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The news-sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01062
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 07-01-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:01062
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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C M Y K By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING — The day began with an opaque, silver gray sky. Combat veterans, wearing their motorcycle club leathers and insignia, stood protectively in a semicircle, facing the First Baptist Church of Sebring’s main doors. They held American flags. Slowly, people began to arrive, the first to deliver their condolences in person during the visitation hour, and then for the 11 a.m. service — the final farewell to Private First Class Joshua Jetton, the 21-year-old soldier who was shot and killed June 20 while serving in Kunar Province, Afghanistan. The gathering was large; the people respectful. Joshua Jetton’s widow, Alicia Moore Jetton, teaches in the First Baptist Church of Sebring’s preschool program, as does another member of her family. “We’ve known them a long time,” David Richardson, senior pastor at First Baptist Church of Sebring, said in explaining why the church so quickly provided support. Surrounded by photographs taken at different points in his life, Jetton NEWS-SUN Highlands County’s Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Friday-Saturday, July 1-2, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 77 | 50 cents www.newssun .com 079099401001 HighLow 91 74Complete Forecast PAGE 10A A couple of showers or T-storms possible Forecast Question: Should Rod Blagojevich get the maximum possible sentence? Next question: Will you buy fireworks for this Fourth of July? www.newssun .com Make your voice heard at Online Obituaries Elijah Jones Age 85, of Sebring Marie Jones Age 88, of Avon Park Saundra Light Age 63, of Avon Park Louise Scotburt Age 92, of Sebring Louisa SpitonoliBattista Age 91, of Sebring Obituaries, Page 5A Phone ... 385-6155Fax ... 385-2453Online: www.newssun.com Yes 77% No 23% Total votes: 78 Classifieds7A Community Briefs2A Community Calendar8B Dear Abby9B Editorial & Opinion3A Friends & Neighbors10B Healthy Living5B Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times9B Sports On TV2B Index WAUCHULA STATE BANK; 11.25"; 1.5"; Black plus three; process, front strip; 0 0 0 0 9 8 3 5 Tips for handling food PAGE10B By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING — County Commissioners voted 4-0 to delay impact fees for another year at their meeting Tuesday night. “I’ve heard enough,” said Commissioner Greg Harris, who made the motion to extend the suspension of the fees until July 1, 2012. “I don’t think we need impact fees for a long time.” Most of those that spoke at the public meeting were in support of suspending the fees for at least a year, and one idea floated out there was to eliminate the fees completely. But one group was for reinstating the fees Oct. 1. The impact fee committee voted 6-2 to put the fees back into effect with the start of the fiscal year, according to County Engineer Ramon Gavarrete, who was responsible for presenting the agenda item to the board. Chip Boring, representing 513 Realtors in the Heartland Realtors Association, and also the chairman of the Impact Fee Committee, stated that he was not at the meeting when the vote was made and called a reinstatement of the fees the “death blow” for the construction and real estate industries. “I can’t say how the vote would have went if there was a full compliment of the board in attendance, but I can say that I would not have supported the motion,” Boring said about the committee vote. Close to 45 Realtors stood in support of Boring’s statements at the request of Chairwoman Barbara Stewart. Marlene Barger, representing the Group for Better Government, also read a letter Impact fees to remain at bay And they who for their country die shall fill an honored grave, for glory lights the soldiers tomb, and beauty weeps the brave.JOSEPHDRAKE American poet (1795-1820) By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comAVON PARK — Interim city manager Julian Deleon warned the city council at its regular Monday meeting that tough choices lay ahead, but he was still hopeful the city could balance its budget without laying off workers. Wednesday night, however, Deleon notified the NewsSun that three workers do have to be laid off. Deleon said he regretted having to take the action, but at the moment no other options remained. Acombination of uncontrollable costs — primarily pension contributions and rising insurance rates — and reductions in revenue — the city now takes in $777,000 less than it did in 2009 — has created a $270,000 deficit in the 20112012 budget. “The main thing is, we’re trying to behave in a sensitive manner,” Deleon said, Avon Park to lay off three workers Deleon News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY David Richardson, senior pastor at the First Baptist Church of Sebring, and Army Lt. Col, John E. Hugus, lead the procession carrying the body of Pfc. Joshua Jetton to the gravesite Wednesday afternoon. A warrior at peace Hundreds attend funeral for Jetton News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY The local community reaches out to a fallen soldier and his family. See JETTON, page 4A See IMPACT, page 6A See AP, page 6A By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING — School board members engaged in a discussion of how to best find teacher applicants at a workshop Monday afternoon. The issue revolved around whether or not the district should look first to former or current local teachers in filling positions, or hire from outside. Board members Ned Hancock and Andy Tuck have concerns regarding the policy. Vivianne Waldron, director of Human Resources, told the board that when openings occur, the district advertises in-house before advertising in publications and on Web sites outside the district. She said this process was part of an agreement with the teacher’s union. “I just want to be sure we’re getting the very best people,” Tuck said. Hancock agreed, saying, “If we don’t advertise outside, how do we know we’re getting the best applicants? There is no way to know if we don’t advertise outside School board debates policy for advertising jobs News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY School board member Bill Brantley (left) and school superintendent Wally Cox exchange ideas during a discussion of teacher recruitment Monday night. See SCHOOL, page 6A A tough seasonSebring's Hoffner fights through injury SPORTS, 1BComfortingQuilters donate to sick kids PAGE2AUnder reviewLPtaking long look at manager PAGE6A Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and

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C M Y K By SAMANTHAGHOLAR s gholar@newssun.comSEBRING Agroup of talented women have beenw orking diligently on a project that will bring smiles to t he faces of some of Highlands Countys sick anda iling children. The Central Florida chapter of Quilts for Kids has recently completed 54 different quilts that will be donat-e d to pediatric patients at Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center in Sebring. Eight women have been sewing quilts sinceD ecember. Each of the quilts is different in pattern, color and decor. Quilts for Kids Central Florida coordinator Claudia Hopkins was thrilled at the amount of quilts that had been made. It is such a thrill to have people in the community that care enough to take time to do something and give back, Hopkins said. The quilters find that using their hobby for a good cause is fulfilling and enjoyable. Florida Hospital director of volunteer services Carole Seifert was present Wednesday to pick up the quilts. Seifert was surprised at the number of quilts that the ladies had created. ow. These are just amazing, Seifert said. According to Pat Villere, one of the quilters, the majority of the quilt can be completed in one day depending on the detail and patterns. Many of the ladies created multiple quilts. The bright colors and animals spread all over Heart to Heart Fabrics in Avon Park brought a smile to many of the quiltersfaces. Quilts for Kids is a nonprofit organization that works hard to provide things for children that they can not get in a hospital. Often times when kids are sick in the hospital they arent able to get a teddy bear or stuffed animal in their rooms. These quilts give them something unique and sentimental to hang on to while they are in there, Hopkins said. Quilts for Kids will hand over the quilts to the hospital next week. Seifert and her volunteers plan to hand out the blankets to children in the upcoming weeks. ith the holiday coming up, not many more children will be admitted so we will wait and give them to as many kids as possible. We just dont want them sitting around, Seifert said. The Quilts for Kids organization meets the last Wednesday of every month at Heart to Heart Fabrics. Villere and Hopkins invite local residents that are interested to come by or contact for any information. e are raffling off a hand-made quilt. Tickets are $1. All the money will go to Quilts for Kids, Villere said. Anyone interested in joining must have their own sewing machine. Quilters do not have to be very experienced the organizationp repares kits that include all the patterns and pieces that w ould be needed to create the top portion of a quilt.Q uilters can work in the store with the group during the monthly meeting or in their own home. For more information or to m ake contributions, contact Hopkins at (321 centralfloridaQFK@gmail.co m/. Contributions of fabric are w elcomed, but all fabric must be 100 percent cotton and of good quality. Page 2ANews-SunFriday, July 1, 2011www.newssun.com Publishers Block; 5.542"; 4.5"; Black; publishers block; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 8 0 0 3 3 4 4 POSHE DAY SALON; 3.639"; 2"; Black; 07/01/2011; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 8 8 3 3 6 6 June 29 103036414951x:3Next jackpot $18 millionJune 25 22736434452x:5 June 22 2619313639x:4 June 29 119242636 June 28 57223235 June 27 1622252936 June 26 46171932 June 29 (n 5182 June 29 (d 7012 June 28 (n 2196 June 28 (d 5211 June 29(n 875 June 29 (d 822 June 28 (n 143 June 28(d 657 June 28 413274415 June 24 212732381 June 21 1330323722 June 17 69253918 June 29 2430455759 PB: 26 PP: 3Next jackpot $20 millionJune 25 1836394157 PB: 12 PP: 4 June 22 1215194659 PB: 12 PP: 4 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawings are twice per day: (d daytime drawing, (n nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Play Lottery Center Caladium Co-op added to drop off sites for JettonL AKE PLACID The Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative, 132 E. Interlake Blvd., has joined the many other businessesi n Highlands County in setting up a box for donations of baby items for the twins of Pfc. Joshua Jetton when they are born. Call6 99-5940 for directions. Certain community businesses have set out boxes for donations of the supplies diapers, lotion,p owder, wipes any of the essentials Alicia Moore Jetton will need when hert wins are born. Boxes are also set out at the News-Sun, at the Cut N Up Salon and Polston Engineering in Sebring, the H eartland Bank in Avon Park, and at Jones Oil and Tires and the GoldenC orral in Lake Placid.Fourth of July holiday schedulesAVON PARK City of Avon Park Public Worksg arbage schedule for July 4th holiday will be as foll ows: No garbage pick-up on Monday, July 4. Mondaysg arbage pick-up will move to Tuesday, July 5. T uesdays garbage pickup will move to Wednesday, July 6. SEBRING City of Sebring city offices will be closed Monday, July 4 to observe Independence Daya nd will re-open Tuesday, July 5. No garbage pick-ups on Monday, July 4. Schedule for pick-ups is as follows:M onday pick-ups will be on Tuesday and Tuesday p ick-ups will change to Wednesday. Boil Water Notice rescindedAVON PARK The J une 27 Precautionary Boil Water Notice for all Sebring Ridge water customers, including the Crossings, has beenr escinded following the repairs of the four-inch water main and the satisfactory completion of the bacteriological survey s howing that the water is s afe to drink. I f you have any quest ions, call Avon Park Public Works at 452-4427.Transition Now w orkshop setS EBRING Try the e lectronic cigarette free in a Transition Now works hop. Workshops are bein g held at the Sebring Chamber of Commerce. Call 471-2002 for a scheduled workshop.YMCA plans car wash todayS EBRING The Highlands County Family YMCAis hosting a car w ash from 8:30-11 a.m. today. Proceeds will help with the cost of field trips t he children will enjoy this summer. Volunteers will ask for a donation that includes a complete wash and drying o f your car. For information, call 382-9622.District will begin testing sirenLAKE PLACID The Southwest Florida Water Management District will b egin monthly audible testi ng on Saturday of an emergency siren at a water c ontrol structure on Jack Creek. T he audible testing wil l o ccur the first Saturday of e ach month at 12:30 p.m. t o ensure the siren performs properly. During testing, the siren will sound once for approximately 15 seconds and is expected to reach a two-mile radius. The siren was installed as an additional safety procedure for the unlikely event of an emergency that could result in the failureo f the water control structure. The structure, locatedo n Jack Creek at 1152 P eachtree Drive, regulates water levels in Lake June i n-Winter to ensure environmental health, recreational use and aesthetic value of the lake. The District currently owns and operates the structure, CO MMUNITYBR IEFS C ontinued on page 5B By ED BALDRIDGE e d.baldridge@newssun.comLAKE PLACID In order to offset the loss in take-home pay that begins on July 1 because of state pension require-m ents, the Lake Placid Town Council voted 2-1 to give employees a small raise for three months. Council members Ray Royce and Debra Worley voted for the 1.5 percenti ncrease and Steve Bastardi opposed the motion. The request came from town employees who are forced by a change in state law to contribute 3 percent to their own p ension plans stating on July 1. The pay increase is just for three months, July, August and September, and even though Royce made the motion, he did not want to go the full 3p ercent s get this straight, the changes in the law does not cut anyones pay. It reduces the amount that is taken home by 3 percent, said Royce. Sometime in the middle of the year, the federal government cut the employee contribution to social security, giving employees about 2 percent more in their pay check. No one volunteered to give t hat back to the town, Royce said. Royce volunteered the 1.5 percent instead of the full 3 percent in order to balance the amount of take-home pay after the social security break, he said. P olice Chief Phil Williams presented the issue on behalf of the employees, and confirmed that the request for the short term, not the long term. The employees have not had a raise i n two years, and this kind of caught everyone by surprise, Williams said. e just want to put the money back into the employees take-home pay. It is not a lot, but every bit helps. LP employees get three-month pay raise T hree days after the tragic combat death of Pfc. Brian Backus inA fghanistans Kandahar province, a Facebook t ribute page was launched in the 21-yearold warriors honor. I have never met this soldier, the pages unidentified creator wrote o n June 21. But I felt this page was needed for t his fallen hero. More than a thousand people have since liked the page, including many of the Harbor Beach,M ich., soldiers relatives, friends and fellow troops. People who hadnt seen Pfc. Backus in years have also been sharing fond memories. I used to babysit B rian and his brother Lisa Bain posted on June 2 3. e will always remember him as a smart, energetic boy who insisted on having his back scratched during bed-t ime. The heartfelt messages of support are comforting the Backus family duringa time of unrelenting g rief. It means more to us than you can imagine, the fallen heros grieving mother, Anne Backus, posted on June 22. To see that our son, Brian, touched so many lives helps ease the pain of loss. Facebook communities like this one harness the staggering toll of the ongoing Afghanistan and Iraq conflicts. As the national media obsess over next years presidential election and the Casey Anthony trial, these posts, filled with genuine compassion and raw emotion, remind us that we are still a nation at war. Another 21-year-old fallen hero, Pfc. Josue Ibarra, made the ultimate sacrifice while conducting combat operations in Afghanistans Helmand province on June 19. In the dark hours following the tragedy, a Facebook page was quickly, caringly created to celebrate the Marines life. ou wanted to protect us; you did protect us, Dennis Ly wrote on June 23. Theres no way we can thank you in person now, but what we can do is live out the rest of our lives to the fullest and to the most positive way we can for Josue. He will live on through us, the people he wants to protect, he conFaces of war N ews-Sun photos by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Q uilts for Kids members along with Carole Seifert, Florida Hospital Director of Volunteer Services (centeren next week. Hospitalized children to receive dozens of quilts Pat Villere organizes 54 quilts at Heart to Heart Fabrics Wednesday afternoon in preparation of the quilts being donated to pediatric patients. See FACEBOOK, page 5A

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C M Y K Not only will crass partisanship hopefully be restrained, but the process will be more open and transparent. ... For the first time lawmakers will have to redraw legislative and congressional districts according to standards set forth in two amendments to the Florida Constitution that voters approved last November. Amendments 5 and 6, collectively known as “Fair Districts,” give politicians far less leeway than they have previously enjoyed — and abused. In the past, districts didn’t so much reflect geographic boundaries as they did narrow political and demographic concerns. Legislators used sophisticated computer programs to crunch census data and engineer meandering, bizarrely shaped districts that cherry-picked voters. Because the majority party in the Legislature controls the redistricting process, it had the power to create districts that were virtually guaranteed to elect a representative of the majority. ... Fair Districts has changed that. The twin measures require districts to be compact, to utilize existing political and geographical boundaries and not to favor incumbents or any party, while at the same time protecting minority voting rights. The amendments don’t remove politics from redistricting, but they should force lawmakers to treat voters more as members of communities. ... Many complain that the new restrictions require lawmakers to comply with conflicting standards, and their imperfect products will be subject to legal challenges. They fear that several new districts either will violate the state constitution or they will run afoul of the federal Voting Rights Act. In part to rebut those charges, the Legislature has included the public in the process. It is soliciting input online at www.floridaredistricting.org and www.flsenate.gov/Redistricting where Floridians can use the same tools lawmakers have to create their own redistricting maps and submit them to the reapportionment committees. ... So speak your mind. You can’t accuse politicians of ignoring your opinion if you never offered it in the first place. Go on the record by voicing an idea or submitting a redistricting plan, check out others and then compare them to what the Legislature comes up with. An editorial from the News Herald in Panama City. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, July 1, 2011Page 3ATODAYSEDITORIALTODAYSLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION Watch for baby deerEditor: I would like to mention to the public that baby deer are being born this time of year in Highlands County and surrounding counties: DeSoto, Hardee, Glades and Polk. Should you see a baby deer (fawn) that is in the field or grassy area, do not approach it or pick it up. The mother deer (doe) is most likely around and can hear the baby up to a mile away. If you are mowing or cleaning in a field or wooded area, leave the area so that the deer is safe. If you have dog(s), keep them away from the baby deer. Dog(s) are known to attack baby deer and either harm or kill the deer. Deer have natural predators that they have to contend with. They don’t need humans to be a problem for them as well. Be careful when driving down the roads that you know may have deer in the area. Alot of accidents happen when deer run onto the road in front of motor vehicles then car/truck will try to avoid hitting them and run off the road. If you see a baby deer and you think that either the mother has been killed, or there are flies around the deer or anything else that may be a problem with the baby deer, then you need to either call Florida Fish and Wildlife office or a local rehabilitation center in your area. Either one will advise what to do. Don’t take a baby deer home. It is against the law to have one in your care. Remember, nature will take care of itself if left alone. Only rescue if the animal is either injured or abandoned. If not sure, call someone. The number of Wrede’s Wildlife Center is 385-2770; Florida Fish and Wildlife is (888) 404-3922 or (863) 648-3200. David Wrede Wrede’s Wildlife Rehabilitation Center Inc.Honoring a fallen local heroEditor: We want to thank everyone of you who took time to honor PFC Joshua Jetton, theSebring young man who gave the ultimatesacrifice to his country in Afghanistan last week and was brought home this (Tuesday) morning. We spoke to the group of veterans who drove their motorcycles in the procession and they said that the crowds all the way from Orlando to Sebring were something to be proud of. On Sebring Parkway they had a fire truck from Sebring on one side of the road, a fire truck from Avon Park on the other side.They joined their ladders together in the middle of the street to form a huge arch, then hung a huge flag from the center. This was where the procession passed under heading toward the funeral home with PFC Jetton’s casket. Quite moving. Both sides of the street were covered with people holding flags all the way from U.S. 27 to the funeral home, not a space to be had. May God bless and comfort the family ... and thank you again for your participation. John (Jack) Nelson President The Highlands Tea Party BouquetAmazing Race was amazingEditor: Having just finished our second Amazing Race for the Children’s Museum, I wanted to take this opportunity to thank the many businesses, organizations, and people that made this fantastic event such a wonderful experience. Our prize sponsor, Positive Medical Transport, was wonderful along with the following sponsors: Alan Jay Automotive, SJ Hartt and Sons, Central Florida Glass, Allan DixonAllstate Insurance and Swaine and Leidel. Jessica Hartline Allstate Insurance, Brenner Pottery, Ridge Water Filter Systems, Still Chic Boutique, First Presbyterian Church, Barbara Boss, Florida Hospital, Glades Electric, Ridge Florist, Heartland Imports, Highlands Independent Bank, Boss Business Solutions, Highlands Today, Baker PreCast and Avon Park Rotary also made donations for the race. We would like to give a big thank you to Papa John’s for providing delicious pizza for all of our hungry teams and workers. Thanks also to the following businesses that let us use their facilities as locations for the race. Home and Office Essentials, Baker PreCast, Cohan Radio, Duffers Sports Grill, River Greens, Avon Park Middle School, Banana Splits, Avon Park Rotary, Woodlawn Elementary, Sebring International Raceway and South Ridge Ag were gracious enough to allow our teams onto their property where they looked for clues, made concrete manhole covers, tasted ice cream, memorized poems and attempted various unusual challenges. The competing teams had a wonderful time with all of the challenges and enjoyed finding new locations and learning about Highlands County. Avery special thank you goes to our volunteer judges – Brenda Nelson, Caroline Livingston, Bobby and Anne Baker, Meredith Lutz, Robert Brown, Jean Federico, Megan Darr, Tina Gottus, Cathy Hardesty, Craig Crowder, Becky Travers, Pat Pella and Barry Foster. None of this would have happened without the help of the planning committee. Cathy Hardesty, Craig Crowder, and Tina Gottus spent many hours working on locations and challenges to make the day special. Thank you to everyone that made this fundraiser truly special. Linda Crowder Director Children’s Museum of the Highlands Another viewpoint Legislative reapportionment happens in Florida every 10 years. But it has never occurred the way it will this census cycle. I drove through my old neighborhood a few weeks ago. It is like many suburban neighborhoods that sprouted up in the 1960s. Many of the people who moved there grew up in the city. All of them wanted big yards in which their kids could play. Many wanted to be near St. Germaine Catholic Church and its elementary school. We moved into our new house in 1964, when I was 2. It was a basic, square house — brick on the bottom, white siding on the top — designed for raising children. And there were a lot of children. I was born at the tail end of the baby boom. Neighbor kids were everywhere. The Gillens had four; the Bennetts, three; the Greenaways, four; the Kriegers, five ... It was a traditional time, to be sure. Fathers worked and worried about the bills. Most mothers stayed home and worried about the kids. But there was less to worry about then. Moms ran the neighborhood. Kids were free to play. One summer, the fad was to make skateboards by nailing old roller skates onto two-foot pieces of 2by-4. So many kids rode their skateboards down Tracy Drive, the pavement turned gray. When the young families moved into their new homes, a lot of work needed to be done. Grass, shrubs and trees were planted. Concrete patios and driveways were poured. Porch roofs were built, basements remodeled into family rooms. Most of the fathers were in their 20s then. They spent Saturdays helping each other. They enjoyed breaking a sweat and drinking a few ice-cold beers. Most every decision these young parents made was based on the needs of their children. The principles they lived by were simple. They treated their children as little souls that God gave them to watch over. They wanted them to have a solid moral foundation and good education. Most of us attended St. Germaine School. Despite the struggles these parents encountered — all people, rich and poor, encounter struggles — most stayed married. Most believed they would be together “until death do us part.” More than a decade ago, after my parents moved out of the neighborhood, they threw a party for the old neighbors in their new house. I tended bar at the event. The last time I had seen many of these people had been more than 20 years earlier, when I was still a kid myself. At the party, I had a chance to learn about these good people. Every person in that room was a child of the Depression who came from nothing. One told stories of how the row house he grew up in was freezing cold in the morning. He wouldn’t get out of bed until he heard his father go down to the basement to fire up some coal. Another told me that for nearly 20 years of his marriage, he worked three jobs — 60 hours a week — to keep up with the bills. In spite of the fact that they hadn’t saved much money and worried about their futures, they married young, had families right away and worked hard. They scrimped and saved and gradually built a wonderful world for themselves and their children. And every one of them raised children who are all doing well in life. These good people are in their 70s and 80s now. They’re retired and living the good life. They have plenty to celebrate. It was my honor to spend an evening with them. Tom Purcell, a freelance writer is also a humor columnist for the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, and is nationally syndicated exclusively by Cagle Cartoons newspaper syndicate. Email Tom at Purcell@caglecartoons.com. Good old neighbors Guest Column Tom Purcell EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; or e-mail editor@newssun.com To make sure the editorial pages aren't dominated by the same writers, letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months. Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the opinion of that author and not necessarily the opinion of the staff or editors of the News-Sun All items will run on a first-come basis as space permits, although more timely ones could be moved up. We believe your viewpoints are just as important as any community leader or government official, so consider this a personal invitation to get your two cents in. The NewsSun has a long history of encouraging public discussion through letters, guest columns, and Reader's Response questionnaires. Providing this forum for our readers is a pleasure, not an obligation.

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C M Y K Page 4ANews-SunFriday, July 1, 2011www.newssun.com Musselman's ; 11.25"; 10.5"; Process color; -; 0 0 0 0 9 9 1 1 News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY An honor guard carries Pfc. Joshua Jetton to his burial site in Lakeview Memorial Gardens Wednesday afternoon. lay in his coffin in full dress uniform. “There is no pain greater than the pain of saying goodbye to a loved one,” Lt. Col. Chaplain John E. Hugus said during the service. “What can you say? But, I know that the word of God can pierce the darkness each of you are feeling.” The service came to a close with the song “Amazing Grace.” By the time the long funeral procession arrived at Lakeview Memorial Gardens, the high overcast was gone, the sky filled with low lying clouds of gray to black. Thunder rumbled in the distance. Yet, the rains held off. The mood, however, was somber and subdued — as if nature itself was expressing sorrow. Despite the weather, families and individuals stood along the side of the road, holding umbrellas and waving small American flags as the hearse and the Jetton family drove by, accompanied by at least 100 veterans riding motorcycles, sheriff’s deputies with their patrol car lights flashing and strangers, there to honor a brave young man killed in battle just as his life was beginning. Hugus and Pastor Richardson led Jetton’s coffin, carried by six honor guard pallbearers, from the hearse to his burial site, which was protected from the weather by a green canvas tent. His family huddled among themselves close to the coffin, the mourners circling around them — as if they were forming a shield to keep the family safe. The graveside military rites, with their long history and formality, added a bittersweet poignancy — the slow motion salutes, the folding of the flag and returning it to the family, the gun salute, the playing of Taps. Throughout the graveside service, the clouds grew darker and the sound of thunder grew closer, but still it did not rain. Near the end of the ceremony, Vicki Leisy DiGiovanni, representing the national organization Blue Star Mothers (mothers of men and women on active duty) told Jetton’s family that “(Joshua) is definitely among the stars. His job now is to watch over and guard his fellow warriors.” It was only after Jetton was safely at rest that the rain poured down. Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Army Maj. Gen. Anthony Crutchfield presents Joshua Jettons 19 year old widow with the flag that covered his coffin. News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY An Army bugler waits to play Taps in honor of Pfc. Joshua Jetton Wednesday afternoon. Jetton laid to rest News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Veterans lead the funeral procession of Pfc. Joshua Jetton to Lakeveiw Memorial Gardens on Wednesday.

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C M Y K tinued. “We won’t let you down.” After coordinating on Facebook, Pfc. Ibarra’s community didn’t let him down. When the Marine returned to Midland, Texas, in a flag-draped casket, city streets were lined with patriotic supporters. When an American service member is killed in action, fellow troops are deeply affected. Facebook pages like the one memorializing Pfc. Eric Soufrine, 20, of Woodbridge, Conn., give grieving warriors a place to pour out their hearts. “As a soldier also raised in Connecticut just returning from Afghanistan, I’d like to thank you for your service, and for making the ultimate sacrifice,” Tara LaDore posted on June 17. “Though I’ve never met you, you are my brother in arms and you will never be forgotten.” Pfc. Soufrine, who died on June 14 in Afghanistan’s Farah province when terrorists attacked his unit with an improvised explosive device, had a girlfriend who couldn’t wait for him to come home. As war’s harshest reality sinks in, the Facebook page is painful but also therapeutic for Paige Woodward. “We were supposed to have such an amazing life together,” she posted on June 16. “But I promise you, I will see you in heaven eventually, and we will pick up where we left off.” Pvt. Ryan Larson, 19, hailed from a tiny Wisconsin village called Friendship. Since his June 15 combat death in Afghanistan’s Kandahar province, more than 2,000 people -nearly three times his town’s population -have “liked” a Facebook page in tribute to their friend. “To see men and women, old and young, rich and poor, all races, types, personalities, and positions in our community all as one yesterday for Ryan was so amazing,” Izzy Jackson wrote on June 26. “God was shining his light down yesterday to welcome Ryan home.” During past conflicts, Americans could not instantly connect to wars being fought by our friends and neighbors, nor could families of the fallen visit virtual communities filled with memories of their loved ones. In the 21st century, through these interactive, invaluable tribute groups, parents can teach their children about the indelible sacrifices being made in Afghanistan and Iraq. I never met these four fallen heroes. But today, thanks in part to four remarkable Facebook pages, they are dearly missed. To find out more about Tom Sileo, or to read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com. MARIE J. JONES Marie J. Jones, 88, of Avon Park, Fla., passed away Wednesday, June 29, 2011, in Sebring. She was born Feb. 7, 1923, to Fred R. and Julia Marie (White) Sutton in Highlands, N.J., and had been a resident of Highlands County since 1987, coming from Gouldsboro, Pa. She was a homemaker and of the Catholic faith. She is survived by her sons, Clarence (Theresa) Welsh, Sebring, John (Karen) Welsh, Leighton, Pa., Patrick Welsh, Daytona Beach Shores, Fla. and Peter (Dorreen) Welsh, The Villages, Fla.; daughter-inlaw, Patti Jones, Littleton, Ga.; 14 grandchildren; 10 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her son, David Jones. Funeral services will take place at 10 a.m. Friday, July 1, 2011, at StephensonNelson Funeral Home, Sebring, with Deacon James McGarry officiating. Entombment at Lakeview Memorial Gardens, Avon Park, will be immediately following the service. Memorial donations may be made in her memory to Good Shepherd Hospice, 1110 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33870. Arrangements have been entrusted to: Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home Sebring, Florida 33870 863-385-0125 www.stephensonnelsonfh.com Death noticesElijah Jones, 85, of Sebring died June 24, 2011. Arrangements are being handled by Swann’s Mortuary, Sebring. Saundra Light, 63, of Avon Park died June 27, 2011. Arrangements are being handled by Swann’s Mortuary, Sebring. Louise Scotburt, 92, of Sebring died June 27, 2011. Arrangements handled by Swann’s Mortuary, Sebring. Louisa Spitonoli-Battista, 91, of Sebring died June 30, 2011. Arrangements are incomplete at this time. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, July 1, 2011Page 5A PUBLIX-National Newspaper Plac; 3.639"; 16"; Black; main, 84273 liquor; 0 0 0 0 9 5 4 8 MARTIAL ARTS (pp); 3.639"; 3"; Black; main ff top right pg; 0 0 0 0 9 8 8 3 which is regularly inspected and maintained to ensure it is safe and functioning properly. In the event of a real emergency, the siren would be activated with alternating intervals of three minutes of sound followed by three minutes of silence to alert residents living along Jack and Josephine creeks to evacuate and seek higher ground. This would continue until the conclusion of the emergency situation or until all residents downstream of the structure have been safely evacuated. For more information, contact David Crane, district structure operations manager, at (800) 423-1476 (Florida only) or (352) 7967211, ext. 4535.Military Sea Services Museum closed until July 6SEBRING — The Military Sea Services Museum will be closed through Tuesday to allow volunteers to participate in and enjoy the celebrations of Independence of the United States. The museum, on the corner of Kenilworth Boulevard and Roseland Avenue, will reopen Wednesday. Normal operating hours of the museum are 12-4 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday. Visitors are welcome.Habitat offers free tour of housing conditionsSEBRING — Join Highlands County Habitat for Humanity for a tour and lunch to learn more about Habitat’s work in Highlands County. See the untenable conditions in which applicant families are living. Tour existing Habitat homes, ongoing construction at Mason’s Ridge and be welcomed by a Habitat family into their home. You’re guaranteed to learn something new about Habitat. The tour date is Wednesday, July 20 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Transportation is provided by Annett Bus Lines. Seating is limited to 45 passengers. All tours begin and end at the Habitat office at 159 S. Commerce Ave. in downtown Sebring. Reservations are needed and can be made by calling Sarah Pallone at 402-2913 or e-mailing spallone@habitathighlands.org.DeMolay serves spaghetti dinnerSEBRING — The young men of the DeMolay will host an all-you-can-eat spaghetti dinner from 46:30 p.m. Saturday at the Sebring Masonic Lodge, 1809 Home Ave., for a donation of $7. The menu includes salad, spaghetti with meat sauce, dessert and beverage. Tickets will be available at the door. Continued from page 2A APHousing 3x10.5 color 00009918 OBITUARIES COMMUNITYBRIEFS Continued from page 2A Facebook used to honor fallen Pfc. Brian Backus, 21, carries his 2-year-old son, Jack. Pfc. Backus was killed in Afghanistans Kandahar province on June 18. Image courtesy of RIP Combat Medic Brian Backus of Harbor Beach, MichiganŽ Facebook page. Classified ads get results! Call 314-9876 www.facebook.com/newssun

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C M Y K Page 6ANews-SunFriday, July 1, 2011www.newssun.com GRIFFIN'S CARPET MART; 7.444"; 10"; Black; patio; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 8 8 8 8 2 2 By ED BALDRIDGE e d.baldridge@newssun.comLAKE PLACID The L ake Placid Town Council approved a committee to look at hiring a town administrator at the regular meeting on Monday night atT own Hall. e have selected a committee and would like the council to approve or make other selections or recom-m endations on the list I provided, Marlene Barger, cochair of the TownA dministrator Committee, told council Monday night. The list approved by c ouncil included citizens of the town and county, as w ell as those who favored the idea of an administrator and those who opposed,a ccording to Barger. e wanted different v iews on this, but we wanted folks who would have an open mind on both sides and who would be willing to listen and evaluateo pposing views, Barger told an approving council. B arger also asked the council to put forward ideas of what they thought wouldb e the most important issue concerning the town over t he next five years. The approved list of committee members i ncludes: Shelagh Byatt, owner of Tomoka Heights Realty Inc. and owner of Indigo Builders of Lake Placid Inc.; Jon Draper,o wner of Datarep Inc.; Bill Compton, retired president and CEO of Trans World Airlines; Robert Brown, branch manager ofS unTrust Bank in Lake Placid; Jim DiNapoli, owner of Highlands Investment Management; Marlene Barger; and coun-c il member Cheryl Davis. Lake Placid citizens voted down a charter change that would create a town manager position lastN ovember, but Mayor John Holbrook stressed at a previous meeting that although few citizens have come forward to agree with the idea,t he growing needs of the municipality requires the extra administration, You keep saying the people, but very few people have said they want a pub-l ic administrator Holbrook explained at the M ay 23 meeting. But the need for someone to serve full time ist here. I know that the mayor can do that, but with the n eeds of growth and meetings with the county as well as utility concerns, I think we need someone doing this 40 hours a week, Holbrookt old the News-Sun after the meeting. A ccording to Town Attorney Bert J. Harris III, the mayor could justa ppoint and or hire someone to do the job, but H olbrook stated he was looking for more community input. T he Town Administrator Advisory Committee has scheduled a meeting for 8:30 a.m. Tuesday at Town Hall, and will work underF loridas Sunshine Laws, according to Harris. The committee has a target date of Aug. 22 to assemble additional infor-m ation for the council to consider, Barger said. L P Council approves town administrator research committee DesignerDental 2x4 00009917 f rom her organization into the record. The Group strongly urges you to extend the impact fee m oratorium for another year B arger said. We see no credible reason to justify reinstating these fees, which are intended to cover the cost of building infrastructure in response to growth. Unfortunately, Highlands Countys population continues to decline. Commissioner Don Elwell asked for more opinions from those on the committee who voted for the putting the fees back into place. Elwell also asked for the county staff to look at possible ways to fund growth without impact fees. Impact fees have kinda gotten a bad rap. Weve never hada good look to see the effect of impact fees. When we put them in, the economy was heading south. Similarly, we have not seen the effect of what suspending the impact fees has been, Elwell said. I agree that now is not the time for impact fees to go in ...b ut my question is this: If we suspend impact fees, is there a better way to fund growth as ith appens than impact fees? Elwell asked. I dont want to penalize growth, but I want to do the right thing. Elwell also suggested that the county may need to look at the impact fees every six months. I would like to look at the need for impact fees more than just once a year, Elwell said. Stewart explained that staff had been instructed just today to look at alternatives to impact fees, but was hesitant to describe what some of the options might be. Some of the options may look even more onerous than impact fees. And some communities around the state are looking at other options, Stewart said. The county will review the fees again in June 2012. Continued from page 1A referring to how the lay offs will be handled. T he question of which exact individuals will end up without a job doesnt yet h ave an answer. This is because one or more of the three targeted w orkers may be eligible to bump other workers who have less seniority. That is, they may take another workers position. To comp licate things further, a bumped worker may in turn be eligible to bump an even less senior individual. The process takes time to sort out. This is why, D eleon said, he had ordered t he lay offs early, so the matter would be settled byt he time budget discussions begin. He added that another reason for laying off w orkers now is that the 2 010-2011 budget was sound enough to absorb s everance payments Deleon said each laid off worker will receive four w eeks pay. The city is also r eady to help the individuals contact all appropriate agencies in their new job search. D eleon said he had been m aking an effort to cut city e xpenses. He merged the Parks and Recreation Department with the Street Department, for example, in an effort toc ut costs by sharing equipm ent and doing away with a street supervisors position. There are already three vacancies in the department, which he will not fill. Contributing to the citys difficulty at Parks and Recreation is the $158,000c ut in the countys annual contribution toward park maintenance. A t the Monday night m eeting Deleon told the council not all was bad news. The utility and sani-t ation departments are both sound financially, he said, t o the point where the city is able to lower user rates. The utility and sanitation departments, because they earn money for the city, arec alled enterprise funds. But these funds, while e xpected to pay for themselves, may not, by state statute, be put into the gen-e ral fund and used for dayto-day business. T he same applies to money in the infrastructure fund. Deleon said, however,t he city was able to use infrastructure funding to pay off a street bond and t he loan on the new fire truck. We hope for no more lay offs, Deleon said, but there are still difficult choices ahead. I will be meeting with d epartment heads and we will go over their budgets another time; well turn over every stone looking for savings. Deleon and the city council will be discussing thei ssue July 11. Continued from page 1A Impact fees remain suspended and restrict the (talent I dont know who we are leaving out. S teve Picklesimer, president of the Highlands County T eachers Association, told the board that the district advertises exclusively in-h ouse for the first five days only, and the position is o pened to all applicants during the second five days. He added that this is what m ost districts do. Board member Bill Brantley was concerned that teachers who fail in their evaluations would be thef irst to go on the in-house hire list. Principals have the right to pick and choose, Waldron said. They look over the listsa nd have a good idea of which local applicants have good reputations as teachers and which does not. No principal has to hire in-house, she said. Hancock also worries that i n-house applicants have an u nfair advantage, and Tuck s aid that outside applicants might be discouraged from applying. On the other hand, board member Ronnie Jackson saidt hat recommendations for o utside applicants might be q uestionable because there was no way to know their reliability. Being a workshop, no action was taken. Because the policy is an agreement b etween teachers and the dist rict, even if the board decide d to change the policy it would be a complicated process, not based on a boards vote alone. C ontinued from page 1A AP to lay off three city employees School board talks about job advertisements Courtesy photo Students in South Florida Community Colleges Camp Discovery hold an albino reticulated python during the c amps public service careers week. The students learned about various types of wildlife when Officer Greg Graziani of t he Lake Placid Police Department and the National Geographic Channels television show Python Hunters b rought a variety of animals he has rescued. Each week, SFCCs Camp Discovery focuses on a different career field, a nd campers participate in a variety of activities based on those careers. SFCCs Camp Discovery is open to students a ges 7-16. Openings are still available. For more information or to register, visit http://www.southflorida.edu/academic/commed/Camp-Discovery.aspx. A lengthy lesson There are still d ifficult choices a head. I will be meeting with d epartment h eads and we w ill go over their budgets another time; well turn over every stone l ooking for s avings.J ULIANDELON interim city manager The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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C M Y K www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, July 1, 2011Page 7A I N THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001206 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff, vs. PHILLIP J HOLLEMAN, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on June 13, 2011, in the Circuit Court of HIGHLANDS County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida described as: LOT 22, BLOCK 268, OF SUN N' LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, UNIT 13, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 71, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 5117 MAGNOLIA PLACE, SEBRING, FL 33870-7900; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, on July 21, 2011 at 11 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must filea claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 13th day of June, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk June 24; July 1, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CASE NO.: 2009-CA-000708 B AC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/A COUNT RYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff,v s. G REGORY A. WILEY AND SYDNEY F. WILEY A/K/ A S YNDEY F. WILEY, HUSBAND AND WIFE; AMERICAN GENERAL HOME EQUITY, INC., Defendant(s NOTICE OF SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an O rder of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated J une 13, 2011 entered in Civil Case No. 2 009-CA-000708 of the Circuit Court of the 10th J udicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Flori da, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F /K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L .P., Plaintiff and GREGORY A. WILEY AND SYDN EY F. WILEY A/K/A SYNDEY F. WILEY, HUSBAND A ND WIFE are defendant(s est and best bidder for cash, AT THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 S OUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORID A A T 11:00 A.M., July 21, 2011, the following des cribed property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 6, BLOCK 2, OF AVON PARK ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 15, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY FLORIDA.A NY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE S URPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN T HE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE L IS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 D AYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at 430 S.Commerce Avenue, S ebring, Florida 33870, telephone ( 863)534-4690, within two (2) working days of r eceipt of this Notice; if you are hearing or voice i mpaired, call 1-800-955-8771. R OBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk of Court ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP 4 630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. S uite 100 T ampa, FL 33614 ( 813)880-8888 (813 June 24; July 1, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2009-CA-000507 A URORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC, Plaintiff vs. M ARIA MONTALBANO, et al. D efendant(s N OTICE OF SALE N otice is hereby given that, pursuant to an Fin al Judgment of Foreclosure or Order dated June 1 3, 2011, entered in Civil Case Number 2 009-CA-000507 in the Circuit Court for Highl ands County, Florida, wherein AURORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC is the Plaintiff, and MARIA MONTALBANO, et al, are the Defendants, I will sell the p roperty situated in Highlands County, Florida, des cribed as: L OT 8, BLOCK 20, OF SUNN LAKE ESTATE OF S EBRING, UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT T HEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 4 8, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS C OUNTY, FLORIDA. a t public sale, to the highest and bet bidder, for cash, at the Jury Assembly Room, in Basement of Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33871 at 11:00 A.M. o n 22nd day of August, 2011. Any person claimi ng an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, o ther than the property owner as of the date of the l is pendens must file a claim within 60 days after t he sale. D ated: June 13, 2011. H ighlands County Clerk of Court C LERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT B y: /s/ Annette E. Daff J une 24; July 1, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION C ase No.: 28-2011-CA-000181 D EUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, A S TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF M ORGAN STANLEY ABS CAPITAL I INC. TRUST 2 007-HE5 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES,SERIES 2007-HE5 Plaintiff, v. LANNY KIDD; CATHERINE KIDD N/K/A CATHERINE ANN CARIDI; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CATHERINE KIDD N/K/A CATHERINE ANN CARIDI; UNKNOWN T ENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER U NKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, T HROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED D EFENDANT(S DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN P ARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMA NTS, Defendants, NOTICE OF ACTION Catherine Kidd n/k/a Catherine Ann Caridi Last Known Address: 8107 Highway 91 Lot 12A Laurel Bloomery, TN 37680 Current Address: Unknown Previous Address: 611 Killarney Drive Sebring, FL 33875 Previous Address: P.O. Box 7413 Sebring, FL 33872-0107 ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County, Florida: LOT 54, BLOCK 2, ERIN PARK SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 77, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA This property is located at the Street address of: 611 Killarney Drive, Sebring, FL 33875. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses on or before July 25, 2011 a date which is within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A., Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 350 Jim Moran Blvd., Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This Notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the The News Sun. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on June 1, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE COURT By: /s/ Annette E. Daff (COURT SEAL Deputy Clerk June 24; July 1, 2011 I N THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C ASE NO. 28-2009-CA-001443 T HE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE B ANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERT IFICATEHOLDERS, CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-7, Plaintiff, vs. AGUADA, YOHANKA, et. al., Defendants. N OTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Ord er or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 28-2009-CA-001443 of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, wherein, THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS, CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-7, Plaintiff, and, AGUADA, YO-H ANKA, et. al., are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT AT COURTHOUSE, 430 S COMMERCE AVENUE SEBRING, FL 33870, at the hour of 11 A.M. on the 21st day of July, 2011, the following described property: BEGIN AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP 38 SOUTH, RANGE 29 EAST FOR POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID TRACT, 662.72 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 1 DEGREE 03 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST, 328.60 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST, 662.96 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID TRACT; THENCE NORTH 1 DEGREE 00 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EAST LINE, 327.55 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING, LESS AND EXCEPT THE WEST 35 FEET THEREOF. To be published on 06/24/2011 and 07/01/2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 13th day of June, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff June 24; July 1, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C IVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: GC-09-001876 BAC HOME LOANS SERVCING, L.P. FKA C OUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING L.P. Plaintiff,v s. S IMONE THIBEAULT A/K/A SIMONE THIBEAULT B ERGERON; RICHARD R. BERGERON A/K/A RICHA RD BERGERON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SIMONE T HIBEAULT A/K/A SIMONE THIBEAULT BERGE RON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RICHARD R. BERGERON A/K/A RICHARD BERGERON; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and o ther unknown persons or unknown spouses c laiming by, through and under any of the a bove-named Defendants, D efendants. N OTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE N OTICE is hereby given that the undersigned C lerk of the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, will on the 20th day of September, 2011, a t 11:00 o'clock A.M. at the in the Jury Assembly R oom in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property s ituate in Highlands County, Florida: L ot 28 in Block E of SPRING LAKE VILLAGE I II, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in P lat Book 9, at Page 54, of the Public Records of H ighlands County, Florida. p ursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, o ther than the property owner as of the date of the L is Pendens, mus file a claim on same with the C lerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure s ale. W ITNESS my hand and official seal of said C ourt this 14th day of June, 2011. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, (941 w ithin two (2 n otice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call ( TDD) (941) 534-7777, or Florida Relay Service 8 00-955-8770. C LERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk J une 24; July 1, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NUMBER: 10-870 GCS SUN 'N LAKE OF SEBRING IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT, a special district and a public corporation of the State of Florida, Plaintiff, vs. CS PARADISO HOLDINGS, LLC, a Foreign Limited Liability company, its successors and/or assigns; NATIONAL RECREATIONAL PROPERTIES OF SUN 'N LAKES, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company, its successors and/or assigns; JOSE NIVELA and MIRNA BASTERRECHEA, Husband and Wife, if alive and if not, their unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming by, through, under or against JOSE NIVELA and MIRNA BASTERRECHEA, and all claimants under any of such party; DEVELOPER FINANCE CORPORATION, a Delaware Corporation, its successors and/or assigns; and CAPITALSOURCE FINANCE, LLC, a Delaware corporation; its successors and/or assigns; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final decree of foreclosure entered in the above-titled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida, described as: Lot 46, Block 342, Unit 16, Sun 'n Lake Estates of Sebring, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 10, Page 04, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, in Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M. on the 18th day of July, 2011. SIGNED this 13th day of June, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk June 24; July 1, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C ASE NUMBER: 10-838 GCS SUN 'N LAKE OF SEBRING IMPROVEMENT DIST RICT, a special district and a public corporation o f the State of Florida, P laintiff, v s. L ENNOX D. REID, if alive and if not, his unknown s pouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, or o ther parties claiming by, through, under or a gainst LENNOX D. REID, and all claimants under any of such party; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final d ecree of foreclosure entered in the above-titled c ause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, F lorida, I will sell the property situated in Highl ands County, Florida, described as: L ot 44, Block 342, Unit 16, Sun 'n Lake Est ates of Sebring, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 10, Page 04, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for c ash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement o f the Highlands County Courthouse located at 4 30 South Commerce Avenue, in Sebring, Florida a t 11:00 A.M. on the 18th day of July, 2011. S IGNED this 13th day of June, 2011. R OBERT W. GERMAINE C LERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: /s/ Annette E. Daff D eputy Clerk J une 24; July 1, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C ASE NUMBER: 10-812 GCS SUN 'N LAKE OF SEBRING IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT, a special district and a public corporation of the State of Florida, Plaintiff, vs. BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, a Foreign corporation, its successors and/or assigns; Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final decree of foreclosure entered in the above-titled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida, described as: Parcel 1: Lot 28, Block 342, Unit 16, Sun 'n Lake Estates of Sebring, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 10, Page 04, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Parcel 2: Lot 39, Block 342, Unit 16, Sun 'n Lake Estates of Sebring, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 10, Page 04, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Parcel 3: Lot 40, Block 342, Unit 16, Sun 'n Lake Estates of Sebring, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 10, Page 04, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, in Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M. on the 18th day of July, 2011. SIGNED this 13th day of June, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk June 24; July 1, 2011 I N THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C ASE NUMBER: 10-959 GCS SUN 'N LAKE OF SEBRING IMPROVEMENT DIST RICT, a special district and a public corporation of the State of Florida, Plaintiff, vs. GREGORY T. BEATY, a married man, if alive and if not, his unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming by, through, under or against GREGORY T. BEATY, a married man, and all claimants under any of such party; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final decree of foreclosure entered in the above-titled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida, described as: Parcel 1: Lot 12, Block 342, Unit 16, Sun 'n Lake Estates of Sebring, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 10, Page 04, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Parcel 2: Lot 13, Block 342, Unit 16, Sun 'n Lake Estates of Sebring, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 10, Page 04, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, in Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M. on the 20th day of July, 2011. SIGNED this 13th day of June, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk June 24; July 1, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT F OR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA P ROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-263 IN RE: ESTATE OF PAULINE K. BLUMM a/k/a PAULINE KENNEDY N OTICE TO CREDITORS T he administration of the estate of Pauline K. Blumm, deceased, whose date of death was April 28, 2011, and whose social security number is x xx-xx-0177, file number PC-11-263, is pending i n the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, P robate Division, the address of which is 590 S outh Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 3 3870-3867. The names and addresses of the p ersonal representatives and the personal repres entative's attorney are set forth below. A ll creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with t his court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFT ER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF T HIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF S ERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. A ll other creditors of the decedent and other p ersons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME P ERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF T HE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER B ARRED. N OTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET F ORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2 Y EARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is June 24, 2011. Personal Representatives: /s/ Kerrie A. Doyle 2 50 Morgan RoadBinghamton, New York 13903 / s/ Stanley W. Blumm 5 21 Sportsman Avenue Sebring, Florida 33875 A ttorney for Personal Representatives: / s/ Richard N. Matties F lorida Bar No. 0296503 L evene Gouldin & Thompson, LLP P .O. Box F-1706 Binghamton, New York 13902-0106 Telephone: 607-763-9200 J une 24: July 1, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C ASE No. 11-237 GCS W ELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, TRUSTEE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENTD ATED AS OF JULY 1, 2006 SECURITIZED ASSET B ACKED RECEIVABLES LLC TRUST 2006-FR3 M ORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SER IES 2006-FR3, P laintiff, v s. J OHN SCIACCA, ELEANOR SCIACCA, UNKNOWN T ENANT #1, AND UNKNOWN TENANT #2, Defendants. Notice of Action TO: John Sciacca Eleanor Sciacca Last Known Address: Residence Unknown 1 089 Dewitt Street S ebring, FL 33872 I f living: if dead, all unknown parties claiming i nterest by, through, under or against the above n amed defendant(s t ies claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, or other claimants; and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property herein described. Y OU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in Highlands County, Florida: LOT 3, BLOCK "EE", SPRING LAKE VILLAGE V, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 23, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. S treet Address: 625 WOODMONT STREET, S EBRING, FL 33876 h as been filed against you and you are required to s erve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it o n Clarfield & Okon, P.A. Plaintiff's attorney, w hose address is 500 Australian Avenue South, Suite 730, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, within 30 days after the date of the first publication of this notice, on or before July 19, 2011, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief d emanded in the complaint or petition. D ATED on June 14, 2011. B ob Germaine C lerk of the Circuit Court B y: /s/ Lisa Tantillo As Deputy Clerk Clarfield & Okon, P.A. A ttorney for Plaintiff 5 00 Australian Avenue South, Suite 730 W est Palm Beach, FL 33401 T elephone: (561 June 24; July 1, 2011 1050Legals Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under t he Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (22o list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed under our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be placed under the Bargain Buy category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com 863-314-9876 DEADLINES P ublication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. FridayA ll fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedA DJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 314-9876. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that p ortion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE S ALE6 lines 2 days $115 03 days$14(additional lines $1 eachM ISCELLANEOUSm erchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 eachR EAL ESTATE E MPLOYMENT T RANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $315 06 lines 14 pubs$71 1050Legals 1050Legals FIND A SWEETHEART OF A DEAL! Search the News-Sun classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. Classified ads get fast results WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 314-9876 Then shop till you drop!

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C M Y K Page 8ANews-Sun Friday, July 1, 2011www.newssun.com IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C IVIL ACTION C ASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-000706 D IVISION: W ELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, S UCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO WACHOVIA MORTG AGE, F.S.B. F/K/A WORLD SAVINGS BANK, F.S.B., Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM DAVOREN, et al, Defendant(s N OTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final J udgment of Foreclosure dated June 13, 2011, a nd entered in Case No. 28-2010-CA-000706 of t he Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Wachovia Mortgage, F.S.B. f/k/a World Savings Bank, F.S.B., is the Plaintiff and William Davoren, Tenant #1 n/k/a Michelle Coleman, Ten-a nt #3 n/k/a Brittany Jowers, And And All Unk nown Parties Claiming by, Through, Under, And A gainst The Herein named Individual Defendant(s Who are not Known To Be Dead Or Alive, Whether Said Unknown Parties May Claim An Interest in S pouses, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Or Other Claimants are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 21st day of July, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 9, BLOCK 246, PLACID LAKES-SECTION TWENTY, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 31, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY FLORIDA. A/K/A 230-232 ALEUTIAN ST. NE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852-3420 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 13th day of June, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813 TG-10-41967 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, (863 534-4690, within two (2 ceipt of this (describe notice voice impaired, call TDD (863 ida Relay Service 711. To file response please contact Highlands County Clerk of Court, 590 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870-3867, Tel: (863863 June 24; July 1, 2011 I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT O F THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY C IVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 28-2009-CA-000584 S AXON MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC., Plaintiff, v s. LUIS O. BARRETO; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LUIS O. BARRETO; JENIFFER PADRON PADILLA; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JENIFFER PADRON PADILLA; WESLEY HILL; MARY HILL; IF LIVING, INCLUDING A NY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECT IVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR A GAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S T ENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s N OTICE OF SALE N otice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Highl ands County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Highlands County, Florida, described as: T HE NORTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF T HE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 IN S ECTION 16, TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH, RANGE 29 EAST, HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO KNOWN AS TRACT 7, IN BLOCK 14, RIVER RIDGE RANCHES UNRECORDED. A /K/A 820 RIVERDALE ROAD AVON PARK, FL 3 3825 a t public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for c ash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on August 24, 2011. D ATED THIS 26th DAY OF May, 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendents, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. W itness, my hand and seal of this court on the 2 6th day of May, 2011. C LERK OF CIRCUIT COURT B y: /s/ Priscilla Michalak D eputy Clerk J une 24; July 1, 2011 I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR H IGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 10-1117-GCS D EUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, A S TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2006-OPT4, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFIC ATES, SERIES 2006-OPT4, Plaintiff v s. RAMON ARANGO, SHELLY ARANGO, et al. D efendant(s NOTICE OF SALE N otice is hereby given that, pursuant to an Final Judgment of Foreclosure or Order dated June 1 3, 2011, entered in Civil Case Number 1 0-1117-GCS in the Circuit Court for Highlands C ounty, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NAT IONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2006-OPT4, A SSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OPT4 is the Plaintiff, and RAMON ARANGO, e t al, are the Defendants, I will sell the property s ituated in Highlands County, Florida, described a s: L OTS 12699 AND 12700, AVON PARK LAKES UNIT NO. 40, AS PER PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED I N PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 83, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA.a t public sale, to the highest and bet bidder, for cash, at the Jury Assembly Room, in Basement of H ighlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33871 at 11:00 A.M. o n 21st day of July, 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, o ther than the property owner as of the date of the l is pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. D ated: June 13, 2011. Highlands County Clerk of Court C LERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Annette E. Daff J une 24; July 1, 2011NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is hereby given that on 7/14/11 at 10:30 am the following vehicles will be sold for towing & storage charges pursuant to F.S. 713.78. 1999 FORD UT #1FMPU18L4XLA29190 1988 CHEV SW #1GNCT18Z1J8161982 2001 KIA 4D #KNAFB12125054840 2005 DODGE PK#1D7HA18N35S300848 1989 FORD SUV #1FMCU14T3KUB97796 ALL Sales to be held at Alan Jay Automotive Network 441 US 27 N Sebring, Fl 33870 863 402 4210 July 1, 2011 1050LegalsDUMMY 09 SERVICE DIRECTORY DUMMY 5X21.5 00009904

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C M Y K www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, July 1, 2011Page 9A 1998 CHRYSLERConcorde White, 4 door, A/C, new tires, needs battery. $1200 obo. 863-452-0027 or 8 63-873-0627. Leave message. 9450Automotive for Sale 9000 Transportation 8000 RecreationLIFT FORElec. Chair or Scooter. $ 400.obo. Call 863-699-5517 7560Medical Supplies& EquipmentW ORLD'S BESTMANGOS H aden / Lake Jackson C all or Text 863-381-5034 7540F resh Fruits &V egetables S HIH TZUFemale puppy for sale. $300 C all 863-382-3808/ cell 863-446-1402 or 863-446-4218. P UPPIES AKC/ Golden Retriever. Blonde. Health cert. Parents on p remises. 8 weeks old. $950. C all 863-634-2395 NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. F REE TOGOOD HOME Adult Male B lack Cat, long hair, approx 3-4 yrs old. N eeds to be only pet in home, Call 863-658-1273 C KC REGISTEREDBoxer Puppies 1st s hots, Health certificates, tails cropped. R eady 718/2011. $650 Call 8 63-214-0772 or 863-214-2108 7520Pets & Supplies SEBRING FRI.July 1st. 8 ?. 6910 Hwy. 98, (5 mi. off 27 area. Children's & baby clothes, lots of DVD's, household goods, toys, artwork, picture frames & misc. SEBRING FRI.8 -2pm. Sat. 8 12pm. 203 Andretti Ave. 98 E., turn right Revson Ave., left on Stewart, house on corner of Stewart & Andretti. Microwave, weight bench, bikes, exercise system & misc. household. SEBRING -2023 Fernway St. Fri & Sat 7/1 & 2, 8am 2pm. Household items, toys, books, linens, clothing. Too Much To List! 7320Garage &Yard Sales TWIN HEADBOARDBookcase. Light oak. $40. Call 863-453-0569. RECLINER -Lazy Boy / tan. $95. 863-212-0602 PERFECT SIT-UPMachine. Paid $100. Sell $50. Call 863-386-5445 LOVE SEATLazy Seat / Pastel shade $100. 863-212-0602 GOLF DRIVER,PING G5, 12* 43" shaft w/cover. $60. 863-386-5445 FUTON -Black w/beige removable cover, and 2 pillows. Good cond. All $60. Call 863-655-1644 FILE CABINETHeavy duty metal, 2 drawer. $40. Call 863-453-0569. 7310Bargain BuysPOOL TABLELegacy / 8 foot / 3 /4 inch slate with accessories. $1100. 863-471-2002 7300MiscellaneousDINING ROOMTABLE 42 x 60. Honey Oak w/20" leaf. 6 matching ladder back chairs w/brown fabric seats. Excel cond. $400.obo. Call 863-441-2065 7180FurnitureCOMPUTER $350.Call for details. 863-382-3226 7140Computers& SuppliesT ELEVISION 24".color w/remote. Excel c ond. $150. firm. 863-699-2742 7100TV, Radio, & Stereo 7000 Merchandise SEBRING FURNISHEDroom w/kitchen. $110. a week incl. electric & water. Call 8 63-655-0137 S EBRING -Room for Rent. Adults only. Must be employed. Call 863-471-2002 6400Rooms for RentS EBRING 1/1Cottage. $290. month. + $ 290 sec. No Pets w ww.620bowman.itgo.com or Call 8 63-382-4655. 6350Cottages for Rent SEBRING HILLS2BR, 2BA, 2car gar. S creened Porch. Modern updated h ome. Enjoy low electric bills. Appl. i ncl. 1 yr. lease, no pets or smoke. $725. mo. + sec. Call 863-381-3990 SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3 BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $ 800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 P LACID LAKESNewer, very clean 3/2/2. Many upgrades. Nice area. N on-smoker. $875. per mo. Call 863-465-3838 or 863-441-2844. 6300Unfurnished HousesSEBRING SENIORCitizen. 2240 Avalon Rd. 3/2 furn. Small animals ok. Near Shopping Center & Senior Club References $700. first/last. Call 305-387-6863 after 4pm. or 863-382-0912 or 863-273-3129. 6250Furnished Houses SEBRING (21BR extra large, $600 mo./ 1BR Cozy with porch, $500 mo. Lake View Walk to Beach & Historic Circle. Quiet / Pets Welcome. W / D on site 863-381-7095 SEBRING FREE1/2 mo. rent special. Free cable. Large clean 1/1. New paint, tile floors, central A/C. Quiet/safe. Call 863-385-1999 SEBRING CLEANquiet area. Small 3/1 unfurnished. Central A/C, vaulted ceiling, tile floors. Lawn maintenance incl. Small pets ok. $415. per mo. 941-224-9756 AVON PARKClean, Quiet: Studios 1BR, 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., form $375/mp. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook up. Students/Seniors Discount Call 863-602-4683 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 SEBRING -1BR, 1BA. Fresh paint. Includes water. $395 / mo. Call Gary Johnson, 863-381-1861. RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 1BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartmentsLAKE PLACIDFully Furnished, Beautiful Gulf Studio w/kitchenette, laundry & pool. Elec. & water paid. $ 395. per mo. $500. deposit. No pets, n o smoking. Call 863-243-4580 6150FurnishedApartments S EBRING 2/1,tile floors. Most pets ok. 4 911 Manatee. $490. per mo. Call 863-446-7274 S EBRING 2/1,Tile floors, Screened p orch, Fenced yard ,most pets ok. 1926 & 28 Theodore St. $550. per mo. $300 security. Call 863-446-7274 S EBRING 2/1Quiet neighborhood. Close to H.S. & Hospital. Washer/Dryer hook -up. Central heat/air. No smoke/pet. $525. + $500. security. Call 863-655-0982 S EBRING -2BR, 1BA. Newly R emodeled. $425. per mo. Call for d etails. 863-381-0357 or 863-446-2838. 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 RentalsSEBRING 2/1Mobile Home. Quiet neighborhood. $425. + first/last. Call 8 63-471-2063 5150Mobile HomesFor RentP ALM HARBORHOMES Has closed 2 Model Centers Save up to 60K on select models Call Today! 800-622-2832 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesSEBRING BEAUTIFUL5 acres on Selah Rd. 2 Barns, 2 Wells w/pumps. Older d ouble wide 3/2. Large Oaks in front & back yards. Close to Highlands Hammock. $150,000. Firm. Call 863-285-6503 4260Acreage for Sale 4000 Real EstateC ASH FORModel Trains, all gauges welcome. Large or small collections. C all 352-592-5081 3050BusinessOpportunities 3000 FinancialS EEKING RADIOLOGYTech. Min. 3 yr. exp. Please email resume to: officetale nt@yahoo.com or fax it to 863-471-2565.N OW H IRINGFor Certified Nursing Assistant ( CNA) for non-medical home health. You must have a state cert ification, and pass a criminal & d riving record check. Submit your application on line: c k381.ersp.biz/employment N ATIONAL BEVERAGEManufacturer seeking Equipment Maintenance Tech. f or refurbishing in shop juice dispensing equipment. Full time w/benefits. Bi-l ingual & experience preferred but will t rain. Fax resume to 863-635-7630 or p hone 863-635-8454 L PN -Needed in busy pediatric office in Sebring. Immediate opening. Q ualifications: Must be certified with experience in phlebotomy and medical o ffice experience, computer literate, capable of multi-tasking and possess g ood public relation skills. Excellent B enefits. Salary commensurate with e xperience. Fax resume to 8 63-471-9340 or email to c fmtabitha@gmail.com 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentC HILD CAREin private home 24-7, lic ense # F10HI0515, 20 yr. exp. Ages 2 & up. CPR, first aid, & CDA. Call for a ppt. 863-453-6439 1500Child Care Services 1100Announcements 1055H ighlandsC ounty Legals The City of Sebring will receive sealed bids in the City Purchasing Department for: I I T T B B 1 1 1 1 0 0 2 2 0 0 : : P P r r o o f f e e s s s s i i o o n n a a l l S S e e r r v v i i c c e e t t o o E E v v a a l l u u a a t t e e O O u u t t d d o o o o r r a a n n d d I I n n d d o o o o r r L L o o c c a a t t i i o o n n s s S S u u i i t t a a b b l l e e f f o o r r L L i i v v e e E E n n t t e e r r t t a a i i n n m m e e n n t t / / C C o o n n c c e e r r t t s s i i n n D D o o w w n n t t o o w w n n S S e e b b r r i i n n g g Specifications & General Terms and Conditions may be obtained from our website at: mysebring.com or by cont acting Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB by phone 863-471-5110, Fax 863-471-5168, or e-mail: kirkzimmerman@mysebring.com at the City purchasing office located at 368 South Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. If obtaining documents via the website, it shall be the bidders responsibility to check for amendments/changes made to the document. Proposals must be sealed and marked wih the bid number and name as to identify the enclosed bid. Bids must be delivered to the City of Sebring Purchasing Office Attn: Kirk Zimmerman so as to reach the said office no later than 2 2 : : 0 0 0 0 P P M M , M M o o n n d d a a y y , J J u u l l y y 1 1 1 1 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 , o o f f t t h h e e o o f f f f i i c c i i a a l l t t i i m m e e c c l l o o c c k k i i n n t t h h e e p p u u r r c c h h a a s s i i n n g g o o f f f f i i c c e e Proposals received later than the date and time specified will be rejected. The City will not be responsible for the late delivery of any bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail, of any other type of delivery service. The submitting firm will be required to comply with all applicable laws, regulations, rules and ordinance of local, state and federal authorities having jurisdiction, including, but not limited to: all provisions of the Federal Government Equal Employment Opportunity clauses issued by the Secretary of Labor on May 21, 1968 and published in the Federal Register (41 CFR Part 60-1, 33 F.2 7804 visions of the Public Entity Crimes (Fla. Stat. 287.133, et s eq, as amended) and the provisions in F la. Stat2 87.134, et seq,as amended, regarding discrimination. The Sebring City Council reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts Thereof; and the award; if an award is made, will be made to the most responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of the City of Sebring. The counc il reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB Purchasing Agent Sebring, Florida J une 29; July 1, 2011 The City of Sebring will receive sealed bids in the City Purc hasing Department for: I I T T B B 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 9 9 : : L L a a n n d d s s c c a a p p e e A A r r c c h h i i t t e e c c t t f f o o r r R R i i d d g g e e w w o o o o d d & & L L a a k k e e v v i i e e w w T T r r i i a a n n g g l l e e Specifications & General Terms and Conditions may be obtained from our website at: mysebring.com or by contacting Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB by phone 863-471-5110, Fax 863-471-5168, or e-mail: kirkzimmerman@mysebring.com at the City purchasing office located at 368 South Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. If obtaining documents via the website, it shall be the bidders responsibility to check for amendments/changes made to the document. Proposals must be sealed and marked wih the bid number and name as to identify the enclosed bid. Bids must be delivered to the City of Sebring Purchasing Office Attn: Kirk Zimmerman so as to reach the said office no later than 2 2 : : 0 0 0 0 P P M M , M M o o n n d d a a y y , J J u u l l y y 1 1 1 1 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 , o o f f t t h h e e o o f f f f i i c c i i a a l l t t i i m m e e c c l l o o c c k k i i n n t t h h e e p p u u r r c c h h a a s s i i n n g g o o f f f f i i c c e e Proposals received later than the date and time specified will be rejected. The City will not be responsible for the late delivery of any bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail, of any other type of delivery service. T he submitting firm will be required to comply with all applicable laws, regulations, rules and ordinance of local, state and federal authorities having jurisdiction, including, but not limited to: all provisions of the Federal Government Equal Employment Opportunity clauses issued by the Secretary of Labor on May 21, 1968 and published in the Federal Register (41 CFR Part 60-1, 33 F.2 7804 visions of the Public Entity Crimes (Fla. Stat. 287.133, et s eq, as amended) and the provisions in F la. Stat2 87.134, et seq,as amended, regarding discrimination. The Sebring City Council reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts Thereof; and the award; if an award is made, will be made to the most responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of the City of Sebring. The council reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB Purchasing Agent Sebring, Florida June 29; July 1, 2011I N THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT I N AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C ASE NO.: 09000093GCS SEC.: CV C ITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, v CHAD J. CHAVIS; TONYA CHAVIS; ANY AND ALL U NKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIV IDUAL DEFENDANT(S T O BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNK NOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS S POUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; D efendant(s NOTICE OF SALE N OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure d ated June 13, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 0 9000093GCS of the Circuit Court of the Tenth J udicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Flori da, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 21st day of July, 2 011, at 11:00 a.m. in the Jury Assembly Room, Courthouse Basement, 430 South Commerce A venue, Sebring, Florida 33870, relative to the f ollowing described property as set forth in the Fin al Judgment, to wit: L OTS 19 AND 20, BLOCK 16, SEBRING LAKES UNIT TWO-A, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT T HEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 10, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS C OUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus f rom the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. I f you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proc eeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: O ffice of the Court Administrator Phone: (863 T DD: (863 or (800Florida Relay Servicem uch in advance of your court appearance or visit to the courthouse as possible. Please be prepared t o explain your functional limitations and suggest a n auxiliary aid of service that you believe will enable you to effectively participate in the court prog ram or service. DATED AT SEBRING, FLORIDA THIS 21st DAY O F June, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK C lerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff D EPUTY CLERK HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA June 24; July 1, 2011 1050LegalsCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure iti scorrect.Sometimesinstruction s over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first d ay your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. I f We can assist you, please c all us:314-9876 News-Sun Classified IN THE CIRCUIT COURT O F THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA C ASE NUMBER: GC 10-803 SUN 'N LAKE OF SEBRING IMPROVEMENT DIS-T RICT, a special district and a public corporation o f the State of Florida, Plaintiff, v s. TARPON IV LLC, a Limited Liability Company not registered with the State of Florida, it ssuccessors a nd/or assigns; NATIONAL RECREATIONAL PROPERTIES OF SUN 'N LAKES, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Comp any, its successors and/or assigns; CAPITAL SOSURCE FINANCE, LLC, a Delaware c orporation; its successors and/or assigns; and WALTER McCORMACK, if alive and if not, his unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, credit ors, or other parties claiming by, through, under or against WALTER McCORMACK, and all claimants under any of such party;D efendants. N OTICE OF SALE N otice is hereby given that pursuant to a final decree of foreclosure entered in the above-titled c ause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, F lorida, I will sell the property situated in Highl ands County, Florida, described as: L ot 45, Block 342, Unit 16, Sun 'n Lake Est ates of Sebring, according to the plat thereof rec orded in Plat Book 10, Page 04, of the Public R ecords of Highlands County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 4 30 South Commerce Avenue, in Sebring, Florida a t 11:00 A.M. on the 18th day of July, 2011. S IGNED this 13th day of June, 2011. R OBERT W. GERMAINE C LERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT B Y: /s/ Annette E. Daff D eputy Clerk June 24; July 1, 2011 Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 DUMMY 09 PT SUBSCRIPTION SALES 2X2.5 00009905 DUMMY 09 PAGE DESIGNER 2X4 00008865AVON PARK HOUSING 1X4 00009885AVON PARK HOUSING 1X3 00009884RIDGE AREA ARC 1X1 00009887

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C M Y K Page 10ANews-SunFriday, July 1, 2011www.newssun.com SURGERY & ENDOSCOPY; 11.25"; 10.5"; Black plus three; process, 7/1,3; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 9 9 0 0 6 6 TODAYA couple of showers and a t -storm91 / 74Winds: SSW at 6-12 mphAn afternoon thunderstorm92 / 73Winds: E at 4-8 mphSATURDAYA t-storm possible in the a fternoon94 / 73Winds: E at 7-14 mphSUNDAYAn afternoon thunderstorm i n spots93 / 74Winds: ESE at 7-14 mphMONDAYAn afternoon t hunderstorm possible93 / 75Winds: E at 7-14 mphTUESDAY City Hi/Lo/W H i/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W T oday Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. W ashington W a s h i n g t o n 88/67 8 8 /6 7 New York N e w Y o r k 84/67 8 4/ 6 7 M iami M i a m i 90/79 9 0/ 7 9 Atlanta A t l an t a 9 4/72 9 4/ 7 2 Detroit D e t r o i t 87/72 8 7/ 7 2 Houston H o u s t o n 95/76 9 5 / 76 Chicago C h i c a g o 93/74 9 3 / 7 4 Minneapolis M i n n e a p o li s 90/67 9 0 /6 7 Kansas City K a n s a s C ity 98/74 9 8 / 7 4 El Paso E l P a s o 97/80 9 7 /8 0 D enver D e n v e r 86/57 8 6 / 5 7 Billings B i l l i n g s 76/52 7 6 / 52 Los Angeles L o s A n g e l es 84/65 8 4/ 6 5 San Francisco S a n F r a nc i s c o 6 8/53 6 8 /5 3 Seattle S e at t l e 73/51 7 3 / 5 1 Washington 88/67 New York 84/67 M iami 90/79 Atlanta 9 4/72 Detroit 87/72 Houston 95/76 Chicago 9 3/74 Minneapolis 90/67 Kansas City 9 8/74 El Paso 97/80 Denver 86/57 Billings 76/52 Los Angeles 84/65 San Francisco 6 8/53 Seattle 73/51 W ith high pressure centered over the mid-Atlantic, most of the East will be dry with a good amount of sunshine today. However, a few storms will rumble through New England as well as parts of the Great Lakes, while numerous drenching thunderstorms will impact Florida once again. The remnants of Arlene will continue to bring a few storms to deep South Texas, while searing heat expands north and east across the Mississippi and Ohio valleys as well as the Midwest. U .S. Cities National Forecast for July 1S hown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.C ity Hi/Lo/W H i/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W T oday Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. World Cities National SummaryC ity Hi/Lo/W H i/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W H i/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. Weather (Wssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow urries, snsnow, i-ice. Albuquerque 93/69/pc 93/69/s 95/70/pc Atlanta 94/72/s 9 5/74/s 96/74/s B altimore 87/66/s 9 0/68/s 9 2/70/t Birmingham 96/74/s 96/72/s 99/75/s B oston 78/63/pc 8 2/65/s 8 6/66/pc Charlotte 94/67/s 95/69/s 97/71/s C heyenne 80/54/s 85/57/s 91/60/t Chicago 93/74/s 88/64/t 85/63/pc C leveland 84/69/t 9 0/71/t 84/64/pc Columbus 88/71/t 94/72/t 89/67/pc D allas 102/77/s 99/75/s 97/75/pc Denver 86/57/s 92/61/s 95/63/t D etroit 87/72/t 90/67/t 86/64/pc Harrisburg 86/58/s 92/69/pc 90/66/t H onolulu 88/73/s 87/73/pc 8 8/74/s Houston 95/76/pc 9 5/76/s 9 5/76/pc I ndianapolis 90/70/s 94/73/t 92/67/pc Jackson, MS 96/70/s 97/71/s 96/70/s K ansas City 98/74/s 92/72/s 90/71/pc Lexington 93/66/s 96/70/s 95/70/t Little Rock 96/69/s 98/71/s 96/74/s Los Angeles 84/65/pc 87/67/pc 89/67/pc Louisville 94/70/s 9 8/74/s 96/73/t Memphis 96/74/s 99/76/s 9 7/77/s Milwaukee 90/71/s 84/63/pc 80/63/pc Minneapolis 90/67/t 84/62/pc 87/67/pc Nashville 94/65/s 98/72/s 9 7/74/s N ew Orleans 94/76/pc 93/75/t 93/75/t New York City 84/67/s 88/70/s 87/72/t N orfolk 86/69/s 9 1/73/s 92/75/pc Oklahoma City 103/72/s 101/71/s 102/71/pc P hiladelphia 86/66/s 90/72/s 9 0/72/t Phoenix 112/88/s 114/92/s 113/90/t P ittsburgh 85/66/s 8 9/70/t 89/66/pc Portland, ME 74/56/pc 80/58/s 80/61/pc P ortland, OR 79/53/s 84/57/s 77/55/pc Raleigh 93/68/s 95/71/s 9 8/72/s R ochester 80/61/s 88/66/t 8 8/61/pc St. Louis 96/75/s 96/76/s 93/76/pc S an Francisco 68/53/s 71/55/s 73/55/pc Seattle 73/51/pc 7 8/54/pc 72/53/pc W ash., DC 88/67/s 92/74/s 95/73/t Cape Coral 91/74/t 91/73/t 93/74/pc Clearwater 91/77/t 9 2/77/t 9 2/78/pc Coral Springs 88/77/t 88/74/t 91/77/pc Daytona Beach 88/74/t 87/72/pc 90/73/pc Ft. Laud. Bch 89/78/t 88/78/t 89/81/pc Fort Myers 90/75/t 91/74/t 92/74/pc Gainesville 90/69/t 92/67/pc 9 3/69/pc Hollywood 90/77/t 9 0/75/t 92/77/pc Homestead AFB 87/76/t 87/75/t 88/77/pc J acksonville 90/69/pc 91/66/pc 92/69/pc Key West 91/82/pc 91/81/t 89/81/pc Miami 90/79/t 89/77/t 91/79/pc Okeechobee 89/72/t 87/72/t 90/73/pc Orlando 90/74/t 91/74/t 92/73/pc Pembroke Pines 90/77/t 90/75/t 92/77/pc St. Augustine 88/74/t 85/71/pc 89/71/pc St. Petersburg 90/76/t 92/78/t 92/78/pc Sarasota 90/74/t 91/76/t 92/76/pc Tallahassee 96/71/pc 9 6/69/pc 9 6/70/pc Tampa 90/76/t 92/78/t 9 2/77/pc W. Palm Bch 88/75/t 88/74/t 90/77/pc Winter Haven 92/75/t 93/73/t 93/73/pc Acapulco 84/75/r 8 8/75/t 89/78/sh A thens 84/72/s 9 0/71/s 9 0/72/s Beirut 80/67/s 82/70/s 84/71/s B erlin 66/50/sh 64/58/r 6 6/60/r Bermuda 79/71/sh 7 9/73/sh 8 0/75/sh Calgary 67/48/pc 72/48/s 81/53/pc D ublin 61/50/pc 63/48/pc 64/52/pc Edmonton 63/44/pc 69/44/s 7 4/51/pc F reeport 88/78/t 8 5/77/t 87/77/pc Geneva 72/50/sh 75/51/s 7 7/58/s Havana 91/73/t 92/74/t 88/74/t Hong Kong 88/81/t 90/81/sh 89/80/sh Jerusalem 76/57/s 7 8/59/s 8 1/59/s J ohannesburg 63/38/s 63/43/s 63/32/s Kiev 73/61/sh 70/60/r 7 3/58/sh London 70/52/pc 72/55/pc 76/55/pc M ontreal 81/63/pc 82/68/pc 82/64/c Moscow 82/61/pc 7 9/57/r 77/61/c N ice 81/67/sh 7 9/65/s 80/66/s Ottawa 84/60/s 85/68/t 8 5/64/pc Quebec 77/59/pc 81/63/c 7 9/61/c R io de Janeiro 84/72/pc 83/74/pc 78/65/pc Seoul 85/69/sh 89/75/c 77/68/r S ingapore 86/77/t 8 7/77/t 87/77/t Sydney 63/46/sh 65/42/s 66/46/s Toronto 81/66/s 8 1/64/t 85/62/pc V ancouver 67/53/pc 7 0/53/pc 73/55/sh Vienna 73/55/sh 67/54/sh 65/59/r W arsaw 70/52/sh 61/50/r 6 4/50/r Winnipeg 79/59/t 79/60/s 8 2/66/s A lmanac R eadings at Palm Beach High .............................................. 9:16 a.m. Low ............................................... 2:54 a.m. High .............................................. 9:56 p.m. Low ............................................... 3:08 p.m. Clouds and sun today with few showers and a thunderstorm. A shower or thunderstorm tonight, mainly early. A shower or thunderstorm tomorrow afternoon. Sunday: c hance of an afternoon shower or thunderstorm. H eavy rain that started July 1, 1975, in easte rn North Dakota and northwestern Minnesota c aused ooding three days later on the Red R iver. Property damage exceeded $1 billion. A couple of showers and a thunderstorm today. Winds southwest 6-12 mph. Expect 4-8 h ours of sunshine with a 65% chance of precipitation and average relative humidity 60%. Even addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday. Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and Saturday. All watering should take place before 10 a .m. and after 4 p.m. N ewFirstFullLast July 1July 8July 15July 23 T oday Saturday S unrise 6:37 a.m. 6:38 a.m. Sunset 8:22 p.m. 8:22 p.m. Moonrise 6:50 a.m. 7:52 a.m. Moonset 8:45 p.m. 9:31 p.m.Forecasts and graphics provided by A ccuWeather, Inc. Jacksonville 90/69 Gainesville 90/69 O cala 92/70 D aytona Beach 88/74 O rlando 90/74 Winter Haven 92/75 T ampa 90/76 Clearwater 91/77 St. Petersburg 90/76 S arasota 9 0/74 Fort Myers 90/75 Naples 87/75 O keechobee 8 9/72 W est Palm Beach 8 8/75 Fort Lauderdale 8 9/78 Miami 9 0/79 Tallahassee 96/71 Apalachicola 9 0/73 Pensacola 95/77 Key West Avon Park 9 1/74 Sebring 91/74 Lorida 9 2/74 Lake Placid 9 2/73 Venus 9 1/73 B righton 9 1/72 TidesReadings at St. Petersburg High .............................................. 4:51 a.m. Low ............................................... 7:05 a.m. High .............................................. 1:56 p.m. Low ............................................. 10:01 p.m. UV Index TodayThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Indexnumber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8 -10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m. 6 10 10 5 Weather History Farm Report S un and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions R egional SummaryS hown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Five-Day forecast for Highlands County 9 1/82 Lake Levels Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 L ake Okeechobee ................................. 9.71 N ormal ...............................................14.51 Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterdayTemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHigh Sunday .......................................... 92 Low Sunday ........................................... 67 High Monday ......................................... 91 Low Monday .......................................... 68 H igh Tuesday ......................................... 90 L ow Tuesday .......................................... 70 High Wednesday .................................... 87 Low Wednesday .................................... 70Heat IndexF or 3 p.m. todayRelative humidity .................................. 52% E xpected air temperature ....................... 91 M akes it feel like .................................... 98BarometerMonday ...............................................29.96 Tuesday ...............................................29.98 Wednesday .........................................29.94PrecipitationMonday ...............................................0.12 Tuesday ...............................................0.32 Wednesday .........................................0.26 Month to date ..................................... 7.42 Y ear to date ....................................... 22.28 WHATS HOPPIN AROUND TOWN?Subscribe today and nd out! Call 863-385-6155 for free home delivery www.newssun.com

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C M Y K By LAUREN WELBORN News-Sun correspondent and DANHOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comThey don't call third base the “Hot Corner” for nothing. To play third base, one needs to be quick on their feet, have a strong arm, be able to read the batter and most of all have stellar reaction time to cope with the ball usually ripping its way down the left side of the field. Cody Hoffner possesses such qualities, and it is his knack for the position and the game in general that gave him the edge to play ball at the college level. Hoffner's talents showed early on in his high school years, as both his offensive and defensive skills played a major contribution to several successful Sebring seasons. That skill would continue to shine as Hoffner accepted an offer to play at Daytona State on a full scholarship this past year, but not without a little extra heat being turned up on the third baseman. At some point early in the season, Hoffner felt and noticed something not quite right with his ankle. “I don’t even know how it happened, but I started having a bone sticking out and it was giving me problems,” he said. “I missed about 15 games, and even when I came back, it was giving me problems.” But the gamer battled his way through it for the rest of the season and, judging by his numbers, one might not have noticed anything was wrong. In 30 games played, Hoffner batted .327 with 16 runs scored and 18 RBI. He had a four-hit game against Hillsborough and a three RBI game against S t. Johns River. Hoffner’s two home runs on the season came four days apart, on March 14 against St. Johns and March 18 versus Florida State College of Jacksonville. Despite the strong num bers, however, the ankle didn’t improve and, as it turned out, required surgery four weeks ago. “The surgeon told me I was lucky that I had not ripped a tendon,” Hoffner said. “Then I would have had worse problems.” Looking back at the risk he took, that the team took in continuing to play him, despite the lingering pain, Hoffner decided to move on and continue his education and career at Sante Fe in Gainesville next year. “It was a lot of things, really,” he said. “But my progress from the surgery is going as planned and I’m really looking forward to getting back at it and playing at 100-percent again.” But looking back on his SPORTS B SECTION News-Sun Friday, July 1, 2011 Page 3B Courtesy photo Despite the transition to college baseball and an injured ankle, Cody Hoffner had a strong season at Daytona State. Courtesy photo During the Highlands County Special STARS Bowling County Games on June 25, several special athletes received trophies for their outstanding performance in the sport. Those getting awards are (in front, from left) Tim Johnson, Donna Addison, Sara Canali and Greg Robinson; (in back from left) Dennis Taylor, Ruth Hancock, Shawn Squires, Owen Barnhill and Hugh Sims. Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID – Bowlers were rolling with excitement on Saturday, June 25, at Royal Palms Bowling Center as they competed in the Special STARS Bowling County Games. Special athlete, Markevin Smith, sang the national anthem and the Avon Park Youth Academy presented the colors at the opening ceremony. There were approximately 120 athletes with mental and physical disabilities from all over Highlands County converging in Lake Placid to compete for ribbons and the opportunity to advance to District Games. They trained for three weeks prior to the County Games. Athletes paired up to bowl doubles, teams and singles. Athletes in wheelchairs were able to use ramps and compete. There were two levels of ramp bowling – assisted and unassisted. Assisted ramp bowling means a volunteer lines up the ramp for the bowler while the athlete pushes the ball down the shoot. In unassisted, the bowler lines up the ramp on their own. Young men from the Avon Park Youth Academy participated with the special athletes on the teams. Cracker Trail 4-H Club assisted with the lanes and served lunch. Awards were presented after lunch. Special STARS partnered with South Florida Community College Adult Education Program to provide bowling for people with disabilities. This program provides an opportunity for athletes to further develop their motor and socialization skills. Sylvia Turner, SFCC Adult Education Director, was on hand to present awards to the athletes. Special trophies were given for the top athletes in Highlands. Shawn Squires was the Best Overall Bowler by bowling a 207 game and having an average of 187. Squires paired up with Joe Singha to bowl doubles and they won first place. Squires had the top score during County Games with a 187. In addition to Squires, Owen Barnhill won the Best Male Bowler trophy with a 144 game and 117 average; Donna Addison was the Best Female Bowler with a 134 score and 115 average; Sara Canali was Best Ramp Bowler with 149 score and 125 average; Dennis Taylor was the Best and Most Improved Bumper Bowler with a 97 score, 83 average and 16-pin improvement. Trophies were also given to the most improved bowlers such as Hugh Sims on unassisted ramps with a 31 pin improvement; Ti m Johnson on assisted ramps with 22 pin improvement; Greg Robinson for the men with a 38 pin improvement; and Ruth Hancock for the women with a 30 pin improvement. Athletes who placed first and second will be advancing to the District Games in Lake Placid on July 9 to compete against athletes in Hardee and Okeechobee counties. Special STARS is a sports training and recreational services program that is affiliated with Ridge Area Arc and is totally operated by volunteers. It provides more than 1 2 different sports and recreational programs for 250 children and adults with mental and physical disabilities in Hardee and Highlands counties. For more information about Special STARS, call Cindy Marshall, coordinator at (863) 452-1295, ext. 124. Special athletes bowled over with excitement By STEVEN WINE Associated PressBRADENTON — The NFLlockout has prevented Marcell Dareus from cashing in on turning pro, so he mows his godfather’s lawn in exchange for a place to stay. Other rookies are low on dough, too. Von Miller sleeps in the same room he had in high school. Anthony Castonzo makes deliveries for his parents’restaurant. And Aaron Williams does ranch work, throwing hay and fixing barbed-wire fences. “Acres and acres of land; you’re always moving,” Williams said. “But it’s better than sitting on your butt playing Xbox.” These are odd times for NFLrookies, and more than 150 of them gathered for a symposium sponsored by the players association that concluded Wednesday. This incoming class is unlike any other, because the lockout has indefinitely delayed that first pro paycheck. “Guys are hurting for money right now,” said quarterback Christian Ponder, a first-round pick by the Minnesota Vikings. “It’s a crazy time, especially with the uncertainty of when we’re going to start and get some money in our pocket.” To make the situation even more gloomy for players just out of college, the league is pushing for a rookie wage scale as part of a new collective bargaining agreement. NFLCommissioner Roger Goodell and players association chief DeMaurice Smith spoke to the group Wednesday but offered no indication as to when the 4month-old labor dispute might end. NFL rookies anxious to collect 1st paycheck See ROOKIES, Page 4B ‘ Guys are hurting for money right now. ’CHRISTIANPONDER Minnesota draft pick ‘ I don’t even know how it happened, but I started having a bone sticking out ’CODYHOFFNER By ALAN SCHER ZAGIER Associated PressST. LOUIS — It’s almost July, and for college basketball coaches and their assistants, that means a series of trips that makes the conference road schedule look like a drive to the gym. There are more than 230 NCAA-approved events coming up around the country featuring high school stars — and potential recruits — from the Nike Peach Jam in South Carolina to LeBron James’skills academy in his hometown of Akron, Ohio, to any of the five youth tournaments slated for Las Vegas over a single summer weekend. Even as it acts as a gatekeeper for the summer circuit, the NCAAis working to rewrite its men’s basketball recruiting rules to try and slim down the season, avoiding potentially unsavory influences of AAU coaches, event operators and other hangers-on who may be looking to ride the coattails of the next superstar. The latest effort comes after conference commisNCAA eyes summer hoops in recruiting rules rewrite See CAMPS, Page 4B Cody Hoffner hobbled, hits his way through See CODY, Page 3B

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C M Y K YMCA offers Cheer, VolleyballSEBRING The Highlands County Family YMCAis hosting a 4-on-4 hardcourt volleyball tournament on Tuesday, July 12, from 6 p.m. until the last team is standing, for ages 15 and up. Any questions for the Cheer Camp or volleyball tournament, call 382-9622.Elks Golf tourneySEBRING This months Elks golf tournament will be held on Tuesday, July 5, at Golf Hammock Country Club. Cost for the 8 a.m. shotgun start is $25 per player. To register either your team or as an individual player, contact Jack McLaughlin at 471-3295 or by email at jacknjudy33872@gmail.com. Check in not later than 7:40 a.m. outside of the restaurant area.Lake Placid Youth BowlingLAKE PLACID The Royal Palms Youth Bowling League, for ages 7 and up, begins itsnew season Saturday, Sept. 3. The sign-up fee is $25, which includes a shirt, and new bowlers are welcome. B owling is every Saturday morning at 9 a.m. through December 10. Weekly cost is $11 and includes three g ames of bowling, shoes and prize fund. All Youth Bowlers are also eligible for r educed rate open bowling, though some restrictions may apply, and free bowling with instruction on Fridays from 4-6 p.m. must be accompanied by an adult. For more information, call Frank Peterson at 382-9541, or Donna Stanley at 441-4897.Firecracker 5KSEBRING The 17th Annual Firecracker 5K Run/Walk is set for Monday, July 4 at the Highlands Hammock State Park at 7:30 a.m. The annual run to celebrate the nations birthday will feature plaques for overall, master and grand master male and female winners, age group awards in 5-year age divisions, technical tee shirts and plenty of ice-cold watermelon and other refreshments for runners. Entry fee is $20 thru June 27 and $25 from June 28 thru race day registration. Tee shirts guaranteed to only the first 200 entrants, so sign up early! Those desiring an entry form may email cbrojek@comcast.net or call Chet Brojek at 385-4736. Mail your checks made payable to Central Florida Striders, along with the signed application, to Chet Brojek, 3310 Par Road, Sebring, FL33872. Each year we urge runners and walkers to wear red, white and blue on race day and to entry early as we always have a large turnout for our nations birthday celebration. The race benefits the boysand girls cross country teams at Avon Park High School.Panther Volleyball CampsAVONPARK This summer the South Florida Community College volleyball program has more camps to offer than ever before. If there is a camp date that you could attend but the age group is different than yours please call and special arrangements could be made. Individual private sessions for indoor and sand are available year-round. July 2011 Sand:11-14 (4 days, 8:30 -10:30 a.m. (Grades 9-12 Indoor:11-14 (4 days Thursday, 11:30-1:30 p.m. (Grades 5-12 $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps July 11-14: $100 Indoor: 25-28 (4 days Thursday Morning Session (Grades 5-8 11:30 a.m. $60 Afternoon Session (Grades 9-12 4:30 p.m. $75 Contact Coach Crawford with any questions at kim.crawford@southflorida.edu cell: 863-835-2377, or Office: 863-784-7037.Sebring Summer SwimSEBRINGThe summer season for swimming is upon us as the Sebring High School pool is open to the public. Pool hours for open swim will be 67:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1-3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays additional hours will be added once school is out. Cost is $2 per swimmer with big savings for frequent swimmers. Afamily pass can be bought for $50 for the first swimmer and $15 for each additional family member. Swimming lessons will also be available with four separate sessions throughout the summer for eight differents levels of instruction, ranging from Adult Beginner, Parent and Tot, Fundamentals, Introduction to Water Skills, Pre-School Aquatics, Fundamental Aquatic Skills, Stroke Development, Improvment and Refinement, Personal Water Safety and Diving Fundamentals and Fitness. Session II runs from June 27-July 8, session III from July 11-22 and session IV from July 25-August 5. Water aerobics return as well, with certified instructor Ricki Albritton, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30-7:30 p.m. Cost is just $2 per workout, or just $1 if you have the Summer Swim Pass the first class was Thursday, May 5. Summer swim lesson sign up will be Monday May 23 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. andS aturday, May 28 from 9-10:30 a.m. in t he front office at Sebring High School. For questions call 471-5500 ext. 228 and leave a message for Pat Caton.Lady Dragon B-Ball CampLAKEPLACID The Lady Dragons will be holding their first Basketball Camp July 18-22 for boys and girls aged 3rd-8th grade. There will be T-shirts, awards and lots of FUN-damentals, with all proceeds going to benefit the LPHS Girls Basketball team. For more camp information and camp brochure, email Jackie Coyne at jackie_coyne@yahoo.com .Heartland SoccerSEBRING Heartland Soccer Club boys and girls, 13 and under, will havet ryouts on July 23 at the Highlands County Sports Complex, times TBA. For questions, contact Coach Bowyer at 273-3891 or Coach Brown at 381-0600.Lake Placid Volleyball CampLAKEPLACID The Lady Dragon V olleyball Camp will take place Monday, J uly 11 through Friday, July 15, for aspiring players from grades 4-8. Cost is $45 per child, which includes a camp T-shirt, and campers will learn basic volleyball skills from setting and passing to serving and hitting. Juniors, grades 4 through 6, will meet from 10 a.m.-Noon, while Intermediates, grades 7 and 8, meet from 1-3 p.m. At the conclusion of the week, there will be a tournament with parents and frends invited to watch. For any questions, call head coach Linette Wells at 441-2320.Firemen Memorial GolfSEBRING The 12th annual Sebring Firemen Inc. Memorial Golf Tournament presented by AXAAdvisors LLC and Home Depot is scheduled for Saturday, Aug. 20 at Sun n Lake. The tourney will once again feature a four-man scramble with $75 entry fees. That includes range balls, golf, food and drink on the course and the pre-tourney mixer on Friday night with great appetizers. There will also once again be a silent auction featuring autographed sports memorabilia from people like Tim Tebow, Jimbo Fisher, Will Muschamp, Nick Saban and many others. Hole sponsorships are available for $100 and team sponsorships, which include a team entry and hole signs, are $500. All proceeds will help benefit Sebring athletics. The tourney will begin with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start on both Deer Run and Turtle Run. For more information, call Tommy Lovett at 385-5100 or 382-2255.Warrior Golf ClassicLAKE WALES Webber Football Warrior Golf Classic, a fundraising event in support of the Warrior Football program will be held Saturday, August 27, at the Lake Wales Country Club. Shot gun start 9 a.m. Fees: $60 per player/$240 team of four; $5 Mulligans; 50/50 $1 ticket or 15 tickets for $10 (includes green fees and lunch buffet). Prizes: First, second and third place winner; team prizes; Closest to the pin/Longest Drive. Sponsorship opportunities: Hole sponsor $100, includes sign with name and logo. Season tickets available including team schedule and memorabilia. Lunch will be served during Webber Footballs scrimmage immediately following golf tournament at WIU campus. Make checks payable to: Webber Football, 1201 N. Scenic Highway, Babson Park, FL33827; e-mail: Vothdw@webber.edu ; or call (863 1529 for more information. AMERICAN LEAGUEEAST WLPCTGB New York4731.603 Boston4534.570212Tampa Bay4536.556312Toronto4041.494812Baltimore3542.4551112Central Division WLPctGB Cleveland4237.532 Detroit4338.531 Chicago3942.4814 Minnesota3445.4308 Kansas City3348.40710 West Division WLPctGB Texas4338.531 Los Angeles4240.512112Seattle3942.4814 Oakland3645.4447___Tuesdays Games Philadelphia 5, Boston 0 N.Y. Yankees 12, Milwaukee 2 N.Y. Mets 14, Detroit 3 St. Louis 6, Baltimore 2 Pittsburgh 7, Toronto 6 Tampa Bay 4, Cincinnati 3 Texas 7, Houston 3 Minnesota 6, L.A. Dodgers 4 Colorado 3, Chicago White Sox 2, 13 innings Arizona 6, Cleveland 4 Oakland 1, Florida 0 San Diego 4, Kansas City 2 L.A. Angels 11, Washington 5 Atlanta 5, Seattle 4 Wednesdays Games Cincinnati 4, Tampa Bay 3 Minnesota 1, L.A. Dodgers 0 San Diego 4, Kansas City 1 Atlanta 5, Seattle 3 Cleveland 6, Arizona 2 Philadelphia 2, Boston 1 N.Y. Yankees 5, Milwaukee 2 N.Y. Mets 16, Detroit 9 St. Louis 5, Baltimore 1 L.A. Angels 1, Washington 0 Toronto 2, Pittsburgh 1 Texas 3, Houston 2 Chicago White Sox 3, Colorado 2 Florida 3, Oakland 0 Thursdays Games Boston at Philadelphia, late Milwaukee at N.Y. Yankees, late N.Y. Mets at Detroit, late Chicago White Sox at Colorado, late Florida at Oakland, late St. Louis at Baltimore, late Pittsburgh at Toronto, late Texas at Houston, late Fridays Games Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 4-4oronto (R.Romero 7-7 Chicago White Sox (E.Jackson 4-6 Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 1-2), 2:20 p.m. San Francisco (Bumgarner 4-9 Detroit (Penny 5-6 Cleveland (Masterson 5-6 (Arroyo 7-6 N.Y. Yankees (Nova 7-4. Mets (Niese 7-6 St. Louis (Westbrook 6-4) at Tampa Bay (W.Davis 7-5), 7:10 p.m. Baltimore (Guthrie 3-9 (Jurrjens 10-3 Boston (Wakefield 4-3) at Houston (Norris 4-6 Florida (Ani.Sanchez 6-1exas (Ogando 7-3 Kansas City (Duffy 1-2 (Nicasio 2-1 Milwaukee (Gallardo 9-4 (Liriano 4-7 Arizona (Collmenter 4-4 (Harden 0-0 L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 5-9 Angels (Chatwood 5-4 San Diego (Moseley 2-7 (Vargas 5-5), 10:10 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEEAST WLPCTGB Philadelphia5130.630 Atlanta4735.573412New York4139.513912Washington4041.49411 Florida3545.4381512Central Division WLPctGB Milwaukee4437.543 St. Louis4338.5311 Cincinnati4240.512212Pittsburgh4039.5063 Chicago3348.40711 Houston2853.34616 West Division WLPctGB San Francisco4635.568 Arizona4438.537212Colorado3941.488612San Diego3745.451912Los Angeles3646.4391012___ Tuesdays Games San Francisco 13, Chicago Cubs 7, 1st game Philadelphia 5, Boston 0 N.Y. Yankees 12, Milwaukee 2 N.Y. Mets 14, Detroit 3 St. Louis 6, Baltimore 2 Pittsburgh 7, Toronto 6 Tampa Bay 4, Cincinnati 3 San Francisco 6, Chicago Cubs 3, 2nd game Texas 7, Houston 3 Minnesota 6, L.A. Dodgers 4 Colorado 3, Chicago White Sox 2, 13 innings Arizona 6, Cleveland 4 Oakland 1, Florida 0 San Diego 4, Kansas City 2 L.A. Angels 11, Washington 5 Atlanta 5, Seattle 4 Wednesdays Games Cincinnati 4, Tampa Bay 3 Minnesota 1, L.A. Dodgers 0 San Diego 4, Kansas City 1 Atlanta 5, Seattle 3 Cleveland 6, Arizona 2 Philadelphia 2, Boston 1 N.Y. Yankees 5, Milwaukee 2 N.Y. Mets 16, Detroit 9 St. Louis 5, Baltimore 1 L.A. Angels 1, Washington 0 Toronto 2, Pittsburgh 1 Chicago Cubs 2, San Francisco 1 Texas 3, Houston 2 Chicago White Sox 3, Colorado 2 Florida 3, Oakland 0 Thursdays Games Boston at Philadelphia, late Milwaukee at N.Y. Yankees, late N.Y. Mets at Detroit late San Francisco at Chicago Cubs, late Chicago White Sox at Colorado, late Florida at Oakland, late St. Louis at Baltimore, late Pittsburgh at Toronto, late Texas at Houston, late Fridays Games Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 4-4oronto (R.Romero 7-7 Chicago White Sox (E.Jackson 4-6 Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 1-2), 2:20 p.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 7-4ashington (Gorzelanny 2-6), 7:05 p.m. San Francisco (Bumgarner 4-9 Detroit (Penny 5-6 Cleveland (Masterson 5-6 (Arroyo 7-6 N.Y. Yankees (Nova 7-4. Mets (Niese 7-6 St. Louis (Westbrook 6-4) at Tampa Bay (W.Davis 7-5), 7:10 p.m. Baltimore (Guthrie 3-9 (Jurrjens 10-3 Boston (Wakefield 4-3) at Houston (Norris 4-6 Florida (Ani.Sanchez 6-1exas (Ogando 7-3 Kansas City (Duffy 1-2 (Nicasio 2-1 Milwaukee (Gallardo 9-4 (Liriano 4-7 Arizona (Collmenter 4-4 (Harden 0-0 L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 5-9 Angels (Chatwood 5-4 San Diego (Moseley 2-7 (Vargas 5-5), 10:10 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEWLTPtsGFGA Philadelphia745261914 New York539242721 Columbus646242017 Houston467192122 D.C.456182127 Toronto FC379181729 Chicago2411171821 Sporting K.C.465171921 New England386151321WESTERN CONFERENCEWLTPtsGFGA Los Angeles928352515 FC Dallas944312417 Seattle847312518 Real Salt Lake73526189 Colorado557221921 San Jose555202017 Portland573181826 Chivas USA475172021 Vancouver288141825 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ___ Wednesdays Game Toronto FC 1, Vancouver 0 Saturdays Games Philadelphia at D.C. United, 7 p.m. Columbus at FC Dallas, 9 p.m. Chicago at Chivas USA, 10 p.m. New York at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at Portland, 11 p.m. Sundays Game Houston at Colorado, 9 p.m. Mondays Games New England at Real Salt Lake, 8:30 p.m. Seattle FC at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 6 Toronto FC at New York, 8 p.m. Colorado at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m. Columbus at Vancouver, 10 p.m. San Jose at Chivas USA, 10:30 p.m. At TD Ameritrade Park Omaha Omaha, Neb. Double Elimination x-if necessary Saturday, June 18 Game 1 Vanderbilt 7, North Carolina 3 Game 2 Florida 8, Texas 4 Sunday, June 19 Game 3 Virginia 4, California 1 Game 4 South Carolina 5, Texas A&M 4 Monday, June 20 Game 5 North Carolina 3, Texas 0, Texas eliminated Game 6 Florida 3, Vanderbilt 1, 512innings, susp., rain Tuesday, June 21 Game 6 Florida 3, Vanderbilt 1, comp. of susp. game Game 7 California 7, Texas A&M 3, A&M eliminated Game 8 South Carolina 7, Virginia 1 Wednesday, June 22 Game 9 Vanderbilt 5, North Carolina 1, North Carolina eliminated Thursday, June 23 Game 10 Virginia 8, California 1, California eliminated Friday, June 24 Game 11 Florida 6, Vanderbilt 4, Vanderbilt eliminated Game 12 South Carolina 3, Virginia 2, 13 innings, Virginia eliminatedCHAMPIONSHIP SERIESBest-of-3 Monday, June 27 Game 1 South Carolina 2, Florida 1, 11 innings, South Carolina leads series 1-0 Tuesday, June 28 Game 2 South Carolina 5, Florida 2, South Carolina wins series 2-0 BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLESReinstated RHP Alfredo Simon from the 15-day DL. Designated LHP Clay Rapada for assignment. DETROIT TIGERSSent LHP Daniel Schlereth to Toledo (IL Brayan Villarreal from Toledo. NEW YORK YANKEESAcquired RHP Sergio Mitre from the Milwaukee Brewers for cash. Designated RHP Buddy Carlyle for assignment. Purchased the contract of RHP Logan Kensing from Bridgeport of the Atlantic League and assigned him to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL SPORTSSNAPSHOTS TH ESC OREBOARD M M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E S S O O C C C C E E R R S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . N .Y. Red Bulls at San Jose Earthquakes E E S S P P N N 2 2A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 2 2 p p . m m . NASCAR Subway Jalapeno 250, Qual E E S S P P N N 2 2 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . N ASCAR Subway Jalepeno 250 . . . . . E E S S P P N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NASCAR Coke Zero 400 . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T TM M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 2 2 p p . m m . Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs . . . . W W G G N N 7 7 p p . m m . S t. Louis at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . N.Y. Yankees at N.Y. Mets or Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X X 7 7 p p . m m . S t. Louis at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NB B O O X X I I N N G G F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 1 1 1 1 p p . m m . Freddy Hernandez vs. Mark Melligen . E E S S P P N N 2 2S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 4 4 : : 4 4 5 5 p p . m m . David Haye vs. Wladimir Klitschko . . . . . H H B B O OT T E E N N N N I I S S F FR R I I D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n W imbledon, Mens Semifinals . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . Wimbledon, Womens Final. . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CTimes, games, channels all subject to change G G O O L L F F F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . E uroPGA Alstom France Open . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Montreal Championship . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA AT&T National . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 6 6 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . U.S. Womens Amateur Public Links . . . G G O O L L F FS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . PGA AT&T National . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA AT&T National . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 4 4 p p . m m . U.S. Womens Amateur Public Links . . . G G O O L L F F 6 6 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Montreal Championship . . . . . . . G G O O L L F FW W O O M M E E N N S S W W O O R R L L D D C C U U P P S S O O C C C C E E R R F FR R I I D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n New Zealand vs. England . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 1 1 : : 3 3 0 0 a a . m m U .S.A. vs. Colombia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N LIVESP ORTSONTV Major League Baseball College World Series Major League Soccer Transactions Page 2BNews-Sun Friday, July 1, 2011www.newssun.com

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C M Y K 1910 Comiskey Park then known as White Sox Park held its first major league game, with the St. Louis Browns beating Chicago 2-0. 1917 Fred Toney of the Cincinnati Reds pitched complete-game victories in a doubleheader against the Pittsburgh Pirates. Toney threw a three-hitter in each game for 4-1 and 5-1 wins, setting a record for the fewest hits allowed in a doubleheader by a pitcher. 1920 Walter Johnson of the Washington Senators defeated the Boston Red Sox 1-0 at Fenway Park with the season's only no-hitter. 1925 Hack Wilson of the New York Giants hit two home runs in the third inning of a 16-7 victory over the Philadelphia Phillies in the second game of a doubleheader.Wilson also doubled twice during the game. 1941 Joe DiMaggio of the New York Yankees singled off Bostons Jack Wilson in the fourth inning, tying Willie Keelershitting streak of 44 games. 1951 Bob Feller of the Indians pitched his third career no-hitter, beating the Detroit Tigers 2-1 in the first game of a doubleheader at Cleveland. 1990 Andy Hawkins of the New York Yankees pitched the sixth no-hitter in the majors this season and the third in less than 48 hours, but lost 4-0 to the Chicago White Sox on two outfield errors in the eighth inning. 1994 Baltimore and California tied a major league record by combining for 11 home runs in the Orioles' 14-7 victory. Jeffrey Hammonds hit two homers for Baltimore. 1997 Detroits Bobby Higginson homered in the first inning against the New York Mets, tying a major league record by homering in four consecutive at-bats over two games. Higginson, who struck out looking in his next at-bat, became the 23rd player since 1900 to accomplish the feat and the fourth Tiger. 2002 Los AngelesEric Gagne picked up his 30th save in a 4-0 win over Arizona, reaching that mark in the Dodgers82nd game a major league record. The previous mark was 83 games by Bobby Thigpen with the Chicago White Sox in 1990 and Lee Smith with St. Louis in 1993. 2009 One run was enough for a victory for three National League teams, the first time in 33 years there were three 1-0 games in one league on the same day. The Mets, Dodgers and Reds came away with 1-0 victories. The last time there were three 1-0 games in one league was Sept. 1, 1976, in the NL. 2009 One day after succumbing to the greatest comeback in Orioles history, the Red Sox staged an improbable rally of their own. Boston used a four-run ninth inning to pull even, Julio Lugo singled in the tiebreaking run in the 11th and Jonathan Papelbon became the teams career saves leader by closing out a 6-5 victory over Baltimore. 2009 Hanley Ramirez extended his RBI streak to 10 games in the Florida Marlins' 5-3 victory over the Washington Nationals. Ramirez hit a two-run double in the third inning to become the first shortstop in NLhistory with an RBI streak of double-digit games. Todays birthdays: Chris Perez 26; Nelson Cruz 31. Golf HammockLast Monday the Mezza group played Individual Pro-Am Points at Golf Hammock CC. There was a tie for first place in A group between Joe Martini and Pat Dell with a plus 3. B illy Parr scored 30 points and had a plus 4, good enough to take first place in B group and David Mulligan scored even for second place. Lee Stark made even for first place in C group while Pete Mezza and Bob Colandrea tied for second at minus 3. While on vacation in Battle Creek, MI, Pete Mezza had an eagle on the 318 yard par four. Pete was playing with former member Fred Lewis, Jeff Lewis and Lloyd Lack at Binder Park Municipal golf course. N ext Monday the Mezza group will h ave a scramble at Golf Hammock CC beginning at 8 a.m. P lease arrive early to register. For more information, call Pete Mezza at 382-1280.Lake June West Golf ClubA Mixed Scramble was played Thursday, June 23. Winning first place was the team of Ron Hesson, Dick and Norma Denhart a nd Gloria Huggett with 54; second place, Frank Gallagher, Joanne McGill, Dick and Nancy Reaney with 55; and third place, Joyce and Joe Swartz,J ohn and Sue Ruffo and Betty Billau with 56. Closest to the pin: (Ladies Sue Ruffo, 8-feet-5-inches. (Men None. The Mens Association played a mens league event on Wednesday, June 22. Winning first place was the team of Ron Hesson, Dan Bishop, Dick Reaney and Roger Childers with 41. Closest to the pin: No. 4, Rich Loomis, 7-feet; and No. 8, Dave Colvin, 6-feet-10-inches.Placid LakesA One Best Ball Plus All Birdies tournament was played Wednesday, June 29. Winning first place was the team of Ed B artusch, Taft Green and David Raciti with minus-24; second place, Jim Hays, Bob McMillian and Cliff Moore with minus-23; and third place, Marvin Snyder, Howard T icknor, Darrell Horney and Chuck Fortunato with minus-22. Closest to the pin: No. 2, Ed Bartusch, 18feet-4-inches.River GreensThe Morrison Group played a game on T hursday, June 23. The winners were: First place, J.R. Messier and Harold Plagens with 59. Tying for second/third places, were Frederick Evans and Tim Thomas; Len Westdale and Russ Rudd with 62 each. The Ladies Association played a pro am tournament on Thursday, June 23. Winning first place was the team of Babe McDonald, Kay Conkle, Carol Roy and Pat Kincer with plus-1.5. Individual winners were: First place, Pat Kincer with plus-2.5; and second p lace, Kay Conkle with plus-2. The Mens Association played a pro am tournament on Wednesday, June22. W inning first place was the team of Al Farrell, Dan Pelfrey, Lefty St. Pierrea nd Len Westdale with plus-15; and second place, Brian Vanslooten, JoeG raf, Harold Kline and Cecil Lemon with plus-10. The Golfettes played a game on Tuesday, June 21. Winning first place was the team of Carole McClay, Frances Neil, Bev Rudd and Pat Graf with minus-23. The Morrison Group played a game on Tuesday, June 21. Tying for first/second places were the teams of Lefty St. Pierre, Keith Kincer and Harold Plagens; Gil Heier, Len Westdale and Tim Thomas with minus-18 each. T he Morrison Group played a game on Monday, June 20. Tying for first/second places were Gil Heier and Frederick Evans; Russ Rudd and Frederick Evans with minus18 each. The Mens Association played a Mens Day event on Saturday, June 18. Tying for first/second places were Fred Evans and Neil Purcell with 70 each. Third place, Joe Graf with 71. Closest to the pin: No. 3, Lenny Westdale, 10-feet-8-inches; No. 5, None; No. 12, Dick Long, 11-feet-4inches; and No. 17, J.R. Messier, 36-feet. An Afternoon Scramble was playedon Friday, June 17. Winning first place was the team of Len and Rhonda Westdale, Jerry Lewis, Kay Conkle and Tony Lankford with minus14. The Morrison Group played a game on Thursday, June 16. The winners were: F irst place, F. Evans with 65; second place, T. Thomas with 67; and third place, G. Heierw ith 69. The Ladies Association played a pro am tournament on Thursday, June 16. Winning first place was the team of Betty Wallace, Frances Neil and Carole McClay with plus-7. Individual winners were: First place, Sally Dworak with plus-4; and second place, Carole McClay with plus-3. The Mens Association played a pro am tournament on Wednesday, June1 5. Winning first place was the team of Harold Kline, Lefty St. Pierre and Tim Thomas with plus-2.5. Tying for seco nd/third places were the teams of Peter March, Kevin Kincer and Keith Kincer; Al Farrell, Neil Purcell, J.R.M essier and Harold Lee with plus-.5 each. Individual winners were: First place, J.R. Messier with plus-7.5; second place, Gil Heier with plus-4; and third place, Kevin Kincer with plus-4.5. The Morrison Group played a game on Tuesday, June 14. The winners were: Tying for first/second places were Cecil Lemons and Lefty St. Pierre with 68 each. Tying for third/fourth places were Fred Evans and Gil Heier with 74 each. T he Morrison Group played a game on Tuesday, June 14. Winning first place was the team of Harold Kline, Len Westdale and Harold Plagens with minus-26. The Golfettes played a game on Tuesday, June 14. Winning first place was the team of Carol Roy, Pat Graf and Bev Rudd with minus-19.SpringLakeThe SpringLake Womens Golf Association played a Low Gross/Low Net Flighted Tournament on the wet and soggy Cougar Trail course on W ednesday, June 29. Low Gross winner in Flight A was Marsi Benson with an 84. Flight B winner was Rita Jaskowski, who shot an 82. W inning Flight A Low Net was Terrie Austin with 70 and Margaret Mazzola, 67, won Flight B. On Tuesday, June 28, the Spring Lake Mens Golf Association held a T eam Scramble event in which each t eam contained (to the degree possible) an A player, a B player, a C player and a D player. Due to cancellations, certain teams only had 3 players; in which case players alternated holes for the missing teammates. First place in this event went to the team of Joe Austin, Dan Porter and Leon Van, who scored a net 50 strokes. T wo teams tied for Second place. Bill Lawens, Jack Hoerner, Gale Monda and Wiley Ferguson tied with the team of Richie Eastep, Ed Clay and Jim Foote with net 51s. The team of Gary Behrendt, Edd Vowels, Jay Payne, and John Schoeder came in Fourth with 52 strokes. While very few players imagined how tight the final scores would be, it was another great day to play golf. w ww.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, July 1, 2011Page 3B E.O. KOCH CONSTRUCTION CO.; 5.542"; 4"; Black; seamless p/u; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 8 8 3 3 8 8 INDIAN RIVER TRANSPORT/; 3.639"; 3"; Black; healthy living; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 8 8 4 4 1 1 JOHN PALMER ELECTRIC; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 07/01, 07/03, 07/06; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 8 8 7 7 9 9 INDIAN RIVER TRANSPORT/; 3.639"; 3"; Black; healthy living; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 8 8 4 4 1 1 E.O. KOCH CONSTRUCTION CO.; 5.542"; 4"; Black; seamless p/u; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 8 8 3 3 8 8 JOHN PALMER ELECTRIC; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 07/01, 07/03, 07/06; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 8 8 7 7 9 9 Today in Baseball History July 1 The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN first year, tumultuous as it may have been in some regards, Hoffner was better for the experience overall. Going off on my own was a lot different from living at home, he said. It makes you grow up and learn some things. Playing around better players and in a college environment makes you better as well. It was a lot different from high school baseball, with two more innings, longer bus rides and the intensity level is h igher Acriminal justice major, Hoffner will continue in the field of study and his playing career with Sante Fe, virtually across the street from the World Series runner up Florida Gators. But, considering the injury which held him back, hes not looking too far ahead. College life is great and its an experience being off on your own, he said. Im just looking forward to getting healthy again. I have no idea where I want to go after this year. Im just going to see what happens and go from there. Probably a wise way to proceed after his season at the hot corner. Continued from 1B Cody to continue at Sante Fe CODYHOFFNER

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C M Y K Page 4BNews-SunFriday, July 1, 2011www.newssun.com 64 WEST COLLISION; 3.639"; 3"; Black; tv incentive; 0 0 0 0 9 8 8 1 Testimonial; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus one; spot blue, testimonial; 0 0 0 0 9 9 0 3 Testimonial; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black plus one; spot blue, testimonial; 0 0 0 0 9 9 0 3 64 WEST COLLISION; 3.639"; 3"; Black; tv incentive; 0 0 0 0 9 8 8 1 Special to the News-SunSEBRING – Sebring Youth Football & Cheer is getting geared up to begin it’s 54th Season here in Highlands County on Monday, July 11. While it has not always been smooth sailing for SYF, the dedicated folks in the organization have consistently made decisions to advance their program and create the best environment for their players and cheerleaders. We continue to have a strong organization with both the Thunderbolt and Bluestreak Teams; we are looking forward to a great season. Our mission at SYF is to provide a safe, healthy environment to teach the game of football and the fundamentals of sideline cheer. We also believe strongly in putting the right coaches in front of participants in order to mentor them on and off the field. We are working with the high school system in order to make sure that our players understand how they call plays and give the kids an advantage once they get into high school. Anyone interested in volunteering or participating in Sebring Youth Football & Cheer should call President Bob Duncan 449-1012. We will hold another registration on Saturday, July 9, from 9 a.m.Noon at Somo’s Deli, 209 Circle Park Dr. (Downtown Sebring) Questions regarding registrations call Monica 214-1079. Sebring Youth Football and Cheer gearing up for season APphoto Carolina Panthers draft pick Cam Newton, right, and former Ohio State quarterback Terrelle Pryor, left, run through drills with a YMCA summer camp student during a community service event during the NFL Players Associations Business of Football: Rookie Edition seminar at IMG Academies on Wednesday in Bradenton. Negotiations are ongoing, but with training camps scheduled to open in about three weeks, the season remains in jeopardy. “You come out of college with plans of making big money, and everything goes on hold,” said Dareus, the third overall pick by the Buffalo Bills. “It grinds you.” Dareus, a 320-pound defensive tackle from Alabama, said he earns his keep while living in Birmingham with his godfather. “Everybody calls him ‘Sergeant,’because he was a sergeant in the Army,” Dareus said. “At 6 o’clock in the morning, we’re up cutting grass. He ain’t playing. He’s crazy about keeping his yard cut. He has kind of a big yard. We cut it twice a week and trim his hedges. It’s an all-day thing.” When asked if Sergeant provides a push mower or a rider, Dareus groaned. “He’s old school.” Dareus is hardly the only extraordinary athlete settling for an ordinary summer job. Castonzo, an offensive tackle drafted in the first round by the Colts, is living with his parents in Chicago and making deliveries for their restaurant, just like he did growing up. He’s a bit bigger now, though. “When I show up at someone’s door, a 6-7, 315-pound guy, they’re like, ‘Oooooookay. Put the food over here, please,”’he said with a laugh. “I make basically whatever they tip me. With my parents, I’m on a volunteer basis. I’m living like I’m still a college kid — there’s no money to spend.” Detroit Lions receiver Titus Young is back with his parents, too. They live in Los Angeles, and because he played at Boise State, they appreciate the chance to see more of him lately — up to a point. “My mom is rooting for the lockout to continue,” Young said. “But my dad is saying, ‘Get out of the house, son.’He’s looking up the latest on the lockout every day and telling me updates.” Miller and Ponder said they’re getting by in part because they made money doing rookie-card signings. “I saved it up, because I didn’t know how long this lockout was going to be,” said Miller, the second overall pick by the Denver Broncos. “So I’ve got a couple of dollars in my pocket.” And then there’s Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton, who’s taking the biggest financial hit of any rookie. As the top overall draft pick, he might have commanded $60 million guaranteed under the old system. Newton was spotted Tuesday night in Bradenton grabbing a bite at a 7-Eleven. Continued from 1B Rookies bridging gap sioners asked the NCAAto entirely scrap the July recruiting period. An NCAApanel is instead expected to recommend a reduction in July recruiting, but not its outright elimination. DePaul assistant coach Billy Garrett knows the nuances of summer travel ball better than most: along with his job as a recruiter, his son Billy Jr. is a top prep prospect. The younger Garrett, a 6foot-3 inch point guard entering his junior year, has verbally committed to stay in Chicago and play for his father’s school. Yet he’ll continue to crisscross the country over the next few months, attending events such as the recent Nike Elite 100 camp for top high school freshmen and sophomores. “Anybody that’s good wants to play the best,” said the elder Garrett, a former college football player whose previous coaching stops include Iowa, Seton Hall and Siena. Current NCAArules provide two 10-day windows for coaches to evaluate prospects: July 6-15 and July 22-31. That means a midsummer schedule packed with events ranging from the Battle of The Ballerz in Tulsa to the L.A. LASTCHANCE College Coach View in Anaheim, Calif. The Division I Leadership Council plans to offer a series of suggested changes for consideration by NCAA members later this year or in early 2012, said Purdue athletic director Morgan Burke, who heads the effort. While Burke said the proposals aren’t “revolutionary,” they’re not insignificant. Among the group’s expected recommendations, in addition to a reduction in the July recruiting period: — lifting the ban on offcampus contacts between coaches and recruits during their junior year; — requiring recruits to meet minimum academic standards before they can visit a college campus as a recruit; — further restrictions on unofficial visits, with closer scrutiny of how such visits are paid for. College basketball has had an uneasy relationship with non-scholastic travel teams — many of which play under the AAU moniker — for years. The concern is for potential recruiting violations and improper benefits that result in scandals and hurt the sport. The investment of major equipment and apparrel sponsors in youth teams, Nike, adidas and other shoe companies, has only made things more complicated. Coaches, meanwhile, know their relationships with an AAU contact can help land a recruit for their team, sometimes even going so far as to hire inexperienced assistants with strong grass roots ties. That was the case at Indiana in 2007, where former coach Kelvin Sampson hired AAU coach Travis Steele as the team’s video coordinator to help land Eric Gordon. More recently, UCLA coach Ben Howland hired as an assistant 32-year-old Korey McCray, coach of an Atlanta AAU team whose alumni include NBAstars Dwight Howard, Josh Smith and Amare Stoudamire. Yet they’re also aware that rule-breakers in that crowd can bring down a program. In 2004, the NCAAsanctioned Auburn after concluding that summer team coach Mark Komara was essentially a school booster who provided two of his players recruited by Auburn with extra benefits. And a decade ago, Kansas City AAU coach Myron Piggie was convicted of federal fraud and tax evasion charges after he admitted paying five high school stars, often hiding the money in shoe boxes. Both instances led to incremental changes in summer basketball recruiting rules — along with calls for more forceful action. “I don’t know that you’re necessarily going to be able to walk away from the summer,” Burke said. “The third-party influences aren’t going to go away.” And even before the two July recruiting periods, top players do like to play together. At the Nike camp, college basketball’s next generation were paired with Nike instructors and well-regarded high school coaches at a Saint Louis University rec center. Campers worked on fundamentals but also spent much of the four-day session in 3-on-3 games as well as daily 5-on-5 contests, culminating with a championship. Mindful of the summer circuit critics, Nike has formed an “Elite Youth Basketball League” for 40 spring and summer 17-andunder travel teams that includes a regular season and concludes with a 24team championship at the mid-July Peach Jam in North Augusta, S.C. “We’ve definitely put more of an emphasis on skills development,” said Vince Baldwin, Nike’s elite youth director of scouting. “Kids were playing way too many meaningless games.” Like Garrett, who attended the St. Louis event as a parent, Baldwin said the summer circuit has a valuable, if misunderstood, role, especially for college programs with smaller recruiting budgets. “It hurts the universities and it hurts the kids,” he said, referring to the likely reduction in the July evaluation period. “Colleges will make more mistakes about who they recruit. And kids will get overlooked.” Similar to members of select soccer programs or summer baseball all-star teams, the basketball players at summer all-star camps are there to match their skills against other top talent, Baldwin said. Most high school games can’t provide that sort of environment. “It’s about the competition,” he said. “You can watch them compete against other Division I athletes. If you watch a kid at his high school, he might be the only Division I athlete on the court.” Burke acknowledged that “there are some good things to come out of the camps.” But he also stands firmly behind the NCAA’s effort to keep those influences in check. “There are way too many people out there ... selling a vision that only a few will realize,” he said. Alan Scher Zagier can be reached at http://twitter.com/azagier. Continued from 1B Camps can be cause for concern Call 385-6155 and a Sales Representative will be glad to assist you!

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C M Y K Associated PressLOS ANGELES — Researchers analyzing the genetic makeup of ovarian cancer tumors have found a gene mutation that is surprisingly frequent, suggesting it plays a key role in driving the cancer. The finding, appearing in Thursday’s issue of the journal Nature, may eventually lead to tests for earlier diagnosis of the disease and to better treatment. Ovarian cancer kills nearly 14,000 women in the United States each year. It’s usually not spotted until at an advanced stage. The gene sequencing was carried out by The Cancer Genome Atlas, a federally funded network of medical centers that analyzed 316 ovarian tumors. Scientists found that 96 percent of the tumors had mutated TP53 genes. The mutations were not present in normal tissue from the patients, showing they arose within the tumors. Normally, the gene directs the cell how to make a protein that acts as a tumor suppressor, keeping cells from growing and dividing uncontrollably. Alterations in nine other genes also played a role in ovarian cancer, though to a much lesser extent, the researchers reported. Among them were the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, which increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer. “In other cancers, there are usually several genes that are involved” on almost equal footing, said one of the study authors, Dr. David Wheeler of Baylor College of Medicine. “This is an unusual pattern.” The new work “is producing impressive insights into the biology” of ovarian cancer, Dr. Francis Collins, who heads the National Institutes of Health, said in a statement. Among cancers, ovarian is the fifth leading cause of death among women. Aregular pelvic exam is considered the best way to detect ovarian cancer early. The Cancer Genome Atlas was launched in 2006 to unravel the genetic underpinning of cancer. Free amplified telephone distributionSEBRING — Hearing Impaired Persons will distribute free amplified telephones to Florida residents who have a hearing or speech loss, in the Conference Room at NuHope Elder Care Services, 6414 U.S. 27 South in Sebring, on Thursday, July 7, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Important: By appointment only. Call (941) 7438347.Community outreach scheduleAce Homecare plans the following community outreach events this week: Today: 8 a.m., Health Fair, Sebring Village, Schumacher Road, Sebring; 10 a.m., Health Fair, Highland Village, Villa Road, Sebring. Tuesday: 10 a.m., Health Fair, Fair Havens, Apartments, Spinks Road, Sebring; 1 p.m., Health Fair, Groves, behind Sebring Diner, U.S. 27 Sebring. Wednesday: 8 a.m., Health Fair, Villa Del Sol, behind Winn Dixie, U.S. 27, Avon Park; 9 a.m., Health Fair, Avon Park Meal Site, Main St, Avon Park. Thursday: 10 a.m., Caregiver training, Balmoral Assisted Living Facility 93 Balmoral Road, C.R. 621, Lake Placid; 10:30 a.m., Caregivers support group, Balmoral Assisted Living Facility 93 Balmoral Road, C.R. 621, Lake Placid. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, July 1, 2011Page 5B STATE FARM; 3.639"; 2"; Black; 07/01/11; 0 0 0 0 9 8 3 7 LAMPE & KEIFFER; 5.542"; 4"; Black; healthy living; 0 0 0 0 9 8 3 9 HRMC; 3.639"; 3"; Black plus three; process, healthy living; 0 0 0 0 9 8 4 3 DR. ROTMAN, DARRIN; 3.639"; 3"; Black; healthy living; 0 0 0 0 9 8 4 4 HEALTHYLIVING Dear Pharmacist: It seems my kids spend the summer getting bumped and bruised. Can you recommend a natural remedy to treat all those boo boos? —P.E., Clackamus, Oregon Answer: Yes, I have just the thing. Not too long ago, a friend of mine took a nasty spill while riding her bicycle. She shared the details of what happened with me, and today, I will share her story with you. My friend’s nextdoor neighbor asked politely how she was doing after the minor accident, and she confessed to her neighbor that everything hurt. “I have just the thing,” the neighbor responded and dunked inside her house, emerging a moment later with a jar of calendula cream. Calendula (Calendula officinalis) is an herb that has been used safely all over the world for centuries, specifically for wound healing. My friend decided to give her neighbor’s cream a try, since she trusted the source. She trusted her because the lady had raised five teenagers who played every sport from soccer to volleyball. If this stuff came with the soccer mom’s seal of approval, it had to be effective. As my friend relayed her story to me, I became excited to write about it too, since there are no prescription drugs or salves that do all that Calendula can. My friend dabbed the cream on her bruises and scrapes, took a nap and woke up significantly better. Within days, she was as good as new. This inspired me to research calendula. I wish I knew about it when my children were young. Afew European studies have concluded calendula to help soothe wounds and improve healing. It has antifungal, antiviral, and even anti-tumor properties! I think calendula would be fantastic for cradle cap and diaper rashes, or any rash for that matter. You can use it on minor burns, sunburn, bedsores, eczema and poison ivy. Asmall study proved it can ease the pain of radiation-induced dermatitis. Calendula may improve acne too. Health food stores and online retailers sell calendula in cream, lotions, ointments or tinctures. You’ll see various brands and companies selling it, a few of which include Boiron, Weleda, California Baby and Hyland’s. If you are creating a first-aid cabinet, I highly recommend you include Calendula. Put it next to your hydrocortisone and tea tree oil. Calendula is so safe you can literally eat the eat the beautiful yellow flowers from which the cream is made, so long as you’re not allergic to flowers in the daisy or marigold family. Calendula extract imparts a beautiful yellow color, so it’s used as a natural coloring agent in cuisines around the world. Lately, I’ve been buying the fresh (and edible version) of flowers from my natural grocer to garnish salads and soups. It makes for a delicious conversation piece at my dinner table. Did you know? Folate found in green leafy veggies (and supplements) was just shown to reduce colon cancer risk. Suzy Cohen is a registered pharmacist and the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and Real Solutions. For more information, visit www. DearPharmacist. com. This information is not intended to treat, diagnose or cure your condition. First aid ointment comes from Calendula flowers Hookah cafes and lounges may be one of the hottest college town fads to pop up across the nation in the past few years, but for one to pop up in Highlands County has sure surprised many locals. Since its development more than 500 years ago in India, hookah has become a worldwide smoking phenomenon. Hookahs are readily available over the Internet, allowing young adults and adults alike to purchase these strangely shaped smoking devices. The trend has also spread to bars and restaurants, which allows customers to smoke a hookah while also enjoying their favorite meals. Ahookah is used to smoke specially made tobacco that is available in a variety of flavors (e.g., apple, mint, cherry, chocolate). The tobacco is heated, and the smoke passes through water and is then drawn through a rubber hose to a mouthpiece. Hookah smoking is typically practiced in groups with the same mouthpiece passed from person to person and typically lasts for about an hour. Hookah smoking among young adults promotes lifelong nicotine addiction and disease, consequences that last far beyond the “college” experience, and now the “hometown” experience that our Highlands County residents will see. Some people believe that smoking from a hookah is safer than smoking cigarettes. This is 100 percent false. Hookah smokers are subject to the same negative health effects as cigarette smokers: lung cancer, heart and respiratory disease and other deadly illnesses. Hookah smoke can contain four times more nicotine than cigarettes and five times the number of cancer causing agents. On average, 45-60 minutes of hookah smoking is the equivalent of chain smoking 15 cigarettes. Hookah tobacco also contains 36 times more tar, 15 times more carbon monoxide and 70 percent more nicotine than cigarette tobacco. And if that’s not enough negativity, hookah smoke poses dangers associated with secondhand smoke. Secondhand smoke from hookahs is a serious risk for nonsmokers, particularly because it contains smoke not only from the tobacco but also from the heat source (charcoal) used in the hookah. Moreover, hookah smoking by pregnant women can result in low birth weight babies, premature birth and babies that suffer from respiratory problems. Yet another thing to be aware of is that the pipes used in these hookah bars and cafes may not be cleaned properly, which may increase the risk of transmitting diseases and viruses such as herpes, hepatitis, tuberculosis or other infectious diseases. The fact of the matter is that tobacco is dangerous to your health no matter how it is smoked, hookahs included. So don’t believe the hype if someone tells you it is cool or safe to smoke hookah pipes. References: www.cdc.gov/ tobacco/data_statistics/fact_s heets/tobacco_industry/hooka hs/. Amanda Sherley is the project coordinator for Drug Free Highlands. She can be contacted by email at asherley@drugfreehighlands.org or by phone at 382-2138. Hookah pipes are not the answer One Stop for Drug Talk Amanda Sherley Dear Pharmacist Suzy Cohen MCT Calendula is an edible flower that has many medicinal uses. Snapshots Researchers analyze gene changes in ovarian cancer

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C M Y K Page 6BNews-SunFriday, July 1, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. A POSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic C hurch, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Scott King youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. childrens choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. childrens mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life c hanging Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863 www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and womens prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 E. Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Group Bible Studies, 9:15 a.m.; Blended Service, 10:30 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas M cLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Daily Masses 8 a.m. Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Saturday 3-3:45 p.m. or first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31 Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way,Truth and Life! Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Changing Seasons, a mens grief support group, meets at 1 p.m. Wednesdays. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets at 1 p.m. Thursdays. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863 Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church.Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a .m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S. Pine St., Sebring, FL33870. Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m. Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Christ, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, FL 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts. Sunday Worship Services, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available at every service. Bible Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. and Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centered classes for all ages. Church phone: 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church of C hrist, 3800 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. We would like to extend an invitation for you and your family to visit with us here at Sebring Parkway. Our hours of service are: Sunday Bible Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazarene of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W. Main St. Randall Rupert, Pastor. Sunday: Sunday school begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning worship at 10:45 a.m.; and evening service at 6 p.m. Wednesday evening service is at 7 p.m. with special services for children and adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) and Ladies ministries. If you need any more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazarene of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852. Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children and youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christian Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck routeAvonPark. Presenting Jesus Christ as the answer for time and eternity. Sunday morning worship service, 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided. Junior Church activities at same time for K-6 grade. Sunday School Bible hour (all ages (Transportation available.) Sunday evening praise and worship service, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening prayer service, 7 p.m. Children and youth activities at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Everyone is welcome, please come worship with us. Don Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phone 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP RELIGION Atonement Lutheran Church, ELCAS EBRING The Third Sunday after Pentecost service will be led by Deacon David Thoresen. Eucharist Assistant and Lector is Ron Fitzpatrick. The Labyrinth Prayer Garden, on the east side of t he church, is open to the community as well as congregation seven days per week. All are welcome to do this walking meditation.Avon Park Church of ChristA VON PARK God S upplies All Our Needs (Philippians 4:19t he message presented by Minister Larry Roberts on S unday The Lords Supper is served every Sunday. There will be a dinner in the multi-purpose room i mmediately following the m orning worship. All memb ers and guests are invited. The Timothy Class will meet Sunday afternoon. Jeff P arker is in charge. Vacation Bible School will be each Wednesday night at 6 :30 p.m. The theme is Around the Map Jack based on Mark 16:15. There will be a Bible program, games and refreshments. Avon Park Church of C hrist is at 200 S. Forest Ave. For information, call 453-4692.C hrist Lutheran Church LCMSAVON PARK This Sunday morning, Pastor Scott McLean will bep reaching a sermon entitled Nobody is Perfect. The church is at 1320 C.R. 64, east the Avon Park High School. For morei nformation, call 471-2663 or visit christlutheranavonpark.org. This is an LCMSc ongregation.Christian Training Church S EBRING Associate Minister Casey L. Downing will bring the message titled Destinys Challenge at the Sunday morning service. T he Wednesday night Bible study is canceled for the month of July.Emmanuel United Church of ChristS EBRING In lieu of a sermon, there will be a hymn sing Sunday morning. Devotional scripture will be Galatians 3:23-29. Therew ill be no communion service. The church is 1.7 miles west of U.S. 27 on County Road 634 (Hammock RoadC all 471-1999 or visit sebringemmanuelucc.com/.First Baptist Church Avon Park AVON PARK The Rev. Jon Beck, pastor, will be speaking at the morning service and the evening serv-i ce. Wednesday services include prayer meeting/Bibles tudy as well as children and youth activities. Spanish church is led by t he Rev. Johnattan Soltero and meets Sunday and W ednesday. The church is at 100 N. Lake Ave. For more informa-t ion, call 453-6681 or e-mail info@fbcap.net/.First Baptist Church of Placid LakesLAKE PLACID On S unday, Pastor Darryl George will preach the serm on entitled Reaching Out ToThe Hurting! Reflecting Gods Love! with regards to L uke 5:12-16. The church is at the corner of Washington and Kemper Avenues in Placid Lakes. A nursery is provided for alls ervices. For more information, call 465-5126 from 8 a.m. to noon, Mondayt hrough Thursday or e-mail the church at placidlakes@hotmail.com.First Christian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK Freedom Never Has Been Free is the title of this w eeks sermon. Also, remember that the church office will be closed on the Fourth of July in observance of Independence Day. W ednesday evening Bible study is available for all a ges, from infant through senior adults. First Christian Church of A von Parks motto is at 1016 W. Camphor (behind the Wachovia Bank). Call 4535334 or e-mail firstchristianap@embarqmail.com.T he website is www.firstchristianap.com/.First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)SEBRING At the L ords Table this Sunday morning will be Bob and Betty Harcourt. Communionw ill be served by Juanita Roberts, Joyce Winstel, C arol Chandler and Teresa Williams. Greeter will be Carol Chandler and our soloist, Johnny Johnston will sing The Family of God. There will be no C hildrens Church during the month of July. Lighting the candles duri ng the month of July will be Daniel Thibodeau. Joe W instel will be with the children in the nursery while h is wife Joyce will be in the nursery the rest of July. The title of Pastor Rons s ermon is Our Freedom from Sin, taken from R omans 6:1-7. The church is at 510 Poinsettia Ave. Call 3850352 for information.First Presbyterian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK On S unday morning, the Rev. Tim Osterlund will be the g uest speaker. Holy Communion will be observed during the worshi p s ervice. Special music will be provided by Bev Rudd and M argaret Desness singing God Bless the USA. Sunday school is available for all ages. The adult Sunday school class is watching the video seriesc alled The Path to the C ross published by Focus on the Family and narrated by renowned teacher and historian Ray Vander Laan. R ELIGION NEWSGUIDELINES: The N ews-Sunp ublishe s religion news on Fridays. T he submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday to be c onsidered for publication in the following Fridas p aper. S ubmit items to the News-Sunsfrom 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays; fax to 385-2453; send e-mail to editor@newssun.com; or mail to Lifestyle Editor,NewsSun,2227 U.S. 27 South,Sebring,FL 33870. For information,call 385-6155,ext. 516. Continued on page 7B

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C M Y K www.newssun.comN ews-SunF riday, July 1, 2011Page 7B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the Redeemer .Service time is 9:30 with Holy Communion. Coffee hour following services. Newcomers welcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mailredeemer1895@aol.com Web site:redeemeravon.com. The church is at 839 Howes Way,Avon Park (two miles north of Sun N Lake Boulevard, across from Wells Dodge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 33870. Sunday Services: Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy Eucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek service on Wednesday at 6 p.m. Sunday School for all ages at 9 a.m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. until 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. service ends. Wednesday: Adult Bible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are always welcome. The Rev. Jim Kurtz, rector. Church office 3857649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal Church, 43 Lake June Road, Lake Placid, FL33852. Phone: 4650051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Nelson, Rector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday evening: Holy Communion with Healing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child care available at the 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come see what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 Thunderbird Road, (863 0869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior pastor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday services at 7 p.m. We offer Kid City Childrens Ministry throughout all services, and there are variosu other classes for teens, married couples, prime-timers, and Bible studies in Spanish. Kid City Day Care, Preschool and After-School Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For registration call: 385-3111). Check us out on the Web atwww.sebringgrace.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration Ministries, (non-denominational 2200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 33825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533771. Sunday service: Sunday School, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. prayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W.H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church (ELCA 1178 S.E. Lakeview Drive., Sebring. David Thoresen, Deacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, third and fifth Sunday each month, and Rev. Jefferson Cox on the second and fourth Sunday of each month. Jim Helwig, organist/choir director. Worship service at 9:30 a.m.; Holy Eucharist is every Sunday. Coffee hour on the first and third Sunday of each month. Council meeting on the first Monday of month; Ladies Group WELCAmeets at noon second Monday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable Garden Club meets as needed. Labyrinth Prayer Garden open seven days a week to congretation and community. Like to sing? Come join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park LCMS, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coff ee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Closet, 385-2782. Gary Kindle, Pastor. Faith Child Development Center, 382-3232. Kathy Pontious, director. Preschool/VPK/Extended Day Care. Summer Worship services: 9:30 a.m. Sunday; Bible class is 8:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Worship s ervice is broadcast live on WITS 1340 AM. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALCAmerican Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Sunday service at 9:30 a.m. Sunday school will resume in the fall. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year roundfice phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots PreSchool director; and Noel Johnson, minister of youth and family life. Worship schedule after Easter through December: Worship service 10 a.m., and Education Hour, 8:45 a.m. Worship schedule for January through Easter: Worship service, 8:30 and 11 a.m., Education Hour 9:45 a.m. Traditional Service with Holy Communion each first and third Sunday. Non-Traditional Service each second, fourth and fifth Sunday. Seasonal mid-week services Wednesday evenings during Lent and Advent. Call church office for additional Worship times and special holiday services. Other activities and groups include: Choirs; Ladies Guild and LWML; Mens Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies as scheduled; Trinity Tots Pre-school, Youth Group activities (call for meeting times and dates). Visit us online at:www.Trinitylutheranlp.com. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p .m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. A small friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.ctmforme.com Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. The Lords Sentinel Fellowship Church 148 E. Interlake Blvd., Lake Placid (at Lake Placid Christian School), Pastor Juanita Folsom. Sunday morning service, 10:30 a.m.; Monday, Sentinel School of Theology, 7 p.m.; Church service, Tuesday, 7 p.m. More information at www.juanitafolsom ministries.com. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 8:45 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. in the Millennium Church. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer a Saturday service at 6 p.m. with Pastor Tiger Gullett in the Millennium Church. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturers Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The W ay is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church ( PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:30-7 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail:covpres@strato.net; Web site:www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; MondayFriday, Summer Day Camp (youth ages 11-14) 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. excluding holidays; Tuesday: Grief Support Group, 3 p.m., adult classroom; Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m., adult classroom. Nursery available during worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 9-10 a.m. in the sanctuary; contemporary worship is from 11 a.m. to noon. Sunday school classes for adults and children will be 10:10-10:50 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Childrens Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School,9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the m onth. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863 Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL33870. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC a t 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays with Rick Heilig, youth director. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church, 200 South Lake Avenue, Avon Park, FL33825. (863 James Weiss, Pastor, Sunday School 9 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Prayer Shawl Ministry on the second and fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m. for women who love God and croc heting. Visit us at our church Web site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodist Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overlooking Lake Clay) Lake Placid, FL, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pastor. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastoral assistant. Sunday schedule: Heritage Worship Service, 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worship service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nursery care provided every Sunday morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m. Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m. (October-May onlye offer Christ-centered Sunday school classes, youth programs, Bible studies, book studies and Christian fellowship. We are a congregation that want to know Christ and make Him known. Call the church office at 465-2422 or check out our church Web site at www.memorialumc.com. St. John United Methodist Church, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring, FL33872. The Rev. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for all services. Phone 382-1736. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodist Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane, (Hwy 98The Rev. Clyde Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship service starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Study meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. Church office phone: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church of Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, FL 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 27 and Hammock Road). Sunday worship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion with worship first Sunday of month; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. all other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For more information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@earth link.net or check theWeb sitesebringemmanuelucc.com. No matter who you are or where you are on lifes journey, youre welcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP The title for Sunday is Into the Desert to Be Tested. Carol Scranton is teaching t he youth class this summer and the lessons discuss how the Bible applies to life t oday. Members are asked to bring non-perishable items for the Church Service Center. The Family Gathering meets at 6 p.m. T he church office will be closed on Monday, July 4. Members will gather for a hot-dog dinner at 6 p.m. As usual, the church will be open to the public prior to the annual firework display. Free popcorn, water and use of the restroom facilities will be available. On Thursday, July 7, the M ens Fellowship meets at The Depot for breakfast and then returns to the church for a short Bible study and then to a members house for a w ork project. T he church is at 215 E. Circle St. (with two entrances on Lagrande Street). For more information, call the church office at 453-3242.First Presbyterian Church of SebringSEBRING The Red Heifer is the title of Sunday mornings sermon given by the Rev. Darrell A. Peer. Summer Day Camp for ages 11-14 is Tuesday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. in fellowship hall (excluding holidays Program includes lunch, snacks and activities (Bible lessons, sports, crafts and games). Program is free other than field trips. Space is limited. Sign up in the c hurch office.First United Methodist Church of SebringSEBRING The message Declaration of D ependence with Bible passage from Romans 11:33-36 will be given by youth director Rich Heilig at all three services on Sunday morning. The United Methodist W omen will meet for lunch at the Twin Oaks Tea Room at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday. Family fellowship dinner a nd Bible study on Wednesday evening with dinner in the Family Life Center. L isten Live on WITS-AM 1340 each Sunday to hear the service. Call the church office for information at 385-5184.T he church is downtown at 126 South Pine Stt. The website is www.sebringfirstumc.com/.G race Pointe ChurchSEBRING Grace Pointe Church is at 200 LarkA ve. in the Sebring Hills Association Clubhouse. T uesdays home Bible study The Future Reveals continues on the Trumpets.S pecial times for kids on Tuesday nights including B ible stories, arts and crafts, games, snacks and other activities. Sunday, Pastor Ron Zimmer continues riverr enewal sermon series on the Psalms. Class provided for children. Log on to ustreamtv, then enter gracepointetv in the search box. Choose the session you want to view.Heartland Christian ChurchSEBRING Pastor Ted Moores sermon this Sunday morning will be Happy Birthday America! Scripture will be taken from Mark 6:1-6. Communion is offered during the service weekly The service will also include Ruth Rayburn singing God Bless America. The church is at 2705 A lternate Route 17 South in S ebring (behind Publix Look for the lighthouse. Form ore information, call 3149 693.M emorial United M ethodist ChurchLAKE PLACID Rev. Fred Ball will preach at the C ombined Patriotic Service (Celebration and New Song in the sanctuary Sunday on the subject One NationU nder Which God? C ommunion will be o bserved at both worship services Sunday. Nursery Care is available for all morning events. Childrens Church will meet in the Sanctuary for the childrens sermon and then proceed to the Sonshine Club House for their worship service. There will be no evening Youth Group. The Church is at 500 Kent Ave. For information, please call 465-2422.Parkway Free Will Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Sunday morning Bible lesson, Dealing With D isobedience is from Joshua 7 (King James Version). Pastor Jim Scaggs will bring the message in the morning and evening services. T he Wednesday evening service will be praise, prayer and Bible study.St. John United Methodist ChurchSEBRING On Sunday, the sermon topic will be The Invitation to Rest t aken from Matthew 11:2530. Holy Communion will be served. Nursery is provideda t all three services.Sebring Church of the BrethrenS EBRING Sunday morning will be the annual conference live from Grand R apids, Mich. at 10 a.m. The worship service will be titled Gifted with Promise: Extending JesusTable. Sunday school will meet i n the Fidelis Room. They will be studying God Callst he People to Covenant, taken from the Scripture D euteronomy 5:1-17. Call 385-1597.Southside Baptist ChurchS EBRING The Rev. David Altman will speak on Continued from page 6B RELIGION Continued on page 8B

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C M Y K The Community Calendar provides a brief listing of local clubs and organizations who meet on a regular basis. It is the responsibility of the groupt o update the N ews-Suno n a ny changes in this listing by calling 385-6155, ext. 516; send any changes by e-mail toeditor@newssun.com;or mail them to News-SunCommunity Calendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870.F RIDAY Alcoholics Anonymous One Day At ATime group meets for a closed discussion at 9:30 a.m. Monday and Friday at CovenantP resbyterian Church, 4500 S un Lakes Blvd., Sebring. For details, call 314-0891. American Legion Post 25 hosts a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. at the post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake Placid. Cost is $6. Shrimp also is available for same price. Open to the pub-l ic. Tickets in the lounge on F riday night. Lounge hours are from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For details, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 has karaoke from 7 p.m. until final call at the post, 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Post open at n oon. Happy Hour from 4-6 p.m. Members and guests only. For details, call 4711448. AvonPark Breakfast R otary Club meets 7 a.m., Rotary Club building. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge C lub)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. For details, call 385-8118. Harmony Hoedowners S quare Dance Club offers a class in Lake Placid at the Sunshine RV Resort from 9-11 a.m. Friday. For more informat ion, call Sam Dunn at 3826792 or e-mail him at samdunn@samdunn.net. Highlands Social Dance C lub hosts ballroom dancing e very Friday, October through March from 7-9:30 p.m. at the Senior Center on Sebring Parkway. Dance the night a way to the music of the areas Big Bands. All club dances are open to the public. Appropriate dress required. A dmission is $5 for members a nd $7 for non-members. Call 385-6671. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 has lounge hours beginning at 1 p.m. There is a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. Cost is $8.50 per person. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose serves w ings, fish and burgers at 6 p .m. Music provided from 7-11 p.m. Pool tournament is at 8 p.m. Open to members and q ualified guests only. Loyal Order of Moose H ighlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Karaoke from 7-10 p.m. Lodge phone number 4520579. MOMs Club meets at 10:30 a.m. first Friday at the First United Methodist Church on Pine Street in Sebring. Narcotics Anonymous New Day Group meets at 6 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave, Sebring. For information call Heartland area helpline (863 6 83-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Sebring Bridge Club has B ridge, ACBLDuplicate at the c lubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Fridays. For d etails or info on lessons, call 3 85-8118. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 s erves chicken or fish baskets f rom 5-7 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring, for a $4 donation. Blind darts is p layed at 7 p.m. For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 s erving buffet dinner at 5-7 p.m. Elks and guests invited. Dance music in ballroom at 6:30 p.m. Dinner and dance is $10 donation.Smoke-free environment. For reservations, c all 385-8647 or 471-3557. L ounge is open from 1-10 p.m. Sebring Moose Lodge 2 259 serves beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave. For details, call 385-2966 or leave a name, number and message. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. TexasH old em lessons, 2 p.m. For m ore details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 4300 serves pizza from 5 :30-7 p.m. and music is from 6 -9 p.m. at the post, 2011 S.E. Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For d etails, call 385-8902. S ATURDAY Airborne (Paratrooper Breakfast Club meets at 9 a.m. every first Saturday at Bob Evans Restaurant, Sebring. All paratroopers and their guests are invited. For details, call Joe Noto at 4520106. American Legion Post 25 serves sirloin burgers from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake P lacid. Jam session is from 24 p.m. The lounge hours are 1 1 a.m. to 9 p.m. Members and guests invited. For details, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 69 in AvonPark serves dinner at 5 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Public Library has a free Adult Film Series at noon. For details, call 4523 803. Car Show from 5-8 p.m. on t he first Saturday of each month at Woodys BBQ. Proceeds benefit Hope Hospice.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. provides f ree assisted riding sessions f or adults and children with special needs from 9-11 a.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday at 118 W. College Drive, AvonPark. For details or to volunteer, call Mary M cClelland, coordinator, 4520006. Highlands Chapter 601 m eets at Golf Hammock Restaurant in the Golf Hammock Country Club at noon. Any service person who w as awarded the Purple Heart is invited to attend and bring t heir wife or husband. Highlands Shrine Club, 2606 State Road 17 South, Avon Park (between Avon Park and Sebring) has a flea market from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., country store open from 8 a.m. t o noon and pancake breakfast served from 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Vendors are welcome. No setup fee is charged for the s ummer months. Plenty of off road parking. For details, call 382-2208. Highlands Woodcarvers meet from 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays at 825 Sunbird Terr. (Community Center off Thunderbird Road). Call Bob Seybolt at 471-6077. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 opens the lounge at 1 p.m. Card games are played at 1 p.m., and Bar Bingo is at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Art League has a class in Pastels/Acrylicst aught by Llewellyn Rinald f rom from 9 a.m. to noon at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal H all Blvd. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Military Officers Association of America (MOAA South Central Florida Chapter Board meets at 9:30 a.m. on the first Saturday at the Military Sea Services Museum on Kenilworth and Roseland. The monthly members luncheon is on the third Saturday of each month at noon (except holid ays). Location is at K enilworth Lodge. For further information call Roy Whitton at 4 65-7048. Military Order of the Purple Heart Chapter 601 meets at noon on the first S aturday at Sunrise Restaurant. All recipients and w ives of the Purple Heart are welcome. Call 471-9190 or 465-7074 for details. Narcotics Anonymous New Day Group meets at 7 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave, S ebring. For information call H eartland area helpline (863 6 83-0630. More information on o ther meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Overeaters Anonymous meets at 10:30 a.m. at FirstP resbyterian Church, Oak Street, Lake Placid. For more d etails, call 382-1821. Paratrooper breakfast every first Saturday of the month at 9 a.m. at Bob Evans. Call John Schumacher at 382-8648. Scleroderma Support Group meets on the second Saturday in January, March, May, July, September, and Novembe for lunch at rotating restaurants. Call 452-2968 for meeting location. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 s erves dinner from 5-7 p.m. at t he club, 12921 U.S. 98, S ebring. Music is from 7-10 p .m. For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Club 2259 offers line dancing lessons at 2 p.m. the first and third Saturday for members and guests at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 6553920. Twelve Step Study Group for Adult Children of Alcoholics meets at 11 a.m. first and third Saturday, at first building south of Union Congregational Church, 105 N. Forest Ave., AvonPark. Parking available south of old church. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 3880 1224 County Road 6 21 E., Lake Placid. Laides a uxiliary dinner from 5:30-7 p .m. on the first Saturday of each month. For more details, c all 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 4300 serves a meal for $6 from 5:30-7 p.m. and music i s from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902. SUNDAY American Legion Post 25 Lake Placid has lounge hours from 1-9 p.m. Live music is from 5-8 p.m. For details, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 46 p .m. Members and guests only. Post is at 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Call 471-1448. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 lounge is open from 1-7 p.m. Card games start at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Fo r d etails, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has karaoke in the pavilion. H orseshoes played at 9:30 a.m. Food available at 4 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Cards start at 4 p.m. Music outside Tiki Hut at 3 p.m. Lodge phone number 452-0579. Overeaters Anonymous, meets from 4-5 p.m. in secon d floor conference roomNo. 3 at Florida Hospital HeartlandM edical Center, 4200 Sun N L ake Blvd., Sebring. For d etails, call 382-7731. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. For details on the organization, g o to www.oa.org. Ridge Area Missionary Soldiers AvonPark Pathfinder Club meets from 9 a.m. to noon every first and third Sunday at 58 E. Sixth St., Avon Park. For details, call4 71-2143. Heartland Pops to give free Fourth of July concertAVON PARK The Heartland Pops Concert Band is pleased to announce their participation in the Avon Park Fourth of July celebration with a free concert in the Grogan Center of Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St. The concert is sponsored by the Avon Park Jaycees in cooperation with the Avon Park Chamber of Commerce. The concert begins at 6:30 p.m. and will conclude in time for everyone to view the fireworks display sponsored by the Avon Park Jaycees. This year marks the 235th year that America will celebrate their independence. The Heartland Pops will salute America with a Red, White and Blue Musical Tribute featuring select ions honoring American composers and arrangers. The band will also spotlight vocal soloists Laura Wade and Daniel Burke singing several patriotic selections.Vacation Bible School at St. John SEBRING An exciting week is promised children ages 3-12 who attend Vacation Bible School at St. John United Methodist Church. This years theme is Big Jungle Adventure, A Faith Journey with Jesus, which will be held each day July 18-22 from 9 a.m. to noon. Daily activities will include games, crafts, music, Bible stories and a light snack, all at no cost. St. John United Methodist Church is at 3214 Grand Prix Drive (behind Wal-Mart) in Sebring. Call 382-1736 to register or receive information. Page 8BNews-SunFriday, July 1, 2011www.newssun.com DENTON CAMP/PAM ELDERS; 3.639"; 3"; Black; lk dent camp; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 8 8 8 3 3 5 5 Sponsor CM for Children; 5.542"; 10.5"; Black; sponsor CM for Children; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 6 6 8 8 9 9 CREATIVE FLOORS; 3.639"; 3"; Black; 07/01, 07/03, 07/06; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 8 8 7 7 8 8 Noah Found Grace from the book of Hebrews in the Sunday morning worship service. Childrens church and a nursery are available. Lunch will be served at 1:30 p.m. There will be a worship service at 1:30 p.m. The church is at 379 S. Commerce Ave. For information call 385-0752.The Way ChurchSEBRING Church Leadership is the title of Pastor Reinhold Buxbaums message with Scripture from I Timothy Chapter Three. Plans are under way for Vacation Bible School July 25-29. The Way Church is at 1005 North Ridgewood Dr., Sebring. Church phone is 471-6140. Pastors cell is 214-6190. For church information and the pastors messages go to www.thewaychurch.org/ C ontinued from page 7B RELIGION Snapshots Church News The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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C M Y K www.newssun.comN ews-SunF riday, July 1, 2011Page 9B HIGHLANDS SHEDS; 1.736"; 4"; Black; 07/01/11; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 8 8 3 3 4 4 STANLEY STEEMER CARPET; 3.639"; 3"; Black; healthy living; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 8 8 4 4 2 2 FAIRMONT CINEMA; 1.736"; 6"; Black; 07/01, 07/03, 07/06; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 8 8 7 7 7 7 AVON PARK BINGO; 3.639"; 3"; Black; tv incentive; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 8 8 8 8 0 0 Ridge Area ARC; 1.736"; 3"; Black; 07/01, 07/15, 07/22, 07/29; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 8 8 8 8 6 6 DIVERSIONS DearAbby: Im writing because Im afraid I willn ever be able to have a normal, healthy relationship with a man. Until recently, I was the victim of a physically, verbally and sexuallya busive father. Now I find myself unable to speak around even the most nonthreatening boy. At even the slightest hint o f aggression or anger I flinch and run away. Im afraid I will never escape thes hadow of what he did to me. What should I do? Shy and Battered in New J ersey DearShy and Battered: F or you to move from victim to survivor will take professional help. Few people area ble to completely overcome the abuse you have experie nced on their own. Agood first step would be to contact R.A.I.N.N., the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network. Its website isw ww.rainn.org and its tollfree phone number is 8006 56-4673. The counselors there can guide you in finding help to repair your life. M en like your father belong behind bars, where t hey cant hurt helpless children. If he would sexually and physically abuse you, no c hild is safe around him. If there are minors still living with your parents, the police should be notified about what he did to you so theyc an be rescued. DearAbby: I have been happily married for six years. My husband is kind,c aring and honest. Our only problem involves jewelry. I m not very good at wearing my wedding ring every day.I can be forgetful and clumsy, and I have misplaced it, almost dropped it down the d rain, etc. I have tried wearing it around my neck, but it just gets in the way. M y husband wears his ring every day and says he doesnt mind if I dont wearm ine because he trusts me. My problem is other people. M y co-workers are suspicious. My family thinks its strange. Men have hit onm e, and when I politely told them Im married, they b ecame angry and asked where my ring is. Abby, I dont do or say anything to lead people on, and I often mention that Imh appily married. Im becoming frustrated and have even c onsidered getting a tattoo on my ring finger so that people know Im married.M y husband says not to let it bother me; that he doesnt c are about what others think. Any suggestions? No Ring on It, C olumbia, Mo. DearNo Ring on It: I do not recommend getting your finger tattooed to allay your co-workerssuspicions orb ecause some fool becomes angry that you dont welcome his advances. My recommendation is to listen to the secure, mature man youm arried and stop worrying so much about what other p eople think. D earAbby: My wife makes snarky comments to our extremely nice daughterin-law. O ur son finally had enough and has issued an ultimatum to his mother: Either change her ways or she wont be able to seet heir child. Our first grandchild is due soon. Has our son gone too far? What can this grandpato-be do when Grandma-to-b e claims she doesnt care, even though I know shes lying to herself? Not Fair to Me in San Jose DearNot Fairto You: H as your son said that you wont be welcome to visit y our grandchild? If not, Im sure you will be welcome minus his mother. I respecty our son for drawing the line and insisting his wife be t reated with respect, which his mother hasnt been doing. Because you cant control her behavior or her mouth,i nvest in cartons of tissue because I predict shell be n eeding a lot of them when the baby arrives and shes sitting by herself, personan on grata. Dear Abby is written by Abigail V an Buren, also known as J eanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.W hat teens need to know about sex, drugs, AIDS and getting along with peers and parents is in What Every Teen Should Know. To order, send a businesssized, self-addressed envelope, p lus check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds Teen Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included in the price.) Constant state of fear around men is abuse victims legacy Dear Abby Follow the News-Sun online on www.twitter.com/thenewssun Dreamworks/SKG The robots battle it out again in the latest Transformers movie. B y DAVID GERMAIN APMovie WriterTo his credit, Michael Bay does try to put more human touch into Transformers: Dark of the Moon, aiming to make up f or the clattering mess of overgrown kitchen appliances that duked it out int he franchises last installment. B ay went to the far side of the moon and even to planet Vulcan, enlistingJ ohn F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Mr. Spock i n search of the human face of the Transformers univ erse. And he came back with another loud, long, bruising and wearisome onslaught of giant, shape-shifting robots.T he human element arises largely from archival footage involving the 1960s moon race, along with images that may disturb younger kids as a succession of screaming, scram-b ling humans are vaporized by the bots like insects in a b ug zapper. In 3-D, too, so you get to wear those clunky glasses for the franchises longest movie yet. I t really felt like people didnt matter in 2009s ransformers: Revenge of the Fallen, a mega-blockbuster despite being littlem ore than a turgid assemblage of computer-generated machine parts thrashing about. So Bay and his collaborators set out to show the flesh-and-blood consequences in the war between the benevolent Autobots and their evil counterparts, the Decepticons. But human consequence in a Bay flick means more shots of Shia LaBeouf bellowing while he and his pals get battered around amid the mayhem. The action sequences drag on and on, and while the stunts and digital imagery are even more dazzling than the visuals of Bays first two ransformers tales, it all flies by in such frenzy that it remains a challenge to figure out whos who, which robot is which, and what machines you should be rooting for. Its a thin line between the idiotically incomprehensible Revenge of the Fallen and the merely i ncomprehensible of Dark of the Moon. U nlike Revenge of the Fallen, part three actuallyh as a plot, or at least starts with one before the movie lapses into nonsense. Returning screenwriter Ehren Kruger weaves in a1 960s prologue as NASA tracks the crash of an alien ship on the moon, prompting Kennedy to order a salvage mission under cover ofh is call to beat the Russians to the lunar surface (along with Kennedy, the prologue features archival footage of Nixon and moon walkers Armstrong and Aldrin, the latter also turning up in a cameo as himself in present times). The crashed vessel carried technology that was the last hope of the Autobots in their losing battle against the Decepticons on their home world. It also carried the leader of the Autobots, Sentinel Prime (voiced by Leonard Nimoy, who also is seen briefly as Vulcan Spock from a Star Trek episode as Paramount Pictures forges a strange marriage of its two big sci-fi franchises). Sentinel Prime is revived by his protigi and successor, Optimus Prime (again voiced by Peter Cullen), and the two lead their scant Autobot forces and human allies against Decepticon leader Megatron (Hugo Weaving) in the race to recover the lost technology. E arths fate is again in the balance, with LaBeoufs Sam Witwicky naturally at the center of things. Bay cast out Megan Fox asS ams girlfriend, replacing her with new romantic intere st Carly (Victorias Secret model Rosie HuntingtonWhitely, who makes al aughably titillating, skinbearing entry into the m ovie, reminiscent of Foxs introduction in the last one). Like Fox, HuntingtonW hitely is never expected to do more than look hot while in deathly peril in the c lutches of hulking robots, so in that regard at least, her b ig-screen debut is a success. LaBeouf is reunited with Josh Duhamel and Tyrese Gibson as leaders of theh uman strike forces, along with John Turturro as a former government operative who jumps back into the battle. Some genuine humor arises early on, courtesy ofJ ohn Malkovich as Sams quirkily autocratic new boss a nd Frances McDormand as a supremely capable but bythe-book intelligence chief (hearing Academy Award winner McDormand statew ith conviction that its some sort of prototype Autobot technology is a natural giggle). Alan Tudyk provides a f ew laughs as Turturros unstable assistant, while Patrick Dempsey manages at least one chuckle as Carlys wealthy boss, a guy who talks up the need to liaise with the humungous robots. As they always are, Kevin Dunn and Julie White are annoying as Sams parents, whose roles serve no purpose this time and could have been jettisoned to save precious time. Whatever humor the movie offered fades as Bay ratchets up the relentless action, the battles grinding on so long that the motion and noise turns numbing (the mind really can wander during all this ruckus; stare long enough at some of the Decepticonsflying machines and they oddly start to resemble jumbo shrimp). The 3-D images generally are crisp, avoiding the blurriness that has spoiled some 3-D tales. Latest Transformers is another loud bruiser Movie Review Transformers: Dark of the Moon Rating: PG-13 (intense prolonged sequences ofs ci-fi action violence, mayhem and destruction, and for language, some sexuality and innuendo) Running time: 154 minutes Review: (of 4)

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C M Y K LIVING 10B PA GE News-Sun Friday, July 1, 2011 REMOVE ACCESSORIESDont wear jewelry or fake nails while cooking. Remove all rings, bracelets and wristwatches. They can harbor bacteria and contaminate food, says Bruce Staebler, a certified executive chef and former head of the kitchen at Saint Agnes Medical Center in Fresno, Calif. As for fake nails, they can fall into food, he says.WASH HANDSWash your hands often and properly. Wash them before preparing or serving food, and after touching raw meat, poultry, seafood and produce, Staebler says. When washing hands, rub soap into them for 15 seconds before rinsing off, Hudson says. Washing your hands for that long will kill the bacteria, she adds. If you shorten that time frame, it only makes the bacteria stronger. Also, if you wash your hands according to these guidelines, anti-bacterial soap is not necessary, she says.WASH PRODUCE, NOT MEATSWash your fruits and veggies, but not your meats. The CDC recommends washing all produce under running water before prepping or eating. Use a brush to scrub off any stubborn dirt, Staebler says. Keep the running water at about the same temperature as the produce, Hudson says. Any severe change in temperature opens up the skin (of fruits and vegetables to absorb into the skin. By contrast, Hudson doesnt recommend washing meat, especially chicken. With chicken, theres a lot of salmonella, she says. People rinse their chicken and they contaminate their sinks. All youre doing is spreading the salmonella around your kitchen. If you cook meat to proper internal temperatures, the heat will kill salmonella that may have been on the surface.CHECK THE TEMPERATURECook all types of poultry to 165 degrees. Combination foods, such as frozen lasagna and other prepared dishes to be reheated, also should reach 165 degrees for 15 seconds, she says. All types of ground meat (excluding poultry reach 155 degrees. And cook seafood, steaks, pork chops and eggs (poached, scrambled or fried) to 145 degrees.SANITIZEClean and sanitize. Heres a typical scenario: A home cook slices poultry or meat on a cutting board, transfers the meat to a plate, then washes the board with soap, water and a sponge before using it to chop vegetables. Does this prevent the spread of bacteria? No. The sponge cleaned the cutting board but didnt sanitize it. Theres a difference between cleaning and sanitizing, says Don Waddell, the culinary division director at the Institute of Technology in Clovis. Cleaning means wiping off visible debris, he says. Sanitizing reaches the microscopic level. Sanitizers include Clorox Anywhere Hard Surface daily sanitizing spray or Lysol Food Surface Sanitizer. Neither is appropriate for wooden cutting boards, but plastic ones are OK. Follow this method of preparing food if you have only one cutting board: Slice bread (or other shelfstable items) on the board, and transfer to a plate. Then cut cleaned fruits and vegetables on the board, and set them aside on a plate. Wash the cutting board, knives and sink with hot soap and water, spray with sanitizer and let them air dry. If raw produce touched the counter, clean and sanitize that as well. Then cut all of your meats and seafood, set them aside on a plate, and clean and sanitize everything again. All of this cleaning in the middle of food pre p c an get unwieldy when youre pressed for time. I s easier to keep two cutting boards and knives for each board. Just remember to put protein on one cutting board, veggies on another, Staebler says. Then turn the veggie one over and slice bread. Youll still have to wash your hands and sink (and countertops, if raw, perishable food touched them) in the middle of prep. But if you keep the cutting boards and knives separate, you can skip cleaning and sanitizing them until youre done. For the final cleaning, use the dishwasher to sanitize plastic cutting boards. Just be sure to run the high-heat rinse and high-heat dry cycles, Hudson says. The energy-saving settings wont be hot enough. A lso clean and sanitize countertops after eac h cooking session. And dont forget the sponges. Dampen them with water, then microwave each of them for 20-30 seconds at high heat. Zap them one at a time to prevent fires, Hudson says.STORE SAFELYStore food properly. This advice from the CDC is a no-brainer: Keep produce meant to be eaten raw separate from other raw foods. As for cooked food, it should be stored belo w 41 degrees within two hours. Thats because bacteria thrives in a danger zone of 135-141 degrees, Hudson says. Theres also a rapid growth zone for bacteria, which is 125-170 degrees. If you get out of the danger zone within tw o hours, she adds, youll have a better chance of slowing down the growth. Given this advice, you never should place a large pot of steaming food directly into the refrigerator or freezer, Staebler says. In addition to heating up the surrounding space, it wont cool quickly enough. Instead, spread the food onto a shallow pan to help it cool faster. Refrigerate after the steam disperses. To store the pot itself, first cool its contents to 70 degrees, Hudson says. Place the pot in a sink filled with ice water, stir its contents, check its temperature with a thermometer and refrigerate. To freeze, transfer cooled food to smaller containers. Label the containers with the date and contents, then store and eat wit hin three to six months (or sooner, if a recipe tells you to).THAW SAFELYThaw frozen food in the refrigerator. But if youre in a pinch, thaw a container under cold, running water, Staebler says. Once youve thawed the food, eat it within three days for optimum safety. The same goes for refrigerated leftovers. And when serving, its best to discard perishable food after four hours at room temperature. If youd like to save leftovers, then refrigerate within three hours. But if youre serving food in hot weather, such as a picnic, then throw away all leftovers. Use common sense. When in doubt, throw it out, Staebler says. If people would just use common sense, they probably would eliminate 80 percent of foodborne illness in the home. Reduce your chances of getting sick with these food-handling tipsBYJOANOBRAMcClatchy Newspapersf you follow the news about foodborne illnesses, you might wonder about the safety of our meats, fruits and vegetables. Theres good news and bad news. First, the bad: About 76 million cases of foodborne illnesses occur each year in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Taken together, foodborne illnesses result in 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths yearly. Heres the good news: The majority of cases are mild, according to the CDC. Also, improper food handling causes many cases of foodborne illness. That means you can take steps to protect yourself, says Molly Hudson, a food-safety instructor in the Institute of Technologys culinary program in Clovis, Calif. To minimize your chances of falling ill, weve collected these food-safety tips used in commercial kitchens.ILLUSTRATIONS BY BOB CAMPBELL/MCT