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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01035
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 04-29-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:01035
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK After receiving a complaint, Avon Park's Police Chief Michael J. Rowan, who was placed on administrative leave April 19, had asked the State Attorney's Office to look into possible city government corruption January. The investigation, obtained through a public records request from the State Attorney's Office in Bartow, confirms that one of the charges investigated stemmed from a complaint of "unethical practices by the City of Avon Park regarding the hiring of a surveying firm owned by Mayor (Sharon) Schuler's husband." Chip Thullbery, a spokesman for the state attorney, said his office had closed their investigation and had "declined to prosecute." Documents show that the city did business with Schuler's company, Sherco Inc., in 2010. Filings from the Florida Division of Corporations show that Sharon Schuler was president of Sherco Inc., a surveying company, and her husband, Robert Schuler, was added as secretary in 2010. Additionally, records at Avon Park's City Hall lists NEWS-SUN Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Friday-Saturday, April 29-30, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 50 | 50 cents www.newssun .com 079099401001 HighLow 86 62Complete Forecast PAGE 7A Partly sunny with T-storms possible Forecast Question: Has the royal wedding received too much media coverage in the United States? Next question: Should city governments do business with a company owned by an elected official or their spouse? www.newssun .com Make your voice heard at Online Obituaries Jack Goldman Age 72, of Sebring Eula Love Age 68, of Sebring Valorie A. Nietubicz Age 58, of Lake Placid Lydia Wolcott Age 84, of Sebring Obituaries, Page 5A Phone ... 385-6155Fax ... 385-2453Online: www.newssun.com Yes 76.6% No 23.4% Total votes: 107 Classifieds9A Community Briefs2A Community Calendar10B Dear Abby11B Editorial & Opinion4A Healthy Living5B Lottery Numbers2A Movie Reviews/Times11B Religion7B Sports On TV2B Sudoku Puzzle11B Index Heck of a weekAP's Barnes shines playing for FAU SPORTS, 1BSaintly stepPope John Paul on the road to sainthood PAGE12BA proud graduateSFCC grad had to battle to continue her education PAGE2AOn the webAvon Park Polic e Chief Mike Rowan tells his side of the stor y www.newssun.com By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comAVON PARK South Florida Community College received an unexpected honor Tuesday, learning it is among the 10 percent best community colleges in the nation. That makes SFCC one of the top 120 out of 1,200 community colleges. The surprise was not because the college is one of the best it was because no one knew there was an accounting going on. According to a press release from The Aspen Institute College Excellence Program, a group of experts were asked to appraise the country's community colleges to determine which were fulfilling expectations and educating students. The committee looked for those colleges which "demonstrated high standards for learning, college completion without delay, and (provided) training grounds for jobs that pay competitive wages." Being in the top 10 percent of American community colleges means SFCC is eligible for the $1 million Aspen Prize. SFCC rating puts it in line for $1 million prize See SFCC, page 3A Declined to prosecute By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comLAKE PLACID Students at Lake Placid are gearing up for their annual prom Saturday at the Highlands County Convention Center. Highlands County Sheriff's Office Deputy Ross Porter and the resource team have been busy giving students insight to be safe and smart. The students spent their morning at the media center watching a presentation about safety and making good decisions regarding prom. This marks the first year that this presentation has ever been seen by the LPstudents. "I wanted to do something different this year. We've always done the crashed cars in the parking lot, but they've seen that so many times before. It's even gotten old with the teachers; some of them hardly even notice it anymore," said Porter. Instead, Porter used a different visual aid to get the attention of the students a casket. The office personnel at LPHS all agreed that it definitely got their attention. "I hope it gets to them like it's gotten to us," an officer member said. The casket sits in the corner of the school commons where many students walk between periods. After the students left the presentation, many glanced in the direction of the looming casket, but not many were brave enough to take a closer look. Two students, Daniel Nelson and Katelyn Cozier, however, decided that they would approach. "I was riding in a truck once with a friend and I didn't know they had been drinking. We almost hit a tree. It was really scary," said Cozier. The two seemed pretty aware of the consequences of drinking and driving and making poor decisions. "I think this helps a lot," said Visual gives LPHS students reason to play it safe A life-and-death decision By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLE Y christopher.tuffley@newssun.co m SEBRING Now th at Senate Bill 736, called t he Student Success Act, is la w, school districts are scram bling to fulfill its requir ements. Teacher and administrat or evaluations are at its core. The Commissioner of Education is required to approve, and the State Boa rd of Education to adopt, form ulas for schools to use in measuring student growt h. School districts are requir ed to administer assessments f or every course offered, esp ecially those not measured b y the Florida Comprehensi ve Assessment Test, which w ill be the primary source of st udent performance data. Student measurements a re emphasized because teache rs will be judged by how we ll their students do on the sta ndardized tests. By law, of t he total teacher evaluation, 5 0 percent is based on tho se scores. The state allows som e flexibility regarding t he remaining 50 percent of t he evaluation, which is based o n observations and document ation, as long as a variety of sources contribute to tho se observations and are weigh ted proportionally li ke feedback from school admi nistrators, parents and st udents, or newly created pe er teacher evaluators. Each district has to subm it its plan to the DOE by June 1 for approval. Districts whi ch do not meet the deadline w ill be denied a share of the Ra ce To The Top (RTT) feder al dollars, which Florida wo n competing against oth er states. The legislature is not pr oviding any funding for t he new evaluation system which is why local distri ct administrators plan on usin g a portion of Highlan ds County's share of the RT T funds $1.14 of $2.2 m illion to pay for the ne w system. District preps for teacher evaluations News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Lake Placid High School ninth graders Katelyn Cozier and Daniel Nelson believe that setting up a coffin inside the school is an effective way to get students attention about drinking and driving. The coffin was set up earlier this week to remind students to make good choices during prom this weekend. See LPHS, page 6A See TEACHER, page 5A SAOinvestigated Avon Park's dealings with Schuler's business See SCHULER, page 8A www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun

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Page 2ANews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.com April 27 162026273753x:2Next jackpot $19 millionApril 23 122232384353x:2 April 20 42040434653x:3 April 27 1123293336 April 26 711162633 April 25 1116242831 April 24 34162226 April 27 (n) 2037 April 27 (d) 1927 April 26 (n) 5233 April 26 (d) 6803 April 27(n) 16 4 April 27 (d) 55 1 April 26 (n) 67 4 April 26(d) 31 9 April 26 151943441 April 22 524394221 April 19 838394210 April 15 259314 April 27 424404455 PB: 5 PP: 2Next jackpot $25 millionApril 23 311474858 PB: 19 PP: 3 April 20 924343643 PB: 27 PP: 3 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center So far in 2011, hype s urrounding today's wedd ing of Prince William a nd Kate Middleton has p robably attracted more m edia attention than the w ars in Afghanistan and I raq combined. As this B ritish ceremony is forcef ed to us by a ratingsh ungry American press, p erhaps we can take a m oment to notice a cerem ony of far greater cons equence. On April 11, Gen. D avid Petraeus visited F orward Operating Base J oyce in eastern A fghanistan. He was t here to thank the battleh ardened soldiers of Task F orce No Slack, who, a long with so many other b rothers and sisters of the 1 01st Airborne Division ( Air Assault), have made a n incalculable number of s acrifices on America's p ost-9/11 battlefields. The Afghanistan War c ommander specifically w anted to shake the hands o f Capt. Edward B ankston and Sgt. Joshua B ostic. During several c haotic firefights, beginn ing on March 28, these v aliant warriors helped o vercome hundreds of i nsurgents, a blinding s nowstorm and the p ainful loss of six fellow s oldiers to defeat Taliban f orces in the area. "They're all heroes," T ony Berry told The U nknown Soldiers. "They a ll did the same job; some m ade it home and some d idn't." As you may have read i n last week's column, B erry's stepson, Pfc. J eremy Faulkner, was one o f six Screaming Eagles t o not make it home from t he eastern Afghanistan m ission. In an emotional A pril 9 ceremony at F aulkner's Jonesboro, G a., church, I had the h onor of witnessing the s oldier's Bronze Star b eing presented to his g rieving family. When Bankston and B ostic both received the S ilver Star from Petraeus, w ith Afghanistan's deadly m ountains as a backdrop, t he emotions were overw helming. "I would trade all the m edals to get our lost g uys back," Bankston, w ho is from Decatur, Ga., r eportedly said at the cere mony. An article by Sgt. 1st C lass Mark Burrell, who i s doing incredibly valua ble work by reporting f or the Army from the f ront lines, explains how B ankston and Bostic e arned our nation's thirdh ighest military decorat ion. Bankston, who was s hot in the leg earlier in h is third and current comb at deployment, rallied f ellow troops amid boomi ng machine guns and r ocket-propelled grenade f ire, which tragically k illed several soldiers a mong them. "The way I look at it is t hat I was walking in the f ootsteps of heroes t hroughout the mission, s o I was covered," B ankston said. What's really important See ROYAL, page 6A The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Wednesday, April 27: Rhonda Nichelle Callahan, 42, of Lake Placid, was charged with contempt of court. Jimmy Ray Jackson, 29, of Avon Park, was charged with battery. Theresa Lefkowitz, 39, of Sebring, was charged with driving with expired license and DUI. Guillermo Lopez, 26, of Lake Placid, was charged with battery. Ricardo Lopez, 26, of Lake Placid, was charged with battery. Lusvin Edward Mota, 25, of Avon Park, was charged with operating a motor vehicle without a valid license. William Patrick Norman, 52, of Lake Placid, was charged with violation of probation reference cocaine possession. Gary Allen Sampson, 52, of Lake Placid, was charged with contributing the delinquency of a minor, interfering with custody of a minor, and trespassing on school grounds. Morton Henry Volvaire, 29, of Avon Park, was charged with driving while license suspended and giving false identification to law enforcement. The following people were booked into the Jail on Tuesday, April 26: Angela Marquerite Bateman, 18, of Avon Park, was charged with battery. Richard Dean Demery, 22, of Avon Park, was charged with criminal mischief, battery, and burglary of an unoccupied conveyance. Antonio Hernandez, 30, of Stuart, was charged with violation of probation reference DUI. Pablo Huron, 33, of Winter Haven, was arrested on an outof-county warrant reference failure to appear for DUI. Noe Luna-Gomez, 28, of Miami, was charged with the four counts of failure to appear reference DUI, no valid driver license, and DUI with property/personal damage. Milagros Burgos Ramirez, 29, of Lake Placid, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference possession of cannabis and possession of drug paraphernalia. Robert Maddox Speakman, 68, of Sebring, was charged with burglary of an unoccupied structure, dealing in stolen property and petit theft. Mark Raymond Wagner, 33, of Sebring, was charged with criminal mischief, trespassing, grand theft of motor vehicle, burglary of an unoccupied conveyance, and grand theft. Kimberly Ann Wester, 20, of Sebring, was charged with violation of probation reference battery. Paul Eric Woodall, 35, of 1018 Lemon Ave. in Sebring, registered as a sexual predator. POLICEBLOTTER Classified ads get results! Call 314-9876 COMMUNITYBRIEFS Dinner to benefit Massey set for Saturday in Avon ParkAVON PARK Chicken Dinner Benefit for the Renae Gunn Massey Heart Transplant Fund will be held Saturday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Lucy Derkman Softball Fields (behind the Hess station). Massey recently had a heart transplan t and is doing well at Tampa General Hosptial. She is 38 years old and marrie d to Wesley Massey, a mother of two and a lifelong resident of Avon Park. Tickets can be purchased for $8 at the following locations: EMCI wireless (Verizon in Avon Park ); Dr. Abanilla (next to Turner Furniture south Avon Park) and Mane Salon ( Avo n Park) Donations can be made to Heartland National Bank in Avon Park: Renae Massey Heart Transplant Fund.Orchid Repotting Workshop is Saturday in SebringSEBRING The Orchid Society of Highlands County and Robbins Nursery are sponsoring an Orchid Repotting Workshop on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Robbins Nursery, 4803 U.S. 27 South. The members of the society will repo t your orchids for you for a nominal fee. You must supply the pots and potting mix; Robbins will have a full assortmen t of orchid supplies for sale. The society is also sponsoring a trip t o the Redlands International Orchid Festival at the Fruit & Spice Park in Homestead on Saturday, May 14. The cost is $35 and includes admission to th e festival. There will be more than 60 orchid and orchid related vendors from around the world. For additional information, contact Ed at 414-5424 or by e-mail at orchidman124@yahoo.com.CAAT summer camp Program set in Avon ParkAVON PARK The goal of the Children's Academy of Arts & Theatre, (CAAT) is to give opportunity and train ing to up and coming young artists in th e fields of visual art, dance, music, creativ e writing, and theatre both on stage and behind the scenes. Parents and young people enjoy our programs and understand the importance of the Arts to a complete education and to becoming a well rounded individual. "We are excited about this summer's theatre camp which is a musical version of Hans Christian Anderson's The Littl e Mermaid," said Krista Flores director of CAAT. "We are anticipating some very Continued on page 5B Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Jennifer Trace could have become another sad statistic, but, due to hard work, sacrifice and a vision of a better life, the South Florida Community College graduate is getting a second chance to make her dreams come true. When Trace accepts her Associate in Arts degree at SFCC's commencement exercises on Wednesday, she will celebrate more than the completion of two years of college. For the 26-yearold single mother and former domestic violence victim, this academic achievement mirrors her own personal growth and renewed self-confidence, which, together, are opening the door to a bright and promising future. Five years ago, Trace's future was anything but promising. At age 19, after moving to Sebring to be close to family, she enrolled in SFCC to take the prerequisite courses she needed to enter its nursing program. During her second academic term, she was swept up in a perfect storm of crises that forced her to abandon her pursuit of a college education. First, her father suffered a nearfatal heart attack, causing her to fall behind in her course work. Fearing that she would never catch up, she dropped out of college, hoping to shore up her finances by working full time. Then, she had a child with a man she believed she would marry until domestic violence issues convinced her she was better off alone. At 19, she was an independent young woman, just starting out in life. At 23, she was a single mother, with an infant son to support, a dead-end, low-paying job and a plague of legal issues involving the father of her son. "I was working all the time," Trace recalled. "It was killing me. I knew I had to get a college education, because I would never be able to make any money without a college degree." In 2008, Trace got a job at Florida Hospital Heartland Division, sometimes working 32hour shifts so that she could spend more time with her son. She moved from apartment to apartment, living for a time with her sister and getting periodic assistance from her mother, grandparents, and other relatives. Still, month after month, once all bills were paid, she often found herself left with as little as $30. "That $30 was my grocery money for the entire month," she said. But thanks to a group of Florida Hospital nurses, who encouraged her and helped her financially, as well as her supervisor who arranged for her to work a flexible schedule, Trace returned to SFCC in 2009 and resumed her studies in health care administration. "At the time, I was on my own, working and taking care of my son," she recalled. "I knew I had to put everything into finishing school as soon as possible." At SFCC, Trace was exposed to New graduate gets second chance to follow her dreams Single mother Jennifer Trace has battled through adversity to get her eduction Courtesy photo Jennifer Trace understands the value of education in opening doors for single mothers like herself. Wednesday, she will accept her associate in arts degree from South Florida Community College with the goal of earning her doctorate in ophthalmology. Being a more educated person on the inside makes you a better person on the outside.'JENNIFERTRACE SFCCgraduate See SFCC, page 6A

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Associated PressPLEASANTGROVE, Ala. Dozens of tornadoes r ipped through the South, f lattening homes and busin esses and killing people in s ix states in the deadliest outb reak in nearly 40 years. The Alabama Emergency M anagement Agency said in a news release Thursday that t he total confirmed dead in t he state had risen to 162. Deaths across the region t otaled at least 248. People a lso were killed in T ennessee, Kentucky, G eorgia, Virginia and M ississippi. It was the deadl iest tornado outbreak in n early 40 years. As day broke Thursday, p eople in hard-hit Alabama s urveyed flattened, debriss trewn neighborhoods and t old of pulling bodies from r ubble after the storms p assed Wednesday afternoon a nd evening. "It happened so fast it was u nbelievable," said Jerry S tewart, a 63-year-old retired f irefighter who was picking t hrough the remains of his s on's wrecked home in P leasant Grove, a suburb of Birmingham. "They said the storm was in Tuscaloosa and it would be here in 15 minutes. And before I knew it, it was here." He and his wife, along with their daughter and two grandchildren, survived by hiding under their front porch. Friends down the street who did the same weren't so lucky Stewart said he pulled out the bodies of two neighbors whose home was ripped off its foundation. Alabama's state emergency management agency said it had confirmed 131 deaths, while there were 32 in Mississippi, 30 in Tennessee, 13 in Georgia, eight in Virginia and one in Kentucky. The National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla., said it received 137 tornado reports into Wednesday night. Some of the worst damage was in Tuscaloosa, a city of more than 83,000 that is home to the University of Alabama. Neighborhoods there were leveled by a massive tornado caught on video by a tower-mounted news camera that barreled through late Wednesday afternoon. "When I looked back, I just saw trees and stuff coming by," said Mike Whitt, a resident at DCH Regional Medical Center who ran from the hospital's parking deck when the wind started swirling and he heard a roar. On Thursday morning, he walked through the neighborhood next to the hospital, home to a mix of students and townspeople, looking at dozens of homes without roofs. Household items were scattered on the ground a drum, running shoes, insulation, towels, and a shampoo bottle. Streets were impassable, the pavement strewn with trees, pieces of houses and cars with their windows blown out. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Aktion C lub members hopped on d own April 21 to the Avon P ark Community Child D evelopment Center with the E aster Bunny to deliver 109 b askets to the children. Members of the Aktion C lub assembled baskets f illed with candy-filled eggs a nd toys for the children on A pril 20 at Ridge Area Arc. T hey also put together 26 g ifts filled with candy for the s taff at the center. The club p urchased all the items with m oney that they raised t hroughout the year. "I got to put grass in the b askets," Aktion Club memb er Rose Tilley said. Members grabbed a basket a nd Tilley stuffed grass in t hem. They then walked a round a table filled with c andy and toys that they each t ook turns putting in the bask ets. Aktion Club member J effrey Crews suited up in the b unny costume on April 21 to v isit with the kids while s ome of the other members h anded out the goodies. Most o f the kids gave the giant seven-foot rabbit high fives and others wanted to hug him. "The kids really liked the bunny," Crews said, "but there were some who were scared." "I liked handing out the baskets to the kids. It made them happy," Aktion Club member Billy Owens said. Aktion Club is a community service group comprised of people with disabilities who perform a variety of services to help others. The club is sponsored by the Kiwanis Club of Sebring. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011Page 3A Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Aspecial L uminaria Ceremony held during t he American Cancer Society Relay F or Life of Avon Park remembers t hose lost to cancer and honors t hose who have survived. L uminarias will be lit at Joe Franza S tadium at Avon Park High School a t 8:30 p.m. Saturday, May 7 to repr esent these individuals. "It will be beautiful when all the b ags with candles are illuminated a round the track," said Romona W ashington, luminaria chair. "We h ope to have enough luminaria to light the entire area." Anyone desiring to create a luminaria may do so by contacting Washington at 452-0337 for an order form prior to Tuesday. Each luminaria is available with a monetary donation. Anyone who would like to include a photo in the PowerPoint presentation during the luminaria should email it to aprelayforlife@hotmail.com prior to Wednesday. Relay For Life, the Society's signature event, is a life-changing experience that helps us celebrate the lives of those who have battled cancer, remember loved ones lost and to fight back against a disease that takes too much. This unforgettable event raises awareness and funds to save lives, help those touched by cancer, and empower people to fight back against this disease. With the money raised at Relay, your American Cancer Society is working toward an important goal a future without cancer. Teams of eight to 15 members gather with tents and sleeping bags to participate in the largest fundraising walk in the nation. Relay For Life brings together friends, families, businesses, hospitals, schools, churches people from all walks of life. Teams seek sponsorship prior to the Relay, all with the goal of eliminating cancer. Avon Park's cancer survivors (anyone who has ever been diagnosed with cancer) can register at 11:30 a.m. Saturday, May 7 and will be honored at the Relay For Life at noon with the official Survivors Lap after lunch. Information about creating a luminaria, forming a team, or walking in the Survivors Lap is available by calling LeAnn Hinskey at 382-4110. The American Cancer Society is dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by savin g lives, diminishing suffering an d preventing cancer through researc h, education, advocacy and servic e. Founded in 1913 and with nation al headquarters in Atlanta, the Socie ty has 13 regional Divisions and loc al offices in 3,400 communitie s, involving millions of voluntee rs across the United States. For mo re information anytime, call toll fr ee 1-800-ACS-2345 or visit www.ca ncer.org. Luminaria Ceremony to honor cancer survivors, victims at AP Relay NEWS-SUN€ 385-6155 Courtesy photo Erick Leon, a student at Avon Park Community Child Development Center, applauds the Aktion Club and Easter Bunny when he got a turn to get his basket on April 21. Aktion Club members (from left) Angie Luft, Rob Ward and Sara Canali help hand out the goodies. Aktion Club treats 109 children in Avon Park to Easter goodies "Now the competition gets a little tougher," SFCC presid ent Norm Stephenson said. The college has to fill out a n extensive application f orm, which will be reviewed b y the prize committee. The 1 20 colleges will be pared d own to eight or 10 schools. At that time visiting teams w ill make in-depth inspect ions. The winner will then be selected. Stephenson said Floridians should be proud. Of the 120 colleges, 14 are located in state half of the 28 Florida community colleges. Only 33 states, including Florida, are represented in the contest. The application is due in June. The final 10 competitors should be chosen by early fall and the winner should be announced before the end of the year. Continued from page 1A SFCCin running for $1 million prize Death toll from tornadoes climbing

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Page 4ANews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.comTODAY'SEDITORIALTODAY'SLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION A s state legislators continue to g rapple with the b udget and a $4 b illion funding g ap, there is p rogress at least on o ne front in the b attle against subs tance abuse.The Florida House of R epresentatives has agreed w ith Gov. Rick Scott to keep f unding for substance-abuse p rograms as is, without sign ificant cuts. But the Florida Senate, w hich has added back $10.1 m illion to detoxification prog rams, still wields an ax o ver another $33.4 million in s tate funding for adult treatm ent programs that deal with a ddiction and substance a buse. If the cuts are particularly s evere for adult substancea buse programs, about 2 7,000 people could lose s ervices, according to the F lorida Alcohol and Drug A buse Association. About 1 ,500 jobs in the private sect or not the public sector could be eliminated, as n onprofits have to cut posit ions. And at risk are 492 resid ential beds, which have b een part of the state treatm ent system for years. They c ould be zeroed out, and t hey could never come back. Mark Fontaine, director of the Florida Alcohol and Drug Abuse Association, said losing those beds would be very costly, as they are hard to replace later, when times are better. The reason? The beds have to be zoned by local officials for usage, and that is not easy. It's easy, then, to understand what substance-abuse officials mean when they say cuts will have an impact beyond dollars and cents. Afew million here or there could cost them millions of dollars more in costs and manpower-hours later. And it could cost them resources in later years. For the Florida taxpayer, this won't save money in the long run. It will merely cause reverberations into other areas, such as the criminal justice sector, which we pay for, and various private sectors, such as hospitals that will have to pick up the financial slack. All that gets passed on to the taxpayers and the consumers of the Sunshine State. ... The Senate has already made the choice of staying away from programs for vulnerable populations such as children and teens who need substance-abuse counseling. Adults also need the state's helping hand. An editorial from the Daytona Beach News-Journal. Another viewpoint Reduce spending to reduce deficitEditor: Pay additional taxes to reduce the deficit? Willingly or not, that idea is idiotic. All it says to the politicians is "Keep right on spending people, we'll keep right on paying for it." The only sensible way to reduce the deficit is to reduce spending. Period. Unless and until we, the taxpayers, demand that, the politicians will just continue to spend, spend, spend. Tom Walsh SebringIt's sometimes hard to follow teachingsEditor: This is in reply to those posts under the article about the entertainment district downtown. I am absolutely fed up with this continual Christian bashing, in this forum and elsewhere. Maybe we Christians should agitate to be included in the anti-hate crime laws now applied to gays, blacks, Muslims and other groups that hate Christians. We are tired of you trying to impose your will on us, while you complain about us imposing our will on you No one forces you to go to church, or to listen to a Christian speak. No one forces you to live next to a church. The churches were here long before you were, and will be here long after. I can not understand why alcohol is so important to you people that you hate those who are opposed to its insinuation into every single place of business serving food. All we ask is the respect you demand, and the simple courtesy of respecting our beliefs even if you are opposed to them. We are willing to allow you to go to Hell in your own way, please allow us to go to Heaven in our own way. Saint Paul, what makes you think that "evangelical Protestantism" is so dangerous? Is it that your immortal soul is in danger and you know it? Bebo, the church itself may not pay taxes, but most of its members do, and should have just as much say in government as you Christian haters do. "Anormal person," please define normal. Is it "normal" to hate one for one's beliefs? Is it "normal" to have to get blotto to have a good time? Is it "normal" to enjoy something that causes so much death and suffering? Is it "normal" to get so drunk that you don't even realize you just killed someone? Our Lord and Saviour taught us to love even those who hate us, regardless of how we are treated by them, but when rewarded with constant hate it sure can be hard to follow Jesus'teachings to hate the sin, love the sinner. John Payne SebringNumbers countEditor: One million seconds approximately equals 12 days. One billion seconds approximately equals 32 years. One trillion seconds approximately equals 32,000 years. Fourteen trillion seconds approximately equals 448,000 years. Our present federal deficit is $14-plus trillion for which every tax payer is obligated to pay, a debt that we, our children, our children's children will be held responslble for. This is a result of an administration who pushed for and Cogressional Democrats who voted for spending this amount of money to fund government programs. Now these same politicians want to raise our debt ceiling limit beyond the $14 trillion mark. Does this make any logical sense to add to our national debt when we will be struggling for years to pay off our existing debt? Wake up, Mr., Mrs., and Ms. Voter as your future, your children's and their children's future is being squandered by our politicians as our country's financial stability is being destroyed right before our eyes. Dr. Robert Zielinski Lake PlacidA glaring inequityEditor: Recently there was an article in the Tampa Tribune telling about a "Recreational Upgrade to Courtney Campbell planned by state" (4/8/11). This is regarding a 7.4-mile stretc h of recreational trail that th e Department of Transportation plans to build at a cost of $20 million. During that same timeframe, our local Ridge Are a Arc folks were diligently trying to figure out how to come up with enough money to operate their pro grams for individuals with developmental and other disabilities after Tallahasse e drastically cut their fundin g. Arc trains and educates individuals to reach their capabilities so they can be more independent and thus contribute to his or her ow n life plan. This is such a glaring inequity it is obscene. Anyone with an ounce of compassion can see it is an outright injustice when folks who are working to learn to more completely care for themselves in life are passed over so others can get improvements for their recreation time. It is bordering unspeakable to see this happen. I plan to send a copy of this letter to all our Tallahassee and Washingto n representatives and I hope others would be moved to write as well. Not fair. No t right. Change this. Judith Hink le Sebrin g I've always felt uncomfortable having an iPhone. I'm no high-tech guy and it seemed a little too yuppie for me. It was definitely more Orlando suburb than Avon Park, more fancy loafers than work boots, more Cool Jazz 105 than 99 Country, more Lexus than pick-up truck. Yet my boss thought it would make me more productive. I'm a teacher with some distance learning classes and I handle lots of emails. It made sense. It just didn't feel right, like those medical exams we should all get when we turn 50. I first got the phone two years ago just before I left for a history teachers'workshop in Maine. Since I was on a tight budget, I used public transportation rather than renting a car. I got on the bus with my suitcase and headed for my luxury accommodations. After all, Tom Bodett had promised to leave the light on for me. If you have not ridden on a public bus lately, trust me, they have an interesting mix of humanity. I started to reach for my phone and paused. My iPhone was going to stick out like a tuxedo at a tractor pull with this crowd. I just left it in my pocket. That was the start of a rocky relationship. I am not a materialistic guy. I have told myself that my '99 white Dodge Caravan screams out responsible dad paying college tuition. Nearly all my favorite movies in our house are still on VHS. You can even find cassette tapes in my car. I was sure I could hear that iPhone sigh with contempt as it looked at its low-tech, lowrent neighbors. Acouple weeks ago our relationship changed dramatically. I was out walking the dog and talking to my parents. It was the kind of multi-tasking trip that I had been handling for months without incident. Suddenly, the dog lunged and the leash pulled me one way and the phone sought another way. I juggled it for a split second and batted it up in the air. Ominously, the phone went end over and end and landed face down on the sidewalk. I was hopeful because the phone had survived other drops unscathed. I picked it up and turned it over. The screen resembled a map of the Amazon and its tributaries. It looked like the windshield of the Ford Pinto you saw on I-4 that made you laugh out loud. It was now pathetic, but it still worked! Sweet! Now when people see my phone, they often gasp audibly. My wife said, "I hope you don't get shards of glass in your ear." I took that as a term of endearment. When you have been married for nearly thirty years, your wife may think you deserve some shards of glass in your body. Last week I was using the phone o n a plane, my seatmate noticed and commented, "That is the worst scree n I have ever seen." I laughed. My 27-year-old son, an iPhone owner that fits demographics that Apple corporation covets, said, "How can you read that thing? It's like a jig saw puzzle." Just the other day, I set it on the podium before a class. Astudent walked by and stopped. "Mr. Bedell, what happened to you r phone?" "Uh. I dropped it on the sidewalk. Then I smiled to myself. My battered phone can no longer be condescending or snooty. It now fits my working class youth and my less than hip middle age. For my iPhone and me, this may be the start of a beautif ul relationship. John Bedell is a former Avon Park resident and News-Sun correspondent. He now lives in Orlando. Learning to love my iPhone Courtesy pho to Believe it or not, this iPhone still works. Guest Column John Bedell EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. We have to make room for everybody. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; or e-mail editor@newssun.com. To make sure the editorial pages aren't dominated by the same writers, letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months. Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the opinion of that author and not necessarily the opinion of the staff or editors of the News-Sun.

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This will not be a perman ent funding source, howeve r, because RTTmoney will o nly be available for two y ears. The high cost of the prop osed evaluation system c omes from the need to hire t hose specialists to do the i ndependent evaluating. The district proposes to h ire a coordinator on a spec ial one-year assignment s chool year 2011-12 to i nstitute the system. That i ndividual would be paid $ 104,628. The next year, the coordin ator would be replaced by a n educational research spec ialist, paid $79,524 annuall y. In addition, beginning t his summer, six peer t eacher evaluators would be h ired to both do evaluations a nd provide feedback for t eachers. Those salaries add u p to $397,626. After additional funds are a dded for development t raining and travel. The prop osed system will cost $ 1,139,404 for its first two y ears. School superintendent W ally Cox and district offic ials were up-beat and posit ive in their presentation d uring a workshop on T uesday. Assistant S uperintendent Becky Fleck s aid that while there were q uestions still to answer, a nd despite the proposed s ystem would be expensive, i t did have value in being f air, consistent and r esearch-based. The particul ar model being debated, she s aid, was chosen by a comm ittee that included the p resident of the teacher's u nion, teachers, principals a nd district officials. "They felt after research t hat it provided the greatest a mount of reliable, fair and d efensible information," F leck said. School board members, o n the other hand, have reservations. Andrew Tuck expressed doubt six people would have enough time to fairly evaluate the 677 teachers covered by the evaluation law. "I don't see how we can do this with six people," he said. For one thing, each evaluator will have to provide four to five formative feedback sessions per year for every teacher on an annual contract with less than four years in the classroom. Then there are the more experienced teachers, who will have fewer feedback sessions, but still require some. Tuck is also opposed to one provision of the evaluation process the fact that an evaluation may be changed within 90 days of its being issued. This is because FCATscores do not arrive until the end of the school year and teacher evaluations have to be ready sooner. "I never knew of an evaluation you could change in 90 days," he said. School Board member Ronnie Jackson, a retired teacher and coach, had another concern. "We need to improve the evaluation process," he said, but added he still had concerns having to do with the cost of the proposed system and the fact he worried an evaluator could not be fair to a variety of teaching styles. "I don't want us to get to where there is only one way of teaching," he said. Several board members pointed out the total $2.2 million coming from RTT would make up the district's shortfall. Tuck and Bill Brantley wanted to know if the money could be used to stop the proposed technical education teacher layoffs. RTTdollars, however, cannot be used for every purpose. Before making a decision the board wants a full understanding of how the money could be spent. Being a workshop discussion, no action was taken Tuesday. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011Page 5A talented teenagers and kids coming out for auditions." Auditions will be Tuesday, May 17 and Thursday, May 19 at the Avon Park Community Center at 310 W. Main St. from 3:30-5:30 pm. There are many male and female roles both singing and non-singing. According to Flores, who adapted "The Little Mermaid" for the stage, "The Polypi are some of the coolest creatures in the play. They are gross looking and comedic as well. Of course, the mermaids have enchanting voices and glittering personalities." Summer camp will run May 24-July 16. The cost of the eight-week camp is $250 per student. Some needbased scholarships are available to students who have the desire to learn about the arts and to perform. The cost of producing live theatre is a reality. The financial support of the community is needed to continue to offer student scholarships opportunities are available. Contact Krista Flores at 212-0800 or Michelle Cathey at 449-0191 for more information. What's Up Main Street?' meeting TuesdayAVON PARK The Avon Park Community Redevelopment Agency Main Street District will host its nexe "What's Up on Main Street?" meeting at 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday in the Community Center, 310 W. Main St. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss the Community Strategic Vision of Main Street and all of Avon Park and to develop a more cohesive Main Street Avon Park network where people can share information, happenings and events. "Anyone interested in Avon Park's future is encouraged to attend this informative meeting," said Wes Hoadland, CRAdirector. "We must first start with what we want our city to be and the vision for our future, then we can discuss how we get there." Call Hoagland and 321287-6543 for more information.St. Agnes holding lasagna dinnerSEBRING There will be a lasagna dinner today at St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3840 Lakeview Drive. Dinner will be served from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. and includes tossed salad, bread, coffee, ice tea, milk and ice cream. Tickets are $8and are available from St. Agnes parishioners or at the door. For more information, please call the church at 385-7649.Events at local lodges and postsAVON PARK The steak dinner sponsored by The United States Military Vets MC held at VFW9853 in Avon Park will be today since the usually scheduled (fourth Friday), date was on Good Friday. After the April Steak Dinner, the date will continue to be on the fourth Friday of the month. The Combat Veterans Memorial VFWPost 9853 in Avon Park, 75 N. Olivia Drive, will host the following events this week: Today Steak dinner for $7, served from 5-7 p.m. Music by Big Freddie from 5-8 p.m. Saturday, April 30 Karaoke by Cowbells from 5-8 p.m. Bar menu served from 4-7 p.m. NASCAR 7:30 p.m. For any questions, call the lodge at 452-9853. LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Moose 2374, will host the following events this week: Today Wings, shrimp and fish 6 p.m. Music with BobKat 6-10 p.m. Saturday Bingo-bango 2 p.m. 12-ounce strip steak served (call for time). NASCAR Richmond, 7:30 p.m. Music with Bud Followell, 6-10 p.m. Spring Fashion Show dinner will be chicken cordon bleu at 6 p.m. and show at 7:30 p.m. Reserved seating, tickets $1 2 per person. For details, call the lodge at 465-0131. The Veterans of Foreign Wars 3880 in Lake Placid, will host the following events this week: Saturday Bingo 2 p.m. For details, call the lodge at 699-5444. The Lake Placid America n Legion Placid Post 25 in Lake Placid will host the fo llowing events this week: Today Barbecue ribs 57 p.m. Music by Buddy Canova 6:30-9:30 p.m. Saturday Auxiliary burg ers 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Classi c Car Show 10 a.m. to 2 p.m Texas Hold-em 1:30 p.m. Karaoke Bill 5-8 p.m. For more information, ca ll 465-0975. The Lake Placid Elks 2661, will host the followin g events this week: Today Fish fry 5-7 p.m Music by Chrissy Harriman For details, call 465-2661 Veterans Connect meeting today in BartowBARTOW Veterans Connect, presented by the Department of Financial Services Division of Consumer Services in partnership with the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs, Polk County Veterans Service Office and the UF Extension Service, will meet from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., today at The Stuart Center, 1710 Highway 17 South, Bartow. Florida CFO Jeff Atwate r invites Florida Veterans to learn more about the many resources available in their community. Educational pr ograms will be available throughout the day for fam ilies, caregivers and professionals who work with vete rans. Veterans Connect was established by state and loc al agencies to help veterans b e more aware of the many benefits and resources avai lable to them. Please visit www.MyFloridaCFO.com t o learn more. Continued from page 2A COMMUNITYBRIEFS The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Classified ads get results! JACK GOLDMAN Jack Goldman, 72, died o n Wednesday, April 27, 2 011, at his home in S ebring. Jack was a man of g reat integrity and whose c haracter was defined by his a ctions and not his words. H e dearly loved his wife, c hildren and grandchildren a nd will be greatly missed. H e was vice-president area d irector for Citibank in New Y ork and moved to Sebring i n 2006 from Sarasota, Fla. He is survived by his w ife, Suzanne Thornton G oldman of Sebring; child ren, Robin Goldman and D onna Hernandez, both of N ew Jersey, and Brett G oldman of Florida; sister, G eri Breunig of Wisconsin; a nd four grandchildren. The family will receive f riends from 2-4 p.m. F riday, April 29, 2011, at S tephenson-Nelson Funeral H ome in Sebring. Everyone i s invited to the residence at 3060 Going to the Sun following the gathering. Arrangements have been entrusted to: Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home Sebring, Fla 33870 863-385-01215 www.stephensonnelsonfh.com EULALOVE Eula Clairene Love, 68, of Sebring, Fla., passed away Wednesday, April 27, 2011, in Sebring. She was born Nov. 21, 1942, to Grover and Thelma (Eakes) Love, in Madison College, Tenn. She was bookkeeper for a service station and had been a resident of Sebring since 1972, coming from Miami, Fla. Eula is survived by many loving family members and friends. Funeral services will take place at 11 a.m. Monday, May 2, 2011 at StephensonNelson Funeral Home, Sebring, with Rev. W. Mike Adams officiating. The family will receive friends the hour preceding the service, beginning at 10 a.m. Interment at Pinecrest Cemetery, Sebring, will immediately follow. Arrangements have been entrusted to: Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home Sebring, Fla. 33870 863-385-0125 Death noticeValorie A. Nietubicz 58, of Lake Placid died April 24, 2011. StephensonNelson Funeral Home, Sebring, is in charge of arrangements. Lydia Jane Wolcott 84, of Sebring died April 25, 2011, in Sebring. Arrangements are being handled by StephensonNelson Funeral Home, Sebring. OBITUARIES Continued from page 1A Teacher evaluations will be costly Courtesy photo American Diabetes Association representative Delia Jervier (center) accepts a check from Barb Giese (left) on and Betty Robinson, on behalf of Reflections on Silver Lake. Throughout the season, Reflections hosts numerous fundraising events led by Giese and Robinson (affectionately known as the Hustler Sisters). This year's events raised a total of $4,500, which was divided equally between Hope Hospice, the American Cancer Society and the American Diabetes Association. Checks were presented to representatives of each organization during a recent coffee hour. Reflections makes donations

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Associated PressTALLAHASSEE The Florida Senate has passed a property insurance overhaul aimed at creating more competition in the private marketplace and also cut down on fraudulent sinkhole claims. The measure (SB 408) passed on a 25-12 vote after some 50 minutes of debate Thursday. The House is also considering similar legislation. The bill's sponsor, Sen. Garrett Richter, R-Naples, said the bill might not fix all of the state's insurance problems, but added that he considered it the most consumer friendly bill he's seen this session. The legislation would free company from having to offer sinkhole coverage. Asimilar proposal, minus the sinkhole provisions, was passed last year in the Senate, but vetoed by former Gov. Charlie Crist. Gov. Rick Scott said Thursday he likes many proposals in Richter's bill. In other action: Arevised plan to loosen Florida's class size limits has passed the state Senate with little of the opposition that's accompanied past proposals. The Senate voted 38-1 for the bill (SB 1466) and sent it to the House. It would reduce the number of core courses covered by class size requirements from 849 to 304. The Florida Education Association has led the opposition to past efforts by the Republican-controlled Legislature to weaken the limits set by the Florida Constitution. Mark Pudlow, a spokesman for the statewide teachers union, said the new bill is better than past proposals but the FEAstill objects to removing foreign language classes from the limits. Pudlow said the union hasn't yet decided whether it would challenge the bill if it becomes law. Also, the Senate has approved a proposed state constitutional amendment and a bill to ban abortion funding with public and insurance exchange dollars. The largely party line votes in the Republican-controlled Senate on Wednesday sent both House-passed measures back to that chamber with some changes. The amendment (HJR 1179) passed with 27 favo rable votes the minimu m needed to put it on the 201 2 ballot. It would ban publ ic funding already prohibit ed by federal law and exem pt abortion from the Flori da Constitution's strong priva cy right. The bill (HR 79) wou ld exclude abortion covera ge from policies obtain ed through insurance exchang es states must set up in 201 4 under the federal health ca re overhaul. Both include exceptio ns for rape, incest and to prote ct the mother's life, but not h er health. The Senate also h as approved a trio of guns bi lls that expand citizens'gu ns rights. All were approved alon g party-line votes on Thursda y. One decriminalizes the acc idental showing of a co ncealed weapon. Aperson wi th a concealed weapon perm it now could be charged with a third-degree misdemean or for inadvertently showing h is or her weapon. Another measure restric ts doctors asking patients abo ut gun ownership. m ore than academics. She f orged relationships with i nstructors who took an i nterest in her personal circ umstances. Dr. Brian Deery, her psyc hology instructor, often s topped to ask how she was d oing, long after she comp leted his class. "He r emembered me," Trace said. Sometimes, just talking to h im relieved my worries." Carol Dutton, accounti ng/business professor, b ecame a special friend. She has given me good a dvice career-wise," Trace s aid. "But she's a mommy, t oo, and has good advice for m y son." Dutton also introduced her t o Phi Beta Lambda, a stud ent organization that g rooms future business leade rs. "I'm glad she did," T race said. "It cheered me u p whenever I got down, and I learned professional s kills." Trace demonstrated those new-found skills at Phi Beta Lambda's district competition, where she took second place in marketing and decision making and third place in business management. At the state competition, she placed fifth in business management. Trace credits Laura White, associate dean of enrollment management and university relations, with making it possible for her to participate in commencement. "She found out I wasn't going to be there because I couldn't afford the cap and gown," Trace said. "Later, she called to tell me that one had been donated for me." After commencement, Trace plans to apply for an optician's license. In the fall, she hopes to continue her studies in health care administration at the University of Florida in Gainesville and with the long-term goal of earning a doctorate in ophthalmology. "Education makes you a better person," Trace said. "Being a more educated person on the inside makes you a better person on the outside. Every A'or B'I get makes me want to do better. I feel better about myself that I did when I started going back to college. Now, my son sees his mommy as an educated person, and he tells me he is going college, too. I want to continue that association at the University of Florida. I want him to grow up in an atmosphere where mommy is educated." "I also want to reach out to women in my situation and tell them: you can turn it around. You can be a good example for your children. You can get an education. You'll meet so many professional people in college. You don't know what doors those relationships will open." "I have gotten where I am today with the help of so many people," Trace said. "I'm so thankful for everything everyone has done for me." Trace is the daughter of Greg and Joan Trace and Susan and Bill Temples. SFCC's 2010-11 commencement exercises will be 6:45 p.m. Wednesday in the Theatre for the Performing Arts in Avon Park. Burrell also reports that B ostic refused to leave the m ission to seek medical care a fter he was wounded trying t o pull one of his fellow p aratroopers, who later died, t o safety. "I know the other guys w ould do the same for me," B ostic, who is from Spring C ity, Tenn., said. "It really w asn't a thought." Petraeus has traveled all o ver Iraq and Afghanistan to p ersonally attend these i mportant ceremonies. He b elieves that if battlefield h eroism goes unnoticed w ithin the military and in the g eneral public, then the cont ributions of this "new greate st generation" as the g eneral calls those to step up s ince Sept. 11, 2001 will b e forgotten. "There's such a pace of o perations, there's such a h igh tempo, that the last t hing that our great soldiers, s ailors, airmen, and Marines o ut there want to do when t hey come back from a miss ion is write each other up f or awards," Petraeus said in October. "But we need to do that better, we need to capture the history of our operations better." Every facet of this British royal wedding, from gowns and flowers to guest lists and gossip, is being captured by American journalists. For many weeks, our television, computer and smartphone screens have been filled with information that has absolutely no relevance to our daily lives, as ceremonies honoring men and women who protect us are almost completely ignored. We don't need to watch a royal wedding in London to find heroes. Instead, we can do a better job noticing events like the one our media failed to capture in eastern Afghanistan, and line the streets of American cities when our heroes return home. To find out more about Tom Sileo, or to read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit www.creators.com. Page 6ANews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.com Continued from page 2A Royal wedding overshadows heroes Continued from page 2A SFCC's Trace knows value of education N elson. "When you see this i t's like Well, I don't want t o end up in that.'" Porter agrees that the c asket is effective and s ends a message to students o f the dangers of poor decis ions. "I'm not trying to scare y ou guys. Prom should be f un, but I'm not going to be a t the prom after parties p olicing you. You guys h ave to police yourselves," P orter said. Since Porter began his position as resource officer at Lake Placid three years ago, there have been no accidents. He hopes to keep it that way. "It's in the back of their minds, but they have to make the decisions themselves. Some of them will listen to me and to their parents, but most of them go off of what their peers do. Hopefully they will remember this and if they see a friend making a bad decision, then we hope they will step in and be there for them rather than following," Porter said. Porter hopes that the parents will get involved, as well as the entire community, in the safety of the students on prom night as well as graduation night. "It's not just about accidents. We don't want any arrests for these students. Some of them have full academic scholarships. One arrest and they could loose $30,000 or $40,000 scholarships and we don't want that," Porter said. Continued from page 1A LPHS students get sobering reminder of prom night dangers News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Lake Placid High School students sit somberly Thursday morning watching a slideshow w ith images of their peers during prom followed by graphic pictures of alcohol-related car crashes. The slideshow and program served as a reminder to abstain from drugs and alcohol during prom, which is scheduled for Saturday at the Highlands County Convention Center in Sebring. State senate passes property insurance overhaul bill

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011Page 7A

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S chuler as an owner of S herco. Sharon Schuler filed her r esignation as president of S herco with the state on Aug. 6 leaving her husband as s ole officer of the company. Although the date stamp f rom the state clearly shows A ug. 6 as the filing date, the h and-written date next to M ayor Schuler's signature is J an. 2, 2010. Schuler stated that she had i ntended to resign earlier in t he year. "I resigned from Sherco b ack in January of 2010. U nfortunately, the processing o f the official forms was d elayed. If I have made a m istake, it was not intentiona l. This is no longer an issue s ince I have zero'ownership i n Sherco Inc., and all forms h ave been properly filed with t he State. I have no further c omments since I have not r eceived the details of the a llegations," Schuler said T uesday in an e-mail. Andrea Allen, a clerk with t he Florida Division of C orporations, told the NewsS un on Monday that public r ecords listed Schuler as p resident of Sherco until A ug. 6, which is well past the s igning of several city c hecks. "Even though they dated it J an. 2, it is a public record t hat they are president until t hey file with us," Allen said w hile looking at the record o n her computer. Allen also questioned Jan. 2 as the resignation date w hen Schuler signed as presi dent several times after that d ate. Records show that on Jan. 1 2, 2010 Schuler filed paperw ork as president of Sherco I nc. with the Division of C orporations, and that on M arch 24, 2010 she listed h erself as president on a corp orate record filing making h er husband secretary of S herco. Canceled City of Avon P ark checks reveal that S herco was paid $3,915 from J une through December of 2 010 for work for the city. Florida Statute 112.313(3) s tates "No employee of an a gency acting in his or her o fficial capacity as a purc hasing agent, or public offic er acting in his or her offic ial capacity, shall either d irectly or indirectly purc hase, rent, or lease any realt y, goods, or services for his o r her own agency from any b usiness entity of which the o fficer or employee or the o fficers or employees spouse o r child is an officer, partner, d irector, or proprietor or in w hich such officer or e mployee or the officers or employees spouse or child, or any combination of them, has a material interest." Avon Park's City Charter states in section C-11 that "No officer of the City of Avon Park and no member of the City Council shall be directly or indirectly interested in any contract with said city...or be in any way interested in a contact for any public work of said city. All persons violating the provisions of this section may be removed from office, and all such contracts, except in cases of emergency, are hereby declared illegal and void." One canceled check dated June 24 for $740 shows that Schuler signed the front of the check as mayor and endorsed it for deposit on the back, using her signature for Sherco. Another $40 check dated July 8 was also signed by Schuler as mayor. City Manager Julian Deleon said that the mayor signing the checks to Sherco was a clerical error and that procedures have been put in place to ensure that such a mistake doesn't happen again. "With regards to the Mayor's mistake, the City has implemented internal accounting controls to prevent the same issue from occurring. She signs approximately 4,000 checks per year, and a mistake was made," Deleon wrote in an e-mail to the News-Sun. City records show that Deleon, who was director of Public Works at the time, was the one responsible for hiring Sherco for surveying. "The process of check signing seems quite simple all the checks are procured by city staff, reviewed by the finance office and then first signed by either the City Manager or Financial Officer," Schuler said in an email to the News-Sun Sunday. "I rely on their expertise and executive decision making in order for me to do my part. I can't expect staff to remember every check in a box 50-200 checks and remove just one for me not to sign ... Since this error was first made, city staff now red-flags'checks that are in concern BEFORE they come to me. Then the deputy mayor is called in to sign instead. I regret this honest mistake. However this mistake was discussed at a city council meeting months ago." Five other checks were to Sherco signed by Deputy Mayor Brenda Gray, the city's project manager Maria Sutherland, who was serving as city manager at the time, and Renee Green, the city's financial officer. In response to questions about the investigation, Thullbery stated that he would forward the investigator's report and that "should answer all questions." The report shows investigator Mike Ivancevich was assigned to the matter and he spent 18 hours over three months looking into the Schuler issue and other complaints, including alleged sunshine law violations, possible fraudulent homestead exemptions on Parke and Maria Sutherland as well as a "possible violation of the City Charter involving Mr. (Parke) Sutherland at the time of the election for city commissioner." (sic) The partial report from the state attorney did not include the canceled checks nor statements from those accused. Ivancevich stated that he did not himself interview the mayor about the incidents. "I did not make any contact with Mr. or Mrs. Schuler as it pertained to the City of Avon Park conducting business with the surveying company owned by Mr. Schuler, a company also in which Mrs. Schuler (Mayor) was a corporate officer of the business prior to Nov. 2010. This particular issue was addressed in detail by City Attorney Gerald T. Buhr in a memorandum that was addressed to Mayor Schuler and Maria Sutherland on Nov. 18, 2010," Ivancevich states. Buhr stated in his Nov. 18 memo that "The mayor must not own a portion of any business that conducts business with the city and makes no decisions as to the hiring of the firm," according to the report by Ivancevich. Buhr also stated, "Although she previously had ownership, as of the date of this memo, she does not have any interest in the company." Page 8ANews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.com Continued from page 1A News-Sun T his City of Avon Park check dated June 24, 2010 for $740 to Sherco Inc. was both signed and then endorsed by Mayor Sharon Schuler. Schuler was on record as the president of Sherco on that date. Schuler's company did work for Avon Park; mayor signed checks With regards to the Mayor's mistake, the City has implemented internal accounting controls to prevent the same issue from occurring. She signs approximately 4,000 checks per year, and a mistake was made.'JULIANDELEON interim city manager

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, April 29, 2011Page 9 A The City of Sebring will receive sealed bids in the City Purchasing Department for: I I T T B B 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 2 2 O O D D O O R R C C O O R R R R O O S S I I O O N N & & G G R R E E A A S S E E C C O O N N T T R R O O L L F F O O R R W W A A S S T T E E W W A A T T E E R R C C O O L L L L E E C C T T I I O O N N S S Y Y S S T T E E M M Specifications & General Terms and Conditions may be obtained from our website at: mysebring.com or by contacting Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB by phone 863-471-5110, Fax 863-471-5168, or e-mail: kirkzimmerman@mysebring.com at the City purchasing office located at 368 South Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. If obtaining documents via the website, it shall be the bidders responsibility to check for amendments/changes made to the document. Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked with the bid number and name as to identify the enclosed bids. Bids must be delivered to the City of Sebring Purchasing Office Attn: Kirk Zimmerman so as to reach the said office no later than 2 2 : : 0 0 0 0 P P M M , M M o o n n d d a a y y , M M a a y y 1 1 6 6 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 o o f f t t h h e e o o f f f f i i c c i i a a l l t t i i m m e e c c l l o o c c k k i i n n t t h h e e p p u u r r c c h h a a s s i i n n g g o o f f f f i i c c e e Proposals received later than the date and time specified will be rejected. The City will not be responsible for the late delivery of any bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail, or any other type of delivery service. The submitting firm will be required to comply with all applicable laws, regulations, rules and ordinance of local, state and federal authorities having jurisdiction, including, but not limited to: all provisions of the Federal Government Equal Employment Opportunity clauses issued by the Secretary of Labor on May 21, 1968 and published in the Federal Register (41 CFR Part 60-1, 33 F.2 7804); all provisions of the Public Entity Crimes (Fla. Stat. 287.133, e t seq, as amended) and the provisions in Fla. Stat287.134,et seq,as amended, regarding discrimination. The Sebring City Council reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts Thereof; and the award; if an award is made, will be made to the most responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of the City of Sebring. The council reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB Purchasing Agent Sebring, Florida April 29; May 4, 2011 1055HighlandsCounty Legals NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER A NEW SCHOOL DISTRICT RULE 3.48 AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is creating Rule 3.48, Service Animals. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to amend the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on T T u u e e s s d d a a y y , M M a a y y 2 2 4 4 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed amendment is to create a policy in accordance with requirements set forth in recent Florida legislation. A summary of the proposed rule is as follows: The purpose of this policy is to implement standards related to service animals as set forth in federal and state law. A service animal is any dog that is trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability. The animal must be trained to perform tasks directly related to the person's disability. A service animal is personal property and may not be brought on campus without the knowledge and permission of the school or District administration. A student's need for and use of a service animal must be documented in the student's Individual Education Plan (IEP) or Section 504 Plan. The Superintendent shall develop guidelines for service animals on campus. The specific legal authority includes Sections 1001.41, and 1001.42, Florida Statutes.The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendent's office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey), 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 11-0020-GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, Plaintiff, vs. FORMAN'S CONSTRUCTION & EXCAVATION, INC., a Florida profit corporation, and ROBERT R. FORMAN, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the ``Final Judgment on Verified Complaint'' (the ``Final Judgment''), entered in the above-styled action on April 11, 2011, the Clerk of Highlands County will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida, as described below at a Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, on May 16, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT ``A'' SCHEDULE ``A'' Avon Park Collateral: All of Lot 2, lying East of Seaboard Railroad right of way in Block 2, Section 15,Township 33 South, Range 28 East, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 33, of the Public Records of Desoto County, Florida, of which Highlands County was formerly a part, LESS AND EXCEPT Atlantic Coastline Railroad right of way and LESS AND EXCEPT road right of ways, LESS AND EXCEPT the following: Commence at the N.E. Corner of Lot 2, Block 2 of Section 15 Township 33 South, Range 28 East; Thence run South 0 Degrees 05'06'' East along the East line of said Lot 2 for a distance of 30 feet to a point on the South right of way line of State Road S 17 A; Thence run North 89 Degrees 49'29'' West, a distance of 239.03 feet to Point of Beginning; Thence continue North 89 Degrees 49'29'' West, a distance of 30.0 feet; Thence in a Southerly direction to a point on the South line of said Lot 2,said point being 230.57 feet North 89 Degrees 52'35'' West of the SE corner of said Lot 2; Thence South 89 Degrees 52'35'' East a distance of 10.27 feet; Thence North 1Degrees 46'44'' West a distance of 633.56 feet to Point of Beginning of said excepted parcel. AND LESS AND EXCEPT: Commence at the N.E. corner of Lot 2,Block 2 of Section 15,Township 33 South,Range 28 East; Thence run South 00 Degrees 05'08''East along the East line of Lot 2, Block 2 a distance of 30 feet to a point on the South right of way line of State Road S 17 A for Point of Beginning; Thence continue South 00 Degrees 05'08'' East along the East line of Lot 2,Block 2 for a distance of 633.02 feet to the SE corner of Lot 2,Block2; Thence North 89 Degrees 52'35'' West along the South line of said Lot 2, Block 2 for a distance of 220.30 feet; Thence North 01 Degrees46'44'' West for a distance of 633.58 feet to a point on the South right of way line of State Road S 17 A; Thence South 89 Degrees 49'29'' East fora distance of 239.03 feet along said South right of way line to Point of Beginning of said excepted parcel, Highlands County, Florida. AND LESS AND EXCEPT: the South 200.00 feet of the following described parcel: Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 2,Block 2, Section 15, Township 33 South, Range 28 East, Highlands County,Florida; Thence run South 00 Degrees 05'08;; East for a distance of 30.00 feet to a point on the Southerly right of way line of State Road #17-A; Thence North 89 Degrees 49'29'' West, along said right of way line a distance of 269.03 feet to the Point of Beginning; Thence continue North 89 Degrees 49'29'' West still along said right of way line a distance of 259.14 feet to a point on the Easterly right of way line of the Seaboard Coastline Railroad; Thence South 03 Degrees 28'07'' East along said Railroad right of way a distance of 634.75 feet to a point on the South line of Lot 2,Block 2; Thence South 89 Degrees 52'35'' East along the South line of Lot 2, Block 2, a distance of 260.14 Feet Thence North 03 Degrees 33'36'' West for a distance of 634.57 feet to the Point of Beginning, subject to an easement for ingress/egress over and across the East 20.00 feet of the above described parcel. AND LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PARCEL: Commence at the N.E. corner of Lot 2, Block 2,Section 15, Township 33 South, Range 28 East, Highlands County, Florida; Thence run South 00 Degrees 05'08'' East, 30.00 feet to a point on the Southerly right of way line of State Road #17-A; Thence North 89 Degrees 49'29'' West, 269.03 feet along said right of way line, 50.00 feet; Thence South 03 Degrees 33'36'' East, 198.81 feet; Thence North 89 Degrees 49'29'' West, parallel to the said right of way line of State Road 17A, 209.46 feet to a point on the Easterly right of way line of the Seaboard Coastline Railroad; Thence South 03 Degrees 28'07'' East along said Railroad right of way a distance of 235.57 feet; Thence South 03 Degrees 28'07'' East along said Railroad right of way a distance of 235.57 feet; Thence South 89 Degrees 52'35'' East, 259.82 feet; Thence North 03 Degrees 33'36'' West, 434.17 feet to thePoint of Beginning. The Real Property or its address is commonly known as 393 County Road 17A West, Avon Par,FL 33825. The Real Property tax identification number is A-15-33-28-010-0010-0000. NOTICE OF DISPOSITION ACCORDING TO THE FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT THE FOLLOWING STORAGE UNITS LOCATED AT THE STORAGE PLACE OF AVON PARK, 395 CR 17A WEST, AVON PARK, FL 33825 WILL BE DISPOSED OF ON MAY 16, 2011, AT 10:00AM. ALL UNITS ARE SAID TO CONTAIN HOUSEHOLD GOODS UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED. Names and unit numbers are as follows: NAME UNIT NUMBER Maude Amy Hall #266 Calvin Crowell II #339 DISPOSITION BEING MADE TO SATISFY LANDLORD'S LIEN, MANAGEMENT RESERVES ALL RIGHTS, UNDER FLORIDA LAW, ALL PAYMENTS MUST BE IN CASH. April 22, 29, 2011 1050Legals NOTICE OF FINAL AGENCY ACTION BY THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT Notice is given that the District's Final Agency Action is approval of the Commercial on 2.58 acres to serve N/A known as N/A. The project is located in Highlands County, Section(s) 20/33S/28E, Township AP South, Range AP East. The permit applicant is 64 West Collision Repair, Inc. whose address is 2215 SR 64 West, Avon Park, FL 33825. The permit No. is 46012638.001. The file(s) pertaining to the project referred to above is available for inspection Monday through Friday except for legal holidays, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the Southwest Florida Water Management District (District). NOTICE OF RIGHTS Any person whose substantial interests are affected by the District's action regarding this permit may request an administrative hearing in accordance with Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes (F.S.), and Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C., of the Uniform Rules of Procedure. A request for hearing must (1) explain the substantial interests of each person requesting the hearing will be affected by the District's action, or final action; (2) state all material facts disputed by each person requesting the hearing or state that there are no disputed facts; and (3) otherwise comply with Chapter 28-106, F.A.C. A request for hearing must be filed with and received by the Agency Clerk of the District at the District's Brooksville address, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 within 21 days of publication of this notice (or within 14 days for an Environmental Resource Permit with Proprietary Authorization for the use of Sovereign Submerged Lands). Failure to file a request for hearing within this time period shall constitute a waiver of any right such person may have to request a hearing under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action, the filing of a petition means that the District's final action may be different from the position taken by it in this notice of final agency action. Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by an such final decision of the District on the application have the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding, in accordance with the requirements set forth above. Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, F.S., to settle an administrative dispute regarding the District's final action in this matter is not available prior to the filing of a request for hearing. April 29, 2011 M M E E S S O O N N M M A A D D R R I I D D T T A A S S C C A A B B A A R R . I I N N C C . 3 3 9 9 5 5 5 5 3 3 9 9 5 5 7 7 U U S S 2 2 7 7 S S O O U U T T H H , S S E E B B R R I I N N G G , F F L L 3 3 3 3 8 8 7 7 0 0 , T T E E R R E E S S I I T T A A D D J J B B A A R R R R E E R R A A / / P P R R E E S S I I DD E E N N T T h h a a s s s s o o l l d d t t h h i i s s b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s t t o o S S E E B B R R I I N N G G K K I I T T C C H H E E N N C C O O R R P P . 9 9 9 9 N N W W 2 2 7 7 t t h h A A V V E E N N U U E E , 2 2 n n d d F F L L O O O O R R A A , M M I I A A M M I I , F F L L 3 3 33 1 1 2 2 5 5 ( ( T T r r u u s s t t e e e e A A g g e e n n t t : : S S a a n n t t o o s s G G o o n n z z a a l l e e z z ) ) A A n n y y p p o o s s s s i i b b l l e e B B U U L L K K S S A A L L E E C C R R E E D D I I T T O O R R S S a a g g a a i i n n s s t t M M e e s s o o n n M M a a d d r r i i d d T T a a s s c c a a BB a a r r , I I n n c c . m m u u s s t t b b e e a a w w a a r r e e t t h h a a t t f f i i n n a a l l c c l l o o s s i i n n g g o o f f t t h h i i s s b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s d d e e a a l l w w i i l l l l b b e e h h e e l l d d o o n n M M a a y y 1 1 0 0 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 a a t t 1 1 :: P P M M a a t t t t h h e e b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s l l o o c c a a t t i i o o n n i i n n S S e e b b r r i i n n g g , F F L L F F o o r r a a n n y y r r i i g g h h t t f f u u l l c c l l a a i i m m s s , p p l l e e a a s s e e c c a a l l l l S S a a n n t t o o s s G G o o n n z z a a l l e e z z , TT r r u u s s t t e e e e A A g g e e n n t t a a t t 3 3 0 0 5 5 6 6 3 3 1 1 8 8 5 5 4 4 5 5 . A A p p r r i i l l 2 2 9 9 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001078 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. ROBERTA L. BONFIGLIO A/K/A ROBERTA BREMSER; UNKNOWN TENANTS(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 6th day of April, 2011, and entered in Case No. 28-2009-CA-001078, of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and ROBERTA L. BONFIGLIO A/K/A ROBERTA BREMSER; and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33870 at the Highlands County Courthouse in Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 6th day of May, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: SEE EXHIBIT ``A'' ATTACHED. EXHIBIT A TRACT 5 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF SOUTH BEAR POINTE BOULEVARD AND THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF S.C.F.E. RAILROAD; THENCE SOUTH 12 DEGREES 38'45'' WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 2244.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 12 DEGREES 38'45'' WEST ALONG SAID LINE, A DISTANCE OF 163.56 FEET; THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 05'01'' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1198.43 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 35'13'' WEST A DISTANCE OF 276.40 FEET; THENCE NORTH 90 DEGREES 00'00'' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 54.42 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF SOUTH BEAR POINT DRIVE AND TO A POINT ON A NON TANGENT CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 60.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 10 DEGREES 41'25'' AND A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 23 DEGREES 12'32'' WEST, 11.18 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG THE ARC A DISTANCE OF 11.19 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF 25.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 49 DEGREES 40'47'', AND A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 03 DEGREES 42'51'' WEST, 21.00 FEET; THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG THE ARC A DISTANCE OF 21.68 FEET; THENCE NORTH 21 DEGREES 07'33'' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 167.51 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A A RADIUS 520.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 09 DEGREES 47'59''; AND A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 26 DEGREES 01'32'' EAST, 88.83 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG THE ARC A DISTANCE OF 88.94 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 55 DEGREES 42'48'' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1371.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 10 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N. Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863) 534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 6th day of April, 2011. Robert W. Germaine Clerk Of The Circuit Court By: /s/ Lisa Tantillo Deputy Clerk April 22, 29, 2011 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the ficitious name of SEBRING MOTORS located at 526 Park Street, in the County of Highlands, in the City of Sebring, Florida 33870 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Sebring, Florida, this 26th day of April, 2011. Juan Soto April 29, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-186 IN RE: ESTATE OF A LMA GRACE GAVIN a/k/a GRACE GAVIN, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ALMA GRACE GAVIN a/k/a GRACE GAVIN, deceased, whose date of death was March 12, 2011, and whose social security number is 263-56-0681, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is A pril 29, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Joan E. Ford 1320 Shamrock Dr. Sebring, FL 33875 A ttorney for Personal Representative: / s/ Robert E. Livingston Florida Bar No. 0031259 445 S. Commerce Avenue Sebring, FL 33870 Telephone: (863)385-5156 April 29; May 6, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-163 Division ________ IN RE: ESTATE OF DORIS GREY BENSON a.k.a. DORIS G. BENSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS A GAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of DORIS GREY BENSON a.k.a. DORIS G. BENSON, deceased, File Number PC 11-163, by the Circuit Court for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce A venue, Sebring, Florida 33870; that the decedent's date of death was February 19, 2011; that the total value of the estate is $30,669.14 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address W.R. Benson 2921 Wynstone Drive, Sebring, FL 33875 Terri Stone 228 Coventry Court Ormond Beach, FL 32174 A LL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is A pril 22, 2011. Persons Giving Notice: /s/ W.R. Benson 2921 Wynstone Drive Sebring, Florida 33875 /s/ Terri Stone 228 Coventry Court Ormond Beach, Florida 32174 A ttorney for Persons Giving Notice: / s/ David F. Lanier E-Mail Address: lanier30@embarqmail.com Florida Bar No. 045399 DAVID F. LANIER P.O. Box 400 A von Park, Florida 33826-0400 Telephone: (863)453-4457 April 22, 29, 2011 1050Legals Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or le ss. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads p laced under the Bargain BuysŽ discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom se t ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad st ating Each,Ž the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open RateŽ pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain BuysŽ specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home,Ž are allowed to be pla ced under the Bargain BuyŽ category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com 863-314-9876 DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS € Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 314-9876. € The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 SEBRING COLLATERAL: Real Property tax identification number is C-13-34-28-020-2790-120. Lot 12, Block 279, of LAKE SEBRING SHEET 2, according to the Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 13, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. which currently has the address of 221 West Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33870 (``Property Address''): Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. BOB GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk April 29; May 6, 2011 1055County Legals Classified ads get fast results Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155

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Page 10ANews-Sun Friday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.co m SEBRING -Lake Home 1809 Arbuckle Creek Rd. 1 acre on Dinner Lake. 3BR, 2BA, fireplace, "fixer upper". $150 K. For an appointment Call 863-385-3162 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial SEEKING WELLEXPERIENCED MEDICAL OFFICE HELP P/T. Excellent billing/collection, communication, typing, computer skills & medical terminology are A MUST Fax resume to: 863-471-3206 or email to: medicalofficebilling@yahoo.com OPHTHALMIC ASSISTANT Experienced Ophthalmic Assistant Positions available, COA preferred but not required. Please send resume to: Eye Specialists of Mid-Florida Attn: Human Resources 5032 US 27 N Sebring, Fl 33870 or Fax to 863-385-7442 or Email to cgrice@EyesFl.Com HAIR STYLISTHave your own business without investing. Work in a private room if desired. One week free! Please Call 863-382-2264(days) or 863-655-4040 (evenings) ELIGIBILITY SPECIALIST.15 hrs./wk. Min. High School Diploma. Background in Public Assistance application process preferred. Responsible for assisting clients w/food stamp applications. Fax resume to: 863-452-6882 or email to kelly.johnson@hrhn.org EOE/DRUG FREE. THE HIGHLANDSCOUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT has an opening for a "Tobacco Prevention Program Assistant". Annual Salary range: $29,463.72 ( not negotiable ) plus benefits. Please apply on line at https://jobs.myflorida.com. Refer to requisition number 64003316. Only Sate of Florida Applications will be accepted no resumes, please. Date closes 05/06/2011 EO/AA/VP EMPLOYER. DIRECT SUPPORTPROFESSIONALS wanted for Avon Park Intermediate Care Facility serving disabled adults. HS diploma or 1 year associated experience, valid FL Drivers License and clean criminal background req. Please complete application at 55 E. College Dr., Avon Park, FL 33825. CERTIFIED PATIENTCARE TECH Part Time / per Diem wanted for State of the Art Dialysis Facility. Call Peggy at (863) 382-9443 or fax resume to (863) 382-9242. 2100Help WantedBILINGUAL /SPANISH SPEAKING CASE MANAGER full time. Receive Referrals and completes annual client assessments; devise care plans; secure and target client support services; maintain case records. Position requires a bachelor's degree in social work or related field. Other directly related job education or experience may be substituted for some of these requirements. Apply in person at NU-HOPE Elder Care Services, Inc., 6414 US Hwy. 27 South, Sebring. EOE DFWP 2050Job Opportunities 2000 Employment 1100AnnouncementsCHECK YOUR ADPlease check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day y our ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:385-6155 News-Sun Classified Having something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what you're doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 314-9876

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, April 29, 2011Page 11 A 1998 NISSANMAXIMA, Burgundy, 4Dr, 6 cylinder, automatic, 62K, cold air, CLEAN, Very Good Condition. $5200 Sorry Sold! 1996 CHEVYS10 Super Cab, 4.3, 5 speed. $1500 o.b.o. Sorry This is Sold! 9450Automotive for Sale1973 NORTON850 COMMANDO One Owner* RareFind 10K miles New paint & chrome Will Accept reasonable offer. 863-382-8985 or 863-465-9100 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation 8000 RecreationLIFT RECLINERELEC. Blue in color. Call 863-655-9622 7560Medical Supplies& Equipment PUPS STANDARDPoodles. 3 Colors. 11 wks. We're cute, playful, Pedigree. Free Range, loving, Guarenteed. In training, learning fast. $900. Call 305-731-6242. We won't last. NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. HAND RAISEDIndian Ring Neck Parrots. Very sweet. Great gifts. $200. Call 863-697-3418 GOOD LOVINGDOG, needs good loving home. Call 863-386-4383. 7520Pets & Supplies SEBRING -Spring Lake Village I 6300 Oak Lane Fri & Sat, 4/29 & 30, 8am 5pm. Something For Everyone! SEBRING -3340 Lakeview Dr. Fri & Sat 4/29 & 30 7am ? White hutch, treadmill, very nice home interiors, S / M ladies clothing, household items. Much Much More! SEBRING -2120 Schlosser Rd. Sat & Sun 4/30 & 5/1, 8am 2pm. Tools, children's clothes & toys, some furmiture, household items. Much More! AVON PARKSat. 4/30 8am 1pm. Moving Sale! 632 S Riverdale Rd. Upright piano, love seat, chairs, tables, dresser, television cabinet, elec. bedding, housewares, generator, tools & much more! 7320Garage &Yard Sales STAINED GLASS,hobby suppl.. grinder, glass, chopper, foil, solderleadless, misc. $100 863-402-2285 SEWING MACHINESinger with cabinet, bench & attachments $100 o.b.o. 863-465-7738 or 863-441-3180 METAL DETECTORTechna model DX-1200, rarely used.Works excellent. $50 863-402-2285 EXERCISE BIKEPrime Fit, stationery w/ digital readings. $50. 863-655-0342 DISHWASHER GENautilos. Almond in color. Excel cond. $75. Call 863-655-9622 BEDRAILS -PUTCO pipe, 1 set for Ford F-150 short bed, very nice $60 863-453-7027 BED EXTENSIONfor Ford F-150 Pickup, aluminum pipe, never used, (New $200) Will sell $75 863-453-7027 AUTOMATIC BREADMACHINE needs a good home $25 863-465-7738 or 863-441-3180 AREA RUG95' X 63' and Runner. 92' x 24'. $40. Call 863-655-9622. AB LOUNGElike new $20 863-4414418 7310Bargain Buys WINDOWS -White, Tinted & Tempered Alum. (2) 4'X8' $350 / (1) 6'X3' $175 / Cabinets w/ Formica Top (3) $150. Call 863-385-3199 VACUUM CLEANERKirby with attachments, $200 o.b.o. & ROOMBA (vacuum) complete, used once $50. 863-465-7738 OR 863-441-3180 7300Miscellaneous TABLE, LEXINGTONwhite wicker 44" w/4 chairs on rollers, 8 cushions. $385 obo. Call 863-465-5694 or 863-243-9108 SOFA -Queen Size like new, Floral mauve shade. 863-453-2851 DINING ROOMSET Broyhil w/2 leafs, dark oak & formica top. 6 chairs, 1 captain. All good shape seats need recovered. $350. Call 863-465-4284 7180FurnitureREFRIGERATOR MAYTAG.Excel cond. 20.7 cu.ft. $150. Call 863-452-1904 7040Appliances 7000 MerchandiseAVON PARKLarge Retail/Office Building, 100 E. Main St. A MUST SEE! 863-295-9272 6750Commercial RentalSEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, W/D, Satellite, full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for Rent SPRING LAKE3BR, 2BA, 2CG, CHA, patio, ceramic tiled liv. room, din. room, kitchen, bath & halls, SS appliances, refrigerator has water on door, micro., W/D hook up. No pets. 863-655-0136 SEBRING 3BR (possible 4BR), 1BA LARGEfenced yard with Citrus trees. Nice area, Indian Streets off Lakeview Dr $600 mo., + 1st & Sec. 863-446-1861 SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 LAKE PLACED3/1. Close to Schools & Shopping. $600. mo. + utilities. $500 dep. For more info. Call 863-465-1354. 6300Unfurnished HousesSEBRING 2240Avalon Rd. 3/2 furn. Small animals ok. Near Shopping Center & Senior Club References $700. first/last. Call 305-387-6863 after 4pm. or 863-237-3129. 6250Furnished Houses AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; Washer/Dryer, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook ups. Students/Seniors Discount Call 863-452-0469. AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL : $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartmentsSEBRING -Downtown on the Circle. Monthy rates starting at $400. payable wkly. Includes elec. & water. No Pets. 306 circle. 863-386-9100 or 954-295-7194. Or go to Bldg. and ask for John. 863-414-7535 6150FurnishedApartmentsSEBRING 3024Spinks Rd. 2/1 Completely refurnished. New Wood Floors. Patio. Washer & Dryer. $600. mo. Call 561-967-7161 6100Villas & CondosFor Rent PLACID LAKEDUPLEX 2/2. Nicely furn./unfurnished. C/H/A. Immaculate. Short term/mo. 863-699-0045 LAKE PLACIDPlacid Lakes, Unfurnished 2BR, 2BA. $400/mo. + 1st. mo. & security. 863-699-0897 or 863-840-2013 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 RentalsFURNISHED -55 plus Francis II Park. 2BR, 1BA, carport, air. $500 deposit, $475 monthly plus utilities. 1 year contract. Call 419-408-8821 5150Mobile HomesFor Rent PALM HARBORHOMES Has closed 2 Model Centers Save up to 60K on select models Call Today! 800-622-2832 LAKE PLACIDWell insulated home on Paradise corner lot. Five furn. rooms, two baths, plus lg. utility room, tolls incl. Call for info. 863-202-6325 DOUBLE WIDEin 55+ park, fully furn. All you need are clothes & groceries. Ref./ ice maker, CHA, dishwasher, lg. utility rm., W & D, screened porch, includes golf cart. $12,500 obo. 863-465-7738 or 863-441-3180 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesCEMETARY LOTSPinecrest. 4 Joining. Old Section. $1,500. obo. Call 904-287-7110 or 615-653-1118 4280Cemetery LotsLAKE PLACID Tropical Harbor 55+ Lakeside Park, w/all ammenities. 2/2 DW. Tile Sunroom, Laundry & Utility. Lg. Carport. Scenic open location. Moving. Open to offers. Call 863-465-5129. 4100Homes for SaleLake Placid WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 314-9876 Then shop till you drop! DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 314-9876 LOOKING FOR THAT SPECIAL HOME?Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 314-9876 CASTLE HILL Apartments of Avon ParkAccepting Applications for 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts. Available to individuals 62 years or older, handicap/disabled, regardless of age. For rental information & applications please call: 863-452-6565 TDD: 711 THIS INSTITUTION IS AN Equal Opportunity Provider and EmployerLos Apt. de Castle Hill de Avon ParkEstan aceptando aplicaciones para Apts. de 1 y 2 recamaras. Disponible a personas de 62 ancs o mas, incapacidad fisica/mental, no importa la edad. Para mas informacion favor de llamar 863-452-6565. TDD: 711 Esta Institucion Es De Igualdad De Oportunidad Al Proveedor, Y Empleador

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Page 12ANews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.com

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Special to the News-SunSEBRING Sebring Youth Football had another great week. Our guest speakers on Monday were Coaches Chris Cook and Mark Bryan; they both have coached with SYF and now coach for Sebring High School. Thanks to them both for taking the time to come and talk to the players. They explained what it takes to succeed and be great players, which they believe is faith, family and friends. They inspired the kids to do their best. The camp is a huge success and the football players are having fun while learning the fundamentals of football. SYF is proud of our great coaching staff that is working hard with the players. Coach Luke Ancrum is one of our head coaches and has been with SYF for four years. He was an assistant coach for three years and has now stepped up to be a head coach this year, he feels strongly about giving back to his community. He believes that football is a positive activity and a healthy environment for the kids. He also wants to be a positive role model for those players who may not have role models in their lives. It's important to him to make a difference with each and every child he works with, to let them know they can be great at whatever they do as long as they work hard. He instills in them that part of workin g hard includes sportsmanship, integrity an d to never quit. Ancrum says all of the players he wor ks with are very talented. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING Wednesday's e vening rains washed away t he anticipated District 5-5A s emifinal match-up between t he Blue Streaks and Lake W ales, but perhaps it was g ood for Sebring to have a nother day to recover from t heir harrowing, 2-0 win over H aines City in Tuesday's f irst-round contest. The victory over the H ornets was a testament to perception and defense. From the Streaks perspective, it seemed they kept missing out on scoring o pportunities and yet kept d odging bullets by keeping H aines City off the board in n umerous situations. The perception from H aines City's side was likely q uite the same. For while the final score m ight indicate a lackingd rama pitcher's duel, it was a nything but, if only for the s takes of the game. Both Robert Whalen, for t he Hornets, and Sebring's A aron Hart did work through o ne, two, three firsts, Haines C ity mounted a quick threat i n the second as Taylor I ngram reached on an error, going to second when the throw on his hard-hit grounder into the hole at short, sailed to the backstop along the first-base line. Dalton Scarborough then walked and a frozen-rope line drive off Jason SantiagoColon's bat looked like it could be trouble. But Evan Lewis was in just the right spot in center to snare it for the first out of the inning. Another liner came off Carlos Rodriguez'bat, but second baseman Alex Griffin took a quick step to his left to make the catch and he made the throw to first to double Scarborough off and end the inning. Sebring then mounted it's own early threat in the bottom of the frame with Corbin Hoffner drawing a one-out walk and Johnny Knight singling to center with two down. But Whalen worked out of it to keep the scoreless deadSPORTS B SECTION News-Sun Friday, April 29, 2011 Page 3B News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE After snaring a line-drive, Alex Griffin throws to first to double off this Haines City baserunner in Tuesday's 2-0 win for the Blue Streaks. Streaks washed out, await Lake Wales Sebring2Haines City0 See SEBRING, page 4B Photo Courtesy of www.sunbeltsports.o rg Avon Park native Heather Barnes had a big week for Florida Atlantic and was name Sunbelt Conference Player of the Week. By Sun Belt Conference Special to the News-SunNEWORLEANS After leading the Owls to their first series sweep over Louisiana-Lafayette in program history, Florida Atlantic's Heather Barnes was named the Sun Belt Conference Player of the week, as announced by the conference office on Monday, April 25. The accolade is the first of the season for Florida Atlantic. Barnes led the Owls to one of the best weeks in recent history. The junior began the week by hitting a three run walkoff home run against FIU when the Owls were just one strike away fro m losing the game. She si ngled and walked in FAU 's 1-0 win over Louisian aLafayette. In the second game of the series, Barnes went 2for-4 at the plate and h ad an RBI in FAU's seri es clinching, 4-2 win o n Saturday night. Sunda y, Barnes singled, double d, drew a walk and scored a run in the Owls'6-2 w in that finished the sweep. For the week, the Avo n Park native hit .500 (7-o f14) with a home run, had 4 RBI, scored twice, walk ed twice and had a .786 slu gging percentage. She also extended h er hitting streak to 15 game s. Barnes named Sunbelt Player of the Week Courtesy photo On Saturday and Sunday, April 2 and 3, Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 co-hosted with Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 the 31st Annual Florida State Elks Golf Tournament at Spring Lake Golf Club. More than 235 Florida Elks came together here in Highlands County to raise over $13,500 for the Harry-Anna Trust Fund, which is for The Florida Elks Children's Therapy Services and the Florida Elks Youth Camp. Pictured, left to right, Past Florida State Elk President Merl Sebald, David Sebald, Past State Florida Elk President Don Sansoussi and Jeff Sansoussi. Florida Elks gather, raise big money for Children's Therapy Photo courtesy of cfl-sports.com A nthony Carruthers dives to snag this throw home in T uesday's 7-5 win over Tenoroc. Carruthers had three hits and three RBI to help the Devils reach the District 9-3A tournament semifinals. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comIt wasn't quite as threatening as the final score indicated, even if Avon Park had to hang on for a 7-5 win after taking a 5-0 lead against Tenoroc Tuesday night in their District 9-3Atournament opener at Charles R. Head Field. "They threatened to tie it but never really to take the lead," Red Devil head coach Whit Cornell said. "But they scrapped and didn't lay down after we got up on them. "We had one bad inning that allowed them to get close," he continued. "But it was a well-played game by both teams." Ahard-hitting game as well, as Cornell pointed out that four of the Titans eight hits were for extra bases. But Avon Park did some heavy hitting of its'own as Anthony Carruthers had a big night, going 3-for-3 with three RBI and a run scored. Lane Crossen and Al Brown chipped in as well, Devils hang on, to face Green Dragons Avon Park7Tenoroc5 See AP, page 4B SYF springing forward Courtesy pho to Sebring assistant football coach Chris Cook speaks Monday to the children of Sebring Youth Football during their spring camp. See SYF, page 3B By TIM REYNOLDS Associated PressMIAMI The day began with LeBron James making a playoff analogy out of breakfast, his way of saying the Miami Heat were focused on the first postseason challenge presented by the Philadelphia 76ers and nothing else. Clear the table. "Now," James said about 12 hours later, "we're preparing for lunch." So this much is obvious: There will be som e hunger Sunday afternoo n when Boston visits to open a series both team s wanted. Dwyane Wade scor ed 26 points, Chris Bo sh added 22 points and 11 rebounds, and the He at advanced to the Easte rn Conference semifinals b y topping Philadelphia 9 791 on Wednesday nig ht and ousting the 76ers in five games, four of the m of the grueling variet y, Heat advance past Philly See MIAMI, page 4B

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SYFS BBQ and registrationSEBRING Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is hosting our 2nd Annual BBQ Fundraiser and Tournament on Saturday, April 30 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The BBQ Lunch is $7 and will include a Pulled Pork Sandwich, Baked Beans, Coleslaw, Cookies and a glass of tea. Pick up your meal to go or stay and watch our girls play while you eat. For further information, please email dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201. Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is also conducting registrations for girls ages 10 to 15 now through April 1. Registration is $65 for the first child / $45 for any siblings. For further information, please visit us on Facebook, check out our website at www.eteamz.com/sebringyouthfastpitchsoftball email us at dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201.Golf for God TournamentSEBRING The Golf for God Tournament will kick off with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start on Saturday, May 7 at Golf Hammock Golf and Country Club. It will be a 2-Person scramble at $65 a person, which includes golf, cart, a $25 dry cleaning certificate, a golf certificate for two rounds of golf and a ball for the ball-drop. You can purchase additional balls for the ball-drop which will take place by helicopter at 1 p.m. over the driving range. It will be a 50/50 cash prize, up to $500. Mulligan's will also be available. First, second and third-place winners will receive additional balls for the balldrop. This is a fundraiser for Kayla Griffin who will be on a missionary journey to 11 countries over an 11 month period, spreading the Word of God to the people of these lands. Call the course at 382-2151 to have a registration form faxed to you or pick one up at a near-by course. YMCA Sign-UpsSEBRING The Highlands County YMCAand Eagles Football is doing sign-ups for Youth Flag Football ages 514. Lifeguard Certification Class sign-ups are taking place now for an April 25-30 class.APProject GraduationAVONPARK The APHSProject Graduation 2011 Benefit Golf Tournament will be held Saturday, May 21 at 8:30 a.m. at River Greens Golf Course. The flighted, four-person scramble costs $60 per person and includes greens fee, cart, lunch and prizes. In addition to the action, there will be mulligans, a 50/50 and raffles for purchase the day of the tournament. The grand prize raffle is for a round of golf for two at Doral Golf Resort and Spa. Tee sign sponsorships are going for $50, for a sign and player, it is $100. For more information, contact Suzie Gentry at 446-7368.SFCC Summer Youth CampsAVONPARK South Florida Panther Baseball will be holding Summer Youth Camps from June 13-16 and June 20-23 for children aged 6-13. Each camp runs from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and costs $80 per camp or $150 for both. Registration and sign-in begin at 8 a.m. with the camp to follow, including baseball fundamentals, position instruction, station rotation, games, swimming pool time and a camp T-shirt. SFCC head coach Rick Hitt will serv e as camp director with Panther assistant coach Andy Polk and members of the Panther baseball team will be on hand a s instructors. Campers should bring their individua l baseball attire as well as a bathing suit and towel. The camps will be held at the SFCC Panther field at the Highlands County campus in Avon Park. For more information, call Coach Hit t at the following campus phone numbers at extension 7036: Avon Park/Sebring, 453-6661; Lake Placid, 465-5300; Arcadia, 494-7500; Wauchula, 773-2252.SFCC Fun CampsAVON PARK SFCC Athleticsw ill host a Two Day Fun Sport Selection cam p on Thursday and Friday, June 9 and 10 f or girls and boys aged 6-16. Each day the camp runs from 9 a.m. -3 p.m., with campers choosing their ow n sport, whether Beach Volleyba ll, Basketball, Baseball, Softball or Soccer During the morning portion each da y, campers will stretch, do plyometric s, agility drills, work on strength and flex ibility, learn arm and body care and g et introduced to the Fitness Center. Lunch is then provided with t he campers then delving into the sport th ey chose and wrapping it up with activities in the SFCC pool. Registration and check-in from 8:1 58:55 a.m., and pre-registration is not ne cessary as walk-ups are accepted. The rate for one day is $50 and $95 f or both days. The camp will be aministered by SFC C head and assistant coaches, with he lp from SFCC student-athletes. For questions or more information, co ntact Camp Director and SFCC Athlet ic Director Rick Hitt at 7847036.Sebring Summer SwimSEBRING The summer season f or public swimming is just about upon us as the Sebring High School pool opens to t he public Sunday, May 1. Pool hours for open swim will be 67:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 -3 p.m. Saturday's and Sunday's additio nal hours will be added once school is ou t. Cost is $2 per swimmer with big sa vings for frequent swimmers. Afamily pass can be bought for $50 f or the first swimmer and $15 for each add itional family member. Swimming lessons will also be availab le with four separate sessions throughout t he summer for eight differents levels of instruction, ranging from Adult Beginne r, Parent and Tot, Fundamenta ls, Introduction to Water Skills, Pre-Scho ol Aquatics, Fundamental Aquatic Skil ls, Stroke Development, Improvment an d Refinement, Personal Water Safety an d Diving Fundamentals and Fitness. Session I runs from June 13-24, sessio n II from June 27-July 8, session III fro m July 11-22 and session IVfrom July 2 5August 5. Registrations will be Wednesday, M ay 17 from 5-6:30 p.m., Saturday, May 2 8 from 9-10:30 a.m. and Monday May 2 3 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. in the front office at Sebring High School. Water aerobics return as well, with ce rtified instructor Ricki Albritto n, Tuesday's and Thursday's from 6:30-7:3 0 p.m. Cost is just $2 per workout, or just $1 if you have the Summer Swim Pass the fir st class is Thursday, May 5. For more information, please call 47 15500, ext. 229, and leave a message f or Ms. Pat. FIRST ROUND (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEChicago 4, Indiana 1 Chicago 104, Indiana 99 Chicago 96, Indiana 90 Chicago 88, Indiana 84 Indiana 89, Chicago 84 Tuesday: Chicago 116, Indiana 89 Miami 4, Philadelphia 1 Miami 97, Philadelphia 89 Miami 94, Philadelphia 73 Miami 100, Philadelphia 94 Sunday: Philadelphia 86, Miami 82 Wednesday: Miami 97, Philadelphia 91 Boston 4, New York 0 Boston 87, New York 85 Boston 96, New York 93 Friday: Boston 113, New York 96 Sunday: Boston 101, New York 89 Atlanta 3, Orlando 1 Atlanta 103, Orlando 93 Orlando 88, Atlanta 82 Atlanta 88, Orlando 84 Atlanta 88, Orlando 85 Tuesday: Orlando 101, Atlanta 76 Thursday: Orlando at Atlanta, late x-Saturday, April 30: Atlanta at Orlando, TBDWESTERN CONFERENCEMemphis 3, San Antonio 2 Memphis 101, San Antonio 98 San Antonio 93, Memphis 87 Memphis 91, San Antonio 88 Monday: Memphis 104, San Antonio 86 Wednesday: San Antonio 110, Memphis 103, OT Friday, April 29: San Antonio at Memphis, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Memphis at San Antonio, TBD L.A. Lakers 3, New Orleans 2 New Orleans 109, L.A. Lakers 100 L.A. Lakers 87, New Orleans 78 L.A. Lakers 100, New Orleans 86 New Orleans 93, L.A. Lakers 88 Tuesday: L.A. Lakers 106, New Orleans 90 Thursday: L.A. at New Orleans, late x-Saturday, April 30: New Orleans at L.A., TBD Dallas 3, Portland 2 Dallas 89, Portland 81 Dallas 101, Portland 89 Portland 97, Dallas 92 Portland 84, Dallas 82 Monday: Dallas 93, Portland 82 Thursday: Dallas at Portland, late x-Saturday, April 30: Portland at Dallas, TBD Oklahoma City 4, Denver 1 Oklahoma City 107, Denver 103 Oklahoma City 106, Denver 89 Oklahoma City 97, Denver 94 Monday: Denver 104, Oklahoma City 101 Wednesday: Oklahoma City 100, Denver 97 FIRST ROUND (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEWashington 4, New York Rangers 1 Washington 2, Rangers 1, OT Washington 2, Rangers 0 N.Y. Rangers 3, Washington 2 Washington 4, N.Y. Rangers 3, 2OT Saturday: Washington 3, N.Y. Rangers 1 Philadelphia 4, Buffalo 3 Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0 Philadelphia 5, Buffalo 4 Philadelphia 4, Buffalo 2. Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0 Buffalo 4, Philadelphia 3, OT Philadelphia 5, Buffalo 4, OT Tuesday: Philadelphia 5, Buffalo 2 Boston 4, Montreal 2 Montreal 2, Boston 0 Montreal 3, Boston 1 Boston 4, Montreal 2 Boston 5, Montreal 4, OT Saturday: Boston 2, Montreal 1, 2OT Tuesday: Montreal 2, Boston 1 Wednesday: Boston 4, Montreal 3, OT Tampa Bay 4, Pittsburgh 3 Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 0 Tampa Bay 5, Pittsburgh 1 Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 2 Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 2, 2OT Tampa Bay 8, Pittsburgh 2 Monday: Tampa Bay 4, Pittsburgh 2 Wednesday: Tampa Bay 1, Pittsburgh 0WESTERN CONFERENCEVancouver 4, Chicago 3 Vancouver 2, Chicago 0 Vancouver 4, Chicago 3 Vancouver 3, Chicago 2 Chicago 7, Vancouver 2 Chicago 5, Vancouver 0 Chicago 4, Vancouver 3, OT Tuesday: Vancouver 2, Chicago 1, OT San Jose 4, Los Angeles 2 San Jose 3, L.A. 2, OT Los Angeles 4, San Jose 0 San Jose 6, Los Angeles 5, OT San Jose 6, Los Angeles 3 Saturday: Los Angeles 3, San Jose 1 Monday: San Jose 4, Los Angeles 3, OT Detroit 4, Phoenix 0 Detroit 4, Phoenix 2 Detroit 4, Phoenix 3 Detroit 4, Phoenix 2 Detroit 6, Phoenix 3 Nashville 4, Anaheim 2 Nashville 4, Anaheim 1 Anaheim 5, Nashville 3 Nashville 4, Anaheim 3 Anaheim 6, Nashville 3 Nashville 4, Anaheim 3, OT Nashville 4, Anaheim 2AMERICANLEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB New York138.619 Tampa Bay1211.5222 Toronto1113.458312Baltimore1012.455312Boston1013.4354 Central Division WLPctGB Cleveland158.652 Detroit1212.500312Kansas City1212.500312Minnesota913.409512Chicago1015.4006 West Division WLPctGB Texas159.625 Los Angeles1411.560112Oakland1213.480312Seattle1015.400512___ Tuesday's Games Baltimore 4, Boston 1 Chicago White Sox 3, N.Y. Yankees 2 Cleveland 9, Kansas City 4 Seattle 7, Detroit 3 Toronto 10, Texas 3 Tampa Bay at Minnesota, ppd., rain L.A. Angels 8, Oakland 3 Wednesday's Games Baltimore 5, Boston 4 N.Y. Yankees 3, Chicago White Sox 1 Cleveland 7, Kansas City 2 Oakland 2, L.A. Angels 1, 10 innings Seattle 10, Detroit 1 Texas 7, Toronto 6 Tampa Bay 8, Minnesota 2 Thursday's Games Seattle at Detroit, late Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 1st game, late Toronto at Texas, late Boston at Baltimore, late Chicago White Sox at N.Y. Yankees, late Kansas City at Cleveland, late Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 2nd game, late Friday's Games Detroit (Scherzer 4-0) at Cleveland (J.Gomez 0-1), 7:05 p.m. Toronto (R.Romero 1-3) at N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcia 1-0), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (E.Santana 0-3) at Tampa Bay (Price 3-2), 7:10 p.m. Seattle (Vargas 0-2) at Boston (Matsuzaka 2-2), 7:10 p.m. Baltimore (Arrieta 2-1) at Chicago White Sox (Danks 0-3), 8:10 p.m. Minnesota (S.Baker 1-2) at Kansas City (Chen 3-1), 8:10 p.m. Texas (C.Wilson 3-0) at Oakland (Cahill 3-0), 10:05 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB Philadelphia168.667 Florida158.65212Atlanta1313.5004 New York1113.4585 Washington1013.435512Central Division WLPctGB St. Louis1311.542 Cincinnati1312.52012Milwaukee1212.5001 Pittsburgh1113.4582 Chicago1013.435212Houston915.3754 West Division WLPctGB Colorado167.696 Los Angeles1313.500412San Francisco1112.4785 Arizona1013.4356 San Diego916.3608 ___ Tuesday's Games N.Y. Mets 6, Washington 4 San Francisco 3, Pittsburgh 2, 10 innings Florida 4, L.A. Dodgers 2 Colorado 4, Chicago Cubs 3 Houston 6, St. Louis 5 Milwaukee 3, Cincinnati 2 Arizona 7, Philadelphia 5 Atlanta 8, San Diego 2 Wednesday's Games L.A. Dodgers 5, Florida 4, 10 innings Cincinnati 7, Milwaukee 6, 10 innings Colorado at Chicago, ppd., rain Atlanta 7, San Diego 0 Philadelphia 8, Arizona 4 N.Y. Mets 6, Washington 3 Pittsburgh 2, San Francisco 0 St. Louis 6, Houston 5 Thursday's Games San Francisco at Pittsburgh, late N.Y. Mets at Washington, late St. Louis at Houston, late Chicago Cubs at Arizona, late Friday's Games N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 1-2) at Philadelphia (Blanton 0-1), 7:05 p.m. San Francisco (Lincecum 2-2) at Washington (Marquis 2-0), 7:05 p.m. Florida (Vazquez 1-2) at Cincinnati (T.Wood 1-2), 7:10 p.m. St. Louis (Carpenter 0-2) at Atlanta (T.Hudson 3-2), 7:35 p.m. Milwaukee (Marcum 2-1) at Houston (Myers 1-0), 8:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Correia 3-2) at Colorado (Hammel 2-1), 8:40 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 2-1) at Arizona (Galarraga 3-1), 9:40 p.m. San Diego (Richard 1-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Lilly 1-2), 10:10 p.m.BASEBALLAmerican League CLEVELAND INDIANSPlaced RHP Carlos Carrasco on the 15-day DL. LOS ANGELES ANGELSOptioned RHP Matt Palmer to Salt Lake (PCL). MINNESOTA TWINSPlaced OF Delmon Young on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 19. Recalled OF Rene Tosoni and RHP Anthony Swarzak from Rochester (IL). Optioned RHP Eric Hacker to Rochester. OAKLAND ATHLETICSPlaced C Kurt Suzuki on the paternity leave list. Recalled C Josh Donaldson from Sacramento (PCL). TEXAS RANGERSPlaced RHP Darren O'Day on the 60-day DL. Purchased the contract of RHP Ryan Tucker from Round Rock (PCL). National League WASHINGTON NATIONALSPlaced RHP Chad Gaudin on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 26. Activated RHP Henry Rodriguez from the 15-day DL. Optioned LHP Lee Hyde outright to Syracuse (IL).BASKETBALLNational Basketball Association GOLDEN STATE WARRIORSAnnounced coach Keith Smart will not be retained for the 201112 season.HOCKEYNational Hockey League FLORIDA PANTHERSSigned D Keaton Ellerby to one-year contract. NASHVILLE PREDATORSRecalled D Teemu Laakso and D Chet Pickard from Milwaukee (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALSRecalled F Mathieu Perreault, F Steve Pinizzotto and D Patrick McNeill from Hershey (AHL).COLLEGEAPPALACHIAN STATENamed Kolby O'Donnell associate head volleyball coach. LEWIS-CLARK STATENamed Brandon Rinta men's basketball coach. NORTHERN ARIZONANamed Travis Baker defensive line coach. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid TODAY: Baseball at District Tournament,Avon Park,Championship Game,7 p.m.,if necessary Sebring TODAY: Baseball hosts District Tournament,Championship Game,7 p.m.,if necessary Avon Park TODAY: Baseball hosts District Tournament,Championship Game,7 p.m.,if necessary P P R R E E M M I I E E R R L L E E A A G G U U E E S S O O C C C C E E R R S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 9 9 : : 5 5 5 5 a a . m m . Sunderland vs. Fulham . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NASCAR Hansen 400. . . . . . . F F O O X XM M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . L.A. Angels at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Regional N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, St. Louis at Atlanta or L.A. Angels at Tampa Bay . . F F O O X X 7 7 p p . m m . Baltimore at Chicago White Sox . . . . . . . W W G G N NT T R R A A C C K K A A N N D D F F I I E E L L D D S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . U.S.A. vs. The World at Penn Relays . . E E S S P P N N 2 2Times, games, channels all subject to change C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Arkansas at Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 3 3 p p . m m . Alabama at Mississippi State . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 7 7 p p . m m . Auburn at South Carolina . . . . .. . . . . . . . S S U U N NC C O O L L L L E E G G E E S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . Oklahoma at Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NG G O O L L F F F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Ballantine's Championship . G G O O L L F F 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . LPGA Avnet LPGA Classic . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA Zurich Classic of New Orleans . . . G G O O L L F FS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Ballantine's Championship . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA Zurich Classic of New Orleans . . . . C C B B S S 4 4 p p . m m . LPGA Avnet LPGA Classic . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F FN N B B A A P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . San Antonio at Memphis, if necessary . . E E S S P P N N 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Oklahoma City at Denver, if necessary . . E E S S P P N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . Atlanta at Orlando, if necessary . . . . . . . . T T N N T T LIVESPORTSONTV NBA Playoffs WNBA Major League Baseball Transactions Page 2BNews-Sun Friday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.co m

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Golf HammockLast Monday, April 25, the Mezza group played individual Pro-Am golf at the Golf Hammiock Country Club. Denis Shank shot a 71 and made plus 10 to take first place inA group and Joe Martini, with a plus 2, took second place and Chuck Ford had a minus 1, good for third place. Pat Dell had a plus 7 and tied with Billy Parr for first place in B group. Larry Lamparski had a plus 3 good for first place in Cgroup and Janet Regan in second place with a plus 2. Paul Brown had a spectacular day with a plus 10 for first place in D group while Bob Hugheshad a plus 2 for second place. Lee Stark made plus 5 for first place in E group and Larry Holzworth made plus 3 for second place. Frank Branca came alive with a plus 4 to take first place in F group and John Tyner made plus 2 for second place. Next week there will be a shotgun start beginning at 8 a.m. at Golf Hammock. For more information, call Pete Mezza at 382-1280.Harder HallThe ladies league played a Blind Partners game on Thursday, April 21. Tying for first/second places were Pat Rice and Helen Sayre; Patty Maxcy and Jackie Christopher with 147 each. Lake June West Golf Club A scramble was played on Thursday, April 21. Winning first place was the team of Orville and Eva Huffman, Helen Mellon, Rex Simmons and Ken Rowen with 48; second place, John and Virginia Simmons, Margaret Schultz, Charlotte Mathew and John Howarth with 49; and third place, John and Shelly Byron, Cal Billingsley, Jan Westerfield and Gloria Huggett with 53. Closest to the pin: (Ladies), No. 2, Betty Billau, 2-feet; and No. 8, Margaret Shultz, 13-feet. (Men), No. 4, Orville Huffman, 3-feet-1-inch. The men's association played a Best Ball event on Wednesday, April 20. Winning first place was the team of Rich Loomis, John Simmons, Rex Simmons, Dave Colvin and Ernie Hall with 34; and second place, John Byron, Doyan Eades, Ken Strong, Roger Childers and John Ruffo with 41. Closest to the pin: No. 2, Rex Simmons, 6-feet-8-inches; No. 4, Rich Loomis, 14-feet5-inches; and No. 8, Dave Colvin, 6-feet. The ladies association played a league event on Monday, April 18. Winning first place was the team of Virginia Simmons, Sylvia West, Janice Barringer and Gloria Huggett with 36; and second place, Helen Mellon, Betty Billau and Pat Asmus with 39. Closest to the pin: No. 2, Helen Mellon, 13-feet-6-inches; and No. 8, Sylvia West, 3-feet-1-inch.Placid LakesThe Men's Association played a Two Best Ball Plus all Net Birdies tournament Wednesday, April 27. Frank Fisher, Bob McMillian, Gene Ransom and AlVerhage teamed up to card a -31 to take the win by just one stroke over the -30 brought in by John Goble, Ed Bartusch and Cody Coates. Bruce Miseno, Chuck Fortunato and David Moiles finished in third with a 28 while Fisher had closest to the pin, getting to 3-feet, 5-inches on No. 2.River GreensAn evening scramble was played on Friday, April 22. Winning first place was the team of Jerry Lewis, Linda Therrien, Jiim Sisemore and Tom Stewart with 59. Tying for second/third places were the teams of Clay Davis, Len and Rhonda Westdale, Jo Sherman and Pat Graf; Charlie Seralde, Tim Thomas, Chuck Berryman and Jack Sayre with 60 each. The Morrison Group played a game on Thursday, April 21. The winners were: Tying for first/second places were Romy Febre and Jim Cercy; John Smutnick and Paul Johnson with 57 each. Tying for third/fourth places were Bill Mountford and Harold Kline; Bob Stevens and Lefty St. Pierre with 58 each. The ladies association played a pro am tournament on Thursday, April 21. Winning first place was the team of Nancy Long, Bob Stevens, Bev Rudd and Michele Koon with plus-9; second place, Laura Smutnick, Pauline Bridge and Pat Kincer with plus-5.5; and third place, Elaine Keppler, Donna Johnson and Linda Therrien with plus-3.5. Individual winners were: First place, Michele Koon with plus-5. Tying for second/third places were Pat Gower and Laura Smutnick with plus-4.5 each. The men's association played a pro am tournament on Wednesday, April 20. Winning first place was the team of Peter March, Bob Stevens, Paul Johnson and Jim Anderson with plus-13; second place, Brian VanSlooten, Bill Mountford, Cliff Aubin and Cliff Steele with plus-11; and third place, Al Farrell, Ken Koon, Gil Heier and Romy Febre with plus10. Individual winners were: Flight A Jim Anderson with plus-11. Flight B Ken Koon with plus-6.5. Flight C Brian VanSlooten with plus-8.5. The Morrison Group played a game on Tuesday, April 19. Winning first place was the team of Jim Anderson, Joe Graf, Gil Heier and Paul Johnson with minus-31; second place, Butch Smith, John Smutnick, Cliff Steele and Cliff Aubin with minus-30; and third place, Jim Cercy, Cliff Aubin, Lefty St. Pierre and Ken Brunswick with minus-28. The Golfettes played a game on Tuesday, April 19. Winning first place was the team of Michele Koon, Carol Roy, Bev Rudd and Pat Graf with minus-27; and second place, Linda Therrien, Penny Anderson, Mary Beth Carby and Helen Ochala with minus-22.SpringLakeThe SpringLake Women's Golf Association played an Individual Low Gross/Low Net Flighted Tournament on Wednesday, April 27, on the Panther Creek Course. The Low Gross winners were: Flight A Marsi Benson with a 79, Flight B Pam Ferguson with an 84 and Flight C Carolyn Irvine with an 85. Marilyn Redenbarger won Low Net Flight A with61.Mary Cebula was the Flight B winner with67 and Ann McWilliams won a Flight C tiebreaker at 67 over Sharon Hubbard, Carole Frederick & Julia Starr. SpringLak On Tuesday, April 26, the Spring Lake Men's Golf Association played a Four Man Team / 3 Club Monte event in which each player was limited to 3 golf clubs and every shot counted(less handicap, with a max of triple net bogey).It was held on the fearsome Panther Creek course. The winning team, with 287 (net) strokes, included Joe Austin, Bob Rogers, Ray McKenzie, and Leon Van. The team gross total of 352 averaged out to 88 strokes per man and a net average of 72 strokes. Second Place went to Bob Hinde, Charlie Keniston, Bob Berg, and Joe Smith with 305 net strokes.This group of "seasoned" golfers had gross scores of 92, 92, 93 and 94, totalling 371--very consistent. In Third Place, the team of Don Cunning, John Delaney, Pat Shatney, and Chips Ryan came in with 308 net strokes. On Tuesday, April 19 and Thursday, the 21, the club held a two day, pick your partner tournament in which Two Man Teams played both balls on the first day and 1 Best Ball on the second day. This tournament was flighted, with the first day played on Cougar and the second day played on Panther. Winners of the A Flight were Bo Bohanon and Bob Rogers with 127 (first day) and 62 (second), totalling 189 net strokes. Second place went to John Danko and Bill Lawens with 135/59 totalling 194 strokes. Third place A Flight went to Jan Hard and Jack Hoerner 138/58 totalling 196 strokes. In the B Flight, the team of Richie Eastep and George Thomas won First with 184 strokes (124/60). Second Place went to John Bozynski and John Delaney with 186 strokes and Third was won by Chips Ryan and Ray McKenzie with 190 strokes. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011Page 3B As a child, Ancrum played for Pop Warner then went on to play at Sebring Middle and Sebring High Schools. After he graduated he played college football at Bethune Cookman University for two years until he was injured. Ancrum loves the game of football, but knows what comes first in his life and that is his faith and family which he learned from his role model, his father Reverend Earl Ancrum, who taught him that Jesus Christ and his family are the most important. We at Sebring Youth Football feel blessed and lucky to have him be a part of our organization. As a reminder, Monday, May 2 at 5:30 p.m. the Cheer Camp will kick off. If you have not registered yet please come out on Monday. Cost is $10 and the camp is three weeks. For questions regarding the camp, please call Amy at 381-4801. We look forward to seeing you there. Continued from 1B SYF blessed to learn lessons from Ancrum SEBRING The 28th Annual Blue Streak Golf Classic is set to tee off Saturday, May 7, at Sun N Lake, with a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. The Sebring Firemen, Inc., are the major sponsor for the event which benefits Sebring High School Athletics. Entry fee is $60 per golfer for the Four-Person, Flighted Scramble and includes one mulligan, lunch, beverages, prizes, cart, greens fee, range balls and loads of fun. Among the plethora of prizes are a 50" widescreen plasma, HD television and IPads courtesy of ABC Appliences as well as a Hole-In-One prize of a 2011 Ford donated by Bill Jarrett For-Mercury. Blue Streak Scramble rules dictate that each team members tee shot must be used twice and professio nals are not eligible for hol ein-one prizes. Entry forms can be picked up at the Sebrin g High School front office or at Sun N Lakes. Checks to be ma de payable to Sebring Hig h School. For more informatio n, call Terry Quarles at 47 15500. 28th Blue Streak Golf Classic

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perhaps none more nailbiting than the finale. "We're going to be ready," Wade said. "Philly got us ready." Mario Chalmers scored 20 points off the bench and James finished with 16 points, 10 rebounds and eight assists for Miami. Joel Anthony who played 39 minutes without a single field-goal attempt made a pair of critical free throws with 16.8 seconds left for the Heat. Winners of a playoff series for the first time since the 2006 NBAfinals, the Heat have little time to savor the winning flavor. Boston took three of four in the regular season, plus ended both Miami's season and James'stint with the Cleveland Cavaliers in the 2010 playoffs. "We understand where we are in this league and where the Celtics are," Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. "They've proven themselves. They were the Eastern Conference champions last year. If we want to get to anywhere where we want to go, and the goals that we set for ourselves early in training camp, we have to go through them. And it wouldn't be right if we didn't play them." Boston punched its ticket to the second round on Sunday, and the Heat insisted they were not looking ahead to the Celtics. Good thing, because Philadelphia was far from a pushover. Andre Iguodala and Elton Brand each scored 22 points for Philadelphia, which got 13 from Thaddeus Young, 12 from Jodie Meeks and 10 from Jrue Holiday. "We were proud to have these guys on our team," said Brand, one of only two Philadelphia starters with postseason experience before this series. "They listen, they work hard and they're going to get better. Being vets ... it can be tough kind of playing with young guys. But not these guys." Wade made a 3-pointer with 8:34 left, pumped his fist on his way up the sideline, and Miami was up 8171. The celebration was way, way, too early. Philadelphia chipped away steadily, getting within two points on three occasions and after Steve Javie called a technical against Wade for arguing with 51 seconds left cut Miami's lead to one point twice, first on the technical free throw at 90-89 and again at 92-91 after Iguodala made a jumper with 36 ticks remaining. Those were the final points of Philadelphia's season. The Sixers started 3-13, then got into the playoffs and wound up pushing Miami to the edge. "We fought to the finish," Philadelphia coach Doug Collins said, "as we said we were going to do." James created a bit of a stir before the game by, of all things, quoting rapper Jay-Z. Asked after Miami's morning shootaround practice about the need to finish Philadelphia off on Wednesday to allow time to finally start preparing for Boston, James said the Heat were focusing on, "just finishing our breakfast," the lyric Jay-Z used. Collins shrugged it off as "an analogy." But some Sixers seemed to take offense at the comment Lou Williams was giving teammates various breakfast-item nicknames before the game, saying some were fruit salad, others flapjacks. Maybe it was no coincidence that James was nearly held to another breakfast food a bagel, otherwise known as 0 points in the first half. He had only three poin ts at intermission, matchin g his playoff career low, an d the stage was set for anot her down-to-the-wire night "That was a long buffet ," Brand said. "We kept com ing. We didn't give up." Wade capped it with a dunk with a half-secon d left, as white seat covers g ot tossed around the arena t riumphantly by the sello ut crowd. Collins and Spoelst ra shared a warm handsha ke moments later, most of t he two rosters exchang ed quick hugs, and then Miam i retreated back to its lock er room for a moment or tw o of celebration. "Four out of five game s, it came down to the la st minute, down to the wire ," Sixers center Spenc er Hawes said. "It soun ds cliche, but a couple bounc es here and there you don 't know which way it can go ." NOTES: Philadelphia 's combined scoring marg in over Miami's starters to open games grew to 92-5 0 for the series, after a 14 -4 start on Wednesday. l ock intact. Hart cruised through a p erfect third and the Streaks w ere able to cash in with t wo in the bottom half. With one out, Seth Abeln s ingled on a line-drive to c enter and soon stole seco nd. Matt Randall looped a s ingle to center, moving A beln to third, before L ewis drew a walk to load t he bases. Haines City then dodged o ne of those bullets as a J esse Baker shot to short w as thrown home to force A beln, but with the bases s till packed, Hoffner took o ne for the team, getting p lunked with a pitch to b ring Randall in for the first r un of the game. Then, in a seeming ploy, c ourtesy runner Kyle C unningham was caught s traying too far from second a nd a rundown soon started. But as soon as Whalen's t hrow commenced the p otential back-and-forth, L ewis broke for home and s lid in safely for a 2-0 lead. Haines City wasn't about t o go quietly, however, as t hey put two more on in the f ourth, with Griffin turning a double play to get out of i t. Sebring looked to add to i t when Knight walked and s tole second to start the bott om of the fourth, but W halen worked out of it u nscathed. Another threat came in t he fifth when two more H ornets reached with one o ut before Hart caught Jadia O rtega looking and got a pop out from Chris Rheaume. Again in the sixth, Haines City looked to get on the board when Whalen doubled with one out and looked to score on hard shot by Ingram to left. But Gunnar Westergom came charging in to snag it on the slide and threw behind Whalen to double him off and end the inning. "I thought it was going to drop," Westergom said. "But it just stayed up and I was able to get to it." In the bottom of the inning, Sebring put two runners on in hopes of breaking it open and adding a little cushion, but Whalen worked out of it and the Hornets mounted their final threat. Scarborough walked, which signaled the end of Hart's game effort on the night as he gave way to Nate Greene. Greene promptly got Santiago-Colo to fly out to center, but Rodriguez soon singled and the runners moved to second and third on a Kyle Moores ground out. But Greene finally ended the drama with a strike out to move Sebring to the semifinal against the Highlanders "That's what happens with good defense," Blue Streak head coach Hoppy Rewis said. "If a team is making mistakes, it will get away from them." Lake Wales had easily disposed of Ridge Tuesday, with a 10-0, mercy-rule win, and Winter Haven won Wednesday's earlier semifinal game with a 5-0 win over Liberty to secure the Blue Devils a berth in the title game. The Highlander, Blue Streak contest was moved to Thursday night and had Sebring waiting another day for revenge. Lake Wales won both regular season contests by one run, scoring early and then staving off Streak rallies. "We just need to get out of the first inning against them," Rewis said. Page 4BNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.com LAKE PLACID Green Dragon Basketball will be holding its'annual summer camp from June 13-17 at the Lake Placid High School Gymnasium for boys and girls in grades 2-8. Camp will run each day from 8 a.m.-4 p.m., with the final day ending at Noon. Cost of the camp is $65 and all campers will receive a Dragon Basketball camp Tshirt. Campers can bring lun ch or purchase lunch items at camp concessions each day Drinks and other snac ks will be available at a reaso nable cost. Half-day options are al so available. Call or text Linda Vel ey for details and other inform ation at 441-0299, or ema il veley131@comcast.net. Dragon Summer Hoops Camp This summer the South Florida Community College volle yball program has more camps to offer than ever before. Listed below you will see opportunities for sand and indo or camps. If there is a camp date that you could attend but the a ge group is different than yours please call and special arrang ements could be made. Individual private sessions for indoor and sand are ava ilable year-round. Call/Email to schedule today! June 2011 Sand: 13th-16th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:30-10:3 0 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor: 13th16th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 11:30-1:3 0 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps June 13-16th: $100 July 2011 Sand: 11th -14th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:30 -10:3 0 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor: 11th-14th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 11:30-1:3 0 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps July 11-14: $100 July 2011 Indoor: 25th-28th (4 days) Monday-Thursday Morning Session (Grades 5-8) 9:30-11:30 a.m. $60 Afternoon Session (Grades 9-12) 2-4:30 p.m. $75 Contact Coach Crawford with any questions at kim.craw ford@southflorida.edu cell: 863-835-2377, or Office: 86 3784-7037. Panther Volleyball Camps News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Wednesday evenings rain postponed the Sebring, Lake Wales semifinal contest to Thursday night at Firemen's Field. Continued from 1B Sebring looking to get past Highlanders w ith two hits each and C rossen scoring twice and B rown knocking in three. And so the win set up a d istrict semifinal game a gainst county rival Lake P lacid Thursday night., w hich ensures a Highlands C ounty representative in the d istrict championship schedu led for Friday. Amatch-up that has seen t he Dragons win twice during t he regular season, but with n ot too much of a difference t o be overcome. "We probably had our w orst two innings of the year i n the two games against t hem," Cornell said. "Afiver un inning in a game we lose 5 -4 and a four-run inning in a 4 -1 game." And at this time of year, w ith teams so closely m atched, and with the sort of familiarity these two squads have with one another, anything can happen. "We just haven't played well against them this year," Cornell said. "If we come out and play well, we could win convincingly. If we don't play well, we'll get beat. But if both teams come out and play well, this one will be a dog fight." In Tuesday's earlier action, Fort Meade got past Frostproof and was to face top-seeded McKeel in Thursday's early game. The front-running McKeel, with only two district losses on the season, saw both those losses come at the hands of the Miners. See Sunday's News-Sun for a recap of both Thursday's semifinal round and Friday's championship game. Continued from 1B AP facing LP in district semis Photo couresty of cfl-sports.com A lfred Brown rapped out two hits and drove in three in T uesday's win for Avon Park. Continued from 1B Miami sets to face Celtics in second round

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011Page 5B HEALTHYLIVING By MARK SHERMAN Associated PressWASHINGTON The Supreme C ourt cast doubt Tuesday on efforts b y states to limit drug manufacture rs'use of information about the p rescription drugs that doctors like t o prescribe. The court took up a dispute b etween the state of Vermont and c ompanies that sell doctors'pres cribing information to pharmaceut ical companies, though without p atient names. The drug makers use t he data to tailor their pitch to indiv idual doctors. The Vermont law had prevented t he sale of information about indiv idual doctors'prescribing records w ithout the doctors'permission. But several justices said the soc alled data mining law raised troub ling constitutional concerns b ecause it appeared to make it harde r for brand-name drug makers to s tate their case, while placing no s imilar restrictions on the state, i nsurance companies and others who favor the increased use of cheaper generic medicines. Chief Justice John Roberts said the Vermont law seemed to be "censoring" what doctors could hear. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said the court has ruled in the past that governments "can't lower the decibel level of one speaker so that another speaker, in this case the generics, can be heard better." Afederal appeals struck down the Vermont law as a restriction on commercial free speech that violates the First Amendment, but another appeals court rejected the constitutional challenge and upheld similar laws in Maine and New Hampshire. The case also is being closely watched by consumer groups that fear a broad ruling could call into question federal and state consumer privacy protections. The Obama administration and 35 states urged the court to uphold Vermont's statute. On the other side, The Associated Press joined other media companies and press freedom groups in urging the court to strike down the Vermont law and extend broad constitutional protection to the gathering and use of computerized data. Pharmacies are required by state and federal law to collect information about prescriptions. The pharmacies sell the information to companies that, in turn, sell it to the drug companies. The data reveal what drugs doctors prescribe, including changes in brand-name drugs they choose for their patients and their use of generics. The information is extremely valuable to the drug companies, which spend a reported $8 billion a year marketing their products to doctors. Backers of the laws generally believe that drug prices are too high and that one reason is the money drug makers spend to market and advertise their products. The laws' supporters say that by preventing the sale of the information, they help protect medical privacy, control health care costs by promoting generic drugs and improve public health. Bridget Asay, Vermont's lawyer, said the drug companies do not have a right to the information without the consent of the doctor. Justice Antonin Scalia was among several justices who said doctors can simply choose not to meet with the drug companies'representatives if they want to avoid the sales pitches. Justice Department lawyer Edwin Kneedler said the restrictions on data mining are in keeping with laws that prohibit the commercial exploitation of driver license information. He also said the law aims only at the one-on-one pitches that the sales reps make to doctors using information about that individual doctor's prescribing trends. Widespread television and other media advertisements are unaffected, Kneedler said. Justice Anthony Kennedy jumped in at that point. "What you're saying is the state can prohibit the most efficient form of speech." Three companies that sell t he information they gather IM S Health, SDI and Source Healthca re Analytics challenged t he Vermont law. The drug industry's trade grou p, the Pharmaceutical Research an d Manufacturers of America, al so joined the lawsuit because t he Vermont law also prohibits dru g companies from using the inform ation for sales and marketing purpo ses. The lawsuit says the informatio n about doctors'prescribing patter ns is important in helping spot trend s, keeping tabs on the safety of ne w medications and studying treatme nt outcomes. Thomas Goldstein, representin g the companies, said one remarkab le feature of the case is that t he Vermont law is not focused on fal se or deceptive advertising. The Foo d and Drug Administration regulat es what claims drug makers m ay make, Goldstein said. Supreme Court questions limits on use of prescription data Special to the News-SunRita Goldberg can't believe some p eople still teach kids to swim by p roverbially throwing them in the w ater to see if they sink or swim i nstinctively. "Many parents and even some t raumatic swim programs still use t hat ancient and ridiculous method o f introducing children to swimm ing by throwing them into the w ater without any knowledge about s wimming whatsoever and all t hey are doing is teaching their child ren how to be terrified of the w ater," said Goldberg, a former n ational swimmer in Great Britain, o wner of a swimming school and a uthor of the children's book "I L ove to Swim" (www.ilovet oswimthebook.com. "These advocates claim they are t eaching survival, but I believe t eaching survival can be and s hould be gentle and fun." Goldberg's lament is that too m any children drown needlessly e very year, and too many parents a re either resistant to teaching their t oddlers to swim, or teach them the w rong way. "No child, and I mean no child, h as to ever drown in a swimming p ool again if they are taught how to s urvive in the water the right way a nd at the earliest possible age," she a dded. "Drowning is actually the second l eading cause of accidental death in t he country. It is leading in Florida a nd a few other states, and the real t ragedy is that most every child who d rowns could have been saved by s imply being taught to swim corr ectly. "Traumatizing them only teaches t hem to fear the water, and who a mong us makes the best choices, or c an even process calm thought, w hen we are afraid? Children are no d ifferent. They need to be given the t ools to survival and draw their conf idence in the water from that k nowledge. We want kids to respect t he water, not fear it." Goldberg's tips for teaching kids t o swim include:Start youngNew studies show that the best a ge to teach a child to swim is b etween the ages of six and 12 m onths. Just as parents are learning t his is a good time to teach child ren how to read, they are beginning to understand this is a time when children are able to absorb information like sponges. Teaching them to swim at this early age is a great way to make swimming second nature to them. Float to surviveAs a supplement to safeguarding your kids through extra vigilant supervision and a safety gate around the pool, focus on giving your child the best lifesaving tool you could offer them the ability to survive in the water. The first gift I give children when I teach them is the ability to float on their backs. This is the most important survival skill of all. This enables all swimmers to rest, breathe and call for help, thus alleviating the "silent" danger of floating face down. Gentle and funSwimming will come more naturally to children who are taught gently, without trauma, and with a sense of fun. You cannot teach a 2year-old not to go near the swimming pool. You cannot teach them that the pool is dangerous. Parents see the swimming pool as a potential death trap for their kids, but all kids see is a big, wet playground. You're not going to change their opinion, so stop trying. Focus on calm, gentle fun, and your kids will take to their lessons like fish to water. "Parents need to understand that playing in a swimming pool is the same as playing on dry land to children," she added. "It's all play to them. While it's important for them to feel confident in the water, we need to help temper that confidence with a strong sense of safety and good judgment. Adhering to those rules as parents will serve to reinforce those rules, however, the best way to pull it all together is to start them young. Once both swimming and safety are second nature to them, they'll be safer and your supervision of them in the water will be more fun for everyone. Tips for teaching kids to swim Metro Services Children need to be taught early to respect the water, but not to fear it. Snapshots Health Department offers Diabetes SelfManagement classSEBRING The Highlands County Health Department is offering Diabetes Self-Management Education classes as part of its Wellness and Diabetes Education Program. This program serves Highlands County residents of all ages especially those with diabetes or at risk for develop ing diabetes These classes are free of charge and provided by a certified diabete s educator. Classes in English are scheduled in Sebring from 5:30-8:30 p.m. May 2-4 an d from 8:30-11:30 a.m. May 16-18 at the Highlands County Health Department (7205 S. George Blvd., con ference room B). Enrollment is limited and registration is required. To register and for more information, contact the HCHD Wellness and Diabetes Education Program at 382-7294. Ace Homecare plans outreach eventsAce Homecare communi ty outreach events for May include: Monday 8 a.m., Healt h Fair, Brookside Bluffs, Stat e Road 17, Zolfo Springs; 10 a.m., Health Fair, NuHope Elder Services, 310 N. 8th Ave., Wauchula; 1 p.m., Caregivers Support Group, Crown Pointe Assisted Living Community, Sun 'N Lake Blvd., Sebring Tuesday 10 a.m., Health Fair, Fair Havens, Apartments, Spinks Road, Sebring; 1 p.m. Health Fair, Groves, behind Sebrin g Diner, U.S. 27, Sebring, Wednesday 8 a.m., Health Fair, Villa Del Sol, behind Winn Dixie, U.S. 27 Avon Park; 9 a.m., Health Fair, Avon Park Meal Site, Main Street, Avon Park. Thursday 10 a.m., Caregiver training, Balmor al Assisted Living Facility, 93 Balmoral Road, County Continued on page 6B

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Page 6BNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.com Road 621, Lake Placid; 10:30 a.m., Caregivers support group, Balmoral Assisted Living Facility, 93 Balmoral Rd,County Road 621, Lake PlacidAmplified telephone distribution SEBRING Hearing Impaired Persons will distribute amplified telephones to Florida residents who have a hearing or speech loss, in the conference room at Nu-Hope Elder Care Services, 6414 U.S. 27 South in Sebring, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday. By appointment only. Call (941) 743-8347.HALLO-hosted programs on breakSEBRING Traumatic Brain Injury Group, "New Beginnings" meets every first Thursday of the month at 6 p.m., October through March, at the office of H.A.L.L.O., 112 Medical Center Ave. The goal of the group is to create a positive, supportive setting and experience in which the traumatic brain injury population can address physiosocial and adjustment issues related to their injury. Patient fellowship, self-improvement, education and social activities will be stressed. Heartland Amputee Group meets every second Thursday of the month during season (October through March) at 1 p.m. for coffee hour at H.A.L.L.O. Check local listings for speakers. The group's main purpose is to give support, encouragement and exchange information and product knowledge to amputees of all levels, both recent and experienced, their family members and friends. Heartland Amputee Group is organized through Handicapped Americans Love of Life Organization bringing to people opportunities to reach personal goa ls and objectives. Low Vision Information Group meets every third Thursday of the month during season (October throug h March) at noon at St. John' s United Methodist Church o n Grand Prix Boulevard in Sebring except when specia l arrangements have to be made for guest speakers. T he group's purpose is to exchange information and product knowledge through lectures and demonstration to all people experiencing problems with low vision, particularly macular degeneration. For any other informatio n on any of these programs o r if you would like to be on the post card notification list, call 385-1196, email halloinc@embarqmail.com or write: H.A.L.L.O., P.O. Box 7082, Sebring, FL 33872. Cornerstone Hospice Volunteer Training LAKE PLACID Would you or anyone you know have time to contribute two to four hours or more a we ek to read a book or magazine run a local errand, free a caregiver for a much neede d break, or simply keep a Hospice patient company? Would you like to help with the Cornerstone SALUTES ceremonies planned to hono r and recognize veteran patients? Would you have time to help in a number of ways? Anew Cornerstone Hospice (nonprofit) Volunteer Training has been scheduled over a two-day period for Tuesday, May 17 and Tuesday, May 24 from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (lunch an d snacks provided). Volunteer applicants mus t attend both class days to take place at Southern Lifestyle Assisted Living Facility at 1297 U.S. 27 N. in Lake Placid. Call 3824563 for information or to reserve your seat. Continued frompage 5B HEALTHYLIVING Snapshots DearPharmacist: My d ad used to eat almonds all t he time, he said it helped w ith his headaches and j oint pain. I inherited this c ondition, lucky me ... and I 'm not sure if they work or n ot but I eat them once a w eek. Is there any medicin al truth to the almond f olklore? C.P., Portland, Ore. Answer: The National H eadache Foundation ident ifies 20 types of headaches, r anging from simple tension h eadaches to the dreaded m igraine. What they have in c ommon is that they all d rive you nuts to one extent o r another. But research s uggests that nuts is good or "are" good, in this c ase. It's been discovered t hat almonds, for instance, c ontain salicin which, when c onsumed, forms salicylic a cid, the primary by-produ ct of aspirin metabolizat ion. We all know what a spirin's for don't we? T his is why your dad feels b etter eating them. Anecdotal evidence has s ome headache sufferers c laiming that eating a lmonds daily has a cumul ative effect. In other w ords, regular headaches m ight become less severe a nd/or disappear gradually w ith regular consumption of a lmonds. Over time, eating 1 0 to 15 almonds per day m ight give you relief from t hat jackhammer in your h ead. I say "might" because s ome people are allergic to s alicin, an ingredient in a lmonds. So if your throat i tches, or your tongue and l ips swell whenever you eat a lmonds, then this regal litt le gem might not be for y ou. Otherwise, eat up. You can make or buy c ommercially prepared a lmond butter. Almond butt er is a healthier (and tastie r, I think) alternative to p eanut butter. It also seems to be lest allergenic than peanuts. In my home, Sam makes me fresh almond milk. I buy raw, organic almonds and soak them overnight in water. Then I skin the almonds and he blends them, then mixes them with a few other ingredients. My video on how to make this is posted on youtube and I'll also send it via email to those of you who subscribe to my free health newsletter (sign up at my Web site, www.DearPharmacist.com). The recipe is on page 343 of my book, "Diabetes Without Drugs" (Rodale 2010). Besides the natural pain pacifier they already contain, almonds are rich in magnesium, a mineral that helps to lessen nerve excitability and increase muscle relaxation. They provide even higher amounts of vitamin E, potassium, and manganese, and a little bit of copper, riboflavin, zinc and phosphorous. Even though a quarter cup of almonds contains 18 grams of fat, 11 of those are the heart-healthy monounsaturated kind. What's more, emerging research suggests that eating almonds does not result in weight gain, and may even contribute to weight loss due to the nut's tendency to cause a feeling of fullness after eating them. So next time you feel a headache coming on, go ahead and get a little nutty with almonds.Did you know? Quercetin is a natural antihistamine, you can buy it in health food stores nationwide if you have seasonal allergies. Suzy Cohen is a registered pharmacist and the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist' and Real Solutions.' For more information, visit www. DearPharmacist. com. This information is not intended to treat, diagnose or cure your condition. Headaches driving you nuts? Then eat some Dear Pharmacist Suzy Cohen Metro Services Eating almonds might help you get rid of your constant headaches. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK All nine s tudents in this year's South F lorida Community College D ental Hygiene program's g raduating class have passed t he written Dental Hygiene N ational Board Exam. This continues the except ional trend of SFCC's dental hygiene students achieving a 100 percent passing rate on the exam. By passing the written Dental Hygiene National Board Exam, prospective dental hygienists become eligible to sit for the Florida Dental Hygiene Board Exam, which requires them to demonstrate their skills on a patient. Once they pass the Florida Dental Hygiene Board Exam they become licensed to work as dental hygienists. "Not all programs can boast that their students have a 100 percent passing rate," said Becky Sroda, director, Allied Health. "I believe it is because of the high quality instruction they receive from our instructors in their prerequisite and program courses at SFCC that we are able to achieve this every year." All nine of SFCC's dental hygiene students pass national exam Got something to sell? News-Sun classified ads get results! Call 314-9876

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A tonement Lutheran ChurchSEBRING The Second S unday in Easter celebration w ill be led by Deacon David T horesen. Council meeting is T uesday at 6 p.m. in the C ounting Room. Aspecial invitation is b eing extended to all churche s and people in the commun ity to come and experience t he Labyrinth Prayer Garden w hich is on the east side of t he church's premises. How? You walk it very s lowly, try to really empty y our mind or focus it, you g et to the center, stop, cons ider your place before God a nd then you walk back out p erhaps this time, reflecting o n how Jesus might guide y our steps when you leave. T oo often we forget the p romises of God. In the face o f uncertainty, instead of do-it-yourself" Christianity, l et us turn to God in prayer a nd let Him fix our probl ems. Prayer will transform o ur country, community and o urselves. The Labyrinth was patt erned after a famous one in F rance, in memory of a form er member, Kaitlyn G ossett. It is open seven d ays per week for all to c ome and pray. It's been r eferred to as a "walking m editation." A von Park Church of ChristAVON PARK Renewal Time" (Colossians 3 :1-4), will be the Sunday m orning message presented b y Minister Larry Roberts. T he Lord's Supper is served e very Sunday. There will be a dinner in t he fellowship hall immedia tely following the morning w orship. All members and g uests are invited to attend. The Timothy Class will m eet Sunday afternoon. Jeff P arker is in charge. Avon Park Church of C hrist is at 200 S. Forest A ve. For information call 4 53-4692 A von Park Church of the NazareneAVON PARK On S unday morning, Chaplain D avid L. Cowles will preach a nd sing. His message will b e "The Hope of the R esurrection" based on I C orinthians 15. Cowles is a retired minist er and directs Pacer M inistries (www.pacerministries.org). The Avon Park Church of the Nazarene is at 707 W. Main St. For more information, please call the church office at 453-4851.Christ Lutheran ChurchAVON PARK This Sunday, Pastor Scott McLean will be preaching a sermon entitled "Gamaliel's If." The church is at 1320 CR 64, east the Avon Park High School. For more information, call 471-2663 or visit christlutheranavonpark.org. This is an LCMS congregation.Christian Science ChurchSEBRING The lesson sermon on Sunday morning is titled "Everlasting Punishment." The keynote is from Jeremiah 31:3, "The Lord hath appeared of old unto me, saying, Yea, I have loved thee with an everlasting love: therefore with lovingkindness have I drawn thee." The church is at 146 N. Franklin St.Christian Training Church SEBRING The Rev. Linda M. Downing will bring the message titled "Easter Seals: Part 2" at the Sunday morning service. The Wednesday night Bible study will continue the book of Hebrews. Eastside Christian ChurchLAKE PLACID The midweek Bible study and discussion time is Wednesday. This is an informal setting with open discussion. The Sunday morning worship celebration contains a traditional style of worship music. Communion is offered weekly. The Agape Cafe is open from 9:45-10 a.m. All are invited to join members for fellowship and refreshments before worship services.Emmanuel United Church of ChristSEBRING The Rev. George Miller will deliver the Sunday morning sermon "Fearless Forgiveness" with Scripture taken from John 20:19-23. The church is 1.7 miles west of U.S. 27 on County Road 634 (Hammock Road). Call 471-1999 or visit sebringemmanuelucc.com. Fellowship Baptist Church AVON PARK This week, Pastor Bill Cole will be preaching "The Resurrection, So What?" as a follow-up to Easter services. Guests are invited to join all services and the monthly fellowship lunch which follows the morning service. The church is at 1000 Maxwell St. From U.S. 27 North, turn right at Advanced Discount Auto Parts and the church is on the left. Visit www.apfellowship.org for additional information.First Baptist Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK Rev. Jon Beck, senior pastor, will be speaking at the morning and sevening services. Nursery is available for the morning service. The church is at 100 N. Lake Ave. For more information, call 453-6681 or e-mail info@fbcap.netFirst Baptist Church of Placid LakesLAKE PLACID Pastor Darryl George will preach the sermon entitled "The Father's Endorsement of His Son!" with regards to Luke 3:21-22. The church is at the corner of Washington and Kemper Avenues in Placid Lakes. A nursery is provided for all services. For more information, please call 465-5126 from 8 a.m. to noon Monday through Thursday or e-mail the church at placidlakes@hotmail.com.First Christian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK Sunday, the church will be looking to the Scripture John 2:12-22 in the sermon "Want Proof? Listen!" The pastor will be preaching this sermon from his "Hear It, See It, Speak It, Believe It" sermon series. Bible studies for all ages, from infant through senior adults are available on Wednesday. All ladies will receive a gift as they leave the Mother's Day service next Sunday. First Christian Church of Avon Park is at 1016 W. Camphor St. (behind the Wachovia Bank). Call 4535334 or e-mail us at firstchristianap@embarqmail.com. The website is www.firstchristianap.com.First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)SEBRING At the Lord's Table this Sunday morning will be Walter and Anna Coley. Communion will be served by Jayne Weldy, Carol Graves, Carol Chandler and Gretchen Ames. Greeting the congregation will be Eugene Stutzman and Judi Stutzman. Leading us in the Call to Worship will be Ann Holly. Noel and Juanita Roberts will be working with Children's Church in May. Lighting the candles during the month of May will www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011Page 7B RELIGION Say, have you heard of Brics"? How about "SDR" o r "IMF"? Hi, my name is Pastor R einhold Buxbaum from The W ay Church, and I like to h ave a word with you. There are new terms flyi ng around and many don't k now their meaning. "Brics" stands for Brazil, R ussia, India, China and S outh Africa. These count ries have met together and d ecided to bypass the A merican dollar to do trade w ith each other. "Let's cut out the middle m an." How about the SDR? It s tands for "Special Drawing R ight." It is made up of a basket of currencies." M ainly the US dollar, the E uro, the British pound and t he Japanese yen. Originally i t was created to replace the g old and silver standard. The IMF (International M onetary Fund) administers t he SDR. "So what?" you might ask. Well, lately the voices to replace the US dollar as the world trade currency have become stronger. This fall or winter there will be a vote at the United Nations level to address this question. If the dollar is replaced with the SDR, it would be a first step towards the new world currency. Again you say, "so what?" First of all it would hurt the US dollar greatly, since 70 percent of all dollars are in foreign countries and would have to be exchanged. Secondly, the US would no longer be able to just print their own money to pay debt. But most importantly it would move us much closer to the Biblical end time scenario of one world currency leading to one world government, leading to a one man control, called Antichrist. Almost 2,000 years ago, God told us in the Bible that just such a man will appear on the world scene. He will control all the world banking and commerce. Remember that this prophecy was penned long before our computer-driven society! Until recently, you could not have even dreamed how a person could have such a great control. Yet Revelation 13:16-17 reads: "He also forced everyone, small and great, rich and poor, free and slave, to receive a mark on his right hand or on his forehead, so that no one could buy or sell unless he had the mark" (NIV) The technology of such a mark already exists in the form of a chip the size of a grain of rice. The company that produces them is called "Applied Digital Solutions" out of Palm Beach. The name is "VeriChip" and is implanted with a needle just under the skin. So after you fill your basket at your local grocery store, you swipe your hand with the chip and the bank automatically takes the amount out of your account. Sounds great, right? No more stolen credit card, no more lost purse. But here is what you give up: Control. Somebody can shut you down if you don't cooperate. That's scary. But it's coming! Yes, the stage is set for the second coming of Jesus! Reinhold Buxbaum is Pastor of The Way Church, he teaches "An Evening in Prophecy" at Homer's Restaurant at 6:30 p.m. the first Monday of each month. World moving toward one currency, just as Bible predicted Guest Column Reinhold Buxbaum Church News RELIGION GUIDELINES: The News-Sunpublishes religion news on Fridays. The submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday to be considered for publication in the following Friday's paper. Submit items to theNews-Sun'sfrom 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays; fax to 385-2453; send e-mail to editor@newssun.com; or mail to Lifestyle Editor,News-Sun,2227 U.S. 27 South,Sebring,FL 33870. For information, call 385-6155,ext. 516. Get the paper delivered to you! NEWS-SUN€385-6155 Continued on page 8B New Life Anglican FellowshipLAKE PLACID New Life Anglican Fellowship, an orthodox Anglican parish in the Gulf Atlantic Diocese of the Anglican Church of North America, celebrated its first Easter Sunday service at 10 a.m. on April 24. The worship service, which was a blend of traditional hymns and contemporary praise and worship songs, was held at 370 East Interlake Blvd. in Lake Placid. New Life Anglican Fellowship is a missional fellowship out of Servants of Christ Anglican Church in Gainesville. The Rt. Rev. Neil Lebhar, Bishop of the Gulf Atlantic Diocese, has given the task of establishing an orthodox Anglican presence in Highlands County to the Rev. Susan T. Rhodes and her husband, David W. Rhodes, both of whom are local attorneys. The Rev. Alex Farmer, the rector of Servants of Christ Anglican and Dean of the Gainesville Deanery, commissioned the couple during a Sunday worship service in March at the church. New Life Anglican Fellowship combines adherence to Scripture, a missionary vision and a spirit for worship with a rich tradition in the Church. The fellowship worships on Sunday at 10 a.m. at 370 East Interlake Blvd. in Lake Placid. The service is followed by a time of fellowship and refreshments. St. Agnes hosting lasagna dinnerSEBRING There will be a lasagna dinner today at St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3840 Lakeview Drive. Dinner will be served from 5-6 p.m. and includes tossed salad, bread, coffee, ice tea, milk and ice cream. Tickets are $8 and are available from St. Agnes parishioners or at the door. For more information, please call the church at 385-7649.Celebration of Family setSEBRING First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine at 111 Lake Josephine Dr., invites everyone to its "Celebration of Family" on Sunday and on May 8. Sunday at 11 a.m., ther e will be a guest speaker from the Baptist Children Home in Lakeland. On May 8 at 11 a.m., mothers will be honored i n the Mother's Day Service There will be special recognition to the oldest and newest mothers and the mother with the most in attendance in church. There will be great music and a message on the importance of families. A ll are invited. Call the church office a t 655-1524 or check out email Padreahrens@yahoo.com Union Church serving breakfastAVON PARK There will be an all-you-can-eat pancake breakfast at the Union Church on Saturda y, May 14 from 7:30-10:30 a.m. The breakfast will consist of pancakes, sausage, scrambled eggs, juice and coffee for the low price o f $5 per person. Women's Ministry plans movie nightSEBRING The First Baptist Church of Sebring Women's Ministry team invites women of all ages to a special movie night Tuesday, June 7, at 6:30 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Light refreshments will be served. Use the Pine Street entrance. Snapshots VIEW ALL OF TODAYS ADS > MARKETPLACE ADSVIEW ALL OF TODAYS ADS > For over 74 years, the News-Sun has recognized the achievements of our graduating Seniors. This year is no exception, we will publish our “Salute” to the Seniors Friday, May 29 in the full-run of the News-Sun. And we’ve made it affordable to congratulate “your” special senior. Please contact Vickie Jones by May 14, 2009 to reserve your space for your special graduate.386-56312227 US 27 SOUTH– SEBRING 2009 Graduation Edition Leanna –We are all so proud of you. We know you will go far! Online ad expires 5/17/09 2009 GRADUATION EDITION Check out THE new Marketplace Ads at www.newssun.comYOUR HOMETOWN ONLINE NEWSP APER REPOR TING LOCAL NEWS WHEN IT HAPPENS.

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Page 8BNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. children's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. children's mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing God's Heart and Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and women's prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the "Place to discover God's love." For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mother's Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) "Where the old fashion gospel is preached." Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the "Son" always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. JosŽ Gonz‡lez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Saturday 3-3:45 p.m. or first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lord's Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building God's Kingdom for Everyone." "Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!" Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is "Jesus is First at First Christian Church."Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures'by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP b e Nina Kunsak. Adrienne Diaz w ill be with the children in the n ursery during the month of May. Rev. Ron's sermon is titled Jesus Ascends into Heaven" from L uke 24:50-53. The church is at 510 Poinsettia A ve. Call 385-0352.First Presbyterian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK On Sunday, P astor Johnson's sermon is entitled Seeing Jesus" based on Luke 2 4:1-12. The choir's introit is "He Is E xalted" and the anthem is "We H ave Seen the Risen Lord." Sunday School is available for a ll ages. Maxine Johnson, adult t eacher, continues the study of D avid in II Samuel Chapter 12 in w hich Nathan rebukes David. W endy Garcia teaches the youth c lass and discusses issues of today a nd how the Bible instructs us. Members are asked to bring nonp erishable items for the Church S ervice Center. There will be no Youth Band or Y outh Group this evening. The W omen's Ministries Executive B oard will meet at 6 p.m. Pastor Johnson will lead the W ednesday morning Bible study g roup in the study of Revelation. On Thursday, the Men's Fellowship will meet at The Depot at 7 a.m. for breakfast and then return to the church for a short Bible study and then to a member's house for a work project. Members are asked to observe The National Day of Prayer at home by praying for our country and the world. The church is at 215 E. Circle Street (with two entrances on Lagrande St.). Call the church office at 453-3242.First Presbyterian Church of SebringSEBRING "Isn't There Another Way?" is the title of Sunday morning's sermon given by the Rev. Darrell A. Peer. Thursday is the National Day of Prayer. The sanctuary will be open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.First United Methodist Church of SebringSEBRING The Rev. A.C. Bryant's message on Sunday will be "Mary Weeps Disciples Fear Thomas Doubts" with Scripture taken from John 20:1-31. Family Movie Night tonight from 6-8 p.m. in the Family Life Center will be showing "Rust." Free admission. Family Fellowship Dinner and Bible Study is on Wednesday evening with dinner in the Family Life Center. The Mother Daughter Banquet will be Tuesday, sponsored by the Methodist Women. Tickets are $10 for adults and $6 for children. Listen on WITS-AM 1340 each Sunday to hear the 10:50 a.m. worship service. Call the church office at 385-5184. The church is downtown at 126 South Pine St. www.sebringfirstumc.com.Memorial United Methodist ChurchLAKE PLACID The Rev. Fred Ball will preach at the Heritage (Traditional) Worship Service on Sunday. At 10:45 a.m., there will be a combined worship service in the sanctuary. Pastor Ball will bring the message. Holy Communion will be served. It is also Confirmation Sunday for the 2011 Confirmation Class. Achurch-wide potluck lunch will celebrate this special day at Memorial in Rob Reynolds Fellowship Hall after the service. Nursery care is available for all morning events in the Creepy Crawly Clubhouse. Children's Church meets in the Sanctuary and Rob Reynolds Hall and then moves to the SonShine Clubhouse. The church is at 500 Kent Ave. Parkway Free Will Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Sunday morning Bible lesson, "Praise and Submission," is taken from Philippians 2. Pastor Jim Scaggs will bring the messages in the morning and evening services. Wednesday evening service will be praise, prayer and Bible study.St. John United Methodist ChurchSEBRING On Sunday, the Rev. Ronald De Genaro's sermon will be "Jesus and Thomas" taken from John 20:19-31. Holy Communion will be served. Nursery is provided at all three services. Boy Scouts meet Monday at 7 p.m.Sebring Church of the BrethrenSEBRING This Sunday morning, the church will be bringing in new members and also baptisms. Pastor Keith Simmons will be preaching on "The Goal of Faith." The Scripture reading will be from I Peter 1:3-9. Sunday school is n the Fidelis Room. They will be studying "The Christ Hymn," with Scripture from Philippians 2:1-11. Children's Sunday school is The Kids'Zone. There is also a nursery available. Don't forget The Kids'Zone on Wednesday evenings after the meal.Southside Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Rev. David Altman will speak on, "Christian Homes" from Colossians 3:18-25 in the Sunday morning worship service. Children's church and a nursery are available. Prayer for All Nations will be the focus of th e evening worship service. The church is at 379 S. Commerce Ave. Call 385-0752.Spring Lake United Methodist ChurchSEBRING Spring Lake United Methodist Church is at 8170 Cozumel Lane. Holy Communion will be celebrated. The Rev. Clyde Weaver's sermo n is "With Desire to Commune." Fellowship follows the service.The Way ChurchSEBRING Pastor Reinhold Buxbaum's message will be "The Sun Stands Still" with Scripture from Joshua, Chapter 10. Worship will be followed by a covered dish meal. At 1 p.m., ther e will be a Memorial Service for Ea rl Carter. The Way Church is at 1005 North Ridgewood, Sebring. The church phone is 471-6140 and the pastor's cell phone is 214-6190. For church information and the pastor's messages go to www.thewaychurch.org. Continued from page 7B RELIGION Church News

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011Page 9B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer .Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun 'N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid C ity" Children's Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, "prime-timers," and Bible s tudies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots PreSchool director; and Noel Johnson, minister of youth and family life. Worship schedule after Easter through December: Worship service 10 a.m., and Education Hour, 8:45 a.m. Worship schedule for January through Easter: Worship service, 8:30 and 11 a.m., Education Hour 9:45 a.m. Traditional Service with Holy Communion each first and third Sunday. Non-Traditional Service each second, fourth and fifth Sunday. Seasonal mid-week services Wednesday evenings during Lent and Advent. Call church office for additional Worship times and special holiday services. Other activities and groups include: Choirs; Ladies Guild and LWML; Men's Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies as scheduled; Trinity Tots Pre-school, Youth Group activities (call for meeting times and dates). Trinity Tots Preschool (3-4years old): 7:15 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Visit us online at:www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and children's church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Children's & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kid's World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturer's Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Children's Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of God's Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and children's church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Women's Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m. in the sanctuary. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Children's Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruc e Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on life's journey, you're we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP RELIGION Death is generally a subject m ost people would rather avoid. B ut the reality of death is i nevitable. When we understand w hat God's Word says on the t opic, it can take on a pleasant m eaning. This past week, we rememb ered the death, burial and resurr ection of Christ. This was merely a fulfillment of prophecy that C hrist reiterated to his disciples b efore he went to Calvary. We r ead in Matthew 16:21, "From t hat time forth began Jesus to s how unto his disciples, how that h e must go unto Jerusalem, and s uffer many things of the elders a nd chief priests and scribes, and b e killed, and be raised again the t hird day." Notice that Jesus said that he m ust go suffer, die, and rise a gain. Early that first R esurrection morning, the angel r eminded the women who had c ome to the empty tomb of C hrist's words. (Luke 24:7) The c rucifixion and Resurrection was o rdained by God and must occur t hat sin would be conquered and death defeated. Christ was the only eligible sacrifice for the sins of the world. He had to die so He could rise again. Thus, Jesus knew and declared that He must die and that He must rise again. In John 12:24, Jesus used agriculture to teach the principle that a seed must die for fruit to be born. Only when a seed is planted and dies can life then be born and a plant grown. Only by God's power can life come out of death. Jesus went on to say, "He that loveth his life shall lose it; and he that hateth his life in this world shall keep it unto life eternal." In this way, we may receive life eternal because Jesus died for our sin. But we must come to the place where we deny trusting ourselves, our good works, our sinful ways, and our idols. We must repent and by faith depend on Christ alone to give us eternal life. Ephesians 2:5 says, "Even when we were dead in sins, (God) hath quickened us together with Christ, (by grace ye are saved)." We certainly must recognize that in our sin, we are dead; but when we believe on Christ, we are born again into God's family. As a Christian, I have come to learn that there are things that are helpful to my life and other things that are destructive. Some things, influences, and pursuits must be put to death, if I am to be effective in ministry. There are some thoughts, desires, words and actions that must be terminated that I may keep pure and available for the Master's use. You may think of some habits or activities that are harmful or wasteful of your time. Put those things to death, so that better things may be given life. Luke Knickerbocker is the pastor of Bethel Baptist Church in Lake Placid. You may email him at knickprint@yahoo.com Some things must die Timeless Treasure Luke Knickerbocker Most of us are not glamorous. We're just average. We idolize Hollywood celebs because they dazzle and sparkle. I don't know about you, but there are a few that I would love to look like. But then I get to thinking that most of them seem to have everything money, looks, clothes, style, people fawning all over them. Then I watch the news or catch the tabloid captions and realize that in spite of all that, they are miserable. Liz Taylor, at her mother's death, made the comment that she would give everything she had to have the peace and contentment her mother had found in life. Do you ever notice that some of the plainest women have lots of friends and men just flock to them? I know the secret. I wish I had learned it much earlier in our marriage. It would have saved a lot of heartache. Thankfully, the Lord carried us through and taught me the secret before we headed for divorce. The answer sounds very simple, but actually takes a lot of work. It involves grit, determination and being willing to be vulnerable. Wait for it. Here it comes. Learn to chill out; laugh, don't take yourself or life too seriously. Learn to laugh at your mistakes. One of my coworkers says it very well: breathe in, breathe out, move on. Laughter is contagious and attractiv e. Think about it. Would you rather be around someone who is happy, who laughs and smiles a lot, or someone who is grumpy, whiny and a complain er? Think about your friends. Do you prefer to be with the ones who are always in some kind of drama in their lives, or the ones who know how to have fun? Proverbs 17:22 says, "Amerry hear t doeth good like a medicine, but a broken spirit drieth the bones." It isn't ju st good for your health; it's good for the health of all those around you. If you want a healthy, happy husband and family, let go of your need to vent to them. Let go of your selfish pride that demands to be pitied and petted. Go to the privacy of your room or closet if you must, let it out, and go have fun with those around you. Aleta Kay can be reached at themarriagementor@yahoo.com Beauty is only skin deep The Marriage Mentor Aleta Kay

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Page 10BNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.com T he Community Calendar provides a b rief listing of local clubs and organiz ations who meet on a regular basis. It i s the responsibility of the group to u pdate the News-Sunon any changes i n this listing by calling 385-6155, ext. 5 16; send any changes by e-mail to e ditor@newssun.com;or mail them to N ews-SunCommunity Calendar, 2227 U .S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870.FRIDAY Alcoholics Anonymous One Day A t ATime group meets for a closed d iscussion at 9:30 a.m. Monday and F riday at Covenant Presbyterian C hurch, 4500 Sun N Lakes Blvd., S ebring. For details, call 314-0891. American Legion Post 25 hosts a f ish fry from 5-7 p.m. at the post, 1490 U .S. 27, Lake Placid. Cost is $6. S hrimp also is available for same p rice. Open to the public. Tickets in t he lounge on Friday night. Lounge h ours are from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For d etails, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 has k araoke from 7 p.m. until final call at t he post, 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. P ost open at noon. Happy Hour from 4 -6 p.m. Members and guests only. F or details, call 471-1448. AvonPark Breakfast Rotary Club m eets 7 a.m., Rotary Club building. Bridge Club of Sebring (American C ontract Bridge Club)plays duplicate g ames at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf A ve., Sebring. For details, call 3858 118. Better Breathers Club Support G roup This American Lung A ssociation affiliated group meets the l ast Friday of each month, at 12:00 pm i n Conference Room 3 at Florida H ospital Heartland Medical Center, 4 200 Sun n Lake Blvd. Contact Mike N apper, RRTat (863)402-3450 for m ore information. Buttonwood Bay Squares meets f irst and third Friday in recreation hall, S ebring. Early rounds are from 7-7:30 p .m., alternate mainstream/plus / rounds are from 7:30-9:30 p.m. E veryone is welcome to attend. For d etails, callLarry Gow at 382-6995. Grand Prix Cloggers Beginner c lasses are at 9 a.m., EZ I ntermediate classes are at 10 a.m., a nd Intermediate classes are at 11 a .m. every Friday at Reflection on S ilver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for f urther information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square D ance Club offers a class in Lake P lacid at the Sunshine RV Resort from 9 -11 a.m. Friday. For more informat ion, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or em ail him at samdunn@samdunn.net. Highlands Social Dance Club h osts ballroom dancing every Friday, O ctober through March from 7-9:30 p .m. at the Senior Center on Sebring P arkway. Dance the night away to the m usic of the area's Big Bands. All club d ances are open to the public. A ppropriate dress required. Admission i s $5 for members and $7 for nonm embers. Call 385-6671. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 has l ounge hours beginning at 1 p.m. T here is a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. Cost i s $8.50 per person. The lodge is open t o members and their guests. For d etails, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose serves wings, f ish and burgers at 6 p.m. Music prov ided from 7-11 p.m. Pool tournament i s at 8 p.m. Open to members and q ualified guests only. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands C ounty Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell S t., Avon Park. Karaoke from 7-10 p .m. Lodge phone number 452-0579. MOM's Club meets at 10:30 a.m. f irst Friday at the First United M ethodist Church on Pine Street in S ebring. Narcotics Anonymous New Day G roup meets at 6 p.m. at First P resbyterian Church, 319 Poinsettia A ve, Sebring. For information call H eartland area helpline (863) 6830 630. More information on other meeti ngs and events at www.naflheartl and.org. Sebring Bridge Club has Bridge, A CBLDuplicate at the clubhouse, 347 N Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Fridays. F or details or info on lessons, call 3858 118. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves c hicken or fish baskets from 5-7 p.m. a t the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring, f or a $4 donation. Blind darts is played at 7 p.m. For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 serving buffet dinner at 5-7 p.m. Elks and guests invited. Dance music in ballroom at 7 p.m. Dinner and dance is $10 donation. For reservations, call 385-8647 or 471-3557. Lounge is open from 3-10 p.m. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 6553920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave. For details, call 385-2966 or leave a name, number and message. Teamster Retiree's meet at the First Assembly of God, 485 W. Haines Blvd., Lake Alfred at 11 a.m. on the last Friday of the month (except June, July and August). For details, call Paul Thomas at 471-9684. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. Texas Hold em lessons, 2 p.m. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 serves pizza from 5:30-7 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 385-8902.SATURDAY American Legion Post 25 serves sirloin burgers from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake Placid. Jam session is from 2-4 p.m. The lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Members and guests invited. For details, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 69 in Avon Park serves dinner at 5 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Public Library has a free Adult Film Series at noon. For details, call 452-3803.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. provides free assisted riding sessions for adults and children with special needs from 9-11 a.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday at 118 W. College Drive, AvonPark. For details or to volunteer, call Mary McClelland, coordinator, 452-0006. Highlands County Democratic Women's Club meets 9:30 a.m., Democratic Party Headquarters, 2710 Fairmount Drive, Sebring. Highlands Shrine Club, 2606 State Road 17 South, Avon Park (between Avon Park and Sebring) has a flea market from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., country store open from 8 a.m. to noon and pancake breakfast served from 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Vendors are welcome. No setup fee is charged for the summer months. Plenty of off road parking. For details, call 382-2208. Highlands Woodcarvers meet from 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays at 825 Sunbird Terr. (Community Center off Thunderbird Road). Call Bob at 4716077. Lake Placid Art League has a class in Pastels/Acrylics taught by Llewellyn Rinald from from 9 a.m. to noon at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 opens the lounge at 1 p.m. Card games are played at 1 p.m., and Bar Bingo is at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Military Order of the Purple Heart Chapter 601 meets at 12:30 p.m. first Saturday at Candlelight Restaurant, Sun N Lake in Sebring. All recipients and wives of the Purple Heart are welcome. Call 471-9190 or 465-7074 for details. Narcotics Anonymous New Day Group meets at 7 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave, Sebring. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 6830630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Overeaters Anonymous meets at 10:30 a.m. at First Presbyterian Church, Oak Street, Lake Placid. For more details, call 382-1821. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves dinner from 5-7 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Music is from 7-10 p.m. For details, call 655-4007. Twelve Step Study Group for Adult Children of Alcoholics meets at 11 a.m. first and third Saturday, Union Congregational Church, Room 12 o f the education building (upstairs), 105 N. Forest Ave., Avon Park. Parking available south of old church. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. For more details, call 6995444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 serves a meal for $6 from 5:30-7 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 385-8902. Volunteers of America of Florida is a nonprofit organization in Sebring that specializes in assisting person's with mental illness. We are pleased to announce our Drop in Center is open to individuals with a mental illness 6 days a week from 11am to 3 pm. The center offers a welcoming environment where individuals are accepted and feel comfortable. For more information please contact Wendy at 863-3822022.SUNDAY American Legion Post 25 Lake Placid has lounge hours from 1-9 p.m. Live music is from 5-8 p.m. For details, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open 18 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Members and guests only. Post is at 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Call 471-1448. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 lounge is open from 1-7 p.m. Card games start at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has karaoke in the pavilion. Horseshoes played at 9:30 a.m. Food available at 4 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Cards start at 4 p.m. Music outside Tiki Hut at 3 p.m. Lodge phone number 452-0579. Overeaters Anonymous, meets from 4-5 p.m. in second floor conference roomNo. 3 at Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center, 4200 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring. For details, call 382-7731. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. For details on the organization, go towww.oa.org. Ridge Area Missionary Soldiers AvonPark Pathfinder Club meets from 9 a.m. to noon every first and third Sunday at 58 E. Sixth St., Avon Park. For details, call 471-2143. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves lunch at 2 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 offers NASCAR racing in the pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar open and kitchen open from 2-5 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 655-3920. Society for Creative Anachronism (Local Chapter: Shire of Stagridge) meets at 2 p.m. first and third Sunday at Brewster's Coffee House on U.S. 27 in Sebring. For details, call 214-5522. The Artists'Group at South Florida Community College will hold a critique clinic the first Sunday of every month, 2-4 p.m., at the Hotel Jacaranda, Avon Park. Professional local artists will discuss and evaluate participants'paintings. The fee is $5 with a two painting limit. For more information, call 7847346. U.S. Military Vets Motorcycle Club meets at 1 p.m. on the first Sunday of each month at VFW Post 9853, State Road 64 West and North Oliva Drive. For information call Hocky at (954) 592-4847 Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 serves hamburgers from 4-5:30 p.m. and plays poker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For details, call 6995444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 Karaoke is from 5-8 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 385-8902. COMMUNITYCALENDAR RELIGION In 1988 I went on a "Journey to the Holy Land." The tour covered the countries of Jordan, Israel and Egypt. I have always considered that tour to be my "once-in-a-lifetime" experience. But now, as Paul Harvey often said, let me tell you "the rest of the story." My brother, Ben Rider, was a Methodist pastor in Florida for more than 30 years. When he retired from the ministry, he became a Holy Land tour guide. He made more than 40 trips to the Holy Land! There was a school for pastors in Jerusalem. The purpose of the school was to give pastors an in-depth study of how the geography of the land and the customs of the people in biblical times could even give a broader understanding of Scriptures. There was a limit of 30 pastors to a class. In February of 1989, there was a class of only 29 signed up, so my brother Ben signed me on as No. 30. My son Mike stepped up and paid my tuition and so I, as a lay person, went to school with 29 pastors. Wow! The school was a morning, noon and night program for nine days. The schedule was such that right after breakfast we climbed on the bus and started our daily tour of the sites we were to see and study. One day the bus let us off at the site of Jesus'story about "The Inn of the Good Samaritan" on the old Jericho Road (Luke 10:25-37). The old road from Jerusalem (2,500 feet above sea level) to Jericho (800 feet below sea level) drops 3,300 feet in about 17 miles. We took a short cut to Jericho by climbing down several hundred feet to the bottom of a "wadi" (a canyon). Hiking down the wadi, after three or four miles, we came to the north edge of Jericho. At this point, one of the pastors in our group fell to the ground and passed out. In a few minutes, we revived him, but we realized he was seriously ill. Our guide carried a two-way radio. He was able to contact our bus driver, who was waiting for us in Jericho. The bus soon came to us. We loaded the sick man as gently as we could and the driver started the bus up th e new four-lane divided highway toward the hospital to Jerusalem. The guide had already contacted the hospital and they ha d an ambulance on the way to meet us. We had only been on the uphill climb a few minutes when we saw the ambulance, red lights flashing, sirens wail ing coming toward us in the downhill lane. The ambulance crossed the median, turned uphill and stopped on the right side of the road in front of us. In less than two minutes, the ambulance driver, a doctor and a male nurse were on the bus, hooking up their equipment to our sick pastor. In moments it was determined that he had ha d a heart attack. It only took a few minutes to transfer the patient to the ambulance and with 350-horsepower under th e hood, the ambulance went screaming up the hill to the ho spital in Jerusalem. As soon as the pastor was under the care of the hospital staff, the tour company person nel notified the pastor's church in California of the situation. The folks in his congregation immediately came up with the funds to fly his wife to Jerusalem. After 36 days in the hospital, the pastor and his wif e were flown home to California This long story reminds me of the story Jesus told in the book of Luke about the "Good Samaritan." In the same vein, my modern story tells of a ma n who, while in a foreign land, falls seriously ill and needs he lp and care. In this case, some fo reigners came forward and rescued him. In the Biblical story when Jesus asked the "man of law" how the law reads, he replied, "We are to love God with all our heart, soul, streng th and mind and to love our neig hbor as ourselves." At the end of the story Jesus says, "Go do it!" Floyd Rider is a Lake Placid resident and a long-time Sunday school teacher. Helping others Guest Column Floyd Rider Associated PressROSWELL, Ga. Amarble statue of Jesus vandalized outside a Catholic church in Roswell before Easter Services has been restored, lifting the spirits of the congregation members. Worshippers discovered the vandalism when they arrived for Easter Sunday mass at St. Peter Chanel Catholic Church to find the 9-foot statue defaced with bright pink paint. Someone put paint on the face and hands of the statue and painted other offensive symbols, WSB-TVreported. Church officials feared the paint would permeate the statue, but the damage was not as bad as first thought and a restoration expert was able to remove it. "We used graffiti remover and a light solvent final rub with small brushes and cotton tips, and got in there and got all t he detail done," John Morley, pres ident of J.J. Morley Enterprise s, told The Atlanta Journa lConstitution. Morley said he came to t he suburban Atlanta church Mond ay morning because "it was too s ad to see it the way it was left." "I thought the least I could d o was make this headache go aw ay for them," Morley told t he Journal-Constitution. "Th ey were very appreciative." Father Peter Rau, church pa stor, said the vandalism hurt man y of the parishioners. "As the day passed, to begin to see the children's reaction really, it hurt them, especially o n Easter morning," Rau said. Roswell police Det. K en Kraus said investigators plann ed to send samples of the paint to a lab for analysis and to try to determine where it came from. Statue of Jesus at Ga. church restored after vandalism

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By CHRISTYLEMIRE APMovie CriticIt's not just prom, it's D isney's "Prom." And so no o ne smokes, no one sneaks in p each schnapps in a flask and n o one that's right, no one gets lucky in the back of a l imo. This is all about that magic al night when everyone gets t ogether, regardless of the s ocial hierarchy that had b een firmly in place for the p ast four years, and dreams c ome true. Wholesome, e arnest dreams for wholes ome, earnest kids except f or the resident bad boy, that i s. But naturally, he'll turn o ut to have a heart of gold. Yes, director Joe N ussbaum's film, from a s cript by first-timer Katie W ech, is chock full of highs chool movie clichis s ometimes knowingly and a musingly so. There's a tall, m isfit character named Lloyd ( Nicholas Braun) who resemb les "Say Anything ..."-era J ohn Cusack a tall, misfit c haracter named Lloyd. His a wkward attempts at landing a prom date represent the f ilm's most consistent source o f laughs. Of course, straight-arrow g ood girl Nova (Aimee T eegarden) will get stuck w orking with motorcycle-ridi ng rebel Jesse (Thomas McDonell), and they will see through their respective prejudices to not only get along but fall for each other. Various other couples will suffer through missed opportunities and miscommunication and come out better for them in the end. "Prom" is so steadfastly family friendly, even the dude who's clearly stoned the whole time his nickname is Rolo, like the candy never even comes close to taking any sort of drugs. He's just laid-back and wisecracking. You're welcome to draw your own conclusions. There is a plot, sort of. Members of the Brookside High School senior class are getting ready for prom. Along the way, the shed where the decorations are being stored burns down. Nova, the prom coordinator and Molly Ringwald figure here, must reconstruct the whole extravaganza with the help of Jesse, the Judd Nelson figure in the equation who's been thrust upon her because he's a delinquent. Making papier-mbchi moons and stars will straighten him out, the principal figures. Essentially, this feels like a Disney Channel TVshow stretched out to fit the big screen. No one pops out as a major star quite like the actors did in the "High School Musical" series, but they're all harmless and good-looking and the school is sufficiently multicultural to make everyone feel comfortable and included. Still, the sweetness and guilelessness of "Prom" is actually strangely charming, and for its target audience girls who are several years away from having to pick out that perfect dress this will be a safe, enjoyable and validating little diversion. The fact that it's not snarky and too-hip is unexpectedly refreshing. Like the 3-D Justin Bieber movie, you have to look at it through the prism of the viewers for whom it was intended. Adults know prom sucks they went to prom. Pre-teen girls are still idealistic (we hope). Let them enjoy their vicarious fun. "Prom" means well and it grows on you. And it's much less of a hassle than schlepping to the real thing. By DAVID GERMAIN APMovie WriterIf the "Fast Five" filmm akers had thrown in giant, s hape-shifting robots, talking a pes and some vampires, the f ifth installment in "The Fast a nd the Furious" franchise w ould hardly have been m ore outlandish. That said, the movie will g et you where you're going. P retty cars, prettier women, i nsanely absurd action that t ruly thrills even as it shatt ers all physical laws, and e nough testosterone-fueled v iolence to satisfy the mostr abid WWE SmackDown c rowd. Opting for a blowout of a m ovie with no restraints w hatsoever, the filmmakers w isely add former wrestling s uperstar Dwayne Johnson a s a relentless federal agent t o go toe-to-toe with Vin D iesel's driving ace Dom T oretto, who's again on the r un along with his sister, M ia (Jordana Brewster), and c op-turned-outlaw Brian O 'Conner (Paul Walker). Any thwack from the i nevitable Diesel-Johnson s lug-fest might kill an ordin ary human, but these chara cters basically are comicb ook figures, so they're able t o wail the innards out of each other and come through with only a cosmetic bruise or two. Directing his third chapter in the franchise, Justin Lin applies that over-the-topand-then-some approach to everything in "Fast Five." If it can move, it can move faster. If it can crash, it can crash harder. If it can roar, it can roar louder. It's nonsense, but when Hollywood does nonsense right, it can be a lot of fun. Lin now is far more assured as an action director, crafting stunts and chases that zip along so recklessly you won't much care how utterly impossible they are. Likewise, Lin and screenwriter Chris Morgan, who wrote the last two "Fast and Furious" flicks, step up the silliness of the dialogue and the characters'mannerisms to let the audience in on the joke that no one is supposed to take any of this seriously. People strut and pronounce in such farcical fashion that it goes beyond stupid and somehow becomes, if not clever, at least crafty. The filmmakers do actually achieve cleverness with a surprise or two. You'll want to stay through a portion of the end-credits to catch one of them, a jolting tease for the franchise's preordained sixth installment after "Fast Five" hauls in its fortune. In the current story, Dom is hunting his own fortune after Brian and Mia break him out of custody in a dementedly excessive prison-bus escape. Hiding out in Rio de Janeiro, the three join a daring car heist that puts them at odds with local crime boss Reyes (Joaquim de Almeida) and sets super agent Hobbs (Johnson) on their trail. So Dom decides to get the band back together, enlisting an "Ocean's Eleven"-style ensemble of past "Fast and the Furious" rowdies to part Reyes from his millions. Returning as part of the team are Tyrese Gibson, Chris "Ludacris" Bridges, Sung Kang, Gal Gadot, Matt Schulze, Tego Calderon and Don Omar. Elsa Pataky joins the cast as possibly Brazil's lone honest police officer, a woman tapped by Hobbs to help him chase down Toretto's gang. But words like honest don't mean much in the "Fast Five" world, where good guys are bad, bad guys are good, and only the really, really bad guys get what they've got coming. There's no moral compass here (and apparently no clock, either; the movie runs much too long, and despite the breathless pace, the trip does start to wear on you). The only compass is the one pointing down the road straight ahead, down which "The Fast and the Furious" flicks will keep moving faster and faster. Maybe the filmmakers can do a little "Alice in Wonderland" rhyming and call the next one "Furiouser and Furiouser." www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011Page 11B DIVERSIONS DearAbby: My husband's darling mother died of cancer last summer. During the last month of her illness she was confined to bed, so we hired a nurse, "Lois," to cover the night shift. The day after the funeral, my husband's father started calling Lois. Dad swore they were "just friends," but continued pursuing her despite our strong disapproval. Two months later, they were dating. Last Thanksgiving, our first holiday without Mom, he cancelled plans to be with us and the grandkids to spend it with "friends" guess who? On Christmas it was the same story. This has hit my husband hard. Dad and Mom were married for 50 years. We have always had a close family, particularly at holiday time. Are we wrong to feel that Dad and Lois are disrespecting Mom's memory and to feel hurt and angry? Grieving in Minnesota DearGrieving: Please accept my sympathy for your family's loss. While it may appear your father-inlaw jumped quickly into a relationship, it could be he grieved during the time his wife was ill and has concerns that his own time may be limited, so he wants to enjoy life while he can. As to missing the holidays, being there with his wife of 50 years conspicuously missing may have been more than he could face. So please, try to be understanding because I'm sure your mother-in-law's death has been painful for all of you. DearAbby: After having a stroke, my mother spent the last few years of her life in a wonderful nursing facility. She was an accomplished gardener and enjoyed sharing her bounty. Instead of sending her a fresh flower bouquet for Mother's Day, I'd have some potted tomato plants delivered to her nursing home. On her death bed last year, she reminded us to water her tomato plants. Sadly, those plants outlived her. I cannot think of a more fitting tribute to her memory than to encourage your readers to provide living vegetable plants for their senior relatives. Most nurseries or florists will accommodate your request and, perhaps, could be persuaded to dona te a plant or two to a local sen ior care center. The joy of nurturing a liv ing plant will continue through the summer. Carole in S an Clemen te DearCarole: What a sweet idea. Your mother appears to have been a gen erous and caring woman, and your letter shows the apple doesn't fall far from the tree. DearAbby: When I was in high school, I was very popular and part of a large social group. That was thre e years ago. Since graduation I have been dealing with an anxiety disorder. It has reached the point where I can no longer work, go to school or have much of a social life. I am currently seeking treatment. Whenever I'm in touch with someone I was close t o in high school, I am always asked where I'm working now or what school I'm attending. I feel embarrasse d because of my disorder and often I don't respond becau se I don't know what to say. Any ideas? Speechless in Illino is DearSpeechless: You could say that you haven't been well and needed to tak e some time to recover or if you don't want to reveal that much, say, "I decided t o take some time to find myself," which is common and sufficiently euphemisti c. And the surest way to find treatment for your anxiety disorder would be to tell your family doctor you nee d to consult a mental health professional who specialize s in anxiety disorders. Once you find one, you can quic kly return to the mainstream Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Dating his late wife's nurse distresses widower's family Dear Abby Fast Five' revs up preposterous fun Movie Review Fast Five' Rating: PG-13 (intense violence and action, sexual content and language) Running time: 130 minutes Review: (of 4) Universal Pictures Paul Walker stars as Brian O'Conner and Vin Diesel stars as Dominic Toretto in Fast Five.' Earnestness of Disney's Prom' grows on you Movie Review Prom' Rating: PG (mild language and a brief fight) Running time: 103 minutes Review: (of 4) GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCEƒ

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LIVING 12B PAGE News-Sun Friday, April 29, 2011ix years after his death, John Paul II's beatification on May 1 will be the fastest on record, bringing him one step closer to s ainthood. Just weeks after the former pontiff's 2005 p assing, Pope Benedict XVI put John Paul II on t he fast track, waiving the usual five-year waiti ng period to begin the process to sainthood. The e vent also marks the first time a pope has beatif ied his immediate predecessor. The quick beatification beats Mother Teresa's p revious record by a few days. She was beatified ( declared "blessed") in 2003 but is not yet a s aint. John Paul II had waived the five-year wait f or her in 1998. Prior to John Paul II's pontificate, the process c ouldn't begin until 50 years after a person's d eath. It was changed to 10 years and then to f ive years in 1983 by John Paul II. During his 26-year papacy, John Paul II n amed more than 470 people as saints, more than a ll other popes combined. At his 2005 funeral, people held up signs and s houted: "Santo subito!" ("Sainthood immediatel y!"). His popularity among Roman Catholics made h im a prime candidate for early consideration. Sainthood is conferred on a person who is e xceptionally virtuous and a model of godly livi ng. The word "saint" comes from the Latin w ord "sanctus" meaning "holy." In the Roman Catholic Church, a person who i s declared a saint is said to be canonized offic ially recognized as a saint by the Church. Before John Paul II, the process of canonizat ion included a trial, with a prosecutor (the advoc atus diaboli, or devil's advocate) and a defender o f the candidate (advocatus Dei, or God's advoc ate). Since 1983, the process has been streamlined, a nd the role of devil's advocate has been elimin ated. Earlier this year, Pope Benedict XVI declared a French nun's recovery from Parkinson's dise ase was the miracle needed for John Paul II to b e beatified. Once beatified, John Paul II can be publicly v enerated, or worshipped. But a second miracle i s needed to be canonized a saint. THE ROAD TO SAINTHOODHow a person becomes a saint in the Roman C atholic Church: At least five years must have passed since a c andidate's death before he or she can be conside red for sainthood (see exceptions, above). The bishop of the diocese in which the cand idate died is responsible for beginning the i nvestigation of his or her qualifications. The "Actor Causae" (the group promoting t he candidate) asks the bishop to start the investig ation that may lead to sainthood. After obtaining permission from the V atican, a diocesan tribunal is formed and witn esses are called to testify about the candidate's v irtues. If acceptable, the candidate is given the t itle of "servant of God." After the investigation, all information a bout the candidate is given to the Vatican's C ongregation for the Causes of Saints. The cand idate's worthiness is examined by various c hurch teachers and leaders. If they approve, the c andidate's name is given to the pope who can d eclare the candidate "venerable." For beatification, a miracle (usually a physi cal healing) attributed to the candidate after his o r her death must be verified. An ecclesiastical i nvestigation is required. If such a miracle is a uthenticated, the candidate's name is sent to the p ope. With the pope's approval, the candidate is p ublicly declared "blessed." For canonization or sainthood, a second m iracle must be attributed to the candidate and a uthenticated. With that established, the candid ate is given the title of "saint."GLOSSARY OF TERMSAll Saints'Day:Aholy day of obligation that h onors the saints. All Catholics are required to a ttend Mass on this day. Doctor of the Church:Atitle given to a s aint whose teachings that are influential in any t ime period. Doctors of the Church are known f or their significant understanding of the doctrine of the Church and theology.Feast day:The day assigned to honor a particular saint. Martyr:Aperson who has died rather than give up their religious beliefs. Patron saints:Saints that are chosen to be the special guardians over a specific area, which can be anything from an occupation, a place, a specific group of people, an illness or a cause. Saint:Aholy person who has died and been determined by the Catholic Church as able to intercede for people on earth.DID YOU KNOW?According to Catholic Church teaching: Honor and humble reverence (called doulia) is given to saints by the faithful. Praying to saints is asking them to pray fo r and with the one praying. More than 10,000 believers have been bea tified in the Roman Catholic Church. The first saint to be added to the Church's official list was St. Ulrich of Augsburg, who wa s canonized in 993. Formal canonization procedures were organized in 1588.FAMOUS SAINTSSt. Francis of Assisiis the patron saint of animals and the environment. He founded the Franciscan Order, which was a life of complete poverty, following his childhood in a wealthy family. There are stories of Francis preaching to animals in addition to his love for all of God's creation. St. Anthony of Padua, the patron saint of lost objects, is often depicted carrying a book and Jesus as an infant. Anthony was a brother in the Canons Regular of Saint Augustine before joining the Franciscan Order of Friars Minor follow ing the martyrdom of five Franciscans. ADocto r of the Church, Anthony gained a reputation as a preacher and teacher of theology and is said to be one of the most beloved saints in the Cathol ic Church. St. Nicholasis the patron saint of children. One story about the saint tells of a poor family who did not have the dowry needed for its three daughters to marry. If they didn't marry they would be sold into slavery. The story says that Nicholas threw the necessary dowry in through an open window, and it landed in shoes and stockings hanging by the fire. Because of this, i t is now tradition for children to put their shoes out on the eve of St. Nicholas'feast day (Dec. 6 ) for a treat from St. Nick. St. Joan of Arcreceived visions from St. Michael, St. Catherine and St. Margaret in the 1400s telling her to help the King of France defeat England and Burgundy. Joan led the French troops to several victories but was captured on her way home. She was sold to the English and was later burned at the stake as a heretic. She is the patron saint of France and soldiers. St. Elizabeth Ann Setonis the first American saint. She converte d to Catholicism following the death of her husband. Mother Seton started a religious order, th e Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph's, in 1809. She also set up the "first free Catholic school in America." St. Thomas Morewas a lawyer and membe r of England's Parliament during Henry VIII's reign and is the patron saint of lawyers, politicians and public servants. The author of "Utopia," Thomas was tried and beheaded for treason when he would not recognize the king a s the head of the Church of England. St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, was actually born in Scotland. When he was 14 years old, he was captured and sold into slavery in Ireland. He was in captivity tending to sheep until he was 20 years old and returned to Scotland to become a priest. When he was ordained a bishop, Patrick returned to Ireland to preach to the predominantly pagan island. Patrick used the shamrock, which was a common plant in the Irish landscape, to explain the Trinity. St. Valentine, the patron saint of love, youn g people and happy marriages, was martyred during Claudius II's persecution of Christians. One story about Valentine says that while he was imprisoned, he wrote a letter to the daughter of the jailer the night before his death signing it, "From your Valentine." St. Bernadettewas born in Lourdes, France As a child, the Virgin Mary appeared to Bernadette several times. On one of the occasions, Mary told Bernadette to dig in the mud and she discovered a spring with healing power s. Bernadette is the patron saint of Lourdes and of the sick.McClatchy-Tribu ne Pope John Paul II will be beatified on Sunday, arriving at the final stage before sainthood. Here we look at the process, define key terms and highlight some famous saints.SOURCES: WWW.CATHOLIC-PAGES.COM; THE HOLYSEE PRESS OFFICE; MCT; WWW.CATHOLIC.ORG; WWW.AMERICANCATHOLIC.ORG; EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/WI KI/CANONIZED; THE ST. NICHOLAS CENTER; WWW.DICTIONARY.COMCOURTESYOF DR. ANDREAS FRANZ BORCHERTAdetail from a stained glass window in the Church of Our Lady in County Cork, Ireland, depicting St. Bernadette's visions of the Virgin Mary.VICKI VALERIO/PHILADELPHIAINQUIRER/MCTJohn Paul II greets the crowd at St. Peter's Square in October 2003. John Paul II will be beatified on May 1. COURTESYOF CATHOLIC ONLINESt. Francis of Assis i COURTESYOF CATHOLIC ONLINESt. Joan of Arc COURTESYOF CATHOLIC ONLINESt. Patrick



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By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK After receiving a complaint, Avon Parks Police Chief Michael J. Rowan, who was placed on administrative leave April 19, had asked the State Attorneys Office to look into possible city government corruption January. The investigation, obtained through a public records request from the State Attorneys Office in Bartow, confirms that one of the charges investigated stemmed from a complaint of unethical practices by the City of Avon Park regarding the hiring of a surveying firm owned by Mayor (Sharon) Schulers husband. Chip Thullbery, a spokesman for the state attorney, said his office had closed their investigation and had declined to prosecute. Documents show that the city did business with Schulers company, Sherco Inc., in 2010. Filings from the Florida Division of Corporations show that Sharon Schuler was president of Sherco Inc., a surveying company, and her husband, Robert Schuler, was added as secretary in 2010. Additionally, records at Avon Parks City Hall lists NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Friday-Saturday, April 29-30, 2011 www.newssun.com Volume 92/Number 50 | 50 cents www.newssun.com 079099401001 HighLow 86 62Complete Forecast PAGE 7A Partly sunny with T-storms possible Forecast Question: Has the royal wedding received too much media coverage in the United States? Next question: Should city governments do business with a company owned by an elected official or their spouse? www.newssun.comMake your voice heard at Online Obituaries Jack Goldman Age 72, of Sebring Eula Love Age 68, of Sebring V alorie A. Nietubicz Age 58, of Lake Placid Lydia Wolcott Age 84, of Sebring Obituaries, Page 5A Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453 Online: www.newssun.com Yes 76.6% No 23.4% Total votes: 107 Classifieds 9A Community Briefs2A Community Calendar10B Dear Abby 11B Editorial & Opinion4A Healthy Living 5B Lottery Numbers2A Movie Reviews/Times11B Religion 7B Sports On TV 2B Sudoku Puzzle 11B Index Heck of a weekAPs Barnes shines playing for FAU SPORTS, 1BSaintly stepPope John Paul on the road to sainthood PAGE12BA proud graduateSFCC grad had to battle to continue her education PAGE2AOn the webAvon Park Polic e Chief Mike Rowan tells his side of the stor y www.newssun.com By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comAVON PARK South Florida Community College received an unexpected honor Tuesday, learning it is among the 10 percent best community colleges in the nation. That makes SFCC one of the top 120 out of 1,200 community colleges. The surprise was not because the college is one of the best it was because no one knew there was an accounting going on. According to a press release from The Aspen Institute College Excellence Program, a group of experts were asked to appraise the countrys community colleges to determine which were fulfilling expectations and educating students. The committee looked for those colleges which demonstrated high standards for learning, college completion without delay, and (provided) training grounds for jobs that pay competitive wages. Being in the top 10 percent of American community colleges means SFCC is eligible for the $1 million Aspen Prize. SFCC rating puts it in line for $1 million prize See SFCC, page 3A Declined to prosecute By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comLAKE PLACID Students at Lake Placid are gearing up for their annual prom Saturday at the Highlands County Convention Center. Highlands County Sheriffs Office Deputy Ross Porter and the resource team have been busy giving students insight to be safe and smart. The students spent their morning at the media center watching a presentation about safety and making good decisions regarding prom. This marks the first year that this presentation has ever been seen by the LPstudents. I wanted to do something different this year. Weve always done the crashed cars in the parking lot, but theyve seen that so many times before. Its even gotten old with the teachers; some of them hardly even notice it anymore, said Porter. Instead, Porter used a different visual aid to get the attention of the students a casket. The office personnel at LPHS all agreed that it definitely got their attention. I hope it gets to them like its gotten to us, an officer member said. The casket sits in the corner of the school commons where many students walk between periods. After the students left the presentation, many glanced in the direction of the looming casket, but not many were brave enough to take a closer look. Two students, Daniel Nelson and Katelyn Cozier, however, decided that they would approach. I was riding in a truck once with a friend and I didnt know they had been drinking. We almost hit a tree. It was really scary, said Cozier. The two seemed pretty aware of the consequences of drinking and driving and making poor decisions. I think this helps a lot, said Visual gives LPHS students reason to play it safe A life-and-death decision By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLE Y christopher.tuffley@newssun.co m SEBRING Now th at Senate Bill 736, called t he Student Success Act, is la w, school districts are scram bling to fulfill its requir ements. Teacher and administrat or evaluations are at its core. The Commissioner of Education is required to approve, and the State Boa rd of Education to adopt, form ulas for schools to use in measuring student growt h. School districts are requir ed to administer assessments f or every course offered, esp ecially those not measured b y the Florida Comprehensi ve Assessment Test, which w ill be the primary source of st udent performance data. Student measurements a re emphasized because teache rs will be judged by how we ll their students do on the sta ndardized tests. By law, of t he total teacher evaluation, 5 0 percent is based on tho se scores. The state allows som e flexibility regarding t he remaining 50 percent of t he evaluation, which is based o n observations and document ation, as long as a variety of sources contribute to tho se observations and are weigh ted proportionally li ke feedback from school admi nistrators, parents and st udents, or newly created pe er teacher evaluators. Each district has to subm it its plan to the DOE by June 1 for approval. Districts whi ch do not meet the deadline w ill be denied a share of the Ra ce To The Top (RTT) feder al dollars, which Florida wo n competing against oth er states. The legislature is not pr oviding any funding for t he new evaluation system which is why local distri ct administrators plan on usin g a portion of Highlan ds Countys share of the RT T funds $1.14 of $2.2 m illion to pay for the ne w system. District preps for teacher evaluations News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Lake Placid High School ninth graders Katelyn Cozier and Daniel Nelson believe that setting up a coffin inside the school is an effective way to get students attention about drinking and driving. The coffin was set up earlier this week to remind students to make good choices during prom this weekend. See LPHS, page 6A See TEACHER, page 5A SAOinvestigated Avon Parks dealings with Schulers business See SCHULER, page 8A www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun

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Page 2ANews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.com April 27 162026273753x:2Next jackpot $19 millionApril 23 122232384353x:2 April 20 42040434653x:3 April 27 1123293336 April 26 711162633 April 25 1116242831 April 24 34162226 April 27 (n) 2037 April 27 (d) 1927 April 26 (n) 5233 April 26 (d) 6803 April 27(n) 16 4 April 27 (d) 55 1 April 26 (n) 67 4 April 26(d) 31 9 April 26 151943441 April 22 524394221 April 19 838394210 April 15 259314 April 27 424404455 PB: 5 PP: 2Next jackpot $25 millionApril 23 311474858 PB: 19 PP: 3 April 20 924343643 PB: 27 PP: 3 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center So far in 2011, hype s urrounding todays wedd ing of Prince William a nd Kate Middleton has p robably attracted more m edia attention than the w ars in Afghanistan and I raq combined. As this B ritish ceremony is forcef ed to us by a ratingsh ungry American press, p erhaps we can take a m oment to notice a cerem ony of far greater cons equence. On April 11, Gen. D avid Petraeus visited F orward Operating Base J oyce in eastern A fghanistan. He was t here to thank the battleh ardened soldiers of Task F orce No Slack, who, a long with so many other b rothers and sisters of the 1 01st Airborne Division ( Air Assault), have made a n incalculable number of s acrifices on Americas p ost-9/11 battlefields. The Afghanistan War c ommander specifically w anted to shake the hands o f Capt. Edward B ankston and Sgt. Joshua B ostic. During several c haotic firefights, beginn ing on March 28, these v aliant warriors helped o vercome hundreds of i nsurgents, a blinding s nowstorm and the p ainful loss of six fellow s oldiers to defeat Taliban f orces in the area. Theyre all heroes, T ony Berry told The U nknown Soldiers. They a ll did the same job; some m ade it home and some d idnt. As you may have read i n last weeks column, B errys stepson, Pfc. J eremy Faulkner, was one o f six Screaming Eagles t o not make it home from t he eastern Afghanistan m ission. In an emotional A pril 9 ceremony at F aulkners Jonesboro, G a., church, I had the h onor of witnessing the s oldiers Bronze Star b eing presented to his g rieving family. When Bankston and B ostic both received the S ilver Star from Petraeus, w ith Afghanistans deadly m ountains as a backdrop, t he emotions were overw helming. I would trade all the m edals to get our lost g uys back, Bankston, w ho is from Decatur, Ga., r eportedly said at the cere mony. An article by Sgt. 1st C lass Mark Burrell, who i s doing incredibly valua ble work by reporting f or the Army from the f ront lines, explains how B ankston and Bostic e arned our nations thirdh ighest military decorat ion. Bankston, who was s hot in the leg earlier in h is third and current comb at deployment, rallied f ellow troops amid boomi ng machine guns and r ocket-propelled grenade f ire, which tragically k illed several soldiers a mong them. The way I look at it is t hat I was walking in the f ootsteps of heroes t hroughout the mission, s o I was covered, B ankston said. Whats really important See ROYAL, page 6A The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Wednesday, April 27: Rhonda Nichelle Callahan, 42, of Lake Placid, was charged with contempt of court. Jimmy Ray Jackson, 29, of Avon Park, was charged with battery. Theresa Lefkowitz, 39, of Sebring, was charged with driving with expired license and DUI. Guillermo Lopez, 26, of Lake Placid, was charged with battery. Ricardo Lopez, 26, of Lake Placid, was charged with battery. Lusvin Edward Mota, 25, of Avon Park, was charged with operating a motor vehicle without a valid license. William Patrick Norman, 52, of Lake Placid, was charged with violation of probation reference cocaine possession. Gary Allen Sampson, 52, of Lake Placid, was charged with contributing the delinquency of a minor, interfering with custody of a minor, and trespassing on school grounds. Morton Henry Volvaire, 29, of Avon Park, was charged with driving while license suspended and giving false identification to law enforcement. The following people were booked into the Jail on Tuesday, April 26: Angela Marquerite Bateman, 18, of Avon Park, was charged with battery. Richard Dean Demery, 22, of Avon Park, was charged with criminal mischief, battery, and burglary of an unoccupied conveyance. Antonio Hernandez, 30, of Stuart, was charged with violation of probation reference DUI. Pablo Huron, 33, of Winter Haven, was arrested on an outof-county warrant reference failure to appear for DUI. Noe Luna-Gomez, 28, of Miami, was charged with the four counts of failure to appear reference DUI, no valid driver license, and DUI with property/personal damage. Milagros Burgos Ramirez, 29, of Lake Placid, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference possession of cannabis and possession of drug paraphernalia. Robert Maddox Speakman, 68, of Sebring, was charged with burglary of an unoccupied structure, dealing in stolen property and petit theft. Mark Raymond Wagner, 33, of Sebring, was charged with criminal mischief, trespassing, grand theft of motor vehicle, burglary of an unoccupied conveyance, and grand theft. Kimberly Ann Wester, 20, of Sebring, was charged with violation of probation reference battery. Paul Eric Woodall, 35, of 1018 Lemon Ave. in Sebring, registered as a sexual predator. POLICEBLOTTER Classified ads get results! Call 314-9876 COMMUNITYBRIEFS Dinner to benefit Massey set for Saturday in Avon ParkAVON PARK Chicken Dinner Benefit for the Renae Gunn Massey Heart Transplant Fund will be held Saturday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Lucy Derkman Softball Fields (behind the Hess station). Massey recently had a heart transplan t and is doing well at Tampa General Hosptial. She is 38 years old and marrie d to Wesley Massey, a mother of two and a lifelong resident of Avon Park. Tickets can be purchased for $8 at the following locations: EMCI wireless (Verizon in Avon Park ); Dr. Abanilla (next to Turner Furniture south Avon Park) and Mane Salon ( Avo n Park) Donations can be made to Heartland National Bank in Avon Park: Renae Massey Heart Transplant Fund.Orchid Repotting Workshop is Saturday in SebringSEBRING The Orchid Society of Highlands County and Robbins Nursery are sponsoring an Orchid Repotting Workshop on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Robbins Nursery, 4803 U.S. 27 South. The members of the society will repo t your orchids for you for a nominal fee. You must supply the pots and potting mix; Robbins will have a full assortmen t of orchid supplies for sale. The society is also sponsoring a trip t o the Redlands International Orchid Festival at the Fruit & Spice Park in Homestead on Saturday, May 14. The cost is $35 and includes admission to th e festival. There will be more than 60 orchid and orchid related vendors from around the world. For additional information, contact Ed at 414-5424 or by e-mail at orchidman124@yahoo.com.CAAT summer camp Program set in Avon ParkAVON PARK The goal of the Childrens Academy of Arts & Theatre, (CAAT) is to give opportunity and train ing to up and coming young artists in th e fields of visual art, dance, music, creativ e writing, and theatre both on stage and behind the scenes. Parents and young people enjoy our programs and understand the importance of the Arts to a complete education and to becoming a well rounded individual. We are excited about this summers theatre camp which is a musical version of Hans Christian Andersons The Littl e Mermaid, said Krista Flores director of CAAT. We are anticipating some very Continued on page 5B Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Jennifer Trace could have become another sad statistic, but, due to hard work, sacrifice and a vision of a better life, the South Florida Community College graduate is getting a second chance to make her dreams come true. When Trace accepts her Associate in Arts degree at SFCCs commencement exercises on Wednesday, she will celebrate more than the completion of two years of college. For the 26-yearold single mother and former domestic violence victim, this academic achievement mirrors her own personal growth and renewed self-confidence, which, together, are opening the door to a bright and promising future. Five years ago, Traces future was anything but promising. At age 19, after moving to Sebring to be close to family, she enrolled in SFCC to take the prerequisite courses she needed to enter its nursing program. During her second academic term, she was swept up in a perfect storm of crises that forced her to abandon her pursuit of a college education. First, her father suffered a nearfatal heart attack, causing her to fall behind in her course work. Fearing that she would never catch up, she dropped out of college, hoping to shore up her finances by working full time. Then, she had a child with a man she believed she would marry until domestic violence issues convinced her she was better off alone. At 19, she was an independent young woman, just starting out in life. At 23, she was a single mother, with an infant son to support, a dead-end, low-paying job and a plague of legal issues involving the father of her son. I was working all the time, Trace recalled. It was killing me. I knew I had to get a college education, because I would never be able to make any money without a college degree. In 2008, Trace got a job at Florida Hospital Heartland Division, sometimes working 32hour shifts so that she could spend more time with her son. She moved from apartment to apartment, living for a time with her sister and getting periodic assistance from her mother, grandparents, and other relatives. Still, month after month, once all bills were paid, she often found herself left with as little as $30. That $30 was my grocery money for the entire month, she said. But thanks to a group of Florida Hospital nurses, who encouraged her and helped her financially, as well as her supervisor who arranged for her to work a flexible schedule, Trace returned to SFCC in 2009 and resumed her studies in health care administration. At the time, I was on my own, working and taking care of my son, she recalled. I knew I had to put everything into finishing school as soon as possible. At SFCC, Trace was exposed to New graduate gets second chance to follow her dreams Single mother Jennifer Trace has battled through adversity to get her eduction Courtesy photo Jennifer Trace understands the value of education in opening doors for single mothers like herself. Wednesday, she will accept her associate in arts degree from South Florida Community College with the goal of earning her doctorate in ophthalmology. Being a more educated person on the inside makes you a better person on the outside.JENNIFERTRACE SFCCgraduate See SFCC, page 6A

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Associated PressPLEASANTGROVE, Ala. Dozens of tornadoes r ipped through the South, f lattening homes and busin esses and killing people in s ix states in the deadliest outb reak in nearly 40 years. The Alabama Emergency M anagement Agency said in a news release Thursday that t he total confirmed dead in t he state had risen to 162. Deaths across the region t otaled at least 248. People a lso were killed in T ennessee, Kentucky, G eorgia, Virginia and M ississippi. It was the deadl iest tornado outbreak in n early 40 years. As day broke Thursday, p eople in hard-hit Alabama s urveyed flattened, debriss trewn neighborhoods and t old of pulling bodies from r ubble after the storms p assed Wednesday afternoon a nd evening. It happened so fast it was u nbelievable, said Jerry S tewart, a 63-year-old retired f irefighter who was picking t hrough the remains of his s ons wrecked home in P leasant Grove, a suburb of Birmingham. They said the storm was in Tuscaloosa and it would be here in 15 minutes. And before I knew it, it was here. He and his wife, along with their daughter and two grandchildren, survived by hiding under their front porch. Friends down the street who did the same werent so lucky Stewart said he pulled out the bodies of two neighbors whose home was ripped off its foundation. Alabamas state emergency management agency said it had confirmed 131 deaths, while there were 32 in Mississippi, 30 in Tennessee, 13 in Georgia, eight in Virginia and one in Kentucky. The National Weather Services Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla., said it received 137 tornado reports into Wednesday night. Some of the worst damage was in Tuscaloosa, a city of more than 83,000 that is home to the University of Alabama. Neighborhoods there were leveled by a massive tornado caught on video by a tower-mounted news camera that barreled through late Wednesday afternoon. When I looked back, I just saw trees and stuff coming by, said Mike Whitt, a resident at DCH Regional Medical Center who ran from the hospitals parking deck when the wind started swirling and he heard a roar. On Thursday morning, he walked through the neighborhood next to the hospital, home to a mix of students and townspeople, looking at dozens of homes without roofs. Household items were scattered on the ground a drum, running shoes, insulation, towels, and a shampoo bottle. Streets were impassable, the pavement strewn with trees, pieces of houses and cars with their windows blown out. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Aktion C lub members hopped on d own April 21 to the Avon P ark Community Child D evelopment Center with the E aster Bunny to deliver 109 b askets to the children. Members of the Aktion C lub assembled baskets f illed with candy-filled eggs a nd toys for the children on A pril 20 at Ridge Area Arc. T hey also put together 26 g ifts filled with candy for the s taff at the center. The club p urchased all the items with m oney that they raised t hroughout the year. I got to put grass in the b askets, Aktion Club memb er Rose Tilley said. Members grabbed a basket a nd Tilley stuffed grass in t hem. They then walked a round a table filled with c andy and toys that they each t ook turns putting in the bask ets. Aktion Club member J effrey Crews suited up in the b unny costume on April 21 to v isit with the kids while s ome of the other members h anded out the goodies. Most o f the kids gave the giant seven-foot rabbit high fives and others wanted to hug him. The kids really liked the bunny, Crews said, but there were some who were scared. I liked handing out the baskets to the kids. It made them happy, Aktion Club member Billy Owens said. Aktion Club is a community service group comprised of people with disabilities who perform a variety of services to help others. The club is sponsored by the Kiwanis Club of Sebring. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011Page 3A Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Aspecial L uminaria Ceremony held during t he American Cancer Society Relay F or Life of Avon Park remembers t hose lost to cancer and honors t hose who have survived. L uminarias will be lit at Joe Franza S tadium at Avon Park High School a t 8:30 p.m. Saturday, May 7 to repr esent these individuals. It will be beautiful when all the b ags with candles are illuminated a round the track, said Romona W ashington, luminaria chair. We h ope to have enough luminaria to light the entire area. Anyone desiring to create a luminaria may do so by contacting Washington at 452-0337 for an order form prior to Tuesday. Each luminaria is available with a monetary donation. Anyone who would like to include a photo in the PowerPoint presentation during the luminaria should email it to aprelayforlife@hotmail.com prior to Wednesday. Relay For Life, the Societys signature event, is a life-changing experience that helps us celebrate the lives of those who have battled cancer, remember loved ones lost and to fight back against a disease that takes too much. This unforgettable event raises awareness and funds to save lives, help those touched by cancer, and empower people to fight back against this disease. With the money raised at Relay, your American Cancer Society is working toward an important goal a future without cancer. Teams of eight to 15 members gather with tents and sleeping bags to participate in the largest fundraising walk in the nation. Relay For Life brings together friends, families, businesses, hospitals, schools, churches people from all walks of life. Teams seek sponsorship prior to the Relay, all with the goal of eliminating cancer. Avon Parks cancer survivors (anyone who has ever been diagnosed with cancer) can register at 11:30 a.m. Saturday, May 7 and will be honored at the Relay For Life at noon with the official Survivors Lap after lunch. Information about creating a luminaria, forming a team, or walking in the Survivors Lap is available by calling LeAnn Hinskey at 382-4110. The American Cancer Society is dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by savin g lives, diminishing suffering an d preventing cancer through researc h, education, advocacy and servic e. Founded in 1913 and with nation al headquarters in Atlanta, the Socie ty has 13 regional Divisions and loc al offices in 3,400 communitie s, involving millions of voluntee rs across the United States. For mo re information anytime, call toll fr ee 1-800-ACS-2345 or visit www.ca ncer.org. Luminaria Ceremony to honor cancer survivors, victims at AP Relay NEWS-SUN 385-6155 Courtesy photo Erick Leon, a student at Avon Park Community Child Development Center, applauds the Aktion Club and Easter Bunny when he got a turn to get his basket on April 21. Aktion Club members (from left) Angie Luft, Rob Ward and Sara Canali help hand out the goodies. Aktion Club treats 109 children in Avon Park to Easter goodies Now the competition gets a little tougher, SFCC presid ent Norm Stephenson said. The college has to fill out a n extensive application f orm, which will be reviewed b y the prize committee. The 1 20 colleges will be pared d own to eight or 10 schools. At that time visiting teams w ill make in-depth inspect ions. The winner will then be selected. Stephenson said Floridians should be proud. Of the 120 colleges, 14 are located in state half of the 28 Florida community colleges. Only 33 states, including Florida, are represented in the contest. The application is due in June. The final 10 competitors should be chosen by early fall and the winner should be announced before the end of the year. Continued from page 1A SFCCin running for $1 million prize Death toll from tornadoes climbing

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Page 4ANews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.comTODAYSEDITORIALTODAYSLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION A s state legislators continue to g rapple with the b udget and a $4 b illion funding g ap, there is p rogress at least on o ne front in the b attle against subs tance abuse.The Florida House of R epresentatives has agreed w ith Gov. Rick Scott to keep f unding for substance-abuse p rograms as is, without sign ificant cuts. But the Florida Senate, w hich has added back $10.1 m illion to detoxification prog rams, still wields an ax o ver another $33.4 million in s tate funding for adult treatm ent programs that deal with a ddiction and substance a buse. If the cuts are particularly s evere for adult substancea buse programs, about 2 7,000 people could lose s ervices, according to the F lorida Alcohol and Drug A buse Association. About 1 ,500 jobs in the private sect or not the public sector could be eliminated, as n onprofits have to cut posit ions. And at risk are 492 resid ential beds, which have b een part of the state treatm ent system for years. They c ould be zeroed out, and t hey could never come back. Mark Fontaine, director of the Florida Alcohol and Drug Abuse Association, said losing those beds would be very costly, as they are hard to replace later, when times are better. The reason? The beds have to be zoned by local officials for usage, and that is not easy. Its easy, then, to understand what substance-abuse officials mean when they say cuts will have an impact beyond dollars and cents. Afew million here or there could cost them millions of dollars more in costs and manpower-hours later. And it could cost them resources in later years. For the Florida taxpayer, this wont save money in the long run. It will merely cause reverberations into other areas, such as the criminal justice sector, which we pay for, and various private sectors, such as hospitals that will have to pick up the financial slack. All that gets passed on to the taxpayers and the consumers of the Sunshine State. ... The Senate has already made the choice of staying away from programs for vulnerable populations such as children and teens who need substance-abuse counseling. Adults also need the states helping hand. An editorial from the Daytona Beach News-Journal. Another viewpoint Reduce spending to reduce deficitEditor: Pay additional taxes to reduce the deficit? Willingly or not, that idea is idiotic. All it says to the politicians is Keep right on spending people, well keep right on paying for it. The only sensible way to reduce the deficit is to reduce spending. Period. Unless and until we, the taxpayers, demand that, the politicians will just continue to spend, spend, spend. Tom Walsh SebringIts sometimes hard to follow teachingsEditor: This is in reply to those posts under the article about the entertainment district downtown. I am absolutely fed up with this continual Christian bashing, in this forum and elsewhere. Maybe we Christians should agitate to be included in the anti-hate crime laws now applied to gays, blacks, Muslims and other groups that hate Christians. We are tired of you trying to impose your will on us, while you complain about us imposing our will on you No one forces you to go to church, or to listen to a Christian speak. No one forces you to live next to a church. The churches were here long before you were, and will be here long after. I can not understand why alcohol is so important to you people that you hate those who are opposed to its insinuation into every single place of business serving food. All we ask is the respect you demand, and the simple courtesy of respecting our beliefs even if you are opposed to them. We are willing to allow you to go to Hell in your own way, please allow us to go to Heaven in our own way. Saint Paul, what makes you think that evangelical Protestantism is so dangerous? Is it that your immortal soul is in danger and you know it? Bebo, the church itself may not pay taxes, but most of its members do, and should have just as much say in government as you Christian haters do. Anormal person, please define normal. Is it normal to hate one for ones beliefs? Is it normal to have to get blotto to have a good time? Is it normal to enjoy something that causes so much death and suffering? Is it normal to get so drunk that you dont even realize you just killed someone? Our Lord and Saviour taught us to love even those who hate us, regardless of how we are treated by them, but when rewarded with constant hate it sure can be hard to follow Jesusteachings to hate the sin, love the sinner. John Payne SebringNumbers countEditor: One million seconds approximately equals 12 days. One billion seconds approximately equals 32 years. One trillion seconds approximately equals 32,000 years. Fourteen trillion seconds approximately equals 448,000 years. Our present federal deficit is $14-plus trillion for which every tax payer is obligated to pay, a debt that we, our children, our childrens children will be held responslble for. This is a result of an administration who pushed for and Cogressional Democrats who voted for spending this amount of money to fund government programs. Now these same politicians want to raise our debt ceiling limit beyond the $14 trillion mark. Does this make any logical sense to add to our national debt when we will be struggling for years to pay off our existing debt? Wake up, Mr., Mrs., and Ms. Voter as your future, your childrens and their childrens future is being squandered by our politicians as our countrys financial stability is being destroyed right before our eyes. Dr. Robert Zielinski Lake PlacidA glaring inequityEditor: Recently there was an article in the Tampa Tribune telling about a Recreational Upgrade to Courtney Campbell planned by state (4/8/11). This is regarding a 7.4-mile stretc h of recreational trail that th e Department of Transportation plans to build at a cost of $20 million. During that same timeframe, our local Ridge Are a Arc folks were diligently trying to figure out how to come up with enough money to operate their pro grams for individuals with developmental and other disabilities after Tallahasse e drastically cut their fundin g. Arc trains and educates individuals to reach their capabilities so they can be more independent and thus contribute to his or her ow n life plan. This is such a glaring inequity it is obscene. Anyone with an ounce of compassion can see it is an outright injustice when folks who are working to learn to more completely care for themselves in life are passed over so others can get improvements for their recreation time. It is bordering unspeakable to see this happen. I plan to send a copy of this letter to all our Tallahassee and Washingto n representatives and I hope others would be moved to write as well. Not fair. No t right. Change this. Judith Hink le Sebrin g Ive always felt uncomfortable having an iPhone. Im no high-tech guy and it seemed a little too yuppie for me. It was definitely more Orlando suburb than Avon Park, more fancy loafers than work boots, more Cool Jazz 105 than 99 Country, more Lexus than pick-up truck. Yet my boss thought it would make me more productive. Im a teacher with some distance learning classes and I handle lots of emails. It made sense. It just didnt feel right, like those medical exams we should all get when we turn 50. I first got the phone two years ago just before I left for a history teachersworkshop in Maine. Since I was on a tight budget, I used public transportation rather than renting a car. I got on the bus with my suitcase and headed for my luxury accommodations. After all, Tom Bodett had promised to leave the light on for me. If you have not ridden on a public bus lately, trust me, they have an interesting mix of humanity. I started to reach for my phone and paused. My iPhone was going to stick out like a tuxedo at a tractor pull with this crowd. I just left it in my pocket. That was the start of a rocky relationship. I am not a materialistic guy. I have told myself that my white Dodge Caravan screams out responsible dad paying college tuition. Nearly all my favorite movies in our house are still on VHS. You can even find cassette tapes in my car. I was sure I could hear that iPhone sigh with contempt as it looked at its low-tech, lowrent neighbors. Acouple weeks ago our relationship changed dramatically. I was out walking the dog and talking to my parents. It was the kind of multi-tasking trip that I had been handling for months without incident. Suddenly, the dog lunged and the leash pulled me one way and the phone sought another way. I juggled it for a split second and batted it up in the air. Ominously, the phone went end over and end and landed face down on the sidewalk. I was hopeful because the phone had survived other drops unscathed. I picked it up and turned it over. The screen resembled a map of the Amazon and its tributaries. It looked like the windshield of the Ford Pinto you saw on I-4 that made you laugh out loud. It was now pathetic, but it still worked! Sweet! Now when people see my phone, they often gasp audibly. My wife said, I hope you dont get shards of glass in your ear. I took that as a term of endearment. When you have been married for nearly thirty years, your wife may think you deserve some shards of glass in your body. Last week I was using the phone o n a plane, my seatmate noticed and commented, That is the worst scree n I have ever seen. I laughed. My 27-year-old son, an iPhone owner that fits demographics that Apple corporation covets, said, How can you read that thing? Its like a jig saw puzzle. Just the other day, I set it on the podium before a class. Astudent walked by and stopped. Mr. Bedell, what happened to you r phone? Uh. I dropped it on the sidewalk. Then I smiled to myself. My battered phone can no longer be condescending or snooty. It now fits my working class youth and my less than hip middle age. For my iPhone and me, this may be the start of a beautif ul relationship. John Bedell is a former Avon Park resident and News-Sun correspondent. He now lives in Orlando. Learning to love my iPhone Courtesy pho to Believe it or not, this iPhone still works. Guest Column John Bedell EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. We have to make room for everybody. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; or e-mail editor@newssun.com. To make sure the editorial pages arent dominated by the same writers, letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months. Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the opinion of that author and not necessarily the opinion of the staff or editors of the News-Sun.

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This will not be a perman ent funding source, howeve r, because RTTmoney will o nly be available for two y ears. The high cost of the prop osed evaluation system c omes from the need to hire t hose specialists to do the i ndependent evaluating. The district proposes to h ire a coordinator on a spec ial one-year assignment s chool year 2011-12 to i nstitute the system. That i ndividual would be paid $ 104,628. The next year, the coordin ator would be replaced by a n educational research spec ialist, paid $79,524 annuall y. In addition, beginning t his summer, six peer t eacher evaluators would be h ired to both do evaluations a nd provide feedback for t eachers. Those salaries add u p to $397,626. After additional funds are a dded for development t raining and travel. The prop osed system will cost $ 1,139,404 for its first two y ears. School superintendent W ally Cox and district offic ials were up-beat and posit ive in their presentation d uring a workshop on T uesday. Assistant S uperintendent Becky Fleck s aid that while there were q uestions still to answer, a nd despite the proposed s ystem would be expensive, i t did have value in being f air, consistent and r esearch-based. The particul ar model being debated, she s aid, was chosen by a comm ittee that included the p resident of the teachers u nion, teachers, principals a nd district officials. They felt after research t hat it provided the greatest a mount of reliable, fair and d efensible information, F leck said. School board members, o n the other hand, have reservations. Andrew Tuck expressed doubt six people would have enough time to fairly evaluate the 677 teachers covered by the evaluation law. I dont see how we can do this with six people, he said. For one thing, each evaluator will have to provide four to five formative feedback sessions per year for every teacher on an annual contract with less than four years in the classroom. Then there are the more experienced teachers, who will have fewer feedback sessions, but still require some. Tuck is also opposed to one provision of the evaluation process the fact that an evaluation may be changed within 90 days of its being issued. This is because FCATscores do not arrive until the end of the school year and teacher evaluations have to be ready sooner. I never knew of an evaluation you could change in 90 days, he said. School Board member Ronnie Jackson, a retired teacher and coach, had another concern. We need to improve the evaluation process, he said, but added he still had concerns having to do with the cost of the proposed system and the fact he worried an evaluator could not be fair to a variety of teaching styles. I dont want us to get to where there is only one way of teaching, he said. Several board members pointed out the total $2.2 million coming from RTT would make up the districts shortfall. Tuck and Bill Brantley wanted to know if the money could be used to stop the proposed technical education teacher layoffs. RTTdollars, however, cannot be used for every purpose. Before making a decision the board wants a full understanding of how the money could be spent. Being a workshop discussion, no action was taken Tuesday. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011Page 5A talented teenagers and kids coming out for auditions. Auditions will be Tuesday, May 17 and Thursday, May 19 at the Avon Park Community Center at 310 W. Main St. from 3:30-5:30 pm. There are many male and female roles both singing and non-singing. According to Flores, who adapted The Little Mermaid for the stage, The Polypi are some of the coolest creatures in the play. They are gross looking and comedic as well. Of course, the mermaids have enchanting voices and glittering personalities. Summer camp will run May 24-July 16. The cost of the eight-week camp is $250 per student. Some needbased scholarships are available to students who have the desire to learn about the arts and to perform. The cost of producing live theatre is a reality. The financial support of the community is needed to continue to offer student scholarships opportunities are available. Contact Krista Flores at 212-0800 or Michelle Cathey at 449-0191 for more information. Whats Up Main Street? meeting TuesdayAVON PARK The Avon Park Community Redevelopment Agency Main Street District will host its nexe Whats Up on Main Street? meeting at 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday in the Community Center, 310 W. Main St. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss the Community Strategic Vision of Main Street and all of Avon Park and to develop a more cohesive Main Street Avon Park network where people can share information, happenings and events. Anyone interested in Avon Parks future is encouraged to attend this informative meeting, said Wes Hoadland, CRAdirector. We must first start with what we want our city to be and the vision for our future, then we can discuss how we get there. Call Hoagland and 321287-6543 for more information.St. Agnes holding lasagna dinnerSEBRING There will be a lasagna dinner today at St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3840 Lakeview Drive. Dinner will be served from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. and includes tossed salad, bread, coffee, ice tea, milk and ice cream. Tickets are $8and are available from St. Agnes parishioners or at the door. For more information, please call the church at 385-7649.Events at local lodges and postsAVON PARK The steak dinner sponsored by The United States Military Vets MC held at VFW9853 in Avon Park will be today since the usually scheduled (fourth Friday), date was on Good Friday. After the April Steak Dinner, the date will continue to be on the fourth Friday of the month. The Combat Veterans Memorial VFWPost 9853 in Avon Park, 75 N. Olivia Drive, will host the following events this week: Today Steak dinner for $7, served from 5-7 p.m. Music by Big Freddie from 5-8 p.m. Saturday, April 30 Karaoke by Cowbells from 5-8 p.m. Bar menu served from 4-7 p.m. NASCAR 7:30 p.m. For any questions, call the lodge at 452-9853. LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Moose 2374, will host the following events this week: Today Wings, shrimp and fish 6 p.m. Music with BobKat 6-10 p.m. Saturday Bingo-bango 2 p.m. 12-ounce strip steak served (call for time). NASCAR Richmond, 7:30 p.m. Music with Bud Followell, 6-10 p.m. Spring Fashion Show dinner will be chicken cordon bleu at 6 p.m. and show at 7:30 p.m. Reserved seating, tickets $1 2 per person. For details, call the lodge at 465-0131. The Veterans of Foreign Wars 3880 in Lake Placid, will host the following events this week: Saturday Bingo 2 p.m. For details, call the lodge at 699-5444. The Lake Placid America n Legion Placid Post 25 in Lake Placid will host the fo llowing events this week: Today Barbecue ribs 57 p.m. Music by Buddy Canova 6:30-9:30 p.m. Saturday Auxiliary burg ers 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Classi c Car Show 10 a.m. to 2 p.m Texas Hold-em 1:30 p.m. Karaoke Bill 5-8 p.m. For more information, ca ll 465-0975. The Lake Placid Elks 2661, will host the followin g events this week: Today Fish fry 5-7 p.m Music by Chrissy Harriman For details, call 465-2661 Veterans Connect meeting today in BartowBARTOW Veterans Connect, presented by the Department of Financial Services Division of Consumer Services in partnership with the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs, Polk County Veterans Service Office and the UF Extension Service, will meet from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., today at The Stuart Center, 1710 Highway 17 South, Bartow. Florida CFO Jeff Atwate r invites Florida Veterans to learn more about the many resources available in their community. Educational pr ograms will be available throughout the day for fam ilies, caregivers and professionals who work with vete rans. Veterans Connect was established by state and loc al agencies to help veterans b e more aware of the many benefits and resources avai lable to them. Please visit www.MyFloridaCFO.com t o learn more. Continued from page 2A COMMUNITYBRIEFS The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Classified ads get results! JACK GOLDMAN Jack Goldman, 72, died o n Wednesday, April 27, 2 011, at his home in S ebring. Jack was a man of g reat integrity and whose c haracter was defined by his a ctions and not his words. H e dearly loved his wife, c hildren and grandchildren a nd will be greatly missed. H e was vice-president area d irector for Citibank in New Y ork and moved to Sebring i n 2006 from Sarasota, Fla. He is survived by his w ife, Suzanne Thornton G oldman of Sebring; child ren, Robin Goldman and D onna Hernandez, both of N ew Jersey, and Brett G oldman of Florida; sister, G eri Breunig of Wisconsin; a nd four grandchildren. The family will receive f riends from 2-4 p.m. F riday, April 29, 2011, at S tephenson-Nelson Funeral H ome in Sebring. Everyone i s invited to the residence at 3060 Going to the Sun following the gathering. Arrangements have been entrusted to: Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home Sebring, Fla 33870 863-385-01215 www.stephensonnelsonfh.com EULALOVE Eula Clairene Love, 68, of Sebring, Fla., passed away Wednesday, April 27, 2011, in Sebring. She was born Nov. 21, 1942, to Grover and Thelma (Eakes) Love, in Madison College, Tenn. She was bookkeeper for a service station and had been a resident of Sebring since 1972, coming from Miami, Fla. Eula is survived by many loving family members and friends. Funeral services will take place at 11 a.m. Monday, May 2, 2011 at StephensonNelson Funeral Home, Sebring, with Rev. W. Mike Adams officiating. The family will receive friends the hour preceding the service, beginning at 10 a.m. Interment at Pinecrest Cemetery, Sebring, will immediately follow. Arrangements have been entrusted to: Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home Sebring, Fla. 33870 863-385-0125 Death noticeValorie A. Nietubicz, 58, of Lake Placid died April 24, 2011. StephensonNelson Funeral Home, Sebring, is in charge of arrangements. Lydia Jane Wolcott, 84, of Sebring died April 25, 2011, in Sebring. Arrangements are being handled by StephensonNelson Funeral Home, Sebring. OBITUARIES Continued from page 1A Teacher evaluations will be costly Courtesy photo American Diabetes Association representative Delia Jervier (center) accepts a check from Barb Giese (left) on and Betty Robinson, on behalf of Reflections on Silver Lake. Throughout the season, Reflections hosts numerous fundraising events led by Giese and Robinson (affectionately known as the Hustler Sisters). This years events raised a total of $4,500, which was divided equally between Hope Hospice, the American Cancer Society and the American Diabetes Association. Checks were presented to representatives of each organization during a recent coffee hour. Reflections makes donations

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Associated PressTALLAHASSEE The Florida Senate has passed a property insurance overhaul aimed at creating more competition in the private marketplace and also cut down on fraudulent sinkhole claims. The measure (SB 408) passed on a 25-12 vote after some 50 minutes of debate Thursday. The House is also considering similar legislation. The bills sponsor, Sen. Garrett Richter, R-Naples, said the bill might not fix all of the states insurance problems, but added that he considered it the most consumer friendly bill hes seen this session. The legislation would free company from having to offer sinkhole coverage. Asimilar proposal, minus the sinkhole provisions, was passed last year in the Senate, but vetoed by former Gov. Charlie Crist. Gov. Rick Scott said Thursday he likes many proposals in Richters bill. In other action: Arevised plan to loosen Floridas class size limits has passed the state Senate with little of the opposition thats accompanied past proposals. The Senate voted 38-1 for the bill (SB 1466) and sent it to the House. It would reduce the number of core courses covered by class size requirements from 849 to 304. The Florida Education Association has led the opposition to past efforts by the Republican-controlled Legislature to weaken the limits set by the Florida Constitution. Mark Pudlow, a spokesman for the statewide teachers union, said the new bill is better than past proposals but the FEAstill objects to removing foreign language classes from the limits. Pudlow said the union hasnt yet decided whether it would challenge the bill if it becomes law. Also, the Senate has approved a proposed state constitutional amendment and a bill to ban abortion funding with public and insurance exchange dollars. The largely party line votes in the Republican-controlled Senate on Wednesday sent both House-passed measures back to that chamber with some changes. The amendment (HJR 1179) passed with 27 favo rable votes the minimu m needed to put it on the 201 2 ballot. It would ban publ ic funding already prohibit ed by federal law and exem pt abortion from the Flori da Constitutions strong priva cy right. The bill (HR 79) wou ld exclude abortion covera ge from policies obtain ed through insurance exchang es states must set up in 201 4 under the federal health ca re overhaul. Both include exceptio ns for rape, incest and to prote ct the mothers life, but not h er health. The Senate also h as approved a trio of guns bi lls that expand citizensgu ns rights. All were approved alon g party-line votes on Thursda y. One decriminalizes the acc idental showing of a co ncealed weapon. Aperson wi th a concealed weapon perm it now could be charged with a third-degree misdemean or for inadvertently showing h is or her weapon. Another measure restric ts doctors asking patients abo ut gun ownership. m ore than academics. She f orged relationships with i nstructors who took an i nterest in her personal circ umstances. Dr. Brian Deery, her psyc hology instructor, often s topped to ask how she was d oing, long after she comp leted his class. He r emembered me, Trace said. Sometimes, just talking to h im relieved my worries. Carol Dutton, accounti ng/business professor, b ecame a special friend. She has given me good a dvice career-wise, Trace s aid. But shes a mommy, t oo, and has good advice for m y son. Dutton also introduced her t o Phi Beta Lambda, a stud ent organization that g rooms future business leade rs. Im glad she did, T race said. It cheered me u p whenever I got down, and I learned professional s kills. Trace demonstrated those new-found skills at Phi Beta Lambdas district competition, where she took second place in marketing and decision making and third place in business management. At the state competition, she placed fifth in business management. Trace credits Laura White, associate dean of enrollment management and university relations, with making it possible for her to participate in commencement. She found out I wasnt going to be there because I couldnt afford the cap and gown, Trace said. Later, she called to tell me that one had been donated for me. After commencement, Trace plans to apply for an opticians license. In the fall, she hopes to continue her studies in health care administration at the University of Florida in Gainesville and with the long-term goal of earning a doctorate in ophthalmology. Education makes you a better person, Trace said. Being a more educated person on the inside makes you a better person on the outside. Every Aor BI get makes me want to do better. I feel better about myself that I did when I started going back to college. Now, my son sees his mommy as an educated person, and he tells me he is going college, too. I want to continue that association at the University of Florida. I want him to grow up in an atmosphere where mommy is educated. I also want to reach out to women in my situation and tell them: you can turn it around. You can be a good example for your children. You can get an education. Youll meet so many professional people in college. You dont know what doors those relationships will open. I have gotten where I am today with the help of so many people, Trace said. Im so thankful for everything everyone has done for me. Trace is the daughter of Greg and Joan Trace and Susan and Bill Temples. SFCCs 2010-11 commencement exercises will be 6:45 p.m. Wednesday in the Theatre for the Performing Arts in Avon Park. Burrell also reports that B ostic refused to leave the m ission to seek medical care a fter he was wounded trying t o pull one of his fellow p aratroopers, who later died, t o safety. I know the other guys w ould do the same for me, B ostic, who is from Spring C ity, Tenn., said. It really w asnt a thought. Petraeus has traveled all o ver Iraq and Afghanistan to p ersonally attend these i mportant ceremonies. He b elieves that if battlefield h eroism goes unnoticed w ithin the military and in the g eneral public, then the cont ributions of this new greate st generation as the g eneral calls those to step up s ince Sept. 11, 2001 will b e forgotten. Theres such a pace of o perations, theres such a h igh tempo, that the last t hing that our great soldiers, s ailors, airmen, and Marines o ut there want to do when t hey come back from a miss ion is write each other up f or awards, Petraeus said in October. But we need to do that better, we need to capture the history of our operations better. Every facet of this British royal wedding, from gowns and flowers to guest lists and gossip, is being captured by American journalists. For many weeks, our television, computer and smartphone screens have been filled with information that has absolutely no relevance to our daily lives, as ceremonies honoring men and women who protect us are almost completely ignored. We dont need to watch a royal wedding in London to find heroes. Instead, we can do a better job noticing events like the one our media failed to capture in eastern Afghanistan, and line the streets of American cities when our heroes return home. To find out more about Tom Sileo, or to read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit www.creators.com. Page 6ANews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.com Continued from page 2A Royal wedding overshadows heroes Continued from page 2A SFCCs Trace knows value of education N elson. When you see this i ts like Well, I dont want t o end up in that. Porter agrees that the c asket is effective and s ends a message to students o f the dangers of poor decis ions. Im not trying to scare y ou guys. Prom should be f un, but Im not going to be a t the prom after parties p olicing you. You guys h ave to police yourselves, P orter said. Since Porter began his position as resource officer at Lake Placid three years ago, there have been no accidents. He hopes to keep it that way. Its in the back of their minds, but they have to make the decisions themselves. Some of them will listen to me and to their parents, but most of them go off of what their peers do. Hopefully they will remember this and if they see a friend making a bad decision, then we hope they will step in and be there for them rather than following, Porter said. Porter hopes that the parents will get involved, as well as the entire community, in the safety of the students on prom night as well as graduation night. Its not just about accidents. We dont want any arrests for these students. Some of them have full academic scholarships. One arrest and they could loose $30,000 or $40,000 scholarships and we dont want that, Porter said. Continued from page 1A LPHS students get sobering reminder of prom night dangers News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Lake Placid High School students sit somberly Thursday morning watching a slideshow w ith images of their peers during prom followed by graphic pictures of alcohol-related car crashes. The slideshow and program served as a reminder to abstain from drugs and alcohol during prom, which is scheduled for Saturday at the Highlands County Convention Center in Sebring. State senate passes property insurance overhaul bill

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011Page 7A

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S chuler as an owner of S herco. Sharon Schuler filed her r esignation as president of S herco with the state on Aug. 6 leaving her husband as s ole officer of the company. Although the date stamp f rom the state clearly shows A ug. 6 as the filing date, the h and-written date next to M ayor Schulers signature is J an. 2, 2010. Schuler stated that she had i ntended to resign earlier in t he year. I resigned from Sherco b ack in January of 2010. U nfortunately, the processing o f the official forms was d elayed. If I have made a m istake, it was not intentiona l. This is no longer an issue s ince I have zeroownership i n Sherco Inc., and all forms h ave been properly filed with t he State. I have no further c omments since I have not r eceived the details of the a llegations, Schuler said T uesday in an e-mail. Andrea Allen, a clerk with t he Florida Division of C orporations, told the NewsS un on Monday that public r ecords listed Schuler as p resident of Sherco until A ug. 6, which is well past the s igning of several city c hecks. Even though they dated it J an. 2, it is a public record t hat they are president until t hey file with us, Allen said w hile looking at the record o n her computer. Allen also questioned Jan. 2 as the resignation date w hen Schuler signed as presi dent several times after that d ate. Records show that on Jan. 1 2, 2010 Schuler filed paperw ork as president of Sherco I nc. with the Division of C orporations, and that on M arch 24, 2010 she listed h erself as president on a corp orate record filing making h er husband secretary of S herco. Canceled City of Avon P ark checks reveal that S herco was paid $3,915 from J une through December of 2 010 for work for the city. Florida Statute 112.313(3) s tates No employee of an a gency acting in his or her o fficial capacity as a purc hasing agent, or public offic er acting in his or her offic ial capacity, shall either d irectly or indirectly purc hase, rent, or lease any realt y, goods, or services for his o r her own agency from any b usiness entity of which the o fficer or employee or the o fficers or employees spouse o r child is an officer, partner, d irector, or proprietor or in w hich such officer or e mployee or the officers or employees spouse or child, or any combination of them, has a material interest. Avon Parks City Charter states in section C-11 that No officer of the City of Avon Park and no member of the City Council shall be directly or indirectly interested in any contract with said city...or be in any way interested in a contact for any public work of said city. All persons violating the provisions of this section may be removed from office, and all such contracts, except in cases of emergency, are hereby declared illegal and void. One canceled check dated June 24 for $740 shows that Schuler signed the front of the check as mayor and endorsed it for deposit on the back, using her signature for Sherco. Another $40 check dated July 8 was also signed by Schuler as mayor. City Manager Julian Deleon said that the mayor signing the checks to Sherco was a clerical error and that procedures have been put in place to ensure that such a mistake doesnt happen again. With regards to the Mayors mistake, the City has implemented internal accounting controls to prevent the same issue from occurring. She signs approximately 4,000 checks per year, and a mistake was made, Deleon wrote in an e-mail to the News-Sun. City records show that Deleon, who was director of Public Works at the time, was the one responsible for hiring Sherco for surveying. The process of check signing seems quite simple all the checks are procured by city staff, reviewed by the finance office and then first signed by either the City Manager or Financial Officer, Schuler said in an email to the News-Sun Sunday. I rely on their expertise and executive decision making in order for me to do my part. I cant expect staff to remember every check in a box 50-200 checks and remove just one for me not to sign ... Since this error was first made, city staff now red-flagschecks that are in concern BEFORE they come to me. Then the deputy mayor is called in to sign instead. I regret this honest mistake. However this mistake was discussed at a city council meeting months ago. Five other checks were to Sherco signed by Deputy Mayor Brenda Gray, the citys project manager Maria Sutherland, who was serving as city manager at the time, and Renee Green, the citys financial officer. In response to questions about the investigation, Thullbery stated that he would forward the investigators report and that should answer all questions. The report shows investigator Mike Ivancevich was assigned to the matter and he spent 18 hours over three months looking into the Schuler issue and other complaints, including alleged sunshine law violations, possible fraudulent homestead exemptions on Parke and Maria Sutherland as well as a possible violation of the City Charter involving Mr. (Parke) Sutherland at the time of the election for city commissioner. (sic) The partial report from the state attorney did not include the canceled checks nor statements from those accused. Ivancevich stated that he did not himself interview the mayor about the incidents. I did not make any contact with Mr. or Mrs. Schuler as it pertained to the City of Avon Park conducting business with the surveying company owned by Mr. Schuler, a company also in which Mrs. Schuler (Mayor) was a corporate officer of the business prior to Nov. 2010. This particular issue was addressed in detail by City Attorney Gerald T. Buhr in a memorandum that was addressed to Mayor Schuler and Maria Sutherland on Nov. 18, 2010, Ivancevich states. Buhr stated in his Nov. 18 memo that The mayor must not own a portion of any business that conducts business with the city and makes no decisions as to the hiring of the firm, according to the report by Ivancevich. Buhr also stated, Although she previously had ownership, as of the date of this memo, she does not have any interest in the company. Page 8ANews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.com Continued from page 1A News-Sun T his City of Avon Park check dated June 24, 2010 for $740 to Sherco Inc. was both signed and then endorsed by Mayor Sharon Schuler. Schuler was on record as the president of Sherco on that date. Schulers company did work for Avon Park; mayor signed checks With regards to the Mayors mistake, the City has implemented internal accounting controls to prevent the same issue from occurring. She signs approximately 4,000 checks per year, and a mistake was made.JULIANDELEON interim city manager

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, April 29, 2011Page 9 A The City of Sebring will receive sealed bids in the City Purchasing Department for: I I T T B B 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 2 2 O O D D O O R R C C O O R R R R O O S S I I O O N N & & G G R R E E A A S S E E C C O O N N T T R R O O L L F F O O R R W W A A S S T T E E W W A A T T E E R R C C O O L L L L E E C C T T I I O O N N S S Y Y S S T T E E M M Specifications & General Terms and Conditions may be obtained from our website at: mysebring.com or by contacting Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB by phone 863-471-5110, Fax 863-471-5168, or e-mail: kirkzimmerman@mysebring.com at the City purchasing office located at 368 South Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. If obtaining documents via the website, it shall be the bidders responsibility to check for amendments/changes made to the document. Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked with the bid number and name as to identify the enclosed bids. Bids must be delivered to the City of Sebring Purchasing Office Attn: Kirk Zimmerman so as to reach the said office no later than 2 2 : : 0 0 0 0 P P M M , M M o o n n d d a a y y , M M a a y y 1 1 6 6 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 o o f f t t h h e e o o f f f f i i c c i i a a l l t t i i m m e e c c l l o o c c k k i i n n t t h h e e p p u u r r c c h h a a s s i i n n g g o o f f f f i i c c e e Proposals received later than the date and time specified will be rejected. The City will not be responsible for the late delivery of any bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail, or any other type of delivery service. The submitting firm will be required to comply with all applicable laws, regulations, rules and ordinance of local, state and federal authorities having jurisdiction, including, but not limited to: all provisions of the Federal Government Equal Employment Opportunity clauses issued by the Secretary of Labor on May 21, 1968 and published in the Federal Register (41 CFR Part 60-1, 33 F.2 7804); all provisions of the Public Entity Crimes (Fla. Stat. 287.133, e t seq, as amended) and the provisions in Fla. Stat287.134,et seq,as amended, regarding discrimination. The Sebring City Council reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts Thereof; and the award; if an award is made, will be made to the most responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of the City of Sebring. The council reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB Purchasing Agent Sebring, Florida April 29; May 4, 2011 1055HighlandsCounty Legals NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER A NEW SCHOOL DISTRICT RULE 3.48 AND NOTICE OF POTENTIAL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that the School Board of Highlands County is creating Rule 3.48, Service Animals. The Board will discuss/approve future plans to amend the rule at a regular meeting of the Board on T T u u e e s s d d a a y y , M M a a y y 2 2 4 4 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 at 5:30 p.m. in the Board Meeting Room, George Douglass Administration Building, 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida. If requested by an affected person in writing within 14 days of the date of this notice, a rule development workshop will be noticed in a local newspaper. The request must be submitted to Wally Cox, Superintendent, 426 School Street, Sebring, FL 33870. The purpose and effect of the proposed amendment is to create a policy in accordance with requirements set forth in recent Florida legislation. A summary of the proposed rule is as follows: The purpose of this policy is to implement standards related to service animals as set forth in federal and state law. A service animal is any dog that is trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability. The animal must be trained to perform tasks directly related to the persons disability. A service animal is personal property and may not be brought on campus without the knowledge and permission of the school or District administration. A students need for and use of a service animal must be documented in the students Individual Education Plan (IEP) or Section 504 Plan. The Superintendent shall develop guidelines for service animals on campus. The specific legal authority includes Sections 1001.41, and 1001.42, Florida Statutes.The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will have no effect on small business. The School District believes that the proposed rule or amendment will not result in substantial increase in costs or prices paid by consumers, individual industries or state or local government agencies, and will not result in significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation or international trade and/or alternative approaches to the regulatory objective either do not exist and/or are precluded by law. The cost to the School District of promulgating the proposed rule or amendment is estimated to be $200. The estimated annual cost of implementing and enforcing the proposed rule or amendment is $0. The text of the proposed rule or amendment can be obtained at the Superintendents office, George Douglass Administration Building (Attn. Connie Scobey), 426 School Street, Sebring, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, BY: Wally Cox Superintendent & ex officio secretary 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 11-0020-GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, Plaintiff, vs. FORMAN'S CONSTRUCTION & EXCAVATION, INC., a Florida profit corporation, and ROBERT R. FORMAN, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the ``Final Judgment on Verified Complaint'' (the ``Final Judgment''), entered in the above-styled action on April 11, 2011, the Clerk of Highlands County will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida, as described below at a Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, on May 16, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT ``A'' SCHEDULE ``A'' Avon Park Collateral: All of Lot 2, lying East of Seaboard Railroad right of way in Block 2, Section 15,Township 33 South, Range 28 East, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 33, of the Public Records of Desoto County, Florida, of which Highlands County was formerly a part, LESS AND EXCEPT Atlantic Coastline Railroad right of way and LESS AND EXCEPT road right of ways, LESS AND EXCEPT the following: Commence at the N.E. Corner of Lot 2, Block 2 of Section 15 Township 33 South, Range 28 East; Thence run South 0 Degrees 05'06'' East along the East line of said Lot 2 for a distance of 30 feet to a point on the South right of way line of State Road S 17 A; Thence run North 89 Degrees 49'29'' West, a distance of 239.03 feet to Point of Beginning; Thence continue North 89 Degrees 49'29'' West, a distance of 30.0 feet; Thence in a Southerly direction to a point on the South line of said Lot 2,said point being 230.57 feet North 89 Degrees 52'35'' West of the SE corner of said Lot 2; Thence South 89 Degrees 52'35'' East a distance of 10.27 feet; Thence North 1Degrees 46'44'' West a distance of 633.56 feet to Point of Beginning of said excepted parcel. AND LESS AND EXCEPT: Commence at the N.E. corner of Lot 2,Block 2 of Section 15,Township 33 South,Range 28 East; Thence run South 00 Degrees 05'08''East along the East line of Lot 2, Block 2 a distance of 30 feet to a point on the South right of way line of State Road S 17 A for Point of Beginning; Thence continue South 00 Degrees 05'08'' East along the East line of Lot 2,Block 2 for a distance of 633.02 feet to the SE corner of Lot 2,Block2; Thence North 89 Degrees 52'35'' West along the South line of said Lot 2, Block 2 for a distance of 220.30 feet; Thence North 01 Degrees46'44'' West for a distance of 633.58 feet to a point on the South right of way line of State Road S 17 A; Thence South 89 Degrees 49'29'' East fora distance of 239.03 feet along said South right of way line to Point of Beginning of said excepted parcel, Highlands County, Florida. AND LESS AND EXCEPT: the South 200.00 feet of the following described parcel: Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 2,Block 2, Section 15, Township 33 South, Range 28 East, Highlands County,Florida; Thence run South 00 Degrees 05'08;; East for a distance of 30.00 feet to a point on the Southerly right of way line of State Road #17-A; Thence North 89 Degrees 49'29'' West, along said right of way line a distance of 269.03 feet to the Point of Beginning; Thence continue North 89 Degrees 49'29'' West still along said right of way line a distance of 259.14 feet to a point on the Easterly right of way line of the Seaboard Coastline Railroad; Thence South 03 Degrees 28'07'' East along said Railroad right of way a distance of 634.75 feet to a point on the South line of Lot 2,Block 2; Thence South 89 Degrees 52'35'' East along the South line of Lot 2, Block 2, a distance of 260.14 Feet Thence North 03 Degrees 33'36'' West for a distance of 634.57 feet to the Point of Beginning, subject to an easement for ingress/egress over and across the East 20.00 feet of the above described parcel. AND LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PARCEL: Commence at the N.E. corner of Lot 2, Block 2,Section 15, Township 33 South, Range 28 East, Highlands County, Florida; Thence run South 00 Degrees 05'08'' East, 30.00 feet to a point on the Southerly right of way line of State Road #17-A; Thence North 89 Degrees 49'29'' West, 269.03 feet along said right of way line, 50.00 feet; Thence South 03 Degrees 33'36'' East, 198.81 feet; Thence North 89 Degrees 49'29'' West, parallel to the said right of way line of State Road 17A, 209.46 feet to a point on the Easterly right of way line of the Seaboard Coastline Railroad; Thence South 03 Degrees 28'07'' East along said Railroad right of way a distance of 235.57 feet; Thence South 03 Degrees 28'07'' East along said Railroad right of way a distance of 235.57 feet; Thence South 89 Degrees 52'35'' East, 259.82 feet; Thence North 03 Degrees 33'36'' West, 434.17 feet to thePoint of Beginning. The Real Property or its address is commonly known as 393 County Road 17A West, Avon Par,FL 33825. The Real Property tax identification number is A-15-33-28-010-0010-0000. NOTICE OF DISPOSITION ACCORDING TO THE FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT THE FOLLOWING STORAGE UNITS LOCATED AT THE STORAGE PLACE OF AVON PARK, 395 CR 17A WEST, AVON PARK, FL 33825 WILL BE DISPOSED OF ON MAY 16, 2011, AT 10:00AM. ALL UNITS ARE SAID TO CONTAIN HOUSEHOLD GOODS UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED. Names and unit numbers are as follows: NAME UNIT NUMBER Maude Amy Hall #266 Calvin Crowell II #339 DISPOSITION BEING MADE TO SATISFY LANDLORD'S LIEN, MANAGEMENT RESERVES ALL RIGHTS, UNDER FLORIDA LAW, ALL PAYMENTS MUST BE IN CASH. April 22, 29, 2011 1050Legals NOTICE OF FINAL AGENCY ACTION BY THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT Notice is given that the District's Final Agency Action is approval of the Commercial on 2.58 acres to serve N/A known as N/A. The project is located in Highlands County, Section(s) 20/33S/28E, Township AP South, Range AP East. The permit applicant is 64 West Collision Repair, Inc. whose address is 2215 SR 64 West, Avon Park, FL 33825. The permit No. is 46012638.001. The file(s) pertaining to the project referred to above is available for inspection Monday through Friday except for legal holidays, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the Southwest Florida Water Management District (District). NOTICE OF RIGHTS Any person whose substantial interests are affected by the District's action regarding this permit may request an administrative hearing in accordance with Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes (F.S.), and Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C., of the Uniform Rules of Procedure. A request for hearing must (1) explain the substantial interests of each person requesting the hearing will be affected by the District's action, or final action; (2) state all material facts disputed by each person requesting the hearing or state that there are no disputed facts; and (3) otherwise comply with Chapter 28-106, F.A.C. A request for hearing must be filed with and received by the Agency Clerk of the District at the District's Brooksville address, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 within 21 days of publication of this notice (or within 14 days for an Environmental Resource Permit with Proprietary Authorization for the use of Sovereign Submerged Lands). Failure to file a request for hearing within this time period shall constitute a waiver of any right such person may have to request a hearing under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action, the filing of a petition means that the District's final action may be different from the position taken by it in this notice of final agency action. Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by an such final decision of the District on the application have the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding, in accordance with the requirements set forth above. Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, F.S., to settle an administrative dispute regarding the District's final action in this matter is not available prior to the filing of a request for hearing. April 29, 2011 M M E E S S O O N N M M A A D D R R I I D D T T A A S S C C A A B B A A R R . I I N N C C . 3 3 9 9 5 5 5 5 3 3 9 9 5 5 7 7 U U S S 2 2 7 7 S S O O U U T T H H , S S E E B B R R I I N N G G , F F L L 3 3 3 3 8 8 7 7 0 0 , T T E E R R E E S S I I T T A A D D J J B B A A R R R R E E R R A A / / P P R R E E S S I I D D E E N N T T h h a a s s s s o o l l d d t t h h i i s s b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s t t o o S S E E B B R R I I N N G G K K I I T T C C H H E E N N C C O O R R P P . 9 9 9 9 N N W W 2 2 7 7 t t h h A A V V E E N N U U E E , 2 2 n n d d F F L L O O O O R R A A , M M I I A A M M I I , F F L L 3 3 3 3 1 1 2 2 5 5 ( ( T T r r u u s s t t e e e e A A g g e e n n t t : : S S a a n n t t o o s s G G o o n n z z a a l l e e z z ) ) A A n n y y p p o o s s s s i i b b l l e e B B U U L L K K S S A A L L E E C C R R E E D D I I T T O O R R S S a a g g a a i i n n s s t t M M e e s s o o n n M M a a d d r r i i d d T T a a s s c c a a B B a a r r , I I n n c c . m m u u s s t t b b e e a a w w a a r r e e t t h h a a t t f f i i n n a a l l c c l l o o s s i i n n g g o o f f t t h h i i s s b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s d d e e a a l l w w i i l l l l b b e e h h e e l l d d o o n n M M a a y y 1 1 0 0 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 a a t t 1 1 : : P P M M a a t t t t h h e e b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s l l o o c c a a t t i i o o n n i i n n S S e e b b r r i i n n g g , F F L L F F o o r r a a n n y y r r i i g g h h t t f f u u l l c c l l a a i i m m s s , p p l l e e a a s s e e c c a a l l l l S S a a n n t t o o s s G G o o n n z z a a l l e e z z , T T r r u u s s t t e e e e A A g g e e n n t t a a t t 3 3 0 0 5 5 6 6 3 3 1 1 8 8 5 5 4 4 5 5 . A A p p r r i i l l 2 2 9 9 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001078 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. ROBERTA L. BONFIGLIO A/K/A ROBERTA BREMSER; UNKNOWN TENANTS(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 6th day of April, 2011, and entered in Case No. 28-2009-CA-001078, of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and ROBERTA L. BONFIGLIO A/K/A ROBERTA BREMSER; and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33870 at the Highlands County Courthouse in Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 6th day of May, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: SEE EXHIBIT ``A'' ATTACHED. EXHIBIT A TRACT 5 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF SOUTH BEAR POINTE BOULEVARD AND THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF S.C.F.E. RAILROAD; THENCE SOUTH 12 DEGREES 38'45'' WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 2244.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 12 DEGREES 38'45'' WEST ALONG SAID LINE, A DISTANCE OF 163.56 FEET; THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 05'01'' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1198.43 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 35'13'' WEST A DISTANCE OF 276.40 FEET; THENCE NORTH 90 DEGREES 00'00'' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 54.42 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF SOUTH BEAR POINT DRIVE AND TO A POINT ON A NON TANGENT CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 60.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 10 DEGREES 41'25'' AND A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 23 DEGREES 12'32'' WEST, 11.18 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG THE ARC A DISTANCE OF 11.19 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF 25.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 49 DEGREES 40'47'', AND A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 03 DEGREES 42'51'' WEST, 21.00 FEET; THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG THE ARC A DISTANCE OF 21.68 FEET; THENCE NORTH 21 DEGREES 07'33'' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 167.51 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A A RADIUS 520.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 09 DEGREES 47'59''; AND A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 26 DEGREES 01'32'' EAST, 88.83 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG THE ARC A DISTANCE OF 88.94 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 55 DEGREES 42'48'' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1371.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 10 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N. Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863) 534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 6th day of April, 2011. Robert W. Germaine Clerk Of The Circuit Court By: /s/ Lisa Tantillo Deputy Clerk April 22, 29, 2011 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the ficitious name of SEBRING MOTORS located at 526 Park Street, in the County of Highlands, in the City of Sebring, Florida 33870 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Sebring, Florida, this 26th day of April, 2011. Juan Soto April 29, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-186 IN RE: ESTATE OF A LMA GRACE GAVIN a/k/a GRACE GAVIN, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ALMA GRACE GAVIN a/k/a GRACE GAVIN, deceased, whose date of death was March 12, 2011, and whose social security number is 263-56-0681, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is A pril 29, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Joan E. Ford 1320 Shamrock Dr. Sebring, FL 33875 A ttorney for Personal Representative: / s/ Robert E. Livingston Florida Bar No. 0031259 445 S. Commerce Avenue Sebring, FL 33870 Telephone: (863)385-5156 April 29; May 6, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-163 Division ________ IN RE: ESTATE OF DORIS GREY BENSON a.k.a. DORIS G. BENSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS A GAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of DORIS GREY BENSON a.k.a. DORIS G. BENSON, deceased, File Number PC 11-163, by the Circuit Court for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce A venue, Sebring, Florida 33870; that the decedent's date of death was February 19, 2011; that the total value of the estate is $30,669.14 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address W.R. Benson 2921 Wynstone Drive, Sebring, FL 33875 Terri Stone 228 Coventry Court Ormond Beach, FL 32174 A LL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is A pril 22, 2011. Persons Giving Notice: /s/ W.R. Benson 2921 Wynstone Drive Sebring, Florida 33875 /s/ Terri Stone 228 Coventry Court Ormond Beach, Florida 32174 A ttorney for Persons Giving Notice: / s/ David F. Lanier E-Mail Address: lanier30@embarqmail.com Florida Bar No. 045399 DAVID F. LANIER P.O. Box 400 A von Park, Florida 33826-0400 Telephone: (863)453-4457 April 22, 29, 2011 1050Legals Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under the Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be placed under the Bargain Buy category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com 863-314-9876 DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 314-9876. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 SEBRING COLLATERAL: Real Property tax identification number is C-13-34-28-020-2790-120. Lot 12, Block 279, of LAKE SEBRING SHEET 2, according to the Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 13, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. which currently has the address of 221 West Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33870 (``Property Address''): Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. BOB GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk April 29; May 6, 2011 1055County Legals Classified ads get fast results Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155

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Page 10ANews-Sun Friday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.co m SEBRING -Lake Home 1809 Arbuckle Creek Rd. 1 acre on Dinner Lake. 3BR, 2BA, fireplace, "fixer upper". $150 K. For an appointment Call 863-385-3162 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial SEEKING WELLEXPERIENCED MEDICAL OFFICE HELP P/T. Excellent billing/collection, communication, typing, computer skills & medical terminology are A MUST Fax resume to: 863-471-3206 or email to: medicalofficebilling@yahoo.com OPHTHALMIC ASSISTANT Experienced Ophthalmic Assistant Positions available, COA preferred but not required. Please send resume to: Eye Specialists of Mid-Florida Attn: Human Resources 5032 US 27 N Sebring, Fl 33870 or Fax to 863-385-7442 or Email to cgrice@EyesFl.Com HAIR STYLISTHave your own business without investing. Work in a private room if desired. One week free! Please Call 863-382-2264(days) or 863-655-4040 (evenings) ELIGIBILITY SPECIALIST.15 hrs./wk. Min. High School Diploma. Background in Public Assistance application process preferred. Responsible for assisting clients w/food stamp applications. Fax resume to: 863-452-6882 or email to kelly.johnson@hrhn.org EOE/DRUG FREE. THE HIGHLANDSCOUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT has an opening for a "Tobacco Prevention Program Assistant". Annual Salary range: $29,463.72 ( not negotiable ) plus benefits. Please apply on line at https://jobs.myflorida.com. Refer to requisition number 64003316. Only Sate of Florida Applications will be accepted no resumes, please. Date closes 05/06/2011 EO/AA/VP EMPLOYER. DIRECT SUPPORTPROFESSIONALS wanted for Avon Park Intermediate Care Facility serving disabled adults. HS diploma or 1 year associated experience, valid FL Drivers License and clean criminal background req. Please complete application at 55 E. College Dr., Avon Park, FL 33825. CERTIFIED PATIENTCARE TECH Part Time / per Diem wanted for State of the Art Dialysis Facility. Call Peggy at (863) 382-9443 or fax resume to (863) 382-9242. 2100Help WantedBILINGUAL /SPANISH SPEAKING CASE MANAGER, full time. Receive Referrals and completes annual client assessments; devise care plans; secure and target client support services; maintain case records. Position requires a bachelor's degree in social work or related field. Other directly related job education or experience may be substituted for some of these requirements. Apply in person at NU-HOPE Elder Care Services, Inc., 6414 US Hwy. 27 South, Sebring. EOE DFWP 2050Job Opportunities 2000 Employment 1100AnnouncementsCHECK YOUR ADPlease check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day y our ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:385-6155 News-Sun Classified Having something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what youre doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 314-9876

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, April 29, 2011Page 11 A 1998 NISSANMAXIMA, Burgundy, 4Dr, 6 cylinder, automatic, 62K, cold air, CLEAN, Very Good Condition. $5200 Sorry Sold! 1996 CHEVYS10 Super Cab, 4.3, 5 speed. $1500 o.b.o. Sorry This is Sold! 9450Automotive for Sale1973 NORTON850 COMMANDO One Owner* RareFind 10K miles New paint & chrome Will Accept reasonable offer. 863-382-8985 or 863-465-9100 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation 8000 RecreationLIFT RECLINERELEC. Blue in color. Call 863-655-9622 7560Medical Supplies& Equipment PUPS STANDARDPoodles. 3 Colors. 11 wks. We're cute, playful, Pedigree. Free Range, loving, Guarenteed. In training, learning fast. $900. Call 305-731-6242. We won't last. NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. HAND RAISEDIndian Ring Neck Parrots. Very sweet. Great gifts. $200. Call 863-697-3418 GOOD LOVINGDOG, needs good loving home. Call 863-386-4383. 7520Pets & Supplies SEBRING -Spring Lake Village I 6300 Oak Lane Fri & Sat, 4/29 & 30, 8am 5pm. Something For Everyone! SEBRING -3340 Lakeview Dr. Fri & Sat 4/29 & 30 7am ? White hutch, treadmill, very nice home interiors, S / M ladies clothing, household items. Much Much More! SEBRING -2120 Schlosser Rd. Sat & Sun 4/30 & 5/1, 8am 2pm. Tools, children's clothes & toys, some furmiture, household items. Much More! AVON PARKSat. 4/30 8am 1pm. Moving Sale! 632 S Riverdale Rd. Upright piano, love seat, chairs, tables, dresser, television cabinet, elec. bedding, housewares, generator, tools & much more! 7320Garage &Yard Sales STAINED GLASS,hobby suppl.. grinder, glass, chopper, foil, solderleadless, misc. $100 863-402-2285 SEWING MACHINESinger with cabinet, bench & attachments $100 o.b.o. 863-465-7738 or 863-441-3180 METAL DETECTORTechna model DX-1200, rarely used.Works excellent. $50 863-402-2285 EXERCISE BIKEPrime Fit, stationery w/ digital readings. $50. 863-655-0342 DISHWASHER GENautilos. Almond in color. Excel cond. $75. Call 863-655-9622 BEDRAILS -PUTCO pipe, 1 set for Ford F-150 short bed, very nice $60 863-453-7027 BED EXTENSIONfor Ford F-150 Pickup, aluminum pipe, never used, (New $200) Will sell $75 863-453-7027 AUTOMATIC BREADMACHINE needs a good home $25 863-465-7738 or 863-441-3180 AREA RUG95' X 63' and Runner. 92' x 24'. $40. Call 863-655-9622. AB LOUNGElike new $20 863-4414418 7310Bargain Buys WINDOWS -White, Tinted & Tempered Alum. (2) 4'X8' $350 / (1) 6'X3' $175 / Cabinets w/ Formica Top (3) $150. Call 863-385-3199 VACUUM CLEANERKirby with attachments, $200 o.b.o. & ROOMBA (vacuum) complete, used once $50. 863-465-7738 OR 863-441-3180 7300Miscellaneous TABLE, LEXINGTONwhite wicker 44" w/4 chairs on rollers, 8 cushions. $385 obo. Call 863-465-5694 or 863-243-9108 SOFA -Queen Size like new, Floral mauve shade. 863-453-2851 DINING ROOMSET Broyhil w/2 leafs, dark oak & formica top. 6 chairs, 1 captain. All good shape seats need recovered. $350. Call 863-465-4284 7180FurnitureREFRIGERATOR MAYTAG.Excel cond. 20.7 cu.ft. $150. Call 863-452-1904 7040Appliances 7000 MerchandiseAVON PARKLarge Retail/Office Building, 100 E. Main St. A MUST SEE! 863-295-9272 6750Commercial RentalSEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, W/D, Satellite, full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for Rent SPRING LAKE3BR, 2BA, 2CG, CHA, patio, ceramic tiled liv. room, din. room, kitchen, bath & halls, SS appliances, refrigerator has water on door, micro., W/D hook up. No pets. 863-655-0136 SEBRING 3BR (possible 4BR), 1BA LARGEfenced yard with Citrus trees. Nice area, Indian Streets off Lakeview Dr $600 mo., + 1st & Sec. 863-446-1861 SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 LAKE PLACED3/1. Close to Schools & Shopping. $600. mo. + utilities. $500 dep. For more info. Call 863-465-1354. 6300Unfurnished HousesSEBRING 2240Avalon Rd. 3/2 furn. Small animals ok. Near Shopping Center & Senior Club References $700. first/last. Call 305-387-6863 after 4pm. or 863-237-3129. 6250Furnished Houses AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; Washer/Dryer, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook ups. Students/Seniors Discount Call 863-452-0469. AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL: $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartmentsSEBRING -Downtown on the Circle. Monthy rates starting at $400. payable wkly. Includes elec. & water. No Pets. 306 circle. 863-386-9100 or 954-295-7194. Or go to Bldg. and ask for John. 863-414-7535 6150FurnishedApartmentsSEBRING 3024Spinks Rd. 2/1 Completely refurnished. New Wood Floors. Patio. Washer & Dryer. $600. mo. Call 561-967-7161 6100Villas & CondosFor Rent PLACID LAKEDUPLEX 2/2. Nicely furn./unfurnished. C/H/A. Immaculate. Short term/mo. 863-699-0045 LAKE PLACIDPlacid Lakes, Unfurnished 2BR, 2BA. $400/mo. + 1st. mo. & security. 863-699-0897 or 863-840-2013 6050Duplexes for Rent 6000 RentalsFURNISHED -55 plus Francis II Park. 2BR, 1BA, carport, air. $500 deposit, $475 monthly plus utilities. 1 year contract. Call 419-408-8821 5150Mobile HomesFor Rent PALM HARBORHOMES Has closed 2 Model Centers Save up to 60K on select models Call Today! 800-622-2832 LAKE PLACIDWell insulated home on Paradise corner lot. Five furn. rooms, two baths, plus lg. utility room, tolls incl. Call for info. 863-202-6325 DOUBLE WIDEin 55+ park, fully furn. All you need are clothes & groceries. Ref./ ice maker, CHA, dishwasher, lg. utility rm., W & D, screened porch, includes golf cart. $12,500 obo. 863-465-7738 or 863-441-3180 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesCEMETARY LOTSPinecrest. 4 Joining. Old Section. $1,500. obo. Call 904-287-7110 or 615-653-1118 4280Cemetery LotsLAKE PLACID Tropical Harbor 55+ Lakeside Park, w/all ammenities. 2/2 DW. Tile Sunroom, Laundry & Utility. Lg. Carport. Scenic open location. Moving. Open to offers. Call 863-465-5129. 4100Homes for SaleLake Placid WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 314-9876 Then shop till you drop! DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 314-9876 LOOKING FOR THAT SPECIAL HOME?Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 314-9876 CASTLE HILL Apartments of Avon ParkAccepting Applications for 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts. Available to individuals 62 years or older, handicap/disabled, regardless of age. For rental information & applications please call: 863-452-6565 TDD: 711 THIS INSTITUTION IS AN Equal Opportunity Provider and EmployerLos Apt. de Castle Hill de Avon ParkEstan aceptando aplicaciones para Apts. de 1 y 2 recamaras. Disponible a personas de 62 ancs o mas, incapacidad fisica/mental, no importa la edad. Para mas informacion favor de llamar 863-452-6565. TDD: 711 Esta Institucion Es De Igualdad De Oportunidad Al Proveedor, Y Empleador

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Page 12ANews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.com

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Special to the News-SunSEBRING Sebring Youth Football had another great week. Our guest speakers on Monday were Coaches Chris Cook and Mark Bryan; they both have coached with SYF and now coach for Sebring High School. Thanks to them both for taking the time to come and talk to the players. They explained what it takes to succeed and be great players, which they believe is faith, family and friends. They inspired the kids to do their best. The camp is a huge success and the football players are having fun while learning the fundamentals of football. SYF is proud of our great coaching staff that is working hard with the players. Coach Luke Ancrum is one of our head coaches and has been with SYF for four years. He was an assistant coach for three years and has now stepped up to be a head coach this year, he feels strongly about giving back to his community. He believes that football is a positive activity and a healthy environment for the kids. He also wants to be a positive role model for those players who may not have role models in their lives. It's important to him to make a difference with each and every child he works with, to let them know they can be great at whatever they do as long as they work hard. He instills in them that part of workin g hard includes sportsmanship, integrity an d to never quit. Ancrum says all of the players he wor ks with are very talented. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING Wednesdays e vening rains washed away t he anticipated District 5-5A s emifinal match-up between t he Blue Streaks and Lake W ales, but perhaps it was g ood for Sebring to have a nother day to recover from t heir harrowing, 2-0 win over H aines City in Tuesdays f irst-round contest. The victory over the H ornets was a testament to perception and defense. From the Streaks perspective, it seemed they kept missing out on scoring o pportunities and yet kept d odging bullets by keeping H aines City off the board in n umerous situations. The perception from H aines Citys side was likely q uite the same. For while the final score m ight indicate a lackingd rama pitchers duel, it was a nything but, if only for the s takes of the game. Both Robert Whalen, for t he Hornets, and Sebrings A aron Hart did work through o ne, two, three firsts, Haines C ity mounted a quick threat i n the second as Taylor I ngram reached on an error, going to second when the throw on his hard-hit grounder into the hole at short, sailed to the backstop along the first-base line. Dalton Scarborough then walked and a frozen-rope line drive off Jason SantiagoColons bat looked like it could be trouble. But Evan Lewis was in just the right spot in center to snare it for the first out of the inning. Another liner came off Carlos Rodriguezbat, but second baseman Alex Griffin took a quick step to his left to make the catch and he made the throw to first to double Scarborough off and end the inning. Sebring then mounted its own early threat in the bottom of the frame with Corbin Hoffner drawing a one-out walk and Johnny Knight singling to center with two down. But Whalen worked out of it to keep the scoreless deadSPORTS B SECTION News-Sun Friday, April 29, 2011 Page 3B News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE After snaring a line-drive, Alex Griffin throws to first to double off this Haines City baserunner in Tuesdays 2-0 win for the Blue Streaks. Streaks washed out, await Lake Wales Sebring2Haines City0 See SEBRING, page 4B Photo Courtesy of www.sunbeltsports.o rg Avon Park native Heather Barnes had a big week for Florida Atlantic and was name Sunbelt Conference Player of the Week. By Sun Belt Conference Special to the News-SunNEWORLEANS After leading the Owls to their first series sweep over Louisiana-Lafayette in program history, Florida Atlantics Heather Barnes was named the Sun Belt Conference Player of the week, as announced by the conference office on Monday, April 25. The accolade is the first of the season for Florida Atlantic. Barnes led the Owls to one of the best weeks in recent history. The junior began the week by hitting a three run walkoff home run against FIU when the Owls were just one strike away fro m losing the game. She si ngled and walked in FAU s 1-0 win over Louisian aLafayette. In the second game of the series, Barnes went 2for-4 at the plate and h ad an RBI in FAUs seri es clinching, 4-2 win o n Saturday night. Sunda y, Barnes singled, double d, drew a walk and scored a run in the Owls6-2 w in that finished the sweep. For the week, the Avo n Park native hit .500 (7-o f14) with a home run, had 4 RBI, scored twice, walk ed twice and had a .786 slu gging percentage. She also extended h er hitting streak to 15 game s. Barnes named Sunbelt Player of the Week Courtesy photo On Saturday and Sunday, April 2 and 3, Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 co-hosted with Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 the 31st Annual Florida State Elks Golf Tournament at Spring Lake Golf Club. More than 235 Florida Elks came together here in Highlands County to raise over $13,500 for the Harry-Anna Trust Fund, which is for The Florida Elks Childrens Therapy Services and the Florida Elks Youth Camp. Pictured, left to right, Past Florida State Elk President Merl Sebald, David Sebald, Past State Florida Elk President Don Sansoussi and Jeff Sansoussi. Florida Elks gather, raise big money for Childrens Therapy Photo courtesy of cfl-sports.com A nthony Carruthers dives to snag this throw home in T uesdays 7-5 win over Tenoroc. Carruthers had three hits and three RBI to help the Devils reach the District 9-3A tournament semifinals. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comIt wasnt quite as threatening as the final score indicated, even if Avon Park had to hang on for a 7-5 win after taking a 5-0 lead against Tenoroc Tuesday night in their District 9-3Atournament opener at Charles R. Head Field. They threatened to tie it but never really to take the lead, Red Devil head coach Whit Cornell said. But they scrapped and didnt lay down after we got up on them. We had one bad inning that allowed them to get close, he continued. But it was a well-played game by both teams. Ahard-hitting game as well, as Cornell pointed out that four of the Titans eight hits were for extra bases. But Avon Park did some heavy hitting of itsown as Anthony Carruthers had a big night, going 3-for-3 with three RBI and a run scored. Lane Crossen and Al Brown chipped in as well, Devils hang on, to face Green Dragons Avon Park7Tenoroc5 See AP, page 4B SYF springing forward Courtesy pho to Sebring assistant football coach Chris Cook speaks Monday to the children of Sebring Youth Football during their spring camp. See SYF, page 3B By TIM REYNOLDS Associated PressMIAMI The day began with LeBron James making a playoff analogy out of breakfast, his way of saying the Miami Heat were focused on the first postseason challenge presented by the Philadelphia 76ers and nothing else. Clear the table. Now, James said about 12 hours later, were preparing for lunch. So this much is obvious: There will be som e hunger Sunday afternoo n when Boston visits to open a series both team s wanted. Dwyane Wade scor ed 26 points, Chris Bo sh added 22 points and 11 rebounds, and the He at advanced to the Easte rn Conference semifinals b y topping Philadelphia 9 791 on Wednesday nig ht and ousting the 76ers in five games, four of the m of the grueling variet y, Heat advance past Philly See MIAMI, page 4B

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SYFS BBQ and registrationSEBRING Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is hosting our 2nd Annual BBQ Fundraiser and Tournament on Saturday, April 30 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The BBQ Lunch is $7 and will include a Pulled Pork Sandwich, Baked Beans, Coleslaw, Cookies and a glass of tea. Pick up your meal to go or stay and watch our girls play while you eat. For further information, please email dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201. Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is also conducting registrations for girls ages 10 to 15 now through April 1. Registration is $65 for the first child / $45 for any siblings. For further information, please visit us on Facebook, check out our website at www.eteamz.com/sebringyouthfastpitchsoftball, email us at dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201.Golf for God TournamentSEBRING The Golf for God Tournament will kick off with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start on Saturday, May 7 at Golf Hammock Golf and Country Club. It will be a 2-Person scramble at $65 a person, which includes golf, cart, a $25 dry cleaning certificate, a golf certificate for two rounds of golf and a ball for the ball-drop. You can purchase additional balls for the ball-drop which will take place by helicopter at 1 p.m. over the driving range. It will be a 50/50 cash prize, up to $500. Mulligans will also be available. First, second and third-place winners will receive additional balls for the balldrop. This is a fundraiser for Kayla Griffin who will be on a missionary journey to 11 countries over an 11 month period, spreading the Word of God to the people of these lands. Call the course at 382-2151 to have a registration form faxed to you or pick one up at a near-by course. YMCA Sign-UpsSEBRING The Highlands County YMCAand Eagles Football is doing sign-ups for Youth Flag Football ages 514. Lifeguard Certification Class sign-ups are taking place now for an April 25-30 class.APProject GraduationAVONPARK The APHSProject Graduation 2011 Benefit Golf Tournament will be held Saturday, May 21 at 8:30 a.m. at River Greens Golf Course. The flighted, four-person scramble costs $60 per person and includes greens fee, cart, lunch and prizes. In addition to the action, there will be mulligans, a 50/50 and raffles for purchase the day of the tournament. The grand prize raffle is for a round of golf for two at Doral Golf Resort and Spa. Tee sign sponsorships are going for $50, for a sign and player, it is $100. For more information, contact Suzie Gentry at 446-7368.SFCC Summer Youth CampsAVONPARK South Florida Panther Baseball will be holding Summer Youth Camps from June 13-16 and June 20-23 for children aged 6-13. Each camp runs from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and costs $80 per camp or $150 for both. Registration and sign-in begin at 8 a.m. with the camp to follow, including baseball fundamentals, position instruction, station rotation, games, swimming pool time and a camp T-shirt. SFCC head coach Rick Hitt will serv e as camp director with Panther assistant coach Andy Polk and members of the Panther baseball team will be on hand a s instructors. Campers should bring their individua l baseball attire as well as a bathing suit and towel. The camps will be held at the SFCC Panther field at the Highlands County campus in Avon Park. For more information, call Coach Hit t at the following campus phone numbers at extension 7036: Avon Park/Sebring, 453-6661; Lake Placid, 465-5300; Arcadia, 494-7500; Wauchula, 773-2252.SFCC Fun CampsAVON PARK SFCC Athleticsw ill host a Two Day Fun Sport Selection cam p on Thursday and Friday, June 9 and 10 f or girls and boys aged 6-16. Each day the camp runs from 9 a.m. -3 p.m., with campers choosing their ow n sport, whether Beach Volleyba ll, Basketball, Baseball, Softball or Soccer During the morning portion each da y, campers will stretch, do plyometric s, agility drills, work on strength and flex ibility, learn arm and body care and g et introduced to the Fitness Center. Lunch is then provided with t he campers then delving into the sport th ey chose and wrapping it up with activities in the SFCC pool. Registration and check-in from 8:1 58:55 a.m., and pre-registration is not ne cessary as walk-ups are accepted. The rate for one day is $50 and $95 f or both days. The camp will be aministered by SFC C head and assistant coaches, with he lp from SFCC student-athletes. For questions or more information, co ntact Camp Director and SFCC Athlet ic Director Rick Hitt at 784-7036.Sebring Summer SwimSEBRING The summer season f or public swimming is just about upon us as the Sebring High School pool opens to t he public Sunday, May 1. Pool hours for open swim will be 67:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 -3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays additio nal hours will be added once school is ou t. Cost is $2 per swimmer with big sa vings for frequent swimmers. Afamily pass can be bought for $50 f or the first swimmer and $15 for each add itional family member. Swimming lessons will also be availab le with four separate sessions throughout t he summer for eight differents levels of instruction, ranging from Adult Beginne r, Parent and Tot, Fundamenta ls, Introduction to Water Skills, Pre-Scho ol Aquatics, Fundamental Aquatic Skil ls, Stroke Development, Improvment an d Refinement, Personal Water Safety an d Diving Fundamentals and Fitness. Session I runs from June 13-24, sessio n II from June 27-July 8, session III fro m July 11-22 and session IVfrom July 2 5August 5. Registrations will be Wednesday, M ay 17 from 5-6:30 p.m., Saturday, May 2 8 from 9-10:30 a.m. and Monday May 2 3 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. in the front office at Sebring High School. Water aerobics return as well, with ce rtified instructor Ricki Albritto n, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30-7:3 0 p.m. Cost is just $2 per workout, or just $1 if you have the Summer Swim Pass the fir st class is Thursday, May 5. For more information, please call 47 15500, ext. 229, and leave a message f or Ms. Pat. FIRST ROUND (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEChicago 4, Indiana 1 Chicago 104, Indiana 99 Chicago 96, Indiana 90 Chicago 88, Indiana 84 Indiana 89, Chicago 84 Tuesday: Chicago 116, Indiana 89 Miami 4, Philadelphia 1 Miami 97, Philadelphia 89 Miami 94, Philadelphia 73 Miami 100, Philadelphia 94 Sunday: Philadelphia 86, Miami 82 Wednesday: Miami 97, Philadelphia 91 Boston 4, New York 0 Boston 87, New York 85 Boston 96, New York 93 Friday: Boston 113, New York 96 Sunday: Boston 101, New York 89 Atlanta 3, Orlando 1 Atlanta 103, Orlando 93 Orlando 88, Atlanta 82 Atlanta 88, Orlando 84 Atlanta 88, Orlando 85 Tuesday: Orlando 101, Atlanta 76 Thursday: Orlando at Atlanta, late x-Saturday, April 30: Atlanta at Orlando, TBDWESTERN CONFERENCEMemphis 3, San Antonio 2 Memphis 101, San Antonio 98 San Antonio 93, Memphis 87 Memphis 91, San Antonio 88 Monday: Memphis 104, San Antonio 86 Wednesday: San Antonio 110, Memphis 103, OT Friday, April 29: San Antonio at Memphis, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Memphis at San Antonio, TBD L.A. Lakers 3, New Orleans 2 New Orleans 109, L.A. Lakers 100 L.A. Lakers 87, New Orleans 78 L.A. Lakers 100, New Orleans 86 New Orleans 93, L.A. Lakers 88 Tuesday: L.A. Lakers 106, New Orleans 90 Thursday: L.A. at New Orleans, late x-Saturday, April 30: New Orleans at L.A., TBD Dallas 3, Portland 2 Dallas 89, Portland 81 Dallas 101, Portland 89 Portland 97, Dallas 92 Portland 84, Dallas 82 Monday: Dallas 93, Portland 82 Thursday: Dallas at Portland, late x-Saturday, April 30: Portland at Dallas, TBD Oklahoma City 4, Denver 1 Oklahoma City 107, Denver 103 Oklahoma City 106, Denver 89 Oklahoma City 97, Denver 94 Monday: Denver 104, Oklahoma City 101 Wednesday: Oklahoma City 100, Denver 97 FIRST ROUND (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEWashington 4, New York Rangers 1 Washington 2, Rangers 1, OT Washington 2, Rangers 0 N.Y. Rangers 3, Washington 2 Washington 4, N.Y. Rangers 3, 2OT Saturday: Washington 3, N.Y. Rangers 1 Philadelphia 4, Buffalo 3 Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0 Philadelphia 5, Buffalo 4 Philadelphia 4, Buffalo 2. Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0 Buffalo 4, Philadelphia 3, OT Philadelphia 5, Buffalo 4, OT Tuesday: Philadelphia 5, Buffalo 2 Boston 4, Montreal 2 Montreal 2, Boston 0 Montreal 3, Boston 1 Boston 4, Montreal 2 Boston 5, Montreal 4, OT Saturday: Boston 2, Montreal 1, 2OT Tuesday: Montreal 2, Boston 1 Wednesday: Boston 4, Montreal 3, OT Tampa Bay 4, Pittsburgh 3 Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 0 Tampa Bay 5, Pittsburgh 1 Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 2 Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 2, 2OT Tampa Bay 8, Pittsburgh 2 Monday: Tampa Bay 4, Pittsburgh 2 Wednesday: Tampa Bay 1, Pittsburgh 0WESTERN CONFERENCEVancouver 4, Chicago 3 Vancouver 2, Chicago 0 Vancouver 4, Chicago 3 Vancouver 3, Chicago 2 Chicago 7, Vancouver 2 Chicago 5, Vancouver 0 Chicago 4, Vancouver 3, OT Tuesday: Vancouver 2, Chicago 1, OT San Jose 4, Los Angeles 2 San Jose 3, L.A. 2, OT Los Angeles 4, San Jose 0 San Jose 6, Los Angeles 5, OT San Jose 6, Los Angeles 3 Saturday: Los Angeles 3, San Jose 1 Monday: San Jose 4, Los Angeles 3, OT Detroit 4, Phoenix 0 Detroit 4, Phoenix 2 Detroit 4, Phoenix 3 Detroit 4, Phoenix 2 Detroit 6, Phoenix 3 Nashville 4, Anaheim 2 Nashville 4, Anaheim 1 Anaheim 5, Nashville 3 Nashville 4, Anaheim 3 Anaheim 6, Nashville 3 Nashville 4, Anaheim 3, OT Nashville 4, Anaheim 2AMERICANLEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB New York138.619 Tampa Bay1211.5222 Toronto1113.458312Baltimore1012.455312Boston 1013.4354 Central Division WLPctGB Cleveland158.652 Detroit 1212.500312Kansas City1212.500312Minnesota913.409512Chicago1015.4006 West Division WLPctGB Texas159.625 Los Angeles1411.560112Oakland1213.480312Seattle 1015.400512___ Tuesdays Games Baltimore 4, Boston 1 Chicago White Sox 3, N.Y. Yankees 2 Cleveland 9, Kansas City 4 Seattle 7, Detroit 3 Toronto 10, Texas 3 Tampa Bay at Minnesota, ppd., rain L.A. Angels 8, Oakland 3 Wednesdays Games Baltimore 5, Boston 4 N.Y. Yankees 3, Chicago White Sox 1 Cleveland 7, Kansas City 2 Oakland 2, L.A. Angels 1, 10 innings Seattle 10, Detroit 1 Texas 7, Toronto 6 Tampa Bay 8, Minnesota 2 Thursdays Games Seattle at Detroit, late Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 1st game, late Toronto at Texas, late Boston at Baltimore, late Chicago White Sox at N.Y. Yankees, late Kansas City at Cleveland, late Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 2nd game, late Fridays Games Detroit (Scherzer 4-0) at Cleveland (J.Gomez 0-1), 7:05 p.m. Toronto (R.Romero 1-3) at N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcia 1-0), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (E.Santana 0-3) at Tampa Bay (Price 3-2), 7:10 p.m. Seattle (Vargas 0-2) at Boston (Matsuzaka 2-2), 7:10 p.m. Baltimore (Arrieta 2-1) at Chicago White Sox (Danks 0-3), 8:10 p.m. Minnesota (S.Baker 1-2) at Kansas City (Chen 3-1), 8:10 p.m. Texas (C.Wilson 3-0) at Oakland (Cahill 3-0), 10:05 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB Philadelphia168.667 Florida158.65212Atlanta 1313.5004 New York1113.4585 Washington1013.435512Central Division WLPctGB St. Louis1311.542 Cincinnati1312.52012Milwaukee1212.5001 Pittsburgh1113.4582 Chicago1013.435212Houston915.3754 West Division WLPctGB Colorado167.696 Los Angeles1313.500412San Francisco1112.4785 Arizona1013.4356 San Diego916.3608 ___ Tuesdays Games N.Y. Mets 6, Washington 4 San Francisco 3, Pittsburgh 2, 10 innings Florida 4, L.A. Dodgers 2 Colorado 4, Chicago Cubs 3 Houston 6, St. Louis 5 Milwaukee 3, Cincinnati 2 Arizona 7, Philadelphia 5 Atlanta 8, San Diego 2 Wednesdays Games L.A. Dodgers 5, Florida 4, 10 innings Cincinnati 7, Milwaukee 6, 10 innings Colorado at Chicago, ppd., rain Atlanta 7, San Diego 0 Philadelphia 8, Arizona 4 N.Y. Mets 6, Washington 3 Pittsburgh 2, San Francisco 0 St. Louis 6, Houston 5 Thursdays Games San Francisco at Pittsburgh, late N.Y. Mets at Washington, late St. Louis at Houston, late Chicago Cubs at Arizona, late Fridays Games N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 1-2) at Philadelphia (Blanton 0-1), 7:05 p.m. San Francisco (Lincecum 2-2) at Washington (Marquis 2-0), 7:05 p.m. Florida (Vazquez 1-2) at Cincinnati (T.Wood 1-2), 7:10 p.m. St. Louis (Carpenter 0-2) at Atlanta (T.Hudson 3-2), 7:35 p.m. Milwaukee (Marcum 2-1) at Houston (Myers 1-0), 8:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Correia 3-2) at Colorado (Hammel 2-1), 8:40 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 2-1) at Arizona (Galarraga 3-1), 9:40 p.m. San Diego (Richard 1-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Lilly 1-2), 10:10 p.m.BASEBALLAmerican League CLEVELAND INDIANSPlaced RHP Carlos Carrasco on the 15-day DL. LOS ANGELES ANGELSOptioned RHP Matt Palmer to Salt Lake (PCL). MINNESOTA TWINSPlaced OF Delmon Young on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 19. Recalled OF Rene Tosoni and RHP Anthony Swarzak from Rochester (IL). Optioned RHP Eric Hacker to Rochester. OAKLAND ATHLETICSPlaced C Kurt Suzuki on the paternity leave list. Recalled C Josh Donaldson from Sacramento (PCL). TEXAS RANGERSPlaced RHP Darren O'Day on the 60-day DL. Purchased the contract of RHP Ryan Tucker from Round Rock (PCL). National League WASHINGTON NATIONALSPlaced RHP Chad Gaudin on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 26. Activated RHP Henry Rodriguez from the 15-day DL. Optioned LHP Lee Hyde outright to Syracuse (IL).BASKETBALLNational Basketball Association GOLDEN STATE WARRIORSAnnounced coach Keith Smart will not be retained for the 201112 season.HOCKEYNational Hockey League FLORIDA PANTHERSSigned D Keaton Ellerby to one-year contract. NASHVILLE PREDATORSRecalled D Teemu Laakso and D Chet Pickard from Milwaukee (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALSRecalled F Mathieu Perreault, F Steve Pinizzotto and D Patrick McNeill from Hershey (AHL).COLLEGEAPPALACHIAN STATENamed Kolby ODonnell associate head volleyball coach. LEWIS-CLARK STATENamed Brandon Rinta mens basketball coach. NORTHERN ARIZONANamed Travis Baker defensive line coach. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid TODAY: Baseball at District Tournament,Avon Park,Championship Game,7 p.m.,if necessary Sebring TODAY: Baseball hosts District Tournament,Championship Game,7 p.m.,if necessary Avon Park TODAY: Baseball hosts District Tournament,Championship Game,7 p.m.,if necessary P P R R E E M M I I E E R R L L E E A A G G U U E E S S O O C C C C E E R R S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 9 9 : : 5 5 5 5 a a . m m . Sunderland vs. Fulham . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NASCAR Hansen 400. . . . . . . F F O O X XM M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . L.A. Angels at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Regional N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, St. Louis at Atlanta or L.A. Angels at Tampa Bay . . F F O O X X 7 7 p p . m m . Baltimore at Chicago White Sox . . . . . . . W W G G N NT T R R A A C C K K A A N N D D F F I I E E L L D D S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . U.S.A. vs. The World at Penn Relays . . E E S S P P N N 2 2Times, games, channels all subject to change C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Arkansas at Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 3 3 p p . m m . Alabama at Mississippi State . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 7 7 p p . m m . Auburn at South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NC C O O L L L L E E G G E E S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . Oklahoma at Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NG G O O L L F F F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Ballantines Championship . G G O O L L F F 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . LPGA Avnet LPGA Classic . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA Zurich Classic of New Orleans . . . G G O O L L F FS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Ballantines Championship . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA Zurich Classic of New Orleans . . . . C C B B S S 4 4 p p . m m . LPGA Avnet LPGA Classic . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F FN N B B A A P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . San Antonio at Memphis, if necessary . . E E S S P P N N 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Oklahoma City at Denver, if necessary . . E E S S P P N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . Atlanta at Orlando, if necessary . . . . . . . . T T N N T T LIVESPORTSONTV NBA Playoffs WNBA Major League Baseball Transactions Page 2BNews-Sun Friday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.co m

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Golf HammockLast Monday, April 25, the Mezza group played individual Pro-Am golf at the Golf Hammiock Country Club. Denis Shank shot a 71 and made plus 10 to take first place inA group and Joe Martini, with a plus 2, took second place and Chuck Ford had a minus 1, good for third place. Pat Dell had a plus 7 and tied with Billy Parr for first place in B group. Larry Lamparski had a plus 3 good for first place in Cgroup and Janet Regan in second place with a plus 2. Paul Brown had a spectacular day with a plus 10 for first place in D group while Bob Hugheshad a plus 2 for second place. Lee Stark made plus 5 for first place in E group and Larry Holzworth made plus 3 for second place. Frank Branca came alive with a plus 4 to take first place in F group and John Tyner made plus 2 for second place. Next week there will be a shotgun start beginning at 8 a.m. at Golf Hammock. For more information, call Pete Mezza at 382-1280.Harder HallThe ladies league played a Blind Partners game on Thursday, April 21. Tying for first/second places were Pat Rice and Helen Sayre; Patty Maxcy and Jackie Christopher with 147 each. Lake June West Golf Club A scramble was played on Thursday, April 21. Winning first place was the team of Orville and Eva Huffman, Helen Mellon, Rex Simmons and Ken Rowen with 48; second place, John and Virginia Simmons, Margaret Schultz, Charlotte Mathew and John Howarth with 49; and third place, John and Shelly Byron, Cal Billingsley, Jan Westerfield and Gloria Huggett with 53. Closest to the pin: (Ladies), No. 2, Betty Billau, 2-feet; and No. 8, Margaret Shultz, 13-feet. (Men), No. 4, Orville Huffman, 3-feet-1-inch. The mens association played a Best Ball event on Wednesday, April 20. Winning first place was the team of Rich Loomis, John Simmons, Rex Simmons, Dave Colvin and Ernie Hall with 34; and second place, John Byron, Doyan Eades, Ken Strong, Roger Childers and John Ruffo with 41. Closest to the pin: No. 2, Rex Simmons, 6-feet-8-inches; No. 4, Rich Loomis, 14-feet5-inches; and No. 8, Dave Colvin, 6-feet. The ladies association played a league event on Monday, April 18. Winning first place was the team of Virginia Simmons, Sylvia West, Janice Barringer and Gloria Huggett with 36; and second place, Helen Mellon, Betty Billau and Pat Asmus with 39. Closest to the pin: No. 2, Helen Mellon, 13-feet-6-inches; and No. 8, Sylvia West, 3-feet-1-inch.Placid LakesThe Mens Association played a Two Best Ball Plus all Net Birdies tournament Wednesday, April 27. Frank Fisher, Bob McMillian, Gene Ransom and AlVerhage teamed up to card a -31 to take the win by just one stroke over the -30 brought in by John Goble, Ed Bartusch and Cody Coates. Bruce Miseno, Chuck Fortunato and David Moiles finished in third with a 28 while Fisher had closest to the pin, getting to 3-feet, 5-inches on No. 2.River GreensAn evening scramble was played on Friday, April 22. Winning first place was the team of Jerry Lewis, Linda Therrien, Jiim Sisemore and Tom Stewart with 59. Tying for second/third places were the teams of Clay Davis, Len and Rhonda Westdale, Jo Sherman and Pat Graf; Charlie Seralde, Tim Thomas, Chuck Berryman and Jack Sayre with 60 each. The Morrison Group played a game on Thursday, April 21. The winners were: Tying for first/second places were Romy Febre and Jim Cercy; John Smutnick and Paul Johnson with 57 each. Tying for third/fourth places were Bill Mountford and Harold Kline; Bob Stevens and Lefty St. Pierre with 58 each. The ladies association played a pro am tournament on Thursday, April 21. Winning first place was the team of Nancy Long, Bob Stevens, Bev Rudd and Michele Koon with plus-9; second place, Laura Smutnick, Pauline Bridge and Pat Kincer with plus-5.5; and third place, Elaine Keppler, Donna Johnson and Linda Therrien with plus-3.5. Individual winners were: First place, Michele Koon with plus-5. Tying for second/third places were Pat Gower and Laura Smutnick with plus-4.5 each. The mens association played a pro am tournament on Wednesday, April 20. Winning first place was the team of Peter March, Bob Stevens, Paul Johnson and Jim Anderson with plus-13; second place, Brian VanSlooten, Bill Mountford, Cliff Aubin and Cliff Steele with plus-11; and third place, Al Farrell, Ken Koon, Gil Heier and Romy Febre with plus10. Individual winners were: Flight A Jim Anderson with plus-11. Flight B Ken Koon with plus-6.5. Flight C Brian VanSlooten with plus-8.5. The Morrison Group played a game on Tuesday, April 19. Winning first place was the team of Jim Anderson, Joe Graf, Gil Heier and Paul Johnson with minus-31; second place, Butch Smith, John Smutnick, Cliff Steele and Cliff Aubin with minus-30; and third place, Jim Cercy, Cliff Aubin, Lefty St. Pierre and Ken Brunswick with minus-28. The Golfettes played a game on Tuesday, April 19. Winning first place was the team of Michele Koon, Carol Roy, Bev Rudd and Pat Graf with minus-27; and second place, Linda Therrien, Penny Anderson, Mary Beth Carby and Helen Ochala with minus-22.SpringLakeThe SpringLake Women's Golf Association played an Individual Low Gross/Low Net Flighted Tournament on Wednesday, April 27, on the Panther Creek Course. The Low Gross winners were: Flight A Marsi Benson with a 79, Flight B Pam Ferguson with an 84 and Flight C Carolyn Irvine with an 85. Marilyn Redenbarger won Low Net Flight A with61.Mary Cebula was the Flight B winner with67 and Ann McWilliams won a Flight C tiebreaker at 67 over Sharon Hubbard, Carole Frederick & Julia Starr. SpringLak On Tuesday, April 26, the Spring Lake Mens Golf Association played a Four Man Team / 3 Club Monte event in which each player was limited to 3 golf clubs and every shot counted(less handicap, with a max of triple net bogey).It was held on the fearsome Panther Creek course. The winning team, with 287 (net) strokes, included Joe Austin, Bob Rogers, Ray McKenzie, and Leon Van. The team gross total of 352 averaged out to 88 strokes per man and a net average of 72 strokes. Second Place went to Bob Hinde, Charlie Keniston, Bob Berg, and Joe Smith with 305 net strokes.This group of "seasoned" golfers had gross scores of 92, 92, 93 and 94, totalling 371--very consistent. In Third Place, the team of Don Cunning, John Delaney, Pat Shatney, and Chips Ryan came in with 308 net strokes. On Tuesday, April 19 and Thursday, the 21, the club held a two day, pick your partner tournament in which Two Man Teams played both balls on the first day and 1 Best Ball on the second day. This tournament was flighted, with the first day played on Cougar and the second day played on Panther. Winners of the A Flight were Bo Bohanon and Bob Rogers with 127 (first day) and 62 (second), totalling 189 net strokes. Second place went to John Danko and Bill Lawens with 135/59 totalling 194 strokes. Third place A Flight went to Jan Hard and Jack Hoerner 138/58 totalling 196 strokes. In the B Flight, the team of Richie Eastep and George Thomas won First with 184 strokes (124/60). Second Place went to John Bozynski and John Delaney with 186 strokes and Third was won by Chips Ryan and Ray McKenzie with 190 strokes. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011Page 3B As a child, Ancrum played for Pop Warner then went on to play at Sebring Middle and Sebring High Schools. After he graduated he played college football at Bethune Cookman University for two years until he was injured. Ancrum loves the game of football, but knows what comes first in his life and that is his faith and family which he learned from his role model, his father Reverend Earl Ancrum, who taught him that Jesus Christ and his family are the most important. We at Sebring Youth Football feel blessed and lucky to have him be a part of our organization. As a reminder, Monday, May 2 at 5:30 p.m. the Cheer Camp will kick off. If you have not registered yet please come out on Monday. Cost is $10 and the camp is three weeks. For questions regarding the camp, please call Amy at 381-4801. We look forward to seeing you there. Continued from 1B SYF blessed to learn lessons from Ancrum SEBRING The 28th Annual Blue Streak Golf Classic is set to tee off Saturday, May 7, at Sun N Lake, with a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. The Sebring Firemen, Inc., are the major sponsor for the event which benefits Sebring High School Athletics. Entry fee is $60 per golfer for the Four-Person, Flighted Scramble and includes one mulligan, lunch, beverages, prizes, cart, greens fee, range balls and loads of fun. Among the plethora of prizes are a 50 widescreen plasma, HD television and IPads courtesy of ABC Appliences as well as a Hole-In-One prize of a 2011 Ford donated by Bill Jarrett For-Mercury. Blue Streak Scramble rules dictate that each team members tee shot must be used twice and professio nals are not eligible for hol ein-one prizes. Entry forms can be picked up at the Sebrin g High School front office or at Sun N Lakes. Checks to be ma de payable to Sebring Hig h School. For more informatio n, call Terry Quarles at 47 15500. 28th Blue Streak Golf Classic

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perhaps none more nailbiting than the finale. Were going to be ready, Wade said. Philly got us ready. Mario Chalmers scored 20 points off the bench and James finished with 16 points, 10 rebounds and eight assists for Miami. Joel Anthony who played 39 minutes without a single field-goal attempt made a pair of critical free throws with 16.8 seconds left for the Heat. Winners of a playoff series for the first time since the 2006 NBAfinals, the Heat have little time to savor the winning flavor. Boston took three of four in the regular season, plus ended both Miamis season and Jamesstint with the Cleveland Cavaliers in the 2010 playoffs. We understand where we are in this league and where the Celtics are, Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. Theyve proven themselves. They were the Eastern Conference champions last year. If we want to get to anywhere where we want to go, and the goals that we set for ourselves early in training camp, we have to go through them. And it wouldnt be right if we didnt play them. Boston punched its ticket to the second round on Sunday, and the Heat insisted they were not looking ahead to the Celtics. Good thing, because Philadelphia was far from a pushover. Andre Iguodala and Elton Brand each scored 22 points for Philadelphia, which got 13 from Thaddeus Young, 12 from Jodie Meeks and 10 from Jrue Holiday. We were proud to have these guys on our team, said Brand, one of only two Philadelphia starters with postseason experience before this series. They listen, they work hard and theyre going to get better. Being vets ... it can be tough kind of playing with young guys. But not these guys. Wade made a 3-pointer with 8:34 left, pumped his fist on his way up the sideline, and Miami was up 8171. The celebration was way, way, too early. Philadelphia chipped away steadily, getting within two points on three occasions and after Steve Javie called a technical against Wade for arguing with 51 seconds left cut Miamis lead to one point twice, first on the technical free throw at 90-89 and again at 92-91 after Iguodala made a jumper with 36 ticks remaining. Those were the final points of Philadelphias season. The Sixers started 3-13, then got into the playoffs and wound up pushing Miami to the edge. We fought to the finish, Philadelphia coach Doug Collins said, as we said we were going to do. James created a bit of a stir before the game by, of all things, quoting rapper Jay-Z. Asked after Miamis morning shootaround practice about the need to finish Philadelphia off on Wednesday to allow time to finally start preparing for Boston, James said the Heat were focusing on, just finishing our breakfast, the lyric Jay-Z used. Collins shrugged it off as an analogy. But some Sixers seemed to take offense at the comment Lou Williams was giving teammates various breakfast-item nicknames before the game, saying some were fruit salad, others flapjacks. Maybe it was no coincidence that James was nearly held to another breakfast food a bagel, otherwise known as 0 points in the first half. He had only three poin ts at intermission, matchin g his playoff career low, an d the stage was set for anot her down-to-the-wire night That was a long buffet , Brand said. We kept com ing. We didnt give up. Wade capped it with a dunk with a half-secon d left, as white seat covers g ot tossed around the arena t riumphantly by the sello ut crowd. Collins and Spoelst ra shared a warm handsha ke moments later, most of t he two rosters exchang ed quick hugs, and then Miam i retreated back to its lock er room for a moment or tw o of celebration. Four out of five game s, it came down to the la st minute, down to the wire , Sixers center Spenc er Hawes said. It soun ds cliche, but a couple bounc es here and there you don t know which way it can go . NOTES: Philadelphia s combined scoring marg in over Miamis starters to open games grew to 92-5 0 for the series, after a 14 -4 start on Wednesday. l ock intact. Hart cruised through a p erfect third and the Streaks w ere able to cash in with t wo in the bottom half. With one out, Seth Abeln s ingled on a line-drive to c enter and soon stole seco nd. Matt Randall looped a s ingle to center, moving A beln to third, before L ewis drew a walk to load t he bases. Haines City then dodged o ne of those bullets as a J esse Baker shot to short w as thrown home to force A beln, but with the bases s till packed, Hoffner took o ne for the team, getting p lunked with a pitch to b ring Randall in for the first r un of the game. Then, in a seeming ploy, c ourtesy runner Kyle C unningham was caught s traying too far from second a nd a rundown soon started. But as soon as Whalens t hrow commenced the p otential back-and-forth, L ewis broke for home and s lid in safely for a 2-0 lead. Haines City wasnt about t o go quietly, however, as t hey put two more on in the f ourth, with Griffin turning a double play to get out of i t. Sebring looked to add to i t when Knight walked and s tole second to start the bott om of the fourth, but W halen worked out of it u nscathed. Another threat came in t he fifth when two more H ornets reached with one o ut before Hart caught Jadia O rtega looking and got a pop out from Chris Rheaume. Again in the sixth, Haines City looked to get on the board when Whalen doubled with one out and looked to score on hard shot by Ingram to left. But Gunnar Westergom came charging in to snag it on the slide and threw behind Whalen to double him off and end the inning. I thought it was going to drop, Westergom said. But it just stayed up and I was able to get to it. In the bottom of the inning, Sebring put two runners on in hopes of breaking it open and adding a little cushion, but Whalen worked out of it and the Hornets mounted their final threat. Scarborough walked, which signaled the end of Harts game effort on the night as he gave way to Nate Greene. Greene promptly got Santiago-Colo to fly out to center, but Rodriguez soon singled and the runners moved to second and third on a Kyle Moores ground out. But Greene finally ended the drama with a strike out to move Sebring to the semifinal against the Highlanders Thats what happens with good defense, Blue Streak head coach Hoppy Rewis said. If a team is making mistakes, it will get away from them. Lake Wales had easily disposed of Ridge Tuesday, with a 10-0, mercy-rule win, and Winter Haven won Wednesdays earlier semifinal game with a 5-0 win over Liberty to secure the Blue Devils a berth in the title game. The Highlander, Blue Streak contest was moved to Thursday night and had Sebring waiting another day for revenge. Lake Wales won both regular season contests by one run, scoring early and then staving off Streak rallies. We just need to get out of the first inning against them, Rewis said. Page 4BNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.com LAKE PLACID Green Dragon Basketball will be holding itsannual summer camp from June 13-17 at the Lake Placid High School Gymnasium for boys and girls in grades 2-8. Camp will run each day from 8 a.m.-4 p.m., with the final day ending at Noon. Cost of the camp is $65 and all campers will receive a Dragon Basketball camp Tshirt. Campers can bring lun ch or purchase lunch items at camp concessions each day Drinks and other snac ks will be available at a reaso nable cost. Half-day options are al so available. Call or text Linda Vel ey for details and other inform ation at 441-0299, or ema il veley131@comcast.net. Dragon Summer Hoops Camp This summer the South Florida Community College volle yball program has more camps to offer than ever before. Listed below you will see opportunities for sand and indo or camps. If there is a camp date that you could attend but the a ge group is different than yours please call and special arrang ements could be made. Individual private sessions for indoor and sand are ava ilable year-round. Call/Email to schedule today! June 2011 Sand: 13th-16th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:30-10:3 0 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor: 13th16th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 11:30-1:3 0 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps June 13-16th: $100 July 2011 Sand: 11th -14th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:30 -10:3 0 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor: 11th-14th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 11:30-1:3 0 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps July 11-14: $100 July 2011 Indoor: 25th-28th (4 days) Monday-Thursday Morning Session (Grades 5-8) 9:30-11:30 a.m. $60 Afternoon Session (Grades 9-12) 2-4:30 p.m. $75 Contact Coach Crawford with any questions at kim.craw ford@southflorida.edu cell: 863-835-2377, or Office: 86 3784-7037. Panther Volleyball Camps News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Wednesday evenings rain postponed the Sebring, Lake Wales semifinal contest to Thursday night at Firemens Field. Continued from 1B Sebring looking to get past Highlanders w ith two hits each and C rossen scoring twice and B rown knocking in three. And so the win set up a d istrict semifinal game a gainst county rival Lake P lacid Thursday night., w hich ensures a Highlands C ounty representative in the d istrict championship schedu led for Friday. Amatch-up that has seen t he Dragons win twice during t he regular season, but with n ot too much of a difference t o be overcome. We probably had our w orst two innings of the year i n the two games against t hem, Cornell said. Afiver un inning in a game we lose 5 -4 and a four-run inning in a 4 -1 game. And at this time of year, w ith teams so closely m atched, and with the sort of familiarity these two squads have with one another, anything can happen. We just havent played well against them this year, Cornell said. If we come out and play well, we could win convincingly. If we dont play well, well get beat. But if both teams come out and play well, this one will be a dog fight. In Tuesdays earlier action, Fort Meade got past Frostproof and was to face top-seeded McKeel in Thursdays early game. The front-running McKeel, with only two district losses on the season, saw both those losses come at the hands of the Miners. See Sundays News-Sun for a recap of both Thursdays semifinal round and Fridays championship game. Continued from 1B AP facing LP in district semis Photo couresty of cfl-sports.com A lfred Brown rapped out two hits and drove in three in T uesdays win for Avon Park. Continued from 1B Miami sets to face Celtics in second round

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011Page 5B HEALTHYLIVING By MARK SHERMAN Associated PressWASHINGTON The Supreme C ourt cast doubt Tuesday on efforts b y states to limit drug manufacture rsuse of information about the p rescription drugs that doctors like t o prescribe. The court took up a dispute b etween the state of Vermont and c ompanies that sell doctorspres cribing information to pharmaceut ical companies, though without p atient names. The drug makers use t he data to tailor their pitch to indiv idual doctors. The Vermont law had prevented t he sale of information about indiv idual doctorsprescribing records w ithout the doctorspermission. But several justices said the soc alled data mining law raised troub ling constitutional concerns b ecause it appeared to make it harde r for brand-name drug makers to s tate their case, while placing no s imilar restrictions on the state, i nsurance companies and others who favor the increased use of cheaper generic medicines. Chief Justice John Roberts said the Vermont law seemed to be censoring what doctors could hear. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said the court has ruled in the past that governments cant lower the decibel level of one speaker so that another speaker, in this case the generics, can be heard better. Afederal appeals struck down the Vermont law as a restriction on commercial free speech that violates the First Amendment, but another appeals court rejected the constitutional challenge and upheld similar laws in Maine and New Hampshire. The case also is being closely watched by consumer groups that fear a broad ruling could call into question federal and state consumer privacy protections. The Obama administration and 35 states urged the court to uphold Vermonts statute. On the other side, The Associated Press joined other media companies and press freedom groups in urging the court to strike down the Vermont law and extend broad constitutional protection to the gathering and use of computerized data. Pharmacies are required by state and federal law to collect information about prescriptions. The pharmacies sell the information to companies that, in turn, sell it to the drug companies. The data reveal what drugs doctors prescribe, including changes in brand-name drugs they choose for their patients and their use of generics. The information is extremely valuable to the drug companies, which spend a reported $8 billion a year marketing their products to doctors. Backers of the laws generally believe that drug prices are too high and that one reason is the money drug makers spend to market and advertise their products. The laws supporters say that by preventing the sale of the information, they help protect medical privacy, control health care costs by promoting generic drugs and improve public health. Bridget Asay, Vermonts lawyer, said the drug companies do not have a right to the information without the consent of the doctor. Justice Antonin Scalia was among several justices who said doctors can simply choose not to meet with the drug companiesrepresentatives if they want to avoid the sales pitches. Justice Department lawyer Edwin Kneedler said the restrictions on data mining are in keeping with laws that prohibit the commercial exploitation of driver license information. He also said the law aims only at the one-on-one pitches that the sales reps make to doctors using information about that individual doctors prescribing trends. Widespread television and other media advertisements are unaffected, Kneedler said. Justice Anthony Kennedy jumped in at that point. What youre saying is the state can prohibit the most efficient form of speech. Three companies that sell t he information they gather IM S Health, SDI and Source Healthca re Analytics challenged t he Vermont law. The drug industrys trade grou p, the Pharmaceutical Research an d Manufacturers of America, al so joined the lawsuit because t he Vermont law also prohibits dru g companies from using the inform ation for sales and marketing purpo ses. The lawsuit says the informatio n about doctorsprescribing patter ns is important in helping spot trend s, keeping tabs on the safety of ne w medications and studying treatme nt outcomes. Thomas Goldstein, representin g the companies, said one remarkab le feature of the case is that t he Vermont law is not focused on fal se or deceptive advertising. The Foo d and Drug Administration regulat es what claims drug makers m ay make, Goldstein said. Supreme Court questions limits on use of prescription data Special to the News-SunRita Goldberg cant believe some p eople still teach kids to swim by p roverbially throwing them in the w ater to see if they sink or swim i nstinctively. Many parents and even some t raumatic swim programs still use t hat ancient and ridiculous method o f introducing children to swimm ing by throwing them into the w ater without any knowledge about s wimming whatsoever and all t hey are doing is teaching their child ren how to be terrified of the w ater, said Goldberg, a former n ational swimmer in Great Britain, o wner of a swimming school and a uthor of the childrens book I L ove to Swim (www.ilovet oswimthebook.com. These advocates claim they are t eaching survival, but I believe t eaching survival can be and s hould be gentle and fun. Goldbergs lament is that too m any children drown needlessly e very year, and too many parents a re either resistant to teaching their t oddlers to swim, or teach them the w rong way. No child, and I mean no child, h as to ever drown in a swimming p ool again if they are taught how to s urvive in the water the right way a nd at the earliest possible age, she a dded. Drowning is actually the second l eading cause of accidental death in t he country. It is leading in Florida a nd a few other states, and the real t ragedy is that most every child who d rowns could have been saved by s imply being taught to swim corr ectly. Traumatizing them only teaches t hem to fear the water, and who a mong us makes the best choices, or c an even process calm thought, w hen we are afraid? Children are no d ifferent. They need to be given the t ools to survival and draw their conf idence in the water from that k nowledge. We want kids to respect t he water, not fear it. Goldbergs tips for teaching kids t o swim include:Start youngNew studies show that the best a ge to teach a child to swim is b etween the ages of six and 12 m onths. Just as parents are learning t his is a good time to teach child ren how to read, they are beginning to understand this is a time when children are able to absorb information like sponges. Teaching them to swim at this early age is a great way to make swimming second nature to them. Float to surviveAs a supplement to safeguarding your kids through extra vigilant supervision and a safety gate around the pool, focus on giving your child the best lifesaving tool you could offer them the ability to survive in the water. The first gift I give children when I teach them is the ability to float on their backs. This is the most important survival skill of all. This enables all swimmers to rest, breathe and call for help, thus alleviating the silent danger of floating face down. Gentle and funSwimming will come more naturally to children who are taught gently, without trauma, and with a sense of fun. You cannot teach a 2year-old not to go near the swimming pool. You cannot teach them that the pool is dangerous. Parents see the swimming pool as a potential death trap for their kids, but all kids see is a big, wet playground. Youre not going to change their opinion, so stop trying. Focus on calm, gentle fun, and your kids will take to their lessons like fish to water. Parents need to understand that playing in a swimming pool is the same as playing on dry land to children, she added. Its all play to them. While its important for them to feel confident in the water, we need to help temper that confidence with a strong sense of safety and good judgment. Adhering to those rules as parents will serve to reinforce those rules, however, the best way to pull it all together is to start them young. Once both swimming and safety are second nature to them, theyll be safer and your supervision of them in the water will be more fun for everyone. Tips for teaching kids to swim Metro Services Children need to be taught early to respect the water, but not to fear it. Snapshots Health Department offers Diabetes SelfManagement classSEBRING The Highlands County Health Department is offering Diabetes Self-Management Education classes as part of its Wellness and Diabetes Education Program. This program serves Highlands County residents of all ages especially those with diabetes or at risk for develop ing diabetes These classes are free of charge and provided by a certified diabete s educator. Classes in English are scheduled in Sebring from 5:30-8:30 p.m. May 2-4 an d from 8:30-11:30 a.m. May 16-18 at the Highlands County Health Department (7205 S. George Blvd., con ference room B). Enrollment is limited and registration is required. To register and for more information, contact the HCHD Wellness and Diabetes Education Program at 382-7294. Ace Homecare plans outreach eventsAce Homecare communi ty outreach events for May include: Monday 8 a.m., Healt h Fair, Brookside Bluffs, Stat e Road 17, Zolfo Springs; 10 a.m., Health Fair, NuHope Elder Services, 310 N. 8th Ave., Wauchula; 1 p.m., Caregivers Support Group, Crown Pointe Assisted Living Community, Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring Tuesday 10 a.m., Health Fair, Fair Havens, Apartments, Spinks Road, Sebring; 1 p.m. Health Fair, Groves, behind Sebrin g Diner, U.S. 27, Sebring, Wednesday 8 a.m., Health Fair, Villa Del Sol, behind Winn Dixie, U.S. 27 Avon Park; 9 a.m., Health Fair, Avon Park Meal Site, Main Street, Avon Park. Thursday 10 a.m., Caregiver training, Balmor al Assisted Living Facility, 93 Balmoral Road, County Continued on page 6B

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Page 6BNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.com Road 621, Lake Placid; 10:30 a.m., Caregivers support group, Balmoral Assisted Living Facility, 93 Balmoral Rd,County Road 621, Lake PlacidAmplified telephone distribution SEBRING Hearing Impaired Persons will distribute amplified telephones to Florida residents who have a hearing or speech loss, in the conference room at Nu-Hope Elder Care Services, 6414 U.S. 27 South in Sebring, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday. By appointment only. Call (941) 743-8347.HALLO-hosted programs on breakSEBRING Traumatic Brain Injury Group, New Beginnings meets every first Thursday of the month at 6 p.m., October through March, at the office of H.A.L.L.O., 112 Medical Center Ave. The goal of the group is to create a positive, supportive setting and experience in which the traumatic brain injury population can address physiosocial and adjustment issues related to their injury. Patient fellowship, self-improvement, education and social activities will be stressed. Heartland Amputee Group meets every second Thursday of the month during season (October through March) at 1 p.m. for coffee hour at H.A.L.L.O. Check local listings for speakers. The groups main purpose is to give support, encouragement and exchange information and product knowledge to amputees of all levels, both recent and experienced, their family members and friends. Heartland Amputee Group is organized through Handicapped Americans Love of Life Organization bringing to people opportunities to reach personal goa ls and objectives. Low Vision Information Group meets every third Thursday of the month during season (October throug h March) at noon at St. John s United Methodist Church o n Grand Prix Boulevard in Sebring except when specia l arrangements have to be made for guest speakers. T he groups purpose is to exchange information and product knowledge through lectures and demonstration to all people experiencing problems with low vision, particularly macular degeneration. For any other informatio n on any of these programs o r if you would like to be on the post card notification list, call 385-1196, email halloinc@embarqmail.com or write: H.A.L.L.O., P.O. Box 7082, Sebring, FL 33872. Cornerstone Hospice Volunteer Training LAKE PLACID Would you or anyone you know have time to contribute two to four hours or more a we ek to read a book or magazine run a local errand, free a caregiver for a much neede d break, or simply keep a Hospice patient company? Would you like to help with the Cornerstone SALUTES ceremonies planned to hono r and recognize veteran patients? Would you have time to help in a number of ways? Anew Cornerstone Hospice (nonprofit) Volunteer Training has been scheduled over a two-day period for Tuesday, May 17 and Tuesday, May 24 from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (lunch an d snacks provided). Volunteer applicants mus t attend both class days to take place at Southern Lifestyle Assisted Living Facility at 1297 U.S. 27 N. in Lake Placid. Call 3824563 for information or to reserve your seat. Continued frompage 5B HEALTHYLIVING Snapshots DearPharmacist: My d ad used to eat almonds all t he time, he said it helped w ith his headaches and j oint pain. I inherited this c ondition, lucky me ... and I m not sure if they work or n ot but I eat them once a w eek. Is there any medicin al truth to the almond f olklore? C.P., Portland, Ore. Answer: The National H eadache Foundation ident ifies 20 types of headaches, r anging from simple tension h eadaches to the dreaded m igraine. What they have in c ommon is that they all d rive you nuts to one extent o r another. But research s uggests that nuts is good or are good, in this c ase. Its been discovered t hat almonds, for instance, c ontain salicin which, when c onsumed, forms salicylic a cid, the primary by-produ ct of aspirin metabolizat ion. We all know what a spirins for dont we? T his is why your dad feels b etter eating them. Anecdotal evidence has s ome headache sufferers c laiming that eating a lmonds daily has a cumul ative effect. In other w ords, regular headaches m ight become less severe a nd/or disappear gradually w ith regular consumption of a lmonds. Over time, eating 1 0 to 15 almonds per day m ight give you relief from t hat jackhammer in your h ead. I say might because s ome people are allergic to s alicin, an ingredient in a lmonds. So if your throat i tches, or your tongue and l ips swell whenever you eat a lmonds, then this regal litt le gem might not be for y ou. Otherwise, eat up. You can make or buy c ommercially prepared a lmond butter. Almond butt er is a healthier (and tastie r, I think) alternative to p eanut butter. It also seems to be lest allergenic than peanuts. In my home, Sam makes me fresh almond milk. I buy raw, organic almonds and soak them overnight in water. Then I skin the almonds and he blends them, then mixes them with a few other ingredients. My video on how to make this is posted on youtube and Ill also send it via email to those of you who subscribe to my free health newsletter (sign up at my Web site, www.DearPharmacist.com). The recipe is on page 343 of my book, Diabetes Without Drugs (Rodale 2010). Besides the natural pain pacifier they already contain, almonds are rich in magnesium, a mineral that helps to lessen nerve excitability and increase muscle relaxation. They provide even higher amounts of vitamin E, potassium, and manganese, and a little bit of copper, riboflavin, zinc and phosphorous. Even though a quarter cup of almonds contains 18 grams of fat, 11 of those are the heart-healthy monounsaturated kind. Whats more, emerging research suggests that eating almonds does not result in weight gain, and may even contribute to weight loss due to the nuts tendency to cause a feeling of fullness after eating them. So next time you feel a headache coming on, go ahead and get a little nutty with almonds.Did you know? Quercetin is a natural antihistamine, you can buy it in health food stores nationwide if you have seasonal allergies. Suzy Cohen is a registered pharmacist and the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and Real Solutions. For more information, visit www. DearPharmacist. com. This information is not intended to treat, diagnose or cure your condition. Headaches driving you nuts? Then eat some Dear Pharmacist Suzy Cohen Metro Services Eating almonds might help you get rid of your constant headaches. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK All nine s tudents in this years South F lorida Community College D ental Hygiene programs g raduating class have passed t he written Dental Hygiene N ational Board Exam. This continues the except ional trend of SFCCs dental hygiene students achieving a 100 percent passing rate on the exam. By passing the written Dental Hygiene National Board Exam, prospective dental hygienists become eligible to sit for the Florida Dental Hygiene Board Exam, which requires them to demonstrate their skills on a patient. Once they pass the Florida Dental Hygiene Board Exam they become licensed to work as dental hygienists. Not all programs can boast that their students have a 100 percent passing rate, said Becky Sroda, director, Allied Health. I believe it is because of the high quality instruction they receive from our instructors in their prerequisite and program courses at SFCC that we are able to achieve this every year. All nine of SFCCs dental hygiene students pass national exam Got something to sell? News-Sun classified ads get results! Call 314-9876

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A tonement Lutheran ChurchSEBRING The Second S unday in Easter celebration w ill be led by Deacon David T horesen. Council meeting is T uesday at 6 p.m. in the C ounting Room. Aspecial invitation is b eing extended to all churche s and people in the commun ity to come and experience t he Labyrinth Prayer Garden w hich is on the east side of t he churchs premises. How? You walk it very s lowly, try to really empty y our mind or focus it, you g et to the center, stop, cons ider your place before God a nd then you walk back out p erhaps this time, reflecting o n how Jesus might guide y our steps when you leave. T oo often we forget the p romises of God. In the face o f uncertainty, instead of do-it-yourself Christianity, l et us turn to God in prayer a nd let Him fix our probl ems. Prayer will transform o ur country, community and o urselves. The Labyrinth was patt erned after a famous one in F rance, in memory of a form er member, Kaitlyn G ossett. It is open seven d ays per week for all to c ome and pray. Its been r eferred to as a walking m editation. A von Park Church of ChristAVON PARK Renewal Time (Colossians 3 :1-4), will be the Sunday m orning message presented b y Minister Larry Roberts. T he Lords Supper is served e very Sunday. There will be a dinner in t he fellowship hall immedia tely following the morning w orship. All members and g uests are invited to attend. The Timothy Class will m eet Sunday afternoon. Jeff P arker is in charge. Avon Park Church of C hrist is at 200 S. Forest A ve. For information call 4 53-4692 A von Park Church of the NazareneAVON PARK On S unday morning, Chaplain D avid L. Cowles will preach a nd sing. His message will b e The Hope of the R esurrection based on I C orinthians 15. Cowles is a retired minist er and directs Pacer M inistries (www.pacerministries.org). The Avon Park Church of the Nazarene is at 707 W. Main St. For more information, please call the church office at 453-4851.Christ Lutheran ChurchAVON PARK This Sunday, Pastor Scott McLean will be preaching a sermon entitled Gamaliels If. The church is at 1320 CR 64, east the Avon Park High School. For more information, call 471-2663 or visit christlutheranavonpark.org. This is an LCMS congregation.Christian Science ChurchSEBRING The lesson sermon on Sunday morning is titled Everlasting Punishment. The keynote is from Jeremiah 31:3, The Lord hath appeared of old unto me, saying, Yea, I have loved thee with an everlasting love: therefore with lovingkindness have I drawn thee. The church is at 146 N. Franklin St.Christian Training Church SEBRING The Rev. Linda M. Downing will bring the message titled Easter Seals: Part 2 at the Sunday morning service. The Wednesday night Bible study will continue the book of Hebrews. Eastside Christian ChurchLAKE PLACID The midweek Bible study and discussion time is Wednesday. This is an informal setting with open discussion. The Sunday morning worship celebration contains a traditional style of worship music. Communion is offered weekly. The Agape Cafe is open from 9:45-10 a.m. All are invited to join members for fellowship and refreshments before worship services.Emmanuel United Church of ChristSEBRING The Rev. George Miller will deliver the Sunday morning sermon Fearless Forgiveness with Scripture taken from John 20:19-23. The church is 1.7 miles west of U.S. 27 on County Road 634 (Hammock Road). Call 471-1999 or visit sebringemmanuelucc.com. Fellowship Baptist Church AVON PARK This week, Pastor Bill Cole will be preaching The Resurrection, So What? as a follow-up to Easter services. Guests are invited to join all services and the monthly fellowship lunch which follows the morning service. The church is at 1000 Maxwell St. From U.S. 27 North, turn right at Advanced Discount Auto Parts and the church is on the left. Visit www.apfellowship.org for additional information.First Baptist Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK Rev. Jon Beck, senior pastor, will be speaking at the morning and sevening services. Nursery is available for the morning service. The church is at 100 N. Lake Ave. For more information, call 453-6681 or e-mail info@fbcap.netFirst Baptist Church of Placid LakesLAKE PLACID Pastor Darryl George will preach the sermon entitled The Fathers Endorsement of His Son! with regards to Luke 3:21-22. The church is at the corner of Washington and Kemper Avenues in Placid Lakes. A nursery is provided for all services. For more information, please call 465-5126 from 8 a.m. to noon Monday through Thursday or e-mail the church at placidlakes@hotmail.com.First Christian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK Sunday, the church will be looking to the Scripture John 2:12-22 in the sermon Want Proof? Listen! The pastor will be preaching this sermon from his Hear It, See It, Speak It, Believe It sermon series. Bible studies for all ages, from infant through senior adults are available on Wednesday. All ladies will receive a gift as they leave the Mothers Day service next Sunday. First Christian Church of Avon Park is at 1016 W. Camphor St. (behind the Wachovia Bank). Call 4535334 or e-mail us at firstchristianap@embarqmail.com. The website is www.firstchristianap.com.First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)SEBRING At the Lords Table this Sunday morning will be Walter and Anna Coley. Communion will be served by Jayne Weldy, Carol Graves, Carol Chandler and Gretchen Ames. Greeting the congregation will be Eugene Stutzman and Judi Stutzman. Leading us in the Call to Worship will be Ann Holly. Noel and Juanita Roberts will be working with Childrens Church in May. Lighting the candles during the month of May will www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011Page 7B RELIGION Say, have you heard of Brics? How about SDR o r IMF? Hi, my name is Pastor R einhold Buxbaum from The W ay Church, and I like to h ave a word with you. There are new terms flyi ng around and many dont k now their meaning. Brics stands for Brazil, R ussia, India, China and S outh Africa. These count ries have met together and d ecided to bypass the A merican dollar to do trade w ith each other. Lets cut out the middle m an. How about the SDR? It s tands for Special Drawing R ight. It is made up of a basket of currencies. M ainly the US dollar, the E uro, the British pound and t he Japanese yen. Originally i t was created to replace the g old and silver standard. The IMF (International M onetary Fund) administers t he SDR. So what? you might ask. Well, lately the voices to replace the US dollar as the world trade currency have become stronger. This fall or winter there will be a vote at the United Nations level to address this question. If the dollar is replaced with the SDR, it would be a first step towards the new world currency. Again you say, so what? First of all it would hurt the US dollar greatly, since 70 percent of all dollars are in foreign countries and would have to be exchanged. Secondly, the US would no longer be able to just print their own money to pay debt. But most importantly it would move us much closer to the Biblical end time scenario of one world currency leading to one world government, leading to a one man control, called Antichrist. Almost 2,000 years ago, God told us in the Bible that just such a man will appear on the world scene. He will control all the world banking and commerce. Remember that this prophecy was penned long before our computer-driven society! Until recently, you could not have even dreamed how a person could have such a great control. Yet Revelation 13:16-17 reads: He also forced everyone, small and great, rich and poor, free and slave, to receive a mark on his right hand or on his forehead, so that no one could buy or sell unless he had the mark (NIV) The technology of such a mark already exists in the form of a chip the size of a grain of rice. The company that produces them is called Applied Digital Solutions out of Palm Beach. The name is VeriChip and is implanted with a needle just under the skin. So after you fill your basket at your local grocery store, you swipe your hand with the chip and the bank automatically takes the amount out of your account. Sounds great, right? No more stolen credit card, no more lost purse. But here is what you give up: Control. Somebody can shut you down if you dont cooperate. Thats scary. But its coming! Yes, the stage is set for the second coming of Jesus! Reinhold Buxbaum is Pastor of The Way Church, he teaches An Evening in Prophecy at Homers Restaurant at 6:30 p.m. the first Monday of each month. World moving toward one currency, just as Bible predicted Guest Column Reinhold Buxbaum Church News RELIGION GUIDELINES: The News-Sunpublishes religion news on Fridays. The submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday to be considered for publication in the following Fridays paper. Submit items to theNews-Sunsfrom 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays; fax to 385-2453; send e-mail to editor@newssun.com; or mail to Lifestyle Editor,News-Sun,2227 U.S. 27 South,Sebring,FL 33870. For information, call 385-6155,ext. 516. Get the paper delivered to you! NEWS-SUN-6155 Continued on page 8B New Life Anglican FellowshipLAKE PLACID New Life Anglican Fellowship, an orthodox Anglican parish in the Gulf Atlantic Diocese of the Anglican Church of North America, celebrated its first Easter Sunday service at 10 a.m. on April 24. The worship service, which was a blend of traditional hymns and contemporary praise and worship songs, was held at 370 East Interlake Blvd. in Lake Placid. New Life Anglican Fellowship is a missional fellowship out of Servants of Christ Anglican Church in Gainesville. The Rt. Rev. Neil Lebhar, Bishop of the Gulf Atlantic Diocese, has given the task of establishing an orthodox Anglican presence in Highlands County to the Rev. Susan T. Rhodes and her husband, David W. Rhodes, both of whom are local attorneys. The Rev. Alex Farmer, the rector of Servants of Christ Anglican and Dean of the Gainesville Deanery, commissioned the couple during a Sunday worship service in March at the church. New Life Anglican Fellowship combines adherence to Scripture, a missionary vision and a spirit for worship with a rich tradition in the Church. The fellowship worships on Sunday at 10 a.m. at 370 East Interlake Blvd. in Lake Placid. The service is followed by a time of fellowship and refreshments. St. Agnes hosting lasagna dinnerSEBRING There will be a lasagna dinner today at St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3840 Lakeview Drive. Dinner will be served from 5-6 p.m. and includes tossed salad, bread, coffee, ice tea, milk and ice cream. Tickets are $8 and are available from St. Agnes parishioners or at the door. For more information, please call the church at 385-7649.Celebration of Family setSEBRING First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine at 111 Lake Josephine Dr., invites everyone to its Celebration of Family on Sunday and on May 8. Sunday at 11 a.m., ther e will be a guest speaker from the Baptist Children Home in Lakeland. On May 8 at 11 a.m., mothers will be honored i n the Mothers Day Service There will be special recognition to the oldest and newest mothers and the mother with the most in attendance in church. There will be great music and a message on the importance of families. A ll are invited. Call the church office a t 655-1524 or check out email Padreahrens@yahoo.com Union Church serving breakfastAVON PARK There will be an all-you-can-eat pancake breakfast at the Union Church on Saturda y, May 14 from 7:30-10:30 a.m. The breakfast will consist of pancakes, sausage, scrambled eggs, juice and coffee for the low price o f $5 per person. Women's Ministry plans movie nightSEBRING The First Baptist Church of Sebring Womens Ministry team invites women of all ages to a special movie night Tuesday, June 7, at 6:30 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Light refreshments will be served. Use the Pine Street entrance. Snapshots VIEW ALL OF TODAYS ADS > MARKETPLACE ADSVIEW ALL OF TODAYS ADS > For over 74 years, the News-Sun has recognized the achievements of our graduating Seniors. This year is no exception, we will publish our Salute to the Seniors Friday, May 29 in the full-run of the News-Sun. And weve made it affordable to congratulate your special senior. Please contact Vickie Jones by May 14, 2009 to reserve your space for your special graduate.386-56312227 US 27 SOUTH SEBRING 2009 Graduation Edition Leanna We are all so proud of you. We know you will go far! Online ad expires 5/17/09 2009 GRADUATION EDITION Check out THE new Marketplace Ads at www.newssun.comYOUR HOMETOWN ONLINE NEWSP APER REPOR TING LOCAL NEWS WHEN IT HAPPENS.

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Page 8BNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. childrens choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. childrens mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and womens prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Saturday 3-3:45 p.m. or first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life! Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church.Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP b e Nina Kunsak. Adrienne Diaz w ill be with the children in the n ursery during the month of May. Rev. Rons sermon is titled Jesus Ascends into Heaven from L uke 24:50-53. The church is at 510 Poinsettia A ve. Call 385-0352.First Presbyterian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK On Sunday, P astor Johnsons sermon is entitled Seeing Jesus based on Luke 2 4:1-12. The choirs introit is He Is E xalted and the anthem is We H ave Seen the Risen Lord. Sunday School is available for a ll ages. Maxine Johnson, adult t eacher, continues the study of D avid in II Samuel Chapter 12 in w hich Nathan rebukes David. W endy Garcia teaches the youth c lass and discusses issues of today a nd how the Bible instructs us. Members are asked to bring nonp erishable items for the Church S ervice Center. There will be no Youth Band or Y outh Group this evening. The W omens Ministries Executive B oard will meet at 6 p.m. Pastor Johnson will lead the W ednesday morning Bible study g roup in the study of Revelation. On Thursday, the Mens Fellowship will meet at The Depot at 7 a.m. for breakfast and then return to the church for a short Bible study and then to a members house for a work project. Members are asked to observe The National Day of Prayer at home by praying for our country and the world. The church is at 215 E. Circle Street (with two entrances on Lagrande St.). Call the church office at 453-3242.First Presbyterian Church of SebringSEBRING Isnt There Another Way? is the title of Sunday mornings sermon given by the Rev. Darrell A. Peer. Thursday is the National Day of Prayer. The sanctuary will be open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.First United Methodist Church of SebringSEBRING The Rev. A.C. Bryants message on Sunday will be Mary Weeps Disciples Fear Thomas Doubts with Scripture taken from John 20:1-31. Family Movie Night tonight from 6-8 p.m. in the Family Life Center will be showing Rust. Free admission. Family Fellowship Dinner and Bible Study is on Wednesday evening with dinner in the Family Life Center. The Mother Daughter Banquet will be Tuesday, sponsored by the Methodist Women. Tickets are $10 for adults and $6 for children. Listen on WITS-AM 1340 each Sunday to hear the 10:50 a.m. worship service. Call the church office at 385-5184. The church is downtown at 126 South Pine St. www.sebringfirstumc.com.Memorial United Methodist ChurchLAKE PLACID The Rev. Fred Ball will preach at the Heritage (Traditional) Worship Service on Sunday. At 10:45 a.m., there will be a combined worship service in the sanctuary. Pastor Ball will bring the message. Holy Communion will be served. It is also Confirmation Sunday for the 2011 Confirmation Class. Achurch-wide potluck lunch will celebrate this special day at Memorial in Rob Reynolds Fellowship Hall after the service. Nursery care is available for all morning events in the Creepy Crawly Clubhouse. Childrens Church meets in the Sanctuary and Rob Reynolds Hall and then moves to the SonShine Clubhouse. The church is at 500 Kent Ave. Parkway Free Will Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Sunday morning Bible lesson, Praise and Submission, is taken from Philippians 2. Pastor Jim Scaggs will bring the messages in the morning and evening services. Wednesday evening service will be praise, prayer and Bible study.St. John United Methodist ChurchSEBRING On Sunday, the Rev. Ronald De Genaros sermon will be Jesus and Thomas taken from John 20:19-31. Holy Communion will be served. Nursery is provided at all three services. Boy Scouts meet Monday at 7 p.m.Sebring Church of the BrethrenSEBRING This Sunday morning, the church will be bringing in new members and also baptisms. Pastor Keith Simmons will be preaching on The Goal of Faith. The Scripture reading will be from I Peter 1:3-9. Sunday school is n the Fidelis Room. They will be studying The Christ Hymn, with Scripture from Philippians 2:1-11. Childrens Sunday school is The KidsZone. There is also a nursery available. Dont forget The KidsZone on Wednesday evenings after the meal.Southside Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Rev. David Altman will speak on, Christian Homes from Colossians 3:18-25 in the Sunday morning worship service. Childrens church and a nursery are available. Prayer for All Nations will be the focus of th e evening worship service. The church is at 379 S. Commerce Ave. Call 385-0752.Spring Lake United Methodist ChurchSEBRING Spring Lake United Methodist Church is at 8170 Cozumel Lane. Holy Communion will be celebrated. The Rev. Clyde Weavers sermo n is With Desire to Commune. Fellowship follows the service.The Way ChurchSEBRING Pastor Reinhold Buxbaums message will be The Sun Stands Still with Scripture from Joshua, Chapter 10. Worship will be followed by a covered dish meal. At 1 p.m., ther e will be a Memorial Service for Ea rl Carter. The Way Church is at 1005 North Ridgewood, Sebring. The church phone is 471-6140 and the pastors cell phone is 214-6190. For church information and the pastors messages go to www.thewaychurch.org. Continued from page 7B RELIGION Church News

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011Page 9B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer.Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howes Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer Kid C ity Childrens Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, prime-timers, and Bible s tudies in Spanish. Kid City Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; Susan C. Norris, Trinity Tots PreSchool director; and Noel Johnson, minister of youth and family life. Worship schedule after Easter through December: Worship service 10 a.m., and Education Hour, 8:45 a.m. Worship schedule for January through Easter: Worship service, 8:30 and 11 a.m., Education Hour 9:45 a.m. Traditional Service with Holy Communion each first and third Sunday. Non-Traditional Service each second, fourth and fifth Sunday. Seasonal mid-week services Wednesday evenings during Lent and Advent. Call church office for additional Worship times and special holiday services. Other activities and groups include: Choirs; Ladies Guild and LWML; Mens Fellowship Group, Small Group Bible Studies as scheduled; Trinity Tots Pre-school, Youth Group activities (call for meeting times and dates). Trinity Tots Preschool (3-4years old): 7:15 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Visit us online at:www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturers Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m. in the sanctuary. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Childrens Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruc e Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on lifes journey, youre we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP RELIGION Death is generally a subject m ost people would rather avoid. B ut the reality of death is i nevitable. When we understand w hat Gods Word says on the t opic, it can take on a pleasant m eaning. This past week, we rememb ered the death, burial and resurr ection of Christ. This was merely a fulfillment of prophecy that C hrist reiterated to his disciples b efore he went to Calvary. We r ead in Matthew 16:21, From t hat time forth began Jesus to s how unto his disciples, how that h e must go unto Jerusalem, and s uffer many things of the elders a nd chief priests and scribes, and b e killed, and be raised again the t hird day. Notice that Jesus said that he m ust go suffer, die, and rise a gain. Early that first R esurrection morning, the angel r eminded the women who had c ome to the empty tomb of C hrists words. (Luke 24:7) The c rucifixion and Resurrection was o rdained by God and must occur t hat sin would be conquered and death defeated. Christ was the only eligible sacrifice for the sins of the world. He had to die so He could rise again. Thus, Jesus knew and declared that He must die and that He must rise again. In John 12:24, Jesus used agriculture to teach the principle that a seed must die for fruit to be born. Only when a seed is planted and dies can life then be born and a plant grown. Only by Gods power can life come out of death. Jesus went on to say, He that loveth his life shall lose it; and he that hateth his life in this world shall keep it unto life eternal. In this way, we may receive life eternal because Jesus died for our sin. But we must come to the place where we deny trusting ourselves, our good works, our sinful ways, and our idols. We must repent and by faith depend on Christ alone to give us eternal life. Ephesians 2:5 says, Even when we were dead in sins, (God) hath quickened us together with Christ, (by grace ye are saved). We certainly must recognize that in our sin, we are dead; but when we believe on Christ, we are born again into Gods family. As a Christian, I have come to learn that there are things that are helpful to my life and other things that are destructive. Some things, influences, and pursuits must be put to death, if I am to be effective in ministry. There are some thoughts, desires, words and actions that must be terminated that I may keep pure and available for the Masters use. You may think of some habits or activities that are harmful or wasteful of your time. Put those things to death, so that better things may be given life. Luke Knickerbocker is the pastor of Bethel Baptist Church in Lake Placid. You may email him at knickprint@yahoo.com Some things must die Timeless Treasure Luke Knickerbocker Most of us are not glamorous. Were just average. We idolize Hollywood celebs because they dazzle and sparkle. I dont know about you, but there are a few that I would love to look like. But then I get to thinking that most of them seem to have everything money, looks, clothes, style, people fawning all over them. Then I watch the news or catch the tabloid captions and realize that in spite of all that, they are miserable. Liz Taylor, at her mothers death, made the comment that she would give everything she had to have the peace and contentment her mother had found in life. Do you ever notice that some of the plainest women have lots of friends and men just flock to them? I know the secret. I wish I had learned it much earlier in our marriage. It would have saved a lot of heartache. Thankfully, the Lord carried us through and taught me the secret before we headed for divorce. The answer sounds very simple, but actually takes a lot of work. It involves grit, determination and being willing to be vulnerable. Wait for it. Here it comes. Learn to chill out; laugh, dont take yourself or life too seriously. Learn to laugh at your mistakes. One of my coworkers says it very well: breathe in, breathe out, move on. Laughter is contagious and attractiv e. Think about it. Would you rather be around someone who is happy, who laughs and smiles a lot, or someone who is grumpy, whiny and a complain er? Think about your friends. Do you prefer to be with the ones who are always in some kind of drama in their lives, or the ones who know how to have fun? Proverbs 17:22 says, Amerry hear t doeth good like a medicine, but a broken spirit drieth the bones. It isnt ju st good for your health; its good for the health of all those around you. If you want a healthy, happy husband and family, let go of your need to vent to them. Let go of your selfish pride that demands to be pitied and petted. Go to the privacy of your room or closet if you must, let it out, and go have fun with those around you. Aleta Kay can be reached at themarriagementor@yahoo.com Beauty is only skin deep The Marriage Mentor Aleta Kay

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Page 10BNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011www.newssun.com T he Community Calendar provides a b rief listing of local clubs and organiz ations who meet on a regular basis. It i s the responsibility of the group to u pdate the News-Sunon any changes i n this listing by calling 385-6155, ext. 5 16; send any changes by e-mail to e ditor@newssun.com;or mail them to N ews-SunCommunity Calendar, 2227 U .S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870.FRIDAY Alcoholics Anonymous One Day A t ATime group meets for a closed d iscussion at 9:30 a.m. Monday and F riday at Covenant Presbyterian C hurch, 4500 Sun N Lakes Blvd., S ebring. For details, call 314-0891. American Legion Post 25 hosts a f ish fry from 5-7 p.m. at the post, 1490 U .S. 27, Lake Placid. Cost is $6. S hrimp also is available for same p rice. Open to the public. Tickets in t he lounge on Friday night. Lounge h ours are from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For d etails, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 has k araoke from 7 p.m. until final call at t he post, 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. P ost open at noon. Happy Hour from 4 -6 p.m. Members and guests only. F or details, call 471-1448. AvonPark Breakfast Rotary Club m eets 7 a.m., Rotary Club building. Bridge Club of Sebring (American C ontract Bridge Club)plays duplicate g ames at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf A ve., Sebring. For details, call 3858 118. Better Breathers Club Support G roup. This American Lung A ssociation affiliated group meets the l ast Friday of each month, at 12:00 pm i n Conference Room 3 at Florida H ospital Heartland Medical Center, 4 200 Sun n Lake Blvd. Contact Mike N apper, RRTat (863)402-3450 for m ore information. Buttonwood Bay Squares meets f irst and third Friday in recreation hall, S ebring. Early rounds are from 7-7:30 p .m., alternate mainstream/plus / rounds are from 7:30-9:30 p.m. E veryone is welcome to attend. For d etails, callLarry Gow at 382-6995. Grand Prix Cloggers Beginner c lasses are at 9 a.m., EZ I ntermediate classes are at 10 a.m., a nd Intermediate classes are at 11 a .m. every Friday at Reflection on S ilver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for f urther information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square D ance Club offers a class in Lake P lacid at the Sunshine RV Resort from 9 -11 a.m. Friday. For more informat ion, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or em ail him at samdunn@samdunn.net. Highlands Social Dance Club h osts ballroom dancing every Friday, O ctober through March from 7-9:30 p .m. at the Senior Center on Sebring P arkway. Dance the night away to the m usic of the areas Big Bands. All club d ances are open to the public. A ppropriate dress required. Admission i s $5 for members and $7 for nonm embers. Call 385-6671. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 has l ounge hours beginning at 1 p.m. T here is a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. Cost i s $8.50 per person. The lodge is open t o members and their guests. For d etails, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose serves wings, f ish and burgers at 6 p.m. Music prov ided from 7-11 p.m. Pool tournament i s at 8 p.m. Open to members and q ualified guests only. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands C ounty Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell S t., Avon Park. Karaoke from 7-10 p .m. Lodge phone number 452-0579. MOMs Club meets at 10:30 a.m. f irst Friday at the First United M ethodist Church on Pine Street in S ebring. Narcotics Anonymous New Day G roup meets at 6 p.m. at First P resbyterian Church, 319 Poinsettia A ve, Sebring. For information call H eartland area helpline (863) 6830 630. More information on other meeti ngs and events at www.naflheartl and.org. Sebring Bridge Club has Bridge, A CBLDuplicate at the clubhouse, 347 N Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Fridays. F or details or info on lessons, call 3858 118. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves c hicken or fish baskets from 5-7 p.m. a t the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring, f or a $4 donation. Blind darts is played at 7 p.m. For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 serving buffet dinner at 5-7 p.m. Elks and guests invited. Dance music in ballroom at 7 p.m. Dinner and dance is $10 donation. For reservations, call 385-8647 or 471-3557. Lounge is open from 3-10 p.m. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 6553920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave. For details, call 385-2966 or leave a name, number and message. Teamster Retirees meet at the First Assembly of God, 485 W. Haines Blvd., Lake Alfred at 11 a.m. on the last Friday of the month (except June, July and August). For details, call Paul Thomas at 471-9684. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. Texas Hold em lessons, 2 p.m. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 serves pizza from 5:30-7 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 385-8902.SATURDAY American Legion Post 25 serves sirloin burgers from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake Placid. Jam session is from 2-4 p.m. The lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Members and guests invited. For details, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 69 in Avon Park serves dinner at 5 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Public Library has a free Adult Film Series at noon. For details, call 452-3803.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. provides free assisted riding sessions for adults and children with special needs from 9-11 a.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday at 118 W. College Drive, AvonPark. For details or to volunteer, call Mary McClelland, coordinator, 452-0006. Highlands County Democratic Womens Club meets 9:30 a.m., Democratic Party Headquarters, 2710 Fairmount Drive, Sebring. Highlands Shrine Club, 2606 State Road 17 South, Avon Park (between Avon Park and Sebring) has a flea market from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., country store open from 8 a.m. to noon and pancake breakfast served from 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Vendors are welcome. No setup fee is charged for the summer months. Plenty of off road parking. For details, call 382-2208. Highlands Woodcarvers meet from 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays at 825 Sunbird Terr. (Community Center off Thunderbird Road). Call Bob at 4716077. Lake Placid Art League has a class in Pastels/Acrylics taught by Llewellyn Rinald from from 9 a.m. to noon at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 opens the lounge at 1 p.m. Card games are played at 1 p.m., and Bar Bingo is at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Military Order of the Purple Heart Chapter 601 meets at 12:30 p.m. first Saturday at Candlelight Restaurant, Sun N Lake in Sebring. All recipients and wives of the Purple Heart are welcome. Call 471-9190 or 465-7074 for details. Narcotics Anonymous New Day Group meets at 7 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave, Sebring. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 6830630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Overeaters Anonymous meets at 10:30 a.m. at First Presbyterian Church, Oak Street, Lake Placid. For more details, call 382-1821. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves dinner from 5-7 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Music is from 7-10 p.m. For details, call 655-4007. Twelve Step Study Group for Adult Children of Alcoholics meets at 11 a.m. first and third Saturday, Union Congregational Church, Room 12 o f the education building (upstairs), 105 N. Forest Ave., Avon Park. Parking available south of old church. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. For more details, call 6995444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 serves a meal for $6 from 5:30-7 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 385-8902. Volunteers of America of Florida is a nonprofit organization in Sebring that specializes in assisting person's with mental illness. We are pleased to announce our Drop in Center is open to individuals with a mental illness 6 days a week from 11am to 3 pm. The center offers a welcoming environment where individuals are accepted and feel comfortable. For more information please contact Wendy at 863-3822022.SUNDAY American Legion Post 25 Lake Placid has lounge hours from 1-9 p.m. Live music is from 5-8 p.m. For details, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open 18 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Members and guests only. Post is at 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Call 471-1448. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 lounge is open from 1-7 p.m. Card games start at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has karaoke in the pavilion. Horseshoes played at 9:30 a.m. Food available at 4 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Cards start at 4 p.m. Music outside Tiki Hut at 3 p.m. Lodge phone number 452-0579. Overeaters Anonymous, meets from 4-5 p.m. in second floor conference roomNo. 3 at Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center, 4200 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring. For details, call 382-7731. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. For details on the organization, go towww.oa.org. Ridge Area Missionary Soldiers AvonPark Pathfinder Club meets from 9 a.m. to noon every first and third Sunday at 58 E. Sixth St., Avon Park. For details, call 471-2143. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves lunch at 2 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 offers NASCAR racing in the pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar open and kitchen open from 2-5 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 655-3920. Society for Creative Anachronism (Local Chapter: Shire of Stagridge) meets at 2 p.m. first and third Sunday at Brewsters Coffee House on U.S. 27 in Sebring. For details, call 214-5522. The ArtistsGroup at South Florida Community College will hold a critique clinic the first Sunday of every month, 2-4 p.m., at the Hotel Jacaranda, Avon Park. Professional local artists will discuss and evaluate participantspaintings. The fee is $5 with a two painting limit. For more information, call 7847346. U.S. Military Vets Motorcycle Club meets at 1 p.m. on the first Sunday of each month at VFW Post 9853, State Road 64 West and North Oliva Drive. For information call Hocky at (954) 592-4847 Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 serves hamburgers from 4-5:30 p.m. and plays poker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For details, call 6995444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 Karaoke is from 5-8 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 385-8902. COMMUNITYCALENDAR RELIGION In 1988 I went on a Journey to the Holy Land. The tour covered the countries of Jordan, Israel and Egypt. I have always considered that tour to be my once-in-a-lifetime experience. But now, as Paul Harvey often said, let me tell you the rest of the story. My brother, Ben Rider, was a Methodist pastor in Florida for more than 30 years. When he retired from the ministry, he became a Holy Land tour guide. He made more than 40 trips to the Holy Land! There was a school for pastors in Jerusalem. The purpose of the school was to give pastors an in-depth study of how the geography of the land and the customs of the people in biblical times could even give a broader understanding of Scriptures. There was a limit of 30 pastors to a class. In February of 1989, there was a class of only 29 signed up, so my brother Ben signed me on as No. 30. My son Mike stepped up and paid my tuition and so I, as a lay person, went to school with 29 pastors. Wow! The school was a morning, noon and night program for nine days. The schedule was such that right after breakfast we climbed on the bus and started our daily tour of the sites we were to see and study. One day the bus let us off at the site of Jesusstory about The Inn of the Good Samaritan on the old Jericho Road (Luke 10:25-37). The old road from Jerusalem (2,500 feet above sea level) to Jericho (800 feet below sea level) drops 3,300 feet in about 17 miles. We took a short cut to Jericho by climbing down several hundred feet to the bottom of a wadi (a canyon). Hiking down the wadi, after three or four miles, we came to the north edge of Jericho. At this point, one of the pastors in our group fell to the ground and passed out. In a few minutes, we revived him, but we realized he was seriously ill. Our guide carried a two-way radio. He was able to contact our bus driver, who was waiting for us in Jericho. The bus soon came to us. We loaded the sick man as gently as we could and the driver started the bus up th e new four-lane divided highway toward the hospital to Jerusalem. The guide had already contacted the hospital and they ha d an ambulance on the way to meet us. We had only been on the uphill climb a few minutes when we saw the ambulance, red lights flashing, sirens wail ing coming toward us in the downhill lane. The ambulance crossed the median, turned uphill and stopped on the right side of the road in front of us. In less than two minutes, the ambulance driver, a doctor and a male nurse were on the bus, hooking up their equipment to our sick pastor. In moments it was determined that he had ha d a heart attack. It only took a few minutes to transfer the patient to the ambulance and with 350-horsepower under th e hood, the ambulance went screaming up the hill to the ho spital in Jerusalem. As soon as the pastor was under the care of the hospital staff, the tour company person nel notified the pastors church in California of the situation. The folks in his congregation immediately came up with the funds to fly his wife to Jerusalem. After 36 days in the hospital, the pastor and his wif e were flown home to California This long story reminds me of the story Jesus told in the book of Luke about the Good Samaritan. In the same vein, my modern story tells of a ma n who, while in a foreign land, falls seriously ill and needs he lp and care. In this case, some fo reigners came forward and rescued him. In the Biblical story when Jesus asked the man of law how the law reads, he replied, We are to love God with all our heart, soul, streng th and mind and to love our neig hbor as ourselves. At the end of the story Jesus says, Go do it! Floyd Rider is a Lake Placid resident and a long-time Sunday school teacher. Helping others Guest Column Floyd Rider Associated PressROSWELL, Ga. Amarble statue of Jesus vandalized outside a Catholic church in Roswell before Easter Services has been restored, lifting the spirits of the congregation members. Worshippers discovered the vandalism when they arrived for Easter Sunday mass at St. Peter Chanel Catholic Church to find the 9-foot statue defaced with bright pink paint. Someone put paint on the face and hands of the statue and painted other offensive symbols, WSB-TVreported. Church officials feared the paint would permeate the statue, but the damage was not as bad as first thought and a restoration expert was able to remove it. We used graffiti remover and a light solvent final rub with small brushes and cotton tips, and got in there and got all t he detail done, John Morley, pres ident of J.J. Morley Enterprise s, told The Atlanta Journa lConstitution. Morley said he came to t he suburban Atlanta church Mond ay morning because it was too s ad to see it the way it was left. I thought the least I could d o was make this headache go aw ay for them, Morley told t he Journal-Constitution. Th ey were very appreciative. Father Peter Rau, church pa stor, said the vandalism hurt man y of the parishioners. As the day passed, to begin to see the childrens reaction really, it hurt them, especially o n Easter morning, Rau said. Roswell police Det. K en Kraus said investigators plann ed to send samples of the paint to a lab for analysis and to try to determine where it came from. Statue of Jesus at Ga. church restored after vandalism

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By CHRISTYLEMIRE APMovie CriticIts not just prom, its D isneys Prom. And so no o ne smokes, no one sneaks in p each schnapps in a flask and n o one thats right, no one gets lucky in the back of a l imo. This is all about that magic al night when everyone gets t ogether, regardless of the s ocial hierarchy that had b een firmly in place for the p ast four years, and dreams c ome true. Wholesome, e arnest dreams for wholes ome, earnest kids except f or the resident bad boy, that i s. But naturally, hell turn o ut to have a heart of gold. Yes, director Joe N ussbaums film, from a s cript by first-timer Katie W ech, is chock full of highs chool movie clichis s ometimes knowingly and a musingly so. Theres a tall, m isfit character named Lloyd ( Nicholas Braun) who resemb les Say Anything ...-era J ohn Cusack a tall, misfit c haracter named Lloyd. His a wkward attempts at landing a prom date represent the f ilms most consistent source o f laughs. Of course, straight-arrow g ood girl Nova (Aimee T eegarden) will get stuck w orking with motorcycle-ridi ng rebel Jesse (Thomas McDonell), and they will see through their respective prejudices to not only get along but fall for each other. Various other couples will suffer through missed opportunities and miscommunication and come out better for them in the end. Prom is so steadfastly family friendly, even the dude whos clearly stoned the whole time his nickname is Rolo, like the candy never even comes close to taking any sort of drugs. Hes just laid-back and wisecracking. Youre welcome to draw your own conclusions. There is a plot, sort of. Members of the Brookside High School senior class are getting ready for prom. Along the way, the shed where the decorations are being stored burns down. Nova, the prom coordinator and Molly Ringwald figure here, must reconstruct the whole extravaganza with the help of Jesse, the Judd Nelson figure in the equation whos been thrust upon her because hes a delinquent. Making papier-mbchi moons and stars will straighten him out, the principal figures. Essentially, this feels like a Disney Channel TVshow stretched out to fit the big screen. No one pops out as a major star quite like the actors did in the High School Musical series, but theyre all harmless and good-looking and the school is sufficiently multicultural to make everyone feel comfortable and included. Still, the sweetness and guilelessness of Prom is actually strangely charming, and for its target audience girls who are several years away from having to pick out that perfect dress this will be a safe, enjoyable and validating little diversion. The fact that its not snarky and too-hip is unexpectedly refreshing. Like the 3-D Justin Bieber movie, you have to look at it through the prism of the viewers for whom it was intended. Adults know prom sucks they went to prom. Pre-teen girls are still idealistic (we hope). Let them enjoy their vicarious fun. Prom means well and it grows on you. And its much less of a hassle than schlepping to the real thing. By DAVID GERMAIN APMovie WriterIf the Fast Five filmm akers had thrown in giant, s hape-shifting robots, talking a pes and some vampires, the f ifth installment in The Fast a nd the Furious franchise w ould hardly have been m ore outlandish. That said, the movie will g et you where youre going. P retty cars, prettier women, i nsanely absurd action that t ruly thrills even as it shatt ers all physical laws, and e nough testosterone-fueled v iolence to satisfy the mostr abid WWE SmackDown c rowd. Opting for a blowout of a m ovie with no restraints w hatsoever, the filmmakers w isely add former wrestling s uperstar Dwayne Johnson a s a relentless federal agent t o go toe-to-toe with Vin D iesels driving ace Dom T oretto, whos again on the r un along with his sister, M ia (Jordana Brewster), and c op-turned-outlaw Brian O Conner (Paul Walker). Any thwack from the i nevitable Diesel-Johnson s lug-fest might kill an ordin ary human, but these chara cters basically are comicb ook figures, so theyre able t o wail the innards out of each other and come through with only a cosmetic bruise or two. Directing his third chapter in the franchise, Justin Lin applies that over-the-topand-then-some approach to everything in Fast Five. If it can move, it can move faster. If it can crash, it can crash harder. If it can roar, it can roar louder. Its nonsense, but when Hollywood does nonsense right, it can be a lot of fun. Lin now is far more assured as an action director, crafting stunts and chases that zip along so recklessly you wont much care how utterly impossible they are. Likewise, Lin and screenwriter Chris Morgan, who wrote the last two Fast and Furious flicks, step up the silliness of the dialogue and the charactersmannerisms to let the audience in on the joke that no one is supposed to take any of this seriously. People strut and pronounce in such farcical fashion that it goes beyond stupid and somehow becomes, if not clever, at least crafty. The filmmakers do actually achieve cleverness with a surprise or two. Youll want to stay through a portion of the end-credits to catch one of them, a jolting tease for the franchises preordained sixth installment after Fast Five hauls in its fortune. In the current story, Dom is hunting his own fortune after Brian and Mia break him out of custody in a dementedly excessive prison-bus escape. Hiding out in Rio de Janeiro, the three join a daring car heist that puts them at odds with local crime boss Reyes (Joaquim de Almeida) and sets super agent Hobbs (Johnson) on their trail. So Dom decides to get the band back together, enlisting an Oceans Eleven-style ensemble of past Fast and the Furious rowdies to part Reyes from his millions. Returning as part of the team are Tyrese Gibson, Chris Ludacris Bridges, Sung Kang, Gal Gadot, Matt Schulze, Tego Calderon and Don Omar. Elsa Pataky joins the cast as possibly Brazils lone honest police officer, a woman tapped by Hobbs to help him chase down Torettos gang. But words like honest dont mean much in the Fast Five world, where good guys are bad, bad guys are good, and only the really, really bad guys get what theyve got coming. Theres no moral compass here (and apparently no clock, either; the movie runs much too long, and despite the breathless pace, the trip does start to wear on you). The only compass is the one pointing down the road straight ahead, down which The Fast and the Furious flicks will keep moving faster and faster. Maybe the filmmakers can do a little Alice in Wonderland rhyming and call the next one Furiouser and Furiouser. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 29, 2011Page 11B DIVERSIONS DearAbby: My husband's darling mother died of cancer last summer. During the last month of her illness she was confined to bed, so we hired a nurse, Lois, to cover the night shift. The day after the funeral, my husband's father started calling Lois. Dad swore they were just friends, but continued pursuing her despite our strong disapproval. Two months later, they were dating. Last Thanksgiving, our first holiday without Mom, he cancelled plans to be with us and the grandkids to spend it with friends guess who? On Christmas it was the same story. This has hit my husband hard. Dad and Mom were married for 50 years. We have always had a close family, particularly at holiday time. Are we wrong to feel that Dad and Lois are disrespecting Mom's memory and to feel hurt and angry? Grieving in Minnesota DearGrieving: Please accept my sympathy for your family's loss. While it may appear your father-inlaw jumped quickly into a relationship, it could be he grieved during the time his wife was ill and has concerns that his own time may be limited, so he wants to enjoy life while he can. As to missing the holidays, being there with his wife of 50 years conspicuously missing may have been more than he could face. So please, try to be understanding because I'm sure your mother-in-law's death has been painful for all of you. DearAbby: After having a stroke, my mother spent the last few years of her life in a wonderful nursing facility. She was an accomplished gardener and enjoyed sharing her bounty. Instead of sending her a fresh flower bouquet for Mother's Day, I'd have some potted tomato plants delivered to her nursing home. On her death bed last year, she reminded us to water her tomato plants. Sadly, those plants outlived her. I cannot think of a more fitting tribute to her memory than to encourage your readers to provide living vegetable plants for their senior relatives. Most nurseries or florists will accommodate your request and, perhaps, could be persuaded to dona te a plant or two to a local sen ior care center. The joy of nurturing a liv ing plant will continue through the summer. Carole in S an Clemen te DearCarole: What a sweet idea. Your mother appears to have been a gen erous and caring woman, and your letter shows the apple doesn't fall far from the tree. DearAbby: When I was in high school, I was very popular and part of a large social group. That was thre e years ago. Since graduation I have been dealing with an anxiety disorder. It has reached the point where I can no longer work, go to school or have much of a social life. I am currently seeking treatment. Whenever I'm in touch with someone I was close t o in high school, I am always asked where I'm working now or what school I'm attending. I feel embarrasse d because of my disorder and often I don't respond becau se I don't know what to say. Any ideas? Speechless in Illino is DearSpeechless: You could say that you haven't been well and needed to tak e some time to recover or if you don't want to reveal that much, say, I decided t o take some time to find myself, which is common and sufficiently euphemisti c. And the surest way to find treatment for your anxiety disorder would be to tell your family doctor you nee d to consult a mental health professional who specialize s in anxiety disorders. Once you find one, you can quic kly return to the mainstream Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Dating his late wifes nurse distresses widowers family Dear Abby Fast Five revs up preposterous fun Movie Review Fast Five Rating: PG-13 (intense violence and action, sexual content and language) Running time: 130 minutes Review: (of 4) Universal Pictures Paul Walker stars as Brian O'Conner and Vin Diesel stars as Dominic Toretto in Fast Five. Earnestness of Disneys Prom grows on you Movie Review Prom Rating: PG (mild language and a brief fight) Running time: 103 minutes Review: (of 4) GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCE

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LIVING 12B PAGE News-Sun Friday, April 29, 2011ix years after his death, John Paul IIs beatification on May 1 will be the fastest on record, bringing him one step closer to s ainthood. Just weeks after the former pontiffs 2005 p assing, Pope Benedict XVI put John Paul II on t he fast track, waiving the usual five-year waiti ng period to begin the process to sainthood. The e vent also marks the first time a pope has beatif ied his immediate predecessor. The quick beatification beats Mother Teresas p revious record by a few days. She was beatified ( declared blessed) in 2003 but is not yet a s aint. John Paul II had waived the five-year wait f or her in 1998. Prior to John Paul IIs pontificate, the process c ouldnt begin until 50 years after a persons d eath. It was changed to 10 years and then to f ive years in 1983 by John Paul II. During his 26-year papacy, John Paul II n amed more than 470 people as saints, more than a ll other popes combined. At his 2005 funeral, people held up signs and s houted: Santo subito! (Sainthood immediatel y!). His popularity among Roman Catholics made h im a prime candidate for early consideration. Sainthood is conferred on a person who is e xceptionally virtuous and a model of godly livi ng. The word saint comes from the Latin w ord sanctus meaning holy. In the Roman Catholic Church, a person who i s declared a saint is said to be canonized offic ially recognized as a saint by the Church. Before John Paul II, the process of canonizat ion included a trial, with a prosecutor (the advoc atus diaboli, or devils advocate) and a defender o f the candidate (advocatus Dei, or Gods advoc ate). Since 1983, the process has been streamlined, a nd the role of devils advocate has been elimin ated. Earlier this year, Pope Benedict XVI declared a French nuns recovery from Parkinsons dise ase was the miracle needed for John Paul II to b e beatified. Once beatified, John Paul II can be publicly v enerated, or worshipped. But a second miracle i s needed to be canonized a saint. THE ROAD TO SAINTHOODHow a person becomes a saint in the Roman C atholic Church: At least five years must have passed since a c andidates death before he or she can be conside red for sainthood (see exceptions, above). The bishop of the diocese in which the cand idate died is responsible for beginning the i nvestigation of his or her qualifications. The Actor Causae (the group promoting t he candidate) asks the bishop to start the investig ation that may lead to sainthood. After obtaining permission from the V atican, a diocesan tribunal is formed and witn esses are called to testify about the candidates v irtues. If acceptable, the candidate is given the t itle of servant of God. After the investigation, all information a bout the candidate is given to the Vaticans C ongregation for the Causes of Saints. The cand idates worthiness is examined by various c hurch teachers and leaders. If they approve, the c andidates name is given to the pope who can d eclare the candidate venerable. For beatification, a miracle (usually a physi cal healing) attributed to the candidate after his o r her death must be verified. An ecclesiastical i nvestigation is required. If such a miracle is a uthenticated, the candidates name is sent to the p ope. With the popes approval, the candidate is p ublicly declared blessed. For canonization or sainthood, a second m iracle must be attributed to the candidate and a uthenticated. With that established, the candid ate is given the title of saint.GLOSSARY OF TERMSAll SaintsDay:Aholy day of obligation that h onors the saints. All Catholics are required to a ttend Mass on this day. Doctor of the Church:Atitle given to a s aint whose teachings that are influential in any t ime period. Doctors of the Church are known f or their significant understanding of the doctrine of the Church and theology.Feast day:The day assigned to honor a particular saint. Martyr:Aperson who has died rather than give up their religious beliefs. Patron saints:Saints that are chosen to be the special guardians over a specific area, which can be anything from an occupation, a place, a specific group of people, an illness or a cause. Saint:Aholy person who has died and been determined by the Catholic Church as able to intercede for people on earth.DID YOU KNOW?According to Catholic Church teaching: Honor and humble reverence (called doulia) is given to saints by the faithful. Praying to saints is asking them to pray fo r and with the one praying. More than 10,000 believers have been bea tified in the Roman Catholic Church. The first saint to be added to the Churchs official list was St. Ulrich of Augsburg, who wa s canonized in 993. Formal canonization procedures were organized in 1588.FAMOUS SAINTSSt. Francis of Assisiis the patron saint of animals and the environment. He founded the Franciscan Order, which was a life of complete poverty, following his childhood in a wealthy family. There are stories of Francis preaching to animals in addition to his love for all of Gods creation. St. Anthony of Padua, the patron saint of lost objects, is often depicted carrying a book and Jesus as an infant. Anthony was a brother in the Canons Regular of Saint Augustine before joining the Franciscan Order of Friars Minor follow ing the martyrdom of five Franciscans. ADocto r of the Church, Anthony gained a reputation as a preacher and teacher of theology and is said to be one of the most beloved saints in the Cathol ic Church. St. Nicholasis the patron saint of children. One story about the saint tells of a poor family who did not have the dowry needed for its three daughters to marry. If they didnt marry they would be sold into slavery. The story says that Nicholas threw the necessary dowry in through an open window, and it landed in shoes and stockings hanging by the fire. Because of this, i t is now tradition for children to put their shoes out on the eve of St. Nicholasfeast day (Dec. 6 ) for a treat from St. Nick. St. Joan of Arcreceived visions from St. Michael, St. Catherine and St. Margaret in the 1400s telling her to help the King of France defeat England and Burgundy. Joan led the French troops to several victories but was captured on her way home. She was sold to the English and was later burned at the stake as a heretic. She is the patron saint of France and soldiers. St. Elizabeth Ann Setonis the first American saint. She converte d to Catholicism following the death of her husband. Mother Seton started a religious order, th e Sisters of Charity of St. Josephs, in 1809. She also set up the first free Catholic school in America. St. Thomas Morewas a lawyer and membe r of Englands Parliament during Henry VIIIs reign and is the patron saint of lawyers, politicians and public servants. The author of Utopia, Thomas was tried and beheaded for treason when he would not recognize the king a s the head of the Church of England. St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, was actually born in Scotland. When he was 14 years old, he was captured and sold into slavery in Ireland. He was in captivity tending to sheep until he was 20 years old and returned to Scotland to become a priest. When he was ordained a bishop, Patrick returned to Ireland to preach to the predominantly pagan island. Patrick used the shamrock, which was a common plant in the Irish landscape, to explain the Trinity. St. Valentine, the patron saint of love, youn g people and happy marriages, was martyred during Claudius IIs persecution of Christians. One story about Valentine says that while he was imprisoned, he wrote a letter to the daughter of the jailer the night before his death signing it, From your Valentine. St. Bernadettewas born in Lourdes, France As a child, the Virgin Mary appeared to Bernadette several times. On one of the occasions, Mary told Bernadette to dig in the mud and she discovered a spring with healing power s. Bernadette is the patron saint of Lourdes and of the sick.McClatchy-Tribu ne Pope John Paul II will be beatified on Sunday, arriving at the final stage before sainthood. Here we look at the process, define key terms and highlight some famous saints.SOURCES: WWW.CATHOLIC-PAGES.COM; THE HOLYSEE PRESS OFFICE; MCT; WWW.CATHOLIC.ORG; WWW.AMERICANCATHOLIC.ORG; EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG/WIKI/CANONIZED; THE ST. NICHOLAS CENTER; WWW.DICTIONARY.COMCOURTESYOF DR. ANDREAS FRANZ BORCHERTAdetail from a stained glass window in the Church of Our Lady in County Cork, Ireland, depicting St. Bernadettes visions of the Virgin Mary.VICKI VALERIO/PHILADELPHIAINQUIRER/MCTJohn Paul II greets the crowd at St. Peters Square in October 2003. John Paul II will be beatified on May 1. COURTESYOF CATHOLIC ONLINESt. Francis of Assis i COURTESYOF CATHOLIC ONLINESt. Joan of Arc COURTESYOF CATHOLIC ONLINESt. Patrick