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The news-sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01087
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 08-28-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:01087
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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NEWS-SUN Highlands County’s Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, August 28, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 102 | 75 cents www.newssun .com HighLow 95 78Complete Forecast PAGE 14A An afternoon thunderstorm Forecast Question: Did Avon Park make the right choice for city manager? Next question: Should the tourism tax have a sunset? www.newssun .com Make your voice heard at Online Inside Obituaries Audrey Ducharme Age 58, of Sebring Obituaries, Page 5A Phone ... 385-6155Fax ... 385-2453Online: www.newssun.com Yes 20.8% No 79.2% 099099401007 Total votes: 77 Arts & Entertainment7A Books9B Business9A Chalk Talk10B Classifieds11A Community Briefs2A Community Calendar5B Crossword Puzzle113B Dear Abby13B Editorial & Opinion4A Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times13B School Menus11B Sports On TV2B Index HEARTLAND NATIONAL BANK***; 11.25"; 1.5"; Black plus three; process, front strip; 0 0 0 1 0 8 2 7 Tenoroc . . .19 Avon Park . .13 Hardee . . . .42 Lake Placid . .3 Sebring . . . .45 Mulberry . . . .8 (overtime) DETAILSINSPORTS, 1B Addiction?Video games took over a man's life PAGE8AHonoring the dreamMartin Luther King Jr. Memorial open in D.C. PAGE14B By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK — An Avon Park man was arrested Wednesday on alleged charges of sexual battery on a 13-year-old girl. Kelvin Alberto Perez, 20, was booked into the Highlands County Jail on charges of lewd and lascivious acts on a victim older than 12 but younger than 16. Perez is still being held in the HCSO jail on $300,000 bond. According to the arrest report from the Avon Park Police Department, on May 13, Perez met with the victim and walked with her towards a park near a wooded area. The interview of the victim revealed that when she and Perez reached the wes t end of the park, Perez grasped her arm and would not release her. As the victim protested, Perez allegedly grabbed her hair and forced her to perform oral sex on him. The report then states that Perez allegedly pulled down the girls pants and had sex with her as she protested many times that she wanted him to stop. The report also alleges that the act of forceful sex was repeated two more times at later dates. AP man charged with raping girl Cops: Suspect, 20, attacked 13-year-old multiple times Perez Celebrating caladiums TODAYSWOMAN A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO:A woman is the full circle. Within her is the power to create, nurture and transform. D ia n e M a r i c h i ld AUGUST 31ST 2011 Todays WomanSpecial section inside this issue by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING — Time ran out Friday during the first hearing on Avon Park Police Chief Michael Rowan’s civil suit against the city of Avon Park during a moment of some drama. Rowan’s lawyer, Robert Grizzard II, was conducting his direct examination of Avon Park’s interim city manager Julian Deleon. Deleon testified that he was very suspicious after he discovered Rowan had asked his second-in-command, Commander Jason Lister, to wipe Rowan’s office computer’s hard drive clean. Grizzard asked Deleon if he had told Lister to write a letter about the incident, threatening him with his job if he didn’t make Rowan’s request seem questionable. “Absolutely not,” Deleon said. “Then why would (Lister) say so?” Rowan hearing ends on dramatic note News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Avon Park police chief Michael Rowan (left) sits with his attorney Robert Grizzard II in hearing room 2A at the Highlands County courthouse. Rowan is suing the city of Avon Park over his unpaid suspension. See ROWAN, page 5A News-Sun staffSEBRING —An apparent burglary attempt on Friday led to the shooting death of one man and the arrest of another on drug charges. According to the Highlands County Sheriff’s Office, a 911 call was received at around 12:30 p.m. Friday in regards to a burglary with shots fired at 3350 Cindy’s Lane in Sebring. Rodfredricka Uhlander Nowell Jr. made the 911 call and said that there was a person who may have been shot to death. Deputies and units from the Sebring Police Department responded to the home, and found a black male, later identified as 22-year-old Rodney Wayne Woodard Jr., dead inside the home. Asearch warran t was obtained to continue the investigation, an HCSO press release said, and during the search of the home a quantity of drugs were discovered. That led to Nowell Alleged burglary attempt leads to shooting death Nowell See SHOOTING, page 5A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Celeste Tharp (above) peeks through the caladiums Saturday morning in search of one to take home and Carel Hurless (from left) of Bamboo Creations helps Lorraine Wright and Diana McLaren make a purchase Saturday morning during the 21st annual Caladium Festival Saturday morning in Lake Placid. More pictures, page 7A. By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comAVON PARK — While most students were gearing up for the new school year, Matthew Roberts, Tyler Heiring and Rachel Macklin were spending their last week of summer in Madrid, Spain. The three students arrived on Aug. 13 and joined nearly 2 million others who migrated to Madrid for the annual World Youth Day. WYD is a pilgrimage of people that when in 1986 where the Pope asked youth to gather for worship and growth. It is described as “a worldwide encounter with the Pope, which is celebrated every three years in a different country.” Since 1986, WYD has taken place in 12 international cities with millions of people ages 16-35 in attendance. The idea behind the day is to unify for Christ and to share with the whole world the hope and commitment to Christ in the world’s youth. “Catholic kids from around the world meet for this pilgrimage,” Roberts said. “My brother went last World Youth Day to Sydney (Australia) and he came back changed.” Heiring described the trip as a huge daily Mass where friendships were born. “There were 17 kids in our group, St. Peter and Paul of Bradenton. We went to mass and heard speakers and there were concerts,” Three students participate in World Youth Day in Madrid See STUDENTS, page 5A

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Special to the News-SunAVONPARK — The latest addition to South Florida Community College’s Highlands Campus – the Wildflower Wayside Shrine Trail – was formally dedicated Wednesday evening. Located off College Drive, the walking trail extends approximately 7/10ths of a mile through pristine scrubland on the SFCC Highlands Campus and showcases the rare native plants of the Lake Wales Ridge ecosystem. The project was conceived about five years ago and came to fruition through the joint efforts of SFCC, the SFCC Museum of Florida Art and Culture (MOFAC), Archbold Biological Station, SFCC students, and many community supporters. Significant grant funding was provided by the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Sciences with additional sponsorship from the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs. Mollie Doctrow, curator of the SFCC Museum of Florida Art and Culture (MOFAC), conceived the trail from her own exploration of the natural world and from the indigenous shrine boxes she encountered while traveling through India. She selected the location because of its concentration of pygmy fringe trees, which bloom spectacularly in the spring, and created six shrine boxes that depict native plants found along the trail. Dr. Eric Menges, Archbold’s chief plant biologist, identified plants and helped write the trail guide, “Wildflower Wayside Shrine Trail Flora.” Although the trail opened last March, some components had yet to be added. The trail is now complete and open to individuals, students, and groups for reflection, study, and guided tours. Already, Doctrow is looking at the possibility of expanding the trail into two adjacent ecosystems. “The amazing thing was that it actually came together here, in this community, in this habitat with support from this college and our sponsors,” Doctrow said. “We had this dedication now to officially acknowledge the trail opening as part of the community and the Highlands Campus. I want more people to be aware of this as a resource, to take advantage of it and use it in ways I never thought of.” “It’s inspirational,” said Dr. Norman Stephens Jr., SFCC president. “I can’t think of a better word. We’ve been very aggressive in pursuing grant funding and have been very successful. It’s been a marvelous project.” For more information, visit the Web site www.waysideshrinetrail.com or call SFCC MOFAC at 784-7240. Special to the News-SunSEBRING – Authors of all ages are invited by Highlands Little Theatre to submit an original play of 10 minutes in length by Sept. 6. Six scripts will be chosen for performance in front of an audience at the Ten Minute Play Festival fundraising event on Sept. 10. Audience members will be encouraged to vote for their favorites by placing money in designated collection boxes. The play that raises the most money will be awarded half the money collected in their container. All of the other money collected will go to HLTto support their programs. Playwrights will organize or arrange the production of their plays for the festival. Plays should require zero to minimal set, props, and costuming. Each production provides its own props, costumes and set. A10-minute play is a play with at least two characters that is not a scene, skit, o r sketch. Structurally, i t should have a beginning, middle and end, just like any good one-act or full-length play. It is recommended there be no more than six characters. Writers are also asked to tap into their spooky side and submit a family-friendly ghost story for the 2012 Ghost Tours. The stories should be 100-1,000 words long, and appropriate for listeners ages 5 and up. There is no limit to the number o f stories that may be submitted by each person. The committee will determine which will be included in the tours. Special consideration will be given to stories set in downtown Sebring. The deadline to submit a ghost story is Oct. 25.Contact Vanessa Logsdon at 385-2175 o r vmlogsdon@yahoo.com/. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011www.newssun.com Publisher Block; 5.542"; 4.5"; Black; publishers block; 0 0 0 0 8 0 3 4 KAYLOR & KAYLOR; 5.542"; 1.5"; Black; below lottery, soc sec; 0 0 0 1 1 2 9 5 KAYLOR & KAYLOR; 5.542"; 1.5"; Black; above lottery, workers comp; 0 0 0 1 1 2 9 6 Aug. 24 467193239x:2Next jackpot $5 millionAug. 20 263340444652x:3 Aug. 17 1815444647x:2 Aug. 26 1114172935 Aug. 25 513151822 Aug. 24 411183334 Aug. 23 112313334 Aug. 26 (n) 0575 Aug. 26 (d) 3060 Aug. 25 (n) 8825 Aug. 25 (d) 6620 Aug. 26(n) 847 Aug. 26 (d) 151 Aug. 25 (n) 511 Aug. 25(d) 047 Aug. 26 51022421 Aug. 23 102435435 Aug. 19 23336371 Aug. 16 58304416 Aug. 24 913474953 PB: 39 PP: 5Next jackpot $61 millionAug. 20 217232847 PB: 36 PP: 2 Aug. 17 1828314852 PB: 37 PP: 4 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawings are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Play Lottery Center Good Shepherd Hospice needs volunteersSEBRING – Good Shepherd Hospice is seeking compassionate volunteers to serve patients and families in the Lake Placid and Avon Park areas. Potential volunteers can learn more about the fulfilling experience of volunteering with Good Shepherd Hospice at a free, 90-minute orientation session in Sebring. Good Shepherd Hospice needs volunteers at all levels – from providing companionship for a hospice patient to supplying office help to facilitating a children’s grief support group. Those interested in volunteering with Good Shepherd Hospice have two options to attend a 90-minute volunteer orientation session: at 1 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22 or 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 27. All training is free and volunteers do not need any type of prior experience. Contact Regina Merrick at (863) 551-3943 or email merrickr@goodshepherdhospice.org for more information or to register.Germaine to speak at Tea Party meetingSEBRING – Highlands County Clerk of Courts Bob Germaine will be the guest speaker at The Highlands Tea Party’s meeting Tuesday. The group will gather at Homer’s Restaurant at 5:30 p.m. for a buffet dinner, followed by the 6 p.m.meeting. Members and guests will have a chance to find out how Highlands County is computerizing all county documents, to be put online and able to be viewed by the public. Tea Party folks may purchase dinner at either 5:30 p.m. for $8.69 or 7 p.m. for $5.99.Events planned at lodges, postsLAKE PLACID The American Legion Placid Post 25 will host Buddy Canova, who will be providing the music today. Call for time. For more information, call 465-0975. The Lake Placid Moose Lodge 2374 will host music with Bama Jam from 3-6 p.m. today. For more information, call 465-0131. The American Legion Auxiliary, Placid Unit 25 will host a casino trip to Immokalee on Tuesday. Cost is $35 (you receive $30 free play and $5 food voucher). Coffee and doughnuts served from 7:45-8:15 a.m. Bus leaves at 8:30 a.m. from the American Legion Post, 1490 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid. Sign up early before Wednesday. Non-members welcome. For more information or to sign up, call 6550232. SEBRING The Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 will host karaoke with MegaSound from 5-8 p.m. today. Music with Frank “E” from 5-8 p.m. Tuesday. For more details, call 385-8902.Divorce and Beyond begins Sept. 16LAKE PLACID — Divorce and Beyond, a 10week program, will address issues you face as a divorced adult. It will help you mourn your loss, move beyond the grief and adjust to your new lifestyle. As you build a network of friends who experience similar feelings and who accept you where you are at this point in your life, you will become a stronger and happier person. The program – which starts at 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 16 and runs consecutive Fridays through Nov. 18 – will be held at St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placid View Drive. The cost will be $15 (stipends available). For more information or to sign up, call 699-2788 or (cell) 633-8142. COMMUNITYBRIEFS The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Thursday, Aug. 25: Jose Guadalupe Cruz, 25, of Lake Placid, was charged with two counts of failure to appear reference battery and culpable negligence. Joshua Alfonso Hanson, 23, of Sebring, was charged with trafficking opium or a derivative, using a two-way communication device to facilitate a felony, and possession and or use of drug equipment. Nathaniel Jay Hutchison, 25, of Arcadia, was charged with failure to appear reference battery. Tracy Stambek Reed, 44, of Sebring, was charged with burglary of an unoccupied dwelling, trespass of a structure or conveyance and grand theft. Harold James Rhinehardt, 48, of Avon Park, was charged with grand theft and burglary of an unoccupied structure. Deah Louise Trousdale, 31, of Maitland, was charged with violation of conditional release reference possession of cocaine. Amanda Mae Widenhofer, 27, of Sebring, was charged with trafficking opium or a derivative, using a twoway communication device to facilitate a felony, possession and or use of drug equipment and possession of opium or a derivative with intent to sell. POLICEBLOTTER GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCEƒ HLT offers local writers chance to show talents Courtesy photo South Florida Community Colleges Wildflower Wayside Shrine Trail came into existence through a partnership between the college, Archbold Biological Station, and the community. Representing the many contributors at the trails formal dedication on Wednesday are Dr. William Gregory (from left), SFCC biology professor; Don Appelquist, executive director of the SFCC Foundation Inc.; Mollie Doctrow, artist and curator of the SFCC Museum of Florida Art and Culture (MOFAC); Dr. Eric Menges, senior research program director and research biologist for Archbold Biological Station; and Dr. Norman Stephens Jr., SFCC president. Wildflower Wayside Shrine dedicated as a living resource EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE (AP) — Apython that killed a Florida toddler two years ago will be used in training at Eglin Air Force Base. The Northwest Florida Daily News reported Saturday that the 8-foot, 6inch snake named Gypsy will be used to teach troops to recognize venomous snakes. Gypsy killed 2-year-old Shaianna Rosa Hare at he r home northwest of Orlando. Prosecutors say her mother, Jaren Hare, and the mother’s boyfriend, Charles Darnell, didn’t properly care for Gypsy. Hare and Darnell received 12-year sentences Wednesday. Python that killed child now used by military

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011Page 3A

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Page 4ANews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011www.newssun.com Some have been arguing that since the commission was attempting major changes, the voters should get another look. That the tax is necessary, but it needs a sunset. The News-Sun agrees. The arguments are obvious. One side, the county and supporters of the tax, ask why should there be a vote? The people passed the tax by 561 votes in 2002. The tax almost never affects local citizens and the amount is just 2 percent, much lower than the tourist taxes on either coast. The tax has done good in the county and can continue to do good. Others, even some who support the levy, think the tax should be back in front of the voters. This small but determined group has been touting the idea that no tax should be in place without periodic review by the voters, and every tax should have a sunset. Commissioner Don Elwell supported the idea during a commission meeting last week, but ran into interference by those who think the voters decided once and do not need to decide again. In a representative democracy, there should be more votes for items like this, and the people should have a periodic review, and leverage, to make sure that the tax is being spent correctly. The News-Sun is not arguing that tourism is squandering the money; on the contrary, there has been a lot of good programs and marketing that has come from the Tourism Tax. Lake clean-up is one of the areas where the tax has been used successfully and to the benefit of residents and visitors alike. The News-Sun is arguing that the voters got one draft of where the tax would be spent and decided they liked those ideas, but without the check and balance of a sunset vote, the voters have no voice in government without staging a cumbersome petition. Otherwise we do not have an engaged democracy, just one built around protest. No argument can be made that the economy and the needs have changed worldwide; therefore, the rules may need to change to adapt. Which is another excellent argument for the voters to look over the tax and its application on a regular basis. Some taxes need to be sunset and some taxes need to be added. The elected officials who think the public will not approve new taxes are the very same ones that think they have to be slick in how they keep taxes going forever. That builds mistrust in your government. “Never give it back” should not be a motto any government touts, because after all, those very same governments are working for the good of the taxpayers. That means we are all working towards the same goals. Right?TODAYSEDITORIAL 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com Tourist tax, like all taxes, needs voter review There should never be a tax that does not sunset. Never. The tourism tax is a great idea and a way to support promotions of the county to enhance business, but any tax without a sunset should be re-examined. Texas Governor Rick Perry has been formally running for the 2012 Presidential nomination for less than a month and he has already made a huge splash. But will he also soon spark a big explosion — like one going off in a political minefield, or the sound of a mob of screaming, torchwielding GOPestablishment types seeking to end the threat of what they consider a political monster roaming their electoral countryside? To supporters, Perry is the new Ronald Reagan. To critics, he’s a SNLcaricature of Josh Brolin caricaturing George Bush in Oliver Stone’s “W.” To Democratic liberals and some moderate Republicans, he’s a dangerous rightist who could ooze his way into the Oval Office, further empower the religious right, and make Ronald Reagan look like Dennis Kucinich. To some conservatives, he’s squishy on illegal immigration. Attention Rick Perry: You are walking in a minefield. Mobs are on your trail — coming from your left, center and right. And the Bush-family-allied political mad scientist who “created” you reportedly has regrets and wants to short-circuit you. The Huffington Post’s Howard Fineman believes Perry worries Republican political maven Karl Rove: “The Perry-Rove story is shaping up as the ultimate tale of dangerously unintended consequences, with Rove in the role of Dr. Frankenstein and Perry as his living, rampaging political creation.” In the classic movie, the Frankenstein monster threw a little girl in the lake. Rove is worried Perry will throw his party’s increasing chances to win the Senate and the White House in the 2012 political lake. The Big Gulp now only isn’t at 7 Eleven it’s the sound of worried establishment GOPers. In his opening weeks, Perry stumbled more than Wayne Newton on “Dancing with the Stars.” Perry’s comments that he didn’t believe climate change science and doubted evolution threatened to scare independent voters. He said it would be “treasonous” if Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke printed more money — causing former George H. W. Bush administration Treasury official Bruce Bartlett to call him an “idiot” and former NixonFord speechwriter Ben Stein to say: “ I hope he’ll get some moderation in his speech and some lessons in economics ... and soon.” ATexas Ron Paul supporter ran a full page ad in a newspaper asking “Have You Ever Had Sex with Rick Perry?” trying to get evidence that Perry is a hypocrite. It’ll likely create sympathy for him. On the other hand, if the ad is answered by a sheep, porcupine or pair of women’s’high heel shoes, he might have campaign problems. Can Perry win? He is finessing his own positions, disowning parts of his book that declared Social Security unconstitutional. MSNBC’s First Read notes: “We’ve seen examples of him trying to straddle the line — Tea Party (Bernanke and creationism) and Establishment (not doubling down on Bernanke and delivering a well-received businessfocused speech in New Hampshire). And he impressed GOPconsultant Alex Castellanos, who was aligned with Romney in ‘08.” Perry has never lost an election. AGallup Poll finds Perry and Obama tied at 47 percent. And could it be that liberals — as they once again take their eye off the Supreme Court — will stay home and that independents will be so disgusted at underachiever Obama that they will elect Perry? As the movies show, once a Frankenstein monster gets in the area it takes a lot of torch-wielding mob members to destroy him. But whoever said mobs with torches ALWAYS win in the end? Joe Gandelman is a veteran journalist. He can be reached at jgandelman@themoderatevoice.com. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily those of the NewsSun. The political minefield facing Texas Gov. Rick Perry Make sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. We have to make room for everybody. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; or e-mail editor@newssun.com To make sure the editorial pages aren't dominated by the same writers, letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months. Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the opinion of that author and not necessarily the opinion of the staff or editors of the News-Sun EDITORIALPAGEPOLICY Independents Eye Joe Gandelman I’ve seen my share of Mother Nature gone wild in my time. For example, I live in Florida, where every once in a while we get visited by Hurricane Somebody who sends wind and rain. In 2004 we in Highlands County got visits from four of these creatures, which made us a tad cranky. Some storms should know when they aren’t welcome. I also lived in Oklahoma for about a year. We occasionally get what we call tornadoes here in Florida. In Oklahoma their tornadoes are much bigger and scarier than any Florida one I’ve heard of. I was actually in a Walmart that a tornado skipped over one scary night in Oklahoma. You learn fast to respect a tornado and make sure you are out of its way. One natural phenomenon I have not experienced in my time – earthquakes. Oh, I’ve done the rides at Disney and Universal that simulate an earthquake. You shake around and act all scared but deep inside you know it’s fake. The real thing? Nope.Never. There are a number of people on the east coast of the United States that can now honestly say they’ve had the experience. According to news reports, a 5.8-5.9 earthquake rattled people from the Carolinas to New England. To put it mildly, people freaked out. I do not blame them – you get the earth moving under me and I promise you I am going to be doing some freaking out of my own. So far, as I type this, there have been no deaths or serious damage reported. There apparently is a crack in the top of the Washington Monument (but it is not tilting, whatever you might have heard). The Washington National Cathedral did suffer some damage that is still being assessed at the moment. But overall, the East Coast came out of this with nothing more than a grand scare. Of course some on the West Coast, which goes through earthquakes much more frequently, saw fit to poke fun at the East Coast’s reaction to the quake. According to an article on http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com, Dennis Miller, a famous West Coaster, was quoted as saying that they wouldn’t even bother to wake up for a 5.8 earthquake. In fact, it wasn’t long after the shaking stopped that the jokes began. The Washington Examiner even posted a list of the better politically themed tweets regarding the earthquake on their blog, Beltway Confidential. One of my favorites was tweeted by a wag who said, “As all of DC leaves work at the same time, the United States experiences a brief economic recovery.” I could crack some bad jokes here about Washington getting all shook up and maybe the quake would shake some sense into our elected officials, but I am above such humor. OK, I’m not above it. Sorry.We’ve tried all kinds of other things to get Washington’s attention, why not an earthquake? At least during the quake they had other things on their minds instead of how to spend more of our money. It might surprise you to learn that Florida has experienced minor tremblings in its past. According to http://earthquake.usgs.gov/ earthquakes/states/florida/h istory.php, the state has felt some tiny shocks, only one which was reported to cause any damage.The latest of these was said to occur on Nov. 18, 1952, when a minor tremor at Quincy, Fla. rattled doors and windows (Quincy is about 20 miles northwest of Tallahassee). Me, I’ll stay here in Florida, where the ground stays solid and I just worry about hurricanes. Not that I’m inviting any to Florida this year. Would someone yank in the welcome mat before one arrives? Laura Ware is a Sebring resident. She can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady@ embarqmail.com Shake, rattle and roll Lauras Look Laura Ware

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Grizzard asked just before Judge David Langford ended the session because the hearing room was needed by others. In fact, only five witnesses made it to the witness stand during the four hours of the hearing, former Avon Park city manager Bruce Behrens and Deleon being questioned for the bulk of the time. The hearing will continue at a date to be announced. Around 20 witnesses have been subpoenaed by Grizzard. Issues began to clarify during the hearing. Grizzard established that by city charter the city manager is authorized to hire and fire the police chief, and that the council had not been involved with the contracts of former police chiefs. Grizzard also established that there was early conflict between the city council and Behrens, who became city manager in October 2010. In an effort to save money, the council had agreed before Behrens was hired to create a single position of public safety director and do away with the police and fire chief positions. Acting on its decision, the council budgeted for the safety director in the fiscal year 2010-2011 — then just begun — and allotted no money for either chief. After researching fire safety directors in other cities, however, Behrens concluded the change was not a good idea. This put him in conflict with the council. That tension worsened, Grizzard brought out, after Behrens promoted Rowan to police chief, even though the position had been removed from the budget. Questions concerning specific points of Rowan’s contract were raised at the time. Avon Park’s labor attorney, Brian Koji, established that City Attorney Gerald Buhr had requested to review Rowan’s contract, but that Behrens had never complied. Testimony established further complicating factors. Layered over the council’s ire at Behrens’actions, were investigations Rowan began on selected council members and city officials concerning alleged Sunshine Law violations and ethics violations. Deleon testified that it was these investigations that lead him to suspend Rowan with pay. Deleon said he was particularly upset that Rowan denied any investigations were ongoing when asked directly. This led to a heated exchange, with Grizzard asking if it was appropriate to question a police officer about an ongoing investigation, and if Deleon was trained in police procedure. Deleon replied he was not, but that “I have the normal intellect most people have.” Deleon also testified that Rowan’s behavior concerned him. He described a clandestine meeting with Rowan, in a parked car at the Hess station on U.S. 27 North. Deleon said Rowan used crude, violent language and threatened the city, saying he had a nine-inch pile of materials that “would lock everybody up.” Deleon said he thought Rowan was upset the council wanted to review his contract. Deleon testified he suspended Rowan’s pay after turning to outside law enforcement agencies for an investigation of Rowan’s methods and motives. Deleon said he couldn’t pay Rowan while the police chief was under investigation. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011Page 5A MARTIAL ARTS (pp); 3.639"; 3"; Black; ff main top rhp only pg 3 or 5; 0 0 0 1 0 6 8 2 Stephenson Nelson ****; 7.444"; 5"; Black; obit pg; 0 0 0 1 1 2 8 8 CITY OF SEBRING; 5.542"; 5"; Black; 8/28/11; 0 0 0 1 1 4 2 7 AUDREYMARIE DUCHARME Audrey Marie Ducharme, 58, went to be with her Heavenly Father on Aug. 26, 2011 after a nine-year battle with early onset Alzheimer’s disease. She passed away at her home with her family by her side. She was born June 14, 1953 in West Terly, R.I. and grew up in Auburn, Maine where she spent her childhood. She graduated from Edward Little High School in 1971 and continued working in the school system as an aide for students with special needs. Preceding her in death were her parents, Raymond and Carmen Bermudez; her brother, Ray Bermudez; and her sister, Juanita Bermudez. Audrey was the dearly beloved wife of Frank Ducharme for 37 years and treasured mother to Kevin Ducharme of Sebring and Kimberly Smith (Jason) of Sebring. Audrey will forever be remembered by her siblings, Rico Bermudez, John Bermudez and Faye Hayes, as well as her grandchildren, Mackenzie Smith and Conner Smith. From a very young age, Audrey loved performing and being on stage. She enjoyed playing the guitar, singing, planning practical jokes and pranks, and helping others. She touched the lives of many people with her infectious laugh, he r generosity, and her willingness to do anything for anyone. Audrey maintained he r sense of humor and love o f pranks until the very end. Friends and family are invited to attend a memorial service on Monday, Aug. 29 at 5 p.m. at StephensonNelson Funeral Home, 4001 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. The family request that in lieu of flowers, please send plants o r donations to Works in Faith, P.O. Box 809, Sebring, FL 33871; (863) 382-4332. Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home Sebring, Florida 863-385-0125 www.stephensonnelsonfh.co m OBITUARIES Continued from page 1A being arrested on drug charges. He was booked into the jail on cocaine trafficking, drug equipment possession and evidence tampering charges. His bond was set at $16,500. Arrest records show that Woodard had been arrested several times in Highlands County, the last time on June 2 for contempt of court. He was also charged with grand theft and possession of marijuana on Dec. 22, 2010 and burglary on Sept. 22 of last year. The investigation is continuing. Anyone with information about this incident is asked to contact Det. Mike Huften at 402-7250. Anyone with information who wants to remain anonymous and be eligible for a cash reward is asked to call Heartland Crime Stoppers at 1-800226-TIPS (8477), or submit information via the Internet at www.heartlandcrimestoppers.com. Anonymity is guaranteed for anyone who has information. Continued from page 1A Heiring said. The schedule included several catechesis (or teaching sessions), festivals and trips throughout the country. The most powerful part of the trip, both Heiring and Roberts said, was the mass directed by Pope Benedict XVI. “We had to sleep out one night in a field with thousands and thousands of people. The next morning we had mass and he was there,” Roberts said. “It rained and rained all night. It was an eight-mile walk there and then it just started storming. The next morning it was clear,” Heiring said. The students received sponsors from the church in order to go on the trip. The total cost for two of the students to attend WYD was just more than $7,000. The group spent 10 days in Madrid before leaving the pilgrimage. Both Heiring and Roberts hope to be able to attend WYD next year. “Next year it will be in Brazil, in Rio. I’d love to go again,” Roberts said. Roberts’and Heiring’s families were extremely proud of the boys pilgrimage and their accomplishments. They were happy to be among a large group of their peers and represent Avon Park’s Our Lady of Grace Catholic Parish. Macklin was not able to attend the interview. For more information on how to join the pilgrimage visit worldyouthday.com/. Continued from page 1A News-Sun by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Matthew Roberts ,18, and Tyler Heiring ,16, both Avon Park High School students and members of Our Lady of Grace Catholic Parish, recently returned from World Youth Day in Madrid, Spain. The two along with a third student, Rachel Macklin, spent 10 days in the city worshipping with young Catholics. Students attend World Youth Day in Spain Rowan hearing gets through five witnesses in first day of testimony Woodard Shooting death in reported burglary Friday Associated PressTALLAHASSEE — Justreleased emails show that former Gov. Jeb Bush was disappointed that Gov. Rick Scott fired the mother of an Army soldier who had just been killed in Afghanistan and others who worked in the governor’s office. Bush’s comments were included in more than 700 pages of emails released Friday evening by an attorney who worked on Scott’s transition team. The new emails were recovered from Scott’s campaign manage r and give insights into those trying to influence Scott. Scott last week ordered an investigation into why the email accounts were shut down in January. Bush was upset Scott fired staffers POINCIANA(AP) — Republican presidential candidate Michele Bachmann claims the U.S. has more energy resources than any other country but isn’t exploiting them because of radical environmentalists. Bachmann says with shale oil, natural gas and coal, the United States shouldn’t be “begging” others for oil and energy supplies. She said “we are the king daddy dogs when it comes to energy.” But she says environmentalists are preventing resources from being tapped. As president, Bachmann said she would unlock those resources and eliminate the Environmental Protection Agency. Bachmann: Environmentalists blocking US energy

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Page 6ANews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011www.newssun.com

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011Page 7A FLORIDA HOSPITAL HEARTLAND A/P; 9.347"; 13"; Black plus three; pocess, heart; 0 0 0 1 1 4 2 8 SCENESFROMTHECALADIUMFESTIVAL News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Nolan Roberts, 2, is almost as cute as you can get Saturday morning during the 21st Annual Caladium Festival in Lake Placid. News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Joe Marrs (from left), Brandon Graham, 12, and Garrett Lanier, 12, sit together and enjoy a snack Saturday during the festival in Lake Placid. News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Bates Sons & Daughters booth is busy Saturday morning selling potted caladiums. News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Linda Schwartz and her mom JoAnn Bobbitt both of Mount Dora shop for caladiums Saturday in Lake Placid. Schwartz said they attend the event every year, We come for the t-shirts, posters and caladiums. News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS T wo-month-old Alissondra J acobs takes in the sights and sounds Saturday during her first trip to the Caladium Festival in Lake Placid. News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS V icci Grant serves up ice cream and strawberry shortcake Saturday morning from the Elks Lodge 2661 booth during the Caladium Festival in Lake Placid. Did YouKNOW?In Florida, the bicycle is legally defined as a vehicle. Bicyclists using a public roadway are considered operators of motor vehicles and are responsible for observing all traffic laws. With few exceptions, there is only one road and it is up to motorists and bicyclists to treat each other with care and respect. Adherence to the law is the foundation of respect.

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By TAMARALUSH Associated PressSARASOTA— At the height of what he calls his addiction, Ryan Van Cleave would stand in the grocery store checkout line with his milk and bread and baby food for his little girls and for a split second think he was living inside a video game. It sounds crazy, but it’s true: Something would catch his attention out of the corner of his eye — maybe another shopper would make a sudden move for a Hershey bar — and he was mentally and emotionally transported to another world. World of Warcraft, to be exact. It was his favorite video game, the one he played every night, every day, sometimes all weekend. The sudden movement in the store triggered a response similar to when he was in front of the computer screen, battling dragons and monsters for up to 60 hours a week. Van Cleave’s heart pounded. His breathing quickened. But then the thirtysomething family man would catch his breath and come back to reality. Sort of. World of Warcraft began to crowd out everything in Van Cleave’s world. His wife. His children. His job as a university English professor. Before teaching class or late at night while his family slept, he’d squeeze in time at the computer screen, playing. He’d often eat meals at the computer — microwave burritos, energy drinks, Hot Pockets, foods that required only one hand, leaving the other free to work the keyboard and the mouse. Living inside World of Warcraft seemed preferable to the drudgery of everyday life. Especially when the life involved fighting with his wife about how much time he spent on the computer. “Playing ‘World of Warcraft’makes me feel godlike,” Van Cleave wrote. “I have ultimate control and can do what I want with few real repercussions. The real world makes me feel impotent ... a computer malfunction, a sobbing child, a suddenly dead cell phone battery — the littlest hitch in daily living feels profoundly disempowering.” Despite thoughts like this, despite the dissociative episodes in supermarkets, he did not think he had a problem IRL— gamerspeak for In Real Life. But he did, and a reckoning was coming. Van Cleave grew up in suburban Chicago. He was adopted, which he said always made him feel like an outsider in his own home and in the world. As a kid, he was more interested in guitars and computers. In high school, each year brought more exciting games with better graphics, but his parents didn’t see a problem because all teen boys seemed to play video games. And their son also played guitar in a band, so video games weren’t the only thing in his life. Same with college. “Gaming 15-20 hours a week in college is no big deal,” said Van Cleave, who graduated from Northern Illinois University with a degree in English. “The problem occurred after that, when I got into the real world.” He earned a master’s degree and a PhD in creative writing at Florida State, was named a poetry fellow at the University of WisconsinMadison, and found a teaching job at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Then in the fall of 2003, he was offered a tenure-track position at Clemson University in South Carolina — his dream job. His wife, Victoria, became pregnant for the first time; the baby was unplanned and Van Cleave admitted being shocked at the idea of becoming a father. He and his wife were late for her first ultrasound because Van Cleave was playing Madden Football, a sports game. It was around this time that World of Warcraft entered his life. Van Cleave ended up playing one entire weekend, stealing away to the computer while his family was sleeping or while his parents, who were visiting, played with his baby daughter. Victoria used one word to describe her feelings: “disgusted.” She felt abandoned. “I couldn’t believe that someone could choose a virtual family over a real one.” One reason Van Cleave was so captivated: It offered different perspectives. Previously, most games Van Cleave played were seen from a bird’s eye view, looking down at the action. In WoW, a player can zoom, pan and look at a scene exactly how a human does in real life. Three years into his job at Clemson, Van Cleave’s life began to fall apart. His four dogs died, one after another from various causes. His wife was pregnant again. Then Van Cleave began to get the impression that other faculty disliked him and wanted him gone. But he didn’t try to repair the rifts, instead channeling his anxieties into WoW, a virtual world he could control. “All that tethered me to anything meaningful during this time was WoW, which I clung to for dear life,” he wrote. For millions who play, the lure of games like WoWis hard to resist. Players create an “avatar,” or online character, who operates within a startlingly detailed storyline and graphics. Playing makes the gamer feel like the star of a really awesome sci-fi movie. While in-game, characters form “guilds,” or teams, and go on “quests” to find items, conquer lands or achieve new levels. They occasionally fight with other players or guilds, slay zombies, clash with evil elves or kill monsters. Players talk to each other in the game via headsets and often form intense friendships. In the past five years, news stories have described people suffering exhaustion after playing a game for 50 hours straight, of teens killing their parents after having games taken away and of parents neglecting infants while mesmerized by the online world. Yet not all authorities believe the games are addictive. “I do not believe that the concept of ‘addiction’is useful; it only describes strong temptations; it does not explain strong temptations. What makes the temptation so strong? The memory of past pleasant experiences with the behavior that we are talking about — in this case videogames,” wrote Jackson Toby, a professor emeritus of sociology at Rutgers University, in an email to The Associated Press. “I don’t believe that someone can be addicted to videogames.” The American Psychiatric Association will not list video game addiction as a mental disorder in the 2012 edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. However, the APA said there is a possibility that a group of reward-seeking behavioral disorders — including video game addiction and Internet addiction — will be included in an appendix of DSM-5 to “encourage further study.” Van Cleave and others insist video game addiction is similar to gambling addiction. By the time his second baby was born in 2007, Van Cleave was playing some 60 hours a week. Afew months later, Clemson didn’t renew his contract and said he would not achieve tenure. He was hired for a one-year fellowship at George Washington University, teaching one class, but that meant he had more time for gaming while the stress of finding a longterm, full-time job ratcheted up. He spent money on gaming and bought two new computers so he could see better game graphics. In 2007, Van Cleave had three different World of Warcraft accounts (each at a cost of $14.95 a month). A secret Paypal account paid for two of the accounts so his wife wouldn’t hound him about the cost. He spent $224 in real money to buy fake gold, so he could get an in-game “epic-level sword” and some “top-tier armor” for his avatar. Changes in Van Cleave’s personality began to appear. Among those who noticed was his best friend from high school, Rob Opitz, who lived in another state but played “World of Warcraft” with him for years. “When things in IRL— in real life — would interrupt what was going on in the game, he would get very loud very quickly about those things,” Opitz recalled. “During that time, it’s kind of like everything was completely over the top. It wasn’t that he was a little mad, he was in a full-blown rage.” Van Cleave was about to hit bottom. It was Dec. 31, 2007. Van Cleave was halfway through his yearlong fellowship at George Washington University. Yet there he was, standing on the Arlington Memorial Bridge. He was thinking about jumping into the icy water. He had been gaming for 18 hours straight and wasn’t feeling well. He had told his wife that he was going to buy cough drops for his sore throat. But his misery was not just physical. “My kids hate me. My wife is threatening (again) to leave me,” Van Cleave would write in his book. “I haven’t written anything in countless months. I have no prospects for the next academic year. And I am perpetually exhausted from skipping sleep so I can play more Warcraft.” That night marked the first time Van Cleave realized he had a problem. The self-examination pulled him back from the bridge railing. He went home and deleted the game from his computer. For the next week, his stomach and head hurt and he was drenched in sweat — like an addict withdrawing from drugs. Staying away from WoW was difficult, but he didn’t re-install the game. And he started rebuilding — In Real Life. Said his wife: “I didn’t believe him. I had heard it all before and had no confidence that he would stop.” Van Cleave worked on his professional life. He set his sights on a job, sending out 182 resumes. In 2010, he was hired as an English professor at the Ringling School of Art and Design in Sarasota. Van Cleave and his family bought a beige stucco home in a quiet subdivision. It’s an irony in Van Cleave’s new, game-free life that Ringling is one of the nation’s top schools for video game designers. He knows his students spend much of their lives online, and he worries about them. “I don’t think video games are evil,” said Van Cleave. “That’s not what I’m saying at all. I think games are fine if they are part of a balanced life.” But even now, four years after he stopped gaming, Van Cleave thinks about World of Warcraft. Then there are his dreams. In them, he is playing one of his former characters, running through the virtual world. When he wakes, sweating and out of breath, he always has the same impulse: to rush to the computer and log into the game. Page 8ANews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011www.newssun.com SEBRING PEDIATRICS, LLC; 3.639"; 4"; Black; 08/28/11; 0 0 0 1 1 2 7 6 GRIFFIN'S CARPET MART; 7.444"; 10"; Black; 8/28/11; 0 0 0 1 1 4 3 2 Addiction? Video games crowded out mans real life Metro Services The American Psychiatric Association will not list video game addiction as a mental disorder in the 2012 edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011Page 9A Chamber Page; 7.444"; 12"; Black; chamber page; 0 0 0 1 1 2 9 0 BUSINESS You can scarcely turn on the TV without seeing ads for reverse mortgages. They’re touted as a great tool for cash-strapped seniors to tap their home equity to pay off bills while remaining in their homes with no monthly mortgage payments. Although that may be true for some people, these complicated and costly loans aren't right for everyone, so it pays to do your homework. Here’s a primer on reverse mortgages and precautions you need to take: Reverse mortgages let homeowners age 62 or older borrow against their home equity without having to make monthly payments (as with refinance loans). The loan needn’t be repaid until you move out permanently, sell the property or die. In addition, seniors wishing to downsize or relocate may make a large down payment on a new home and then use a reverse mortgage to finance the rest. The vast majority of these mortgages are made through the Federal Housing Administration's Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) program. Common features include: All parties on the loan must be at least age 62. The home (current or future) must be your principal residence. You must own the home outright or be able to pay it off with proceeds from the loan. The allowable loan amount is based on your home’s appraised value, your age, interest rate and type (fixed or variable), mortgage insurance and applicable fees. Generally, the older you are and the more valuable your home, the greater the available loan. The repayment amount never exceeds the home’s final sale value, so you (or your heirs) are never liable for more than you originally borrowed. You can take the money as a lump sum, a line of credit, fixed monthly payments or any combination. Reverse mortgages can be very expensive. Lenders may charge a loan origination fee of up to $6,000. In addition, you must pay upfront and then ongoing mortgage insurance premiums (MIPs). HECM Standard loans have an upfront MIP of 2 percent of the home’s value. HECM Saver loans have a far lower 0.01 percent upfront MIP(although the allowable loan amount may be up to 18 percent less). Both versions also charge an additional 1.25 percent MIPof the outstanding balance annually, as well as a loan origination fee of up to $6,000 and various other charges. Afew other potential downsides with reverse mortgages: You are responsible for homeowner’s fees, property taxes, insurance and repairs for the life of the loan. If you don’t pay them, you risk cancellation or foreclosure. They aren’t cost-effective if you plan to move in a few years. Some couples put only the older spouse on the loan in order to secure a higher balance, but this can backfire: If that person dies first, the survivor could be bound to pay off the loan – a real problem if the home's value is “underwater.” The longer you carry a reverse mortgage, the more your home equity – and thus, your estate – will decrease. Because reverse mortgages are so complicated, potential borrowers are required to consult a Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)approved counselor before being allowed to apply. Before you even get to that stage, do your research. Helpful sites include those sponsored by the HUD (www.hud.gov) and AARP (www.aarp.org). Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. To follow him on Twitter: www.twitter.com/PracticalMoney Reverse mortgages are not for everyone Personal Finance Jason Alderman By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comAVON PARK — Natalie Le and Gary Nguyen are excited to celebrate the reopening of their nail shop, Crystal’s Nail Salon. Crystal’s is located in a new location, 816 U.S. 27 in Avon Park. The salon’s hours of business are Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. until 7:30 p.m. The couple has been in the community for eight years and began their first business in 2004. “We started the business in August 2004 and got hit by Hurricane Charley. After that I remember we had like $100 in our hands. We were struggling; we had no power due to the hurricane. We painted nails and earned $50 a week,” Le said. The couple pushed through the hard times doing whatever was necessary to survive and always worked toward owning a business again. “We ate hot dogs for two months. We ate them for every meal; breakfast, lunch and dinner. Then we committed ourselves to not give up. We prayed everyday and always dreamed to be successful,” Le said. After working long hours everyday for the past several years, the couple has been able to re-establish their beloved business and share it with the community. “We are so blessed. We had so much support from clients ... we’ve been voted number one salon in Avon Park,” Le said. Crystal’s Salon offers a variety o f traditional salon services including deluxe pedicures, deluxe manicures, eyelash extension, permanent makeup, spa facials, body waxing, body wraps, massages, and body piercing. The re-opening will also provide a few new services – tanning (booth, bed, and spray), tattoos and hair services. Appointments and inquiries can be made by calling the salon at 453-4806. Crystals Nail Salon adds new services for re-opening Special to the News-SunSEBRING – Norm and Mandy Elliott of Nextage Floridian Living Realty had an incredible month with $1,035,900 in closed residential sales, with an average price of close to $148,000 between June 27 and July 30. “Houses are selling, you just can’t sit in the office and hope people call you, you have to go after the business” Norm said. Real estate is new to Norm, who has been a painting contractor with his father for 10 years. His wife Mandy was a successful real estate agent in Michigan and they both obtained their Florida Real Estate License in October 2010. They immediately jumped into real estate full time. “Failure was not an option, we have six children from ages 19 days to 15 years old” said Mandy. In just nine months, The Elliott team has managed to be in the top 10 in residential closings and they are No. 1 in residential listings taken (according to the MLS). The Elliotts are often the first ones in the office before 8 a.m. They have an incredible work ethic starting with a set schedule for prospecting for buyers and sellers. They attend their children’s school activities, have a lot of family time and even manage to go on date nights. The Elliotts credit thei r success to having goals, a strict schedule of planned activities, an office that provides them with a grea t environment with other like minded hard working real estate agents who are all excited about the real estate business and take it very seriously. They can be reached a t 658-1737 or at 2031 U.S. 27 South in Sebring. Realtor couple closes over $1M in 30 days Courtesy photo Norm and Mandy Elliott. Plan to start receiving your Social Security retirement benefits in January of 2012? Apply this October if you’d like your benefits to begin in January. If the prospect of traveling to an office does not appeal to you, then save yourself a trip and consider the advantages of applying online for Social Security retirement benefits. The Social Security website at www.socialsecurity.gov makes the process easy and convenient. In most cases, once you submit your online application electronically, that’s it. There are no additional forms to sign or paperwork to complete. In rare cases where we need additional information, a representative will contact you. You can complete your application for retirement benefits from the comfort of your home or office in as little as 15 minutes. Then you can celebrate 2012 by receiving your first Social Security payment on time. If you are not quite ready to retire but are thinking about doing so in the near future, you may want to visit Social Security’s website to use our convenient and informative retirement planner at www.socialsecurity.gov/retir e2. Here you can find out just how close you are to meeting your financial goals and then “bookmark” the website to file for retirement benefits whenever you are ready. People at any stage in their working career are encouraged to use the Retirement Estimator for an instant, personalized estimate of future retirement benefits. Find it at www.socialsecurity.gov/estimator. Remember that you’re always first in line when you go online, to www.socialsecurity.gov. Esther Harris is manager of the Social Security branch in Sebring. Want to retire in 2012? Apply now Social Security Esther Harris Classified ads get results! Call 314-9876

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Page 10ANews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011www.newssun.com HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, 8/28,31; 0 0 0 1 1 4 2 9 BUSINESS By PAULWISEMAN and MARTIN CRUTSINGER APEconomics WritersJACKSON HOLE, Wyo. — Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke leaned on Congress on Friday to do more to promote hiring and growth, or risk delaying the economy’s return to full health. Bernanke proposed no new steps by the Fed to boost the economy. But at a time when Congress has been focused on shrinking long-run budget deficits, he warned lawmakers not to “disregard the fragility of the current economic recovery.” Bernanke, who spoke at an annual economic conference in Jackson Hole, left open the possibility that the Fed will take further steps to strengthen the economy. He said its September policy meeting will be held over two days, instead of just one, to allow for a “fuller discussion.” But analysts said the speech provided no assurances of any new help from the Fed. “He appears to be saying that the Fed has largely played its part and that the politicians need to step up their game,” said Paul Dales, senior U.S. economist at Capital Economics. Stocks fell after the speech was released but then recovered. The Dow Jones industrial average rose about 150 points in early-afternoon trading as traders responded to Bernanke’s judgment that the job market and the economy would return to full health in the long run. Bernanke’s speech followed news that the economy grew more slowly in the April-June quarter than previously estimated — a meager 1 percent annual rate. Some economists worry that Europe’s financial crisis, along with persistently weak U.S. job growth and falling home prices, could tip the economy into another recession. Those fears have pulled down stock prices in the past month. The Dow has lost 12 percent of its value since late July. The sell-off on Wall Street was triggered Congress’s battle over raising the debt ceiling. In his speech, Bernanke criticized lawmakers for their handling of the issue and warned that further standoffs could hurt the economy in the long run. Aplan Congress passed this month means annual deficits are expected to be reduced by $3.3 trillion over the next decade through spending cuts. The Fed chairman said long-term deficit reduction is necessary. But he said that future economic health could be jeopardized if hiring and growth are not strengthened now. Analysts noted the lack of new proposals in Bernanke’s speech. But Aneta Markowska, senior U.S. economist at Societe Generale, said the extension of the Fed’s September meeting to two days might suggest something new could be unveiled. Many have looked with anticipation to the Fed to do more. It has already kept short-term interest rates near zero for 2 1/2 years. And earlier this month, it said it would keep them there through mid-2013. “I’m a little fearful that there are a lot of expectations built in that I don’t think Bernanke can deliver on,” said Jack Ablin, chief investment officer at Harris Private Bank. To promote growth, Bernanke said the government must pursue tax, trade, and regulatory policies that encourage economic health. The approach of this year’s Jackson Hole conference raised expectations. In last year’s speech, Bernanke signaled that the Fed might unveil a Treasury-buying plan to help lower long-term rates. In November, the Fed announced a $600 billion such program. The bond purchases were intended to lower long-term rates, lift stock prices and spur more spending. Immediately afterward, stock prices started rising and continued up until May, when they leveled out. Still, critics, from congressional Republicans to some Fed officials, have raised concerns that the Fed’s Treasury purchases could ignite inflation and speculative buying on Wall Street, while doing little to aid the economy. Others have wondered whether any further lowering of long-term rates is needed. Investors seeking the safety of U.S. debt have forced down the yield on the 10-year Treasury note to 2.19 percent — a full point lower than it was when the Fed completed its Treasury purchases about two months ago. Yet the economy is still sputtering. The Congressional Budget Office this week estimated that the unemployment rate will hover around 8.5 percent when President Barack Obama seeks re-election next year. And it predicts that unemployment will stay above 8 percent through 2013. That continued weakness is why many speculated that the Fed would still embark on some new plan to help the economy. They note that while inflation has risen, it’s still within the Fed’s target range. At their meeting earlier this month, Bernanke said policymakers discussed the “relative merits and costs” of further steps to spur growth. Clues to where the Fed is leaning might be found in those meeting’s minutes, which will be released Tuesday. “There could be more action, but we’re in treacherous waters right now,” said John Silvia, Wells Fargo’s chief economist. “What he’s doing is making small moves.” Many economists note, however, that the economy’s main problem is not that interest rates are too high. They say the main problem is that consumer spending remains too weak. So businesses feel little incentive to hire, expand and invest. Until demand for goods and services steps up, the Fed may have limited ability to strengthen the economy. Joshua Shapiro, an economist at MFR Inc., said that by dwelling on budget and tax issues facing Congress, Bernanke was conceding that the Fed has “basically exhausted its tools.” Crutsinger reported from Washington. AP Business Writers Daniel Wagner, Derek Kravitz and Christopher S. Rugaber contributed to this report. Bernanke proposes no new steps to boost economy MCTphoto Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernankes speech on Friday gave no indication that the Fed plans to do anything new to help the economy.

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, August 28, 2011Page 11 A 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2008-CA-000824 THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWABS, INC. ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-20, Plaintiff, GUILLERMO RUELAS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated August 18, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2008-CA-000824 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWABS, INC. ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-20, is the Plaintiff and GUILLERMO RUELAS; JUAN RUELAS; MARIA RUELAS; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 14th day of September, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 9, IN BLOCK 174, OF LEISURE LAKES, SECTION 3, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 3377 GOSSAMER AVENUE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on August 18, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Lisa Tantillo Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F08015461 COUNTRY-CONV B/C-Team 2 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. August 28; September 4, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 11-283-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF KAREN L. MEEKINS, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of KAREN L. MEEKINS, deceased, File Number 11-283-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is August 28, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Daniel P. Meekins Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Michael L. Keiber MICHAEL L. KEIBER, ESQUIRE Law Office of Michael L. Keiber, P.A. 129 South Commerce Avenue Sebring, FL 33870 V. (863)385-5188 F. (863)471-1111 Florida Bar No. 620610 August 28; September 4, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-318 IN RE: ESTATE OF JOSEF RIEDERER A/K/A JOSEPH RIEDERER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Josef Riederer a/k/a Joseph Riederer, deceased, whose date of death was February 6, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is August 28, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Charles Miller 226 W. Lake Damon Drive Avon Park, Florida 33825 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Charlotte C. Stone Attorney for Charles Miller Florida Bar Number: 21297 Stone & Walder, P.L. 3200 US Hwy 27 S., Suite 304 Sebring, FL 33870 Telephone: (863)402-5424 Fax: (863)402-5425 August 28; September 4, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-363 IN RE: ESTATE OF JAMES MORRIS HOUPE aka J.M. HOUPE, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JAMES MORRIS HOUPE aka J.M. HOUPE, deceased, whose date of death was March 4, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is August 28, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Bonnie Francis Houpe BONNIE FRANCIS HOUPE AKA BONNIE FRANCES HOUPE 202 Margarete Drive, Avon Park, FL 33825 Attorney for Personal Representative: CLIFFORD M. ABLES, III, P.A. 551 SOUTH COMMERCE AVE. SEBRING, FL 33870 Telephone: (863) 385-0112 /s/ Clifford M. Ables III FLORIDA BAR NO. 178379 August 28: September 4, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY Case #: GCS 11-453 Judge: J. David Langford BROWN & BROWN INVESTMENTS, LLC Plaintiff(s), -vs.FIRST FLORIDA LENDING CORP. A dissolved Florida Corporation, et al Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION PROPERTY TO: Michael A. Clein Last Known Address 2075 W 76th St. Hialeah, FL 33016 James Price Last Known Address 1400 S Waterview Dr. Inverness, FL 34450 Nancy D. Price Last Known Address 1879 E Monopoly Loop Inverness, FL 34453 First Florida Lending James Price Registered Agent Last Known Address 3903 SE 21st Place Cape Coral, FL 33904 or if any of the aforesaid persons is dead, then his or her unknown heirs, devisees, legatees or grantees; and any and all other persons or parties claiming by, though, under or against them; and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status, if known, claiming under any of the above named or interest in and to the lands hereinafter described. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an Action to Quiet Title for the following described property, to wit: Lot 17, Block D, SILVER FOX RANCH, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 10, Page 41, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Parcel ID Number C 22-35-28-020-00D0-0170 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any to it, on the Plaintiff(s) attorney, whose name and address is: David F. Lanier, Esq., P.O. Box 400, A von Park, Florida 33826-0400, and file the original with the Clerk of the above styled Court on or before September 7, 2011, otherwise a judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court on August 4, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of said Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk August 7, 14, 21, 28, 2011 Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or le ss. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads p laced under the Bargain BuysŽ discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom se t ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad st ating Each,Ž the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open RateŽ pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain BuysŽ specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home,Ž are allowed to be pla ced under the Bargain BuyŽ category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com 863-314-9876 DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS € Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 314-9876. € The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2008-CA-000648 THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-1, Plaintiff, MIRAINE BALLESTERO, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated August 18, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2008-CA-000648 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-1, is the Plaintiff and MIRAINE BALLESTERO; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 14th day of September, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS 19 AND 20, BLOCK 154, PLACID LAKES SECTION TWELVE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 8, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 115 FIG ROAD NW, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on August 18, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Cler k Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F08029080 COUNTRYWIDE-CONV B/C-Team 2 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. August 28; September 4, 2011 1050Legals Having something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what youre doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 314-9876CROSS COUNTRY AUTOMOTIVE 3X10.5 00011278 3310Hwy.27South Sebring,FL33870EOEE-mail:resumesebring@crosscountry-auto.comFormoreinformationaboutCrossCountryAutomotiveServices,weencourageyoutovisitourwebsiteat:www.CrossCountr y NowHiring Full&Part TimeCustomer Service AssociatesStartingat $9.00perhourBilingualisaplus English/SpanishDifferentialBEA HEROlikeDarla Gwynn863-402-2786MandiFosterSupervisor positions available DarlaGwynn AssociateoftheMonthComprehensive Benefit Package AGreatPlacetoWork!

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Page 12ANews-Sun Sunday, August 28, 2011www.newssun.co m IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: FC11-881 DIVISION: FAMILY SALGADO-RIOS, Herminia, Petitioner and GUZMAN, Manuel B., Respondent. AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE TO: Manuel B. Guzman 120 East Washingtonia, Lake Placid, FL 33852 Y OU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Herminia Salgado-Rios whose address is 408 Michigan St., Lake Placid, FL 33852, on or before Sept. 20, 2011, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, before service on petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. Y ou may review these documents upon request. Y ou must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file a Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the Clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated August 19, 2011. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Alicia Perez Deputy Clerk August 28; September 4, 11, 18, 2011 NOTICE Pursuant to IRC Section 6104(d), the annual return of the Sonni Family Foundation, Inc. is available for public inspection at the office of the NCT Group CPA's, L.L.P. located at 435 S. Commerce A venue, Sebring, Florida, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Questions should be directed to the Foundation's trustee, Dr. Rajeswari Sonni, at 446-2017, or the Foundation's C.P.A. William R. Benton, at 385-1577. August 26, 28, 31, 2011 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING FOR A SPECIAL EXCEPTION REQUEST HEARING NO. 1699 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a PUBLIC HEARING will be held before the HIGHLANDS COUNTY Board of Adj ustment on the 13th day of September, 2011, beginning at 3:00 P.M., or as soon thereafter as possible, in the County Commissioners Board Room, Highlands County Government Center Building, 600 South Commerce Ave., Sebring, Florida, to consider a Special Exception to allow commercial activity directly serving agricultural pursuits and limited to the service of agricultural pursuits, within the area described as follows: approximately 5 acres located on the southeast corner of Highlands Boulevard and Orange Street in Sun 'N Lakes Estates Acres, and legally described as follows: Lot 1, Block 22, Sun 'N Lakes Estates Acres, as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 24, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. A ny person or persons interested or affected by this change are invited to attend this hearing. You may submit comments in writing to the attention of Linda Conrad, Zoning Supervisor, P.O. Box 1926, Sebring, Florida 33871-1926, or you may call (863) 402-6638, for further information. Please reference the above hearing number when calling or writing. A NY PERSON WHO MIGHT WISH TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT IN PUBLIC HEARING OR MEETING IS HEREBY ADVISED THAT THEY WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS, AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, THEY MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE WHICH WILL INCLUDE THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH SUCH APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. A nyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact Mrs. Melissa Bruns, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice) or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: Mbruns@hcbcc.org Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service. ONE OR MORE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MAY BE PRESENT AT THE MEETING. Jim Brooks, Chairman August 28; September 2, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2009-CA-001420 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff, vs. PIERCY, KRISTA, et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 2009-CA-001420 of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, wherein, BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff, and, PIERCY, KRISTA, et. al., are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT AT COURTHOUSE, 430 S. COMMERCE A VENUE SEBRING, FL 33870, at the hour of 11 A .M. on the 14th day of September, 2011, the following described property: LOT 47, IN BLOCK 360, OF SUN N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, UNIT 16, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, AT PAGE 4, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA Property Address: 6748 SAN BRUNO DRIVE, SEBRING, FL 33872 To be published on 8/28/ and 9/4, 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 18th day of August, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk August 28; September 4, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001255 US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR SASCO 2007-WF1, Plaintiff, DARLIN ROMERO A/K/A DARLIN O. ROMERO, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated August 18, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2009-CA-001255 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR SASCO 2007-WF1, is the Plaintiff and DARLIN ROMERO A/K/A DARLIN O. ROMERO N/K/A SYLVIA BEUDELL; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 14th day of September, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 33 SUNSHINE VILLAS, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 13, PAGE 22, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 6 WEST SUNSHINE LANE, AVON PARK, FL 33825 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on August 18, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.DUMMY 09 SERVICE DIRECTORY DUMMY 5X21.5 00010683

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, August 28, 2011Page 13 A 2000 CHEVTrk. 1 ton, dually turbo diesel A/T crew cab, SE model 8 ft. bed, fully loaded. 1 owner, custom chrome wls, & fiberglass topper, bed liner, tow pkg, good cond., low miles. Book $8,450 Asking $6,450. 863-471-3329 1996 DODGEDAKOTA SPORT Auto 96,000 miles, A/C, includes topper, no leaks, new shocks, well maintained, one owner, Good Condition. $3000 obo 863-414-1201 or (cell) 954-937-9189 9200Trucks 9000 Transportation 8000 RecreationNOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & SuppliesSNAPPER RIDINGMower 28 cut, Like New! / McLane gas edger / Featherlite gas weed eater. Will sell all for $850. 863-382-0555 7400Lawn & Garden SPRING LAKEFri. Sat. 8 2pm. 8324 Castile Rd. MOVING SALE!! SEBRING -Reserve your space at the downtown SEBRING COMMUNITY GARAGE SIDEWALK SALE. Clear your closet and garage. See application at www,destinationdowntownsebring.com 7320Garage &Yard Sales VACUUM -Upright / excellent condition. reconditioned & Guaranteed 30 days. $ 20 863-402-2285 ROD &REEL Jarvis Walker Rod & Reel combo 7'. New. 4 for $70. Call 863-655-1953 MOTOR CROSSBIKE small. $75 Call 863-655-0216 DRAPERIES &VALANCE, Burgundy color, with 2 sets of sheers that fits standard window, 84" long. $50 863-385-4356 COMPUTER DESKw/slide out drawer & tray, hutch w/2 doors. $35.00 Call 863-385-2349 AIR CONDITIONER4000 BTU Room size unit. Hot Point, older model, works excellent. $40 863-402-2285 7310Bargain Buys ORGAN -elect., 2 manual keyboards, pedal board made by General Music model Topaz, w/ bench. $150 / Golf club set, Cleveland driver & 3 wood Callaway Big Bertha, 3-sand wedge, putter & bag, $150 863-465-7009 APPLIANCES, FURNITURE,Antique Pieces, Collections of Hummel & Goebel Figurines, Crystals, etc. Call 863-873-1292 7300MiscellaneousPIANO -SPINET, BALDWIN HOWARD with Bench. Excellent Condition. $300. 863-385-8231 7260MusicalMerchandise ENTERTAINMENT CENTER3 pc. Oak. Broyhill $450 Will sell in separate pieces. Call 863-699-1918 DUNCAN FIFEMahogany Dining Room Suite. Very Nice. Res tonic pillow top twin beds, sofa, antique wooden chair, china & more. $1100 Call 863-414-7303 or 863-414-4183 DINING SETRattan, w/4 chairs, glass top. $150 obo. Call 863-385-5677 DINING SET$400, China Cabinet, $400, Wall Unit, $700, All Like New. Call 863-382-8740 BED -queen size, 5 drawer chest & night stand. $100 863-465-7009 7180FurnitureMOVING SALE!PIANO Kimball console Excellent condition. Very well tuned! & Side by Side refrigerator, with ice & filtered water on door 3mos old.. For Details Call 863-382-9800 7040Appliances 7000 MerchandiseSEBRING LARGERoom, Furn. Private bath. All utilities plus cable. Laundry, kitchen, huge backyard w/canal. Lovely Community. $450/mo. Move in September 1st. Call 863-655-1644. 6400Rooms for Rent SEBRING RENTor Rent to Own 3/2 at 6413 Old Orchard Rd. $600/mo. + $600 deposit. 2/2 at 3303 Highlander, 6126 & 6130 Oak Crest, Sebring, $500/mo. + $500 deposit. Call 863-446-2414 SEBRING 3BR/2BA Lakefront home w/pool. Many upgrades. Nice yard. Enjoy boating, fishing & swimming, right in your own back yard! $1000 per mo 1st./last/sec. 863-446-1861 SEBRING 2/1House. Lawn care included. $650/mo. + security. Call 863-253-1029 or 863-381-7967 SEBRING -3BR / 1BA, 2 car gar. 917 Sunniland Dr. close to Dinner Lake. W/D hook-up, large yard. Pets OK. $800 mo. with $200 sec. deposit. 863-381-1095 SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. RENTED!!! CHEAPER THANRENT! 2 Bed/1Bath Home For Sale. Needs some elbow grease! Owner Financing. Only $350/mo. Bad Credit OK! 4721 5th St., Sebring. Call 863-216-8592 6300Unfurnished Houses 6300Unfurnished HousesLAKE PLACIDNear Lake Placid Boat Ramp with lake access. Furnished 2/1, appliances, A/C. $650/mo. + $500 security. 863-465-1354. 6250Furnished Houses LAKE PLACID1 Bedroom / 1 Bath Apartment for Rent $350 Monthly & $325 Security Dp. Call Century 21 Compton Realty 863-465-4158BEAUTIFUL APTSSEBRING 2BR, 1BA, tile floors, screen back porch, beautiful landscaping, building 5 yrs. new. Pets OK. $595 month. Medical Way. RENTED!!! AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS 1BR $520 mo. + $350 Sec. Deposit, available immediately. Washer/Dryer & WSG included. Call Alan 386-503-8953 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 SEBRING -1 & 2 BR Apts. Fresh paint. Includes water. $395-$550 / mo. Call Gary Johnson, 863-381-1861. 6200UnfurnishedApartments PLACID LAKESStudio Apartment. Kitchenette, pool w/d avail. Fully Furn. on golf course, weekly, monthly, yearly. $425 incl. elec. & water. No pets. 954-805-5630 AVON PARKFully Furnished Efficiency Apartment. Pay by the week or month. $100/wk. or $400/mo. $150 down, cable TV & utilities incl. Call 863-453-4591 6150FurnishedApartmentsSEBRING NEAT& Clean 2br./1ba. Central Air/Heat. Utility room, yard maint. incl. Close to everything. No pets. $500/mo. + security. 863-763-1759 or 863-381-2810 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 RentalsPALM HARBORHOMES Has 3 Modular Homes Available at HUGE Savings Over 40K Off Call Today! 800-622-2832 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesATTENTION: CASH for your Home, Duplex, Apartment, Commercial Property. Rapid Closing, "As Is Condition. 863-441-2689 STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL 4320Real Estate Wanted SEBRING 1202Armstrong St. Orange Blossom Estates. Corner Lot. $2800. Call S. Smith 830-563-3357 ATTN: CONTRACTORS/DEVELOPERS! Lot for Sale! Cash Price: Only $6500. 2320 Barn Owl St. Sebring. Call: (772) 410-3737 4220Lots for SaleRECENTLY FORECLOSED Special Financing Available, Any Credit, Any Income 3BD, 2BTH, 1344 Sq. Ft. Located at 6211 Fara St. Sebring. $59,900. Visit: www.roselando.com/9QF, Drive by then call (866) 249-0680 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial TRUCK DRIVEROver-the-Road. Must be able to stay out 3 + weeks at a time. Verifiable experience necessary. Clean driving record a must! Mechanical knowledge a plus. For application or information Call 863-452-5959. SEEKING WEB/GRAPHICSDESIGNER Must have multi platform experience Please E-mail officetalent@yahoo.com or Fax 863-471-2565 SEBRING &LAKE PLACID F/T Experienced Cooks & Servers. Bartenders needed 1 yr. exp. Apply on line @ beefobradys.com PHLEBOTOMY TRAINING With Certification Workshop Saturday Sept. 17 9am. 6pm. Fee $400. Call 877-741-1996 www.medical2.com Also Hiring Instructors MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANWanted for Apartment Complex. Performs all duties as assigned. High school education and/or technical skills. Experience in multifamily residential building maintenance preferred. HVAC systems, household appliances, and familiarity w/electricity, plumbing and carpentry required. No criminal record and valid drivers license required. Please call (863) 382-0044 EOE/DFWP LIBRARY ASSISTANT(PT) Responsible for library technical services & clerical work. Associate's degree & exp. pref. Mon Thurs.8 am -1 pm and occasional Fridays. $8.60/hr. Deadline 5pm., 9/8/11. Visit: www.southflorida.edu/hr for details. (863)784-7132. EA/EO/VET'S PREF. FOOD SERVICEWORKER (P/T) August thru April. Exp. pref. Mon Thurs. 9:00am 2:00pm. $7.73/hr. Deadline 5pm., 8/29/11. Visit www.southflorida.edu/hr for details. (863) 784-7132 EA/EO/VET'S PREF. Tobacco Free College EXPERIENCED PLOWFOREMAN 3 years plus a must. Experienced in plowing & locating telephone and fiber optics. Call 863-443-6250 CARPENTERS NEEDEDExperienced. Must have passport and able to travel out of Country. Drug free work place. Salary based on experience. Call 863-465-4400. 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:314-9876 News-Sun Classified 1100Announcements HIGHLANDS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING INVITATION TO BID (ITB) The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), Highlands County, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed bids in the County Purchasing Department for the following Annual Bid: ITB 12-013 IN PLACE ASPHALTIC CONCRETE ANNUAL RESURFACING PROJECTS USING HIGHLANDS COUNTY ASPHALT NIGP Code: 913-94 Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net"www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, Highlands County General Services/Purchasing Department Assistant Purchasing Director 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33875-5803 Phone: 863-402-6524 Fax: 863-402-6735; or E-Mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:dgilbert@hcbcc.org"dgilbert@hcbcc.org Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked with the bid number and name so as to identify the enclosed bids. Bids must be delivered to the Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL. 33875-5803 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., Thursday, September 15, 2011, at which time they will be opened. Bids received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The Board will not be responsible for the late deliveries of bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service. One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at the above bid opening. Highlands County Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this bid. The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsive and responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of Highlands County. The Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. The Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. The Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mrs. Melissa Bruns, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: mbruns@hcbcc.org. Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service. Board of County Commissioners Purchasing Department; Highlands County, Florida Website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net August 28; September 4, 2011 1055HighlandsCounty LegalsHIGHLANDS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS (HCBCC) GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING INVITATION TO BID (ITB) The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), Highlands County, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed bids in the County Purchasing Department for the following Annual Bids: ITB 11-051 IN PLACE PAVEMENT MARKING NIGP CODE No. 968-61 Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, Assistant Director/ Highlands County General Services/Purchasing Department 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33875-5803 Phone: 863-402-6524 Fax: 863-402-6735; or E-Mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:dgilbert@hcbcc.org" dgilbert@hcbcc.org Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked with the bid number and name so as to identify the enclosed bids. Bids must be delivered to the Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL. 33875-5803 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., Thursday, September 15, 2011 at which time they will be opened. Bids received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The Board will not be responsible for the late deliveries of bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service. One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at the above bid opening. Highlands County Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this ITB. The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners (HCBCC) reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of Highlands County. The Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. The Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mrs. Melissa Bruns, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: mbruns@hcbcc.org. Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service. Board of County Commissioners Purchasing Department Highlands County, Florida Website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net August 28; September 4, 2011 Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 Classified ads get fast results CITY OF SEBRING 2X2 DUMMY 09 DOCK CAPTAIN 2X3 00011051AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 00010695 HIGHPOINT/ NORTHGATE FURNITURE 1X3 00010841 AVON PARK HOUSING 1X4 00010697AVON PARK Whispering Pines Apartments. Government Subsidized Apartments for rent. Must meet eligibility requirements. Equal Opportunity Housing. Call 863-452-2426 or TTY 1-800-233-6694 NOW ACCEPTINGAPPLICATIONS VERANDA BREEZE APARTMENT AND TOWNHOMES Affordable Housing Income Restrictions Apply. 2, 3, & 4 Bedrooms Clubhouse-Playground Resident Activities-Computer Lab 2308 Wightman Avenue Sebring, FL 33870 Phone 863-382-0044 TTY/TDD 711

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Page 14ANews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011www.newssun.com WARREN'S AUTO SALES #2; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, back ofweather page; 0 0 0 1 1 4 2 5 BOOM BOOM'S; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, 8/28/11; 0 0 0 1 1 4 2 6

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SPORTS B SECTION Inside This Section AFC West preview . . .3B Florida Football scores . . .4B Irene alters sports landscape. .3B News-Sun Sunday, August 28, 2011 News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE Jarvielle Hart stiff arms this Titan defender on a run in Avon Parks overtime loss at Tenoroc in Fridays Kickoff Classic. News-Sun photo courtesy of JAMES TAYLOR Nevada Weaver breaks through the line to start a 37-yard run that would eventually lead to Lake Placids lone score Friday against Hardee. News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Benji Toney hammers this Moore Haven quarterback as he releases the ball on this play. Toney had a sack previously and the Blue Streak defense was all over the Terriers in Fridays 45-8 win. By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comLAKELAND – The Red Devils dropped their preseason kickoff on the road Friday to the Tenoroc Titians 19-13 in hard-fought, sudden-death thriller. The Titans drew first blood on their opening drive, moving the ball 60 yards for a Darius Frasierjaunt in for six. Neither bench could gain an advantage up to the half, but the Devils answered in the third when aTitan fumbled the opening kickoff and Avon Park recovered. Just two short plays later, Devil quarterback Ryan Dick connected with Jarviel Hart for the TD from 30 yards out, but the point after went wide leaving the Titans out front by one point, 7-6. Holding Tenoroc fast for their next possession, Avon Park’s defense stopped the 40-yard drive from the 17 to force a Tenoroc punt deep into Devil territory. The touchback put the Red Devils on the 20, and Roger Pringle took it the other 80 yards on his first touch. Agood point after from Garrett Taylor put Avon Park in the driver’s seat 13-7 with 7:31 still on the clock in the third quarter. With 2:26 left in the third, Tenoroc’s Travis Tucker found Darius again, this time for a 59yard pass and run down the home side for six, but a motion penalty put the Titans out 18 and out of reach for the extra point tying the Red Devils fall in OT Tenoroc19Avon Park13 See AP, Page 4B By JAMES TAYLOR Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID – The Lake Placid Green Dragons entered the preseason classic against Hardee Wildcats with some questions to be answered. They left the game knowing that they played hard for 60 minutes, but they still needed some work to do as they lost to the Wildcats 42-3. “We got a lot of work this week.” Lake Placid head coach Jason Holden told his players after the game. “Discipline is the biggest thing we are going to work on this week.” “It means knowing my place and knowing my position,” continued Holden. “Discipline knows when to come in and out of games and we’ve got to shore some things up.” One of the questions that Holden was hoping to be answered was the quarterback situation where Tyler Kelsen and Robert Walton are competing for the starting position. Holden alternated the quarterback between series and both quarterbacks had trouble handling the snap as both had three fumbles in the first half. Hardee dominated from the beginning as their defense held Lake Placid’s AJ Gayle to 37 yards on 21 carries and did not allow the Green Dragons to get a first down in the first half. Lake Placid got the ball first and was forced to punt the ball after three plays. Starting on the Green Dragon’s 38-yard line, it took the Wildcats only three plays score to give the Wildcats an 8-0 lead. After forcing Lake Placid to punt after three plays on their second possession, Hardee put together a 4-play, 30-yard scoring drive to take a 15-0 lead. Lake Placid stopped Hardee and forced a turnover on downs, but lost a fumble to give the ball back to the Wildcats to end the first quarter. Hardee took advantage of the turnover and scored on the first play of the secDragons no match for Cats Hardee42Lake Placid3 See LP, Page 4B By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comMOORE HAVEN – His first victorious ice-water shower came soon after the final horn sounded on Sebring’s 45-8 win in Friday night’s Kickoff Classic at Moore Haven, though new Blue Streak head man LaVaar Scott wasn’t too pleased. With the sudden chill, that is. “Oh man, I don’t like those,” he said. “But I’ll take them, because that means you got a victory.” As for the game itself, there were plenty of positives, most notably, the defense that Scott felt would have to carry the team in the early weeks of the season. After a three-and-out on their opening series, Sebring got the ball back on an Anthony Powell leaping interception on their own 40. The offense, behind new quarterback Davaris Faulk, made progress to get into field goal range, but a bad snap thwarted the early scoring chance. But another chance was soon in the offing as Kyle Cunningham picked off another Terrier pass which, along with his return and a penalty, put the ball inside the 10. Moments later, Damion Thompson charged in from the three and Donovan White’s kick made it 7-0 at the 2-minute mark of the opening quarter. The defense stepped up again, forcing and recovering a fumble to get it back near midfield and the ensuing drive netted a 25-yard White field goal for a 10-0 lead at 11:13 of the second quarter. Looking to strike again quick, White’s onside kick was snared by the Streaks and Thompson was soon seen roaring past the defense along the far sideline for a 60-yard touchdown run and a 17-0 lead. “That’s a weapon we can use,” Scott said of the often booming kicks White put on display. “He’s got such a big leg, but can also spray it like that, so the receiving team can be caught off guard.” And while the offense seemed to be humming now, it was the defense that was still racking up the hits and turnovers while getting into the scoring action as well. After a jarring hit near midfield popped the ball loose, Decaris Jones scooped it up and dashed 50 yards for the 24-0 lead Sebring would carry in at the half. Early in the second half, the offense continued to show its’potential when Faulk showed fine touch on a fade pass to the back corner of the end zone, where Aaron Hankerson a nice catch to stretch the lead to 30-0. Not to be outdone, the defense was back at it just eight seconds later when, on Moore Haven’s first play of their next drive, Powell made his second pick of the night and returned it 30 yards for a 37-0 lead. Defense keys Sebring win Sebring45Moore Haven8 See STREAKS, Page 4B ‘ I’ll take them, because that means you got a victory. ’LAVAAR SCOTT Sebringhead coach News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Alana Nielander came up big as the Lady Dragons bounced back from Tuesdays loss in the opener of Sebrings Preseason Classic for a sweep of Avon Park Thursday night. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.c om SEBRING – That’s wha t the preseason is for, after all, taking steps to progress toward the regulation slate o f games to come. Thursday night’s wrap-up to the Blue Streak Preseason Volleyball Classic certainly saw steps taken, some forward and some back. And though Sebring came up short in a three-game Okeechobee sweep for the championship, it was more about the positives that were seen. Aperennial power, the Lady Brahmans had to hold off the Streaks through 25-21 and 25-23 wins, before kicking it up a notch for the 25-14 clincher. But with the preseason mindset, the result wasn’t as important as the effort and signs of progress. “It was a good night, an improvement over Tuesday,” head coach Vanessa Sinness said. “We played more as a team tonight.” Sebring gets its’regula r season underway Tuesday on the road at Hardee. In the consolation match, Lake Placid saw a much improved performance, while Avon Park took a noticeable step back from Tuesday night, in the Lady Dragons convincing three-game sweep. Steps taken in Preseason Classic See VBALL, Page 3B

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Red Devil golf tryoutsAVON PARK — Avon Park High School boys and girls golf team tryouts began Monday, August 8. Boys interested in trying out, please call Coach Shane Ward at (863) 6338597. Girls interested in trying out, call Coach Suzie Gentry at (863) 446-7368.Avon Park Fall BallAVON PARK – The Avon Park Dixie Youth Baseball Inc. is currently holding Fall Ball registration through Sept. 9, for kids aged 4-12-years old. Players can pick up their registrations at the Top Shop at 12 N. Anoka Ave. in Avon Park from 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday through Friday. When registering, players must provide a copy of Birth Certificate, recent photo and payment in full. For more information and any questions, call Chris Tolar at (863) 253-0897.Softball sign-upsSEBRING–Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball has begun Fall registration. Age groups include 6 through 16-years old. Parents can register their child online at www.sebringsoftball.com by calling 3816521, or in person on Friday, Sept. 2 from 5-8 p.m. at the Max Long Batting Cages.Panther Hitting CampsThe SFCC Baseball program will be hosting hitting camps this fall for aspiring players aged 6-14. The camps will be held Saturday’s Sept. 10 and 24 as well as Oct. 15 and 29. Each day, the camps will run from 8:30 -11 a.m. on Panther Field at the SFCC Avon Park campus. Under the guidance of Panther head coach Rick Hitt, along with assistant coach Andy Polk and members of the 2011 SFCC squad, campers will learn all aspects of hitting, with drills, instruction and hitting analysis. Registration begins at 8 a.m. each day and players should bring glove, cap, bat and any desired baseball attire. Camp cost is $25 per camper. To register, print Application and Consent and Release forms from www.southflorida.edu/baseball/camp and mail to address on application form. Register by phone, all area codes 863, at 784-7036 for Sebring and Avon Park residents, 465-5300 for Lake Placid, 4947500 for DeSoto County or 773-2252 for Hardee County. Walk-up registrations are accepted. For further information, call any of the above numbers or email coach Hitt at hittr@southflorida.edu .Lake Placid Youth BowlingLAKE PLACID – The Royal Palms Youth Bowling League, for ages 7 and up, begins its’new season Saturday, Sept. 3. The sign-up fee is $25, which includes a shirt, and new bowlers are welcome. Bowling is every Saturday morning at 9 a.m. through December 10. Weekly cost is $11 and includes three games of bowling, shoes and prize fund. All Youth Bowlers are also eligible fo r reduced rate open bowling, though some restrictions may apply, and free bowling with instruction on Friday’s from 4-6 p.m. – must be accompanied by an adult. For more information, call Frank Peterson at 382-9541, or Donna Stanley at 441-4897.Seminole Club kicks off SEBRING – The Highlands Seminole Club will host a season-opening football party on Saturday, Sept. 3, at the Sebring Beef O Brady’s at 3 p.m. Come join the fun as we kick off the 2011 season with FSU vs LouisianaMonroe. Door prizes and other fun contests will be available. For more information, call 386-9194 o r email mantarayEM@earthlink.net.Soccer, Cheer at YMCASEBRING – The Highlands County Family YMCAis signing up ages 3-14 fo r the Fall Soccer Program. We are also signing up 5-13 year olds for The YMCACheer Team. Call 382-9622 for any questions.Habitat Golf FORE HomesŽ SEBRING — Mountain Top Productions presents for 2011 “Gol f FORE Homes” tournament on Saturday, Sept. 17 on the new greens at Country Club of Sebring. “Golf FORE Homes” benefits Highlands County Habitat for Humanity and the Mason’s Ridge project. Registration is at 7:30 a.m. and shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. – four person teams will be flighted by handicap. Entry fee includes complimentary practice round, continental breakfast, goodie bags, prizes, snacks on the course and lunch and awards following play. Complimentary reception for all players the evening before on Friday, Sept. 16 at Country Club of Sebring. A$2,000 hole-in-one is being sponsored by Cohan Radio Group and chance to win a vehicle sponsored by Alan Jay Automotive Network. Entry fee is $220 per team or $55 pe r player. Please contact Sarah Pallone at 4022913 for additional information or e-mail team information to spallone@habitathighlands.org .Elks golf outingSEBRING – The monthly Elks gol f outing will be held at Harder Hall Country Club on Labor Day, Monday, Sept. 5 beginning at 8 a.m. Cost is only $22, which includes golf, lunch and prize fund. To sign up contact Jack McLaughlin a t jacknjudy33872@gmail.com or leave a message on 863 471-3295. Check in not later than 7:40 a.m. in the clubhouse. AMERICAN LEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB Boston8051.611„ New York7851.6051 Tampa Bay7159.54681‡2Toronto6665.50414 Baltimore5277.40327 Central Division WLPctGB Detroit7259.550„ Cleveland6464.50061‡2Chicago6465.4967 Minnesota5576.42017 Kansas City5478.409181‡2West Division WLPctGB Texas7558.564„ Los Angeles7160.5423 Oakland6071.45814 Seattle5674.431171‡2___ Thursdays Games N.Y. Yankees 22, Oakland 9 Baltimore 6, Minnesota 1 Detroit 2, Tampa Bay 0 Kansas City 9, Toronto 6 Boston 6, Texas 0 Fridays Games Cleveland 2, Kansas City 1 Baltimore 12, N.Y. Yankees 5 Tampa Bay 6, Toronto 1 Oakland 15, Boston 5 Texas 11, L.A. Angels 7 Detroit 8, Minnesota 1 Chicago White Sox 4, Seattle 2 Saturdays Games Oakland at Boston, 1st game, late N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 1st game, late Tampa Bay at Toronto, late Detroit at Minnesota, late Oakland at Boston, 2nd game, late Kansas City at Cleveland, late N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 2nd game, late L.A. Angels at Texas, late Chicago White Sox at Seattle, late Sundays Games Kansas City (Chen 9-5) at Cleveland (Masterson 10-7), 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 11-11) at Toronto (Morrow 9-8), 1:07 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Colon 8-8) at Baltimore (Britton 7-9), 1:35 p.m., 1st game Oakland at Boston, ppd., hurricane threat Detroit (Penny 9-9) at Minnesota (Duensing 8-13), 2:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Floyd 11-10) at Seattle (Vargas 7-11), 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcia 10-7) at Baltimore (Matusz 1-6), 7:35 p.m., 2nd game L.A. Angels (Weaver 15-6) at Texas (C.Lewis 11-9), 8:05 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB Philadelphia8346.643„ Atlanta7954.5946 New York6268.477211‡2Washington6268.477211‡2Florida5972.45025 Central Division WLPctGB Milwaukee7954.594„ St. Louis6963.52391‡2Cincinnati6566.49613 Pittsburgh6170.46617 Chicago5775.432211‡2Houston4389.326351‡2West Division WLPctGB Arizona7359.553„ San Francisco7062.5303 Colorado6369.47710 Los Angeles6169.46911 San Diego6072.45513 ___ Thursdays Games Atlanta 8, Chicago Cubs 3 Arizona 8, Washington 1 Cincinnati at Florida, ppd., rain St. Louis 8, Pittsburgh 4 Houston 3, San Francisco 1 Fridays Games Florida 6, Philadelphia 5 N.Y. Mets 6, Atlanta 0 Cincinnati 4, Washington 3 Milwaukee 5, Chicago Cubs 2 St. Louis 5, Pittsburgh 4 Arizona 5, San Diego 0 L.A. Dodgers 6, Colorado 1 San Francisco 2, Houston 1 Saturdays Games Florida at Philadelphia, 1st game, late Atlanta at New York, ppd., rain Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, late Pittsburgh at St. Louis, late Florida at Philadelphia, 2nd game. late Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, late Washington at Cincinnati, late San Diego at Arizona, late Houston at San Francisco, late Sundays Games Atlanta at New York, ppd., hurricane threat Washington (Zimmermann 8-11) at Cincinnati (Cueto 9-5), 1:10 p.m. Florida at Philadelphia, ppd., hurricane threat Chicago Cubs (C.Coleman 2-6) at Milwaukee (Greinke 12-5), 2:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Karstens 9-7) at St. Louis (Lohse 11-8), 2:15 p.m. Houston (Norris 6-8) at San Francisco (Cain 10-9), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (Chacin 10-10) at L.A. Dodgers (Eovaldi 1-1), 4:10 p.m. San Diego (Luebke 5-6) at Arizona (I.Kennedy 16-4), 4:10 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEWLTPtsGFGA Columbus1177402924 Sporting KC979363631 Houston8711353432 Philadelphia8610343024 New York6614324137 D.C.7710313435 Chicago3715242833 New England41111232639 Toronto FC41211232548WESTERN CONFERENCEWLTPtsGFGA Los Angeles1439513720 Seattle1259453627 FC Dallas1277433327 Colorado10611413934 Real Salt Lake1076363220 Portland9125323341 Chivas USA7910313229 San Jose51010252634 Vancouver3139182642 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ___ Saturdays Games Columbus at Seattle FC, late Houston at Vancouver, late San Jose at Toronto FC, late Portland at D.C. United, late Colorado at Chicago, late FC Dallas at Sporting KC, late Real Salt Lake at Chivas USA, late Sundays Games Los Angeles at New York, 7 p.m. New England at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEWLPctGB ndiana198.704„ Connecticut1810.64311‡2New York1612.57131‡2Atlanta1413.5195 Chicago1315.46461‡2Washington522.18514WESTERN CONFERENCEWLPctGB x-Minnesota226.786„ Seattle1612.5716 Phoenix1512.55661‡2San Antonio1314.48181‡2Los Angeles1216.42910 Tulsa225.074191‡2x-clinched playoff spot ___ Thursdays Games Seattle 74, Tulsa 57 Fridays Games Connecticut 95, Phoenix 92 Minnesota 85, San Antonio 75 Chicago 80, Washington 67 Tulsa 77, Los Angeles 75 Saturdays Game Atlanta at Indiana, late Sundays Games Minnesota at San Antonio, 3 p.m. Connecticut at Tulsa, 4 p.m. Phoenix at Washington, 4 p.m. New York at Chicago, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at Seattle, 9 p.m.BASEBALLAmerican League BALTIMORE ORIOLES…Assigned OF Felix Pie outright to Norfolk (IL). BOSTON RED SOX…Recalled RHP Scott Atchison from Pawtucket (IL). Optioned C Ryan Lavarnway to Pawtucket. Assigned C Blake Swihart and SS Mookie Betts to the GCL Red Sox. CLEVELAND INDIANS…Placed OF Michael Brantley, retroactive to Aug. 23, and RHP Josh Tomlin, retroactive to Aug. 25, on the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Nick Hagadone from Columbus (IL). Assigned SS Francisco Lindor to Mahoning Valley (NYP). DETROIT TIGERS…Activated 1B Miguel Cabrera from the paternity leave list. Recalled 3B Danny Worth from Toledo (IL). MINNESOTA TWINS…Activated OF Jason Repko from the 15-day DL. NEW YORK YANKEES…Assigned RHP Jeff Marquez outright to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS…Optioned RHP Bruce Billings and LHP Jordan Norberto to Sacramento (PCL). Recalled LHP Jerry Blevins and LHP Josh Outman from Sacramento (PCL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS…Claimed OF Dewayne Wise off waivers from Florida. National League CINCINNATI REDS…Activated LHP Logan Ondrusek from the 15-day DL. Optioned LHP Travis Wood to Louisville (IL). COLORADO ROCKIES…Reinstated RHP Matt Lindstrom and RHP Huston Street from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Josh Roenicke and LHP J.C. Romero to Colorado Springs (PCL). FLORIDA MARLINS…Assigned RHP Jose Fernandez to the GCL Marlins. HOUSTON ASTROS…Assigned OF George Springer to Tri-City (NYP). LOS ANGELES DODGERS…Activated RHP Kenley Jansen from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Josh Lindblom to Chattanooga (SL).FOOTBALLNational Football League JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS…Waivedinjured DE Steven Wesley. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid TUESDAY: Volleyball vs.Clewiston,6/7:30 p.m.; Swimming at Sebring,5:30 p.m. THURSDAY,Sept 1: JV Football vs.DeSoto,7 p.m.; Volleyball at Sebring,6/7:30 p.m. FRIDAY: Football at Celebration,7 p.m. Sebring TUESDAY: Volleyball at Hardee,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Golf at Lake Wales,4 p.m.; Girls Golf at George Jenkins,4 p.m.; Swimming vs.Lake Placid,5:30 p.m. THURSDAY,Sept.1: JV Football vs.Avon Park,7 p.m.; Volleyball vs.Lake Placid, 6/7:30 p.m.; Girls Golf at Lady Maverick Tournament,Pembroke Pines,4 p.m.; Swim at All Saints Academy,5:30 p.m. FRIDAY: Football vs.DeSoto,7 p.m. SFCC TUESDAY: Volleyball at Clearwater Christian College,7 p.m. FRIDAY: Volleyball at Hillsborough Tournament,vs.HCC,11:30 a.m.,vs.Webber JV,2 p.m. SATURDAY: Vollebyall at Hillsborough Tournament,vs.State College of Florida,10 a.m.,vs.St.Petersburg College,12:30 p.m. Avon Park THURSDAY: JV Football at Sebring,7 p.m. FRIDAY: Football at Frostproof,7 p.m. N N F L L P R E S E A S O N SU N D A Y N o o n Miami at Tampa Bay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C B S 1 0 8 8 p m New Orleans at Oakland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . N B C A U T O R A C I N G SU N D A Y 7 : 3 0 0 p m NHRA …Lucas Oil Series . . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 2M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L SU N D A Y 1 1 p m Tampa Bay at Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S U N 1 : 3 0 0 p m N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore . . . . . . . . . . . . . T B S 4 4 p m Chicago White Sox at Seattle . . . . . . . . . W G N 8 8 p m L.A. Angels at Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P NMO N D A Y 7 7 p m Philadelphia at Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 7 7 p m Tampa Bay at Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S U NTU E S D A Y 8 8 p m Tampa Bay at Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S U N 1 0 0 p m Chicago Cubs at San Francisco . . . . . . . . W G NM A J O R L E A G U E S O C C E R SU N D A Y 7 7 p m Los Angeles at N.Y.. Red Bulls. . . . E S P N 2B I C Y C L I N G SU N D A Y 2 2 p m USA Pro Challenge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N B CT E N N I S MO N D A Y 1 1 p m U.S. Open, First Round . . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 2 7 7 p m U.S. Open, First Round . . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 2TU E S D A Y 1 1 p m U.S. Open, First Round . . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 2 7 7 p m U.S. Open, First Round . . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 2L I T T L E L E A G U E W O R L D S E R I E S SU N D A Y 1 1 1 a m Consolation Game. . . . . . . . . E S P N 3 3 p m Championship Game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A B C Times, games, channels all subject to change T R A C K A N D F I E L D SU N D A Y 1 : 3 0 0 p m IAAF World Championships . . . . . . . . . . . N B CG O L F SU N D A Y 9 9 a m EuroPGA … Johnnie Walker Classic . . . . G O L F N o o n PGA … The Barclays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G O L F 2 2 p m PGA … The Barclays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C B S 2 2 p m LPGA … Canadian Womens Open . . . . . . G O L F 4 4 p m U.S. Amateur Championship, Final . . . . . N B C 7 7 p m PGA … Boeing Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G O L FH I G H S C H O O L F O O T B A L L SU N D A Y N o o n Glenbard W. at Whtn-Wrrnvle S. (IL) . . E S P N 2 3 3 p m Cocoa (FL) at Colerain (Ohio) . . . . . . . . . E S P NM A J O R L E A G U E L A C R O S S E SU N D A Y 3 3 p m Championship Game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 2 LIVESPORTSONTV Major League Baseball WNBA Major League Soccer Transactions Page 2BNews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011www.newssun.co m Classified Ads € 385-6155 NEWS-SUN

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The Associated PressBefore it hit land, Hurricane Irene trimmed at least 18 holes off the PGA Tour’s first playoff event and forced several more schedule changes and cancellations along the East Coast. U.S. Open tennis officials called off one of their big pre-tournament events, an MLS game was rescheduled and the New York Mets postponed their Saturday and Sunday games against the Atlanta Braves in advance of the storm. The split doubleheader Saturday between the New York Yankees and Baltimore Orioles that was scheduled for Saturday was postponed. The game originally scheduled for Saturday night will become part of a split doubleheader on Sunday. The afternoon game will be held on Sept. 8, previously an off day for both teams. With up to 10 inches of rain expected Sunday in the New York area, the PGA Tour decided to turn the Barclays into a 54-hole event, with the top 100 players advancing to the second playoff tournament next week in Boston. If conditions worsen before 54 holes are complete, the tournament could revert to 36 holes. “It kind of makes you want to cry because of all the effort that went in, and all of the energy that surrounded this event going into the week, which is going to be the best Barclays we have ever had,” tournament director Peter Mele said. The Giants and Jets originally moved their preseason game up from Saturday night to the afternoon, but decided on Friday to postpone it until Monday night. At Flushing Meadows, the U.S. Tennis Association called off Arthur Ashe Kids’Day, a tennis-andmusic event set for Saturday and scheduled to feature Novak Djokovic, defending champion Rafael Nadal and Carmelo Anthony of the New York Knicks. Tennis officials said they would close the National Tennis Center on Sunday, with plans to reopen it Monday morning before play begins. In other sports, the MLS game between the Portland Timbers and D.C. United, set for Saturday, was postponed, with a makeup date to be announced next week. Other games had been previously rescheduled. —Major League Baseball moved Sunday’s games at Philadelphia and Boston to Saturday to make them part of day-night doubleheaders, but the Phillies have since rescheduled the night game to Sept. 15. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011Page 3B COCHRAN BROTHERS ROOFING; 5.542"; 3"; Black; 8/7,14,21,28; 0 0 0 1 0 6 6 5 STANLEY STEEMER CARPET; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 08/28/11; 0 0 0 1 1 2 7 9 STANLEY STEEMER CARPET; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 08/28/11; 0 0 0 1 1 2 7 9 COCHRAN BROTHERS ROOFING; 5.542"; 3"; Black; 8/7,14,21,28; 0 0 0 1 0 6 6 5 The Lady Devils actually held a 3-2 lead in the first set, but the sharpness, decisiveness and aggressiveness that gave Sebring fits two nights earlier, were virtually absent this night. ALake Placid run made it 6-3, then 14-7 and 20-8 before cruising to a 25-11 win. It was a similar script in the second set as a 4-4 game was soon 10-5 and 16-9. Avon Park began to show the vast improvement seen Tuesday in making it a back-and-forth contest for a time. But the Dragons had found their game and went off for a 25-15 win. The Devils seemed to gain some of their composure back in the third set, with Mackenzie Myers and Teresa Devlin serving up aces for scores and Kayla Wilson adding a kill. But those were matched by a Taylor Miller kill and Breauna Corley block to keep things close. Tied at 22, it was Alana Nielander’s time to step up for the Lake Placid, registering a kill and deftly redirecting tips for the final three points of the 25-22 win. “They did come to play today,” head coach Linette Wells said. “We worked on it in practice and they came out and did what they needed to do. They found it. “Avon Park didn’t play like I thought they would,” she continued. “But that’s not the team we’re going to see as we move on into the season.” Something Lady Red Devil head coach Stephanie Devlin agreed with, on both counts. “I think right now it’s a head game,” she said. “I see them in practice and they are doing great. But that’s what preseason is all about. We are here to work out some of those things.” Avon Park will be back in tournament action Friday and Saturday, Sept. 9-10, at Bartow, while the Lady Dragons host Clewiston Tuesday. Continued from 1B VBall season about to get underway News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Kaley Walter goes low to get this dig Thursday, though Sebring fell short against Okeechobee in the Preseason Classic final. Irene forces changes By JENNAFRYER Associated Press BRISTOL, Tenn. — The car chief for T.J. Bell’s Nationwide Series team has been taken to a hospital for injuries suffered on pit road. Cory Howe was making adjustments underneath the Chevrolet when Bell accidentally backed over him. Howe was airlifted to Wellmont Health System in Kingsport and is listed in good condition. Teams work on pit road and behind their haulers a t Bristol because there are no garage stalls. The Nationwide teams are on one side of the tiny infield, and the Sprint Cup teams are on the other. Crewman in good condition

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Associated PressTALLAHASSEE — Florida State coach Jim Fisher says the Seminoles have plenty of talent to win a championship. Fisher told a crowd of some 1,400 boosters Friday that he wouldn’t trade his talent with anyone else and that sixth-ranked Florida State is ready to make a championship run if they stay focused and play up to their ability. The second-year head coach has eight starters back on both offense and defense from a team that finished 10-4 last season. The Seminoles also return nearly all of a special teams unit that was among the nation’s best last year. Top-ranked Oklahoma is scheduled to visit Sept. 17, after the Sept. 3 opener against Louisiana-Monroe. Associated PressAlonso 13, Spoto 12 Barron Collier 36, Estero 14 Bayshore 35, Pinellas Park 12 Bozeman School 32, Franklin County 6 Brandon 35, Blake 6 Cape Coral 41, Palmetto Ridge 36 Carrollwood Day 38, Bishop McLaughlin 6 Chamberlain 30, East Bay 7 Chaminade-Madonna College Prep 34, Lely 14 Colquitt County, Ga. 20, Madison County 19 Coral Springs Charter 3, Highlands Christian 2 Darlington, Ga. 42, Dade Christian 35, OT Durant 15, Bloomingdale 0 FAMU Developmental Research 28, Chiles 14 Haines City 13, Frostproof 6 Hillsborough 19, Plant City 14 Holmes County 27, Graceville 15 Jefferson 46, Tampa Bay Tech 21 Keswick Christian 30, Southwest Florida Christian 14 King 43, Middleton 13 Lennard 42, Leto 8 Melbourne 43, Sebastian River 14 Melbourne Central Catholic 40, LaSalle 14 Mosley 31, Rutherford 23 Naples 46, Hialeah 6 Navarre 6, Milton 0 Newsome 37, George Steinbrenner 33 Niceville 14, Pensacola Washington 0 Ocala Trinity Catholic 47, Taylor County 7 P.K. Yonge 20, Hilliard 14 Pace 10, Crestview 6 Palm Beach Gardens 46, Port St. Lucie 7 Pasco 17, Hernando 0 Pensacola 35, Tate 14 Ransom Everglades 8, Coral Shores 0 River Ridge 26, Gulf 3 Riverdale 35, East Lee County 0 Robinson 42, Seminole 0 Santa Fe Catholic 36, Calvary Christian 27 Seffner Christian 35, All Saints 0 Sickles 17, Gaither 2 South Fork 45, Clewiston 23 South Fort Myers 33, Gulf Coast 0 St. Lucie West Centennial High School 23, Fort Pierce Westwood 22 Tampa Freedom 31, Strawberry Crest 20 Tenoroc 19, Avon Park 13, OT University School 54, North Broward 14 Wharton 42, Riverview 28 Winter Haven 37, Ridge Community 0 Zephyrhills 31, Brooksville Central 14 Page 4BNews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011www.newssun.com HARDER HALL GOLF COURSE; 3.639"; 3"; Black; sports; 0 0 0 1 0 6 7 8 DR. LEE, IKE; 1.736"; 3"; Black; 8/7,28; 0 0 0 1 0 8 2 6 YMCA; 3.639"; 5"; Black; 08/28/11; 0 0 0 1 1 2 8 3 DR. LEE, IKE; 1.736"; 3"; Black; 8/7,28; 0 0 0 1 0 8 2 6 HARDER HALL GOLF COURSE; 3.639"; 3"; Black; sports; 0 0 0 1 0 6 7 8 YMCA; 3.639"; 5"; Black; 08/28/11; 0 0 0 1 1 2 8 3 game at 13-13. After the regulation game ended 13-13, Avon Park won the toss to take four stabs at the end zone in a sudden death play-off. With just two tries under their belt, the Devils moved the ball to within four in the tie-breaker, but dropped the ball within three yards of victory on their third attempt. That turned the ball over to the Tenoroc, who were able to pound it in on their fourth try from just one-foot out. “We had a whole of want to, but we have a whole lot of work to do,” said Avon Park head coach Andy Bonjokian. “The effort was there, execution wasn’t. We need to score a lot more and hold onto the ball to win games. We will be working on that for Frostproof next week.” Avon Park hits the road to face the Frostproof Bulldogs in the regular season opener next Friday at 7:30 p.m. Continued from 1B ond quarter on an 18-yard run to give Hardee a 22-0 lead. The Lake Placid defense stopped the Wildcats on their next two possessions as they intercepted two passes. Marty Hickey got the first interception when he undercut the Wildcat receiver in the flat. Marquavian Copeland pulled in the second interception on a deep pass that was off target and slightly underthrown. Lake Placid was unable to capitalize on either turnover, though, and Walton returned the favor, throwing an interception on a deep route down the left sideline and turning the ball over on downs. Hardee would put together an 8-play drive for 71 yards to take a 29-0 halftime lead. In the second half, Hardee scored a touchdown in both the third and fourth quarters to build their lead to 42-0 The Green Dragons managed their first first down midway through the third quarter before putting together a 13-play scoring drive in the fourth quarter. On their last possession of the game, Lake Placid took possession after a kickoff on their 31-yard line. Gayle ran the ball four times for 17 yards and Weaver had a run for four yards to reach the Wildcats 38-yard line. Weaver then broke a tackle through the right side of the line and ran 37 yards before being dragged down at the 1 yard line. The Dragons were unable to punch the ball in the end zone and Vicente Barajas kicked a 32-yard field goal that split the uprights with plenty of leg to spare to make the final score 42-3 and help Lake Placid avoid the shutout. “The guys played hard,” stated Holden. “We put people in different positions to see what guys can do and especially with our youth, and I am not using that as an excuse because we are excited abou t our youth, but it put us a little behind as we try to find the right fit.” “It was due to their hustle and their effort” explained Holden about his defense forcing four turnovers. “Ou r guys will play physical and we are excited about that.” Lake Placid travels to play Celebration next Friday. Continued from 1B “He’s electrifying,” Scott said of Powell. “He’s smart and he gets great reads so he’ll make plays like that.” The Blue Crush defense then forced and pounced on another fumble to get the ball back and Michael Weston soon bulled in from the three to make it a 43-0 margin. And Sebring’s scoring was capped of by the defense when Ryan Schuffert blocked a Terrier punt in the end zone for a safety to make it 45-0 with 2:55 left in the third. From there, it was time for the backups to get some needed playing time, given the lack of depth due to numbers for this seasons’ squad. “It got a little ugly at times and we fell off a little bit,” Scott said. “We need them to get in and step up because we’re going to need everybody this year. But it was a good learning experience for them. We’ll see it in the film and they’ll know what they need to do.” Moore Haven finally got on the board with 1:26 left in the fourth on a dazzling run. “Defensively, we matched their team speed,” Scott said. “But you see what can happen when they get outside.” But awash in the chill of the ice water and the thrill of his first win, there was something else Coach Scott had to look forward to, with no cold shower needed. “It was my first win, but also my ninth wedding anniversary,” he said. “So it was a double celebration and that really capped the night off.” Sebring now moves into its’regular season schedule with a home date next Friday against the Bulldogs of DeSoto. Continued from 1B News-Sun photo courtesy of JAMES TAYLOR Though he got past these Hardee defenders on this play, A.J. Gayle was held to 37 yards on 21 carries by the Wildcats Friday. LP has work to do before Celebration AP close, but no cigar ‘ We had a whole lot of want to, but we have a whole lot of work to do. ’ANDYBONJOKIAN Avon Parhead coach News-Sun photo courtesy of KIM GAUGER A nthony Powell picks off this Moore Haven pass, one of two he would nab on the night. Streaks roll, look for depth to step up News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Damion Thompson is about to get past the last of the pursuers on this 60-yard touchdown run. Friday Florida Football Scores Fisher … Noles have the talent for titles

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The Community Calendar provides a brief listing of local clubs and organizations who meet on a regular basis. It is the responsibility of the group to update the News-Sun on any changes in this listing by calling 385-6155, ext. 516; send any changes by e-mail to editor@newssun.com; or mail them to News-Sun Community Calendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870. S UNDAY American Legion Post 25 Lake Placid has lounge hours from 1-9 p.m. Live music is from 5-8 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Members and guests only. Post is at 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Call 471-1448. Inerstate chapter of A.B.A.T.E. meets the last Sunday of every month at The Blue Crab, 825 Ridgewood Dr., Sebring at 11 a.m. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 lounge is open from 1-7 p.m. Card games start at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has karaoke in the pavilion. Horseshoes played at 9:30 a.m. Food available at 4 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Cards start at 4 p.m. Music outside Tiki Hut at 3 p.m. Call 452-0579. Overeaters Anonymous, meets from 4-5 p.m. in second floor conference roomNo. 3 at Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center, 4200 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring. For details, call 382-7731. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. For details on the organization, go to www.oa.org Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves lunch at 2 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 offers NASCAR racing in the pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar open and kitchen open from 25 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-3920. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 serves hamburgers from 4-5:30 p.m. and plays poker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 Karaoke is from 5-8 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 385-8902. MONDAY Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN WITH ME family group meets at 10:30 a.m. every Monday at the Heartland Christian Church on Alt. 27 in Sebring. The church is behind Southgate Shopping Center where Publix is. Call 385-5714. Alcoholics Anonymous meets from 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal Church, Lakeshore Drive, Sebring. For more details, call 385-8807. Alcoholics Anonymous One Day At ATime group meets for a closed discussion at 9:30 a.m. Monday and Friday at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 4500 Sun N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. For details, call 314-0891. Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 6:30 p.m. at Rosewood Center, 517 U.S. 27 South, Lake Placid. Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3840Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 202-0647. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 12-9 p.m. For details, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. Call 4711448. AmVets Post 21 plays darts at 7:30 p.m. for members and guests. Call 385-0234. Avon Park Lakes Association has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m. The clubhouse is at 2714 Nautilus Drive in Avon Park. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118. Florida Association Home and Community Education meets from 9-11 a.m. weekl y on Mondays at The AgriCenter. The group of sewers and crafters make items for residents of adult congregate living facilities. Call Penny Bucher at 385-0949. Grand Prix Cloggers EZ Intermediate and Intermediate Clogging class are held at 9 a.m. every Monday at Reflections on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September.Heartland Pops rehearses at 7 p.m. Mondays at Avon Park High School Band Room, 700 E. Main St., under the direction of Anthony Jones. Musicians of all ages are welcome. Call 314-8877. Highlands County Concert Band rehearses 7-9 p.m. every Monday at Sebring High School band room. All musicians are welcome. Vic Anderson, musical director. Call Bill Varner at 386-0855. Highlands County Narcotics Anonymous meets at 8 p.m. at the Lakeside house, 1513 S. Highlands Ave., AvonPark. Highlands County Sewing Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Highlands County AgriCivic Center in the 4-H laboratory, Sebring. For details, call 402-6540. Highlands Sertoma Club meets noon, Takis Family Restaurant, Sebring. Lake Placid Art League will have classes in Drawing and Painting, conducted by Anne Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart will teach Fabric Painting at the center. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2 p.m. Sign up for darts is at 6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m. It is open to members and their guests.Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 35 except during holidays. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m. Let It Begin With Me Alanon Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Monday at Heartland Christian Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South, Sebring. For details about Alanon, a self-help group for families and friends of alcoholics, call 385-5714. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Rotary Club of Highlands County meets at 6:15 p.m. at Beef O Brady's, Sebring. Sebring Bridge Club has Bridge, ACBLDuplicate at the clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Mondays. For details or info on lessons, call 385-8118. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 has pizza and darts at 7:30 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has the lounge open from 12-7 p.m. For more details, call 4713557. Sebring Historical Society open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Located in back side of Sebring Public Library building on Lake Jackson. Call 471-2522. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S. 98. For details, call 655-3920. Sebring Optimist Club meets at 6:30 p.m. first and third Mondays at Sebring Library. For details, call Gabriel Read, 453-2859 or Barbara Stringer, 453-6661, Ext. 305. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL632, Sebring meets at 2 p .m. for wei g h-in at the fellowship hall at the First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, Sebring. For details, call 6591019. Veterans of Foreign War Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444.TUESDAY Al-Anon Family Groups meet for discussion and Twelve Step study at noon, Union Congregational Church, 105 N. Forest Ave., AvonPark. Parking available south of old church. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard and euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Boy Scout Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30 p.m. in the Scout Lodge, 202 Robert Britt St., AvonPark. Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to join. For details, call 452-2385. AvonPark Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Busy Bee Craft Club meets 9-11 a.m., Fairway Pines, Sun N Lakes Boulevard, Sebring. Everyone is welcome. For more details, call 382-8431. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday night at "The Rock," Union Congregational Church, 28 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park. Abarbecue meal is served at 6 p.m. for a donation. At 6:45 p.m., members meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group breaks up into small groups for men and women. The program is designed for drug and alcohol addiction, divorce, death or illness grief, low or lost selfesteem or identity due to dysfunctional relationships, depression/anxiety, or any other need for healing. Call Pam Sim at 453-3345, ext. 106. Fletcher Music Club meets every Thursday and Tuesday at Fletcher Music Center in Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. For more details, call 385-3288. G2G (Grandparent to Grandparent) a support group to help grandparents raising grandchildren, meets at 10 a.m. Tuesdays at One Hope United, 7195 S. George Blvd., Sebring. Call 214-9009. Heartland Harmonizers Barbershop Chorus meets from 7-9:30 p.m. in the Sebring High School Music Room, Sebring. All men who enjoy singing are invited. Reading music is not required. Call 4712294 or 386-5098. Highlands County Quilt Guild meets first and third Tuesday, St. Agnes Episcopal Church, Sebring. Call Lynn Ullinn for meeting times at 3140557 or e-mail luckyduck@mymailstation.com Highlands Senior Center Bingo every Tuesday 6-9 p.m. at 3400 Sebring Parkway. Doors open at 4 p.m. Cards on sale at 5 p.m.; games start at 6 p.m. Great snack bar. For more information, call 386-0752. Highlands Tea Party meets at 6 p.m. Tuesdays at Homer's Restaurant, 1000 Sebring Square. Call 386-1440. Hope Hospice grief support group meets at 11 a.m. at 319 W. Center Ave., Sebring; and 4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle ALF, across U.S. 27 from Florida Hospital Lake Placid. Call 382-0312. Lake Placid Art League has classes in Parchment Embossing from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant. For information, call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Happy hour is from 2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Grief Support (Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, with Charlie Stroup. Refreshments served. Door prize given. Call 465-0568. Lake Placid Moose has euchre at 7 p.m. Food available. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lorida Community Club meets at 7 p .m. Tuesda y at the Lorida Community Center to plan events. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 W.Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup.co m. For details, call 382-7731. Visit www.oa.org for more information on OA. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday and has blood pressure screening from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. first and third Tuesday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. For details, call 465-4888. Nar-Anon Support Group for family members or friends of someone with a drug problem or addiction. Nar-Anon helps attain serenity and a more normal life for those affected by the addictions of loved ones, regardless of whether or not he/she has stopped using. 6 p.m. every Tuesday at First Baptist Chuch of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 W.Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup.co m. For details, call 382-7731. Rotary Club of Sebring (Noon) meets at noon at the Sebring Civic Center, near the library in downtown Sebring. For information, call 385-3829 or 471-9900.. Sebring Bridge Club will have Duplicate Bridge games every Tuesday evening. If interested in playing Duplicate Bridge, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 plays darts, beginning with sign in at 6 p.m. Games start at 6:30 p.m. No experience necessary. Cost is $2. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves soft shell tacos 57 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing. Euchre is played at 6:30 p.m. Call 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. For details, call 385-2966. SertomaClub meets at 7 a.m. at Dee's Restaurant, Sebring. For details, call Scott Albritton at 402-1819. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL99 meets from 6-7 p.m. at the Atonement Lutheran Church, 1744 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 655-1743. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL618 has weigh in from 4-430 p.m. at Community Bible Church, 1400 CR-17AN., AvonPark. Meeting is at 4:45 p.m. For details, call 452-1093. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, plays darts 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 has sandwiches at 5 p.m. and Franke from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 385-8902.WEDNESDAY 50 Plus Singles Connection is an activities club for all persons over 50. Members gather for dinner at various local restaurants and have other activities. The group meets at Beef O'Bradys on the last Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. For information call 452-1669. Adult Children of Alcoholics and Dysfunctional Families. New Life Group meets Wednesdays at 11:30 a.m. at Grace Bible Church, 4453 Thunderbird Road, Sebring. For details, call 446-0461. For details on the organization, go to www.adultchildren.org American Legion Post 25 Lake Placid has lounge hours from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Burgers served from 5-7 p.m.Live music is from 5-8 p.m. For details, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. AvonPark Noon Rotary Club meets noon, Rotary Club building, corner of Verona Avenue and Pine Street, Avon Park. Balance Transitions (Support Group For People Suffering With Mental Issues) meets every Wednesday at 1 p.m. with Qi-Gong to follow at 2:45 p.m. at 3003 Herring Ave., Sebring (Good Shepard Building). Call 386-5687. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. For details, call 385-8118. The Bridgettes meet at 12:15 p.m. at Sebring Recreation Center to play bridge. For details, call Sandra Yates at 655-5815. Christian Fellowship Group meets 7 p.m. Call 3819005 or 381-9007. Country Swingers has dances at the Sebring Recreation Club, 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. Membership is required. Beginners dancing from 5:156:15 p.m. Advanced dancing is from 6:30-8:30 p.m. New dances taught every other week. Call 655-2398.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September. Highlands County Narcotics Anonymous meets at 8 p.m. at the Lakeside house, 1513 S. Highlands Ave., AvonPark. For details, call the 24-hour hotline 1-800-8507347 or (941) 616-0460. Highlands Senior Center will hold lunch, dancing, fun and games from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. every Wednesday at 3400 Sebring Parkway.Come and join us for the fun. For more information, call 386-0752. Highlands Shrine Club, 2606 State Road 17 South, Avon Park (between Avon Park and Sebring) meets from 8:3010:30 a.m. for coffee and doughnuts and socializing for members and any interested person. Call 382-2208. Kiwanis Club of Sebring meets every Wednesday at noon at Homer's Restaurant. Call Grace Plants 273-1421 for more information. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 is open to members and their guests. Shuffleboard is at 1:30 p.m. Mah-Jong from 1-5 p.m. Lounge opens at 12:30 p.m. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at night. Open to members and qualified guests only Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Dinner served every Wednesday from 5:30-6:30 p.m.Call 452-0579. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 7 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, nea r the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Over The Hill Gang meets 10:15 a.m., Jim's Pistolarrow Range for target shooting. Fo r details, call 655-4505. Rotary Club of Lake Placid (Morning Rotary) meets at 6:44 a.m. at The Heron's Garden, 501 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, just north of the Tower. Visiting Rotarians always welcome. Coffee only is $2; full breakfast is $7. Call 465-4834. Sebring Bridge Club has Bridge, ACBLDuplicate at the clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Wednesdays Call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 hosts Wacky Wednesday from 5-6:30 p.m. serving a varied menu of food for $6 and special drink prices. Lounge open from 1-8 p.m. Open to Elk members and guests. Music provided from 4:30-7:30 p.m. For details, call 471-3557. Sebring Kiwanis Club meets noon, Homer's Smorgasbord, Sebring. Sebring Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves hamburgers, frie s and fish sandwiches from 5-7 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing. There will be music from 4:30-7:30 p.m. For details, call 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club has ice cream shuffleboard at 1:15 p.m. at 333 Pomegranat e Ave., Sebring. Call 385-2966. Suicide and Sudden Death Grief Support group meets every Wednesday, 6 p.m., atUnity Life Enrichment Center, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd, Sebring. Facilitated by license d therapist. Call 381-4410. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL487 meets at 9 a.m. at Whispering Pines Baptist Church, 303 White Pin e Drive, Sebring. For details, call 382-7716 or 314-9485. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3800 plays poker at 2 p.m. at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 food available 5-7 p.m. Entertainment 5-8 p.m. 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Service officer at pos t 12-3 p.m. Call 385-8902. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9853 Auxiliary meets a t 2 p.m. first Wednesday at the post, 75 N. Olivia Drive, Avon Park. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9853 and Auxiliary trav el to Royal Care Nursing Home in Avon Park the last Wednesday. Young Artists String Orchestra (YASO) rehearses each Wednesday at 5:15 p.m at Lake Placid Church of the Nazarene (512 W. Interlake). We are looking for violin, viola, cello, and string bass players to be a part of this orchestra. Call Diane Osborne, conductor, at 659-4541 or (503) 709-1440. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011Page 5B E.O. KOCH CONSTRUCTION CO.; 5.542"; 4"; Black; seamless p/u; 0 0 0 1 1 2 8 0 COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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By CHRISTYLEMIRE APMovie CriticLOS ANGELES — On Sept. 11, 2001, I was living in New York, covering entertainment and reviewing films for The Associated Press. I had a typically random, frivolous day planned: a screening of “The Glass House”; an interview with Carson Daly; and a hair appointment to get my highlights touched up. None of that happened. But I’ll never forget the title of the movie that was in my calendar that day, a thriller starring Leelee Sobieski. For many of us critics, “The Glass House” ended up being the first movie we saw once we struggled to return to reality after the attacks, and its manufactured scares seemed so cheap and crass compared to the real horrors we’d all j ust witnessed. Approaching entertainment in general, and movies specifically — especially those set and shot in New York with images of the twin towers — was a tricky proposition in the weeks and months following 9/11. There was, of course, the broader question: When is it appropriate to enjoy ourselves again? But studios debated how to be respectful in releasing films that featured images of those iconic, fallen buildings. They wanted to strike the right tone, but there didn’t seem to be a right answer. The twin towers were so instantly recognizable, so majestic and evocative. In a movie such as “Working Girl,” they’re a beacon of promise; in the classic poster for Woody Allen’s “Manhattan,” they even form the letter H. Do you eradicate them entirely to avoid upsetting the audience? Or do you leave them in, because they existed when the film was being made? “Glitter” is probably bestknown now as a laughably self-serving star vehicle for Mariah Carey. But it happened to come out just 10 days after the terrorist attacks, and included a couple of shots in which the twin towers are visible in the background. At a screening in a Times Square multiplex, those images drew the only cheers and applause. Then there was the comedy “Zoolander,” directed by and starring Ben Stiller, which came out Sept. 28. The towers were erased from the finished print, which was jarring. Ascene in which Derek Zoolander gives the eulogy at a funeral for his male model roommates, who die in a gasoline explosion inexplicably played for laughs, also struck an awkward note, especially with the New York City skyscrapers gleaming behind the cemetery. The romantic comedy “Serendipity,” starring John Cusack and Kate Beckinsale, was released less than a month after 9/11, but it takes place in a Manhattan that is so idyllic, so romantic, it probably never existed. Shots of the World Trade Center in a version that screened at the Toronto International Film Festival were excised after the attacks for maximum moviegoing happiness. Meanwhile, Arnold Schwarzenegger’s “Collateral Damage” was postponed from an October 2001 release to the following February; even though it takes place in Los Angeles, it’s about a terrorist plot to blow up buildings. It was the most high-profile example of Hollywood’s attempt to be sensitive, even though “Collateral Damage” was, in retrospect, just another big, loud, dumb Schwarzenegger movie. But as time went on, filmmakers began feeling their way around the tragedy with what appeared to be a bit more comfort and confidence. The police drama “City by the Sea,” starring Robert De Niro and James Franco, came out on Sept. 6, 2002. It had been filmed all over New York City in early 2001 and contains several prominent images of the World Trade Center towers. This struck a somber chord upon the one-year anniversary of the attacks, a time when the city collectively was on edge once more, and sent a ripple through the screening I attended. Still, I was glad to see the towers remain in the film, because that was an accurate reflection of what the city looked like during production. Afew months later, we had “25th Hour,” one of my favorite movies of that year and one of Spike Lee’s best. Naturally, being a filmmaker who personifies New York, Lee wouldn’t dream of avoiding the attacks. His unflinching title sequence focuses on the downtown skyline as it appeared around the oneyear anniversary, with two beams of light stretching skyward from the spot where the towers had stood. Later, Edward Norton’s character visits his father at the bar he owns in Staten Island — a firefighter hangout with memorials on the walls to the men who died. And Barry Pepper and Philip Seymour Hoffman have a long conversation in front of a picture window in Pepper’s high-rise apartment, which overlooks ground zero. Hoffman asks whether Pepper plans to move, since the air quality downtown is so bad. “(Bleep) that, man,” Pepper responds. “Bin Laden could drop in next door — I ain’t movin’.” Five years after the attacks, Oliver Stone approached the towers headon with “World Trade Center,” starring Nicolas Cage and Michael Pena as a pair of Port Authority police officers trapped beneath the rubble of the collapsed towers. The prevailing wisdom was that Stone would inject some pointed political perspective in depicting this tragedy; instead, he offered an exceptionally crafted, strongly acted, high-end made-for-TVmovie. It’s visceral and intense, exceedingly faithful in its depiction of the fear and chaos, the ash and smoke that enveloped New York that day. Eventually, the buildings again became a welcome sight. James Marsh’s Oscarwinning documentary “Man on Wire” (2008) traces tightrope-walker Philippe Petit’s death-defying highwire act between the World Trade Center towers in 1974. The film is hugely engrossing, but it also harkens to a simpler, more innocent time. Askywalk such as the one Petit pulled off would be impossible today; security is too tight and too pervasive in every segment of our daily lives. And that’s because of what happened on Sept 11, 2001 — a date that never arises in “Man on Wire” because Marsh wisely realizes he doesn’t need to mention it. The absence of the towers — and the reason for their absence — is implicit throughout the film, which adds a level of unspoken yet inescapable poignancy. Contact AP Movie Critic Christy Lemire through Twitter: http://twitter.com/christylemire. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011Page 7B HODGES UNIVERSITY; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, race inches ads; 0 0 0 0 1 0 8 0 9 CENTRAL SECURITY; 5.542"; 5"; Black plus three; process, 8/28/11; 0 0 0 1 1 4 2 3 Essay: Filmmakers struggled with towers after 9/11 ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT MCT The World Trade Centers familiar twin towers dominated the Manhattan skyline and were naturally a part of many movie settings. By PAULDERGARABEDIAN For The Associated PressLOS ANGELES — Disney’s late-summer hit “The Help” should stay busy atop the domestic box office chart for a second straight weekend with a gross in the high teens. The film opened three weeks ago in the No. 2 spot, but has achieved dominance in the marketplace as great word-of-mouth for the film sweeps the nation. The weekly drop rate has been impressively low and the $100 million mark should be within reach by Sunday night. Sony’s debuting “Colombiana” will add some late-season sizzle to the mix, with Zoe Saldana kicking butt as a cold-blooded assassin in this stylized PG-13 romp. Expect a gross in the mid-teens as action aficionados hit theaters for a last blast of bloodshed. Also opening this weekend is the offbeat, R-rated comedy “Our Idiot Bother” from the Weinstein Company and the producers of “Little Miss Sunshine.” Alow-teen debut is expected for the film starring comedy mainstay Paul Rudd as a stoned-out idealist who crashes into the lives of his sisters. Yet another horror remake creeps into theaters this weekend as Film District’s “Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark” updates the 1973 TV movie of the same name with the unique sensibility of Guillermo del Toro, who served as co-screenwriter. Starring Katie Holmes and Guy Pearce, this R-rated story of a young girl who discovers creatures in her new home is sure to send horror fans to the multiplex looking for a good scare and an opening weekend of around $11 million. Fox’s “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” enters its fourth weekend with a likely finish in the top five at around $8 million and close to $150 million in domestic revenue by Sunday night. Box office preview: The Help expected to clean up again The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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Page 8BNews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sun that is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSun at 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site, www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Scott King youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. children's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. children's mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing God's Heart and Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and women's prayer breakfast is at 8a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the "Place to discover God's love." For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.; Blended Service, 10:30 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mother's Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) "Where the old fashion gospel is preached." Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the "Son" always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 382-0869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 3850752. Spring Lake Baptist Church, "Where the Bible is Always Open." Pastor Richard Schermerhorn. 7408 Valencia Road; 655-2610. On U.S. 98 at the Spring Lake Village II entrance. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. for all ages; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Bible Study and Prayer Service, 6:30 p.m. Nursery available for all services. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695 CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com Very Rev. JosŽ Gonz‡lez, V.F. Masses Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Saturday; 8 and 10:30 a.m. and noon Sunday. Confession: every Saturday 3-3:45 p.m. or first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lord's Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building God's Kingdom for Everyone." "Jesus Christ, the Way,Truth and Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!" Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Changing Seasons, a men's grief support group, meets at 1 p.m. Wednesdays. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets at 1 p.m. Thursdays. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is “Jesus is First at First Christian Church.” Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures'by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-se rmons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL33870. Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m. Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Christ, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, FL 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts. Sunday Worship Services, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available at every service. Bible Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered classes for all ages. Church phone: 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. We would like to extend an invitation for you and your family to visit with us here at Sebring Parkway. Our hours of service are: Sunday Bible Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazarene of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W. Main St. Randall Rupert, Pastor. Sunday: Sunday school begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning worship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening service at 6 p.m. Wednesday evening service is at 7 p.m. with special services for children and adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) and Ladies ministries. If you need any more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazarene of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852. Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children and youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christian Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17A North (truck route), AvonPark. Presenting Jesus Christ as the answer for time and eternity. Sunday morning worship service, 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided. Junior Church activities at same time for K-6 grade. Sunday School Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m. (Transportation available.) Sunday evening praise and worship service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and youth activities at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Everyone is welcome,PLACESTOWORSHIP Did you know that studies have shown that raccoons are able to remember the solution to tasks for up to three years after they learned them? Although some folks may consider these “little bandits” a pest, raccoons are extremely intelligent animals. The name raccoon basically means “the one who rubs, scrubs and scratches with its hands.” The creature is unique in many ways. They have very dexterous front paws and a facial mask. The “mask” appears as an area of black fur around the eyes, which contrasts with the surrounding white face. For the most part, raccoons are nocturnal critters. They are the largest of the procyonid family, having a body length of from 16 to 28 inches and weight of 8 to 20 pounds. Raccoons are omnivores, meaning they eat plants and animals. Their diet consists of about 40 percent invertebrates, 33 percent plant foods and 27 percent vertebrates.These cute critters sample their food and other objects with their front paws to examine it and remove any unwanted parts. They will also “douse” objects into nearby water before consuming them. These creatures originally favored mixed forests in all North America. With changes in the landscapes, development and agriculture, they have learned to adapt to just about any type of environment. Raccoons are very unique in their abilities regarding movement. They can stand on their hind legs to examine objects with their front paws. The sense of touch is the most important asset to the creature.Their paws, which resemble little hands, bring food to the mouth and hold it while they eat. Raccoons have been known to open jars, locks, car latches and many other man-made closing devices including garbage can lids. The “hyper sensitive” front paws are covered with a thin protective layer, which becomes pliable when wet. The five digits on the forepaws have no webbing between them. The raccoon’s brain is specialized with almost two thirds of the cerebral cortex devoted to the interpretation of touch. In fact, by using specialized hairs near their claws that are similar to whiskers, they can identify objects before actually touching them with their little hands. It is said that raccoons are color blind, though their eyes are welladapted for sensing green light. They see very well at night but have poor long distance vision. They also have an excellent sense of smell. Raccoons are very curious, inquisitive creatures and will seldom pass up an opportunity to investigate nearby smells. Their top speed when running is about 10 to 15 miles per hour. They are good swimmers and have been known to remain in the water for hours at a time. They can move about three miles per hour while swimming. For its size, the raccoon can perform a feat that most mammals cannot. It has the ability to climb down a tree headfirst by rotating its hind feet so they are pointing backwards. Raccoons have a dual cooling system to regulate their temperature, which means they are able to sweat and pant for heat dissipation. Raccoons do not construct their own den sites but rely on natural processes or the work of other animals. They usually den in hollow trees, rock crevices and ground dens. Active den trees are identified by claw marks or worn bark. These dens include abandoned buildings, car bodies, wood or brush piles, hay stacks, rock crevices and abandoned dens of other animals. Adult males are generally solitary animals; however the females form family groups and are very social.They will feed and den together. Females give birth to an average litter of three or four babies each spring. Babies stay with their mothers for up to a year. The male has a range of about a mile in diameter, while the females and their young utilize smaller territories. Due to its adaptability, the raccoon has been able to utilize urban areas as a habitat.This has caused problems for some folks that have found trash cans constantly overturned and the contents strewn across their lawns. These incidents are unfortunate and can be quite irritating; however, raccoons are simply trying to survive in a world where their natural habitat is shrinking daily. They are amazingly intelligent animals and contribute to the diversity and balance of nature.Fun raccoon factsPopulation densities of raccoons in urban areas can be 20 times higher than for raccoons in rural environments. There may be as many as 8,000 raccoons living in large cities. Raccoons have a large array of vocalizations. They purr, whistle, growl, hiss, scream and even whinny. Raccoons have been kept as pets (President Coolidge and his wife had one named Rebecca), and while young, seem happy to be in human company. As they mature, especially during mating season, they can become increasingly destructive and aggressive. Raccoons never den more than 1,200 feet from a permanent water source. Araccoon’s hands are so nimble they can unlace a shoe, unlatch a cage and deftly retrieve coins as thin as dimes from your shirt pocket. Raccoons will over-eat when nursing. Raccoons can easily unlock doors. Ababy raccoon’s eyes do not open until about three weeks. Raccoons are very clean and use a common latrine in the wild. Corine Burgess is the Natural Resources Specialist for the Highlands County Natural Resources Department assisting the Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District Natures little bandit: the intelligent, adaptable raccoon News From The Watershed Corine Burgess Courtesy photo R a c c o o n s s c a n n s t a n d d o n n t h e i r h i n d d l e g s a n d d e x a m i n e o b j e c t s s w i t h h t h e i r r f r o n t p a w s .

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011Page 9B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the Redeemer .Service time is 9:30 with Holy Communion. Coffee hour following services. Newcomers welcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail redeemer1895@aol.com Web site: redeemeravon.com The church is at 839 Howe's Way,Avon Park (two miles north of Sun 'N Lake Boulevard, across from Wells Dodge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday Services: Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek service on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always welcome. The Rev. Jim Kurtz, rector. Church office 3857649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL33852. Phone: 4650051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Nelson, Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday evening: Holy Communion with Healing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child care available at the 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come see what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 Thunderbird Road, (863) 8350869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday services at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid City" Children's Ministry throughout all services, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married couples, "prime-timers," and Bible studies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day Care, Preschool and After-School Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For registration call: 385-3111). Check us out on the Web at www.sebringgrace.org INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration Ministries, (non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533771. Sunday service: Sunday School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church (ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen, Deacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, third and fifth Sunday each month, and Rev. Jefferson Cox on the second and fourth Sunday of each month. Jim Helwig, organist/choir director. Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee hour on the first and third Sunday of each month. Council meeting on the first Monday of month; Ladies Group WELCAmeets at noon second Monday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable Garden Club meets as needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden open seven days a week to congretation and community. Like to sing? Come join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park LCMS, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or see christlutheranavonpark.org Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Closet, 385-2782. Gary Kindle, Pastor. Faith Child Development Center, 382-3232. Kathy Pontious, director. Preschool/VPK/Extended Day Care. Summer Worship services: 9:30 a.m. Sunday; Bible class is 8:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Worship service is broadcast live on WITS 1340 AM. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Sunday service at 9:30 a.m. Sunday school will resume in the fall. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots PreSchool director; and Noel Johnson, minister of youth and family life. Worship schedule after Easter through December: Worship service 10 a.m., and Education Hour, 8:45 a.m. Worship schedule for January through Easter: Worship service, 8:30 and 11 a.m., Education Hour 9:45 a.m. Traditional Service with Holy Communion each first and third Sunday. Non-Traditional Service each second, fourth and fifth Sunday. Seasonal mid-week services Wednesday evenings during Lent and Advent. Call church office for additional Worship times and special holiday services. Other activities and groups include: Choirs; Ladies Guild and LWML; Men's Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies as scheduled; Trinity Tots Pre-school, Youth Group activities (call for meetingtimes and dates). Visit us online at: www.Trinitylutheranlp.com NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and children's church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com. Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www. ctmforme.com Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Children's & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry. www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kid's World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. The Lord's Sentinel Fellowship Church 148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid (at Lake Placid Christian School), Pastor Juanita Folsom. Sunday morning service, 10:30 a.m.; Monday, Sentinel School of Theology, 7 p.m.; Church service, Tuesday, 7 p.m. More information at www.juanitafolsom ministries.com. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 8:45 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. in the Millennium Church. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer a Saturday service at 6 p.m. with Pastor Tiger Gullett in the Millennium Church. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org All teachings are taken from the Manufacturer's Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Children's Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. TheWay is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of God's Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and children's church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com Web site: www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:30-7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net ; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Women's Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; MondayFriday, Summer Day Camp (youth ages 11-14) 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. excluding holidays; Tuesday: Grief Support Group, 3 p.m., adult classroom; Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m., adult classroom. Nursery available during worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com, 118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 9-10 a.m. in the sanctuary; contemporary worship is from 11 a.m. to noon. Sunday school classes for adults and children will be 10:10-10:50 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Children's Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail, springlakepc@embarqmail.com, Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com, Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL33870. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays with Rick Heilig, youth director. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avon Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R. James Weiss, Pastor, Sunday School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Prayer Shawl Ministry on the second and fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m. for women who love God and crocheting. Visit us at our church Web site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodist Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pastor. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral assistant. Sunday schedule: Heritage Worship Service, 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worship service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m. Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m. (October-May only). We offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth programs, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship. We are a congregation that want to know Christ and make Him known. Call the church office at 465-2422 or check out our church Web site at www.memorialumc.com St. John United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL33872. The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all services. Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodist Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church office phone: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church of Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, FL 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 27 and Hammock Road). Sunday worship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion with worship first Sunday of month; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. all other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For more information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@earth link.net or check theWeb site sebringemmanuelucc.com. No matter who you are or where you are on life's journey, you're welcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP HARDCOVER FICTION 1. "ADance With Dragons" by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 2. "Full Black" by Brad Thor (Atria) 3. "The Ideal Man" by Julie Garwood (Dutton Adult) 4. "Cold Vengeance" by Lincoln Child and Douglas Preston (Grand Central Publishing) 5. "Ghost Story" by Jim Butcher (Roc) 6. "Victory and Honor" by W.E.B. Griffin and William E. Butterworth IV (Putnam Adult) 7. "Star Wars: Fate of the Jedi: Ascension" by Christie Golden (Del Ray/Lucas Books) 8. "Portrait of a Spy" by Daniel Silva (Harper) 9. "The Magician King: A Novel" by Lev Grossman (Viking) 10. "The Help" by Kathryn Stockett (Putnam/Amy Einhorn) 11. "Retribution" by Sherrilyn Kenyon (St. Martin's Press) 12. "Smokin'Seventeen" by Janet Evanovich (Bantam) 13. "Now You See Her" by James Patterson, Michael Ledwidge (Little, Brown) 14. "State of Wonder" by Ann Patchett (Harper) 15. "Happy Birthday: A Novel" by Danielle Steel (Delacorte Press) HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. "AStolen Life" by Jaycee Dugard (Simon & Schuster) 2. "Unbroken: AWorld War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption" by Laura Hillenbrand (Random House) 3. "The 17 Day Diet: A Doctor's Plan Design for Rapid Results" by Dr. Mike Moreno (Free Press) 4. "Go the F--k to Sleep" by Adam Mansbach and Illustrations by Ricardo Cortes (Avon) 5. "Prime Time: Love, Health, Sex, Fitness, Friendship, Spirit--Making the Most of All of Your Life" by Jane Fonda (Random House) 6. "1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created" by Charles C. Mann (Knopf) 7. "In the Garden of Beasts" by Erik Larson (Crown) 8. "After America: Get Ready for Armageddon" by Mark Steyn (Regency) 9. "The Dukan Diet" by Pierre Dukan (Crown Archetype) 10. "The Greater Journey" by David McCullough (Simon & Schuster) 11. "Bossypants" by Tina Fey (Reagan Arthur) 12. "SEALTeam Six" by Howard E. Wasdin and Stephen Templin (St. Martin's Press) 13. "Through My Eyes" by Tim Tebow with Nathan Whitaker (Harper) 14. "The 4-Hour Body: An Uncommon guide to Rapid Fat-Loss, Incredible Sex, and Becoming Superhuman" by Timothy Ferriss (Crown) 15. "Of Thee I Zing" by Laura Ingraham with Raymond Arroyo (Threshold) MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS 1. "The Confession: A Novel" by John Grisham (Dell) 2. "Private" by James Patterson & Maxine Paetro (Vision) 3. "AGame of Thrones" by George R.R. Martin (Spectra) 4. "Born to Die" by Lisa Jackson (Zebra) 5. "AClash of Kings" by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 6. "AStorm of Swords" by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 7. "Midnight Sins" by Lora Leigh (St. Martin's Paperbacks) 8. "The Glass Rainbow: ADave Robicheaux Novel" by James Lee Burke (Pocket Star) 9. "Secrets of Bella Terra: AScarlet Deception Novel" by Christina Dodd (Signet) 10. "Out of the Rain" by Debbie Macomber (Mira) 11. "Treachery in Death" by J.D. Robb (Berkley) 12. "AFeast for Crows" by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 13. "Hell's Corner" by David Baldacci (Vision) 14. "Dark Watch" byClive Cussler and Jack Du Brul (Berkley) 15. "The Templar Salvation" by Raymond Khoury (Signet) TRADE PAPERBACKS 1. "The Help" by Kathryn Stockett (Putnam Adult) 2. "Heaven is for Real: A Little Boy's Astounding Story of His Trip to Heaven and Back" by Todd Burpo, Sonja Burpo, Colton Burpo and Lynn Vincent (Thomas Nelson) 3. "Safe Haven" by Nicholas Sparks (Grand Central Publishing) 4. "One Day" by David Nicholls (Vintage) 5. "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" by Rebecca Skloot (Broadway) 6. "Sarah's Key" by Tatiana de Rosnay (St. Martin's Griffin) 7. "Outliers: The Story of Success" by Malcolm Gladwell (LB/Back Bay) 8. "Cutting for Stone" by Abraham Verghese (Vintage) 9. "The Glass Castle: A Memoir" by Jeannette Walls (Scribner) 10. "Room" by Emma Donoghue (LB/Back Bay) 11. "The Original Argument: The Federalists'Case for the Constitution, Adapted for the 21st Century" by Glenn Beck (Threshold Editions) 12. "Water for Elephants: ANovel" by Sara Gruen (Algonquin) 13. "The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America" by Erik Larson (Vintage) 14. "The Art of Racing in the Rain" by Garth Stein (Harper) 15. "1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus" by Charles C. Mann (vintage) BOOKS Publishers Weekly Best Sellers

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Special to the News-Sun AVON PARK — Heart of Highland Sweet Adelines Show Chorus recently awarded a $1,000 scholarship Award to Jasmine Santiago, a recent graduate of Sebring High School. Jasmine was in Sebring High School’s Varsity Choir and received two awards: one for solo and one for a duet at state competition. Jasmine also volunteered at Highlands Little Theatre for musical plays. She will attend South Florida Community College in Avon Park to pursue an registered nurse degree. Heart of Highland Sweet Adelines Show Chorus has two yearly scholarship fundraisers: a fashion show and luncheon in the fall, to be held this year on Nov. 12 at the Kenilworth Lodge’s Plantation Room, and their annual show in February, which will be held Feb. 25, 2012, at Union Congregational Millennium Center in Avon Park. If you love to sing and want to learn all about barbershop harmony, visit the chorus on a Thursday, 7 p.m., at the Avon Park Rotary, 20 S. Verona St. For more information, call 452-1927 or 699-0743. Page 10BNews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011www.newssun.com Church Page; 5.542"; 7.1"; Black; church page dummy; 0 0 0 0 4 0 6 9 CHAPMAN, CATALINA; 3.639"; 6"; Black; 45th anniversary; 0 0 0 1 1 4 3 1 CHALKTALK Special to the News-SunAVON PARK – Gail Johnson, vice president of Heart of Highland Sweet Adelines Show Chorus presented a $1,000 scholarship award to Sharleen Focant. Sharleen recently graduated from Sebring High School. She plans on attending South Florida Community College in Avon Park in the fall majoring in Pre-Med. She plays the piano beautifully and sings in her church choir. She will continue her studies of piano and voice. Heart of Highland Sweet Adelines has two yearly scholarship fundraisers: a fashion show and luncheon in the fall, to be held this year on Nov. 12 at the Kenilworth Lodge’s Plantation Room, and their annual show in February, which will be held Feb. 25, 2012, at Union Congregational Millennium Center in Avon Park. If you love to sing and want to learn all about barbershop harmony, visit the chorus on a Thursday, 7 p.m., at the Avon Park Rotary, 20 S. Verona St. For more information, call 452-1927 or 699-0743. Focant receives scholarship from Sweet Adelines Courtesy photo Heart of Highland Sweet Adelines Show Chorus vice president Gail Johnson (left) presents $1,000 scholarship to Sharleen Focant, a recent graduate of Sebring High School. Highland Show Chorus presents scholarship to Sebrings Santiago Courtesy photo Heart of Highland Sweet Adelines Show Chorus vice president Gail Johnson (from left) presents a $1,000 scholarship to Jasmine Santiago, a recent graduate of Sebring High School, with the assistance of Chorus president Ida DiStefano. The Panther Network is made possible by the combined efforts of Comcast Cablevision and South Florida Community College and may be viewed exclusively on Comcast Cable Channel 6. Wednesday2-2:30 p.m. Building our Strengths through Languages 2:30-3 p.m. Untold Stories: Sanibel After the Ferry 3-3:30 p.m. 03. Raising Money Savy Kid 3:30-4 p.m. 22. Wind Dust And Deserts .repaired 4-4:30 p.m. Arts in Every Classroom: 1. What is Art 4:30-5 p.m. Arts in Every Classroom: 1. What is Art cont. Thursday2-2:30 p.m. 01. Becoming an Educated Investor 2:30-3 p.m. 02. The Global Marketplace 3-3:30 p.m. 04. Corporate Ethics 3:30-4 p.m. Career Day 4 Robotics 4-4:30 p.m. 1 Stranges in their own Land 4:30-5 p.m. 1 Stranges in their own Land cont. Visit our Web site at: www.southflorida.edu Panther Network Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID – South Florida Community College’s Community Education Department is offering a variety of classes this fall at the SFCC Lake Placid Center. The Cardio-Fitness class consists of aerobic and floor exercises. The class is held from 8-9 a.m. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Pilates and Stretch Combo class consists of a 30-minute Pilates workout and 30 minutes of stretching and exercises. The class meets 9-10 a.m. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Interval Training targets toning and flexible fitness. The class consists of a 20minute aerobic workout, a 20-minute step workout and a 20-minute weight training workout. The class is held from 4:30-5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday. The Pilates and Muscle Movement class consists of an aerobic workout, step workout, interval training, and Pilates. Class is held from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday. The Cardio-Fitness, Pilates and Stretch Combo, Interval Training, and Pilates and Muscle Movement classes run on a continuing monthly basis, and these sessions will be held Sept. 1-30. These classes are taught by Kathy Rouse and offer a high intensity, low-impact aerobic workout with a cardiovascular workout at a controlled level. All classes include the use of stability bars, resistance bands, hand weights, balls, gliders, heavy hoops, and mats. The registration fee for a fourweek morning or afternoon session is $35.40. Tai Chi is a high intensity strengthening and stretching exercise that has been used by the Chinese for hundreds of years. It is designed to strengthen your body and improve flexibility and balance. The class meets with instructor Karin Grunden from 8-9 a.m. and 9-10 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, Aug. 23-Oct. 13. The cost is $47.20. The SFCC Lake Placid Center is also offering clogging classes with instructo r Patricia Kules on Mondays, Sept. 12Oct. 31. Beginning Clogging meets 6:30-7:30 p.m., and Intermediate Clogging meets 5:30-6:30 p.m. The cost is $38. To register or for more information on Community Education classes offered a t the SFCC Lake Placid Center, call 465-3003 o r 465-5300, ext. 7082. SFCC Lake Placid Center offers fall community ed classes Associated PressBOISE, Idaho — Asubcommittee of the Idaho State Board of Education has voted in favor of requiring high school students to complete two online courses before they can graduate. The recommendation from the subcommittee now goes before the full board. The Spokesman-Review reports that the subcommittee approved the new rule on a 6-2 vote — despite overwhelming opposition from stakeholders who testified at seven public hearings around the state. Only eight of the 76 people who testified at the hearings or submitted written comments supported the new rule.Omaha 8th grade teacher in fight flap could lose jobOMAHA, Neb. — A39year-old Omaha teacher accused of taking two eighth-grade students outside a school building to settle their differences with a fight could lose his job. District spokeswoman Luanne Nelson says the administration is recommending that Patrick Kocsis be dismissed. The issue could be decided by the school board at its nex t meeting, Sept. 7. Kocsis faces two counts of misdemeanor child neglect. Idaho Ed Board committee Oks online classes The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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Breakfasts and lunches being served in the Highlands County School District for the upcoming week of Aug. 29-Sept. 2 include: HIGH SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast „ Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch „ Penne pasta, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, tacos, taco toppers, salsa, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked french fries, orange glazed carrots, cheddar cheese stick, tossed salad, applesauce snacking cake, diced pears, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast „ Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, applesauce, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch „ Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, Presidents Smart cookie, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast „ Breakfast pizza, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch „ Turkey enchiladas, tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, grilled chicken sandwich, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, green peas, black beans, strawberry cup, dried blueberries, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast „ Breakfast burrito, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch „ Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, broccoli, potato wedges, Colby Jack cheese stick, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Breakfast „ Maple waffle stick, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch „ Chicken tenders, dinner roll, tacos, taco toppers, salsa, burger, cheeseburger, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked french fries, corn, carrots and dip, tossed salad, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. ACADEMY SCHOOLS Monday Lunch„ Penne pasta, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, corn cobbettes, tossed salad, glazed berries and cherries, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Lunch „ Baked chicken, dinner roll, mashed potatoes, green beans, Presidents Smart cookie, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Lunch „ Turkey enchiladas, salsa, yellow rice, baked buffalo chips, black beans, dried blueberries, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Lunch „ Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, broccoli, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Lunch „ Cheeseburger, dill stack, Sun Chips, carrots and dip, peach cup, chocolate chip cookie, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. MIDDLE SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast „ Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch „ Penne pasta, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, tacos, taco toppers, salsa, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad, orange glazed carrots, cheddar cheese stick, tossed salad, applesauce snacking cake, diced pears, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast „ Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, applesauce, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch „ Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, Presidents Smart cookie, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast „ Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Breakfast pizza, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch „ Turkey enchiladas, tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, grilled chicken sandwich, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, green peas, black beans, strawberry cup, dried blueberries, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast „ Breakfast burrito, salsa, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch „ Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, broccoli, potato wedges, Colby Jack cheese stick, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Breakfast „ Maple waffle stick, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted juice, assorted fresh fruit, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch „ Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, burger, cheeseburger, chicken tenders, dinner roll, tacos, taco toppers, salsa, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, chef salad meal, PBJ sandwich meal, carrots and dip, corn, tossed salad, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast „ Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Cinnamon Toast Crisp, string cheese, orange juice, chocolate milk. Lunch „ Homestyle turkey roast, dinner roll, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, turkey chef salad, mashed potatoes, brown gravy, green beans, apple crisp, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast „ Breakfast burrito, salsa, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, applesauce, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Blueberry/sausage pancake, strawberry cup, chocolate milk, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, peach cup. Lunch „ Baked chicken, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, scalloped potatoes, corn cobbettes, raisins, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast „ Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, peach cup, chocolate milk, blueberry/sausage pancake, strawberry cup. Lunch „ Beefaroni, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, orange glazed carrots, tossed salad, Presidents Smart cookie, fresh apple slices, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast „ Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Breakfast frittata, orange juice, chocolate milk, Whole Grain PopTarts, apple juice. Lunch „ Cheeseburger, dill stack, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, potato puffs, carrots and dip, glazed berries and cherries, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. FridayBreakfast „ Maple waffle stick, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Whole Grain PopTarts, apple juice, chocolate milk, breakfast frittata, orange juice. Lunch „ Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, mixed vegetables, ice cream sandwich, peach cup, orange juice slushy, fruit juice slushy, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. KINDERGARTEN LEARNING CENTER Monday Lunch „ Homestyle turkey roast, dinner roll, mashed potatoes, brown gravy, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, green beans, apple crisp, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Lunch „ Baked chicken, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, scalloped potatoes, corn cobbettes, raisins, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Lunch „ Beefaroni, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, orange glazed carrots, Presidents Smart cookie, fresh apple slices, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Lunch „ Cheeseburger, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, potato puffs, carrots and dip, glazed berries and cherries, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Lunch „ Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, mixed vegetables, ice cream sandwich, peach cup, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011Page 11B Disney on Ice; 5.542"; 9.5"; Black; trade disney on i c e ; 0 0 0 1 0 9 2 3 STATE FARM; 3.639"; 5"; Black; 08/28/11; 0 0 0 1 1 2 7 4 CROSSWORDSOLUTION SCHOOLMENUS

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Associated PressGIRDWOOD, Alaska — Jennifer Tullis still keeps her husband’s camouflage uniform in the closet, all starched, ironed and folded, even though he died 12 years ago. “He took so much pride in that,” she said, smiling at the memory of her husband, Michael Peterson, a powerlifting Marine from Tooele, Utah, whose nickname was Ogre. “I lost my husband when I was 19 to suicide, which is one of the harder ways because there’s so many stigmas attached to it,” said Tullis, of Valley Center, Calif. Tullis and about 75 other military widows — ranging in age from 21 to 62 — shared memories of their loved ones while hiking rugged wooded trails, canyoneering in the backcountry and rafting the rapids of Alaska’s Crow Creek last weekend. They were participants in the second Alaska Adventure excursion organized by TAPS, the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors. Tullis turned to the group for support when Peterson died, and now gives back as a peer mentor to the growing ranks of military widows and widowers whose spouses or significant others died in combat, from illness, suicide, “every type of loss imaginable,” said TAPS founder and president Bonnie Carroll. “What brings us together and really binds us as a community is their life, and their service and their sacrifice to this nation. “This is about honoring the life, and remembering the love far more than it is about mourning the death,” Carroll said. Tullis simply calls TAPS family. “These people are family because when you go through the loss of a spouse when you’re young, it’s something that no one understands if they haven’t lost their spouse because it’s unnatural. “So other people are going through anniversaries and having babies and buying houses, and you’re grieving,” she said. By KIMBERLYHEFLING Associated PressARLINGTON, Va. — Night after night this summer, troops from the Army’s historic Old Guard have left their immaculately pressed dress blues, white gloves and shiny black boots at home to slip into Arlington National Cemetery in T-shirts and flipflops to photograph each and every grave with an iPhone. The sometimes eerie task to photograph more than 219,000 grave markers and the front of more than 43,000 sets of cremated remains in the columbarium is part of the Army’s effort to account for every grave and to update and fully digitize the cemetery’s maps. The Old Guard performs its work at night to escape the heat and to avoid interrupting funerals. Last year a scandal over mismanagement at the nation’s most hallowed burial ground revealed unmarked and mismarked graves. Congress then mandated that the cemetery account for the graves of the more than 330,000 people interred in the cemetery. Markers may bear more than one name, such as a service member and spouse. The photos taken at night are matched with other records to find discrepancies that need to be fixed, and officials say it’s too early in the process to draw any conclusions. Military officials hope they can eventually use the photos to create an online database for the public. Four million people annually visit the cemetery. The Old Guard troops typically escort remains and fire three-volley salutes at military funerals. When taking photos, they have middle-ofthe-night run-ins with rabbits, foxes and deer in the cemetery, which is situated on the estate where Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee once lived. Using head lamps to light their way, they’ve tripped in shallow holes and brushed aside countless spider webs. They’ve paused at seeing freshly dug graves prepared for the next day’s funerals. One soldier, Spc. Raymond Piron, 22, of Detroit, says he was working one night in an old section of the cemetery when he felt something tap him on the shoulder. He turned around, but he was alone. Before this summer, Spc. Craig Green, 21, of Dover, Del., a broad-shouldered, tough-looking Iraq war veteran, says that when it came to walking cemeteries at night, “you couldn’t pay me to do it.” At least one of the soldiers, Sgt. Yvens Saintil, 26, of Philadelphia, who has done two tours in Iraq, says he has friends buried in the cemetery. He has taken time to find their graves and pay respects, even though his duties didn’t include photographing their graves. “At first I was kind of sad a little bit, but it’s just part of the mission to continue your mission,” Saintil says while standing in the columbarium shortly after sunrise on a recent morning. The mission is called Task Force Christman, in honor of Pvt. William Henry Christman, an Easton, Pa., native and Civil War soldier who was the first soldier buried at Arlington. The troops executing it are from Delta Company of the 1st Battalion of the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, known as the Old Guard — the Army’s official ceremonial unit, which provides escorts to the president and helps put on military funerals. With an average of 27 funerals conducted daily at the cemetery, leaders from the Old Guard decided to slip about 60 troops in each night and send them home before the cemetery opened at 8 a.m. Initially, the men wore basic Army utility uniforms, but they later switched to comfortable civilian clothes after it was determined the photos were of better quality without the light reflected off the patches on their uniforms. The troops have walked Section 60, where loved ones commonly leave whiskey bottles and children’s art at the graves of those killed in Iraq and Afghanistan, and Section 27, where about 1,500 black soldiers from the Civil War were laid to rest. They’ve seen monuments small and large — including one more than 14 feet tall marking President William Howard Taft’s grave. They had to sit on each other’s shoulders to get a good shot. They’ve captured the grave marker of astronauts, combat nurses, Medal of Honor recipients and unnamed infants born to service members. In the early hours on Wednesday, one of the last nights of their three-month mission, the troops were in Section 15, a relatively flat part of the cemetery where two sons of Confederate Lt. Gen. James Longstreet share a tombstone. They needed to re-shoot the photos in the section because the graves there had been numbered in a way that had made their earlier photos difficult to categorize. Sometimes, the men worked in silence as one soldier shown a light on a grave while another squatted to photograph it. Other times they chatted about football, or debated the best flavor of Gatorade. In June 2010, the Army’s inspector general released a scathing report on mismanagement at the cemetery, which prompted the Army to immediately bring in new managers and instigate efforts to rectify the problems. Among other things, the IG said it found 117 gravesites marked as occupied on maps but without a headstone or a burial card. Ninety-four gravesites were marked on the maps as unoccupied, but each had a headstone and a burial card. Some gravesites were not reflected on the burial maps. Criminal investigato rs have been looking into the burial of eight sets of cremated human remains in a single location, improper burial reservations and possible contract fraud. Just last week, the cemetery said that Army criminal investigators had identified a figure skater in a photograph found in the urn with the multiple remains, meaning it could confirm the identity of the remains and notify the family. The troops say they take seriously their role in restoring order to the cemetery. They reported to cemetery managers any problems, such as a few graves with duplicative headstones, so the issues could be resolved. “It’s something that’s important that needs to be done so that family members can come out here and understand where they need to go to find their loved ones,” said Spc. Matthew Caruso, 24, o f Staatsburg, N.Y. “It’s a good feeling, but it can be pretty stressful and it’s a lot of hard work and a lot of walking.” Page 12BNews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011www.newssun.com G&N DEVELOPERS; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 8/14,21,28; 0 0 0 1 0 9 3 6 DR. ROTMAN, DARRIN; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; 08/28/11; 0 0 0 1 1 2 7 7 LIL WIZARDS ACADEMY; 3.639"; 3"; Black; main a, top, 08/28/11; 0 0 0 1 1 2 8 1 Troops photograph every Arlington grave MCT More than 330,000 people are interred at Arlington National Cemetery. Military widows bond at Alaska retreat 863-386-0786 | 3109 MedicalWay, Sebring MELANOMA PREVENTIONDarrinA. Rotman M.D.Looks Harmless... BUT IT KILLSG G E T T Y O U R R S K I N N C H E C K E D !T O D A Y FACT: Oneoutof59 personswillhavea lifethreateningMelanomaAmerican Institute of Dermatology P.A. Serving the community for 13 years We treat all skin conditions.

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DearAbby: I’m an only child. My parents moved three miles from my husband and me after our first daughter was born. They were determined not to miss a minute of her life. Mom’s life has always been centered around Dad, my daughters and me. She has never approved of my husband because he didn’t finish college and enlisted in the military, unlike Dad, who has two master’s degrees and retired from the Navy as a lieutenant commander. She regards my husband as the “sperm donor,” and that’s about all the credit he gets. Mom isn’t happy about anything unless she’s complaining. She resents that we spend part of Dad’s birthday with my husband’s family — never mind that it’s the anniversary of his father’s death. She has tried to discipline my daughters based on their grades, even though we have told her that her job is to “spoil them,” and it’s our job to discipline them. My husband now refuses to set foot in my parents’ home, and I dread the next event that will put them together in the same place. I have asked them to agree to disagree for my sake and my girls, but both feel “justified” in their feelings. I feel as though I must make a choice between the two. Please help. — Torn In Two DearTorn: Since you must make a choice, choose your husband. If you don’t, you stand a good chance of being a divorced mother of two with overbearing parents judging every move you and your daughters make for the foreseeable future. Your parents owe you and your husband an apology for the way they have treated him, and frankly, you need to distance yourself from them until you are strong enough to establish some adult boundaries. DearAbby: I was recently diagnosed with cancer. The support I have received from friends and family has been wonderful. However, I have a challenge. Afriend from work who is a cancer survivor has solicited money from other coworkers on my behalf. I didn’t know she had done it, but if I had, I certainly would not have condoned it. My husband and I are well-off, and my company’s health insurance is adequate for my medical expenses. My friend keeps trying to find ways to spend the collected money on me. Unfortunately, she buys things I neither want nor need. I’m so uncomfortable with this entire situation that I don’t know what to do. How would you handle this? — Embarrassed By The Attention DearEmbarrassed: I’d ask the friend for a list of the names of the people who contributed so I could thank them for their thoughtfulness and generosity. And when I got it, I would NICELYtell her that, while I appreciate her collecting the money, I do not need it and I want it returned to the donors. Then I would write each of the donors a short, personal note explaining the situation and expressing my gratitude. DearAbby: Sometimes my secretary says things like, “I could just kill myself” or, “Just shoot me!” Abby, my son took his life by shooting himself two years ago. She knows what happened because we live in a small town. I don’t know what to say when I hear her utter those phrases, but it feels like someone has reached in and torn a piece of my heart out. Have you any advice for me? — Still Grieving For My Sun DearStill Grieving: Your secretary’s level of insensitivity is astonishing. Since it appears she hasn’t a clue, the next time she says it — and she will — tell her emphatically not to do it again because of the tragedy your family has experienced firsthand involving guns and suicide. If that doesn’t shame her into watching her mouth, nothing will. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. To order How to Write Letters for All Occasions,Ž send a business-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $6 to: Dear Abby „ Letter Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included). www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, August 28, 2011Page 13B FAIRMONT CINEMA; 1.736"; 6"; Black; 8/26/11 p/u; 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 6 5 DIVERSIONS FISHHEADSBy ROBERTA. DOLL ACROSS 1 Building supports 7 Dirty dog 15 Calyx part 20 Sarge, e.g. 21 Drive off 22 Said in an ugly way 23 Constant threat, metaphorically 25 Inscribed pillar 26 Floor square 27 Is deceptive, in a way 28 Nile reptile 30 Russian communications acronym since 1992 31 Vacation area 33 Confederate Memorial Carving site 39 German article 40 Healthy as __ 41 Do goo 42 Pianist who claimed to have invented jazz 50 Yellow fever mosquito 54 Bullfight cry 55 __-de-France 56 Get the better of 58 Watch 59 Controversial orchard spray 60 Comic Carvey 62 "On His Blindness" poet 64 River to the Rhein 65 Places to pick up cats 67 "La Loge" artist 69 Deep-seated 71 Doomed duo 76 Tiberius' villa at Sperlonga included one 78 Current events? 79 Dabbling ducks 82 Hot stuff 83 1951 Lanza role 87 Early '60s Polo Grounds team, nowadays 89 "Dragonwyck" author Seton 90 Island strings 91 Country estate 92 In place of 93 Trojan War counselor 95 Land in old Rome 97 Esso ad phrase 101 Amsterdam street adornment 103 Results 104 "Oz" airer 105 Light dessert 111 Aardwolf's diet 116 Apply in a slapdash way 117 Wood on a diamond? 118 Peek-__ 120 Seed pod 121 Literally, "to God" 123 Source of spy movie suspense 129 Irritating 130 Places for duds 131 Made square 132 Head lock 133 Foolhardy 134 Ones who excite devils? DOWN 1 MIT and others 2 Alamo hero 3 __ Gay: WWII plane 4 Plots that may be developed 5 In style 6 Existed in a suppressed state 7 "Smooth Operator" singer 8 Word with act or action 9 Draw a bead 10 Denebola's constellation 11 Mandela's org. 12 __-Mart Stores, Inc. 13 TV group with B.A. Baracus and Hannibal Smith 14 Bas-relief medium 15 Barbecue sound 16 Authorize 17 St. Peter's Basilica masterpiece 18 Dwight's two-time opponent 19 Get wind (of) 24 '80s Pontiac 29 Curly-tailed dog 32 Poem of everyday life 34 Hardly racy 35 Notable 1969 bride 36 "The world will little note, __ long remember, what we say here": Lincoln 37 Heap praises on 38 Ebb's relative 42 Shaw title saint 43 Cinders of old comics 44 Vaults 45 Lynn from Kentucky 46 Titanic, e.g. 47 Grassy plain 48 Can. province 49 Con opener 51 Hopeful letter opener 52 Rochester's love 53 __ money 57 TCU part: Abbr. 61 S part 62 Botch 63 Plenty mad 64 Up with, with "of" 66 Remained 68 Psych ending 70 Surfing site 72 Almond __: candy 73 Tangy mustard 74 On one's guard 75 Dsseldorf direction 76 Oversupply 77 Croupier's tool 80 City about 200 miles from Marseille 81 Cutty __: Scotch 84 Aardvark's tidbit 85 "Vive le __!" 86 More than suggested 88 Like a 29-Down 91 Shopping venue 92 Hall of Fame catcher Carlton 94 Libido symbol 96 Nikes alternative 98 Something besides the ltr. 99 Nutritional stat 100 Sch. in Athens 102 Writer's deg. 105 Show flexibility 106 Perennial '90s'00s presidential candidate 107 False front 108 One may be present when an envelope is opened 109 Midwest hub 110 Chair designer Charles 112 Anxious 113 Film set contraption 114 Track official 115 They may follow teams 119 Honcho 122 Procedure: Abbr. 124 Cinephile's TV choice 125 Hunky-dory 126 Nothing at all 127 Doctor of music? 128 Stowe girl Solution on page 11B For better than 16 years, my parents have lived in Sebring. We’ve shared many fun times together and have worshiped at the same church. But, they are moving on to a new adventure. It makes me think of the various roles of parent and child over the years. When our children are young, we are in a starring role in their eyes. Parents are their world. As they grow older, we’re in a supportive role. They’re beginning to pull away and test their wings…hanging on while wanting to let go. Abit part follows. It’s not that they don’t love us. The adventure of being on their own awaits and they excitedly pursue it. We’re always loving; but, showing it differently. We’ve been children; become adults and raised our own families. As our parents also age, we provide needed care and guidance. My Dad, 92, no longer drives and my Mom, 89, needs a smaller place to manage. What to do? One passage in Ephesians 6:1, NKJV, seems to touch on our role as younger and older children; and became a source of much prayer for me. “Children, obey your parents in the Lord, for this is right. ‘Honor your father and mother,’which is the first commandment with promise, ‘that it may be well with you and you may live long on the earth.’” In all things, I wanted to honor my parents while still being able to visit our children who all live in different states. But it wasn’t good to leave Mom and Dad for long stretches when we visited. I beseeched the Lord for answers. Gradually, God revealed to me that honoring my parents would look a little differently at this season of life. I would honor them by recognizing their needs and encouraging a wise, proactive decision for their benefit: a smaller place near my brother and his family was clearly the Lord’s provision. By living near my brother, they’ll be able to interact with grandchildren and a great-grandson, too. God quieted my own heart by revealing to me that this was a new way in which I would honor my father and mother…showing them love that embraced them while letting go. I trusted him to quiet their hearts as well. He did and they are now ready for their new adventure. Growing up and leaving home doesn’t just happen to young children. It continues throughout our lives. And it’s all good as long as love is the covering. Selah. Jan Merop of Sebring is a News-Sun correspondent. Showing love in all seasons of life Metro ServicesAries (March 21-April 20) –Aries, it can be difficult to accept help, but help is what you need right now. Accept it with open arms and get to the task at hand. Time for buckling down is near. Taurus (April 21-May 21) –Taurus, it’s alright to be cautious with your decisions, but taking much too long could indicate you’re not ready for a change. Soon a spouse or partner will grow weary. Gemini (May 22-June 21) – Gemini, new beginnings have arrived and you’re excited about these new prospects. Others may share your joy and anticipation but not to the extent that you do. Cancer(June 22-July 22) – You’re in over your head, Cancer. Too many projects and not enough helpers can you leave you feeling overwhelmed. You may want to tackle one thing at a time. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) – Leo, there’s not much to be done about a current situation. Complaining about things won’t solve anything, so why waste the breath? Better news is coming. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) – Start thinking about curbing your spending, Virgo. Your finances are in trouble if you don’t make some changes. More is going out than is coming into your accounts. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) – Libra, it’s hard to keep friends if you are overly critical of the way they live their lives. Remember, no one is perfect — including you. Keep an open mind at all times. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) –Scorpio, it seems as if drama is always following you. That’s because you tend to be the life of the party or prefer all eyes be on you. Sagittarius (Nov. 23Dec. 21) –Sagittarius, you may feel like you’re the only one keeping the ship from sinking. However, this is not the case. Behind-thescenes work is taking place, also. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) –Trust your instincts, Capricorn. Someone who seems like they have your best interests at heart really may have ulterior motives. Heed Capricorn’s sage advice. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) – Aquarius, a good night is in store this week. The night brings rewards you did not expect. Working hard yields more than financial success, offering personal satisfaction as well. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) –Patience is a virtue, Pisces. The best will be in store for you later in the week. There’s not much adventure until then. Famous birthdaysAug. 29: Leah Michele, Actress, 25; Aug. 30: Lisa Ling, Actress, 38; Aug. 31: Richard Gere, Actor, 62; Sept. 1: Gloria Estefan, Singer, 54; Sept. 2: Lennox Lewis, Prizefighter, 46; Sept. 3: Charlie Sheen, Actor, 46; Sept. 4: Beyonce, Singer, 30. Think about curbing your spending, Virgo Wife in middle of family feud faces painful choice Pause And Consider Jan Merop Dear Abby Snapshots GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCEƒ

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LIVING 14B PAGE News-Sun Sunday, August 28, 2011 Symbolism AboundsThe Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is situated along the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C., among the famous cherry trees — a gift from Japan as a sign of peace and unity. Each spring, the season of hope and rebirth, the trees bloom with delicate pink and white flowers for two weeks, often coinciding with the anniversary of King’s assassination, April 4. During the summer and early fall, blooms from newly planted crepe myrtles will offer a colorful display and sense of enduring faith. The symbolism doesn't stop with the trees. The memorial’s address, 1964 Independence Ave., is a reference to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The site also creates a visual “line of leadership” from the Lincoln Memorial, where King gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech in 1963, to the memorial honoring Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence. The memorial’s sculpture also plays a symbolic role, inspired by this line in King’s “Dream” speech: “With this faith, we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope.” Visitors enter the site through a split boulder ( the“mountain of despair”) to find a solitary stone (the “stone of hope”) from which King’s image emerges. There also is a 450-foot long, crescent-shaped granite inscription wall containing 14 of King’s most notable quotes on justice, democracy, hope and love.Celebrity SupportThe entertainment community’s support for King didn't end with his death in 1968. Entertainers have come out in droves, donating their time and resources to help promote the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial. This "Dream Team" includes celebrities such as Muhammad Ali, Maya Angelou, Chris Brown, Laurence Fishburne, Harrison Ford, George Foreman, Whoopi Goldberg, Dustin Hoffman, Peter Max, Al Roker, Martin Sheen and Dionne Warwick. The group held a series of “Dream Dinners,” as well as a “Dream Concert” at Radio City Music Hall, to raise funds for the memorial. — MCTSOURCE: WWW.MLKMEMORIAL.ORG uring the turbulent decade of the 1960s, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was about the gleam — in the eyes, that is. He was about the cadence in his speech intonations — a rapper of social consciousness before Kurtis Blow, before Public Enemy, before Queen Latifah, that is. He was about “The Dream” — the iconic speech at the Lincoln Memorial on that sweltering afternoon of Aug. 28, 1963, that is. He was about the rhythm of the civil rights movement — played to the spirit of Motown and the serenity of Burt Bacharach, that is. King was about star power. That means he knew how to captivate an audience in the palm of his hand on a hot, humid day when most Americans would rather just abandon the city for the beach. In other words, King was a minister by trade, an entertainer by necessity. And he garnered assistance from the best. Harry Belafonte was in his corner; so were Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr., Charlton Heston, Gregory Peck, Lena Horne, Leonard Bernstein, James Baldwin. And that was before it was even cool to be associated with the movement. Yes, we’re talking serious star power of the transcendent ’60s. “When an artist showed up of the caliber of a Burt Lancaster or Marlon Brando,’’actor-singer Belafonte recalled during “King,” a documentary hosted by former NBC News anchorman Tom Brokaw for the History Channel (now available on DVD), “people paid attention, and if they were anointing you with their approval, then that carried us a long way.” Clayborne Carson is the founder and director of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Research and Education Institute at Stanford University. He also is editor of the “MLK Papers Project,” which Coretta Scott King entrusted him with before her death. Contacted at Stanford, he explained that the celebrity/entertainment factor “added money to the movement; it provided access to a wider audience.” Carson, who helped design the layout of the King Memorial on the four-acre site in Washington D.C., then poignantly noted the historical significance: “(President John F.) Kennedy and King were the first figures to tap into the Hollywood industry during the Cold War era. They both recognized the importance of it.” King became the face — and voice — of the civil rights movement in this country as an idealistic minister at age 26 in 1955; he spearheaded the fight against the taut chains of customized segregation in the South; he implemented the principles of non-violence and civil disobedience gleaned from India’s Mohatma Gandhi for his own revolutionary U.S. movement; he, ultimately, stood tall as an erudite moral arbiter of our nation — and the greatest orator of our time. Except, before most of those majestic accolades, then-25-year-old Coretta Scott thought he was too short. Before a “star was born,” Coretta initially wasn’t impressed with a young, 5-foot-6 King, but they eventually married in 1953. Now, King has a holiday every third Monday in January and a memorial bearing his name on the National Mall, located near the President Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial, and not far from the Lincoln Memorial, which exhibits a subtle inscription identifying where King stood 22 steps up in ’63. Says former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice in the “King” documentary: “This country was born with a huge birth defect — slavery. It really was not until the ’60s that America finally lived up to the principles on which it had been founded.” King spoke in reverence in 1963: “I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: We hold these truths to be self-evident — that all men are created equal. ... “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. ... ” It was a “Dream” sermon, but it arguably wasn’t his best speech. During the ’60s, Belafonte used his fame to start what was loosely called the “New York delegation.” It was his job to make sure the stars came out. The “delegation” was a collection of entertainers and public figures who met at Belafonte’s New York home and gathered to support King’s cause. Bernstein, the legendary conductor-composer, was a “member”; so was world-renowned author Baldwin. “It was my task to make sure that I had a strong celebrity core,’’Belafonte explained in “King,” “that I had a lot of artists to bring validation to the table. King understood the great value in that.” Legendary singer Sinatra, for one, staged fund raisers for King; regal actor Peck marched with King during several demonstrations; actors Belafonte, Heston and Sidney Poitier attended the March on Washington, as did singer-actress Horne; folk-music trio Peter, Paul and Mary sang at the March, and King wrote Davis a famous letter, thanking him for his support of the civil rights movement and acknowledging the integral power of entertainment. The letter, in part, stated, “Art can move and alter people in subtle ways because, like love, it speaks through and to the heart ...” When black actress Nichelle Nichols — also known as Lieutenant Uhura on television — was considering resigning from her TVrole on “Star Trek,” King, himself a “trekkie,” implored her to stay: “Don’t you realize you have the first nonstereotypical role on television. Don’t you realize that not only for our own little black children but for people who don’t look like us, for the first time they will see us as equals,” according to Jet magazine. King gave his last public speech on April 3, 1968, in Memphis, Tenn. Wesensed both an eerie fatalism and a futuristic promise in what was his seminal “Mountain Top” speech. In excerpt, King said that night: “ ... Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. “But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will. And He’s allowed me to go up to the Mountain. And I’ve looked over. And I’ve seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the Promised Land! “And so I’m happy tonight. “I’m not worried about anything. “I’m not fearing any man! “Mine eyes have seen the glory of the comin g of the Lord!!” The next night, April 4, 1968, King was struck by an assassin’s bullet in Memphis. Has King’s legacy remained relevant the past 50 years or has it been rendered dormant, like a volcano? As Bono, lead singer of the rock band U2, wondered during the “King” documentary: “Is he a historical figure or is he, in fact, a very present challenge to our way of seeing the world, because inequality and injustice are more pervasive now than they’ve ever been” As Bono suggests, legacies are open to interpretation. But one aspect of King’s persona is finite, that is to say, in his own words, “The time is always right to do the right thing ...” And “only in the darkness can you see the stars.” Nichelle Nichols NATIONALARCHIVESSidney Poitier, Harry Belafonte and Charlton Heston stand at the Lincoln Memorial at the March on Washington on Aug. 28, 1963. MLK MEMORIALDr. Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial Opens: Today Location: National Mall, Washington, D.C. The memorial is located across the Tidal Basin from the Jefferson Memorial. Online: www.mlkmemorial.org"Mountain of despair," memorial entry "Stone of hope," memorial plaza "Inscription wall" Martin Luther King, Jr. By Gregory Clay | McClatchy-Tribune News ServiceIMAGES COURTESYOF MLK MEMORIA L