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The news-sun
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01063
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 07-03-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:01063
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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NEWS-SUN Highlands County’s Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, July 3, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 78 | 75 cents www.newssun .com HighLow 94 73Complete Forecast PAGE 12A Some more afternoon rain showers around Forecast Question: Will you buy fireworks for this Fourth of July? Next question: Have you watched the Casey Anthony trial on television? www.newssun .com Make your voice heard at Online Obituaries Mary L. Stewart Age 74, of Lake Placid Obituaries, Page 5A Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453Online: www.newssun.com Yes 11.8% No 88.2% 099099401007 Total votes: 93 Arts & Entertainment6B Books9B Business7A Classifieds9A Community Briefs2A Community Calendar5B Crossword Puzzle11B Dear Abby11B Editorial & Opinion4A Horoscope11B Lottery Numbers2A Movies10B News From The Watershed8B Pause and Consider11B Police Blotter2A Sports On TV2B Index HEARTLAND NATIONAL BANK***; 11.25"; 1.5"; Black plus three; process, front strip; 0 0 0 0 9 9 2 1 No matter where you're watching the show, you'll want to fully enjoy your fireworks viewing this Fourth of July. To help make the most of those "oohs" and "ahhs," we've compiled a few tips that could spell the difference between your night being a blast or a dud 10WAYS TO PUT A BANG IN YOUR FIREWORKS SHOW1Say, can you see?: Aclose, clear vantage point is essential. And remember, trees grow, so the higher up the better. 2Squatter’s rights: Like unclaimed land in an infant nation, the best spots go fast. Find your place long before the sun goes down.3Stars and stripes forever: Along wait could be the price you pay for staking out that perfect spot. Declare your independence from boredom by passing the time with a Frisbee or a good book, or by playfully hiding stuff from the guy in the spot you really wanted.4Blanket policy: Let the interlopers know “my space” is more than just a website. Spread out an old blanket or two to buy yourself a buffer zone. This is your best defense to ward off late-comers. (And if you are the latecomer, no, you can’t put your blanket on ours.)5 Sit down forthis: While blankets can help protect your turf, you don’t want to actually sit on them. Go for real creature comfort and break out the camp chairs — with cup holders!6 Beverage leverage: If bringing your own drinks, particularly of the adult variety, be mindful of local ordinances. Those aren’t margaritas in the Gatorade bottles, are they?7Twilight’s last gleaming: The fireworks will light up the night, but they won’t help you find that bottle opener or your wandering 2-year-old. Flashlights are essential for keeping track of your stuff. Or just drape everything in glow-stick necklaces, including the kids.8Music to youryears: If you bring the radio, be courteous to those around you. Lady Gaga is not considered patriotic music.9Amended articles: Snacks, cameras, bug spray, a light jacket and even an umbrella could all come in handy. But if you can’t fit it in a backpack or sling it over your shoulder, don’t bring it. You’re sitting outside for a few hours, not crossing the Delaware.10 Exit strategy: Be it screaming child, barking dog or just the end of the show, you’ll have to get out of there somehow. Don’t sit so close that you can’t easily escape the fleeing hordes. You’d like to get home sometime before the dawn’s early light. Fourth full of fun By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comAvon Park, Lake Placid and Sebring each have activities planned to celebrate the nation’s 235th birthday, including the Fourth of July favorite — fireworks. Sebring’s firework display is the first up in the lineup. The show over Lake Jackson will begin at 9 p.m. tonight. The fireworks will be shot from a barge on the lake. Also in Sebring, the annual Patriotic Revue will take place at Highlands Little Theatre. The scholarship committee will put on 35-minute shows every hour on the hour beginning Monday at 11 a.m. The final show is scheduled for 3 p.m. Admission is free for the production. Six cast members will take the stage and entertain audiences with hymns, song and dance all dedicated to America. “We have had a full house for the last two or three years and we can seat 200,” said HLTexecutive director, Vanessa Logsdon. Veterans are invited to attend in uniforms and will be seated as Independence Day festivities lined up By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING — Public school accountability grades were released Thursday afternoon. The grades are primarily based on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test, the state’s standardized assessment in reading, math, writing and science, but at the school level are a part of the federal No Child Left Behind program. The FCATwas made more rigorous this year, with the writing section requiring a higher score to pass and the reading section having more difficult material. The results for Highlands County are mixed, but positive overall. The overall district grade improved from a “C” last year to a “B.” Three schools — Sebring and HillGustat middle schools and Lake Placid Elementary School — each earned an “A” grade. Four schools improved their grade from the 2009-10 school year — Fred Wild, Park and Sun ’N Lake elementary schools, and Lake Placid Middle School. Fred Wild went from a “C” to a “B”; Sun ’N Lake from a “C” to an “A”; Park Elementary from a “B” to an “A”; and Lake Placid Middle from a “C” to a “B”. Three schools held their ground. Avon Park Middle School earned its third “C” in a row; Cracker Trail Elementary School earned a “C”, as it did in 2009-10; and Woodlawn Elementary retained its “B” grade from last year. Two schools, Avon Elementary and Lake Country Elementary continued a downward path for the third year in a row — Avon falling to a “D” having Elementary, middle school grades released Districts grade goes up to a B See SCHOOL, page 7A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS The Sebring fireworks are tonight at 9 p.m. Lake Placids are set for 9 p.m. Monday over Lake June and Avon Parks at 9:15 on Monday over Lake Verona. By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK — The Highlands County Sheriff’s Office is requesting help from the Department o f Agriculture and the U.S. Secret Service as a rash o f debit and credit card fraud continues to plague Highlands County. “We don’t have the manpower to run down all o f these cases,” said HCSO Public Information Office r Nell Hays on Friday. “We have a meeting afte r the Fourth of July to determine how this is going to be handled. We have a large number of victims, and we just don’t have the manpowe r to follow up with all of these offenses. Each case not only has the fraud aspect to it and the theft, but there can also be identity theft charges.” Hays would not confirm exactly how many cases have been reported to the HCSO, but did say the number was considerable. “There is more than we can handle at this point,” Hays confirmed. Including Randy Aronoff, a carrier for the News-Sun, who took a $300 hit las t week. “It was a surprised. I keep close track of my receipts fo r tax purposes, but they hi t before I could catch them. The bank actually called me about the transactions before I could catch it,” said Aronoff. According to Aronoff, he purchased gas at two different gas stations in over the past week, including the Raceway in Avon Park and the 24/7 (formerly LoveBugs) Station in Sebring before getting three charges to his account for close to Credit thieves still at work See FOURTH, page 3A HCSO calling in help to combat skimmers See SKIMMERS, page 6ADays of DixieYouth baseball tourney action heats up SPORTS, 1BTop cadetsAP's AFJROTC cadets shine at competition PAGE2AFranklin factsAlook at the impact of Benjamin Franklin PAGE12B Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and

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The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Thursday, June 30: Shawna Ann Burgess, 26, of Avon Park, was charged with second-degree petit theft. Stanley Moore, 54, of Lake Placid, was charged with two counts of possession/use of drug equipment, two counts of possession of cocaine, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and smuggling contraband into a detention facility. Christopher Lane Rice, 26, of Avon Park, was charged with violation of probation. Juan Ramon Robinson, 29, of Sebring, was charged with failure to appear. Garrett Lee Spence, 18, of Lake Placid, was charged with non-support. Joshua Warner Voy, 28, of Sebring, was charged with dealing in stolen property, second degree petit theft, grand larceny, burglary of an unoccupied dwelling and contempt of court. Carol Ann Willey, 64, of Lake Placid, was charged with driving with an expired license and DUI. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Wednesday, June 29: Chad Owen Caldwell, 21, of Lorida, was charged with domestic violence or battery, touch or strike. Evelyn Maxine Chesser, 35, of Sebring, was charged on an out-of-county warrant for possession of drug paraphernalia. Louis Juarz Gutierrez, 41, of Avon Park, was charged for driving while license suspended or revoked. Jesus Rivas, 32, of Frostproof, was charged with burglary, possession of tools with intent to use; grand theft of motor vehicle; and dealing in stolen property. Lynn Marie Schreiter, 43, of Lake Placid, was charged with domestic violence or obstructing justice, intimidating, threatening, etc. victim or witness; and domestic violence or battery, causing bodily harm. Jessica Marie Taylor, 20, of Sebring, was charged with domestic violence or battery, touch or strike. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Tuesday, June 28: Stanley Uluyses Crosdaile, 24, of Malone, was charged with two counts of violation of municipal ordinance. Damen Jerome Flowers, 23, of Quincey, was charged with two counts of vehicle theft, burglary of an unoccupied dwelling, burglary of a structure/conveyance, theft, grand theft of firearm. Hughston Foy Hall, 59, of Avon Park, was charged with two counts of trespassing. Rufino Hernandez, 18, of Ruskin, was charged with driving while license suspended. Justin Lee Jordan, 27, of Avon Park, was charged with firing a weapon from a vehicle and improper exhibit of a firearm. Jorge Lara, 51, of Avon Park, was charged with selling/giving/serving liquor to a person under 21 years of age. Kevin James Nestle, 50, of Brandon, was charged with driving while license suspended and failing to register a motor vehicle. Luis Angel Rivera, 38, of Caledonia, Miss., was charged with contempt of court reference failure to pay child support payments. Sinel Severe, 36, of Sebring, was charged with contempt of court reference failure to pay child support payments. Olga Morilda Stemple, 80, of Lake Placid, was charged with DUI. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, July 3, 2011www.newssun.com Publishers Block; 5.542"; 4.5"; Black; publishers block; 0 0 0 0 8 0 3 4 DR. LEE, IKE; 1.736"; 3"; Black; 7/3/11; 0 0 0 0 9 9 2 6 KAYLOR & KAYLOR; 5.542"; 1.5"; Black; social security below lottery; 0 0 0 0 9 9 2 8 KAYLOR & KAYLOR; 5.542"; 1.5"; Black; auto accident above lottery; 0 0 0 0 9 9 2 9 June 29 103036414951x:3Next jackpot $18 millionJune 25 22736434452x:5 June 22 2619313639x:4 July 1 1115222629 June 30 1415203235 June 29 119242636 June 28 57223235 July 1 (n) 9051 July 1 (d) 1584 June 30 (n) 8234 June 30 (d) 6506 June 29(n) 837 June 29 (d) 770 June 28 (n) 422 June 28(d) 680 July 1 82227379 June 28 413274415 June 24 212732381 June 21 1330323722 June 29 2430455759 PB: 26 PP: 3Next jackpot $20 millionJune 25 1836394157 PB: 12 PP: 4 June 22 1215194659 PB: 12 PP: 4 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawings are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Play Lottery Center SFCC offers driving coursesSouth Florida Community College’s Community Education Department is offering a series of Safe Driving Accident Prevention Program (SPAPP) courses for drivers who have received a traffic citation. The four-hour courses will be held Wednesday, July 13, 5:30-9:30 p.m., at the SFCC DeSoto Campus, 2252 N.E. Turner Ave., Arcadia, and Saturday, July 23, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., at the SFCC Hardee Campus, 2968 U.S. 17 N., Bowling Green. Pre-registration is required. The fee is $40 and may be paid by cash, check, or credit card. For more information, contact the Community Education Department at 453-6661, 465-5300, 494-7500, 7732252, or 382-6900, ext. 7388 or by e-mail at communityeducation@southflorida.edu. ——— South Florida Community College’s Community Education Department is offering a series of Alcohol Drug Accident Prevention Training (ADAPT) courses for first-time driver license applicants. The four-hour courses will be held 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Saturday, July 9, at the SFCC DeSoto Campus, 2252 N.E. Turner Ave., Arcadia; 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Saturday, July 16, at the SFCC Highlands Campus, 600 W. College Drive, Avon Park; and 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Saturday, July 23, at the SFCC Hardee Campus, 2968 U.S. 17 N., Bowling Green. Pre-registration is required. The fee is $35 and may be paid by cash, check, or credit card. Participants may register in Building B on the Highlands Campus or at any SFCC campus or center. For more information contact the Community Education Department at 453-6661, 465-5300, 4947500, 773-2252, or 3826900, ext. 7388 or by email at communityeducation@southflorida.edu. Guardian ad litem program begins back to school driveSEBRING – The guardian ad litem program has begun its back to school supply drive. Guardian volunteers and staff workers are asking for donations of school supplies such as back packs, notebook paper, pens, pencils, folders, crayons, rulers, notebooks, glue, pencil boxes, colored pen cils and markers, Kleenex, hand sanitizer, index cards and gift cards from Walmart for clothes and shoes. The guardian ad litem program represents children that have been removed from their homes due to abuse, neglect or abandonment. Alot of these children are placed in foster homes or with relatives who are on limited incomes and aren’t able to give the children things required for school. The guardian ad litem office will be collecting supplies through Aug. 19. The supplies can be COMMUNITYBRIEFS Continued on page 5A POLICEBLOTTER By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK — Eight Avon Park students proved they are the elite of the elite, and three took top honors in June at the Air Force Junior Reserves Officer Training Corps Leadership Competition in Charleston, S.C. “I am proud of all of them. They worked very hard at this, and it was great to see them do so well,” said Maj. James K. Galloway, Avon Park’s JROTC commander. The Avon Park group arrived at the famous Citadel Military Academy on June 13 and spent the week getting up at 5 a.m., drilling, studying and working on their leadership skills. “Lights out happened at 11:30 p.m. It was a full day for them, that’s for sure. But they showed that they could do the work and hang in there with the best cadets from five different states. There were even cadets there from as far away as Singapore,” Galloway added. Three Avon Park students — Jorge Vincens, Angel Perez and Melissa Dominguez — took Distinguished Cadet Awards, but Perez stood out by capturing Outstanding Cadet and Top Drill Awards out of 280 cadets at the gathering. “Angel certainly is a hard worker. I don’t know if I have ever seen kids as sharp as this group. Jorge and Angel could easily compete with regular troops. I would have been disappointed if they had not taken home awards,” Galloway added. Daily, according to Galloway, there were inspections of the barracks and uniform, as well as physical exercise, and Perez was considered top-notch on more than one occasion. “Angel got a perfect on making his bunk the first day. I think he slept on the floor after that so that he would not mess up his bunk,” Galloway joked. “He did well in every aspect there. I think they will all move on to do well,” Galloway said. The Citadel is one of the six senior military colleges in the U.S., and is famous because it was originally an arsenal for the state of South Carolina and traditional troops were replaced by lesser expensive cadets during a slave rebellion in 1842. Cadets from the Citadel were authorized to participate in nine battles during the Civil War. “There is a lot of history there, and it is great experience for the kids. I hope that next year we can take the maximum of 12 students with us. We certainly have the talent to do well. We have about 120 students in Avon Park that participate in the JROTC, and we have some outstanding students,” Galloway added. AP cadets shine at Citadel competition Courtesy photo Avon Parks team of Air Force JROTC cadets did well at a competition held at the Citadel in South Carolina in June. Perez brings home top honor ST. PETERSBURG (AP) — Gov. Rick Scott says he supports the idea of adding new campgrounds in more than 50 Florida state parks. Scott said Friday in St. Petersburg that adding amenities such as RVcamping will make people want to use the state’s parks even more. The idea has come under fire by some Republican lawmakers and others opposed to campgrounds at the pristine Honeymoon Island State Park in the Tampa Bay area and others that do not presently offer camping. State Department of Environmental Protection officials are pushing a plan to let private contractors design, build and operate new camp sites in 56 state parks. Gov. Scott supports new campgrounds in state parks

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, July 3, 2011Page 3A DR. ROTMAN, DARRIN; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; 07/03/11; 0 0 0 0 9 8 3 0 WARREN'S AUTO SALES #2; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, back of weather pg; 0 0 0 0 9 9 3 0 quickly as possible. Hot dogs, brats, chili, soft drinks and beer will be available for purchase along with a 50/50 drawing. “They’ll be plenty of food. Guests can get regular foods as well as desserts,” Logsdon said. All funds collected from the food sales will go to benefit scholarships for HLT members. There will also be a cake walk at Thakkar Pavilion between each show; those funds will benefit the general fund of HLT. Post 25 in Lake Placid will host a Bike Show today beginning at 2:30 p.m. Registration will be at 2 p.m. There will be different categories of bikes along with trophies for winners. Vendors will also be present. The proceeds will go to benefit Pfc. Joshua Jetton’s family. For more information contact John “Metric” Vincent at 471-0233. Lake Placid’s annual firework display will begin Monday at 9 p.m. The exciting display sponsored by the Lake Placid Jaycees will take place at the Lake June Ball Field and will be seen over the lake. In Avon Park, the Heartland Pops Concert Band invites the community to a free concert Monday evening at the Grogan Center at Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church located at 595 East Main St.The concert is scheduled to begin at 6:30 p.m. and will end at 8:30 p.m. Avon Park’s fireworks display will begin at 9:15 p.m. and will be shot from a floating barge in Lake Verona. The display will include new special effects for audience to enjoy. Several local vendors will be in the park selling treats. Continued from page 1A Fourth of July festivities planned News-Sun file photo by SCOTTDRESSEL Fireworks light up the sky over Lake Jackson in Sebring. By KYLE HIGHTOWER Associated PressORLANDO — Jurors in the Casey Anthony murder trial will have to interrupt their July 4th weekend to hear closing arguments and deliberate on whether the Florida woman is guilty of killing her 2-year-old daughter in 2008. Judge Belvin Perry told jurors on Friday afternoon that closing arguments will be presented Sunday, after which he will give them final instructions. He said he expects them to begin deliberations Sunday evening. The jury also will deliberate on the Fourth of July holiday. The state rested its case Friday, after prosecutors called witnesses to bolster their contention that the woman’s mother couldn’t have been home to perform Internet searches for a harmful chemical, as she had claimed. Testimony by two of Cindy Anthony’s co-workers — among the last of the trial — was intended to disprove her surprising assertion this week that she, not the defendant, was the one who keyed in searches for the term “chloroform.” Prosecutors have argued that Casey Anthony made the searches as she plotted to kill her 2-year-old daughter Caylee in 2008. Prosecutors used parts of Friday and the previous day to give their rebuttal to the defense’s case, calling about a half-dozen witnesses. Gentiva Health Services Chief Compliance Officer John Camperlengo answered questions about Cindy Anthony’s work history on two days in March 2008 when the “chloroform” searches were done on a computer at the Anthony household. The company’s electronic records show that she was logged onto her company’s system for most of the day on both March 17 and March 21. Using the latter date as an example, Camperlengo said the system would not have recorded Anthony’s presence if a person had no t been actively using the work computer. “Someone human was pushing the enter button to enter data,” he said Friday. Cindy Anthony’s supervisor at Gentiva, Deborah Polisano, also testified tha t electronic work records show that Cindy Anthony was on the clock for 10 hours on March 17 and nine hours on March 21. Earlier this week, Cindy Anthony testified that she had performed the Interne t searches for “chloroform” while looking up information on chlorophyll, a green pigment found in plants. Chloroform, on the othe r hand, is a chemical that can be used as a sedative and is fatal to children in small doses. She testified that she was home on the days when the computer searches were run. She said she could leave work when she wanted, and that the work records migh t not have reflected he r absence. Casey Anthony is charged with first-degree murder in her daughter’s death. If convicted of that charge, she could face the death penalty. The prosecution contends she used duct tape to suffocate the toddler, while the defense says the girl accidentally drowned in he r grandparents’above-ground swimming pool. Casey Anthony murder trial closings set for today Associated PressST. PETERSBURG — Gov. Rick Scott told newspaper editors Friday that public records requests have skyrocketed since he has taken office and the fees he’s charging to provide documents are needed to make sure taxpayer money isn’t wasted. Scott, whose relationship with the media has been a little rocky since he took office in January, spoke at the annual Florida Press Association/Florida Society of News Editors convention and was twice asked about his policies on public records. St. Petersburg Times Editor Paul Tash told Scott told that one of his reporters obtained thousands of pages of public records at a cost of about $150 to investigate a story on the exorbitant cost of a courthouse, but under Scott’s policy it would have cost her thousands of dollars to get the same records. “Governor, is the extra revenue to the state worth the tradeoff of the chilling effect of scrutiny on state government?” Tash asked. Scott defended his policy. “Part of my job is to make sure I don’t waste taxpayer money,” Scott said. “It costs us money to do, we pass that cost on, so it’s the right thing to do.” Scott did say that he is trying to put more documents on the Internet to make it easier for journalists to do their jobs. Scott: Media should pay for public records

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W e moved from isolated villages to great cities; from traveling through deep forests on rough tracks to speeding along six-lane interstate highways. In our early years we only p layed a small political role on the global stage, sitting at the p eriphery of world events. Now, we are a world leader with the power to shape events. W eAmericans turned out to be a complicated people on t he one hand, while passionately committed to individual liberty, we have allowed slavery. Weve turned on many of our fellow citizens for speaking t heir minds at the same time we pledge to protect freedom of speech. While creating a haven for the oppressed and subjugated, we built concentration camps in times of war. We gen-e rously ship food to starving people overseas, but let our o wn children sleep in cars and go hungry. We are the richest nation on the face of the eartha nd yet 20 percent of the population controls 93 percent of t he financial wealth. We reward our upper-tier business leaders with unimaginable salaries, while not paying our entry-level workers enough m oney to rent an apartment or afford a car. We pride ourselves in believing in fair play, yet insider trading remains a problem.W e believe gambling is a sin, yet governments use lotteries to raise money. We think of ourselves as the good guys, but torture suspects, or send themt o other countries to be tortured. We sharply criticize other nations when their leaders lie to their people, yet too often we simply accept what our leaders tell us. T he thing is, one of the most honorable and enduring qualit ies in American culture is our courage to face up to our own shortcomings and problems.O h, we may not wrestle with the truth right away. S ometimes it takes years to recognize an issue, then years more to solve it but we persist and follow through, even if it takes generations. W e really do want the world to be a better place. We really do want to do the right thing. e, however, are made up o f Ultimately, it is what the individual chooses that moves the nation. America has always been a grassroots kind of coun-t ry, a place where those who make things run and get things done are the foundation of our society. What each of us as individuals must discover, then, is whate ach of us as individuals believe. T here is nothing more American you can do than make up your own mind. I n 1776, making up ones mind was not that clear cut or e asy. To join the revolutionary cause meant rebelling against authority and putting oneself at great risk of jail or even death. Many people remained loyal to England, some of them l ess out of conviction than of fear. Many other people, how-e ver, believed in law and order, in a correct way to go about t hings. They condemned revolutionary actions, especially those that violently destroyed private property like the Boston Tea Party. Each of us needs to remember how many generations of A mericans have passed before us, each facing the same gut-w renching question are we doing the right thing? O nly you can decide. So wish us all a happy birthday and give thanks we live in a country where, for 235 years, weve been encouraged to think for ourselves. Page 4AN ews-SunS unday, July 3, 2011www.newssun.comTODAYSEDITORIALTODAYSLETTERS 2 227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 N EWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor E xt. 515editor@newssun.com S COTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comD AN HOEHNES ports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com C IRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com B USINESS OFFICEJ ANET EMERSONE xt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION A thoughtful Fourth of July This weekend, we celebrate the United States of Americas 235th birthday. Our nation has changed so much since 1776 we are quite sure no one living then would recognize it now with the possible exception of Benjamin Franklin, or maybe Thomas Jefferson. Embrace the Heartland TriathlonEditor: It is alarming to me when I hear those with a voice of influence abuse their power for their own personal gain. Most recently it has come to light that there are some people with less than positive opinions regarding the Heartland Triathlon and have taken to the air waves to make attacks against its organizers. Highlands County has played host to many athletic events, as well as cultural events. During these year, each event was revered for bringing revenue into the community and for showcasing Highlands County for her many splendors. For those that are unaware, the Heartland Triathlon is only in its sixth year. During this time, its organizer, Cherie Starr, has worked diligently as the director to expand the triathlon. Most recently, she was able to secure the national championship for the junior/senior kids for this past year. This brought in over 150 kids just for the triathlon. Think about this for a second the national championships for kids was just in our county. Families came from all over the United States to compete in Highlands County. That means money for our hotels, restaurants, gas, and other retail dollars of the like being infused into our community. Now, I realize there was certainly an inconvenience to those wishing to travel downtown and also some claim the downtown area was even trashed. Is there any less for the 12 Hours of Sebring? Have you ever tried to travel during that week? Living in Highlands County means we embrace those things which showcase our community in a good light and make our community a place to stop. Many adults, both during the kids and the adult event sited the many reasons why this event is one they look forward to every year. Over 600 athletes participated in the Heartland Triathlon. Judging by the growth over the past several years, Cherie and her board are doing something right. Seems like we have the perfect combination of a great venue, supportive community, and organizers with a passion to make this event the best it can be. Finally, as a spectator on Saturday, I will share that I could think of no better Fathers Day gift than to see my two sons crossing the finish line. Watching my children embrace a healthy lifestyle and challenge themselves was an amazing moment for me. Then, my wife and I took to the course on Sunday to do the same. Afterwards, hundreds and hundreds of people shared stories, broke bread with each other, and made lasting friendships. I guess for me the burning question would be, Isnt this what a community is supposed to do fellowship together? I would invite those who find fault to come down and enjoy the fellowship and excitement that surrounds this event; its a family friendly event which promotes good health and lasting relationships. I commend Cherie, her board, the city of Sebring, Highlands County, and the many race volunteers who make this event one of the finest in the sprint race circuit. Chris Doty SebringFrom the outside looking inEditor: An 81-year-old veterans view of Americas VAsystem: The Veterans Administration system could well be a role model for all of Americas health care systems. The people who staff the VAcant seem to do enough for the veteran. The care is excellent. I have received treatment at West Palm Beach, Bay Pines, Fla., and their clinics at Sebring and Okeechobee, Fla., Chillicothe, Ohio, Cincinnati Ohio VAs and the clinic at Portsmouth, Ohio. The veterans claims department is quite the opposite. We have over 100,000 claims and growing at an alarming rate. We have five wars going on at the same time, more than 900 bases worldwide. The cost of the claims department is staggering. The huge cost to pay personnel to deny service connected claims in unacceptable. The transparency of denied claims is unacceptable to all veterans. The veterans claim should be allowed if it is the slightest chance of being a just claim. No veteran likes to be judged by a political appointed claims adjuster whose salary is many times the average working class wages, considering how little the veteran was paid for his service, putting his very life on the line. Try walking a few miles in that veterans shoes. The huge amount of veterans left behind and their claims not addressed without transparency is not acceptable. Where is the transparency the sitting president promised? Job security for the political appointed claim adjuster is to deny all claims. All veterans have put their young lives on the line. I would ask that the American taxpayer put veterans claims as a first priority. The veteran who has no voice in the outcome of his claim is asking the American taxpayer to speak for him. Someone, somewhere has to watch the veterans back. Billie E. Jewett Sebring Last week the FDA released nine new warningst o go on cigarette packages. Instead of the text advising s mokers how bad the habit is, there are going to be pictures. The pictures will be r equired to cover at least half the pack of cigarettes and are expected to go fully into effect by 2013. Huffingtonpost.com i ncluded copies of the pictures that will be used. Some of them are quite graphic. One shows a set of diseased lungs. Another displays ag ross set of rotting teeth. A third is apparently a picture o f a corpse on an autopsy table, with the words, Smoking can kill you underneath the picture. If the pictures sound disturbing, that will please the FDA, because they are sup-p osed to be. The reasoning going into this latest change to cigarette packaging is that if you freak out smokers enough, they will quit theh abit. The article on the Huffington Post even cites a study conducted by the CDC that appears to show that graphic warning labels used in other countries caused some smokers to consider quitting. So this sounds like a great idea, right? Graphic pictures ought to freak smokers right out of their addiction. Well, maybe. Heres the key word in the above paragraph: consider. The smokers thought about quitting based on what they saw. The study does not show how many of those went from considering to actually making the break from smoking. I suspect that the numbers of those quitting werent that high. Yes, the pictures will make you cringe. And no doubt, smokers might think twice before taking a puff. But my guess is that, picture or not, they will go ahead and take that puff. Its not that I want the FDAto fail in their endeavor to get people to quit smoking. I am for any and all attempts to do so. When cigarette taxes go up? I do not shed a single tear. If the p owers that be decided to outlaw nicotine tomorrow, they would get no argument from me. Its just that Ive seen how t ightly the addiction grips some. My own mother was one such example. My mother was a licensed practical nurse, so she wellk new the risks of smoking. She survived breast cancer a nd then developed lung cancer. She was on oxygena t home. Even with all that, she did not quit smoking. Until the day she died she kept up with the habit. And while Id ont think smoking was put on her death certificate, you would have a hard time convincing me it didnt play a role. S o yes, I can tell you that in my opinion, people will continue to smoke. Despite knowing better. Despite the costs to their health. Despite graphic, shocking warnings splashed on their cigarette packs. I wish I had the sure fire way to make people quit. But I cant think of any. And maybe, just maybe the pictures will cause someone to think twice before they pick up their first cigarette. Perhaps they will cause a few people to prove me wrong and give up the habit once and for all. If the pictures manage to do that, then I will say hooray for them. Maybe youre a smoker who reads this column. Maybe Ive offended you by implying you cant give up the habit. My challenge to you is to prove me wrong. Quit smoking and show me it can be done. This will be one time I will be happy to say I made a mistake. Laura Ware is a Sebring resident. She can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady@ embarqmail.com Scaring smokers Lauras Look Laura Ware EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; or e-mail editor@newssun.com Letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months. Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the opinion of that author and not necessarily the opinion of the staff or editors of the News-Sun

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Special to the News-Sun LAKE PLACID —The National Wildlife Federation (NWF) announces that the property of Charles K. Henderson in Lake Placid is now recognized as an official Certified Wildlife Habitat site. The property attracts a variety of birds, butterflies and other wildlife, while helping to protect the local environment. With the help of NWF, many habitat enthusiasts have turned their yards and other garden spaces into enticing wildlife refuges. NWF began the Wildlife Habitat certification program in 1973 and has since certified over 101,000 habitats nationwide. The majority of these sites represent the hard work and commitment of individuals and families providing habitat near their homes, but NWF has also certified more than 2,900 schools and hundreds of business and community sites. Certified habitats can be found everywhere from post offices, hospitals and places of worship to community parks, corporate buildings and municipal facilities. The average habitat is between one-third and one-half acre but certified sites range from urban balconies to thousandacre areas. Any habitat enthusiast can create a certified habitat and learn the rewards of gardening for wildlife. NWF teaches the importance of environmental stewardship by providing guidelines for making landscapes hospitable to wildlife. In order to become certified, a property must provide the four basic elements that all wildlife need: Food, water, cover and places to raise young; and must employ sustainable gardening practices. Habitat restoration is critical in urban and suburban setting. When commercial and residential development encroaches on natural wildlife areas, limiting the availability of resources wildlife need to survive and thrive. In addition to providing for wildlife, certified habitats conserve our natural resources by reducing or eliminating the need for fertilizers, pesticides and/or irrigation water, which ultimately protects the air, soil and water throughout the communities. More information about gardening for wildlife is available at www.nwf.org/habitat or by calling (800) 822-9919. Creating habitats not only helps wildlife, it can help reduce global warming pollution and save energy costs as well. Burning fossil fuels to heat and cool our homes and maintain our lawns releases carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, which is the main greenhouse gas responsible for global warming. Replacing lawns with strategically located trees and other native vegetation can insulate our homes from heat, cold and wind, reducing our heating and cooling needs and thus our carbon dioxide emissions. Unlike lawns, wildlife friendly native plants don’t need constant maintenance from gas guzzling lawn mowers o r fertilizers that require fossil fuels to manufacture. An additional benefit is that plants actually absorb carbon dioxide, helping to further reduce the amount o f greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. All of this adds up to increased areas available for wildlife habitats, reductions in levels of carbon dioxide that cause global warming and reduced energy costs. More abou t how gardeners can reduce the effects of global warming can be found a t www.nwf/gardenersguide. dropped off at the guardian office at the Children’s Advocacy Center, 1968 Sebring Parkway, or pick up of items from homes and businesses can be arranged. For more information about donating call 402-6969 and ask to speak to Juanita Masters or any other staff member. Heartland Pops help with celebrationAVON PARK — The Heartland Pops Concert Band will participate in the Avon Park Fourth of July celebration with a free concert in the Grogan Center of Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 E. Main St. The concert is sponsored by the Avon Park Jaycees in cooperation with the Avon Park Chamber of Commerce. The concert begins at 6:30 p.m. and will conclude in time for everyone to view the fireworks display sponsored by the Avon Park Jaycees. This year marks the 235th year that America will celebrate their independence. The Heartland Pops will salute America with a “Red, White and Blue Musical Tribute” featuring selections honoring American composers and arrangers. The band will also spotlight vocal soloists Laura Wade and Daniel Burke singing several patriotic selections. The fireworks display will follow over Lake Verona.The Salvation Army taking names for back to school programSEBRING — Sign up now for the back to school clothing program from 8:30 a.m. to noon, five days only (Tuesday through Monday: July 5-11) at The Salvation Army, 3135 Kenilworth Blvd. This for students going into kindergarten through fifth grade only. Call 385-7548, ext. 100 for any questions in regards to qualifications for signing up.Bennett to speak at Tea Party meetingSEBRING — Will Bennett, a canditate for the Highlands County Board of County Commission, will speak at the Highlands Tea Party meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Quality Inn, 6525 U.S. 27. Bennett is running for Barbara Stewart’s open seat in the upcoming election. He wants to have a questions and answers from members regarding their concerns as to where county government is going and what needs to be done. There will be no buffet. Bring snacks and water from outside vendors, but purchase any other beverages from the Quality Inn bar. For more information, call 699-0743 or visit thehighlandsteaparty.com.YMCA will take unwanted carsSEBRING – Got a car and not sure what to do with it? How about donating it to the Highlands County Family YMCA. The proceeds from the sale will help a child learn how to swim, be able to participate in soccer, basketball, flag football, gymnastics among others. The YMCAis a 5013C program, so donations are tax deductable. Questions? Call 382-9622 and ask for Dave.Sebring Elks offer special eventSEBRING — From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. today the Sebring Elks 1529 will be offering a Country Breakfast Buffet. Invite friends, family and fellow Elks; everyone is welcome. Cost is $7. For more information, call 4713557. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, July 3, 2011Page 5A Stephenson Nelson ****; 7.444"; 5"; Black; obit page; 0 0 0 0 9 8 3 3 MARTIAL ARTS (pp); 3.639"; 3"; Black; main ff top right pg; 0 0 0 0 9 8 8 3 Continued from page 2A MARYL. STEWART Mary L. Stewart, 74 of Lake Placid, passed away Friday, July 1, 2011 at Hope Hospice, Sebring. She was born August 10, 1936 in Middletown, NYto parents, George and Mary(Sweeny) Lanniuer and had been a resident of Lake Placid for 30 years coming from Jacksonville, FL. She was a homemaker and of the Catholic faith. Mrs. Stewart is survived by her loving family, sons, Robert, Shaun, George, and Michael; daughters, Rosita, Rose, and Brenda; 12 grandchildren, eight great-grandchildren; and significant other, Gonzalo Vasquez. The family will receive friends at Scott Funeral Home from 11 a.m. to 12 noon, Sunday, July 3, 2011 with a Celebration of Life Service beginning at 12 noon with Rev. Michael Cannon as celebrant. Burial will follow at Oak Hill Cemetery, Lake Placid. Arrangements entrusted to: Scott Funeral Home 504 W. Interlake Blvd. Lake Placid, Fl 33852 863-465-4134 OBITUARIES COMMUNITYBRIEFS Courtesy photo Lake Placid Police Officer Greg Graziani and his son, Lane, introduce students in South Florida Community Colleges Camp Discovery to a tortoise, the most recent addition to their collection of rescued animals. Each week, SFCCs Camp Discovery focuses on a different career field, and campers participate in a variety of activities based on those careers. SFCCs Camp Discovery is open to students ages 7-16. Openings are still available. For information or to register, visit www.southflorida.edu/academic/commed/ Camp-Discovery.aspx. Camp Discovery at SFCC NWF certifies new wildlife habitat in Lake Placid Associated PressCAPE CANAVERAL— America’s longest space-flying streak ends this week with the smallest crew in decades — three men and a woman who were in high school and college when the first space shuttle soared 30 years ago. History will remember these final four as bookending an era that began with two pilots who boldly took a shuttle for a two-day spin in 1981 without even a test flight. That adventure blasted space wide open for women, minorities, scientists, schoolteachers, politicians, even a prince. On Friday aboard Atlantis, this last crew will make NASA’s 135th and final shuttle flight. It will be years before the United States sends its own spacecraft up again. Commander Christopher Ferguson, co-pilot Douglas Hurley, Rex Walheim and Sandra Magnus are delighting in their good luck. “We’re very honored to be in this position. There are many people who could be here,” said Ferguson, a retired Navy captain. “When the dice fell, our names were facing up.” NASAmanagers were looking for space vets when they cobbled together this minimalist crew with seven spaceflights among them, to deliver one last shuttle load of supplies to the International Space Station. They are an eloquent, colorful bunch in their 40s, accepting if not embracing the spotlight. Ferguson is a drummer for an astronaut rock ‘n’roll band. Hurley is nuts about NASCAR; his cousin is married to crew chief Greg Zipadelli. Walheim is a former shuttle flight controller; his graphic designer wife creates the mission patch every time he flies, always on Atlantis. Magnus is arguably the first out-of-this-world chef: She whipped up Christmas cookies and Super Bowl salsa aboard the space station in late 2008 and early 2009, using — as all good chefs — ingredients on hand. The four astronauts feel the extra burden of putting “the best possible face forward for the last go-around of this,” as Ferguson describes it. NASAs Final 4 set for farewell flight MCT A stronauts, from left, Pilot Douglas Hurley, Sandra Magnus, Commander Christopher Ferguson and Rex Walheim will make up the final space shuttle crew when Atlantis blasts off. The launch is set for Friday.

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Page 6ANews-SunSunday, July 3, 2011www.newssun.com SURGERY & ENDOSCOPY; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, 7/3; 0 0 0 0 9 9 0 6 CENTRAL SECURITY; 5.542"; 5"; Black plus two; spot red & yellow, 7/3,10; 0 0 0 0 9 9 1 9 earned an “A” in 2008-09 and a “B” in 2009-10; and Lake Country falling to a “D” after earning an “A” in 200809, and a “C” in 2009-10. Grades are pending for the three high schools, each of which have had “D” grades in the past three years. In a press release school superintendent Wally Cox said, “Congratulations to those schools that achieved a Grade of “A” and “B.” Overall our schools did very well and we are proud of their accomplishments. “While a few schools dropped a grade based on their lowest quartile, others improved. Our school administrators will look at the individual student scores to determine how best to help them improve next year. I would like to express my appreciation to our teachers, administrators and support staff.” Akey component of determining school grades is how well a school improves learning gains for the bottom quartile — 25 percent — of struggling students. Schools lose an entire grade — an “A” going to a “B,” for example — if those low-performing students do not make one year’s worth of progress in one year’s time. Targets also have to be met for sub-groups of students including those for whom English is a second language, or are disabled, or from lower socio-economic backgrounds. For example, for this past school year, 79 percent of the students in each sub-group had to be proficient in reading, and 80 percent in math. Proficiency is determined by the student’s performance on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test. If schools do not meet the set goals for two consecutive years, the school can be rated as “needs improvement” and be subject to interventions, including allowing student to transfer to other schools. Interventions increase the longer a school does not meet the goals. Ultimately an entire staff may be replaced, or the school closed and reopened as a charter school. Out of Highlands County’s 13 schools — the high schools not being counted — the district has five schools earning “A”s, three schools earning “B”s; three schools earning “C”s and two schools earning “D”s. This article contains information from an Associated Press report by Christine Armario. Continued from page 1A $100 each. What also flagged the account, Aronoff added, was the even numbers and the unusual purchase amounts. “There were three charges. Two for $99 even at a RaceTrac in Orlando and one for $100 at an Exxon Mobile station, also in Orlando. These showed up on Thursday last week. MidFlorida called me on Friday, that’s when I filed the police report,” Aronoff said. Aronoff originally took his complaint to the Highlands County Sheriff’s Office, but was directed to Orange County because that was where the charges were entered. “I was told it could take up to 10 days to get the money replaced in my account, but MidFlorida was very helpful in getting a police report filed with Orange County, and they were determined to get my money returned to me,” Aronoff said. Askimmer puts a electronic device on the inside or outside of the card swiper on a gas pump. When someone swipes their card to pay for their gas, the device “skims” the card number, expiration date and verification code off of the card before it is processed. The skimmer is usually in the area and is either taking pictures as the individual keys in their PIN number or has a camera concealed close by that sends out the pictures. After just a few hours, the skimmer removes the devices, having plenty of cards and PIN numbers. “What the skimmers do is approach a set of pumps away from the center areas and away from the front windows. They only need two or three hours worth of information to make it worth their while,” Hays told the NewsSun for a previous article. Hays said that the best way to protect yourself from a skimmer was to stay diligent in reviewing your bank statements and to be aware o f your surroundings. “Go to a central pump within view of the attendan t inside. Cover your hand when you key in your pin and report any unexpected charges immediately,” Hays said. “I cannot encourage people enough to watch their bank statements closely. I would encourage them to look every day if they have access online to their accounts,” Hays said. MidFlorida was reluctan t to give out even general information about how many problems they were experiencing. “I’ve seen a few, but I don’t know how many,” said Michele Jolin at the Avon Park MidFlorida branch. Continued from page 1A School accountability grades released Skimmers still targeting area gas pumps; HCSOgetting help News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Skimmers use a device they attach to the card readers at gas pumps to steal credit and debit card information. Classified ads get results! Call 314-9876

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By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comLAKE PLACID — Furniture by Cathy is a brand new furniture store located at 361 Interlake Blvd. Owners Cathy and Danny Simmons have been in Highlands County for 33 years. Their first business was Cabinetry by Danny, a very successful and long running cabinetry company. Furniture by Cathy was initially opened in Sebring and was located inside the Dickey Electrical building. “We were there for about six months. There wasn’t any A.C, in our part of the warehouse,” Simmons said. Simmons was informed by a friend of a friend regarding the current retail space. “The owner, Jerry Coleman, showed us the building. We looked in the window and we just loved it,” said Simmons. The store moved into its current location just two short months ago and opened its doors in late May. Furniture by Cathy features new and quality used furniture, rugs, lamps and bedding. Simmons and her husband take several shopping trips for new items to feature in their store and are in good with the newest suppliers. “What we are offering is good price furniture,” www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, July 3, 2011Page 7A JOHN PALMER ELECTRIC; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 07/01, 07/03, 07/06; 0 0 0 0 9 8 7 9 EDWARD JONES/ED BURNSIDE***; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; 7/3/11; 0 0 0 0 9 9 2 0 Duffers 6x10.5 color 00009944 BUSINESS Furniture by Cathy makes move to Lake Placid Courtesy photo Furniture by Cathy is the newest furniture store in Lake Placid. The store initially opened up inside Dickey Electrical company building but the store was relocated only after a few short months. Owner Cathy Simmons, pictured here, is happy with the new location. See FURNITURE, page 8A

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C M Y K Simmons said. “We work to keep our overhead low so that we can keep our prices low and reasonable.” The store features a wide selection of items including name brands like Serta and Symbol mattresses and box springs. Simmons feels that the bedding is the key aspect of the store. Cathy Simmons’dream of owning her very own furniture is finally a reality and though the move from Sebring to Lake Placid made her a little nervous at first, she has come to feel comfortable and welcomed in the new store. “I was afraid that people would thought we shut down and they would forget about us, but I got a lot of calls asking where the store had gone and just told them where we are now,” said Simmons. Cathy Simmons feels that the store is something that the community will appreciate and value as it grows. “We aren’t here looking to get rich or build some huge empire. This is something that I enjoy and that I’m passionate about. “We’re going to be here as long as people continue to support us. It has been a challenge, but it’s been worth it,” she said. Furniture by Cathy is open Monday through Friday 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. The store number is 4650200 and Simmons plans to hold a grand opening event soon. Page 8ANews-SunSunday, July 3, 2011www.newssun.com Orchid Hill Stable PP; 5.542"; 5"; Black; main a top, 13 of 16; 0 0 0 0 9 8 2 8 GRIFFIN'S CARPET MART; 7.444"; 10"; Black; 7/3/11; 0 0 0 0 9 9 2 5 BUSINESS Special to the News-SunAVON PARK —South Florida Community College’s Corporate and Community Education Department is offering a series of classes that can help business people become more productive in the workplace by managing their time, becoming better writers, learning how to motivate employees, and understanding personality differences that affect relationships with customers and employees. All classes meet in Building T, Room 20, of the SFCC Highlands Campus. Tuition for each class is $125 per person. “Personal and Professional Time Management” teaches time-saving techniques and strategies that help business people increase their productivity while finding time to relax. The class will be offered twice – on Friday, July 22, and Friday, Nov. 18 – from 1-5 p.m. The course registration number is 30633 for the July class and 11120 for the November class. “Business Writing and Grammar” offers solid techniques for writing and formatting effective business correspondence, e-mails, agendas, PowerPoint presentations, and other materials while eliminating the miscommunication that comes from undisciplined writing. The class meets Friday, Aug. 19, 1-5 p.m. Tuition is $125. The course registration number is 11533. Motivating your employees to become cooperative team players and give their best work is an ongoing challenge for employers. “Monumental Motivation” teaches managers how to coach employees who have “checked out” from their jobs and are exhibiting such unproductive workplace habits as laziness, tardiness, indifference, sloppiness, a poor attitude, or general onthe-job malaise. The class meets Friday, Sept. 23, 1-5 p.m. The course registration number is 11534. The power of personality has a great effect on personal and professional life. Differences in opinions, preferences, communication styles, and attitudes are often deeply rooted in personality. “The Personality Principle” can help you understand the character traits associated with four basic styles of personality, become aware of the unspoken expectations of the people you deal with, avoid arguments, and develop more productive relationships. The class meets Friday, Oct. 21, 15 p.m. The course registration number is 11120. Call Lorrie Keyt, 863-7847033 or e-mail corporatetraining@southflorida.edu/. Register for the class at any SFCC campus or center or by calling 453-6661, ext. 7405. Classes offered to help hone professional skills Special to the News-SunSEBRING – The Downtown Sebring Gallery Walk has a new name. The purpose of the newly created Entertainment District is to make Downtown Sebring a destination point for residents and visitors. Therefore, a core group of merchants, who have participated in what has been known as Gallery Walk, have decided to change the name of the monthly event to coincide with the new destination theme. Now the monthly evening event in which merchants stay open late and offer special deals, will be known as Destination Downtown Sebring. “The new name provides more opportunities to include all of the stores and merchants in the Downtown Sebring area in addition to the galleries,” said Kathy Doherty of Kathy’s Consignment. New banners are being made to promote Destination Downtown Sebring, which will be held every second Friday from 5-8 p.m. with various themes, activities and entertainment. The first Destination Downtown Sebring will be held on Friday and will celebrate the “Dog Days of Summer.” Activities will include hot dog vendors, live entertainment, a dog fashion show and pet-related exhibitors. Attendees are encouraged to bring thei r canine companion. Merchants will provide water bowls outside of their stores. For more information, visi t www.DowntownSebring.org/. Gallery Walk gets new name One common misconception among many people who rent their homes is that they are covered under their landlord’s insurance in case of an accident, burglary, or other disaster. Let me dispel that myth: Landlords typically only insure the building and any fixtures they own, so renters are responsible for lost or damaged possessions. And, if someone has an accident in your apartment, you’re liable. Given this level of risk exposure, it’s surprising that up to two-thirds of renters don’t have insurance. Here are a few tips for finding the right coverage: — Ask what’s covered. Renter’s insurance commonly covers property that’s lost, damaged or stolen due to most occurrences including fire, lightning, windstorms, hail, explosions, smoke, vandalism, theft, plumbing leaks, electrical surges or falling objects. You’re also usually covered away from home – for example, if something is stolen from your car or hotel room, or if you get mugged. However, flood, hurricane and earthquake damage usually isn’t covered, so you’ll need a separate rider. — Catalog everything you own and how much it would cost to replace. Consider furniture, clothing, electronics, jewelry, art and other collectibles, books and CDs, sports equipment, etc. To settle claims faster and verify losses for tax purposes, save receipts and photograph or videotape everything; then store copies in a safe deposit box or other offsite location. — Compare payout options. “Actual cash value” (ACV) coverage pays the amount needed to repair or replace your belongings, minus depreciation and your deduc-tible. The alternative method, “replacement cost” coverage, pays the amount needed to replace the items in today’s dollars, minus deductible. Here’s the difference: A five-year-old TVthat cost $500 is worth a fraction of that today. ACVwould pay that depreciated amount, while replacement coverage would pay enough to buy a comparable new television. Replacement cost coverage is slightly more expensive, but often worth it. Personal liability coverage protects you if someone files a claim alleging you caused them bodily injury or property damage, provided it’s not vehicle-related or tied to business activities. — Loss-of-use coverage. Many policies pay an allowance for housing and living expenses if you’re forced to move out temporarily. Check whether this coverage is included or costs extra and what the limits are. —High-value items. Standard policies typically place limits on how much they’ll pay to replace certain expensive items like jewelry, antiques, art, electronics and computer equipment – often well below replacement value. You’ll probably want to purchase additional riders to fully cover these items. Here are tips for lowering your premium: —Raise your deductible. — Ask about discounts for non-smokers or added security devices like deadbolt locks, alarms and smoke detectors. — Many carriers offer multi-line discounts if you also purchase car insurance through them. —Insurance is a competitive business, so shop around. Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. Follow Jason Alderman at ww.twitter.com/PracticalMoney Why you need renters insurance Personal Finance Jason Alderman Continued from page 7A Furniture store finds new home YOKOSUKA, Japan (AP) — Nissan’s plant is busily rolling out the Leaf electric car and other models on a Saturday. The weekend schedule is part of an aggressive nationwide effort to fight a power crunch caused by nuclear reactors in meltdown from a recent earthquake and tsunami. “Setsuden,” or “save electricity,” has become Japan’s biggest buzzword, since the March 11 disaste r hobbled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The government is demanding that major companies reduce electricity consumption by 15 percent. Nissan plant hustling Saturday amid power crunch

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, July 3, 2011Page 9 A IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2009 CA 001657 PNC MORTGAGE, a Division of PNC BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, v. JOSE JULIEN MOUNSAMY, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 8, 2011 entered in Case No. 2009 CA 001657 in the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein PNC Mortgage, a Division of PNC BANK, N.A., is the Plaintiff and JOSE JULIEN MOUNSAMY, et al, are the defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Highlands County Courthouse, Basement of Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 at 11:00 a.m. on August 10, 2011, the following described real property situated in Highlands County, as set forth in said Agreed Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 23, BLOCK 40, PLACID LAKES, SECTION FOUR, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 64, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. STREET ADDRESS: 118 MADISON AVENUE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED THIS 8th day of June, 2011. BOB GERMAINE, CLERK of COURT, HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA (SEAL) By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk June 26; July 3, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 10-1257-GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, Plaintiff, vs. FRED P. ARCHER, JOAN H. ARCHER; CHASE BANK USA, N.A.; CACH, LLC; HSBC BANK NEVADA, N.A.; MIDLAND FUNDING, LLC; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THEREIN NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, AND TENANT #4, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the "Final Judgment on Verified Complaint'' (the "Final Judgment''), entered in the above-styled action on June 6, 2011, the Clerk of Highlands County will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida, as described below at a Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, on July 15, 2011, at 11:00 a.m.: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT ``A'' EXHIBIT ``A'' Lot 9, Block 11, HIGHLANDS PARK ESTATES SECTION J, according to the Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 41, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Property Tax ID No. C-20-36-30-090-0110-0090 Property Address: 1520 Rutledge Avenue, Lake Placid, Florida 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. BOB GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida /s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Cler k June 24; July 1, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-238-GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ALBRITTON CONSTRUCTION, LLC; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, AND TENANT #4, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 Notice is given that pursuant to a Final Judgment in Foreclosure Against Defendant, ALBRITTON CONSTRUCTION, LLC, dated the 21st day of June, 2011, in Case No. 10-238-GCS, of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK is the Plaintiff and ALBRITTON CONSTRUCTION, LLC, is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on the 25th day of July, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure Against Defendant, ALBRITTON CONSTRUCTION, LLC, and described as follows: The West 4 acres of Lot 4, Block 8, LESS road right-of-way, Section 14, Township 33 South, Range 28 East, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 33, Public Records of DeSoto County, Florida (of which Highlands County was formerly a part). Said lot lying in and comprising a part of the Southeast 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of said section, township and range, in Highlands County, Florida. AND A portion of Lot 4, Block 8, in Section 14, Township 33 South, Range 28 East, Highlands County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Begin at the East 1/4 corner of said Section 14; thence North 89 degrees 57'30'' West along the South lines of the Northeast 1/4 of said Section 14, a distance of 398.84 feet; thence North 0 degrees 02'20'' East a distance of 664.15 feet; thence South 89 degrees 58'30'' East a distance of 398.39 feet to a point on the East line of said Section 14 a distance of 664.27 feet to the Point of Beginning. LESS AND EXCEPT the East 25.00 feet thereof and the South 20.00 feet thereof for road right-of-way. AND Lot 4, LESS the North one-half thereof, Block 1 and all of Lot 1, Block 8; all of said land being located in Section 14, Township 33 South, Range 28 East, Highlands County, Florida, LESS road right-of-way. AND Lot 2, Block 8, Section 14, Township 33 South, Range 28 East, Highlands County, Florida, as recorded in Transcript Book, at Page 13, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida, also described as the Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of Section 14, Township 33 South, Range 28 East, Highlands County, Florida. Real Property Address: 909 East Albritton Road, Avon Park, FL 33825 Real Property Tax ID#: C-14-33-28-A00-0040-0000 DATED on June 23, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of Said Court By: /s/ Lisa Tantillo As Deputy Cler k IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM OF LIEN WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. July 3, 10, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO: 09000637GCS OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC PLAINTIFF, VS. MIRIAM PANTOJA, PABLO PANTOJA, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, any and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under and against the herein named individual Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees or other claimants, DEFENDANT(S). RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale filed June 20, 2011 entered in Civil Case No. 09000637GCS of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Avon Park, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Jury Assembly Room, Sebring, FL 33870 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes at 11:00 AM on the 25th day of July, 2011 the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 7, OF HEIRING SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, AT PAGE 27, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 20th day of June, 2011. BOB GERMAINE By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk July 3, 10, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2008-CA-001081 DIVISION: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT RELATING TO IMPAC SECURED ASSETS CORP., MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-4, Plaintiff, vs. FLAVIO MOY, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated June 10, 2011, and entered in Case No. 2008-CA-001081 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT RELATING TO IMPAC SECURED ASSETS CORP., MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-4, is the Plaintiff and FLAVIO MOY, JANE DOE n/k/a MICHELLE SMITH, JOHN DOE n/k/a CHRIS SMITH, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FLAVIO MOY, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 25th day of July, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 1, BLOCK 16, AVOCADO PARK, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 62, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY FLORIDA. A/K/A 3303 LAKEWOOD ROAD, SEBRING, FL 33875 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 20th day of June, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 11-68577 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, (863) 534-4690, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this (describe notice); if you are hearing or voice impaired, call TDD (863) 534-7777 or Florida Relay Service 711. To file response please contact Highlands County Clerk of Court, 590 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870-3867, Tel: (863) 402-6591; Fax: (863) 402-6664. July 3, 10, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA Civil Action Case No. 10-848-GCS TIB BANK, Plaintiff, v. RUTH K. DAVIS; JOSE QUINONES; GOLF HAMMOCK OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTERST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; AND UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure, dated June 7, 2011, in the above styled case in the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the foreclosure sale conducted in the Courthouse Basement (Jury Assembly Room), Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 at 11:00 a.m., or as soon as possible thereafter, on July 14, 2011, the following described real property: Lot 374, Golf Hammock Unit IV, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 14, Page(s) 78, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. Dated on this 8th day of June, 2011. Bob Germaine Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk June 26; July 3, 2011 1050Legals 1050Legals LEGAL NOTICE The Highlands County Sheriff's Office has custody of the following found items. If no claim is made, the items will be disposed of in accordance with the law. Those people missing items that may match the description given should contact the Sheriff's Office at 402-7220 Monday through Friday 8:00am to 4:00pm to set up an appointment. O f f e n s e e N u m b e r HCSO11OFF004295 Jewelry located on Bristol St., Sebring on 6/17/11 HCSO11OFF004135 Key chain w/keys, car remote, can opener & 2 D rings located in the area of Corvette Ave., in Sebring on 6/12/11 HCSO11OFF003479 Coach Purse w/currency located on Sebring Parkway, Sebring on 6/20/11 HCSO11OFF002145 Clothing & misc. jewelry located in restroom @ Court House in Sebring on 3/24/11 HCSO11OFF001585 Green Schwinn bike located on Lake Crews Ave., Lake Placid on 3/7/11 HCSO11OFF002105 White BMX bike located @ Honeysuckle & Spring Lk Blvd. in Sebring on 2/20/11 HCSO11OFF000605 Blue Schwinn & green JC Higgins bikes located @ Geneva Ave. & E. Albritton Rd. in Avon Park on 1/26/11 HCSO11OFF003367 Burgundy Next bike located on Pompino Dr. in Sebring on 5/16/11 HCSO11OFF003426 Dell Inspiron located on Edgewater Dr., Sebring on 5/18/11 HCSO11OFF004018 Next Power Climber bike located @ N. Ithica & W. Elmont Rd., Avon Park on 6/8/11 HCSO11OFF004093 Concrete statue of dog located on S. Huckleberry Lake Dr. in Sebring on 6/11/11 June 26, 2011 PUBLIC NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE AIR PERMIT Florida Department of Environmental ProtectionAir Resource Section, South OfficeDraft Minor Source Air Construction PermitProject No. 0550060-003-ACFlorida Gas Transmission CompanyHighlands County, Florida Applicant: The applicant for this project is Florida Gas Transmission Company. The applicants authorized representative and mailing address is: Mr. David W. Shellhouse, Vice President, SE Operations, 2405 Lucien Way, Suite 200, Maitland, Florida 32751. Facility Location: Florida Gas Transmission Company operates the Highlands Compressor Station 29, which is located in Highlands County at 20179 State Road 70 in West Okeechobee, Florida. Project: This is a revision to Air Operating Permit No. 0550060-002-AO that includes the change to increase the horsepower and emissions of two (2) Solar Model Taurus 60 turbines (EU-001 and EU-002) and the addition of miscellaneous support equipment defined as one (1) pipeline liquids (SPL) above ground storage tank and one (1) contact water (PCW) above ground storage tank. The emissions are CO @34.7 tons/year, NOx @ 28.5 tons/year, SO2 @8.7 tons/year, VOC @ 1.0 tons/year and PM/PM10 (Particulate Matter) @ 2.1 tons/year. Permitting Authority: Applications for air construction permits are subject to review in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 403, Florida Statutes (F.S.) and Chapters 62-4, 62-210 and 62-212 of the Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.). The proposed project is not exempt from air permitting requirements and an air permit is required to perform the proposed work. The Permitting Authority responsible for making a permit determination for this project is the Department of Environmental Protections Air Resource Section in the South District Office. The Permitting Authoritys physical address is: 2295 Victoria Avenue, Suite 364, Fort Myers, Florida 33902. The Permitting Authoritys mailing address is: P.O. Box 2549, Fort Myers, Florida 33902-2549. The Permitting Authoritys telephone number is 239/344-5600. Project File: A complete project file is available for public inspection during the normal business hours of 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday (except legal holidays), at the physical address indicated above for the Permitting Authority. The complete project file includes the Draft Permit, the Technical Evaluation and Preliminary Determination, the application and information submitted by the applicant (exclusive of confidential records under Section 403.111, F.S.). Interested persons may contact the Permitting Authoritys project engineer for additional information at the address and phone number listed above. In addition, electronic copies of these documents are available on the following web site: HYPERLINK "http://www.dep.state.fl.us/air/emission/apds/default.asp "http://www.dep.state.fl.us/air/emission/apds/default.asp. Notice of Intent to Issue Air Permit: The Permitting Authority gives notice of its intent to issue an air construction permit to the applicant for the project described above. The applicant has provided reasonable assurance that operation of proposed equipment will not adversely impact air quality and that the project will comply with all appropriate provisions of Chapters 62-4, 62-204, 62-210, 62-212, 62-296 and 62-297, F.A.C. The Permitting Authority will issue a Final Permit in accordance with the conditions of the proposed Draft Permit unless a timely petition for an administrative hearing is filed under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. or unless public comment received in accordance with this notice results in a different decision or a significant change of terms or conditions. Comments: The Permitting Authority will accept written comments concerning the proposed Draft Permit for a period of 14 days from the date of publication of this Public Notice. Written comments must be received by the Permitting Authority by close of business (5:00 p.m.) on or before the end of the 14-day period. If written comments received result in a significant change to the Draft Permit, the Permitting Authority shall revise the Draft Permit and require, if applicable, another Public Notice. All comments filed will be made available for public inspection. Petitions: A person whose substantial interests are affected by the proposed permitting decision may petition for an administrative hearing in accordance with Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed with (received by) the Departments Agency Clerk in the Office of General Counsel of the Department of Environmental Protection at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station #35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000 Telephone: 850/245-2241). Petitions filed by any persons other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3), F.S. must be filed within 14 days of publication of this Public Notice or receipt of a written notice, whichever occurs first. Under Section 120.60(3), F.S., however, any person who asked the Permitting Authority for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of receipt of that notice, regardless of the date of publication. A petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above, at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of that persons right to request an administrative determination (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., or to intervene in this proceeding and participate as a party to it. Any subsequent intervention (in a proceeding initiated by another party) will be only at the approval of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205, F.A.C. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Permitting Authoritys action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agencys file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address and telephone number of the petitioner; the name address and telephone number of the petitioners representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioners substantial rights will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency action or proposed decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so state; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action including an explanation of how the alleged facts relate to the specific rules or statutes; and, (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agencys proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts upon which the Permitting Authoritys action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, F.A.C. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action, the filing of a petition means that the Permitting Authoritys final action may be different from the position taken by it in this Public Notice of Intent to Issue Air Permit. Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by any such final decision of the Permitting Authority on the application have the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding, in accordance with the requirements set forth above. Mediation: Mediation is not available for this proceeding. July 3, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-248 Division Tenth RICHARD JULIUS CHAGNOT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of RICHARD JULIUS CHAGNOT, deceased, whose date of death was February 20, 2011, and whose social security number is 048-24-9737, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) Y EARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is June 26, 2011. Personal Representative: Christine M. Miller 755 S. Broadway Avenue Bartow, Florida 33830 A ttorney for Personal Representative: STEPHEN M. MARTIN Florida Bar No. 0308234 STEPHEN M. MARTIN, P.A. 200 Lake Morton Drive, 2nd Floor Lakeland, Florida 33801 Telephone: (863)683-8765 June 26; July 3, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-278 IN RE: ESTATE OF PAUL BECKWITH RAHENKAMP, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of PAUL BECKWITH RAHENKAMP, deceased, whose date of death was February 25, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is July 3, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ SAMUEL MARK RAHENKAMP 1028 OLD ELLIS SQUARE AIKEN, SC 29801 /s/ Samuel M. Rahenkamp A ttorney for Personal Representative: CLIFFORD M. ABLES, III, P.A. 551 SOUTH COMMERCE AVE. SEBRING, FL 33870 Telephone: (863) 385-0112 / s/ Clifford M. Ables III FLORIDA BAR NO. 178379 July 3, 10, 2011 1050Legals SUN 'N LAKE OF SEBRING IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT INVITATION TO BID #11-016 The Board of Supervisors of the Sun 'n Lake of Sebring Improvement District will receive sealed bids at the Sun 'n Lake of Sebring Improvement District Office for: BID #11-016: CLUB HOUSE PARKING EXPANSION A Scope of Work, Plans, Specifications and other Bid Documents are available at Polston Engineering, Inc., 2925 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33870, 863-385-5564, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and between the hours of 11:30 A.M. and between the hours of 1:30 P.M. and 5:00 P.M., Monday through Friday. Bid Bond, Payment and or Performance Bonds will not be required for this project. Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked with the bid number and name as to identify the enclosed bids. Bids must be delivered to the Sun 'n Lake of Sebring Improvement District: Attention Board Secretary, 5306 Sun 'n Lake Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33872, so as to reach the said office no later than 2:00 PM, Tuesday, August 2, 2011. Proposals received later than the date and time specified will be rejected. The Sun 'n Lake of Sebring Improvement District will not be responsible for the late delivery of any bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail, or any other type of delivery service. The submitting firm will be required to comply with all applicable laws, regulations, rules and ordinances of local, state and federal authorities having jurisdiction, including, but not limited to: all provisions of the Federal Government Equal Employment Opportunity clauses issued by the Secretary of Labor on May 21, 1968 and published in the Federal Register (41 CFR Part 60-1, 33 F.2 7804); all provisions of the Public Entity Crimes (Fla. Sta. S287.133 et seq, as amended) and the provisions in Fla. Stat. S287.134, et seq., as amended, regarding discrimination. The Board of Supervisors reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of the Sun 'n Lake of Sebring Improvement District. The Board of Supervisors reserves the right of waive irregularities in the bid. Michael Wright, General Manager Sun 'n Lake of Sebring Improvement District 5306 Sun 'n Lake Blvd. Sebring, Florida 33872 July 3, 10, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001667 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF BANC OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-6, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-6 Plaintiff, vs. JAMIE PETTY JOHN AND KAREN PETTY JOHN, LAKE PARK VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC., AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on June 13, 2011, in the Circuit Court of HIGHLANDS County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida described as: CONDOMINIUM PARCEL KNOWN AS UNIT 4-A, BUILDING 4 OF LAKE PARK VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM PHASE II, A CONDOMINIUM, ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM THEREOF, RECORDED IN OFFICAL RECORDS BOOK 1478, PAGE 1233. PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 2841 LAKE JUNE BLVD., LAKE PLACID, FL 33852; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, on July 18, 2011 at 11 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 13th day of June, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk July 3, 10, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 10760GCS SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. SHANE E. MORGAN, an individual, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to a Uniform Final Judgment of Foreclosure of SunTrust Bank entered in the above-styled case, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida, on July 20, 2011, at 11:00 a.m., at the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. The legal description of the property being sold is described as: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PARCEL OF LAND, AND IMPROVEMENTS AND APPURTENANCES THERETO IN THE COUNTY OF HIGHLANDS, STATE OF FLORIDA TO WIT: 4600 MIGNON, LOT 9, BLK 349, SUN-N-LAKE EST OF SEBRING, FL. UNIT 16, BK 10 PG. 4 TOGETHER WITH 4562 MIGNON, LOT 10 BLK 349 SUN-N-LAKES EST OF SEBRING, FL. UNIT 16, BK 10, PG 4. The Property or its address is commonly known as Mignon Drive Lot 9 and 10, Sebring, Florida 33872. DATED this 13th day of June, 2011. (SEAL) CLERK OF THE COURT By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk June 26; July 3, 2011 SUN 'N LAKE OF SEBRING IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT INVITATION TO BID #11-015 The Board of Supervisors of the Sun 'n Lake of Sebring Improvement District will receive sealed bids at the Sun 'n Lake of Sebring Improvement District Office for: BID #11-015: MASTER LIFT STATION EMERGENCY PUMP A Scope of Work, Plans, Specifications and other Bid Documents are available at Polston Engineering, Inc., 2925 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33870, 863-385-5564, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and between the hours of 11:30 A.M. and between the hours of 1:30 P.M. and 5:00 P.M., Monday through Friday. Bid Bond, Payment and or Performance Bonds will not be required for this project. Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked with the bid number and name as to identify the enclosed bids. Bids must be delivered to the Sun 'n Lake of Sebring Improvement District: Attention Board Secretary, 5306 Sun 'n Lake Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33872, so as to reach the said office no later than 2:00 PM, Tuesday, August 2, 2011. Proposals received later than the date and time specified will be rejected. The Sun 'n Lake of Sebring Improvement District will not be responsible for the late delivery of any bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail, or any other type of delivery service. The submitting firm will be required to comply with all applicable laws, regulations, rules and ordinances of local, state and federal authorities having jurisdiction, including, but not limited to: all provisions of the Federal Government Equal Employment Opportunity clauses issued by the Secretary of Labor on May 21, 1968 and published in the Federal Register (41 CFR Part 60-1, 33 F.2 7804); all provisions of the Public Entity Crimes (Fla. Sta. S287.133 et seq, as amended) and the provisions in Fla. Stat. S287.134, et seq., as amended, regarding discrimination. The Board of Supervisors reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of the Sun 'n Lake of Sebring Improvement District. The Board of Supervisors reserves the right of waive irregularities in the bid. Michael Wright, General Manager Sun 'n Lake of Sebring Improvement District 5306 Sun 'n Lake Blvd. Sebring, Florida 33872 June 26; July 3, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS 1050LegalsHaving something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what youre doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 314-9876 WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 314-9876 Then shop till you drop! LOOKING FOR AN APARTMENT? Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 314-9876 GOING, GOING, GONE! NEWS-SUN CLASSIFIEDS GET RESULTS! DONTT DELAY, CALL TODAY, 314-9876

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Page 10ANews-Sun Sunday, July 3, 2011www.newssun.co m 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT CORT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 09-524 REGIONS BANK, as successor by merger to A mSOUTH BANK, Plaintiff, vs. MDG LAKE PLACID 2000, LLC, et. al., Defendants. CLERK'S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HERBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure as to Count I entered on June 15, 2011, by the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in Civil Case Number 09-524, I will sell at public sale on July 25, 2011, beginning at 11:00 a.m. to the highest bidder for cash, at the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, the property described on Exhibit ``A'' hereto. EXHIBIT A PARCEL A: The Southerly 970.0 feet of the unnamed tract lying between the Westerly right-of-way line of U.S. Highway No. 27 and the Easterly line of the alley abutting Block 2 of TEMPLE TERRACE SUBDIVISION as recorded in Plat Book 6, at page 36, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: Commence at the South Quarter corner of Section 24, Township 36 South, Range 29 East: thence North 1 degree 44'33'' West for a distance of 116.73 feet to a point on the Westerly right-of-way line of said U.S. Highway No. 27; thence North 52 degrees 05'15'', West along the said Westerly right-of-way line for a distance of 819.25 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue North 52 degrees 05'15'' West along said Westerly right-of-way line for a distance of 945.0 feet to a point; thence South 37 degrees 54'45'' West for a distance of 240.0 feet to a point; thence South 52 degrees 05'15'' East for a distance of 970.0 feet to a point on the Northerly right-of-way line of Lake Henry Drive; thence North 37 degrees 54'45'' East along said Northerly right-of-way line for a distance of 215.0 feet to a point of curvature of a circular curve to the left having for its elements a radius of 25.0 feet and a central angle of 90 degrees; thence along said curve for an arc distance of 39.27 feet to the point of beginning. PARCEL B: Commence a that certain Permanent Reference Monument located at the Southeasterly lot line of Lot 2 and the Southwesterly lot line of Lot 1, in Block 2, and the Easterly boundary, of Miami Drive, of TEMPLE TERRACE SUBDIVISION, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 6, page 36, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida; thence run North 37 degrees 54'45'' East to the Northeasterly lot line of Lot 2 and the Northwesterly lot line of Lot 1 and the edge of a 20 foot alley, all lying in and comprising a part of Block 2 of said TEMPLE TERRACE SUBDIVISION; thence continue North 37 degrees 54'45'' East for a distance of 20 feet to a point on the Northeasterly boundary of said 20 foot alley; thence run North 52 degrees 05'15'' West for a distance of 880 feet to a point on the Northeasterly boundary of said 20 foot alley and the Point of Beginning; thence run North 37 degrees 54'45'' East to the point of intersection with the South and Westerly right-of-way line of State Road #25 to a point of intersection with the Southeast right-of-way line of Lake Henry Drive as shown on plat of Temple Terrace Subdivision, as recorded in Plat Book 6, at page 36, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida; thence continue in a Northwesterly, Westerly and Southwesterly direction along the Southeastern right-of-way line of said Lake Henry Drive to the point of intersection with a 20 foot alley, said point lying in the Northeasterly terminus of said 20 foot alley at its point of intersection with the Southerly boundary of Lake Henry Drive; thence run South 52 degrees 05'15'' East for a distance of 970 feet to the Point of Beginning; said tract representing the Northwest half (NW1/2) of that certain tract lying Southeasterly of Lake Henry Drive in Block 3, and Northwesterly of Lake Henry Drive in Block 1, and between State Road No. 25 and Temple Terrace Subdivision as recorded in Plat Book 6, page 36, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Said land lying in and comprising a part of Section 24, Township 36 South, Range 29 East. LESS AND EXCEPT: A portion of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 24, Township 36 South, Range 29 East, Highlands County, Florida, lying Northeasterly of and contiguous with the Northeasterly line of a twenty (20.00) foot Alley as shown on the plat of TEMPLE TERRACE, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 6 at page 36 of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northeasterly corner of Lot 1, Block 2 of the aforesaid TEMPLE TERRACE, said point being on the Northwesterly right-of-way line of Lake Henry Drive; thence North 37 degrees 54'45'' East along the Northwesterly right-of-way line of said Lake Henry Drive a distance of 20.00 feet to the Northeasterly corner of said 20.00 foot A lley; thence North 52 degrees 05'15'' West along the Northeasterly line of said 20.00 foot Alley a distance of 105.00 feet to a point of curvature, said point being the Point of Beginning of the Tract of land hereinafter to be described; thence Northwesterly along a circular curve to the right, having for its elements a radius of 100.00 feet, a central angle of 36 degrees 52'12'' for an arc distance of 64.35 feet; thence North 52 degrees 05'15'' West parallel to the Northeasterly line of said 20.00 foot Alley for a distance of 1,610 feet to a point on a circular curve; thence Southwesterly along a circular curve to the left, having for its elements a radius of 100.00 feet, a central angle of 36 degrees 52'12'' for an arc distance of 64.35 feet to a point of tangency; said point being on the Northeasterly line of said 20.00 foot Alley; thence South 52 degrees 05'15'' East along the Northeasterly line of said 20.00 foot Alley for a distance of 1,735 feet to the Point of Beginning. LESS AND EXCEPT: A portion of land lying in Section 24, Township 36 South, Range 29 East, Highlands County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the South Quarter corner of said Section 24, Township 36 South, Range 29 East; thence North 01 degrees 44'30'' West, 116.81 feet to the Southwesterly right-of-way line of U.S. Highway No. 27; thence North 52 degrees 05'15'' West along said Southwesterly right-of-way line, 2,461.24 feet to a point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northeast, having for its elements a radius of 3,894.72 feet and a central angle of 03 degrees 37'39''; thence Northwesterly along said curve to the right, an arc length of 246.58 feet to a point of reverse curvature of a curve concave to the South having for its elements a radius of 25.00 feet and a central angle of 93 degrees 37'39''; thence Westerly along said curve to the left, an arc length of 40.85 feet to the Southeasterly right of way line of Lake Henry Drive; thence South 37 degrees 54'45'' West along said Southeasterly right of way line, a distance of 41.82 feet for the point of beginning; thence South 52 degrees 05'15'' East, a distance of 5.00 feet; thence South 37 degrees 54'45'' West, 181.03 feet; thence North 52 degrees 05'15'' West, 5.00 feet to the aforementioned Southeasterly right of way line of Lake Henry Drive; thence North 37 degrees 54'45'' East along said Southeasterly right of way line, 181.03 feet to the point of beginning. LESS AND EXCEPT A portion of land lying in Section 24, Township 36 South, Range 29 East, Highlands County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the South Quarter corner of said Section 24, Township 36 South, Range 29 East; thence North 01 degrees 44'30'' West, 116.81 feet to the Southwesterly right of way line of U.S. Highway No. 27; thence North 52 degrees 05'15'' West along said Southwesterly right of way line, 819.24 feet to a non tangent curve concave to the West, having for its elements a radius of 25.00 feet and a central angle of 90 degrees 00'00; thence Southerly along said curve to the right, an arc length of 39.27 feet, said arc subtended by a chord which bears South 07 degrees 05'15'' East, to the point of tangency and for the point of beginning; thence South 37 degrees 54'45'' West along said right of way line, 215.00 feet; thence North 52 degrees 05'15'' West departing said Northwesterly right of way line, 5.00 feet; thence North 37 degrees 54'45'' East, parallel with said Northwesterly right of way line 215.00 feet; thence South 52 degrees 05'15'' East, 5.00 feet DUMMY 09 SERVICE DIRECTORY DUMMY 5X21.5 PROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY PROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY Service € Repair € Supplies € Equipment Delivered Right to your DoorPool Service & Mobile Retail(863) 382-7728Fax (863) 402-2200 poolparadise101@aol.com www.poolparadiseonline.com Brad & Julie Kurtz WANDA KLINE WEIGHT LOSS & WELLNESSSee what one drop of your blood indicates as to YOUR nutritional health and well-being. By appointment only863-414-4066 LIVEBLOODANALYSISŽ & WILLIAMSJANITORIALCARPETCLEANING$1095 Per Room3 Rooms Minimum € Upholstery Cleaning € All Types of Flooring € Free EstimatesLic € Bonded € Ins(863) 214-1940 863-465-7491TREE SERVICE, INC.Joe Johnsons TRIMMING € REMOVAL SOD INSTALLATION € STUMP GRINDING LOT CLEARING € PRESSURE CLEANING Will Beat Any Written Estimate!Peoples Choice Award Free Estimates Licensed & Insured No job is too small. We can take care of all your home repairs and maintenance needs.€ Small Flooring Jobs € Some Electric & Plumbing863-381-6677 Free Estimates Rogers Handyman Services Roger McCartney JR licensed and insured Freedom Lawn CareGet the freedom you deserveCarl Horton ~OwnerVet. & Sr. Discount € Lawn Maintenance € Landscaping € Small Tree Work € Clean Ups € Free Estimates863-655-2526 Service Available 7 Days A Week Website: extraordinaireairconditioning.com EXTRAORDINAIRE POOL HEATERS & AIR CONDITIONING LLC 863-451-2399Mike & Kandy Sheldone CEO/Owner Lic# CAC 1816569All Service Calls $40 Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 A & E LAWN MOWER REPAIRNew & Used Parts12 S. Forest Ave. Avon Park, FL 33825863-452-0389Push & Ride Lawnmowers€Change Oil €Clean filters €Sharpen Blades$25.95 -Landscaping-Mowing-Trimming-Rocks-Mulch-BordersSod & Irrigation Installation Complete Lawn Maintenance Licensed & Insured No Job Too Small! 863-314-0969 Install doors, windows, flooring, plumbing & more!Licensed & InsuredLic# HM0096HANDYMAN BOBCall 863-452-5201 or 863-449-1744 World Famous Healthier CoffeeŽInfused with The King of HerbsŽ100% Certified Organic Ganoderma Lucidum What our coffee does. €Balances PH Levels €Provides Energy €Oxygenates the Body €Increases Stamina €Boots Immune System €Natural DetoxificationsIts Your Health... you choose! Call for a Free Sample 863-651-1508 ORGANOGOLDChange your Coffee, Change your LifeGwen Sutton-Boddie CEO of Gwens Cafe gwenette@mail.usf.edu www.gwenscafe.organogold.com(863) 651-1508 Robert W. Kline -Pinstriping-Custom Graphics-Wheel Well Moldings-Body Side Moldings-Door Edge Guards863-414-2178863-382-0310 DIDYOU KNOW?The News Sun Professional Service Directory is one of the most economoical & effective means of advertising today?Call Anita at: 863-385-6155 or e-mail: amarsella@newssun.com for details!

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, July 3, 2011Page 11 A 1998 CHRYSLERConcorde White, 4 door, A/C, new tires, needs battery. $1200 obo. 863-452-0027 or 863-873-0627. Leave message. 9450Automotive for Sale 9000 Transportation 8000 RecreationLIFT FORElec. Chair or Scooter. $400.obo. Call 863-699-5517 7560Medical Supplies& EquipmentWORLD'S BESTMANGOS Haden / Lake Jackson Call or Text 863-381-5034 7540Fresh Fruits &Vegetables SHIH TZUFemale puppy for sale. $300 Call 863-382-3808/ cell 863-446-1402 or 863-446-4218. PUPPIES AKC/ Golden Retriever. Blonde. Health cert. Parents on premises. 8 weeks old. $950. Call 863-634-2395 NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states tha t all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of in testinal and external parasites. FREE TOGOOD HOME Adult Male Black Cat, long hair, approx 3-4 yrs old. Needs to be only pet in home, Call 863-658-1273 CKC REGISTEREDBoxer Puppies 1st shots, Health certificates, tails cropped. Ready 718/2011. $650 Call 863-214-0772 or 863-214-2108 7520Pets & Supplies WASHER &DRYER SET works well, white in color. $100 obo. 863-381-4529 TWIN HEADBOARDBookcase. Light oak. $40. Call 863-453-0569. RECLINER -Lazy Boy / tan. $95. 863-212-0602 PERFECT SIT-UPMachine. Paid $100. Sell $50. Call 863-386-5445 LOVE SEATLazy Seat / Pastel shade $100. 863-212-0602 GOLF DRIVER,PING G5, 12* 43" shaft w/cover. $60. 863-386-5445 FILE CABINETHeavy duty metal, 2 drawer. $40. Call 863-453-0569. COMPUTER DESK,hutch type, keyboard drawer, cd rack, printer shelf, tower cupboard. $45. 863-332-5012 7310Bargain BuysPOOL TABLELegacy / 8 foot / 3/4 inch slate with accessories. $1100. 863-471-2002 7300Miscellaneous DINING TABLEWrought iron w/glass top w/4 arm chairs, good cond. $100 Call 863-332-5012. DINING ROOMTABLE 42 x 60. Honey Oak w/20" leaf. 6 matching ladder bac k chairs w/brown fabric seats. Excel cond. $400.obo. Call 863-441-2065 7180FurnitureTELEVISION 24".color w/remote. Excel cond. $150. firm. 863-699-2742 7100TV, Radio, & StereoINSIGHT AUCTIONEERSJuly 9th Public Auction 9AM 5000 State Rd 66 Sebring, Fl. Farm & Construction Equipment Vehicles. Other misc New Customers, $200 cash Dep. 863-386-1225 InsightAuction.com AU2567/AB1898 7020Auctions 7000 Merchandise SEBRING FURNISHEDroom w/kitchen. $110. a week incl. electric & water. Call 863-655-0137 SEBRING -Room for Rent. Adults only. Must be employed. Call 863-471-2002 6400Rooms for RentSEBRING 1/1Cottage. $290. month. + $290 sec. No Pets www.620bowman.itgo.com or Call 863-382-4655. 6350Cottages for RentSEBRING HILLS2BR, 2BA, 2car gar. Screened Porch. Modern updated home. Enjoy low electric bills. Appl. incl. 1 yr. lease, no pets or smoke. $725. mo. + sec. Call 863-381-3990 6300Unfurnished Houses SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 PLACID LAKESNewer, very clean 3/2/2. Many upgrades. Nice area. Non-smoker. $875. per mo. Call 863-465-3838 or 863-441-2844. 6300Unfurnished HousesSEBRING SENIORCitizen. 2240 Avalon Rd. 3/2 furn. Small animals ok. Near Shopping Center & Senior Club References $700. first/last. Call 305-387-6863 after 4pm. or 863-382-0912 or 863-273-3129. 6250Furnished Houses SEBRING (2)1BR extra large, $600 mo./ 1BR Cozy with porch, $500 mo. Lake View Walk to Beach & Historic Circle. Quiet / Pets Welcome. W / D on site 863-381-7095 SEBRING FREE1/2 mo. rent special. Free cable. Large clean 1/1. New paint, tile floors, central A/C. Quiet/safe. Call 863-385-1999 SEBRING CLEAN quiet area. Small 3/1 unfurnished. Central A/C, vaulted ceiling, tile floors. Lawn maintenance incl. Small pets ok. $415. per mo. RENTED!!! AVON PARKClean, Quiet: Studios 1BR, 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., form $375/mp. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook up. Students/Seniors Discount Call 863-602-4683 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 SEBRING -1BR, 1BA. Fresh paint. Includes water. $395 / mo. Call Gary Johnson, 863-381-1861. RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 1BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartmentsLAKE PLACIDFully Furnished, Beautiful Gulf Studio w/kitchenette, laundry & pool. Elec. & water paid. $395. per mo. $500. deposit. No pets, no smoking. Call 863-243-4580 6150FurnishedApartments SEBRING 2/1,tile floors. Most pets ok. 4911 Manatee. $490. per mo. Call 863-446-7274 SEBRING 2/1,Tile floors, Screened porch, Fenced yard ,most pets ok. 1926 & 28 Theodore St. $550. per mo. $300 security. Call 863-446-7274 SEBRING -2BR, 1BA. Newly Remodeled. $425. per mo. Call for details. 863-381-0357 or 863-446-2838. SEBRING -2 BR /1BA, Quiet neighborhood, close to Hospital & H.S., Washer/Dryer hookup. Central heat/air. No smoke / pet. $525. + $500. security. Call 863-655-0982 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 RentalsPALM HARBORHOMES Has closed 2 Model Centers Save up to 60K on select models Call Today! 800-622-2832 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesSEBRING BEAUTIFUL5 acres on Selah Rd. 2 Barns, 2 Wells w/pumps. Older double wide 3/2. Large Oaks in front & back yards. Close to Highlands Hammock. $150,000. Firm. Call 863-285-6503 4260Acreage for SaleVACANT LOTLorida. 163' x 270' approx. 1 acre. $4500.. By owner. 954-983-7088. 4220Lots for Sale 4000 Real EstateCASH FORModel Trains, all gauges welcome. Large or small collections. Call 352-592-5081 3050BusinessOpportunities 3000 FinancialNOW HIRINGFor Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) for non-medical home health. You must have a state certification, and pass a criminal & driving record check. Submit your application on line: ck381.ersp.biz/employment NATIONAL BEVERAGEManufacturer seeking Equipment Maintenance Tech. for refurbishing in shop juice dispensing equipment. Full time w/benefits. Bilingual & experience preferred but will train. Fax resume to 863-635-7630 or phone 863-635-8454 2100Help WantedLPN -Needed in busy pediatric office in Sebring. Immediate opening. Qualifications: Must be certified with experience in phlebotomy and medical office experience, computer literate, capable of multi-tasking and possess good public relation skills. Excellent Benefits. Salary commensurate with experience. Fax resume to 863-471-9340 or email to cfmtabitha@gmail.com 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentCHILD CAREin private home 24-7, license # F10HI0515, 20 yr. exp. Ages 2 & up. CPR, first aid, & CDA. Call for appt. 863-453-6439 1500Child Care Services 1100Announcements HIGHLANDS COUNTYBOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GENERAL SERVICES/PURCHASING REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR DESIGN-BUILD SERVICES The Board of County Commissioners, Highlands County, Sebring, Florida, will receive proposals in the County Purchasing Department for the following requirement:RFP 11-048 DESIGN … BUILD SERVICES FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF A PROFESSIONAL OFFICE BUILDING FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTYS OFFICE OF THE SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONSSpecific proposals are not solicited at this time. Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, Acting Director, Highlands County General Services / Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 Telephone: 863-402-6524; Fax: 863-402-6735, or by E-Mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:dgilbert@hcbcc.org" dgilbert@hcbcc.org Vendor qualification and selection shall be based on the evaluation process and criteria stated in the RFP. A MANDATORY Pre-Proposal conference will be held on Wednesday; JULY 13TH, 2011 at 10:00 A.M. in the County Engineers Conference / Training Room, (Annex Building) 505 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. Proposal submissions must be sealed and marked with the name of the proposer, and the RFP number and title RFP 11-048 DESIGN … BUILD SERVICES FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF A PROFESSIONAL OFFICE BUILDING FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTYS OFFICE OF THE SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS Ž so as to identify the enclosed proposal. Each submittal shall include (1) one original and (10) ten copies of the proposal. Proposals must be delivered to Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803, so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., Thursday, AUGUST 4TH, 2011, at which time they will be opened. Proposals received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The Board will not be responsible for the late deliveries of proposals that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service. One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at the above bid opening. Highlands County Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this bid. The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made in the best interest of Highlands County. The Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. The Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mrs. Melissa Bruns, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: mbruns@hcbcc.org. Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service.Board of County Commissioners, Purchasing Department, Highlands County, Florida Website: HYPERLINK "http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net July 3, 10, 2011 1055HighlandsCounty LegalsHIGHLANDS COUNTYBOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING INVITATION TO BID (ITB) The Board of County Commissioners, Highlands County, Sebring, Florida, (COUNTY) will receive sealed bids in the County Purchasing Department for: ITB … 11-049 US-27 A T SEBRING LAKES BOULEVARD, STREET LIGHTING PROJECT No. 08019, FM No. 414512-2-58-01Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, Assistant Director, Highlands County General Services / Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 Telephone: 863-402-6524, E-Mail: dgilbert@hcbcc.org A NON-MANDATORY Pre-Bid meeting will be held at Wednesday; JULY 13TH, 2011 at 1:00 P.M. in the Engineering Conference Room, 505 South Commerce A venue, Sebring, Florida 33870. All potential bidders are encouraged attend this meeting. Submit one (1) original and two (2) copies of your bid form, bid security and other required data in a sealed envelope and marked with the bid number and name so as to identify the enclosed bid submittal. Bids must be delivered to Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., Thursday, AUGUST 4TH, 2011 at which time they will be opened. Bids received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The COUNTY will not be responsible for the late deliveries of bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service. One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at either or both of the above meetings. Vendors submitting responses must submit bids on all work to receive consideration. A Bid Bond or Cashiers Check in an amount of five percent (5%) of the bid must be included on bids over $100,000.00. If the successful bid is greater than $200,000.00, a Public Construction Bond will be required. An Irrevocable Letter of Credit may be considered in lieu of the Public Construction Bond depending on its verbiage. Bid must be accompanied by evidence of bidder's qualifications to do business in the State of Florida, in accordance with F.S. 489. The principal features of the Project are: To provide all labor, materials and equipment to install highway lighting system at the intersection of US 27 AT SEBRING LAKES BOULEVARD in accordance with the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge Construction (2010 Edition), FDOT Design Standards for Design, Construction, Maintenance and Utility Operations on the State Highway System (2010 Edition), and highway lighting construction plans.The COUNTY reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsive and responsible BIDDER whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of Highlands County. The COUNTY reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. The Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. The Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mrs. Melissa Bruns, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: mbruns@hcbcc.org. Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service. Board of County Commissioners, Purchasing Department, Highlands County, Florida Website: HYPERLINK"http://www.hcbcc.net" www.hcbcc.net July 3, 10, 2011 1055HighlandsCounty Legals 1050LegalsCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:314-9876 News-Sun Classified Classified ads get fast results Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 314-9876to the point of beginning. A NY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED this 15th day of June, 2011. ` `If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, (863)534-4690, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice of Foreclosure Sale; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call TDD (863)534-7777 or Florida Relay Service 711, no later than five (5) days prior to this proceeding.'' BOB GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Annette E. Daff As Deputy ClerkCROSS COUNTRY 3X10.5AVON PARK HOUSING 1X4 AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3DUMMY 09 SUBSCRIPTION SALES 2X2.5DUMMY 09 PAGE DESIGNER 2X4HIGHPOINT/ NORTHGATE FURNITURE 1X3

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Page 12ANews-SunSunday, July 3, 2011www.newssun.comA TODAYA p.m. shower or thunderstorm94 / 73Winds: E at 7-14 mphSome sun, a t-storm in the p.m.93 / 74Winds: E at 6-12 mphMONDAYAn afternoon thunderstorm possible93 / 75Winds: ENE at 7-14 mphTUESDAYSome sun with a t-storm possible92 / 76Winds: NE at 8-16 mphWEDNESDAYAn afternoon thunderstorm in spots94 / 75Winds: NE at 7-14 mphTHURSDAY CityHi/Lo/WHi/Lo/WHi/Lo/WCityHi/Lo/WHi/Lo/WHi/Lo/W TodayMon.Tue.TodayMon.Tue. W ashington 92/73 NewYork 85/72 Miami 89/79 Atlanta 94/72 Detroit 82/64 Houston 97/73 Chicago 83/63 Minneapolis 86/67 Kansas City 92/71 E l Paso 94/75 Denver 96/64 B illings 94/61 Los Angeles 89/67 San Francisco 8 0/53 Seattle 68/51 W ashington 92/73 NewYork 85/72 Miami 89/79 Atlanta 9 4/72 Detroit 82/64 Houston 97/73 C hicago 83/63 Minneapolis 86/67 Kansas City 92/71 El Paso 94/75 Denver 96/64 Billings 9 4/61 Los Angeles 89/67 S an Francisco 80/53 Seattle 68/51 Summerlike heat and humidity will continue from the Deep South to the mid-Atlantic today, however less humid air will work into the Great Lakes region. In between, a cold front will produce locally gusty thunderstorms, extending from the mid-Mississippi Valley to the big cities of the Northeast later in the day. Meanwhile, the central and s outhern Plains will continue to sizzle, with many once again topping out above the century mark. Likewise, the D esert Southwest will remain exceptionally hot. U.S. Cities National Forecast for July 3Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.C ityHi/Lo/WHi/Lo/WHi/Lo/WCityHi/Lo/WHi/Lo/WHi/Lo/W T odayMon.Tue.TodayMon.Tue. World Cities National SummaryC ityHi/Lo/WHi/Lo/WHi/Lo/WCityHi/Lo/WHi/Lo/WHi/Lo/W T odayMon.Tue.TodayMon.Tue. W eather (Wssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow urries, snsnow, iice. A lbuquerque90/70/pc94/70/t91/69/pc A tlanta94/72/t94/74/pc95/74/t Baltimore92/67/t90/63/t88/66/s Birmingham96/75/s96/73/pc95/74/t Boston82/68/t86/68/t84/67/s Charlotte94/69/t94/69/t93/70/t C heyenne92/60/t92/59/s85/59/pc C hicago83/63/pc88/65/pc88/70/pc C leveland86/62/pc81/61/s84/65/s C olumbus86/65/t86/64/pc88/67/s Dallas99/75/pc101/75/s102/77/s Denver96/64/t100/63/s94/62/s Detroit82/64/pc82/65/s86/68/s Harrisburg88/64/t89/60/pc89/63/s H onolulu88/72/pc87/74/pc88/75/s H ouston97/73/pc97/73/t95/73/pc I ndianapolis88/67/t87/66/pc89/70/s J ackson, MS98/72/s97/73/pc94/73/t Kansas City92/71/t92/73/t98/73/s Lexington96/68/t90/64/pc92/65/pc Little Rock97/72/s97/73/pc97/74/t L os Angeles89/67/pc89/67/pc88/68/pc L ouisville96/73/t92/69/pc95/71/pc Memphis98/77/s99/75/pc96/76/t Milwaukee82/63/pc81/66/pc84/68/pc Minneapolis86/67/c89/74/pc89/67/pc Nashville96/72/s96/72/t94/71/t N ew Orleans93/75/t93/75/t92/76/t N ew York City85/72/t88/70/t88/70/s N orfolk92/75/pc91/74/t87/73/t O klahoma City102/72/pc101/71/s100/72/s Philadelphia88/72/t90/68/pc89/70/s Phoenix111/90/t108/92/t109/89/t Pittsburgh86/59/t86/57/pc86/60/s Portland, ME74/63/t84/59/t82/58/s P ortland, OR74/53/pc81/56/s83/59/s R aleigh96/72/pc96/70/t94/70/t R ochester82/61/t80/58/pc84/62/s S t. Louis93/76/t93/76/t93/76/s San Francisco80/53/s71/55/s76/57/s Seattle68/51/pc76/53/s78/55/s Wash., DC92/73/t92/70/t91/70/pc C ape Coral93/74/t93/74/t93/75/t C learwater94/76/t93/77/t92/78/t C oral Springs89/77/t88/77/t91/78/t D aytona Beach88/73/pc89/73/pc91/75/t Ft. Laud. Bch89/79/t88/81/t90/80/t F ort Myers92/74/t92/75/t93/75/t G ainesville93/65/pc93/70/t93/71/t H ollywood90/77/t90/77/t91/79/t Homestead AFB88/77/t88/78/t89/79/t J acksonville90/68/s92/69/pc94/71/pc K ey West89/81/pc91/80/t91/82/t M iami89/79/t89/79/t91/80/t O keechobee88/73/t88/73/t90/75/t O rlando92/71/pc92/74/t93/74/t P embroke Pines90/77/t90/77/t91/79/t St. Augustine86/72/pc88/73/pc90/75/pc S t. Petersburg94/77/t93/77/t92/78/t S arasota92/74/t91/76/t93/76/t T allahassee96/70/pc95/69/pc97/73/pc Tampa92/77/t92/77/t93/77/t W Palm Bch88/77/t89/78/t90/78/t W inter Haven93/73/pc94/75/t93/74/t A capulco84/79/r88/79/sh89/79/t A thens90/72/s89/73/s91/75/s B eirut84/70/s84/70/s84/72/s B erlin73/60/r75/59/sh76/59/c B ermuda80/75/r80/74/sh80/75/sh C algary80/46/t76/51/s78/48/s D ublin64/48/pc67/50/pc64/52/sh Edmonton78/46/t69/46/s74/50/s Freeport89/77/pc90/77/t90/77/t G eneva77/54/s80/56/pc80/60/s Havana90/72/t88/73/t86/75/t Hong Kong90/81/s91/82/s91/81/pc Jerusalem81/57/s81/57/s80/59/s Johannesburg64/43/s62/40/s50/28/rK iev72/54/pc69/56/sh74/60/pc L ondon74/54/s73/52/s75/57/pc M ontreal81/64/t82/63/pc82/64/s M oscow77/59/sh77/61/t74/58/r N ice80/66/s78/66/sh81/68/s O ttawa82/60/t83/60/pc85/62/s Q uebec79/61/t79/61/c79/61/s R io de Janeiro76/63/s65/61/r70/64/r S eoul77/68/r88/70/s88/68/s S ingapore88/79/t88/79/t90/77/t S ydney68/52/pc68/50/pc63/46/s T oronto82/64/pc81/64/s85/64/s V ancouver70/50/sh70/53/s72/57/s Vienna68/58/c74/64/sh75/64/sh W arsaw62/49/r65/55/sh64/54/r Winnipeg86/62/t85/62/t79/57/pc A lmanac R eadings at Palm Beach H igh............................................ 10:51 a.m. L ow............................................... 4:22 a.m. High............................................ 11:23 p.m. Low............................................... 4:38 p.m.I ntervals of clouds and sunshine today with a shower or t hunderstorm around during the afternoon. A thunderstorm around this evening. A thunderstorm tomorrow afternoon. Tuesday: a thunderstorm possible in the afternoon.On July 3, 1966, northwest winds pushed t emperatures to a record-breaking 102 deg rees in Hartford, Conn., and 107 in New York C ity and Harrisburg, Pa. A shower or thunderstorm this afternoon. Winds east 7-14 mph. Expect 4-8 hours of sunshine with a 55% chance of precipitation and average relative humidity 60%. t &WFOBEESFTTFTNBZXBUFSPO5IVSTEBZBOE Sunday. t 0EEBEESFTTFTNBZXBUFSPO8FEOFTEBZ and Saturday. t"MMXBUFSJOHTIPVMEUBLFQMBDFCFGPSF a.m. and after 4 p.m. F irstFullLastNew July 8July 15July 23July 30 T odayMonday S unrise6:38 a.m.6:38 a.m. S unset8:22 p.m.8:22 p.m. M oonrise8:54 a.m.9:56 a.m. M oonset10:13 p.m.10:53 p.m.F orecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Jacksonville 90/68 Gainesville 93/65 Ocala 93/69 Daytona Beach 88/73 Orlando 92/71 Winter Haven 93/73 Tampa 92/77 Clearwater 94/76 St. Petersburg 94/77 Sarasota 92/74 Fort Myers 92/74 Naples 92/74 Okeechobee 88/73 West Palm Beach 88/77 Fort Lauderdale 8 9/79 Miami 89/79 Tallahassee 96/70 Apalachicola 91/71 Pensacola 93/77 Key West Avon Park 93/73 Sebring 94/73 Lorida 91/73 Lake Placid 93/71 Venus 93/71 B righton 91/73 TidesR eadings at St. Petersburg High.............................................. 5:30 a.m. L ow............................................... 8:58 a.m. H igh.............................................. 3:29 p.m. L ow............................................. 11:15 p.m. UV Index TodayThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Indexnumber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0 -2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 1 0 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m. 6 10 10 5 W eather History F arm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities W ater Restrictions Regional SummaryShown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Five-Day forecast for Highlands County 89/81 Lake Levels Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ................................. 9.77 Normal............................................... 14.51 R eadings as of 7 a.m. yesterdayTemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHigh Tuesday ......................................... 87 Low Tuesday .......................................... 70 H igh Wednesday .................................... 89 Low Wednesday ..................................... 67 High Thursday ....................................... 88 L ow Thursday ........................................ 69H eat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayR elative humidity .................................. 45% E xpected air temperature ....................... 92 M akes it feel like .................................... 97B arometerT uesday ...............................................29.94 W ednesday .........................................29.94 T hursday............................................. 29.91PrecipitationTuesday ...............................................0.26 Wednesday .........................................0.07 Thursday............................................. 0.55 M onth to date ..................................... 0.55 Y ear to date ....................................... 22.90

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SPORTS B SECTION News-Sun Sunday, July 3, 2011 And Another Thing... Dan Hoehne Each week Sports Illustrated puts in a little blurb noting ‘This week’s sign that the apocalypse is upon us.’ I can only think that next week’s sign was reached in the wee hours of Friday morning, when the NBA lockout officially commenced. When the old collective bargaining agreement expired at midnight Thursday, with the sides apparently miles apart in their negotiations, the owners did what they said they would do, locked the players out and as of now, the business of professional basketball is closed. So, at the moment, two of the top three professional sports leagues in America are not open for business due to labor negotiations. Granted, it is the offseason for both the NFLand NBA, so in some ways it doesn’t really matter. But pro football is getting dangerously close to a time where things will be effected. And we should be in the NBA’s free agency signing period, which was one of the most intriguing parts of last summer. It’s kind of hard to get your mind around it, really. At least people can identify with, or maybe it’s better to say, can understand the plight of NFLplayers. Sure, the top-tier guys make crazy money, but there are plenty who don’t get the “set you up for a lifetime” contracts, or get injured too early and the non-guaranteed portion of the contract is never picked up. For the vast majority of professional football players, there is little to no job security and the risk of a career ending injury around every corner. An average career length of 3.5 years, I believe, was the latest number I saw, so it’s understandable for the players union to want to get what they can in the short amount time they have. Professional basketball players, meanwhile, have guaranteed contracts, make more, on average, and have longer careers. They made out like bandits, as it turned out, with the just past CBA, and aren’t willing to give much back. They claim it’s not their fault that the owners signed too many bad contracts and are now losing money because of that, combined with the bad economy. But it’s more like, the last collectively bargained agreement was set up with too many ways for the big contracts to be allowed. Bigger market teams could afford to sign the often ridiculously long and costly contracts and pay the luxury tax. But that forced the smaller Labor disputes? I thought this was sports? See NBA, Page 4B News-Sun photos by DAN HOEHNE Kyle Helms, above, hit three three-run home runs in Sebring two wins Friday night. The hometown AllStars hit 11 homers, with another three by Trey Frazier, below, in blowout wins over Okeechobee and Lake Placid. By BRIAN MAHONEY Associated PressNEWYORK — No free agency now, maybe no games later. The NBAlockout claimed a quick casualty in Day 1, when the free agency period did not open as usual on July 1. Games eventually could be lost, too, if owners and players can’t make progress whenever they start talking again. “It’s going to get ugly. I’ve already been on the record saying I don’t think they’re going to play at all next season,” Hall of Famer and TNTanalyst Charles Barkley said Friday. The last lockout reduced the 1998-99 season to 50 games, and players say they’re prepared to hang in as long as necessary this time, rather than agree to the financial changes owners are seeking. The silence of this July 1 was a sad contrast to the dizzying events of exactly one year earlier, when LeBron James welcomed the New York Knicks and New Jersey Nets to Cleveland to hear their pitches, and teams crisscrossed the country in pursuit of other stars that were available. Interest in the leag ue surged from there, right on through the NBAfinals that drew some of the bes t TVratings the event had seen in years. “Basketball as a sport is in such a great place righ t now. It’s a shame it came to this,” agent Marc Cornstein said. “Hopefully, we can resolve this in a fair and equitable way.” And, owners would add, a profitable one. Tired o f losing millions in a system that has guaranteed players 57 percent of revenues, they want an overhaul tha t would allow small-marke t teams to compete with the big spenders, and all o f them to make money. Deputy Commissione r Adam Silver has said some teams would be better off if there were no games this season, though stressed no owner wanted that to happen. The NHLshut down fo r a year to get the salary cap system it sought. With NBAowners seeking the same result, the question is: Would they be willing to take the same route? “I’m not scared. I’m resigned to the potential No free agency now, maybe no NBA games later See LABOR, Page 4B By JENNAFRYER Associated PressDAYTONABEACH — Joey Logano needed a boost to turn around his slumping season. It started last weekend on the road course at Sonoma and continued on the high banks of Daytona. Logano picked up his first win of the season Friday night with a last-lap push from teammate Kyle Busch to win the Nationwide Series race at Daytona International Speedway. It comes on the heels of him winning the pole at Sonoma then finishing a career-high sixth on the road course. “I really needed it. I’ve been digging as hard as I possibly can. I’ve been confused,” Logano said. “I don’t know what to do different, but the big thing is just having some momentum on your side and you’ll be amazed at what it can do. This is definitely a huge win for me for a lot of reasons. I’m pretty pumped up.” He was the unlikely winner, though, as Danica Patrick flirted several times with the victory. She had help at various times from Tony Stewart, and was paired in the closing laps with JR Motorsports teammate Aric Almirola. Stewart at that point had hooked up with Elliott Sadler and was committed to pushing his Kevin Harvick Inc. teammate to the win. The Sadler-Stewart pairing took the lead from the Patrick-Almirola tandem, and Patrick had to weave her way back to mount another pass. Then Logano-Busch charged to the front on the final lap, leaving all the other contenders stuck in a tight pack of traffic. As Logano closed in on the finish line, Mike Wallace squeezed Patrick against the wall, she bounced back into the pack and an eight-car accident marred the finish. Sadler and Stewart were also in the wreck, and Almirola had to climb from Logano wins at Daytona with help from Kyle Busch MCTphoto Nationwide driver Joey Logano finishes first in the 10th Annual Subway Jalapeno 250 in his SportsClip Toyota at Daytona International Speedway Friday. See NASCAR, Page 4B By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING – Friday’s evening of cool rains paved the way to the midday Saturday swelter, which may have quieted the booming bats of the Sebring Ozone All-Stars, but it didn’t nearly silence them enough in the District 8 title game championship over Okeechobee by a 15-0 score at the Max Long Recreational Complex. In the rematch from Friday’s tournament opener, young Brahman squad seemed to learn not to let the Sebring sluggers get their arms extended and kept the ball inside. That lead to a downturn in the power numbers, but the junior Blue Streaks scored with the small ball, putting three across in the first and four in the second on a variety of singles and walks. “It was hot out there and that may have gotten us off to a slow start with the bats,” head coach Dean Frazier said. But with the 7-0 lead heading into the bottom of the third, the bats heated up to match the temperature as two singles sandwiched a walk to load the bases. That’s when number nine hitter Everett Hurst put the hurt on as he took a fastball up and elevated it up, up and over the center-field wall for a grand slam. With one out, Seth Cannady walked ahead of Jimmy Peck’s no-doubter to center and the lead was up to 13-0, two away from a threeinning mercy rule. But then it was more small ball that brought it home. Kyle Helms walked and moved to third on Josh Crouch’s double before Daniel Simons brought them both in with a single for the title. “I was real proud of Everett,” Frazier said. “It shows what you can do when you’ve 12 players as talented as I have. He got a shot to get some at bats today and he came through in a big way.” So now it’s on to the Dixie Ozone State Championship tournament where defending World Series champion Sebring will look to defend its’state title as well, beginning July 16 at the Durrah Martin Baseball Complex in Avon Park. Okeechobee, as district runner-up, also qualified for the state tournament.Friday fireworksThe week of rains leading up to Friday’s start of the Dixie Ozone District 8 Tournament could well have had an adverse effect on either or all of the three teams competing – Sebring, Lake Placid or Okeechobee. “We haven’t been on the field all week,” Frazier said. “The pitchers threw some in the batting cages, but really, all we’ve been able to do is hit in the cages.” All that batting practice sure paid off for the host team, however, as they rolled to back-to-back wins Friday night, topping the Junor Brahmans and the Dragon All-Stars by a combined total of 32-2. And they did it with an almost unheard of power display, launching more big bombs than a list of Ryan Reynolds movies, blasting out 11 home runs in a total o f six innings of at bats. “We really just did it with the long ball tonight,” Frazie r said. And the tone was set by his son, lead-off hitter Trey who, after starting pitcher Simons set down Okeechobee in order in the top of the first in the evening’s initial contest, drilled one over the left-field fence for a 1-0 lead. Cannady and Peck then reached on a single and walk, respectively, before Helms hammered one well over the first tier of cars in the parking lot to make it 4-0 afte r one. The purple-clad lads go t one back when Gary Matthews sent one over the center-field fence in the top of the second, but Sebring would put a touchdown total of seven across in the bottom of the frame. Brendan Doty reached on an error to get things started and moved to third on a David DeGenaro single. Hurst’s infield single brought Doty in and one ou t later, Frazier went yard again with a three-run shot to left. Left-hander Dylan Morris came on in relief and go t Cannady for the second out, but Peck popped a solo sho t to make it 9-1. Helms then singled and Josh Crouch doubled into the left-field corner to put runners on second and third before Simons singled Helms home and Crouch came in on a wild pitch before the inning ended with an 11-1 lead. Jared Joyner reached in the top of the third, but Simons Sebring slugs way to Ozone District title See DIXIE, Page 4B

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YMCA offers Cheer, VolleyballSEBRING – The Highlands County Family YMCAis hosting a 4-on-4 hardcourt volleyball tournament on Tuesday, July 12, from 6 p.m. until the last team is standing, for ages 15 and up. Any questions for the Cheer Camp or volleyball tournament, call 382-9622.Elks Golf tourneySEBRING – This month’s Elks golf tournament will be held on Tuesday, July 5, at Golf Hammock Country Club. Cost for the 8 a.m. shotgun start is $25 per player. To register either your team or as an individual player, contact Jack McLaughlin at 471-3295 or by email at jacknjudy33872@gmail.com. Check in not later than 7:40 a.m. outside of the restaurant area.Lake Placid Youth BowlingLAKE PLACID – The Royal Palms Youth Bowling League, for ages 7 and up, begins its’new season Saturday, Sept. 3. The sign-up fee is $25, which includes a shirt, and new bowlers are welcome. Bowling is every Saturday morning at 9 a.m. through December 10. Weekly cost is $11 and includes three games of bowling, shoes and prize fund. All Youth Bowlers are also eligible for reduced rate open bowling, though some restrictions may apply, and free bowling with instruction on Friday’s from 4-6 p.m. – must be accompanied by an adult. For more information, call Frank Peterson at 382-9541, or Donna Stanley at 441-4897.Firecracker 5KSEBRING – The 17th Annual Firecracker 5K Run/Walk is set for Monday, July 4 at the Highlands Hammock State Park at 7:30 a.m. The annual run to celebrate the nation’s birthday will feature plaques for overall, master and grand master male and female winners, age group awards in 5-year age divisions, technical tee shirts and plenty of ice-cold watermelon and other refreshments for runners. Entry fee is $20 thru June 27 and $25 from June 28 thru race day registration. Tee shirts guaranteed to only the first 200 entrants, so sign up early! Those desiring an entry form may email cbrojek@comcast.net or call Chet Brojek at 385-4736. Mail your checks made payable to Central Florida Striders, along with the signed application, to Chet Brojek, 3310 Par Road, Sebring, FL33872. Each year we urge runners and walkers to wear red, white and blue on race day and to entry early as we always have a large turnout for our nation’s birthday celebration. The race benefits the boys’and girls’ cross country teams at Avon Park High School.Panther Volleyball CampsAVONPARK – This summer the South Florida Community College volleyball program has more camps to offer than ever before. If there is a camp date that you could attend but the age group is different than yours please call and special arrangements could be made. Individual private sessions for indoor and sand are available year-round. July 2011 Sand:11-14 (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:30 -10:30 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor:11-14 (4 days) MondayThursday, 11:30-1:30 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 –Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps July 11-14: $100 Indoor: 25-28 (4 days) MondayThursday Morning Session (Grades 5-8) 9:3011:30 a.m. $60 Afternoon Session (Grades 9-12) 24:30 p.m. $75 Contact Coach Crawford with any questions at kim.crawford@southflorida.edu cell: 863-835-2377, or Office: 863-784-7037.Sebring Summer SwimSEBRING– The summer season for swimming is upon us as the Sebring High School pool is open to the public. Pool hours for open swim will be 67:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1-3 p.m. Saturday’s and Sunday’s – additional hours will be added once school is out. Cost is $2 per swimmer with big savings for frequent swimmers. Afamily pass can be bought for $50 for the first swimmer and $15 for each additional family member. Swimming lessons will also be available with four separate sessions throughout the summer for eight differents levels o f instruction, ranging from Adult Beginner, Parent and Tot, Fundamentals, Introduction to Water Skills, Pre-School Aquatics, Fundamental Aquatic Skills, Stroke Development, Improvment and Refinement, Personal Water Safety and Diving Fundamentals and Fitness. Session II runs from June 27-July 8, session III from July 11-22 and session IV from July 25-August 5. Water aerobics return as well, with certified instructor Ricki Albritton, Tuesday’s and Thursday’s from 6:30-7:30 p.m. Cost is just $2 per workout, or just $1 i f you have the Summer Swim Pass – the firs t class was Thursday, May 5. Summer swim lesson sign up will be Monday May 23 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. and Saturday, May 28 from 9-10:30 a.m. in the front office at Sebring High School. For questions call 471-5500 ext. 228 and leave a message for Pat Caton.Lady Dragon B-Ball CampLAKEPLACID –The Lady Dragons will be holding their first Basketball Camp July 18-22 for boys and girls aged 3rd-8th grade. There will be T-shirts, awards and lots of FUN-damentals, with all proceeds going to benefit the LPHS Girls Basketball team. For more camp information and camp brochure, email Jackie Coyne a t jackie_coyne@yahoo.com .Heartland SoccerSEBRING – Heartland Soccer Club boys and girls, 13 and under, will have tryouts on July 23 at the Highlands County Sports Complex, times TBA. For questions, contact Coach Bowyer at 273-3891 or Coach Brown at 381-0600.Lake Placid Volleyball CampLAKEPLACID – The Lady Dragon Volleyball Camp will take place Monday, July 11 through Friday, July 15, for aspiring players from grades 4-8. Cost is $45 per child, which includes a camp T-shirt, and campers will learn basic volleyball skills from setting and passing to serving and hitting. Juniors, grades 4 through 6, will mee t from 10 a.m.-Noon, while Intermediates, grades 7 and 8, meet from 1-3 p.m. At the conclusion of the week, there will be a tournament with parents and frends invited to watch. For any questions, call head coach Linette Wells at 441-2320.Firemen Memorial GolfSEBRING — The 12th annual Sebring Firemen Inc. Memorial Golf Tournamen t presented by AXAAdvisors LLC and Home Depot is scheduled for Saturday, Aug. 20 at Sun ’n Lake. The tourney will once again feature a four-man scramble with $75 entry fees. That includes range balls, golf, food and drink on the course and the pre-tourney mixer on Friday night with grea t appetizers. There will also once again be a silen t auction featuring autographed sports memorabilia from people like Tim Tebow, Jimbo Fisher, Will Muschamp, Nick Saban and many others. Hole sponsorships are available fo r $100 and team sponsorships, which include a team entry and hole signs, are $500. All proceeds will help benefit Sebring athletics. The tourney will begin with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start on both Deer Run and Turtle Run. For more information, call Tommy Lovett at 385-5100 or 382-2255.Warrior Golf ClassicLAKE WALES — Webber Football Warrior Golf Classic, a fundraising even t in support of the Warrior Football program will be held Saturday, August 27, a t the Lake Wales Country Club. Shot gun start 9 a.m. Fees: $60 per player/$240 team of four; $5 Mulligans; 50/50 $1 ticket or 15 tickets for $10 (includes green fees and lunch buffet). Prizes: First, second and third place winner; team prizes; Closest to the pin/Longest Drive. Sponsorship opportunities: Hole sponsor $100, includes sign with name and logo. Season tickets available including team schedule and memorabilia. Lunch will be served during Webbe r Football’s scrimmage immediately following golf tournament at WIU campus. Make checks payable to: Webbe r Football, 1201 N. Scenic Highway, Babson Park, FL33827; e-mail: Vothdw@webber.edu ; or call (863) 7341529 for more information. AMERICAN LEAGUEEAST WLPCTGB New York4931.613„ Boston4734.58021‡2Tampa Bay4537.5495 Toronto4043.482101‡2Baltimore3544.443131‡2Central Division WLPctGB Cleveland4337.538„ Detroit4439.5301‡2Chicago4142.49431‡2Minnesota3545.4388 Kansas City3349.40211 West Division WLPctGB Texas4439.530„ Los Angeles4241.5062 Seattle4042.48831‡2Oakland3746.4467___Thursdays Games Boston 5, Philadelphia 2 N.Y. Yankees 5, Milwaukee 0 Detroit 5, N.Y. Mets 2 Chicago White Sox 6, Colorado 4, 10 innings Florida 5, Oakland 4 St. Louis 9, Baltimore 6 Pittsburgh 6, Toronto 2 Houston 7, Texas 0 Fridays Games Philadelphia 7, Toronto 6 Chicago White Sox 6, Chicago Cubs 4 San Francisco 4, Detroit 3 Cleveland 8, Cincinnati 2 N.Y. Yankees 5, N.Y. Mets 1 St. Louis 5, Tampa Bay 3 Atlanta 4, Baltimore 0 Boston 7, Houston 5 Texas 15, Florida 5 Colorado 9, Kansas City 0 Minnesota 6, Milwaukee 2 Oakland 5, Arizona 4 L.A. Dodgers 5, L.A. Angels 0 Seattle 6, San Diego 0 Saturdays Games Philadelphia at Toronto, late Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs, late Cleveland at Cincinnati, late N.Y. Yankees at N.Y. Mets, late Boston at Houston, late San Francisco at Detroit, late Baltimore at Atlanta, late Milwaukee at Minnesota, late St. Louis at Tampa Bay, late Florida at Texas, late Kansas City at Colorado, late Arizona at Oakland, late L.A. Dodgers at L.A. Angels, late San Diego at Seattle, late Sundays Games San Francisco at Detroit, 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m. Baltimore at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m. St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m. Boston at Houston, 2:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. Kansas City at Colorado, 3:10 p.m. Arizona at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. San Diego at Seattle, 4:10 p.m. Florida at Texas, 8:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at L.A. Angels, 8:10 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST WLPCTGB Philadelphia5231.627„ Atlanta4835.5784 New York4141.500101‡2Washington4141.500101‡2Florida3646.439151‡2Central Division WLPctGB St. Louis4538.542„ Milwaukee4439.5301 Pittsburgh4140.5063 Cincinnati4241.5063 Chicago3449.41011 Houston2954.34916 West Division WLPctGB San Francisco4736.566„ Arizona4439.5303 Colorado4042.48861‡2Los Angeles3746.44610 San Diego3746.44610 ___ Thursdays Games Boston 5, Philadelphia 2 N.Y. Yankees 5, Milwaukee 0 Detroit 5, N.Y. Mets 2 Chicago Cubs 5, San Francisco 2, 13 innings Chicago White Sox 6, Colorado 4, 10 innings Florida 5, Oakland 4 St. Louis 9, Baltimore 6 Pittsburgh 6, Toronto 2 Houston 7, Texas 0 Fridays Games Philadelphia 7, Toronto 6 Chicago White Sox 6, Chicago Cubs 4 Washington 2, Pittsburgh 1 San Francisco 4, Detroit 3 Cleveland 8, Cincinnati 2 N.Y. Yankees 5, N.Y. Mets 1 St. Louis 5, Tampa Bay 3 Atlanta 4, Baltimore 0 Boston 7, Houston 5 Texas 15, Florida 5 Colorado 9, Kansas City 0 Minnesota 6, Milwaukee 2 Oakland 5, Arizona 4 L.A. Dodgers 5, L.A. Angels 0 Seattle 6, San Diego 0 Saturdays Games Philadelphia at Toronto, late Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs, late Cleveland at Cincinnati, late N.Y. Yankees at N.Y. Mets, late Boston at Houston, late San Francisco at Detroit, late Baltimore at Atlanta, late Pittsburgh at Washington, late Milwaukee at Minnesota, late St. Louis at Tampa Bay, late Florida at Texas, late Kansas City at Colorado, late Arizona at Oakland, late L.A. Dodgers at L.A. Angels, late San Diego at Seattle, late Sundays Games San Francisco at Detroit, 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m. Baltimore at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m. Pittsburgh at Washington, 1:35 p.m. St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m. Boston at Houston, 2:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. Kansas City at Colorado, 3:10 p.m. Arizona at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. San Diego at Seattle, 4:10 p.m. Florida at Texas, 8:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at L.A. Angels, 8:10 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEWLTPtsGFGA Philadelphia745261914 New York539242721 Columbus646242017 Houston467192122 D.C.456182127 Toronto FC379181729 Chicago2411171821 Sporting K.C.465171921 New England386151321WESTERN CONFERENCEWLTPtsGFGA Los Angeles928352515 FC Dallas944312417 Seattle847312518 Real Salt Lake73526189 Colorado557221921 San Jose555202017 Portland573181826 Chivas USA475172021 Vancouver288141825 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ___ Wednesdays Game Toronto FC 1, Vancouver 0 Saturdays Games Philadelphia at D.C. United, late Columbus at FC Dallas, late Chicago at Chivas USA, late New York at San Jose, late Sporting Kansas City at Portland, late Sundays Game Houston at Colorado, 9 p.m. Mondays Games New England at Real Salt Lake, 8:30 p.m. Seattle FC at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 6 Toronto FC at New York, 8 p.m. Colorado at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m. Columbus at Vancouver, 10 p.m. San Jose at Chivas USA, 10:30 p.m.BASEBALLAmerican League BALTIMORE ORIOLES…Recalled LHP Pedro Viola from Bowie (EL). Optioned LHP Brian Matusz to Norfolk (IL). CLEVELAND INDIANS…Placed RHP Chris Perez on bereavement list. Called up RHP Josh Judy from Columbus (IL). DETROIT TIGERS…Placed RHP Al Alburquerque on 15-day DL, retroactive to June 30. Recalled RHP Lester Oliveros from Toledo (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS…Agreed to terms with C Kenny Swab. OAKLAND ATHLETICS…Activated RHP Rich Harden from 60-day DL. Recalled RHP Fautino De Los Santos from Sacramento (PCL). Optioned RHP Trystan Magnuson to Sacramento. Designated LHP Bobby Cramer for assignment. SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD M A J O R L E A G U E S O C C E R SU N D A Y 9 9 p m Houston at Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 2MO N D A Y 8 : 3 0 0 p m New England at Real Salt Lake . . . . . . E S P N 2 1 0 : 3 0 0 p m Seattle at L.A. Galaxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 2A U T O R A C I N G SU N D A Y 1 1 p m NHRA … Lucas Oil Series. . . . . . E S P N 2 2 2 p m NHRA …Get Screened Series . . . . . . . . E S P N 2 2 : 3 0 0 p m NHRA …Get Screened Series . . . . . . . . E S P N 2M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L SU N D A Y 1 1 p m N.Y. Yankees at N.Y. Mets . . . . . . . . . . . . . T B S 1 : 3 0 0 p m St. Louis at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S U N 2 2 p m Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs . . . . W G N 8 8 p m L.A. Dodgers at L.A. Angels . . . . . . . . . . E S P NMO N D A Y 1 1 p m Chicago Cubs at Washington . . . . . . . . . . W G N 2 2 p m Tampa Bay at Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . S U NTU E S D A Y 7 7 p m Cincinnati at St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 8 8 p m Tampa Bay at Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . S U NS O C C E R SU N D A Y 3 : 5 5 5 p m FIFA U-17 World Cup, Quarterfinal. . E S P N 2B I C Y C L I N G SU N D A Y 3 3 p m Tour de France, Stage 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N B CT E N N I S SU N D A Y 9 9 a m Wimbledon, Mens Final . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N B CB O W L I N G SU N D A Y 2 : 3 0 0 p m PBA … Team Shootout. . . . . . . . E S P N 3 3 p m PBA … Team Shootout. . . . . . . . E S P N 3 : 3 0 0 p m PBA … Team Shootout. . . . . . . . E S P N 4 4 p m PBA … Team Shootout. . . . . . . . E S P N Times, games, channels all subject to change C O L L E G E B A S E B A L L SU N D A Y 2 2 p m TD Ameritrade Home Run Derby . . . . . . . C B SV O L L E Y B A L L SU N D A Y 4 : 3 0 0 p m FIVB World Beach Championships . . . . . N B CG O L F SU N D A Y 1 1 p m PGA … AT&T National . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G O L F 3 3 p m PGA … AT&T National . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C B S 3 : 3 0 0 p m m EuroPGA … Alstom French Open . . . . . . G O L F 7 7 p m PGA …Montreal Championship . . . . . . . G O L FW N B A TU E S D A Y 9 9 p m Los Angeles at Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 2W O M E N  S W O R L D C U P S O C C E R SU N D A Y N o o n Brazil vs. Norway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P NTU E S D A Y N o o n England vs. Japan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P N N o o n New Zealand vs. Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 2 2 : 3 0 0 p m France vs. Germany . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 2 : 3 0 0 p m Canada vs. Nigeria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E S P N 2 LIVESPORTSONTV Major League Baseball Transactions Major League Soccer Page 2BNews-Sun Sunday, July 3, 2011www.newssun.co m

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, July 3, 2011Page 3B Sponsor CM for Children; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; sponsor CM for Children; 0 0 0 0 9 6 8 9 WELLS MOTOR COMPANY; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, new; 0 0 0 0 9 9 3 1 Sponsor CM for Children; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; sponsor CM for Children; 0 0 0 0 9 6 8 9 WELLS MOTOR COMPANY; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, new; 0 0 0 0 9 9 3 1 News-Sun photos by DAN HOEHNE A bove: Jimmy Peck added his name to the long list of Sebring players hitting home runs Friday night. Below left: Sam Weber-Callahan singles to right Friday, starting a Lake Placid threat in the first inning of Fridays district tournament nightcap. Below right: D.J. Williams slides into second with a lead-off double in the second inning, which would soon lead to him scoring a run for Lake Placid in the Dixie Ozone District 8 tournament Friday night. F riday Night Highlights

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damage that it can cause to our league, all of the people that earn a living from our league,” Commissioner David Stern said. “As we get deeper into it, these things have the capacity to take on a life of their own. You never can predict what will happen.” With the NFLin a lockout since March, two of the four major U.S. sports are in shutdown mode. In case you’re wondering, Major League Baseball is next on the clock, with its collective bargaining agreement expiring at the end of the day on Dec. 11 — though players and owners hope to have a new deal before then. The NHL’s deal goes until Sept. 15, 2012. The NFLalready has lost free agency, minicamps and some workouts during its lockout, with training camps still a few weeks from opening. If the NBA’s work stoppage were to last as long, it clearly would put the start of the 2011-12 season in October in jeopardy. “If we were out as long as it appears the NFLwill be out, even on a best-case scenario, given the length of our season, that would take us to a place that would assure a lot, I think, more damage because we have such a long season,” Stern said last week. “And I think that motivates us on both sides to see whatever we can do.” They couldn’t do nearly enough before Thursday’s deadline, not with the enormous gap in their financial proposals. Union executive director Billy Hunter said the sides hoped to meet again in about two weeks and would perhaps start with other topics instead of going right back to economics. In the meantime, rookies are missing the chance to play in summer league games and don’t know when their first paycheck will arrive. National teams are worrying about putting together rosters for Olympic qualifying tournaments that won’t include their top players. And down the line, there’s the fear that an 82-game schedule won’t exist next season. “Nervous? I wouldn’t say that’s the right word for it. Probably upset, a little frustrated because we just want to play basketball,” Hornets All-Star Chris Paul said. “At the end of the day, we just want to do what’s right. We want a fair deal. We just want to hoop. Like I’ve said before, it’s all about our fans. I think the worst thing about this whole situation is our fans. They want to see us play.” AP Sports Writers Tom Canavan in Newark, N.J., Brett Martel in New Orleans and John Zenor in Auburn, Alabama contributed to this report. market teams, in efforts to remain competitive, to sign players to similarly silly contracts. It’s not the players fault, but it is within the owners’ purveyance to want to rework that previous agreement so things don’t get so out of control. Invariably, there will be those that bring the comparison to your own workplace, suggesting it’s the same, in principal, to your own company bosses cutting your salary, making things more stringent and how you wouldn’t be as willing to agree to that as you suggest the NBAplayers should. But the difference is, of course, the levels we’re talking about. If this job paid me enough, in one year, to literally set me up comfortably for life, and fours in, the owners said, “We’re going through some growth problems, and instead of this really large salary, we need to cut it a bit.” If I’ve invested well, been smart with the large amounts I already made, I might not be happy with this news, but I’d have my nest egg in place and would still be making a real good amount to live off of. But when you’re in a job that has you doing decent and the cut would leave you to barely getting by, that’s a big difference. Players that have signed 10-year, $100-million dollar plus contracts being told that, let’s just say, the most they could sign their next contract for would be 5 years and $40 million is a big drop, yes, but will still leave them at a level of living more than comfortably. The principal might be the same, but the numbers skew it way out of line. The average fan struggling to get by isn’t going to shed too many tears for a player being told he will be going down to a maximum of $8 million per year. Pay me eight million for a year and I’ll work the next 30 years at minimum wage, you know, just to pay off my cell phone texting bills. The owners seem prepared to keep the lockout going for as long as it takes to get the deal done more to their liking. The players are saying that they’ve been preparing for this and are ready, willing and able to wait it out and hold fast to their stance. The sportswriters and broadcasters who cover professional sports these days may as well go back and get both a law and economics degree, since sports is among the last things they are now writing or talking about. Which is why I’m also glad my career didn’t fast track as well as I’d initially hoped it would. I don’t have to be in the midst of all this business, financial type writing. I can just comment on it from afar, and then go cover the Dixie Tournament and actually write about action on the field. Major League Baseball, meanwhile, might finally get some more of the fans back that they lost during the 1994-95 strike, wth little other professional sports to give us our brief respites from reality. Which is something the NBAshould keep in mind. It took the home run chase of ‘98 to start bringing back the masses of disillusioned fans, and I still personally know people who never went back to being baseball fans. The subsequent steroid era gave MLB another black eye, and it seems the league is just now getting past that. The post-Jordan era of the NBAwas on a steady decline in popularity, and with the economic downturn, financially in recent years. That was until this past season started to move the needles up again. An extended lockout, a shortened season, or no se ason at all could do more damage to them than some of the sacrifices they’d make by agreeing to what’s on the table. Dan Hoehne is the Sports Editor for the News-Sun. He can be reached at daniel.hoehne@newssun.com. a car engulfed in flames. “It just looks like a bit of a cluster,” Patrick said. “I kept my foot in it, which might not be the best thing here, but I was going for broke. I learned a lot, that’s for sure.” It was Logano’s first win at Daytona, and ninth of his Nationwide career. “They told me a stat here earlier this week and it said the last eight superspeedway races I finished second four times out of the eight,” Logano said. “It’s nice to be on the other side of it and be in Victory Lane here. This will really help me a lot.” Jason Leffler finished second and Reed Sorenson was third to win a $100,000 bonus as the highest finishing eligible driver in sponsor Nationwide’s first Dash 4 Cash race. Nationwide is paying out a guaranteed $400,000 over four races to one of four eligible series regulars as a way to promote NASCAR’s second tier series. Winning the bonus capped a strong week for series points leader Sorenson, who earned his first victory of the season last Saturday at Road America. Busch was fourth, Justin Allgaier fifth and Michael Annett was sixth. Kenny Wallace was seventh, while Sadler, Almirola and Patrick rounded out the top 10. KHI swept the top fo u r spots in qualifying, but all four wrecked in the end. Clint Bowyer was wrecked late in the race, and Harvick, Sadler and Stewar t were all in the last-lap accident. “Well that was expensive ... “ team owner Delana Harvick posted on Twitte r immediately after the race. Page 4BNews-SunSunday, July 3, 2011www.newssun.com E.O. KOCH CONSTRUCTION CO.; 5.542"; 4"; Black; commercial p/u; 0 0 0 0 9 8 2 6 YMCA; 3.639"; 5"; Black; sports, 07/03/11; 0 0 0 0 9 8 2 9 E.O. KOCH CONSTRUCTION CO.; 5.542"; 4"; Black; commercial p/u; 0 0 0 0 9 8 2 6 YMCA; 3.639"; 5"; Black; sports, 07/03/11; 0 0 0 0 9 8 2 9 Special to the News-SunSEBRING – Sebring Youth Football & Cheer is getting geared up to begin it’s 54th Season here in Highlands County on Monday, July 11. Our mission at SYF is to provide a safe, healthy environment to teach the game of football and the fundamentals of sideline cheer. We also believe strongly in putting the right coaches in front of participants in order to mentor them on and off the field. We are working with the high school system in order to make sure that our players understand how they call plays and give the kids an advantage once they get into high school. Anyone interested in volunteering or participating in Sebring Youth Football & Cheer should call Presiden t Bob Duncan 449-1012. We will hold another registration on Saturday, July 9, from 9 a.m.Noon a t Somo’s Deli, 209 Circle Park Dr. (Downtown Sebring) Questions regarding registrations call Monica 214-1079. SYF and Cheer gearing up for season Continued from 1B NBA may want to heed MLB Continued from 1B Labor pains come to NBA again Continued from 1B NASCAR sees Logano win, wild finish Get the paper delivered to you! NEWS-SUN€385-6155 worked out of it with two strike outs and a caught stealing before Sebring put the finishing touches on the mercy-rule win. Alex Lopez singled to left and Doty sent a single to center. Frazier was retired for the first time on a come-backer, but Cannady picked him up with a three-run, oppositefield homer to push the margin to 14-1, a spread that would hold as Crouch closed the game by striking out the side in the top of the fourth. “Daniel (Simons) did a really nice job,” coach Frazier said. “I didn’t think they’d be able to outhit us, as long as we threw strikes. We came ready to play and ready to hit.” Though maybe it was the relative ease with which the opener was won, or the security in knowing their line-up was stacked and rolling, but Sebring quickly learned that taking a game for granted can be problematic as they took the field against a relatively young and inexperienced Lake Placid squad. That’s because the game and scrappy Dragons made things interesting right off the bat. After two quick outs in the top of the first, Sam WeberCallahan singled to right and Mikey Warner followed with a knock to right of his own. Damien Lusby then worked a walk and the bases were loaded. But DeGenaro escaped with a strike out and it was time for the offense to crank it up again. Frazier drew a walk to get it started and Cannady blooped a double down the right-field line to put runners on second and third. Helms then hit his second three-run shot of the night for a 3-0 lead. The inning looked to continue when Crouch was hit by a pitch and stole second, but Callahan got a strike out and Crouch was caught in a perfectly executed rundown to get out of it without any further damage. Lake Placid then cut into the, at this point, narrow lead when D.J. Williams sent a two-strike pitch into the right-center field gap for a lead-off double in the top of the second. Williams advanced to third on a wild pitch and scored when Chance Bertram made a productive out with a grounder to second. But that would be all they would muster before the side was retired and the boys in blue would soon open this one up. Walks to Jay Bible, DeGenaro and Doty loaded the bases to start the bottom of the second and with one out, Hurst singled to drive in two. D.J. McPhail sent a sacrifice fly deep enough to score Doty before Frazier reached on an error that brought Hurst in. Cannady then had an RBI single and Peck’s shot couldn’t be handled cleanly to allow him to reach and Frazier to score before Helms took one out to center for his third home run of the night, all of the three-run variety. Crouch doubled to set the table once again and Simons took his turn going yard and when the dust settled, though it was more muddy on this rainy night, the lead had ballooned to 13-1. Cannady came on in relief and struck out the side and with three runs needed to end it early on the mercy rule, Sebring finished it the way they started. Frazier hit his third dinger of the day and Cannady his second to put the team on the cusp with plenty more big bats coming up. But Peck didn’t end it, as he singled, and Helms couldn’t get his fourth of the night as he was hit by a pitch. In the end it was Crouch crushing the longest drive of the night, a tape-measure shot to left-center that may well have cleared the parking lot entirely. “Our bats obviously carried us, but we saw early on what can happen if you take a team for granted,” coach Frazier said. “I give Lake Placid credit, they’re a scrappy team and they got to us early. In the second inning, we gathered the guys and just told them to not let up, get back to playing our game and keep competing because we’re going to have tougher games down the line.”Saturday semifinalWith the two wins under their belt, the team had a chance to relax as Lake Placid and Okeechobee squared off Saturday morning to see who would face them again in the district final. The Dragons struck early, but it was Okeechobee making a comeback to send them to the Sebring rematch. After building a 3-0 lead, Lake Placid saw their lead cut into with a second-inning run, then erased with Baron Stuart hitting a two-run double in the third to tie it at 3-3. With one on and one out in the third, Jason Andrews made a fantastic, diving catch of a drive to right center that looked like it might quell any rally. But Gabe Greseth doubled and Dylan Morris rapped a two-run single. Another run would come in on an error and ‘Chobee was up 6-3. Mikey Warner hit a solo home run, but Okee added two more for the 8-4 final. Continued from 1B Dixie district champs

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www.newssun.comN ews-SunS unday, July 3, 2011Page 5B Residence Inn; 7.444"; 4"; Black; residence inn; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 2 2 7 7 7 7 SEBRING PEDIATRICS, LLC; 3.639"; 4"; Black; 07/03/11; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 8 8 2 2 4 4 The Community Calendar provides a brief listing of local clubs and organizations who meet ona regular basis. It is the responsibility of the group to update the News-Sun on any changes in this listing by calling 3856155, ext. 516; send any c hanges by e-mail to editor@newssun.com; or mail them to News-Sun Community Calendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870.S UNDAY American Legion Post 25 Lake Placid has lounge hoursf rom 1-9 p.m. Live music is from 5-8 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Members and guests only. Post is at 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Call 471-1448. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 lounge is open from 1-7 p .m. Card games start at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Call 4652661. Lake Placid Moose has k araoke in the pavilion. Horseshoes played at 9:30 a.m. Food available at 4 p.m. Open t o members and qualified g uests only. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon P ark. Cards start at 4 p.m. M usic outside Tiki Hut at 3 p.m. C all 452-0579. Overeaters Anonymous, meets from 4-5 p.m. in second floor conference roomNo. 3 atF lorida Hospital Heartland M edical Center, 4200 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 3827731. No dues, fees or weighins. For details on the organization, go to www.oa.org Ridge Area Missionary S oldiers AvonPark Pathfinder Club meets from 9 a.m. to noon every first and third Sunday at 58 E. Sixth St., Avon Park. Call 471-2143. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 s erves lunch at 2 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 offers NASCAR racing in the pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar opena nd kitchen open from 2-5 p.m. L odge is at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-3920. Society for Creative Anachronism (Local Chapter:S hire of Stagridge) meets at 2 p .m. first and third Sunday at Brewsters Coffee House on U.S. 27 in Sebring. Call 2145522. The ArtistsGroup at South Florida Community College will h old a critique clinic the first Sunday of every month, 2-4 p.m., at the Hotel Jacaranda, Avon Park. Professional local artists will discuss and evaluate participantspaintings. The feei s $5 with a two painting limit. For more information, call 7847346. U.S. Military Vets Motorcycle Club meets at 1 p.m. on the first Sunday of each month at VFW Post 9853, State Road 64 West and North Oliva Drive. Call Hocky at (954 4847 Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 serves hamburgers from 4-5:30 p.m. and plays poker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 Karaoke is from 5-8 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902. MONDAY Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN WITH ME family group meets at 10:30 a.m. every Monday at the Heartland Christian Church on Alt. 27 in Sebring. The church is behind Southgate ShoppingC enter. Call 385-5714. Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal C hurch, Lakeshore Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8807. Alcoholics Anonymous One Day At ATime group meets for a closed discussion at 9:30 a.m. Monday and Friday at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 4 500 Sun N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. Call 314-0891. Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 6:30 p.m. at Rosewood Center, 517 U.S. 27 South, Lake Placid. Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at St. A gnes Episcopal Church, 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 202-0647. Ambucs, a local charity that assists people with disabilities, m eets at noon every first Monday at R.J. Gators Sea Grill and Bar, Sebring. The meeting is open to the public. Call 386-4387. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 12-9 p.m. Legion and auxiliary boards meet at 6 p.m. General meeting at 7 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 o pen noon to 8 p.m. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. Call 4711 448. AmVets Post 21 plays darts at 7:30 p.m. for members and g uests. Call 385-0234. Avon Park Lakes Association has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m. The clubhouse is at 2714 Nautilus Drive in Avon Park. AvonPark Veterans Honor Guard meets first Monday at the American Legion Post 69, AvonPark. Call 382-0315. Boy Scout Troop 482 meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave., Lake Placid. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., S ebring. Call 385-8118. Corvette Cruisers meets at 6:30 p.m. first and third Monday at the Dairy Queen in front of The Home Depot, Sebring. Call E d Robson at 655-2092. Florida Association Home and Community Education meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly on Mondays at The Agri-Center.T he group of sewers and crafters make items for residents of adult congregate living facilities. Call Penny Bucher at 385-0949. Grand Prix Cloggers EZ Intermediate and Intermediate Clogging class are held at 9 a.m. every Monday atR eflections on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further i nformation at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club meets from 7:30-9:30 p.m. the first and third Monday at Sebring Civic Center from December through April. There will be alternating mainstream and plus dancing with rounds. Casual dress or square dance attire is acceptable. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or email him at samdunn@samdunn.net .Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September.H eartland Pops rehearses at 7 p.m. Mondays at Avon Park High School Band Room, 700 E Main St., under the direction of Anthony Jones. Musicians of all ages are welcome. Call 3148877. Highlands County Concert Band rehearses 7-9 p.m. every M onday at Sebring High School band room. All musicians are welcome. Vic Anderson, musical director. Call Bill Varner at 386-0855. Highlands County Sewing G roup meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Highlands County Agri-Civic C enter in the 4-H laboratory, Sebring. Call 402-6540. Highlands Stamp Club m eets the first Monday. Talk and swap at St. Johns United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive. Call Bob Gleisner at 471-6526 or Budd Steinke at 382-9373. Lake Placid Art League will have classes in Drawing and Painting, conducted by Anne Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. From 1 -4 p.m., Mary Gebhart will teach Fabric Painting at the center. Call Dan Daszek at 4657730. Lake Placid Democratic Club meets at 6 p.m. first M onday at Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. C all Bill Sayles at 699-6773. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2 p.m. S ign up for darts is at 6:30 p .m.Music from 5-8 p.m. It is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Lake Placid Moose plays c ards at 2 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m. Let It Begin With Me A lanon Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Monday at Heartland Christian Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South, Sebring. For details about Alanon, a self-help group forf amilies and friends of alcoholics, call 385-5714. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., AvonP ark. Meetings held first and third Mondays at 8 p.m. Call 452-0579. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N. ButlerA ve. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. Call Heartland area helpline (863 tion on other meetings ande vents at www.naflheartland.org. National Association for Advancement of Colored People, Highlands County Branchmeets 7:30 p.m., 401 T ulane, Avon Park. Patriots Chapter, Daughter of the American Revolution meets at 1:30 p.m. on the first Monday of each month September through May at the Church of the Redeemer Parish Hall on U.S. 27 directly across from Wells Motor Company, three-tenths of a mile north of the South Florida Community College stoplight. Call 4712096. Rotary Club of Highlands County meets at 6:15 p.m. at Beef O Bradys, Sebring. Sebring AARP meets 1:30 p.m., The Palms, Pine Street, Sebring. Sebring Bridge Club has Bridge, ACBLDuplicate at the clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Mondays. Call 385-8118. Sebring Historical Society open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Located in back side of Sebring Public Library building on Lake Jackson. Call 471-2522. Sebring Optimist Club m eets at 6:15 p.m. first and third Mondays at Jims house. Call Jim Harrison at 381-9767 o r Gabriel Read at 453-2859. Sebring Women of the Moose has chapter meeting at 7 p.m. Monday at the lodge, 11675 U.S. 98. Call 382-8782. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 has a joint officers meeting on the first Monday of each month at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has the lounge open from 12-7 p.m. Smoke-free environment. Call 471-3557. Sebring Moose Club 2259 s erves beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. The Women of the Moose meets at 7 p.m. the first Monday for chapter enrollment, refreshments and trivia pursuit. Call6 55-3920. Take Off Pounds Sensibly F L632, Sebring meets at 2 p.m. for weigh-in at the fellowship hall at the First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, S ebring. Call 659-1019. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 East, L ake Placid. Call 699-5444.TUESDAY Al-Anon Family Groups m eet for discussion and Twelve Step study at noon, Union C ongregational Church, 105 N. Forest Ave., AvonPark. Parking available south of old church. American Legion Placid P ost 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard and euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Boy Scout Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30 p .m. in the Scout Lodge, 202 Robert Britt St., AvonPark. Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to join. Call 452-2385. Avon Park Library has stor ytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 e xcept during holidays. Avon Park Lions Club meets 6:45 p.m., dinner include d, Lions Club, 1218 W. Bell S t., Avon Park. Busy Bee Craft Club meets 9-11 a.m., Fairway Pines, Sun N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. Everyone welcome. Call 3828 431. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday night at The Rock, Union Congregational Church, 28 N. Butler Ave., Avon P ark. Abarbecue meal is s erved at 6 p.m. for a donation. At 6:45 p.m., members meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group breaks up into small groups for men and women. The program is designed for drug and alcohol addiction, divorce, death or illness grief, low or lost selfesteem or identity due to dysfunctional relationships, depression/anxiety, or any other need for healing. Contact call PamSim 453-3345, ext. 106. Fleet Reserve Association Board of Directors Heartland Branch No. 173 meets 7 p.m., Branch Hall, 1402 Roseland Ave., Sebring. Regular meeting, first Tuesday after board of directors meeting. Call 4716109 for details. Fletcher Music Club meets every Thursday and Tuesday at Fletcher Music Center in Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. Call 385-3288. Florida Native Plant Society meets at 7 p.m. the first Tuesday in Conference Room 3 a t the Highlands County AgriCivic Center, 4509 George Blvd., Sebring. Call Roy Stewart at (863 Heartland Harmonizers Barbershop Chorus meets from 7-9:30 p.m. in the Sebring H igh School Music Room, S ebring. All men who enjoy singing are invited. Reading music is not required. Call 4712 294 or 386-5098. Heartland Insulin Pump Support Group meets the first T uesday of the month at 3 p.m. a t the Highlands County Health Dept., 7205 S. George Blvd., Sebring. If you would like more i nformation on insulin pumps or a re a pump wearer and would like to share ideas and suggestions, please join us. For more i nformation, contact Kathy McNeil at 414-6444. Highlands County Adoption Support Group meets from 78 :30 p.m. first Tuesday at Quality Inn & Suites Conference Center, 6525 U.S. 27 North, S ebring. Call 382-0352. Highlands County Lodge of the Order Sons and Daughters of Italy in America meets the first Tuesday of each month at Visions ADTin Sebring. The officers meet at 6 p.m. and the general meeting will follow at 7 p.m. Call Philomena Greco at 402-0048. Highlands County Quilt Guild meets on the first and third Tuesday of each month at the Women's Club of Sebring, 4 260 Lakeview Drive, across from Veterans' Beach, from 10 a .m. to 2 p.m. Call 471-0694 or e-mail sbringquilter@embarqm ail.com Highlands Tea Party has an e ducational and informational meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday a t the Quality Inn, 6525 U.S. 27 in Sebring. Call 699-0743. Hope Hospice grief support group meets at 11 a.m. at 319 W Center Ave., Sebring; and 4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle A LF, across U.S. 27 from Florida Hospital Lake Placid. C all 382-0312. G2G (Grandparent to G randparent) a support group t o help grandparents raising g randchildren, meets at 10 a.m. T uesdays at One Hope United, 7195 S. George Blvd., Sebring. C all 214-9009. Lake Placid Art League has c lasses in Parchment Embossing from 8 a.m. to noon a nd 1-4 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant. Call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Happy hour is from 2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Grief Support (Hope Hospice meets at 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, with Charlie Stroup. Refreshments served. Door prize given. Call 4650568. Lake Placid Jaycees meets 7:30 p.m., first and third Tuesdays, Jaxsons. Board meetings at 6:30 p.m. on second Tuesday. Call Joe Collins, 655-5545. Lake Placid Toastmasters meet the first and third Tuesday at 6 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 101 S. Oak Ave. in Lake Placid. The web address is www.toastmasters.org. Call Cathy Schreima at 382-3574 or Linda Udall at 386-6495. Lorida Community Club m eets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Lorida Community Center to p lan events. Multiple Sclerosis Suppor t Group meets 7 p.m. second T uesday at Highlands Regional Medical Center, Sebring, in the f irst floor doctors conference room. Call 465-3138. Nar-Anon Support Group for family members or friends o f someone with a drug problem o r addiction. Nar-Anon helps attain serenity and a more normal life for those affected by the a ddictions of loved ones, regardless of whether or not he/she has stopped using. 6 p .m. every Tuesday at First Baptist Chuch of Lake J osephine, 111 Lake Josephin e Drive, Sebring. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventhday Adventist Church, 1410 W. A von Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup.co m Call 382-7731. Visit www.oa.org. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. eve ry Tuesday and has blood pressure screening from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. first and third Tuesday a t P lacid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 P lacid Lakes Blvd. Call 4654888. Rotary Club of Sebring ( Noon) meets at noon at the S ebring Civic Center, near the l ibrary in downtown Sebring. C all 385-3829 or 471-9900. Scleroderma Support G roup Meeting is the first T uesday of each month from 1 2 pm. at the Sebring Library, 3 19 W. Center Ave., Sebring. Call 402-6716. Sebring Bridge Club will have Duplicate Bridge games every Tuesday evening. If inte rested in playing Duplicate Bridge, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 plays darts, beginning with sig n in at 6 p.m. Games start at 6:30 p.m. No experience necessary. Cost is $2. Smoke-free environment. Call 471-3557. Sebring Lions Club meets at noon at Dots Restaurant, 950 Sebring Square. Call 3822 333. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves soft shell tacos 5-7 p.m. and beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Euchre is played at 6:30 p.m.C all 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club p lays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. Call 385-2966 or leave a name number and message. SertomaClub meets at 7 a .m. at Dees Restaurant, Sebring. Call Scott Albritton at 402-1819. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL99 meets from 6-7 p .m. at the Atonement Luthera n Church, 1744 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 655-1743. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL618 has weigh in from 4-430 p.m. at Community Bible Church, 1400 CR-17AN., AvonPark. Meeting is at 4:45 p.m. Call 452-1093. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, plays darts 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. The ladies aux iliary board meeting is at 10 a.m. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 has sandwiches at 5 p.m. and Franke from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902. Zonta Club of Highlands County meets second Tuesda y. Call Rebekah Kogelschatz at 314-9336. COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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Special to the News-SunAVON PARK— Ron Bower, director of the Heart of Highland Show Chorus, was recently granted Certified Director status in Sweet Adelines International. Bower, who has been directing Barbershop groups for more than 30 years, began directing Heart of Highland Show Chorus in 2008. The course of study to achieve this Certification included not only musical knowledge and directing skills but overall knowledge of Sweet Adelines’organization and competition judging categories. Bower stated that he feels completing this program will assist him in his quest to keep the Heart of Highland Show Chorus one of the premier vocal groups in Highlands County. To learn more, come to the Avon Park Rotary, 20 S. Verona Ave., on a Thursday night at 7 p.m. or call 452-1927 or 699-0743. Page 6BNews-SunSunday, July 3, 2011www.newssun.com WELLS MOTOR COMPANY; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, used; 0 0 0 0 9 9 3 2 CHATHAM POINTE; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; 7/3,17,24,31; 0 0 0 0 9 9 2 2 ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Bower earns Certified Director status from Adelines Bower By ALICIARANCILIO Associated PressNEWYORK — Elijah Wood’s latest acting gig is ridiculous, and he’s OK with that. The actor stars in the new FX show “Wilfred,” playing a depressed guy named Ryan who is on the verge of suicide. He finds a new zest for life while hanging out with his neighbor’s dog Wilfred, except this dog is quite different. As Ryan sees it, Wilfred is a talking man in a dog suit who also smokes cigarettes. “There were days where there would just be absurd situations that my character and Wilfred would get into and you’d step out of that and thing ‘what are we doing? What total madness are we creating?” Wood said. “And there was a gleefulness associated with it like wow, this is really bizarre and wonderful and it was a joy. So much fun.” The show, based on a hit comedy in Australia, had 2.6 million viewers when it premiered June 23. That’s the best ratings FX has ever had for a comedy. Wood says over the course of the season the character of a stuffed bear that Wilfred is drawn to will be developed. “There’s an interesting parallel because Ryan is the only one to see Wilfred as a man in a dog suit and Wilfred refers to this bear as having its own personality as well, but we never see bear move or talk. It’s very weird.” In October, Wood heads to New Zealand to resume the role of Frodo Baggins from “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy in “The Hobbit,” directed by Peter Jackson. Wood says he’s “really excited” about it and compares it to a family reunion. “It’s not often in your life that you get to revisit such a significant time in your life,” Wood said. Elijah Wood loves total madness of new TV show Wilfred MCT Elijah Wood, left, as Ryan and Jason Gann as Wilfred in Wilfred, airing on FX.

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Page 8BNews-SunSunday, July 3, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sun that is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSun at 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry C armody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, R oyal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site, www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Scott King youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. childrens choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. childrens mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863 www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and womens prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 3 3870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.; Blended Service, 10:30 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist C hurch, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, S ebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, miss ion-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service,6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695 CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Daily Masses8 a.m. Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Saturday 3-3:45 p.m. or first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31 Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way,Truth and Life! Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Changing Seasons, a mens grief support group, meets at 1 p.m. Wednesdays. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets at 1 p.m. Thursdays. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863 Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church. Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. R onald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL33870. Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Christ, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, FL 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts. Sunday Worship Services, 10:30 a .m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available at every service. Bible Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered classes for all ages. Church phone: 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. We would like to extend an invitation for you and your family to visit with us here at Sebring Parkway. Our hours of service are: Sunday Bible Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazarene of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W. Main St. Randall Rupert, Pastor. Sunday: Sunday school begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning worship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening service at 6 p.m. Wednesday evening service is at 7 p.m. with special services for children and adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) and Ladies ministries. If you need any more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazarene of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852. Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children and youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christian Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17A North (truck routeAvonPark. Presenting Jesus Christ as the answer for time and eternity. Sunday morning worship service, 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided. Junior Church activities at same time for K-6 grade. Sunday School Bible hour (all ages (Transportation available.) Sunday evening praise and worship service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and youth activities at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Everyone is welcome, please come worship with us. Don Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phone 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP R esiliency is not a luxury that many species of wildlife possess. For example, the gopher tor-t oise needs a specific type of plant community to survive and reproduce. This is true with manys pecies, which is the reason that the endangered and extinct status exist. Once theirh abitat is destroyed, they have no where else to go. However, there are those few fortunate species that can survive just about anywhere under most circumstances.B obcats are in this category. Although they have been h unted by mankind throughout history and their habitats destroyed, they continue tos urvive. Bobcats have been around f or a long time. In fact, it is said that they were roaming around in the Irvingtonian stage, which was about 1.8 million years ago. They arem embers of the cat family Felidae. They can be found a s far north as Canada and as far south as Mexico. They inhabit most states in theU .S. and are not particular about the plant community t hey live in. Bobcats can adapt to semidesert areas, swamplands, woods and can even surviven ear urban populations. As far as diet, their favorite meal is rabbit, but they will e at just about anything. Bobcats will munch on bugs or small rodents if other food is scarce. O ne of the most fascinating things about this cat is that although it is not large in size, it has been known to take down deer. This amazing creature may go long periodsw ithout eating. Once it finds available prey, it will eat h eavily. If food is scarce, the cat may attack a larger animal and return time anda gain to feast on the carcass. Bobcats stalk their prey and p ounce once they get close enough to the unfortunate creature. Being adaptable to different types of ecosystems as well as food may be ther easons that this creature has survived and thrived for so l ong. Bobcats are beautiful creatures. They are grayish browni n color and are marked with spots on their bodies, which act as camouflage. They are about twice the size of a nor-m al house cat. Like other felines, they have a w hiskered face and yellow cat eyes. The black-tufted, pointed ears, distinctive blackb ars on the forelegs and stubby tail are features that make t his species unique. The lips, chin and underparts of the cat are an off-white color. These creatures may vary in lightness or darknessa ccording to their environment. For example, if the b obcat is found in a desert region it will be lighter in color than one located in thef orest. Kittens are born with spots with wide-looking faces due to the tufts of hair under their ears. T he bobcat has sharp hearing as well an excellent sense o f smell. Being in the cat family, the round, black pupils of their eyes widenw hen its dark, maximizing their light reception. Bobcats a re generally on the move a few hours before sunset until around midnight. Then they rest a while and get up and prowl around before dawnu ntil a few hours after the sun rises. T hey travel from two to seven miles on their route within their territory. Thes ize of the region they travel in depends on gender of the c at and availability of prey. They mark their areas with feces, urine and claw marks on trees. Within their territory the feline will generallyh ave a main den and several auxiliary shelters near the outer boundaries. These additional shelters can be hollow logs, thickets, brush piles andu nder rock ledges. Bobcats usually live about six to eight years in the wild, although in captivity, may survive as long as 32 years.A s adults, they dont have too many natural enemies other than mankind. Occasionally, out west, cougars and gray wolves may kill bobcats, but here inF lorida, not much bothers them. When they are young a nd defenseless however, eagles, owls, foxes and even other male bobcats are at hreat. Even though these animals a re very adaptable, in some areas they are in trouble. For example, Ohio, Indiana and New Jersey dont have the benefit of having an abun-d ance of these beautiful creatures and they are considered e ndangered in those states. The main cause of this status is attributed to over huntinga nd trapping. These beautiful cats have been hunted for c enturies for their beautiful fur. Some hunters enjoy killing them for the sport. Habitat destruction is another cause for theird ecline in certain areas. Although they are resilient creatures, they do need someplace to hunt and breed. Steps have been and are c urrently being taken to ensure the bobcats future. In an effort to protect these creatures in the areas where they most need it, manya gencies are working together to collar and track them to gain valuable information such as their movements and which habitats are most important to their survival.O nce equipped with this vital data, biologists will be able t o create a protection plan and management strategy that will assist these magnificenta nimals in their efforts to survive. E ven though the bobcat is considered the most common wildcat in North America, there is nothing common about it. Corine Burgess is the Natural R esources Specialist for the H ighlands County Natural R esources Department assisting t he Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District (www.highlandsswcd.org). The resilient bobcat continues to survive despite challenges Courtesy photo B eing adaptable to different types of ecosystems as well as food may be the reasons that the bobcat continues to surv ive. N ews From T he W atershed Corine Burgess

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, July 3, 2011Page 9B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the Redeemer .Service time is 9:30 with Holy Communion. Coffee hour following services. Newcomers welcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail redeemer1895@aol.com Web site: redeemeravon.com The church is at 839 Howe's Way,Avon Park (two miles north of Sun 'N Lake Boulevard, across from Wells Dodge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday Services: Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek service on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always welcome. The Rev. Jim Kurtz, rector. Church office 3857649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL33852. Phone: 4650051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Nelson, Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday evening: Holy Communion with Healing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child care available at the 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come see what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 Thunderbird Road, (863) 8350869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday services at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid City" Children's Ministry throughout all services, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married couples, "prime-timers," and Bible studies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day Care, Preschool and After-School Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For registration call: 385-3111). Check us out on the Web at www.sebringgrace.org INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration Ministries, (non-denominational) 2200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533771. Sunday service: Sunday School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church (ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen, Deacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, third and fifth Sunday each month, and Rev. Jefferson Cox on the second and fourth Sunday of each month. Jim Helwig, organist/choir director. Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee hour on the first and third Sunday of each month. Council meeting on the first Monday of month; Ladies Group WELCAmeets at noon second Monday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable Garden Club meets as needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden open seven days a week to congretation and community. Like to sing? Come join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park LCMS, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or see christlutheranavonpark.org Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Closet, 385-2782. Gary Kindle, Pastor. Faith Child Development Center, 382-3232. Kathy Pontious, director. Preschool/VPK/Extended Day Care. Summer Worship services: 9:30 a.m. Sunday; Bible class is 8:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Worship service is broadcast live on WITS 1340 AM. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Sunday service at 9:30 a.m. Sunday school will resume in the fall. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots PreSchool director; and Noel Johnson, minister of youth and family life. Worship schedule after Easter through December: Worship service 10 a.m., and Education Hour, 8:45 a.m. Worship schedule for January through Easter: Worship service, 8:30 and 11 a.m., Education Hour 9:45 a.m. Traditional Service with Holy Communion each first and third Sunday. Non-Traditional Serviceeach second, fourth and fifth Sunday. Seasonal mid-week services Wednesday evenings during Lent and Advent. Call church office for additional Worship times and special holiday services. Other activities and groups include: Choirs; Ladies Guild and LWML; Men's Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies as scheduled; Trinity Tots Pre-school, Youth Group activities (call for meeting times and dates). Visit us online at: www.Trinitylutheranlp.com NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and children's church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com. Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www. ctmforme.com Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Children's & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry. www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kid's World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. The Lord's Sentinel Fellowship Church 148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid (at Lake Placid Christian School), Pastor Juanita Folsom. Sunday morning service, 10:30 a.m.; Monday, Sentinel School of Theology, 7 p.m.; Church service, Tuesday, 7 p.m. More information at www.juanitafolsom ministries.com. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 8:45 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. in the Millennium Church. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer a Saturday service at 6 p.m. with Pastor Tiger Gullett in the Millennium Church. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org All teachings are taken from the Manufacturer's Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service,Nursery and Children's Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of God's Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and children's church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com Web site: www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:30-7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net ; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Women's Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; MondayFriday, Summer Day Camp (youth ages 11-14) 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. excluding holidays; Tuesday: Grief Support Group, 3 p.m., adult classroom; Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m., adult classroom. Nursery available during worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com, 118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 9-10 a.m. in the sanctuary; contemporary worship is from 11 a.m. to noon. Sunday school classes for adults and children will be 10:10-10:50 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Children's Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail, springlakepc@embarqmail.com, Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com, Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruc e Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL33870. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays with Rick Heilig, youth director. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church, 200 South Lake Avenue, Avon Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R. James Weiss, Pastor, Sunday School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Prayer Shawl Ministry on the second and fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m. for women who love God and crocheting. Visit us at our church Web site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodist Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pastor. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral assistant. Sunday schedule: Heritage Worship Service, 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worship service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m. Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m. (October-May only). We offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth programs, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship. We are a congregation that want to know Christ and make Him known. Call the church office at 465-2422 or check out our church Web site at www.memorialumc.com St. John United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL33872. The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all services. Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodist Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church office phone: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church of Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, FL 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 27 and Hammock Road). Sunday worship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion with worship first Sunday of month; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. all other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For more information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@earth link.net or check theWeb site sebringemmanuelucc.com. No matter who you are or where you are on life's journey, you're welcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP HARDCOVER FICTION 1. "Smokin'Seventeen" by Janet Evanovich (Bantam) 2. "Against All Enemies" by Tom Clancy and Peter Telep (Putnam Adult) 3. "The Devil Colony" by James Rollins (William Morrow) 4. "One Summer" by David Baldacci (Grand Central Publishing) 5. "State of Wonder" by Ann Patchett (Harper) 6. "Silver Girl: ANovel" by Elin Hilderbrand (Reagan Arthur Books) 7. "Carte Blanche" by Jeffery Deaver (Simon & Schuster) 8. "Fallen" by Karin Slaughter (Random House) 9. "Folly Beach: ALowcountry Tale" by Dorothea Benton Frank (William Morrow) 10. "Sisterhood Everlasting: A Novel" by Ann Brashares (Random House) 11. "The Kingdom" by Clive Cussler and Grant Blackwood (Putnam Adult) 12. "Dead Reckoning" by Charlaine Harris (Ace) 13. "The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest" by Stieg Larsson (Knopf) 14. "Maine" by J. Courtney Sullivan (Knopf) 15. "Summer Rental" by Mary Kay Andrews (St. Martin's Press) HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. "Go the F--k to Sleep" by Adam Mansbach and Illustrations by Ricardo Cortes (Avon) 2. "Unbroken: AWorld War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption" by Laura Hillenbrand (Random House) 3. "In the Garden of Beasts" by Erik Larson (Crown) 4. "The Greater Journey" by David McCullough (Simon & Schuster) 5. "Reckless Endangerment" by Gretchen Morgenson & Joshua Rosner (Times Books) 6. "The 17 Day Diet: A Doctor's Plan Design for Rapid Results" by Dr. Mike Moreno (Free Press) 7. "The Dukan Diet" by Pierre Dukan (Crown Archetype) 8. "Bossypants" by Tina Fey (Reagan Arthur) 9. "Demonic: How the Liberal Mob is Endangering America" by Ann Coulter (Crown Forum) 10. "Through My Eyes" by Tim Tebow and Nathan Whitaker (Harper) 11. "SEALTeam Six" by Howard E. Wasdin & Stephen Templin (St. Martin's) 12. "Lies That Chelsea Handler Told Me" by Chelsea Handler (Grand Central Publishing) 13. "Those Guys Have All the Fun" by James Andrew Miller & Tom Shales (Little, Brown) 14. "The Miracle of Freedom" by Chris Stewart & Ted Stewart (Shadow Mountain) 15. "Lost in Shangri-La" by Mitchell Zuckoff (Harper) MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS 1. "AGame of Thrones" by George R.R. Martin (Spectra) 2. "AClash of Kings" by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 3. "Sizzling Sixteen" by Janet Evanovich (St. Martin's Paperbacks) 4. "Tough Customer: ANovel" by Sandra Brown (Pocket Star) 5. "AStorm of Swords" by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 6. "Worst Case" by James Patterson and Michael Ledwidge (Vision) 7. "AFeast for Crows" by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 8. "The Spy" by Clive Cussler and Justin Scott (Berkley) 9. "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo" by Stieg Larsson (Vintage) 10. "The Shack" by William P. Young (Windblown Media) 11. "Foreign Influence" by Brad Thor (Pocket) 12. "The Girl Who Played with Fire" by Stieg Larsson (Vintage) 13. "Frankenstein: The Dead Town" by Dean Koontz (Bantam) 14. "Wicked Lies" by Lisa Jackson and Nancy Bush (Zebra) 15. "AWedding Wager" by Jane Feather (Pocket) TRADE PAPERBACKS 1. "The Help" by Kathryn Stockett (Putnam Adult) 2. "Heaven is for Real: ALittle Boy's Astounding Story of His Trip to Heaven and Back" by Todd Burpo, Sonja Burpo,Colton Burpo and Lynn Vincent (Thomas Nelson) 3. "Room" by Emma Donoghue (LB/Back Bay) 4. "The Original Argument: The Federalists'Case for the Constitution, Adapted for the 21st Century" by Glenn Bec k (Threshold Editions) 5. "Water for Elephants: A Novel" by Sara Gruen (Algonquin) 6. "Learning" by Karen Kingsbury (Zondervan) 7. "Outliers: The Story of Success" by Malcolm Gladwell (LB/Back Bay) 8. "Game of Thrones" by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 9. "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" by Rebecca Skloot (Broadway) 10. "Cutting for Stone" by Abraham Verghese (Vintage) 11. "AVisit from the Goon Squad" by Jennifer Egan (Anchor) 12. "One Day" by David Nicholls (Vintage) 13. "The Glass Castle: A Memoir" by Jeannette Walls (Scribner) 14. "Life" by Keith Richards (LB/Back Bay) 15. "The Art of Racing in the Rain" by Garth Stein (Harper) BOOKS

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By CHRISTYLEMIRE APMovie CriticLOS ANGELES — There’s been no shortage of movies made about mobsters over the years; their power and brazenness understandably hold a fascination for Hollywood and filmgoers. But some gangsters are more fearsome than others. One of the most infamous of all is James “Whitey” Bulger, the New England mob boss who was captured last week after 16 years as a fugitive, and who helped inspire Jack Nicholson’s character in Martin Scorsese’s 2006 Oscar-winner “The Departed.” He’s our inspiration this week to take a look at five of the most formidable movie mobsters of all time: — Marlon Brando as Don Vito Corleone in “The Godfather” (1972): Of course, we have to start here, but what more can we say that hasn’t been said a million times before? Brando’s quietly intimidating performance as the aging patriarch of an organized crime family set the standard for portrayals of Mafia leaders — at least in the first part of Francis Ford Coppola’s ambitious, ground-breaking trilogy. Al Pacino’s Michael Corleone is truly frightening, but Brando’s shadow looms large over everything. He’s been endlessly worshipped, quoted and parodied, and deservedly so. Brando’s work is nothing short of iconic, and it earned him an Academy Award for best actor, which he famously wouldn’t accept in protest. See, the Academy made him an offer he COULD refuse. — Ray Liotta as Henry Hill in “Goodfellas” (1990): Scorsese was robbed, of course. On no planet should “Dances With Wolves” ever win the best-picture Oscar over “Goodfellas,” which remains one of the director’s masterpieces. All his stylistic signatures are there: the fluid movement and the rock soundtrack; the colorful characters and the visceral violence. But at the center of it all is Liotta, doing the best work of his career as a resourceful up-and-comer who rises to the top of the mob heap, only to find he’s in over his head. He’s just as dangerous as he is boyishly handsome and charming — resourceful and clever but capable of volatility. He’s snorting lines, he’s stirring the sauce, he can do it all. — James Cagney in multiple roles: Playing a tough guy was one of Cagney’s strong suits, and that persona was indelibly on display in several classic gangster movies. In 1931’s “The Public Enemy,” he plays Tom Powers, a volatile Chicago gangster on the rise who has some creative uses for grapefruit. In 1938’s “Angels With Dirty Faces,” he plays Rocky Sullivan, who grew up in a tough part of New York and returns as a career criminal, only to cross paths with the priest who was his childhood best friend. Michael Curtiz’s film features plenty of stereotypes and a moral undercurrent, but Cagney is at his brash best, and the performance earned him the first of his three Academy Award nominations for best actor. — Ben Kingsley as Don Logan in “Sexy Beast” (2001): Part of the allure of this performance is that it’s so vastly different from the kind of quiet, dignified work we ordinarily associate with Kingsley: He’s the antiGandhi. He’s just tremendous here, and the role earned him an Oscar nomination for best supporting actor. As a foulmouthed, gun-toting, buttkicking British thug, Kingsley is unpredictable, impossible to stop watching. His performance alone would make “Sexy Beast” worth seeing, but it punctuates a stylish noir thriller that’s totally addictive. — William Hurt as Richie Cusack in “A History of Violence” (2005): Hurt also earned a supporting-actor Oscar nomination for his performance as a passively threatening Philadelphia mob boss. He shows up toward the end o f the movie and has only a single scene, one that’s unlike any other in the film with its dark sense of humor. Parading around an ostentatious castle of a home, he plays the role with a mix o f affection, menace, paranoia and regret, laying on the mos t charming guilt trip with just a touch of insanity. Even though he barely appears in director David Cronenberg’s twisty thriller, he nearly steals the whole movie. Think of any other examples? Share them with AP Movie Critic Christy Lemire at http://twitter.com/christylemire. Larry CrowneYou can have two of the most likable, bankable stars on the planet together, but strong writing is crucial to making them shine. Even the combined, blinding brilliance of Tom Hanks and Julia Roberts cannot salvage the corny, contrived script — which Hanks, who also directed the film, cowrote. His longtime friend Nia Vardalos (“My Big Fat Greek Wedding”) was his collaborator, and the shticky nature of her style is just overpowering. Main characters behave in unbelievable ways and say j ust the right poignant things at just the right times, while supporting players are relegated to one-note roles that are straight out of a sitcom. But the main problem is that Hanks is as bland as the film’s title. Larry Crowne undergoes a major life change when he finds himself downsized out of his job at a behemoth superstore; middleaged and divorced, he decides it’s finally time to go to college. Roberts co-stars as the professor who becomes Larry’s unlikely love interest, while Gugu Mbatha-Raw plays the impossibly gorgeous fellow student who gives him a makeover. Rated PG-13 for brief strong language and some sexual content. Running time: 98 minutes. One and a half stars out of four. — Christy Lemire, AP Movie CriticMonte CarloThe French Riviera, that golden-hued playground of Grace Kelly and Cary Grant, here gets taken over by teenyboppers. In her biggest role yet, Disney Channel star and pop singer Selena Gomez plays Grace, a Texas 18-year-old who has long dreamed of visiting Paris. Traveling with her best friend (Katie Cassidy) and stepsister (Leighton Meester), their visit to the French capital is a bust. But when a British heiress look-alike (also played by Gomez) turns up, Grace impersonates her and earns a private-jet trip to Monte Carlo the next day. In Monaco, the scheme mostly leads to romance and sappy self-discovery. Impersonating a famous heiress, one would think, might lead to numerous comical situations. But this isn’t “Some Like it Hot”; “Monte Carlo” likes it lukewarm. Gomez, while endearingly earnest, doesn’t command the screen. Rated PG for brief mild language. Running time: 108 minutes. Two stars out of four. — Jake Coyle, AP Entertainment WriterTerri Jacob Wysocki makes his subtly confident film debut as a misfit teen who’s comfortable in his own skin — even though there’s a lot of it. Heavyset, soft-spoken and reserved, he makes the same solitary trek to school each day in his pajamas — “They’re just comfortable on me,” he reasons — but barely makes much of an impression on anyone once he gets there, except to serve as a target of torment. What’s fascinating about director Azazel Jacobs’quietly beautiful film, though, is that it never condescends to Terri, never pities him, because Terri doesn’t pity himself. He is who he is: nononsense, observant and smarter than he looks. He goes about his days, living in a cluttered home with his aging uncle (Creed Bratton) who’s showing early signs of Alzheimer’s. John C. Reilly is versatile as always as the affable high school vice principal who takes Terri under his wing. Rated R for sexual content, language, some drug and alcohol use, all involving teens. 105 minutes. Three stars out of four. — Christy Lemire, AP Movie Critic Page 10BNews-SunSunday, July 3, 2011www.newssun.com Church Page; 5.542"; 7.1"; Black; church page dummy; 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 6 9 STANLEY STEEMER CARPET; 3.639"; 4"; Black; 07/03/11; 0 0 0 0 9 8 2 7 CREATIVE FLOORS; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 07/01, 07/03, 07/06; 0 0 0 0 9 8 7 8 COCHRAN BROTHERS ROOFING; 5.542"; 3"; Black; July ads; 0 0 0 0 9 8 3 1 CROSSWORDSOLUTION MOVIES The five most memorable and formidable movie mobsters MCTphotos Marlon Brando (above) as The Godfather and James Cagney in several roles are two of the most iconic movie mobsters. CAPSULEMOVIEREVIEWS

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LIVING 12B PAGE News-Sun Sunday, July 3, 2011 Boston:On Jan. 17, 1706, Benjamin Franklin was born on Milk Street to Josiah Franklin and his wife, Abiah. The house at Milk Street and Washington is gone, but the site is commemorated by a bust above the secondfloor facade. Across the street is the Old South Meeting House, a gathering place and church where Franklin was once a congregant. It was the location of his parents'wedding and his baptism. Today the meeting house is a National Historic Landmark and museum dedicated to preserving a place for people to meet, discuss and act upon important issues of the day. Apermanent exhibition titled "Voices of Protest" opened in 2000. Franklin:Named after Benjamin Franklin, the town is home to the nation's oldest continuously operational one-room schoolhouse as well what some consider to be the first public library. The current Franklin Public Library building was built in 1904 and features granite and marble staircases, frescoed walls and original books from the collection of Benjamin Franklin. A visit to the library offers lessons in architecture, Greek mythology, Yankee austerity and small town politics. The town is known for its preservation efforts, and the historic district contains 32 buildings built before 1900.More Info: 800-227-6277 or massvacation.com London:The Benjamin Franklin House, located near Trafalgar Square on Craven Street, is the only remaining home in which Franklin lived. It was built circa 1730, and Franklin resided at the Georgian-style home from 1757 to 1775. Today the home is a museum with three main exhibits: the Historical Experience, the Student Science Center, and a Scholarship Center. Franklin kept a laboratory at his home, where he researched the Gulf Stream, developed an alternative alphabet and invented bifocal spectacles and the "glass armonica," a kind of harmonica. Afunctional replica of the instrument is on display.More Info:44-0-207-839-2006 orbenjaminfranklinhouse.org Paris:Franklin was sent to Paris on a crucial mission to negotiate the Treaty of Alliance during the American Revolution. Acting as the American Commissioner to France from 1776 to 1784, he was present to witness the world's first hydrogen balloon flight in Annonay on June 4, 1783, and many other events in scientific and political history. The royal court was charmed by his wit and intellect. Today walking tours follow the footsteps of Franklin, Thomas Jefferson and their French supporter, the Marquis de Lafayette around the City of Light. The CafŽ Procope, which Franklin and Jefferson frequented, still operates in the 6th Arrondissement.More Info:410-286-8310 or en.parisinfo.com Philadelphia:Franklin is often referred to as "Philadelphia's most famous citizen." The city's main parkway and bridge are named in his honor and more than 5,000 likenesses of Franklin are found around the city. Independence National Historic Park includes Franklin Square, Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell. It was at Independence Hall that the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were adopted. The Benjamin Franklin National Memorial, a statue of Franklin, sits in the rotunda of The Franklin Institute. Sculpted by James Earle Fraser, the statue weighs 30 tons and sits on a 92-ton pedestal of white Seravezza marble. Franklin died at age 84 on April 17, 1790, and was interred at the Christ Church Burial Ground.More Info:800-537-7676 orvisitphilly.com MASSACHUSETTS M A S S A C H U S E T T S MASSACHUSETTS Boston Franklin UNITED KINGDOMLondon Paris FRANCE F PENNSYLVANIAPhiladelphia 1706:Jan. 17, born in Boston 1718:Begins an apprenticeship in his brother James'printing shop in Boston1723:Runs away to Philadelphia1724:Moves to London, continues training as a printer1726:Returns to Philadelphia1728:Opens his own printing office in Philadelphia1729:Becomes sole owner and publisher of the Pennsylvania Gazette1730:Marries Deborah Read Rogers1731:Birth of Ben's son, William; Founds the first Circulating Library1732:Birth of Ben's son, Francis; Publishes "Poor Richard: An Almanack," which continues annually through 17581736Death of Ben's son, Francis; Founds the Union Fire Company in Philadelphia1737:Appointed Postmaster of Philadelphia1742:Proposes the idea for the University of Pennsylvania1743:Birth of Ben's daughter, Sarah, also known as "Sally"1747:First writings of electrical experimentation; organizes the first militia1748:Sells printing office, retiring from business1751:His book "Experiments and Observations on Electricity" is published in London1752:In June, performs famous kite experiment; Founds first American fire insurance company1757:Travels in London as representative of the Pennsylvania Assembly1762:Returns to Philadelphia1764:Travels to London1767:Travels to France1769:Elected president of the American Philosophical Society1774:While in London, receives word of his wife's death1775:Returns to Philadelphia; Elected to Continental Congress; Submits Articles of Confederation of United Colonies1776:Signs the Declaration of Independence; Presides at Pennsylvania Constitutional Convention; Sails to France as American Commissioner1778:Negotiates and signs Treaty of Alliance with France1779:Appointed Minister to France1782:Negotiates, with John Adams and John Jay, the Treaty of Peace with Great Britain1784:Negotiates treaties with Prussia and other European countries1785:Returns to Philadelphia1787:Elected president of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery; Serves as delegate to the Constitutional Convention1790:April 17, at age 84, dies in Philadelphia LIBRARYOF CONGRESS"Poor Richard: An Almanack"COURTESYOF MICHAELPARKERThe statue of Franklin at the Benjamin Franklin National Memorial weighs 30 tons.COURTESYOF YALE UNIVERSITYLIBRARYBenjamin Franklin was a sensation in the French royal court. 2 3 1 4 1 2 3 4 Benjamin FranklinLIBRARYOF CONGRESS By Kate Lucas, The Orange County Registers one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, Benjamin Franklin was an essential contributor to the shaping of our country. He was the only statesman to have signed all four documents that created a new nation: the Declaration of Independence (1776), the Treaty of Alliance with France (1778), the Treaty of Paris establishing peace with Britain (1783) and the Constitution (1787). Franklin was a leading author, satirist, politician, scientist, inventor, diplomat and statesman. Throughout his lifetime he traveled or lived in the following places: Tracing the travels of U.S. Founding FatherBenjamin Franklin