501 COOPER DRIVE, SEBRING, FL 33872 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Clarfield & Okon, P.A. Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 500 Australian Avenue South, Suite 730, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, within 30 days after the date of the first publication of this notice, on or before February 18, 2011, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on January 6, 2011. Bob Germaine Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff As Deputy Clerk Clarfield & Okon, P.A. A ttorney for Plaintiff 500 Australian Avenue South, Suite 730 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Telephone: (561) 713-1400 May 1, 8, 2011 1050LegalsP P U U B B L L I I C C N N O O T T I I C C E E A A v v o o n n P P a a r r k k A A i i r r F F o o r r c c e e R R a a n n g g e e R R e e s s t t o o r r a a t t i i o o n n A A d d v v i i s s o o r r y y B B o o a a r r d d M M e e e e t t i i n n g g N N o o t t i i c c e e The next Restoration Advisory Board (RAB) meeting for the Avon Park Air Force Range (AFR) Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) will be held at 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 10, 2011, at Building 236, 236 South Boulevard, Avon Park AFR. The purpose of the RAB is to update the public on the environmental cleanup progress at the Range and allow the public the opportunity to provide input for the Program. Additional information may be obtained by contacting Ash Yacoub at (863) 452-4137 or via e-mail at ashraf.yacoub.ctr@us.af.mil. May 8, 2011 Classified ads get fast results WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 385-6155. Then shop till you drop! Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155

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Page 12ANews-Sun Sunday, May 8, 2011www.newssun.co m United States District Court Southern District of Florida Public Notice United States Magistrate Judge (Two Positions) West Palm Beach, Florida The Judicial Conference of the United States has authorized the appointment of two full-time United States Magistrate Judges for the Southern District of Florida. These appointments will succeed incumbents, who will be retiring on or about January 6, 2012 and May 27, 2012 respectively. The basic jurisdiction of the United States magistrate j udge is specified in Title 28, United States Code, Section 636. The duties of the position are demanding and wide ranging, including, but not limited to: 1) conducting most preliminary proceedings in criminal cases; 2) trial and disposition of misdemeanor cases; 3) conducting various pretrial matters and evidentiary proceedings on delegation from the judges of the district court; 4) trial and disposition of civil cases upon consent of the litigants; and 5) assist the district court with any additional duties as are not inconsistent with the Constitution and Laws of the United States). To be qualified for the appointment an applicant must: 1. Be, and have been for at least five years, a member in good standing of the bar of the highestcourt of a state, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Territory of Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, or the Virgin Islands of the United States, and have been engaged in the active practice of law for a period of at least five years; 2. Be competent to perform all the duties of the office; be of good moral character; be emotionally stable and mature; be committed to equal justice under the law; be in good health; be patient and courteous; and be capable of deliberation and decisiveness; 3. Be less than seventy years old; and 4. Not be related to a judge of the district court. A Merit Selection panel composed of attorneys and other members of the community will review all applicants and recommend to the judges of the district court, in confidence, the names of at least five applicants for each position whose character, experience, ability and commitment to equal justice under law fully qualify them to serve as a United States magistrate judge. The Court will make the appointment, following an FBI full-field investigation and an IRS tax check of the appointee. An affirmative effort will be made to give due consideration to all qualified candidates, including women and members of minority groups. The current annual salary for the position is $160,080.00. The term of office is eight years. Official application forms may be found on our U.S. District Court, Southern District, web page, www.flsd.uscourts.gov under Public NoticeVacancy of U.S. Magistrate Judge (Two Positions). Completed applications must be submitted to: Flsd_magistratejudgerecruitment@flsd.uscourts.gov A ll applications will be kept confidential, unless the applicant consents to disclosure, and all applications will be examined only by members of the Merit Selection Panel and the judges of the district court. The panels deliberations will remain confidential. Instructions for completion and submission of the application are included on each application form.Completed applications must be received by 5:00 p.m. on May 31, 2011. THE DISTRICT COURT IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER May 8, 2011 1050LegalsHIGHLANDS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING (RFP) REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), Highlands County, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed proposals in the County Purchasing Department for: RFP 11-040SNACK VENDING SERVICES FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY FACILITIES NIGP COMMODITY / SERVICE CODE: 740-85 Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, Acting Director, Highlands County General Services / Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 Telephone: 863-402-6524; Fax: 863-402-6735, or by E-Mail: dgilbert@hcbcc.org Proposal submissions must be sealed and marked with the name of the proposer, and the RFP number and title RFP 11-040 SNACK VENDING SERVICES FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY FACILITIES NIGP COMMODITY / SERVICE CODE: 740-85 so as to identify the enclosed proposal. Each submittal shall include (1) one original and (5) five copies of the proposal. Proposals must be delivered to Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803, so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., Thursday, June 2, 2011, at which time they will be opened. Proposals received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The Board will not be responsible for the late deliveries of proposals that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service. One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at the above bid opening. Highlands County Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this RFP. The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners (HCBCC / COUNTY) reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsive and responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of Highlands County. The Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. The Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This nondiscrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John A. Minor, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: Jminor@hcbcc.org. Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service. Board of County Commissioners; Purchasing Department; Highlands County, Florida; Website: www.hcbcc.net May 8, 15, 2011 Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, May 8, 2011Page 11 A The NewspaperAll Around Your World In the Classroomcurrent events vocabulary geography At the Officebusiness news networking Over Coffeegarage sales local advertising community Family Timetravel recreation family events Sunday Morningcomics games puzzles Onlinelocal events email highlights 24-hour updates Support your local newspaper and the continued tradition of quality journalism by renewing your subscription today,and well continue to deliver. Thanks,readers! Rain,Sleet,Hail,Heat,Potholes,Flat Tires...Nothing stops them from making their deliveries!www.newssun.comWe celebrate how the newspaper has evolved to meet our changing needs without sacrificing the quality coverage youve come to expect. Day after day, anywhere you go,the newspaper delivers. Whether in print or online,it brings us the latest headlines from across town and around the world,local events,lots of laughs, touching stories,money-saving offers and so much more. Call 863-385-6155 for home delivery! M M E E S S O O N N M M A A D D R R I I D D T T A A S S C C A A B B A A R R . I I N N C C . 3 3 9 9 5 5 5 5 3 3 9 9 5 5 7 7 U U S S 2 2 7 7 S S O O U U T T H H , S S E E B B R R I I N N G G , F F L L 3 3 3 3 8 8 7 7 0 0 , T T E E R R E E S S I I T T A A D D J J B B A A R R R R E E R R A A / / P P R R E E S S I I D D E E N N T T h h a a s s s s o o l l d d t t h h i i s s b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s t t o o S S E E B B R R I I N N G G K K I I T T C C H H E E N N C C O O R R P P . 9 9 9 9 N N W W 2 2 7 7 t t h h A A V V E E N N U U E E , 2 2 n n d d F F L L O O O O R R A A , M M I I A A M M I I , F F L L 3 3 3 3 1 1 2 2 5 5 ( ( T T r r u u s s t t e e e e A A g g e e n n t t : : S S a a n n t t o o s s G G o o n n z z a a l l e e z z ) ) A A n n y y p p o o s s s s i i b b l l e e B B U U L L K K S S A A L L E E C C R R E E D D I I T T O O R R S S a a g g a a i i n n s s t t M M e e s s o o n n M M a a d d r r i i d d T T a a s s c c a a B B a a r r , I I n n c c . m m u u s s t t b b e e a a w w a a r r e e t t h h a a t t f f i i n n a a l l c c l l o o s s i i n n g g o o f f t t h h i i s s b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s d d e e a a l l w w i i l l l l b b e e h h e e l l d d o o n n M M a a y y 1 1 0 0 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 a a t t 1 1 : : P P M M a a t t t t h h e e b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s l l o o c c a a t t i i o o n n i i n n S S e e b b r r i i n n g g , F F L L F F o o r r a a n n y y r r i i g g h h t t f f u u l l c c l l a a i i m m s s , p p l l e e a a s s e e c c a a l l l l S S a a n n t t o o s s G G o o n n z z a a l l e e z z , T T r r u u s s t t e e e e A A g g e e n n t t a a t t 3 3 0 0 5 5 6 6 3 3 1 1 8 8 5 5 4 4 5 5 . A A p p r r i i l l 2 2 9 9 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 NOTICE OF SALE The following vehicles will be sold at public sale or auction to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78(2) of the Florida Statutes at 10:00 a.m. on 5/24/11 at 1118 WEIGLE AVE. Sebring, FL 33870 1990 FORD 2FTJW35H0LCB31994 SALE DATE 6/10/11 2003 CHEVY 2G1WX12K839197562 1998 CHRY 1C3EJ56H4WN312867 1994 TOY JT3VN29V6R0036245 1996 HYNU KMHJF34M0TU275636 May 8, 2011 1050Legals PUBLIC AUCTION FOR TOWING & STORAGE 1998 CHEVROLET 1GCCS1948W8127933 ON MAY 21, 2011, AT 9:00AM AT PRECISION AUTO BODY 734 CR 621 EAST LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 May 8, 2011 PUBLIC AUCTION FOR TOWING & STORAGE 1989 CHEVROLET 1GCGK14Z1KE126397 ON MAY 17, 2011, AT 9:00AM AT PRECISION AUTO BODY 734 CR 621 EAST LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 May 8, 2011 NOTICE OF SALE The following vehicles will be sold at public sale or auction to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78(2) of the Florida Statutes at 10:00 a.m. on 5/23/11 at 1118 WEIGLE AVE. Sebring, FL 33870 1997 CHEVY 2C1MR2299V6728684 May 8, 2011 Dated: April 26, 2011. BOB GERMAINE, CLERK HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) April 8, 15, 2011 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 10000815GCS CIVIL DIVISION VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee corporation authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. CESAR RODRIGUEZ, a single man; THE STATE OF FLORIDA; and EMELIA MORALES OBO, MARTHA MARTINEZ, Defendants. CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiff's Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered March 14, 2011 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on May 25, 2011 at 11:00 A.M. (EST), in the BASEMENT OF THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM of the HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 430 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, Florida, the following described property: Lot 1, Block 250, Sun 'N Lakes Estates of Sebring, Unit 13, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 9, Page(s) 71, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Property Address: 4937 Vilabella Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-953-GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, Plaintiff, vs. GEORGE N. JACOBS; DELORES A. JACOBS; Husband and Wife; THE GROVE ON LAKE FRANCIS PROPERTY OWNERS' ASSOCIATION, INC.; AND ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, AND TENANT #4, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 Notice is given that pursuant to a Final Judgment in Foreclosure Against Defendants, GEORGE N. JACOBS and DELORES A. JACOBS, dated the 20th day of April, 2011, in Case No. 10-953-GCS, of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK is the Plaintiff and GEORGE N. JACOBS and DELORES A. JACOBS are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on the 17th day of May, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure Against Defendants, GEORGE N. JACOBS and DELORES A. JACOBS, and described as follows: Lot 7 and 16, THE GROVE ON LAKE FRANCIS, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 16, Page 68, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Real Property Address: 2029 Jack Creek Drive, Lake Placid, FL 33852; and 2065 Jack Creek Drive, Lake Placid, FL 33852. Real Property Tax ID#: C-22-36-29-020-0000-0160. DATED on April 21, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of Said Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak As Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM OF LIEN WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. May 1, 8, 2011 file the original with the clerk of this Court at 590 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870, before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition.Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request.You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office.WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. DATED: April 20, 2011.CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Alice Perez Deputy Clerk April 24; May 1, 8, 15, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 11000469FCS BETTY L. CALVILLO, Petitioner and JOSE A. CALVILLO, Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE TO: JOSE A. CALVILLO LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWNYOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on, BETTY L. CALVILLO, whose address is 1307 Spinks Lane, Sebring, FL 33870 on or before May 20, 2011 and IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-181 IN RE: ESTATE OF EDITH C. CLARK NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of EDITH C. CLARK, deceased, whose date of death was December 23, 2010, and whose social security number is 265-36-2950, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is May 1, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Kevin D. Marsh 1532 N. Delaware Ave. Avon Park, Florida 33825 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ David F. Lanier E-Mail Address: lanier@embarqmail.com Florida Bar No. 045399 DAVID F. LANIER P.O. Box 400 Avon Park, Florida 33826-0400 Telephone: (863)453-4457 May 1, 8, 2011 PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any to it, on the Plaintiff's attorney, whose name and address is: Pamela T. Karlson, P.A. 301 Dal Hall Boulevard Lake Placid, Florida 33852 and file the original with the Clerk of the above styled Court on or before May 17, 2011, otherwise a judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint for Homestead Determination and Partition of Real Property. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court on April 12, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of Circuit Court By: /s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk May 8, 15, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NUMBER: 11-110 GCS DEBORAH S. SEXTON, Plaintiff, vs. KIMBERLY G. ANDREWS; TIFFANY D. LOWRY, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION PROPERTY TO: TIFFANY D. LOWRY LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 4395 Dana Road Labelle, Florida 33935 or if the aforesaid person is dead, then his unknown heirs, devisees, legatees, or grantees; and any and all other persons or parties claiming by, through, under or against him; and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status, if known, claiming under any of the above named or interest in and to the lands hereafter described. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action relating to homestead determination and partition of real property with respect to the following described property in Highlands County, Florida, to wit: LOT 10, BLOCK 10, LAKE BLUE ESTATES REPLAT, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 47, OF THE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE No. GC 10-1317 DEUTSCHE BANK TRUST COMPANY AMERICANS, A S TRUSTEE FOR TEH REGISTERED HOLDERS OF SAXON ASSET SECURITIES TRUST 2005-4 MORTGAGELOAN ASSET BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-4, Plaintiff, vs. MARIA A. PYLE, FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, UNKNOWN TENANT #1, AND UNKNOWN TENANT #2, Defendants. Notice of Action TO: Maria A. Pyle Residence Unknown If living: if dead, all unknown parties claiming interest by, through, under or against the above named defendant(s), whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, or other claimants; and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property herein described. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in Highlands County, Florida: LOT 1, BLOCK 59, SEBRING COUNTRY ESTATES, SECTION THREE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, A T PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. Street Address: 4501 COOPER DRIVE, SEBRING, FL 33872 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Clarfield & Okon, P.A. Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 500 Australian Avenue South, Suite 730, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, within 30 days after the date of the first publication of this notice, on or before February 18, 2011, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on January 6, 2011. Bob Germaine Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff As Deputy Clerk Clarfield & Okon, P.A. A ttorney for Plaintiff 500 Australian Avenue South, Suite 730 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Telephone: (561) 713-1400 May 1, 8, 2011 1050LegalsP P U U B B L L I I C C N N O O T T I I C C E E A A v v o o n n P P a a r r k k A A i i r r F F o o r r c c e e R R a a n n g g e e R R e e s s t t o o r r a a t t i i o o n n A A d d v v i i s s o o r r y y B B o o a a r r d d M M e e e e t t i i n n g g N N o o t t i i c c e e The next Restoration Advisory Board (RAB) meeting for the Avon Park Air Force Range (AFR) Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) will be held at 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 10, 2011, at Building 236, 236 South Boulevard, Avon Park AFR. The purpose of the RAB is to update the public on the environmental cleanup progress at the Range and allow the public the opportunity to provide input for the Program. Additional information may be obtained by contacting Ash Yacoub at (863) 452-4137 or via e-mail at ashraf.yacoub.ctr@us.af.mil. May 8, 2011 Classified ads get fast results WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 385-6155. Then shop till you drop! Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155

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ALMS.comDuring Winners Circle i nterviews, many drivers will t hank their mom. The gratitude is generally f or the support and encoura gement received throughout a racing career. But what if that thanks m eant Thank you for that g reat pit stop and second stint that put us in the lead? In honor of Mothers Day, we asked several drivers from the American Le Mans Series presented by Tequila Patrn what their odds would be if Mom was a co-driver. Chris Dyson, Dyson Racing If my mom was my coALMS Drivers Ponder Their Odds if Mom was on the Team H ow much has been made of soccer moms, the stage moms of the athletic world, often too fervent and blind to their own bias? A nd while those are out there, this is not a day to make that the focus. P erhaps, because even in those cases, the love, devotion and adoration our mothers so often show is what is meaningful. P oint being, I know I dont call as often as I should, given that the times together are few and far between. Y et my mother is never far from my mind, and when brought to mind, the memories come flooding back. M emories, more recently, of how she so shockingly was into the Bears-Packers meeting in the NFC Championship game. O lden-day memories of me feigning illness to leave school early on the Cubs opening day. T he thought being, that the standard for a sick child in the house was to set them up in bed, bring a television into the bedroom and serve up a meal. H alfway through arranging this set-up, I had been internally gloating as to how well Id pulled it off. E xcept that soon enough, I heard the shriek from downstairs as my mom was finishing preparing my lunch. R acing up the stairs, with my lunch in hand, mom starts her speech from down the hall. S o you thought I wouldnt remember its opening day, she accused. D umbfounded by this turn of events, I froze momentarily before playing dumb. A re you sure it is? Y ou know very well it is, she said, still in a punishing tone. T hat tone, however, soon changed and she smiled at her innocently guilty 11-year old. O f course, my ritual always was to dart home from school during the early part of the baseball season so I could catch my Cubs by about the third inning and watch the rest of the game. A nd only a mother could know the depth of devotion I had for my team, and forgive my dubious intentions on this day. L ittle moments like that are what bring a smile to my face and a warmth to my heart. L ike the time Id had the little accident sledding in the back yard on a winters night when I was six. T he fact that I had been a bit overly dramatic as a kid when I got hurt, my wails of pain this night were met with incredulity. H urtling down the little snow-covered hill in the yard, I had swung my right leg out to slow down the sled. E ventually, my extended leg hit the base of a tree. M y cries of pain were immediate. O thers came racing down to see what was the matter. T oo in pain to get up and walk on my own, an older neighbor lifted me up and carried me to the house. H oisting me onto the couch, the examination soo n began. E xcruciating pain, but no bruising, discoloration or any indication that it was something major. R eacting with relative indifference at this point w as understandable. S ensible even, as I was the same kid who once crawled up a hill in agony after skinning my knee. O ver the course of the night, however, my mom could hear my crying in my sleep and the next morning took me to the doctor. U ltimately, it was seen that my leg was, in fact, br oken, which wracked my mom with guilt. T hing is though, while I milked it for a little while, there was no way she could have known. T he fact that I once crawled up a hill in pain after skinning my knee was indication that this scenario hadnt been that serious. H aving no obvious signs of any severe injury only added to that. E ven today, though, if I were to bring it up, she would revisit the pang of guilt she felt the next day when the doctor delivered the news. R eally though, despite realizing there was no way she could know, she was, after all, my mom. E very mom out there, Im sure, can understand whic h is why I extend this Happy Mothers Day too all the mothers out there. Dan Hoehne is the Sports Editor of the News-Sun. He can be reached at daniel.hoehne@newssun.com. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Special STARS served up an awesome tennis competition on Saturday, April 30, at South Florida Community College. There were 19 athletes with disabilities who competed either in skill levels or doubles on the courts. They practiced for two weeks with local tennis players Stewart Hayner and Joe Young and nursing students from SFCC who volunteered. In doubles competition, the athletes played one set. Shawn Squires, of Sebring, and Sharon Carpenter, of Avon Park, won a tiebreaker against Eva Monk and Owen Barnhill, both of Sebring, to win first place. The skill level is designed to help teach the fundamentals of the game to players and then they are tested on each skill such as volleys, serves and ground strokes. The players are matched up against others who have similar abilities and placed in heats. In Heat 1, Nicole Lewis, of Avon Park, was first; Alex Lopez, of Sebring, was second; and John Smith and Joe Singh, both of Sebring, tied for third. SPORTS B SECTION Inside This Section Webber Golf Outing . . .4B Today in Baseball History . . .4B Kobe, Lakers down 3-0 . . .4B News-Sun Sunday, May 8, 2011 Courtesy photo Special STARS volunteer Ralph Meyers (left) helps special athlete Dustin Akey, of Sebring, prepare for a tennis skill test during competition on Saturday, April 30. Courtesy photo Special athlete Nicole Lewis gets ready to hit a tennis ball tossed by volunteer Stewart Hayner during the Special STARS Tennis competition on Saturday, April 30, at South Florida Community College tennis courts in Avon Park. Lewis was competing in skill level and won her division. Special STARS serves it up in tennis competition See STARS, page 4B By PAULNEWBERRY Associated PressATLANTA When Derrick Rose spotted the slightest of openings, he flew into the lane, a blur who made everyone else appear to be standing still. When the defender took a step back, hoping to cut off Roses path to the hoop, he would launch a jumper that usually hit nothing but net. It was that kind of night for the MVP. The Hawks never had a chance. Rose sliced up Atlanta for a career-high 44 points as the top-seeded Chicago Bulls seized control of the Eastern Conference semifinals with their best performance of the postseason, romping to a 9982 victory over the Hawks in Game 3 Friday night. Derrick was in attack mode, coach Tom Thibodeau said. When hes not dancing with the ball and hes attacking, hes impossible to stop. Youll get no argume nt from the Hawks. Hes tough to cover an yway, said Jeff Teague, wh o had the futile task of trying to guard Rose much of t he night. But when his jum p shot is falling, hes t he MVP. The Bulls lead the series 21, putting Atlanta in mus twin position heading in to Game 4 Sunday night. Rose was dominant fro m Rose scores career-high 44 in Bulls rout of Atlanta MCTphoto Derrick Rose had his way with the Hawks Friday night, scoring 44 points to give Chicago a 2-1 series lead. See ROSE, Page 3B And Another Thing... Dan Hoehne To the moms MyFWC.comOfficers and biolog ists with the Florida F ish and Wildlife C onservation C ommission (FWC) are w orking together to d etermine if what two k ayakers encountered d uring an early morni ng trip in Sexton Cove, n ear Key Largo, T hursday, April 28, was a n American crocodile. With limited inform ation at hand, the F WC cannot conclude w hat animal the kayake rs encountered. The FWC suspects t his may have been a c hance occurrence and n ot an overt act by w hatever animal the k ayakers may have e ncountered. Wild animals instinct ively flee from an u nexpected or perc eived threatening or e ncounter with a h uman. The pair reported t hat their kayak hit s omething in the water a nd overturned. While in the water, t he kayakers reported, s omething brushed a gainst them. They did not see the a nimal and thought it w as a manatee. Once home, both k ayakers realized they h ad suffered minor i njuries. They were treated for t heir injuries a few h ours later. The kayakers could n ot recall all the details o f the incident. The FWC cannot c onfirm what caused t he kayak to overturn, b ut there are many anim als and things found i n water that can cause s cratches and wounds t o people. The shy and reclus ive American crocod ile is an endangered s pecies success story. Since 1975, their n umbers have i ncreased from fewer t han 300 to more than 1 ,500 adults. Today, they are class ified as a threatened s pecies. As the crocodile popu lation has grown, the n umber of complaints a bout them has risen. FWC checking human-croc encounter See CROCS, 3B As the crocodile population has grown, the numberof complaints about them has risen If my mom was my co-driver Photo courtesy of ALMS.com Chris Dyson with his mother. See MOMS, Page 3B

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APProject GraduationAVONPARK The APHSProject Graduation 2011 Benefit Golf Tournament will be held Saturday, May 21 at 8:30 a.m. at River Greens Golf Course. The flighted, four-person scramble costs $60 per person and includes greens fee, cart, lunch and prizes. In addition to the action, there will be mulligans, a 50/50 and raffles for purchase the day of the tournament. The grand prize raffle is for a round of golf for two at Doral Golf Resort and Spa. Tee sign sponsorships are going for $50, for a sign and player, it is $100. For more information, contact Suzie Gentry at 446-7368.SFCC Summer Youth CampsAVONPARK South Florida Panther Baseball will be holding Summer Youth Camps from June 13-16 and June 20-23 for children aged 6-13. Each camp runs from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and costs $80 per camp or $150 for both. Registration and sign-in begin at 8 a.m. with the camp to follow, including baseball fundamentals, position instruction, station rotation, games, swimming pool time and a camp T-shirt. SFCC head coach Rick Hitt will serve as camp director with Panther assistant coach Andy Polk and members of the Panther baseball team will be on hand as instructors. Campers should bring their individual baseball attire as well as a bathing suit and towel. The camps will be held at the SFCC Panther field at the Highlands County campus in Avon Park. For more information, call Coach Hitt at the following campus phone numbers at extension 7036: Avon Park/Sebring, 453-6661; Lake Placid, 465-5300; Arcadia, 494-7500; Wauchula, 773-2252.SFCC Fun CampsAVON PARK SFCC Athleticswill host a Two Day Fun Sport Selection camp on Thursday and Friday, June 9 and 10 for girls and boys aged 6-16. Each day the camp runs from 9 a.m.-3 p.m., with campers choosing their own sport, whether Beach Volleyball, Basketball, Baseball, Softball or Soccer. During the morning portion each day, campers will stretch, do plyometrics, agility drills, work on strength and flexibility, learn arm and body care and get introduced to the Fitness Center. Lunch is then provided with the campers then delving into the sport they chose and wrapping it up with activities in the SFCC pool. Registration and check-in from 8:158:55 a.m., and pre-registration is not necessary as walk-ups are accepted. The rate for one day is $50 and $95 for both days. The camp will be aministered by SFCC head and assistant coaches, with help from SFCC student-athletes. For questions or more information, contact Camp Director and SFCC Athletic Director Rick Hitt at 784-7036.Sebring Summer SwimSEBRING The summer season for public swimming is upon us as the Sebring High School pool opened to the public Sunday, May 1. Pool hours for open swim will be 67:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1-3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays additional hours will be added once school is out. Cost is $2 per swimmer with big savings for frequent swimmers. Afamily pass can be bought for $50 for the first swimmer and $15 for each additional family member. Swimming lessons will also be available with four separate sessions throughout the summer for eight differents levels of instruction, ranging from Adult Beginner, Parent and Tot, Fundamentals, Introduction to Water Skills, Pre-School Aquatics, Fundamental Aquatic Skills, Stroke Development, Improvment and Refinement, Personal Water Safety and Diving Fundamentals and Fitness. Session I runs from June 13-24, session II from June 27-July 8, session III from July 11-22 and session IVfrom July 25August 5. Registrations will be Wednesday, May 17 from 5-6:30 p.m., Saturday, May 28 from 9-10:30 a.m. and Monday May 23 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. in the front office at Sebring High School. Water aerobics return as well, with certified instructor Ricki Albritton, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30-7:30 p.m. Cost is just $2 per workout, or just $1 if you have the Summer Swim Pass the fir st class is Thursday, May 5. For more information, please call 47 15500, ext. 229, and leave a message f or Ms. Pat.Blue Streak Golf ClassicSEBRING The 28th Annual Bl ue Streak Golf Classic is set to tee o ff Saturday, May 7, at Sun N Lake, with a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. The Sebring Firemen, Inc., are t he major sponsor for the event which ben efits Sebring High School Athletics. Entry fee is $60 per golfer for the Fou rPerson, Flighted Scramble and includ es one mulligan, lunch, beverages, prize s, cart, greens fee, range balls and loads of fun. Among the plethora of prizes are a 5 0 widescreen plasma, HD television an d IPads courtesy of ABCAppliences as we ll as a Hole-In-One prize of a 2011 Fo rd donated by Bill Jarrett For-Mercury. Blue Streak Scramble rules dictate th at each team members tee shot must be us ed twice and professionals are not eligib le for hole-in-one prizes. Entry forms can be picked up at t he Sebring High School front office or at Su n N Lakes. Checks to be made payable to Sebrin g High School. For more information, call Ter ry Quarles at 471-5500.Dragon Summer HoopsLAKEPLACID Green Drago n Basketball will be holding itsannu al summer camp from June 13-17 at t he Lake Placid High School Gymnasium f or boys and girls in grades 2-8. Camp will run each day from 8 a.m. -4 p.m., with the final day ending at Noon Cost of the camp is $65 and all campe rs will receive a Dragon Basketball camp Tshirt. Campers can bring lunch or purcha se lunch items at camp concessions ea ch day. Drinks and other snacks will be ava ilable at a reasonable cost. Half-day options are also available. Call or text Linda Veley for details an d other information at 441-0299, or ema il veley131@comcast.net.Help for Haiti 5KSEBRING A5K run/walk to suppo rt Haiti Bible Missions outreach to provi de educational support, orphan care an d humanitarian assistance in Haiti will be held Saturday, May 28 at Highlan ds Hammock State Park. Entry fee is $20 through May 22 an d $25 the day of the race. The run will start at 8 a.m. For more information, contact Ti m Baker at 381-0701 or Chet Brojek at 38 54736, or cbrojek@comcast.net to pre-re gister.Lake Placid Youth BowlingLAKE PLACID The Royal Palm s Youth Bowling League, for ages 7 and u p, begins itsnew season Saturday, Sept. 3 The sign-up fee is $25, which includ es a shirt, and new bowlers are welcome. Bowling is every Saturday morning at 9 a.m. through December 10. Weekly cost is $11 and includes thr ee games of bowling, shoes and the pri ze fund. All Youth Bowlers are also eligible f or reduced rate open bowling, though som e restrictions may apply, and free bowlin g with instruction on Fridays from 4-6 p.m must be accompanied by an adult. Come out for instruction and a goo d time. For more information, call Fran k Peterson at 382-9541, or Donna Stanley at 441-4897.Sebring Spring Game, BBQSEBRING The Blue Streaks will be holding their annual spring Blue an d White game Friday, May 20, at Firemen s Field, marking the first on-field actio n under new head coach LaVaar Scott. Along with the hits on the gridiro n, there will also be a fundraising BBQ wi th pork and chicken dinners or a pork san dwich dinner, including beans an d coleslaw, for $8 each. Also, any businesses, classes or grou ps with five or more orders, meals will be delivered for lunch the day of the game Meals can be pre-ordered with pick-u p between 4-6 p.m. on game day. Cost for the game itself is just $2, wi th no charge for parking. FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEChicago 4, Indiana 1 Miami 4, Philadelphia 1 Boston 4, New York 0 Atlanta 4, Orlando 2WESTERN CONFERENCEMemphis 4, San Antonio 2 L.A. Lakers 4, New Orleans 2 Dallas 4, Portland 2 Oklahoma City 4, Denver 1 ___ CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7)EASTERN CONFERENCEChicago 2, Atlanta 1 Monday: Atlanta 103, Chicago 95 Wednesday: Chicago 86, Atlanta 73 Friday: Chicago 99, Atlanta 82 Sunday, May 8: Chicago at Atlanta, 8 p.m. x-Tueseday, May 10: Atlanta at Chicago, TBA x-Thursday, May 12: Chicago at Atlanta, TBA x-Sunday, May 15: Atlanta at Chicago, TBA Miami 2, Boston 0 Sunday: Miami 99, Boston 90 Tuesday: Miami 102, Boston 91 Saturday: Miami at Boston, late Monday, May 9: Miami at Boston, TBA x-Wednesday, May 11: Boston at Miami, TBA x-Friday, May 13: Miami at Boston, TBA x-Monday, May 16: Boston at Miami, 8 p.m.WESTERN CONFERENCEDallas 3, L.A. Lakers 0 Monday: Dallas 96, L.A. Lakers 94 Wednesday: Dallas 93, L.A. Lakers 81 Friday: Dallas 98, L.A. Lakers 92 Sunday, May 8: L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 3:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 10: Dallas at L.A. Lakers, TBA x-Thursday, May 12: L.A. Lakers at Dallas, TBA x-Sunday, May 15: Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m. Memphis 1, Oklahoma City 1 Sunday: Memphis 114, Oklahoma City 101 Tuesday: Oklahoma City 111, Memphis 102 Saturday: Oklahoma City at Memphis, late Monday, May 9, Oklahoma City at Memphis, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 11, Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBD Friday, May 13, Oklahoma City at Memphis, TBD x-Sunday, May 15, Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBD FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEWashington 4, New York Rangers 1 Philadelphia 4, Buffalo 3 Boston 4, Montreal 3 Tampa Bay 4, Pittsburgh 3WESTERN CONFERENCEVancouver 4, Chicago 3 San Jose 4, Los Angeles 2 Detroit 4, Phoenix 0 Nashville 4, Anaheim 2 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7)EASTERN CONFERENCETampa Bay 4, Washington 0 Tampa Bay 4, Washington 2 Tampa Bay 3, Washington 2, OT Tuesday: Tampa Bay 4, Washington 3 Wednesday: Tampa Bay 5, Washington 3 Boston 4, Philadelphia 0 Boston 7, Philadelphia 3 Boston 3, Philadelphia 2, OT Wednesday: Boston 5, Philadelphia 1 Friday: Boston 5, Philadelphia 1WESTERN CONFERENCEVancouver 3, Nashville 1 Vancouver 1, Nashville 0 Nashville 2, Vancouver 1, OT Tuesday: Vancouver 3, Nashville 2, OT Thursday: Vancouver 4, Nashville 2 Saturday: Nashville at Vancouver, late x-Monday, May 9: Vancouver at Nashville, TBA x-Wednesday, May 11: Nashville at Vancouver, TBA San Jose 3, Detroit 1 San Jose 2, Detroit 1, OT San Jose 2, Detroit 1 Wednesday: San Jose 4, Detroit 3, OT Friday: Detroit 4, San Jose 3 x-Sunday, May 8: Detroit at San Jose, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 10: San Jose at Detroit, TBA x-Thursday, May 12: Detroit at San Jose, TBAAMERICAN LEAGUEEAST WLPCTGB New York1812.600 Tampa Bay1814.5631 Toronto1517.4694 Baltimore1417.452412Boston 1418.4385 Central Division WLPctGB Cleveland2110.677 Kansas City1715.531412Detroit 1518.4557 Minnesota1218.400812Chicago1122.33311 West Division WLPctGB Los Angeles1914.576 Oakland1716.5152 Texas1716.5152 Seattle1617.4853___Thursdays Games Detroit 6, N.Y. Yankees 3 Tampa Bay 3, Toronto 1 L.A. Angels 11, Boston 0 Kansas City 9, Baltimore 1 Cleveland 4, Oakland 3, 12 innings Seattle 3, Texas 1 Fridays Games Tampa Bay 6, Baltimore 2 Toronto 7, Detroit 4 Minnesota 9, Boston 2 N.Y. Yankees 4, Texas 1 Oakland 3, Kansas City 2 L.A. Angels 2, Cleveland 1, 11 innings Seattle 3, Chicago White Sox 2 Saturdays Games Minnesota at Boston, late Tampa Bay at Baltimore, late Detroit at Toronto, late Oakland at Kansas City, late N.Y. Yankees at Texas, late Cleveland at L.A. Angels, late Chicago White Sox at Seattle, late Sundays Games Detroit (Penny 2-3) at Toronto (Jo.Reyes 0-2), 1:07 p.m. Minnesota (Pavano 2-3) at Boston (Matsuzaka 2-3), 1:35 p.m. Tampa Bay (W.Davis 3-2) at Baltimore (Bergesen 0-3), 1:35 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 2-2) at Texas (Ogando 3-0), 2:05 p.m. Oakland (T.Ross 1-2) at Kansas City (Francis 0-3), 2:10 p.m. Cleveland (Carmona 3-3) at L.A. Angels (Haren 4-2), 3:35 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 2-3) at Seattle (Bedard 1-4), 4:10 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST WLPCTGB Philadelphia2110.677 Florida1912.6132 Atlanta1915.559312Washington1517.469612New York1418.438712Central Division WLPctGB St. Louis1914.576 Cincinnati1715.531112Pittsburgh1517.469312Chicago1417.4524 Houston1319.406512Milwaukee1319.406512West Division WLPctGB Colorado1812.600 San Francisco1616.5003 Los Angeles1518.455412Arizona 1417.452412San Diego1319.4066 ___ Thursdays Games Cincinnati 10, Houston 4 N.Y. Mets 5, San Francisco 2 St. Louis 6, Florida 3 Philadelphia 7, Washington 3 Atlanta 2, Milwaukee 1 Arizona 3, Colorado 2, 11 innings Fridays Games Cincinnati 5, Chicago Cubs 4 Atlanta 5, Philadelphia 0 Houston 3, Pittsburgh 2 N.Y. Mets 6, L.A. Dodgers 3 Washington 3, Florida 2, 10 innings St. Louis 6, Milwaukee 0 San Diego 4, Arizona 3, 11 innings San Francisco 4, Colorado 3 Saturdays Games Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, late Milwaukee at St. Louis, late Atlanta at Philadelphia, late Houston at Pittsburgh, late L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets, late Washington at Florida, late Arizona at San Diego, late Colorado at San Francisco, late Sundays Games L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 3-3) at N.Y. Mets (Dickey 1-3), 1:10 p.m. Washington (L.Hernandez 3-3) at Florida (Ani.Sanchez 1-1), 1:10 p.m. Houston (Happ 2-4) at Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 2-2), 1:35 p.m. Milwaukee (Narveson 1-2) at St. Louis (McClellan 4-0), 2:15 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 0-0) at Chicago Cubs (Dempster 1-3), 2:20 p.m. Arizona (J.Saunders 0-3) at San Diego (Harang 4-2), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (De La Rosa 4-0) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 1-0), 4:05 p.m. Atlanta (Jurrjens 3-0) at Philadelphia (Hamels 4-1), 8:05 p.m.BASEBALLAmerican League BOSTON RED SOXRecalled RHP Alfredo Aceves from Pawtucket (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYALSSelected contract of 1B Eric Hosmer from Omaha (PCL). Optioned 1B Kila Ka'aihue to Omaha. MINNESOTA TWINSSelected contract of C Rene Rivera from Rochester (IL). Optioned LHP Dusty Hughes to Rochester. NEW YORK YANKEESClaimed RHP Jess Todd off waivers from Cleveland. Designated INF Kevin Russo for assignment. TAMPA BAY RAYSPlaced RHP Jeff Niemann on 15-day DL. Recalled OF Brandon Guyer from Durham (IL). TEXAS RANGERSActivated RHP Neftali Feliz from 15-day DL. Optioned C Taylor Teagarden to Round Rock (PCL). National League LOS ANGELES DODGERSPlaced RHP Jonathan Broxton on 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Kenley Jansen from Chattanooga (SL). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIESPlaced RHP Roy Oswalt on 15-day DL, retroactive April 27. Recalled RHP Scott Mathieson from Lehigh Valley (IL). SAN DIEGO PADRESPlaced C Nick Hundley on 15-day DL, retroactive to May 5. Selected the contract of C Kyle Phillips from San Antonio (TL). Transferred INF Jarrett Hoffpauir from 15-day to 60-day DL. WASHINGTON NATIONALSPlaced CF Rick Ankiel on 15-day DL, retroactive to May 3. SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD P P R R E E M M I I E E R R L L E E A A G G U U E E S S O O C C C C E E R R M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 2 2 : : 5 5 5 5 p p . m m . Fulham vs. Liverpool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Lucas Oil Off Road Racing. . . . . . . C C B B S S 1 1 p p . m m . NHRA Lucas Oil Series . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 2 2 p p . m m . NHRA Get Screened Modified Series. E E S S P P N N 2 2N N H H L L P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p . m m . Boston at Philadelphia, if necessary . . . . . N N B B C CM M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Tampa Bay at Baltimore . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 2 2 p p . m m . Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs . . . . . . . . . . . W W G G N N 2 2 p p . m m . N.Y. Yankees at Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T B B S S 8 8 p p . m m . Atlanta at Philadelphia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Minnesota at Boston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Tampa Bay at Cleveland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 8 8 p p . m m . St. Louis at Chicago Cubs . . . . . . . . . . . . W W G G N NT T E E N N N N I I S S M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 6 6 p p . m m . USTA Boys and Girls 12s Nationals . . . . . S S U U N NTimes, games, channels all subject to change C C O O L L L L E E G G E E S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 a a . m m . Florida at Florida State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 1 1 p p . m m . Texas at Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NG G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . PGA WellsFargo Championship . . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA Wells Fargo Championship . . . . . . C C B B S S 3 3 p p . m m . PGA Regions Tradition . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F FM M O O T T O O R R C C Y Y C C L L E E R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 2 2 p p . m m . AMA Supercross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S SN N B B A A P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 3 3 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . L.A. Lakers at Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A A B B C C 8 8 p p . m m . Chicago at Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T TM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Miami at Boston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Oklahoma City at Memphis . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T TT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . Atlanta at Chicago . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Dallas at L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T LIVESPORTSONTV NBA Playoffs NHL Playoffs Major League Baseball Transactions Page 2BNews-Sun Sunday, May 8, 2011www.newssun.co m The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 8, 2011Page 3B t he opening tip, slashing i nto the lane for a basket t hat prompted Atlanta to call a timeout before the game w as a minute old. He finished off the Hawks m idway through the fourth w ith back-to-back 3-pointe rs, hopping down the court, s erenaded by chants of MVP! MVP! from a hefty c ontingent of Bulls fans. Just attacking the whole g ame, Rose said. That was m y whole thought process. Teague was about the only h ighlight for Atlanta, scori ng 21 points. That wasnt nearly e nough against the D-Rose o nslaught. He made 16 of 27 shots f rom the field, including f our 3s. He dished out seven a ssists, grabbed five r ebounds, came up with a s teal heck, he even b locked a shot. MVP, indeed. Of course, I love the a ward, Rose said. But Im g lad to get that over with a nd just focus on basketb all. After struggling to put a way Indiana in the opening r ound and losing at home in t he opener of this series, the B ulls finally resembled the t eam that won 62 games duri ng the regular season. While everyone will point t o Roses performance, the C hicago bench played a key r ole in a decisive secondq uarter spurt. And everyone chipped in r ebounding, leading the B ulls to a 47-34 edge that i ncluded 18 offensive b oards. Joakim Noah led the way with 15 rebounds, plus five blocks. Hustle plays, Rose called em. Thats who we are as a team, he added. The Hawks hadnt played a home playoff game of this magnitude since 1997, when this same scenario presented itself after Atlanta split the first two games in Chicago against the Michael Jordanled Bulls in the East semifinals. That one didnt work out too well for the Hawks, who promptly lost both games at the old Omni and were finished off in Game 5 back in ChiTown. Judging by the way things went Friday night, this series could be headed toward a similar result. They completely beat us up, coach Larry Drew said. My big guys did not show up. Most noticeably, Al Horford had another miserable game. With Joe Johnson and Jamal Crawford getting doubled every time they touch the ball, the Hawks need more from their All-Star center. He had just 10 points and is shooting less than 40 percent in the series. For us to win, Johnson said, weve got to get Al back on track. Thibodeau, of course, knows Rose is the key to his team. He had played well in the first two games, despite a sprained left ankle, but the coach wanted him to be more aggressive. The dynamic guard sure took that message to heart right from the opening tip, throwing a damper on a raucous sellout crowd. Avirtual one-man team in the first quarter, he scored 17 points to push the Bulls to a 29-23 lead. Teague, who wouldnt have been playing much if not for an injury to Kirk Hinrich, kept up his strong play from the first two games. He scored 11 of Atlantas first 17 points but couldnt keep the Hawks in it all by himself. And, boy, he sure couldve used some help at the defensive end trying to guard Rose. Teague, who did a respectable job on the Bulls star in Chicago, was left standing in his tracks over and over, unable to keep Rose from doing pretty much whatever he wanted. Chicago turned to its bench at the start of the second quarter, and those guys really delivered. Ronnie Brewer stole the ball from Jamal Crawford on the opening possession. C.J. Watson scored on a layup, then connected on a jumper to quickly push the lead into double figures for the first time while the starters rested. Taj Gibson chipped in with a block, stuffing Marvin Williams on a drive to the hoop. After the Hawks seemed to weather the storm, Kyle Korver responded like he does so often: A3-pointer that sparked a 19-6 run to stun the home crowd and force Drew to call two more timeouts in a futile bid to slow the Bulls. Even though some of the starters returned, it was the backups who kept delivering, scoring 12 points during that span. The Atlanta fans had plenty of chances to boo, and much of their wrath was directed at Josh Smith. The enigmatic hometown player did some good work on the inside with 17 points, 13 rebounds and four blocks. But he kept insisting on putting up outside jumpers that clanked off the rim time after time. When they did, the crowd screamed in disgust. Smith was hardly the biggest problem, though. Johnson was held to 10 points on 4-of-12 shooting. Crawford managed only seven. It was those two who dominated Game 1. Theyd better get it going again, or Atlantas season will be done in a few days. It seemed like I was buried in the corner all night, Johnson said. We didnt do anything to get the ball to our scorers. NOTES: Roses previous career high, in either the regular season or playoffs, was 42 points. ... Rose was the only Chicago starter in double figures. Gibson had 13 points, while Korver added 11. ... All five Atlanta starters scored at least 10 points. Continued from 1B Rose a thorn in Hawks side For us to win, weve got to get Al (Horford) back on track.JOEJOHNSON Atlanta Hawk guard However, conflicts b etween crocodiles and h umans are still very rare. Because crocodiles get l arge, people must use caut ion when near them or recrea ting in areas where they are f ound. For more information a bout living with crocodiles, v isit MyFWC.com/Crocodile. Continued from 1B Crocs out there, conflicts rare MCTphoto The crocodile population has grown significantly, but while there have been complaints, conflicts with humans remain rare. driver at Lime Rock, the team would operate in its most efficient manner possible. She is an excellent driver and may be the quickest and smartest one in the family. While my sister, father and I have received countless speeding tickets, Mom never gets caught but gets from Point Ato Point B faster than all of us. Thats intelligence. Shed never hit anyone in traffic due to impatience. Her debriefs would be crisp, decisive and the engineering staff would be right on point the whole weekend. As her codriver, all I would have to do is not make a mistake, and wed win the event by a lap. Then afterward shed host the most incredible dinner at the farm as if nothing had happened that afternoon. Thats how cool my mom is! Luis Diaz, Level 5 Motorsports I dont think my chanc es would be very good becau se before each race my moth er tells me Drive safely,and If I drive like that I will n ot have a chance. Kyle Marcelli, Intersport Racing For starters I think it m ay lead to a few speeding ticke ts en route to the race track th en maybe a little fender bend er in Turn 1! I actually had t he experience of riding shotgu n with her in a Corvette aroun d Mosport Internation al Raceway. You could tell s he was intimidated by the circu it at first, but who isnt? After a little coaching, it all came to her. She is quite the spe ed demon and certainly doesn t have any fear for going fa st whether its in a car, moto rcycle or snowmobile... c ar control on the other han d could use some more coac hing. So for Lime Rock Par k, it would be either first or crash trying! Continued from 1B Moms as co-drivers Photo courtesy of ALMS.co m Kyle Marcelli of Intersport riding shotgun with his mom.

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By JAIME ARON Associated Press DALLAS Kobe Bryant knows the deal. His Los Angeles Lakers are down 03 to the Dallas Mavericks and none of the 98 NBA teams facing that deficit have ever come back to win a series. Yet Bryant also knows his team has won the last two championships, and reached the finals three straight years. And that his soon-to-beretired coach has won a record 11 championships and has never been swept in his 20 years on the sideline. Bryant also realizes how close his team is to leading this series 2-1. They blew a 16-point lead in the opener, losing only in the final seconds, and on Friday night they fell apart down the stretch again on the way to a 98-92 loss. So, with all that in mind, he made this declaration following the Game 3 defeat: I think were still going to win the series. Confidence, eh? Well, he also prefaced that line by laughing and saying, I might be sick in the head or crazy. The Lakers have mostly themselves to blame for being in this predicament. Leading by seven with 5:05 left, and having controlled the game throughout the second half, they got sloppy on defense. They gave Dirk Nowitzki, Jason Terry and Peja Stojakovic wide open shots, and that turned things around in a hurry. A20-7 closing run jumpstarted by 3s from Nowitzki and Stojakovic put the Mavericks on the verge of not only winning this series, but pulling off a sweep. Dallas can move to the Western Conference finals for the first time since 2006 with a victory at home on Sunday. Were not good enough to relax or take the pedal off the metal, Nowitzki said. You dont want to ever give a champion life, so hopefully we can have the same effort and the same crowd and a great game on Sunday. The Mavericks scored 32 points in the fourth quarter, the most by either team in any period this series. Bryant said the Lakers helped by making some of the dumbest defensive mistakes Ive seen us make all year. Were disappointed, said Lakers coach Phil Jackson, who has never been down 0-3 in a series, much less been swept, in 20 years as an NBAcoach. We feel like Games 1 and 3 we controlled the pace of the games. They were better at finishing the games than we were. But we still believe were going to win the next game and well go from there. Nowitzki and the Mavericks want to get this over with as soon as possible. This veteran-filled club would love to avoid another long round-trip flight and to start resting up for the next series. Dallas would be the home team in the conference finals, regardless of whether Oklahoma City or Memphis advances. For a franchise thats perennially underachieved, and is still trying to overcome blowing a 2-0 lead in the 2006 NBAfinals, ending this series Sunday also would send a great message about their chances of winning their first title. It also would avoid any chance of yet another postseason disaster. We dont want to open the door for them because then it will be hard to close, forward Shawn Marion said. Missing the suspended Ron Artest, Jackson gambled with a starting lineup featuring 6-foot-10 Lamar Odom at small forward, alongside 7-footers Andrew Bynum and Pau Gasol. The Lakers logically pounded the ball inside with great results. Even Bryant started getting into the paint, making his first layup of the series. Perhaps Artests absence caught up to them at the end. Jackson acknowledged there was some fatigue factor in there. He also admitted that his super-sized lineup was much better protecting the paint than defending the 3-point line. And there was that Nowitzki fellow. Dallassuperstar scored 32 points, making 12 of 19 shots. With the Lakersbig gu ys crowding the lane, he we nt back to his roots and g ot comfortable behind the 3point line, burying 4 of 5. Just about everythin g that happened down t he stretch was a direct result of him either scoring the ball or making a play to get som ebody a shot, or make a pa ss for an assist for a 3 or a 2 or whatever it was, Ma vs coach Rick Carlisle said. Arecord Dallas crowd of 21,156 most wearin g royal-blue giveaway T-shir ts that read, The Time Is Now, with the Mavs logo in place of the basketball o n top of the championship tr ophy went through t he usual chants of De-fense ! and Beat LA! witho ut much impact through t he first three quarters. With the game on the lin e, they got to their feet an d helped the home team su stain its final push. Page 4BNews-SunSunday, May 8, 2011www.newssun.com In Heat 2, Greg Robinson, o f Sebring, was first; Thomas D irkson, of Wauchula, was s econd; Maria Rivera, of S ebring, was third; and Mac S mith, of Sebring, was f ourth. In Heat 3, Annie Horn, of S ebring, was first; Ilana L evey, of Sebring, was seco nd; and Markevin Smith, of A von Park, was third. In Heat 4, Dustin Akey, of S ebring, was first; Mark R ieke, of Sebring, was second; Josh Croston, of Avon Park, was third; and Emily Harrison, of Avon Park, was fourth. All athletes were presented ribbons during an awards ceremony after the competition. Special STARS started basketball season on Saturday, May 7. Anyone wanting more details about how to volunteer or participate, can call the coordinator Cindy Marshall at 452-6607. Continued From 1B STARS take to the courts May 81906 Philadelphia manager Connie Mack needed a subs titute outfielder in the sixth inning of a game against Boston a nd called on pitcher Chief Bender to fill in. Bender hit two h ome runs, both inside the park. 1907 Bostons Big Jeff Pfeffer threw a no-hitter to give t he Braves a 6-0 victory over the Cincinnati Reds in Boston. 1929 Carl Hubbell of the New York Giants pitched a noh itter against the Pittsburgh Pirates, the first by a left-hander i n the majors in 13 seasons. 1935 In the first game of a doubleheader, Ernie L ombardi of the Cincinnati Reds hit four doubles in consecut ive innings (sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth) off four differe nt Phillies pitchers. Lombardi also singled as the Reds beat P hiladelphia 15-4. 1966 Frank Robinson became the only player to hit a h ome run out of Baltimores Memorial Stadium. Robinson hit a 451-foot 541 feet total shot on a fly over the left-field w all off Cleveland right-hander Luis Tiant. The Orioles won 8 -3. 1966 The St. Louis Cardinals closed old Busch Stadium w ith a 10-5 loss to the San Francisco Giants. 1968 Jim Catfish Hunter of the Oakland As pitched a p erfect game to beat the Minnesota Twins 4-0. 1984 Minnesotas Kirby Puckett had four singles in his f irst major league game as the Twins beat the California A ngels 5-0. 1994 The Colorado Silver Bullets, the first womens t eam to play a pro mens team, lost 19-0 to the Northern L eague All-Stars. Leon Durham hit two homers and Oil Can B oyd started for the All-Stars. The Silver Bullets had two hits, s truck out 16 times and made six errors. 1998 Mark McGwire became the fastest player to hit 400 h ome runs when he connected in the third inning of the St. L ouis Cardinalsgame against the New York Mets. McGwire, t he 26th player to reach the milestone, hit his 400 homers in 4 ,726 at-bats. The previous best was 4,854 by Babe Ruth. 2001 Randy Johnson became the third pitcher to strike o ut 20 in nine innings, but didnt finish the game as the A rizona Diamondbacks went on beat Cincinnati 4-3 in 11 i nnings. Johnson, the first left-hander to strike out 20, missed o ut on the chance to join Roger Clemens and Kerry Wood as t he record-holders for a nine-inning game because Arizona c ould not finish off the Reds in regulation. 2003 Aaron Boone hit three solo homers, leading the w ay as the Cincinnati Reds beat the St. Louis Cardinals 8-6. 2010 Jody Gerut hit for the cycle and drove in four runs a s the Milwaukee Brewers pounded the Arizona D iamondbacks 17-3. Gerut hit a solo home run in the second i nning, singled in the third, drove in a run with a triple in the f ifth, and added a two-run double in the ninth. 2010 Mark Teixeira joined Lou Gehrig as the only Y ankees to hit three home runs against the Boston Red Sox, a nd he and Francisco Cervelli drove in five runs each as New Y ork beat Boston 14-3. Teixeira hit solo homers in the fifth a nd seventh, then added a two-run shot far over the left field w all in the ninth off outfielder Jonathan Van Every for the t hird three-homer game of his career. Todays birthdays: Adam Moore 27; Adrian Gonzalez 29. Today in Baseball History Special to the News-SunSEBRING Webber I nternational Universitys A thletic Department will be h olding its Second Annual G olf Outing Saturday, May 2 1, with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun s tart at the Sun N Lake Golf C lub. Cost per player is $60 and i ncludes cart, 18 holes of g olf, lunch, drinks and p rizes. Among those prizes is $ 10,000 for a hole in one on e ither Deer Run No. 8 or T urtle Run No. 12. Other fun games include a 50/50 drawing, Adidas Closest to the Pin, Long Drive contest, Beat the Webber Golfer and a putting contest to win a flat screen television. All proceeds go to benefit the Webber international University Athletic Department. For more information, contact Bill Heath at 528-3775, HeathWL@webber.edu; Tim Desmarteau at (352) 2677619. DesmarteauTJ@webber.edu or Steve Rassel at 638-1431, ext. 3114, RasselSE@webber.edu. Webber Golf Outing Kobe not counting out Lakers

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 8, 2011Page 5B SENIORSCENE The 1900s were Floridas boom days, however, many o f the early pioneers in rural a reas that were making a livi ng off the birth of the cattle i ndustry struggled through h ard times. Dillon Thomas, w ho now lives in LaBelle, w est of Lake Okeechobee, m oved from job to job, city t o city. He served in the milit ary in the s, worked cons truction, and eventually r eturned to the ranch. H owever, Dillon Thomas a lways found a way to surv ive. In 1944, I went into the N avy for two years. I helped b uild the first cement barrier b unkers in Burlington where t he soldiers where training f or World War II. Then I got a job in West Palm Beach in c onstruction; I didnt know a nything. After working a while at the company, they s tarted laying off men; I was o ne of only five men left. The superintendent saw I did a good job so he got us work building a church. Changing jobs again, I signed up for the civil service and went to aircraft mechanics school at Drew Field in Tampa. I worked on a bunker for test pilots. The head man was a Russian lieutenant. One day I questioned him about a decision and he fired back, are you telling me what to do? I will get you for insubordination. Turn in your tools in 90 days. I left and got a job two blocks down the way at a hanger. They had a Waller Trainer,which is a hangar that you put a plane in upside down with the pilot inside to get him used to spinning and other flying conditions. By now I was about 21 years old. After the Navy, I returned to Florida and got a job at the Bullshead Ranch, just below the Big Cypress Indian Reservation. The ranch was part of the Bancroft Hotel chain that owned half interest along with a Ford dealer, called Harris, from Miami. I was hired as ranch manager. The very rough and porous limestone at this ranch ruined the horsesfeet working cattle; it was slippery and pitted with holes. The horses would slip and break a leg. I stayed working at this ranch until my oldest daughter graduated from high school, then we moved to a ranch in Stuart, Fla. It was a good job, as the rancher owned high priced horses that I was to train. The other fellow from Okeechobee, who had managed the ranch, was afraid of breaking horses. In a short time, I called the horse by name, calmed him down and he would do anything I wanted, Thomas says proudly. At this ranch, we were put up in a nearby house. Again, there were stories that this house was haunted and I believed it. The story goes that one night the owners fatherin-law was left in charge of the children. He had gone to bed but awoke when he heard noises in the kitchen but there was no one else home but them. He and the girls crept down to the kitchen and no one was there. They all went back upstairs to bed. Then it happened again. This time the man pulled his gun out of the closet and went downstairs. In those days everyone kept a loaded shot gun nearby. Again, he did not see anyone. Then the man went to bed again and this time heard heavy walking noises again in the kitchen. After being awakened for the third time in the night, the man finally called out into the dark, When you get breakfast ready call me, and went back to bed. The next day, the family was sitting down to biscuits and sausage when they heard knocking on the floor; they all got scared. The man searched the house but could not find what caused the knocking, however, what he did find were footprints he believed were left behind by a spirit. From then on, he kept a loaded rifle close by, tells Thomas. Excerpts from soon to be published book: The Legacy of the Florida Pioneer Cow Hunters In Their Own Words. For signed copies of other pioneer books available visit www.nancydalephd.com or call 214-8351. By Julia Lewter-SmithIts good to have a mother around And you wont fe el so all alone But I know the lon ely feeling For my mother is already gone. But those of yo u who have your mothe r Love her and tre at her right Cause you won t know how much you ll miss her Til God has tak en her out of your sight She may grow o ld and weary But she still belon g to you God made the pl an when you were born So you do what yo u have to do. God did not make a mistake When he let her be your mother Cause He is the pa ttern of your life And there couldn t have been no other. Love your moth er with all your heart And you will be fr ee to say When that d ay behold your eyes Just Happy Mother s Day. To all mothers Follow the News-Sun on www.facebook.com/newssun Cow man Dillon Thomas tells about ghosts in the kitchen Wild Florida Nancy Dale OK, I am not mad any more ... not f rantic ... I am calm ... almost. With m y ear glued to the phone I had gone t hrough what seemed like a hundred o ptions to press for any number of s ubjects except my complaint. Breath ... breath ... easy First it was Customer Service. It t ook about 22 minutes to be connected t o the first available operator. T hen after reciting my complaint and g etting nowhere I asked to speak to a s upervisor. It took another three quart ers of an hour before they disconnecte d. Easy ... breath ... breath Rather than spew forth my angst I w ill just relate the facts. The scenario g oes like this: Whoever opens the mail usually sorts the meaningful pieces from the bills. The bills go to my husbands desk to pay. But first I check the charge cards for any unfamiliar charges and then the telephone bill just to see that I dont get charged for more than the five Avon Park calls I am allowed free. This time the telephone bill was $40 instead of the usual $25. I dont make calls out of my free area. I use my cell phone for long distance. (Doesnt everyone?) There was an unfamiliar charge of $14.95. It read Miscellaneous charges Solo Communications VM monthly fee. ESBI Credits and Charges. Century Link provides billing on behalf of ESBI. So I called the telephone company assuming (you know the line about assuming) since they billed me they would take care of deleting the erroneous charge. But no Century Link only bills it as a courtesy to Solo. They kindly provides me with that companies telephone number for me to make the corrections myself. After prolonged time with we appreciate your business and thank you for waiting and additional sales blurbs someone came on that I could not understand and it wasnt even India. It was Nevada. Yes they acknowledged that charge was on my bill (I already knew that)! When I protested that I never ordered additional services the response was someone else must have registered you. I wish I had recorded that call. After wrangling back and forth someone authorized it no I didnt. I asked to speak to a supervisor. Ahalf hour later a supervisor came on and agreed to credit my telephone bill in a month or two. So the message is look at every bill especially the ones that are repetitive and automatic charges. Recently we Read all of the enclosures before throwing to the trash Pearls Pearls Pearl Carter See READ, page 6B

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Well, its a rainy day here in southern Florida and since outside activities are out, I am stuck in my living room retreat trying to think of something to do. Frost danger is past and I have planted the caladiums that we bought at the festival a couple of months ago. Ive cleaned up the water mess in my workshop and now its time to look ahead. Ive been putting off for the last few years a final trip back up into the Canada that I used to spend all my summer school vacations and later our family vacation from work. These were only trips of about 600 miles one way and just a breeze for me then. I was young and full of it and vinegar and would make it over night. Now I have put on a few years and the distance I want to traverse has climbed to 1,500 miles one way. My drivers license is due for renewal in August and since I will be 93 years old, I dont have much hope of it being renewed so if I go it will have to be this summer. Im not worried about my own driving and I will have along a good relief driver, (Grace, my wife), so the driving should be no problem if I can keep out of the way of some of the damn fools on the road these days. Ill describe the trip that I have in mind so that you can see that it isnt just a jump in the car and go deal. First I would like to drive up to Cincinnati, Ohio and then to Milford, Ohio and book a canoe trip down the Little Miami River from South Lebanon to Milford, Ohio. Thats a trip I have made many times in the past both for fishing or for showing off the beauty of my country. The next leg is the original trip that we made in my youth from Cincy to Manitoulin Island and then up the north shore to Espanola and hitting the Old Logging Road to Eight Lake (our base camp then), now a built-up summer haven for fishermen and summer tourists. First year I was there, seven of us high school buddies spent two months on the string of lakes there and the only people that we saw were some Indians in canoes moving through the chain of lakes of which our lake was a little link. Its changed now. Its all built up with cottages and fishing camps, and boat traffic is heavy. I would still like to see it again to bring back old memories. Next, back on the road again and heading north and west we go over the most beautiful country I ever hope to see. We are heading west on Canadian Route 17 to the town of Ignace where we will pick up Route 599 north to Savant Lake where we will stock up on groceries and proceed to the final stop on the journey, Fitchie Lake! You all have dreams of the perfect place in our lives, well this lake is my ideal. The fishing is the best! Walleye, yellow perch, great northerns and pan fish galore. But wait, the fishing is just one of the features. This area here is to me one of the most perfect places in the world and I have seen most of it! I can only speak of this area as it is in the summer. When the lakes are frozen solid with ice for six months of the year I want no part of them, but come summer they are mine. We will be camping on the west shore of the lake and will be awakened by the morning sun beaming in on us to wake us up for a wonderful day of fishing or just plain sightseeing. We are on just one lake of vast chain that runs from I dont know where to I dont know where but we have been lost on many of the lakes on many occasions. We always have a map and compass with us. We cant afford a GPS even if it works up in this area. If you wished, you could reach at least a hundred good fishing lakes just by taking your canoe and heading out in any direction. There is a gravel do ck made by the road crew wh o made original camp here. It extends about 50 feet in to the lake and serves as a bo at dock, swimming platfor m and fishing place. O ne morning I had been settin g up my tackle for the day s fishing and just for the he ck of it I made three casts fro m the dock, one to the left, o ne center and one right. Gue ss what? On each cast I hooked landed a three fo ot long northern pike! Tha ts the kind of lake it is. Then just about 100 yar ds from the dock there is a weed bed that holds a b ig school of yellow perch, t he next best eating to t he walleyed pike that this la ke is famous for. I always fi sh this area with a flyrod f or the fun of taking these litt le guys on the light tackl e. However, quite often I ru n into trouble when a northe rn takes the bait meant for t he perch. Let me tell you, lan ding a three foot northe rn with a flyrod is a cho re unless you want to ruin a good outfit. I think that by now yo u can see why I want to ma ke one last trip to my wonde rland. The fact that the tr ip will cover more than 3,00 0 miles and gobble up at lea st of gas 350 gallons at t he going price (now) of $3.60 a gallon that comes to almo st $540. Thats way out of m y budget but I dont have lon g to live and my kids don t need my money. Guess I better start wor king on Grace to see if w e could really make my drea m come true. Woody Jackson is a Sebring resident. Page 6BNews-SunSunday, May 8, 2011www.newssun.com SENIORSCENE g ot a renewal notice of our h ome owners insurance w hich had just about doub led. I questioned the bill and i t was re-evaluated but for t he first time I put my cost m oney over loyally to the i nsurance agent and the comp any. I went on the net and f ound there were many other l esser rates including one w ith my own company for h alf the price. Since then I check every b ill. I ask for a review on the b igger ones. Then I recalled a p hrase from our antiquing d ays, Can you do better? Much to my surprise it often works. Furthermore no longer can one cavalierly toss out enclosures that come with bank statement or Comcast bills etc. Lately I have been getting many notices that read that you must refuse a certain offer or it will be billed to you. It took me a painful experience of getting something I didnt want because I didnt bother with those nasty little inserts and small print. When I went to college and for my masters in my 60s I had to develop techniques to understand the written and oral material. Fortunately, Ken and Rita Dunn had developed the concept of Learning Styles, the study of which enabled me to decipher all the new information coming my way. It would seem that those same techniques need to be applied to the mass of information that currently comes our way: political, technical, even social. Why not apply them to real life now as I did to getting an education. Pearl Carter is writer, poet and a Lake Placid resident. E-mail her at timely87@comcast.net. Continued from page 5B Read the enclosures first Making just one more dream come true Woodys Wisdom Woody Jackson By ESTHER HARRIS Special to the News-SunQuestion: Is it illegal to l aminate your Social Security c ard? Answer: No, it is not illeg al, but we discourage it. Its b est not to laminate your card. L aminated cards make it diffic ult, sometimes even impossib le, to detect important secur ity features and an employer m ay refuse to accept them. The Social Security Act r equires the commissioner of S ocial Security to issue cards t hat cannot be counterfeited. W e incorporate many features t hat protect the cards integrit y. They include highly spec ialized paper and printing t echniques some visible to t he naked eye and some not. Keep your Social Security c ard in a safe place with other i mportant papers. Do not c arry it with you. Learn more a t www.socialsecurity.gov. Question: I have two minor children at home and I plan to retire next fall. Will my children be eligible for monthly Social Security benefits after I retire? Answer: Monthly Social Security payments may be made to your children if: They are unmarried and under age 18; Age 18 or 19 and still in high school; or Age 18 or older, became disabled before age 22, and continues to be disabled. Children who may qualify include a biological child, adopted child, or dependent stepchild. (In some cases, your grandchild also could be eligible for benefits on your record if you are supporting them.). For more information, see our online publication, Benefits for Children, at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/ 10085.html. Social Security questions

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Special to the News-Sun AVON PARK Two South F lorida Community College i nstructors received Endowed T eaching Chair awards when t he SFCC Foundation, Inc. h eld its 27th Annual Spring G ala on April 24 at the Hotel J acaranda in Avon Park. Mathematics instructor Lori S humard received the Carol E mery Endowed Teaching C hair Award in Mathematics, a nd Bobby Sconyers, professor o f dental assisting, received the H ighlands County Health F acilities Authority Endowed T eaching Chair Award in D ental Education. The endowm ents will help provide traini ng for new tools and technolog y they plan to incorporate into t heir classes. Shumard will use her e ndowment to attend the Sloan C international conference in N ovember, where she will l earn new ways to use technolo gy in her online and face-tof ace math classes. She will t hen incorporate these new t ools into her classes and use a L ikert Scale survey at the end o f the class, asking her students t o rate each method. My goal i s to increase the use technolog y in my classes and learn a bout any new technology I m ay not yet be aware of, she s aid. The student survey will t hen help me determine how e ffective the technology was f or them. Sconyers will use his e ndowment for training in dent al clinical photography. Almost every dental clinic u ses photography to track patient progress, he said. It can also be used to show a patient what their future dental work results will look like by using photo manipulation programs like Photoshop. Sconyers will learn how to take intraand extraoral digital photographs and develop creative and engaging lesson plans that can be used in both the assisting and hygiene classes. Each year, the SFCC Foundation, Inc. conducts its annual meeting during the banquet and raises money for student scholarships. Highlights of this years gala included a Kentucky Derby theme for which attendees were invited to wear their finest hats to celebrate. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 8, 2011Page 7B CHALKTALK Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South Florida C ommunity Colleges Student Support S ervices (SSS) TRIO program held an a ward ceremony recognizing students w ho achieved academic excellence duri ng the first year of the program. First-year SFCC student Gabriel L ambert received the Pressing through t o Excellence award for his determinat ion in overcoming the daily physical a nd mental obstacles he faces following t wo life-threatening car accidents from w hich he suffered three traumatic brain i njuries. After a 10-year recovery from e xtensive physical injuries, memory i mpairment, and relearning how to walk, t alk, and perform other basic functions, L ambert is majoring in Information T echnology and maintains a 4.0 grade p oint average. Lambert also participates in Phi Beta L ambda Future Business Leaders of A merica, through which he has won f our awards in state competition for his C omputer Business group. I used to l ive a negative life, said Lambert. I u sed to think I could change a persons p oint of view through my physical actions. Following the accidents, I realized intelligence is a much more effective way of changing a persons point of view. Now I strive for positive things. Students were also recognized for achieving 3.5 and higher grade point averages. Students recognized were Angela Barrett, Samantha Cochran, Josean Cruz, Angel Damaso, Claudia Garcia, Cecilia Gayosso-Cruz, Crystal Grabski, Maria Guzman, Galetha Hawthorne, Tanya Hayes, Christopher Jennings, Jonathan Joles, Summer Joles, Gabriel Lambert, Heather Lemos, Fatima Lozano, Dion McAllister, Gladys Mejia, Pablo Mingrino, Virginia Lee Murphy, Lenisa Ragoodial, Larry Rios, and Johnny Vazquez. SSS TRIO is a federal program that assists eligible students who are seeking their Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degrees and plan to pursue further education at four-year institutions. The SSS program is open to students who are currently enrolled at SFCC and are first-generation college students (parents do not hold a bachelors degree), meet federal income guidelines, and/or have a documented disability. SFCC TRIO Program recognizes students Courtesy photo Gabriel Lambert (second from left) receives the Pressing Through to Excellence award. He was chosen to receive the award for his perseverance in overcoming debilitating injuries. Presenting the award to him are (left) Vivian Scott, director, student support services; Sandra Klepinger, administrative assistant II, student support services; and Ricardo Pantoja, coordinator, student support services. Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID Lake Placid Elementary students have embarked on an amazing project. The school libraryas filled with older books without cheerful bright covers were overlooked by readers time and time again, as they were considered ugly books. But they are Ugly, No More as students have been illustrating new covers for them. The students researched the library database for summaries of the books so that the covers depict t he theme of the book. Wi th bright cheerful colors, t he students drew pictur es which were cut out, an d attached to brown paper an d laminated. The studen ts were given credit on t he book cover. Now the books are fin ding their way into the han ds of great readers. Ab ig thank you needs to go to Publix for supplying t he brown grocery bags. Ugly No More, as these books have a ne w beginning. LP Elementary students give books new looks SFCC instructors selected as Endowed Teaching Chairs Courtesy pho to Lake Placid Elementary students (front row, from left) Haylee Coulter, Hannah Powel, Alondra Torres, (back row) Leslie Hawkins, Austin Perry, Luke Andrews, Gino Majias-Reinos and Yesenia Vega (standing) show off the books with the newly created covers. CROSSWORDSOLUTION Courtesy photo South Florida Community College instructors received Endowed Teaching Chair Awards during the 27th Annual SFCC Foundation, Inc. Spring Gala. Bobby Sconyers, dental assisting, received the Highlands County Health Facilities Authority Endowed Chair and Lori Shumard, mathematics, received the Carol Emery Endowed Teaching Chair in Mathematics. (From left) Sconyers, Carol Emery, Shumard, and Dr. Norm Stephens, SFCC president. School menus online at www.newssun.com

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Page 8BNews-SunSunday, May 8, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. childrens choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. childrens mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and womens prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.; Blended Service, 10:30 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Saturday 3-3:45 p.m. or first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life! Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church.Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP CHALKTALK Special to the News-Sun AVON PARK We all have b een given the chance to excel in t he classroom; what we do with our k nowledge is up to us, said Ricki A lbritton, keynote student speaker a t South Florida Community C olleges commencement ceremony o n May 4. She spoke of the value of educat ion and learning and encouraged h er fellow students to do the work t hey need to accomplish their goals. Each of us has a story that we a re creating right now, Albritton s aid. Our stories started when we w ere born and continue all the way t o today, graduating from South F lorida Community College. We h ave been given the greater chance t o create more chapters and keep b uilding our story with this educat ion. Think about your future and get e xcited about accomplishing your g oals without fear, Albritton said. I challenge you to go after your w ildest dreams. She credited Kimberly Crawford, h ead coach of Lady Panther volleyb all; Dr. Brian Deery, professor of p sychology; and her grandfather for e ncouraging her to keep learning a nd reaching for her goals. More than 818 students met S FCC graduation requirements by c ommencement. Atotal of 719 received their associate in arts degrees, associate in science degrees, associate in applied science degrees, vocational certificates, or college credit certificates. Another 99 graduated from SFCCs Adult Education program. Participating in commencement were 239 students. Dr. Norm Stephens, SFCC president, opened the ceremony by encouraging the graduates to continue on their journey, always pursuing greater knowledge and wisdom; striving to serve the interests of others in our communities, our state, our nation, and around the world. He recognized eight Honors Program graduates for academic excellence, outstanding leadership, and strong citizenship: Joshua Ball, Shane Donglasan, Karrie Dudek, Trenton Haralson, Christopher Jennings, Samuel Morgan, Ismael Vazquez, and Shea Young. The Honors Program is a selective admission academic program with the Division of Arts an d Sciences at SFCC. Faculty who were selected by t he SFCC Faculty Council to serve as marshals for the ceremony we re Kathleen Cappo, Wayne Craig, D r. Brian Deery, Felecia Dozier, Ki m Hemler, Tanna Markel, Le na Phelps, and Ellen Thornton. Laura Wade, coordinator of SFCC student life, sang This is t he Moment, accompanied on t he piano by Doug Andrews, dean of Cultural Programs. Rhon da Nesmith and Deborah Florence pr ovided American Sign Langua ge interpretation. Members of the SFCC Distri ct Board of Trustees in attendan ce were Gary Delatorre, chair, Ti m Backer, vice chair, Tami Cullen s, Joan Hartt, Louis Kirschner, Dav id Leidel, Richard Maenpaa, and An ne Reynolds. Distinguished guests were Je ff Mechlin, vice president of t he SFCC Foundation Board of Directors; Adrian Cline, superi ntendent of schools, Desoto Count y; Wendell Williams, former SFC C trustee, founding member of t he SFCC Foundation, Inc., and chart er member of the State Board of Community Colleges; Senior Past or Laura White, New Mount Zio n AME Church, and associate dean of SFCC Enrollment Management an d University Relations; and Albritto n. SFCCs Class of 2011 graduates get their degrees Courtesy photo South Florida Community Colleges new graduates demonstrate reverence for their nation as they sing the national anthem during 2010-11 commencement exercises. Courtesy photo In her keynote speech to South Florida Community Colleges class of 2010-11, Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree graduate Ricki Albritton encouraged her peers to continue their love of learning throughout their lives.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 8, 2011Page 9B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer.Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howes Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer Kid C ity Childrens Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, prime-timers, and Bible s tudies in Spanish. Kid City Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots PreSchool director; and Noel Johnson, minister of youth and family life. Worship schedule after Easter through December: Worship service 10 a.m., and Education Hour, 8:45 a.m. Worship schedule for January through Easter: Worship service, 8:30 and 11 a.m., Education Hour 9:45 a.m. Traditional Service with Holy Communion each first and third Sunday. Non-Traditional Service each second, fourth and fifth Sunday. Seasonal mid-week services Wednesday evenings during Lent and Advent. Call church office for additional Worship times and special holiday services. Other activities and groups include: Choirs; Ladies Guild and LWML; Mens Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies as scheduled; Trinity Tots Pre-school, Youth Group activities (call for meeting times and dates). Trinity Tots Preschool (3-4years old): 7:15 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Visit us online at:www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 8:45 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. in the Millennium Church. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer a Saturday service at 6 p.m. with Pastor Tiger Gullett in the Millennium Church. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturers Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m. in the sanctuary. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Childrens Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m.; Sunday School for all age s, 9:30 a.m.; Celebration Worsh ip Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Son g worship service at 10:45 a.m Loving nursery care provided eve ry Sunday morning. Youth Fellowshi p, 5 p.m. Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m. (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on lifes journey, youre we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP May is National Wetlands M onth and it is a good time t o appreciate all that these v aluable plant communities h ave to offer. Wetlands are s ometimes thought of as s ponges, filters and kidneys o f the land. The reason is s imple; the function they s erve is the same as those m entioned. Wetlands literall y remove toxins and other s ubstances that flow through t hem. Lets take a swamp as an e xample. Aswamp is simply any w etland that is dominated by w oody plants. The soils t here are generally saturated w ith water most of the year. A s water flows through the s wamp, the roots of the p lants trap many pollutants a nd sediments which may t hen sink and settle to the b ottom rather than travel to t heir original destination. B ecause of these areas and o ther types of wetlands, the m ajority of the water that r eaches our lakes and event ually the ocean, is cleaner a nd healthier. Another important function of a wetland is flood control. Without these sponge type ecosystems, a lot more water reaches the lake. The function of the wetland is to hold water, therefore, if the wetland is taken out, the water has no where else to go and in its travels will most likely flood a few areas on its way. Awetland also has the ability to store water, which helps protect and replenish surface and underground water sources. Our aquifers, where we get the majority of our drinking water, are assisted by the existence of these important areas. Wetlands are home to countless species of plant and animal life. Aquatic vegetation flourishes in these areas and provides shelter and food for the wildlife that resides there and in surrounding areas. Wetlands are the favorite plant community of many species for a number of reasons. Smaller animals find shelter from predators in the wetlands. Nesting conditions are ideal for waterfowl and migratory birds enjoy a safe place to stop and rest during their long flight. Wetlands serve as a nursery and spawning habitat for many species of fish and shellfish and perhaps most importantly, they provide an important link in the food chain for both animals and man. In fact, according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Wetlands are among the most biologically productive natural ecosystems in the world, comparable to rain forests and coral reefs in their productivity and diversity of species they support. Recreational opportunities in these pristine areas are endless. Fees charged to enter many wetland areas help boost the economy and provide a unique, natural experience for visitors. Hiking, biking, bird watching and hunting are all activities that are popular in wetlands. Nationally 60 percent of our freshwater wetlands are lost to development. Not only is this loss of actual wetland area a problem, but as more development takes place, there is an increase in pollutants and chemicals that may overload the few existing wetlands ability to deal with them. We all know that development is necessary. We need houses, schools, hospitals and roads. However there are steps that can be taken to lessen the impact on these valuable areas. Restoration of degraded wetlands, protection and limitations of building near wetlands, planting native vegetation, limiting fertilizers and other chemicals, education, and taking action to support and promote wetlands by joining or participating in groups or cleanup projects are steps that can be taken to help protect these ecosystems. This May, take time to learn about wetlands. Highlands County is full of them and this may be a great month to get out and visit one first hand. There are quite a few beautiful areas that you can visit to get into the wetland mind set. The Sun N Lake Preserve, Lak e Istokpoga Park and Highlands Hammock State Park are just a few of the protected areas in our coun ty that invite the visitor to enjoy nature. Corine Burgess is the Natural Resources Specialist for the Highlands County Natural Resources Department assisting the Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District (www.highlandsswcd.org). Courtesy pho to A cypress swamp traps many pollutants and sediments that may sink and settle to the bottom rather than travel to a nearby lake. May is National Wetlands Month News From The Watershed Corine Burgess

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Page 10BNews-SunSunday, May 8, 2011www.newssun.com ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The Mountain Brew B luegrass band is traveling from the W inter Park area to entertain the crowds a t the Avon Park Rotary Bluegrass & B lueberry Festival on Sunday, May 15. T hey will be performing old timey m usic that is distilled from traditional A merican and Celtic ingredients. The potent brew includes folk, rock, b luegrass, old-time Cajun, Irish and pop a nd country standards. Its served up in a n informal manner with a healthy dose o f self-deprecating humor as a chase. A ndy plays the guitar and harmonica a nd his wife Sara on the mandolin. They a re joined by Renee Riddle of Bowling G reen on the fiddle. Major beneficiaries of the Festival w ill be Habitat for Humanity, Heartland F ood Reservoir food bank and S amaritan's Touch. More information on the Bluegrass & B lueberry Festival is available at w ww.aprotaryblueberryfestival.com, or c all 863-585-2132. Mountain Brew Bluegrass Band to perform at Bluegrass & Blueberry Festival in AP Courtesy photo Renee Riddle (from left) and Andy and Sara Burr make up Mountain Brew Bluegrass and will be the band performing during the Avon Park Rotary Bluegrass & Blueberry Festival on Sunday, May 15. Special to the News-SunSEBRING Duffers Sports Grille will bring some laughs back to the stage on Saturday, May 14, with a male and female comedian. Tony Gaud and Catherine Maloney will entertain the audience from 8-10 p.m. at Comedy Night. Maloney will take the stage first and Gaud will be the headliner. Tickets are $10 each and they can be purchased in advance at Duffers or at the door. Gaud, a 20-year veteran comedian, will share triumphs and failures of an eternally sarcastic optimist. His instant likeability and confidence draws the crowd in for a glimpse in the controlled chaos from an every-day man. He has worked with Ron White, Jackie Mason and many others. He was selected Best Up & Coming Comic in Tampa Bay in 2003; appeared on Comedy Network in Yuk Yuk s Great Canadian Laugh O ff in 2007; and was nam ed regional contender of Comedy Centrals Op en Mic Fight in 2007. He h as performed in various fes tivals, commercials, and in the award winning sho rt film Mic Check. Maloney is America s favorite problem-solve r. Her solutions are simpl e, direct and blunt. She w ill walk everyone through t he everyday life of a fre ethinking American woma n. She has toured sever al comedy clubs in Flori da and performed in vario us venues. She won t he Biggest Jerk Comed y Competition in 2010 whi ch makes her a Big Jerk. Those wishing to ma ke dinner reservations prior to the show should do so before 7:45 p.m. since t he kitchen closes at that tim e for the show. Duffers is at 6940 U.S. 27 North. F or details, call 382-6339. Male, female comedians to laugh it up at Duffers Catherine Maloney Tony Gaud Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun Special to the News-SunSEBRING Karaoke perf ormers in the area got a taste o f stardom this past weekend w hen they entered the K araoke Kontest sponsored b y Duffers Sports Grille. There were 29 amateur s ingers who sang along with r ecorded music provided by S outhern Style Karaoke and J & B Karaoke on April 29. Participants were of all a ges from 21 to 70 doing a v ariety of music genres. Three local professional k araoke judges whittled d own the competition Friday n ight to the 10 best men and w omen to enter the finals on A pril 30 where they would be j udged by the audience and w in $100 for the best male and female. Variety was a key in the contest and those who worked the audience got the votes. Cris Cwalinski, of Sebring, wowed the audience as she walked around the room with the cordless microphone Saturday with her version of Dont Stop Believin by Journey to win the womens category. Cwalinski, 26, has been singing since she was 8. My daddy taught me, Cwalinski said. Her dad is Don Cya Cwalinski who plays with a local band. Its just getting out there and doing what you love to do. I get into it when the crowd gets into it. I love entertaining. The deep voice of Mike Sanders, of Sebring, melted hearts in the audience while he sang Paint Me A Birmingham by Tracy Lawrence. He walked away with first place in the mens category. Cwalinski, Sanders win Karaoke Kontest Courtesy photo General manager Ross Vickers congratulates Cris Cwalinski and Mike Sanders, who are the winners of the Karaoke Kontest sponsored by Duffers Sports Grille. They each won $100 on April 30 during the finals.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 8, 2011Page 11B ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Highlands Art League ( HAL) hosted its spring fundraiser, Art on the W aterfront, on Saturday, April 30 at the Art V illage in Downtown Sebring. This Key West-themed event was complete w ith Keys cuisine prepared by Chef Mac of T he Palms of Sebring, Tim Blackman of B lackman Properties, Pat & Chris Miller and J immy Wohl of Heartland Real Estate Corp. G uests enjoyed Jimmy Buffet-inspired music w ith mojitos and margaritas. Many thanks to those who contributed to the l ive Celebrity & Bachelor/Bachelorette A uction: Mayor George Hensley, Greg Harris, B en Mayworth, Justin Hartt, Trevor Hinote, C indy Sebring Adams, Donna Keith, Marie Boley, Kelli Bronson, The Cohan Radio Group, Alan Jay Wildstein, Max Gooding, Janet King, Alice Hansen, Mark Gose, Chris Miller, Josh Miller, Gary Peeples, Mike Reark and Casey Wohl. Don Elwell and Martile Blackman entertained the crowd as emcees and encouraged the bidding. Also, a big thank you to the event sponsors who helped HALraise nearly $20,000: Florida Hospital, Taylor Rental, Highlands Today and Baker Septic Installations, as well as the Sebring High National Honor Society, who helped set up for the event. The money raised will help HALfund summer programs for children that begin in June. For more about HAL, visit www.HighlandsArtLeague.org. HALs Art on the Waterfront a success with $20,000 raised Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South Florida C ommunity College announces the 2012 M atinee Series lineup. Performances are h eld on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. in the S FCC Theatre for the Performing Arts. Starting out the season on Jan. 10 is s inger and impressionist Paul Tanner. He h as amazed audiences from Las Vegas to B roadway and beyond. His show is jam p acked with impressions from the worlds o f celebrity, comedy, and music includi ng Tom Jones, Neil Diamond, and Elvis P resley. His classical training at the J uilliard School of Music coupled with h is natural ability has turned him into a m ust-see sensation. The Bronx Wanderers take the stage on J an. 17. Being a teenager on an avenue in t he Bronx back in the 1950s and early 1 960s was unlike any other experience. W ith the liberating sound of doo-wop a nd rock and roll, the music had heart, s oul, purity, and a sound that made you w ant to dance, harmonies that made you f eel good, and lyrics that once in a while, e ven made you cry. Fans of Jersey Boys w ill love this show. Areturn engagement by Branson n ative Denny Yeary and Friends will be h eld on Jan. 24. Known as Mr. E ntertainment, his easily recognizable b ass and deep baritone voice has been a m emorable part of Branson entertainm ent, from the days when he had his o wn dinner theatre and show with his p artner Shelia Renee. Three On AString performs classic old s tandards, country, bluegrass, and folk m ixed with comedy and humor on Jan. 3 1. Its three-part harmony has a unique a nd pleasing blend, from a heart-renderi ng country song to an unexpected a capp ella rendition. The group was formed 40 y ears ago and is led by Bobby Horton. On Feb. 7, Dino Kartsonakis will e ntertain the audiences with his except ional showmanship and piano skills. He m oves outside the bounds to keep things i nteresting, leading to a unique hybrid style of piano music, which has led to his title, Americas Piano Showman. He is well known for his television program The Dino Show on the Trinity Broadcast Network. The Chenille Sisters will perform on Feb. 14. Blending three uniquely gifted souls, these three women have heavenly voices, a lot of witty wisdom and a passion for connecting with their audiences. On Feb. 21, Darren Williams takes the stage. With the rare ability to sing just about everything from pop to opera, he captivates audiences with his Aussie charm and amazing vocal range. His first stage appearances were at the age of 7 when he won several medals for singing at Sydneys Opera House. He has won numerous prestigious awards since for his amazing vocals. Marti Capodiferro with Gary Filip and the Sebring High Show Choir will perform on Feb. 28. Capodiferro and Filip have joined forces to create a show featuring great musical classics from the past and present. Each has more than 30 years of experience in music, their soulful vocals, command of the piano, and effortless musical phrasing is both loving and unforgettable. The second half of the show, the Sebring High Show Choir will perform popular music. Andy Cooneys Forever Irish will perform on March 6. His outstanding voice and dynamic stage presence has always been a favorite among American and Irish audiences everywhere. His talent and versatility provide the ability to deliver a song directly to the hearts of his audience. Being christened Irish Americas Favorite Son by The New York Times, is a title he truly deserves. Closing out the season on March 20 is Dana Daniels. Teamed with his Psychic Parrot Luigi, he sets out to prove his little green friend is truly clairvoyant by performing incredible magic blended with rapid-fire clean comedy and audience participation. He has been awarded some of the top honors in magic, and brings to the stage years of performing skills encompassing magic, and improvisation with impeccable comic timing. Season subscriptions are currently on sale. Prices start at $105 for all 10 shows. Order forms can be obtained by visiting the SFCC Box Office from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday or by calling 784-7178. Order forms can also be downloaded at http://performances.southflorida.edu. Single tickets go on sale in October. SFCC announces 2012 Matinee Series lineup Courtesy photo Dana Daniels, teamed with his Psychic Parrot Luigi, will close SFCCs 2012 Matinee Series on March 20. Courtesy photo The Chenille Sisters will perform Feb. 14 at South Florida Community Colleges 2012 Matinee Series. Courtesy photo Dino Kartsonakis will entertain the crowd at South Florida Community College on Feb. 7 with his piano skills. Courtesy photo Andy Cooneys Forever Irish will perform March 6 as part of South Florida Community Colleges Matinee Series. Courtesy photo The Bronx Wanderers take the stage at South Florida Community College on Jan. 17 as part of the Matinee Series. Courtesy pho to Hugh Davies exhibition, Transitions The Recent Work of Hugh Davies, will come to a close Thursday, at the same time as Davies will host a lecture at the Highlands Museum of the Arts. Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Highlands Art League is hosting a lecture by artist Hugh Davies on Thursday. Daviesexhibition in the Highlands Museum of the Arts, Transitions The Recent Work of Hugh Davies, opened on April 8 with a well-attended reception held in conjunction with downtown Sebrings monthly Gallery Walk. Thursdays lecture will be the last chance to see a fabulous exhibition and to meet a very talented artist, as it is also the shows last day. Davies will speak about his work and his move from England to Florida, which he cites as a major inspiration for the pieces in Transitions, and will also be answering questions. The lecture begins at 1 p.m. at the Highlands Museum of the Arts. Admission is a $10 donation, or a $5 donation for students. Davies has served on t he faculties of both Oxfo rd University and t he University of Arts in London, and is current ly the Core Studio Progra m Director for the Ringlin g College of Art and Desig n in Sarasota. His work h as been shown in over six ty group and solo exhibitio ns in the United Kingdom France, Germany, Australi a, South Africa, and throug hout America. With the technic al accomplishments of the o ld masters, a combination of ambiguity and abstractio n, a unique approach to col or which is simultaneous ly contemporary and natur alistic, and a coupling of irony and verisimilitud e, Hugh Daviespaintin gs occupy a highly individu al position in the spectrum of current artistic practic e (from artists statement). This lecture promises to be both educational an d entertaining. Highlands Museum of the Arts presents lecture by Hugh Davies Courtesy pho to Hugh Davies with his wife Susan (left) and Betty Ford Smith of the Highlands County School Board at the April 8 reception.

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Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID The Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative in Lake Placid announces that Beverly Fyfee has been selected as the Crafter of the Month for May. Fyfee is also the newly elected president of the Caladium Co-op for 20112012. Fyfee comes from Springfield, Ohio where she worked in physical therapy for 37 years. After retirement, she moved to Highlands County and a friend talked her into taking up sewing. She loved sewing so much and accumulated so many finished projects that she and her friend would hold craft shows. Fyfee is so thankful that she found the Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative as an outlet for her crafts. She has many items in the store such as vests, table runners, aprons, and placemats, most of which are reversible. Fyfee also makes pillows and embroideries towels. See her work at 132 E. Interlake Blvd. The store is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m Tuesday through Saturda y. Call 699-5940 or visit t he Web site at www.caladi umarts.org for addition al information. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Rehearsals a re under way for Highlands L ittle Theatres June product ion of Little Women. Each of the March girls d isplays a major character f law: Meg, vanity; Jo, a hot t emper; Beth, shyness; and A my, selfishness. They overc ome their flaws through less ons learned the hard way. W ith their minister/scholar f ather away, the girls struggle w ith family dynamics and the b urgeoning tugs at that fabric f rom the outside world. The family pillar, Marmee, p layed by HLTveteran a ctress Jennifer Westergom, u ndergirds all this. The Little Women are: Kaity Z elenenki (Meg), Lyndsey R eck (Jo), Heather Boyce ( Beth) and Hannah Cribbs ( Amy). Character actresses B renda Hippchen and Ellen L emos play crotchety Aunt M arch and devoted housek eeper Hannah, respectively. J ustin Pratt (Laurie) and J onathan Lambright (Brooke) p lay the eligible men. B ringing his wide-range of c haracterizations to this stage i s Allan Grosman ( Grandfather Laurence). Bob Hippchen plays Mr. March. The family friendly play deals with the full range of joys and anxieties that make the original story by Louisa May Alcott timeless, and the characters compelling for even the most sophisticated audiences. This play, adapted for the stage by Peter Clapham, was chosen by the Louisa May Alcott Society to be the official production presented in celebration of the 140th anniversary of her birth several years ago. Sometimes I think people give this story a short glance because of its title. Its not just about little girls. While written many years ago, the family dynamics are similar to this day and time. This play was to be directed by my husband, Jim McCollum. I am so pleased to be able to carry his vision to the stage, director Sue McCollum said. The play opens to the First Nighters at 8 p.m. June 1, and runs through June 19, with shows on Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Wednesday. Highlands Little Theatre is at 356 W. Center Ave. in downtown Sebring. Tickets are $20 for general admission. There is a special Red Hat & Girl Scouts Command Performance at 2:30 p.m. Saturday, June 11. This performance (only) includes a question and answer session with the cast, crew and audience immediately following the performance. Call 382-2525 or visit www.highlandslittletheatre.o rg for more information or to purchase tickets. Page 12BNews-SunSunday, May 8, 2011www.newssun.com ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Courtesy pho to Beverly Fyfee is Crafter of the Month at Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative. Some of her colorful items are shown here. Fyfee is Crafter of the Month Special to the News-Sun SEBRING Highlands L ittle Theatre announces o pen auditions for The S ecret Garden, the upcomi ng August production. The a udition schedule is 6:30 p.m. Monday, M ay 16, all roles. 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, M ay 17, and Wednesday, M ay 18, children auditioni ng for roles of Mary or C olin. 8 p.m. Wednesday, M ay 18, adults auditioning f or Archibald, Lily, Rose, M artha, and Dickon. 6:30 p.m. Thursday, M ay 19 and 9 a.m. Saturday, M ay 21, all roles. Auditions will be held in o rganizations Drs. Thakkar P avilion. No appointment is necess ary. Prepare 32 bars of an a ppropriate song from the s how or an up-tempo song o r ballad, musical comedy g enre (no rock or pop) and b e prepared to dance. A c ompact disc player will be p rovided if you bring your o wn backtracks. Bring your c alendar and be prepared to l ist all conflicts through S ept. 4. The production runs Aug. 1 9 through Sept. 4 ( Wednesdays, Fridays and S aturdays at 8 p.m. and S undays at 2:30 p.m.). M usic rehearsals begin June 6 All candidates should h ave powerful, well-trained v oices, almost operatic in n ature. All characters need a B ritish accent unless otherw ise indicated. Character descriptions Archibald Craven: 30s4 0s, high baritone/tenor, M arys wealthy, crippled u ncle, reclusive, cheerless, a nd distraught by the death of his wife. Mary Lennox: 10-12, alto/mezzo, transitions from petulant and surly to warm and nurturing, the heart and centerpiece of the show. Must be able to carry off demanding vocals and emotional content. Dr. Neville Craven: 3540, baritone. Archibalds younger brother, secretive, jealous, dour. Lily: 25-35, soprano from middle C to high C. Archibalds dead wife, sweet, tender, loving. Martha: 16-25, mezzo/alto belt. Marys chambermaid, spunky, highspirited, overwhelmingly optimistic. Yorkshire dialect. Dickon: 18-25, tenor. Marthas brother, mischievous, mystical, and an old soul. Yorkshire dialect. Ben Weatherstaff: 50plus, baritone. Gruff yet kind Head gardener. Yorkshire dialect. Colin Craven: 10-12, boy soprano to E. Archibalds bedridden son; spoiled, isolated. Mrs. Medlock: 30-plus, non-singing. Housekeeper, stern and serious. Mean. Sharp. Pinch lipped. (The following appear as ghosts and in flashbacks) Rose Lennox: 25-35, mezzo. Marys haughty mother. Albert Lennox: 30-40. Marys loving father. Ayah: age open, alto. Marys indulgent Indian nanny who follows her from India in spirit form. Fakir: age open, high tenor. Afeatured member of the Dreamers. Fakir is an Indian Holy man. Mysterious. The Dreamers: age open, soprano-alto-tenor-bass. To play a variety of roles, all have solo singing lines. These characters are people from Marys life in India who haunt her until she finds a new life.Show synopsisLiving in a lonely manor house in 1906 England, Archibald Craven yearns for his beautiful, late wife. He blames his crippled son, Colin, for his wife's death and has left him neglected and isolated. Their quiet routine is turned upside down when young Mary Lennox, a rich, spoiled child, is sent to live with them following the death of her parents from cholera in India. While living at the manor house, Mary discovers a secret walled garden hidden in the grounds and releases the magic and adventures locked inside, changing their lives forever. This stunning and challenging musical features music and lyrics by Lucy Simon and book by Marsha Norman. It is based on the book The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett. The production is directed by Kristin Taylor and choreographed by Jenny Rowe. The set is designed by Jennifer Westergom, lighting and special effects by Thor Knutson, and costuming designed by Helen Curcio. For further audition information, please contact Kristin Taylor, taylorette@aol.com. Tickets may be purchased from the Box Office from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday trough Friday, by phone at 382-2525 or online at www.highlandslittletheatre.org. Highlands Little Theatre is at 356 West Center Ave., Sebring. HLT sets auditions for production of Secret Garden Cast for Highlands Little Theatres Little Women selected Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID The Greater Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce invites you to participate in the Caladium Festival Art Competition. Artwork is to be brought to the Caladium Arts & Crafts Co-op at 132 E. Interlake Blvd. between Agu. 22-24 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. This time frame is strictly enforced. All artwork must feature caladiums. Any medium (oil/acrylic, watercolor, pastel, mixed media) will be accepted as long as it is on a flat surface and is not three dimensional. All entries must be professionally framed and ready to hang with wire (no saw tooth hangers and cardboard backs are not accepted). All entries may be priced for sale during the Festival. All artwork will be on display at the Caladium Arts and Crafts Co-op throughout the Caladium Festival Aug. 26-27. The Festival draws more than 30,000 visitors. The winning artwork for the T-shirt and poster and the Peoples Choice Award wi nning artwork will be on display at Highlan ds Independent Bank, Lake Placid office durin g the forthcoming year. The bank contributes a $250 savings bond to the winners. The winning artists should make eve ry effort to be available in late August of 2011 to sign posters and T-shirts for the Caladiu m Festival awards for the Co-op's Caladiu m Festival Art competition. Prizes ($50 for first, $30 for second an d $20 for third) and ribbons will be awarded in the categories of oils/acrylics, pastels/wat er colors, and miscellaneous as long as there a re at least four entries in each category. Contact: Margie Callas at 441-0585 or Joyce DeSmet at 633-9096. The childrens T-shirt/Poster competitio n for grades 2-5 is conducted through the pu blic and private school system. Wauchula State Bank, Lake Placid, whe re the art work will be displayed during t he forthcoming year, contributes a $100 savin gs bond to the winner. Artists wanted for Caladium Festival Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun Search for The News-Sun and

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, May 8, 2011Page 13B DIVERSIONS MARKETWOESBy MELROSEN ACROSS 1 Do what Michelle Wie did before age 16 6 Lentil housings 10 For example 13 Muzzleloading aid 19 Out-of-this-world type 20 Beige relative 21 Beverage ending 22 Protected, in a way 23 Hows your Ticonderoga stock? answer? 27 Rally attendance fig. 28 Join in the fun 29 Busy mo. for a CPA 30 ... __ quit! 31 Old Glory detail 33 Ancient Phoenician seaport 34 Deliverer of text messages? 37 __ in victor 38 Melodic passages 40 Eroded 41 Faith-based group 42 Hows your Johnson & Johnson stock? answer? 46 Fondue needs 47 Old frosh topper 48 Sightings 50 Words after shake or break 54 One playing for time 56 Cmo __ usted? 57 Shtick 60 Baseball commissioner Bud 62 Stashes 63 Villa dEste city 65 Hows your Ginsu stock? answer? 71 Classic Ford 72 Janvier, across the Pyrenees 73 Arrive home, in a way 74 Program file suffix 75 Beaut 78 Boxers attendant 80 Began a round, with off 81 Mallomars maker 83 Draft, as a contract 85 Stop legally 88 Hows your Mot & Chandon stock? answer? 94 Slimy mud 95 Be indisposed 96 Airport near Tokyo 97 Ranch addition? 98 Weather page datum 99 H.H. Munros pen name 102 ... like __ of chocolates 103 Joplin work 104 Bowl highlights: Abbr. 105 Statistical group 108 Like Gershwins piano concerto 109 Hows your Aqua Lung stock? answer? 114 Refrain from the song Hot Hot Hot 115 Success 116 Cartoonist Goldberg 117 Sleep lab phenomenon 118 Settled in 119 Record 120 Affect strongly 121 The Glass Bead Game author DOWN 1 Views wide-eyed 2 Fake fat 3 Migratory duck 4 TiVo button 5 Not procrastinating 6 Bothersome 7 Brownish hue 8 Hang loosely 9 Fijis capital 10 Gunpowder ingredient 11 Bother 12 To be sure! 13 Like bodybuilders muscles 14 Love abroad 15 Kvbrick opvs? 16 Go longer than planned 17 Just as planned 18 Refrains 24 Calif. daily 25 Ode writers Muse 26 Traditional straw mats 32 Elephant predator of myth 35 What mares eat, in song 36 Putney __: 1969 film 39 Deli choice 40 White poplars 41 Emergency letters 43 __ yoga 44 And seem to walk on wings, and tread __: Pope 45 Pia colada ingredient? 46 Grain threshers 49 J.D. holder 50 Shoot! 51 Fine china 52 Say nothin, say? 53 Cave 55 Surrey town in which George Harrison lived in the s 57 The Man Who Fell to Earth star 58 Pariss __ la Cit 59 Ready to hit the hay 61 Actress Sarah Michelle __ 64 Battery unit 66 Ticket souvenir 67 Battery terminalrelated 68 Corp. shuffling 69 Spin doc 70 My Fair Lady composer 76 It may be poetic 77 Two seater, maybe? 78 Disappear 79 Making a mess of 81 Sorry, lassie! 82 City SW of Bogot 84 Pro bono TV ad 85 The Sage of Concord 86 Revival claim 87 Wing-tipped shoes 89 Arraignment answers 90 Angelicos address 91 Freudian principles 92 Penitents 93 Like many muni bonds 95 Exaggerated 98 Told too often 99 Teapot part 100 Perps story 101 Hall of Fame slugger Ralph 106 Ballpark figs. 107 Talk effusively 110 Hi-tech worker 111 Sharp punch 112 Ipanemas locale 113 Vane dir. Solution on page 7B Special to the News-SunAries (March 21-April 20) Aries, with so many things on your plate, it might seem as if nothing will ever get done. Separate things into manageable lists and tackle each project one at a time. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Taurus, take a few moments to analyze your preferences in friends. Maybe youre being too stringent. Its time to open up the options and make a few new ones. Gemini (May 22-July 22) Gemini, there are so many fun things in store that you cant decide where to begin. Get started on the fun and make the most of the good times ahead. Cancer(June 22-July 22) Cancer, devote lots of time to hanging out with friends this week. Others will flock to you and want to be in your presence. Enjoy the spotlight. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Leo, without much on the docket, this week could prove a bit boring. Instead of focusing on the negative side of having a lot of time, relish in the relaxation time. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Bad news arrives and catches you off guard, Virgo. Unless you can rebound quickly, it might take a lot of wind out of your sails for the time being. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Opportunities at work are many, Libra. You will be a rising star this week. Enjoy the notoriety while it lasts. If your salary is commission-based, expect much. Scorpio (Oct. 24-No v. 22) Scorpio, even thoug h you try hard, you cann ot control everything. You w ill have to go with the flo w every now and then. It w ill help you develop a strong er character. Sagittarius (Nov. 2 3Dec. 21) Sagittarius, i ts time to put an end to an ongoing disagreement wi th a loved one. This feud is taking up too much energ y that can be put toward bett er things. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Ja n. 20) Capricorn, some pe ople underestimate your ab ilities, but you can be quite a force when you set yo ur mind to it. Continue to su rprise others with your ta lents. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Fe b. 18) Aquarius, althoug h you will be held accountab le for something going on at work, the effects will actua lly work to your advantag e. Its good to be in the lim elight. Pisces (Feb. 19-Marc h 20) Pisces, concentratio n proves difficult but yo u have to buckle down and g et some important tas ks accomplished. Famous birthday s May 8 -Enrique Iglesia s, singer, 36; May 9 -Rosar io Dawson, actress, 32; M ay 10 Kenan Thompso n, comic, 33; May 11 Cor ey Monteith, actor, 29; May 1 2 Stephen Baldwin, acto r, 45; May 13 Robe rt Pattinson, actor, 25; an d May 14 Miran da Cosgrove, actress, 18. Taurus should analyze preferences in friends When a child has one pare nt leave, his biggest conc ern is that the other parent w ill stay.As the staying pare nt, I had to answer those t ough questions from my p re-school child. He was seeking stability i n the roots of his family. W ould those roots dig deeply e nough to keep him emot ionally secure and physicall y protected? I prayed and t rusted God to help me give h im security. As he grew, he began to i nch out for some independe nce wanting to walk to s chool with a friend and s ometimes alone. I held back f or a while until one day I r ealized I needed to trust h im and God as I let go in s mall, appropriate ways. At first, I walked with him p art way. Later, he walked a lone in the same direction I d travel to my part-time j ob. Id catch upwith him a s I slowly drove by. Seeing h is progress, Id wave and d rive on praying fervently knowing he was testing his w ings. Roots and wings develop healthy self-confidence two keys moms hold in their hands. By creating a loving, nurturing and safe home where our children are cherished, they dig deep roots.This is home and it is good. This is family and family loves, cares and protects. Once a child feels secure at home, his wingsitch to spread a bit further. By giving our children appropriate freedoms according to their age, abilities and trustworthiness; we have turned the key to self-confidence and adventure. But, there is another key that is essential. That key opens the door to grounding them spiritually. Their roots and wings will be more effective when their anchor in God holds fast. With faith in God through an abiding relationship with Jesus Christ, our children can face the storms that may threaten their roots or render them incapable of flying for a time. As moms, we have the awesome privilege of training our children in the things of the Lord and helping them get to know God personally. As we love God with all our heart, soul and strength, we can teach our children by our words and behavior as seen in Deuteronomy 6:7, NKJV, where it says, You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, when you walk by the way, when you lie down, and when you rise up. Roots, wings and an anchor for the soul three keys a mom needs on her key ring.Selah Jan Merop of Sebring is a NewsSun correspondent and an award-winning writer. Roots, wings and an anchor Pause And Consider Jan Merop Classified ads get results! DearAbby: Its Mothers Day, so I hope youll allow me to share how I memorialize my mom today since s he is no longer living. My mother was a nurse for many y ears and worked well past retirem ent age. She finally had to quit w hen her body could no longer keep u p with the physical demands of the j ob. She was an extremely caring a nd self-sacrificing person who w ould help anyone at any time. She w as also a softie when it came to h omeless animals. I honor her by always making a p oint of being scheduled to work on M others Day. By doing so, Im hopi ng it will free up someone else to s pend time with her/his mother. Then I add up my earnings for the day and d onate that amount to the local anim al shelter. I can think of no better way to honor the wonderful woman who molded me and gave me the basis of who I am today. Celebrating Mom in Liberty, Texas DearCelebrating Mom: Your mother raised a thoughtful, caring and generous child. Im sure she was as proud of you as you are of her. Thank you for sharing. DearAbby: My world is crumbling and I dont know how to fix it. I have failed at being what my wife needs, which resulted in her confiding in another man. I try every day to be the best husband and father I can, but I think it may not be enough for her. I want her to be happy, but I want her to be happy with me. I guess I dont listen and provide the support she needs. I thought I did, but I was wrong. I trust my wife, but I violated that trust by snooping at her Facebook. I did it because she has been distant and I was afraid; if she wasnt talking to me, then to whom? Im afraid of life without her. If there was a single thing I could do or say, I would. If there was something I could buy, Id go broke getting it for her. As of now I am lost and wanting to hold her and whisper how much I love her. Abby, I dont expect an answer except to seek counseling, which I plan to do. I just needed to get it out. How Did I Get Here? DearHow: While you may not expect an answer, allow me to offer one. The way to start fixing this is to talk to your wife. Explain what you did and the reason for it, and find out from her why she has been confiding in another man. Once you start communicating, it may turn out that your fears are groundless. However, if theyre not, then the two of you should seek counseling to try to heal your marriage. DearReaders: Ahappy Mothers Day to mothers everywhere birth mothers, adoptive and foster mothers, and stepmothers and especially to my own beautiful mother, Pauline Phillips, in Minneapolis. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Daughter works to honor moms memory with acts of generosity Dear Abby

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LIVING 14B PAGE News-Sun Sunday, May 8, 2011 F AMILYFEATURES A ccording to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, more than 90 percent of Americans want to protect the environment. D espite the desire to care for the earth, o nly 33 percent of trash in the U.S. actua lly gets recycled, and 54 percent gets b uried in landfills. With sustainable livi ng becoming more top-of-mind, Ziploc w ants to empower families to get i nvolved in recycling efforts. In an effort to offset the amount of p roduct waste that could potentially end u p in landfills and motivate families to d o their part to protect the environment f or future generations, Ziploc has partn ered with Recyclebank, the leading sust ainable action platform designed to m otivate and enable individuals to make a collective impact on the environment. F rom recycling and reusing everyday k itchenware to being mindful of water a nd energy usage, families can incorpor ate these simple, earth-friendly tips into t heir kitchen routines:Increase Recycling EffortsRecycle items that you no longer need and participate in community recycling initiatives. Community support for recycling of common and uncommon goods can vary from place to place. In fact, clean and dry Ziploc Brand Sandwich, Freezer and Storage Bags are now accepted at existing in-store recycling bins that accept plastic shopping bags for recycling at approximately 18,000 participating retailers nationwide.Use Smart Kitchen SuppliesWhen buying supplies for your kitchen whether an appliance, cooking pan or piece of cutlery choose durable and high quality kitchenware to withstand the test of time. Also, save energy (and potentially reduce your gas bill) by using smaller appliances when cooking small amounts of food. For example, heating water in an electric kettle rather than a teapot on the stove or cooking small or medium sized portions of food in the microwave instead of the regular oven use less energy. Store Meals in Reusable and Multi-Purpose ContainersWhen preparing and storing meals for the family, try using Ziploc Brand Containers, which are available in a variety of sizes and shapes. They not only help families stay organized and get more out of meals (and reduce waste) by keeping food fresh, but they are also microwaveable, freezer-safe and are perfect for storing leftovers or carrying lunch to work.Conserve the Household WaterSupplyFor a cold beverage, keep a cool pitcher of water in the fridge instead of letting the tap run until water gets cold. Refill one water glass or reusable bottle throughout the day so there will be fewer items to wash. After eating, dont rinse dishes with water just scrape off the excess food and load directly into the dishwasher. Tests by Consumer Reports showed that pre-rinsing usually isnt necessary and by skipping it you can save 20 gallons of water per load. Through its partnership with R ecyclebank, Ziploc is offering another o ption to get involved and help the envir onment by incentivizing families to i nspire change. Together, they are comm itted to motivate and reward cons umers who take sustainable actions. To Families everywhere have a new option in recycling. Clean and dry Ziploc Brand Sandwich, Freezer and Storage Bags can now be recycled at existing in-store bins at approximately 18,000 participating retail locations that accept plastic shopping bags for recycling. Its an easy way to protect the environment for future generations. Here is a list from www.PlasticBagRecycling.org of some of the items you can recycle at in-store recycling bins: Contact your local retailer with a collection bin or your local recycling company for a full list of items that can be recycled in your community, as they will differ by locale. earn rewards, visit www.recyclebank.com/ziploc and pledge to recycle Ziploc Brand Bags and packaging. Soon, specially marked packages of the bags will be available for purchase. Simply enter the code from inside the marked packages at www.Recyclebank.com and start earning points which can be redeemed for prizes. Learn more about Ziploc and Recyclebank recycling efforts to divert millions of pounds of waste from landfills at www.ziploc.com/sustainability. Additionally, share recycling and earth-friendly tips by joining the Facebook community at www.Facebook.com/Ziploc. Photo courtesy of Getty ImagesClean and dry Ziploc Brand Bags Plastic grocery or retail bagsNewspaper bagsDry-cleaning bagsBread and produce bagsToilet paper, napkin and papertowel wrapsPlastic shipping envelopesClean plastic bags labeled #2 or #4