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The news-sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01111
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 10-23-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:01111
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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C M Y K NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 S unday, October 23, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 125 | 75 cents w ww.newssun .com H ighLow 81 60Complete Forecast PAGE 14A Partly sunny and p leasant Forecast Question: Should the state reject a federal early learning grant if there are strings attached? Next question: Does the county need a place where people can legally ride ATVs and do mud bogging? www.newssun .comMake your voice heard at Online Obituaries Nathan Miller Age 26, of Lake Placid Obituaries, Page 5A Phone ... 385-6155Fax ... 385-2453Online: www.newssun.com Yes 72.9% No 27.1% 099099401007 Total votes: 48 Arts & Entertainment7B Books11B Business9A Chalk Talk10B Classifieds11A Community Briefs2A Community Calendar5B Crossword Puzzle13B Dear Abby13B Editorial & Opinion4A Horoscope13B Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times13B Sports On TV2B Index Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and HEARTLAND NATIONAL BANK***; 11.25"; 1.5"; Black plus three; process, front strip; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 4 4 0 0 1 1 Booker . . .36 A von Park . .34 Clewiston . .3 5 Lake Placid . .7 W inter Haven.45 S ebring . . . .7 DETAILSINSPORTS, 1BDoggy dress-upC ostume t ips for your pets PAGE1 2BScary scenesM ore TV s hows going for f rights PAGE1 4BArmed robberyD eputies: Man r obbed friend at gunpoint, then asked him for a light PA GE2 A Fridays Football Scores Photo, page 2A By ED BALDRIDGE e d.baldridge@newssun.comTALLAHASSEE After almost a year o f no representation, citizens in District 3 now have a new county commissioner. G ov. Rick Scott appointed local contractor William Ron Handley Thursday to fill the seat left empty when Jeffery D.C arlson was removed in November of 2010. Handley will serve the remainder of C arlsons term, which expires on Nov. 20, 2012. A ccording to the press release from Gov. Scotts office, Handley, 56, of Sebring, has owned and operated Homes by Handley Inc. since 1990 and W.R. Handley Construction Company from1 984 to 1990. Handley replacing Carlson L ocal builder will serve out rest of term B y CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comA VON PARK City Manger Julian Deleon told the city council Thursday night there is nothing to talk abou regarding Police Chief Michael Rowan, because he has terminated Rowans employment. Rowan has already been through the pre-disciplinary process, Deleon said, adding that it became clear there wasnt room for an amicable separation, and that the matter will end up in the courts. Council member Parke Sutherland, who expressed concerns about the proposed settlement between the city and Rowan at the special meeting on Oct. 14, had second thoughts about simply terminating the police chief. e put forward an offer which he didCouncil wants to discuss Rowan issue privately Muddy fun hits sticking point News-Sun photo by SCOTTDRESSEL Gabe White, whose truck is shown above, talks about the proposed Saddleridge outdoor recreation area, which will feature mud bogs, ATV trails, camping, fishing and more if it clears legal hurdles. C o u r t e s y p h o t o By ED BALDRIDGE e d.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING We are not breaking any laws or county ordinances. We are trying to make something out of a failed development. Something that families can use and enjoy, said Gabe White, former professional baseball player and partner in Saddleridge Ranch. The possibilities are endless, White said. White was speaking in response to a Tuesday decision by county commissioners to possibly seek a moratorium on using the 1,136-acre ranch at 1200 Marguerite Rd. in Lake Placid as a outdoor recreational club, complete with mud pits and a mud track as well as camping, fishing and other activities. White, with his partners Jeff Kennedy and Steve Copeland, have worked out a way with the property owners, Braha Sebring LLC, to put the fallow acreage to productive use by allowing the public somewhere to enjoy outdoor activities like four-wheeling. There is no safe and legal place to go in Highlands County right now if you want to ride your four-wheeler with friends. We want to provide that, said White. Commissioners responded to a request by the Skipper family, who own adjoining property, to fully investigate the plans to have large crowds visit the ranch. John Skipper, who has a parcel to the north of the property, expressed concern that the outdoor activities would draw thousands of people and could Proposed outdoor recreation facility draws opposition By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comAVON PARK Every once in while, a perfect day happens. If ever a couple has earned a perfect day, it is Pete and Leslie Zeegers. Pete, the executive director of the Avon Park Youth Academy, was diagnosed with throat cancer early this year. After weeks of painful chemotherapy and radiation treatments, he was declared cancer free. The day he heard that wonderful news, however, was not their perfect day. Leslie made that happen. Always an athlete Pete played baseball at the University of Oklahoma he developed shoulder, elbow and knee problems as he got older. Then he saw a new product called Joint Juice and decided to try it. It worked so well he used it regularly. My whole body felt good, Pete said. Joint Juice is not inexpensive. Leslie went to the companys website looking for coupons to download. Acontest caught her eye. Entrants were asked to write Playing catch with a legend Courtesy photo Pete Zeegers (lefts autograph on the football the two tossed around in San Francisco earlier this month. See ZEEGERS, page 8A See OUTDOOR, page 6A S ee HANDLEY, page 5A See COUNCIL, page 5A O vertime

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C M Y K N ews-Sun staffS EBRING A20-yearold Sebring man is facing a rmed robbery charges after he allegedly held up an acquaintance at gunpoint onO ct. 14. Miguel Angel Molina was b ooked Thursday on charges of robbery with a firearm and possession of a weapon by a c onvicted felon. According to the arrest report, Molina asked the victim, whom he has known for several years, for a ride at around 8 p.m.,o ffering the victim $5 for his trouble. The victim picked up Molina on Jacklin Avenue, the report said. Just a coupleb locks away, Molina told the victim to pull into Max Long R ecreation Complex on Lakewood Road. The victims aid he pulled into the back area of the complex near the batting cages. At that point, the victim said that Molina pulled out ap istol, racked the slide to load a round in the chamber, and p ointed it at the victims head. When the victim asked M olina if he was serious, Molina reportedly pushed the barrel of the gun hard againstt he victims temple and said he was not kidding. M olina allegedly demanded anything of value to be g iven to him, the report said. The victim surrendered t he money from his wallet, and was able to talk Molina into putting the gun down and exiting the vehicle. T he victim said Molina started to walk away from the c ar toward Westminster Avenue, then turned arounda nd walked back to the vehicle. The victim was in fear for his life due to the fact Molina still had the gun in his hand, the report said, but all Molinad id when he got back to the vehicle was ask the victim for a lighter. The report said Molina was o ut on bond for a recent charge of possession of a firearm by a convicted felon.H e was being held without bond on Saturday. C apt. Tim Lethbridge of the Highlands County Sheriffs Office said the arrest w as a significant success for the sheriffs Safe Neighborhood Unit, which operates in various areas of the county whenever a prob-l em crops up. Lethbridge said the unit located and arrested Molina the same day they received the arrest warrant. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011www.newssun.com Pub Block; 5.542"; 4.5"; Black; publishers block; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 8 0 0 3 3 4 4 KAYLOR & KAYLOR; 5.542"; 1.5"; Black; soc security below lottery; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 4 4 6 6 4 4 KAYLOR & KAYLOR; 5.542"; 1.5"; Black; above lottery workers comp; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 1 1 2 2 4 4 O ct. 19 1717323334x:5Next jackpot $17 millionOct. 15 3936414244x:3 Oct. 12 8925385052x:3 Oct. 21 1314172035 Oct. 20 213152627 Oct. 19 19232636 Oct. 18 29232536 Oct. 21 (n 3818 Oct. 21 (d 3510 Oct. 20 (n 0825 Oct. 20 (d 7630 Oct. 21(n 232 Oct. 21 (d 502 Oct. 20 (n 754 Oct. 20(d 644 Oct. 21 2733344211 Oct. 18 151625317 Oct. 14 41025443 Oct. 11 112028422 Oct. 19 1626355258 PB: 2 PP: 4Next jackpot $148 millionOct. 15 510243843 PB: 1 PP: 4 Oct. 12 1012234347 PB: 18 PP: 3 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawings are twice per day: (d daytime drawing, (n nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Play Lottery Center CO MMUNITYBRIEFS Garden Club meets MondaySEBRING The next meeting of the GardenC lub of Sebring to be held on Monday at noon at the downtown civic center. Lunch will be followed by a program pre-s ented by a local beekeeper. The program, Whats All the Buzz About Bees, will be presentedb y Steve Sparks. For more information, call 471-0657 or 385-0759.F ree goal setting business seminar MondayA VON PARK The Avon Park Community Redevelopment Agency( CRA) Main Street District is hosting a free b usiness and marketing seminar series this fall. The last 90-minute seminar will be held on Monday and address thet opic, Goal Setting: Make Sure Your Business M easures Up, starting promptly at 5:30 p.m. at the Avon ParkC ommunity Center located on Main Street. A von Park business owners, organizations and merchants who want toi ncrease their business should plan to attend. Attendees will gain mark eting tools and ideas that they can incorporate i nto their current business practices. The retail value of this seminar is $1,000. Although the seminar is free, please RSVPtor eserve your seat by contacting Avon Park CRA Marketing Coordinator Casey Wohl at (863 6326 or via email at Casey.Wohl@Yahoo.com. For more informationa bout the Avon Park CRA, please visit w ww.AvonParkCRA.com/ .Salvation Army offering Christmas assistanceSEBRING The Salvation Army Church, 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring, will be offeringC hristmas assistance applications on Tuesday from 9:30-11:30 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.; Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Thursday, 9:30-11:30 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.; Monday, Oct. 31, 9:3011:30 a.m. and 1-7 p.m.; Tuesday, Nov. 1, 9:3011:30 a.m. and 1-4 p.m.; Wednesday, Nov. 2, 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Thursday, 9:30-11:30 a.m. and 1-4 p.m. Toys for children 12 years old and under only. For more information, call 385-7548. All applicants must bring the following: Valid picture identification for the registrant and identification for all others 13 and older (U.S. drivers license, state-issued nondriver identification, U.S. Passport, employee identification card, school identification card, health insurance card, matricula counsular identification card and U.S. military identification card. Proof of residency in Highlands County (utility bill Birth certificates for all children, 12 and under. Proof of legal guardianship (if not parent of all income for all members of the household, including food stamps, pay stubs, TANF, TCA, pension, child support, social security income and SSI. All current monthly bills. Two suggested gifts that your Continued on page 5A Special to the News-SunPlans are under way for the Veterans Day parade followed by a Veterans Dayc eremony in downtown Sebring. Lineup for the Veterans Day Parade, under the direction of John Vincent witht he Veterans Council of Highlands County, Inc., will begin around 1 p.m. near the Sebring Middle School. Contact Vincent at 863-471-0 233. The parade route begins in front of the City ofS ebring Police Department on Ridgewood Drive, continues to the Circle. Thep arade with continue around the Circle to South C ommerce to the parking lot at the fairgrounds. Immediately following t he parade is the Veterans Day ceremony on the C ourthouse Lawn. The Lake Placid High School JROTC will advance the Colors for the ceremony, sponsored by the Veteran Services Office,w ith support by the Veterans Council of Highlands C ounty Inc. and the Veterans Advisory Board. One of the highlights of t he ceremony this year, according to Jackie Graham, a cting county service officer, will be the participation of the 13th Army Band. The 4 1-member band, under the direction of Chief Warrant Officer Stephen Rivero, consists of members of the Florida National Guard outo f Pembroke Pines. Golden Corral Restaurant in Lake Placid, according to Mark Tharpe, owner, will host veterans and military service members on Monday, Nov. 14. This will be the 10th year the localr estaurant has participated in the Golden Corral National program to salute the Veterans and Military. On Sunday, Nov. 6, H eartland Pops, Highlands Countys Concert Band, in partnership with Chateau Elan Hotel and Conference Center will provide a Salutet o Veterans featuring guest conductor Allen Beck, Commander U.S. Navy( Ret) at 3 p.m. St. Catherine Catholic School of Highlands Countyi s honoring veterans from all armed forces at the Friday, N ov. 11, 8 a.m. Mass at St. Catherine's Church. Acontinental breakfast w ill follow in the Parish Hall. The students are r equesting a photo of yourself with the following information: name, branch of service, number of years served and where yous erved. Please let them know if y ou are attending the breakfast and how many family members will be in atten-d ance with you. Destination Downtown S ebring is coordinating a promotion around the Veterans Day ceremony and p arade, according to Tami Boss, promotions spokesperson for the organization. South Florida Community C ollege will hold a Veterans Day program on the main campus at 10:45 a.m. at the campus flagpole. Veterans Day events planned Courtesy photo Gov. Rick Scott (lefteplace Jeff Carlson on the County Commission. Handleys first meeting will be Tuesday night. Handley named to county commission HCSO: Man robbed friend, then asked for a light Molina B y SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comAVON PARK For the 17th year, Highlands County residents will be able to experience a Halloween alternative event that continually outgrows its previous year. Noahs Fall Festival will be held Saturday at Joe Franza Stadium Avon Park High School from 5-9 p.m. on Saturday. The non-denominational event works with local churches and organizations to provide safe, kid-friendly fun for the holiday. This years festival will be at the hands of 11 Highlands County churches of six different denominations. These churches work with one another to provide a unique and memorable event for thousands of guests. Last year, over 3,600 people enjoyed the festivities. We provide children with lots of games, inflatables, prizes, live entertainment, food, health and resource fair and, of course, tons of candy. We create memories that will last a lifetime, said event coordinator Jay Whipkey. The second coordinator, Sandy Billings, is very excited about the move of the event as well as all the things planned for the community. This is the most churches weve had. We still have churches that keep calling. We hear from new churches every day. Im excited about the move from Fellowship Bible Church to the stadium at the high school. Overall its just going to be bigger and better, Billings said. Billings stated that the health care providers that will be a part of the event have doubled this year. Health care screenings and chair massages will be offered to the public at no cost. The event currently has 300 volunteers ready to help out. Local law enforcement as well as the national guard will be in attendance at Joe Franza Stadium. Entertainment for the event will include In One Voice (Ishmael and Immanuel Everett and Pompano Beach Calvary Chapel Praise Band), Highlands County Children's Theater, DQuick, and Shawnn Taylor. Children can come in their costumes or no costumes. Its completely free to the public. Its safe, family fun. We are trying to create great memories. Thats what this is about, Billings said. Noahs Fall Festival is free to the public. Parking is available at Avon Park High School. Noahs Fall Festival moves, gears up for more families Classified ads get results! Call 314-9876

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C M Y K By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comAVON PARK The first Harvest on Main Festival fundraiser brought thousands of resi-d ents and guests to Donaldson Park in Downtown Avon Park Saturday morning. T he day was filled with nostalgia, recalling past Halloween parades and festivals in the downtown area. Patrons enjoyed games,a ctivities, community education, entertainment and, of course, yummy food. The festival costume parade and contest k icked off the event. Hundreds of princesses, superheroes, and a few pirates roamed the p ark looking for fun and games throughout the morning. Lines for the bounce house were filled with elementary students waiting for their turn to run amuck. The festival also offered ponyr ides for little ones and horse rides for bigger kids. Apumpkin patch gave parents the opportunity to snap a few memories of little ones picking out their favorite pumpkin for painting and carving. Festival organizers Laura Barben (Park Elementary Parent-Teacher Organization) andT rish Best (Avon Elementary PTO) decided to do the festival together as this years big f undraiser for each of the schools. e wanted to bring the community together and have something affordable in the economic times and something fun. We had well over 300 kids in the costume paradea lone and so many smiles walking around, Barben said. According to festival volunteers, the event d rew in between 3,000 and 4,000 people. All proceeds from the Harvest Festival benefited the Avon and Park Elementary PTOs. This way exceeds any expectations we e ver had. Its a beautiful day and its just a great event. We appreciate the communitys support, said Barben. Harvest on Main Festival brings in crowd for first run News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Krew Cobb, 1, takes a seat in the pumpkin patch Saturday morning during the Harvest on Main Festival in Avon Park. www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, October 23, 2011Page 3A MUSSELMAN APPLIANCES; 5.542"; 21.5"; Black plus three; process, RHP far right; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 1 1 2 2 6 6 By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comAVON PARK City Manager Julian Deleon presented the city council with his proposed consolidation for city halls staffing structure. e have gone through transition in the citys upper management, he told the council. With several vacant positions, this would be an appropriate time to reorganize the citys upper management. Deleon wants to delete five positions and freeze one. The positions to be deleted would be finance director, payroll specialist, police chief, police lieutenant and streets and parks operations supervisor. The public works directors position would be frozen for at least a year in a money-saving measure, with Deleon fulfilling that role as well as being city manager. Deleon said because of his experience he was originally hired by Avon Park to head public works he felt comfortable and capable of fulfilling both roles. He recommends the city create three department heads to serve under the city manager: a public service director who would be in charge of the police and fire departments; and an administrative services director who would manage the airport, human resources, recreation and oversee city hall operations. Each of these individuals would have a salary of $65,000. The third department head would be the public works director, whose salary would be $80,000. Sebring has three high level spots (public works, utilities, solid waste). In Avon Park only one person does that. I think ($80,000 pay scale, Deleon said. The position of administrative services director is something we really need. I need help with the airport. The fourth new position would be a certified public account to oversee internal controls. That individual would have a salary of $45,000. Deleon said several times the reorganization is simply to consolidate, streamline and save the city money. Things are running smoothly, he said. I want to be clear about this. There are no problems now, but it is important to have a succession in place. The combined salary savings of the five positions to be deleted amounts to $263,000, Deleon said. The three new positions have a combined impact of $175,000. That does not include the public works directors salary. Deleon asked that department heads be hired under contract, but City Attorney Gerald Buhr said it was unusual to have that kind of agreement, adding that it wasa policy decision and a matter of choice, not a matter of charter rules or statute. The problem, he said, is that when disagreements occur, it leads to expensive legal action. Not if you have a crackerjack lawyer who writes a good agreement, said Council member Parke Sutherland, who is an attorney. Action was postponed until the next regular city council meeting. Deleon details reorganization plan Deleon Would save AP $263,000 in salaries News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Domanick Angel, Cameron Nicklaw and Jaden Nicklaw pose for a picture Saturday morning at the Harvest on Main Festival in Avon Park.

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Page 4ANews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011www.newssun.comTODAYSEDITORIAL 2227 U.S. 27 South € Sebring, FL 33870 € 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION When I was in junior high (middle school today) and high school I played violin in orchestras. My family, who had to endure the times I practiced, will testify to that. Orchestra was a mostly fun class. I grew to love being a part of the music, and I can still remember the thrill it gave me when I joined with my fellow music makers to combine our sounds into something beautiful to hear. After all these years (and way past the point anyone can change my grades) I will admit I was not as diligent in my practicing as I should have been. It wasn’t that I didn’t practice at all – I just didn’t put in the hours that I now admit would’ve helped. Somehow I did practice enough to make good grades in the class and play in the second violin section of the Jacksonville Youth Symphony. The time with the music form some of my fonder memories of high school. Of course, the violin went to and from school with me. Because I took a school bus, this made things interesting. My younger sister Anita often shared a seat with me, my violin propped up between us. She never complained that I remember. Neither did the bus driver or anyone else in authority. The same cannot be said of a Massachusetts school district. According to an article on Fox News, the Bridgewater-Raynham Regional School District is telling 12-year-old Anthony DiMarzio that his tenor saxophone is not welcome on the school bus. The district claims that the instrument creates a safety hazard on the vehicle, which is filled to capacity. In contrast, Anthony’s mother says that the instrument fits under a seat and other students are allowed to bring athletic equipment onto the bus, so what’s the big deal? Cathy DiMarzio also says that since she leaves for work before her son, she cannot drive him to school. And unless she ca n make other arrangements the three times a week Anthony has band practice, he may have to quit the band, something she doesn’t want to happen. While school superintendent Jacqueline Forbes is said to have “characterized the situation as unfortunate,” the district seems adamant about not letting the sax on the bus. They claim that no instruments larger than a flute or clarinet are allowed on a bus, a policy Cathy DiMarzio says she has not seen in writing. The school district has already considered letting Anthony keep the instrument at school. That solution that won’t work since he needs the sax at home to practice with. As far as I know, both sides are still talking to each other about the situation. I am all for safety on school buses. But I really hope that something can be worked out here so that Anthony won’t have to quit the band. Yes, band is optional. But it seems to me that teaching a student to love music isn’t a bad thing. And as I said, I remember the joys of being a part of the music. Do we really want to deny that to this kid? By the way, I still have the violin. It needs new strings and the bow needs to be rehaired. I shudder to think of the noises I would make with it after all these years. But there are times I want to try it out, just to be part of the music again. Maybe someday I will. Cover your ears. Laura Ware is a Sebring resident. She can be contacted by e mail at bookwormlady@ embarqmail.com Visit her website at www.laurahware.com. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the staff of the NewsSun. Making music Lauras Look Laura Ware EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; or e-mail editor@newssun.com To make sure the editorial pages aren't dominated by the same writers, letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months. Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the opinion of that author and not necessarily the opinion of the staff or editors of the News-Sun All items will run on a first-come basis as space permits, although more timely ones could be moved up. We believe your viewpoints are just as important as any community leader or government official, so consider this a personal invitation to get your two cents in. In the past I have written stories involving scams, crime watch, the love of Christmas and Jesus Christ, and people in general. Today I come to you with a story of heart and heroes. These heroes are there with open arms, ready to put a smile on their faces with respect and honor, and with their families all in a circle of appreciation and love with a tear in their eye for them. I have a grandson whom I adopted – a beautiful boy, 7 years old, who has autism. Time after time I have tried to get him involved in sports, but we all know it is difficult for some with disorders of many types. Last week I had the honor to meet Saundra Bass, an employee of The School Board of Highlands County. After having a few words with her, she in turn told me about a wonderful place to take my grandson on Saturday mornings in Lake Placid so he can enjoy a new experience with one special sport that we all love. It turns out that Bass is a board member of The Miracle League. I told her I did not know anything about it, but she insisted that I come to see something beautiful. So, on Saturday, Oct. 15 I took my grandson, his sister, and my wife down to see this event, and my heart was filled with joy at first sight. It was a real baseball league designed for the disabled and special needs children and adults alike. My grandson’s face lit up with happiness. They did not hesitate to give him a uniform and a baseball hat, and they put him to play with a team called the Nationals. The tools and techniques they used on my grandson being new to the team was a complete connection that he was playing in the field and batting. He even hit the ball and ran the bases with their guidance of volunteers and having a one-on-one buddy student system to each player. Oh, how exciting it was to me and my wife and his little sister watching him having such a great time meeting new friends and learning the game of baseball that we started to cry. It’s been a long time waiting to find a small miracle for my boy, and my many thanks to Saundra Bass, who reached out for me and my family in sharing this beautiful experience. I can see how baseball would fit in for the disabled children of special needs in our county. It’s good for their motor skills, cognitive, communication, social experiences, a perfect developmental tool for their lives and at the same time helping to keep family unification positive with love, understanding and commitment. Watching the faces of all the parents seeing their children playing and smiling in the field just brought me joy and happiness. I had the privilege of meeting John Varady, the director of The Miracle League of Highlands County. He in turn explained to me what was their mission – to provide opportunities for individuals with cognitive and physical challenges to play Miracle League Baseball, and participate in other recreational opportunities. To promote community awareness; garner support and sponsorship of The Miracle League through their student “Buddies” that guide the children into the sport, “Fans In The Stands” and community involved activities. To promote the construction and maintenance of specialized facilities that meet the unique needs of individuals who participate in The Miracle League. My friends, you must go out to The Miracle League For Highlands County and see for yourselves what a great place to visit and this heart-warming heroes event for our disabled children in Lake Placid. Spend a beautiful Saturday morning watching these children and our heroes touching your hearts playing baseball. These are God’s heroes doing God’s work for his children and our children. This is a true blessing in giving to God’s children. This great organization deserves everyone’s support. You don’t want to miss a wonderful, heart-warming sight. Please contact John Varady at 840-0482 for directions to the field and information. The Miracle League for Highlands County is the place to go. God bless our heroes of Highlands County and our children. Amen. Ralph Colon is a Sebring resident. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the News-Sun staff. Baseball miracles of Highlands County Guest Column Ralph Colon In fact, a large chunk of the HCSO staff has already moved to a temporary site in Liberty Star Plaza south of town. Regarding what that should be, we agree with the Sebring City Council the sensible answer is to keep the Sheriff’s administration center downtown. Sebring’s downtown is centrally located in the county, and near the jail. It seems to us the location makes logistical sense. Moving out to the Restoration Center on State Road 66, for example, has several disadvantages. The location is out of the way — inconvenient for civilians needing documents and isolating for those who would work there. Just going out to lunch would be time consuming with limited choices. In addition, the distance from the jail is likely to create daily headaches and delays. The budget for gasoline and vehicle maintenance would undoubtedly have to increase. The idea of building on George Boulevard has all the above drawbacks, plus the tremendous expense of construction. Estimates range from $5 to $7 million just to create the building, never mind all the additional costs involved in a major move. We understand that a law enforcement site requires special consideration and has unique requirements, however, we don’t think building from scratch is the only solution. Athoughtful remodeling of an existing building would be a fraction of the price. We understand the draw of something shiny and new, built to exact specifications, but given the economic climate and shrinking government budgets we can’t justify the expense. Instead we look to The School Board of Highlands County as an inspiration and example. True, its administration building is dowdy and worn at the heels, but it is functional and makes good use of existing space. It lends credence to the board’s avowed goal of spending every tax dollar wisely. Then there is the other issue — the impact of permanently moving a large staff out of the city center. Not only will the people working in the building be inconvenienced, local restaurants and merchants will also be affected. Sebring is having enough difficulty getting people downtown to support local businesses, removing potential customers who are already there will only make a bad situation worse. Finally, there are alternatives downtown. Both buildings under consideration for renovation — the old SunTrust building and the former Bank of America — have ample parking (although we admit that’s not saying much given the lack of parking space at the sheriff’s current location on Fernleaf Avenue). Both buildings are large with multiple stories, the SunTrust coming in at between 28,000 and 29,000 square feet and the Bank of America at 32,000. Either building will be accessible and user friendly, especially for civilians. We encourage all those involved in making the decision to be practical. The less spent on the outer shell, the more can used on state-ofthe-art equipment. Keep the Sheriff downtown W e agree with Highlands County Sheriff Susan Benton that the current Sheriff’s Office headquarters in downtown Sebring is out of date, overcrowded and probably unsafe. There isn’t a question that something has to be done.

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C M Y K By KATE SPINNER S arasota Herald-TribuneS ARASOTA When anglers targeting sweet-eating snapper instead see the hulking shape of a 400pound goliath grouper at thee nd of their line, expletives usually follow. Not in awe over the size of the fish the Gulf of Mexicos largest groupert hat can reach 8 feet in length and top out at 800 pounds but in anger over the loss of their dinner. The goliaths often eat hooked or speared game fishb efore anglers can get them in the boat. W hile reputably tasty, the giant groupers are protected and illegal to keep. They eat any fish you put a hook in, said Captain G ary Gilliland, who works at Economy Tackle in Sarasota. Most recreational guys that want to catch something different, theyh ate them. As goliath have grown in s ize and number, so has the vitriol toward the giant fish, a product of their partial r ebound since a 1990 ban on their harvest saved them f rom extinction. The goliaths rebound, driven by continued statea nd federal restrictions, has created an unusual conflict between wildlife officials w ho see them as threatened and anglers who see them as a nuisance. In Southwest Florida, more fishermen are having e ncounters with goliaths, in part because of the expans ion of artificial reefs that concentrate fish and anglers in the same places. As a result, fishermen both commercial and recre-a tional are beginning to demand the right to harvest g oliath. Conversely, conservationists want the federal govern-m ent to give the goliaths further protection by putting t hem on the endangered species list. To help solve the conflict, s cientists Christopher Koenig and Felica Coleman of Florida State University a re beginning a 3-year study to document the goliaths r ecovery and figure out whether it makes sense to allow anglers to catch and k eep them. Formerly known as jewf ish, goliath are the largest groupers in the Western North Atlantic, thriving mainly in tropical regions. They can reach 800 poundsa nd live 50 years. They prefer to eat box c rabs and require little sustenance because of their lazy habits. W hen goliath see a hooked or speared fish, h owever, it looks like easy dinner, and they will defend their claim to it, giving fish-e rmen the perception that goliath are ravenous beasts. Theyre like big puppy d ogs, they really are. I could show you video where they c ome right up to you and you could put a hand on their face, Koenig said. c hild would like and your childs clothing and shoes sizes.Orchid Society meeting MondaySEBRING The Orchid Society of Highlands County will hold their monthlym eeting on Monday at 7 p.m. at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agricultural Center, 4509 George Blvd. This month, the speaker w ill be Prem Subrahmanyam. He has been studying Floridas native orchids for more than a quarter century. His presentation will be Orchids inO ur Backyard: Floridas Wild Orchids. T he society will also be holding a silent auction for orchid plants as a fund raisera t this months meeting. Guests are always welcome a nd participants do not have to be knowledgeable of orchids to attend. Contact Ed at 465-2830 or by email at oshc9@aol.com or go tow ww.orchidsocietyhighlands.org/.AP Chamber mixer TuesdayAVON PARK The A von Park Chamber mixer will be held from 5-7 p.m., on Tuesday at SierrasS ports Grill. There will be hors doeuvres, complimentary beer a nd wine served, along with some great networking o pportunities. Sierras Sports Grill is located on U.S. 27 Northr.Whats Up Downtown? meeting TuesdaySEBRING The Sebring Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA next monthly Whats UpD owntown meeting on Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. at S costa Supply & Interiors (510 Maple Ave.) with a special presentation by the Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce. T hese informative meetings are open to the public. Anyone who has an interest in Downtown Sebring is encouraged to attend.Audubon telling stories againAVON PARK Carol Mahler, author, storyteller, songwriter and singer will undoubtedly mesmerize the members of the Audubon Chapter of Highlands County on Tuesday when they meet for their regular monthly meeting at the Masonic Lodge on the corner of Park and Main in Lake Placid. Specializing in early Florida folklore, Mahler will focus her stories on plants and animals accompanied with period photographs. Mark Deyrup, naturalist, author, and also a great storyteller, will add the naturalh istory of the species to this power point presentation centered around the newly opened Wayside Shrine at South Florida CommunityC ollege. The public is invited to join Audubon for the evening. Arrive at 6:30 p.m. for dinner. Bring utensilsa nd a covered dish to share (drinks provided 7:30 p.m. in time for the presentation.T alk to an attorney for freeS EBRING Would you like to talk to an attorney for free? The American BarA ssociation and the Highlands Bar Association a re promoting One-on-One Florida, where people can meet with a volunteer attor-n ey one-on-one during National Pro Bono Week and a sk a legal question, free of charge. Two events are being coordinated in Highlands County. The first is beingh eld at the Agricultural Center, Sam Polston A uditorium, 4509 George Blvd., Sebring, on Tuesday from 5-8 p.m. and the sec-o nd event will be held at Our Lady of Grace, 595 E M ain St., Avon Park, on Thursday from noon until 2 p.m. A ttorneys have volunteered to answer questions in areas such as family law, real estate, probate, social security disability, bankrupt-c y, foreclosure, personal injury, civil litigation, etc. Walk-ins are invited to attend. Contact Alexandra Srsic, Esq., at Florida RuralL egal Services (863 7376, ext. 3018.Events at local lodges, postsAVON PARK The Combat Veterans Memorial VFWPost 9853 in AvonP ark, will host the following events: Today NASCAR at 2 p.m. Call 452-9853. AVON PARK The American Legion Post 69 in Avon Park, will host the following events: Today Karaoke by Naomi (call for time C all 453-4553. LAKE PLACID The American Legion Placid Post 25 in Lake Placid, will hostt he following events: Today Thomas will provide music 5-8 p.m. Tuesday Casino trip. Call Judy for details at 655-0 232. Call 465-0975. LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Moose 2374,w ill host the following events: Today Pavilion open 1-8 p .m. NASCAR Karaoke with Bama Jam (call for times). M onday Lodge open from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. C all 465-0131. LAKE PLACID The L ake Placid Elks 2661 will host the following events: M onday BPOE Board meeting 7:30 p.m. Music by Frankie (call for time Tuesday BPOE Initiation meets at 7 p.m. (new mem-b ers welcome). Call 465-2661. SEBRING The VFW Post 4300 in Sebring, willh ost the following events: Today Karaoke from 5-8 p .m. with Mega Sound. Monday VFWPost meeting 7 p.m. T uesday Frank E music 6-9 p.m. For details, call 385-8902.Shrine Ladies play buncoAVON PARK The public is invited to play bunco at the Highlands ShrineC lub, 2604 SR 17 South on Tuesday at 11:30 a.m. The e vent is open to new or experienced players; cost is$ 2 per person. Call 471-2425.Woodlawn Fall Fest is ThursdaySEBRING Woodlawns annual Fall Fun Fest will be held at our school on Thursday from 5-8 p.m. C ome in costume and enjoy fun games and good food.The public is invited. www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, October 23, 2011Page 5A DAILY COMMERCIAL; 3.639"; 1"; Black; cornerstone hospice; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 4 4 2 2 2 2 MARTIAL ARTS (pp only pg 3 or 5; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 4 4 6 6 2 2 Stephenson Nelson ****; 7.444"; 5"; Black; obit pg; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 9 9 Continued from page 2A CO MMUNITYBR IEFS Handley is a 52-year resident of Highlands County, and currently serves on the board of directors for the Heartland National Bank. He is a member of the Highlands Sertoma Club, the Sebring Firemens Association, the Sebring Chamber of Commerce and the Florida Cattlemens Association. He is a past member of the City of Sebring Code Enforcement Board and wasa carpenter for the Highlands County Board of County Commissioners from 1976 to 1978. Handley received a bachelors degree from the University of Florida, the press release stated. Carlson was charged with BUI manslaughter after a boating accident on July 24, 2010. Allegedly, the boat Carlson was operating struck a channel marker near the Capt. Hirams Resort in Sebastian in Indian River Count, resulting in the death of his wife, Julie Carlson. Phone calls to Handleys place of business were not returned by press time. Continued from page 1A t accept, Sutherland said, adding the city should consider making another offer. I want to take the time to b anter this about, he told the council. City Attorney Gerald Buhr warned against a discussion in an open meeting. I dont know if its best, he said. Instead, he recommended an executive session that is a council m eeting closed to the public and the media so city council members could be frank in their discussion. Because executive sess ions require early notice, Buhr recommended scheduling one during the councils first regular meeting in December. W hen he was asked if an executive session can be scheduled by itself, Buhr said the Florida Attorney G eneral prefers an executive session be held in the course of a regular meeting. Open the meeting, have the session, and come back, hes aid. Executive sessions are used by governing bodies when sensitive material is to be addressed. For example,T he School Board of Highlands County always discusses student expulsions behind closed doors. Continued from page 1A NATHAN DAVID MILLER Nathan David Miller, age 26, passed away on Thursday Oct. 20, 2011 in Lake Placid, Fla. He was born in Winter Haven, Fla. on May 26, 1985 to David and Gayle A. (Malmstrom. He was the owner/operator of a tree service and was a member of the First United Methodist Church of Sebring. He enjoyed spending time with his family and listening to music. He was a lifelong resident of Highlands County. He is survived by his longtime girlfriend, Kristie Vasquez of Lake Placid; his daughter, Isabella Miller, his mother and step-father, Gayle and Craig Griffith of Sebring; sister, Rachel (Ryan) Hill, of Sebring; step-sister, Dawn Griffith, of Avon Park; stepbrother, Matthew (Shannon Griffith of Sebring. He was preceded in death by his father, David Miller. Memorial services will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011 at 11 a.m. at the First United Methodist Church of Sebring with Rev. A.C. Bryant officiating. Visitation will be from 10 a.m. until service time. Cremation arrangements entrusted to: Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home Sebring, Fla. www.stephensonelsonfh.com OBITUARIES Council plans executive session to discuss Rowan termination Handley selected for commission Sue Cocking/Miami Herald/MCT A team of researchers led by Chris Koenig, center, of Florida State University measures a Goliath grouper they caught on board the Dykoke off Jupiter Inlet. Goliath groupers comeback creates conflict

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C M Y K bring other issues as well. “Amud bog track is planned for this area, and it came as a complete surprise to me. I called the zoning department to check for a permit, and they said they had no knowledge of this. Our group of neighbors then called the water management district, and they said they knew nothing about it,” Skipper told the commissioners. “They (mud boggers) just don’t have a very good reputation about what they bring in,” said Skipper about other areas that have mud tracks. “There is a lot of underage activities, alcohol, etcetera. Our concern is about the amount of traffic that could come to this area. I would ask that the commission look into this,” Carol Skipper said. Carol Skipper also asked the commissioners to look into the proposed usage of the agricultural land. “My main distress in this is that the county road is so inadequate to carry that amount of traffic,” Carol Skipper said. Carol Skipper described problems with semi-trucks that miss the 90 degree turn in front of her property and have plowed over her fences in the past. “I don’t think people that come to this kind of activity are good drivers or careful drivers. I worry that I will go out to my front gate one morning and find somebody dead out there,” she told the commission. Kennedy and White visited the News-Sun on Friday, and brought their maps and facts to counter the statements made by the Skippers during the commission meeting. Kennedy said that other adjacent property owners support the idea. “I was kind of surprised on Wednesday when someone told me about this. We have been meeting with the water management folks and county staff about this. The water management people felt this was a great alternative use for a failed development,” Kennedy said on Friday. “We are not just a mud bog events, this is a family oriented outdoor recreational club. There is camping, fishing, bird watching. This is where you can take the family out and do outside activities for not a lot of money,” said White. “We realize there is no special rules for mud bogs or that kind of activity on the books, but we are covered under outdoor recreational club,” said Kennedy. Gary Ritter, with the South Florida Water Management District, told commissioners that his agency had already done a fly-over and that none of the planned activities were in the designated wetland areas, but his agency would send out an investigative letter to make sure that the property was being used and permitted property. “In any situation, we try to work with the land owners before we do any enforcement,” Ritter said. County Planner Mark Hill recommended a moratorium be placed on mud bogging in order to give the county time to draft land usage regulations to deal with Saddle Ridge. “Mud bogging is not now specifically defined in our land regulations for use. Therefore it is not clear what is legal and what is not legal in this specific land designation of agriculture,” Hill said. “This could take six to nine months to draft regulation.” “We realize that there are no specific rules for a mud bog park, just as there are no specific rules for many other activities and uses that occur on a daily basis. I do not believe that the purpose of government is to regulate every aspect of our daily lives. In fact in a free society, rules should be primarily made to protect the citizens from the tyranny of government. I would welcome further discussion with myself and my partners and we would love to give any interested parties a tour of the property and share our ideas for the club,” Kennedy wrote in an email to the commission on Thursday. “This is so much more than just a mud bog track. This is a place where families and church groups and Boy Scouts can camp and fish in a safe environment. This is where we could organize safe outdoor events that are family friendly and bring revenue into Highlands County. These folks have to buy groceries and gas when they come or go,” White said Friday. The board voted 4-0 to “take action to task you to start addressing this and then we will come back next week will be the moratorium,” Board Chairwoman Barbara Stewart told Hill. “Since there is so much money involved in this, I hear $900,000 to over $1 million, what is the process for this?” Stewart asked Ritter. St. Lucie County drew more than 30,000 visitors for a two-day event, Ritter said, although White told the News-Sun the number was probably closer to 10,000. “But they got their permits through us and through the county,” Ritter explained. Ritter also discussed legal battles and enforcement they enacted to shut down a mud bog event in Palmdale that was using wetland areas. “We are working to get everything together with the water management district and to do everything properly before we move forward,” White said Friday. Page 6ANews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011www.newssun.com CENTRAL SECURITY; 5.542"; 5"; Black plus three; process, new technology; 0 0 0 1 3 1 2 3 Veranda Breeze 6x10.5 color 00013195 Continued from page 1A Outdoor recreation area draws opposition from some neighbors News-Sun photo by SCOTTDRESSEL A map of the Saddleridge site shows trails and camping sites. The areas outlined in blue are proposed mud pits.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011Page 7A

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C M Y K Page 8ANews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011www.newssun.com G RIFFIN'S CARPET MART; 7.444"; 10"; Black; 10/23/11; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 8 8 I N THE CIRCUIT COURT F OR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION F ILE NO.PC 11-403 Division Probate I N RE:ESTATE OF R OBERT LEE SCHALLER D eceased. N OTICE TO CREDITORS T he administration of the estate of ROBERT LEE SCHALLER,deceased,whose date of death w as January 11,2011; File Number PC 11-403, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands C ourt,Florida,Probate Division,the address of w hich is 430 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring, FL 33870.The names and addresses of the per-s onal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. A ll creditors of the decedent and other persons h aving claims or demands against decedent's estate,on whom a copy of this notice is required t o be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE T IME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. A ll other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claim with this court W ITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is October 16,2011. Personal Representative: Susan J.Schaller 1009 Contour Street Sebring,FL 33872 Derek B.Alvarez,Esquire FBN:114278 dba@gendersalvarez.com Anthony F.Diecidue,Esquire FBN:146528 afd@gendersalvarez.com GENDERS ALVAREZ DIECIDUE,P.A. 2307 West Cleveland Street IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT F OR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION F ILE NO.PC 11-379 I N RE:ESTATE OF DOROTHY LORRAINE ADAMS akaD OROTHY L.ADAMS aka DOROTHY LARRINE ADAMS, D eceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS T he administration of the estate of DOROTHY L ORRAINE ADAMS aka DOROTHY L.ADAMS aka DOROTHY LARRINE ADAMS,deceased,whose d ate of death was June 11,2011,is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands Court,Florida,Pro-b ate Division,the address of which is 590 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,Florida 33870.The names and addresses of the personal representat ive and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. A ll creditors of the decedent and other persons h aving claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served must f ile their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST P UBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons h aving claims or demands against decedent's est ate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is October 23,2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Kenneth Adams 396 High Tide Dr.,St.Augustine,FL 32080 Attorney for Personal Representative: CLIFFORD M.ABLES,III,P.A. 551 SOUTH COMMERCE AVE. SEBRING,FL 33870 Telephone:(863 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY,FLORIDA P ROBATE DIVISION F ILE NO.PC 11-413 I N RE:ESTATE OF ALICE MARGARET FRASER a/k/a ALICE M.FRASER a /k/a ALICE FRASER D eceased. N OTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ALICE MARGARET FRASER a/k/a ALICE M.FRASER a/k/a ALI CE FRASER,deceased,whose date of death was A ugust 6,2011,is pending in the Circuit Court f or Highlands Court,Florida,Probate Division,the address of which is 590 South Commerce Avenue,Sebring,FL 33870.The names and add resses of the personal representative and the p ersonal representative's attorney are set forth b elow. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's est ate on whom a copy of this notice is required to b e served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE O F A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. A ll other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedent's est ate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 M ONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLIC ATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF T HE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER B ARRED. N OTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE O F DEATH IS BARRED. T he date of first publication of this Notice is October 16,2011. P ersonal Representative: I ngram W.Fraser 1 1 Medway Court D artmouth,Nova Scotia B2W 4G4 Canada M ary E.Ferguson 3 0 Cranston Avenue Dartmouth,Nova Scotia B2Y 3G4 C anada BREED & NUNNALLEE,P.A. A ttorneys for Personal Representative: 325 NORTH COMMERCE AVENUE S EBRING,FL 33870 T elephone:(863 B y:/s/ Thomas L.Nunnallee 1050Legals 1050Legals INVITATION TO BID The Town of Lake Placid,Highlands County,Lake Placid, Florida,will receive sealed bids at the Office of Director of Utilities,Gary V.Freeman,located at 311 W.Interlake Blvd,Lake Placid,Florida 33852 for the following bid titles (there are three [3] Bids herewith (BID 1ANELS (STAINLESS STEEL ENCLOSURE) INCLUDING LEVEL SENSOR FLOAT SWITCHES FOR ELEVEN (11 SEWER LIFT STATIONS. (BID 2ATIONS ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS IN TEN (10ATIONS; INC LUDES LABOR AND MATERIAL. ( BID 3) INSTALL NEW ELECTRIC SYSTEMS FOR TEN (10 EXISTING LIFT STATIONS. Specifications may be received at the Town of Lake Placid Municipal Building,311 W.Interlake Blvd,Lake Placid, F lorida 33852,attention Gary V.Freeman,Director of Utilities,Monday through Friday from 8:00 am until 3:30 pm until Wednesday,November 9,2011.The phone number is 863-699-3747 and the fax number is 863-699-3749. There are three (3Specifications on each are also available for download in pdf format from the Towns website,which is at:HYPERLINK "http://www.lakeplacidfl.net" www.lakeplacidfl.net. Bid envelopes must be sealed and clearly marked LIFT STATION BIDS,on the outside,so as to identify the enclosed bids.Bids must be delivered to the Town of Lake Placid Municipal Building office attention to Director of Utilities,Gary V.Freeman,located at 311 W.Interlake Blvd,Lake Placid,Florida 33852 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 pm,Wednesday November 9,2011,at which time the bids will be opened.Bids received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected.The Town will not be responsible for the late deliveries of bids that are incorrectly addressed,delivered in person,by mail or any other type of delivery service. The town of Lake Placid reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids and to waive any irregularities in bidding.Local businesses and/or drug free workplaces shall be given preference in the evaluation and award of purchases and contracts. Gary Freeman Director of Utilities Town of Lake Placid Posted on the Town of Lake Placid Website Printed in the News-Sun Newspaper on Sunday, NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETINGS ON THE SPRING LAKE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT CHARTER REVISION PROCESS The Spring Lake Improvement District will conduct a Public Meeting on Wednesday,November 9,1:00 p.m.and Wednesday,December 14,6:00 p.m.at the District Office,115 Spring Lake Blvd.,Sebring,Florida,33876.The purpose of the meeting is to review and discuss the proposed District Charter Revision Process. E ACH PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT MEETINGS IS ADVISED THAT PERSON MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGSIS MADE,INCLUDING THE TESTIM ONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH SUCH APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. Joseph DeCerbo District Manager October 23,2011 a blog testimonial. The grand prize was an all-expenses-paid trip to San F rancisco and the chance to spend time with Joe Montana, the legendary San F rancisco 49ers quarterback. I dont even play the lottery L eslie said recently, sitting with Pete in his office. Ive never won anything in my life. At the time Pete was still in treatment for the cancer. Leslie forgot about the contest, including telling Pete she h ad entered. Months passed. Then, at the end of S eptember, Leslie found an envelope on her porch. She was stunned to discover that out of 17,000 entries, hers had won the grand prize. I couldnt even remember what I wrote, she said laughing. Of course, she immediately called Pete. Worried it might be some kind ofa gimmick, his first reaction was to tell her not to give out their credit card number. I t was the real deal, however. They were going to San Francisco. A s to meeting for an hour with Montana, Pete could pick one of five things to do: Play tennis, hike, golfn ine holes, play Ping-Pong, or spend the time throwing a football. P ete said tennis and hiking were out. He thought Montana would be too g ood at golf for it to be fun, and he had enough confidence in his own PingP ong game to believe Montana wouldt enjoy playing against him. S o, throwing the football it was. It was perfect timing, Pete said, Id just been declared cancer free on Sept. 26 and we celebrated our 24th wedding anniversary on Sept. 19. It just all came together They flew to San Francisco on Oct. 5. The next day they met with officialsf rom Joint Juice at Candlestick Park who were wonderful, Pete and Leslies aid more than once and went to the h ome team locker room. As they were enjoying themselves, P ete caught a motion out of the corner of eye. He turned, and here came Joe w alking in by himself. He was down to earth and didnt have an entourage. M ontana took the Zeegers on a tour of the stadium, telling them inside stor ies, then walked them to the field through the same tunnel the team uses on game day. Outside, surrounded by cameras, Pete and Montana started to throw a football. Hes still got it, said Pete in awe, tight spirals right to my chest. Me,t wo out of three throws were wounded ducks. But Joe caught every one, ev en though he sometimes had to lean for-w ard. He took his time with us, asked me about my coaching, it was just the c oolest thing. Montana signed the ball theyd been throwing It has his DNA, said Pete with a disarming, childlike wonder along with several other sou-v enirs. Walking on cloud nine, Pete and L eslie spent the afternoon sight-seeing, had an excellent meal at a restaurant Montana recommended, and met withL eslies aunt and uncle. Still together at dinner, Pete kept track of the junior v arsity Sebring vs. Hardee football game. Sebring won 7-6, and Garrett (his son It was just a perfect day Then came shocking news. Garrett had fallen ill in the locker room. Texts b egan to stream in. He was being sent to the hospital. No one was sure what w as wrong. The Zeegers were beside themselves. Their only thought was to rush to the airport and get the first flight home. Then new messages arrived. Garrettw as feeling better. He was not in any danger. Everything was all right. Pete leaned back in his chair, reliving the day, smiling ruefully. Ironically, he said, it had been the moment of panic at the end of the day that made every earlier thrill so muchs weeter. Continued from 1A It was just the perfect d ayPETEZEEGERS Zeegers gets to play catch with Montana Did YouKNOW?EMERGENCY VEHICLESUpon the immediate approach of an authorized emergency vehicle,while en route to meet an existing emergency,the driver of every other vehicle shall,when such emergency vehicle is giving audible signals by siren,exhaust whistle, or other adequate device,or visible signals by the use of displayed blue or red lights,yield the right-of-way to the emergency vehicle and shall immediately proceed to a position parallel to,and as close as reasonable to the closest edge of the curb of the roadway,clear of any intersection and shall stop and remain in position until the authorized emergency vehicle has passed,unless otherwise directed by any law enforcement officer.YOUCANBETICKETEDFORFAILINGTOPULL OVERANDSTOPWHENANAMBULANCE, POLICE, FIREOROTHEREMERGENCYVEHICLEIS TRAVELLINGTOMEETANEMERGENCY. BELOWISTHEFLORIDALAW. Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Southwest Florida Water Management District is gathering input needed to improve identification of floodingr isks in the areas surrounding 17 lakes in Highlands County. The District is serving as a cooperating technical partner for the Federal Emergency ManagementA gency (FEMA effort to update and modernize the FEMAFlood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs FIRMs are 10 to 30 years old anda re outdated because of natural and physical changes caused by land use, development and erosion. The District is holding an open house in Sebring to present preliminary floodplain information ande xplain the basis behind the findings. This information will be used to identify areas of flood risk, which are based on watershed boundaries. Areas surrounding thef ollowing lakes are affected: Blue Lake, Lake Denton, Dinner Lake, Lake Glenada, Huckleberry Lake, Lake Isis, Lake Jackson, Little Lake Jackson, Lake Lachard, Lake Lelia,L ake Lillian, Lake Lotela, Lake McCoy, Lake Pansy, Lake Sirena, Lake Tulane and Lake Verona. An open house for residents living in these areas will be held Thursday at 4 p.m., at the Bert J.H arris, Jr. Agricultural Center. The center is located at 4509 George Boulevard in Sebring. District representatives will be available to meet with residents anytimeb etween 4 and 6:30 p.m. Residents affected by changes have received letters advising them of the need to contact the District and attend the open house. Futureo pen houses will be scheduled for additional watersheds as preliminary models are completed. During the meeting, preliminary models and floodplain information will be presented to the public forr eview and comment. After addressing the comments, floodplain information will be finalized and presented to the Districts Governing Board for permission to develop thep reliminary FIRMs for submittal to FEMA. Upon receipt of the preliminary FIRMs, FEMAwill begin its FIRM adoption process, which includes: At echnical review by FEMA; Review by Highlands County; Public input; A90-day appeals period; and Issuance of a letter of final determin ation that informs Highlands County and the public of the date when the FIRMs will be considered effective. The floodplain information will b e used by the county and the District for land use and zoning decisions, to help manage development in and around floodplains and wetlands, to reduce flood risks, top reserve land and water resources and for emergency planning. It will also provide valuable information to the public for decisions about purchasing and protecting property. F or more information, visit www.WaterMatters.org/FloodRisk/ or you can also call the District at (3521, ext. 4297. P ublic invited to open house to help develop flood insurance maps O pen house set for Thursday at Bert J. Harris Center

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C M Y K NEWYORK (AP Fords credit rating was lifted to within one level of investment grade Friday, making it cheaper for the automaker to borrow, after it secured a new contract with workers. Standard & Poors Ratings Services raised Ford two levels to BB+ from BB-, saying the agreement will allow its North American operations to remain profitable. The agency said strong performance in North America has helped Ford generate global profits in the past two years. The new 4-year contract with the United Auto Workers will allow for continued profitability and cash generation in North America, it said. The union, which represents 41,000 Ford employees, approved the contract Wednesday. It includes signing bonuses but no annual pay increases, and it will let Ford hire more workers at lower wages. Ford executives said it will raise labor costs by less than 1 percent each year $280 million this year and $80 million a year after that. Fitch Ratings upgraded Ford on Thursday, also to within one level of investment-grade status. Moodys Investor Service has also said its reviewing its below-investment grade ratings for the automaker. Fords credit sank to socalled junk status in 2005, when it was deeply in debt. www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, October 23, 2011Page 9A HICO DEMOCRATIC PARTY; 5.542"; 5"; Black; hoe down; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 E.O. KOCH CONSTRUCTION CO.; 5.542"; 4"; Black; seam p/u; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 7 7 BUSINESS S pecial to the News-SunSEBRING On Oct. 5, H eartland Workforce partnered with Webber I nternational University, the Small Business Development Center of theU niversity of South Florida, Highlands County Economic Development Commission, a nd South Florida Community College, to cond uct a Solutions for Success entrepreneurial seminar. The event was wellattended by diverse members of the communityi ncluding entrepreneurs, small business owners, individuals interested in starting up a business, and community partners including staff from the various chambers of commerce and SouthF lorida Community College. Atalented group of speake rs presented the various opportunities available for entrepreneurialism. The first to speak was Professor Ronald Weber from WebberU niversity, a national trainer, radio show host, and university professor. Weber is best known for his ability to identify the talents of eachu nique individual and teach them how to utilize those talents to become successful. His resourceful and creative ideas, along with his humor-o us personality, inspired everyone and kept the room i n good spirits. The next to present was Dr. Elmer Hall, President ofS trategic Business and Planning and Chair of the Highlands County Economic D evelopment Business Accelerator Board. Dr. Hall e xplained the tools available to our community through the Highlands Business Incubator program. Some of the businesses in attendancew ere not aware of the vast array of services available through the Incubator Program, which has locations in Avon Park and at the Sebring Airport Authority. The Incubator targets newb usinesses and provides physical space with afforda ble rent, vital business services, and business development direction. The next speaker was David Noel, certified busi-n ess analyst from the Small Business Development Center of the University of South Florida. Noel discussed the many serviceso ffered by his team of 12 specialists, at little or no cost to the community. The team provides confidential counseling covering any-t hing from the development of a business plan, to busin ess valuation and market research, to assisting businesses with the knowledgen eeded to apply for government contracts. The presentation conclude d with Heartland Workforce Business Representative C olleen Dukes explaining Heartland Workforce services available to businesses, including job posting, applicant pool screening, and var-i ous funding sources available for businesses to train their existing workforce on needed skills and technology. The Solutions for Success seminar focused on givings mall businesses and entrepreneurs the inspiration to t ake on new challenges, which in turn will generate jobs and spur growth in our region. Participants left the session inspired, makinga ppointments with each of the agencies for follow-up services and information. For additional information, contact Colleen Dukes,H eartland Workforce Business representative, at cdukes@hwib.org/. Heartland Workforce Solutions a success C ourtesy photo David Noel, certified business analyst from the Small Business Development Center of the U niversity of South Florida, speaks at the Solutions for Success entrepreneurial seminar. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Ridge Area Arc traveled to WestP alm Beach Oct. 5-7 to participate in the 2011 Arc of Florida Convention and came back with some awards. R idge Area Arc Director of Program Development and Special STARS Coordinator Cindy Marshall brought home the2 011 Volunteer of the Year Award from the Arc of Florida Convention. Thiss tatewide award was presented during an awards luncheon on Oct. 6 at theC rowne Plaza Hotel. Marshall received the a ward for the volunteer work she has done for the past seven years in coordi-n ating Special STARS, a sports and recreational prog ram for more than 250 children and adults with disabilities in Highlands, Hardee and Okeechobee counties. R idge Area Arc also won second place at the Super H ero Dance on Oct. 6 for designing some awesome costumes. ConsumersM aricel Moreno, Amelia Titus, Amy Matthews and K errie Baker and CEO Rhonda Beckman wore pink capes and masks to p romote Breast Cancer Awareness Month which is October. Titus is a breast cancer survivor and encouragede veryone to get an annual exam. Baker also has an a unt who survived breast cancer. M arshall donned a cow costume and went as Mamma Moo a locals uper hero character designed to educate people a bout getting annual breast exams to stamp out cancer. Ridge Area Arc staff m embers Candice Ciesla, Heather Hodge and Marshall gave presentations at the convention. Everyone enjoyed learningn ew ideas. Ridge Area Arc brings h ome state honors C ourtesy photo Ridge Area Arc Director of Program Development and Special STARS Coordinator Cindy Marshall won the 2011 Arc of Florida Volunteer of the Year Award at a state convention in West Palm Beach on Oct. 5-7. B y ANDREWTAYLOR Associated PressWASHINGTON President Barack Obamas allies in theS enate on Friday unveiled the next piece of his failed $447 billion jobs measure to get a vote in the Senate: a $60 billion investment in infrastruc-t ure projects such as roads and bridges. L ike its two predecessors, however, the infrastructure package figurest o be unanimously opposed by Republicans a nd a handful of Democrats over its stimulus-style spending and tax surcharge on the very wealthy. A test vote on the measure will come after t he Senate returns from vacation next month. The legislation would p rovide an immediate $50 billion investment in A mericas roads, bridges and airports, and transit systems and establish a$ 10 billion national infrastructure bank to leverage private and public capital f or longer-term infrastructure projects. This legislation will create hundreds of thousands of construction jobs rebuilding our roads, bridges and infrastruc-t ure, said Majority Leader Harry Reid, DNev. The measure would be financed by a 0.7 percentage point surcharge on income over $1 million. T he announcement by Senate Democrats came t he day after Republicans scuttled a pared-back jobs measure designed to boost hiring of teachers and first responders. T hat plan failed on a 50-50 test vote that fell well short of the 60 needed to break a filibuster. Two Democrats aband oned Obama on the vote and two more who voted with the president said they couldnt support the underlying Obama plan unless its changed. Thursdays $35 billion measure combined $30 billion for state and local governments to hire teachers and other school workers with $5 billion to help pay the salaries of police officers, firefighters and other first responders. The White House says the measure would support almost 400,000 education jobs for one year. Republicans call that a temporary sugar high for the economy and say its a taxpayerfunded bailout of state and local governments. More of Obamas jobs bill unveiled Associated PressNEWYORK M cDonalds Corp.s thirdquarter net income rose by 9 p ercent as it kept defying a tough economy and attracting more customers. But those diners might want to get ready to pay more. T he worlds largest hamburger chain, which has performed well throughout the recession and its aftermath, noted potential challengesl ike the rising cost of beef and higher labor costs. McDonalds, a bellwether for the rest of the fast-food industry, hinted that it could raise menu prices for the third time this year. Companies of all stripes, from restaurants to clothing makers, raised prices this year as the cost for many raw materials spiked, and it appears that more increases are coming. For McDonalds that means the beef in its burgers, the grain in its buns and the coffee in its lattes. But companies know that they still have to be careful to not raise prices too much and drive away customers, who are choosing carefullyw here to spend their money. The economists say we a re officially out of the recession, but it hardly feels that way, CEO Jim Skinner said in a conference call with analysts. He referred toM cDonalds gains as hardwon victories. The 9 percent rise in net income, to $1.51 billion, represents McDonalds ninths traight quarter of earnings gains. McDonalds success has hinged on quickly adapting to customerschanging tastes and reshaping itself as a hip, healthier place to eat. It has added menu items like smoothies and oatmeal, remodeled restaurants, and converted more locations to 24-hour operations. All those moves, the company says, have brought in more customers. The company didnt give details about possible price increases, though Skinner said that keeping prices affordable was paramount. McDonalds keeps gaining, talks price hikes S&P upgrades Ford debt after labor deal

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C M Y K Associated PressNEWYORK Wal-Mart S tores Inc., the nations largest private employer, is scaling back health care coverage for future part-time workers while raising premiums for many of its full-time workers, particularly tobacco users. The discounter, which employs more than 1.4 million workers, said that rising health care costs are forcing it to eliminate health care coverage for future part-time workers who work less than 24 hours a week. Many workers will also see their premiums rise, and the company will be reducing by half the amount it contributes for health care expenses that are not covered under their plan. Tobacco users will particularly be hit hard, seeing premiums increase by about 40 percent, the company said. Greg Rossiter, a Wal-Mart spokesman, said that the decision was not in response to the new health care law but rather to the harsh realities of escalating health care costs. Health care costs are continuing to go up faster than anyone would like, said Rossiter. It is a difficult decision to raise rates. But we are striking a balance between managing costs and providing quality care and coverage. Rossiter said the premium increases vary by plan, but noted that for the most popular health care plan, an associate who paid $11 per pay period, will be paying $15 per pay period next year. He noted that tobacco users with a spouse would pay $141 per pay period for one plan as compared with $108 per pay period for a non-tobacco user. R ossiter reasoned that tobacco users consume 25 percent more health care services than non-tobacco users. The company noted that preventative care such as annual checkups and mammograms remain fully covered. But Wal-Mart will now provide $500 for families to use for health care expenses that are not covered, down from $1,000. For individuals, WalMart will contribute $250 for associates, down from $500. Rossiter also noted that w hile eligibility rules for new part-time associates have changed, it will not change for current associates. For those who average 24 hours to 33 hours a week, their children will still be able to be covered. Their spouses had never been eligible. Like many other retailers, Wal-Mart has been on a campaign to cut costs by having more workers on duty during peak sales times without being overstaffed during lulls. But the companys cuts onh ealth care represent a reversal from only a few years ago when Wal-Mart, under pressure from union-backed groups, announced that it would provide health care coverage to part-time workers, including those who work less than 24 hours a week, after one year on the job. Prior to that, part-time workers had to work at WalMart for two years before being eligible for coverage. Page 10ANews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011www.newssun.com MILLER'S CENTRAL AIR; 9.347"; 6"; Black plus three; process, main; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 0 0 0 0 9 9 N ews-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS C entral Florida Glass & Mirror installers Mike Moore, left, and Deyben Fabian install a glass facade Thursday morning at t he Alan Jay Kia dealership in Sebring. Central Florida Glass & Mirror owner Don Maddox said he was grateful for a local commercial job, explaining that for the past three years the company has been forced to take mostly out-of-town jobs. Maddox was pleased that Alan Jay Wildstein chose to hire Bevis Construction, a local contractor, which in turn hired a l ocal company to install the glass. BUSINESS If you havent already jumped on the home energy-e fficiency bandwagon, the good news is that several federal energy tax credits origi-n ally slated to end in 2010 were extended through Dec. 31, 2011; but the not-so-goodn ews is that these credits are worth significantly less and are morer estrictive than before. All is not lost, however, since several additional credits( outlined below) remain in effect through 2016. H eres how the soon-toexpire energy tax credits work: Y ou may claim a credit for 10 percent of the total c ost of various home energy-efficiency products for your existing primary residence, including: insulation; heating, ventilationa nd air conditioning systems; metal and asphalt r oofs; energy-efficient windows, doors and skylights; biomass stoves and non-s olar water heaters. There are a few restrictions, howe ver: The maximum combined credit is $500 (10 percent o f $5,000 in total cost) for all allowable products purchased between 2006 and 2011. Thus, if youve already claimed creditso ver $500 in previous years when limits were higher, you cannot file. Certain items have lower allowable tax credit maxi-m ums. For example: windows are capped at $200 in t otal credits; furnaces and boilers $150 maximum( must have an annual fuel utilization rate of 95 or greater); central air conditioner $300 maximum; water heater $300 (withinc ertain efficiency limits); and biomass stoves $300. You cannot claim a credit for labor costs. Energy tax credits are n onrefundable, which means you can only claim a credit to offset taxes you owe for the year. Tax credits may only be claimed once and are limited to the year in which you purchased the item. Energy tax credits will continue to be available for geothermal heat pumps, solar energy systems and wind energy systems installed at new or existing principal or second homes by December 31, 2016, for 30 percent of cost, with no upper limit. In addition,a credit continues for fuel cells at 30 percent of cost up to $500 per kWof power capacity( for primary residences only). And tax credits are still available on certain fuel-efficientv ehicles. Visit www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/ taxcenter.shtml for details.F or full details on available tax credits, visit www.energystar.gov/. I f youre a low-income household and cant afford t o weatherproof your home, you may be eligible for the Department of EnergysW eatherization Assistance Program (WAP). If youre a ccepted, a professional weatherization crew will conduct a home energy audit where theyll analyze your utility bills, test fori nfiltration of outside air, inspect your home and e quipment for safety and determine the most costeffective energy conserva-t ion measures for your home. D epending on what they find, the agency will then conduct needed repairs and e quipment installation, which might include: installing wall, floor and attic insulation; sealing and repairing ducts; reducinga ir infiltration and pressure imbalances; and tuning, repairing or replacing heating and cooling systems, as needed. To learn how WAPw orks, visit www.eere.energy.gov/wip/ w ap.html. Also, you may qualify for short-term utili-t y bill assistance through the Low-Income Energy Assistance Program (www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ocs/liheap). O ther great ways to cut energy costs include turning your thermostat back 10-15 degrees for eight hours, while asleep or atw ork, using Energy Star appliances and compact fluorescent lights and lowering your hot water heater temperature to 120 degrees or lower. Bottom line: Take advantage of financial incentives available to make your home more energy efficient just in time for winters chill. Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. (twitter.com/PracticalMoney) Energy-efficiency tax credits expire soon Personal Finance Jason Alderman Putting up a good front Wal-Mart cuts some health care coverage A ssociated PressBPmoved a step closer to being allowed to drill new deepwater wells in the Gulf of Mexico when the agency that regulates U.S. offshore drilling saidF riday it approved a supplemental exploration plan submitted by the oil giant. The British firm still must obtain permits to be able to start drilling. BPPLCi s seeking to drill up to four wells in the Gulfs Keathley Canyon in water that is more than 6,000 feet deep and is located 192 miles from the Louisiana shore. The project would be the first new o ne drilled by BPin the Gulf since last years Deepwater Horizon explosion that killed 11 workers and led to thew orst offshore oil spill in U.S. history. The company has a 46 percent stake in a well already approved for drilling byN oble Energy. BPalso bought out S hells 25 percent interest in two Gulf fields in December, making BPthe sole owner of both. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Regulation andE nforcement said it conducted a thorough review before making its decision, and it cited additional safety enhancements and performance standards announced by BPin July. The agencys aid it has verified that BPhas met the relevant voluntary performance standards. In Washington, U.S. Rep. Edward Markey, a Massachusetts Democrat andr anking member of the House Committee on Natural Resources, said the approval may be premature. Comprehensive safety legislation hasnt passed Congress, and BPhasnt paid the fines they owe for their spill,y et BPis being given back the keys to d rill in the Gulf, Markey said. Adeepwater drilling moratorium that was painful for the industry and Gulf states that rely on drilling for jobs and tax revenue was imposed after the April2 010 spill. After it was lifted, the U.S. government began a slow process of approving the resumption of deepwater activities in the Gulf. It set out to make sure the drilling plans met strict newr ules put in place after the BPspill. Also Friday, a federal judge in New Orleans held a hearing to update lawyers on the status of the more than 500 lawsuits pending in the multidistrictl itigation over the oil spill. Atrial is scheduled for February to determine whether rig owner Transocean Ltd. canl imit what it pays claimants under maritime law and to assign percentages of fault to Transocean and other companiesi nvolved in the disaster. BP step closer to drilling new Gulf wells

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C M Y K www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011Page 11A I N THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-000197-GCS J UDGE: J. David Langford TD BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, v s. P AULINE E. DELMARR, an individual; MICHAEL A. DELMARR, an individual; SUN 'N LAKE OF SEBRING IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT, a special district and public corporation of the State of Florida; and J OHN DOE and JANE DOE, unknown parties in possession,D efendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final J udgment of Foreclosure dated October 10, 2011 ( the ``Judgment''), entered in Civil Case No. 1 1-000197-GCS of the Circuit Court of the Tenth J udicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Flori da, in which TD BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, i s Plaintiff, and PAULINE E. DELMARR and MIC HAEL A. DELMARR, are Defendants. I will sell the Property as defined in the Judgment and as set forth below at a public sale on November 9th, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. to the ``highest bidder'', for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room i n the basement of the Highlands County Courth ouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, S ebring, Florida 33870, in accordance with Sect ion 45.031, Florida Statutes. The ``highest bidd er'' for purposes of this Notice of Sale, is defined a s the party who bids the largest amount of m oney to purchase the Property ad who comp letes the sale in a timely fashion, as hereinafter s et out. The one who bids the largest amount of m oney to purchase the Property shall be permitt ed to complete the sale by delivering to the Clerk, the balance of such bid, over and above the deposit, by 5:00 p.m. on the day of the sale. The following Property located in Highlands C ounty, Florida, is the subject of this Notice of S ale: L ot 21, Block 105, SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES Unit 8 according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat B ook 9, Page 58, of the Public Records of Highl ands County, Florida, t ogether with all existing or subsequently erected or affixed buildings, improvements, and fixtures (the ``Property'' Property Address: 5708 San Juan Drive, Sebring, Florida 33872 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus f rom the sale, if any, other than the property o wner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. W ITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on O ctober 12, 2011. BOB GERMAINE Clerk of Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michala k D eputy Clerk O ctober 23, 30, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10000726GCS DKR MORTGAGE ASSET TRUST I, P laintiff(s v s. DAMARIS DIXON, ET AL D efendants N OTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Octob er 4, 2011, and entered in Case No. 1 0000726GCS of the Circuit Court of the TENTH J udicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, wherein DKR MORTGAGE ASSET TRUST I, is the Plaintiff and DAMARIS DIXON, WILFREDO CASTELLANOS, HIGHLANDS COUNTY AND UNK NOWN TENANT OR TENANTS IN POSSESSION a re Defendants. T he Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest a nd best bidder for cash in JURY ASSEMBLY R OOM, BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY C OURTHOUSE at 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVEN UE, SEBRING, FL 33870, at 11:00 A.M. on the 3rd day of November, 2011, the following described property s set forth in said order of Final Judgment, to wit: L OT 484 OF SEBRING RIDGE, SECTION E, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 53, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. P ROPERTY ADDRESS: 4515 SNAPPER DRIVE, S EBRING, FL 33870 I F YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO F UNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST F ILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO L ATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU F AIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED T ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS.D ATED at HIGHLANDS County, Florida, this 7th d ay of October, 2011. R OBERT W. GERMAINE, Clerk H IGHLANDS County, Florida B y: /s/ Toni Kopp D eputy Clerk O ctober 16, 23, 2011 HIGHLANDS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL (RFP The Board of County Commissioners, Highlands County, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed proposals in the County Purchasing Department for: RFP 12-016 RECYCLABLES TRANSFER & PROCESSING SERVICES AND PROVISION OF RECYCLING CARTS Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, Interim Director, Highlands County General Services/Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 Telephone: 863-402-6523; Fax: 863-402-6735, or by E-Mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:dgilbert@hcbcc.org" dgilbert@hcbcc.org Proposer qualification and selection shall be based on the evaluation process and criteria stated in the RFP. A Mandatory Pre-Proposal Meeting and site visit of the Desoto City Landfill Recycling Facility (DCLRF County Solid Waste Management Center (HCSWMC be held on November 10, 2011 at 9:00 A.M. The meeting will be held in the County Engineers Training Room, (Annex Building) 505 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The site visits of the DCLRF and HCSWMC will immediately follow the pre-proposal meeting. Sufficient time will be provided for all interested parties to tour the DCLRF and HCSWMC, take photographs, speak with County staff, and ask relevant questions. Prospective PROPOSERS to this RFP should bring appropriate staff, such as engineers, to the site visit. Due to the scope and nature of the proposed project, Proposals received from any PROPOSER who did not attend the mandatory pre-proposal meeting and the DCLRF and HCSWMC site visits will be judged as non-responsive and will not be considered for award. Proposal submissions must be sealed and marked with the name of the PROPOSER, and the RFP number and title RFP 12-016 Recyclables Transfer & Processing Services And Provision Of Recycling Carts so as to identify the enclosed Proposal. Each submittal shall include one (1 original and ten (10 must be delivered to Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803, so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., January 11, 2012, at which time they will be opened. Proposals received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The BCC will not be responsible for the late deliveries of Proposals that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service. One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at the above Proposal opening. Highlands County Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this Proposal. The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to accept or reject any or all Proposals or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made in the best interest of Highlands County. The BCC reserves the right to waive irregularities in the Proposal. The Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the BCCs functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mrs. Melissa Bruns, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice or by e-mail: mbruns@hcbcc.org. Requests for Computer-Assisted Realtime Technology services or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service. Board of County Commissioners; Purchasing Department Highlands County, Florida Website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net October 23, 30, 2011 1050Legals I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION C ASE NO.: 10-00392 SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. DAWN L. SIERADZAN; M.T. LOTZ, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT(S POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 12th day of 10-00392, of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. is the Plaintiff and DAWN L. SIERADZAN; M.T. LOTZ, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT(S IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY,, are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33870 at the Highlands County Courthouse in Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 9th day of November, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 13, BLOCK 293, LAKE SEBRING SUBDIVISION, RECORDED ON SHEETS 1 THRU 5, INCLUSIVE OF LAKE SEBRING SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 12 THUR 16, INCLUSIVE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING A PART OF SECTION 13, 14 AND 24, ALL IN TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH, RANGE 28 EAST RECORDED IN HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 13th day of October, 2011. Robert W. Germaine Clerk Of The Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk October 23, 30, 2011 I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 282008CA0001463AOOOXX C OUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC., P laintiff, vs. R ICHARD J. BRILHANTE; UNKNOWN S POUSE OF RICHARD J. BRILHANTE; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT(S SION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, D efendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order R esetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 12th day of O ctober, 2011, and entered in Case No. 2 82008CA0001463AOOOXX, of the Circuit Court o f the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands C ounty, Florida, wherein COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC. is the Plaintiff and RICHARD J. BRILH ANTE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RICHARD J. BRILHANTE; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT(S PROPERTY, are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the HIGHLANDS C OUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE A VENUE, SEBRING, FL 33870 at the Highlands C ounty Courthouse in Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 a .m. on the 9th day of November, 2011, the foll owing described property as set forth in said Final J udgment, to wit: LOT 24, BLOCK 255, SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, UNIT 13, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, AT PAGE 71, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHL ANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A NY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE S URPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN T HE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE L IS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 D AYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 13th day of October, 2011. Robert W. Germaine Clerk Of The Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk O ctober 23, 30, 2011 I N THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 282008001313AOOOXX COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INCORPORATED, Plaintiff, vs. FREDERICK D. BRYAN; MELINDA BRYAN; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INCORPORATED, ACTING SOLELY AS A NOMINEE FOR AMERICA'S WHOLESALE LENDER; JANE DOE; JOHN DOE; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 12th day of 282008001313AOOOXX, of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INCORPORATED is the Plaintiff and FREDERICK D. BRYAN; MELINDA BRYAN; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INCORPORATED, ACTING SOLELY AS A NOMINEE FOR AMERICA'S WHOLESALE LENDER; JANE DOE; JOHN DOE; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33870 at the Highlands County Courthouse in Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 9th day of November, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 11, IN BLOCK 9, OF PLACID LAKES SECTION NINETEEN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 14, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 13th day of October, 2011. Robert W. Germaine Clerk Of The Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michala k Deputy Clerk October 23, 30, 2011 1050Legals NOTICE OF LANDOWNERS MEETING AND THE ELECTION OF ONE SUPERVISOR FOR THE SPRING LAKE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT The Spring Lake Improvement District will conduct a Landowners Meeting on Wednesday, November 9, 2011, at 10:00 A.M. at the District Office, 115 Spring Lake Boulevard, Sebring, Florida 33876. An election shall be held for the purpose of electing ONE Supervisor to a Board of five Supervisors for a term expiring on the regular meeting date in November, 2014 in accordance with the Florida Statutes, Chapter 90-434. The Landowners may vote in person or by proxy, in writing; Proxies are available at the District Office. At said meeting each landowner shall be entitled to cast one vote per acre of land owned and located within the District. Fractions of an acre shall be treated as one acre, entitling the landowners to one vote with respect thereto. The person receiving the highest number of votes for the office of Supervisor shall be declared elected. In addition any other business relating to the Spring Lake Improvement District as may properly come before the meeting will be heard. EACH PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THE MEETING IS ADVISED THAT PERSON MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, INCLUDING THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH SUCH APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. Joseph DeCerbo District Manager October 16, 23, 30, 2011 HIGHLANDS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS (HCBCC GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING INVITATION TO BID (ITB T he Board of County Commissioners (BCC County, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed proposals in the County Purchasing Department for the following servi ces: ITB No. 12-015 SECURITY SERVICES FOR PLACID LAKES SPECIAL BENEFIT DISTRICT NIGP Code: 990-46 Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, Interim P urchasing Manager; 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33875-5803 Phone: 863-402-6524 Fax: 863-402-6735; or E-Mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:dgilbert@hcbcc.org" dgilbert@hcbcc.org Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked with the bid number and name so as to identify the enclosed bid. Bids must be delivered to the Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL. 33875-5803 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., THURSDAY; NOVEMBER 10, 2011, at which time they will be opened. Bids received later than the date and time as s pecified will be rejected. The Board will not be responsible for the late deliveries of bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service. One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at the bid opening. Highlands County Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this bid. The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners (HCBCC/COUNTY or all proposals or any parts thereof, and the determination of this award, if an award is made, will be based on the ranking of each vendors proposal. The Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the proposal. The Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. The B oard of County Commissioners of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mrs. Melissa Bruns, ADA Coordinator at: 8 63-402-6509 (Voice or by e-mail: mbruns@hcbcc.org. Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service. Board of County Commissioners; Purchasing Department; Highlands County, Florida Website: www.hcbcc.netI N THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C IVIL DIVISION C ASE NO.: 282009CA001585AOOOXX BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., Plaintiff, vs.R OXANA COLONGO; UNKNOWN TENANT(S P OSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, D efendants. N OTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgm ent of Foreclosure Sale dated the 4th day of October, 2011, and entered in Case No. 2 82009CA001585AOOOXX, of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. is the Plaintiff and ROXANA COLONGO and UNKNOWN TENANT(S POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33870 at the Highlands County Courthouse in Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 8th day of November, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF HIGHLANDS, STATE OF FLORIDA, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOTS 1 AND 2, OF LAKE ANGELO SUBDIVISION, A RESUBDIVISION OF A PART OF LOT 16, BLOCK 4, SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH, RANGE 28 EAST AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 63, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA; LESS AND EXCEPT A PORTION OF LOT 1 DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 1 THENCE RUN EASTERLY ALONG THE SHORELINE OF LAKE ANGELO A DISTANCE OF 25 FEET, THENCE IN A NORTHWESTERLY DIRECTION TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 1, THENCE IN A SOUTHERLY DIRECTION ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 1 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 7th day of October, 2011. Robert W. Germaine Clerk Of The Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk October 23, 30, 2011 1050Legals I N THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C IVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2008-CA-000270 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. CONNIE BROWN, AS PERSONAL R EPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF, G EORGE GRANT, DECEASED, et al, D efendant(s N OTICE OF REFORECLOSURE SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Reforeclosure dated Jun 20, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2008-CA-000270 of t he Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein W ELLS FARGO BANK, NA is the Plaintiff and CONNIE BROWN, AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF, GEORGE GRANT, DECEASED; GEORGE M. GRANT A/K/A GEORGE MICHAEL GRANT A/K/A GEORGE MICHEAL GRANT JR.;a are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 9th day of November, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: THE LAND REFERRED TO IN THIS EXHIBIT IS LOCATED IN THE COUNTY OF HIGHLANDS AND THE STATE OF FLORIDA IN DEED BOOK 470 AT PAGE 047 AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: THE EAST 50 FEET OF LOTS 4, 5 AND 6 AND THE EAST ONE HALF OF LOT 7, BLOCK 166, SEBRING HIGHLANDS SUBDIVISION, AS SHOWN BY MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 97. A/K/A 4708 MINVERA STREET, SEBRING, FL 33870 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on October 11, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 G11001333 NMNC-SPECFNMA-twernick-Team 1 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813 251-4766, not later than seven (7 the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V via Florida Relay Service. October 23, 30, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION C ASE NO.: 09001396GCS BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, P laintiff, DASMIE JAMES, et al, Defendant(s NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated October 7, 2011 and entered in Case No. 09001396GCS of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, is the Plaintiff and DASMIE JAMES; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 3rd day of November, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 11, SUN 'N LAKES OF SEBRING UNIT 25R1, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 15, PAGE 59, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 5410 COLUMBUS BLVD., SEBRING, FL 33870 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on October 7, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10110612 COUNTRY-Conv--Team 2 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813 251-4766, not later than seven (7 the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V via Florida Relay Service. October 16, 23, 2011 I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C IVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2009-CA-001091 B ANK OF AMERICA, N.A., P laintiff, GERI WHITE A/K/A GERALDINE WHITE, et al, Defendant(s N OTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Ord er Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated October 7 2011 and entered in Case No. 2 009-CA-001091 of the Circuit Court of the T ENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS C ounty, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., i s the Plaintiff and GERI WHITE A/K/A GERALDINE WHITE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GERI WHITE A/K/A GERALDINE WHITE IF ANY; are the Defendants, I w ill sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at J URY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF T HE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 S OUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 3 rd day of November, 2011, the following des cribed property as set forth in said Final Judgm ent: LOT 1, BLOCK 2, LARO VISTA SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 11, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A /K/A 1537 VICKI DR., SEBRING, FL 33870 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus f rom the sale, if any, other than the property o wner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 W ITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on October 10, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak D eputy Clerk F lorida Default Law Group, P.L. P .O. Box 25018 T ampa, Florida 33622-5018 F 10110048 COUNTRY-Conv--Team 2 *See Americans with Disabilities Act I n accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, p ersons with disabilities needing a special accomm odation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813 251-4766, not later than seven (7 the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V v ia Florida Relay Service. O ctober 16, 23, 2011 Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under the Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (22o list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed under our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be placed under the Bargain Buy category. Index1000 Announcements 2 000 Employment 3000 Financial 4 000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9 000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com 863-314-9876 DEADLINES Publication Place by: W ednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 314-9876. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. A DD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! A D RATESG ARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $115 03 days$14(additional lines $1 eachMISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 eachREAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$7 1 PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION Pursuant to Section 324 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know act of 1986 (EPCRA lowing information is available to the public upon request during normal business hours by contacting the Florida, District VII, Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC for Hazardous Materials. Hazardous Material Safety Data Sheets Facility Hazardous Chemical Inventory Forms Section 304 Chemical Release Follow-up Notifications District VII, LEPC Hazardous Materials Emergency Plan The District VII LEPC services residents of DeSoto, Hardee, Highlands, Okeechobee, and Polk Counties. EPCRA requires that any business that regularly uses, handles, or stores certain hazardous chemicals register with State and local regulatory agencies. If you have never registered or wish to verify your requirement to register, contact the LEPC at the address or phone number listed below. If you have previously complied, be sure your notif ications are current penalties for non-compliance are severe. To obtain notification information or to learn more about EPCRA, please contact: Florida District VII LEPC 555 East Church Street P.O. Box 2089 B artow, Florida 33831 863-534-7130 ext. 107 October 23, 2011 1050Legals PLEASE SEE A DDITIONAL LEGALS ON PAGE 8A O F TODAYS NEWS-SUN

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C M Y K Page 12ANews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011www.newssun.com IN THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C ASE NUMBER: 2011-153 GCS UNITED MIDWEST SAVINGS BANK,P LAINTIFF, VS. C ARMEN BARTLETT, EDMUND BARTLETT, JASCINTH SMITH, XAVIER SMITH, LINCOLN B LACKWOOD, MERIL BLACKWOOD, ADRIAN W ILLIAMS and SIMONE PROPERTIES, INC., a F lorida corporation, D efendants. NOTICE OF SALE P ursuant to Chapter 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final J udgment of Foreclosure dated August 29, 2011 and entered in Case No. 2011-153 GCS of the C ircuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for H ighlands County, Florida, wherein United Midwest S avings Bank is Plaintiff and Carmen Bartlett, E dmund Bartlett, Jascinth Smith, Xavier Smith, Lincoln Blackwood, Meril Blackwood, Adrian W illiams, and Simone Properties, Inc., a Florida corporation are defendants, I will sell to the highesta nd best bidder for cash in the Jury Assembly room in the Basement at the Highlands County Courthouse l ocated at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, F lorida 33870, at eleven oclock a.m. on October 3 1, 2011, the following described propety as set f orth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: See Exhibit ``A attached hereto and made a part h ereof. EXHIBIT ``A LEGAL DESCRIPTION P ARCEL 6A B eing a parcel of land lying in Section 12, Township 38 South, Range 30 East, Highlands County, Florida, a nd being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of said Section 1 2; thence bear S 00 degrees 14 W along the West line of said Section 12, for a distance of 1 205.32 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING: T hence continue S 00 degrees 14 W, along said W est line of Section 12, for a distance of 469.59 f eet to a point; thence bear N 89 degrees 10 E f or a distance of 1837.74 feet to a point; thence bear N 10 degrees 10;; E for a distance of 129.10 feet to a point; thence bear N 26 degrees 49 E for a distance of 152.10 feet to a point;t hence bear N 00 degrees 12 W for a distance of 198.08 feet to a point; thence bear S 89 degrees 1 0 W for a distance of 1926.55 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 20.0 acres, more o r less, and being subject to any and all easements, restrictions, reservations and right of way of record. Together with and subject to the following described e asements: A 50.00 feet perpetual non-exclusive easement for r ight of way, ingress, egress and regress lying in S ections 1 and 12, Township 38 South, Range 30 East, Highlands County, Florida, and being more p articularly described as the West 50.00 feet of said Sections 1 and 12, Tonwship 38 South, Range 30 E ast, Highlands County, Florida; and being 70.00 feet easements for the purpose of ingress, egress, u tilities and drainage, lying in Sections 1 and 12, Township 38 South, Range 30 East, Highlands C ounty, Florida, and being more particularly d escribed as follows: Being the Easst 70.00 feet of Sections 1 and 12, Township 38 South, Range 30 East, Highlands County, Florid, and: L ying in Section 1, Township 38 South, Range 30 E ast, Highlands County, Florida, and being 35.00 feet on either side of and parallel with the following d escribed centerline; Commence at the Southwest corner of said Section 1 ; thence bear N 00 degrees 30 E along the W est line of said Section 1, for a distance of 200.23 f eet to the POINT OF BEGINNING of said centerline of e asement; thence bear N 89 degrees 10 E for a d istance of 5288.00 feet to the intersection with the E ast line of said Section 1, and the POINT OF T ERMINUS of said centerline of easement; and: L ying in Sections 1 and 12, Township 38 South, R ange 30 East, Highlands County, Florida, adn being 35.00 feet on either side of and parallel with the following described centerline: C ommence at the Southwest corner of said Section 1 : Thence bear N 00 degrees 30 E, along the W est line of said Section 1, for a distance of 200.23 f eet to a point; thence bear N 89 degrees 10 E f or a distance of 3056.81 feet to the POINT OF B EGINNING of said centerline of easement; thence bear the following bearings and distances along said centerline of easement: S 08 degrees 54 W for a distance of 256.25 f eet to a point; S 39 degrees 34 W for a distance of 191.60 f eet to a point; S 26 degrees 14 W for a distance of 214.13 f eet to a point; S 33 degrees 09 W for a distance of 125.94 feet to a point;S 54 degrees 34 W for a distance of 60.99 feet to a point;S 72 degrees 50 W for a distance of 105.22 feet to a point; S 89 degrees 44 W for a distance of 360.18 f eet to a point; S 75 degrees 06 W for a distance of 241.98 f eet to a point; S 14 degrees 55 W for a distance of 107.03 feet to a point; S 05 degrees 22 E for a distance of 287.70 feet to a point; S 24 degrees 07 W for a distance of 163.72 f eet to a point; S 00 degrees 12 E for a distance of 252.14 feet t o a point; S 26 degrees 49 W for a distance of 152.10 f eet to a point; S 10 degrees 10 W for a distance of 301.16 feet to a point;S 07 degrees 50 E for a distance of 123.86 feet t o a point; S 32 degrees 17 W for a distance of 329.78 f eet to a point; N 84 degrees 26 W for a distance of 73.66 feet t o a point of curvature of a curve concave to the South and having for its elements a radius of 186.68 feet, a central angle of 31 degrees 53, a chord bearing of S 63 degrees 11 W and a chord distance of 102.57 feet; thence bear along said curve for an arc length of 103.91 feet to the POINT OF CURVATURE of a curve concave to the Southeast and having for its elements a radius of 143.13 feet,a central angle of 69 degrees 26, a chord bearing of S 12 degrees 32 W and a chord distance of 163.01 feet; thence bear along said curve for an arc length of 173.42 feet to the POINT OF TANGENCY of said curve; thence bear S 22 degrees 10 E for a distance of 309.76 feet to a point; S 08 degrees 54 E for a distance of 292.18 feet to a point; S 08 degrees 06 W for a distance of 198.17 feet to a point; S 33 degrees 10 E for a distance of 134.22 feet to a point; S 02 degrees 12 W for a distance of 266.15 feet to a point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northeast and having for its elements a radius of 139.87 feet, a central angle of 70 degrees 02, a chord bearing of S 30 degrees 33 E and a chord distance of 160.54 feet; thence bear long said curve for an arc length of 170.99 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the North and having for its elements a radius of 111.85 feet, a central angle of 64 degrees 56, a chord bearing of N 81 degrees 57 E and a chord distance of 120.09 feet; thence bear along said curve for an arc length of 126.77 feet to a point of reverse curvature of a curve concave to the South and having for its elements a radius of 136.53 feet, a central angle of 49 degrees 45, a chord bearing of N 74 degrees 21 E and a chord distance of 114.88 feet; thence bear along said curve for an arc length of 118.57 feet to the POINT OF TANGENCY of said curve; thence bear S 80 degrees 45 E for a distance of 260.64 feet to a point; N 86 degrees 48 E for a distance of 483.66 feet to a point; N 70 degrees 19 E for a distance of 166.64 feet to a point; N 52 degrees 33 E for a distance of 144.46 feet to a point; N 51 degrees 17 E for a distance of 134.00 feet to a point; N 17 degrees 08 E for a distance of 46.36 feet to a point; N 14 degrees 44 W for a distance of 203.88 feet to a point; N 02 degrees 40 E for a distance of 1050L egalsDUMMY 09 SERVICE DIRECTORY DUMMY 5X21.5 AD # 00011623

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C M Y K www.newssun.comNNews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011Page 13A 137.08 feet to a point; N 07 degrees 19 W for a d istance of 164.46 feet to a point; N 45 degrees 11 E for a distance of 54.02 feet to a point; N 8 1 degrees 51 E for a distance of 169.97 feet t o a point; S 63 degrees 00 E for a distance of 2 32.42 feet to a point; N 84 degrees 59 E for a d istance of 150.14 feet to a point; N 37 degrees 03 E for a distanc of 470.83 feet to a point; S 8 1 degrees 07 E for a distance of 742.85 feet to a point; N 59 degrees 08 E for a distanc of 8 07.62 feet to the intersection with the East line of said Section 12, and the POINT OF TERMINUS of s aid centerline of easement. A NY PERSON CLAIMIN AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THANT HE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY ( 60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated at Highlands County, Florida this 29th day o f August, 2011. BOB GERMAINE C lerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida B y: /s/ Priscilla Michalak A s Deputy Clerk I f you are a person with a disability who needs a ssistance in order to participate in a program or service of the State Court System, you should c ontact the Office of the Court Administrator at (863voice863TDD ( 800)955-8770 (Florida Relay Service), as much in advance of your court appearance or visit thec ourthouse as possible. Please be prepared to explain your functional limitations and suggest an a uxilliary aid or service that you believe will enable y ou to effectively participate in the court program or service. O ctober 16, 23, 2011 GRAND MARQUIS,2000. 69K, Silver, gray velour seats. Purrs like a kitten. Must see and drive to appreciate. $3500 obo. 863-657-2491. 9450Automotive for SaleCHEST -All aluminum diamond plate, 48" long, good for pickup or trailer. Very Nice! $95. 863-453-7027 9350Automotive Parts& Accessories 9000 TransportationELECTRIC SCOOTER(2 trunks, Batteries included, Both for $275 Call 863-385-2907 8400RecreationalVehicles BIG GUNSHOWHighlands County Fair Grounds Sebring, FLOCTOBER 29 & 30SAT. 9-5; SUN. 9-4 Concealed Course At Show! Call 321-777-7455 AMMO -Looking for hard to get ammo? I have Fed. 257 Roberts, Win 358, Rem 25-20, 5mm Rim Fire, Win 225 PSP, Win 30-4Krag & more Call Jim 863-414-1900 8350Sporting Goods 8000 RecreationNOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & SuppliesH USTLER SUPERZ 60" Commercial L awn Mower. 1 yr.old. 233 hrs. Great cond. $5900 obo. Call 863-257-0856 7400Lawn & Garden S EBRING FRI.SAT. 7 11. 1121 Suns et Dr. Huge Sale! Kitchenware, small a ppl., elec. wheel chair and more. C ome early for best selection! SEBRING -Down Sizing Sale! 2419 Cleveland Rd., Thur & Fri, 10/27 & 28, 8 am-? King b-rm set, Dining w/ buffet, L shape home off w/ comp. desk, disp lay cases, Xmas decor. No early Birds! S EBRING -BIGGGGG YARD SALE! 2 454 Lakeview Dr. Fri Sat Sun, Oct 21-22-23. Clean Under cover! Lots of Furn,. knick knacks, Very nice Apt. size E lec. range & Like new Baldwin Classic P iano, set of drums & collectibles. Plus a ll in between. 8AM 3PM! LAKE JUNEPT. Community Sale, Sat 10-29 8am-3pm. Furn., sports equip., h ousehold, boat trailer, clothing, crib, g olf cart, generator, plants, collectibles & more! US 27S to Interlake Blvd. West 2 miles. Lake June Pointe Sub. Lake Placid 7320Garage &Yard Sales V ACUUM CLEANERRoom Mate D irt Devil. Good Condition. $25. Call 8 63-471-2502 TIN CANCollection Various sizes (9 $ 20 Call 863-273-3731 S MALL ROLLTOP DESK Oak, 32x43x20. Good Cond. $50 Call 8 63-386-4749. SM. APPL.Rival steamer, Gevalia 12 c up coffee, West Bend & Farberware elec. skillets. All / $34 863-452-0903 S EBRING SAT.Oct. 29th. 310 VanWall Terrace. Sebring Country Estates off T hunderbird Rd. S EARS STEREOSYSTEM with SPEAKERS. $35. 863-471-2256 RECLINER LIGHTBrown. $20 Call 8 63-655-9622 PORTER CABLECompressor $75 Call 8 63-453-8384 M R. COFFEE12 cup & Sterling silver 3 casserole elec. serve. All for $31 C all 863-452-0903 M EN'S SUITS40,41,42 regular. Excel cond. $30 Call 863-382-0972. EDGER -MANTIS 21.2 cc Echo E ngine. $35. 863-655-0342 D OUBLE PATIOGlass Sliding Doors with Frame & Charlie Bar. $85 8 63-214-8462 CURIO CABINETCASE wall mount mirr or on back 3 shelf glass door 6x14x19 $25 Call 863-273-3731 CORNER PIECECOUCH off white. G ood Cond. $100 863-453-7663 C OMPUTER HUTCHLike New! $50. C all 863-655-9622 BEDRAILS -PUTCO pipe, 1 set for s hort bed pickup. Dress up your truck f or only $50. 863-453-7027ce A NTENNA POLESNew/ from Radio Shack. 1-5ft pole & 1-10ft pole, 212 in s tandoff brackets. $40 863-382-1243 ANTIQUE /CRAFTSMAN TABLE S AWS (2 7310Bargain Buys G LASS DISPLAYCASES A SSORTED SIZES: SMALL $50; MED IUM $75; LARGE $100. GOOD COND ITION. CALL 863-257-3592 OR 8 63-443-9285. 2 002 YAMAHA125 Dirt Bike 4 cycle Excellent Condition! Very Clean. $1500 o bo, / HOT TUB 6 person Vita, indoor 1 owner never moved. Like New cond. $ 1800 obo. Call 863-381-4677 7300MiscellaneousO RGAN -LOWRY FIESTA T ickle the ivories with this one! Includes p added storage bench for only $2000. C all today! 863-453-8287 7260M usicalM erchandise 7180FurnitureCHRISTMAS! VILLAGES!Villages! Villages! Variety. $20. Only serious collectors need to call 863-699-2887. 7060Antiques -Collectible 7000 MerchandiseROOMMATE WANTED.Processional to share 3/2 in Gulf Community w/pool. Call 863-991-5159 6450Roommates WantedLAKE PLACIDlakefront 2/1. Seasonal rental, October March. C all 863-465-1354 6320Seasonal Property SEBRING 3/2Lakefront home w/pool. Many upgrades. Enjoy boating, fishing & swimming, right in your own back y ard! $1000 per mo 1st./last/sec. 3 21-452-7090 or 863-446-0760 SEBRING 2/1House, screened porch. Fenced back yard. Lawn care included. $600/mo. + security. Call 863-253-1029 or 863-381-7967 S EBRING -1645 Hammock Rd. 3BR/ 2 BA/ Kitchen, Living & Dining W&D h ookup, tiled floors, C/H/A, Screened p orch. 2 car gar No pets! $950 mo. + 1st. sec. deposit. 407-459-6925 S EBRING -"Rustic Retreat"! 3BR, 2BA, split floor plan on dead end st., quiet neighborhood w/ lake view / access. Oversized 2cg, screened porch, good schools. Rent to own possible, $ 975 mo. 863-414-7021 R EFLECTIONS /SILVER LAKE, Park M odel, 2BR/ 1 BA / Kitchen, living & dining room, W & D hookup. Deck & Shed.No steps inside. $45,000. L ot S39 Call 863-452-2217 PLACID LAKES3/2 full baths. New House $750/mo. + $750 dep. Beautiful views, quiet & nice. All tile & new appl. 3 05-926-7987 6300Unfurnished Houses AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS 1 BR $495 mo. + $200 Sec. Deposit, available immediately. Washer/Dryer & WSG included. Call Alan 3 86-503-8953 A VON PARKApartment with Balcony Overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 1 00 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL : $325/mo. 8 63-453-8598 A VON PARK** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware Ave. 1 BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1 st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 6200UnfurnishedApartmentsS EBRING -DUPLEX / CUTE! 2 BR / 1BA, Screened porch, W/D h ookup. Most pets OK. $550 mo. & $ 300 security. 1927 Theodore St. Call 863-446-7274 6050Duplexes for RentSEBRING LARGE1br/1ba. Water, garbage & sewer paid. Furnished. No pets. $450/mo. + $350/deposit. Call 863-382-8658 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 RentalsPALM HARBORHomes Has 3 Modular Homes Available at Huge Savings Over 40K off 800-622-2832 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesA TTENTION: CASH for your Home, Duplex, Apartment, Commercial Property. Rapid Closing, "As Is Condition. 863-441-2689 STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL 4320Real Estate WantedL AKE PLACID299 E. Interlake Blvd., 2 400 sq. ft. bldg.. 50' X 120' lot. Retail store in the heart of Lake Placid; 2BA/ kitchenette, workshop, office, showrooms w/ slat wall. Can be divided into 2 units. $219,000. OBO 863-699-2228 or 863-840-2990 nancy@sewbiz.biz 4160Commercial Prop.For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial S EEKING WELLExp. Medical office help. Exc. billing/collection, communic ation, typing, computer skills & medic al terminology are a MUST Part-time. F ax resume to: 863-471-2565 or email t o: m edicalofficebilling@yahoo.com O FFICE ASSISTANTBusy Doctor's Office has immediate full time position for s omeone with good work ethic, people s kills & self motivated. S end resume to: P O Box 3679 Sebring 3 3871 or email to: n ewhire123@ymail.com NOW HIRING! Full Time & Part Time. W ait Staff, Dish Washers & Drivers. Apply in person at Zeno's Sun`n Lake Blvd., Sebring. MEDIA ADVERTISING M ULTI-MEDIA ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE W e are a Sebring Florida N ewspaper is accepting resumes for a qualified OutsideSales Representative t hat values teamwork and has a desire to succeed. The successful candidate must have at l east 6 months to 1 year sales experience. Is highlymotivated and enjoys b uilding client relationships, not afraid to ask for a sale, professional, enthusiastic, and exhibit a high level of i ntegrity. This position is the perfect choice for a nyone loving to sell a product you b elieve in. We offer base salary plus commission; e xcellent benefits to include medical, dental, life, 401k and more; paid time o ff; and training. S end reply to 2 227 US 27th South Sebring, Florida 33870 EOE C USTOMER SERVICEREPRESENTATIVE/DISPATCHER NEEDED IMMEDIATLEY F or The News-Sun. This is an entry l evel position. Position requires excellent communication skills, s uperior computer and phone skills with the ability to multi-task. P rior Customer Service Experience is a plus. Please send resume to humanresources@dailycommercial.com f ax to 352-365-8229 or apply in person at: N ews Sun 2227 US 27 S Sebring Florida 33870. E OE C ERTIFIED POLICEOFFICER C ity of Avon Park is accepting applicat ions for a full time entry-level P olice Officer. Minimum qualifications: HS diploma or G ED; possess valid Florida driver's license, must have passed Florida Police S tandards and Training and Florida CJST requirements at the time of hire. Starting salary is $29,786.27. Applicat ions available at the City of Avon Park P olice Department, 304 W. Pleasant S treet, Avon Park, Fl. 33825 and must b e accompanied with a copy of Florida driver's license. Return completed app lications to City of Avon Park Police Department 304 W. Pleasant St. Avon P ark. A pplications close 5:00pm. on Friday, N ovember 4, 2011. Police Officer's E xam to be given at 1:00pm. Friday, N ovember 9, 2011, at the City of Avon Park Community Center, 310 W. Main S treet, Avon Park, Fl. D rug & Smoke -Freework place. EOE C ASHIER -Part Time Needed at Lakeshore Car Wash in Sebring. M UST be able to work weekends. Fax resume to 863-324-5669 or email to: n whitaker@hmgfl.com 2100Help WantedA DVERTISING SALESASSISTANT We Are Expanding! W e have a new position available, in Sebring Florida for a A DVERTISING SALES ASSISTANT R esponsibilities: S cheduling client a ppointments. Maintaining a dvertising schedules. Client relations and assist Multi Media A ccount Executive. S alary + Commission. N ews Sun S end reply to 2 227U S 27 South S ebring Fl. 33870 EOE 2100Help WantedA DMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANCE: F irst Baptist Church Sebring is seeking a practicing Christian with a heart for service to provide high-level administ rative support to the Senior Pastor and Minister of Education through data c ompilation, preparation of statistical reports, database maintenance, hand ling of information requests, creation a nd distribution of monthly newsletter and performing clerical functions such a s correspondence preparation, receiving visitors, arranging conference calls, a nd scheduling meetings. Please send resume to personnelfbc@gmail.com 2100Help Wanted 1 050LegalsC HECK YOUR AD P lease check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be h appy to fix it as soon as we can. I f We can assist you, please call us: 3 14-9876 News-Sun Classified Classified ads get fast results I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION C ase No.: 11-297-GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, P laintiff, vs. D ANNY R. SIMMONS and M ARY C. SIMMONS, Defendants. N OTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment on Verified Complaint'' (the "Final Judgment''), entered in the above-styled act ion on October 4, 2011, the Clerk of Highlands County will sell the property situated in Highlands C ounty, Florida, as described below at a Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, on N ovember 10, 2011, at 11:00 a.m.: Lot 85 and 86, Block 30, SUN 'N LAKE EST ATES, UNIT 2. according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 9, Page 48, of the Public R ecords of Highlands County, Florida. Address: 5613 US Highway 27 North, Sebring, F lorida 33870 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. BOB GERMAINE C lerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida /s/ Priscilla Michalak D eputy Clerk October 23, 30, 2011 N OTICE OF DISPOSITION ACCORDING TO THE FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FAC ILITY ACT THE FOLLOWING STORAGE UNITS LOC ATED AT THE STORAGE PLACE OF AVON PARK, 3 95 CR 17A WEST, AVON PARK, FL 33825 WILL B E DISPOSED OF ON NOVEMBER 16, 2011, AT 1 0:00AM. ALL UNITS ARE SAID TO CONTAIN H OUSEHOLD GOODS UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED. N ames and unit numbers are as follows: NAME UNIT NUMBER J uanita Jervier 109 Sue Austin 111 R andal Ennis 229 Sarah Deweese 360 A aron Yarborough 102 D ISPOSITION BEING MADE TO SATISFY LANDLORD'S LIEN, MANAGEMENT RESERVES ALL R IGHTS, UNDER FLORIDA LAW, ALL PAYMENTS MUST BE IN CASH. O ctober 23, 30, 2011 Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 Classified ads g et fast results AD PARTNERS 1 X4.5 AD # 00012420CLARK DAUGHTREY 2X3 AD # 00013154A VON P ARK H OUSING 1X4 AD # 00012992 AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 AD # 00012990 HIGHPOINT NORTHGATE FURNITURE 1X3 AD # 00012418CROSS COUNTRY AUTOMOTIVE 3X10.5 AD # 00013116

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C M Y K Page 14ANews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011www.newssun.com A very Sample; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, 10/23/11 p/u; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 0 0 0 0 8 8

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C M Y K By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING Im embarrassed in the way my team played tonight, said Sebring h ead coach LaVaar Scott after a crushing 45-7 homecoming loss to Winter Haven on Friday. But the game didnt start out that way, when in the first three minutes Blue Streak Decaris Jones picked six on a 77-yard interception return to put Sebring out front of the 10thranked Blue Devils. T hen the game turned against Sebring and Winter Haven seemed to score at will. R oderick Ceasar returned the following kick-off 81 y ards, breaking tackles the entire way putting the Devils e ven with Sebring. Blue Streak Ladante Harris p icked off another Winter Haven pass but Sebring fumbled the ball over after just two plays, setting up another Blue Devil score. The team was better coached than this. Those kids didnt execute. We saw it from the first play, Scott s aid. We concentrated on the corner screen we watched it on film, pick six and we were gone. After that, everything we coached them about went out the window Winter Havens Walter Bridges jitterbugged for 47 yards and a TD on the next possession and the Blue Devils opted for the Moise Jean fieldg oal to set the score 24-7 at the half. Winter Haven would control the pigskin for eight oft he 12 minutes in the third, giving Sebring just a taste b efore they turned it over on downs. S ebrings defense held but a fumbled punt put Winter H aven into range for a Levi Borders to Jeffery Allums 30Streaks suffer blue homecoming B y DAN HOEHNE d aniel.hoehne@newssun.comAVON PARK One yard short. Three feet. Thirty-six inches was all that separated the Red Devils from at least forcing a second overtime in Fridays 36-34 setback to visiting Booker. And yet, the measure of this night did not lay within the numbers. It was shown in the heart and spirit of a team that is taking steps, though with a few missteps to overcome. D eadlocked at 2-1 in the District 6-4Astandings, Avon Park and the Tornadoes had everything to play for and the e ffort on both sides was a showcase of intensity. B ut intensity doesnt mean m istakes wont be made. The Devils took the opening kick off and began to drive from their own 39. Junior tailback Charles Louis pounded out nine yards on two carries and Dylan Brown carried a host of Booker defenders for a nineyard bull-rush up the middle. After two more yards from Louis and an offsides penalty moved it to the Tornado 34, quarterback Ryan Dick was m aking his way around the right end on a keeper. T ackled from behind, the Booker defender also got a handful of facemask, moving it to the 17. Louis then sprinted for an eight-yard gain and then three more to get it to first and goal at the six. But two straight plays went for big losses and it was third-and-goal at the 18. Ashift in the backfield saw J arviel Hart take the snap and connect with Dick to get it to t he four. Too early to risk not getting any points out of the drive, Garrett Taylor booted the 22-yard field goal to put Avon Park up 3-0 at the 6:15 mark of the first quarter. The Tornadoes then unleashed their predominant game plan, riding the running of 6-foot-2, 190-pound Michael Jones, who gained 2 3 yards on three carries. But when they strayed f rom the plan, it cost them. An attempted pass in the flat from quarterback Alex Riddle was stepped in front of by Hart, who snared it and had a clear path to the end zone for a 44-yard return. Taylors extra point split the uprights and it was 10-0 at the 5:07 mark. APs OT heartbreak Overtime thriller and two blowouts mark county contests SPORTS B SE CTION News-Sun Sunday, October 23, 2011 By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comIt really was a home field Thursday as Sebring hosted itsHomecoming Invitational Cross Country meet on the South Florida Community College campus. Filled with teams from all around the Heartland area, including five from Highlands County, the meet celebrated the area. Though it was the Streaks themselves that brought home the wins on both the boys and girls side of the event. Individually, however, Lake Placid got a win in the boys race, with Dalton Shelton taking first with a time of 16:30, barely edging Hardees Christian Moralez and his 16:31, with Sebrings Evan Wilburn finishing third in 17:21. But with the added finishes of Eric Foster, sixth in 17:30, Damian Foster, eighth in 18:04, Wesley Koning, 10th in 18:10 and Grey Lawrence, 13th in 18:23, the Blue Streaks got the team win with an impressive 40-point total. Frostproof took second with a 97-point total, just ahead of Hardees 99 for third. Avon Park was fourth with 112 points. The Devils were lead by Dexter Greniers seventh place finish in 17:50, and had help from Thierry Alcindor, 14th in 18:31, David Garcia, 23rd in 19:09, Eduardo Magana, 33rd in 20:16 and Darlin Romeo, 35th in 20:25. Bartow took fifth with 143 points, exactly matching Lake Placids total for the five top finishes. But with a total time comparison, the YellowJacke ts were .16 seconds ahead to break the tie. After Sheltons win, the Dragons saw Bryant Reyes take 11th in 18:11 and Benny Aguilar finish 19th in 18:59. Evan Holden came in 52nd in 21:50 and Javier Cornejo was 60th in 23:26 to round out the Lake Placid scoring. Finishing out the boys team standings, DoSoto was seventh, Lake Wales eighth, Ridge Community ninth, Auburndale 10th, Walker Memorial 11th and Heartland Christian 12th. On the girls side of the meet, the competition was stiff, though the final results skew it somewhat. With only four runners available, the Lady Dragons, as well as a few other teams, werent to have enough finHome Running See RUN, Page 4B News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Sydnee Connelly hammers one home for Sebring in Thursdays regular season finale. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING The tradition is long standing, having the last home game of a season to honor the soon-to-be graduating seniors. That tradition continued Thursday night as the Lady Blue Streaks paid homage to their seven seniors, Bianca Nortelus, Dino Lower, Stephanie Struck, Kaley Walter, Sydnee Connelly, Kenzie Hargaden and Madison Harris. What wasnt such a longstanding tradition was the consistency Sebring has played with in recent matches, including this nights three-set sweep of Hardee. Thats been our problem all year is consistency, head coach Vanessa Sinness said. eve got the ability, but weve been too inconsistent. The ability is evident as A Senior Night Sebring sweep News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Jarviel Hart would evade this tackler en route to his second pick-six in Fridays overtime l oss to Booker. Friday Football Fallout B ooker36Avon Park34 Winter Haven45Sebring7 See AP, Page 3B News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE Davaris Faulk looks downfield, but there wasnt much to see most of the night as Winter Haven flew past the Blue Streaks, 45-7. See VB, Page 4B See SEBRING, Page 3B Courtesy photo Nevada Weaver and Malachi McLean crunch this Clewiston runner, but the Tiger offense would be too much for the Dragons Friday. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comThe yardage stats alone tell the story in Lake Placids 357 loss at Clewiston Friday night. The Tigers used a balanced attack to pile up over 500 yards of total offense, 275 on the ground and 240 through the air. The Dragons, meanwhile, would must just 158 total yards, all but 33 of those on the ground. Though it was the Lake Placid defense that came out strong, as it has often throughout the season, halting Clewistons opening drive. But after an A.J. Gayle fumble was recovered on the 48, the Tigers put together a nine-play drive that lead to a Demarcus Terry touchdown. Two more possessions lead to two more scores and a 21-0 halftime lead. The lead widened when Clewiston got a 15-yard Derry West run for a 28-0 margin. But it was the next Tiger possession where the Dragons stepped up. The defense forced a punt, Tigers maul Dragons See LP, Page 4B C lewiston35Lake Placid7

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C M Y K YMCA Youth BasketballSEBRING The Highlands County Family YMCAis currently signing up for our Youth Basketball Program for ages ranging from 4-14. The program is having an all boys age g roup, 12-14 years, and an all girls age group, 12-14 years, this year. Any questions call 382-9622Panther Hitting CampAVONPARK The South Florida C ommunity College Baseball program will be holding its final Fall Hitting C amp Saturday, Oct. 29, for players aged 6-16. Registration will take place from 88:30 a.m., with hitting skill work to follow from 8:30-11:30 a.m. Cost is just $25. Pre-register by calling 863-784-7036. Pre-register or sign-up Saturday morning. **This is the final clinic this fall. The Annual SFCC Christmas camp will be held in December. Busy fall for local golfersLocal golfers should find links active during the coming months with several tournaments scheduled. The Veterans Council Golf Tournament is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 22, at Harder Hall. Proceeds from the 4-man team shotgun scramble, silent auction, and 50/50 will go to benefit the Veterans Assistance Fund. The Meals on Wheels Golf Tournament will be held on Saturday, Nov. 5, at Harder Hall. This tournament is usually sold out and itsproceeds assist in providing meals to the clients. On Sunday, Nov. 6, the Mens Golf A ssociation of Sun n Lakes is sponsoring a golf tournament with proceeds to benefit the Veterans Assistance Fund. There will be an auction and several o ther fundraisers going on during this tournament. O ne field is sold out and another has been opened for this event. A merican Legion Post 25, Lake Placid, has slated May 8, 2012 in SpringLake for t heir annual Golf Tournament. If a Unit would like to help sponsor one or more of these events, please contact the sponsoring group. There is always a need for volunteers. Volunteers are needed at the registration table, the silent auction, raffle and watching for a hole-in-one.Blue Streak Basketball CampSEBRING Head girls basketball coach Mike Lee will be running a basketball camp at Sebring High School for boys and girls from 2nd through 6th grade on Saturday, Nov 12, from 9 a.m.-Noon. The cost for the camp is $10 and each camper will receive a Blue Streaks Basketball T-shirt. The camp is for boys and girls of all skill levels and experience. Registration forms can be picked up at Sebring High School or can be emailed. If you have any questions, please contact Coach Lee at 441-1221 or by email at leem@highlands.k12.fl.us DIVISION SERIESAMERICAN LEAGUE Detroit 3, New York 2 Texas 3, Tampa Bay 1 NATIONAL LEAGUE St. Louis 3, Philadelphia 2 Milwaukee 3, Arizona 2L EAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES(Best-of-7; x-if necessary) AMERICAN LEAGUE Texas 4, Detroit 2 NATIONAL LEAGUE St. Louis 4, Milwaukee 2WORLD SERIES(Best-of-7; x-if necessary) St. Louis 1, Texas 1 Wednesday: St. Louis 3, Texas 2 Thursday: Texas 2, St. Louis 1 Saturday: St. Louis (Jackson 12-9 Texas (Holland 16-5 Sunday, Oct. 23: St. Louis (Lohse 14-8 at Texas (Harrison 14-9 Monday, Oct. 24: St. Louis at Texas, 8:05 p.m. x-Wednesday, Oct. 26: Texas at St. Louis, 8:05 p.m. x-Thursday, Oct. 27: Texas at St. Louis, 8:05 p.m.A MERICAN CONFERENCEEast WLTPctPFPA New England510.833185135 Buffalo420.667188147 N.Y. Jets330.500145131 Miami050.00075128 South WLTPctPFPA Tennessee320.60010594 Houston330.500141124 Jacksonville150.16772132 Indianapolis060.000104163 North WLTPctPFPA Baltimore410.80014871 Cincinnati420.667137111 Pittsburgh420.667119102 Cleveland230.40091117 West WLTPctPFPA San Diego410.800120109 Oakland420.667160150 Kansas City230.40077150 Denver140.200105140NATIONAL CONFERENCEEast WLTPctPFPA N.Y. Giants420.667154147 Washington320.6009683 Dallas230.400115121 Philadelphia240.333145145 South WLTPctPFPA Tampa Bay420.667113145 New Orleans420.667177151 Atlanta330.500135147 Carolina150.167133163 North WLTPctPFPA G reen Bay6001.000197114 Detroit510.833178114 Chicago330.500146132 Minnesota150.167121145 West WLTPctPFPA San Francisco510.83316797 Seattle230.40094122 Arizona140.20096121 St. Louis050.00049137 ___ Sundays Games Houston at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Washington at Carolina, 1 p.m. San Diego at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Seattle at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Denver at Miami, 1 p.m. Atlanta at Detroit, 1 p.m. Chicago vs. Tampa Bay at London, 1 p.m. Kansas City at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Arizona, 4:05 p.m. St. Louis at Dallas, 4:15 p.m. Green Bay at Minnesota, 4:15 p.m. Indianapolis at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m. Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, N.Y. Giants, New England, Philadelphia, San Francisco Mondays Game Baltimore at Jacksonville, 8:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 30 Indianapolis at Tennessee, 1 p.m. New Orleans at St. Louis, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Houston, 1 p.m. Miami at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m. Minnesota at Carolina, 1 p.m. Arizona at Baltimore, 1 p.m. Detroit at Denver, 4 p.m. Washington vs. Buffalo at Toronto, 4 p.m. Cleveland at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m. Cincinnati at Seattle, 4:15 p.m. New England at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m. Open: Atlanta, Chicago, Green Bay, N.Y. Jets, Oakland, Tampa Bay Monday, Oct. 31 San Diego at Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA Pittsburgh522122621 Philadelphia41192115 New Jersey31171212 N.Y. Islanders32061210 N.Y. Rangers21261211 Northeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Buffalo510102010 Toronto41191919 Boston34061715 Ottawa25042031 Montreal14131319 Southeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Washington600122313 Carolina32281922 Florida33061416 Tampa Bay23262227 Winnipeg14131122WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA Detroit50010187 Chicago41192013 St. Louis34061822 Nashville23151320 Columbus06111425 Northwest Division WLOTPtsGFGA Colorado520102116 Minnesota32281617 Vancouver33171921 Edmonton22261112 Calgary23151518 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA Dallas610121914 Los Angeles41191610 Anaheim42081212 Phoenix23151518 San Jose23041414 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. ___ Thursdays Games Minnesota 2, Edmonton 1, SO Boston 6, Toronto 2 Washington 5, Philadelphia 2 Pittsburgh 3, Montreal 1 Ottawa 4, Winnipeg 1 Tampa Bay 4, N.Y. Islanders 1 Buffalo 3, Florida 0 Chicago 3, Colorado 1 N.Y. Rangers 3, Calgary 2, OT Vancouver 5, Nashville 1 Los Angeles 2, Phoenix 0 Fridays Games San Jose 4, New Jersey 3, SO Detroit 5, Columbus 2 St. Louis 3, Carolina 2, OT Dallas 3, Anaheim 1 Saturdays Games Nashville at Calgary, late Minnesota at Vancouver, late San Jose at Boston, late Toronto at Montreal, late Columbus at Ottawa, late St. Louis at Philadelphia, late New Jersey at Pittsburgh, late Detroit at Washington, late Carolina at Winnipeg, late Buffalo at Tampa Bay, late N.Y. Islanders at Florida, late Colorado at Chicago, late N.Y. Rangers at Edmonton, late Dallas at Los Angeles, late Sundays Games Phoenix at Anaheim, 8 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEWLTPtsGFGA x-Sporting KC12912484940 x-Philadelphia11815484436 x-Columbus13128474141 x-New York10816465044 x-Houston11913464240 Chicago8916404343 D.C.91212394951 Toronto FC61314323457 New England51612273656WESTERN CONFERENCEWLTPtsGFGA y-Los Angeles19410674725 x-Seattle1779605336 x-Real Salt Lake15117524335 x-FC Dallas15117524035 x-Colorado11913464240 Portland11148413947 Chivas USA81312364040 San Jose71214353643 Vancouver61710283453 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. xclinched playoff berth yclinched conference ___ Thursday's Games New York 1, Philadelphia 0 Saturday's Games New England at Toronto FC, late Colorado at Vancouver, late Sporting Kansas City at D.C. United, late Columbus at Chicago, late Portland at Real Salt Lake, late FC Dallas at San Jose, late Seattle FC at Chivas USA, late Sundays Games Los Angeles at Houston, 7 p.m.B ASEBALLAmerican League BOSTON RED SOXAnnounced the resignation of Theo Epstein general manager. OAKLAND ATHLETICSSigned pitching coach Curt Young to a one-year contract. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKSAdded INF David Winfree to the 40-man roster. Assigned INF Sean Burroughs, LHP Alberto Castillo and C Robby Hammock outright to Reno (PCL ATLANTA BRAVESNamed Greg Walker hitting coach and Scott Fletcher advance coach/assistant hitting coach. CHICAGO CUBSNamed Theo Epstein head of baseball operations. COLORADO ROCKIESNamed Jerry Weinstein catching coach and Marv Foley minor league catching coordinator. NEW YORK METSGranted RHP Ryota Igarashi his unconditional release. Assigned INF Valentino Pascucci, RHP Dale Thayer and RHP Manny Alvarez outright to Buffalo (IL American Association EL PASO DIABLOSReleased LHP Jose M. Rodriguez, C Adam Deleo, INF Nelson Teilon and INF Johan Garcia. FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKSTraded RHP Trevor Longfellow and INF Donald Blunt to Lake Erie (Frontier Roberts. GRAND PRAIRIE AIRHOGSAcquired OF Stephen Douglas from Lancaster (Atlantic LINCOLN SALTDOGSSigned RHP Ryan Sheldon. WINNIPEG GOLDEYESAcquired OF Asif Shah from Normal (Frontier cash. Can-Am League WORCESTER TORNADOESReleased RHP Luis Pardo and OF Jacob Fabry.FOOTBALLNational Football League NFLFined Green Bay LB A.J. Hawk $10,000, Green Bay LB Clay Matthews $5,000, Green Bay CB Tramon Williams $5,000, Pittsburgh S Troy Polamalu $10,000 and Houston DE Antonio Smith $7,500 for their actions during last week's games. SEATTLE SEAHAWKSReleased RB Vai Taua from the practice squad. Signed LB Allen Bradford to the practice squad.SOCCERMajor League Soccer MONTREAL IMPACTSigned G Evan Bush.HOCKEYNational Hockey League NHLFined Nashville D Shea Weber $2,500 for boarding Vancouver F Jannik Hansen during Thursday's game. PHOENIX COYOTESRecalled C Andy Miele from Portland (AHL LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid TUESDAY: Volleyball at District Tournament,DeSoto,vs.Frostproof,5:30 p.m. THURSDAY: Volleyball at District Tournament,DeSoto,TBD,7 p.m. FRIDAY: Football vs.LaBelle,Homecoming,7:30 p.m. Sebring MONDAY: Volleyball hosts District Tournament,Winter Haven vs.Kathleen,7 p.m. TUESDAY: Volleyball hosts District Tournament,Sebring vs.Lake Gibson,7 p.m. THURSDAY: Volleyball hosts District Tournament,Monday winner vs.Tuesday winner,7 p.m. FRIDAY: Football at Bartow,7 p.m. SFCC TUESDAY: Volleyball vs.Pasco Hernando,7 p.m. Avon Park MONDAY: Volleyball at District Tournament,DeSoto,vs.Mulberry,7 p.m. TUESDAY: Volleyball at District Tournament,De Soto,vs.DeSoto,7:30 p.m. T HURSDAY: Volleyball at District Tournament,DeSoto,if necessary,7 p.m. FRIDAY: Football at Dunbar,7:30 p.m. N N F F L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Denver at Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 6 6 1 1 p p . m m . Chicago vs. Tampa, at London . . . . . . . . . F F O O X X 4 4 p p . m m . Pittsburgh at Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 1 1 0 0 4 4 p p . m m . Green Bay at Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X X 8 8 : : 1 1 5 5 p p . m m . Indianapolis at New Orleans . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 8 8 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Baltimore at Jacksonville . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 2 2 p p . m m . NASCAR Talladega 500 . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NW W O O M M E E N N S S C C O O L L L L E E G G E E S S O O C C C C E E R R S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Auburn at Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NM M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . St. Louis at Texas, Game 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X XM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . St. Louis at Texas, Game 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X XR R U U G G B B Y Y S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p . m m . IRB World Cup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CTimes, games, channels all subject to change W W O O M M E E N N S S C C O O L L L L E E G G E E V V O O L L L L E E Y Y B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . Florida at Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 1 1 p p . m m . Michigan at Penn State . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2G G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 2 2 p p . m m . PGA Miracle Network Classic . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 5 5 p p . m m . PGA Winn Dixie Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . LPGA Taiwan Championship . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F FC C O O L L L L E E G G E E F F O O O O T T B B A A L L L L T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . Troy at Florida International . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 LIVESPORTSONTV Major League Baseball Transactions National Hockey League National Football League Major League Soccer Page 2BNews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011www.newssun.com The NewspaperAll Around Your World In the Classroomcurrent events vocabulary geography At the Officebusiness news networking Over Coffeegarage sales local advertising community Family Timetravel recreation family events Sunday Morningcomics games puzzles Onlinelocal events email highlights 24-hour updates Support your local newspaper and the continued tradition of quality journalism by renewing your subscription today,and wll continue to deliver. Thanks,readers! Rain,Sleet,Hail,Heat,Potholes,Flat Tires...Nothing stops them from making their deliveries!www.newssun.comWe celebrate how the newspaper has evolved to meet o ur changing needs without sacrificing the quality c overage youve come to expect. Day after day, a nywhere you go,the newspaper delivers. 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C M Y K By MATTIAS KAREN Associated PressLONDON Commissioner Roger Goodell says the NFLis considering a plan to have a few teams play regularly in Britain to build an overseas fan base. This would be part of the leagues evaluation about whether a team could be permanently based in London. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers are making their second trip in three years to Wembley to play the Chicago Bears on Sunday. The league decided this month to continue playing games in London through at least 2016, and Goodell said Saturday he hopes more teams will agree to make multiple trips. Goodell said the idea of letting a few teams build a British following will be very powerful, and lead us (to would like to do, have a franchise here in London. He expects the NFLto play multiple games in London as early as next year. w ww.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011Page 3B HARDER HALL GOLF COURSE; 3.639"; 3"; Black; sports; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 9 9 1 1 2 2 PAGE, WILLIAM J.; 5.542"; 3"; Black; sports 10/23,26,28; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 2 2 HARDER HALL GOLF COURSE; 3.639"; 3"; Black; sports; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 9 9 1 1 2 2 PAGE, WILLIAM J.; 5.542"; 3"; Black; sports 10/23,26,28; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 2 2 A dmiral Farragut 38, Bradenton Christian 22 Agape Christian 50, Mount Dora Bible 9 Andrew Jackson 21, Ribault 20 Apopka 53, West Orange 22 Archbishop Carroll 35, Florida Christian 14 Atlantic Coast 47, R.E. Lee 23 Auburndale 28, Mulberry 7 Baker County 61, Terry Parker 0 Baker School 61, Jay 26 Bayside 36, Heritage 10 Belen Jesuit 36, Miami Northwestern 28 Berkeley Prep 21, Clearwater Central Cath. 0 Bishop Kenny 56, Clay 35 Bishop McLaughlin 28, Shorecrest Prep 21 Bishop Moore 34, Eustis 7 Blountstown 20, Liberty County 7 Booker 36, Avon Park 34 B oone 38, Orlando Freedom 35 Boyd Anderson 44, Monarch 34 Braden River 26, Sarasota 11 Cape Coral 38, Mariner 24 Cardinal Gibbons 23, Dillard 7 Cardinal Newman 57, Fort Lauderdale Calvary Christian 26 Carrollwood Day 54, Cambridge Christian 35 Champagnat Catholic 58, Sheridan Hills Christian 0 Charles Flanagan 33, Western 30 Charlotte 52, Lemon Bay 6 Chipley 62, Bozeman School 25 Clewiston 35, Lake Placid 7 Cocoa 28, Jones 7 Columbia 28, Middleburg 0 Community School of Naples 20, Seffner C hristian 7 Coral Glades 47, Coconut Creek 7 Coral Springs Charter 40, Coral Shores 13 Countryside 35, Clearwater 0 Creekside 42, Matanzas 34 C ypress Bay 51, West Broward 3 D ade Christian 55, South Florida HEAT 0 Deerfield Beach 39, Piper 0 DeLand 15, Sandalwood 0 Delray American Heritage 61, Benjamin 0 D eltona Trinity Christian 53, Florida Air Academy 7 Dixie County 30, Newberry 6 Dr. Phillips 38, Cypress Creek 0 Dunnellon 51, Belleview 7 Dwyer 14, Atlantic Community 0 Eagles View 21, University Christian 19 East Gadsden 28, Taylor County 13 East Lake 28, Sarasota Riverview 21 East River 17, Winter Park 7 Eastside 31, Crystal River 24 Episcopal 45, Bishop Snyder 10 Estero 42, Cypress Lake 21 Evangelical Christian 44, St. Stephens Episcopal 0 Evans 20, Leesburg 10 FAMU Developmental Research 28, Port St. Joe 0 First Baptist 42, Merritt Island Christian 12 Fletcher 42, Flagler Palm Coast 21F orrest 14, Paxon 10 Fort Meade 28, Lakeland Christian 7 Fort Myers 62, North Fort Myers 13 Fort Pierce Central 27, Martin County 0 Fort White 65, Fernandina Beach 30 Frostproof 12, Cardinal Mooney 7 Gibbs 20, Middleton 17 Glades Central 39, Fort Pierce Westwood 0 Godby 30, Rickards 7 Golden Gate 44, Lely 14 Gulf Breeze 44, Bay 14 Gulliver Prep 28, LaSalle 6 H amilton County 52, Branford 34 Hawthorne 42, Bell 13 Hernando 42, Springstead 0 Highlands Christian 71, Berean Christian 0 Hilliard 51, Bronson 6 Hollywood Hills 26, Archbishop McCarthy 14 Holmes County 42, South Walton 21 Ida S. Baker 30, Riverdale 27, OT Immokalee 48, Barron Collier 11 Indian Rocks 54, Northside Christian 20 Inlet Grove 15, Somerset Academy 0 Jefferson County 30, Lafayette 20 Jesuit 33, Lakewood 19 Jupiter 30, Wellington 16 Keswick Christian 28, Calvary Christian 25 Key West 24, Hialeah-Miami Lakes 19 Keystone Heights 19, Bradford 18 Kings Academy 31, Pahokee 0 Lake Brantley 49, Hagerty 7 Lake Gibson 28, Bartow 14 Lake Highland 41, Cocoa Beach 34 Lake Mary 28, University (Orange City Lake Mary Prep 49, Orlando Christian 13 Lake Wales 49, Tenoroc 0 Lake Weir 42, Lecanto 14 Lakeland 28, George Jenkins 6 Lakewood Ranch 35, Dixie Hollins 21 Landmark Christian 42, All Saints 6 Largo 35, Boca Ciega 20 Lehigh 28, East Lee County 2 Lincoln 55, West Port 21 Lyman 16, Sanford Seminole 6 Maclay 43, Aucilla Christian 7 Madison County 49, Pensacola Catholic 6 Mainland 46, Pine Ridge 14 Manatee 52, Venice 19 Marianna 35, Walton 19 M cArthur 46, Plantation 9 Melbourne Central Catholic 59, John Carroll Catholic 32 M erritt Island 21, Astronaut 0 Miami Beach 30, Goleman 20 Miami Central 48, Miami Carol City 8 Miami Krop 35, North Miami 21 Miami Washington 57, Doral Academy Charter 0 Milton 37, Pensacola Washington 14 Miramar 42, Everglades 20 Monsignor Pace 17, Miami Edison 7 Munroe Day 50, John Paul II Catholic 10 N aples 44, Palmetto Ridge 0 Nature Coast Tech 16, Mitchell 13 Navarre 42, Crestview 24 N ease 47, Menendez 20 Niceville 23, Ft. Walton Beach 7 North Marion 38, Santa Fe 0 Northview 35, Freeport 21 Oak Hall 34, St. Joseph Academy 16 Oak Ridge 53, Winter Springs 21 Ocala Trinity Catholic 46, Glades Day 0 Ocala Vanguard 16, Gainesville 14 Orange Park 45, Leon 34 Orlando The First Academy 41, Holy Trinity Episcopal 7 Out-of-Door Academy 43, Southwest Florida Christian 21 O viedo 24, Edgewater 14 Pace 24, Tate 10 Palm Beach Central 41, John I. Leonard 16 Palm Harbor University 26, North Port 6 Palmetto 16, Hardee 13 Park Vista Community 28, Boca Raton Community 27 Pasco 59, Fivay 6 Pembroke Pines 34, Fort Lauderdale 20 Peniel Baptist 34, Leesburg The First Academy 26 Pensacola 45, Pine Forest 21 Pinellas Park 35, St. Petersburg Northeast 14 Plantation American Heritage 42, Pompano Beach 0 Poinciana 35, Lake Nona 21 Ponte Vedra 20, Palatka 13 Port Charlotte 20, Gulf Coast 17P ort Orange Atlantic 47, Tavares 7 Port St. Lucie 23, Viera 0 Raines 26, Bolles School 21 Ransom Everglades 22, Archbishop Curley 1 2 Ridge Community 35, Lake Region 26 Rockledge 30, Titusville 0 Royal Palm Beach 40, Lake Worth 27 Santa Fe Catholic 42, Foundation Academy 35 Seabreeze 49, New Smyrna Beach 21 Sebastian River 42, Palm Beach Lakes 0 Seminole Osceola 25, Tarpon Springs 22 Seminole Ridge 28, Palm Beach Gardens 27 Seven Rivers Christian 35, Oviedo Masters Academy 7 South Dade 24, Miami Palmetto 22 South Fork 52, Okeechobee 14 South Fort Myers 14, Island Coast 7 South Lake 27, Lake Minneola High School 3 South Plantation 26, Coral Springs 17 S outh Sumter 26, Mount Dora 20 Southeast 34, Bayshore 7 Space Coast 12, Satellite 0 St. Augustine 26, Bartram Trail 10 St. Francis 52, St. Johns Country Day 0 St. John Lutheran 41, St. Edwards 0 St. John Neumann 22, Moore Haven 0 St. Lucie West Centennial High School 17, Vero Beach 14 St. Petersburg 33, Seminole 21 St. Thomas Aquinas 50, Nova 6 Summit Christian 36, Zion Christian 0 Tampa Catholic 70, St. Petersburg Catholic 7 Taravella 17, Douglas 0 The Villages 35, Crescent City 20 Timber Creek 44, Colonial 6 Treasure Coast 27, Jupiter Christian 7 Trenton 47, P.K. Yonge 7 Trinity Christian-Jacksonville 55, Providence 17 Trinity Prep 29, Orangewood Christian 7 Umatilla 16, Interlachen 13 Union County 34, Baldwin 7 University School 55, Westminster Christian 16 Varela 65, Miami Sunset 28 Vernon 34, Graceville 18 Victory Christian 62, Central Florida Christian 0 Village Academy 40, Coral Springs Christian 0 Wakulla 42, Suwannee 0 Warner Christian 62, Ormond Beach Calvary Christian 10 Wekiva 40, Ocoee 14 West Florida 25, Rutherford 19 West Gadsden 34, Franklin County 26 Wewahitchka 43, Sneads 19 Williston 42, Chiefland 13 Windermere Prep 43, Life Academy 6 Winter Haven 45, Sebring 7 Wolfson 46, Stanton College Prep 19 Yulee 38, West Nassau County 37 Zephyrhills 49, Ridgewood 0 Fridays Florida Prep Football Scores The Devil defense hold Jones and Booker in check on the next series and took over on their 34 after the punt. But on the first play from scrimmage, the ball was jarred out of Louisgrasp and returned for a score which, after the two-point conversion, made it 10-8 nearing the end of the opening quarter. Atrade-off of drives moved it midway through the second quarter, and though Avon Park was predominantl y holding Jones in check, at least that game plan was keeping things safe for the Tornadoes. Because again, trying a pass after a three-yard Jones run, saw Hart again make a play on the ball, nab it and return it, this time from 38 yards out, to put the Devils up 17-8. Booker kept it on the ground for itsnext drive, with Jones carrying five straight plays, gaining 24 yards. Riddle then ran for 13, Jones had two carries for 8 yards and then a little trickery saw Ricky Jones take a reverse and race into the end zone untouched. The two-point conversion was good and the teams soon went into the half with AvonP ark holding on to a 17-16 lead. The Tornadoes stuck with the ground game to open the t hird and went back to the reverse, to similar effect as R icky Jones again took it to t he house to put Booker up 22-17 at the 9:21 mark. Alead they would increase as, after a solid Devil drive had them lining up for a Taylor field goal, some confusion as to the blocking personnel allowed a defender a clear path to block the kick, which was then returned 83 yards for a 28-17 Tornado lead with 3:09 left in the third. I should have called a time out at that point, head coach Andy Bonjokian said. It seemed especially so as Avon Parks next drive was a rare three-and-out and it seemed the wind may have gone out of the Devilssails. That was until, just before the end of the quarter, Lacy Turner made Booker pay for going to the air again, picki ng off a Riddle pass and getting the ball back at the Tornado 25. In another backfield switcheroo, Hart took a direct snap and connected with J.D. Hardy for 17 yards and soon enough, Louis was taking it in from four yards out and the lead was cut to 28-25 with 8:15 left to play. Needing a stop in the worst way, the Avon Park defenser esponded and had the ball back near midfield. After a five-yard Louis run, Dick and Hart hooked upo n a 30-yard gain and two more Louis runs got it to the 1 4. Taylor connected on the 3 2-yard field goal to tie it at 28-28, though there was still 3 :41 left on the clock. Which was almost too much time as Booker moved it to the Devil 17 and with the clock rolling had to spike it with 15 seconds left. One incomplete pass brought it down to 12 seconds, but then when Riddle was under pressure on the next pass attempt, he tried extending the play and inadvertently ran out the clock and not allowing for even a field-goal attempt to end it. To overtime it went, with each team getting four downs from the 10 to put up whatever points it can. Booker went back to basics and pounded Jones up the middle for five and three yards to get it to the two. The Devils stopped him in his tracks on the next handoff and seemed to have him stuffed on the fourth-down attempt. But a second surge saw Jones just cross the goal line, by inches. The two-point run was good to make it 36-28, but the Devils answered quickly. Dick lofted one over the middle to Steven Roberts on second down for a touchdown and now it was up tot he two-point conversion to keep this one going. But the push up the middle by Brown behind the offens ive line was stopped at the one one yard short. Hats off to Booker B onjokian said. Theyre a very good team, and we s howed tonight that we are as well. We could have hung our h eads and packed it in when they took the big lead in the second half, but these guys love to play and they did all we asked. They came back. The defense kept us in the game and we got things rolling on offense. They just made the big play on the conversion, he continued. I hate to lose, butI couldnt be any prouder of how hard these guys played tonight. Virtually knocked out of playoff contention, Avon Park has a chance to alter the district standings next week as they travel to Ft. Myers to take on district-leading Dunbar. Continued from 1B AP comes up one yard short News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Garrett Taylor connected on two field goals Friday night, including one late in the fourth quarter that would send Avon Park and Booker into overtime. yard touch. Sebring gave up another interception and touchdown to defensive Devil Corey Scott. Three pass attempts later and Winter Haven took over on downs, giving back-up Blue Devil quarterback Luke Borders a chance to connect with Alex Dixon to make it 45-7 with five minutes left to play. The Streaks next possession resulted in a short spurt, then turned into negative yardage when a lateral pass was dropped and Sebring ended the game at their own 23-yard line after an eight play drive that started on the 20. Offensively, defensively, this one was not on coaches, this one was on execution and the players, Scott said. After one play, we stopped executing. The Streaks will look for better execution this Friday on the road at Bartow in district action. Continued from 1B Sebring gets shut down Some teams could be regulars in London

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C M Y K B y PAULLOGOTHETIS A ssociated PressBAGSHOT, England For the Glazer family, it will be quite a sports doubleheader in England on Sunday. The Americans could get to see both of their teams Manchester United and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers playing on the same day. Tampa Bay (4-2 the Chicago Bears (3-3 i n the NFLs fifth regularseason visit to Wembley Stadium, just a few hours after Manchester United faces crosstown rival Manchester City in a Premier League match expected to indicate whether City can be a legitimate contender for Uniteds title. Members of the Glazer family are expected to attend both games, starting with the match at Old Trafford before getting to Wembley by helicopter for the NFLkickoff. Tampa Bay players recognize the importance of the double bill. wo wins from both of their franchises, that would be big, offensive tackle Donald Penn saidF riday at the teams practice facility at Pennyhill Park. Going away 2-0 with your teams, that w ould put a good feeling in your belly T he Buccaneers are m aking their second trip to London in three years, making them the only team to return to Wembley since the NFL started playing regularseason games there in 2007. Tampa Bay has been listed as the home team both times meaning it had to give up a home game to make the trip and coach Raheem Morris this week had to defend the Glazerswillingness to send the team abroad again. This thing is a little bigger than the Bucs. Its more about the NFLpromoting our game, Morris said. Unfortunately for our fans back home it was a home game, but someones got to do it. Somebody has to suck it up and it was us this time. The last time the Buccaneers came to London, in 2009, the Glazersteam lost 35-7 to the New England Patriots. So the team changed s trategy this year, arriving Monday night, four days earlier than last time, to offset the fatigue from jet lag and to get acclimated to the surroundings. The Bears, meanwhile, arrived Friday. I feel great, the jet lag i ssue is out of the way said running back Ernest Graham, who will start in place of the injured L aGarrette Blount. Its a huge difference to two y ears ago. Page 4BNews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011w ww.newssun.com COCHRAN BROTHERS ROOFING; 5.542"; 3"; Black; 10/2,9,16,23,30; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 3 3 9 9 6 6 HANCOCK, JANE; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; 10/16,19,23; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 9 9 6 6 2 2 HANCOCK, JANE; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; 10/16,19,23; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 9 9 6 6 2 2 COCHRAN BROTHERS ROOFING; 5.542"; 3"; Black; 10/2,9,16,23,30; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 3 3 9 9 6 6 ishes to post a final score. Though in the race itself, Lake Placids Alexandria Coyne finished in 20:20, which would have been good for third. But with her place not official, it lead to a Sebring sweep of the top three slots. Taylor Tubbs and Hannah Schroeder each broke the 20minute mark again, going first and second in 19:36 and 19:47, respectively. Emily Smith got that nudge to third with her 22:09 and Ashley White was sixth in 23:53 with Laura Eshelman seventh in 23:57. The total of the finishes added up to a miniscule 19 points, easily topping the field. Bartow was second with 82, Lake Wales third at 88 and Avon Park totaled 91 for fourth. The Lady Devils got an eighth-place finish from Marium Olupitan in 24:02 and a 10th-place from Jennifer Patino in 24:16. Erica Rodriguez took 14th in 24:55, Jordan Edwards 19th in 26:18 and Tamara Stokes pushed her way through the distance and finished 40th in 35:33. Rounding out the team scores from those squads ablet to qualify, Auburndale was fifth and DeSoto sixth. Once again, lots of personal bests were set and were extremely happy with how well the kids ran, Sebring coach Krysta Schult said. Everyone did great. Sebring now gears up for the District 7-3Ameet on Thursday, Nov. 3 at Tenoroc High School, beginning at 5 p.m. Avon Park and Lake Placid will run in the District 8-2A meet, also at Tenoroc and also on Nov. 3, beginning at 4 p.m. Continued from 1B Run teams gear up for Districts even with that assessment, t he team finished the regular season schedule with a 12-4 record, 4-2 in district play. Tuesdays five-set loss to a strong DeSoto squad showed a n upturn in the consistent effort, though Thursdays first set saw the Lady Wildcats keeping pace. Maybe it was the distraction of Senior Night, but we were a little off early in that set, Sinness said. But from about the middle of that set on they got it going and never looked back. That certainly was the case as, after finishing off the 2521 first-set win, the Streaks scored the first 14 points of the second set and sported a 19-1 lead before settling for a 25-6 win. The third set was much the same, getting out to a 16-1 lead and taking a 25-9 win. e played very well and played as a team, Sinness said. Its great to see that going into districts because we need to be at the top of our game. With just four teams making up District 9-6A, it will only take one win to reach the title match, thus securing one of two playoff slots. And though Sebring took both matches from itsfirst opponent, Lake Gibson, during the season, Sinness isnt taking anything for granted. Ive had teams that were higher seeds and didnt win, and when we played at Lake Gibson, they won a set, she said. We cannot look past them. But if we play in the tournament like we have the last couple matches, if we stay consistent, we can play with (top seedWinter Haven. Winter Haven starts the tournament off Monday against Lakeland-Kathleen with Sebring and Lake Gibson squaring off Tuesday, with the winners of each game meeting Thursday night for the district championship. All games are scheduled for 7 p.m. Continued from 1B Volleyball Districts on tap this week News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Brittany Whittington and the Lady Panthers are on a bit of a late-season roll. After sweeping Florida Christian College inT hursdays Dig Pink contest, SFCC split its first two matches at the Lake Sumter Tournament in Leesburg. Against Lake Sumter early Friday afternoon, the Panthers pushed it to five sets with each set being no larger than a f our-point margin, and one stretching out to a 31-29 SFCC win. In Fridays late afternoon match, South Florida bounced back from a 2-0 deficit to take 25-23, 25-17 and1 5-9 wins to top Palm Beach State College. In that match, S tephanie De Hoyos recorded a /20 as she totaled 21 kills as well as 20 digs. For good measure, she added five s ervice aces and half a block. The Lady Panthers continued the tournament slate Saturday, with scheduled matches a gainst Clearwater Christian and St. Johns River. Panthers pick up pace which was then blocked by Chase Griffin and returned to the Clewiston 33. Ashort series soon lead to a six-yard rumble into the end zone by Gayle to get Lake Placid on the board. But the offense wouldnt have any more answers and the Tigers got a four-yard pass from Tyler Clemons to T eAngelo Ulett to provide for the final margin. Under the leadership of sophomore quarterback Robert Walton, the offensive struggles are understandable, and head coach Jason Holden doesnt think that theyre that far away from clicking. e are right there at the door, he said. We are just missing. Adropped pass or a pass just out of reach. If we can turn those around just a little, we will be fine. As for a more broad assessment of his squad, now 2-6 and 1-4 in District 6-4A play, Holden was realistic but enthusiastic. The speed kills us, he said. We dont have the team speed and we don not pretend that we do. Everybody makes mistakes, but when youre not the faster team, it is harder to o vercome those mistakes. But we have great guys and they are working, he continued. They are playing hard and you cant ask for anything more than that. Lake Placid continues its district schedule this week, t he Dragons Homecoming G ame, against visiting LaBelle. Continued from 1B Courtesy photo Just a sophomore, Robert Walton is learning the rigors ofb eing a varsity quarterback, though his head coach believes hes just about to turn the corner. LP cant match Tiger speed G lazer empire on display Sunday with Bucs, United Get the paper delivered to you! NEWSSUN 385-6155

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The Community Calendar provides a brief listing of local clubs and organizations who meet on a regular basis. It is the responsibility of the group to update the News-Sun on any changes in this listing by calling 385-6155, ext. 516; send any changes by e-mail to editor@newssun.com; or mail them to News-Sun Community Calendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870. S UNDAY American Legion Post 25 Lake Placid has lounge hours from 1-9 p.m. Live music is from 5-8 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Members and guests only. Post is at 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Call 471-1448. Inerstate chapter of A.B.A.T.E. meets the last Sunday of every month at The Blue Crab, 825 Ridgewood Dr., Sebring at 11 a.m. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 lounge is open from 1-7 p.m. Card games start at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has karaoke in the pavilion. Horseshoes played at 9:30 a.m. Food available at 4 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Cards start at 4 p.m. Music outside Tiki Hut at 3 p.m. Lodge phone number 452-0579. Overeaters Anonymous, meets from 4-5 p.m. in second floor conference roomNo. 3 at Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center, 4200 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 3827731. No dues, fees or weighins. For details on the organization, go to www.oa.org Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves lunch at 2 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 offers NASCAR racing in the pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar open and kitchen open from 25 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-3920. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 serves hamburgers from 4-5:30 p.m. and plays poker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 Karaoke is from 5-8 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902. MONDAY Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN WITH ME family group meets at 10:30 a.m. every Monday at the Heartland Christian Church on Alt. 27 in Sebring. The church is behind Southgate Shopping Center where Publix is. For more information call 3855714. Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal Church, Lakeshore Drive, Sebring. For more details, call 385-8807. Alcoholics Anonymous One Day At ATime group meets for a closed discussion at 9:30 a.m. Monday and Friday at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 4500 Sun N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. Call 314-0891. Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 6:30 p.m. at Rosewood Center, 517 U.S. 27 South, Lake Placid. Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 202-0647. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 12-9 p.m. Call 4657940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. Call 4711448. AmVets Post 21 plays darts at 7:30 p.m. for members and guests. Call 385-0234. Avon Park Lakes Association has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m. The clubhouse is at 2714 Nautilus Drive in Avon Park. BALANCE Dual Diagnosed (Addiction and Mental Health) Support Group meets the second and fourth Monday of the month from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Florida Hospital Sebring, Conference Room 1. Qi-Gong to follow at 7 p.m. Call 386-5687. Boy Scout Troop 482 meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave., Lake Placid. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118. Diabetes Support Group meets the second and fourth Monday from 1-2:30 p.m. in Florida Hospital Conference Room 3 in Sebring. Call 4020177 for guest speaker list. Dual Diagnosed (Addiction and Mental Health) Support Group meets from 7-8:30 p.m. the fourth Monday at 4023 Sun 'N Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 386-5687. Florida Association Home and Community Education meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly on Mondays at The AgriCenter. The group of sewers and crafters make items for residents of adult congregate living facilities. Call Penny Bucher at 385-0949. Garden Club of Sebring meets noon, fourth Monday, Sebring Civic Center. Grand Prix Cloggers EZ Intermediate and Intermediate Clogging class are held at 9 a.m. every Monday at Reflections on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club meets the second and fourth Monday at the Sebring Country Estates Civic Association clubhouse, 3240 Grand Prix Drive (down the street from Wal-Mart). Dancing will be held every month until April 2008. Classes are being started now in the Sebring and Lake Placid area. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or visit the Web site at www.samdun.net .Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September.Heartland Pops rehearses at 7 p.m. Mondays at Avon Park High School Band Room, 700 E. Main St., under the direction of Anthony Jones. Musicians of all ages are welcome. For information, call 314-8877. Highlands County Concert Band rehearses 7-9 p.m. every Monday at Sebring High School band room. All musicians are welcome. Vic Anderson, musical director. Call Bill Varner at 386-0855. Highlands County Democratic Executive Committee meets 7 p.m. fourth Monday in the Democratic Party Headquarters, 4216 Sebring Parkway, Sebring. Call 6996052. Highlands County Sewing Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Highlands County AgriCivic Center in the 4-H laboratory, Sebring. Call 402-6540. Highlands Sertoma Club meets noon, Takis Family Restaurant, Sebring. Highlands County Senior Squadron, Civil Air Patrol the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary meets the second and fourth Monday nights at the Sebring Airport Terminal Building. All are welcome. For further information, call 471-1433 between 4 and 7 p.m. Lake Placid American Legion Post 25 meets 8 p.m., Legion hall. Lake Placid Art League will have classes in Drawing and Painting, conducted by Anne Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart will teach Fabric Painting at the center. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Art League will have Open Studio'from 1-4 p.m. Bring your projects in whatever medium, to work in a friendly atmosphere. Cost is only $2 per session. Call Pat Keesling, 699-2058. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2 p.m. Sign up for darts is at 6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m. It is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m. Let It Begin With Me Alanon Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Monday at Heartland Christian Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South, Sebring. For details about Alanon, a self-help group for families and friends of alcoholics, call 385-5714. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. National Association for the Advancement of the Colored People, Highlands County Branch meets 7:30 p.m., 401 Tulane, Avon Park. Orchid Society of Highlands County meets 7 p.m. on the fourth Monday at the Highlands County AgriCivic Center, 4509 George Blvd., Sebring. Call Ed Fabik at 465-2830 for details. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 12-4:30 p.m. second and fourth Monday in Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. No meetings from end of May to October. Call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Highlands County meets at 6:15 p.m. at Beef O Brady's, Sebring. Sebring AARP meets 1:30 p.m., The Palms, Pine Street, Sebring. Sebring Bridge Club has Bridge, ACBLDuplicate at the clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Mondays. For details or info on lessons, call 385-8118. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 has pizza and darts at 7:30 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has the lounge open from 12-7 p.m. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Historical Society open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Located in back side of Sebring Public Library building on Lake Jackson. For information, call 471-2522. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 plays Texas Hold em at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Monday at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing. Call 655-3920. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL632, Sebring meets at 2 p.m. for weigh-in at the fellowship hall at the First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, Sebring. Call 659-1019. Veterans of Foreign Wars Ladies Auxiliary Post 4300 meets 2 p.m. fourth Monday, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Volunteers of America of Florida is a nonprofit organization in Sebring that specializes in assisting person's with mental illness. We are pleased to announce our Drop in Center is open to individuals with a mental illness 6 days a week from 11am to 3 pm. The center offers a welcoming environment where individuals are accepted and feel comfortable. For more information please contact Wendy at 863382-2022.TUESDAY Al-Anon Family Groups meet for discussion and Twelve Step study at noon, Union Congregational Church, 105 N. Forest Ave., AvonPark. Parking available south of old church. 8 & 40 Salon 687 Call Betty Darmer, 465-2272, for details. Alzheimer's/Dementia Seminar held at 11 a.m. every fourth Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid. Also sponsored by Nurse on Call. Covers common signs of dementia, coping and care giving tips, disease management, organizations, etc. Call 465-0568. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard and euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Audubon Chapter meets the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Masonic Lodge, downtown Lake Placid on the corner of Main and Park. Bring a covered dish to share, utensils and plates, at 6:30 p.m. or come at 7:30 p.m. for presentations by guest speaker. The public is invited. Avon Park Boy Scout Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30 p.m. in the Scout Lodge, 202 Robert Britt St., AvonPark. Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to join. Call 452-2385. AvonPark Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Beta Sigma Phi, Xi Nu Sigma Chapter of Avon Park, meets the second and fourth Tuesday each month in the members home. Call president Mary Joinerr at 382-4488 or vice president Linda Webster at 385-1124. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday night at "The Rock," Union Congregational Church, 28 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park. Abarbecue meal is served at 6 p.m. for a donation. At 6:45 p.m., members meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group breaks up into small groups for men and women. The program is designed for drug and alcohol addiction, divorce, death or illness grief, low or lost selfesteem or identity due to dysfunctional relationships, depression/anxiety, or any other need for healing. For details, contact Celebrate Recovery coordinator Pam Sim by calling 453-3345, ext. 106. The Computer Club at Buttonwood Bay meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month November through March. We invite anyone interested in expanding their computer knowledge to attend the Buttonwood Bay Bytes Computer Club meeting. Fletcher Music Club meets every Thursday and Tuesday at Fletcher Music Center in Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. For more details, call 385-3288. G2G (Grandparent to Grandparent) a supportgroup to help grandparents raising grandchildren, meets at 10 a.m. Tuesdays at One Hope United, 7195 S. George Blvd., Sebring. Call 214-9009. Heartland Harmonizers Barbershop Chorus meets from 7-9:30 p.m. in the Sebring High School Music Room, Sebring. All men who enjoy singing are invited. Reading music is not required. Call 471-2294 or 386-5098. Highlands County Quilt Guild meets first and third Tuesday, St. Agnes Episcopal Church, Sebring. Call Lynn Ullinn for meeting times at 314-0557 or e-mail luckyduck@mymailstation.com Highlands Senior Center Bingo every Tuesday 6-9 p.m. at 3400 Sebring Parkway. Doors open at 4 p.m. Cards on sale at 5 p.m.; games start at 6 p.m. Great snack bar. For more information, call 3860752. Highlands Tea Party meets at 6 p.m. Tuesdays at Homer's Restaurant, 1000 Sebring Square. Call 386-1440. Hope Hospice grief support group meets at 11 a.m. at 319 W. Center Ave., Sebring; and 4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle ALF, across U.S. 27 from Florida Hospital Lake Placid. Call 382-0312. Knights of Columbus Council 5441 meets 8 p.m. every second and fourth Tuesday at Knights of Columbus Hall, 900 U.S. 27 N., Sebring. Call 385-0987. Lake Placid Art League has classes in Parchment Embossing from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant. For information, call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Art League Woodcarvers will have Focus on Airbrushing from 1-4 p.m. and Open Carving from 5-8 p.m. at the Art League, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. Call Norm Pelland, 465-5510, or Ken Lorant, 699-0172. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Happy hour is from 2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Grief Support (Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, with Charlie Stroup. Refreshments served. Door prize given. Call 465-0568. Lake Placid Jaycees meets 7:30 p.m., Jaxson's. Board meeting, 6:30 p.m. Call Joe Collins, 655-5545, for details. Lake Placid Lions Club meets at 7 p.m. (6 p.m. for dinner)the second Tuesday each month at Herons Garden, 501 US 27 North, Lake Placid. Call Jeanne at 699-0743. Lake Placid Women of the Moose has a business meeting at 7:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday at the lodge. Lorida Community Club meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Lorida Community Center to plan events. Masonic Lodge meets 8 p.m., 106 N. Main St., Lake Placid. Nar-Anon Support Group for family members or friends of someone with a drug problem or addiction. Nar-Anon helps attain serenity and a more normal life for those affected by the addictions of loved ones, regardless of whether or not he/she has stopped using. 6 p.m. every Tuesday at First Baptist Chuc h of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Churc h, 1410 W.Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup. c om. Call 382-7731. Visit www.oa.org for more information on OA. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Placid Lake s Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. Call 465-4888. Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP)offers a full range of voluntee r opportunities for people age 55 and over. RSVPmeets on the fourth Tuesday each month, 10 a.m., at the Highlands Little Theatre. Please join us for coffee and to learn more about current volunteer opportunities in Highlands County. Any interested and enrolled volunteers are invited to attend. For mor e information call Kris Schmidt, coordinator, RSVP, at 7847189. Rotary Club of Sebring (Noon) meets at noon at the Sebring Civic Center, near th e library in downtown Sebring. For information, call 385-3829 or 471-9900. Sebring Bridge Club will have Duplicate Bridge games every Tuesday evening. If interested in playing Duplicate Bridge, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 plays darts, beginning with sign in at 6 p.m. Games start at 6:30 p.m. No experience necessary. Cost is $2. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves soft shell tacos 5 7 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing. Euchre is played at 6:30 p.m. Call 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. an d table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. Call 385-2966 or leave a name, number and message. SertomaClub meets at 7 a.m. at Dee's Restaurant, Sebring. Call Scott Albritton a t 402-1819. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL99 meets from 6 -7 p.m. at the Atonement Lutheran Church, 1744 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Cal l 655-1743. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL618 has weigh in from 4-430 p.m. at Communit y Bible Church, 1400 CR-17A N., AvonPark. Meeting is at 4:45 p.m. Call 452-1093. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, plays darts 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 has sandwiches at 5 p.m. and Franke from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Cal l 385-8902. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011Page 5B LIL WIZARDS ACADEMY; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 10/2,9,16,23,30; 0 0 0 1 2 3 9 4 POSHE DAY SALON; 3.639"; 3"; Black; **internet included**; 0 0 0 1 3 1 1 3 STANLEY STEEMER CARPET; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 10/23/11; 0 0 0 1 3 1 2 5 COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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Page 6BNews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011www.newssun.com

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Special to the News-SunSEBRING – The Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s (DEP) Florida Park Service and Friends of Highlands Hammock welcome the community to the 26th Annual Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Festival at Highlands Hammock State Park on Saturday, Nov. 5, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. “Come enjoy the antique cars and tractors, arts and crafts, wildlife exhibits, model train exhibit, live entertainment and more,” said Dorothy Harris, park services specialist. Tram tours and hay rides will be available for just $1 and Florida Forest Service’s Smokey Bear as well as Highlands County Fire Services’Sparky the Fire Pup will be greeting visitors throughout the day. Promise Acres will offer pony rides for just $3. Park admission fees are just $6 per vehicle (up to eight people per carload) and there’s plenty to enjoy for the whole family. Former CCC “boys” will be sharing their experiences in the 1930s and 1940s during the Great Depression. Former Ranger Darrel Smith will present his CCC living history performance at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Hank Mattson, the Cracker Cowboy Poet, will spin yarns at high noon and Weatherbee’s Magic & Comedy show will delight all ages in two shows scheduled at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. New this year is the Hike & Seek geocaching activity, GC34MAB. Avariety of festival foods will be available by local vendors, including hot dogs, brauts, funnel cakes and more. Highlands Hammock State Park is just one of nearly 4,500 sites that were built by the men of the CCCs as they labored across the United States in Roosevelt’s civilian army. Come hear their stories and watch history come alive. For more about Highlands Hammock State Park visit www.FloridaStateParks.org/h ighlandshammock or call 396-6094. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011Page 7B Hi pops; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, hi pops; 0 0 0 1 3 1 4 2 ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Hank Mattson, the Cracker Cowboy Poet, will spin yarns at high noon during the CCC Festival. Former Ranger Darrel Smith will present his CCC living history performance at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. CCC Festival planned Nov. 5 Special to the News-SunLAKE WALES — Tickets are on sale for Bok Tower Gardens’10th annual Sunset & Symphony concert with the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra on Saturday, Nov. 5 at 6 p.m. Conducted by guest conductor, Dirk Meyer, this year’s theme is “Around the World.” One of Central Florida’s most popular events celebrating the beginning of fall, guests are invited to bring elaborate picnics to experience a magical evening as the sun sets atop Iron Mountain. Flambeaux will illuminate the Olmsted-designed pathways leading up to the 205foot Singing Tower housing one of the world’s great carillons that will be performed by carillonneur William De Turk. New this year, a preshow at 4:30 p.m. will feature the contemporary world-beat percussion ensemble, ZEROtaiko. “Taiko” is one of the most artistic forms of percussion that dates back centuries in Japan. Children dressed as pirates will be invited to help conduct the Orlando Phil’s performance of “Pirates of the Caribbean.” Other selections include “Brazil;” “Hungarian Dance No. 5,” by Brahms; “Young Prince and Princess from Scheherazade” by Rimsky Korskov; “CanCan” by Offenbach; Hermann’s “Italian Fiesta;” “Irish Tune from County Derry;” and Gershwin’s “American in Paris Suite.” Guest tenor Fernando Varela will perform “Questa e quella” by Verdi and “O Sole Mio” by Capua. Patriotic favorites include “From Sea to Shining Sea” and “Stars and Stripes Forever.” Concert tickets will include general Gardens’ admission so guests may enter anytime during the day for picnics. Event gates open at 3:30 p.m. to set up picnics on the Great Lawn. The Instrument Petting Zoo will begin at 4:30 p.m. The popular picnic contest will award prizes fo r Most Elegant, Mos t Original and Best Fall. Judging will take place a t 5:30 p.m. and winners will be announced during intermission. Pre-ordered boxed picnic selections are available from the Blue Palmetto Caf with food and beverages available for sale a t the Hilltop Caf concession from 3:30 to 8 p.m. The Gift Shop and Visito r Center will remain open until after the concert. Tickets are $20 for the general public with a 10 percent discount for members. Day of concert ticke t prices are $25 for the general public and members. Children ages 5 to 12 are $8; day of tickets $10; under 5 are admitted free. Group discounts are available. Visit www.boktowergardens.org o r www.OrlandoPhil.org to purchase tickets online. Bok Tower Gardens Sunset & Symphony fall concert Nov. 5 A ntique cars will be on display at the CCC Festival in Highlands Hammock. Weatherbees Magic & Comedy show will delight all ages at the CCC Festival in two shows scheduled at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. By HILLELITALIE APNational WriterNEWYORK — Fifty years after the publication of “Catch-22,” author Joseph Heller is long dead and his editor has finally gotten around to re-reading it. “I’m happy to report that I love it,” Robert Gottlieb said Wednesday night before hundreds gathered at the Symphony Space performing arts center on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. “(But) I kept wanting to edit it. I kept thinking, ‘How did I let this go by?”’ Gottlieb appeared with two other Heller experts — Mike Nichols and author Christopher Buckley, representing those who met the author in his 30s (Gottlieb), in middle age (Nichols) and in his final years (Buckley). Interviewed by CBS television correspondent Lesley Stahl, they reminisced about a perpetually anxious, but life-affirming former World War II flyer and advertising man whose dark send-up of war and bureaucracy anticipated the disillusion of Vietnam. The novel that has sold more than 10 million copies, read alike by anti-war protesters and cadets at the Air Force Academy, where the book has long been taught. Gottlieb was there at the birth, a new and promising editor at Simon & Schuster who convinced executives to give a first-time author and his strange mix of laughter and horror a chance. Gottlieb, who has since worked with such prize-winners as Toni Morrison, Robert Caro and Barbara Tuchman, said he never knew an author so collaborative as Heller. “He saw his own work completely objectively,” Gottlieb said, adding that he saw himself and Heller as “two surgeons working on the same patient together.” “It was always like that with him,” he said. “He had the mind of an editor more than any writer I worked with.” Nichols, known for such films as “The Graduate” and “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?,” entered the “Catch22” story in the late 1960s. “The Graduate” had made Nichols one of Hollywood’s hottest directors and he was encouraged to take on a seemingly hot property. Nichols was reluctant, finding the novel too dense and complicated, wondering how to assemble a “huge, surrealistic movie that says war is madness.” But he and co-writer Buck Henry became caught up in the story’s circular power, the plot going “round and round and round.” Nichols had his pick of actors — from Alan Arkin and Anthony Perkins to Orson Welles and Jon Voight. But the film received mixed reviews, including from Nichols, who noted that “Catch-22” had the bad luck to come out the same year as Robert Altman’s lighter, hipper “M.A.S.H.” Friends remember Joseph Heller and Catch-22

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Page 8BNews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sun that is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSun at 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Thursday. For information contact (239) 6710390. Pastor Travis Vanderford. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site, www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, senior pastor; Scott King, interim youth minister; Joy Loomis, music director; and Rev. Johnattan Soltero, Primera Mision Bautista pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:45 a.m. Morning Worship; 10:45 a.m. Children's Church; 6 p.m. Evening Service. Nursery provided for Sunday morning service. Regular Wednesday schedule: 6 p.m. Prayer Meeting; 6 p.m. children's choirs; 6 p.m. youth activities; 6:30 p.m. Adult Choir Rehearsal; 7 p.m. Mission Programs. Call 453-6681 for details. Spanish Sunday services: 9:30 a.m. Sunday school; 11 a.m. Sunday worship; 7 p.m. eevening worship. Spanish Wednesday Service: 7 p.m. Bible study. Spanish Friday Meeting: 7 p.m. Family Night Visitation. "In the heart of Avon Park. For the hearts of Avon Park." First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing God's Heart and Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and women's prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the "Place to discover God's love." For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, associate pastor, minister of youth and activities; and Rev. Nuno Norberto, associate pastor, minister of music and senior adults. Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.; Blended Service, 10:30 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mother's Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) "Where the old fashion gospel is preached." Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the "Son" always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Awana kindergartenthrough fifth grade, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 3850752. Spring Lake Baptist Church, "Where the Bible is Always Open." Pastor Richard Schermerhorn 7408 Valencia Road; 655-2610. The Rev. Ronald Smith, assistant pastor, 386-1610. On U.S. 98 at the Spring Lake Village II entrance. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. for all ages; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Mid-week Bible Study and Prayer Service, 6:30 p.m. Nursery available for all services. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695 CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049; fax, 385-5169; email, office@stcathe.com ; website, www.stcathe.com Very Rev. JosŽ Gonz‡lez, V.F., frjose@stcathe.com; Parochial Vicar, Rev. Victor Caviedes, 3853993; Assisting Priest (retired), Rev. J. Peter Sheehan; Decons, Rev. Mr. James R. McGarry and Rev. Mr. Max M. Severe. Parish office hours, 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. Masses Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon MondayFriday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Weekend Masses 4 and 5 p.m. Saturday, 5 p.m. Saturday Spanish Mass (Holy Family Youth Center), 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday, noon Sunday Sunday Mass; 5 p.m. Sunday English Family Mass (Holy Family Youth Center). Confession: every Saturday 3-3:45 p.m. or first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment with any priest. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lord's Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building God's Kingdom for Everyone." "Jesus Christ, the Way,Truth and Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!" Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Changing Seasons, a men's grief support group, meets at 1 p.m. Wednesdays. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets at 1 p.m. Thursdays. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is “Jesus is First at First Christian Church.” Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures'by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL33870. Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m. Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Christ, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, FL 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts. Sunday Worship Services, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available at every service. Bible Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered classes for all ages. Church phone: 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. We would like to extend an invitation for you and your family to visit with us here at Sebring Parkway. Our hours of service are: Sunday Bible Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazarene of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W. Main St. Randall Rupert, Pastor. Sunday: Sunday school begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning worship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening service at 6 p.m. Wednesday evening service is at 7 p.m. with special services for children and adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) and Ladies ministries. If you need any more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazarene of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852. Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children and youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christian Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as the answer for time and eternity. Sunday morning worship service, 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided. Junior Church activities at same time for K-6 grade. Sunday School Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m. (Transportation available.) Sunday evening praise and worship service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and youth activities at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Everyone is welcome, please come worship with us. Don Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phone 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP By JILLLAWLESS Associated PressFilmmakers mess with viewers’childhood memories at their peril, so Steven Spielberg is taking a risk tackling Tintin. In the United States, the teenage adventurer is an acquired taste, known mainly to Europhiles and comic fans. But for millions around the world, the globe-trotting young journalist is a beloved childhood friend — the most famous comic-book reporter since Peter Parker and Clark Kent. Unlike those characters, Tintin has no superhero alter ego, just an unquenchable curiosity and a white terrier named Snowy who more than matches his master in resourcefulness and pluck. The archetypal American Spielberg may seem an odd choice to bring this European hero to the big screen, but Spielberg has been an admirer since a critic compared the Tintin stories to his “Raiders of the Lost Ark.” Belgian cartoonist Herge, who created Tintin in the 1920s, gave Spielberg his blessing before his death in 1983. And it turns out Spielberg is perfect, his love of vintage Saturday afternoon serials exactly in sync with the spirit of the comic book yarns. “The Adventures of Tintin: Secret of the Unicorn” is a nostalgiatinged romp, blending thrilling chases, quirky characters and sly humor — a sort of Young Indiana Jones: Brussels Edition. The original comics, particularly the notorious 1931 story “Tintin in the Congo,” have been accused of colonialism and ethnic stereotyping, but the film carefully avoids controversial terrain. The movie, adapted from three of Herge’s original stories, follows Tintin (played by Jamie Bell, who starred in the movie “Billy Elliot”) as he joins forces with Captain Haddock (Andy Serkis), a whisky-soaked seaman who becomes his friend and ally, in a race against nefarious Ivan Sakharine (Daniel Craig) to pirate treasure and the secret of a lost galleon, the Unicorn. It’s a sign of how big Tintin is around the world that the film debuts internationally on Oct. 26, almost two months before its Dec. 21 U.S. opening — time, producers hope, to build a global buzz and intrigue American audiences. The movie’s most contentious feature, for some viewers, will be Spielberg’s decision to use performance capture technology, in which live actors are recorded digitally, then layered with computer animation to create finished characters and sets. The animation was handled by the WETAvisual-effects house of “The Lord of the Rings” director Peter Jackson, who produced “The Adventures of Tintin.” Some viewers may see it as a “plasticky” halfway house between live action and animation, but Spielberg uses it to create some exhilarating action sequences, including a madcap motorcycle chase through a Moroccan souk. The European detail of vintage automobiles, dusty shops and rain-slicked cobblestones is lovingly rendered, and there are moments of wit and visual surrealism to please adults as well as children. The technology’s slick superficiality is not so good at capturing emotion, despite the best efforts of a largely British cast. Bell’s Tintin is almost as flat as his pen-andink forebear. Bumbling bowler-hatted detectives Thomson and Thompson are played by frequent collaborators Nick Frost and Simon Pegg, but little of the pair’s comic rapport comes through. Only Serkis (the performance-capture Olivier, veteran of the technique from “The Lord of the Rings,” “King Kong” and “Rise of the Planet of the Apes”) transcends the limitations of the form. He wrings blood, bile, laughter and tears from the soused Haddock, whose alcoholism is somewhat uneasily played for both laughs and pathos. The film ends on a note that makes a sequel — which Jackson is lined up to direct — a near certainty, and a third film is planned if all goes well. Will the movie please all Tintin fans? Probably not. The script by Britons Steven Moffat, Joe Cornish and Edgar Wright has taken enough liberties with Herge’s plots and characters to infuriate purists. But it has a ligh t touch, a brisk pace and considerable charm, perfect family fare for casual viewers. Spielbergs Tintin is comic book fun MOVIES Movie Review The Adventures of Tintin: Secret of the Unicorn Rating: R (adventure action violence, some drunkenness, smoking) Running time: 107 minutes Review: (of 4) Courtesy photo A scene from The Adventures of Tintin: Secret of the Unicorn.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011Page 9B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the Redeemer .Service time is 9:30 with Holy Communion. Coffee hour following services. Newcomers welcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail redeemer1895@aol.com Web site: redeemeravon.com The church is at 839 Howe's Way,Avon Park (two miles north of Sun 'N Lake Boulevard, across from Wells Dodge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday Services: Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek service on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always welcome. The Rev. Jim Kurtz, rector. Church office 3857649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL33852. Phone: 4650051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Nelson, Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday evening: Holy Communion with Healing Service, 6 p.m. Child care available at the 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come see what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 Thunderbird Road, (863) 8350869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday services at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid City" Children's Ministry throughout all services, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married couples, "prime-timers," and Bible studies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day Care, Preschool and After-School Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For registration call: 385-3111). Check us out on the Web at www.sebringgrace.org INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration Ministries, (non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533771. Sunday service: Sunday School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church (ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen, Deacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, third and fifth Sunday each month, and Rev. Jefferson Cox on the second and fourth Sunday of each month. Jim Helwig, organist/choir director. Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee hour on the first and third Sunday of each month. Council meeting on the first Monday of month; Ladies Group WELCAmeets at noon second Monday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable Garden Club meets as needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden open seven days a week to congretation and community. Like to sing? Come join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park LCMS, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or see christlutheranavonpark.org Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Rev. Gary Kindle, pastor.Traditional Worship service, 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday Praise Worship Service, 10:30 a.m. Communion is served the first, third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday school and Bible classes: 9:15 a.m. Sunday. Worship service is broadcast at 8 a.m. on WITS 1340 AM each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Faily of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 9 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 385-1163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Sunday service at 9:30 a.m. Sunday school will resume in the fall. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots PreSchool director; and Noel Johnson, minister of youth and family life. Worship schedule after Easter through December: Worship service 10 a.m., and Education Hour, 8:45 a.m. Worship schedule for January through Easter: Worship service, 8:30 and 11 a.m., Education Hour 9:45 a.m. Traditional Service with Holy Communion each first and third Sunday. Non-Traditional Service each second, fourth and fifth Sunday. Seasonal mid-week services Wednesday evenings during Lent and Advent. Call church office for additional Worship times and special holiday services. Other activities and groups include: Choirs; Ladies Guild and LWML; Men's Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies as scheduled; Trinity Tots Pre-school, Youth Group activities (call for meeting times and dates). Visit us online at: www.Trinitylutheranlp.com NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children ages 4 years through fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening service, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Prayer and Bible Study, 6:30 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and children's church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com. Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www. ctmforme.com Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Children's & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry. www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kid's World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. The Lord's Sentinel Fellowship Church 148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid (at Lake Placid Christian School), Pastor Juanita Folsom. Sunday morning service, 10:30 a.m.; Monday, Sentinel School of Theology, 7 p.m.; Church service, Tuesday, 7 p.m. More information at www.juanitafolsom ministries.com. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 8:45 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. in the Millennium Church. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer a Saturday service at 6 p.m. with Pastor Tiger Gullett in the Millennium Church. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org All teachings are taken from the Manufacturer's Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Children's Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of God's Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and children's church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com Web site: www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Sunday morning worship: Informal service, 8 a.m.; traditional service, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday school, 9:15 a.m.; evening service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Children's/Youth Group, 5:30-7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net ; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-12:30 a.m. Monday-Friday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Women's Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Grief Support Group, 1 p.m.; Youth Group (middle and high school), 3:30-6:30 p.m.; Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; Choir Rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available during worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com, 118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 9-10 a.m. in the sanctuary; contemporary worship is from 11 a.m. to noon. Sunday school classes for adults and children will be 10:10-10:50 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Children's Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail, springlakepc@embarqmail.com, Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com, Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarm ysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL33870. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays with Rick Heilig, youth director. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church, 200 South Lake Avenue, Avon Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R. James Weiss, Pastor, Sunday School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Prayer Shawl Ministry on the second and fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m. for women who love God and crocheting. Visit us at our church Web site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodist Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pastor. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral assistant. Sunday schedule: Heritage Worship Service, 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worship service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m. Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m. (October-May only). We offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth programs, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship. We are a congregation that want to know Christ and make Him known. Call the church office at 465-2422 or check out our church Web site at www.memorialumc.com St. John United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL33872. The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all services. Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church office phone: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church of Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, FL 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 27 and Hammock Road). Sunday worship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion with worship first Sunday of month; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. all other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For more information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@earth link.net or check theWeb site sebringemmanuelucc.com. No matter who you are or where you are on life's journey, you're welcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP Halloween usually brings up visions of goblins, monsters, ghosts and bats. While most of these creatures are fantasy, bats are real enough and some folks fear them almost as much as the mythical monsters. This fear stems mostly from misconceptions and myths that have been passed from generation to generation. In reality, bats are extremely beneficial. Florida is home to 13 species of bats. Some live here year round and others are visitors during different seasons. Every species of bat in Florida dines on either insects or nectar. Seventy percent of the world’s bats eat insects. Abat can eat its body weight in bugs each night. These creatures are crucial in the control and balance of the insect population. Other species of bats feed on nectar and serve the world as very important pollinators. In fact, bats play a vital role in the survival of the world’s rainforests. Avocado, banana, date, fig, baobab and mango trees are among the plants that depend on bats to survive. Although bats may be mostly known for their blood-sucking characteristics, only three species in the world actually feed on blood. And, contrary to popular belief, bats do not attack people and get tangled in their hair. For the most part, bats are very shy creatures and try their best to ignore the human race when possible. There is such a thing as a vampire bat, but there are none in the United States. And these types of vampires do not “suck” blood. They make a small incision with their incisor teeth and lap up the gooey substance. Their upper incisors lack enamel, which keeps their teeth razor sharp. The three species of Vampire bats are the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), the hairylegged vampire bat (Diphylla ecaudata), and the white-winged vampire Bat (Diaemus youngi). Like their mythical counterpart, Dracula, they hunt only when it is fully dark. They locate their prey by emitting low-energy sound pulses. They are also equipped with infrared sensors. The common vampire bat feeds mostly on the blood of mammals, whereas both the hairy-legged vampire bat and white-winged vampire bat feed on the blood of birds. Once the common vampire bat locates a host, such as a sleeping mammal, it lands and approaches it on the ground. It then uses thermoception, a sense which perceives the temperature, to identify a good spot on the skin to bite. Vampire bats have many interesting characteristics. They are believed to be the only species of bats in the world to “adopt” another young bat if something happens to the bat's mother. They share a strong family bond with members of the colony. Another unique adaptation of vampire bats is the sharing of food. Avampire bat can only survive about two days without a meal of blood, yet they cannot be guaranteed of finding food every night. This poses a problem, so when a bat fails to find food it will often “beg” another bat for food. The “host” bat may regurgitate a small amount of blood to sustain the other member of the colony. Vampire bats also engage in social grooming. It usually occurs between females and their offspring, but it is also significant between adult females. And these bats are fast. Not only can they walk swiftly, but hey can run at speeds up to almost five miles per hour. Bats are said to be the only mammals that can truly fly. Other species of mammals may glide, but bats literally fly with their hands. Their wings are very much like human hands, but with longer, thinner fingers and a tough membrane between each digit. Bats can see; they are not blind. However, they do have highly developed sonar capabilities and use echolocation to locate objects and prey. Only 0.5 percent of bats carry rabies. This is less than one percent of all bats and those that do contact the disease usually die within three or four days. These truly amazing creatures are disappearing at an alarming rate. Their roost sites, such as caves and dead trees are being destroyed or disturbed due to development. Many bats will move to a more urban setting such as an abandoned bridge or building, but many times vandalism and human abuse cause them to leave or die. There are many ways that humans can give this misunderstood creature a helping hand. Bat houses can be constructed and placed in your yard. It’s a win-win situation. The bats have a safe haven and you won’t be plagued with so many bugs. You can also help by getting involved with supporting local conservation groups that protect these and other creatures along with their habitat. Educate others. The biggest enemy of the bat is fear and misunderstanding. Corine Burgess is and Environmental Specialist for the Highlands County Parks and Natural Resources Department. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the News-Sun. The misunderstood and feared bat is important for environment News From The Watershed Corine Burgess Courtesy photo Vampire bats have many interesting characteristics.

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Page 10BNews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011www.newssun.com Church Page; 5.542"; 7.1"; Black; church page dummy; 0 0 0 0 4 0 6 9 Breakfasts and lunches being served in the Highlands County School District for the upcoming week of Oct. 24-28 include: HIGH SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast „ Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, fruit cocktail cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch „ Penne pasta, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, tacos, taco toppers, salsa, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked french fries, green peas, cheddar cheese stick, tossed salad, applesauce snacking cake, diced pears, assorted fresh fruit, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast „ Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, applesauce, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch „ Baked chicken, dinner roll, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, turkey Cobb salad plate, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, Presidents Smart cookies, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast „ Breakfast pizza, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch „ Turkey enchiladas, yellow rice, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, tacos, taco toppers, salsa, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, tossed salad, black beans, fruit cocktail cup, dried blueberries, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast „ Breakfast burrito, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, diced peaches, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch „ Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, grilled chicken salad plate, broccoli, cooked carrots, Colby Jack cheese stick, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. ACADEMY SCHOOLS Monday Lunch „ Penne pasta, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, green peas, applesauce snacking cake, diced pears, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Lunch „ Baked chicken, dinner roll, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, Presidents Smart cookies, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Lunch „ Turkey enchiladas, salsa, yellow rice, baked buffalo chips, tossed salad, fruit cocktail cup, assorted juice, assorted milk Thursday Lunch „ Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, broccoli, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. MIDDLE SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast „ Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, fruit cocktail cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch „ Penne pasta, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, chicken patty on bun, tacos, taco toppers, salsa, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, green peas, cheddar cheese stick, tossed salad, applesauce snacking cake, diced pears, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast „ Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, applesauce, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch „ Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, turkey Cobb salad, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, Presidents Smart cookies, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast „ Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Breakfast pizza, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch „ Turkey enchiladas, yellow rice, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, tacos, taco toppers, salsa, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, tossed salad, black beans, fruit cocktail cup, dried blueberries, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast „ Breakfast burrito, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, diced peaches, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch „ Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, grilled chicken salad plate, broccoli, cooked carrots, Colby Jack cheese stick, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast „ Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Chocolate chip waffle stick, string cheese, orange juice, chocolate milk. Lunch „ Hot-dog on bun, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, turkey chef salad, baked sweet potato fries, baked beans, apple crisp, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast „ Breakfast burrito, salsa, hash brown biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, applesauce, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Blueberry/sausage pancake, strawberry cup, chocolate milk, apple cinnamon toast, peach cup. Lunch „ Baked chicken, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, scalloped potatoes, corn cobbettes, raisins, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast „ Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Apple cinnamon toast, peach cup, chocolate milk, blueberry/sausage pancake, strawberry cup. Lunch „ Macaroni and cheese, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, broccoli, carrots and dip, banana, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast „ Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Breakfast frittata, orange juice, chocolate milk, blueberry, Ultimate Breakfast Round, fresh apple slices. Lunch „ Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef mixed vegetables, ice cream sandwich, diced peaches, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. KINDERGARTEN LEARNING CENTER Monday Lunch „ Hot-dog on bun, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, baked sweet potato fries, baked beans, apple crisp, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Lunch „ Baked chicken, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, scalloped potatoes, corn cobbettes, raisins, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Lunch „ Macaroni and cheese, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, broccoli, carrots and dip, banana, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Lunch „ Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, mixed vegetables, ice cream sandwich, diced peaches, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. CHALKTALK School Menus Special to the News-SunAVON PARK — The South Florida Community College Public Service Academy (PSA) is accepting applications for its next Corrections Academy and offering opportunities for law enforcement and corrections officers to broaden their employability skills. Corrections Academy classes begin Monday, Dec. 5, for those who wish to become certified correctional officers in Florida. By successfully completing 552 contact hours of training, students earn occupational certificates and are eligible to take the state certification examination for correctional officers. Prospective students should contact the PSAby Nov. 14 to begin the enrollment process. The PSAis also planning to offer corrections and law enforcement crossover courses in January. Through crossover courses, state-certified law enforcement officers can earn occupational certificates in corrections, and corrections officers can earn law enforcement certificates. Anyone interested in taking these classes should contact the PSAby Nov. 1. The PSAis located on SFCC’s Highlands Campus. For more information about these courses and their eligibility requirements o r to request an application, contact Adam Martin, coordinator, Criminal Justice Training, at 784-7282 or email adam.martin@southflorida.edu/ Corrections Academy applications being taken Special to the News-SunAVON PARK —South Florida Community College is offering a 10-week phlebotomy course, beginning Tuesday and running through Thursday, Dec. 8. Phlebotomists are skilled in collecting blood samples for diagnostic purposes. They find employment in physicians’offices, blood banks, laboratories, and clinical facilities. By completing SFCC’s phlebotomy course, students learn the correc t procedures for drawing blood, the safety precautions and sanitary practices they must follow, and the means for disposing of bio-hazardous materials. Basic Concepts o f Phlebotomy meets 4-8 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays, and some Saturdays at the SFCC Highlands Campus. Clinicals meet Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays as scheduling permits. To be eligible for the course, students must be a t least 18 years old, score a nine on all three sections o f the Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE), and complete SFCC’s allied health application. For more information about the course and its admission requirements, call Wayne Craig, allied health advisor, at 453-6661, 773-2252, 494-7500, or 4655300, ext. 7290, or visi t www.southflorida.edu/. Phlebotomy course teaches unique skill Courtesy photo After a three-year term, Dr. Deborah Fuschetti (left), past president of St. Catherine Catholic School of Highlands County School Board, receives a cross from Justine Devlin (center), newly elected president. Dr. Anna Adam, school principal (right) will install the cross at the school in gratitude for Dr. Fuschetti and her boards service. Panther Network The Panther Network is made possible by the combined efforts of Comcast Cablevision and South Florida Community College and may be viewed exclusively on Comcast Cable Channel 6.Wednesday2-2:30 p.m. For The Love of Cars 2:30-3 p.m. Gulf Coast War Memories Part 1 3-3:30 p.m. For The Love of Manatees 3:30-4 p.m. For The Love of Manatees cont. 4-4:30 p.m. Gulf Coast War Memories Part 2 4:30-5 p.m. Gulf Coast War Memories Part 2 cont.Thursday2-2:30 p.m. 01. Becoming an Educated Investor 2:30-3 p.m. 02. The Global Marketplace 3-3:30 p.m. 03. Raising Money Savy Kid 3:30-4 p.m. 04. Corporate Ethics 4-4:30 p.m. 1 Stranges in their own Land 4:30-5 p.m. 1 Strangers in their own Land cont. Panther Network Fuschetti thanked for service

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C M Y K Associated PressSAN FRANCISCO A n ew biography portrays Steve Jobs as a skeptic all his life giving up religion because he was troubled by starving children, callinge xecutives who took over Apple corrupt and delaying cancer surgery in favor of cleansings and herbal medicine. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson, to be published Monday, also says Jobs came up with the companys name while he was on a diet of fruits and vegetables, and asa teenager perfected staring at people without blinking. T he Associated Press purchased a copy of the book Thursday. T he book delves into Jobsdecision to delay surg ery for nine months after learning in October 2003 that he had a neuroendocrine tumor a relatively rare type of pancreatic cancert hat normally grows more slowly and is therefore more t reatable. Instead, he tried a vegan diet, acupuncture, herbalr emedies and other treatments he found online, and e ven consulted a psychic. He also was influenced by a doctor who ran a clinic t hat advised juice fasts, bowel cleansings and other unproven approaches, the b ook says, before finally having surgery in July 2004. I saacson, quoting Jobs, writes in the book: I really didnt want them to open up my body, so I tried to see ifa few other things would w ork,he told me years later with a hint of regret. Jobs died Oct. 5, at age 56, after a battle with cancer. The book also provides insight into the unraveling of Jobsrelationship with EricS chmidt, the former CEO of Google and an Apple board m ember from 2006 to 2009. Schmidt had quit Apples board as Google and Apple went head-to-head in smartphones, Apple with itsi Phone and Google with its Android software. Isaacson wrote that Jobs was livid in January 2010 when HTC introduced anA ndroid phone that boasted many of the popular features of the iPhone. Apple sued, and Jobs told Isaacson in an expletive-laced rant that Googles actions amounted to grand theft. I will spend my last dying breath if I need to, andI will spend every penny of Apples $40 billion in the bank, to right this wrong, Jobs said. Im going to destroy A ndroid, because its a stolen product. Im willing to go thermonuclear war on this. Jobs used an expletive to d escribe Android and Google Docs, Googles Internetbased word processing program. In a subsequent meeting with Schmidt. Jobs told Schmidt that he wasnt inter-e sted in settling the lawsuit, the book says. I dont want your money. If you offer me $5 billion, I wont want it. Ive got plen-t y of money. I want you to stop using our ideas in A ndroid, thats all I want. The meeting, Isaacson wrote, resolved nothing. The book is clearly designed to evoke the Apples tyle. Its cover features the title and authors name s tarkly printed in black and gray type against a white background, along with ab lack-and-white photo of Jobs, thumb and forefinger t o his chin. The biography, for which Jobs granted more than threed ozen interviews, is also a look into the thoughts of a man who was famously s ecret, guarding details of his life as he did Apples p roducts, and generating plenty of psychoanalysis from a distance. Jobs resigned as Apples CEO on Aug. 24, six weeksb efore he died. Doctors said Thursday that it was not clear whether the delayed treatment made a difference in Jobschances for survival. People live with these c ancers for far longer than nine months before theyre e ven diagnosed, so its not known how quickly one can prove fatal, said Dr. Len Lichtenfeld, deputy chief medical officer of theA merican Cancer Society. Dr. Michael Pishvaian, a pancreatic cancer expert at Georgetown Universitys Lombardi ComprehensiveC ancer Center, said people often are in denial after a cancer diagnosis, and some take a long time to accept recommended treatments. eve had many patients who have had bad outcomes when they have delayed t reatment. Nine months is certainly a significant period of time to delay, he said. F ortune magazine reported in 2008 that Jobs tried altern ative treatments because he was suspicious of mainstream medicine. The book says Jobs gave up Christianity at age 13w hen he saw starving children on the cover of Life magazine. He asked his Sunday school pastor whether God knew what would happen to them. Jobs never went back to c hurch, though he did study Zen Buddhism later. J obs calls the crop of executives brought in to run Apple after his ouster in 1985 corrupt people with corrupt values who caredo nly about making money. Jobs himself is described as caring far more about product than profit. He told Isaacson they c ared only about making money for themselves mainly, and also for Apple rather than making great products. Jobs returned to the company in 1997. After that, he introduced the candy-colored i Mac computer, the iPod, the iPhone and the iPad, and turned Apple into the most v aluable company in America by market value for a time. The book says that, while some Apple board members were happy that HewlettPackard gave up trying toc ompete with Apples iPad, Jobs did not think it was cause for celebration. Hewlett and Packard built a great company, and they thought they had left it in good hands, Jobs told Isaacson. But now itsb eing dismembered and destroyed. I hope Ive left a stronger legacy so that will never happen at Apple, he added. A dvance sales of the book have topped best-seller lists. Much of the biography adds to what was already known, or speculated, about Jobs.W hile Isaacson is not the first to tell Jobsstory, he had unprecedented access. Their last interview was weeks before Jobs died. Jobs reveals in the book t hat he didnt want to go to college, and the only school h e applied to was Reed, a costly private college in Portland, Ore. Once accept-e d, his parents tried to talk him out of attending Reed, b ut he told them he wouldnt go to college if they didnt let him go there. Jobs wound up attending but dropped out after less than a year andn ever went back. Jobs told Isaacson that he t ried various diets, including one of fruits and vegetables. On the naming of Apple, hes aid he was on one of my fruitarian diets. He said he h ad just come back from an apple farm, and thought the name sounded fun, spiriteda nd not intimidating. Jobseye for simple, clean design was evident early. T he case of the Apple II computer had originally i ncluded a Plexiglas cover, metal straps and a roll-top door. Jobs, though, wanted something elegant that would make Apple stand out. H e told Isaacson he was struck by Cuisinart food processors while browsing ata department store and decided he wanted a case made of molded plastic. He called Jonathan Ive, A pples design chief, his spiritual partner at Apple. He told Isaacson that Ive had more operation power at Apple than anyone besides Jobs himself that theres no one at the company who can tell Ive what to do. That, s ays Jobs, is the way I set it up. Jobs was never a typical CEO. Apples first president, Mike Scott, was hired mainl y to manage Jobs, then 22. One of his first projects, according to the book, was g etting Jobs to bathe more often. It didnt work. J obsdabbling in LSD an d other aspects of 1960s counterculture has been well docu mented. In the book, Jobs s ays LSD reinforced my sense of what was important creating great things instead of making money, p utting things back into the s tream of history and of human consciousness as much as I could. He also revealed that the Beatles were one of hisf avorite bands, and one of his wishes was to get the band on iTunes, Apples rev olutionary online music s tore, before he died. The Beatlesmusic went on sale on iTunes in late 2010. The book was originally c alled iSteve and scheduled to come out in March. The release date was moved up to November, then, afterJ obsdeath, to Monday. It i s published by Simon & Schuster and will sell for $35. I saacson will appear toda y on Minutes. CBS News, which airs the program, released excerpts of the book Thursday. www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, October 23, 2011Page 11B G&N DEVELOPERS; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 10/2,9,16,23,30; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 4 4 6 6 3 3 DR. LEE, IKE; 1.736"; 3"; Black; 10/23/11; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 4 4 C OUNTRY CLUB REALTY; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; 10/23/11; 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 3 1 1 2 2 1 1 Biography: Jobs questioned authority all of his life MCT S teve Jobs died Oct. 5 at the age of 56. BOOKS HARDCOVERFICTION 1. The Best of Me by Nicholas Sparks (Grand Central) 2. The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides (Farrar, Straus & Giroux) 3. Snuff by Terry Pratchett (Harper 4. The Affair: A Reacher Novel by Lee Child (Delacorte Press 5. Shock Wave by John Sandford (Putnam 6. A Dance With Dragons by George R.R. Martin (Bantam 7. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern (Doubleday 8. Lethal by Sandra Brown (Grand Central Publishing) 9. The Dovekeepers by Alice Hoffman (Scribner 10. Christmas Tree Lane by Debbie Macomber (Mira HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. Killing Lincoln: The Shocking Assassination that Changed America Forever by Bill OReilly and Martin Dugard (Henry Holt and Co.) 2. Boomerang by Michael Lewis (Norton 3. Paula Deens Southern Cooking Bible by Paula Deen with Melissa Clark. (Simon & Schuster) 4. Trust Me, Im Dr. Ozzy by Ozzy Osbourne (Grand Central) 5. Seriously Im Kidding by Ellen DeGeneres (Grand Central) 6. I Never Thought Id See the Day! by David Jeremiah (FaithWords) 7. Jacqueline Kennedy foreword by Caroline Kennedy (Hyperion 8. That Used to Be Us by Thomas L. Friedman and Michael Mandelbaum (Farrar, Straus & Giroux) 9. Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand (Random House 10. Great by Choice by Jim Collins & Morton T. Hansen (Harper PUBLISHERSWEEKLYBEST-SELLERS

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Associated PressLOS ANGELES — Pet owners love dressing up their dogs for Halloween. Only problem is, dogs don’t always love wearing costumes. But there are some tricks you can use for those pets that don’t think it’s a treat to wear hats, boots, masks and coats for their owners’amusement. If a dog is used to wearing clothes, costumes may not be a problem, said veterinarian Terry Marie Curtis, a clinical behaviorist for the Department of Small Animal Clinical Services at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine. Dogs accustomed to wearing snug items designed to calm anxiety — like Thundershirts, Anxiety Wraps or Storm Defender Capes — should be able to adjust to other types of clothing, she said. But every pet is different. “Many dogs hate things on their feet,” she said. “This is true because it can alter how they perceive where they’re walking.” Some dogs are used to booties, though, either because they live where the ground gets very hot or cold, or they are carried most of the time. “The smaller pocket pups are more likely to have ‘dress up’in their experience because that’s what mom has done since puppyhood,” Curtis said. For fussy dogs (and cats), try a starter costume consisting mostly of accessories, advised Reyna Jew, who buys dog and cat apparel, shampoo, travel products and carriers for PetSmart. Try angel, fairy or bat wings, a pirate or witch hat. If that’s still too much, there are bows that clip in the pet’s hair, necklaces and decorative collars or bandannas made of Halloween-themed fabric. Target offers 29 costume styles for dogs, including five rider styles (a stuffed character rides on the back of the pet) designed for larger dogs and 10 partial costumes for the pet that won’t tolerate a full costume, said Kristy Welker of Target Communications in Minneapolis. Options include items that attach to collars, like flowers and even Saint Bernard-style rescue barrels, said Welker. These won’t upset animals who don’t like wearing clothes, but they’ll look like costumes to human eyes. Target also carries three styles of T-shirts and three styles of pajamas, including prisoners and skeletons. Costumes that cover a pet’s head or include eyeglasses or masks may be a challenge. You’ll have to see what your dog will tolerate, but don’t be surprised if a mask or hat is repeatedly shaken or pawed off. The most popular costume at PetSmart is the bumblebee, followed by the pumpkin and dragon, Jew said. Bat wings, hot dogs and a sheriff are Target’s best-sellers. Pajamas are popular because they are comfortable, Welker said. At BuyCostumes.com, a raptor, bee and a dog-riding cowboy top the list. No one sells full costumes just for cats but dog accessories will work. PetSmart also has 12 collars and scarves designed for and modeled by cats online. Some pet owners want to dress like their pets or want to dress their children and pets alike. It’s easy to mix and match many pet costumes with adult costumes from other stores, Jew said. For example, there are Superman and Batman dog costumes. An owner can easily get a Lois Lane or Robin costume, she said. Target offers hot dog and banana costumes for both adults and pets, Welker said. Pet costumes are made to go on easy, Jew said, and usually fasten with Velcro. The best-selling size costume is medium, which usually fits a 30to 40-pound dog. “The toy breeds are second up,” Jew said. One trend that’s driving demand for pet costumes is the surging number of dressup events for pets being staged by neighborhoods, cities, shelters, rescues, magazines, websites, pet stores, charitable organizations and other groups, including photo contests, pet parades and businesses inviting pets in costume to drop by, Jew said. PetSmart is among those sponsoring a costume contest, and you don’t have to buy the outfit at the store to enter, Jew said. As the holiday approaches, pet owners should keep a few things in mind. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals warns that costumes should not limit an animal’s “movement, hearing, sight or ability to breathe, bark, eat, drink or eliminate. And watch for choking hazards.” And, the ASPCAsays, remember that chocolate is toxic for dogs, while the aluminum foil and cellophane in candy wrappers can cause serious problems for cats and dogs. Dr. Justine Lee, associate director of veterinary services for the national Pet Poison Helpline in Minneapolis, said during Halloween week last year, calls about dogs that ingested chocolate increased by 209 percent over a typical week All the activity and oddly dressed people coming and going may scare your pet, Curtis said. “I’ve worked with many dogs who are deathly afraid of cameras and the flash, so if their owners are doing a lot of picture taking around this time, then that could contribute to the overall fear, too,” she said. The ASPCAalso suggests keeping pets away from doors when greeting trick-ortreaters and recommends against candles to light up pumpkins. Online: http://www.vetmed.ufl.edu Page 12BNews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011www.newssun.com DR. ROTMAN, DARRIN; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; 10/2,9,16,23,30; 0 0 0 0 1 2 4 0 3 SEBRING PEDIATRICS, LLC; 3.639"; 4"; Black; 10/23/11; 0 0 0 1 3 1 1 5 Dog doesnt like Halloween costumes? Accessorize! MCT Cater to your pets personality when it comes to picking outfit CROSSWORDSOLUTION

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DearAbby: I work as a waitress although I have a college degree. I am happy with my life. I’m unattached, childless and take three or four vacations every year. Acouple of years ago I started waiting on “Tom” at the restaurant where I work. As time went on, we became friendly. Tom is in his 70s, and I am in my early 40s. Last year at Christmas he gave me some nice costume jewelry and asked if I’d have dinner with him sometime. I was touched and saw no harm in it. We had dinner a few times and went to a couple of movies. Soon after, he started acting as if we were a “couple” and I began declining his dinner invitations. Afamily emergency came up and I was able to remove myself from the situation for a couple of months. I thought it would cool him off. For my birthday last month, Tom presented me with a jewelry box and a bracelet with my birthstone. He was angry because I wouldn’t go out to dinner and because I went on vacation for 10 days the following week. I’m having a difficult time letting him know I’m not interested because I know he’s a lonely old man. I don’t want any more gifts from him. What on earth is Tom thinking? He’s my father’s age. Do you know what they call a middle-aged woman who hooks up with an old man? Anurse! How can I stop Tom’s attentions without being rude or hurting his feelings? — Really Not My Type DearReally: You may not be able to manage that. You and I both know what he is thinking, and his intentions are not “fatherly.” In fact, because you accepted his gifts and his dinner invitations, he thinks you have a relationship and he has become possessive. Return his gifts with a short note explaining that you did not understand when he gave them to you that you were being courted. Tell him you like him and always will, but not in the way he would like you to, and that you hope he will find someone who can reciprocate his feelings. And do not be surprised if he takes his business to some other restaurant. DearAbby: We recently moved to a small town. Our neighbors came over to introduce themselves, and we adore them already. The husband speaks with a stutter. This doesn’t bother me, but I want to be sure that I’m being respectful to him when he’s trying to get a word out. Is it preferable to wait him out, or would it help if I “suggest” the word I think he might say? — Uncertain in Iowa DearUncertain: Although you mean well, the respectful way to handle it is to let the man speak for himself — even if it takes a little longer. DearAbby: Today, after an absence of many years, I met a former employee. He looked the same as he did, except he had no hair. He said he felt fine but — could it be cancer? Chemotherapy? Should one comment? I ignored it and we exchanged small talk going back several decades. Would it have been proper to ask about his baldness? — Curious in New England DearCurious: The questions, “How are you?” and “How have you been?” are a part of normal discourse. If his response was he is “fine,” then that’s an indication that he didn’t want to discuss his changed appearance. He could be in treatment for cancer. He could also have an immune disorder that caused him to lose his hair. Because he didn’t volunteer more information, you were right not to question him. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, October 23, 2011Page 13B FAIRMONT CINEMA; 1.736"; 6"; Black; 10/21/11 p/u; 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 2 0 DIVERSIONS GEEWHIZBy MARYELLEN UTHLAUT ACROSS 1 Marshy ground 7 Parties for royalty, say 12 Finger lever 19 Too 20 Lively Baroque dances 21 Bench warmer 22 Potentially comforted by a bottle of Beefeater? 24 Cruel partner 25 Loosen, in a way 26 Rescued orphan in Byron's "Don Juan" 27 Cutlass maker 28 Eagle's org. 29 Be inclined 30 1994 World Cup host 31 Carts without fixed sides 33 "Take __ from me ..." 34 Place for a complainer? 39 Community character 40 Boxer's greeting 43 Catch sight of 44 Blue gem, briefly 45 Worry-free 46 Scrape 48 Kept talking, and talking ... 49 Spread here and there 50 Some electron tubes 51 Is inclined 52 Mailing ctr. 53 Johnson of "LaughIn" 56 Run to Reno, maybe 57 Forty-niner after a lucky strike? 59 Double-minded 60 Rep.'s opponent 61 Dolphin's home 63 Is in need of 65 Critic's pick 66 Data 68 Christian path to salvation? 72 Celtic, for one 74 Inert gas 75 Show stoppers 76 Hag 77 Be half-asleep 78 Chaucerian estate manager 80 San Antonio landmark 81 Treat with carbon dioxide 82 Quality 84 Word with land or sea 85 Seem less important 87 "You betcha!" 88 Many an Indian 89 Stagehand splitting his sides? 92 Surface statistic 93 Aromatic compound 95 Three abroad 96 Spell opening 100 Sleep lab letters 101 Vintage autos 102 Hyperion, for one 104 Challenging winds 105 Riot figures 107 Like a baseball player who couldn't find his way to the field? 110 The Urals divide it 111 Like a jack-o'lantern's eyes 112 Time of merriment 113 Completely absorbed (in) 114 Striking hammer parts 115 "Help!" film director Richard DOWN 1 Mound on the slopes 2 Woolly, in a way 3 Oscar de la __ 4 Like an arrow in the air 5 Blackthorn fruit 6 Genuine, for real: Abbr. 7 Befitting offspring 8 Alike, to Alain 9 Big brass 10 Snaky fish 11 Boston-toNantucket dir. 12 Indeed 13 Tears apart 14 "We have met the enemy and he __": Pogo 15 Some microwaves 16 Ineptly prepared mess hall offering? 17 Taxpayer's crime 18 Take a turn for the worse 20 Is called 23 Stretch with no hits 27 Porridge, essentially 31 State under oath 32 "Still Falls the __": Edith Sitwell poem 33 "You're in for __!" 35 Cash in 36 Exploits 37 Twisty-horned antelope 38 Like many beaches 39 Always, in verse 40 Began energetically 41 Texas city near Dyess Air Force Base 42 Man at the altar yet again? 45 Baby carrier? 47 Payroll service giant, initially 48 Civil War cannon, e.g. 49 Paint droplet 51 Inquisitor __ de Torquemada 52 Iced, as cake 54 Italian seaport 55 Main courses 57 Avant-__ 58 South American plain 62 "__ my love a cherry ..." 64 Filter out 67 Iroquois tribe 69 Food that's French for "flash of lightning" 70 "The Sound of Music" family name 71 Former Colorado governor 73 "__ b?" 77 Spanish surrealist 79 Coin first minted under Louis IX 80 It might be a whole lot 82 Dickens's Darnay 83 Offer one's services for a fee 84 Certain NCOs 85 Mardi Gras event 86 Boston's TD Garden, e.g. 90 Web-footed mammals 91 Triangular house sections 93 Spine-tingling 94 "Alas!" 97 Upward thrust 98 Rouen remainder 99 Sirius, for one 101 Breathing: Abbr. 102 Gilded metalware 103 One of the Karamazovs 104 Comic strip drooler 106 __ kwon do 107 Mountain pass 108 T-shirt size 109 49ers' org. Solution on page 12B I’m a rather slow eater. In fact, I simply can’t rush through a meal. If I do, I pay the penalty of feeling like the food hasn’t made it to its intended destination. But, eating slowly isn’t just about digestion for me. It’s about savoring. When I or someone else has taken the time to prepare a meal, I enjoy inhaling the aroma, lingering over the tasty herbs and relishing the delightful awakening of my taste buds. Food is meant to nourish us; but, it also should be enjoyed. As convenient as it might be to pop into a fast food restaurant on occasion, there’s nothing like sitting in a restaurant where tantalizing bouquets of herbs and spices tickle and invite true dining. And, even better if it’s your own home where someone has lovingly prepared the meal. I hope I’ve made you hungry! But, take that to a different sphere. How about satisfying the hunger in our souls by savoring the truths in God’s Word? The Psalmist uses the word “taste” to pique our hunger for the Lord in Psalm 34: 8, NKJV, where he declares, “Oh, taste and see that the Lord is good. Blessed is the man who trusts in Him!” In our busy world, it’s tempting to snack or grab a ‘quick meal’from the Bible. And there are times when that can’t be helped. However, when we come to God’s Word with a desire to know him better, to understand the deeper meaning of his teachings, to allow him to guide our lives…then we begin to savor. Certain sweetness floods our souls. Bitterness flees. We enjoy the satisfaction of not just reading his Word; but, knowing him as the Word. In Psalm 119 we learn how important it is to savor God’s Word and let it become a part of us as it nourishes, fulfills and adds delight to our days. Verse 103 says, “How sweet are Your words to my taste, sweeter than honey to my mouth! As we come to know him more intimately, our understanding of him grows as it says in verse 104, “Through Your precepts I get understanding; therefore I hate every false way.” So come to the table spread for you with the fine linen, beautiful china and tantalizing food for your soul. God awaits your company and promises He will be present. You won’t leave hungry. Selah. Jan Merop of Sebring is a News-Sun correspondent. The fine art of savoring Pause And Consider Jan Merop Metro ServicesAries (March 21-April 20) –Aries, you don’t have to put on a show to get others to like you. You can simply win them over with a smile and a nice personality. Expect an admirer to come calling. Taurus (April 21-May 21) –Taurus, think outside the box and you will get some ideas you never imagined. Astrained relationship eases in the next few days. Enjoy the respite. Gemini (May 22-June 21) – Gemini, your thoughts gravitate toward adventures and vacations this week. If you can’t get your mind off of a trip, then take one and bring a friend along for the ride. Cancer(June 22-July 22) – Cancer, it’s one thing to want to advance your career, but don’t walk over others to get to the top in the process. You certainly attract more flies with honey. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) – Leo, this may be the week to be a little rebellious. Break out of a rut with some new clothes, dining experiences or things of this nature. You may get a new perspective. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) – Virgo, you want to get involved with something, but others might feel like you’re stepping on their toes in the process. Give space where space is needed. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) – Don’t be so quick to offer an opinion, Libra. You may not have all of the facts and could upset things if you weigh in at this moment in time. It could be time to check the finances. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) –Scorpio, fun times are ahead as you plan a special retreat. Enjoy this abundance of peace and quiet while you can because reality hits quickly. Sagittarius (Nov. 23Dec. 21) –Keep conversations light and airy for the next few days, Sagittarius. This way you avoid any confrontations and get the most things done that you can. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) –Family issues take precedence over other matters, Capricorn. You may have to buckle down for a few days and alleviate some things on the home front before moving on. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) – Aquarius, take a few moments to think things over before you act. Reacting too quickly could cause issues that aren’t so quickly remedied. Scorpio lends guidance. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) –Pisces, sometimes it’s not so easy to say you are sorry. That’s just what you may have to do for a friend who feels wronged. Famous birthdaysOct. 23 Ryan Reynolds, actor (35); Oct. 24 Kevin Kline, actor (64); Oct. 25 Katy Perry, singer (27); Oct. 26 Keith Urban, singer (44); Oct. 27 Kelly Osbourne, reality star (27); Oct. 28 Bill Gates, Microsoft CEO (56); Oct. 29 Gabrielle Union, actress (39). Give space where space is needed, Virgo Horoscope Romance is not on the menu for waitress elderly patron Dear Abby GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCEƒ

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BYAARONSAGERS M cClatchy-Tribunet is a lively time for the haunting dead, the undead, the walking dead and the deadly things in the water, forests and outer space. Especially in the midst of Halloween season, all the creeping, crawling, shambling and stalking amounts to a lot of bumps in the night. And many of them are coming from the television. There is a lot of paranormal activity on TVthis fall, but instead of slipping away after Oct. 31, the entertainment of the unexplained is continuing year round. There are plenty of bogeyman for viewers to choose from. Ghosts, vampires, zombies, werewolves, witches, beasts and demons are currently haunting on reality TV and scripted fare every day of the week.WHAT'S THE FASCINATION?Of course, paranormal pop culture isn’t new. The human race has always told tales about the things in our universe that had yet to be explained (paranormal) and that which existed beyond the rules of nature (supernatural). But why the fascination? The de facto response was the need to believe in something larger than ourselves. Lately the trend points to 2012 where the unreal is going to get real. Depending on the viewpoint, the end of the Mayan calendar will lead to humanity either getting scraped from the Earth or experiencing a spiritual re-awakening. Then there is the “same as it ever was” David Byrne argument: Mankind has always been curious about the unknown and told tales, found religions and created myth to explain it. But old fears persist about what’s “out there.” Of course, another way to look at it is that the paranormal is just a fun sandbox of imagination. TV ORIGINSOn TV, “The Twilight Zone” explored the paranormal in the 1960s. “In Search Of …” with Leonard Nimoy and “Unsolved Mysteries” did it in the ‘70s and ‘80s, as did “The XFiles” and “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” in the 1990s and early 2000s. But instead of just a few scripted or reenactment programs on the air, the midpoint of the new millennium’s first decade saw paranormal entertainment shift into high gear on television. In the fall of 2004, “Lost” premiered as a show laden with supernatural phenomena. Also in the latter half of 2004, the erstwhile Sci-Fi Channel (now Syfy) debuted “Ghost Hunters.” By fall 2005, genre shows “Medium,” “Ghost Whisperer,” “Night Stalker,” “Supernatural,” and the documentary series “AHaunting” had debuted. The list would only continue to grow. The WB — emboldened by previous successes “Charmed,” “Angel” and “Buffy” — picked up the supernatural slack with shows marketed to high school and college students. They then continued the trend as the reincarnated CWnetwork. The CWprogramming expanded and toyed with literary tropes from the “dark fantasy” subgenre such as angels, fairies, witches, werewolves and vampires. Those paranormal shows would eventually include “The Vampire Diaries” and this fall’s witch coven series “The Secret Circle” — both based on young adult fiction — as well as “True Blood” on HBO, “Teen Wolf” on MTVand Syfy’s upcoming succubus soap (imported from Canada), “Lost Girl.” However, aside from a few exceptions — Syfy’s werewolf-vampire-ghost roommate series “Being Human,” which returns for season two in January — apparitions have been most successful on reality TV.IN REALITY(TV)It was two Roto-Rooter plumbers by day, and paranormal investigators at night, who put a spotlight on ghosts on reality TV. While the reality TVBritish show “Most Haunted” preceded “Ghost Hunters” by two years, the Syfy program can be credited with launching the paranormal investigation docudrama where teams set out to explore, prove or debunk unexplained phenomena. After seven years on the air, more than 150 episodes, two spin-offs (“Ghost Hunters International” and the since-canceled “Ghost Hunters Academy”), five live Halloween-night specials and one canine investigator, the show has cemented itself in pop culture and encouraged other cable channels to air their own ghost hunting programs. Travel Channel’s “Ghost Adventures” is a marked contrast. Co-created by team leader Zak Bagans and Nick Groff, it premiered in 2008. The fittingly named show is more adventure based than “Hunters.” Bagans and his two-man team are “locked” overnight in the locales where they actively pursue the darker elements of the unexplained — namely nasty ghosts and demons. Not surprisingly, by merging the dark fantasy subgenres with paranormal reality TV, “Adventures” tends to appeal to the audience watching “Supernatural” on The CW.ENTER THE REENACTORSAnd now new reenactment programs are on the rise. “Paranormal Witness,” Syfy, features new stories of encounters with the unexplained each week. Produced by documentary filmmaker Mark Lewis, “Witness” intercuts eyewitness interviews with reenactment featuring actors. The show premiered in September and already has highlighted harrowing and inspiring tales involving angels, demons, beasts, UFO and a ghost without a face. Then there is FX’s new drama “American Horror Story,” created by Ryan Murphy (“Glee,” “Nip/Tuck”). Debuting Oct. 5 to a respectable 3.2 million viewers, the series is about a fractured family in a haunted house and is like Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining” meets “Twin Peaks.” Simila r to the zombie survivor show “The Walking Dead” on AMC, “American Horror Story” meshes high productio n value and top tier talent with the horror genre on a weekly basis. If the shows are any indication, it would appear that paranormal TVis going to continue heading down a scary street. Aghost hunter on the normal appeal of the paranormalKris Williams has appeared on Syfy’s paranormal reality-TVseries “Ghost Hunters” and is currently co-lead investigator on its globetrotting spinoff “Ghost Hunters International.” She will appear on Syfy’s “Ghost Hunters” live Halloween investigation at 7 p.m. ET, Oct. 31.Q:What started the recent paranormal TV craze?A:There always has been an interest in the paranormal because most people have had some sort of unexplained experience. Plus everyone loves a good ghost story — but before the paranormal reality TVcraze, people would be more likely to label you as crazy if you seriously believed in it. I think the popularity of these shows has made it OK for all of us to talk about experiences and our interest in the topic.Q:Why do you think paranormal reality TV shows are so popular?A:Reality shows have sparked a new mainstream interest in the paranormal. People no longer have to hide their interest or beliefs in the subject since there are now people they view as professionals in the field. Having an experience to tell these days — or even your own paranormal team — seems to be cool now, when just a few years ago people would have looked at you like you needed a shrink. Plus, some audience members may be living in homes where they are experiencing the unexplainable firsthand and are trying to understand it. Then there are people like me who are unsure what to believe in on a spiritual and religious level. What happens to us when we die? Do we stick around? Can we watch over our family? Do we just end? They use shows like this to try to answer those questions. But at the end of the day, I think people just like to be scared. We all have a tendency to be fascinated with the unknown. Williams Some paranormal TV highlights: Sunday "The Walking Dead," AMC Monday "Death Valley," MTV Wednesday "Ghost Hunters," Syfy "Paranormal Witness," Syfy "American Horror Story," FX Thursday "The Vampire Diaries," CW "The Secret Circle," CW Friday "Ghost Adventures," Travel Channel "Supernatural," CW MTVCops fight supernatural crime on MTV's horrorcomedy "Death Valley." AMC Zombies roam the earth in AMC's "Walking Dead." Vampires live among humans in HBO's "True Blood." Ateen comes to grips with becoming a werewolf in MTV's "Teen Wolf."MTV 14B PAGE News-Sun Sunday, October 23, 2011 LIVING Doggy dress-upPet doesn't like its Halloween costume? Accessorize! PAGE12B