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The news-sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01120
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 11-13-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:01120
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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C M Y K By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comA VON PARK There is something about the outside of a horse that is good f or the inside of a man, was a quote attributed to the famous WinstonC hurchill near the end of his life. s wonderful may be t he same sentiment summed up better by Highlands County residentE spy Garcia after a therapy session with Heartland Horses and Handicapped. Ive wanted to ride since I was a little girl, Garcia said as she clapped her hands together just under her chin. Like Churchill, Garcia is a little on the older side of life at 77. But unlike Churchill, who was aroundh orses all his life, Garcia didnt start riding until Wednesday. And Garcia had to be helped into the saddle from her walker. It was her first time up there, said nursing assistant Wendy Guzman. She said it was a dream to ridea horse, but she never got the chance. Now shes getting the chance. Garcia, along with several others from the Kenilworth Care and Rehab NEWS-SUN H ighlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, November 13, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 134 | 75 cents www.newssun .com H ighLow 82 60C omplete Forecast PAGE 16A Mostly sunny and pleasant F orecast Question: Should Penn State coach Joe Paterno have been fired? Next question: Should the Occupy protests around the country end due to recent deaths at several camps? www.newssun .comMake your voice heard at Online Obituaries Lamar Allen ONeill Age 64, of Lake Placid Walter E. Thantham III Age 60, of Sebring Obituaries, Page 6A Phone ... 385-6155Fax ... 385-2453Online: www.newssun.com Yes 69% No 30% 099099401007 Total votes: 113 Arts & Entertainment7B Business9A Chalk Talk12B Classifieds11A Community Briefs2A Community Calendar6B Crossword Puzzle15B Dear Abby15B Editorial & Opinion4A Horoscope15B Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times15B Senior Scene8B Sports On TV2B Unknown Soldiers11B Index Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and HEARTLAND NATIONAL BANK***; 11.25"; 1.5"; Black plus three; process, front strip; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 6 6 3 3 8 8 B y ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comLAKE PLACID A H ighlands County Sheriffs Office report says that 87y ear-old Doris Smith, was tired of caring for herh usband, 93-year-old Chester Smith, which is why investigators say she stabbed him eight times and killing him on Oct. 26. T hats why she is charged with first-degree murder. On Oct. 26, HCSO deputies responded to a 5:45 a.m. 911 call fromD oris Smith at 42 Hickory Hills Circle, just north of the town of Lake Placid. Doris Smith had told dispatch that she had given her husband a sedative and had taken an overdose herself in an attempt to take their lives. Emergency personnel found Doris Smith calmly sitting at her kitchen table and Chester Smith in bed nude with three kitchen knives still sticking from his body. Doris Smith allegedly t old a deputy at the scene I couldnt take care of him anymore. Chester Smith reportedly had major hearing and vision loses. Chester Smith was found lying on his left side in the couples bed in the master bedroom, the reports states, with three large kitchen knives, which were embedded past the hilt, were protruding from his exposed SO: Wife, 87, used 4 knives to kill husband Doris Smith reportedly said she was tired of caring for 93-year-old Chester Smith D oris Smith News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE Espy Garcia waves from the back of Max Wednesday as Ruben Rodriguez and Wendy Guzman from the Kenilworth Care and Rehab Center help her dismount while Highlands Horses and Handicapped volunteer Gail Trepicone holds Max steady after a ride. s wonderful. Ive wanted to ride since I was a little girl.ESPYGARCIA Sebring stuffs Avon Park for 45-0 rout of arch rivalsSPORTS, 1B Nowhere to run Horsing around can be good for all ages By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING For nine weeks, the 10 members of the Sheriffs Citizens Academy inaugural course met once a week for three hours. During that time they learned about how the Sheriffs Office is organized, each departments responsibilities and, most importantly, how the deputies and staff go about their work. In addition to listening to lectures, talking to employees and watching demonstrations, the students went on ride-along patrols and spent time at the firing range. They learned how evidence is collected and stored, how traffic stops are handled, how official records are kept, how deputies are taught selfdefense, how a crime scene is approached and a criminal investigation conducted. They learned about how suspects are booked into the system, visited the jail, met school resource officers, and saw how sexual predators are monitored. Citizens Academy graduates got up close and personal with law enforcement Courtesy photo Thats Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce executive director and CEO Eileen May being shown how to fire a pistol. Christine Harfield goes through the same routine to the left. See HORSES, page 7A See WIFE, page 7A See CITIZENS, page 3A PAGE1 6B A day of honorC ounty pays tribute o n Veterans Day PICTURES, 5A N ews-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Highlands County Sheriff's Deputy E rnest Gelinas investigates the scene of a shooting incident Saturday morning i n Sun N Lake in Sebring. By SAMANTHAGHOLAR s gholar@newssun.comSEBRING Afatal shooting occurred at 6315 Columbus Blvd. inS un N Lake Saturday morning at approximately 10 a.m. H ighlands County Sheriffs Office Public Information Officer Nell Hays confirmed that the male victimd ied Saturday morning. He was taken to Florida Hospital and was about to be loaded onto a helicopter w hen he was taken into the hospital instead. According to Highlands County P roperty Appraiser records, the residence is owned by Willis E. Bonner J r. and Mary Bonner. The male victim was a current resident of Sunny Hills Assisted LivingF acility in Sebring, according to a neighbor of the victim. The Sebring Police Department was reportedly i nvestigating a related incident at Sunny Hills. The neighbor, who wished to r emain anonymous, confirmed hearing a gunshot from the residence a round 10 a.m. Saturday and described the sound as normal for the area. Man dies of gunshot wound At home on Columbus Boulevard in Sun n Lake Saturday S ee HCSO, page 7A

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C M Y K By SAMANTHAGHOLAR s gholar@newssun.comS EBRING The Highlands County C onvention Center is teaming up with Habitat for Humanity this holiday season for a new event that will bring cheer to the entirec ommunity. The Heartland Holiday Spectacular featuring The Festival of Trees is a new event scheduled for Saturday, Dec. 3 and is the brainchild of Habitat forH umanity Director of Development and C ommunications Sarah Pallone and Highlands County Fair Association Marketing and Sales Manager Tenille Drury. We both love Christmas. So I heard that she was putting on an event and she heard that I was putting on an event so we just decidedt o do them together, said Pallone. The event will take place at the Highlands County Convention Center from 1-7 p.m. Both Drury and Pallone feel it will be a great addition to the holiday season in Highlands County. There is really nothing in the county that is really family fun-oriented event that is just all about the holiday spirit and is all inclusive, said Drury. The Heartland Holiday Spectacular will be held in the Highlands County Fair Convention Center and will host not only Pallones Festival of Trees event, but will also house numerous activities and vendors from all over the community. e will have a Christmas Shop. There will be all sorts of different vendors. Different things that give people the opportunity to Christmas shop if they want to, said Drury. Among the many shop and business vendors that will fill the convention center, Drury has invited some Christmas regulars to join in on the fun. Mr. and Mrs. Claus will be there. Theyll also be a kids section with crafts and we are working on finding someone to put on story time. They would read Christmas stories for the kids, said Drury. Drury also enlisted the help of Heartland Idol founder Diana Walker for entertainment during the Spectacular. e will have Heartland I dol performers, kids from local dance studios, and s ome of the choir and jazz bands from the local schools, said Walker. The Spectacular will also present opportunities forf amily portraits during the holiday season. Taylor Dixon Photography will be provided photography for the event. In conjunction with the Spectacular, Pallone willh old a new event she is calling the Festival of Trees. For my event, I am asking people in the community to come here the day before and decorate a Christmas tree. Businesses, churches,n on-profit organizations anyone can decorate a tree. We are hoping to get rows and rows of Christmas trees to auction off to people whod ont really have the money or the time to purchase and decorate a tree themselves, Pallone explained. Habitat for Humanity will deliver the Christmas trees to the homes or businesses who purchased the tree following the event. oday I went to Starbucks and they committed to decorating a tree...they are doing something really cool, though. They are asking their favorite customers to bring in a Christmas ornament. They dont want it to be just a business tree promoting their business. They want each ornament to come from all over Highlands County and tell a story of that customer, said Pallone. Pallone hopes that many of Highlands County businesses, churches and other organizations will be a part of the festival by purchasinga tree. She currently has about 10 businesses already committed to being a part of the Festival of Trees. I already have Starbucks, Marriott Residence Inn, Positive Medical Transport, Stephanie Sherrae Salon and Spa, and a few Realtor companies, Pallone said. Pallone hopes to have at least 50 trees decorated for the festival and looks forward to working with businesses and individuals in the area. Some of the money will benefit the Humane Society of Highlands County Pallone said. Discounts of 25 percent will be given to any vendor who also decorates a tree for the festival. Vendor deadline i s Dec. 1. Entry deadline for the Festival of Trees is F riday, Nov. 18. For additional tree festival information or decorator applications contact Sarah at 402-2913 or 214-8215. Forv endor booth rental contact Tenille at 214-5584 or 3822255. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, November 13, 2011www.newssun.com Pub Block; 5.542"; 4.5"; Black; publishers block; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 8 0 0 3 3 4 4 KAYLOR & KAYLOR; 5.542"; 1.5"; Black; social security below lottery; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 6 6 2 2 4 4 K AYLOR & KAYLOR; 5.542"; 1.5"; Black; nursing above lottery; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 9 9 3 3 3 3 N ov. 9 91629444851x:4Next jackpot $28 millionNov. 5 145373851x:5 Nov. 2 113134394752x:3 Nov. 11 1718192436 Nov. 10 117182631 Nov. 9 25152931 Nov. 8 3691928 Nov. 11 (n 1179 Nov. 11 (d 6739 Nov. 10 (n 4028 Nov. 10 (d 4687 Nov. 11(n 211 Nov. 11 (d 468 Nov. 10 (n 416 Nov. 10(d 201 Nov. 11 41519424 Nov. 8 1235373821 Nov. 4 310162613 Nov. 1 26283722 Nov. 9 535575859 PB: 12 PP: 3Next jackpot $35 millionNov. 5 233394043 PB: 26 PP: 3 Nov. 2 1214343946 PB: 36 PP: 4 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawings are twice per day: (d daytime drawing, (n nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Play Lottery Center Sebring Christmas parade is Dec. 2SEBRING This years S ebring Christmas parade will be Friday Dec. 2. Step off is at 7 p.m. and the theme is a pre-centennial winter wonderland. T he deadline for registering a float is Nov. 23 by 3 p.m. Registration forms and hold harmless forms can be found at the cham-b er of commerce and on the Heartland Young Professionals website at www.heartlandyp.org/. The cost of having a float is$ 35 for each organization and non-profits are $25. There is a mandatory s afety meeting for at least one member of any organization entering a float sot hey can find out information about parade routes, g eneral safety on the route and the disembarkation procedures. The safetym eeting will be held at Firemens field at 5:30 p .m. Nov. 17. The Heartland YPcan be reached at heartlandyp.org or by phone (863 9462 or on Facebook. Highlands Park Estates Fall dinnert odayL AKE PLACID The annual Thanksgiving dinn er for Highlands Park Estates Association will be held today at 1 p.m. at the F irehouse on Columbus, one block north of C.R. 621 and around the corner from the VFWin Lake Placid. T urkey and drinks are provided by the Association and those attending are asked to bring a covered dish tos hare and their own plate and flatware. Come meet with and visit your neighbors and enjoy a delicious meal.D oor prizes will be given. All property owners are invited to join.Lake Persimmon boat ramp to be closed for repairsLAKE PLACID The Highlands County Parksa nd Recreation Departments Lake Persimmon boat ramp located at 150 Hillside Drive in Lake Placid willb e closed for repair and maintenance from Monday through Thursday, Dec. 9. F or further information on boat ramp closings, you may contact the HighlandsC ounty Parks and Recreation Department at 4 02-6812.Womans Club meets for member arts competitionSEBRING The GFWC Womans Club of Sebring, 4260 Lakeview Drive, will meet onM onday at 11:30 a.m. The Arts Department will host t he event; members are asked to bring a covered dish item for the luncheon.A n awards presentation from the exhibits of memb erstalents will be the days program. An in-house judging of a rts and crafts will take place today from 12:30-2 p.m. Contestants please bring your recently made entries (i.e., needle work,j ewelry, sewing and crochet projects, water color paintings, ceramics, handmade items, etc.), to the CO MMUNITYBR IEFS C ontinued on page 6A C ourtesy photo The 42nd Annual Gene Scheck Rotary Apple & Sweet Cider Sale was another successful event for the Rotary Club of Sebring. Michael Halloram, the president of the club, would like to thank all of those patrons who helped sell out two track loads of apples and apple cider. This annual event has been headed by Bruce Lybarger for almost 15 years. More t han 100 Rotarians and volunteers participated in helping promote the ideals of Rotary and Rotary Fundation. Apple & Sweet Cider sale a success New holiday event planned for Convention Center By CHRISTOPHER T UFFLEYchristopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING The stud ents and faculty at Cracker Trail Elementary School need the communitys help. T he Clorox Company is running a contest with five cash grant prizes one for$ 50,000, and four for $25,000. Nobody has to b uy anything. All people have to do is vote. Winning a grant, howeve r, will be a challenge. So far Cracker Trail has accum ulated 258 votes, but the current leader in the contest has garnered 31,654. The next seven schools all have more than 10,000 votese ach. Cheryl Vermilye, who t eaches second grade, explained the school had created a lab where studentsw ere given a chance to learn in different ways b y listening, looking, and touching, for example. Several teachers were a part o f the project and students rotated through various stations. Budgetary cuts, however, meant cutbacks to the pro-g ram, so that now one staff member oversees a variety of art projects from pottery and sculpting to making useful objects out of dis-c arded materials. It is one of only two elementary s chool art programs in the county. T he staff members salary is funded by the schools after-school daycare, but those funds are now needed elsewhere. W hen it became clear the lab would have to close without additional money, however, Dr. Richard Demeri, Cracker Trailsp rincipal, said, a group of teachers (led by Vermilye) took up it upon themselves to look for grants, dedicated to keeping its funds from drying up. The team found out about the competition and wrote the application needed to enter. They are now getting out the message wed like to have people vote. Demeri has faith in the community. It is quite a steep goal that we have set for ourselves, he said, but the people of Highlands County have always supported their schools. He paused, and then added, Remembering to vote is the kicker The Clorox grant would provide the teachers salary, as well as enhance the $3,000 of materials provided by the Parent Teachers Organization every year. One has to be over 13 to vote. Text Clorox11954 to 44144, or vote online at http://www.powerabrightfuture.com/gallery/detail/? nid=1889/. The Cracker Trail Elementary Schools website has a quick link. Each voter may vote one time online per day and one time via text per day. Demeri said in his experience, texting was easiest. All votes cast must correspond to a single person, email address or text-messaging capable service and/or user account. Voters may not use multiple e-mail addresses. Voting ends on Dec. 9. That means as of today there are 25 days left. Call the school at 471-5777. Cracker Trail needs votes School trying to w in $50K grant from Clorox Heartland Holiday Spectacular featuring The Festival of Trees set Dec. 3

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Page 4AN ews-SunS unday, November 13, 2011www.newssun.comTODAYSEDITORIALOTHERVIEWPOINTS 2 227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 N EWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor E xt. 515editor@newssun.com S COTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comD AN HOEHNES ports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com C IRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com B USINESS OFFICEJ ANET EMERSONE xt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION In fact, it would be fair to say the News-Sun staff believes the worldw ould be a better place if everyone, no matter their religion, lived the spirit of Christmas every day. Some of you may be scratching your heads, wondering why we are bringing up Christmas when Thanksgiving is stillm ore than two weeks away. As it happens, that is our point. S igns of Christmas are already creeping into view. Ashopping plaza on U.S. 27 has decorated its parking lot lights,a nd a reader reports she couldnt find napkins and plates appropriate for her T hanksgiving dinner at a local grocery store because everything on the shelf was geared for Christmas. Shops here and there have Christmas window decorations, and many storesh ave major Christmas displays. One large hardware emporium, for example, has sprouted a indoor forest of well-lita rtificial trees. While we believe in living the spirit of Christmas year round, this is not what we had in mind. We understand how important it is for us Americans to do our duty in a con-s umer economy. Shopping has became the lifeblood of our economic system, a nd buying things, after all, creates jobs. We worry, however, there is a dark side to this approach that it has led toa materialistic, even crass, outlook, something that is as far from Christs t eachings as one can get. Not that Christ wouldnt have been excited about getting an iPad something like that would have helped him spread his message but we cant seeh im standing in line for a wide-screen plasma T.V., or athletic shoes with special air cushions, or the latest Wii game. T hen there is a consuming societys unintended consequence: Advertising, with its goal of making us all need t hings we never would have thought of wanting blankets with sleeves, battery-powered socks, home latte machines and M&Ms with our pictures o n them. And what about advertisings effect on our children? For many of them Santa Claus is the hero of the seas on, not the Messiah. Their prayers fill with wanting rather than giving. We are not so naive, or pure, to think any of this will change in the near future or that it would be entirely a good t hing if it did. Living a Christian life is n ot about doing without. M aybe we can just recognize that r ushing the Christmas season only waters it down, diluting its message. The longer it lasts, the less special it is. It would be a small step to be sure, but maybe we could just wait until after w eve given thanks for what we already have before we go out and shop for m ore. is the season ... already? We love Christmas as much as anyone else of c ourse most importantly, because we celebrate t he birth of Jesus Christ. A lmost as important, however, is the spirit of goodwill, charity and family that Christs teachings engender. S o why not break away the University of South F loridas Polk County campus already named USF Polytechnic and call itF lorida Polytechnic? In 1968 Florida Technological University o pened in Orlando with aspirations to become a G eorgia Tech or MIT. The naming of the new institution in Orlando was a messy affair, a written history of the State UniversityS ystem notes. Indeed, thenGov. Hayden Burns himself insisted on the name despite concerns by some that the university would be unable to attract many liberal arts students with thatn ame. Today, of course, Florida Technological University is called the University of Central Florida. W e dont know much at this point about whether F lorida is finally ready for a full-fledged, independent Polytech U. We do knowt hat state funding for its existing universities is heade d nowhere but down. Reportedly, USFs branch tech campus is undercapital-i zed and underfunded. It may have to depend on modular facilities (aka t railers) for the next decade or two. But on the plus side, i t is fully prepared to join the NCAAimmediately. It took just a decade for Florida Technological University boosters, admin-i strators and faculty to decide that the tech label was just too confining for an institution with higher academic aspirations. Will history repeat itself? A n editorial from the Gainesville Sun. State needs Polytechnic U What Floridar eally n eeds is a frees tanding technol ogical university. It is not unusual for drivers on South Floridas streets and highways to witness police cars, their emergency lights off and sirens silent, weaving in and out of traffic at high speeds, forcing drivers to grip their steering wheels tightly and wonder why the rush if theres no police emergency. The firestorm of controversy over the stop made by Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Donna Watts involving Miami Police Officer Fausto Lopez on Floridas Turnpike in Hollywood on Oct. 11 has raised multiple questions about procedure, policy and judgment by everyone concerned. But none of this should obscure the principal point in this dramatic episode: Anyone driving recklessly or at excessive speeds when no genuine public-safety emergency is involved should be pulled over by any officer on duty who s pots the violation. Apolice chase or any other incident involving emergency vehicles with sirens and flashing lights is an obvious exception. Other drivers know theyre supposed to get out of the way. But in this instance, Lopez was apparently late for his off-duty job while driving a patrol vehicle with no emergency lights or siren in use. Weve all been late for work, but try offering that excuse to the police officer who pulls you over for reckless driving or speeding. The facts of this case remain to be sorted out. Lopez and his attorney maintain he did nothing wrong and deserve the benefit of the doubt, as does anyone accused of a violation. But Watts does not deserve the vituperation aimed at her from some of Miamis officers for doing what she thought was her job. One beneficial result of this controversy should be to make clear what understandings or courtesy agreements are in place among the various law enforcement agencies, for the sake of reassuring the public that no one gets special treatment when common sense rules of public safety are violated. The feud this has ignited between FHPand Miami police is worse than childish it diminishes public confidence in local law enforcement. ... An editorial from the Miami Herald. Law agencies feud is childish Heres a useful rule of thumb for anyone driving a police car offduty: Wearing a uniform and having the right to take the vehicle home at night doesnt offer license to behave as if the rules of the road dont apply to you. E ditor: Yes, the Drowsy Chaperone at Highlands L ittle Theatre is a big bunch of fun and entertainment. Everyone in this talented cast and crew, fromD irector Art Harriman to the wonderful Martile Blackmans singing and dancing to tap dancing and roller skating providea n evening of fast-moving fun and humor. I s a story within a story and a Broadwaym usical in the Busbe Berkely tradition. Dr. Joni Jones Sebring Drowsy Chaperone is wonderful EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; or e-mail editor@newssun.com To make sure the editorial pages aren dominated by the same writers, letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months. Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the opinion of that author and not necessarily the opinion of the staff or editors of the News-Sun All items will run on a first-come basis as space permits, although more timely ones could be moved up. We believe your viewpoints are just as important as any community leader or government official, so consider this a personal invitation to get your two cents in. The News-Sun has a long history of encouraging public discussion through letters, guest columns, and Readers Response questionnaires. As I have mentioned in previous columns, I am a video game player. I remain so even at the tender age of 53 and will probably keep up with them until they pry the controller (or mouse my cold, dead fingers. There are a number of reasons I play video games. They help keep me stimulated mentally, something I regard as semi-important as I get older. Its a great way to spend time with my sons, both of whom are game players. But being honest, a big part of the reasons I play video games? Theyre fun. The games give me a break from work and reality or maybe even time to do something mindless that wont burn the house down. I am even a recovering World of Warcraft player. For those who have never heard of it, World of Warcraft is a massive online role-playing game. You adopt a persona (My first one in WOWwas a human paladin) and proceed to fight your way through innumerable quests, making friends along the way and developing in-game skills. WOWis a great game (yes, to those of you howling at me, it is). But it is also an insidious time sink. You can easily sit down for just a minute and come up blinking hours later, having played past meals and bedtime and in general having forgotten that there was this life outside your computer monitor. It also costs a monthly fee to play, which works in my mind in funny ways. I figure if Im paying a subscription for the game Im almost obligated to play it to justify the payment. This means Im more likely to make time for the game, time I could be doing other things, such as laundry. So, Ive quit WOWfor now. This doesnt mean Ill never go back in fact, I admit to being tempted to return because of something called a new computer. I recently upgraded my old computer. With the help of John, my oldest (who honestly did most of the work), I now have a shiny new computer that can play the video games my kids and I enjoy. Theres one game out there Im already considering buying that I can now play. That game isnt Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3. This game recently came out and has been snatched up by fans at a rapid rate. The game, in which you play a soldier doing various combat missions, is part of an immensely popular series. Im not one of those panting after the game. Ive tried the Call of Duty series, and to put it kindly, I stink at it. I usually wind up spending a lot of time in the game being riddled by bullets and waiting to respawn to do it all over again. According to an article I found at www.9news.com, a Colorado man wants the game a little too much. According to the news report, 31-year-old Lomorin Sar got very upset when he learned that the store hed preordered the video game from was out of it. Witnesses claim that Sar began to threaten the employees of the store, asking when they were getting off of work and allegedly saying hed shoot them in the parking lot. He also allegedly said hed blow up the store. Police picked up Sar and issued him a summons for disorderly conduct. Neither the store nor Mr. Sar had any comments about the incident. Me? I think Mr. Sar took the idea of modern warfare a wee bit too far. Id go on, but its time for me to start dealing with real life. Then hopefully the unreal life of video games. See you online. Laura Ware is a Sebring resident. She can be contacted by email at bookwormlady@ embarqmail.com Visit her website at www.laurahware.com. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the staff of the NewsSun. Video game stupidity Lauras Look Laura Ware LETTER

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C M Y K www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, November 13, 2011Page 5A M usselman's; 11.25"; 10.5"; Process color; -; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 9 9 8 8 2 2 VE TERANSDA Y2011 C ourtesy photo William Cribbs, a Good Shepherd Hospice patient and U.S. Air Force veteran, salutes the flag during the P ledge of Allegiance at the Veterans Day ceremony on F riday morning at the Bud and Donna Somers Hospice H ouse in Sebring. Around 50 people attended the event, which included a flag-raising ceremony and patriotic s ongs. The event culminated with an honor pinning ceremony for Mr. Cribbs and another hospice house patient. N ews-Sun photo by BRIANAWASHINGTON Avon Park High School Junior ROTC Cadets Kathy Norman, Phillix Sterling, Josh G aidos and Taylor Richie raise the flag during South Florida Community Colleges Veterans Day ceremony Friday morning. Professor Erik Christensen, who served in the U.S. Navy, salutes as the cadets raise the flag. News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Air Force veteran, Rob Drawdy, embraces his daughter Kylee Rimer after being recognized for his service during Cracker Trails V eterans Day ceremony. News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Sebring High School Air Force JROTC marches up North Ridgewood to the Circle during the Veterans Day Parade in Downtown Sebring Friday afternoon. News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Cracker Trail Elementars chorus students sing patriotic songs Friday during their Veterans Day Ceremony. N ews-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR World War II Navy veteran Newt Dickey watches in delight as the Sebring Veterans Day Parade rolls down Commerce Avenue. News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Chief Warrant Officer, Steven Rivero, conducts the Florida National Guard 13th Army Band from Pembroke Pines. The band performed several patriotic pieces as w ell as classic jazz renditions during the Veterans Day ceremony on the courthouse l awn in Sebring Friday afternoon.

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C M Y K club at that time. The judging will begin at 3:30 p.m. The two judges will be from the local community: one is a n art teacher from a local high school, and the other is o n the judging panel at the Caladium in Lake Placid. P lease bring kids underw ear and socks sizes 8-12 f or the Safe House endeavor. Visitors are welcome. Call 385-7268 for additional information. Model Railroad Club meets TuesdayS EBRING All Sebring M odel Railroad Club meets on the third Tuesday of eachm onth (Nov. 15) at 7:30 p.m. at the Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway, unless otherwise directed. Planned future displays scheduled for Lakeshore Mall and other Highlands County locations in the near future. Members build and run an HO Gauge model railroad layout, exhibit small educational displays and answer hobby questions. For information, or updates on meeting locations, call Gene Archer at 452-0334 or Curtis Petersen at 382-6967.NARFE meets TuesdaySEBRING NARFE Chapter 288 of Highlands C ounty will meet on T uesday at Homers Smorgasbord in Sebring Square. Lunch is at 11:30 a.m. followed by the speakera nd business meeting at n oon. The guest speaker will be Dr. Joni Jones, DPM, speaking on foot care. Thec hapter will also be electing n ew officers. All current and retired federal employees (and spouses) are invited to attend. For more information, call L R Corky Dabe, president, at 382-9447.SALT education forum is TuesdaySEBRING The Highlands County Seniors and Law Enforcement Together (S.A.L.T.) Councilw ill hold their monthly educational forum on Tuesday at the Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road. The forum will be an Alzheimers Information Event targeted toward caregivers of patients with Alzheimers disease or other dementias. The forum will be presented from 5:30-7:30 p.m. and is open to the public. The program will feature speakers from the Alzheimers Association, Livingston & Livingston, the West Central Florida Area Agency on Aging, Inc., the Highlands County Sheriffs Office and Change of Pace. Vendors will be available a nd refreshments will be served. While there is no charge for this event, reservations are requested. To reserve a seat at this presentation please contact S.A.L.T. P resident Janet Tindell at 8 63-443-0747 or Nell Hays o f the Highlands County S heriffs Office at 402-7369.Can your thoughts m ake you sick?SEBRING Can Your Thoughts and Emotions Make You Sick (or Healthy The Mind/Body ConnectionUnveiled, will be presented by Dr. L. John Pepper, D.C. at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday at t he First Presbyterian C hurch of Sebring, 319 P oinsettia Ave. Why do happy people get sick or get cancer? What impact do my genes have on my health? Discover how your thoughts and emotions can create health or sickness, your genetics are affected by your thoughts and emotions and how you can use simple steps to experience optimal health and wellness. To experience this workshop, call 386-4325.AP chamber luncheon at River Greens ThursdayAVON PARK River Greens Golf Course and P lantation Restaurant will sponsor and host the Novembers Avon ParkC hamber Membership Luncheon at noon, on T hursday. Cost is $10 per person Call the Chamber office at 4 53-3350 to RSVP.Events at local lodges, postsAVON PARK American Legion Post 69 in Avon Park, will host the foll owing events: Today Karaoke with Naomi starting at 4 p.m. M onday Auxiliary board meeting 6:30 p.m. L egion/Auxiliary meeting 7 p.m. For more information, call 453-4553. A VON PARK The Combat Veterans Memorial VFWPost 9853 in Avon Park, will host the following events: Today NASCAR at 3 p .m. and football on our big s creens. For more information, call 452-9853. LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Elks 2661, wil l h ost the following events Monday Music by Chrissy Harriman (call for time). Tuesday BPOE I ndoctrination 7 p.m. For more information, ca l l 465-2661. LAMAR ALLEN ONEILL Lamar Allen ONeill, 64, of Lake Placid went to be with The Lord on Tuesday morning Nov. 8, 2011 at his home surrounded by his loving family. He was born on Feb. 3, 1947 in Kissimmee to parents George and Alice (Hecker) ONeill. Lamar served his country in the US Navy during Vietnam, after being discharged from the service he started ONeills Trucking Company. He moved to Lake Placid 35 years ago from Davenport and continued operating his company from Lake Placid. Mr. ONeill was a member of the American Legion, Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) and was of the Baptist faith. Mr. ONeill enjoyed outdoor activities, loved spending time with both his family and friends. Mr. ONeill is survived by his wife; Rosa, loving children; Peggy Bradley (Jon Nona Taylor (Chris Allen ONeill, Jr. and Vance Allen ONeill (Monica grandchildren; Heath, Alexis and Victoria Bowart, Vance Allen, Jr. and Alexandra ONeill, brother; George Billy ONeill, Jr., sister; Violet ONeill and a very dear friend Carolyn Ellis. Aservice to celebrate Lamars life will be held 2 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 20, 2011 at the Scott Funeral Home, 504 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid with Pastor Darryl George celebrating. Military honors will be presented by the VFW Post 4300, Sebring. Words of comfort to the family can be made and a video tribute can be seen by visiting www.scottfuneralservices.com. Cremation arrangements entrusted with the Scott Funeral Home, Lake Placid, 465-4134. Death NoticeWalterEarl Trantham III 60, of Sebring died Nov. 10, 2011. Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home, Sebring, is in charge of arrangements. Page 6ANews-SunSunday, November 13, 2011www.newssun.com DAILY COMMERCIAL; 3.639"; 1"; Black; hospice (cornerstone), obit pg; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 4 4 8 8 8 8 S FCC; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; discover a new world; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 8 8 9 9 6 6 Continued from page 2A OBITUARIES COMMUNITYBRIEFS Associated PressSTATE COLLEGE, Pa. With P enn States storied football team playing its first game without coach Joe Paterno since Lyndon B. Johnson was president, the schools trustees pledged to find the truthb ehind a child sex abuse scandal that claimed the coachs job and has rattled one of the nations largest universities. Thousands of students gathered p eacefully on campus Friday night for a candlelight vigil for the boys whom former defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky is accused of molesting. Two nights earlier, a vio-l ent student demonstration broke out after Paternos firing, and emotions remain raw a window atS anduskys home was smashed and Paterno has retained a lawyer. On Friday, the trustees met for the f irst time in public since the scandal broke in a state grand jury report r eleased last week. They opened with a show of support for new university President Rodney Ericksonb y removing the interim tag on his new title. The school will keep s earching for a permanent successor to longtime university President Graham Spanier, who was forced out along with Paterno, the coach with the most wins in Division If ootball. Without mentioning Spanier or P aterno, Erickson said the trustees deliberate and decisive action had set a course for the universitys future. Now more than ever, he said,P enn State must devote itself to its core values: honesty, integrity, excellence and community. I know we can do this. We are resilient. We are a university thatw ill rebuild the trust and confidence that so many people have had in us for so many years, Erickson told the trustees. He pledged to appoint an ethics o fficer and said his heart aches for the victims and their families a message that trustees, university student leaders and the states politicians are increasingly trying tos tress in the wake of the firings that absorbed much of the focus. President Barack Obama on F riday night called the assault allegations heartbreaking in his first public comments on the scandal. I think its a good time for the entire country to do some souls earching not just Penn State, Obama said at halftime of the North Carolina-Michigan State basketballg ame. People care about sports, its important to us, but our No. 1 priori ty has to be protecting our kids. And every institution has to examine how they operate, and every individual has to take responsibility for making sure that our kids are protected. E rickson, when asked later whether Paterno would be welcome a t the game, was curt. Clearly, hes welcome to come as any other member of the public w ould be, he said. The home game Saturday against Nebraska had heightened security,w ith the university warning of long lines to get into the stadium. I cant speak to any specific threats. But I can tell you that Penn States security (and police everything seriously, Erickson said. Concern about the scandal was p revalent on the campus, including on its coffers. M oodys Investors Service Inc. said the schools high Aa1 bond rating was placed under review for a p ossible downgrade and will be assessed over the next few months for a potential impact from the uni-v ersity on possible lawsuits, a decline in student applications, the l oss of donations from philanthropies and changes in the schools relationship with the state. The strong current bond rating, like a credit rating for a person,r eflects Penn States attractiveness to prospective students because of i ts respected academic program and status as Pennsylvanias flagship and land grant university, Moodys said. That has drawn out-of-states tudents paying high tuition rates. Paterno and Spanier were forced out Wednesday, primarily amid questions about whether they did enough to stop, report or investigatew hat the grand jury report said was the molestation of boys as young as 10 by Sandusky, sometimes in Penn States facilities. The grand jury report said that a dministrators didnt contact law enforcement after a graduate assistant said he saw Sandusky sodomizing a boy of about 10 in the locker room showers at the teams practicec enter in 2002. Top school officials, including Paterno and Spanier, said theyw erent told about the seriousness of the matter. Sandusky has maintained his i nnocence, his lawyer has said. The board also formed an invest igative committee headed by trustee Kenneth Frazier, the CEO of pharmaceutical company Merck &C o. Inc. to dig into the allegations of wrongdoing. It will have the p ower to hire independent lawyers, and it plans to publicly release the entirety of its findings, Frazier said. The purpose of this investigation is to ensure that the public under-s tands everything that we learn in this investigation and a report will b e made completely public as quickly as we possibly can, Frazier said. M CTphoto Thousands of students, community members, and Penn State fans fill t he Old Main lawn for the candlelight vigil held to show support for the victims of the Jerry Sandusky sexual abuse scandal on Friday, on the Penn State campus in State College, Penn. Searching for truth, Penn State moves past Paterno

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C M Y K Associated PressN EWYORK For a few anguished hours on Nov. 12, 2001, Americans still in shock over the 9/11 attacks watched television footage oft he blazing wreckage of a jetliner that had just crashed in a Queens neighborhood, and wondered: Is it happening again? I t wasnt. By late afternoon, authorities were saying t he crash of American Airlines Flight 587 lookedl ike an accident, not terrorism. The country breathed a sigh of relief. The horror and grief lingered longer for the lovedo nes of the 265 dead. Even after a decade, sadness lives on for people like William Valentine, whose partner and lover of 20 years, Joe Lopes,d ied on the flight. I dont think an hour goes by, he said, suppressing a sob, when Im not thinking of Joe in some way Hundreds of people gathered Saturday morning at a seaside memorial on New Yorks Rockaway peninsula to mark the 10th anniversary of the crash, which killed everyone aboard the aircraft and five people on the ground. The wreck remains the second deadliest aviation accident on U.S. soil. T he ceremony, held on a cool but beautiful fall day, echoed the ones that have been held annually at ground zero. At 9:15 a.m., a bellt olled and there was a moment of silence to mark the moment the plane went down. The name of each victim was read, often tearfully,b y relatives. Some lost several members of their family on t he flight, from toddlers to aging patriarchs. Ten years have gone by, but as you know all too well, every day in the wake of tragedy is a day of remembrance, said Mayor MichaelB loomberg. The accident will remain forever linked to 9/11 because of its proximity in both time and distance to the disaster att he World Trade Center. Belle Harbor, the suburban beach neighborhood where the plane went down, has been a longtime enclave of police o fficers, firefighters and financial district workers, and was still holding funerals for its 9/11 dead when the accident happened. T he hardest blow, though, came for New York Citys large community of immigrants from the Dominican Republic. F light 587 was bound for Santo Domingo when it went d own. Most of the passengers were Dominican. In some cityn eighborhoods, like Manhattans Washington Heights, it seemed like everyone knew someone aboard the flight. P arts of Saturdays ceremony were conducted in Spanish, including a reading of verses by the Dominican poet Pedro Mir. A line from his poetry also graces the Flight 587 memorial: Despues no quiero mas que paz, translated as Afterward I want only p eace. Investigators ultimately determined that the planes tail had detached in midair because of stress put on thep lanes rudder as the co-pilot tried to steady the aircraft in another jets turbulent wake. Since then, steering systems for some airliners have beenr edesigned so pilots can have greater awareness of movem ents in the tail rudder. Before this crash, pilots p robably didnt have an understanding that this kind of accident could occur, said Steve Pounian, a lawyer at the law firm Kreindler &K reindler, which represented the families of 90 crash victims. Well over 250 lawsuits were brought because of the accident. All have since beens ettled, for amounts that Pounian said totaled more t han $500 million. www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, November 13, 2011Page 7A D R. ROTMAN, DARRIN; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; 11/6,13,20,27; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 6 6 3 3 7 7 A FFORDABLE CARE**********; 3.639"; 8"; Black; main; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 8 8 9 9 3 3 Center in Sebring, were part of a pilot program that combines elder patients who need physical therapy witht he gentle touch of horses. The Kenilworth Center has partnered with HHH to provide the slightly unique type of therapy, one thati nvolves sunshine, fresh air and the spiritual connection a rider gets in the saddle. According to Joy Ongley, stable master and instructor for HHH, as those goingt hrough the therapy loosen up, they begin to work on s trength, balance and coordination, enjoying all the aspects of regular physicalt herapy five feet above the ground. Watch as they begin to get comfortable, Ongley pointed out. They work on motor skills, posture and strength.W e help them stretch muscles and increase their a wareness, Ongley said, watching Garcia laugh as she crossed a small bridge. D espite the abundance of h elpers, and the safety precautions of helmets and special saddles in some cases, one rider, Elva Nowlin, 78 who, like Garcia had n ever been on a horse was stretching her confidence. ell, I am a little nervous, Nowlin said, her hel-m et slightly askew while sitting on Bennie, a calm and patient paint, as one of the helpers rolled her wheelchair away. It was clear that Nowlins h eart was racing and the experience was unusual for h er in a positive way, but she worked hard at balance while going through thet herapy direction. Ongley directed Nowlin to s tretch and reach as she pointed out how to steer Bennie, then Nowlin and Bennie made a few laps with the HHH helpers. I was kinda nervous, but that was fun, Nowlin said a fter her 20-minute session in the perfect fall morning air. Its about quality of life, s aid Louis Rodriguez, another Kenilworth employee. ou may be in a nursing home, but life is far form over. This therapy partnership is great and very fun. T he environment is safe, and people here are wonderful with the patients. This should be a part of everyones long term or short term care. It is a definitely a good vision and mission, Rodriguez added. An inquiry about the cost o f the therapy sessions, which will happen every other Wednesday as the weather permits, led Ongley to shrug her shoulders ands mile. s free, she said. The program relies on generosity, volunteers and donations, she said. As Ongley went to care for the horses, Garcia, as she was being helped back into the handicapped van, pointed o ut the obvious with a large s mile. Ill be back. Continued from page 1A right side. Secondary stab wounds were observedf rom C. Smiths neck as well as the right portion of his abdomen. Both Smiths were transported to Florida Hospitali n Lake Placid and were treated, but Chester Smith succumbed to hisw ounds and was pronounced dead. Chester Smith had t aken more than 100 pills, but Doris Smith told the a uthorities that she had not given them to him in an interview at the hospi-t al. All told, the autopsy s howed Chester Smith had received eight stab wounds, including three shallow test wounds in his back. T he other five wounds were deep penetrating s tabbing injuries that pierced organs and major arteries with a blade orb lades that were longer than 9 inches. F our knives in total were used to kill Chester Smith, and the report s hows that the wounds were consistent with someone standing behind the victim on the floor Doris Smith stated there w as no one in the house at the time of the murder. Doris Smith was booked into the HCSO jail on Oct. 28 at 4 p.m. and isc urrently being held awaiting trial without b ond. Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Elva Nowlin, 78, was nervous, but enjoyed her ride on Bennie. Horses help seniors with therapy Wife faces 1st degree murder charge I jumped a little because I always do. There are always people shooting and hunting over here. We are out in the country. But about half an hour later I heard the beeps, like a vehicle backing up, and I saw the ambulance and cars go by, said the witness. Sunny Hills representatives were unable to release information regarding an alleged incident involving the victim or his full name Saturday. e can confirm that one male victim died of a gunshot wound. That is all that we can confirm at this time, Hays told the News-Sun. No other information regarding the incident was available at press time. Continued from page 1A HCSO probes shooting death NYC marks 10th anniversary of Flight 587 crash

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Page 8A News-Sun l Sunday, November 13, 2011 www.newssun.com

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, November 13, 2011Page 9A NATIONAL NEWSPAPER PLACEMENT; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, ad #2 main rhp; 0 0 0 1 3 8 8 8 CENTRAL SECURITY; 5.542"; 5"; Black plus three; process, local & accessible; 0 0 0 1 3 8 9 4 DR. GOLDSTEIN, ROBERT; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, 11/13/11; 0 0 0 1 3 9 5 2 BUSINESS/MONEY Life insurance has no onesize-fits-all option. Singles with no dependents often need little or no coverage. But it can be an important purchase for people whose families depend on their income to cover daily living costs, mortgage repayment, college, retirement or other major expenses. According to Larry Davidman, owner of online insurance brokerage TermWorks.com, life insurance needs often change as family circumstances evolve. “Once you start a family, you’ll probably want to beef up coverage,” he said. “But after the kids are on their own, your house is paid-off and your retirement is well-funded, you may feel comfortable amending your coverage.” In my family’s case, we bought term life insurance shortly after our son was born and added supplementary policies when our daughter arrived. Our goal was twofold: Provide my wife at least 10 times my income if I should die; and help me cover childcare expenses should she go first. Because our initial 10year policies expire soon, we’ve been reexamining our needs with Davidman’s help. If you’re also looking, here’s a brief overview of common life insurance options: There are two broad categories of life insurance: term and cash value (permanent). Costs are based on such factors as your age, gender, overall health, family history, driving record, hazardous activities (like skydiving) and foreign travel habits. Term life is the simplest and least expensive type, since it pays your beneficiaries only if you die while the policy is in force. Term periods usually range from 5 to 30 years. Premiums increase according to your age and overall health, but several other features can also affect the cost and benefits received. Cash value products let you build cash value that grows tax-free and that you can potentially borrow against (also tax free), subject to certain limitations and based on product and design. The cost is significantly higher than a term policy with the same death benefits. Common varieties include: — Whole Life, which provides lifetime protection with locked-in, guaranteed premiums, death benefit and cash values. It’s usually the most expensive type. — Universal life offers the same fixed investment performance as whole life but greater flexibility in terms of premium payment schedules, duration of guaranteed death benefit and accumulation of cash value. — Variable universal life (adjustable life) lets you invest the cash-value portion in securities (stock funds, bond funds, money market, etc.), which have greater growth potential but also carry greater investment risk than fixed accounts. Poor fund performance can reduce the cash value and/or death benefit. Afew additional considerations: — If your term insurance is expiring and you’re in poor health, ask about converting to permanent life. Premiums will be higher, but you won’t have to pass a medical exam. — Interview several insurance agents to gauge their experience and ability to explain complex products. Then compare recommendations they give for your particular circumstances. — Ask your broker for a breakdown of commissions and administrative fees and ask your tax advisor about any tax implications. — Don’t buy life insurance solely as an investment tool. — Be completely truthful on your application. Lying about an underlying condition could cause the insurance company to alter your death benefit or rescind the entire policy. To learn more about the different types of life insurance available, read the Buyer’s Guide posted on the National Association of Insurance Commissioners’ website, www.naic.org. Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. www.twitter.com/PracticalMoney /. Life insurance 101 Special to the News-SunWith many employers still reluctant to hire new staff, and many skilled individuals facing extended unemployment, on-the-job training (OJT) is experiencing a resurgence. Increasingly, local workforce agencies are turning to OJTas a valuable strategy to meet the needs of employers and job seekers. This strategy is a particularly viable option during our currently depressed economic environment. OJTis an “earn as you learn” training option that the workforce investment system can offer local employers and job seekers. Through OJT, workforce agencies are assisting employers in finding qualified workers and helping unemployed job seekers get back to work. It is a successful approach for reemployment that also supports business expansion, requiring collaboration between workforce agencies, businesses and job seekers. The OJTplatform will reimburse qualified employers for a portion of their new hires’wages following a definitive training plan tha t meets the specific needs o f the business. OJTis an investment in the future that allows people to earn a paycheck while learning new skills, and allows the business to grow while securing skilled staf f at a reduced rate. The resul t is a win-win for employees and employers. To learn more about th is and other training programs available, contact Heartland Workforce Business Operations a t ojtinfo@hwib.org/. Heartland Workforce offers on-the-job training assistance to employers Personal Finance Jason Alderman

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By TERRYCOLLINS Associated PressOAKLAND, Calif. — Citing a strain on limited crime-fighting resources, police officers pleaded with Occupy Oakland protesters Friday to leave their encampment at the City Hall plaza where a man was shot and killed the night before. The shooting occurred the same day a 35-year-old military veteran apparently shot himself to death in a tent at a Burlington, Vt., Occupy encampment. Those incidents and tensions at other camps have put pressure on leaders around the country to take decisive action to bring the protests under control. “Tonight’s incident underscores the reason why the encampment must end,” Oakland Mayor Jean Quan said Thursday. “The risks are too great. We need to return resources to addressing violence throughout the city.” The Oakland Police Officer’s Association, which represents rank-and-file police, issued an open letter to protesters saying the camp is pulling officers away from crime-plagued neighborhoods. “With last night’s homicide, in broad daylight, in the middle of rush hour, Frank Ogawa Plaza is no longer safe,” the letter said. “Please leave peacefully, with your heads held high, so we can get police officers back to work fighting crime in Oakland neighborhoods.” The Oakland killing has further strained relations between the anti-Wall Street protesters and local officials, many of whom have called on the demonstrators to leave. Apreliminary investigation into the gunfire suggests it resulted from a fight between two groups of men at or near the encampment, police Chief Howard Jordan said. Investigators do not yet know if the men in the fight were associated with Occupy Oakland, he said. Protesters said there was no connection between the shooting and the camp. The coroner’s office said it was using fingerprints to identify the victim and that a positive identification was not likely to be released before Monday Protesters have been girding for another police raid as several City Council members have said the camp needs to go. After police cleared the camp last month, Quan reversed course and allowed protesters to return and restore the Oakland camp. The mayor’s reversal strained relationships with city police and other San Francisco Bay area law enforcement agencies. More than a dozen agencies joined Oakland police in the Oct. 25 raid on the camp under a mutual aid policy in which each agency covers its own costs. Alameda County Sheriff’s Department spokesman Sgt. J.D. Nelson said Friday that Oakland will have to pick up the entire tab if it asks for deputies to assist another raid, Mutual aid was designed for law enforcement agencies to assist each other in unplanned emergency situations, Nelson said. “When government officials allowed those campers to go back in, well now you know what you’re getting. It’s not an unplanned event,” he said. In Vermont, police said a preliminary investigation shows the man fatally shot himself in the head in a tent in City Hall Park. The name of the Chittenden County man was being withheld because not all of his family has been notified. The shooting raised questions about whether the protest would be allowed to continue, said Burlington police Deputy Chief Andi Higbee. “Our responsibility is to keep the public safe. When there is a discharge of a firearm in a public place like this it’s good cause to be concerned, greatly concerned,” Higbee said. Tensions are also running high at the 300-tent encampment in Portland, Ore., which has become a hub for the city’s homeless people and addicts. Mayor Sam Adams ordered the camp shut down, saying the tipping point came this week with the arrest of a camper on suspicion of setting off a Molotov cocktail outside an office building, as well as two nonfatal drug overdoses at the camp. “I cannot wait for someone to die,” he said. “I cannot wait for someone to use the camp as camouflage to inflict bodily harm on others.” Many at the camp said they would resist any effort to remove them. “There will be a variety of tactics used,” said organizer Adriane DeJerk, 26. “No social movement has ever been successful while being completely peaceful.” At the University of California, Berkeley, about four miles up Telegraph Avenue from the Oakland encampment, a measure of calm had returned after student protesters voted not to try to erect tents for now. An effort to establish a camp earlier this week ended in confrontations with police, with many students beaten. Agroup of protesters who met on Thursday evening in the campus’s Sproul Plaza voted in favor of a strike in which they are encouraging students and faculty to walk out of class Tuesday to protest cuts to higher education. Page 10ANews-SunSunday, November 13, 2011www.newssun.com Rotary wgd; 7.444"; 7"; Black; rotary wgd; 0 0 0 1 3 7 7 6 Karl Mondon/Contra Costa Times/MCT A protester breaks a window as Occupy Oakland protesters take to the street in Oakland, Calif. Oakland police plead with protesters to leave The risks are too great. We need to return resources to addressing violence throughout the city.JEANQUAN Oakland mayor By CHRISTINE ARMARIO APEducation WriterMIAMI — By day, Wade Brosz teaches American history at an A-rated Florida middle school. By night, he is a personal trainer at 24 Hour Fitness. Brosz took the three-night a week job at the gym after his teaching salary was frozen, summer school was reduced drastically, and the state bonus for board certified teachers was cut. He figures that he and his wife, also a teacher, are making about $20,000 less teaching than expected to, combined. “The second job was to get back what was lost through cuts,” said Brosz, a nationally board certified teacher. “It was tougher and tougher to make ends meet. I started personal training because it’s flexible hours.” Second jobs are not a new phenomenon for teachers, who have historically been paid less than other professionals. In 1981, about 11 percent of teachers were moonlighting; the number has risen to about one in five today. They are bartenders, waitresses, tutors, school bus drivers and even lawnmowers. Now, with the severe cuts many school districts have made, teachers like Brosz, who hadn’t considered juggling a second job before, are searching the want ads. The number of public school teachers who reported holding a second job outside school increased slightly from 2003-04 to 2007-08. While there is no national data for more recent years, reports from individual states and districts indicate the number may have climbed further since the start of the recession. In Texas, for example, the percentage of teachers who moonlight has increased from 22 percent in 1980 to 41 in 2010. “It’s the economy, primarily,” said Sam Sullivan, a professor at Sam Houston State University. Rita Haecker, president of the Texas State Teachers Association, said cuts in education have forced many teachers to take furlough days. It’s an extra strain because, unlike in the past, many teachers are now the primary breadwinner, eithe r because they are a single parent or their spouse is unemployed, Haecker said. “It affects their morale in the classroom,” she said. “The last thing we want is our teachers worried abou t how they are going to pay their bills.” The average salary for a public school teacher nationwide in the 2009-10 school year was $5 5,350, a figure that has remained relatively flat, after being adjusted fo r inflation, over the last two decades. Starting teache r salaries can be significantly lower; compared to college graduates in other professions, they earn more than $10,000 less when beginning their careers. “I think people have fel t the need to supplement thei r teaching salaries in order to have a middle class lifestyle,” said Lawrence Mishel, president of the Economic Policy Institute, which published a study this year concluding the average weekly pay of teachers in 2010 was about 12 percen t below that of workers with similar education and experience. The Organization fo r Economic Cooperation and Development, which collects data on student performance across the globe, advised the United States earlier this year to work a t elevating the teaching profession in order to improve student performance. The recommendations included measures like raising the ba r for who is selected to become a teacher, providing better training and bette r pay. In many nations where students outperform the U.S. in reading, math and science, including Japan and South Korea, teachers earn more than in the U.S.. “International comparisons show that in the countries with the highest performance, teachers are typically paid better relative to others, education credentials are valued more, and a higher share of educational spending is devoted to instructional services than is the case in the United States,” the OECD repor t concluded. Teachers, facing low salaries, opt to moonlight TALLAHASSEE (AP) — Congressman Connie Mack IVisn’t even a Senate candidate yet and he’s far outpolling competition that’s been campaigning for months, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Friday. Mack, who plans to enter the race soon, was favored by 32 percent of Republicans polled, a better than 3-to-1 ratio ahead of former Sen. George LeMieux, who was preferred by 9 percent of respondents. Further behind were former Army Col. Mike McCalister at 6 percent and state Rep. Adam Hasner and former steak house CEO Craig Miller with 2 percent each. In a head-to-head with Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson, Nelson was favored by 42 percent of the 1,185 total registered voters polled, compared to 40 percent for Mack, a statistical dead heat. “The entrance of Congressman Connie Mack into the Senate race changes what had been shaping up as an easy reelection for Sen. Bill Nelson into a tough fight that the incumbent could lose,” said Peter Brown, assistant director of Quinnipiac’s Polling Institute. Poll: Mack instant frontrunner in GOP Senate race

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C M Y K IN THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C IVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-000996 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,P laintiff, vs. RAYMOND MARK EDWARDS, et al, D efendant(s N OTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final J udgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated Novemb er 03, 2011 and entered in Case No. 2 8-2010-CA-000996 of the Circuit Court of the T ENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS C ounty, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. i s the Plaintiff and RAYMOND MARK EDWARDS; JEANINE MARIE EDWARDS; QJG, LLC, A FLORID A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY; BANK OF AMERI CA, NA; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the C ourt will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEM ENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTH OUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 1 1:00 AM, on the 1st day of December, 2011, t he following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: T HE EAST 52 FEET OF THE EAST HALF OF THE F OLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: COMMENCING 400 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTHEAST CORN ER OF THE FRACTIONAL WEST HALF OF THE N ORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 36 SOUTH, RANGE 29 EASST, FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING, T HENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 55 MINUTES WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 208 FEET; THENCER UN SOUTH TO THE TRUE MEANDER LINE OF L AKE JUNE-IN-WINTER; THENCE RUN IN A NORTHEASTERLY DIRECTION ALONG SAID TRUE M EANDER LINE OF SAID LAKE JUNE-IN-WINTER T O THE EAST LINE OF SAID FRACTIONAL WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE N ORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 26, THENCE R UN NORTH ALONG THE EAST LINE OF THE AFORESAID WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF S ECTION 26, FOR A DISTANCE OF 185 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, H IGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A /K/A 726 LAKE JUNE ROAD, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus f rom the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 W ITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on November 4, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Cler k F lorida Default Law Group, P.L. P .O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10062878 COUNTRY-SPECFNMA-R-UNASSIGNED-Team 2 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813 251-4766, not later than seven (7 the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V via Florida Relay Service. November 13, 20, 2011 I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C IVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-000825 W ELLS FARGO BANK, NA, P laintiff, v s. JOHN H. BENDER JR., et al, D efendant(s NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final J udgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated Novemb er 03, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2010-CA-000825 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA is the Plaintiff and JOHN H. BENDER JR.; PEGGY C. BENDER; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INCORPORATED AS NOMINEE FOR BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 1st day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 43, BLOCK 26, SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 3908 URBINO STREET, SEBRING, FL 33870 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on November 4, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10044431 NMNC-SPECFHLMC-R-UNASSIGNED-Team 1 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813 251-4766, not later than seven (7 the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V via Florida Relay Service. November 13, 20, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001486 B ANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs.R USSELL NOLAN A/K/A RUSSELL EUGENE N OLAN, et al, D efendant(s NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final J udgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 03, 2011 and entered in Case No. 2 8-2009-CA-001486 of the Circuit Court of the T ENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. i s the Plaintiff and RUSSELL NOLAN A/K/A RUSS ELL EUGENE NOLAN; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND A GAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEF ENDANT(S OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES M AY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, D EVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1 N/K/A JASON MOLINE are the Defend ants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highe st and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS C OUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 1st day of Decemb er, 2011, the following described property as set f orth in said Final Judgment: A PORTION OF LOTS 1, 13, 14, 15 AND 16, OF B LOCK 428, SEBRING SUMMIT SUBDIVISION, ACC ORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 62, OF THE PUBLIC REC ORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING M ORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A POINT WHERE THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF LINE OF STATE ROAD 8 (NOW STATE R OAD 17) INTERSECTS THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF MYRTLE AVENUE, SAID POINT ALSO BE-I NG THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 17, B LOCK 428, SEBRING SUMMIT SUBDIVISION; THENCE RUN SOUTH 0 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 34 S ECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST RIGHT OF W AY LINE OF MYRTLE AVENUE A DISTANCE OF 194.54 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; T HENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 00 MINU TES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF LINE A DISTANCE OF 93.47 FEET; THENCE S OUTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 26 SECONDS W EST A DISTANCE OF 95.30 FEET; THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 02 SECONDS E AST A DISTANCE OF 71.16 FEET; THENCE N ORTH 35 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 53 SECONDS E AST A DISTANCE OF 31.46 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 26 SECONDS E AST A DISTANCE OF 55.80 FEET TO THE POINT O F BEGINNING. A /K/A 1730 MYRTLE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 3 3870 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on November 4, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F09093006 NBNY-CONV--Team 2 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813 251-4766, not later than seven (7 the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V via Florida Relay Service. November 13, 20, 2011 I N THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C IVIL ACTION C ASE NO.: 28-2011-CA-000511 DIVISION: PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION, P laintiff, vs. R EYNA CALVO, et al, D efendant(s NOTICE OF ACTION T o: REYNA CALVO L ast Known Address: 120 Sharon Ave. S ebring, FL 33875-6513 Current Address: Unknown A NY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, T HROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S N OT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER S AID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, O R OTHER CLAIMANTS L ast Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown Y OU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County, Florida: L OT 19, BLOCK 2, LAKE JOSEPHINE HEIGHTS 2 ND ADDITION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 2 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS C OUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 120 SHARON AVE., SEBRING, FL* 3 3872 h as been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 d ays after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli L aw, Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the origi-n al with this Court either before service on Plaint iff's attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the r elief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for two c onsecutive weeks in the News-Sun W ITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on t his 3rd day of November, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court B y: /s/ Toni Kopp D eputy Clerk November 13, 20, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-676 GCS S ECTION NO. Civil M IDFLORIDA CREDIT UNION F/K/A MIDFLORIDA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION,P laintiff, v CHARLES D. SMYTH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF C HARLES D. SMYTH; MIDFLORIDA CREDIT UNION F /K/A MIDFLORIDA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION; TENANT #1; TENANT #2; and ANY AND ALL UNK NOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, AND U NDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN-NAMED DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD O R ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS,D efendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING B Y, THROUGH, AND UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN-NAMED DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID U NKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Y OU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose on the following real property in Highlands County, Florida: L OTS 21 AND 22, BLOCK 35, SEBRING LAKES U NIT 2C, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AT PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 10, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, F LORIDA. Physical Address: 13304 W. Waterway Drive, Sebring, FL 33875-9672 has been filed against you in the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit, Highlands County, Florida, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses to the Complaint, if any, to Gregory A. Sanoba, Esq., 422 South Florida Avenue, Lakeland, Florida 33801, on or before December 16, 2011, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATE: November 7, 2011. BOB GERMAINE Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk November 13, 20, 2011 m ents, and alterations now constructed or at any t ime in the future constructed or placed upon the real property described above (the "Land" c luding any future replacements and additions (the "Improvements" a ll property which is so attached to the Land or the Improvements as to constitute a fixture under a pplicable law, including: machinery, equipment, e ngines, boilers, incinerators, installed building materials; systems and equipment for the purpose o f supplying or distributing heating, cooling, elect ricity, gas, water, air, or light; antennas, cable, wiring and conduits used in connection with radio, t elevision, security, fire prevention, or fire detect ion or otherwise used to carry electronic signals; telephone systems and equipment; elevators and r elated machinery and equipment; fire detection, p revention and extinguishing systems and apparatus; security and access control systems and ap-p aratus; plumbing systems; water heaters, r anges, stoves, microwave ovens, refrigerators, dishwashers, garbage disposers, washers, dryers a nd other appliances; light fixtures, awnings, s torm windows and storm doors; pictures, screens, blinds, shades, curtains and curtain rods; m irrors; cabinets, paneling, rugs and floor and w all coverings; fences, trees and plants; swimming pools; and exercise equipment (the "Fixt ures"); all furniture, furnishings, equipment, machinery, b uilding materials, appliances, goods, supplies, tools, books, records (whether in written or electronic form), computer equipment (hardware and s oftware) and other tangible personal property ( other than Fixtures) which are used now or in the future in connection with the ownership, managem ent or operation of the Land or the Improvements or are located on the Land or in the Improvements, and any operating agreements relati ng to the Land or the Improvements, and any surveys, plans and specifications and contracts for a rchitectural, engineering and construction servi ces relating to the Land or the Improvements and all other intangible property and rights relating to t he operation of, or used in connection with, the L and or the Improvements, including all governmental permits relating to any activities on the L and (the "Personalty" all current and future rights, including air rights, d evelopment rights, zoning rights and other simil ar rights or interests, easements, tenements, rights-of-way, strips and gores of land, streets, al-l eys, roads, sewer rights, waters, watercourses, a nd appurtenances related to or benefitting the Land or the Improvements, or both, and all rights-of-way, streets, alleys and roads which may have been or may in the future be vacated; all proceeds paid or to be paid by any insurer of the Land, the Improvements, the Fixtures, the Personalty or any other part of the Mortgaged Property, whether or not Borrower obtained the insurance pursuant to Mortgagee's requirement; all awards, payments and other compensation made or to be made by any municipal, state or federal authority with respect to the Land, the Improvements, the Fixtures, the Personalty or any other part of the Mortgaged Property, including any awards or settlements resulting from condemnation proceedings or the total or partial taking of the Land, the Improvements, the Fixtures, the Personalty or any other part of the Mortgaged Property under the power of eminent domain or otherwise and including any conveyance in lieu thereof; all contracts, options and other agreements for the sale of the Land, the Improvements, the Fixtures, the Personalty or any other part of the Mortgaged Property entered into by Borrower now or in the future, including cash or securities deposited to secure performance by parties of their obligations; all proceeds from the conversion, voluntary or involuntary, of any of the above into cash or liquidated claims, and the right to collect such proceeds; all present and future leases, subleases, licenses, concessions or grants or other possessory interests now or hereafter in force, whether oral or written, covering or affecting the Mortgaged Property, or any portion of the Mortgaged Property (including proprietary leases or occupancy agreements if Borrower is a cooperative housing corporation), and all modifications, extensions or renewals. all rents (whether from residential or non-residential space), revenues and other income of the Land or the Improvements, including parking fees, laundry and vending machine income and fees and charges for food, health care and other services provided at the Mortgaged Property, whether now due, past due, or to become due, and deposits forfeited by tenants. 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT H IGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIRCUIT CIVIL CASE NO. 11-214-GCS NEIGHBORHOOD LENDING PARTNERS O F WEST FLORIDA, INC., a Florida notfor-profit corporation, Plaintiff, C ARIBBEAN REALESTATE DEVELOPERS, LLC, a F lorida limited liability company, a/k/a CARIBBEAN R EALESTATE DEVELOPERS, "LLC;" JOHN ZERV AS, an individual; HECTOR O. PAGES, an individu al; HECTOR C. PAGES, an individual; FLORIDA H OUSING FINANCE CORPORATION, a public c orporation and a public body corporate and p olitic duly created and existing under the laws of The State of Florida; SELTZER MANAGEMENT G ROUP, INC., a Florida corporation; LAS VILLAS C OMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, a/k/a COMMUNITY ASSOC IATION OF LAS VILLAS, INC.; HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK; KEITH CARTER; CARTER CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, LLC, a Flori da limited liability company; and MITCHELL L. P ERLSTEIN, an individual, D efendants. N OTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Partial F ind Summary Judgment on Counts I, II, III, IV, VI a nd VII of the Complaint dated October 31, 2011, a nd entered in Case No. 11-214-GCS of the Circ uit Court for Highlands County, Florida, I will sell t o the highest and best bidder for cash in the JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THEBASEMENT OF T HE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 S. C OMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORIDA, at 11:00 a.m. on the 28th day of November, 2011, t he following described property as set forth in s aid Final Judgment of Foreclosure: See Attached Exhibit A *ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE S URPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF LIS P ENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60 D AYS AFTER THE SALE. ** WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on O ctober 31, 2011. P ublish in: News-Sun Copy and Invoice to: W Keith Fendrick, Esquire C arly L. Cohen, Esquire HOLLAND & KNIGHT LLPP O. Box 1288 Tampa, FL 33601 ( 813)227-8500 Copy only to: J ohn A. Anthony, Esquire L ynn A. Brauer, Esquire Anthony & Partners, LLC 201 N. Franklin Street, Suite 2800 Tampa,FL 33602 William T. Viergever, Equire Sonnebom Rutter Cooney & Smith, P.A. P.O. Box 24486 West Palm Beach, FL 33402 Matthew Sirmans, Esquire Assistant General Counsel Florida North Bronough Street, Suite 5000 Tallahassee, FL 32301 BOB GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk Exhibit "A" Description of Real Property All of the Plat of LAS VILLAS AT KENILWORTH, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 17, Page 3, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida, which land was previously lying on the following property: Farms 7 and 26, of LAKE VIEW PARK TRACT, in Section 33, Township 34 South, Range 29 East, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 4, of the Public Records of DeSoto County, Florida, of which Highlands County was formerly a part, and recorded in Transcript Book, Page 11, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida (Farm 7 a/k/a ORANGE PARK, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 10, and a Replat of Farm 7, of LAKEVIEW PARK LANDS, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 60, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida). LESS AND EXCEPT all that property conveyed to Highlands County Commissioners in Official Records Book 2112, Page 1011, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT Lots 30B, 32B, 40A, 40B, 43A, 43B, 44A, 44B, 70B, 72A, 73A, 73B, 74A and 74B, LAS VILLAS AT KENILWORTH, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 17, Page 3, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Description of Personal Property All of Caribbean's right, title and interest in and to all of the following (collectively, the "Mortgaged Property"): the buildings, structures, improve1050Legals F ree ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2 a ds per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under the Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (22o list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed under our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be placed under the Bargain Buy category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com 863-314-9876 DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 314-9876. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number w ill be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 eachMISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 eachR EAL ESTATE E MPLOYMENT T RANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $315 06 lines 14 pubs$71 a ll earnings, royalties, accounts receivable, issues a nd profits from the Land, the Improvements or a ny other part of the Mortgaged Property, and all u ndisbursed proceeds of the loan secured by this I nstrument and, if Caribbean is a cooperative housing corporation, maintenance charges or assessments payable by shareholders or residents; d eposits for taxes or insurance that are paid to M ortgagee by Caribbean; a ll refunds or rebates of impositions by any municipal, state or federal authority or insurance c ompany (other than refunds applicable to periods b efore the real property tax year in which this fin ancing statement is Filed); all tenant security deposits which have not been f orfeited by any tenant under any lease; and a ll names under or by which any of the above Mortgaged Property may be operated or known, a nd all trademarks, trade names, and goodwill rel ating to any of the Mortgaged Property. N ovember 6, 13, 2011 1050L egals Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 Classified ads get fast results DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 314-9876www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, November 13, 2011Page 11A www.newssun.com N ews-Sun l S unday, November 13, 2011 Page 11A

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C M Y K N OTICE OF PUBLIC SALE N otice of Public Sale or Auction of the contents of t he following storage units located at CENTURY S TORAGE BAYVIEW, 2609 BAYVIEW STREET, S EBRING, FLORIDA 33870 on 12/01/11 at 9:00 AM. Contents are said to contain Household G oods/Business Items unless otherwise specified. G498 Champions Vending BUSINESS GOODS B 210 Williams, Shannon Zipperer HOUSEHOLD GOODS S ale being made to satisfy landlord's lien. Cash or Credit/Debit Card accepted. Contents to be rem oved by 5:00 p.m. on the day following the sale. C ENTURY STORAGE BAYVIEW 2609 BAYVIEW STREET SEBRING, FLORIDA 33870 ( 863) 386-0880 N ovember 6, 13, 2011 N OTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the unders igned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of TOBY'S CLOWN ALLEY #296, l ocated at 109 W. Interlake Boulevard, Lake P lacid, Florida 33852, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Dep artment of State. DATED at Lake Placid, Florida, this 11th day of N ovember, 2011. TOBY THE CLOWN FOUNDATION, INC. B y: /s/ Albin Pelski ALBIN PELSKI, President N ovember 13, 2011 1050LegalsInternal Revenue Service Public Auction Under the authority in Internal Revenue Code section 6331, the property described belowhas been seized for nonpayment of internal revenue taxes due from Tel Power S ervices Inc. The property will be sold at public auction as provided by Internal Revenue Code section6335 and related regulations. Date of Sale: December 2, 2011 Time of Sale: 10:00 A.M. Registration 09:30 L ocation of Sale: Artistic Towing and Repair Inc. 1118 Weigle Avenue Sebring, FL 33870Only the right, title, and interest of Tel Power Services Inc. in and to the property will be offered for sale. If requested, the Internal Revenue Service will furnish information about possible encumbrances, which may be useful in determining the value of the interest being sold. Description of Property: 1) White 2002 Chevrolet 1500 Van, VIN # 1GCEG15W521177418 Odometer reading: 137,248 2) White 1998 Ford Van, VIN # 1FDWE37F5WHA20824 Odometer Reading: 146,508 3) White 2000 International Truck, VIN # 1HTSCAAM1YH271303 Odometer reading 209,987Payment Terms: Full payment required on acceptance of highest bid. All payments must be by cash, certified check, cashiers or treasurers check or by a United States postal, bank, express, or telegraph money order. Make check or money order payable to the United States Treasury. For more information, please contact Sharon W. Sullivan Internal Revenue Service 7850 SW 6th CT MS 5780 Plantation, FL 33324 Tel (954 Sharon.W.Sullivan@irs.gov or visit our website HYPERLINK "http://www.irsauctions.gov" www.irsauctions.gov November 6, 13, 2011 1050LegalsA ND LESS AND EXCEPT: B egin at a point where the East line of Spring L ake Village IX, as per plat recorded in Plat Book 1 1, Page 9, intersects with the North Line of Section 14, Township 35 South, Range 30 East for P OINT OF BEGINNING; thence run North 16 degrees 47'30'' West for a distance of 161.33 feet; t hence run South 73 degrees 12'30'' West for a distance of 202.72 feet, thence run South 16 deg rees 47'30'' East for a distance of 307.00feet, thence run North 83 degrees 53'30'' East for a d istance of 206.30 feet, thence run North 16 deg rees 47'30'' West for a distance of 183.91 feet t o POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 2: P arcel H of SPRING LAKE VILLAGE VI as per plat recorded in Plat Book 10, Page 21, Public Rec ords of Highlands County, Florida, LESS AND EXCEPT the West 595 feet thereof. A ND LESS AND EXCEPT: T he West 1.5 Acres of Parcel ``H'' of SPRING L AKE VILLAGE VI as per plat recorded in Plat Book 10, Page 21, Public Records of Highlands County, F lorida. P ARCEL 3: Parcel J of SPRING LAKE VILLAGE VI as per plat r ecorded in Plat Book 10, Page 21, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. D ated this 26th day of October, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK OF COURT B y: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C IVIL ACTION CASE NO. 11-238-GCS I BERIABANK, a Louisiana banking corporation, as successor in interest to ORION B ANK, Plaintiff, vs.S PRING LAKE DEVELOPMENT, LLC., a Delaware l imited liability company, RUSSELL HARRIS, individually and PHOENIX SUNRISE, LLC., a Florida limited liability company, HIGHLANDS MORTGAGE A CQUISITION CORP., a Florida corporation, and SPRING LAKE PROPERTY ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, D efendants. NOTICE OF SALE N OTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to the Summ ary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed on the 2 6th day of October, 2011, in Civil Action No. 1 1-238-GCS, of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Jud icial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, i n which SPRING LAKE DEVELOPMENT, LLC, RUSSELL HARRIS, PHOENIX SUNRISE, LLC, HIGHLANDS MORTGAGE ACQUISITION CORP., and S PRING LAKE PROPERTY ASSOCIATION, INC. are t he Defendants, IBERIABANK, is the Plaintiff, I will s ell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the 2 3rd day of November, 2011 in accordance with F lorida Statute 45.031, beginning at 11:00 a.m. o n the prescribed date at Highlands County Courth ouse, Basement, Jury Assembly Room, 430 S. C ommerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, the following described real property set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure in Highlands County, Florida. A copy of the legal descript ion is attached hereto as Exhibit ``A''. E XHIBIT A P ARCEL 1: A ll of SPRING LAKE VILLAGE IX, as shown on the p lat thereof recorded in Plat Book 11, Page 9 of t he public records of Highlands County, Florida, i ncluding the lands formerly included in the plat as l ots, blocks, tracts, and parcels and which have b een since vacated, but not including the Drainage and Maintenance areas. And A Portion of the drainage and maintenance area of Spring Lake Village IX, as per plat recorded in Plat B ook 11, Page 9, of the public records of Highl ands County, Florida and being more particularly d escribed as follows: P arcel A: A 70 foot by 125 foot strip of land lying North of Lot 1, Block B and South of Lot 28, Block A, containing 0.201 acres. Parcel B: Beginning at the most Southerly corner of Lot 1, Block D in the Northeasterly right of way line of Brock Hill Drive thence North 62 degrees 0 8'00'' East along the Southeasterly line of said B lock D, a distance of 740 feet to the most Easte rly corner of Lot 9, Block D and Point of Curvat ure of a curve to the left; thence northeasterly a long said curve concave to the Northwest and having for its elements a radius of 1350.30 feet and a central angle of 14 degrees 14'12'', an arc distance of 335.52 feet to the most Easterly corner of Lot 13, Block D; thence South 14 degrees 29' 49'' East a distance of 101.09 feet to the m ost Northerly corner of Lot 6, Block E; thence S outhwesterly along a curve to the left and conc ave to the Southeast and having for its elements a radius of 815.00 feet and a central angle of 37 degrees 53'27'' an arc distance of 538.98 feet to a point of reverse curvature; thence Southwesterly along a curve to the right and concave to the Northwest and having for its elements a radius of 172.66 feet and a central angle of 54 degrees 10'20'' an arc distance of 163.25 feet to a point of reverse curvature; thence Southwesterly along a curve to the left and concave to the Southeast and having for its elements a radius of 685.00 feet and a central angle of 26 degrees 18' 53'' an arc distance of 314.60 feet to a Point of Tangency; thence South 62 degrees 08'00'' West a distance of 65.00 feet to the most Westerly corner of Lot 18, Block E in the Northeasterly right of way line of Brock Hall Drive; thence North 27 degrees 52'00'' West along said right of way line a distance of 70.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. LESS AND EXCEPT: A portion of Section 14, Township 35 South, Range 30 East, being more particularly described as follows: Begin at the Northeast corner of Lot 1, Block B-B of SPRING LAKE VILLAGE VI as per plat recorded in Plat Book 10, Page 21 of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida; thence South 2 degrees 52'00'' East along the East line of said Lot 1 a distance of 170.00 feet to the Southeast corner of said Lot 1; thence North 80 degrees 25'01'' East a distance of 309.50 feet to a point on a curve concave to the East; thence along said curve to the right and having for its elements a radius of 892.51 feet and a central angle of 2 degrees 00'41'', an arc distance of 31.33 feet; thence North 82 degrees 25'42'' East a distance of 125.00 feet to a point on a curve concave to the East; thence along said curve to the right and having for its elements a radius of 767.51 feet and a central angle of 4 degrees 42'18''; an arc distance of 63.03 feet to a point of tangency; thence North 2 degrees 52'00'' West a distance of 4.42 feet to a point of curvature of a curve concave to the Southwest thence along said curve to the left and having for its elements a radius of 25.0 feet and a central angle of 90 degrees 00'00'', an arc distance of 39.27 feet to a point of tangency; thence South 87 degrees 08'00'' West a distance of 401.25 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. I N THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C IVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2011-CA-000312 P HH MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, v s. SAMMY DAVID CURBELO, et al, D efendant(s N OTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final J udgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated Novemb er 03, 2011 and entered in Case No. 2 8-2011-CA-000312 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS C ounty, Florida wherein PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION is the Plaintiff and SAMMY DAVID CURB ELO; JULLY CURBELO; CASTLE CREDIT CORPORATION; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the C ourt will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEM ENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTH OUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 1 1:00 AM, on the 30th day of November, 2011, t he following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: L OT 42, BLOCK 11, ORANGE BLOSSOM ESTATES, UNIT 6, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO T HE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 35, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHL ANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A /K/A 5928 GOLDEN ROAD, SEBRING, FL 3 3875 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property o wner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 W ITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on November 4, 2011. R OBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court B y: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk F lorida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 T ampa, Florida 33622-5018 F 11014005 CENDANT-FHA-R-UNASSIGNED-Team 4 *See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, p ersons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should c ontact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 2 5018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813 251-4766, not later than seven (7 the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD1 -800-955-8771, or voice (V via Florida Relay Service. N ovember 13, 20, 2011 1050Legals I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2011-CA-000269 U .S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS T RUSTEE, SUCCESSOR-IN-INTEREST TO W ACHOVIA BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR M LMI 2005-A8, P laintiff, vs. ANNA MENDEZ, et al,D efendant(s NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 03, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2011-CA-000269 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR-IN-INTEREST TO WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR MLMI 2005-A8 is the Plaintiff and ANNA MENDEZ, JESUS MENDEZ; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 30th day of November, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 513, OF SYLVAN SHORES ESTATES SECTION D, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE(S COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 1530 PINE TOP TERRACE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on November 4, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F11013970 CENDANT-CONV-R-UNASSIGNED-Team 4 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813 251-4766, not later than seven (7 the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V via Florida Relay Service. November 13, 20, 2011 I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2011-CA-000231 W ELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, v s. DOUGLAS L. ELFERS, et al, D efendant(s NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated Novemb er 03, 2011 and entered in Case No. 2 8-2011-CA-000231 of the Circuit Court of the T ENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA is the Plaintiff and DOUGLAS L. ELFERS; JENNIFER A. GREEN; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST T HE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM A N INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, G RANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the h ighest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMB LY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHL ANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH C OMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 1st day o f December, 2011, the following described prope rty as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 78, ISTOKPOGA SHORES, UNIT NO. 5, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED I N PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 49, OF THE PUBLIC REC ORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A /K/A 235 SQUIRREL POINT, LORIDA, FL 3 3857 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus f rom the sale, if any, other than the property o wner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on November 4, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE C lerk of the Circuit Court B y: /s/ Annette E. Daff D eputy Clerk F lorida Default Law Group, P.L. P .O. Box 25018 T ampa, Florida 33622-5018 F 11010483 NMNC-SPECFHLMC-R-UNASSIGNED-Team 1 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, p ersons with disabilities needing a special accomm odation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the not ice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 2 5018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813 2 51-4766, not later than seven (7 t he proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD 1 -800-955-8771, or voice (V v ia Florida Relay Service. N ovember 13, 20, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C ASE NO. 11-586 GCS S ECTION NO. Civil M IDFLORIDA CREDIT UNION, F /K/A MIDFLORIDA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, v SHIKHA MASIH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SHIKHA M ASIH; SPRING LAKE PROPERTY ASSOCIATION, INC.; TENANT #1; TENANT #2; and ANY AND ALL U NKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, AND UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN-NAMED D EFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE D EAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PART IES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, H EIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, D efendants. NOTICE OF ACTION T O: ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, AND UNDER, AND AGAINST THE H EREIN-NAMED DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT K NOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID U NKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS S POUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Y OU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to f oreclose on the following real property in Highl ands County, Florida: LOT 3, BLOCK ``F'', SPRING LAKE VILLAGE V I, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AT PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 2 1, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A DDRESS: 2925 DUANE PALMER BLVD., SEBRING, FL 33876h as been filed against you in the Circuit Court of t he Tenth Judicial Circuit, Highlands County, Florida, and you are required to serve a copy of your w ritten defenses to the Complaint, if any, to Gregory A. Sanoba, Esq., 422 South Florida Avenue, L akeland, Florida 33801-5227, on or before December 6, 2011, and file the original with the C lerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. D ATE: October 25, 2011. B OB GERMAINE Clerk of the Court B y: /s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk N ovember 6, 13, 2011 1050Legals I N THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 09001321GCS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., P laintiff, v s. MIKE THIBAUD, et al, Defendant(s N OTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 03, 2011 and entered in Case No. 09001321GCS of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and MIKE THIBAUD; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 1st day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: THE EAST 1/2 OF LOT 10, BLOCK 45, AVON PARK ESTATES, UNIT II, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGES 22, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 2500 W. HAMPTON RD., AVON PARK, FL 33825 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on November 4, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10110206 COUNTRY-Conv--Team 2 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813 251-4766, not later than seven (7 the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V via Florida Relay Service. November 13, 20, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION C ASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-001085 B ANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, v s. ANN T. NICHOLS, et al, Defendant(s NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final J udgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 03, 2011 and entered in Case No. 2 8-2010-CA-001085 of the Circuit Court of the T ENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS C ounty, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. i s the Plaintiff and ANN T. NICHOLS; are the Def endants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the h ighest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMB LY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHL ANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH C OMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 1st day o f December, 2011, the following described prope rty as set forth in said Final Judgment: L OT 7, BLOCK 5, OF SEBRING HILLS SOUTH, A CCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS REC ORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 93, OF THE P UBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, F LORIDA. A /K/A 324 PELICAN AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 3 3872 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 W ITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court o n November 4, 2011. R OBERT W. GERMAINE C lerk of the Circuit Court B y: /s/ Annette E. Daff D eputy Clerk F lorida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10066100 COUNTRY-CONV B/C-R-UNASSIGNED-Team 2 *See Americans with Disabilities Act I n accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, p ersons with disabilities needing a special accomm odation to participate in this proceeding should c ontact the individual or agency sending the not ice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813 251-4766, not later than seven (7 the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V v ia Florida Relay Service. N ovember 13, 20, 2011 I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION C ASE NO.: 28-2008-CA-001611 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., P laintiff, v s. I NNOCENT CHINWEZE, et al, Defendant(s N OTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated Novemb er 02, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2008-CA-001611 of the Circuit Court of the T ENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. i s the Plaintiff and INNOCENT CHINWEZE; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF INNOCENT CHINWEZE; A ND ANY ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, T HROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN N AMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER S AID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, O R OTHER CLAIMANTS; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at J URY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 S OUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 3 0th day of November, 2011, the following des cribed property as set forth in said Final Judgm ent: LOT 272, OF BLUE HERON GOLF AND COUNT RY CLUB, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 15, PAGE 78, OF T HE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A /K/A 7182 GOLF CLUB DRIVE, SEBRING, FL 33876 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus f rom the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court o n November 13, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE C lerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak D eputy Clerk F lorida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018T ampa, Florida 33622-5018 F08103535 NBNY-CONV--Team 2 *See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, p ersons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should c ontact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 2 5018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813 2 51-4766, not later than seven (7 the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD 1 -800-955-8771, or voice (V via Florida Relay Service. N ovember 13, 20, 2011 1050Legalswww.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, November 13, 2011Page 13AIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: FC11-1032 DIVISION: FAMILY VIOLET L. WILLIAMS, Petitioner and DAN A. WILLIAMS, Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE TO: Dan A. Williams Fort Stewart Army Base First Battalion, Forty-first Infantry, Building 631 Fort Stewart, Georgia 31314 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Violet L. Williams, whose address is 336 E. Camphor Street, Avon Park, FL 33825, on or before December 15, 2011, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, before service on petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file a Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family L aw Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the Clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated: /s/ Robert W. Germaine, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Kathy Whitlock Deputy Clerk November 13, 20, 27; December 4, 2011Having something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what youre doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 314-9876

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C M Y K ANYONE INTERESTEDin holding a Private Money Mortgage, totally secure first mortgage. Closing, my attorney or yours. All costs incl. From $17,500-$20,000, current market value of Real Estate, $55,000-$57,000. Mortgage note to $17,500-$20,000. 15 yr. & 5.5-6% interest. Call 863-453-2680 1100Announcements I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION C ASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-001307 DIVISION: B ANKUNITED, P laintiff, vs.D EIRDRE K. LEXOW A/K/A DEIRDRE KERI LEXOW, et al, D efendant(s NOTICE OF SALE P URSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final J udgment of Foreclosure dated November 3, 2011, and entered in Case No. 2 8-2010-CA-001307 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which Bank United, is the Plaintiff and D eirdre K. Lexow a/k/a Deirdre Keri Lexow, Ryan Porter Lexow, ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES C LAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S W HO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, G RANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the def endants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S outh Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 2nd day of December, 2011, the following described p roperty as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 8, OF TYSON LAKE FRONT PARK LOTS, ACC ORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED I N PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 52, OF THE PUBLIC REC ORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A /K/A 147 ALDERMAN DRIVE, LAKE PLACID, FL 3 3852-6962 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus f rom the sale, if any, other than the property o wner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. D ated in Highlands County, Florida this 4th day of November, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court H ighlands County, Florida B y: /s/ Toni Kopp D eputy Clerk N ovember 13, 20, 2011 I N THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C ASE NO. 28-2009-CA-001820 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., P laintiff(s vs. H IRMATTIE BAKSH, et al., Defendant(s N OTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment. Final Judgment w as awarded on September 13, 2010 in Civil C ase No. 28-2009-CA-001820, of the Circuit C ourt of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for H IGHLANDS County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and HIRMATTIE B AKSH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HIRMATTIE B AKSH; AND UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION are Defendants. T he Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash IN THE JURY ASSEMBLY R OOM, BASEMENT, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33870, at 11:00 A.M. on D ecember 2, 2011, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judg-m ent, to wit: L OT 5 BLOCK 2, OF HIGHLANDS PARK ESTATES S ECTION L, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF A S RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 72, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, F LORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE S URPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE L IS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. W ITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on N ovember 4, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE / s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk N ovember 13, 20, 2011 1050LegalsCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us: 314-9876 News-Sun Classified DUMMY 09 SERVICE DIRECTORY DUMMY 5X21.5 AD # 00011623Page 14ANews-Sun Sunday, November 13, 2011www.newssun.comI N THECIRCUIT COURT O F THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, F LORIDA C IVIL DIVISION C ASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001652 S UNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC., P laintiff, v s. W ILLIAM SUEPPEL AKA WILLIAM L. SUEPPEL; SUNTRUST BANK; SYLVAN SHORES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; T AMMY S UEPPEL A/K/A TAMMY L. SUEPPEL; U NKNOWN TENANT(S S ION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, D efendants. N OTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure Sale dated the 31st day of August, 2011, and entered in Case No. 28-2009-CA-001652, of the Circuit C ourt of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in a nd for Highlands County, Florida, w herein SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. i s the Plaintiff and WILLIAM SUEPPEL A KA WILLIAM L. SUEPPEL; SUNT RUST BANK; SYLVAN SHORES H OMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; T AMMY SUEPPEL A/K/A TAMMY L. SUEPPEL; UNKNOWN TENANT(S POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash a t the HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33870 at the Highlands County Courthouse in Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 2nd day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 68 OF SYLVAN SHORES ESTATES SECTION ``E'', ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 33, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 31st day of August, 2011. Robert W. Germaine Clerk Of The Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk November 13, 20, 2011

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C M Y K C HEST -Diamond plate, aluminum, 4 8" long, good for pickup or trailer. V ery Nice! $95. 863-453-7027 9350Automotive Parts& Accessories2 008 -SUZUKI BURGHMAN 400 with matching trunk, 3,200 miles. Very nice bike. $4000. Call 83-453-7027 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation 8000 RecreationNOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & Supplies SEBRING HUGEMulti Family Sale! 2710 Grand Concourse (corner of Henscratch & Grand Concourse) Sat. 1 1-19, 8am-? Childrens's clothing, t oys, household items. Too Much To List! L.P. -Fri., Sat., Sun.; Nov. 11, 12, 13; 7 am-4pm. 836 US Hwy. 27 North. Tools, awnings, Xmas, clothes, househ old, scooters, hot tub, exercise equipment, furniture. Something for everyone! C OMMUNITY G ARAGESALE AVON PARK REFLECTIONS O N SILVER LAKE 1850 US 27, South S at, Nov. 19th, 8am 1pm 100's of Residents S elling 1000's of Items! A VON PARKMulti Family Sale Fri-Sun., 8am-? 2538 Avon Blvd. North. Househ old, tools, golf clubs, clothes, antiques, & lots of misc. 7320Garage &Yard Sales WHIRLPOOL WASHER/ Very Good C ondition! $100 863-604-5695 T OWING HITCH complete f or Ford Focus. Nearly New. $75. 8 63-382-6741 T ERRARIUM -Large, Plastic plus Extras. Was $50 will sell for $20. 8 63-873-3801 T ENT OZARKTRAIL, 2 room cabin. 13'x9. $45. Call 863-699-1119 SPORTS COATMaroon. Excel. cond. $ 20 Call 863-446-0972 S LIDING DOOR6'. High Quality. Never u sed. $75 Call 863-414-1929 S HOPSMITH MARK5 $100. 863-655-0342 P UG MIX(2 w /records. Energetic, need love & att ention. Free to good home! Call 863-292-1989. MIRROR LARGE,gold framed, 28"x40". $ 50 Call 863-669-1119. L ADDER /Wooden / 6 foot. Good C ondition. $20. 863-873-3801 G OLF BAG7 FULL SET of CLUBS / Ladies. $75. 863-385-3459 FILE CABINETSTwo w/4 drawers. $80 C all 863-382-4349 FILE CABINET2 Drawer, wood. $25 C all 863-382-4349. DINING ROOMSET 5pc. / 4 chairs / d rop leaf table. Maple color. $65. 8 63-385-7762 DAYBED -with Pop-up trundle. Good c ondition. $100 FIRM. 207-837-3708 C OUCH BLUE72" $400 New. 6 mo. $100. Must sell. 863-446-0972 B UGLE BEADEDJACKET Beautiful black & silver! Great for those special o ccasions. New $ 300 Now $30 Call 8 63-273-1322 B IKE /NEW / LADIES. $75. OBO 8 63-385-3459 7310Bargain Buys BEDROOM SET5 pc, Queen with King coil mattress & box spring. Clean! $100 863-385-7762 BED EXTENSIONfor Ford F-150 Pickup, aluminum pipe never used NEW!! Will sell $50 863-453-7027 7310Bargain Buys2002 YAMAHA125 Dirt Bike 4 cycle Excellent Condition! Very Clean. $1500 obo, / HOT TUB 6 person Vita, indoor 1 owner never moved. Like New cond. $1800 obo. Call 863-381-4677 7300MiscellaneousSHOP CLOSINGEquipment for Sale! Display cases, hair dryers, sink, hydraulic chair & supplies. Would prefer to sell everything for $600, however I will separate. Call 863-471-1452. 7280Office & BusinessEquipment SOFAS (2Thomasville / Leather / Beige. Good condition $135 each or both for $235. Call 863-471-9818 7180FurnitureWASHER &GAS DRYER on pedestal. K enmore Elite Smart Wash High Effic iency. 90wash cycles & 9 dry cycles. $ 900 or trade for small dependable car. SORRY SOLD!! 7040Appliances 7000 MerchandiseS EBRING 640Park St. 6400 sq ft, $ 1600/mo: A/C, office, BA, 8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric, fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway. Call Chip Boring 863-385-0077 or Cell 863-381-1298 6750Commercial RentalR OOMMATE WANTED.Processional to s hare 3/2 in Gulf Community w/pool. C all 863-991-5159 6450Roommates WantedB EAUTIFUL O NLAKE ISTOKPOGA. 1 BR, 1BA. Fully furnished, incl. W/D, p rivate drive and entry, private dock and boat ramp, fish cleaning station w/elec. & water. Central A/C, Direct TV. $1200 mo. (3 mo. min 863-414-5276 or 863-835-0535 6320Seasonal Property SEBRING -LAKEWOOD AREA 2 BR/, 2BA/ New Wood Floors, screened rear p orch, utility room. Small pet ok, f enced yard. $595 mo./ $500 sec,/1 yr lease 863-835-1196 or 863-382-8950 P LACID LAKES3/2 full baths. New House $750/mo. + $750 dep. Beautiful v iews, quiet & nice. All tile & new appl. 305-926-7987 L AKE PLACID2/1 Behind Wendy's. Rec ently remodeled. Available Nov. 1st. $ 550 + $25 for water. $500 Security. C all 863-465-1354 6300Unfurnished HousesLAKE PLACIDSylvan Shores Newer / Nice 2BR, 2BA, Screened room, Garage, Very Clean. Non Smoker. $695 monthly 863-441-2844 or 863-465-3838 6300Unfurnished HousesLAKE PLACIDNear Lake Placid Boat Ramp with lake access. Furnished 1/1, appliances, A/C. $550/mo. + $500 security. 863-465-1354. 6250Furnished Houses AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS 1BR $495 mo. + $200 Sec. Deposit, available immediately. Washer/Dryer & WSG included. Call Alan 386-503-8953 AVON PARKApartment with Balcony Overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL : $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware Ave. 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 6200UnfurnishedApartments SEBRING DUPLEX,2/1 large living room, w/washer, dryer & shed. $575 mo. plus $575 Security. Call 863-385-2613 SEBRING CUTE2/1, Screen porch, W/D hook up, most pets ok. $550 mo. + $300 Security. 1927 Theodore. Call 863-446-7274 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 RentalsV ENUS -New 4BR, 2BA (jacuzzi in m aster BA ) A/C, tile, W/D, porch, w/option of 20 acres. 8 horse barn, privacy fence, 1 block from Hwy 27. 731 CR 201. 786-370-2778 5150Mobile HomesFor Rent PALM HARBORHOMES Factory Direct Sale 15K 25K Off Models 800-622-2832 ext 210 O PEN HOUSETODAY -12:00 TO 2:00 1 037 DE WITT ST SEBRINGImmacul ate, large, 2/2 double wide den, family r oom, workshop, well maintained comm unity with all the amenities in Sebring V illage Park off of Schumacher Rd. $47,500. Sandy Hughes Century 21 Compton Realty 863-414-1102 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesATTENTION: CASH for your Home, D uplex, Apartment, Commercial P roperty. Rapid Closing, As Is Condition. 863-441-2689 S TRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL 4320Real Estate WantedLAKE PLACID2/2 on corner lot. Water A ccess. Lots of tile. Cathedral Ceilings i n living & dining area. Assoc. fees only $ 30 monthly. Boat space rental only $ 10 monthly. $129,900 Call 7 72-321-4984 4100H omes for SaleL ake Placid 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial THE AVONPARK CHAMBER OF C OMMERCE is currently accepting resumes for the p osition of Executive Director. Candidate must be able to manage all c hamber activities and provide business members with world-class service a nd opportunities in an ever more c hallenging business, political, and economic climate. The Executive D irector attends all Chamber events; directs all planning to carry out Chamb er objectives; guides the development and implementation of the Chambers o verall program of work; and serves as the strategic link between the Chamber a nd the community. Qualified candidates must be detail orientated, be able t o multi-task and possess excellent w riting, problem solving and creative solution skills. Must be proficient in use o f computers, internet, social media, Microsoft Office and e-mail. Annual s alary based on level of experience, plus vacation and holiday pay. Must p ossess a High School diploma, 4 year degree preferred. Drug test and backg round check required. Please forward your Cover Letter, Resume and 3 professional references to a pcc@apfl.com or FAX to (863 T o be considered, all documents must be received by 4:00 pm, November 18, 2 011. T ELEVISION TECHMust have one year experience. Pay depending on e xperience. Contact Musselman's Appliances and TV. Email resume: m ussappl@earthlink.net 863-386-0898 T EACHERS NEEDEDFor 2-3 yr. old. C lass at a Christian Private School (FT C all 863-443-2344 S UNSHINE PAYDAY LOANS F ull time office position Must be willing to travel C ash handling experience a plus Fax Resumes to: 8 63-678-2170 SEEKING WELLExp. Medical office h elp. Exc. billing/collection, communication, typing, computer skills & medi-c al terminology are a MUST Part-time. Fax resume to: 863-471-2565 or email t o: m edicalofficebilling@yahoo.com L PN'S -ASSISTED LIVING FACILITY F ull Time & Part Time, Apply at Crown P ointe, 5005 Sun N' Lake Blvd., S ebring, Fl. 33872 2100Help Wanted S EEKING OUTSIDESALES REP FOR PUBLICATION. M UST BE SELF STARTER, M IN. 3 YEARS EXP. o fficetalent@yahoo.com f ax 471-2565. SEBRING -Mature Male, with r eferences, drivers license and car, to care for older son who cannot drive. A c ompanion that likes cards, play pool, movie, etc. Someone with fishing gear & boat a plus. For more info. Call 8 63-655-1068 O UTSIDE SALES If you have sold lawn care, magazines, c able, insurance, newspapers, or have done any outside sales. One of the e asiest sales you will ever make. $15-30 hr. possible part time & full time E d. 352-217-9937 M EDIA ADVERTISING MULTI-MEDIA ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE We are a Sebring Florida N ewspaper is accepting resumes for a qualified OutsideSales Representative t hat values teamwork and has a desire t o succeed. T he successful candidate must have at l east 6 months to 1 year sales experie nce. Is highlymotivated and enjoys building client relationships, not afraid t o ask for a sale, professional, enthusiastic, and exhibit a high level of i ntegrity. T his position is the perfect choice for anyone loving to sell a product you b elieve in. We offer base salary plus commission; e xcellent benefits to include medical, dental, life, 401k and more; paid time o ff; and training. S end reply to Adsalesjobs@newssun.com 2 227 US 27th South Sebring, Florida 33870 E OE M ATH INSTRUCTORS-PTpositions to t each college credit & developmental m ath (daytime & evening classes B achelor's degree in math or related f ield req. for developmental, Master's for college credit. O pen until filled. Visit http://sfcc.interviewexchange.com f or details. 863-784-7132. EA/EO. C AR WASHASSISTANT MANAGER n eeded at Lakeshore Car Wash in S ebring. MUST have car wash machine a nd maintenance skills to make repairs on equipment. MUST be able to work w eekends. Need good people skills. Send resume to nwhitaker@hmgfl.com o r fax to 863-324-5669 2100Help Wanted F INANCE DIRECTOR M inimum Qualifications : Bachelor's Degree from an accredited college or u niversity in Accounting of Finance and three (3 b le professional experience in Accounting or Financial Management. Equival ent combination of education, training and experience may be substituted for above qualifications. Excellent Benefits : Incl. Employee H ealth Care and membership with the Florida Retirement System. Salary Range : $62,500.00$78,500.00 Required Documents : Glades County Employment Application and copy of v alid Florida Driver's License. S ubmit resume' to : Glades County Clerk of Courts P.O. Box 10 M oore Haven, Fl 34471 A DVERTISING SALESASSISTANT W e Are Expanding! W e have a new position available, in Sebring Florida for a A DVERTISING SALES ASSISTANT R esponsibilities: Scheduling client a ppointments. Maintaining a dvertising schedules. Client relations and assist Multi Media A ccount Executive. S alary + Commission. N ews Sun Send reply to A dsalessjobs@newssun.com 2227U S 27 South S ebring Fl. 33870 E OE A DMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT-Highlands Ethanol, LLC is searching for a f ull time Administrative Assistant for its growing agricultural operation. This pos ition will be responsible for providing a dministrative support, coordinate, meetings, schedules, events, order s upplies, copying, filing, and will coordinate and assist in preparing power p oint presentations, spreadsheets, and reports for our rapidly growing operat ion. Associates degree required, must have high level of proficiency in MS W ord, Excel, Power Point, and Outlook. E xperience in agricultural operations h ighly recommended. Fluent Spanish a nd /or Creole preferred. Excel salary and benefit package. Please apply in p erson at Heartland Workforce office or email resume to: HRJobs@vercipia.com E OE 2100Help WantedP ART TIMEHELP Computer Literate, M ust know how to measure, use ruler a nd add fractions. Smiling, Customer F riendly attitude. Hours are flexible and must be available to work Saturdays. M ail resumes to: Reply Box 111, The News-Sun, 2227 U.S, 27 S. S ebring, Fl, 33870 2100Help Wanted 2000 Employment Classified ads get fast results Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 AD PARTNERS 1 X4.5 A D # 0 0013643SUNRISE COMMUNITY 2X2 AD #00013931CROSS COUNTRY AUTOMOTIVE 3X10.5 AD # 00013946A VON PARK HOUSING 1X4 AD # 0 0013747 AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 AD # 0 0013745 NORTHGATE FURNITURE 1X3 AD # 00013639www.newssun.comN ews-Sun S unday, November 13, 2011Page 15ACHECK YOUR ADPlease check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first da y your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:314-9876 News-Sun Classified

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C M Y K Page 16ANews-SunSunday, November 13, 2011www.newssun.com M ILLER'S CENTRAL AIR; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, 11/13/11; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 9 9 5 5 1 1 B OWYER PHYSICAL THERAPY; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, weather pg; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 9 9 5 5 4 4

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C M Y K By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comLAKE PLACID They came too late to salvage the final game of this season, but a few highlight reel moments gave the Green Dragons some definite hope for the f uture amid Fridays 38-21 loss to Lemon Bay. Ive said all season that weve been close, weve been close, head coach Jason Holden said. Tonight we were just able to make those plays. That was, of course, after a haphazard first half that saw the Manta Rays run out to a 24-0 lead. Lake Placid did halt L emon Bays initial drive, which had them down to the 1 4 before quarterback Lucas Sparks was thrown for a sixyard loss and then sophomored efensive back Marquevein Copeland intercepted a pass in the end zone. But after some strong early runs on the Dragons first d rive, a combination of penalties and a turnover gave the Rays the ball back at the 18. Five plays later, running back Andrew Taylor took it in from the nine for a 7-0 lead. After a nice kick-off return g ot Lake Placid the ball near midfield, the ball was moved to the 27 before being turned over on downs. Dragons get glimpse of future in finale By LAUREN WELBORN News-Sun correspondentPerhaps the biggest goal on every high school athletes mind is to make the varsity squad. This feat, however, entails a lot of hard work and determination. Early morning work-outs followed by late nights practicing, with the pressures of homework to boot. Some just might say it is near impossible, but the Sebring girlsvarsity basketball team readily accepts the challenge. With about half the team being rookies to the varsity level of play, the Lady Streaks are currently working towards accommodating to the faster-pace play that being a varsity athlete requires. This was evident as they took on Martin County in the finale of their own Tip-Off Tournament Thursday night. Despite valiant efforts from players such as Ali Mann, who added 18 points to the board for Sebring along with teammates Shalontay Rose and April Wallaces 8and 4-point contributions, Sebring would fall just short with a final score of 59-36. e played better during the second half. There was more intensity and a greater sense of urgency, said head coach Mike Lee. Coach Lee elaborated on the fact that the girls have been working hard to find the groove they need to keep up to the increased speed and strength of other varsity teams. This is a good group of girls, they listen and they work hard because they want to improve. That is half the fight, he said. Once we have that down, we will be able to take care of the basketball better; being faster will leave us open, and in turn we will have better passes. When you are coachable, you will always have a chance to improve. Sebring dominates backyard brawl, second-half surge not enough for Lake Placid SPORTS B SE CTION Inside This Section Marlins make changes . . .3B USF tops Syracuse . . .3B Stetson gets ugly hoops win. .4B News-Sun Sunday, November 13, 2011 Friday Prep Football Finale Courtesy photo Sebrings defense was swarming all night and left little room for Avon Park to run, as Charles Louis became all-too familiar with in the Blue Streaks 45-0 win Friday. News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE T he Lemon Bay sidelines can only watch as Lake Placid freshman Foster Walker finishes off his 64-yard touchdown run Friday night. News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Allie Mann lead the Lady Streaks with 18 points in Thursdays Tip-Off Tournament finale against Martin County. News-Sun file photo by DAN HOEHNE Michelle Hunter was a scoring machine Thursday night, tallying four goals in Lake Placids 8-0 win at Moore Haven. Special to the News-SunSEBRING They say football is a game of inches. You do not need inches, however, when you create opportunities on special teams and your defense can stifle the opponents offense. That was exactly what the Sebring Blue Streaks did to the Avon Park Red Devils ina dominating 45-0 performance. After a penalty on the opening kickoff, Avon Park s tarted their first possession of the game on their own 9yard line. After a short run, an incomplete pass and a 6-yard sack, Avon Park was forcedt o punt from their own end zone. Sebrings Arthur Williams blocked the punt and it was recovered by Samuel Jacobs to give Sebring a quick 7-0 lead. e felt up front that we could get to the punter, stated Sebring head coach LaVaar Scott. We decided that everytime they punted, we would go after it. We either got the block or forced a short punt. S ebring would then kick the ball off and, instead of kicking it deep, kicked it high in the air about 15 yards t oward the right sideline, where the ball was recovered by Sebring on Avon Parks 40. The Streaks then attempted a long pass play, but RedD evil Jarvielle Hart intercepted the ball. Avon Park was unable to capitalize on the turnover and Sebrings defense and special teams play quickly shifted the momentum back to their way. But even though the defense and special teams afforded the Sebring offense great field position, they too struggled early in the game. All seven of Serbrings offensive series started inA von Park territory, with an average start being on the Avon Park 28. But even with that, they f ailed to score four times as they were intercepted, forced to punt and missed two field goals. Sebring scored late in the first quarter on five-play, 25-y ard drive, capped by a 1yard run by Davaris Faulk to make the score 14-0 to end the first quarter. Midway through the seco nd quarter and still putting pressure on the Avon Park p unter, the punter would muff the snap in the end z one. He was able to pick it up a nd run out of the end zone, but was tackled on the 4-yard line forcing a turnover on downs. Sebring would score two plays later on a 1-yard touchdown run. Later in the quarter, Donovan White would add a 38-yard field goal, giving Sebring a 24-0 halftime lead while their defense held the Avon Park offense to minus12 yards total offense. Sebring started their first three drives of the second half in their own territory, but Sebring swarms Devils in cross-county shutout See STREAKS, Page 4B Lady Streaks lose, but learning By BRIAN MAHONEY Associated PressNEWYORK The time for talk in the NBAis over. David Stern made that clear Thursday, saying the league is done negotiating. The next time he hears from the playersassociation, he expects an answer: Yes, players will accept the leagues latest proposal for a new collective bargaining agreement, or no they wont. If they do, the NBAwill commence with a 72-game season on Dec. 15. And if no? Then the next time LeBron James, Kobe Bryant and the rest of the NBAs biggest stars are in uniform, it might be in London during next summers Olympics. So the NBAs lengthy labor fight could come to an end this week. Or, the next phase might just be beginning. Should players reject this deal and they certainly dont love it the next one comes with terms they would never accept, likely sending them into the court system to file an antitrust lawsuit against the league after disbanding the union. Thats far from an assured victory, but it practically assures there would be no 2011-12 season. Stern knows which he prefers and which he thinks the union should accept. e both recognize the seriousness of what were facing, he said. I think both sides would like to begin the season on Dec. 15th, if thats possible. I think our teams want to start playing. That desire is matched by our players. Weve done the best we can to cause that to happen. I think the events of the week and the offer that we presented had the desired impact of causing us both to focus intensely on whether there was a deal here to be done. We very much want to make the deal thats on the table that would get our players into training camp and to begin the 2011-12 season. I dont have a crystal ball. I just have the ability to hope that it will come to that and that our players will accept this revised proposal from the NBA. NBA season could be saved or sunk in coming days See NBA, Page 3B By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comIt wasnt really even that close, Lake Placid girls soccer coach John Merlo said of his teams win Thursday night at Moore Haven. And thats saying something, given the 8-0 final. The combination of a steel-door defense and a relentlessly attacking offense made this one a no-doubter from the getgo. Michelle Hunter lead the parade of goals against the Lady Terriers, racking up four scores, while Brittany Collison added a goal and three assists. Lindsey Bennett dished out a whopping five assists and Rosa Ramirez, Erica Hurtado and Thania Resendiz each scored their first varsity goals. Now 2-0-1 on the young season, the Dragons are at Avon Park Tuesday and at Hardee on Thursday. Lady Dragons mash Moore Haven See DRAGONS, Page 4B

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C M Y K Istokpoga Bass TournamentLORIDAThe Humane Society of Highlands County will be hosting its2nd Annual Bass Tournament Saturday, Nov. 19, launching at first light. Entry fee for the one-day event is $80, per team of up to three people, for Friends Of Istokpoga Lake Association members, and $125 for non-members $45 can be saved by joining FOI for $7 annually. All monies collected will be returned in prizes, except for a minimal administrative cost and a nominal donation to the Humaine Society. P re-registration will be available at Lorida Bait & Tackle, Trails End Fishing Resort, Mossy Cove Fish Camp and Lake Istokpoga Marina. T he first 20 teams to register will receive a spinning rell, compliments of L orida Bait & Tackle. A lso, teams registering on or before Thursday, Sept 17, will have a chance at a $100 drawing at weigh-in time. Entry forms are also posted on the FOI website, Istokpoga.com Sign-ups will be held the morning of the event, with cash only, but this will put the team at the end of the launch line and out of the chance at the $100 drawing. The launch site will be at the Istokpoga Park on US 98, with the weigh-in also at Istokpoga Park at 3 p.m. This year will also feature a silent auction at weigh-in time, with all proceeds going to the Humaine Society. This yearly event is to spread the word about one of Floridas best bass-fishing lakes and also serves as a way to introduce people to the Friends of Istokpoga Lake Association. Good luck, and good fishing.Flag FootballSEBRING The Highlands County Family YMCAis currently conducting a sign-up for Adult Flag Football ages 16and-up. Aminimum of five players and a maximum of twelve players per team. Any questions call 382-9622George Davis MemorialAVONPARK The First Annual George Davis Memorial Golf Tournament will tee off on Saturday, Nov. 19 on the River Greens Golf Course. The flighted, four-person scramble will get underway with a shotgun start at 8 a.m. The cost of $60 per person includes golf, cart, lunch, prizes and lots of fun with proceeds going to benefit the River Greens Highlands County Youth Golf Scholarship Fund. Last year, two $500 scholarships were awarded by the organization and with this years inaugural tournament, the goal is to bring that number up to six. Checks are to be made payable to River Greens Scholarship Fun, and send to 47 West Damon Drive, Avon Park, FL33825. For more information, call Suzy Gentry at 446-7368.Florida Trail AssociationSEBRING The Florida Trail Association, Heartland Chapter, has a number of outings scheduled for the month of November for outdoor enthusiasts and those seeking to enjoy the natural beauty the area has to offer. Saturday, Nov. 19 ABike Ride on Ft. Fraser Trail from Bartow trailhead Bring: helmet, water, snacks and your bicycle. Contact: Eileen at 956-2145 for meetup time, directions and other information. Saturday, Nov. 2 6 Activity: Day Hike, approx. 7 miles Location: Tenoroc Fish Management Area, Lakeland, FL, at office. Description: This former phosphate m ining area consists of lakes, marshes, grasslands and wooded hills, and is an important refuge for wildlife. Bring water, snacks, sun and insect protection. Contact: Monika at 858-3106 for meetup time and other details. Heartland Volleyball ClubSEBRING The Heartland Volleyball Club will be holding a parent meeting Monday, Nov. 14 at 7 p.m. in the Sebring High School Smith Center. For more information, contact Venessa S inness, 214-9633, vsinness@yahoo.com or Kim Crawford, 835-2377, kim.crawford@southflorida.edu .Elks Hoop ShootSEBRING The Sebring Elks Lodge 1 529 is sponsoring the Elks National Hoop Shoot Free Throw contest, open t o all boys and girls, ages eight to 13. All eligible students in public and private schools in Sebring and Avon Park are invited to participate in this contest. Finalists in this contest will advance to a District contest with the possibility of further competing at State level. This Elks nationwide sanctioned program gives youngsters and opportunity for spirited competition and relationships with their peers. This years contest will be held at HillGustat Middle School at 9 a.m., on Saturday, Dec. 3. Registration begins at 8 a.m. Abirth certificate is required. Information is also available at the elementary and middle schools. For more information call Bob Marks, Chairman of the event, at 655-0474.Turkey Trot 5KSEBRING The 19th Annual Turkey Trot 5K Run/Walk is set for Thursday, Nov. 24, at Highlands Hammock State Park at 8 a.m. The annual run to celebrate the national holiday will feature overall male and female awards, age group awards in 5year age divisions, choice of cotton or technical tee shirts, and plenty of ice-cold drinks and other refreshments for runners. Entry fee is $15 through November 12 for cotton or $20 dri-fit and $20 postmark after November 16 and race day with no shirt. Tee shirts guaranteed to only those who pre-register so sign up early! Special Kids rate of $10 for those 14 and under with no shirt at this cost. Visit friendsofhighlandshammock.org to request an application. You may mail your checks made payable to Friends of Highlands Hammock State Park, along with the signed application, to Turkey Trot 5K, 5931 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL33872.Holiday Baseball CampAVONPARK SFCC Baseball will be holding its 14th Annual Holiday Baseball Camp Monday through Wednesday, Dec. 19-21, for players aged 5-14. Cost of the camp is $75 with SFCC head coach Rick Hitt serving as camp director and assistant coach Andy Polk and current and former Panther players will assist campers. There will also be a special appearance by one or more former SFCC players that have made it to the Major Leagues. Register at www.southflorida.edu; click on camps, or call 863 784-7035. Pre-registration is encouraged and walk-up registrations are accepted. Registration and check-in each day from 8:30-9 a.m. Instruction, drills, baseball trivia and games daily from 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. All campers receive camp T-shirt Awards day is Wednesday, Dec. 21. AMERICAN CONFERENCEEast WLTPctPFPA New England530.625222184 N.Y. Jets530.625199163 Buffalo530.625222174 Miami170.125138169 South WLTPctPFPA Houston630.667236157 Tennessee440.500156169 Jacksonville260.25098163 Indianapolis090.000128283 North WLTPctPFPA Baltimore620.750208130 Cincinnati620.750195140 Pittsburgh630.667196162 Cleveland350.375119170 West WLTPctPFPA Oakland540.556208233 Kansas City440.500131201 San Diego450.444216228 Denver350.375171224NATIONAL CONFERENCEEast WLTPctPFPA N.Y. Giants620.750198184 Dallas440.500179175 Philadelphia350.375203182 Washington350.375127158 South WLTPctPFPA New Orleans630.667287205 Atlanta530.625189170 Tampa Bay440.500147196 Carolina260.250187207 North WLTPctPFPA Green Bay8001.000275179 Detroit620.750239147 Chicago530.625200174 Minnesota260.250172199 West WLTPctPFPA San Francisco710.875206118 Seattle260.250122185 Arizona260.250162196 St. Louis170.125100211 ___ Thursdays Game Oakland 24, San Diego 17 Sundays Games Buffalo at Dallas, 1 p.m. Denver at Kansas City, 1 p.m. Washington at Miami, 1 p.m. St. Louis at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Arizona at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. Tennessee at Carolina, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. Houston at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. New Orleans at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. Baltimore at Seattle, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m. Detroit at Chicago, 4:15 p.m. New England at N.Y. Jets, 8:20 p.m. Mondays Game Minnesota at Green Bay, 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17 N.Y. Jets at Denver, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 20 Tampa Bay at Green Bay, 1 p.m. Oakland at Minnesota, 1 p.m. Carolina at Detroit, 1 p.m. Dallas at Washington, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Baltimore, 1 p.m. Buffalo at Miami, 1 p.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Seattle at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m. San Diego at Chicago, 4:15 p.m. Tennessee at Atlanta, 4:15 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 8:20 p.m. Open: Houston, Indianapolis, New Orleans, Pittsburgh Monday, Nov. 21 Kansas City at New England, 8:30 p.m.LEAGUELEADERSAFC PASSING AttCompYdsTDInt Brady, NWE321212 27032010 Rthlsbrgr, PIT3212032632 158 Schaub, HOU277167 2237136 Fitzpatrck, BUF2601701930159 Hsslbeck, TEN285178 2014136 NFCPASSING AttCompYdsTDInt Rodgers, GB2651922619243 Brees, NO37926930042111 Stafford, DET2991832179194 Manning, NYG2801762377 156 A. Smith, SNF2061321467102 AFCRUSHING AttYardsAvgTD F. Jackson, BUF1508035.46 Jnes-Drw, JAC1667404.53 A. Foster, HOU1546564.35 McGahee, DEN1236235.13 Be. Tate, HOU1096235.72 NFCRUSHING AttYardsAvgTD Forte, CHI1488055.42 Peterson, MIN1677984.89 Gore, SNF1597824.95 L. McCoy, PHL1357545.68 M. Turner, ATL1576924.47 AFCRECEIVING NoYds Avg LongTD Welker, NWE6696014.599t6 M. Wallace, PIT4786818.595t6 Marshall, MIA4664414.0462 Grnkwski, NWE4459613.5306 Johnson, BUF4252312.5524 NFCRECEIVING NoYdsAvgLongTD Sproles, NO564468.0363 J. Graham, NO5579114.4595 Jennings, GB4872315.179t6 Johnson, DET4780417.173t11 St. Smith, CAR4691820.077t4 AFC SCORING, NONKICKERS TDRusRecRetX2Pts R. Rice, BAL862004 8 Decker, DEN706104 2 Eight tied with 36 NFC SCORING, NONKICKERS TDRusRecRetX2Pts Johnson, DET110110066L. McCoy, PHL1082006 0 Peterson, MIN1091006 0 C. Newton, CAR770004 2 M. Turner, ATL770004 2 B. Wells, ARI770004 2EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA Pittsburgh1033234835 N.Y. Rangers933214332 Philadelphia843195746 New Jersey761153439 N.Y. Islanders463112839 Northeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Toronto1051214953 Buffalo1050204734 Ottawa791154863 Boston770144633 Montreal672143841 Southeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Washington1040205339 Florida843194439 Tampa Bay852184647 Carolina583133855 Winnipeg583134256WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA Chicago1043235649 Nashville852184240 Detroit851173731 St. Louis771153738 Columbus212153459 Northwest Division WLOTPtsGFGA Edmonton952203632 Minnesota843193429 Colorado871174650 Vancouver881175150 Calgary681133139 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA Dallas1140224636 San Jose941194436 Phoenix743174039 Los Angeles763173638 Anaheim673153347 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. ___ Thursdays Games Toronto 3, St. Louis 2, SO Boston 6, Edmonton 3 Chicago 6, Columbus 3 Florida 5, Winnipeg 2 Colorado 4, N.Y. Islanders 3, OT Montreal 3, Phoenix 2, OT Vancouver 3, Los Angeles 2 San Jose 3, Minnesota 1 Fridays Games Washington 3, New Jersey 1 N.Y. Rangers 5, Carolina 1 Pittsburgh 3, Dallas 1 Buffalo 5, Ottawa 1 Detroit 3, Edmonton 0 Chicago 4, Calgary 1 Anaheim 4, Vancouver 3 Saturdays Games Buffalo at Boston, late Ottawa at Toronto, late New Jersey at Washington, late Pittsburgh at Carolina, late Dallas at Detroit, late Winnipeg at Columbus, late Montreal at Nashville, late Tampa Bay at St. Louis, late Calgary at Colorado, late Minnesota at Los Angeles, late Phoenix at San Jose, late Sundays Games Philadelphia at Florida, 5 p.m. Edmonton at Chicago, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Anaheim, 8 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Vancouver, 9 p.m. SCORING LEADERS PlayerTeamGAPTS KesselTOR121123 D. SedinVAN61622 KopitarLA81220 BackstromWASH51520 Five tied with 19MLSPLAYOFFSWILDCARD New York 2, FC Dallas 0 Colorado 1, Columbus 0 WILD CARD SEEDS: 2. Colorado; 3. ColumbusEASTERN CONFERENCESEMIFINALS Sporting City advances 4-0 Houston advances on aggregate 3-1 CHAMPIONSHIP Sunday, Nov. 6: Houston 2, Sporting Kansas City 0WESTERN CONFERENCESEMIFINALS Los Angeles advances on aggregate 3-1 Real Salt Lake advances on aggregate 3-2 CHAMPIONSHIP Sunday, Nov. 6: Los Angeles 3, Real Salt Lake 1MLS CUPSunday, Nov. 20: Houston vs. Los Angeles at Carson, California, 9 p.m.BASEBALLAmerican League MINNESOTA TWINSSigned RHP Jared Burton and OF/INF Brian Dinkelman to minor-league contracts. National League NEW YORK METSAssigned INF/OF Nick Evans and OF Jason Pridie to Buffalo (IL American Association EL PASO DIABLOSSigned OF JJ Muse. Frontier League LAKE ERIE CRUSHERSSigned INF Zach Messer, C Kyle Shaffer and LHP Randy Sturgill to contract extensions.FOOTBALLNational Football League NFLFined Denver LB Von Miller $15,000, Pittsburgh S Ryan Clark $40,000 and Baltimore LB Ray Lewis $20,000 for their actions in last weeks games. Arena Football League ORLANDO PREDATORSRe-signed CB Travis Coleman. Added OL Marc Cile to the roster.HOCKEYNational Hockey League NEW JERSEY DEVILSRecalled LW Vladimir Zharkov from Albany (AHL ST. LOUIS BLUESTraded D Nikita Nikitin to Columbus for D Kris Russell. TORONTO MAPLE LEAFSAssigned F Brayden Irwin from Toronto (AHL Reading (ECHL WINNIPEG JETSActivated G Chris Mason from injured reserve. Reassigned G Peter Mannino to St. Johns (AHL ECHL READING ROYALSReleased F Richard Purslow. Central Hockey League FORT WAYNE KOMETSSigned D Jamie Lovell. RAPID CITY RUSHSigned F Patrick Knowlton. TULSA OILERSWaived F Jason Weeks.COLLEGENCAAPlaced Oklahoma on three years probation and fined the school $15,000 for major violations in its mens basketball program. Suspended Marquette freshman Juan Anderson for the three games for accepting a free ticket to a Milwaukee Brewers playoff game. GEORGIA TECHSuspended junior F Glen Rice Jr. for three games for an undisclosed violation of team rules. PENN STATEPlaced assistant football coach Mike McQueary on administrative leave. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid MONDAY: Girls Basketball at Clewiston,6/7:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Boys Soccer at Avon Park,7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer at Avon Park,6 p.m. THURSDAY: Boys Basketball at Bill Jarrett Tip-Off Tournament Avon Park,6 p.m.; Boys Soccer at Hardee,7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer at Hardee,6 p.m. Sebring MONDAY: Boys Basketball at Preseason Classic,TBA; Boys Soccer at Clewiston,6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer at Frostproof,6/7:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Boys Basketball at Preseason Classic,TBA; Girls Basketball vs.Hardee, 6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer vs.Auburndale,6/7:30 p.m. Avon Park TUESDAY: Girls Basketball vs.Victory Christian,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Soccer vs.Lake Placid,7:30 p.m.; Girls Soccer vs.Lake Placid,6 p.m. T HURSDAY: Boys Basketball hosts Bill Jarrett Tip-Off Tournament,6 p.m.; Boys Soccer vs.DeSoto,8 p.m.; Girls Soccer vs.DeSoto,6 p.m. N N F F L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . J acksonville at Indianapolis . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 6 6 1 1 p p . m m . Houston at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 1 1 0 0 1 1 p p . m m . W ashington at Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X X 3 3 6 6 4 4 p p . m m . Regional Detroit at Chicago or N.Y. Giants at San Francisco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X X 8 8 : : 1 1 5 5 p p . m m . N ew England at N.Y. Jets . . . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 8 8 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Minnesota at Green Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p . m m . N ASCAR Kobalt 500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 7 7 p p . m m . NHRA Southern California Finals . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2W W O O M M E E N N S S C C O O L L L L E E G G E E S S O O C C C C E E R R T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 6 6 p p . m m . Miami at Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2N N H H L L M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 8 8 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Tampa Bay at Winnipeg.. . . . . . . S S U U N NTimes, games, channels all subject to change G G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . Golf Emirates Australian Open . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F N N o o o o n n EuroPGA Barclays Singapore Open . . G G O O L L F F 4 4 p p . m m . LPGA Lorena Ochoa Invitational . . . . . G G O O L L F FC C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 1 1 0 0 a a . m m . Kent State at West Virginia . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N N N o o o o n n B elmont at Memphis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 p p . m m . San Diego State at Baylor . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 4 4 p p . m m . R hode Island at Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 7 7 p p . m m . Duke vs. Michigan State . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 7 7 p p . m m . Winthrop at Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 8 8 p p . m m . Florida at Ohio State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 9 9 p p . m m . Kansas vs. Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 1 1 0 0 p p . m m . Austin Peay State at California . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 LIVESP ORTSONTV National Football League Transactions National Hockey League Major League Soccer Page 2BNews-SunSunday, November 13, 2011www.newssun.com

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C M Y K B y STEVEN WINE Associated PressMIAMI Hanley Ramirez emerged from the b ack of the stage, wearing a grin and a new uniform, a rms raised as he basked in t he first applause for a Miami Marlin. The franchise founded in 1993 as the Florida Marlins officially changed its name Friday night in a ceremony at the teams new ballpark. The Marlins also unveiled a new logo, new uniforms and new colors orange, blue, black and yellow. The changes emphasize the teams move from a suburban multipurpose stadium, where attendance was poor, to a cozier ballpark near downtown where crowds of more than 30,000 are expected for every game next season. If our ballpark could speak, its first words would be, Hola, Miami,owner Jeffrey Loria told 500 guests seated along the third-base line. They wore hard hats because the ballpark isnt quite complete, but a large video scoreboard was up and running to show franchise highlights and the new logo. Its a block M with a sleek marlin curled above it. Ramirezs uniform was mostly white. Josh Johnson modeled a black jersey with white pants, and Ricky Nolasco was next with an orange jersey and white pants. When asked who was behind the design decisions, art dealer Loria said, Most of it was me. He chose the colors mindful of the ocean and South Floridas sunsets, he said. Aconcert by Miami native Pitbull capped the ceremony. At 11 p.m. on 11/11/11, long lines formed when the Marlins began selling new T-shirts, jerseys, caps and other accessories. w ww.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, November 13, 2011Page 3B HARDER HALL GOLF COURSE; 3.639"; 3"; Black; sports; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 7 7 4 4 0 0 E.O. KOCH CONSTRUCTION CO.; 5.542"; 4"; Black; comm p/u; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 9 9 4 4 2 2 HARDER HALL GOLF COURSE; 3.639"; 3"; Black; sports; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 7 7 4 4 0 0 E.O. KOCH CONSTRUCTION CO.; 5.542"; 4"; Black; comm p/u; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 9 9 4 4 2 2 By JOHN KEKIS A ssociated PressSYRACUSE, N.Y. The South Florida Bulls finallyg ot to sing their fight song. Thank you, B.J. Daniels. Daniels ran for 117 yards and a touchdown, skipped a way from Syracuses defensive pressure at every turn, a nd the Bulls celebrated a B ig East victory, beating Syracuse 37-17 on Friday night. After four straight conference losses, South Florida (54, 1-4 Big East) finally had snapped the programs longest losing streak. Coming out with a win, the tradition for us is to go into the locker room and sing the fight song we havent done that in a while, Daniels said. It was real exciting to get the opportunity to do that. The Bulls had dropped their previous three by a total of 12 points, including 20-17 in overtime at Rutgers a week ago. Thanks to Daniels, they scored early on this night and watched Syracuse selfdestruct with a slew of early major penalties. Everybody kept asking, what is there to play for now, youre 0-4 in the league? head coach Skip Holtz said. I said, These guys are going to go in the locker room and theyre going to play for each otherIts been six weeks (with two open dates) since weve had a win. It hasnt been that long for Syracuse (5-5, 1-4 Orange are getting closer. Theyve lost three straight since a huge 49-23 win over then-No. 11 West Virginia three weeks ago and have two games left to get that elusive sixth victory to qualify for the postseason. It makes us last in the Big East. Obviously, thats not our goal, Orange center Macky MacPherson said. Just making a bowl game wasnt something we were trying for we wanted to take it a step higher. Were a talented enough club to do that and were a good enough team. Not on this night. Not against the fleet-footed Daniels, who was 23 of 34 for 254 yards passing and was not sacked, easily dashing away from troublea gainst Syracuses swarming defense. He finished with 371 yards of offense and had outgained t he Orange until the final 3 minutes. He was extending plays, t hrowing strikes, said Syracuse defensive end Chandler Jones, who was called for two early personal fouls. He did a good job of being himself. Syracuses Ryan Nassib completed 23 of 46 passes for 297 yards, but the offense never clicked consistently. The Orange crossed midfield only once on its first four possessions, going scoreless in the opening quarter for the fifth time this season. They also were hampered by four major penalties in the early going. The Bulls built a 10-0 lead on Maikon Bonanis 29-yard field goal and Marcus Shaws 3-yard touchdown run, then watched Syracuse selfdestruct in the penalty-filled game. The Orange were called for seven penalties totaling 86 yards and the Bulls had 10 for 84. When Demetris Murray scored on a 2-yard run to make it 30-10 late in the fourth, the Orange had gained only 280 yards of offense. Small wonder most of the 41,582 who showed up on a blustery night had packed up and left the Carrier Dome before the end of the game. Syracuses Ryan Nassib completed 23 of 46 passes for 297 yards. Alec Lemon had 10 catches for a career-high 179 yards and scored twice, including a 58-yard reception with 3:41 left. It was the pass that Lemon didnt catch that will haunt him for a while. He dropped a critical pass deep in Bulls territory on fourth down early in the fourth quarter with the Orange trailing 23-10 and Daniels guided the Bulls back down the field for a 14point swing that essentially sealed the victory. I should have pulled that one in. Its frustrating for myself, Lemon said. I didt come down with the touchdown. I feel like I kind of let my team down. Its going to haunt me tonight and all through the byew eek. Nassib, who gained 30 yards rushing on 10 carries, finally got the Orange u ntracked late in the second quarter, driving them 52 y ards in just five plays. He scrambled left and hit t ight end Nick Provo for 24 yards and, after getting sacked by Ryne Giddins, hit Lemon for 22 yards on a third-and-14 play. Lemon caught a 10-yard scoring pass on the next play to draw Syracuse within three with 3:52 left. The Orange hurt themselves on the ensuing kickoff when Shane Rauperskick squirted out of bounds, and Jeremiah Kobena was called for a personal foul. That put the ball at the Syracuse 45, with plenty of time remaining for fast-scoring South Florida. In the previous six games, the Bulls had 14 scoring drives of less than two minutes and six took less than one minute and three plays or less. Add one more. Andre Davis made a diving 43-yard reception between two defenders on first down and Daniels scored from the 2 to cap a drive that took 25 seconds. Ross Krautman kicked a 28-yard field goal with 1:21 to go, but the Bulls quickly marched down the field again. Daniels drove South Florida to the Syracuse 29 with 9 seconds left. Jeremi Wilkes prevented a touchdown with a vicious hit at the back of the end zone that jarred the ball away from Victor Marc, but Bonani converted a 46-yard field goal as time expired for a 20-10 lead. After Bonani kicked a 35yard field goal to give USF a 23-10 lead midway through the third, the Orange got a lucky break. Daniels hit a wide-open Marc along the left side, but he fumbled as he dove for the goal line and the ball sailed through the end zone for a touchback. Daniels leads USF over Syracuse Thats far from guaranteed. The revised proposal makes some improvements over the one players said was unacceptable after a meeting of team representatives earlier in the week. Aperson directly involved with the talks told The Associated Presso n Friday that there are some within the league including owners who cant believe players would hesitate to accept it. All this deal does is slow the growth of player salaries, the person said. No one will be taking any cut. Their response to the movement on Wednesday and Thursday is very disappointing. But it doesnt address all the playersconcerns about the salary cap system. They have said before they would a gree to the financial concessions owners are demanding if there is more movement toward their issues with the system. There are some important issues we feel that we need to close this out in order to get a deal done, in particular when you consider the economic concessions we have made thus far, union president Derek Fisher said. The revised proposal will allow teams over the luxury tax to participate in sign-and-trades for the first two years of the 10-year deal, which would have the unions desired optout after six years. The mini midlevel exception for taxpayers would be for three years and $3 million annually, up from two years and $2.5 million, and another midlevel would be included for teams that are under the cap. Annual raises were upped to 6.5 p ercent for Bird players re-signi ng with their own teams and 3.5 percent for others, but thats still far below the 10.5 percent and 8 percent in the expired CBA. And players remain concerned that the repeater penalties the league wants to charge teams that are over the tax more than three t imes in a five-year span would be so punitive that it would scare some teams from spending, limiting the options they would have in free agency. The revised proposal prevents taxpayers from using the full $5 million midlevel exception and bars them acquiring another teams free agent via sign-and-trade. It would not only raise the escrow from 8 percent to 10 percent of salaries, but also would seek to make up a shortfall during the following season. Union officials have repeatedly said the system issues are perhaps more important to them than the split of basketball-related income, but owners say they need fundamental changes in both to allow fora chance to profit and to ensure m ore competitive balance througho ut the league. Theyre trying to put a system in place that severely restricts the players when competitive balance can be absolutely taken care of through proper revenue sharing, agent Mark Bartelstein said. Displeasure with the proposal f rom the playersside was all over the internet Friday. Problem is, players know what comes next if they reject this deal: one that would call for 53-47 split of BRI in the ownersfavor, a flex cap with a hard ceiling, and rollbacks of current contracts. Thats why Fisher and union executive director Billy Hunter, who said it was not the greatest proposal in the world, have little choice but to see if its one the players could support. So Hunter said hell have the player reps back to New York on Monday and sit them down to say, ou sent us out to get something, here is what were coming back with. Lets sit down and decide what our next option is. What are we going to do? Are we going to gob ack and attempt to engage the N BAagain to see if we can get something or what are our other options? They can forget that one. After a two-month flurry of meetings in hotels throughout New York, Stern is all talked out and wants the deal done. e have done everything possible that was possible to do given our joint goals of both having a sound economic model and having the most competitive league, he said. The union raised some issues, and we discussed those with the (labor relationsWe m oved as far as we could move. So now we are at where were at. Im o ptimistic that the NBAowners will approve it if the union approves it. We await the response from the union. Weve done our best. Many players want to go back to work, and a 72-game season allows them to make back some of the m oney that seemed lost. They would collectively be out $250 million in salaries, about $100 million less than Hunter had said they would forfeit for every month they were locked out. But Hunter said Tuesday on NBA TVhe was aware that perhaps 200 players were in the process of signing decertification cards, so the fight may soon be out of his hands. He has only a few days left to see if that can be avoided. s been a long haul, man, he said. Were coming near the end of i t. Were trying to get this thing done. Continued from 1B NBA could start shortened season on Dec. 15, or not at all NEWS-SUN 385-6155 Name change: Theyre the Miami Marlins now APphoto Hanley Ramirez debuts the new look of the now Miami Marlins Friday in a ceremony at the teams new ballpark, w here the new team logo was also unveiled.

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C M Y K Stetson survives Page 4BNews-SunSunday, November 13, 2011w ww.newssun.com COCHRAN BROTHERS ROOFING; 5.542"; 3"; Black; November ads; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 4 4 7 7 4 4 STANLEY STEEMER CARPET; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 11/13/11; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 9 9 4 4 8 8 COCHRAN BROTHERS ROOFING; 5.542"; 3"; Black; November ads; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 4 4 7 7 4 4 STANLEY STEEMER CARPET; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 11/13/11; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 9 9 4 4 8 8 were unable to move the ball on their first two possessions and were forced to punt. On their third possession, they put together a six-play, 63-yard scoring drive that concluded with Samuel Jacobs scoring on a 15-yard run. With the extra point, Sebring now led the game 31-0. Avon Park would fumble the ball two plays later that Sebring recovered on the Devils 30-yard line. Blue Streak Michael Weston then carried the ballt hree straight times once f or 22 yards, then two, before scoring on a 6-yard run to give Sebring a 38-0 lead to end the third quarter. The Streaks would add one more score in the fourth quarter. Again starting with a short f ield, Jacobs would score on a 5-yard touchdown run that topped off an eight-play, 35yard drive. It also gave Sebring a 45-0 lead that would hold to end the game. They came out and took advantage of opportunities. They took the momentum and rode with it the whole game, said Avon Park head coach Andy Bonjokian. They beat us soundly in every aspect of the football game. Special teams, offense, defense, we did not play a good game. S tatistically, the Avon Park defense did not play as poorly as the score may indicate. T he Sebring offense only managed 221 yard of total o ffense, but their average start position was inside the A von Parks 40 yard line. At the same time, the Sebring defense held the Avon Park offense to 18 total yards. With the exception of a 24yard run by quarterback Ryan Dick, Avon Park did not have a play over 10 y ards. After the last week of practice, I thought we were going to play better than we did, stated Scott. We struggled a little bit, but we got it going which is a good thing. I learned a lot of things this year, Scott continued about his inaugural season at the helm. I think we could have done a lot better this year. Our record is not an indication of how good thist eam really is. When this team does not make a lot of mistakes, they are a good football team. We are going t o work on getting bigger, faster and stronger for next y ear S ebrings Jacobs had a game-high of 64 yards on 13 carries and three touchdowns, Damion Thompson added 51 yards on five carries while Faulk carried the ball 11 times for 31 yards anda touchdown. Perhaps fittingly, the result of the annual cross-county classic left both teams with 4-6 records to end the season. Continued from 1B Streaks slam door on Red Devils I learned a lot of things this year. Our record is not an indication of how good this team really is. LAVAARSCOTT Sebringhead coach Apopka 60, Bayside 21 Archbishop Carroll 35, LaSalle 7 Aucilla Christian 32, Bronson 6 Baker County 41, Bradford 24 Bartram Trail 38, Creekside 17 Bayshore 49, Sarasota 32 Belen Jesuit 24, Monsignor Pace 21 Berkeley Prep 35, DeSoto County 7 B ishop Moore 35, Orlando Freedom 28 Bishop Verot 28, Estero 21 Boca Ciega 21, Seminole 17 Bolles School 41, Episcopal 27 Braden River 31, Palmetto Ridge 28 Cardinal Mooney 23, Out-of-Door Academy 21 Chaminade-Madonna College Prep 68, Archbishop McCarthy 21 Charlotte 48, East Lee County 6 Chipley 48, Graceville 0 Christopher Columbus Catholic 34, Miami Killian 13 Citrus 28, Fivay 20 Clearwater Central Catholic 31, Indian Rocks 0 C lewiston 34, Okeechobee 21 Columbia 24, Suwannee 3 Coral Springs 27, Monarch 13 Coral Springs Charter 49, Gateway Charter 0 C rescent City 54, Peniel Baptist 19 Crystal River 28, Lecanto 25 Dade Christian 49, St. Andrews 21 Delray American Heritage 28, Jones 0 Doral Academy Charter 26, Marathon 3 Dunedin 44, Dixie Hollins 28 Dunnellon 42, Williston 28 East Lake 40, Clearwater 15 East Ridge 45, Mount Dora 14 East River 28, Lake Nona 12 Edgewater 28, Boone 7 Evans 39, Wekiva 14F ernandina Beach 34, Oakleaf 14 First Baptist 42, Zion Christian 12 F lorida Air Academy 30, Christs Church 23 Fort Meade 20, Tenoroc 16 Fort Pierce Central 45, Hardee 28 Fort White 19, Santa Fe 10 Foundation Academy 31, Windermere Prep 21 F rostproof 17, Auburndale 14 G lades Central 70, Pahokee 0 Glades Day 43, South Fork 29H agerty 18, Lake Howell 13 Homestead 20, South Dade 10 Ida S. Baker 34, Mariner 0 Island Coast 29, Cape Coral 9 Jupiter 27, Atlantic Community 17 Keswick Christian 21, Shorecrest Prep 14L aBelle 14, Moore Haven 6 L afayette 29, Blountstown 28 L ake Highland 24, Kings Academy 10 Lake Mary 31, Oviedo 7 L ake Mary Prep 2, Victory Prep Christian Academy 0 L ake Wales 41, Bartow 0 Lake Weir 42, The Villages 41 L akeland Christian 46, Santa Fe Catholic 30 Lakeland 31, Kathleen 21 Landmark Christian 51, Ocala Christian Academy 6 L argo 42, Gibbs 21 Lemon Bay 38, Lake Placid 21 Liberty 64, Poinciana 34 Lincoln 35, Godby 21 Maclay 46, St. Francis 0 Mainland 33, Olympia 6 Marianna 9, Holmes County 3 Miami Central 42, North Miami Beach 0 Miami Northwestern 22, Miami Jackson 0 Miami Washington 45, Miami Southridge 7 Mulberry 27, Haines City 19 Munroe Day 55, St. Johns Country Day 7 Navarre 32, Gulf Breeze 0 North Broward 26, Westminster Christian 21 North Florida Christian 32, Jefferson County 6 N orth Marion 48, St. Cloud 14 North Port 28, Port Charlotte 13 Northside Christian 35, St. Stephens Episcopal 6 Oak Hall 69, St. John Lutheran 61 Oak Ridge 40, Colonial 8 Ocala Forest 17, Ocala Vanguard 14 Orlando The First Academy 48, Orlando C hristian 0 Palm Beach Central 37, Palm Beach Lakes 0 Palm Beach Gardens 46, Lake Worth 26 Palm Harbor University 14, Pinellas Park 13 Pine Crest 35, Pompano Beach 16 Plantation American Heritage 34, Golden Gate 14 Sanford Seminole 55, Winter Springs 14S arasota Riverview 14, Booker 7 Sebring 45, Avon Park 0 Seminole Osceola 31, St. Petersburg Northeast 14 Seminole Ridge 27, Royal Palm Beach 12 Seven Rivers Christian 55, Bishop McLaughlin 38 Sneads 33, Port St. Joe 0 South Walton 38, Franklin County 23 Springstead 24, Anclote 21 Spruce Creek 23, New Smyrna Beach 20 St. Augustine 24, Palatka 6 St. Petersburg Canterbury 56, Mount Dora Bible 7 St. Petersburg 37, Lakewood 14 St. Thomas Aquinas 24, Deerfield Beach 3 T aylor 20, Father Lopez Catholic 10 T aylor County 37, Florida 6 Timber Creek 34, Cypress Creek 6 Trenton 46, Chiefland 6 University Christian 55, Cedar Creek Christian 6 Venice 24, Naples 7 Village Academy 31, Holy Trinity Episcopal 22 W est Gadsden 66, Wewahitchka 40 West Orange 51, Orlando University 36 West Port 46, Belleview 21 Winter Haven 49, Lake Region 6 Winter Park 15, Ocoee 14 Florida High School Football ScoresFriday, Nov. 11 Lemon Bay then ran off a 12-play drive with Taylor again finishing it off with a touchdown for a 14-0 lead a the 6:43 mark of the second quarter. Athree and out was turned into a field goal for the Rays and an interception of a Robert Walton pass paved the way to a Sparks to Zach Scales hook-up for a 10-yard score and the 24-0 halftime lead. The lead went up to 31-0 at the 4:11 mark of the third when Sparks zipped in from 10 yards out, but this was when the Dragon youth movement started to shine. On the first play of their next drive, freshman Foster Walker took the hand-off on a reverse and raced up the far sideline 64 yards to cut the lead to 31-7 with 3:46 left to play in the third. Lemon Bay rolled out a 14-play drive that bridged into the fourth quarter, but the Lake Placid defense stiffened when it needed to and g ot the ball back, though not in the best field position at their own 16. That field position got worse when a illegal motion penalty moved them back to the 11. But Walton, a sophomore, then found Walker deep for an 89-yard catch and run for the score. Senior Nevada Weaver punched in the two-point conversion to make it a 31-15 game with 10:19 left to play. The Rays next drive was stopped and Walton was now connecting on pass plays totaling 23 yards. But a sack and then a Scales interception both stopped the drive and allowed the lead to be added to when Taylor got his third touchdown of the night with 4 :48 left. The Dragons had one more drive in them, however, with Weaver gaining 16 yards on four carries and Walton conn ecting with him on a 44 yard gain. Weaver then capped it off with a blast up the middle from the one to provide for the final margin. He doesnt have the measurables, Holden said of Weaver. Hes one of those guys you have to see play to understand how good of a football player he is. He gives you everything he has on every play. eve got a bright future with our young guys and tonight we flashed it a couple of times, he continued. We have some speed there that we havent had in the past. If we get them stronger, a little more solid and durable from that I think were going to be in pretty good shape. Continued from 1B Dragons rally not enough Courtesy photo Sam Jacobs ran for three touchdowns in Fridays big win. News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Nevada Weaver capped off his high school career with Lake Placids final touchdown of the season. Associated PressDELAND On a night when the two teams combined for 48 turnovers and 46 personal fouls, Stetson rallied for an unsightly 65-60 victory over BethuneCookman Friday night in Casey Alexanders debut as the Hatterscoach. Stetson had 19 turnovers by halftime, 29 by games end. Despite hitting just 4 of 19 shots from 3-point range, Bethune-Cookman held a 5450 lead with 3:35 left. Thats when Stetson went on a decisive 8-0 run. The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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C M Y K w ww.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, November 13, 2011Page 5B SFCC; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process bach AS degreeP0089409; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 9 9 3 3 7 7 HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, 11/13,20; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 9 9 3 3 8 8 SFCC; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process bach AS degreeP0089409; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 9 9 3 3 7 7 HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, 11/13,20; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 9 9 3 3 8 8 C ourtesy photo Aaron Hankerson lays out to make this catch at the one-yard line, setting up a Sebring score in Fridays rout of Avon Park. News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE R obert Walton fires a pass through a seam in the pocket in Lake Placids finale Friday night. Two more Friday football photos

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The Community Calendar provides a brief listing of local clubs and organizations who meet on a regular basis. It is the responsibility of the group to update the News-Sun on any changes in this listing by calling 3856155, ext. 516; send any changes by e-mail to editor@newssun.com; or mail them to News-Sun Community Calendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870. S UNDAY American Legion Post 25 Lake Placid has lounge hours from 1-9 p.m. Live music is from 5-8 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Members and guests only. Post is at 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Call 471-1448. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 lounge is open from 1-7 p.m. Card games start at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Call 4652661. Lake Placid Moose has karaoke in the pavilion. Horseshoes played at 9:30 a.m. Food available at 4 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Overeaters Anonymous, meets from 4-5 p.m. in second floor conference roomNo. 3 at Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center, 4200 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 3827731. No dues, fees or weighins. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves lunch at 2 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 offers NASCAR racing in the pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar open and kitchen open from 2-5 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-3920. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 serves hamburgers from 4-5:30 p.m. and plays poker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 Karaoke is from 5-8 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902. MONDAY Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN WITH ME family group meets at 10:30 a.m. every Monday at the Heartland Christian Church on Alt. 27 in Sebring. The church is behind Southgate Shopping Center where Publix is. Call 385-5714. Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal Church, Lakeshore Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8807. Alcoholics Anonymous One Day At ATime group meets for a closed discussion at 9:30 a.m. Monday and Friday at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 4500 Sun N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. Call 314-0891. Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 6:30 p.m. at Rosewood Center, 517 U.S. 27 South, Lake Placid. Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 202-0647. American Legion Post 74 Sons of Legion meet at 6 p.m. Executive board meets at 7 p.m. on second Monday at the post, 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. Post open noon-8 p.m. Call 4711448. AmVets Post 21 meets 6 p.m. second Monday, at the post, 2029 U.S. 27 South, Sebring. All members welcome. AmVets Post 21 plays darts at 7:30 p.m. for members and guests. Call 385-0234. Avon Park Lakes Association has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m. The clubhouse is at 2714 Nautilus Drive in Avon Park. BALANCE Dual Diagnosed (Addiction and Mental Health) Support Group meets the second and fourth Monday of the month from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Florida Hospital Sebring, Conference Room 1. Qi-Gong to follow at 7 p.m. Call 3865687. Boy Scout Troop 482 meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave., Lake Placid. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118. Diabetes Insulin Pump Support Group meets the second Monday from 3-4:30 p.m. in the Florida Hos p ital Heartland Division Diabetes Center, 4023 Sun N Lake. Call 402-0177 for more information. Diabetes Support Group meets the second and fourth Monday from 1-2:30 p.m. in Florida Hospital Conference Room 3 in Sebring. Call 4020177 for guest speaker list. Fairmount Mobile Estates Lunch Bunch meets at noon second Monday at Homer's Smorgasbord in Sebring. Call 382-0481. Florida Association Home and Community Education meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly on Mondays at The Agri-Center. The group of sewers and crafters make items for residents of adult congregate living facilities. Call Penny Bucher at 385-0949. Grand Prix Cloggers EZ Intermediate and Intermediate Clogging class are held at 9 a.m. every Monday at Reflections on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie, 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club meets the second and fourth Monday at the Sebring Country Estates Civic Association clubhouse, 3240 Grand Prix Drive (down the street from Wal-Mart). Dancing will be held every month until April 2008. Classes are being started now in the Sebring and Lake Placid area. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or visit the Web site at www.samdun.net .Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs.Heartland Pops rehearses at 7 p.m. Mondays at Avon Park High School Band Room, 700 E. Main St., under the direction of Anthony Jones. Musicians of all ages are welcome. Call 3148877. Heartland Riders Association meets at 6 p.m. second Monday at the Sebring Chamber of Commerce Welcome Center in Village Plaza (across from Sebring Gate Station). Call 402-1165. Highlands County Concert Band rehearses 7-9 p.m. every Monday at Sebring High School band room. All musicians are welcome. Vic Anderson, musical director. Call Bill Varner at 386-0855. Highlands County Homeowners Association meets the second Monday of each month at 9 a.m. at the Sebring Country Estates Clubhouse at 3240 Grand Prix Drive in Sebring. Highlands County Parkinson's Support Group meets at 10 a.m. second Monday at First Baptist Church in Downtown Sebring. Call 4536589. Highlands County Sewing Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Highlands County Agri-Civic Center in the 4-H laboratory, Sebring. Call 402-6540. Highlands Sertoma Club meets at noon, Takis Family Restaurant, Sebring. Highlands County Senior Squadron, Civil Air Patrol the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary meets the second and fourth Monday nights at the Sebring Airport Terminal Building. Call 4711433 between 4 and 7 p.m. Insulin Pump Support Group meets from 3-4:30 p.m. the second Monday of every month in conference Room 3 of Florida Hospital. This group is open to all insulin pump wearers, their families and anyone who is interested in knowing more about insulin pumps. Preregistration is not required. Call 402-0177. Lake Placid Art League will have classes in Drawing and Painting, conducted by Anne Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart will teach Fabric Painting at the center. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Art League will have Open Studio'from 1-4 p.m. Bring your projects in whatever medium, to work in a friendly atmosphere. Cost is only $2 per session. Call Pat Keesling, 699-2058. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2 p.m. Sign up for darts is at 6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m. It is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m. Let It Begin With Me Alanon Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Monday at Heartland Christian Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South, Sebring. For details about Alanon, a self-help group for families and friends of alcoholics, call 385-5714. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Cards start at 4 p.m. Music outside Tiki Hut at 3 p.m. Call 452-0579. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 12-4:30 p.m. second and fourth Monday in Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. No meetings from end of May to October. Call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Highlands County meets at 6:15 p.m. at Beef O Brady's, Sebring. Sebring Bridge Club has Bridge, ACBLDuplicate at the clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Mondays. For details or info on lessons, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has the lounge open from 12-7 p.m. Smoke-free environment. Call 471-3557. Sebring Historical Society open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Located in back side of Sebring Public Library building on Lake Jackson. Call 471-2522. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 plays Texas Hold em at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Monday at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing. Call 655-3920. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL632, Sebring meets at 2 p.m. for weigh-in at the fellowship hall at the First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, Sebring. Call 659-1019. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Call 699-5444. Woman's Club of Sebring meets at noon on the second Monday for lunch, from October throughMay, at the clubhouse, 4260 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 385-7268. TUESDAY Al-Anon Family Groups meet for discussion and Twelve Step study at noon, Union Congregational Church, 105 N. Forest Ave., AvonPark. All Sebring Model Railroad Club meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway, unless otherwise directed. Members build and run an "HO" Guage model railroad layout. Rail-buffs interested in other model railroad gauges are welcomed. Call Gene Archer, 452-0334, or Curtis Petersen, 382-6967. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard and euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Boy Scout Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30 p.m. in the Scout Lodge, 202 Robert Britt St., AvonPark. Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to join. Call 452-2385. Avon Park Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Avon Park Lions Club meets 6:45 p.m., in the Lions Club, 1218 W. Bell St. Brown Bag Book Bunch book reader's group meets at noon on the third Tuesday of the month at Emmanuel United Church of Christ, 3115 Hope St., Sebring. Read the selected book, bring your bag lunch, and join in the lively and interesting discussions. Call 471-1999. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday night at "The Rock," Union Congregational Church, 28 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park. Abarbecue meal is served at 6 p.m. for a donation. At 6:45 p.m., members meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group breaks up into small groups for men and women. The program is designed for drug and alcohol addiction, divorce, death or illness grief, low or lost selfesteem or identity due to dysfunctional relationships, depression/anxiety, or any other need for healing. Call Celebrate Recovery coordinator Pam Sim by calling 453-3345, ext. 106. Ballroom Dance lessons, 4 p.m., free, first and third Thursday of each month. Eastside Christian Church Fellowship Hall, 101 Peace AVe., Lake Placid. 314-9215 or 699-0886 Fletcher Music Club meets every Thursday and Tuesday at Fletcher Music Center in Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. Call 385-3288. Friends of Highlands Hammock meets at 6:30 p.m. third Tuesday, Highlands Hammock State Park, Sebring. Call 386-6099. G2G (Grandparent to Grandparent) a support group to help grandparents raising grandchildren, meets at 10 a.m. Tuesdays at One Hope United, 7195 S. George Blvd., Sebring. Call 214-9009. Heartland Avian Society meets every fourth Tuesday, 7:30 p.m., at Huntington National Bank, 126 Center Ave., Sebring. Call 465-9358. Heartland Dolittle Miniature Build meets 7 p.m., third Tuesday, St. Johns Methodist Church social hall, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring. Call 3823553. Heartland Harmonizers Barbershop Chorus meets from 7-9:30 p.m. in the Sebring High School Music Room, Sebring. All men who enjoy singing are invited. Reading music is not required. Call 4712294 or 386-5098. Heartland Talk of the Town Toastmasters meet the first and third Tuesday from 6:157:15 p.m. at Century 21 Advanced All-Service Realty, corner of Thunderbird Road and U.S. 27 in Sebring. Call Linda Udall at 386-6495 or email erinehess@yahoo.com or www.toastmasters.org. Highlands County Quilt Guild meets on the first and third Tuesday of each month at the Women's Club of Sebring, 4260 Lakeview Drive, across from Veterans' Beach, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call 471-0694 or e-mail sbringquilter@embarqmail.com Highlands Senior Center Bingo every Tuesday 6-9 p.m. at 3400 Sebring Parkway. Doors open at 4 p.m. Cards on sale at 5 p.m.; games start at 6 p.m. 386-0752. Highlands Tea Party meets at 6 p.m. Tuesdays at Homer's Restaurant, 1000 Sebring Square. Call 386-1440. Highlands County Veterans Council meets 7 p.m., third Tuesday in the conference room at the Veterans Services Office. The meeting is for the appointed delegate from each veteran organization in the county to meet to discuss current issues regarding veterans and veterans activities. Hope Hospice grief support group meets at 11 a.m. at 319 W. Center Ave., Sebring; and 4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle ALF, across U.S. 27 from Florida Hospital Lake Placid. Call 382-0312. Lake HavenHomeowners Association meets the third Tuesday of the month, 5400 N. Lake Huckleberry Drive, Sebring. Covered dish dinner is at 6:30 p.m. and meeting is at 7:30 p.m. Call 382-4858. Lake Placid Art League has classes in Parchment Embossing from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant. Call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Art League Woodcarvers will have Focus on Airbrushing from 1-4 p.m. and Open Carving from 5-8 p.m. at the Art League, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. Call Norm Pelland, 465-5510, or Ken Lorant, 6990172. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Happy hour is from 2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Grief Support (Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, with Charlie Stroup. Call 465-0568. Lake Placid Jaycees meet 7:30 p.m., first and third Tuesdays, Jaxson's. Board meetings at 6:30 p.m., second Tuesday. Call Joe Collins, 6555545. Lake Placid Moose has an officers meeting at 7:30 p.m. the third Tuesday at the lodge. Lake Placid Toastmasters meet the first and third Tuesday at 6 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 101 S. Oak Ave. in Lake Placid. The web address is www.toastmasters.org. Call Cathy Schreima at 382-3574 or Linda Udall at 386-6495. Lorida Community Club meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Lorida Community Center. Masonic Lodge meets 8 p.m., 106 N. Main St., Lake Placid. Nar-Anon Support Group for family members or friends of someone with a drug problem or addiction. Nar-Anon helps attain serenity and a more normal life for those affected by the addictions of loved ones, regardless of whether or not he/she has stopped using. 6 p.m. every Tuesday at First Baptist Chuch of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephin e Drive, Sebring. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventhday Adventist Church, 1410 W. Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup.co m. Call 382-7731. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday and has blood pressure screening from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. first and third Tuesday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. 465-4888. Rotary Club of Sebring (Noon) meets at noon at the Sebring Civic Center, near the library in downtown Sebring. Call 385-3829 or 471-9900. S.A.L.T. Council (Seniors and Law Enforcement Togethe r) meets the third Tuesday each month at 10 a.m. Location varies monthly. Call 402-7369. Sebring Bridge Club will have Duplicate Bridge games every Tuesday evening. If inte rested in playing Duplicate Bridge, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 plays darts, beginning with sign in at 6 p.m. Games start at 6:30 p.m. No experience necessary. Cost is $2. Smoke-free environment. Call 471-3557. Sebring Lions Club meets at noon at Dot's Restaurant, 950 Sebring Square. For information call 382-2333. Sebring Lodge 249 F&AM meets 7:30 p.m., 1809 Home Ave., Sebring. Sebring Meals on Wheels Inc. hosts board of directors meeting at 1:30 p.m. the third Tuesday each month at the Sebring Hills Association Clubhouse, 200 Lark Ave. Call Jim Smith at 382-8453. Sebring Moose Lodge 225 9 serves soft shell tacos 5-7 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing.Euchre is played at 6:30 p.m. Call 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. Call 385-2966. SertomaClub meets at 7 a.m. at Dee's Restaurant, Sebring. Call Scott Albritton at 402-1819. "Souper" Book Group meets the third Tuesday of eac h month at noon at Emmanuel United Church of Christ to discuss the monthly book selection and enjoy a soup, salad and dessert lunch. All book lovers are welcome. The church is at 3115 Hope St., Sebring (1.8 miles west from corner of Highway 27 and Hammock Rd.) Call 471-1999 or 452-2697. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL99 meets from 6-7 p.m. at the Atonement Lutheran Church, 1744 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 655-1743. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL618 has weigh in from 4-430 p.m. at Community Bible Church, 1400 CR-17AN ., AvonPark. Meeting is at 4:45 p.m. Call 452-1093. U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary meets 7 p.m., third Tuesday, Sebring Jaycees building. Call 471-0393 or 385-2459. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, plays darts 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. House Committee meets at 5:30 p.m. Call 699-5444. Page 6BNews-SunSunday, November 13, 2011www.newssun.com LIL WIZARDS ACADEMY; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 11/6,13,20,27; 0 0 0 1 3 6 4 0 DR. LEE, IKE; 1.736"; 3"; Black; 11/13/11; 0 0 0 1 3 9 4 7 YMCA; 3.639"; 5"; Black; **internet included**; 0 0 0 1 3 9 5 0 COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, November 13, 2011Page 7B KIFFLE KITCHEN; 3.639"; 5"; Black; 11/11,13,18,20; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 7 7 8 8 8 8 SEBRING PEDIATRICS, LLC; 3.639"; 4"; Black; 11/13/11; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 9 9 4 4 5 5 JEWELRY BOX; 5.542"; 5"; Black; 11/13,20,27; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 9 9 5 5 5 5 ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Special to the News-SunS EBRING The T anglewood Actors Guild is pleased to announce the u pcoming production of the enormously funny play, Those Crazy Ladies in the House on the Corner Dec. 7 -9 at 7 p.m. T ickets are $10 and may be purchased at the Tanglewood C lubhouse on Thursdays from 3-4 p.m. or by callingL inda at 382-9507. The laughter is sure to be s pontaneous, enthusiastic and long-lasting as three geriatric sisters do nothing butsit ath ome talking to one another, all at the same time. The doctor convinces a nurse to move in with the ladies to keep ane ye on them. In no time, the nurse has the sisters planning p arties, pulling pranks and racing one another to the corner. When the nephew arrives to sell the family home, things get complicated, espec ially with Christmas just around the corner. The Tanglewood clubh ouse will be set up with tables of eight. Dessert will be served at intermission.G uests are invited to bring their own drinks. Ice will be provided. All proceeds from opening n ight will be donated to the Tanglewood Residents Cancer Benefit. For this spe-c ial night, the doors will o pen at 6 p.m. to allow patrons to look over the numerous raffle prizes, purchase 50/50 tickets, select C hristmas baked goods and enjoy pre-show snacks. Those Crazy Ladies in the House on the Corner is s ponsored by Newsom Eye, Florida Hospital and Edward Jones/Alan J. Holmes. The Tanglewood Actors Guild has been providing q uality entertainment for six years. Past productions i nclude The Odd Couple, Steel Magnolias, Angry Jurors, TheC emetery Club, Nunsense and The Sensuous Senator T he Tanglewood ResidentsCancer Benefit is n ow in its 12th year. Last year, $68,000 was donated t othe American Cancer Society. For further information, contact Neil Simpson, chairman of the TanglewoodA ctors Guild at 382-8349 or nsimp76@gmail.com/. Crazy Ladies taking over Tanglewood in December Courtesy photo Those Crazy Ladies in the House on the Corner are sisters (from left) played by Dora (Joan Rulliydia (Nancy Waitkus) and Maggie (Marie Overtoom). Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South Florida Community C olleges Museum of Florida Art and Culture ( MOFAC) will hold its seco nd Third Thursday program of the season, A Florida Legend: Mary Ann Carroll, at 1 p.m. Thursday. C arroll is the only female of the Highwaymen, a group of 27 African-A merican, self-taught from the Lincoln Park area ofF ort Pierce. They began to sell their artwork from the trunks of their cars in the 1 950s. The majority of the p ainting portrayed the serene and untouchedF lorida landscape of their t ime. In the last decade, their paintings have become h ighly coveted, and in 2004 t he original Florida Highwaymen were inducted into the Florida Artists H all of Fame. Third Thursdays at MOFAC is a series that will e nhance and inspire the p ublics perspective on Florida art and culture. Each program focuses on a different MOFAC exhibit ion. The program is held e very third Thursday of the month, is open to the pub-l ic, and is free. F or more information, contact Mollie Doctrow, MOFAC curator, at 8637 84-7240. SFCC MOFAC i s located on the Highlands Campus, on the east wing of the SFCC Theatre for the P erforming Arts, Avon Park. Like SFCC MOFACs F acebook page at h ttp://www.facebook.com/ mofac/. Carroll to be featured for Third Thursday May Ann Carroll Special to the News-SunSEBRING Afour-part barbershop harmony music workshop will m ake its 2011 debut at Sebring High School from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.F riday. About 300 high school s tudents from Sebring and Avon Park will participate in a workshop sponsored b y the Heartland H armonizers Barbershop Chorus, BarbershopH armony Foundation, The S unshine District, and the Heart of Highlands Sweet Adelines Chorus of Avon P ark, in cooperation with F lorida Department of Education and Highlands County School District. T he purpose and goal of this workshop is to provide students from the l ocal high schools the o pportunity to improve their vocal skills, listen to demonstrations and participate in learning and then singing in the fourpart harmony barbershop s tyle. P ackets containing music, learning CDs and p romotional material a bout the Barbershop H armony Society and Sweet Adelines I nternational will be prov ided to local and area music educators prior to the event. T he day-long event will include physical and vocal warm-ups, craft sessions, section rehearsals a nd individual and combined rehearsals of the boys and girls. RexD arrow of the Heartland Harmonizers has enlisted the assistance of AlexR ubin, an award winning chorus director from Miami, and Camille Sanabria, a Sweet Adelinev ocal training clinician, in conducting this workshop. A lex Rubin will be assisted by a male guest quartet, Fortissimo from Miami, in training the boys attending the workshop. Camille Sanabria will conduct the training of the girl attendees with the assistance of a female guest quartet, So Devine from Inverness. Members and spouses of the Heartland Harmonizers Barbershop Chorus and the Heart of Highlands Sweet Adelines Chorus will assist in hosting this program. The efforts of the young men and women attending this workshop will be rewarded as they listen to performances by the guest quartets and then perform the songs they have learned in their music workshop for an audience of well wishers at the conclusion of the program. Youth in Harmony workshop set for Friday Special to the News-SunThe Heartland Cultural Alliance (HCA t he designated Local Arts Agency (LAA Highlands County and as such is authorized by state and county government to collect and distribute funding to local art and culture organizations. The State of Florida Department of Transportation returns $20 to HCAfor each Florida State of the Arts specialty license plate sold in Highlands County. This money is distributed through a HCAgranting program to local not-for-profit organizations for funding art and culture related projects. The HCAis pleased to announce this years grant panel Gene Brenner (Brenner Pottery), Vicki Jarvis (Frames & Images Kathy Knowles (Kenilworth Lodge awarded the following grants: Lake Placid Depot Museum: $250 to Kay Tarr for expenses to build a display designed to celebrate Lake Placids 85th birthday Toby the Clown Foundation Inc.: $100 for Jr. Joey Clown Classes Ridge Area Arc: $500 for supplies to enable Arc art students to make outdoor decorations to be sold, along with plants in Arcs nursery Lake Placid Historical Society Depot Museum: $250 for a video depicting the life and times of Melville Dewey, the founder of Lake Placid The Childrens Museum: $250 to fund the development of childrens interactive exhibits The Boys and Girls club of Highlands County: $100 for a percussion education program. For more information on the granting program contact Fred Leavitt at 402-8238 or email info@heartlandculturealliance.org/. Heartland Cultural Alliance hands out grants Those Crazy Ladies in the House on the Corner on stage Dec. 7-9 The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN CR OSSWORDSO LUTION

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Page 8BNews-SunSunday, November 13, 2011www.newssun.com LAMPE & KEIFFER; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, senior scene; 0 0 0 1 3 9 5 3 SENIORSCENE Former Florida Supreme Court Chief Justice James Alderman has a love of law and the land. He traces his family history from the 1800s, when his great-greatgrandfather B. E. ‘Teet’Alderman, moved to North Florida until after the end of the Second Seminole Indian War (1835-1842). One of his relatives, “Streaty Parker,” had a renowned reputation as an Indian fighter during the Third Seminole Indian War. In 1851, Streaty, his wife, children, in-laws the Blounts, and some slaves moved from Alligator (now Lake City) in Columbia County to Bartow in Polk County. During the Third Seminole War, Streaty was a first lieutenant in the volunteer militia. When Seminole Indians attacked the home of Willoughby Tillis near Fort Meade, then escaped to Peas Creek swamp, Lt. Streaty Parker, who commanded the militia, attacked the Indians on one side of a horseshoe formation where they were unprotected, killing many. Captain Durrance filed in his report that Lt. Streaty Parker was “a brave and good solder.” One month before the Civil War (1861-1865), Parker, now promoted to captain, led the “Mounted Minute Men” or “Hickory Boys” to Fort Meade (Hardee County) serving under Captain F.A. Hendry in a company of 131 men. During this time, Captain Hendry learned that an estimated 4,500 head of cattle had been rustled by Union forces. In a major accomplishment to stop the rustling, Major C. J. Munneryln wrote to Brig. Gen. Miller, commander of the Department of Florida, that “Capt. F.A. Hendry’s Company is the most efficient of all. It has done active scouting, punished the enemy on several occasions, and cattle stealing has stopped. Capt Hendry is a most valuable officer.” LaBelle, Fla. is part of the F.A. Hendry family settlement honoring sisters Laura and Carrie Belle after which the town is named: “LaBelle.” (See “Old Papers Belonging to Capt. F.A. Hendry,” filed in Lee County, Fla. Circuit Court files, 1917, copied by Kyle VanLandingham, February 2001). After serving with Captain Hendry’s company during the war, Streaty Parker returned to his hand-sewn timber home, cattle ranch, plantation of bananas and oranges that stretched eastward to the Peace River (Contributed by Vernon Peeples, Punta Gorda, Fla.). Born in 1936, sixth generation Jim Alderman grew up in Fort Pierce spending most of his free time working cattle on the ranch while going to school, not yet targeting his dual destiny in law. As a young cowboy, Alderman learned the essential jobs as a cattle rancher, participating in all phases of the operation. He did not ride bulls or rope cattle on the rodeo circuit, as he was doing the “real thing” on the ranch, however, he did participate in Future Farmers of America at Fort Pierce High School raising and selling steers/bulls as FFAprojects. On Saturdays, Alderman and his sister, Joyce went to the Sunrise movie theatre in Fort Pierce (recently revived in the Historic District) or a second theater called the Ritz, no longer there. When Alderman graduated from Fort Pierce High School, he attended the University of Florida for four years. In his sophomore year, he made an evolutionary decision to major in Pre-Law and pursue law school. “It was a tough choice but my grandfather and father were running the ranch and there wasn’t room for another partner. I went to law school for three years. While I was attending the University of Florida, I met my future wife Jennie Thompson on a blind date. She was working as a medical research technologist at the University of Florida Medical School. Amutual friend from Fort Pierce, who worked in the same lab, arranged the date. We dated a couple of years and married March 3, 1961 in Gainesville before I graduated with a law degree. After graduation, we returned to St. Lucie County and I practiced law as a general practitioner attorney helping whoever came through the door. Two years later, Sept. 1, 1963, our only child, James A. ‘Jimmy’Alderman, was born.” Jim Alderman’s story reflects the struggles of many generations to survive the wilds of Florida and for him, the challenge of the law. Excerpts from new book by Nancy Dale, The Legacy of the Florida Pioneer Cow Hunters … In Their Own Words. Contact Dale at 214-8351 for signed inscriptions or www.nancydalephd.com. Alderman has a love of the land and the law Courtesy photo James Alderman, former Florida Supreme Court Chief Justice, traces his family history from the 1800s in Florida. As a young cowboy, Alderman learned the essential jobs as a cattle rancher, participating in all phases of the operation. Wild Florida Nancy Dale Back to the picture series that I promised last month: The Tower Inn was my home away from home on the weekends in 1942 when I visited my GI husband for the weeks following basic training. Such a bitter sweet memory. I lived in Manhattan (I realize that when I say Manhattan – the center of the universe – I mean New York City, but as I learned a few months later there is also a Manhattan, Kansas and probably other Manhattans –but I digress ... and that I realize Manhattan, Kansas is another whole story that follows the “war adventures and travels of a wife to be near her soldier husband while he is stateside.” The Tower Inn is a motel in Alexandria, Va., about a mile or two outside of Fort Belvoir. Each weekend after the first eight weeks of quarantine I would take the four o’clock commuter special out of Grand Central Station to Union Station in Washington and then a bus to Alexandria. The kindly drivers recognized me as a regular and would let me off at the undesignated spot in front of the motel. I told my boss that this was a condition of my continuing to work there. During that period good workers were sort after as so many men were gone and others took jobs in the factories and other wartime activities (were we so lucky today only without a war. I mean a ‘real’war.) Of course the fac t that he was my uncle didn’t hurt. The Hambletons, who owned the place, sort o f adopted “tha t Yankee gal who followed her man.” I would wait at the hotel and Sidney would get a weekend or a day pass and come and stay with me. However a pass was not always forthcoming so there was a substitute called a “drill field pass.” After lights out and bed check Sidney would sneak out of the barracks and run across the drill field out to U.S. Rte. 1 and hitch or tro t to the motel where I would welcome him with open arms and a New York salami and bagels. This particular weekend he had written that he could not leave camp on Friday night but I could come into camp on Saturday. So my benefactors insisted that I have supper with them. A t bedtime they brought thei r two marvelous and obedien t Doberman pinchers to stay with me through the night. After all, it was open county on the highway with all kinds of traffic and strangers going by. The dogs and I were friends and I was delighted to have them as companions. I went to sleep comfortably with happy visions of seeing my love next day. I was awakened at one o’clock by the dogs growling at the door. What was wrong? There was a ligh t tapping on the door. Peering through the drapes I saw my husband. Happy Tower Inn Pearls Pearls Pearl Carter See PHOTOS, page 9B

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days (or rather night), Sid had gotten out after all. I went to open the door, but the dogs barked savagely. They growled and jumped on it. I tried opening it a little way but Bud stuck his nose and paw through the crack with teeth bared. His low grumble went right through my gut. They were guard dogs and they were doing what they were supposed to do. We stood that way for about 10 minutes before I gave up on opening the door. I even tried the windows but they were bolted shut. Lief lay in front of the door and Bud paced back and forth guarding me and then tried to maneuver me from going to the door. We couldn’t even talk for fear of starting the dogs barking again and waking up the other cabins or the owners. Eventually Sid left to get back to barracks before roll call. He was real tired when I came into camp the next day. He had caught the sniffles from being out in the cold and damp night. If you remember being 20 and 21 and separated from your spouse for two long months, well I don’t have to say anymore. How can I even think that this was an easier and more friendly time? But I do. There was a camaraderie and cooperation and everyone pulled together. What does it take to do that now? www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, November 13, 2011Page 9B SWEETBAY-National Newspaper PS; 7.444"; 15"; Black plus three; process, IO11113MSO; 0 0 0 1 3 9 4 0 Touch a Truck; 9.347"; 6"; Process color; -; 0 0 0 1 3 9 8 5 Continued from page 8B Pearl Carter is writer, poet and a Lake Placid resident. E-mail her at timely87@comcast.net. Photos refresh the memories By LISATURTURRO Special to the News-Sun Question: I received a notice from Social Security recently. It said my name and Social Security number do not match Social Security’s records. What should I do? Answer: It is critical that your name andSocial Security number, as shown on your Social Security card, match your employer’s payroll records and your W-2 form. If they don’t, here is what you need to do: Give your employer the correct information exactly as shown on your Social Security card or your corrected card; or Contact your local Social Security office (www.socialsecurity.gov/loca tor) or call 1-800-772-1213 (TTY1-800-325-0778) if your Social Security card does not show your correct name or Social Security number. For more information, visit our website at www.socialsecurity.gov. Question: Are Social Security numbers reassigned after a person dies? Answer: No. We do not reassign Social Security numbers. In all, we have assigned more than 460 million Social Security numbers, and each year we assign about 5.5 million new numbers. The current system has enough new numbers for several more generations. For more information, visit our website at www.socialsecurity.gov or call us toll-free at 1800-772-1213 (TTY1-800325-0778). Question: Is it true that if you have low income you can get help paying your Medicare premiums? Answer: Yes. If your income and resources are limited, your State may be able to help with your Medicare Part B premium, deductibles, and coinsurance amounts. State rules vary on the income and resources that apply. Contact your State or local medical assistance, social services, or welfare office, or call the Medicare hotline, 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227), and ask about the Medicare Savings Programs. If you have limited income and resources, you also may be able to get help paying for prescription drug coverage under Medicare Part D. Call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY users should call 1-800-3250778) or visit any Social Security office. Also, see our publication, Medicare (Publication 10043), at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/10043.html. For even more information, visit our website at www.socialsecurity.gov. Question: Can I apply online for retirement benefits? Answer: Yes. It’s quick and easy. Apply online and save yourself a trip to the office. Once you submit your online application electronically, in most cases, you’re done. There are no forms to sign or documents to send in. If we do need more information to process your application, a representative will contact you. For more information about applying online, visit our website at www.socialsecurity.gov or call us toll-free at 1-800-7721213 (TTY1-800-325-0778). Question: If both my spouse and I are entitled to Social Security benefits, is there any reduction in our payments because we are married? Answer: No. We independently calculate each spouse’s Social Security benefit amount. Each spouse receives a monthly benefit amount based on his or her own earnings. Couples are not penalized simply because they are married. If one member of the couple earned low wages or did not earn enough Social Security credits to be eligible for retirement benefits, he or she may be eligible to receive benefits as a spouse. Lisa Turturro is the public affairs specialist in Lakeland for Social Security. SENIORSCENE Social Security questions and answers

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Page 10BNews-SunSunday, November 13, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sun t hat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSun at 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to c ome worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Thursday. For information contact (239 0390. Pastor Travis Vanderford. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult B ible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site, www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, senior pastor; Scott King, interim youth minister; Joy Loomis, music director; and Rev. Johnattan Soltero, Primera Mision Bautista pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:45 a.m. Morning Worship; 10:45 a.m. Childrens Church; 6 p.m. Evening Service. Nursery provided for Sunday morning service. Regular Wednesday schedule: 6 p.m. Prayer Meeting; 6 p.m. childrens choirs; 6 p.m. youth activities; 6:30 p.m. Adult Choir Rehearsal; 7 p.m. Mission Programs. Call 453-6681 for details. Spanish Sunday services: 9:30 a.m. Sunday school; 11 a.m. Sunday worship; 7 p.m. eevening worship. Spanish Wednesday Service: 7 p.m. Bible study. Spanish Friday Meeting: 7 p.m. Family Night Visitation. In the heart of Avon Park. For the hearts of Avon Park. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midw ay between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863 www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and womens prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, associate pastor, minister of youth and activities; and Rev. Nuno Norberto, associate pastor, minister of music and senior adults. Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.; Blended Service, 10:30 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 3850752. Spring Lake Baptist Church, Where the Bible is Always Open. Pastor Richard Schermerhorn 7408 Valencia Road; 655-2610. The Rev. Ronald Smith, assistant pastor, 386-1610. On U.S. 98 at the Spring Lake Village II entrance. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. for all ages; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Mid-week Bible Study and Prayer Service, 6:30 p.m. Nursery available for all services. Sunridge Baptist Church, ( SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695 CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049; fax, 385-5169; email, office@stcathe.com ; website, www.stcathe.com Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F., frjose@stcathe.com; Parochial Vicar, Rev. Victor Caviedes, 3853993; Assisting Priest (retired Rev. J. Peter Sheehan; Decons, Rev. Mr. James R. McGarry and Rev. Mr. Max M. Severe. Parish office hours, 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. Masses Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon MondayFriday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Weekend Masses 4 and 5 p.m. Saturday, 5 p.m. Saturday Spanish Mass (Holy Family Youth Center), 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday, noon Sunday Sunday Mass; 5 p.m. Sunday English Family Mass (Holy Family Youth Center). Confession: every Saturday 3-3:45 p.m. or first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment with any priest. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31 Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way,Truth and Life! Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Changing Seasons, a mens grief support group, meets at 1 p.m. Wednesdays. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets at 1 p.m. Thursdays. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863 W eb at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church. Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL33870. Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m. Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Christ, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, FL 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts. Sunday Worship Services, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available at every service. Bible Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered classes for all ages. Church phone: 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. We would like to extend an invitation for you and your family to visit with us here at Sebring Parkway. Our hours of service are: Sunday Bible Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazarene of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W. Main St. Randall Rupert, Pastor. Sunday: Sunday school begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning worship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening service at 6 p.m. Wednesday evening service is at 7 p.m. with special services for children and adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) and Ladies ministries. If you need any more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazarene of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852. Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children and youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christian Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17A North (truck routeAvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as the answer for time and eternity. Sunday morning worship service, 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided. Junior Church activities at same time for K-6 grade. Sunday School Bible hour (all ages (Transportation available.) Sunday evening praise and worship service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and youth activities at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Everyone is welcome, please come worship with us. Don Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phone 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP Recycling a ton of wastehas twice the eco-n omic impact of burying it in the ground. In addition, recycling one additional ton of waste will pay $101 more in salaries and wages, pro-d uce $275 more in goods and services, and generate $135 more in sales than disposing of it in a landfill. From Recycling: G ood for the Economy, Good for the Environment. Tuesday is America Recycles Day. Celebrate thisy ear by helping the earth and make it a good habit to recycle. Studies have shown that6 0-75 percent of the garbage dumped in landfills can be recycled. Another great rea-s on to recycle is to save some trees; each ton of p aper that is recycled saves about 17 trees! Or how about recycling to reduce the car-b on footprint? Did you know that by recycling used alum inum cans and paper you are drastically reducing the amount of CO2 released into our atmosphere? Mankind has been recyc ling since the beginning of time. Before the age of technology andi ndustry, there simply werent a lot of materials around for many things. Early man reused most oft heir household waste since they had no way of renewing their supplies. Metal was often meltedd own and reused for other purposes. Bricks were made from dust and ashes. Rags were stitched together tom ake garments. As the world matured and technology and industryb ecame common place, the throw-away concept started to take form in everydayl ife. Often, it is actually cheaper to buy something n ew than to get a broken item fixed. And just about everybody has at least onec omputer and cell phone these days. T he demand for newer, more superior technology becomes commonplace and the pace of purchasing these devices has become phenom-e nal. Unfortunately, Mother Earth is paying a dear price for thisw ay of life and the landfills are rapidly filling up with broken, obsolete and unwanted items. F ortunately, it has become very easy to recycle just about anything these days. Electronic equip-m ent such as computers, cell phones and most anything else technological, is fairly easy to dispose of. Manyc ompanies offer incentives for bringing in your old, unwanted equipment.S chools generally have recycling programs that assist in funding their programs.S tores offer free drop off areas where these types of p roducts can be disposed of. Most any town or city offers some sort of recy-c ling. Many areas have curbside pick up. Or you may h ave to take the extra step and take your recycling to a bin at a nearby drop-off point. Either way, it only takes a few extra minutes ofy our time and just think of how much good it is doing. Paper, cardboard, plastic,a luminum and glass are recyclable. Just about anything you use can either be recycled or reused. You can even reuse your organicw aste for compost! Recycling is simply taking what would normally be considered waste and making something useful out ofi t. Manufacturing raw materials into new products via recycling is a win-win. Recyclables are sent to a materials recovery facility,s orted, and manufactured into a marketable commodity. C ommon household items that contain recycled materials include many paper prod-u cts such as newspapers and paper towels. Other things t hat we use daily that are made from recycled materials include aluminum andp lastic containers. Even glass is reused in asphalt u sed for paving roads. Some materials are also used to manufacture carpet, benches and even bridges. Most stores offer a variety o f recycled products. By purchasing these items, you a re closing the loop in the recycling process. If more p eople buy recycled items, the demand increases thereby encouraging companies tom ake more materials out of recycled items. To waste, to destroy our natural resources, to skin and exhaust the land instead of using it so as to increase its usefulness, will result inu ndermining in the days of our children the very prosp erity which we ought by right to hand down to them a mplified and developed. Theodore Roosevelt C orine Burgess is and Environmental Specialist for the H ighlands County Parks and N atural Resources Department ( www.highlandsswcd.org). Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the News-Sun. Tuesday is America Recycles Day Courtesy photo Nov. 15 is America Recycles Day. Each ton of paper that is r ecycled saves about 17 trees and recycling is a great way to reduce the carbon footprint. Justin Burgess contributes t o the cause and gives a thumbs up for recycling. N ews From T he W atershed C orine Burgess

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www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, November 13, 2011Page 11B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the Redeemer .Service time is 9:30 with Holy Communion. Coffee hour following services. Newcomers welcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mailr edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: redeemeravon.com The church is at 839 Howes Way,Avon Park (two miles north of Sun N Lake Boulevard, across from Wells Dodge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday Services: Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek service on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always welcome. The Rev. Jim Kurtz, rector. Church office 3857649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL33852. Phone: 4650051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Nelson, Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with Healing Service, 6 p.m. Child care available at the 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come see what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 Thunderbird Road, (863 0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday services at 7 p.m. We offer Kid City Childrens Ministry throughout all services, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married couples, prime-timers, and Bible studies in Spanish. Kid City Day Care, Preschool and After-School Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For registration call: 385-3111). Check us out on the Web at www.sebringgrace.org INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration Ministries, (non-denominational 2200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533771. Sunday service: Sunday School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church (ELCA 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen, Deacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, third and fifth Sunday each month, and Rev. Jefferson Cox on the second and fourth Sunday of each month. Jim Helwig, organist/choir director. Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee hour on the first and third Sunday of each month. Council meeting on the first Monday of month; Ladies Group WELCAmeets at noon second Monday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable Garden Club meets as needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden open seven days a week to congretation and community. Like to sing? Come join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park LCMS, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or see christlutheranavonpark.org Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Rev. Gary Kindle, pastor.Traditional Worship service, 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday Praise Worship Service, 10:30 a.m. Communion is served the first, third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday school and Bible classes: 9:15 a.m. Sunday. Worship service is broadcast at 8 a.m. on WITS 1340 AM each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782 open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Faily of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALCAmerican Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 9 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 385-1163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Sunday service at 9:30 a.m. Sunday school will resume in the fall. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year roundfice phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots PreSchool director; and Noel Johnson, minister of youth and family life. Worship schedule after Easter through December: Worship service 9 a.m., and Education Hour, 8:45 a.m. Worship schedule for January through Easter: Worship service, 8:30 and 11 a.m., Education Hour 9:45 a.m. Traditional Service with Holy Communion each first and third Sunday. Non-Traditional Service each second, fourth and fifth Sunday. Seasonal mid-week services Wednesday evenings during Lent and Advent. Call church office for additional Worship times and special holiday services. Other activities and groups include: Choirs; Ladies Guild and LWML; Mens Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies as scheduled; Trinity Tots Pre-school, Youth Group activities (call for meeting times and dates). Visit us online at: www.Trinitylutheranlp.com NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American SignL anguage: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children ages 4 years through fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening service, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Prayer and Bible Study, 6:30 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister, lindadowning@live.com. Casey L. Downing, associate minister, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Church phone: 314-0482. Web site: www. ctm forme.com Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry. www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. The Lords Sentinel Fellowship Church 148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid (at Lake Placid Christian School), Pastor Juanita Folsom. Sunday morning service, 10:30 a.m.; Monday, Sentinel School of Theology, 7 p.m.; Church service, Tuesday, 7 p.m. More information at www.juanitafolsom ministries.com. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 8:45 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. in the Millennium Church. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer a Saturday service at 6 p.m. with Pastor Tiger Gullett in the Millennium Church. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org All teachings are taken from the Manufacturers Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathersf or contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com Web site: www.TheWayChurch.org P RESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Sunday morn-i ng worship: Informal service, 8 a.m.; traditional service, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday school, 9:15 a.m.; evening service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Childrens/Youth Group, 5:30-7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net ; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-12:30 a.m. Monday-Friday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Grief Support Group, 1 p.m.; Youth Group (middle and high school 3:30-6:30 p.m.; Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; Choir Rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available during worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com, 118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8-9:30 a.m. in the sanctuary; contemporary worship is at 11 a.m. Sunday school classes for adults is at 9:15 and 10:45 a.m. and for all ages, adults and children, at 9:45 a.m. in the educational building. Wednesday: 6:45 p.m., youth group (middle and high school), and nursery and childrens ministry; 7 p.m., adult small group Bible studies. Children/youth music ministry (Thursday 3-5 chimes, 2:30 p.m.; grades 3-5 choir, 3:15 p.m.; grades 6-12 handbells, 3:15 p.m. Bible Counseling available by appointment, 6990132. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Childrens Church offeredd uring the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail, springlakepc@embarqmail.com, Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com, Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863 Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL33870. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC a t 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays with Rick Heilig, youth director. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church, 200 South Lake Avenue, Avon Park, FL33825. (863 James Weiss, Pastor, Sunday School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Prayer Shawl Ministry on the second and fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m. for women who love God and crocheting. Visit us at our church Web site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodist Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pastor. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral assistant. Sunday schedule: Heritage Worship Service, 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worship service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning. Middle School Youth, 4 p.m.; High School Youth, 5:30 p.m. We offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth prog rams, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship. Church office, 465-2422 or www.memorialumc.com. Lakeview Christian School, VPK to grade 5; 465-0313. St. John United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL33872. The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Adult Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all services. Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodist Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98The Rev. Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church office phone: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church of Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, FL 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 27 and Hammock Road). Sunday worship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion with worship first Sunday of month; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. all other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For more information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@earth link.net or check theWeb site sebringemmanuelucc.com. No matter who you are or where you are on lifes journey, youre welcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP I became an Ultimate Fighting Championship fan when I had the privilege of meeting a fighter named Brian Stann during the 2011M arine Corps Marathon weekend in Washington. Unlike many professional athletes who revel in gargantuan paychecks and beingd ubbed warriors by television announcers, Stann is the real deal. From his days as a child in the hard-working city of Scranton, Pa., thisc ombat veteran has earned everything he has, including a Silver Star from President George W.Bush. During a hellish week of fighting in early May 2005,C apt. Brian Stann, then a second lieutenant, spent seve ral days battling terrorists while trying to seize a critically important bridge withf ellow U.S. Marines near Karabilah, Iraq. At one point, the enemy massed on his platoon and fired over 30 rocket propelled grenades, machineg uns, detonated two improvised explosive devices and attacked the unit with three suicide vehicle borne improvised explosive devices,S tanns Silver Star citation reads. The incredible story doest end there. Inspired by his leadership a nd endurance, 2nd Lt. Stanns platoon held the battle position on the Euphrates River for six days, protecting the Task Force flank andi solating foreign fighters and insurgents north of the river, the citation continues. Since receiving the prestigious military award, Stann, 31, has displayed a genuineb rand of humility thats mostly absent from my gene ration. I just wanted the award that said 42 out of 42 menc ame home safely, the Marine veteran said on his w ebsite. We all came home, so mission accomplished. Two of Stanns best friends at the U.S. Naval Academy, Marine 1st Lt. T ravis Manion, 26, and Navy SEALLt. Brendan Looney, 29, did not come home safely from final deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan, respectively. Losing twob uddies, as well as several other friends killed in comb at, weighs heavily on the shoulders of this fierce competitor. I had some great times with Brendan and Travis, S tann told me at the Marine Corps Marathon Health and Fitness Expo, where he was promoting the honorable m issions of Hire Heroes USAand the Travis Manion Foundation. Stann, who wrote a book called Heart for the Fight,r evealed his warrior spirit while speaking at the Team Travis and Brendan premarathon dinner. The event honored the fallen and ral-l ied a team of almost 250 runners before the Oct. 30 race. e need men like Brendan and Travis moret han ever, Stann told a packed ballroom in Arlington, Va. Two things struck me about the warriors remarks. First, he didnt say a worda bout himself. Second, he didnt just memorialize his f riends; he challenged a room full of service members, veterans, military fami-l ies, and civilians to honor their sacrifices. Its like the scene in Saving Private Ryan, the Marine said. We need to earn it. A s Stann spoke, several families of fallen heroes, including a Gold Star father and sister sitting at my table, jumped up to applaud. V ery few of us have fought to take a bridge, charged toward the enemy or saved a childs life by disabling a roadside bomb. Buti n order to earn our freedom, Stann doesnt think all of us have to go to Afghanistan or Iraq. Instead, we can start by taking small steps to changeo ur lives. e need to remember that we have families and we have these experiences because of men like Brendan and Travis, Stann said. Sow e have to reflect upon and ask ourselves: Would these r elationships make men like Brendan and Travis proud? Would we be earning it? O n a frigid Sunday morning, 21,250 Marine Corps M arathon participants, including hundreds of wounded veterans, took those steps as the sun rose a bove the Iwo Jima Memorial. First Lt. Travis Manion and Lt. (SEAL Brendan Looney would hav e b een proud, especially as their loved ones crossed the finish line. Are we earning the e xtraordinary freedoms given to us by valiant Americans who fought for our country? As our brothe rs a nd sisters continue to be killed, wounded, and emotionally devastated on post-9 /11 battlefields, its a quest ion we are compelled to ask ourselves. I am proud to be Brian Stanns newest fan. Now, it t ime to embrace his challenge. To find out more about Tom Sileo or to read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com. A warriors message: earn the sacrifices made by others

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Page 12BNews-SunSunday, November 13, 2011www.newssun.com CHICANES; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, bistro; 0 0 0 1 3 8 8 0 Veranda Breeze; 11.25"; 10.5"; Process color; -; 0 0 0 1 3 9 8 3 Special to the News-SunAVON PARK —Five new trustees, including two South Florida Community College alumni, and one reappointment have been approved by Gov. Rick Scott to join the SFCC District Board of Trustees. New members of the Board of Trustees will be Derren Bryan and Kenneth Lambert, representing Hardee County; and Lana Puckorius, Kris Rider, and Joe Wright, representing Highlands County. Tami Cullens, who has represented Highlands County on the board since 2006, was reappointed by the governor upon expiration of her term. Cullens and the new trustees j oin Timothy Backer, chair, who has represented DeSoto County since 2009, and Dr. Louis Kirschner, who has represented DeSoto County since 1999. “We’re pleased to welcome the new members of the board,” Backer said. “They’re going to be a good fit. I’ve had a chance to speak with many of them. Ken Lambert graduated from SFCC and is very proud of the college and the direction it’s taken. Kris Ryder is a recent graduate of SFCC. She decided to get her degree after her kids went to college. Because of the economy, the governor has encouraged these board members to ask a lot of questions and to watch the budget.” The SFCC District Board of Trustees’next meeting is Dec. 7. Dr. Norm Stephens, SFCC president, indicated that the timing is ideal for the new board members. “The college’s annual planning meeting is held in December and that is when the board reviews the mission and strategic plan. During the workshop, the board establishes priorities for the coming year which drives our internal planning and budget development for the next fiscal year.” The trustees will be involved in many positive changes at the college over the next several years. “The new baccalaureate degree program is a significant milestone for the college, and we’re excited about new technical programs including the biofuels education initiative,” said Dr. Stephens. “Our Guide to Personal Success (GPS) first-year experience initiative will unfold over the next five years, benefitting of our incoming students. Our board members will help shape all of these efforts.” Puckorius, who has served as a member of the SFCC Foundation Board, looks forward to further involvement with the college. “I can’t think of anything better than to be a trustee, using my experience and knowledge for the good of the college.” Cullens will now become a senior member of the SFCC District Board of Trustees and brings with her leadership and history. “The most rewarding part is handing diplomas to the students during graduation,” she said. “They’re smiling from ear to ear, and you know that education opens up a whole new world for them. Many of the students are the first family members in college. You know that SFCC provides another step for them in improving their lives.” Cullens takes her work on the SFCC Board of Trustees to heart. “Years ago, my grandfather donated the property on which the Highlands Campus is located. In his mind, it was going to be a small college. I’ve had a chance to see the college grow. Now we’re able to offer a four-year degree. To be a part of that process is warming to me.” “I would like to thank the board members who served the college with such dedication over the last 10 years and more,” said Dr. Stephens. “In that time, the college has undergone a transformation, and the board deserves much credit for providing the leadership and guidance for all the accomplishments.” “We’re looking forward to working with the new members of the board. I’ll meet with each of them over the next several weeks to provide information about the college and their responsibilities. I’ve had a chance to talk each of the new members and I found them to be very interested in the college and interested in participating as part of the ... Board of Trustees.” South Florida Community College welcomes 5 new trustees to its board CHALKTALK Stephens

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Breakfasts and lunches being served in the Highlands County School District for the upcoming week of Oct. 14-18 include: HIGH SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast „ French toast sticks, sausage patty, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, fruit cocktail cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Lunch „ Spaghetti, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, chicken patty on bun, pizza, tacos, taco toppers, salsa, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked french fries, corn cobbettes, mixed vegetables, Colby Jack cheese stick, glazed berries and cherries, diced pears, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Tuesday Breakfast „ Chicken biscuit, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, applesauce, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Lunch „ Homestyle turkey roast, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, turkey Cobb salad meal, mashed potatoes, brown gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, dried blueberries, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Wednesday Breakfast „ Breakfast pizza, hash brown patty, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Lunch „ Pressed Cuban sandwich, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, pizza, tacos, taco toppers, salsa, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, tossed salad, carrots and dip, Smart cookies, fruit cocktail cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Thursday Breakfast „ Breakfast frittata, hash brown patty, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, diced peaches, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Lunch „ Taco salad, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, grilled chicken salad meal, baked beans, cheddar cheese stick, strawberry applesauce, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Friday Breakfast „ Sausage biscuit, assorted cereal, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, milk. Lunch „ Asian chicken nuggets, dinner roll, pizza, chicken patty on bun, PBJ sandwich meal, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, chef salad meal, baked french fries, corn, carrots and dip, string cheese, chocolate chip cookie, diced peaches, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. ACADEMY SCHOOLS Monday Lunch „ Spaghetti, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, corn cobbettes, mixed vegetables, glazed berries and cherries, assorted juice, milk. Tuesday Lunch „ Homestyle turkey roast, dinner roll, mashed potatoes, brown gravy, green beans, dried blueberries, assorted juice, milk. Wednesday Lunch „ Pressed Cuban sandwich, baked buffalo chips, carrots and dip, Smart cookies, assorted juice, milk. Thursday Lunch „ Taco salad, salsa, yellow rice, strawberry applesauce, cut fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Friday Lunch „ Asian chicken nuggets, dinner roll, Sun Chips, carrots and dip, chocolate chip cookie, diced peaches, assorted juice, milk. MIDDLE SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast „ French toast sticks, sausage patty, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, fruit cocktail cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, milk. Lunch „ Spaghetti, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, chicken patty on bun, tacos, taco toppers, salsa, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, corn cobbettes, mixed vegetables, Colby Jack cheese stick, glazed berries and cherries, diced pears, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Tuesday Breakfast „ Chicken biscuit, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, applesauce, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, milk. Lunch „ Homestyle turkey roast, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, turkey Cobb salad meal, mashed potatoes, brown gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, dried blueberries, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Wednesday Breakfast „ Breakfast pizza, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Breakfast pizza, assorted juice, milk. Lunch „ Pressed Cuban sandwich, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, tacos, taco toppers, salsa, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, tossed salad, carrots and dip, Smart cookies, fruit cocktail cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Thursday Breakfast „ Breakfast frittata, hash brown patty, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, diced peaches, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, milk. Lunch „ Taco salad, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, grilled chicken salad meal, baked beans, cheddar cheese stick, strawberry applesauce, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Friday Breakfast „ Sausage biscuit, assorted cereal, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, milk. Lunch „ Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, chicken tenders, dinner roll, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, chef salad meal, PBJ sandwich meal, corn, carrots and dip, string cheese, chocolate chip cookie, diced peaches, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast „ French toast sticks, sausage patty, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Maple waffle stick, string cheese, orange juice, chocolate milk. Lunch „ Chicken nuggets, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green peas, strawberry applesauce, very berry juice bar, assorted juice, milk. Tuesday Breakfast „ Chicken biscuit, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, applesauce, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Chicken biscuit, strawberry cup, chocolate milk, white milk, very berry bread, apple juice. Lunch „ Spaghetti, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, green beans, Smart cookies, cut fresh fruit, very berry juice bar, assorted juice, milk. Wednesday Breakfast „ Breakfast pizza, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Very berry bread, apple juice, chocolate milk, white milk, chicken biscuit, strawberry cup. Lunch „ Homestyle turkey roast, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, mashed potatoes, brown gravy, broccoli, fruited Jell-O, very berry juice bar, juice, milk. Thursday Breakfast „ Breakfast frittata, hash brown patty, assorted cereal, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Breakfast burrito, orange juice, chocolate milk, white milk, cinnamon oatmeal, Ultimate Breakfast Round, fresh apple slices. Lunch „ Tacos, taco toppers,salsa, yellow rice, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, corn, refried beans, fruit cocktail cup, very berry juice bar, assorted juice, milk. Friday Breakfast „ Sausage biscuit, assorted cereal, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Cinnamon oatmeal, Ultimate Breakfast Round, fresh apple slices, chocolate milk, white milk, breakfast burrito, orange juice. Lunch „ Pizza, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, carrots and dip, chocolate chip cookie, diced peaches, very berry juice bar, assorted juice, milk. KLC Monday Lunch „ Chicken nuggets, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green peas, strawberry applesauce, milk. Tuesday Lunch „ Spaghetti, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, green beans, Smart cookies, cut fresh fruit, milk. Wednesday Lunch „ Homestyle turkey roast, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, mashed potatoes, brown gravy, broccoli, fruited Jell-O, milk. Thursday Lunch „ Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, corn, fruit cocktail cup, milk. Friday Lunch „ Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, carrots and dip, chocolate chip cookie, diced peaches, milk. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, November 13, 2011Page 13B HIGHLANDS LITTLE THEATRE PP; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; 11/02, 11/06, 11/09, 11/13; 0 0 0 1 3 4 6 2 CHALKTALK School Menus Special to the News-Sun AVON PARK —South Florida Community College has passed another milestone in the process of reaffirmation of accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) Commission on Colleges (COC). Ateam of nine educators, representing colleges from the southeastern United States, were led by Dr. Kathleen M. Hudson, dean, Division of Health and Life Science, Piedmont Virginia Community College, and Dr. Mark Smith, vice president, COC, to conduct the on-site SACS visitation. The SACS committee visited SFCC’s campuses Nov. 7-10 for the college’s assessment, poured over the college’s documentation and records, and on the final day, conducted an exit interview with Dr. Norm Stephens, SFCC president, and college administrative staff. During the exit interview, Dr. Hudson delivered the news that both the off-site and on-site SACS committees had found no recommendations in compliance and that all SACS standards were met. “You are to be commended for the fantastic job that you do day in and day out,” she said. After the meeting, Dr. Stephens said, “It was a very special moment. I wish everyone, faculty, staff, students, and the community, could have been there. In my 44-year career, I’ve never been more proud of the college where I worked or of the colleagues with whom I share each day on behalf of our students and our communities.” “This is the first visit — and I’ve been doing these for 20 years or so — I’ve left a college campus with no recommendations,” Dr. Smith said. “But I do recommend that you take time to celebrate and recognize yourselves for a quality job.” “The report was as good as it gets, zero recommendations,” said Dr. Stephens to the faculty and staff in a communication following the exit conference. “It comes with genuine affirmation from the visiting team of all that we do to serve our college district.” “What ‘no recommendations’means is that we got an A+ on our report card,” said Dr. Leana Revell, SFCC vice president for educational and student services, who led SFCC employees in the three-year preparation for the SACS off-site and on-site committee reviews. SFCC was first admitted to full accreditation as South Florida Junior College in December 1968. Official reaffirmation of the college’s accreditation comes in June, after the SACS Board of Trustees meets to review the college’s documentation and vote on reaffirmation. The reaffirmation will continue SFCC’s accreditation for 10 years, through 2022. Accreditation by the SACS COC indicates that SFCC supports a mission appropriate to higher education, demonstrates that its resources, programs, and services accomplish this mission, and maintains specified educational outcomes that are consistent with its mission. In addition to generally improving the institution, a college’s accreditation serves several other purposes. It provides the public with evidence of quality educational programs, it lets students know that SFCC’s courses will be recognized by other institutions, it ensures that SFCC’s policies and practices are consistent with other quality institutions, and it provides the accreditation required for federally funded programs, such as financial aid. SFCC sails through reaffirmation of accreditation Courtesy photo Students in Andrea Bruzas Intellectually Disabled class at Woodlawn Elementary School participated in the Special STARS event on Friday, Nov. 4 at the Highlands County Convention Center. There were more than 150 students participating in track and field events.Ribbons w ere awarded for best times and also for best throw in the tennis ball throw. Woodlawns STARS The Panther Network is made possible by the combined efforts of Comcast Cablevision and South Florida Community College and may be viewed exclusively on Comcast Cable Channel 6. W ednesday2-2:30 p.m. NASA Connect 13 2:30-3 p.m. NASA Connect 14 3-3:30 p.m. NASA Connect 15 3:30-4 p.m. NASA Connect 16 4-4:30 p.m. NASA Connect 17 4:30-5 p.m. NASA Connect 18Thursday2-2:30 p.m. NASA Connect 19 2:30-3 p.m. NASA Connect 20 3-3:30 p.m. NASA Connect 21 3:30-4 p.m. NASA Destination Tomorrow 22 4-4:30 p.m. NASA Destination Tomorrow 23 4:30-5 p.m. NASA Destination Tomorrow 24 Panther Network

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Sept. 7Department of Housing & Urban Development to Loancare, L31 Blk 29 Lake Haven Est. Sec. 2, $0. Loancare to Secretary of H ousing & Urban D evelopment, L31 Blk 29 L ake Haven Est. Sec. 2, $0. Clarissa T. Dufour to C larissa T. Dufour, PTSec. 4-35-29, $100. Clarissa T. Dufour to Clarissa T.Dufour, PTL9/10 Blk 1 Lake June Shores, $100. Clarissa T. Dufour to Clarissa T. Dufour, L4 Georgetown Industrial Park, $100. M idfirst Bank to Secretary of Veterans Affairs, L33 BlkE Spring Lake Sec. 1, $100. Residential Investments t o Aaron T. Peavy, Parcel 30 I n Sec. 12-383 0/Easements, $25,100. Eileen Vassallo Melvin to Federal National Mortgage Association, L4 PTL3 Blk1 10 Lakeview Place, $85,600. K aren R. Titus to Jay H. Titus, Week 1 Unit 1DL inkside Villas Resort Condo, $100. Rita C. Fallamal to Randall Jackson, L31 Blk 10 V enetian Village Revised, $ 68,000. D aniel G. Clark Sr. to Woodrow Kirk, Tract 8 In Sec. 18-36-30/Easement, $40,000. Jaime O. Nino to James R Steckley, L108 Sylvan S hores Est. Sec., $118,000. Joseph L. Demske to Joseph L. Demske, L90A Vantage Pointe Phase II, $100. Herbert B. Heyne to M artha A. Layne, Unit 1456 P inecrest Villas, $85,000.Sept. 8D enise M. Valentine to P amela A. Kirouac, L11 Blk 1 1 Orange Blossom Est. Unit 7, $130,000. Edward B. Robbins to Aaron T. Peavy, Tract 5 Blk 21 River Ridge Ranches Unrec, $33,000. J ohn D. Martin to Cynthia Carmona, L18/19 Town & Country Mobile Est., $25,000. Joshua L. Porter to Zachary Lehman, L34 Blk 56 Sebring Country Est. Sec. 3, $66,000. TD Bank to Aliventures, L11 Blk 12 Orange Blossom Est. Unit 3, $1,000. Susan Barnwell Hahn to Generation Mortgage Co., L5625/5626/5652-5654 Avon Park Lakes Unit 18, $67,900. TD Bank to Aliventures, L29/30 Blk 35 Sebring Lakes Unit 2C, $4,400. TD Bank to Frederick A. Bowen, L24 PTL25 Blk 25 Placid Lakes Sec. 2, $116,600. Scot A. Katona to Tina D. Hall, L15-20 Blk 85 Town of Harding, $100. Tina D. Hall to Scot A. Katona, L18 Blk 9 Town Harding Sec. 2, $100. 809 Lake Jackson to Muhammad Sajid Ansari, Unit 217 Majestic Cove Condo, $492,900. Harry D. Eva to H. Elton Lowe, L6 Blk 7 Golfview Est., $52,500. Jean W. Moyer to Pamela J. Hart, L28/29 Blk 626 Sun'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 13, $208,900. Claude R. Forbes to Lamar Reed Forbes, L17 Blk 17 Oak Beach Colony 1st Add, $100. Donnie J. Reeves to Robert Hartt Barben Jr., L3 PTL4 Blk 2 Lotela Gardens Replat, $192,000. Noel S. Durrance to Lavada M. Massaline, L13 Blk 4 Altamont Place Add 2, $34,000. Joseph F. Cicero to Winston H. Smith, L6 Cindys Groves Sub Unit 6, $43,000. Larry E. Foster to Kathleen L. White, L7 PTL6 Blk 180 Woodlawn Terrace Sub, $100. Kathleen L. White to Julio Roman, L7 PTL6 Blk 180 Woodlawn Terrace Sub, $45,000. FM 611 Ltd. to Kenneth E. Ferrand, L7 Blk 78 Town of Sebring 8th Add, $18,500.Sept. 9Salvatore J. DeSalva to Stephanie Frances DeSalva, Week 45 Parcel 6 Harder Hall Resort Club Lakeside I, $100. Highlands County to Jorge L. Lopez Velez, L8 Masons Ridge, $0. H ighlands County Habitat f or Humanity to Jorge L. L opez Velez, L8 Masons Ridge, $95,000. Calvin Carter to Theresa A. Carter, L18 Blk AMarsh Sub, $100. Calvin Carter to Theresa A. Carter, L19/20 Marsh Sub, $100. R onald Roppoccio to B LPW Roppe Inc., L 2615/2616 Avon Park Lakes Unit 9, $100. TD Bank to Aliventures, L45-48 Blk 19 SebringL akes Unit 2-C, $2,000. Northern Maine D evelopment Commission Inc. to H. WilliamW instanley, L16/17 Blk 13 Highlands Park Est. Sec. J, $2,500. Phyllis P. Smith to Carl S. S mith, L34 Brunners Mobile Est., $25,000. L atchmin Singh to Mahadai Singh, L86/87L akeside Heights, $100. Charles Daniel Johnson Jr. to Austin Fleming Maddox, L27/28 Blk 176-C Woodlawn Terrace, $100. H azel Korzep to CWF E nterprises Inc., PTSec. 935-29, $212,000. Richard A. Fry to Deborah K. Summers, L15 Blk 4 Orange Blossom Est. Unit 6/Other, $137,000. Theresa A. Carter to C alvin Carter, L21 Blk A Marsh Sub, $100. Charles Daniel Johnson Jr. to Austin F. Maddox, L4 Blk 176B WoodlawnT errace, $74,500. M anuel Rodriguez to G enevieve Gutierrez, L11 Blk 47 Sebring Country Est. Sec. 2, $58,500. Isaac Palmer to Promisor Relocation, L50 Blk 344 Sun'N Lake Est. SebringU nit 16, $189,000. Promisor Relocation to Jeremy Engler, L50 Blk 344 Sun'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 16, $189,000. Cathy L. Bays to Federal National Mortgage Assn.,L 44 Blk 114 Placid Lakes Sec. 16, $100. Carmen Santiago to Zulemmy J. Ruiz, L15 Blk 22 Sebring Country Est., $100. Carmen Santiago to Zulemmy J. Ruiz, L8 Blk 9 Sebring Hills South, $100.Sept. 12Dennis Pennachio to Michael J. Ambrose, L8 Blk 61 Placid Lakes Sec. 6, $2,500. Dennis Pennachio to Michael J. Ambrose, L20 Blk 61 Placid Lakes Sec. 6, $2,500. Dennis Pennachio to Michael J. Ambrose, L8 Blk 72 Placid Lakes Sec. 7, $15,000. Uriah Mais to Uriah Mais, L1 Holiday Acres, $100. David L. Harrison II to Charles H. Lindsay Jr., PT Tract 11 Lake Apthorpe Country Est./Easement, $30,000. FNMAto J. Mitchell Medford, ABlk G Tulane Sub, $27,500. William T. Duncan to William T. Duncan, Unit 13 Dockside of Sun'N Lakes/Other, $100. Todd A. Hoyt to Marion A. Stoerker, L14 Lakefront Court Sub, $162,000. Maria Vega to Angel Vega, L8 Lake Anoka Mobile Est., $100. Karylis Martinez Cruz to Ramon Martinez Perez, Unit 17/18 Blk 5 APLRed Hill Farms Add Unit L, $100. Tessie O. Mottaz to Abderrahim McHatet, L23 Blk 87 Leisure Lakes Sec. 6, $2,500. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Alfredo A. Perez, L11 Blk 26 Sun'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 2, $53,500. Melvin Ferrell Williams to Jennifer Buckalew, PTL1 Blk 11 Red Hill Farms, $100. Mary P. Soules to Mark M asterson, L205 Blk 3 L eisure Lakes Sec. 4A, $ 140,000. R.F. Ford to Ralph F. Ford, L17 Blk 6 Orange Blossom Est. Unit 7, $100. Retta A. Gray to Retta A. Gray, L9 Blk 2 Mary Jane Manor, $100. Robert J. Coon to Craig Otte, Week 36 Parcel 18 Harder Hall Resort Club Lakeside II, $3. J ames C. Clinard to N orma Jean Warner, L44 W atersedge, $147,900. L eisure Lakes Development Inc. to Hazel R hona Chang, L4 Blk 102 Leisure Lakes Sec. 8, $36,900. Hollywood Faith Christian C hurch Inc. to John C. Hanlon Jr., L8 Lorida Acres, $ 4,500. Emilio Escamilla Jr. to A lvin L. Smith, Unit 1206 Bldg. A-1 Golden Age Villas, $22,000. Dale Hall to Justina Hightower, L19 Blk 40S ebring Country Est. Sec. 2, $ 83,000. Edith McLin-Ryan to Edith J. McLin-Ryan, L6 Blk 17S ebring Country Est. Sec. 1, $100. H elen McKibben to Georgia Cartwright, L6 PTL 5 Blk 3 Forest Hill, $70,000. J.E. Futch Custom Homes Inc. to David M.B oudia, L10 Country Club S ebring Phase 2 Sec. 2 Sterling Oaks, $254,000. Tamaney K. Murphy to Vernon E. Murphy, L78/79 Prairie Oaks Phase 1 Replat, $100. T amaney K. Murphy to V ernon E. Murphy, Unit A Building 3 Country Club Downs, $100. Roy C. Hutchison to Deborah D. Casebier, L15B lk 9 Sebring Ridge Sec. G, $ 100.Sept. 13Jeri Canale to Jeri Canale, L35 Blk 261 Sun'NL ake Est. Sebring Unit 13, $0. John Bracht to Darlene Celentano, L2 Blk D Clearview Terrace Sub/Corrective, $0. Jane C. Smith to Jane C. S mith, L20/21 Blk 502 Sebring Manor Sub, $100. Jack B. Donaldson to Jackie B. Donaldson, Unit 115 Building 4 Golf Village Condo, $100. TD Bank to Frederick A. Bowen, L4 Blk D Serenity Sub, $4,700. Jason E. Dunford to Mico S. Djokic, Unit 8 Granada Villas II Condo/Corrective, $0. Mico S. Djokic to MIco D. Djokic, Unit 8 Granada Villas II Condo, $0. Miko S. Djokic to Gilbert Baligad, Unit 8 Granada Villas II Condo, $37,000. Theodora D. Gunn to Allen V. Whitaker, L3 Blk G Tomoka Heights Sec. IX, $35,000. Mildred Crawford to Brian Yacobini, L26 Blk 1 Highlands Park Est. Sec. D, $15,000. Lori McKenna to William Lee McKenna, L540 Sylvan Shores Est. Sec. D, $0. Leo L. Promey to Daryl L. Promey, L15/16 Blk B Cherokee Heights, $30,000. Keith D. Ickes to Keith D. Ickes, L18 Blk 19 Leisure Lakes Sec. 1, $100. S tephen Ford to Joan E. F ord, L7 PTL6 Blk 4 Erin P ark, $100.Sept. 14Jose Sifuentes to Romina Pizzuti, L33 Blk 7 Orange Blossom Acres Est. Unit 6, $ 100. A lvin J. Creech to Beverly H aynes, L13-15 Raab & Winters Sub, $100. Heartland National Bank to Joan A. Cornejo, PTL11 Blk 354 Sun'N Lake Est. Unit 16, $107,000. Norman R. Jensen to Karen J. Howard, L9 PTL8B lk 242 Sebring Heights S ub, $10. T D Bank to Lotsource Inc., L17 Blk 208 Leisure Lakes Sec. 3, $2,100. Ronald H. Quade to Carol Y Quade, L143 Golf Hammock Unit 3, $100. M iguel Garciga to Santos Lopez, L8 Blk 56 Town ofA von Park, $100. Marion J. Reck to Russell T. Reck, L32 Blk ATomoka Heights Sec. 1, $100. C armen L. Roig to Magalis Aguilera, L2 Blk 173 S un'N Lakes Est., $100. D. Alan Grigsby to G rigsby Properties, PTSec. 2-37-29, $84,000. Magalis Aguilera to Magalis Aguilera, L2 Blk 173 Sun'N Lakes Est., $100. V eronica Symonds to R ichard E. Young, L618 Sebring Hills, $69,500. Mary E. Warshel to Mary E. Warshel, L6 Blk 2 Lake Grassy Homesites, $100. Olga Velez to Gladys Fuentes, L8 Blk 244 Sun'NL ake Est. Sec. 18, $0. Larry C. Musgrave to Patricia C. Grimsley, L19 Blk 72 Placid Lakes Sec. 7, $240,000. Patricia C. Grimsley to Larry C. Musgrave, PTL16 Blk 56 Placid Lakes Sec. 6, $465,000. Highlands Independent Bank to Travis Stivender,T ract 17 Footman's Trail, $ 240,000.Sept. 15Mary Knoll to Mark L. Henson, L76/77 Blk 3 Leisure Lakes Sec. 1, $75,000. T erry M. Hancock to John L Sedlock, PTL1 Blk 32 T own of Avon Park, $175,000. Matrix Capital USAto Zachary Brown, L7 Blk 4 Highlands Park Est. Sec. D, $63,500. Juan Barajas to Juan Jose Barajas Jr., L6 PTL1/2B lk H Town of Avon Park, $ 100. S unset Property Group to Eric Smith, L10799/10800 Avon Park Lakes Unit 33, $1,500. S eminole Land Investment Trust to Eric S mith, L1 Blk 3 Sebring Villas 1st Add, $1,500. R ichard Barriault to Richard Floyd Hoffheins, L3 Blk 5 Map of Oakland, $100. William F. Boehm to O ceanic Property Rental, Week 35 Parcel 21 Harder H all Resort Club Lakeside II, $100. T D Bank to Robert I. McKenzie, L4/5 Blk 4 Highlands Park Est. Sec. R, $600. Donald B. Soldini to Angel O Roman-Centeno, L14 Blk 1 6 Placid Lakes Sec. 2, $11,900. Leisure Lakes Development Inc. to Jesus A. Gonzalez, L4 Blk 65 Leisure Lakes Sec. 12, $35,900. A von Park Estates Corp. to James T. Hall, L13/14 Blk 51 Oak Ridge Sub Sec. B, $37,500. Avon Park Estates Corp. to Troy D. Jenkins, PTL6 Blk 52 Avon Park Est. Unit II, $20,500. Lake Placid Development Corp. Inc. to Eddie Shedrick, L2 Blk 271 PlacidL akes Sec. 20/Corrective, $ 0. L ake Placid Development Corp. Inc. to Danny D. Brimmer, L19 Blk 27 Placid Lakes Sec. 3, $7,000. Lake Placid Development Corp. Inc. to Janice A. Jadusingh, L17 Blk 135 Placid Lakes Sec. 11, $12,900. Maria Cecilia Cabalo to Patricia Imfeld, PTL1 Blk2 18 Placid Lakes Sec. 20, $ 100. L ake Placid Development C orp. Inc. to Rabidatt Bhaggan, L1 Blk 28 Placid L akes Sec. 2, $34,900. Betty Simpson to Michael Simpson, L14 Blk 7 Leisure Lakes Sec. 1, $1,500. C hristopher Getz to Jessie O. Hardin, L9 Blk 1 H E Coys Sub, $12,000. Stanley A. Carr to Bobby J ean George, L23 Blk 17 Sylvan Shores Est. Sec. B, $82,000. Highlands Independent Bank to Dennis Rieken, L21B lk 262 Sun'N Lakes Est. S ec. 20, $16,000. Letsgo Land to Jonatha n Sala, L23 Blk 178 Sun'N Lake Est. Sec. 17, $5,900. F rancis R. Mercer to John R Spina, L11ABlk 253 S un'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 13 Replat, $60,000. Rhoda Straw to Timothy C. Wynn, L28 Blk1 Riverside Est. Sec. 1, $45,900. M ary E. Bond to Kenneth A. Bird, L267 Golf Hammock Unit 111-A, $227,000. Erica M. Crosson to Qiang Chen, L12298/12299 PTL12297 Avon Park Lakes Unit 39, $53,500. 8 09 Lake Jackson to Atina R eal Estate Corp., Unit 102 Majestic Cove, $570,000. Page 14BNews-SunSunday, November 13, 2011www.newssun.com C hurch Page; 5.542"; 7.1"; Black; church page dummy; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 0 0 6 6 9 9 SALVATION ARMY; 7.444"; 3.5"; Black; 11/13/11; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 9 9 6 6 3 3 DEEDTRANSFERS

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DearAbby: I’m a widow who never thought I’d consider marrying again until I met “Lester” online two years ago. Being with him makes me feel like a teenager. He holds my hand when we go for walks, brings me flowers and is a wonderful lover. My problem is he’s taking care of his sister, “Gerda,” who has cancer. He said she doesn’t want him seeing anyone until she’s dead. (He stands to inherit her fortune and doesn’t want to take a chance on losing the money.) I told him we don’t need the money, but he says he has put up with her bad moods for too long to lose it now. My friends insist that because Lester doesn’t call or email me much, Gerda is his wife, not his sister. I checked him out. Their last names are different and the house and his truck are in both their names. I’m lonely and want to be with him. I offered to help him with his sister, but he says she’s also an alcoholic and doesn’t want company. I haven’t heard from Lester since Gerda told him he can’t have a girlfriend until she’s gone. It’s been two months. Should I wait, or should I start looking elsewhere as my son suggested? — Lonley Without Him DearLonely: Listen to your son because it appears he has good common sense. As to Lester, don’t count on him because whatever Gerda is to him, it appears she has rallied and may not be going anywhere for a long, long time. P.S. Married couples these days do not always share the same last name. DearAbby: I have hosted Thanksgiving dinner for a small group of friends for the past 20 years. My brother and sister-in-law live 400 miles away and also attend. It is the only time I get to see them. Last week, I called my brother to invite him. He confirmed they would love to come and went on to say he feels the group should discuss our feelings about the presidential candidates. I pointed out that discussions about politics or religion seldom have happy endings and I prefer they be left at the front door. My brother then announced that due to my decision about inappropriate subjects of conversation, he and his wife won’t be coming! I’m shocked, hurt and angry. I can’t stop crying. I can’t sleep, and I don’t know what to do. Can you help? — Saddened Sister in California DearSister: Dry your tears and stand your ground. That your brother would attempt to hijack your Thanksgiving celebration by injecting subjects that could make any of the guests uncomfortable is extremely rude. The coming election year is one that will determine the direction of this country, and it is already becoming emotional. Your brother has made his intentions clear. Now move forward and do NOTwaffle. DearAbby: If family members provide significant services free for a wedding — officiate, conduct premarriage counseling, perform all the musical accompaniment for a long ceremony — is a wedding gift also expected to be given? This has been a family sore spot. Please help. — Wedding Are O u r Business DearW.A.O.B.: If family members are providing “significant services” for free, that IS the gift, and it is presumptuous for anyone to expect more. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, November 13, 2011Page 15B FAIRMONT CINEMA; 1.736"; 6"; Black; 11/11/11 p/u; 0 0 0 0 1 3 7 7 9 DIVERSIONS KEWPIESBy JEFFCHEN ACROSS 1 "Monty Python's Life of __" 6 It usually occurs twice a day at the shore 9 Locks in a stable 13 Condo meas. 17 Hershey's competitor 18 Corrida competitor 20 Reason for some holdups 22 Fast food item since 1971 24 GPS data connection 25 Babe's home 26 Improves in the cask 27 Hit on the head 28 Like baked dough 29 Dossier letters 30 Homes for the Skipper and Gilligan 31 Stimpy's friend 32 Duped? 35 Market report detail 40 Name for a poodle 41 Polo of "Meet the Fockers" 42 "Burnt" color 43 Rotating machine 44 Lady's employer? 45 The "Star Wars" films, e.g. 46 Duel tools 47 Burden 48 Electrician's supply 49 Dutch engineering feat 50 Hitchcock title 51 Small cleaning tool 52 Blowing in the wind, as hair 55 51-Across target 56 Cressida's love 59 Scornful expression 60 "Embraceable You" lyricist Gershwin 62 Martial arts master 63 "'Sup, seor?" 65 Seldom 69 Bien's opposite 70 Up to 71 Loser 72 Letters for Johnnie Cochran 75 Enter on tippytoe 77 NCAA Bulldog rivals 79 Money alternative? 80 RSVP part 82 Unit for a duel 83 1958 winner of nine Oscars 84 Religion that uses the pentagram 86 "And When __": Blood, Sweat & Tears hit 87 Sets a price 88 Holiday cookie bakers 89 Brown et al. 90 "Livin' La Vida __": Ricky Martin hit 91 Binds 92 "Shh" 94 Many a Punjabi 95 Media mogul Turner 96 Signaled to enter, say 97 Clio award honorees 98 Gondolier, e.g. 100 Crossword pattern 101 Box office take 103 19th Greek letter 106 Wolf, at times 108 Hawking field 111 Traps at a lodge, maybe 112 Shouldered weapons 113 Like many Poe works 114 Jab 115 "Divine Comedy" river 116 Co-producer of the U2 album "Achtung Baby" 117 Condo documents DOWN 1 Jul. 4 events 2 Beat the pants off 3 Holmes preceder? 4 Unlike this ans. 5 "Isn't anyone interested?" 6 Tours infinitive 7 Conks 8 Pal 9 Mammal linked to mermaid folklore 10 Half of Ethiopia's capital 11 Seasonal song 12 Botch the job 13 Picked 14 Fruity dessert 15 Bog 16 Cluck of disapproval 19 Harem guards, usually 20 Leg cramps treatment 21 Shipping choice 23 "Omigosh!" 28 Turn over a new leaf 29 Fit to __ 30 Put the bite on 31 Mediterranean resort 33 Soap Emmy winner Slezak 34 Chopping gadget 35 Knightly missions 36 Masked man, maybe 37 Fairy king 38 Plans with malice 39 Sari-wearing royal 40 Guy from England 51 Template at a bee 52 Let down, as hair 53 Harlem Globetrotter great Curly 54 Speaker of baseball 57 End of a belief 58 Farm lands 59 Alien-seeking org. 61 From __ Z 63 Made like a mallard 64 Hedger's word 66 '60s-'70s White House daughter 67 Knight sticks 68 Completely cover, as a museum piece 71 Cream of the crop 72 Pandora's release 73 "Me too!" 74 Look that doesn't last 76 Less like a stumper 77 Strikingly bright 78 Graceful molding 81 Fish with a prehensile tail 83 Transfixed by 84 Agog 85 "Variations on 'America'" composer 88 March time 93 Route 96 Bonkers 99 Luau wear 100 Neighbor of Mex. 101 FBI agent 102 Lhasa __ 103 Flag 104 It turns litmus red 105 Dupes 106 Guff 107 "Foucault's Pendulum" author 108 They may pass from shotguns: Abbr. 109 Luau instrument 110 "Got it?" Solution on page 7B What do we expect from our military? I would propose that we expect them to defend our freedom and protect our shores. We expect them to be well trained, sacrificial in their service and committed to God, country, and family. We expect them to carry themselves with honor and to respect each other and those with whom they come in contact. We place upon them a higher degree of expectancy because their jobs affect our nation and the world. They are highly trained, efficient and exceptional. Yet, they are, after all, men and women with feelings, needs and families like everyone else. However, when duty calls, they drop everything and go wherever they are sent to get the job done with skill, diplomacy and tireless devotion. While at home, the family continues the day to day living without the support and presence of their loved one. Skype may bring a face and voice into the room. Texting may allow them a way to communicate. Occasional phone calls and goody boxes will lighten their load. But, even with these connections, they are inaccessible to one another. There’s no goodnight hug, no availability with on the spot decisions, no help when storms come and cause havoc at home. The families must fend for themselves. So, perhaps, we should be asking ourselves another question on this Veterans Day weekend. What do our military personnel expect of us? While they are deployed overseas, serving in various capacities in the States or training and getting ready for what this new war on terror may expect of them, can they count on us at home? What are the duties and responsibilities of our citizenship to this nation and to those who serve and protect? Can they expect that we will pray for them and honor them in our thoughts and actions?Can they depend upon us to care for their loved ones, help them with that unexpected car breakdown, baby sit or invite them to share a meal to ease the loneliness? We can ask God to help us let the fruit of the Spirit flow through us to these who deserve our devotion. As it says in Galatians 5:22, NKJV, “But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control.” Might we bless someone in uniform or his or her family today?Each one can do something and truly salute our heroes by our actions. Selah. Jan Merop of Sebring is a News-Sun correspondent. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer and not necessarily those of the News-Sun staff. Saluting our heroes by our actions Pause And Consider Jan Merop Mans devotion to his sister ends widows happy romance Metro ServicesAries (March 21-April 20) — Aries, wait until your temper simmers down before confronting someone who has angered you. This way you will have a level head when you address the situation. Taurus (Taurus (April 21-May 21) — Taurus, mysterious things come into your life, and for once you don’t have the answers. Go with the flow on this and you will be pleasantly surprised. Gemini (May 22-June 21) — Patience is something you lack entirely this week, Gemini. But you will make up for it in personality. Just when you think others aren’t listening to what you say, they’re all ears. Cancer(June 22-July 22) —Afew changes are in store that come as a surprise, but it’s nothing that you can’t handle, Cancer. Rethink your plan of attack later in the week, or you can fall short of your goal. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) — Leo, there’s not much you can do at the moment to resolve a certain issue, so it’s best to just sit quietly on the sidelines and let everything blow over. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) —Virgo, no one expects you to be perfect at everything, so there is no need to drive yourself crazy with all of the minute details. Focus on the bigger picture instead. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Libra, one minute you’re going one way and the next minute another way. People can’t follow your train of thought, and they may see you as scatterbrained. Calm down. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Scorpio, happy times are ahead, so relish every moment of the break you’re given and the memories that can be made in the next few days. Kids’activities take precedence. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — New factors breathe new life into a stale plan, Sagittarius. This renews your ambition and desire to make changes. Others will be supportive of your efforts. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) — Capricorn, financial issues can be quite a problem. You actually may have to ask someone for help until you can get back on track with your accounts. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) — Aquarius, many people experience something special but you won’t get the chance. Relax, you’ll have other opportunities shortly. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) — Pisces, work can be enjoyable if you make it that way. Don’t grumble about the assignments that come your way this week. Famous birthdaysNov. 13: Jimmy Kimmel, Comic, 44; Nov. 14: Yanni, Pianist, 57; Nov. 15: Zena Grey, Actress, 23; Nov. 16: Dwight Gooden, Athlete, 47; Nov. 17: Danny DeVito, Actor, 67; Nov. 18: Sinbad, Comic, 55; Nov. 19: Meg Ryan, Actress, 50. You can handle the changes coming, Cancer Horoscope Dear Abby GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCEƒ

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LIVING 16B PAGE Inside This Section Arts & Entertainment7B Chalk Talk12-13B Community Calendar6B Crossword15B Dear Abby13B Horoscope13B Senior Scene8-9B Unknown Soldiers11B News-Sun Sunday, November 13, 2011 HIGHLANDS COMMUNITY CHURCH****; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, 11/13/11; 0 0 0 1 3 9 4 1 Bagwell Lumber; 5.542"; 10.5"; Process color; -; 0 0 0 1 3 9 8 7 FAMILYFEATURES The holidays are a great time to make memories with friends and family, and a clean and inviting home sets the tone. From family traditions and cookie exchanges to visits from out of town guests, you want your home to always have that special holiday shine. Windex has been helping homes sparkle for the holidays — and every day — for 75 years. Here are some hints to help you keep your home clean and inviting all season long.KitchenTackle the Fridge — Clear out food and leftovers that are past their prime. Wipe down shelves and make room for batches of holiday cookie dough and perishable food gifts you might get. Wipe down the handles and doors with Windex Multi-Surface Vinegar. It gently cleans even stainless steel with a streak-free shine and a fresh, clean scent.Declutter — Clear everything off the counters that isn’t involved in cooking. Put whatever has been slowly piling up, like mail and magazines, in piles: throw away, keep and recycle. This will make clearing the clutter more manageable. Work From the Top Down — Start by dusting the tops of cabinets. Then wipe down the cabinet doors, followed by countertops, lower cabinet doors, then the floors.Clean the Stovetop — Crumbs can build up in the space between the stove and the countertop. Use a stiff brush to loosen and remove them in no time. Once the crumbs are gone, wrap the bristles with a cloth dipped in warm soapy water to degrease that area. Manage the Microwave — In the microwave, boil a cup of water with a few slices of lemon in it for one minute. The steam softens stuck-on food, while the lemon water can be used with a sponge to wipe away grease and residue.BathroomLet the Light In — Take down your bathroom light fixtures and clean them with Windex Original Glass Wipes. Dust off your light bulbs too — you’ll be surprised at how much brighter the bathroom looks when you’re done.Sweep First, Then Mop — Vacuum or sweep the floors, using the crevice tool to get behind sinks and toilets an d to get into corners. This will clear the floor of hair and dust before you wipe down the baseboards and mop the floor, leaving a clean and shiny floor.Soap Up the Sink — Use an old toothbrush to get behind the sink faucet and knobs, and don’t forget the sink pedestal or lower cabinets where dust, hair and makeup can build up.Mind YourMedicine Cabinet — Yes, guests will peek. Tidy things up, dispose of old medications and stash items you’d rather not be seen.Spruce Up — Fresh, neatly folded towels, scented hand soaps and a seasonal candle go a long way toward making a bathroom look and feel wel coming.ClearReflection — Make sure the mirror is free of mascara smudges an d water spots by wiping it down with Windex Original. Living roomFreshen Up Fabrics — Get pet hair off of upholstery with your favorite pet hair remover. Vacuum upholstered surfaces, then spot clean and use a fabric freshener where needed. Add a few seasonal pillows or throws for a fresh look guests will love.Make It Shine — Dust can build up on your most valuable electronics including computers, televisions and other items in your living room. Whether it’s Windex Electronics Spray, Dry Cloths, or Wipes, the gent le formula removes dust, dirt and grime from household electronics, leaving behind only a streak-free shine.Get Rid of Smudges — Doorknobs, light switches, phones and more can get smudges and fingerprints. Give them a good cleaning with Windex Original Glass and Surface Wipes — this is a great job for the kids to tackle. Just in time for the holiday entertaining season, these easy tips will make your house a shiny, clean and welcomin g place for all your holiday guests, whether they’re planned or not. For more cleaning ideas or to share your own tips and traditions, visit www.facebook.com/windex. Speedy Clean-Up Secrets If you’re on a tight schedule, or find out at the last minute that you’ll be having guests, here are three quick tricks to help you tidy up in a hurry:Speed Clean — Go through the house with a few Windex Original Glass and Surface Wipes to remove smudges on mirrors, fingerprints on windows and glass tables, and grime on light switches. You’ll be surprised at how quickly your home will seem polished and pulled together, with just a few touch-ups.Focus on Key Areas Only — Pick the main rooms that guests will be in and clean those. Concentrate on the bathroom first, then the main living area, then the kitchen.Involve YourFamily — Have each family member pick up clutter or misplaced items in a different area of the house and make a game of it — the first person done gets a special holiday treat! Photo courtesy of Getty Images