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The news-sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01032
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 04-22-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:01032
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK Avon Park Poli ce Chief Mike Rowan was placed o n paid administrative leave Tuesd ay afternoon by Interim City Manag er Julian Deleon, but it's not clear wh y. Deleon sent an e-mail to t he News-Sun stating "I have plac ed Chief Rowan on administrative pa id leave. I have asked the Sheriff 's Office (S.O) to assume command of the City's Police Department whi le they help us review our police proc edures. Since this is an open inves tigation, any further questions need to be directed through the Sheriff 's office." When public records we re requested from Deleon that same d ay concerning Rowan, Deleon refus ed to provide the documents until he cleared them with the HCSO, statin g that there was an "active ongoin g investigation and I don't want to mess that up." In a memo to Rowan, Deleon al so stated that "From this point forwar d, the S.O. is charged with commun icating with you until the investig ation is complete." Later on Tuesday, Deleon sent o ut By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Every once in a while a city council meeting can be as dramatic as a Verdi opera, and sometimes louder. Those who did not attend the Sebring City Council meeting Tuesday night missed a lively show. The evening had everything humor, anger, applause, near tears, sharp confrontation and simmering resentment. At issue was a request by the Community Redevelopment Agency to overlay an "entertainment district" on the core downtown area. This means establishments serving more alcohol than food, or just alcohol, would be encouraged to set up business downtown. Current city ordinances ban such businesses within 300 feet of a church, of which there are many in the area. The overlay district had been approved NEWS-SUN Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Friday-Saturday, April 22-23, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 47 | 50 cents www.newssun .com 079099401001 HighLow 88 65Complete Forecast PAGE 7A Bright, sunny and warm Forecast Question: Would you willingly pay more in taxes to reduce the deficit? Next question: Should Sebring have created a special entertainment district downtown? www.newssun .com Make your voice heard at Online Obituaries Joseph Bohnen Jr. Age 69, of West Palm Beach Evelyn Johnson Age 87, of Sebring Eunice Martin of Sebring Dorothy Roy Age 94, formerly of Lake Placid Obituaries, Page 5A Phone ... 385-6155Fax ... 385-2453Online: www.newssun.com Yes 21.5% No 78.5% Total votes: 135 Classifieds9A Community Briefs2A Community Calendar10B Dear Abby11B Editorial & Opinion4A Healthy Living6B Lottery Numbers2A Movie Review/Times11B Religion7B Police Blotter8A Sports On TV2B Index Going down swingingStreaks fall to Lake Wales, but not without a fight SPORTS, 1B PAGE12B A Place to Heal APPD chief feared for job due to investigations of city administrators News-Sun photo b y KATARASIMMON S Avon Park Police Chief Michael Rowan, shown here talking to citizens during a drug raid, was placed on paid administrative leave Tuesday. Entertainment district defeated after heated debate News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Drawing an even bigger audience than the fence debate, the Sebring town council's discussion of an entertainment district downtown stirred up a lot of emotion. See ENTERTAINMENT, page 8A Rowan put on leave; HCSOtakes command See ROWAN, page 8A By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING In honor of Earth Day, a local businessman has made it his mission to do something simple to show his appreciation to the world we live in. Michael Stone, owner of Surf Lessons by Stone, has been preparing to walk 14.5 miles to his job at Budweiser. "I remember growing up here and everyone saying all the time there's nothing to do here'and that's the mentality that got me thinking about doing something so simple," Stone said. Stone is an active member of several organizations that work to better the environment and those that inhabit the world. "I'm not a tree hugger, I'm not saying Hey, don't cut down trees and don't hunt.'I'm just saying if Walking for Earth Day Mike Stone shows off the sign he had made in honor of Earth Day. Stone will wear the sign, while he walks 14.5 miles to work today. KATARASIMMONS Local man walking 14.5 miles to work today See WALKING, page 5A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Promise Acres Equine Rescue currently has five horses under the care of Jennifer Carnahan, her family, and numerous volunteers. Each of the five horses were brought to the rescue for rehabilitation after being abused and neglected. The rescue horses spend their time with the Carnahan's family horses as they heal and prepare for adoption. By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comAVON PARK Tucked neatly inside the city, Promise Acres Equine Rescue is a quiet little world all its own filled with compassion and love. The facility is a growing horse rescue that is family owned and operated. Jennifer Carnahan, her husband Richard, and their two daughters, Ashlee and Meghan, are the kind hearts behind the operation. Jennifer Carnahan is a certified riding instructor and a former veterinary technician with more than 18 years of experience with animals of all sorts. However, horses have been her main focus for the past seven years. "We just kind of fell into it," she said, adding that they have always been a horse family and owning the animals have never been an issue. "We've always had horses and been around them, they've always been a part of our family." The rehabilitation center allows neglected and mistreated horses a place to heal and become better functioning horses. The facility currently has four rescue horses and each arrived less than perfect. "They are usually just neglected. People think you can just get a horse and put it in a pasture and it'll be fine, but that's not the case," said Carnahan. Carnahan said that most of the Promise Acres rescues abandoned horses See HORSES, page 6A By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING City council and Bob DePugh of the Caliber Investment Group LLC are hoping to avoid a court battle. At issue is the $200,000 deposit Calibre gave the city as earnest money when it began its effort to develop Harder Hall as an assisted living center. DePugh is asking for the money back, plus the interest it earned. The city feels it is entitled to keep the mon ey because it allowed excl usive rights to Calibre, poss ibly missing other opport unities to sell the long emp ty building. In additio n, Calibre's applications f or funding were deem ed incomplete, so the grou p was not successful in ge tting the needed funds. DePugh told council th at the incomplete applicatio ns were a result of HUD reg ulations. Aborrower mu st have mortgage insuranc e, Disagreement over Harder Hall deposit See HARDER, page 6ABusy BunnyThousands of eggs to be found at Humane Society Saturday PAGE2A www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and

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By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Susie Bishop, business development manager for Atlantic Blue Ranch and Jeff Roth, director of the Champion for Children Advocacy Center, were honored by the Highlands County Division of the United Way of Central Florida Wednesday morning. Bishop was named Citizen of the Year and Roth was named Volunteer of the Year. Their recognition culminated a morning of good news. Highlands County raised more money for United Way in 2011 than it did in 2010 $421,000 this year compared to $404,000 last year. The county's Publix Supermarkets combined to raise $126,505, the most of any participant. The School Board of Highlands County raised the second highest amount with $77,246. The business with the highest per capita gift was Morgan Stanley Smith Barney with $1,024. Still, while the amount of money raised was impressive, the heart of the United Way lies in the agencies and programs the UWsupports. In Highlands County, the United Way helps 17 agencies and 22 programs. Some of the programs are within the agencies. According to Julie Fells, director of the Highlands County Division of the United Way of Central Florida, apportionment is done by a large committee of 30 people divided into four teams. Individuals receive training in January, learning how to read agency reports and what questions to ask. In March, members review agency and program paperwork, in April they tour sites, talking to administrators and clients. In May they make their decisions. The list of programs and agencies remains the sam e over the years, but applican ts must apply every year. Page 2ANews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.com April 20 42040434653x:3Next jackpot $15 millionApril 16 11221333440x:3 April 13 1815324043x:5 April 20 613172429 April 19 1516303135 April 18 13151830 April 17 19213134 April 20 (n) 7841 April 20 (d) 3969 April 19 (n) 0890 April 19 (d) 8545 April 20(n) 43 4 April 20 (d) 46 1 April 19 (n) 75 7 April 19(d) 28 9 April 19 838394210 April 15 259314 April 12 216224014 April 8 112436379 April 20 924343643 PB: 27 PP: 3Next jackpot $72 millionApril 16 2133444555 PB: 7 PP: 5 April 13 423394950 PB: 39 PP: 3 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center While listening to the h aunting bagpipes of Amazing Grace" during a n April 9 memorial servi ce honoring Pfc. Jeremy F aulkner in Jonesboro, G a., I realized I had no i dea what the 1779 song's f amous lyrics, written by J ohn Newton, actually m eant. Faulkner's pastor, f amily, friends and fellow s oldiers, who filled the h uge church to capacity, h elped clarify the beloved h ymn's resonance. "With a hail of fire all a round him, Jeremy saw a mazing grace," Rev. Ron L ittle said. On March 29, Faulkner, 2 3, was one of six Task F orce No Slack warriors o f the storied 101st A irborne Division (Air A ssault) to die fighting f or our country in A fghanistan's Kunar p rovince. Also killed w ere Sgt. 1st Class Ofren A rrechaga, 28; Staff Sgt. F rank Adamski III, 26; S taff Sgt. Bryan Burgess, 2 9; Spc. Dustin Feldhaus, 2 0; and Spc. Jameson L indskog, 23. "Our enemy had grown t oo large, too bold, too c apable to ignore any l onger," Lt. Col. Joel V owell, Task Force No S lack commander, told g rieving soldiers in a dram atic eastern Afghanistan s peech delivered the same d ay one of their own was l aid to rest in Georgia. Task Force No Slack met t hat challenge, and we d estroyed and killed over 1 30 insurgent fighters and w ounded scores of others i n our biggest battle since V ietnam." As I learned at Tara B aptist Church, Faulkner b egan training for his d efining moment as a litt le boy. "Little Jeremy used to p lay Army in the yard," L ittle said, prompting rare s miles from the devastate d audience. Tony Berry, Faulkner's s tepfather, knew "Remy," a s many loved ones and b uddies called him, since t he future soldier was 11. "He was one of those t ypes of kids that made y ou mad one minute, but t he next, he'd have you l aughing," Berry told The U nknown Soldiers. "He l oved being outside and c amping, so he adjusted t o Army life real quick." Like so many U.S. t roops, Faulkner develo ped an unbreakable a ttachment to his brothers a nd sisters in arms. Berry s aid he spoke to three sold iers from his stepson's u nit at the memorial servi ce. "It's a bond that we can n ever know, unless y ou've been over there to s hare in it with those g uys," Berry explained. When one passes, the o ther one feels guilty, and t hey wish it was them." Quotes from warriors w ho went into the fire w ith Faulkner on that t reacherous day in A fghanistan were read a loud at the service. "He was a very special p erson in my life," one m ourning soldier said. He could make everyone l augh and smile, even in t he worst situations." Amazing Grace See SOLDIER, page 6A By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Tuesday's Highlands County School Board meeting ended much later than usual, with the board members finishing up around 8:30 p.m. Now that the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) is behind students and administrators, the board members have began shifting gears toward the budget issues. Highlands County School District Superintendent Wally Cox, has begun looking at a handful of budget ideas, according to board chairperson Donna Howerton. "He is looking at where to make cuts, and what is needed where," Howerton said. At the beginning of the meeting, the board recognized the many volunteers throughout the district and schools in conjunction with Volunteer Week. The 2010-11 Outstanding Volunteers have been a vital part of the curriculum and instructional community of the school district. Abudget workshop, as well as a student ACTsuccess workshop, is scheduled for April 26 at 3:30 p.m. School board begins to focus on budget United Way donations increase News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLE Y Wade Taveniere, CFO at Heacock Insurance, hugs Susie Bishop, who was honored as Citizen of the Year 2010 by the United Way on Wednesday. Bishop, Roth honored COMMUNITYBRIEFS Lake Placid town offices closed todayLAKE PLACID The town of Lake Placid will be closed today for Good Friday. The town will not college garbage today.Highlands County Habitat celebrates 20th anniversarySEBRING Habitat for Humanity i s celebrating 20 years of building faith, hope and homes in Highlands County o n Thursday, April 28. Since 1990, Habita t for Humanity has built 159 homes for local families in need. The 20th annive rsary dinner begins at 6 p.m. at the Highlands County Fair Convention Center. Cost to attend is a $35 donation to Habitat for Humanity, which include s a choice of chicken florentine roulade o r beef brisket. Dinner will be prepared by Chef Mac of Golden Palms Catering. The event will include special entertainment by Habitat families, recognitio n of donors and silent auction. Don Elwe ll will emcee the event. Dress is business attire. Reservations are required and ca n be made by calling Sarah Pallone at 40 22913 or 214-8215. Dinner helps with heart transplant for APwomanAVON PARK Achicken dinner ben efit is set to assist the Renae Gunn Massey Heart Transplant Fund from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 30 at the Lucy Derkman Softball Fields (behind the Hess station in Avon Park). Massey, 38, has had the transplant an d is doing well at Tampa General Hosptia l. She is married to Wesley Massey, is Continued on page 5A Courtesy photo Florida Hospital pediatric patient Kassidy Wallace, 10, receives an early Easter surprise as the Easter Bunny made an appearance in her hospital room on Wednesday afternoon followed by Farm Bureau Women's Committee members bringing baskets of treats and well wishes for the patient. Courtesy photo The Easter Bunny shows off some of the 8,000 black eggs that will be hidden for a Flashlight Egg Hunt on Saturday at the Humane Society of Highlands County. By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Several of Florida Hospital Heartland Division's pediatric patients got a nice surprise on Wednesday afternoon. Most of the children were resting or napping while recovering from various aliments, but all of them were smiling when the Easter Bunny showed up at their hospital doors. "Happy Farms and Howerton Farms provide the baskets and the gifts inside and we put them together and hand them out," said Highlands County School Board Chairperson Donna Howerton. Wednesday marks the 10th year that Florida Hospital has teamed up with the Farm Bureau Women's Committee to provide smiles to a few sick and injured children. Green, yellow, pink and blue baskets were handed to children from toddlers to middle schoolers. The baskets were filled with books, toys, and of course sweet treats. The parents of the children were both surprised and pleased that the Easter Bunny came to visit the children, giving them a little bit of hope to be home on Easter Sunday. "I always look forward to doing this every year," said Howerton. Humane Society plans huge egg hunts SaturdaySEBRING The Humane Society of Highlands County is planning two big Easter events on Saturday. The first is the Kids Easter Carnival, which will be from 2-4 p.m. Cost is $5 per person and there will be 2,000 eggs to hunt, with a prize for each egg, as well as free ice cream with the Easter Bunny for the first 300 kids, games, hay rides, contests and more. Starting at 7 p.m., it's the adults'turn to have fun. There will be 8,000 black Easter eggs hidden along a half-mile trail in the woods, and the Flashlight Egg Hunt starts at dark. The eggs contain all sorts of prizes, including $1,000 in cash and also a diamond estate ring as the major prizes. Admission is $10. This is the first of its kind event for Highlands County. All the money raised will got directly to the Humane Society. See the Humane Society's Facebook page for the list of donors. The Humane Society is at 7321 Haywood Taylor Blvd. Call Judy Spiegel at 214-6508. Easter Bunny has been busy lately

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011Page 3A

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A reader contacted the News-Sun r ecently to scold us f or printing too much b ad news. Why didn 't we print more g ood news, this reade r wanted to know.Believe us when we say w e enjoy printing stories a bout people putting others f irst, and good government d ecisions, and successful i nnovations and outstanding y oung students but the f act is we already do that w henever there is such a s tory to tell. This happens more often t han many people think. S adly, bad news sticks in our m inds, the dark shading out t he light, and we tend to forg et hearing the good news. Being human, we should r emember there are different p erspectives. What one pers on sees as bad news, another s ees as good. As an illustration of all this w e don't have to go further t han Wednesday's edition and p oint to the four articles on the front page. The center piece article tells of a special event at Sebring High School, where teachers brought living witness history to their students. That's certainly good news. Another article celebrates Highlands County's 90th birthday. This may not necessarily count as good news, but you can't say it is bad news. The two other articles share the same kind of good news in one, a local man announces he is running for the state House of Representatives District 77 seat; the other is a report of registered voters in Avon Park holding recall petition signing parties. Now the news of an individual running for office will generally be considered good news by those who support him, and bad news by those who oppose him, but look deeper. The good news for everyone is that there are more and more people, like this candidate, who is brand new to politics, who are now participating in the political system. Fresh eyes are always a good thing. And the protest in Avon Park is also good news, even though it is bad news that the municipal government has lost the trust of its constituency. Anytime citizens stand up and speak out it is a good thing. Democracy only thrives when all of us work it together. Ultimately, the United States of America is a team endeavor. Is citizen rule frustrating, slow and sometimes even boring? You bet. Is there bad news we have to tell? Of course. But the core of American belief honors the individual and protects freedom beliefs that continue to spread around the world; and the core of America's success comes from hard work and a sense of fair play. Can we solve our problems if we don't face up to the facts, no matter how scary or unsettling? No. Can we work our way through these difficult times, emerging stronger? Absolutely, which is the best good news of all. There is a struggle now being waged in Washington, the outcome of which will determine whether the nation's economy will grow or continue to falter. The main combatants are President Barack Obama and a thoughtful member of Congress from the nation's heartland, Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis. One of them, the president, represents the theory that government needs to regulate every facet of the economy. The other, Rep. Ryan, champions the economic freedom that has made the United States the wealthiest and most free nation on the face of the earth. Ryan, who chairs the powerful House Budget Committee, has outlined a program he calls a "Roadmap for America's Future." It leads to economic freedom, warning that "Washington's leaders have taken an already unsustainable budget outlook and made it far worse" by exploiting "Americans'genuine economic anxieties to justify an unrelenting and wide-ranging expansion of government." Their agenda, he warns, "has included, among other things, a failed, debtfinanced economic stimulus'; an attempt to control the Nation's energy sector; increasing domination of housing and financial markets; the use of taxpayer dollars to seize part ownership of two nearly bankrupt auto makers; and, of course, the planned takeover of Americans'health care, already heavily burdened, manipulated, and distorted by government spending and regulation. This domineering government brings taxes, rules, and mandates; generates excessive levels of spending, deficits, and debt; leads to economic stagnation and declining standards of living; and fosters a culture in which self-reliance is a vice and dependency a virtue -and as a result, the entire country weakens from within." For his part, President Obama sees government regulation of almost all facets of the economy as a vital tool, appointing so-called "czars" to oversee large segments of the supposedly free U.S. economy. This struggle will determine whether our economy, once a beacon of freedom, will continue to be mismanaged by unelected bureaucrats. As this is written, the economy is in a tailspin. Echoing Ryan, respected fiscal monitor Standard & Poor's warned: "The con tinued failure to come up with a credible mediumterm fiscal reform program would increase borrowin g costs for all segments of US socie ty, thereby undermining investmen t, employment and growth. It would also curta il foreigners'appetite to add t o their already substantial holdings of US assets. And it would weaken the dollar." Ryan's website describes key points of the roadmap:: Medical Care: "It pro vides universal access to affordable health coverage, not by expanding government, but by reinforcing th e role of consumers patients in a truly competitive marketplace. In con junction with this, the plan takes on the necessary task of restructuring the government's medical entitlement s, making them sustainable fo r the long term." Social Security: "It saves and strengthens Socia l Security, making the program sustainable for the lon g run, and helping expand investments needed for eco nomic growth." Taxes: "It offers an alternative to today's needlessly complex and inefficient tax code, providing th e option of a simplified mech anism that better promotes and rewards work, saving, and investment." Jobs: "It helps the Nation's workforce prepare for success in the global economy by transforming 4 9 job training programs, scattered across eight agencies, into a flexible, dynamic pro gram focused on results, an d accompanied by clear meas ures of transparency and accountability. The plan requires the development o f performance measures, and gives each State the option to consolidate funding into one program, if such an approach can be shown to improve outcomes and achieve job training goals." Clearly, Rep. Ryan's roadmap points the way to a robust economy free of gov ernment meddling, while Barack Obama's way guarantees a dreary economy managed by power-crazed Washington bureaucrats. Michael Reagan is the son of President Ronald Reagan, a political consultant, and the author of "The New Reagan Revolution" (St. Martin's Press, 2011). He is the founder and chairman of The Reagan Group and president of The Reagan Legacy Foundation. Visit his website at www.reagan.com, or e-mail comments to Reagan@caglecartoons.com. Page 4ANews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.comTODAY'SEDITORIALTODAY'SLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION Ryan vs. Obama Making Sense Michael Reagan A ctions should speak louder than votes E ditor: I am pleased with most of what the new" Highlands County Commission h as accomplished thus far. However, l ast Tuesday's meeting was bitter sweet t o me. I was disappointed, but the two 3 -1 votes were revelational to me. Don Elwell was the only "no" vote o n these two issues. Mr. Elwell, at one p oint, asked if one matter could be put o ff until a later date (his question a ffirmed by our county attorney), yet t he issue continued forward, was voted o n, and passed 3-1. The remaining c ommissioners voted yes on both i ssues. The vote of each commissioner tells m e all I need to know. The fact is we a re facing serious budget issues in this c ounty and cannot afford to be fiscally i rresponsible. We need to get our count y back on track fiscally, and that is not g oing to be easy. We are all suffering and we need to l ook to ourselves for answers, not the g overnment. I do not like the Miami m entality that has crept into this count y. We are not Miami, Orlando or T ampa, and if I hear, "the way they do i t in (fill in the blank) is blah blah b lah" one more time my head is going t o explode. If they do it so much better t here, move back there. I don't think the majority of our c ounty residents, especially those that w ere born and raised here, want to see o ur county turned into a metropolis. O ur county needs to get back to the b asics of small town living. The buzz around the county lately l eads me to believe that a lot of people r ealize they voted for the wrong candid ate in one particular county commiss ion seat race. I didn't cast the wrong v ote in that race, but I may have with r egard to another seat. That's somet hing I will need to consider as I watch t he actions of each commissioner until N ovember 2012. We can affect the most change on o ur local level. Get involved and i nformed. Show up at city council and c ounty commission meetings. If you h ave not done so yet, start now urging t rue conservatives to run for office. E ncourage them and be active in camp aigning for them. I am an activist and encourage a ctivism. I am speaking to everyone, r egardless of whether or not you agree w ith me. Speak up for what you believe i n with action, not just words. Mary Bengtson Sebring Race, gender are not the issues E ditor: In response to the article wrote about B renda Gray's response to the seven v iolations (News-Sun, April 17), it's O K for anyone to defend themselves if a ccused of anything. Yes, it's true the citizens put you in o ffice and they can remove you if they so choose. The citizens put all four councilmembers and a mayor in office. When a citizen puts someone in office they expect them to give 210 percent, so to speak. Time will tell what the community wants and if they choose to let each councilmember keep their positions/titles, then we must respect the end results. I was shocked to read the part of you wondering if the recall was based on race, sex. Well it certainly doesn't look as if all three candidates are black and all females. You were not the only one accused of these violations. Where are you coming from? Enough is enough. This recall is not about race or you being a female. Most of all, it's not just about you, there are also two males involved in this recall and will be another male and female in September who are not black This is the most ridiculous thing I've heard of. Brenda, you need to stop using the words race and female when situations arise. This is anything but true. Anyone following the Recall or Operations Save Avon Park have not singled you out and it's definitely not about just you. It's about four total councilmembers and a mayor who the community feels have possibly done wrong. This includes three men and two females, one who is black. I'm adding all this up and I'm coming up with three males plus two females equals five not one. Patricia Austin Avon ParkTo each their ownEditor: Re: Ray Napper's letter I was happy to see you validate the point that it is not the tools but the misuse of them by people. Thankfully you were also able to get some exercise. You did a stellar job of jumping to conclusions. I did not say I had a firearm and yet you have me owning one. Also you made a very good leap by saying I was a pastor. I am ordained and retired but maybe I was an evangelist, or professor at a college or seminary. Perhaps I was a chaplain. So, you see, I do not minister at a church. If I did, you would be welcome and I would support your right to peaceful assembly, worship as you choose, and I support your right to free speech. I would also support your right to "keep and bear arms," which is also guaranteed under our Consttution. By the way, The Second Ammendment also says that right "Shall not be infringed". Our right to privacy is precious. Doctors need to treat illness, not guns. There is no need for medical people to pry into our personal lives,invading our privacy and straying from issues relating to disease and medicine. I go to the doctor for medical care, not moral judgement, political harassment, nor privacy intrusions. Senate Bill 432 will stop doctors from asking parents and children if they own guns and then telling them to get rid of them. The Senate Judiciary Committee has passed it by a 4 to 2 vote with one member absent. House Bill 155 is designed to make doctors practice medicine in their examination rooms not gun ban politics. HB 155 has passed the House Judiciary Committee by a 15 to 3 vote. It seems I am in agreement with the majority of our Legislators. You allude to the fact that I do not trust God and Jesus. I do trust that God and Jesushave given me the ability to care for my family and myself by what ever means necessary. If I can not do that I will be useless to anyone whenI am laying in the ground. I have been a law enforcement officer, a soldier, and a police chaplain. I am well trained in the use of firearms. If having "lived by the sword, I die by the sword" has spared the life of a family member or neighbor (even you Mr. Napper) it will have been worth it. Rev. Steven W. Trimble (Ret) Sebring Good news, no gloss EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your addres s and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automati cally rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; o r e-mail editor@newssun.com.

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By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comLake Placid Members of the town council want property owners to understand changes in the names for proposed maximum development densities, which should not to be confused with local zoning, an entirely different process. While the proposed Evaluation & Appraisal Report has changed the name of Medium Density Residential to High Density Residential and Low Density Residential to Medium Residential, the number of residences per acre does not change at all. For example, High Density Residential property, formerly known as Medium Density Residential, will still allow 12 dwellings an acre and Medium Density Residential will still allow the six dwellings per acre it did when called Low Density Residential. In other words, it is as if council member Ray Royce changed his name to Roy Rice everything el se would stay the same, wheth er Ray or Roy, he would still be the same height and weight JOSEPH BOHNEN JR. Joseph John Bohnen Jr. went home to be with his savior Jesus Christ on Monday, April 18 in West Palm Beach after a short battle with cancer. Joe was born Sept. 18, 1941 in Chicago. He proudly served his country in the Navy traveling the world. The Bohnen family moved to Sebring in 1971 where Joe was a plumbing contractor for many years. He was a loving father, husband, brother, and friend. He loved the Lord, served as deacon in the church, enjoyed golf, boating, and was a member of the VFWand Moose Lodge Joe is survived by his daughters Lori (Kyle) O'Connor and Kimberly (Charles) Dorman; grandchildren: Devon Durham and Victoria Swift; siblings: Robert (Shirley) Rees, Jack (Dina) Rees, Roy (Colleen) Rees, Sharon (Ron) Quale, Richard (Becky) Bohnen, Jenann Patz, Larry (Sandy) Bohnen, Jeffrey Pouliot. Joe was preceded in death by his parents Joseph & Shirley, and wives Suzie (Margaret) and Joni. Acelebration of Joe's life will be held Saturday, April 23 at 12 p.m. at Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring. Arrangements made by National Cremation & Burial Society 1032 N. Dixie Hwy. Lake Worth, FL33460 EVELYN JOHNSON Evelyn Pearce Johnson, 87, passed away April 20, 2011. She was born Aug. 1, 1923 in DeSoto City, Fla. to Leland Clifford and Clara Williams Pearce. She was preceded in death by her husband, Charles D. (Charlie) Johnson, in 2007. She is survived by her son, Dan (Becky) Johnson; daughters, Carol (Terry) Wolfe and Patricia (Stu) Guthrie, both of Sebring and Colleen (Dave) Ricketts, Lakeland, Fla.; nine grandchildren and one greatgrandson; sisters, Patty Durrance, Knoxville, Tenn. and Ruth Fulton, Sebring. Evelyn was a devoted wife, mother and grandmother and sister, who will be deeply missed by her family and friends. She was a member of First United Methodist Church of Sebring; a charter member of the Patriots Chapter of the Daughter of the American Revolution; Sebring Historical Society and a fourth generation Floridian. Visitation will be from 5-7 p.m. Friday, April 22 at Morris Funeral Chapel, Sebring. Funeral service will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, April 23 at First United Methodist Church of Sebring with burial immediately following at Pinecrest Cemetery. The family requests memorials to First United Methodist Church, Family Life Center, 126 S. Pine St, Sebring, Fla. 33870. Condolences may be expressed at www.morrisfu neralchapel.com. Morris Funeral Chapel 307 S. Commerce Ave Sebring, FL33870 (863) 385-0101 EUNICE MARTIN Eunice Mildred Martin o f Sebring passed away Tuesday, April 5, 2011. She was preceded in death by h er parents, Arlie and Izora (Armstorng) Williams; her sons, Wayne and Roger Martin; and daughter, Ruby Martin. She is survived by her si ster, Lorine (Ed) Summer of North Carolina; seven gran dchildren, Dawn of Texas, Shannon of Texas, Shelby o f Texas, Stephanie of Florida Christy of Florida, Avery o f Florida and Ron of New York; 20 great-grandchildren; and her best friend an d daughter-in-law, Kathy Martin of Sebring. Interment at Lakeview Memorial Gardens. DOROTHYROY Dorothy Roy, 94, passed away Tuesday, April 19 in Lecanto, Fla. Dottie was a previous long-time resident of Lake Placid and enjoyed shuffleboard, dancing, the VFWand the Elks. Dottie is survived by her son, Jim Lewis (Judy), Homosassa, Fla.; granddaughter, Jill Lewis; grandson, Jim Lewis (Holly); great-granddaughters, Nico le and Katelyn; and nephew, Tom Hageman. Donations in memory of Dottie can be made to Hospice of Citrus County. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011Page 5A t he mother of two and a l ifelong resident of Avon P ark. Tickets can be purchased f or $8 at EMCI Wireless ( Verizon), Dr. Abanilla's o ffice (next to Turner F urniture) or Mane Salon. Donations can also be m ade to the Renae Massey H eart Transplant Fund at H eartland National Bank in A von Park.FDLRS annual parent conference setLAKE PLACID F lorida Diagnostic and L earning Resources System H eartland will hold its a nnual parent conference on T uesday, May 17 at the F DLRS Office in Lake P lacid. Guest speakers will a ddress "Living with A utism" and "The Internet: H ow Safe is It?" The program will begin a t 9 a.m. and conclude at 1 p .m., with refreshments b etween the presentations. C all (800) 316-7057 to regi ster. The FDLRS office is a t the Heartland E ducational Consortium, 1 099 U.S. 27 North, in L ake Placid. The confere nce is free, but space is l imited, so register early. ( Register by Friday, May 6; t ransportation is provided).Saving Archives, Centennial Book is theme of Sebring Historical eventSEBRING Allen A ltvater III and Gary L amperelli, members of the S ebring Historical Society B oard of Directors, will h ost the quarterly luncheon m eeting to be held at noon S aturday at the Sebring C ivic Center. The covered d ish luncheon is open to the p ublic; bring a dish to share a nd $1.50 per person, w hich covers beverage and t able service. This presentat ion will also include a tour o f the archives, hosted by C arole Goad, and barbec ued chicken by our own C hef Allen (Altvater). Altvater and Lamperelli w ill give a PowerPoint p resentation on Sebring and t he upcoming Sebring C entennial book that is curr ently being written. Local c itizens and business peop le are welcome to attend t his event where they will h ave the opportunity to disc uss and purchase advertisi ng space in the book, w hich may include business a dvertisements, business or f amily histories, or memoria l tributes to family memb ers. The tour of the Sebring H istorical Society's A rchives will illustrate exactly what this historical archive contains. This history of our community and county, of our individuals and families and their accomplishments, of our schools and other major institutions will be highlighted. Boil water notice rescinded, another issued in LPLAKE PLACID The April 15 Precautionary Boil Water Notice for the emergency water shut-down on that day has been rescinded following the repair of a 10-inch water line and the satisfactory completion of the bacteriological survey showing that the water is safe to drink. Placid Utility Water system customers in the Citrus Lakes Colony area, however, experienced an emergency water shut-down from 2-3 p.m. Wednesday to make emergency repairs to a four-inch water line on Lemon Lane. Effected areas include Citrus Lakes Drive, Grape Lane, Lemon Lane, Cherry Lane, Tidewater Drive, Redwater Lane and Tall Oaks Trail. As a precaution, those affected by this shut down should bring all water used for drinking, cooking or brushing teeth to a folling boil for one minute. As an alternate, bottled water may be used. This Precautionary Boil Water Notice will remain in effect for two consecutive days until the bacteriological samples show that the water is safe to drink. At that time, expected to be today, a rescind notice will be issued. If you have any questions, contact the Placid Utilities Water Department at 402-6786 or 699-3716.Events planned at lodges, postsAVON PARK The Combat Veterans Memorial VFWPost 9853, 75 N. Olivia Drive, will host a baked fish dinner for $7, served from 5-7 p.m. today. Music by L&LDuo from 5-8 p.m. Karaoke by Peg and Perry from 5-8 p.m. Saturday. For any questions, call the lodge at 452-9853. LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Moose 2374 will host a game of Texas Hold-em at 2 p.m. today. Music with Larry Musgrave will be from 6-10 p.m. Bingo-bango is set for 2 p.m. Saturday. Music with Big Freddie will follow at 6-10 p.m. For details, call the lodge at 465-0131. The Veterans of Foreign Wars 3880 will host music with Tom today. Breakfast will be served from 8-11 a.m. Saturday. Bingo is at 2 p.m. Horse races at 5:30 p.m. Aham dinner will be served Sunday. Tickets are $7. For details, call the lodge at 699-5444. The Lake Placid American Legion Placid Post 25 will host a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. today. Music by Chrissy from 6:30-9:30 p.m. The Auxiliary will serve burgers from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday. Texas Hold-em is set for 1:30 p.m. Karaoke Bill will play from 5-8 p.m. For more information, call 4650975. The Lake Placid Elks 2661 will host a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. today. Music will follow by Chrissy Harriman and Frankie. For details, call 465-2661.Henscratch Farms plans Easter FestivalSEBRING The Henscratch Farms Easter Festival will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Back by popular demand there will be an Easter egg hunt at 11 a.m. The Easter Bunny will be on the front porch taking pictures with the guests. By the bunny station there will be an Easter-themed craft tent. Hot dogs, chips and lemonade are on the lunch menu for $3. Included in the day is the farm's walking tour, feeding the chickens, the presentation in the winery and complimentary wine tasting and nibbles. Any questions, call 6992060 or go online www.henscratchfarms.com.New group to make debut at Duffer'sSEBRING Heartland Idol's recent winner Shannon Marrero and Jim Helwig will team up to perform for their first time at Duffer's Sports Grille from 6-9 p.m. today Together they comprise Silhouette, which is an excellent mix of older standards as well as the top hits of today. After the dinner entertainment, Billy "Griff" Griffis with Southern Style Karaoke will be entertaining from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. The He Said She Said duo will be on stage from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Saturday. They play a variety of rock and Top 40 dance tunes to keep everyone moving on the floor. here is no cover charge for any of the entertainment this weekend. Duffer's is at 6940 U.S. 27 North, Sebring. For details, call 382-6339. Continued from page 2A COMMUNITYBRIEFS y ou cut a tree down, plant another one. I t's not okay to go out and just shoot an a nimal and let it die. People should just d o the right thing," Stone said. Stone was set to begin his trek from h is Spring Lake home at 4 a.m. today a nd hoped to arrive at Bernie Little D istribution Center in south Sebring by 8 a.m. "I'm going to pace myself but I figure I can make it there by the time I'm supposed to be at work," Stone said before his walk. Stone doesn't have too much to worry about regarding being at work on time. His boss fully supports his decision and is proud of that Stone is taking the walk for Earth Day. As for the future, Stone is already thinking about next year's walk and how he can make an impact in the community. "I'm trying to think of ideas for next year. I want to get more people involved and hopefully more people will walk with me. My wife wanted to join me but that'd be a little hard with our four boys," Stone said with a laugh. Continued from page 1A Walking to work man's way of honoring Earth Day Bohnen OBITUARIES Johnson LP zoning rules the same, despite wording changes Classified ads get results! Call 314-9876

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Page 6ANews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.com It doesn't get much worse than the ferocious battle that killed Faulkner and five fellow comrades and left many more wounded. Many casualties of those chaotic moments were just weeks from finishing their Afghanistan deployments. "It's quite a shock to us," Berry said. "Being that close to coming home is just tragic." In one of the service's most poignant moments, the fallen hero's mother, Judy Berry, and father, Joel Faulkner, were presented the Bronze Star and Purple Heart, awarded to their son posthumously. The momentous events of March 29 in eastern Afghanistan received nowhere near the level of deserved attention from the national media. For too long, the public has languished in the darkness during the daily victories and struggles of America's post-9/11 conflicts, which marks a great injustice to those who serve and sacrifice. "Our job is not over after today," Little reminded mourners at the service's conclusion. Families of the fallen, as well as those wounded or suffering from the incalculable psychological toll of war, need more than our sympathy. They need and merit our constant focus. "It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died," said renowned tough-as-nails Gen. George S. Patton, whose quote was read aloud at the service. "Rather, we should thank God that such men lived." The grace shown by Pfc. Jeremy P. Faulkner and his fellow troops, who volunteered to serve during a tim e of genuine peril, is truly amazing. "I'm going," the brave soldier said before heading off to war. "But if the wors t happens, I know where I'm going." Was blind, but now I see To find out more about Tom Sileo, or to read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com. Continued from page 2A Soldier was almost on his way home Image courtesy of Sgt. 1st Class Mark Burr ell Spc. Brit Jacobs of Task Force No Slack bids farewell to six fellow soldiers, including Pfc. Jeremy Faulkner, at an April 9 memorial service in eastern Afghanistan. h orses that they receive are v ery debilitated maln ourished, underweight, u ntrimmed and one even a rrived with a broken nose a nd fractured teeth. The time and effort that i t takes to nurse an animal o f such size is immeasurab le, but Carnahan and her v olunteers are happy to do i t. Carnahan is usually i nformed by neighbors, vets a nd sometimes even the o wners of the condition of t he horses and Promise A cres wastes no time and t aking the horses into the c enter on a temporary a nd in some cases perman ent basis. "They are all started on s enior feed, it doesn't matt er their age. It's easier to d igest and better for their s tomachs at these states. T hey are feed small a mounts, several meals a d ay, and slowly build their way back up," explained Carnahan. Promise Acres is a place that functions off the hard work and dedication of the family. Funding for the establishment is not readily available, leaving the Carnahans and volunteers to foot most of the bill. The establishment is currently working on becoming a non-profit organization. Currently, Promised Acres offers numerous programs for the community to enjoy, ranging from various riding lessons to character development programs. The development program teaches children to interact with other individuals accordingly and how to become a stand-up citizen, all while intermingling with the horses at the rescue under the close supervision of trainers, local volunteers and club members including the Highlands County 4H. "These programs we have here help offset some of the funds that we need. We have to pay for feed and supplies and the vet and check-ups. But it is also something we offer just to get people familiar with horses," Carnahan said. Carnahan believes in the facility and the work that she and everyone involved is doing. The biggest mission of Promised Acres is to inform those who have horses and those who plan to own one in the future. "We try to educate the public about horses. We are trying to prevent these problems," Carnahan said. Donations and sponsorships can be mailed to P.O. Box 1144 Avon Park, Fl 33826-1144. For more information visit promiseacres.com Continued from page 1A he said, meaning a HUDapproved lender. Calibre was unable to find one, so the application was returned. "I have three attorneys who have told me I've fulfilled my obligations, but I can spend more money than you. I didn't come here unarmed," DePugh said. Council member John Griffin told DePugh he felt misled, because DePugh had convinced Griffin he had powerful investors lined up. Griffin also pointed out the amount of that has time passed. "It's been three, almost four years. Why even consider asking for your money back?" he said. In the end everyone back ed down from the increasing ly strong language, agreeing to extend the discussion by ha ving city staff negotiate wi th Calibre. "We hope to bring a res olution instead of going to court," DePugh said. The issue will be back o n the May 3 agenda. Continued from page 1A Former Harder Hall developer wants deposit money back News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS J ennifer Carnahan walks with Patches a 15-year-old horse that was brought to Promise A cres Equine Rescue. The horse was physically abused and neglected before coming to Promise Acres. The horse has suffered substantial emotional damage, but is now physically healed and ready to be adopted. Horses have a place to heal

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Page 7ANews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.com TODAYBright and sunny88 / 65Winds: ESE at 7-14 mphMostly sunny88 / 65Winds: ESE at 7-14 mphSATURDAYSunny to partly cloudy88 / 65Winds: E at 8-16 mphSUNDAYMostly sunny and pleasant87 / 65Winds: ESE at 8-16 mphMONDAYPartly sunny, a t-storm possible90 / 69Winds: ESE at 10-20 mphTUESDAY City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. Washington Washington 54/48 54/48 New Yor k NewYork 54/45 54/45 Miami Miami 85/73 85/73 Atlanta Atlanta 79/62 79/62 Detroit Detroit 50/47 50/47 Houston Houston 86/74 86/74 Chicago Chicago 54/49 54/49 Minneapolis Minneapolis 50/39 50/39 Kansas City KansasCity 73/49 73/49 El Paso ElPaso 88/62 88/62 Denver Denver 64/29 64/29 Billings Billings 42/29 42/29 Los Angeles LosAngeles 67/54 67/54 San Francisco SanFrancisco 61/48 61/48 Seattle Seattle 58/40 58/40 Washington 54/48 New Yor k 54/45 Miami 85/73 Atlanta 79/62 Detroit 50/47 Houston 86/74 Chicago 54/49 Minneapolis 50/39 Kansas City 73/49 El Paso 88/62 Denver 64/29 Billings 42/29 Los Angeles 67/54 San Francisco 61/48 Seattle 58/40 A potent storm system across the nations midsection will bring heavy rain to the Ohio Valley today. The same system will trigger an outbreak of severe weather, including tornadoes, from the mid-Mississippi Valley to eastern Oklahoma. The violent thunderstorms will expand into the Ohio Valley at night. Meanwhile during the day, rain will also wet the mid-Atlantic and northern Plains. Enough cold air will be in place for the rain to fall as wet snow in some areas. U.S. Cities National Forecast for April 22Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. World Cities National SummaryCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. Weather (W):ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Albuquerque 76/47/s 74/47/c 71/45/pc Atlanta 79/62/t 83/63/s 83/62/s Baltimore 50/44/r 70/57/c 75/58/pc Birmingham 86/64/pc 83/62/pc 84/62/s Boston 51/37/pc 52/48/r 56/45/c Charlotte 66/57/c 81/60/pc 85/59/pc Cheyenne 55/26/r 50/32/c 55/34/pc Chicago 54/49/r 63/40/c 60/45/c Cleveland 54/49/r 70/45/c 55/45/r Columbus 60/57/r 76/52/t 62/52/r Dallas 88/71/c 89/68/pc 86/70/pc Denver 64/29/pc 53/34/c 63/38/pc Detroit 50/47/r 66/42/pc 58/45/c Harrisburg 48/42/r 67/55/t 68/49/c Honolulu 87/71/pc 85/70/s 85/71/s Houston 86/74/pc 86/74/pc 87/74/pc Indianapolis 64/58/r 72/49/c 64/54/sh Jackson, MS 84/65/pc 85/66/pc 84/66/pc Kansas City 73/49/t 62/47/pc 68/55/sh Lexington 76/61/r 79/57/t 76/59/t Little Rock 81/63/c 82/63/c 83/64/pc Los Angeles 67/54/pc 69/54/pc 69/55/pc Louisville 76/65/r 78/59/t 75/60/t Memphis 83/65/c 84/66/c 81/65/pc Milwaukee 52/45/r 59/39/c 54/42/c Minneapolis 50/39/r 56/39/pc 61/43/pc Nashville 82/64/t 81/63/t 82/62/pc New Orleans 84/68/pc 84/70/pc 84/69/pc New York City 54/45/pc 61/52/r 66/53/r Norfolk 58/52/r 74/62/pc 81/61/pc Oklahoma City 84/59/c 69/54/t 73/62/pc Philadelphia 52/42/r 65/58/t 71/55/c Phoenix 90/63/s 88/64/pc 84/62/s Pittsburgh 50/45/r 72/51/t 65/50/r Portland, ME 52/33/s 48/41/r 59/38/pc Portland, OR 61/38/pc 62/45/c 57/45/sh Raleigh 65/58/r 83/65/pc 86/62/pc Rochester 48/39/pc 65/43/r 56/42/c St. Louis 73/56/t 71/52/c 67/60/t San Francisco 61/48/pc 61/53/c 62/52/pc Seattle 58/40/s 59/43/pc 56/43/sh Wash., DC 54/48/r 73/62/c 81/59/pc Cape Coral 90/65/s 90/66/s 88/66/s Clearwater 89/68/s 88/68/s 86/69/s Coral Springs 85/71/s 83/73/s 84/73/pc Daytona Beach 83/67/s 83/66/s 82/64/pc Ft. Laud. Bch 85/74/s 84/74/s 85/74/pc Fort Myers 89/67/s 91/68/s 89/66/s Gainesville 86/63/pc 86/62/s 87/61/s Hollywood 86/71/s 85/71/s 86/71/pc Homestead AFB 84/70/s 84/72/s 83/72/pc Jacksonville 84/63/pc 83/63/s 82/61/pc Key West 85/76/s 84/76/s 84/76/s Miami 85/73/s 85/74/s 86/74/pc Okeechobee 83/67/s 83/69/s 84/69/s Orlando 86/64/s 86/66/s 86/65/s Pembroke Pines 86/71/s 85/71/s 86/71/pc St. Augustine 81/65/pc 81/65/s 79/64/pc St. Petersburg 89/68/s 88/69/s 86/70/s Sarasota 89/65/s 89/66/s 87/66/s Tallahassee 88/62/pc 87/62/s 87/60/s Tampa 88/70/s 88/69/s 86/68/s W. Palm Bch 83/71/s 83/72/s 83/73/pc Winter Haven 88/66/s 89/66/s 87/65/s Acapulco 90/72/s 90/72/s 88/75/t Athens 63/45/s 65/49/s 65/48/s Beirut 60/52/sh 63/53/sh 68/54/s Berlin 73/53/s 73/49/pc 70/48/s Bermuda 70/61/sh 66/63/pc 71/67/pc Calgary 45/26/s 51/24/s 52/35/pc Dublin 64/46/pc 57/41/r 61/45/pc Edmonton 47/21/s 51/23/s 56/30/s Freeport 84/68/s 84/69/s 85/68/pc Geneva 73/50/pc 71/52/pc 65/54/sh Havana 90/65/pc 89/65/s 89/68/s Hong Kong 80/69/pc 80/72/r 82/73/s Jerusalem 54/45/sh 60/49/sh 66/44/s Johannesburg 68/49/t 63/49/sh 65/49/r Kiev 56/42/c 59/45/c 60/45/r London 72/50/sh 75/52/sh 73/56/sh Montreal 50/37/s 52/43/r 53/41/pc Moscow 52/37/sh 54/39/pc 59/45/s Nice 69/56/r 69/57/r 70/59/pc Ottawa 54/35/s 57/41/r 47/39/pc Quebec 48/33/s 44/37/r 54/33/pc Rio de Janeiro 89/76/s 91/77/s 83/72/s Seoul 57/38/sh 55/41/s 56/39/sh Singapore 87/78/t 88/77/t 87/78/sh Sydney 75/54/c 70/53/sh 74/57/sh Toronto 48/42/c 69/42/c 52/39/pc Vancouver 56/37/s 58/46/pc 52/44/sh Vienna 75/55/s 75/57/s 69/49/sh Warsaw 65/44/s 61/43/sh 61/43/sh Winnipeg 49/33/c 51/33/pc 61/26/pc A lmanac Readings at Palm Beach High ............................................ 12:34 a.m. Low ............................................... 6:27 a.m. High ............................................ 12:45 p.m. Low ............................................... 6:50 p.m. Bright and sunny today. Mostly clear tonight. Mostly sunny tomorrow. Sunday: sunny to partly cloudy. Monday: mostly sunny and pleasant. Tuesday: partly sunny and warm with a shower or thunderstorm possible. April 22 marks the latest ever that the temperature dropped to freezing in Baltimore, Md. Freezing temperatures have been noted in the outlying suburbs well into May. Bright and sunny today. Winds east 7-14 mph. Expect a full day of sunshine with relative humidity 75% early, 40% in the afternoon and good drying conditions. Mostly clear tonight. € Even addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday. € Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and Saturday. € All watering should take place before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. LastNewFirstFull Apr 24May 3May 10May 17 Today Saturday Sunrise 6:57 a.m. 6:56 a.m. Sunset 7:53 p.m. 7:53 p.m. Moonrise 12:01 a.m. 12:53 a.m. Moonset 10:49 a.m. 11:48 a.m. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2011Jacksonville 84/63 Gainesville 86/63 Ocala 88/64 Daytona Beach 83/67 Orlando 86/64 Winter Haven 88/66 Tampa 88/70 Clearwater 89/68 St. Petersburg 89/68 Sarasota 89/65 Fort Myers 89/67 Naples 90/65 Okeechobee 83/67 West Palm Beach 83/71 Fort Lauderdale 85/74 Miami 85/73 Tallahassee 88/62 Apalachicola 82/66 Pensacola 82/68 Key West Avon Park 88/65 Sebring 88/65 Lorida 85/67 Lake Placid 89/63 Venus 89/63 Brighton 85/65 TidesReadings at St. Petersburg High .............................................. 4:45 p.m. Low ............................................. 12:21 a.m. High .....................................................none Low ......................................................none UV Index TodayThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m. 6 10 10 6 Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional SummaryShown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Five-Day forecast for Highlands County 85/76 Lake Levels Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 11.30 Normal ...............................................14.51 Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterdayTemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHigh Sunday .......................................... 89 Low Sunday ........................................... 62 High Monday ......................................... 93 Low Monday .......................................... 59 High Tuesday ......................................... 91 Low Tuesday .......................................... 59 High Wednesday .................................... 91 Low Wednesday .................................... 54Heat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayRelative humidity .................................. 40% Expected air temperature ....................... 86 Makes it feel like .................................... 86BarometerMonday ...............................................30.18 Tuesday ...............................................30.08 Wednesday .........................................30.11PrecipitationMonday ...............................................0.49Ž Tuesday ...............................................0.00Ž Wednesday .........................................0.00Ž Month to date ..................................... 2.03Ž Year to date ......................................... 9.87Ž

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Associated PressTALLAHASSEE A drifter who prosecutors have said abducted two women and then waited hours or even days to kill and behead them in remote forests was sentenced to death on Thursday. The judge came to his decision in less than 15 minutes. Gary Michael Hilton, in a blue jail uniform, showed no emotion as the judge imposed the sentence. Deputies then walked Hilton over to a side table to fingerprint him. The 64-year-old was convicted in February of the 2007 death of Cheryl Dunlap of Crawfordville. The beheaded body of Dunlap a 46-year-old nurse and Sunday school teacher was found in north Florida's Apalachicola National Forest. In a sense, the death penalty was a foregone conclusion. Ajury had unanimously recommended a death sentence in Dunlap's killing, and Florida judges must give "great weight" to a jury's sentencing recommendation. And judges usually follow that recommendation in capital cases. "May God have mercy on your soul," Circuit Judge James C. Hankinson told Hilton before leaving the courtroom. Hilton already had been sentenced to life in prison in Georgia after pleading guilty to killing 24-year-old hiker Meredith Emerson of Buford, Ga. The headless bodies of both women were found in wooded areas where Hilton had camped in Georgia and Florida. Hilton was arrested at a north Georgia convenience store where he had tried to get rid of Dunlap's boots. He still is a suspect in three other killings in Florida and North Carolina. Assistant Public Defender Robert Friedman, Hilton's lawyer, said he would appeal the sentence. The Florida Supreme Court automatically reviews death sentence appeals. Friedman said he will challenge, among other things, the fact the judge allowed some jurors to sit on the ca se even though they said th ey knew about Emerson's mu rder. State Attorney Will ie Meggs, who prosecut ed Hilton, shrugged off que stions about spending mon ey to prosecute the case wh en Hilton already had plead ed guilty to killing Emerson. Page 8ANews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.com The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Wednesday, April 20: Nicole Giovanni Berry, 26, of Baltimore, Md., was charged with resisting an officer without violence. April Marie Castro, 31, of Avon Park, was booked on an out-of-county warrant for violation of probation. Linda Sue Elwell, 48, of Lakeland, was charged with two counts of probation violation. Clifford Claud Melvin, 42, of Venus, was sentenced to 270 days in jail for two counts possession of drug equipment, battery, larceny, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. George Richard Miquel, 47, of Delray Beach, was charged with probation violation. Barbarito Delgado Ramos, 44, of Sebring, was booked on an immigration detainer. Thomas Gordon Ramsey, 49, of Avon Park, was charged with battery. Harold James Rhinehardt, 47, of Avon Park, was charged with battery. Melchor Ruiz-Sanchez, 35, of Avon Park, was booked on an immigration detainer. Steven Michael Thornton, 25, of Sebring, was charged with driving with a suspended license. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Tuesday, April 19: Steve Campbell, 56, of Elkhart, Ind., was charged with loitering or prowling. Christine Marie Carter, 35, of Sebring, was charged with DUI. Tamara Kaye Chapman, 48, of Okeechobee, was charged with violation of probation reference aggravated battery with deadly weapon. Daniel George Cook, 49, of Cape Coral, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference possession of cannabis. Anastasia Dominique Gibbs, 24, of Avon Park, was charged with battery. Justin Ray Griffin, 22, of Sebring, was charged with violation of probation reference possession of cocaine. Brandon Wesley Hyatt, 28, of Sebring, registered as a sex offender. Reginald McDonald Jones, 36, of Lake Placid, was charged with driving while license suspended. Joseph Jude O'Neill, 46, of Sebring, was charged with possession of marijuana. Natasha Torres, 28, of Sebring, was charged with hit and run, DUI and DUI and damage property. Marcus Waugh, 20, of Lake Placid, was charged with violation of probation reference burglary of a dwelling/occupied conve y ance. POLICEBLOTTER u nanimously at its first readi ng on April 5, but it immedia tely became clear Tuesday n ight Stanley and Fells had c hanged their minds, and by t he end of the discussion, the r equest was denied by a 2-1 v ote. With members John Clark a nd Bud Whitlock absent C lark due to a relative's medi cal procedure and Whitlock t o a personal illness A ndrew Fells, John Griffin a nd Council President Scott S tanley faced a close to c apacity audience, which t urned out to have strong o pinions. Stanley opened the discuss ion saying he had approved t he district earlier because he h ad been under some false a ssumptions, and that he no l onger supported the idea. "I don't see (the present ordinance) precluding anything but package stores and bars," he said. Before proceeding, Griffin argued that any discussion or action should wait until Clark and Whitlock were present. "It's not fair to the other council members," he said. Stanley said the room was filled with people who had something to say. It wasn't fair to delay. "We can hardly get people (to come to meetings)," he said, "and now that we have people you're going to send them away?" Among those waiting to speak were David Richardson, pastor at the First Baptist Church; Eugene Sauls, a former council member; Mike Karl, of the New Testament Mission; Gene Brenner, chairman of the CRAAdvisory Committee and a major property owner on the Circle; and Cindy Stanley, Scott Stanley's wife. "Respect all churches of all denominations," Richardson said. "Allowing a bar as a neighbor (to a church) is a cold, hard insult. It sends a thankless message." "We don't need bars," said Sauls. "We need professionals and businesses to bring people downtown." Karl sounded a warning, "If you don't listen to us we don't need to come (to council meetings). We'll just go to the voting booth." Cindy Stanley, who had made a passionate plea against the district during the first hearing, fought tears as she spoke again, closing her remarks by looking at Griffin and saying, "John, please don't vote for this." Brenner and Kristi Olsen, who has a business downtown, spoke in favor of the district. Brenner pointed to the economy and the need to do something for a depressed downtown. "I'm upside down on two buildings, "he said. "I try to rent but applicants walk away. It is too difficult to get licenses. We've spent millions of dollars to revitalize downtown, we need enticement packages." "I'm hearing a lot of judgment," Olsen said. "I'm just asking people to be real release that Bible belt buckle just one notch. This isn't about anything outrageous or off the wall." Griffin moved to table discussion to the next meeting, which Stanley and Fells defeated. That led to a sharp exchange between Griffin and Fells. "You don't want them (Clark and Whitlock) here because they'll vote again st you," Griffin said to Fells. "And you only want the m here because they'd vote wi th you," Fells said back. Continued from page 1A Entertainment district a no-go for Sebring News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLE Y Pastor Mike Karl, of the New Testament Mission, addressed the Sebring city council Tuesday night. He is strongly opposed to allowing bars downtown. Drinking causes enough problems, he said, we don't need people drinking more. a follow-up, striking out the w ords "ongoing investigat ion" and replacing them w ith "outstanding review of t he Department." Sheriff Susan Benton and S heriff's Office Attorney M ike Durham have both c laimed that there is no crimi nal investigation into R owan, that they are just taki ng over "operational cont rol" of the city's police d epartment at Deleon's r equest. E-mails and memos b etween Deleon and Rowan l eading up to the suspension c learly show that Rowan f eared retaliation from the c ity council for investigat ions into city officials i ncluding Mayor Sharon S chuler, Deputy Mayor B renda Gray, former assist ant city manager and now P roject Manager Maria S utherland and her husband, C ouncilman Parke S utherland. "On April 12, 2011, you a nd I met to discuss some c oncerns in more detail. D uring the past two weeks, it h as been my observation that y ou have a great deal of conc ern and worry over your employment with the city," Deleon stated in his memo to Rowan. Another e-mail from Deleon to Rowan indicates that the chief was considering going to the governor's office to seek protection. "You mentioned going to Tallahassee and filing with the Governor's office seeking protection from city officials. Later in this same day, you retracted this option after discussing further with your wife," Deleon wrote. Deleon confirmed that there were investigations involving other city officials, but was not clear what was being investigated or if those investigations held merit. Aspokesman for the State Attorney's Office in Bartow, Chip Thulberry, said an investigation into Avon Park's city officials began in January and ended in March, but that his office closed the investigation without taking any action. Requests to see investigations into city council members from city hall have not been forwarded at press time. Rowan was not available for comment on Thursday. Continued from page 1A APPD under control of sheriff after Rowan placed on leave Death for drifter convicted in forest slaying

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, April 22, 2011Page 9 A LYKES CITRUSMANAGEMENT has an opening for a full time Parts Person at their Basinger Grove Shop. Duties include answering phones, parts, ordering, inventory control, distribution/stocking, invoicing of incoming/outgoing parts, ability to lift 25 lbs. Successful applicants should possess 1 year experience in parts inventory or related field and have compute r skills. Lykes Citrus Management Division offers competitive wages and benefit package including Medical, Dental, Vision, Life, AD&D and LTD insurance plus paid vacation and holidays. Interested applicants should apply in person at: Lykes Citrus Managemanent Division 490 Buckhorn Road Lorida, Fl. 33857 or 7 Lykes Road Lake Placid, Flo. 33852 Lykes Citrus Management Division is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer/Affirmative Action/Drug Free Workplace/M/F/D/V 2100Help Wanted 2000 Employment 1100Announcements NOTICE OF DISPOSITION ACCORDING TO THE FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT THE FOLLOWING STORAGE UNITS LOCATED AT THE STORAGE PLACE OF AVON PARK, 395 CR 17A WEST, AVON PARK, FL 33825 WILL BE DISPOSED OF ON MAY 16, 2011, AT 10:00AM. ALL UNITS ARE SAID TO CONTAIN HOUSEHOLD GOODS UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED. Names and unit numbers are as follows: NAME UNIT NUMBER Maude Amy Hall #266 Calvin Crowell II #339 DISPOSITION BEING MADE TO SATISFY LANDLORD'S LIEN, MANAGEMENT RESERVES ALL RIGHTS, UNDER FLORIDA LAW, ALL PAYMENTS MUST BE IN CASH. April 22, 29, 2011 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is hereby given that on 5/23/2011 at 10:30 am the following vehicles will be sold for towing & storage charges pursuant to F.S. 713.78. 1982 Chev TK # 2GCGK24J8C1209597 ALL Sales to be held at Alan Jay Automotive Network 441 US 27N Sebring, Fl 33870 863 402 4210 April 22, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 09000433GCS SAXON MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC., Plaintiff, vs MELYNDA E. RIGDON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MELYNDA E. RIGDON; EARL T. RIGDON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF EARL T. RIGDON; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THOUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Highlands County, Florida, described as: LOT 11, BLOCK 26, SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on May 2, 2011. DATED THIS 4th DAY OF April, 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 4th day of April, 2011. CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk April 15, 22, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-000777 DIVISION: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR NOVASTAR MORTGAGE FUNDING TRUST, SERIES 2007-1, Plaintiff, vs. ESTHER CALLAHAN, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated February 14, 2011, and entered in Case No. 28-2010-CA-000777 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for NovaStar Mortgage Funding Trust, Series 2007-1, is the Plaintiff and Esther Callahan, Greg Callahan, Tenant #1 n/k/a Helen Alexander, are the defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 18th day of May, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 75, BLOCK 196 OF REPLAT OF BLOCKS 183, 184 AND 196, SUN N LAKE ESTATES (SAID SUBDIVISION ALSO BEING KNOWN AS REPLAT A PORTION OF SUN N LAKES ESTATES, SECTION 17, 18 AND 19), ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 99, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 512 MORNINGSIDE DR., LAKE PLACID, FL 33852-4301 A/K/A 2501 SUNRISE DRIVE, SEBRING, FL 33872 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 14th day of February, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk March 15, 22, 2011 AS OF APRIL 22, 2011, I WILL NO LONGER BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DEBTS INCURRED BY ANYONE OTHER THAN MYSELF. /s/ Gilbert M. Firtz, Jr. April 22, 24, 27, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001078 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. ROBERTA L. BONFIGLIO A/K/A ROBERTA BREMSER; UNKNOWN TENANTS(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 6th day of April, 2011, and entered in Case No. 28-2009-CA-001078, of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and ROBERTA L. BONFIGLIO A/K/A ROBERTA BREMSER; and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33870 at the Highlands County Courthouse in Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 6th day of May, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: SEE EXHIBIT ``A'' ATTACHED. EXHIBIT A TRACT 5 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF SOUTH BEAR POINTE BOULEVARD AND THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF S.C.F.E. RAILROAD; THENCE SOUTH 12 DEGREES 38'45'' WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 2244.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 12 DEGREES 38'45'' WEST ALONG SAID LINE, A DISTANCE OF 163.56 FEET; THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 05'01'' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1198.43 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 35'13'' WEST A DISTANCE OF 276.40 FEET; THENCE NORTH 90 DEGREES 00'00'' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 54.42 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF SOUTH BEAR POINT DRIVE AND TO A POINT ON A NON TANGENT CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 60.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 10 DEGREES 41'25'' AND A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 23 DEGREES 12'32'' WEST, 11.18 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG THE ARC A DISTANCE OF 11.19 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF 25.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 49 DEGREES 40'47'', AND A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 03 DEGREES 42'51'' WEST, 21.00 FEET; THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG THE ARC A DISTANCE OF 21.68 FEET; THENCE NORTH 21 DEGREES 07'33'' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 167.51 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A A RADIUS 520.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 09 DEGREES 47'59''; AND A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 26 DEGREES 01'32'' EAST, 88.83 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG THE ARC A DISTANCE OF 88.94 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 55 DEGREES 42'48'' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1371.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 10 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N. Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863) 534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 6th day of April, 2011. Robert W. Germaine Clerk Of The Circuit Court By: /s/ Lisa Tantillo Deputy Clerk April 22, 29, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-163 Division ________ IN RE: ESTATE OF DORIS GREY BENSON a.k.a. DORIS G. BENSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS A GAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of DORIS GREY BENSON a.k.a. DORIS G. BENSON, deceased, File Number PC 11-163, by the Circuit Court for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce A venue, Sebring, Florida 33870; that the decedent's date of death was February 19, 2011; that the total value of the estate is $30,669.14 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address W.R. Benson 2921 Wynstone Drive, Sebring, FL 33875 Terri Stone 228 Coventry Court Ormond Beach, FL 32174 A LL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is A pril 22, 2011. Persons Giving Notice: /s/ W.R. Benson 2921 Wynstone Drive Sebring, Florida 33875 /s/ Terri Stone 228 Coventry Court Ormond Beach, Florida 32174 A ttorney for Persons Giving Notice: / s/ David F. Lanier E-Mail Address: lanier30@embarqmail.com Florida Bar No. 045399 DAVID F. LANIER P.O. Box 400 A von Park, Florida 33826-0400 Telephone: (863)453-4457 April 22, 29, 2011 1050LegalsCHECK YOUR ADPlease check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:314-9876 News-Sun Classified Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or le ss. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads p laced under the Bargain BuysŽ discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom se t ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad st ating Each,Ž the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open RateŽ pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain BuysŽ specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home,Ž are allowed to be pla ced under the Bargain BuyŽ category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com 863-314-9876 DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS € Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 314-9876. € The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 1050Legals Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 LOOKING FOR THAT SPECIAL HOME?Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 385-6155. Then shop till you drop! DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 385-6155Having something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what you're doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 314-9876

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Page 10ANews-Sun Friday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.co m SEBRING -Downtown on the Circle. Monthy rates starting at $400. payable wkly. Includes elec. & water. No Pets. 306 circle. 863-386-9100 or 954-295-7194. Or go to Bldg. and ask for John. 863-414-7535 REDUCED RENTfor doing maintenance. Upstairs furnished apartment. Need references. 863-385-1806. 6150FurnishedApartments SEBRING 3024Spinks Rd. 2/1 Completely refurnished. New Wood Floors. Patio. Washer & Dryer. $600. mo. Call 561-967-7161 SEBRING VILLA 3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage. Wood floors, vaulted ceilings, screened porch. Convenient location near Hospital. Gated community, Clubhouse & pool, lawn maint. incl. $900. mo. RENTED!!! 6100Villas & CondosFor Rent 6000 RentalsFURNISHED -55 plus Francis II Park. 2BR, 1BA, carport, air. $500 deposit, $475 monthly plus utilities. 1 year contract. Call 419-408-8821 5150Mobile HomesFor Rent PALM HARBORHOMES Call about our Extreme Makeover Home Sale As See On TV!! 800-622-2832 LAKE PLACIDWell insulated home on Paradise corner lot. Five furn. rooms, two baths, plus lg. utility room, tolls incl. Call for info. 863-202-6325 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesCEMETARY LOTSPinecrest. 4 Joining. Old Section. $1,500. obo. Call 904-287-7110 or 615-653-1118 4280Cemetery LotsLAKE PLACID Tropical Harbor 55+ Lakeside Park, w/all ammenities. 2/2 DW. Tile Sunroom, Laundry & Utility. Lg. Carport. Scenic open location. Moving. Open to offers. Call 863-465-5129. 4100Homes for SaleLake PlacidSEBRING NO NEED FOR A BANK! Owner Financing 3BR, 1BA remodeled, NICE HOME! Woodlawn Elem. area. 1243 Fernvale Ave. 863-227-2717 4080Homes for SaleSebring 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial WAIT STAFF NEEDED! Full Time & Part Time. Experience preferred / mature. Lunch & Dinner shifts, Apply in person at Zeno's Sun 'n Lake Blvd., Sebring. V ETERINARY RECEPTIONIST /ASSISTANTneeded for small animal clinic. A compassionate and enthusiastic team player needed for a full time position. Must have a positive attitude and take pride in providing exceptional client service. Multi-tasking, organization, attention to detail & computer skills necessary. Must be able to work flexible hrs. & weekends. Stop by and fill out an application at 11751 Twitty Rd. Sebring 33876. Hours M-F 7:30-6. SEEKING WELLEXPERIENCED MEDICAL OFFICE HELP P/T. Excellent billing/collection, communication, typing, computer skills & medical terminology are A MUST Fax resume to: 863-471-3206 or email to: medicalofficebilling@yahoo.com MEAL SITEMANAGER needed in Sebring. Reliable transportation and caring attitude towards the elderly are a must. Some lifting is required, 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m., M F. Apply in person at NU-HOPE Elder Care Services, Inc. 6414 U.S. 27 South, Sebring. EOE. DFWP. COOKS W/EXPERIENCEpreferred at Spring Lake Golf Resort. Apply in Person. Call for directions only 863-655-0900. LIFEGAURDS NEEDED.Lake Placid Camp and Conference Center is hiring Lifegaurds. Please call 863-465-2197 Mon-Fri 9-5pm. EXPERIENCED. ROOFERS 863-385-0351 CNA PRIVATEduty $150. per day. Sat.-Mon. Ask for Laura 863-709-5333. 2100Help Wanted AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL : $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 SEBRING -2BR, 2BA. Tile floors, fresh paint. Includes water. $600/mo. Call Gary Johnson, 863-381-1861. RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartments Having something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what you're doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 314-9876

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, April 22, 2011Page 11 A Call 385-6155 and a Sales Representative will be glad to assist you! LINCOLN TOWNCAR '97 Blk/blk. Leather, Presidentail Series. Call 863-459-9899 LINCOLN TOWNCAR '97 Blk/blk. leather. Presidential Series. $2,500. Call 863-452-9899. 1998 NISSANMAXIMA, Burgundy, 4Dr, 6 cylinder, automatic, 62K, cold air, CLEAN, Very Good Condition. $5200 Sorry Sold! 9450Automotive for Sale1973 NORTON850 COMMANDO One Owner* RareFind 10K miles New paint & chrome Will Accept reasonable offer. 863-382-8985 or 863-465-9100 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation 8000 Recreation PUPS STANDARDPoodles. 3 Colors. 11 wks. We're cute, playful, Pedigree. Free Range, loving, Guarenteed. In training, learning fast. $900. Call 305-731-6242. We won't last. NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. HAND RAISEDIndian Ring Neck Parrots. Very sweet. Great gifts. $200. Call 863-697-3418 7520Pets & Supplies SEBRING SAT.only 4/23/11 8-5. 2225 Croydon Rd. Puzzles, clothes, books, DVD's, a bike Cardio Fit, & lots of misc. for everyone. Behind Sr. Center, off Sebring Pkwy., N. On Avalon to Rt. on Oakwood, rt. on Croydon. SEBRING -Pine & Lake Estates 2110 Pinewood Blvd. Fri & Sat 4/22 & 23, 9am ? Lots of Decorative accessories, some furniture, sail boat, 3 wheel bike, tools, household items. SEBRING -Multi Family Sale! 1377 Lake Josephine Dr. Sat. Apr. 23rd, 8am ? Children's clothing, games & toys, household items. Much Much More! AVON PARK(RIVERGREENS) 152 Hillcrest Dr. Sat Apr. 23, 8am ? Twin bed, small furniture, boys clothes & games, household items, books, DVDs & CDs. 7320Garage &Yard SalesAVON PARK1955 Torrington Rd. Thur. & Fri 4/21 & 22, 8am-4pm. computer desk, book shelves, sofa tables, furniture, clothing and household items. 7320Garage &Yard Sales WEBER BBQ,OT silver, NIB. $75 863-385-3199 RECIPROCATING SAWDeWalt 304P, Paid $93., used 1 time, $75. 386-273-3731 PICNIC TABLERed, fits in trunk $24 863-385-3199 LOVESEAT BLUEPlaid $40. Call 863-201-3769 ELECTRIC WIRERomex 12 / 2 /W / ground, Paid $40. Asking $30. 863-273-3731 COFFEE TABLE 4' x 20". Glass top & bottom is a basket weave. $50. Call 863-465-4284 BOOKS WESTERNS,20 for $12. CALL 863-385-1563 BAR, WOOD& Leather $50. Call 863-201-3769 7310Bargain BuysWINDOWS -White, Tinted & Tempered Alum. (2) 4'X8' $350 / (1) 6'X3' $175 / Cabinets w/ Formica Top (3) $150. Call 863-385-3199 7300MiscellaneousDINING ROOMSET Broyhil w/2 leafs, dark oak & formica top. 6 chairs, 1 captain. All good shape seats need recovered. $350. Call 863-465-4284 7180Furniture 7000 Merchandise SEBRING (2)Available 3926 Kenilworth Blvd, 1500 sq ft, $550/mo : A/C, office, BA, lg overhead door, near Sebring High School. 640 Park St, 6400 sq ft, $2500/mo : A/C, office, BA, 8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric, fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway. 941-416-2813 AVON PARKLarge Retail/Office Building, 100 E. Main St. A MUST SEE! 863-295-9272 6750Commercial RentalSEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, Satellite, split plan house, share kitchen & laundry room. Full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for Rent SPRING LAKE3BR, 2BA, 2CG, CHA, patio, ceramic tiled liv. room, din. room, kitchen, bath & halls, SS appliances, refrigerator has water on door, micro., W/D hook up. No pets. 863-655-0136 SEBRING 3BR (possible 4BR), 1BA LARGEfenced yard with Citrus trees. Nice area, Indian Streets off Lakeview Dr $600 mo., + 1st & Sec. 863-446-1861 SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 6300Unfurnished HousesSEBRING 2240Avalon Rd. 3/2 furn. Small animals ok. Near Shopping Center & Senior Club References $700. first/last. Call 305-387-6863 after 4pm. or 863-237-3129. 6250Furnished Houses LAKE PLACID2/BR, 2/BA Apt / Duplex, Washer / Dryer, screend porch. Excellent Conditio n. Includes water. $500 monthly plus 1 mo. security. 954-695-8348 BEAUTIFUL APTSSEBRING 2BR, 1BA, tile floors, screen back porch, beautiful landscaping, building 5 yrs. new. Pets OK. $595 month. 3106 Medical Way. RENTED AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; Washer/Dryer, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook ups. Students/Seniors Discount Call 863-452-0469. 6200UnfurnishedApartments LOOKING FOR AN APARTMENT? Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. NEED AHELPING HAND? CALL NEWS-SUN CLASSIFIEDS THEY GET RESULTS (863)314-9876CASTLE HILL Apartments of Avon ParkAccepting Applications for 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts. Available to individuals 62 years or older, handicap/disabled, regardless of age. For rental information & applications please call: 863-452-6565 TDD: 711 THIS INSTITUTION IS AN Equal Opportunity Provider and EmployerLos Apt. de Castle Hill de Avon ParkEstan aceptando aplicaciones para Apts. de 1 y 2 recamaras. Disponible a personas de 62 ancs o mas, incapacidad fisica/mental, no importa la edad. Para mas informacion favor de llamar 863-452-6565. TDD: 711 Esta Institucion Es De Igualdad De Oportunidad Al Proveedor, Y Empleador

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Page 12ANews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.com

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By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comLAKE WALES "We j ust told the girls to leave it a ll out on the field tonight," S ebring head softball coach J oe Sinness related after W ednesday's District 5-5A T ournament game against t op-seeded Lake Wales. And while they did do j ust that, against a team they n ever came close to during t o regular season routs, in t he end it wasn't quite e nough in an 8-5 loss to the L ady Highlanders. "Physically, we outplayed them tonight, there's no doubt in my mind," Sinness said. "Mentally, it caught up with us. We had some m ental mistakes on the b ases and some mental mist akes in the field." But there was no quest ioning the effort put forth a s the Streaks put together o ne of their best all-around p erformances of the season. There were contributions f rom every part of the lineu p with every starter getting a t least one hit on the night. Haley Pack, as Sinness stated, had perhaps her best outing on the mound since returning from an early season foot injury. Oh, Lake Wales took a 10 lead in the second, without a hit, as a walk, passed ball and dropped third strike allowed the first tally to come across, but that alone showed Pack wasn't having too much trouble limiting a potent line-up. The potency showed in the third with two sharp hits pushing the lead to 2-0, but Sebring soon answered back. In the top of the fourth, Amanda Grimaldo singled to lead off and came around when Dino Lower blasted one to right. Even against a steady breeze blowing straight in from right field, the shot looked like it still might carry out. It fell just short, but Lower made it home anyway when, after reaching third with a triple, the incoming throw got away, to knot things at 2-2. The Highlanders would take the lead back with a run in the bottom of the frame, but Pack got out of it with no further damage, notching a bases-loaded strike out to end the inning. The fifth showed a combination of the effort, and mental lapses, as the first two hitters singled to put runners on first and second. Grimaldo then launched one deep down the left-field line, sending the Lake Wales left fielder on a long run to the convergence of SPORTS B SECTION News-Sun Friday, April 22, 2011 Page 3B News-Sun photo courtesy of KIM GAUGE R Alex Griffin goes airborne to make this catch, helping support the shutout pitching of Aaron Hart in Sebring's 6-0 win at Lake Placid Tuesday. News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE A von Park's Calego Hipps is joined by his parents Calego Sr and Lakisha, Thursday morning as he signed on to attend school and play football at Beloit College in Beloit, WI. By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comLAKE PLACID Afif th inning rally helped t he Streaks to overpower La ke Placid 6-0, splitting the seri es Tuesday for the two coun ty rivals. "We just didn't get the jo b done despite having t he opportunities. We've got to take advantage of everythin g we do," said Dan Coomes. "But there is no shame lo sing to Sebring. They pl ay hard ball, and they are thi rd in a district with Lake Wal es and Winter Haven," Coom es added. The 20-4 Streaks, lost 3 -1 to the 13-8 Dragons in Sebring earlier in the yea r, setting the stage for som e hard earn ed payback, b ut both offens es were held to just one h it until the fif th inning. "It was kin d of ragged wi th both of us, but both team s played hard. One big innin g, we were fortunate that w e picked up three in the fift h. They hit balls right at us an d we hit the holes," sa id Sebring coach Hoppy Rewi s. Lake Placid's Dyl an Weber-Callahan gave up ju st one hit in the first fo ur innings, but with two outs in the fifth, Sebring's Gunn er Westergom singled to sco re Nate Green, who h ad stretched a single into a do uble on a wild pitch. That's when Sebring 's Matt Randall went to wo rk and pulled in two RBI on a single to put the Streaks o ut front 3-0. Callahan was retired at t he end of the inning, pitchin g his way out of a jam befo re taking a seat. Aaron Hart started an d ended the game for Sebrin g, and gave up two hits and n o runs. "We are still a young team You have to remember th at we have a freshman at sho rtstop and a sophomore at se cond base," Coomes sai d. "Guess what? You are goin g to have some problems som etimes. We'll get it togethe r, and we'll be all right." Lake Placid's Colb y Delaney took the mound in the sixth and gave up a sing le to Jonathan Knight, wh o turned it into two steals and a Streaks overpower Dragons Sebring6Lake Placid0 News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Carly Hoffner takes the throw to first, from left-fielder Cat Ostrander, to double off this Lake Wales runner Wednesday night. Lady Streaks leave it on the field Lake Wales8Sebring5 By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK Red Devils defensive back Calego Hipps signed on Thursday with Beloit College in Wisconsin for a four-year stint. "It was a good choice. They have a good team, and they have good academics. That's what I wanted," Hipps said during the ceremony. Hipps said that he plans to use the athletic opportunity to pursue a Pre-Med degree at Beloit, and that he thinks he can play all four years there. "They graduated eight defensive players this year, and that opens the door for anyone who wants to work hard," Hipps said. "I think I have a legitimate chance to some time on the field as a freshman. But I am planning on getting there early to get started with their conditioning program." When asked about the drastic change in the weather he'll see in moving to the upper Midwest, Hipps was confident that it would not be a problem. "I lived in Maryland when I was younger and I am used to the snow. It actually snowed when we visited there recently. I don't think it will be a problem," Hipps said. Hipps heading north, signs with Beloit News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Breauna Corley swatted a double and triple in Lake Placid's near upset of Tenoroc in District 9-3A Tournament play Tuesday. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comFROSTPROOF The turnaround was almost complete and would have been miraculous. And even after a late collapse allowed Mulberry to come back for an 11-10 win in the District 9-3A Softball Tournament Tuesday, the turnaround for Lake Placid was, after all was said and done, quite impressive. This was a Mulberry squad that had trounced the Lady Dragons 17-0 in their first meeting this season. Improvement was shown in the next meeting as again Lake Placid fell, but by a 9-3 score. And then on Tuesday, when it mattered most, in the district tournament in Frostproof, the Dragons nearly flipped the script entirely. They started with a run, thanks to an infield RBI single from Ashley Wells, for a 1-0 lead in the first. Laine Weber-Callahan cruised through the Panther line-up, retiring them in order through each of the first three innings. And in the third, Lake Placid looked to blow it open. Taylor Test started it with a bunt single and came all the way around when Breauna Corley walloped a triple to the rightcenter field fence. Arnetia Gobourned took a pitch in the arm to reach and Wells ground-out brought Corley in. Lady Dragons can't hang on Tenoroc11Lake Placid10 See SEBRING, page 3B See STREAKS, page 4B See LP, page 4B

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Dunning TributeAVON PARK On Monday, April 25, South Florida Community College will honor the memory of the first coach in school history, Coach Dunning Terrell. Coach Terrell coached basketball and baseball at what was then SFJC from 19661974, and continued to teach physical education until he retired in 1986. Coach Terrell started the men's basketball and baseball programs in 1966 even before SFJC had a gym on campus. Several of Coach Terrell's former players still live in the Heartland area. SFCC Athletics will pay tribute to the family of Coach Terrell by recognizing his daughter Judy and their family at a short mound ceremony prior to the game against State College of Florida. State College of Florida head baseball coach Tim Hill will be in attendance as well, a former colleague of coach Terrell from his days at SFJC. SFCC would like to invite all former players of Coach Terrell, colleagues, as well as family and friends to come out this night to be a part of this tribute. Game time is 6 p.m. and the ceremony will start at 5:45.SYFS BBQ and registrationSEBRING Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is hosting our 2nd Annual BBQ Fundraiser and Tournament on Saturday, April 30 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The BBQ Lunch is $7 and will include a Pulled Pork Sandwich, Baked Beans, Coleslaw, Cookies and a glass of tea. Pick up your meal to go or stay and watch our girls play while you eat. For further information, please email dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201. Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is also conducting registrations for girls ages 10 to 15 now through April 1. Registration is $65 for the first child / $45 for any siblings. For further information, please visit us on Facebook, check out our website at www.eteamz.com/sebringyouthfastpitchsoftball email us at dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201.Golf for God TournamentSEBRING The Golf for God Tournament will kick off with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start on Saturday, May 7 at Golf Hammock Golf and Country Club. It will be a 2-Person scramble at $65 a person, which includes golf, cart, a $25 dry cleaning certificate, a golf certificate for two rounds of golf and a ball for the ball-drop. You can purchase additional balls for the ball-drop which will take place by helicopter at 1 p.m. over the driving range. It will be a 50/50 cash prize, up to $500. Mulligan's will also be available. First, second and third-place winners will receive additional balls for the balldrop. This is a fundraiser for Kayla Griffin who will be on a missionary journey to 11 countries over an 11 month period, spreading the Word of God to the people of these lands. Call the course at 382-2151 to have a registration form faxed to you or pick one up at a near-by course. YMCA Sign-UpsSEBRING The Highlands County YMCAand Eagles Football is doing sign-ups for Youth Flag Football ages 5 14. Healthy Kids Day is Saturday, April 16 from 9am to 1pm. Lifeguard Certification Class sign-up s are taking place now for an April 25-3 0 class.APProject GraduationAVONPARK The APHSProject Graduation 2011 Benefit Golf Tournament will be held Saturday, May 21 at 8:30 a.m. at River Greens Golf Course. The flighted, four-person scramble costs $60 per person and includes green s fee, cart, lunch and prizes. In addition to the action, there will b e mulligans, a 50/50 and raffles for purchase the day of the tournament. The grand prize raffle is for a round of golf for two at Doral Golf Resort and Spa. Tee sign sponsorships are going for $50, for a sign and player, it is $100. For more information, contact Suzie Gentry at 446-7368.SFCC Summer Youth CampsAVONPARK South Florida Panthe r Baseball will be holding Summer Youth Camps from June 13-16 and June 20-23 for children aged 6-13. Each camp runs from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and costs $80 per camp or $150 fo r both. Registration and sign-in begin at 8 a.m. with the camp to follow, including baseball fundamentals, position instruction, station rotation, games, swimming pool time and a camp T-shirt. SFCC head coach Rick Hitt will serv e as camp director with Panther assistant coach Andy Polk and members of the Panther baseball team will be on hand a s instructors. Campers should bring their individua l baseball attire as well as a bathing suit and towel. The camps will be held at the SFCC Panther field at the Highlands County campus in Avon Park. For more information, call Coach Hit t at the following campus phone numbers at extension 7036: Avon Park/Sebring, 453-6661; Lake Placid, 465-5300; Arcadia, 494-7500; Wauchula, 773-2252.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING Wings of Faith Worship Center presents the First Annual Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one team of four golfers, one tee sign and tw o green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includes one team of four golfers, one green sign; Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $100 includes one green sign. Individual player $60 includes gree n fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26). Team of Four Golfers $240 include s green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after March 26). Make checks payable to: Wings of Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL 33871, or register online at wingsoffaithchristianworshipcenter.com Proceeds to be donated to scholarship program for graduates attending Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center. For more information, call Jason Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhankerson@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at 381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com FIRST ROUND (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEChicago 2, Indiana 0 Saturday: Chicago 104, Indiana 99 Monday: Chicago 96, Indiana 90 Thursday: Chicago at Indiana, late Saturday, April 23: Chicago at Indiana, 2:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Indiana at Chicago, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Chicago at Indiana, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Indiana at Chicago, TBD Miami 2, Philadelphia 0 Saturday: Miami 97, Philadelphia 89 Monday: Miami 94, Philadelphia 73 Thursday: Miami at Philadelphia, late Sunday, April 24: Miami at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 27: Philadelphia at Miami, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Miami at Philadelphia, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Philadelphia at Miami, TBD Boston 2, New York 0 Sunday: Boston 87, New York 85 Tuesday: Boston 96, New York 93 Friday: Boston at N.Y., 7 p.m. Sunday, April 24: Boston at N.Y., 3 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: N.Y. at Boston, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Boston at N.Y., TBD x-Sunday, May 1: N.Y. at Boston, TBD Atlanta 1, Orlando 1 Saturday: Atlanta 103, Orlando 93 Tuesday: Orlando 88, Atlanta 82 Friday: Orlando at Atlanta, 8 p.m. Sunday, April 24: Orlando at Atlanta, 7 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Atlanta at Orlando, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Orlando at Atlanta, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Atlanta at Orlando, TBDWESTERN CONFERENCEMemphis 1, San Antonio 1 Sunday: Memphis 101, San Antonio 98 Wednesday: San Antonio 93, Memphis 87 Saturday, April 23: San Antonio at Memphis, 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 25: San Antonio at Memphis, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Memphis at San Antonio, TBD x-Friday, April 29: San Antonio at Memphis, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Memphis at San Antonio, TBD New Orleans 1, L.A. Lakers 1 Sunday: New Orleans 109, L.A. Lakers 100 Wednesday: L.A. Lakers 87, New Orleans 78 Friday, April 22: L.A. at New Orleans, 9:30 p.m. Sunday, April 24: L.A. at New Orleans, 9:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: New Orleans at L.A., TBD x-Thursday, April 28: L.A. at New Orleans, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: New Orleans at L.A., TBD Dallas 2, Portland 0 Saturday: Dallas 89, Portland 81 Tuesday: Dallas 101, Portland 89 Thursday: Dallas at Portland, late Saturday, April 23: Dallas at Portland, 5 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: Portland at Dallas, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Dallas at Portland, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Portland at Dallas, TBD Oklahoma City 2, Denver 0 Sunday: Oklahoma City 107, Denver 103 Wednesday: Oklahoma City 106, Denver 89 Saturday, April 23: Oklahoma City at Denver, 10 p.m. Monday, April 25: Oklahoma City at Denver, 10:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 27: Denver at Oklahoma City, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Oklahoma City at Denver, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Denver at Oklahoma City, TBD FIRST ROUND (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEWashington 3, New York Rangers 1 Washington 2, Rangers 1, OT Washington 2, Rangers 0 Sunday: N.Y. Rangers 3, Washington 2 Wednesday: Washington 4, N.Y. Rangers 3, 2OT x-Saturday, April 23: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 3 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, TBD Philadelphia 2, Buffalo 2 Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0 Philadelphia 5, Buffalo 4 Monday: Philadelphia 4, Buffalo 2. Wednesday: Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0 x-Friday, April 22: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 3 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Buffalo at Philadelphia, TBD Montreal 2, Boston 1 Montreal 2, Boston 0 Montreal 3, Boston 1 Monday: Boston 4, Montreal 2 Thursday: Boston at Montreal, late x-Saturday, April 23: Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Boston at Montreal, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Montreal at Boston TBD Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 1 Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 0 Tampa Bay 5, Pittsburgh 1 Monday: Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 2 Wednesday: Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 2, 2OT x-Saturday, April 23: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBD x-Monday, April 25: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBDWESTERN CONFERENCEVancouver 3, Chicago 1 Vancouver 2, Chicago 0 Vancouver 4, Chicago 3 Sunday: Vancouver 3, Chicago 2 Tuesday: Chicago 7, Vancouver 2 x-Thursday: Chicago at Vancouver, 10 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Vancouver at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Chicago at Vancouver, TBD San Jose 2, Los Angeles 1 San Jose 3, L.A. 2, OT Saturday: Los Angeles 4, San Jose 0 Tuesday: San Jose 6, Los Angeles 5, OT Thursday: San Jose at L.A., late x-Saturday, April 23: L.A. at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: San Jose at L.A., TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: L.A. at San Jose, TBD Detroit 4, Phoenix 0 Wednesday: Detroit 4, Phoenix 2 Saturday: Detroit 4, Phoenix 3 Monday: Detroit 4, Phoenix 2 Wednesday: Detroit 6, Phoenix 3 Nashville 2, Anaheim 2 Wednesday: Nashville 4, Anaheim 1 Friday: Anaheim 5, Nashville 3 Sunday: Nashville 4, Anaheim 3 Wednesday: Anaheim 6, Nashville 3 x-Friday, April 22: Nashville at Anaheim, 10 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD x-Tuesday, April 26: Nashville at Anaheim, TBDAMERICANLEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB New York106.625 Tampa Bay99.5002 Baltimore89.471212Toronto810.4443 Boston611.353412Central Division WLPctGB Cleveland135.722 Kansas City117.6112 Detroit910.474412Chicago711.3896 Minnesota612.3337 West Division WLPctGB Los Angeles126.667 Texas117.6111 Oakland99.5003 Seattle613.316612___ Wednesday's Games Boston 5, Oakland 3 Detroit 3, Seattle 2 Tampa Bay 4, Chicago White Sox 1 Baltimore 5, Minnesota 4 N.Y. Yankees 6, Toronto 2 L.A. Angels 4, Texas 1 Cleveland 7, Kansas City 5 Thursday's Games Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay, late Minnesota at Baltimore, late Cleveland at Kansas City, late Boston at L.A. Angels, late Oakland at Seattle, late Friday's Games Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Kansas City at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Cleveland at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Boston at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Oakland at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB Philadelphia116.647 Florida106.62512Washington98.5292 Atlanta811.4214 New York513.278612Central Division WLPctGB Chicago99.500 Cincinnati99.500 Milwaukee99.500 St. Louis99.500 Pittsburgh810.4441 Houston711.3892 West Division WLPctGB Colorado135.722 San Francisco108.5563 Arizona88.5004 Los Angeles910.474412San Diego810.4445 ___ Wednesday's Games Philadelphia 4, Milwaukee 3 Washington 8, St. Louis 6, 1st game Chicago Cubs 2, San Diego 1, 11 innings, 1st game Colorado 10, San Francisco 2 San Diego 5, Chicago Cubs 4, 2nd game Arizona 3, Cincinnati 1 Houston 4, N.Y. Mets 3 Florida 6, Pittsburgh 0 St. Louis 5, Washington 3, 2nd game L.A. Dodgers 6, Atlanta 1 Thursday's Games Arizona at Cincinnati, late Washington at St. Louis, late Atlanta at L.A. Dodgers, late Houston at N.Y. Mets, late Pittsburgh at Florida, late Philadelphia at San Diego, late Friday's Games L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. Washington at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Arizona at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Colorado at Florida, 7:10 p.m. Houston at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Cincinnati at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Philadelphia at San Diego, 10:05 p.m. Atlanta at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid TUESDAY: Baseball at District Tournament,Avon Park,vs.Mulberry,TBA WEDNESDAY: Baseball at District Tournament,Avon Park,TBD,if necessary THURSDAY: Baseball at District Tournament,Avon Park,TBD,if necessary Sebring TUESDAY: Baseball hosts District Tournament,vs.Haines City,7:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball hosts District Tournament,vs.Lake Wales/Ridge winner,7:30 p.m.,if necessary THURSDAY: Baseball hosts District Tournament,Championship Game,7 p.m.,if necessary SFCC TODAY: Baseball vs.Hillsborough,6 p.m. SATURDAY: Baseball at Hillsborough,1 p.m. MONDAY: Baseball vs.State College of Florida,6 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball at Hillsborough,3 p.m. Avon Park MONDAY: Baseball hosts District Tournament,TBA TUESDAY: Baseball hosts District Tournament,TBA WEDNESDAY: Baseball hosts District Tournament,TBA A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n NASCAR Nashville 300, Qualifying. . E E S S P P N N 3 3 p p . m m . NASCAR Nashville 300 . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NN N H H L L P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p . m m . N.Y. Rangers at Washington . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CM M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs . . . . . . . . . W W G G N N 7 7 p p . m m . Tampa Bay at Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Tampa Bay at Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 4 4 p p . m m . Regional Atlanta at San Francisco, . . . Cincinnati at St Louis or Chicago White Sox at Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X XTimes, games, channels all subject to change C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 4 4 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . LSU at Vanderbilt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 6 6 p p . m m . Alabama at Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E SS P P N N 2 2 7 7 p p . m m . Arkansas at Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NG G O O L L F F F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Volvo China Open . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Legends of Golf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA The Heritage . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F FS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Volvo China Open . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Legends of Golf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 3 3 p p . m m . PGA The Heritage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S SN N B B A A P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Boston at New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 8 8 p p . m m . Orlando at Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 9 9 : : 3 3 00 p p . m m . L.A. Lakers at New Orleans . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Chicago at Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 5 5 p p . m m . Dallas at Portland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . San Antonio at Memphis . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 1 1 0 0 : : 0 0 0 0 p p . m m . Oklahoma City at Denver . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NC C O O L L L L E E G G E E S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . Alabama at Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2B B O O X X I I N N G G F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . Bayan Jargal vs. Breidis Prescott . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Joseph Agbeko vs. Abner Mares . . . . . . S S H H O O W W LIVESPORTSONTV NBA Playoffs Major League Baseball NHL Playoffs Page 2BNews-Sun Friday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.co m

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Golf HammockThe Golf Hammock Ladies played a Best 9 of 18 holes 1/2 handicap event Wednesday, April 20. Taking first in First Flight was Bonnie Nigh, with an 18, including a hole-in-one on No. 17 with a four iron. Florence Towell took second in the flight with a 20, Ruth Harris and Ruth Kirk tied for third with a 23 and Shirley Enochs finished fifth with a 24. In the Second Flight, Mary Cripps and Nancy Senior tied to top honors with 22 each, while Jo Thornburg's 25 was good for third. A three-way tie for fifth was then seen as Joan Armburster, Cindy Dall and Nancy Porcari each came in at 26. On Monday, April 18, the Mezza Group played Individual Pro-Am Points at Golf Hammock Country Club. Denis won first place at plus 3 in A group and Mike Anselm had a plus 2 for second. Doug Haire shot a plus 6 to take first place in B group and Pat Dell plus 4 for second place. Joe Hyzny also had a plus 6 to take first place in Cgroup and David Mulligan in second place with a plus 5. Ken Porter finished in first place with a plus 3 in D group andBilly Parr at even in second place. Larry Holzwarth had a plus 1 to take first place in E group while Bob Hughes settled with even for second place. Pete Mezza scored a plus 6 in E Group for first place and Jean Terrell with a plus 4 for second place. Janet Howland scored a plus 3 to win first place with plus 3 in G group and Don Tiemens had plus 1, good for second place. Next Monday the Mezza Group will have a shotgun start beginning at 8 a.m. at Golf Hammock CC. Please note that this is a change in the start time. Arrive early to register and call Pete Mezza at 382-1280 for more information.Harder HallThe Ladies League played a pro am points event on Monday, April 18. The winners were: First place, Dori Landrum with plus-7; and second place, Wendy Lake with plus-6. Tying for third/fourth places were Donna Maki and Joyce Fleming with plus-3 each. Chip-in: No. 7, Liz Reinhardt; and No. 3, Wendy Lake. The Ladies League played a low net event on Thursday, April 14. The winners were: First place, Wendy Lake. Tying for second/third places were Helen Sayre and Dori Landrum.Lake June West Golf ClubA scramble was played on Thursday, April 14. Winning first place was the team of Doyan and Donna Eades, John and Sue Ruffo, Larry and Jane Roush with 46; second place, Cal Billingsley, Jane Westorfield, Ken and Norma Colyer and Ken Rowen with 48; and third place, John and Shelly Byron, Dick and Norma Denhart and John Howarth with 49. Closest to the pin: (Ladies), No. 8, Sue Ruffo, 5-feet-10-inches; (Men), No. 2, Walt Nagel, 5-feet-11-inches; and No. 4, John Simmons, 5-feet-4inches. The Men's Association played a Men's Best Ball event on Wednesday, April 13. Winning first place was the team of Ron West, Cal Billingsley, Tim Lynch and Ken Strong with 39; and second place, John Byron, John Simmons, Orville Huffman and Fred Neer with 40. Closest to the pin: No. 2, Ron West, 1-foot-4-inches; No. 4, Dick Denhart, 3-feet-7-inches; and No. 8, Orville Huffman, 4-feet. The Ladies Association played a Ladies League event on Monday, April 11. Winning first place was the team of Virginia Simmons, Betty Billau and Laurie Lorig with 36; second place, Hellen Mellon, Gloria Huggett and Pat Asmus with 37; and third place, Margaret Schultz, Elaine Orr and Janice Barringer with 38. Closest to the pin: No. 2, Sylvia West, Hole-In-One! No. 4, Helen Mellon, 9-feet-1-inch; and No. 8, Eva Huffman, 7-feet-6-inches.PinecrestThe Men's Association played team and individual Pro-Am Points Wednesday, April 20, with Bob Kistler and JW McCamic winning the team event with +10 points. John Joffman, Dick Botelho and Dorrell Herron totaled +6, but so did Don Lamb, Jim Elliott and Bob Colandre as well as the team of Jim Gulick, John O'Neill and Vern Gates for a three-way tie for second. Lamb and Wayne Gordener tied for the tops in A Division, individually, with +7 apiece, while Gerry Geouque headed up B Division with +7. Botelho, Greg Mitchell and Larry Holzworth tied for second in B Division with each totaling +3. Gates was the C Division leader at +7 while McCamic and Chuck Primeau were tied for second at +5.Placid LakesThe Men's Association played an individual quota points event on Wednesday, April 13. The winners were: First place, John Rosettis with plus-12; and second place, Howard Ticknor with plus-9. Tying for third/fourth places are Darrell Horney and Cliff Moore with plus-7 each. The Men's Golf Association played an Odd Holes Half Handicap event Wednesday, April 13 with Bob McMillian winning with a 71. Roger Thompson carded a 73 for second and the dueling 74s brought in by John Goble and Russ Isaacs went to a match of cards with Goble thus claiming third place. Ed Bartusch took fifth witha 75 while Cliff Moore was closest to the pin on No. 11, getting to 12-feet, 6-inches.River GreensThe Morrison Group played a game on Monday, April 18. Winning first place was the team of Vince Boever, Gil Heier and Jim Cercy with minus-21. Tying for second/third/fourth places were Cecil Lemons, Butch Smith and Bob Stevens; Bill Mountford, John Smutnick and Tom Morway; Ed Mosser, Bob Biever and Cliff Aubin with minus-19 each. A Bye-Bye-Birdie event was played Sunday, April 17. Winning first place the team of Donna and Paul Johnson, Mary Beth Carby and Don Ethan with minus-34; second place, Carol and Larry Roy, Helen Ochala and Lefty St. Pierre with minus-33; and third place, Michele and Ken Koon, Jeanine and Leo Persails with minus30. The Men's Association played a Men's Day event Saturday, April 16. Winning first place was the team of Larry Roy, Jim Cercy and G.L. Heier with plus-30; second place, Cliff Aubin, Butch Smith, Fred Evans and Neil Purcell with plus-21; and third place, Cliff Steele, Ken Brunswick, Bob Stevens and Keith Kincer. Closest to the pin: No. 3, Dave Kelly, 7-feet-6-inches; No. 5, Larry Roy, 1foot-6.5 inches; No. 12, Cliff Aubin, 3feet-7.5 inches; and No. 17, Larry Roy, 25-feet. A morning scramble was played on Friday, April 15. Winning first place was the team of David and Anne Kelly, Lee and Leo Persails. An evening scramble was played Friday, April 15. Dennis Dunn, Charlie Seralde. Jack Sayre, Phil Kozak, John Yoder and Annie Kozak with minus-16; and second place, John and Laura Smutnick, Tim Thomas, Joe Graf and Bob Mitchell. The Morridson Group played a game on Thursday, April 14. Winning first place was the team of Cliff Aubin, Gerald Bergeron, Harold Kline and Bill Mountford with minus30; and second place, Ed Mosser, Jim Cercy, Lefty St. Pierre and Butch Smith with minus-28. Tying for third/fourth places were the teams of Paul Johnson, Romy Febre, Russ Rudd and Ed Mosser with minus-27; and Ken Brunswick, Tom Morway, Dave Kelly and guest of Kelly with minus-27 each. The Ladies Association played a pro am on Thursday, April 14. Winning first place was the team of Betty Leblanc, Nancy Long and Helen Ochala with plus-7.5; second place, Marybeth Carby, Mary McDonald, Janet Regan and Fran Neil with plus3.5; and third place, Donna Johnson, Elaine Keppler and Lucy Roberts with plus-3.5. Individual winners were: First place, Barb Stuber with plus-5.5; second place, Nancy Long with plus-4; and third place, Betty Leblanc with plus3.5. The Men's Association played a pro am tournament on Wednesday, April 13. Winning first place was the team of Romy Febre, Cliff Aubin, Gerald Bergeron and Stan Oaths with plus-14; and second place, Tim Thomas, Glenn Nelson, Peter Bridge and B.C. Roberts with plus-11; and third place, Peter March, Jim Wright, Ed Mosser and Russ Rudd with plus-6. Individual winners: A Flight (27over): First place, Larry Roy with plus9.5; and second place, Cecil Lemons with plus-3.5. B Flight (23-28): First place, Cliff Aubin with plus-6.5; and second place, B.C. Roberts with plus5. C Flight (17-22): Tying for first/second/third places were Gil Heier, Jim Wright and Dick McClay with plus-1.5 each. D Flight (16-under): First place, Gerald Bergeron with plus-5; and second place, Glenn Nelson. The Morrison Group played a game on Tuesday, April 12. Winning first place was the team of Romy Febre, Joe Graf, David Kelly and Cliff Steele with minus-34; second place, Gil Heier, Lefty St. Pierre, John Smutnick and Butch Smith with minus-29; and third place, Bob Stevens, Jim Cercy, Ken Koon and Gil Heier with minus-25. The Golfettes played a game on Tuesday, April 12. The winners were: Flight I Gross 83, Linda Therrien; Net 60, Peggy Wehunt. Flight 2 Gross 99, tying for first/second places were Carol Roy and Fran Neil; Net 70, Kay Conkle. Flight 3 Gross 104, Jeannine Persails; Net 69, Sally Dworak. The Morrison Group played a game on Monday, April 11. Tying for first/second places were the team of Ken Brunswick, Aurel Mack and Bob Stevens; Tim Thomas, Butch Smith and Vince Boever with minus-21 each. The Limited Member event was played Monday, April 11. Winning first place was the team of Ed Ward, Tom Brouwer, Don Sherman and Milu Weth with plus-18. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011Page 3B run for home on a catcher overthrow. An error and double steal in the seventh put two more on the board for Sebring, capping the game at 6-0 when the Dragons could not rally back at their last at bat. Both teams had a Thursday contest to wrap up the regular season, with the Streaks hosting Port Saint Lucie and Lake Placid welcoming Clewiston to town, before the Dragons head to the District 9-3A Tournament in Avon Park and face Mulberry Tuesday. Sebring will be hosting t he District 5-5ATournament at Firemen's Field and beg in play Tuesday against Hain es City. Continued from 1B Sebring, Lake Placid head to District Tourneys next week

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An error on a hard hit from Cheyenne Wise brought Gobourne in and Bailey Beeson drew a walk. Bria Wilson then lofted a deep fly to left that was gotten to, but couldn't be held, bring both Wise and Beeson in for a 6-0 Dragon lead. Two more were added in the fourth with Gobourne and Wells each driving home a run for an 8-0 lead. Abig lead that could have been even bigger if not for two diving catches that recorded the last two outs of the inning. One might have thought the sparkling defensive plays might be the spark that Mulberry needed to get going, but other than a oneout single in the bottom of the fourth, Weber-Callahan got through the inning relatively easily. But while the spark didn't click then, it did an inning later as the comeback began. Two walks, three singles and a wild pitch brought three in and an error brought it two more. An error on a pick-off attempt from catcher to third allowed one more to come in before the inning ended and suddenly the lead was a scant 8-6. But the Lady Dragons answered back in the top of the sixth, adding two more with Corley hitting a rocket-shot double to left center moving to third on Gobourne's ground-out and scoring on a wild pitch. Wells reached on a swinging bunt and when the throw to first sailed all the way into the right-field corner, Wells raced all the way around to score and the lead was back to a slightly more comfortable 10-6. The comfort level didn't last long, however, as the Lady Panthers answered with two of their own to make it 10-8 heading into the last inning. Michelle Hunter, Wilson and Weber-Callahan all singled with one out to load the bases and a liner off of Test's bat looked like it might buffer up the lead yet again. But that line-drive went right back to pitcher Rose Stevens, who snared it for the out and leaving the runners where they were. The next out was soon recorded and Mulberry soon came up with its'last rally. AMontana Fulkerson infield single started the bottom of the seventh and with one out, a Stevens push-bunt, hit-and-run started some chaos with overthrows allowing Fulkerson to come around to score and Stevens to get to third. Achopper at the plate started a run down that was run down cleanly and Stevens came in with the tying run. Awalk and a sacrifice bunt then put the winning run at third and Rebecca Wise came through with a clean single to left to bring home the game winner. "We pushed them all the way," Lake Placid head coach Alesia Cheshire said. "They just had some hitters that we couldn't hold back. But the way I see it is, we haven't had a winning season since 1998 and we were 11-9 this year, a winning season. "It's going to continue to get better and better from here," she continued. "The girls have worked hard and it shows. I'm proud of them." Special to the News-SunSEBRING The fourth a nnual Last Chance Ranch 1 0K/5K Run-Walk is set for H ighlands Hammock State P ark on Saturday, April 23 at 7 :30 a.m. The run/walk benefits the L ast Chance Education F oundation for the Venus, F lorida institution. Race organizer Darrell J ensen may be reached at 4 41-3357 and Central Florida S triders president Chet B rojek at 385-4736 or cbroj ek@comcast.net to sign up f or the event. Entry fee is $25 and i ncludes a dri-fit tee, awards i n both events, and refreshm ents post race. Tee shirt sizes can only be g uaranteed for pre-registered e ntrants. Checks made payable to: A MIKids-Last Chance Ranch. Page 4BNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.com This summer the South Florida Community Colle ge volleyball program has more camps to offer than ev er before. Listed below you will see opportunities for sand an d indoor camps. If there is a camp date that you could attend but t he age group is different than yours please call and speci al arrangements could be made. Individual private sessions for indoor and sand a re available year-round. Call/Email to schedule today! June 2011 Sand: 13th-16th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:3 010:30 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor: 13th16th (4 days) Monday-Thursda y, 11:30-1:30 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps June 13-16t h: $100 July 2011 Sand: 11th -14th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor: 11th-14th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 11:3 01:30 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps July 11-1 4: $100 July 2011 Indoor: 25th-28th (4 days) Monday-Thursday Morning Session (Grades 5-8) 9:30-11:30 a.m. $60 Afternoon Session (Grades 9-12) 2-4:30 p.m. $75 Contact Coach Crawford with any questions at kim.crawford@southflorida.edu cell: 863-835-2377, or Office: 863-784-7037. Panther Volleyball Camps Special to the News-SunAVON PARK SFCC A thleticswill host a Two D ay Fun Sport Selection c amp on Thursday and F riday, June 9 and 10 for g irls and boys aged 6-16. Each day the camp runs f rom 9 a.m.-3 p.m., with c ampers choosing their own s port, whether Beach V olleyball, Basketball, B aseball, Softball or Soccer. During the morning port ion each day, campers will s tretch, do plyometrics, agilit y drills, work on strength a nd flexibility, learn arm and b ody care and get introduced t o the Fitness Center. Lunch is then provided w ith the campers then delvi ng into the sport they chose a nd wrapping it up with a ctivities in the SFCC pool. Registration and check-in f rom 8:15-8:55 a.m., and prer egistration is not necessary a s walk-ups are accepted. The rate for one day is $50 a nd $95 for both days. The camp will be aminist ered by SFCC head and a ssistant coaches, with help f rom SFCC student-athletes. For questions or more inform ation, contact Camp D irector and SFCC Athletic D irector Rick Hitt at 7847 036. SFCC Fun Camps Last Chance Ranch 5/10K Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Highlands Youth Football and Cheer Organization (HYF) will be having a Car Wash fundraiser at Advanced Auto Parts at the corner of US 27 and the Sebring Parkway on Saturday, April 23, from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. All monies earned or donated will be used to purchase equipment and uniforms for the boys and girls. HYF is a new league to Sebring and is looking forward to providing a rewarding youth sports program to foster these boys and girls to develop sportsmanship, physical fitness and build their self esteem as well as provide them an opportunity to be part of a team. The team name is the "Highlands Eagles" and team colors are black, yellow and white. Come on down and get registered while your car is being washed. HYF will also be offering registration during our car wash for cheerleade rs and football players. Any registered play er that needs to turn in regi stration information or pa yment can come to the c ar wash to do so. Several of our coach es and board members w ill be there to meet or answ er any questions you m ay have. Available for Ages 5 15 years old (8th Gra de maximum). Registration fees a re $75 each for Football an d Cheer or $65 each if yo u are signing up multip le children, Limited spots are ava ilable for Mighty-Mite, P ee Wee and Junior Varsi ty Divisions Flag an d Varsity players are nee ded. All divisions are op en for Cheerleading Please come on down to support your youth foo tball organization. For football, please ca ll Tim Hooks at 414-287 3, Cliff Howell at 253-707 0 or Becky Grippo at 38 19760 for Cheerleading. HYFC Car Wash t he fence and the foul line. With the ball hanging up in t he air and the fielder giving c hase, the runners had little c hoice but to hold. When the ball dropped in s afely, it went for a very long s ingle to load the bases. With Lower now up and s eemingly in the zone after h er third-inning blast, the r unner on third was caught o ff guard when the H ighlander catcher fired b ehind her for a pick-off. Within a few pitches, L ower showed she was l ocked in, ripping a two-run d ouble into the left-center f ield gap to put the Streaks o n top, 4-3. The bottom of the fifth was a mix of mistakes and s parkling effort as the H ighlanders broke it open. With two on, a fly ball to l eft couldn't be corralled, l oading the bases. Grimaldo then made a divi ng stop on a grounder heade d up the middle and alertly t agged the baserunner for a r un-scoring fielder's choice. But a hit-by-pitch, a strike o ut and a walk were followed b y two run-scoring passed b alls and a two-run single to c enter for a five-run rally to take an 8-4 lead. Asingle to start the sixth showed Sebring was not about to go quietly, even after the deflating previous inning. But another mental mistake halted the progress when a fly to right and throw to first behind the runner caused an inning-ending double play. Grimaldo then turned in another sterling effort in the bottom of the sixth when, with a runner on first, she dove full out to snare a liner in the hole at short and, from her knees, threw across the infield to double off the runner. And the senior would continue her stellar night with a lead-off single in the seventh, her fourth hit of the night. Pack then caught hold of one, rocketing it over the left-fielders head for an RBI double. But the effort, the game and the season would soon come to an end with consecutive ground outs. "I've seen her for four years now and that was the best I've seen Amanda play," Sinness said. "She made highlight plays and she was outstanding at the bat." We hit the ball, top to bottom," he continued. "(The Highlanders) were in more fear than they probably have been in a while. We had them at each others throats a couple times. The mental mistakes caught us, but physically, we beat that team tonight and I commend all our girls for what they did." And so the season ends, with the game marking the last for Grimaldo, Cat Ostrander and Lauren Welborn, but with a host of strong performers coming back next season, with an outstanding level of effort to learn from. Continued from 1B Streaks put up strong effort, fall short News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Amanda Grimaldo lofts this double to left, one of her four hits, to go with a handful of highlight plays in the field in Wednesday's 8-5 loss at Lake Wales. Continued from 1B LP nearly pulls off upset News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Leigha Gersper makes the tag of this Tenoroc runner in Tuesday's District Tournament in Frostproof.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011Page 5B

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By ALICIACHANG APScience WriterLOS ANGELES For the first time in five years, Emily Fennell has two hands. The 26-year-old single mother, who lost her right hand in a car accident, showed off her newly donated hand Tuesday while flanked by a team of transplant doctors. Wearing a protective cast with her fingers poking out, Fennell admitted she's still getting used to it. "I do feel like it's mine. Slowly but surely, every day it becomes more and more mine," she said. Fennell received the donor limb in a marathon surgery last month at the Ronald Reagan UCLAMedical Center in Los Angeles. She had been living with a prosthetic limb, but wanted a hand transplant to better care for her daughter. During the 14?-hour operation on March 5, a team of nearly 20 surgeons, nurses and support staff grafted a hand from a deceased donor and intricately connected bones, blood vessels, nerves and tendons. The transplant was the 13th such case in the United States and the first for the hospital, which launched its hand transplant program last year. With the surgery successful, Fennell begins the long journey of learning to use her transplanted hand. "Emily hasn't used her hand" in a long time, said chief surgeon Dr. Kodi Azari. "The muscles have not worked. They've become weak." At Fennell's first public appearance Tuesday, she rested her right hand over the left one. When it came time to thank her doctors, she managed to clap her hands. Fennell's right hand was crushed in 2006 in a rollover accident in which her hand went through the open sunroof of the car in which she was riding. After the amputation, Fennell learned to use her left hand to do daily chores such as driving, tying her shoelaces and even typing 45 words a minute in her job as an office assistant. Though she wore a prosthesis, she found it bulky and not useful. Fennell was able to move her new fingers soon after the surgery, but does not yet have feeling in her hand. Doctors said it could take up to a year for the nerves to regenerate before she can feel anything. For the past month, Fennell has been undergoing extensive rehabilitation in Los Angeles that includes eight hours of occupational therapy a day. She practices simple tasks such as grasping and gripping objects in an effort to improve her dexterity and gain strength. Fennell hopes to return to her hometown of Yuba City near Sacramento next month to be with her 6-year-old daughter and continue rehab at home. During a recent visit home, her daughter saw the new hand for the first time and exclaimed: "Mommy, it's cool." Though Fennell's donated hand will never be as strong as the one she lost, doctors said she should regain about 60 percent of the function of a normal hand with continued therapy. Fennell hopes that means she could tie her hair in a ponytail again, catch a ball and type even faster. Like other transplant recipients, Fennell has to take drugs for the rest of her life to prevent rejection. UCLAis testing whether a less-toxic combination of medications is effective. Hand transplantation has come a long way since the first one was carried out in Ecuador in 1964 before the development of modern immunosuppressive therapy. The transplant failed after two weeks and the patient had to have the new hand amputated. More than three decades later, French doctors in 1998 performed a hand transplant that lasted two years. The recipient did not take medications as ordered and his body rejected the limb. Since then, more than 40 hand transplants have been performed around the world including several double hand transplants. The recipient of the first U.S. hand transplant in 1999 has lived with a donor hand for a little over a decade. "It's clear that it's achievable," said Dr. Warren Breidenbach, who performed the historic surgery. The UCLAoperation cost about $800,000, but since it was experimental, the patient did not have to pay. Little has been revealed about the donor except that the hand matched the patient's in terms of blood type, size and color. Aweek after the UCLA operation, doctors at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta performed the 14th hand transplant in the country. The recipient was 21year-old Linda Lu, who had her left hand amputated as a baby. Page 6BNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.com HEALTHYLIVING Outreach scheduleAce Homecare commun ity outreach events for t his week are: Monday: 1 p.m., C aregivers Support Group, C rown Pointe Assisted L iving Community, Sun n L ake Boulevard, Sebring. Tuesday: 9 a.m., Health F air, Groves at Victoria P ark behind Sebring Diner, U .S. 27, Sebring. Wednesday: 9 a.m., e alth Fair, Groves at V ictoria Park behind S ebring Diner, U.S. 27, S ebring; 1 p.m., Health F air, Tanglewood, U.S. 27, S ebring. Thursday: 10 a.m., H ealth Fair, Lake Placid Meal Site, Interlake Boulevard, Lake Placid.Amplified telephones distributionSEBRING Hearing Impaired Persons will distribute amplified telephones to Florida residents who have a hearing or speech loss, in the conference room at Nu-Hope Elder Care Services, 6414 U.S. 27 South in Sebring, on Thursday, April 28, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Important: By appointment only, please call (941) 743-8347. Snapshots DearPharmacist: I have b een experiencing what my c ardiologist calls "benign" a rrhythmias for 2 years. T hey come and go, and I a m unable to link them to a ny activities, foods or m edicines. We've tried d igoxin and beta blockers, w hich didn't work. He says h e can fix them with ablat ion and a pacemaker or j ust leave them alone for n ow. Sometimes they make m e lightheaded and I get f rightened. Do you think I s hould do the procedure? S.C., Denver, Colorado Answer: I feel a second o pinion is in order; perhaps y ou need to see an "electrop hysiologist" or a neurolog ist to get more informat ion. The standard of care is t o do ablation (which is sort o f like burning'one of the n odes in your heart) and t hen install a pacemaker w hich forces your heart to b eat in rhythm. I just bang my head tryi ng to figure out why it i sn't the "standard of care" t o determine underlying c ause of heart disease b efore all the invasive irrev ersible procedures like a blation, angioplasty, stenti ng and pacemakers! These p rocedures have a place and s ometimes save lives, but is i t ever wrong to check for i mbalances of essential m inerals, vitamins and a mino acids? I wish that t esting RBC magnesium w as routinely done because a deficiency of magnesium i s a contributing factor in h eart attack. It's often used t o resuscitate someone w hose flatlined. Recently, I went to the c ardiologist with a friend of m ine who had an arrhythm ia like yours. He was o ffered the same procedure b y his cardiologist. On my r ecommendation, he saw a f unctional medicine physic ian who ordered a blood t est (NutrEval by Genova D iagnostics) to evaluate his m icronutrient status. Lo and b ehold, he was found to be d eficient in taurine and m agnesium. Both of these were purc hased at the health food s tore along with hawthorn e xtract. His heart sank into a near-perfect rhythm within two weeks. Had he gone for the ablation procedure, he would have become pacemaker dependent and the underlying deficiencies would have gone undetected! Here are some hearthealthy nutrients to discuss them with your cardiologist: Aged Garlic Extract by Kyolic : Arecent UCLA study found that this supplement slows and may even reverse atherosclerosis, even in people with moderate plaque build up. Aged garlic is a rock star when it comes to heart health. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10): This antioxidant stabilizes your heart beat by maintaining sinus rhythm. It prevents and may reverse symptoms of congestive heart failure. You can now buy the active form of this nutrient as "ubiquinol." Statins and blood pressure pills are drug muggers of this nutrient. Taurine: The most abundant amino acid in the heart, it improves contractions, dampens down the sympathetic nervous system and may help with PACs, PVCs, pauses and tachycardia. Aspartame and MSG are food additives that are drug muggers of taurine. I've posted an extended version of this article with other heart-healthy nutrients to consider. To read the rest of my column, please visit my website, www.SuzyCohen.com. Suzy Cohen is a registered pharmacist and the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist' and Real Solutions.' For more information, visit www. DearPharmacist. com. This information is not intended to treat, diagnose or cure your condition. Let's have a heartto-heart talk Dear Pharmacist Suzy Cohen Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/MCT Emily Fennell, 26, of Yuba City, Calif., became the first person to undergo a hand transplant at UCLA in March. Here, she laughs as she picks up a checker piece during occupational therapy at the UCLA Outpatient Rehabilitation in Westwood, Calif. Calif. woman shows off newly transplanted hand By LINDAA. JOHNSON APBusiness WriterTRENTON, N.J. T he national tab for prescri ption drugs last year grew at the second-slowest pa ce ever measured by a prom inent health data firm. Americans and the ir insurers spent $307.4 b illion on prescription dru gs in 2010, up just 2.3 pe rcent from the previo us year, according to da ta released Tuesday by IM S Health Inc. That's a slow down from a 5.1 perce nt increase in 2009. Earlier in the decade, annual increa ses went as high as 13 pe rcent. Only 2008, the depths of the recession, saw dru g spending grow more slow ly. That's bad news f or drugmakers facing eve rgrowing competition to their pricey brand-nam e medications, but the slow down also may be bad f or doctors, and patien ts delaying needed medic ation. Anumber of factors a re slowing the growth: People are visitin g their doctors less. Visi ts slowed 4.2 percent to 1.5 4 billion in 2010. Th at downward trend began in mid-2009, as the emplo yment rate remained stu bbornly high and more pe ople lost health insurance Patients are getting a bigger share of their pr escriptions filled wi th lower-priced generic me dicines. Generics account ed for 78 percent of retail pr escriptions in 2010, up fro m 63 percent in 2006. Use of generic drug s, which can cost a fractio n of the price of brand-nam e medications, is skyrocke ting, according to the IM S report. Growth in drug spending slows

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011Page 7B RELIGION Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID The Women of St. James, who belong to the St. James Catholic Church in Lake Placid, held their Installation of new officers March 29. The event took place during a special Mass concelebrated by three priests, including the Pastor, Father Michael Cannon, plus Father Luis Albarracin and Father Don Jacquees. These new officers were officially swornin following the Mass. The new President is Rae Burmaster, the First Vice President is Joan Penn; the Second Vice President is Martha Roseman, the Secretary is Sharon Pritz, the Assistant Secretary is Mary Jane Neliusl, the treasurer is Helen Stobaugh and the Assistant Treasurer is Jackie Gunderson. The members continued the celebration by meeting at the Placid Lakes Country Club for a delicious luncheon and an afternoon of fellowship. The Women of St. James is an organization dedicated to providing service to the parish in many different ways. Their out-reach projects touch the lives of the community and beyond. For more information about becoming a member, please call the St. James parish office at 465-3215. St. James Women's Club installs new officers Courtesy photo The Women of St. James held their installation of new officers on March 29. Atonement Lutheran SEBRING The Holy Week Schedule is as follows: Maundy Thursday service will be at 7 p.m., led by the Rev. Jefferson Cox. The Holy Eucharist will be followed by the stripping of the altar in preparation of the Good Friday Service which will be held at 7 p.m. Friday. The sermon for the Good Friday Service will be a reading of the Passion of Jesus according to John 18:1-19; 42. Readers will be Tom Portz, Ed Graff, Lois Hess and Ron Fitzpatrick. The Procession of the Cross and the Reverence to the Cross will end the service. Easter Sunday celebration Service with Holy Communion will be led by the Rev. Jefferson Cox at the 9:30 a.m. service. Brunch will follow service.Avon Park Church of ChristAVON PARK "What Other Hope? The Resurrection!" (John 11:2327), will be the message presented by Ministerr Larry Roberts on Sunday. The Lord's Supper is served every Sunday. Morning worship begins at 10:30 a.m. The Sunday evening service will be a Bible study from the Book of Psalms. Avon Park Church of Christ is at 200 S. Forest Ave. Call 453-4692.Christian Science ChurchSEBRING The lesson sermon on Sunday morning is titled "Probation After Death." The keynote is from Psalms 118:17, "I shall not die, but live, and declare the works of the Lord." The church is at 146 N. Franklin St.Christian Training Church SEBRING The Rev. Linda M. Downing will bring the message titled "Easter Seals" at the Sunday morning service. The Wednesday night Bible study will continue the book of Hebrews. Covenant Presbyterian ChurchSEBRING The Easter worship service will be held at 10:30 a.m. There will be no 8 a.m. service. Pastor Darrell Arnold will deliver the Easter message. The Easter musical "The Risen Christ" will be presented. The musical helps us remember the life of Christ but brings the message of the importance of the resurrection. Covenant Presbyterian Church is at 4500 Sun n Lake Blvd., Sebring. www.cpcsebring.org.Eastside Christian LAKE PLACID The worship schedule for Easter Sunday will remain the same. At the Community Easter Services at Memorial United Methodist Church, Pastor Ray Culpepper will be presenting the Gospel reading and Skook Wright of Stepping Out in Faith will be performing the offertory song. Sunday morning Worship Celebration begins at 10:15 a.m., with a traditional style of worship music. Communion is offered weekly. The Agape Cafe is open from 9:45-10 a.m. Emmanuel United Church of ChristSEBRING The Rev. George Miller will deliver the Sunday morning sermon "Letting Go to Hold On" with Scripture from John 20:1-18. There will be an Easter egg hunt after the 9:30 a.m. Easter service. All are welcome. The church is 1.7 miles west of U.S. 27 on County Road 634 (Hammock Road). Call 471-1999 or visit sebringemmanuelucc.com.First Baptist Church of Lake PlacidLAKE PLACID Easter Services will be as follows: Sunrise service set on the CircleSEBRING The Way Church will be hosting a sunrise service on the Circle in historic downtown Sebring at 7 a.m. on Easter Sunday. Breakfast will follow at the church. All who come to the sunrise service are welcome to join the Way Family for breakfast.Fellowship Baptist plans sunrise service, concertAVON PARK Fellowship Baptist Church will hold an Easter sunrise service at 8 a.m. and worship service at 9:30 a.m. featuring Allison and Spencer in concert on Sunday. Coffee and doughnuts will be served after the sunrise service. The church is at 1000 Maxwell St.Sumner in concert SundaySEBRING Gaither Homecoming artist Donnie Sumner will be in concert Sunday at 11 a.m. at First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd. Prior to receiving Christ into his life, Sumner traveled with the late Elvis Presley as one of his backup singers and as a cast member of the Grand Ole Opry. Since becoming a Christian, all his talents have been used to spread the message of God's love. Sumner says he is "a minister by profession, God's child by forgiveness and a messenger of good news by calling." The public is invited to this special Easter musical presentation. There is no admission charge. An offering will be taken. Call 385-6431.First Baptist plans Easter serviceSEBRING Easter morning First Baptist, Sebring will hold Bible study/Sunday school at 9:15 a.m., with blended service beginning at 10:30 a.m. The choir will present a mini-concert during that service. There will be no evening service. Wednesday at 5 p.m.will be the last church supper until September. Musical Easter celebration planned SEBRING Amusical celebration of the resurrection, "The Risen Christ," will be presented on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 4500 Sun n Lake Blvd. Easter program at LP NazareneLAKE PLACID The Church of the Nazarene in Lake Placid will present its annual Easter program at 10:45 a.m. on Sunday. Th e program will consist of musical numbers interspersed with narration based on the Resurrection of Jesus Christ. Pastor Tim Taylor will bring a message entitled "An Encounter With The Living Christ!" All are invited. The church is located at 512 W. Interlak e Blvd. There will be no evening service on Easter Sunday. For more informa tion, call 446-1339.Community Good Friday service plannedSEBRING Community Good Friday service will be from 1:303 p.m. Friday at St. John United Methodist Church Grand Prix Drive (behind Walmart). The theme of the servic e is "Tracing the Steps of Jesus" and will follow the path of Christ from the Upper Room to the burial in six brief segments. Eac h segment will include a Scripture, meditation and congregational response. Participants will come from 14 different churche s. Special music will includ e the Sounds of Sebring Male Quartet; the choir o f the host church and solois t Robert Faldorf. The freewill offering received will benefit the ministerial relief fund of the Sebring Ministerial Association, which is spo nsoring this annual service The public is cordially invited to participate in th is ecumenical service. For further information, call 382-1737.Community sunrise service at Memorial United MethodistLAKE PLACID Memorial United Methodist Church will ho st the annual sunrise service on Sunday at 6:30 a.m. The Rev. Fred Ball from Memorial United Methodist will begin the service with the welcome and invocation. Rev. Elizabeth Myers from St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal Church, Rev. Ray Culpepper of Eastsid e Christian Church, and Re v. Manny Padilla from Igles ia de Dios will read Scriptur e. Skook Wright of Stepping Out in Faith Ministries and Eastside Christian Church will sing during the offering. The offering will benefit Samaritan's Touch Care Center in Lake Placid to help needy people with medical needs. The message "The Changing Power of the Resurrection" will be give n by Jimmy Goins of Lake Placid Church of Christ using John 20. The benediction will be given by Rev. Mike Ford of First Baptist Church. Church News Continued on page 8B RELIGION GUIDELINES: The News-Sunpublishes religion news on Fridays. The submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday to be considered for publication in the following Friday's paper. Submit items to theNews-Sun'sfrom 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays; fax to 385-2453; send e-mail to editor@newssun.com; or mail to Lifestyle Editor,News-Sun,2227 U.S. 27 South,Sebring,FL 33870. For information, call 385-6155,ext. 516. Continued on page 10B By MARK S. SMITH Associated PressWASHINGTON P ausing to observe Holy W eek amid war and policy s truggles, President B arack Obama said on T uesday that the agony of J esus Christ through death a nd resurrection puts m ere political struggle "in p erspective." For the second year r unning, Obama hosted an E aster prayer breakfast at t he White House, and the E ast Room was filled with a dministration officials a nd clergy from across the c ountry. Obama said "critical n ational debates" are ragi ng, and "my plate has b een full as well. The inb ox keeps accumulating. B ut then comes Holy W eek ... "As busy as we are, as m any tasks as pile up, d uring this season, we are r eminded that there is s omething about the resu rrection ... of Our Savior J esus Christ that puts e verything else in pers pective." Obama spoke just b efore heading to a town m eeting in Virginia on his d eficit plan the start of a cost-to-coast tour prom oting his fiscal blueprint a s more balanced than the o ne advocated by cong ressional Republicans. Obama has used previo us prayer breakfasts to u nderscore the depth of h is Christian faith in the f ace of polls indicating s ome Americans question h is religious beliefs. Last A ugust, a Pew Research C enter poll found 18 perc ent wrongly believe that O bama is a Muslim. On Tuesday, Obama r ecounted the story of C hrist's march to Calvary, t he crucifixion and resurr ection, the "unfatho mable grace" of taking o n the sins of the world. "This amazing grace c alls me to reflect, and it c alls me to pray," he said. Obama said his daught ers help keep things in p erspective for him, and s o does having a "strong s pouse.... But nothing b eats Scripture and the r eminder of the Eternal." Obama: Christ's travails put others in perspective Book of Mormon has sold 150 million copies SALTLAKE CITY ( AP) The Book of M ormon has reached a p ublishing milestone with 1 50 million copies sold. The Church of Jesus C hrist of Latter-day Saints r eleased the information t his week on its website. The book was first p rinted in 1830 and is now a vailable fully translated i n 82 languages. Its official title is "The B ook of Mormon: Another T estament of Christ."

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Page 8BNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. children's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. children's mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing God's Heart and Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and women's prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the "Place to discover God's love." For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mother's Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) "Where the old fashion gospel is preached." Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the "Son" always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. JosŽ Gonz‡lez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Saturday 3-3:45 p.m. or first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lord's Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building God's Kingdom for Everyone." "Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!" Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is "Jesus is First at First Christian Church."Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures'by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP t raditional service from 8-9 a .m.; and contemporary servi ce from 9:15-10:30 a.m. and 1 0:45-noon. There will be no evening s ervice.First Baptist Church of Placid LakesLAKE PLACID On S unday at 10:45 a.m., Pastor D arryl George will preach t he sermon entitled "The E aster Resurrected Life!" b ased on Luke 24:1-7. Acontinental breakfast h osted by Women On M issions will be served at 8 :30 a.m. There will be no S unday evening service. The church is at the corner o f Washington and Kemper A venues in Placid Lakes. F or more information, call 4 65-5126 from 8 a.m. to n oon, Monday through T hursday or e-mail the c hurch at placidlakes@hotm ail.com.First Christian ChurchAVON PARK Pastor G reg will be bringing the E aster Message "And We're S till Talking About It Today." Looking to the Word of God and realizing that when God shakes things up, He does it for a reason. Matthew 28:2 describes the resurrection of Christ like this: "There was a violent earthquake, for an angel of the Lord came down from heaven and, going to the tomb, rolled back the stone and sat on it." (NIV) Ladies are still meeting on Monday evening at 6:30 p.m. for a time of study, prayer and fellowship. First Christian Church of Avon Park is at 1016 W. Camphor St. (behind the Wachovia Bank). Call 4535334 or e-mail firstchristianap@embarqmail.com. The church website is www.firstchristianap.com.First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)SEBRING At the Lord's Table this Sunday morning will be Howard Lewis and Linda Correll. Communion will be served by Joyce Winstel, Chris Baker, Carol Chandler and Mike Graves. Greeting the congregation will be Clara Moore. Leading the Call to Worship will be Bill Hineline. Michael and Carol Graves will be working with Children's Church. Lighting the candles during the month of April will be Daniel Thibodeau. Sherry Kunsak will be with the children in the nursery during the month of April. Rev. Ron will present the Easter message, "He is Risen!" from Luke 24:1-8.First Presbyterian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK For Easter Sunday, Pastor Johnson's sermon is entitled "Resurrection of the Dead" based on I Corinthians 15:12-19. The choir's introit is "He Is Exalted" and the anthem is "Rise Up Singing." Sunday School is available for all ages. Maxine Johnson, adult teacher, continues the study of David in II Samuel 12 in which Nathan rebukes David. Wendy Garcia teaches the youth class and discusses issues of today and how the Bible instructs us. There will be no Youth Band or Youth Group this week. On Wednesday, April 27 there will be no Bible study as Pastor Johnson and several members will be away at Bonclarken in Flat Rock, N.C. for Volunteer Work Week. Choir practice will be at 6:30 p.m. On Thursday, April 28, Men's Fellowship will meet at The Depot at 7 a.m. for breakfast and then return to the church for a short Bible study and then to a member's house for a work project. The church is at 215 E. Circle St. Call the church office at 453-3242.First Presbyterian Church of SebringSEBRING The Easter message for Sunday morning will be delivered by the Rev. Darrell A. Peer. Session meeting is Monday at 2 p.m. in the conference room. Grief support group meets 3 p.m. Tuesday in adult classroom. The Women's Ministries Board Meeting is Thursday at 4:30 p.m. in the adult classroom.First United Methodist Church of SebringSEBRING The Easter celebration and egg hunt for children is Saturday at 10 a.m. Pastor A.C. Bryant will bring the Easter message "The Grave Gives Him Up" with Scripture from John 20:1-18 on Sunday. Family Fellowship Dinner is Wednesday evening with dinner at 5:30 p.m. in the Family Life Center. The Mother Daughter Banquet will be May 3, sponsored by the Methodist Women. Tickets ($10 for adults and $6 for children) are on sale now. Listen Live on WITS-AM 1340 each Sunday to hear the 10:50 a.m. service. Call the church office for information at 385-5184. The church is downtown at 126 South Pine St. www.sebringfirstumc.com.Heartland Christian ChurchSEBRING Pastor Ted Moore's sermon this special Easter Sunday at 10 a.m. will be: "The Tomb is Still Empty" with Scripture from John 20:1-7. Communion is offered. Service will also include Heartland Singers singing "Beyond The Cross," Little Heartland Singers singing "Blessed be the Name" and "Shout to the Lord," Mary VanHooreweghe and Flossi Moore singing "Sing to the King," Vic Anderson playin g "He's Alive" and "Up From the Grave," Ralph Sylveste r playing "The Holy City" an d George Kelly singing "Rise Again." Tuesday night's adult Bible study will be taught b y Pastor Ted Moore. Wednesday night are the young adult and children's programs taught by George Kelly, Jon and Amanda Armentrout and Toby Cribbs. It features a free meal. The church is at 2705 Alternate Route 17 South in Sebring (behind Publix). Chone 314-9693. Look for the lighthouse.Memorial United Methodist ChurchLAKE PLACID Sunrise Service sponsored by the Lake Placid Christia n Ministerial Association wil l be at the church at 6:30 a.m Everyone is welcome. The Rev. Fred Ball will preach on the Resurrection of Jesus Christ at the 8:30 a.m. Heritage (traditional) Worship service and the 10:45 a.m. Celebration Continued from page 7B RELIGION Church News Continued on page 9B

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011Page 9B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer .Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun 'N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid C ity" Children's Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, "prime-timers," and Bible s tudies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always w elcome. Come grow with us. P hone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Children's Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and children's church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Children's & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kid's World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturer's Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Children's Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of God's Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and children's church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Women's Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m. in the sanctuary. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Children's Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL33870. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays with Rick Heilig, youth director. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on life's journey, you're we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP ( blended) worship service. C laude Burnett, pastoral a ssistant, will preach on C elebrating the Resurrection o f Jesus Christ as the 10:45 a .m. New Song C ontemporary Service in R ob Reynolds Hall. Nursery care is available f or all regular morning e vents of the church at the C reepy Crawly Clubhouse. Children's Church will c onvene during the 10:45 s ervice. Children meet in the S anctuary for Wiggle Time a nd then move to the S onShine Clubhouse. The Church is at 500 Kent A ve. Visitors are welcome. C all 465-2422 for informat ion. There will be no e vening events this week.Parkway Free Will Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Sunday morning Bible lesson "Christ is Risen The Easter Message" is taken from the book of Matthew 28. Pastor Jim Scaggs will bring the "Resurrection Day" message in the Sunday morning service. The Sunday evening service will be the regular endof-the-month-sing and fellowship. The Wednesday evening service will be praise, prayer and Bible study.Resurrection Lutheran ChurchAVON PARK On Easter Sunday, the sermon will be based on the 28th chapter of Matthew. The second service will be followed by Easter dinner in Burke Hall. The Busy Bodies meet at 9 a.m. Monday to make and stuff teddy bears to be given to the children in Florida Hospital.St. John United Methodist ChurchSEBRING On Easter Sunday at the 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. services, the Rev. Ronald De Genaro's sermon will be "All Fear is Gone" taken from Matthew 28:1-10. The Chancel Choir will sing at all three services. Nursery is provided at all three services. Boy Scouts meet Monday at 7 p.m. Men's Fellowship and Prayer Breakfast is Wednesday at 7:45 a.m. St. John Youth meet at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.Sebring Church of the BrethrenSEBRING Easter Sunday, Pastor Keith Simmons will be preaching on "Empty Tomb Full of Joy!" The Scripture reading will be from John 20:1-18. Sunday school will be studying "Christ is Risen." They will be looking at the Scripture Matthew 28:1-17. The Kids Zone meets Sundays and Wednesdays. All Christians are welcome to the Easter Sunrise Service to be held at the First Presbyterian Church at 7 a.m. Four churches will be participating: Presbyterian, Church of the Nazarene, First United Methodist and Church of the Brethren.Southside Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Rev. David Altman will bring an Easter message of hope in the Sunday morning worship service. Children's church and a nursery are available. The evening service will be a focus on prayer for all nations. Forever Friends will meet at 11 a.m. Tuesday with Pastor Randy Smith speaking on "Understanding Middle East Turmoil." Wednesday, student ministry starts at 6:30 p.m. and adult Bible study and prayer meeting begins at 7 p.m. The church is at 379 South Commerce Ave. Call 385-0752.Spring Lake Presbyterian ChurchSEBRING The Spring Lake Choir will present an Easter cantata, "It Is Well With My Soul" this Sunday morning; Revs. Barbara and Phil Laucks.Spring Lake United Methodist ChurchSEBRING The 7 a.m. sunrise service on Sundat, the Rev. Clyde Weaver's sermon will be "An Easter Religion." Breakfast will follow the sunrise service. At the 9:55 a.m. service, the Rev. Clyde Weaver's sermon will be: "My Redeemer Lives." No fellowship following the service Sunday. Spring Lake United Methodist Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane.The Way ChurchSEBRING Easter serv ices will begin with a sunri se service on the Circle at 7 a.m. Breakfast will follow a t the church for all who atten d the sunrise service. There will be a film at 9 a.m. and Easter worship will begin a t 10 a.m. Please note change of time of worship for East er Sunday only. May 1 will be the quarte rly meeting following worship and includes a covered dish meal. The Way Church is at 1005 North Ridgewood Drive. Church phone is 471 6140 and the pastor's cell phone is 214-6190. For church information and the pastor's messages go to www.thewaychurch.org. Continued from page 8B RELIGION Church News

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The Community Calendar provides a brief listing of local clubs and organizations who meet on a regular basis. It is the responsibility of the group to update the News-Sunon any changes in this listing by calling 3856155, ext. 516; send any changes by e-mail toeditor@newssun.com;or mail them to News-SunCommunity Calendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870.FRIDAY Alcoholics Anonymous One Day At ATime group meets for a closed discussion at 9:30 a.m. Monday and Friday at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 4500 Sun N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. Call 314-0891. American Legion Post 25 hosts a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. at the post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake Placid. Cost is $6. Shrimp also is available for same price. Open to the public. Tickets in the lounge on Friday night. Lounge hours are from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 has karaoke from 7 p.m. until final call at the post, 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Post open at noon. Happy Hour from 4-6 p.m. Members and guests only. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Breakfast Rotary Club meets 7 a.m., Rotary Club building. Better Breathers Club Support Group This American Lung Association affiliated group meets the last Friday of each month, at 12:00 pm in Conference Room 3 at Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center, 4200 Sun n Lake Blvd. Contact Mike Napper, RRTat (863)402-3450. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118. Grand Prix Cloggers Beginner classes are at 9 a.m., EZ Intermediate classes are at 10 a.m., and Intermediate classes are at 11 a.m. every Friday at Reflection on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club offers a class in Lake Placid at the Sunshine RV Resort from 9-11 a.m. Friday. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or e-mail him atsamdunn@samdunn.net. Highlands Social Dance Club hosts ballroom dancing every Friday, October through March from 7-9:30 p.m. at the Senior Center on Sebring Parkway. Dance the night away to the music of the area's Big Bands. All club dances are open to the public. Appropriate dress required. Admission is $5 for members and $7 for non-members. Call 385-6671. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 has lounge hours beginning at 1 p.m. There is a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. Cost is $8.50 per person. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Hi-12 Club meets at noon on the fourth Friday at the Lake Placid Elks, except in June, July and August. All Masons and their ladies are welcome. Call 465-3038. Lake Placid Moose serves wings, fish and burgers at 6 p.m. Music provided from 7-11 p.m. Pool tournament is at 8 p.m. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Karaoke from 7-10 p.m. Lodge phone number 452-0579. Narcotics Anonymous New Day Group meets at 6 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave, Sebring. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Sebring Bridge Club has Bridge, ACBLDuplicate at the clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Fridays. For details or info on lessons, call 385-8118. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves chicken or fish baskets from 5-7 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring, for a $4 donation. Blind darts is played at 7 p.m. Call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 serving buffet dinner at 5-7 p.m. Elks and guests invited. Dance music in ballroom at 7 p.m. Dinner and dance is $10 donation. For reservations, call 3858647 or 471-3557. Lounge is open from 3-10 p.m. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave. Call 3852966. Teamster Retirees meet at the Teamster's Local 444 Union Hall at 211 Potontoc St., Auburndale at 11 a.m. on the last Friday of the month (except June, July and August). Call Paul Thomas at 471-9684. U.S. Military Vets Motorcycle Club serves a steak dinner on the fourth Friday of every month for $7 at VFW Post 9853, State Road 64 West and North Oliva Drive. For information call Hocky at (954) 592-4847 Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3800 serves steak by the ounce from 5:30-7 p.m. every fourth Friday at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Texas Hold em lessons, 2 p.m. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 serves pizza from 5:30-7 p.m. and music is from 69 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902.SATURDAY American Legion Post 25 serves sirloin burgers from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake Placid. Jam session is from 2-4 p.m. The lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Members and guests invited. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 69 in AvonPark serves dinner at 5 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Public Library has a free Adult Film Series at noon. Call 452-3803. Citrus Ridge Decorative Artists is a chapter of the Society of Decorative Painters. The chapter meets the fourth Saturday of the month at Waters Edge of Lake Wales, 10 Grove Ave. West in Lake Wales. Doors open at 9 a.m. and meeting begins at 10 a.m. Bring a bagged lunch with painting to follow. Guests are welcome to come and join the fun, meet the members and fellowship with the chapter. Call Vickie Alley, Frotproof area at (863) 6321472, or Judy Nicewicz, Highlands County area at 2731339.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. provides free assisted riding sessions for adults and children with special needs from 9-11 a.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday at 118 W. College Drive, AvonPark. For details or to volunteer, call Mary McClelland, coordinator, 4520006. Highlands County Democratic Women's Club typically meets the fourth Saturday of each month unless there is a DWC event planned. Call 214-4680 to confirm the next meeting date. Meetings are from 9-11:30 a.m. at Democratic Headquarters, 4216 Sebring Parkway (beside Ruby Tuesdays). The morning includes a continental breakfast, a speaker, a political action discussion and the regular business meeting. Highlands County Housing Authority meets 7 p.m., 3909 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. Highlands Shrine Club, 2606 State Road 17 South, Avon Park (between Avon Park and Sebring) has a flea market from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., country store open from 8 a.m. to noon and pancake breakfast served from 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Vendors are welcome. No setup fee is charged for the summer months. Plenty of off road parking. Call 382-2208. Highlands Woodcarvers meet from 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays at 825 Sunbird Terr. (Community Center off Thunderbird Road). Call Bob Seybolt at 471-6077. Lake Placid Art League has a class in Pastels/Acrylics taught by Llewellyn Rinald from from 9 a.m. to noon at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 opens the lounge at 1 p.m. Card games are played at 1 p.m., and Bar Bingo is at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Call 4652661. Narcotics Anonymous New Day Group meets at 7 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave, Sebring. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Overeaters Anonymous meets at 10:30 a.m. at First Presbyterian Church, Oak Street, Lake Placid. For more details, call 382-1821. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves dinner from 5-7 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Music is from 7-10 p.m. Call 655-4007. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3800 serves breakfast from 8-11 a.m. and horse raicing at 5:30 p.m. every second and fourth Saturday at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 serves a meal for $6 from 5:30-7 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902. SUNDAY American Legion Post 25 Lake Placid has lounge hours from 1-9 p.m. Live music is from 5-8 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Members and guests only Post is at 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Call 471-1448. Inerstate chapter of A.B.A.T.E. meets the last Sunday of every month at The Blue Crab, 825 Ridgewood Dr. Sebring at 11 a.m. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 lounge is open from 1-7 p.m. Card games start at 1:30 p.m. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has karaoke in the pavilion. Horseshoes played at 9:30 a.m Food available at 4 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Cards start at 4 p.m. Music outside Tiki Hut at 3 p.m Lodge phone number 452-057 9. Overeaters Anonymous, meets from 4-5 p.m. in second floor conference roomNo. 3 at Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center, 4200 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 3827731. No dues, fees or weighins. For details on the organiza tion, go to www.oa.org. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves lunch at 2 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 225 9 offers NASCAR racing in the pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar open and kitchen open from 2-5 p.m Lodge is at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-3920. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 serves hamburgers from 4-5:30 p.m. and plays poker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 Karaoke is from 5-8 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call Page 10BNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.com There will be some f olding chairs, but those a ttending may bring their f avorite lawn chair. The p ublic is cordially invited t o attend this service. The c hurch is at 500 Kent A ve. in Lake Placid. It is s outh of U.S. 27 overl ooking Lake Clay.Special speaker and author at Highlands Community ChurchSEBRING Chad V arga, a former profess ional basketball player, w ill be at Highlands C ommunity Church on E aster Sunday at 10 a.m. Varga is an incredibly d ynamic and gifted s peaker, who connects w ith all ages, backg rounds and every ethnici ty. His hard, surreal u pbringing, his former p rofessional basketball c areer and his ministry to h undreds of thousands of p eople each year has s haped this man and his m essage. You will not f ind anyone who is more r eal, honest and impacti ng in their approach to p eople. His passion and h eart for church is what s ets him apart. Varga is anointed and c alled of God to chall enge, motivate and r evive the complacent C hristian and lost alike. Highlands Community C hurch is at 3005 New L ife Way. For more inform ation, call 402-1684.First Presbyterian hosting sunrise serviceSEBRING All C hristians are welcome to t he Easter sunrise service t o be held at the First P resbyterian Church at 7 a .m. Four churches will be p articipating P resbyterian, The Church o f the Nazarene, The F irst United Methodist a nd the Church of the B rethren. Continued from page 7B Snapshots RELIGION COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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By CHRISTYLEMIRE APMovie CriticIt's a genius little gimm ick, really: a clever, knowi ng twist that isn't so obnoxi ously meta as to be off-putt ing. Morgan Spurlock made a d ocumentary about product p lacement, marketing and a dvertising, and he funded it e ntirely through product p lacement, marketing and a dvertising starting with t he title. And so it isn't just: The Greatest Movie Ever S old." It's: "POM Wonderful P resents: The Greatest Movie E ver Sold." Now, you may not necess arily walk out of the theater c raving pomegranate juice o r itching to book a flight on J etBlue Airways, or nibble on s ome Amy's Kitchen pizza, o r drive a Mini Cooper (or f ill up that Mini Cooper at a S heetz convenience store). A nd those are just a few of t he two dozen or so sponsors S purlock amassed, despite e nduring many, many more r ejections. (The ones that s hot him down also get s hout-outs, but probably not i n the way they would have l iked, which is one of many c auses for laughter here.) But while Spurlock's film i s hugely entertaining, unsurp rising coming from the lika ble maker and star of "Super S ize Me" and "Where in the W orld is Osama Bin Laden?," S purlock also doesn't conn ect the dots sufficiently e nough to prove that product p lacement actually influe nces consumer habits. Still, he has fun trying, even going so far as to insert affectionately over-the-top ads for some of the brands that are sponsoring him; the ones for Hyatt Hotels and Mane 'n Tail hair products which are good for both humans and horses are especially amusing. And he does shine a light on a trend that's only getting more prevalent, and more shameless. The average viewer probably doesn't know, for example, about the kind of wrangling that goes on behind the scenes to get those products into movies that strongarming can occur during shooting to ensure that you see a certain brand of soda at just the right time. "Rush Hour" director Brett Ratner, one of many filmmakers who add their insight, phrases it well: "Artistic integrity? Whatever." But he also explains that if saying yes to product placement means that you get the kind of money you need to make the kind of movie you envision ... well, then it's a win-win. This is, after all, a business. Spurlock also aims to achieve transparency by including footage from the pitch meetings with various companies so we know how much Ban deodorant paid to be involved in his movie, for example. And when the owner of Sheetz asks, "Is there a plot?" Spurlock doesn't miss a beat in responding, "This is the movie right now." Of course, they're in on the joke, too. Thankfully, Ralph Nader also shows up to serve as the voice of reason. He figures that the only place to escape the onslaught of advertising is during sleep but he also finds himself engaged with Spurlock in a discussion of Merrell shoes, which the director just happens to be wearing during his interview with Nader. Just by being himself, Spurlock is a big reason "The Greatest Movie Ever Sold" is so enjoyable, and his presence is powerful enough to make you overlook the film's shortcomings. (Avisit to Florida, where cash-strapped public schools have given into advertising, feels like an unfocused detour.) Unlike Michael Moore, who inserts himself front and center in his documentaries to stridently prove his points, Spurlock's folksy affability creates the sensation that he's truly going on a journey, that he doesn't necessarily know all the answers to the questions he's posing, and he'd like nothing more for us than to go along for the ride. As long as that ride is in a Mini Cooper, of course, and not a Volkswagen. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011Page 11B DIVERSIONS DearAbby: My father is a state worker who has "furlough Fridays." My sister, "Dee," went home early from school last Friday because she wasn't feeling well and found him in bed with one of his coworkers. Mom was at work, so apparently Dad thought he was safe. If Mom ever found out, their marriage would be over. Dad is begging Dee not to tell. Dee and I have been saving for a large HDTV for our bedroom. Dad is now offering to pay for it. He says he'll tell Mom he's helping us because we have been working so hard to save the money. Actually, he'd pay for the whole thing and let us keep our money. Dee is all for it. She says we can use Dad's affair to get more from him in the future. I'm shocked and disappointed in my father, and while I don't want to see my parents' marriage destroyed, I don't feel right about letting him bribe us. What should I do? California Girl DearCalifornia Girl: Your father is a piece of work. That he would attempt to rope his daughters in as co-conspirators shows the extent of his lack of character. And if you didn't realize it, you wouldn't have written to me. Please do not go along with your sister's plan to accept the payoff. It's extortion. If you keep the secret, there is nothing to prevent your father from continuing his adulterous affairs. As difficult as hearing about this from you may be to your mother, if she should find out what's been going on and it ALWAYS comes out and realize her daughters were aware of it, her pain will be magnified. DearAbby: My fiance has a daughter in college. "Kimberly" emails her essays to her father, always saying, "I need you to spell-check, check grammar and fix everything. Then send it back to me." As a teacher, I have told him this is unethical. His daughter is working for a grade and there are resources available at the university. She has no dis ability and time is not an issue. When this happens my blood boils. Am I wrong? Or is it wrong of her to expect Daddy to fix her papers so she can get a good grade? He thinks I'm overreacting. Not Fooled in Michiga n DearNot Fooled: Of course you're not wrong. As well-intended as your fiance may be, by correct ing his daughter's assignments he's preventing her from learning skills she will need once she graduates. Warning: If you plan to marry this man, be pre pared for a future filled with him solving one prob lem after another for her, because he's not going to change and neither will she. Acollege girl being this dependent on Daddy isn't healthy. DearAbby: How long after you are married can you take a honeymoon? My husband and I dream of going to Venice so we can kiss on the Bridge of Sighs. We've heard if you do that, you'll be in love forever. We're saving our mone y, but won't be able to affor d to go until after our first anniversary. Is there a rul e that a honeymoon must b e taken within the first year of marriage? Liza in Alas ka DearLiza: There's no such rule that I know of. Because it's your first big trip together as man and wife, call it a "deferred honeymoon" (after all, that's what it is), and you need not apologize for doing so. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Adulterous dad's TV bribe doesn't offer pretty picture Dear Abby By DAVID BAUDER APTelevision WriterNEWYORK After a s eason of earthquakes, t sunamis and political viol ence, television networks f rom ABC to E! are betting t hat many Americans will w ant to rise before dawn next w eek to bask in the splendor o f the royal wedding between P rince William and Kate M iddleton. Coverage generally begins a t 4 a.m. EDTfor the April 2 9 wedding, or 1 a.m. PDT o n the West Coast, where the i ssue may be whether to stay u p very, very late. "Collectively people are e ager for a bit of a break," s aid Mark Lukasiewicz, NBC N ews executive in charge of p lanning coverage for that n etwork and its cable offs hoots. "It will be a chance to f ocus on something that has a l ittle bit of fun and pageantry i n the grand British style." "Nobody," agreed ABC's B arbara Walters, "does a w edding like the British." Cable television was in its i nfancy when William's pare nts, Prince Charles and Lady D iana Spencer, were married i n 1981. The broadcast netw orks were the place to see t hat wedding, and they'll be b ack this year. But viewers w ill have several other o ptions, including bypassing t elevision altogether by w atching an online stream. Lukasiewicz's assignment f or NBC Universal alone i llustrates the variety. On NBC, the "Today" s how team will be in London f or live coverage, joined by t he network's top anchor, B rian Williams. MSNBC will h ave its own team, led by M artin Bashir and Chris J ansing at first, then the Morning Joe" cast. Cable s ister E! Entertainment will s how the ceremony live, led b y Giuliana Rancic. T elemundo is covering the e vent for Spanish-speaking viewers. The MSNBC.com website is streaming the wedding live. NBC News is also producing a royal wedding app for the iPad, whose features include shortcuts to connect people following the wedding through social media. Most of the stars of U.S. television news will be in London next week not only to cover the wedding itself but the advanced preparations. Their bet is that interest in the royal nuptials will approach that of Charles and Diana's wedding. "The young people in my office are very excited," said Walters, who was on hand for the 1981 wedding and will team with Diane Sawyer to lead ABC's coverage next week. Walters said her head is already filling with royal trivia to use during the live broadcast. She noted the contrast between the relationships: Diana, a virginal 20-year-old who barely knew her prince, compared with Kate, a 29year-old who met her prince while they were in college together and had an off-andon relationship with him ever since. "It's much more reflective of the times and it seems like there's a much better chance of the marriage lasting," she said. U.S. interest in the wedding has been slow to catch fire, but BBC America has noticed improving ratings for its pre-wedding programming lately, said Perry Simon, general manager of channels for BBC Worldwide America. Americans don't really start paying attention until it gets closer to the actual event, he said. BBC America's job, he said, has been to stoke that interest. Simon was riding in a cab in London when word of the royal engagement came down. He immediately pulled out his smartphone to contact fellow executives; he wanted BBC America to "own" the story of the wedding on U.S. TV. Rather than appeal specifically to a U.S. audience on the day of the wedding, BBC America will air a commercial-free simulcast of what the main BBC network is showing. Americans will be able to experience the wedding the way many British citizens will be in their own living rooms. BBC One news anchor Huw Edwards will lead the BBC's team. "There is nobody better prepared and more appropriate to present the event in all of its grandeur," Simon said. Other networks offer a farewell of sorts, a coming out party and a chance to see an old friend. Katie Couric, who is taking her "CBS Evening News" broadcast to London midweek, will anchor CBS'wedding coverage starting at 4 a.m. on Friday. Not only is the morning hour familiar to many of her fans from the "Today" show, there's a good chance it will be the last major news event where she is CBS'lead anchor. Her CBS contract expires on June 4. Networks girding for wall-towall royal wedding coverage Spurlock sells out for Greatest Movie' Movie Review POMWonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold' Rating: PG-13 (for some language and sexual material) Running time: 88 minutes Review: (of 4) MCTphoto The royal wedding will be held at Westminster Abbey in London on April 29.

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LIVING 12B PAGE News-Sun Friday, April 22, 2011 An alien member of the Green Lantern Corps an intergalactic peacekeeping force crash lands on Earth after a fierce battle against an enemy that threatens the universe. Mortally wounded, the dying alien calls upon his power ring to search the planet for a worthy successor, someone "honest and without fear." The ring selects daring, but arrogant, test pilot Hal Jordan. But Jordan, the first human picked to join the Green Lantern Corps, isn't as fearless as he seems. Can he learn to harness his power ring and tackle his insecurities in time to help thwart the cosmic menace?POWERS AND WEAPONS Power ring:Astandard issue of all Green Lanterns, the power ring allows its bearer to fly, project energy and create hard-light constructs of any shape or size from the user's imagination. Its abilities are limited only by the ring-bearer's willpower and creativity. The power ring has one weakness, however it doesn't work against anything colored yellow. The ring must be recharged every 24 hours by a lanternshaped power battery. Mighty, but arrogant, Thor is banished from the realm of Asgard by his father Odin, ruler of the Norse gods, when his actions threaten the peace of the mystical kingdom. Forced to live on Earth, will the outcast god learn what it takes to be a true hero in time to save both Earth and Asgard from a common threat?POWERS AND WEAPONS Mjolnir:Virtually indestructible, this magically enchanted hammer allows Thor to channel the forces of weather such as lightning, rain, wind and thunder. Mjolnir can obey Thor's mental commands and will return to him if thrown. Only those deemed worthy can lift Mjolnir from the ground. Superhuman strength:Thor possesses super strength enabling him to lift up to 100 tons. Resistance to injury:Thor's skin and bones are several times denser than a normal human, making him extremely resilient. Amplified Asgardian physiology:While all Norse gods are extremely long-lived, have other-wordly endurance and are immune to disease, Thor's physiology exceeds even that.MOVIE INFOMovie title:"Thor"Release date:May 6Starring:Natalie Portman, Chris Hemsworth, Anthony HopkinsDirector:Kenneth Branagh By Eric Goodwin, McClatchy Tribune MOVIE INFOMovie title:"Green Lantern"Release date:June 17Starring:Ryan Reynolds, Blake Lively, Peter SarsgaardDirector:Martin CampbellAskinny, frail Steve Rogers volunteers to become the first test subject for a topsecret U.S. government project to create an army of physically enhanced soldiers to fight in World War II. The combination of a special serum and exposure to controlled bursts of "Vita-Rays" radiation transforms the feeble Rogers into a specimen of physical perfection. Captain America is born! As the United States'first "super soldier" jumps into action, an ominous threat from the Nazis looms in the background.POWERS AND WEAPONS Shield:Forged from a special metal alloy, this concave disk is impervious to nearly all forms of artillery providing excellent protection in battle. If thrown, the shield's aerodynamic shape allows it to cut through the air with minimal wind resistance. Peak human strength, speed, agility and endurance:Captain America has been physiologically altered to be as strong, fast and flexible as any human being can possibly be. He can press up to 800 pounds and run at top speeds approaching 30 mph. His body eliminates the excessive build-up of fatigue-producing poisons in his muscles, granting him remarkable endurance.MOVIE INFOMovie title:"Captain America: The First Avenger"Release date:July 22Starring:Chris Evans, Hugo Weaving, Tommy Lee JonesDirector:Joe JohnsonMOVIE INFOMovie title:"X-Men: First Class"Release date:June 3Starring:James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Jennifer LawrenceDirector:Matthew VaughnPROFILEAs young men, Charles Xavier and Erik Lehnsherr (better known by their alter egos Professor X and Magneto) are close allies, sharing a mutual dream of helping other mutants learn how to harness their special powers. However, while their goals are similar, their approaches are not. What begins as a difference of opinion between one-time best friends grows into a full-fledged feud as they battle to put an end to a global crisis.POWERSCharles Xavier Telepathy:One of the most powerful telepaths on the planet, Xavier can read and manipulate the minds of others.Erik Lehnsherr Magnetism:Lehnsherr can generate and control the electromagnetic force, allowing him to manipulate metal, levitate, form powerful force fields and shoot pulses of electromagnetic energy. James McAvoy as Charles XavierLeap into action with this season's batch of comic book superhero moviesChris Evans as Captain America Ryan Reynolds as Green LanternWARNER BROS.PARAMOUNT PICTURES PARAMOUNT PICTURESChris Hemsworth as Thor



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By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK Avon Park Poli ce Chief Mike Rowan was placed o n paid administrative leave Tuesd ay afternoon by Interim City Manag er Julian Deleon, but its not clear wh y. Deleon sent an e-mail to t he News-Sun stating I have plac ed Chief Rowan on administrative pa id leave. I have asked the Sheriff s Office (S.O) to assume command of the Citys Police Department whi le they help us review our police proc edures. Since this is an open inves tigation, any further questions need to be directed through the Sheriff s office. When public records we re requested from Deleon that same d ay concerning Rowan, Deleon refus ed to provide the documents until he cleared them with the HCSO, statin g that there was an active ongoin g investigation and I dont want to mess that up. In a memo to Rowan, Deleon al so stated that From this point forwar d, the S.O. is charged with commun icating with you until the investig ation is complete. Later on Tuesday, Deleon sent o ut By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Every once in a while a city council meeting can be as dramatic as a Verdi opera, and sometimes louder. Those who did not attend the Sebring City Council meeting Tuesday night missed a lively show. The evening had everything humor, anger, applause, near tears, sharp confrontation and simmering resentment. At issue was a request by the Community Redevelopment Agency to overlay an entertainment district on the core downtown area. This means establishments serving more alcohol than food, or just alcohol, would be encouraged to set up business downtown. Current city ordinances ban such businesses within 300 feet of a church, of which there are many in the area. The overlay district had been approved NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Friday-Saturday, April 22-23, 2011 www.newssun.com Volume 92/Number 47 | 50 cents www.newssun.com 079099401001 HighLow 88 65Complete Forecast PAGE 7A Bright, sunny and warm Forecast Question: Would you willingly pay more in taxes to reduce the deficit? Next question: Should Sebring have created a special entertainment district downtown? www.newssun.comMake your voice heard at Online Obituaries Joseph Bohnen Jr. Age 69, of W est Palm Beach Evelyn Johnson Age 87, of Sebring Eunice Martin of Sebring Dorothy Roy Age 94, formerly of Lake Placid Obituaries, Page 5A Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453 Online: www.newssun.com Yes 21.5% No 78.5% Total votes: 135 Classifieds 9A Community Briefs2A Community Calendar10B Dear Abby 11B Editorial & Opinion4A Healthy Living 6B Lottery Numbers2A Movie Review/Times11B Religion 7B Police Blotter 8A Sports On TV 2B Index Going down swingingStreaks fall to Lake Wales, but not without a fight SPORTS, 1B PAGE12B A Place to Heal APPD chief feared for job due to investigations of city administrators News-Sun photo b y KATARASIMMON S Avon Park Police Chief Michael Rowan, shown here talking to citizens during a drug raid, was placed on paid administrative leave Tuesday. Entertainment district defeated after heated debate News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Drawing an even bigger audience than the fence debate, the Sebring town councils discussion of an entertainment district downtown stirred up a lot of emotion. See ENTERTAINMENT, page 8A Rowan put on leave; HCSOtakes command See ROWAN, page 8A By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING In honor of Earth Day, a local businessman has made it his mission to do something simple to show his appreciation to the world we live in. Michael Stone, owner of Surf Lessons by Stone, has been preparing to walk 14.5 miles to his job at Budweiser. I remember growing up here and everyone saying all the time theres nothing to do hereand thats the mentality that got me thinking about doing something so simple, Stone said. Stone is an active member of several organizations that work to better the environment and those that inhabit the world. Im not a tree hugger, Im not saying Hey, dont cut down trees and dont hunt.Im just saying if Walking for Earth Day Mike Stone shows off the sign he had made in honor of Earth Day. Stone will wear the sign, while he walks 14.5 miles to work today. KATARASIMMONS Local man walking 14.5 miles to work today See WALKING, page 5A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Promise Acres Equine Rescue currently has five horses under the care of Jennifer Carnahan, her family, and numerous volunteers. Each of the five horses were brought to the rescue for rehabilitation after being abused and neglected. The rescue horses spend their time with the Carnahans family horses as they heal and prepare for adoption. By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comAVON PARK Tucked neatly inside the city, Promise Acres Equine Rescue is a quiet little world all its own filled with compassion and love. The facility is a growing horse rescue that is family owned and operated. Jennifer Carnahan, her husband Richard, and their two daughters, Ashlee and Meghan, are the kind hearts behind the operation. Jennifer Carnahan is a certified riding instructor and a former veterinary technician with more than 18 years of experience with animals of all sorts. However, horses have been her main focus for the past seven years. We just kind of fell into it, she said, adding that they have always been a horse family and owning the animals have never been an issue. Weve always had horses and been around them, theyve always been a part of our family. The rehabilitation center allows neglected and mistreated horses a place to heal and become better functioning horses. The facility currently has four rescue horses and each arrived less than perfect. They are usually just neglected. People think you can just get a horse and put it in a pasture and itll be fine, but thats not the case, said Carnahan. Carnahan said that most of the Promise Acres rescues abandoned horses See HORSES, page 6A By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING City council and Bob DePugh of the Caliber Investment Group LLC are hoping to avoid a court battle. At issue is the $200,000 deposit Calibre gave the city as earnest money when it began its effort to develop Harder Hall as an assisted living center. DePugh is asking for the money back, plus the interest it earned. The city feels it is entitled to keep the mon ey because it allowed excl usive rights to Calibre, poss ibly missing other opport unities to sell the long emp ty building. In additio n, Calibres applications f or funding were deem ed incomplete, so the grou p was not successful in ge tting the needed funds. DePugh told council th at the incomplete applicatio ns were a result of HUD reg ulations. Aborrower mu st have mortgage insuranc e, Disagreement over Harder Hall deposit See HARDER, page 6ABusy BunnyThousands of eggs to be found at Humane Society Saturday PAGE2A www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and

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By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Susie Bishop, business development manager for Atlantic Blue Ranch and Jeff Roth, director of the Champion for Children Advocacy Center, were honored by the Highlands County Division of the United Way of Central Florida Wednesday morning. Bishop was named Citizen of the Year and Roth was named Volunteer of the Year. Their recognition culminated a morning of good news. Highlands County raised more money for United Way in 2011 than it did in 2010 $421,000 this year compared to $404,000 last year. The countys Publix Supermarkets combined to raise $126,505, the most of any participant. The School Board of Highlands County raised the second highest amount with $77,246. The business with the highest per capita gift was Morgan Stanley Smith Barney with $1,024. Still, while the amount of money raised was impressive, the heart of the United Way lies in the agencies and programs the UWsupports. In Highlands County, the United Way helps 17 agencies and 22 programs. Some of the programs are within the agencies. According to Julie Fells, director of the Highlands County Division of the United Way of Central Florida, apportionment is done by a large committee of 30 people divided into four teams. Individuals receive training in January, learning how to read agency reports and what questions to ask. In March, members review agency and program paperwork, in April they tour sites, talking to administrators and clients. In May they make their decisions. The list of programs and agencies remains the sam e over the years, but applican ts must apply every year. Page 2ANews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.com April 20 42040434653x:3Next jackpot $15 millionApril 16 11221333440x:3 April 13 1815324043x:5 April 20 613172429 April 19 1516303135 April 18 13151830 April 17 19213134 April 20 (n) 7841 April 20 (d) 3969 April 19 (n) 0890 April 19 (d) 8545 April 20(n) 43 4 April 20 (d) 46 1 April 19 (n) 75 7 April 19(d) 28 9 April 19 838394210 April 15 259314 April 12 216224014 April 8 112436379 April 20 924343643 PB: 27 PP: 3Next jackpot $72 millionApril 16 2133444555 PB: 7 PP: 5 April 13 423394950 PB: 39 PP: 3 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center While listening to the h aunting bagpipes of Amazing Grace during a n April 9 memorial servi ce honoring Pfc. Jeremy F aulkner in Jonesboro, G a., I realized I had no i dea what the 1779 songs f amous lyrics, written by J ohn Newton, actually m eant. Faulkners pastor, f amily, friends and fellow s oldiers, who filled the h uge church to capacity, h elped clarify the beloved h ymns resonance. With a hail of fire all a round him, Jeremy saw a mazing grace, Rev. Ron L ittle said. On March 29, Faulkner, 2 3, was one of six Task F orce No Slack warriors o f the storied 101st A irborne Division (Air A ssault) to die fighting f or our country in A fghanistans Kunar p rovince. Also killed w ere Sgt. 1st Class Ofren A rrechaga, 28; Staff Sgt. F rank Adamski III, 26; S taff Sgt. Bryan Burgess, 2 9; Spc. Dustin Feldhaus, 2 0; and Spc. Jameson L indskog, 23. Our enemy had grown t oo large, too bold, too c apable to ignore any l onger, Lt. Col. Joel V owell, Task Force No S lack commander, told g rieving soldiers in a dram atic eastern Afghanistan s peech delivered the same d ay one of their own was l aid to rest in Georgia. Task Force No Slack met t hat challenge, and we d estroyed and killed over 1 30 insurgent fighters and w ounded scores of others i n our biggest battle since V ietnam. As I learned at Tara B aptist Church, Faulkner b egan training for his d efining moment as a litt le boy. Little Jeremy used to p lay Army in the yard, L ittle said, prompting rare s miles from the devastate d audience. Tony Berry, Faulkners s tepfather, knew Remy, a s many loved ones and b uddies called him, since t he future soldier was 11. He was one of those t ypes of kids that made y ou mad one minute, but t he next, hed have you l aughing, Berry told The U nknown Soldiers. He l oved being outside and c amping, so he adjusted t o Army life real quick. Like so many U.S. t roops, Faulkner develo ped an unbreakable a ttachment to his brothers a nd sisters in arms. Berry s aid he spoke to three sold iers from his stepsons u nit at the memorial servi ce. Its a bond that we can n ever know, unless y ouve been over there to s hare in it with those g uys, Berry explained. When one passes, the o ther one feels guilty, and t hey wish it was them. Quotes from warriors w ho went into the fire w ith Faulkner on that t reacherous day in A fghanistan were read a loud at the service. He was a very special p erson in my life, one m ourning soldier said. He could make everyone l augh and smile, even in t he worst situations. Amazing Grace See SOLDIER, page 6A By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Tuesdays Highlands County School Board meeting ended much later than usual, with the board members finishing up around 8:30 p.m. Now that the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) is behind students and administrators, the board members have began shifting gears toward the budget issues. Highlands County School District Superintendent Wally Cox, has begun looking at a handful of budget ideas, according to board chairperson Donna Howerton. He is looking at where to make cuts, and what is needed where, Howerton said. At the beginning of the meeting, the board recognized the many volunteers throughout the district and schools in conjunction with Volunteer Week. The 2010-11 Outstanding Volunteers have been a vital part of the curriculum and instructional community of the school district. Abudget workshop, as well as a student ACTsuccess workshop, is scheduled for April 26 at 3:30 p.m. School board begins to focus on budget United Way donations increase News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLE Y Wade Taveniere, CFO at Heacock Insurance, hugs Susie Bishop, who was honored as Citizen of the Year 2010 by the United Way on Wednesday. Bishop, Roth honored COMMUNITYBRIEFS Lake Placid town offices closed todayLAKE PLACID The town of Lake Placid will be closed today for Good Friday. The town will not college garbage today.Highlands County Habitat celebrates 20th anniversarySEBRING Habitat for Humanity i s celebrating 20 years of building faith, hope and homes in Highlands County o n Thursday, April 28. Since 1990, Habita t for Humanity has built 159 homes for local families in need. The 20th annive rsary dinner begins at 6 p.m. at the Highlands County Fair Convention Center. Cost to attend is a $35 donation to Habitat for Humanity, which include s a choice of chicken florentine roulade o r beef brisket. Dinner will be prepared by Chef Mac of Golden Palms Catering. The event will include special entertainment by Habitat families, recognitio n of donors and silent auction. Don Elwe ll will emcee the event. Dress is business attire. Reservations are required and ca n be made by calling Sarah Pallone at 40 22913 or 214-8215. Dinner helps with heart transplant for APwomanAVON PARK Achicken dinner ben efit is set to assist the Renae Gunn Massey Heart Transplant Fund from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 30 at the Lucy Derkman Softball Fields (behind the Hess station in Avon Park). Massey, 38, has had the transplant an d is doing well at Tampa General Hosptia l. She is married to Wesley Massey, is Continued on page 5A Courtesy photo Florida Hospital pediatric patient Kassidy Wallace, 10, receives an early Easter surprise as the Easter Bunny made an appearance in her hospital room on Wednesday afternoon followed by Farm Bureau Womens Committee members bringing baskets of treats and well wishes for the patient. Courtesy photo The Easter Bunny shows off some of the 8,000 black eggs that will be hidden for a Flashlight Egg Hunt on Saturday at the Humane Society of Highlands County. By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Several of Florida Hospital Heartland Divisions pediatric patients got a nice surprise on Wednesday afternoon. Most of the children were resting or napping while recovering from various aliments, but all of them were smiling when the Easter Bunny showed up at their hospital doors. Happy Farms and Howerton Farms provide the baskets and the gifts inside and we put them together and hand them out, said Highlands County School Board Chairperson Donna Howerton. Wednesday marks the 10th year that Florida Hospital has teamed up with the Farm Bureau Womens Committee to provide smiles to a few sick and injured children. Green, yellow, pink and blue baskets were handed to children from toddlers to middle schoolers. The baskets were filled with books, toys, and of course sweet treats. The parents of the children were both surprised and pleased that the Easter Bunny came to visit the children, giving them a little bit of hope to be home on Easter Sunday. I always look forward to doing this every year, said Howerton. Humane Society plans huge egg hunts SaturdaySEBRING The Humane Society of Highlands County is planning two big Easter events on Saturday. The first is the Kids Easter Carnival, which will be from 2-4 p.m. Cost is $5 per person and there will be 2,000 eggs to hunt, with a prize for each egg, as well as free ice cream with the Easter Bunny for the first 300 kids, games, hay rides, contests and more. Starting at 7 p.m., its the adultsturn to have fun. There will be 8,000 black Easter eggs hidden along a half-mile trail in the woods, and the Flashlight Egg Hunt starts at dark. The eggs contain all sorts of prizes, including $1,000 in cash and also a diamond estate ring as the major prizes. Admission is $10. This is the first of its kind event for Highlands County. All the money raised will got directly to the Humane Society. See the Humane Societys Facebook page for the list of donors. The Humane Society is at 7321 Haywood Taylor Blvd. Call Judy Spiegel at 214-6508. Easter Bunny has been busy lately

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011Page 3A

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A reader contacted the News-Sun r ecently to scold us f or printing too much b ad news. Why didn t we print more g ood news, this reade r wanted to know.Believe us when we say w e enjoy printing stories a bout people putting others f irst, and good government d ecisions, and successful i nnovations and outstanding y oung students but the f act is we already do that w henever there is such a s tory to tell. This happens more often t han many people think. S adly, bad news sticks in our m inds, the dark shading out t he light, and we tend to forg et hearing the good news. Being human, we should r emember there are different p erspectives. What one pers on sees as bad news, another s ees as good. As an illustration of all this w e dont have to go further t han Wednesdays edition and p oint to the four articles on the front page. The center piece article tells of a special event at Sebring High School, where teachers brought living witness history to their students. Thats certainly good news. Another article celebrates Highlands Countys 90th birthday. This may not necessarily count as good news, but you cant say it is bad news. The two other articles share the same kind of good news in one, a local man announces he is running for the state House of Representatives District 77 seat; the other is a report of registered voters in Avon Park holding recall petition signing parties. Now the news of an individual running for office will generally be considered good news by those who support him, and bad news by those who oppose him, but look deeper. The good news for everyone is that there are more and more people, like this candidate, who is brand new to politics, who are now participating in the political system. Fresh eyes are always a good thing. And the protest in Avon Park is also good news, even though it is bad news that the municipal government has lost the trust of its constituency. Anytime citizens stand up and speak out it is a good thing. Democracy only thrives when all of us work it together. Ultimately, the United States of America is a team endeavor. Is citizen rule frustrating, slow and sometimes even boring? You bet. Is there bad news we have to tell? Of course. But the core of American belief honors the individual and protects freedom beliefs that continue to spread around the world; and the core of Americas success comes from hard work and a sense of fair play. Can we solve our problems if we dont face up to the facts, no matter how scary or unsettling? No. Can we work our way through these difficult times, emerging stronger? Absolutely, which is the best good news of all. There is a struggle now being waged in Washington, the outcome of which will determine whether the nations economy will grow or continue to falter. The main combatants are President Barack Obama and a thoughtful member of Congress from the nations heartland, Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis. One of them, the president, represents the theory that government needs to regulate every facet of the economy. The other, Rep. Ryan, champions the economic freedom that has made the United States the wealthiest and most free nation on the face of the earth. Ryan, who chairs the powerful House Budget Committee, has outlined a program he calls a Roadmap for Americas Future. It leads to economic freedom, warning that Washingtons leaders have taken an already unsustainable budget outlook and made it far worse by exploiting Americansgenuine economic anxieties to justify an unrelenting and wide-ranging expansion of government. Their agenda, he warns, has included, among other things, a failed, debtfinanced economic stimulus; an attempt to control the Nations energy sector; increasing domination of housing and financial markets; the use of taxpayer dollars to seize part ownership of two nearly bankrupt auto makers; and, of course, the planned takeover of Americanshealth care, already heavily burdened, manipulated, and distorted by government spending and regulation. This domineering government brings taxes, rules, and mandates; generates excessive levels of spending, deficits, and debt; leads to economic stagnation and declining standards of living; and fosters a culture in which self-reliance is a vice and dependency a virtue -and as a result, the entire country weakens from within. For his part, President Obama sees government regulation of almost all facets of the economy as a vital tool, appointing so-called czars to oversee large segments of the supposedly free U.S. economy. This struggle will determine whether our economy, once a beacon of freedom, will continue to be mismanaged by unelected bureaucrats. As this is written, the economy is in a tailspin. Echoing Ryan, respected fiscal monitor Standard & Poor's warned: The con tinued failure to come up with a credible mediumterm fiscal reform program would increase borrowin g costs for all segments of US socie ty, thereby undermining investmen t, employment and growth. It would also curta il foreignersappetite to add t o their already substantial holdings of US assets. And it would weaken the dollar. Ryans website describes key points of the roadmap:: Medical Care: It pro vides universal access to affordable health coverage, not by expanding government, but by reinforcing th e role of consumers patients in a truly competitive marketplace. In con junction with this, the plan takes on the necessary task of restructuring the governments medical entitlement s, making them sustainable fo r the long term. Social Security: It saves and strengthens Socia l Security, making the program sustainable for the lon g run, and helping expand investments needed for eco nomic growth. Taxes: It offers an alternative to todays needlessly complex and inefficient tax code, providing th e option of a simplified mech anism that better promotes and rewards work, saving, and investment. Jobs: It helps the Nations workforce prepare for success in the global economy by transforming 4 9 job training programs, scattered across eight agencies, into a flexible, dynamic pro gram focused on results, an d accompanied by clear meas ures of transparency and accountability. The plan requires the development o f performance measures, and gives each State the option to consolidate funding into one program, if such an approach can be shown to improve outcomes and achieve job training goals. Clearly, Rep. Ryans roadmap points the way to a robust economy free of gov ernment meddling, while Barack Obamas way guarantees a dreary economy managed by power-crazed Washington bureaucrats. Michael Reagan is the son of President Ronald Reagan, a political consultant, and the author of The New Reagan Revolution (St. Martin's Press, 2011). He is the founder and chairman of The Reagan Group and president of The Reagan Legacy Foundation. Visit his website at www.reagan.com, or e-mail comments to Reagan@caglecartoons.com. Page 4ANews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.comTODAYSEDITORIALTODAYSLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION Ryan vs. Obama Making Sense Michael Reagan A ctions should speak louder than votes E ditor: I am pleased with most of what the new Highlands County Commission h as accomplished thus far. However, l ast Tuesdays meeting was bitter sweet t o me. I was disappointed, but the two 3 -1 votes were revelational to me. Don Elwell was the only no vote o n these two issues. Mr. Elwell, at one p oint, asked if one matter could be put o ff until a later date (his question a ffirmed by our county attorney), yet t he issue continued forward, was voted o n, and passed 3-1. The remaining c ommissioners voted yes on both i ssues. The vote of each commissioner tells m e all I need to know. The fact is we a re facing serious budget issues in this c ounty and cannot afford to be fiscally i rresponsible. We need to get our count y back on track fiscally, and that is not g oing to be easy. We are all suffering and we need to l ook to ourselves for answers, not the g overnment. I do not like the Miami m entality that has crept into this count y. We are not Miami, Orlando or T ampa, and if I hear, the way they do i t in (fill in the blank) is blah blah b lah one more time my head is going t o explode. If they do it so much better t here, move back there. I dont think the majority of our c ounty residents, especially those that w ere born and raised here, want to see o ur county turned into a metropolis. O ur county needs to get back to the b asics of small town living. The buzz around the county lately l eads me to believe that a lot of people r ealize they voted for the wrong candid ate in one particular county commiss ion seat race. I didnt cast the wrong v ote in that race, but I may have with r egard to another seat. Thats somet hing I will need to consider as I watch t he actions of each commissioner until N ovember 2012. We can affect the most change on o ur local level. Get involved and i nformed. Show up at city council and c ounty commission meetings. If you h ave not done so yet, start now urging t rue conservatives to run for office. E ncourage them and be active in camp aigning for them. I am an activist and encourage a ctivism. I am speaking to everyone, r egardless of whether or not you agree w ith me. Speak up for what you believe i n with action, not just words. Mary Bengtson Sebring Race, gender are not the issues E ditor: In response to the article wrote about B renda Grays response to the seven v iolations (News-Sun, April 17), its O K for anyone to defend themselves if a ccused of anything. Yes, its true the citizens put you in o ffice and they can remove you if they so choose. The citizens put all four councilmembers and a mayor in office. When a citizen puts someone in office they expect them to give 210 percent, so to speak. Time will tell what the community wants and if they choose to let each councilmember keep their positions/titles, then we must respect the end results. I was shocked to read the part of you wondering if the recall was based on race, sex. Well it certainly doesnt look as if all three candidates are black and all females. You were not the only one accused of these violations. Where are you coming from? Enough is enough. This recall is not about race or you being a female. Most of all, its not just about you, there are also two males involved in this recall and will be another male and female in September who are not black This is the most ridiculous thing Ive heard of. Brenda, you need to stop using the words race and female when situations arise. This is anything but true. Anyone following the Recall or Operations Save Avon Park have not singled you out and its definitely not about just you. Its about four total councilmembers and a mayor who the community feels have possibly done wrong. This includes three men and two females, one who is black. Im adding all this up and Im coming up with three males plus two females equals five not one. Patricia Austin Avon ParkTo each their ownEditor: Re: Ray Nappers letter I was happy to see you validate the point that it is not the tools but the misuse of them by people. Thankfully you were also able to get some exercise. You did a stellar job of jumping to conclusions. I did not say I had a firearm and yet you have me owning one. Also you made a very good leap by saying I was a pastor. I am ordained and retired but maybe I was an evangelist, or professor at a college or seminary. Perhaps I was a chaplain. So, you see, I do not minister at a church. If I did, you would be welcome and I would support your right to peaceful assembly, worship as you choose, and I support your right to free speech. I would also support your right to keep and bear arms, which is also guaranteed under our Consttution. By the way, The Second Ammendment also says that right Shall not be infringed. Our right to privacy is precious. Doctors need to treat illness, not guns. There is no need for medical people to pry into our personal lives,invading our privacy and straying from issues relating to disease and medicine. I go to the doctor for medical care, not moral judgement, political harassment, nor privacy intrusions. Senate Bill 432 will stop doctors from asking parents and children if they own guns and then telling them to get rid of them. The Senate Judiciary Committee has passed it by a 4 to 2 vote with one member absent. House Bill 155 is designed to make doctors practice medicine in their examination rooms not gun ban politics. HB 155 has passed the House Judiciary Committee by a 15 to 3 vote. It seems I am in agreement with the majority of our Legislators. You allude to the fact that I do not trust God and Jesus. I do trust that God and Jesushave given me the ability to care for my family and myself by what ever means necessary. If I can not do that I will be useless to anyone whenI am laying in the ground. I have been a law enforcement officer, a soldier, and a police chaplain. I am well trained in the use of firearms. If having lived by the sword, I die by the sword has spared the life of a family member or neighbor (even you Mr. Napper) it will have been worth it. Rev. Steven W. Trimble (Ret) Sebring Good news, no gloss EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your addres s and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automati cally rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; o r e-mail editor@newssun.com.

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By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comLake Placid Members of the town council want property owners to understand changes in the names for proposed maximum development densities, which should not to be confused with local zoning, an entirely different process. While the proposed Evaluation & Appraisal Report has changed the name of Medium Density Residential to High Density Residential and Low Density Residential to Medium Residential, the number of residences per acre does not change at all. For example, High Density Residential property, formerly known as Medium Density Residential, will still allow 12 dwellings an acre and Medium Density Residential will still allow the six dwellings per acre it did when called Low Density Residential. In other words, it is as if council member Ray Royce changed his name to Roy Rice everything el se would stay the same, wheth er Ray or Roy, he would still be the same height and weight JOSEPH BOHNEN JR. Joseph John Bohnen Jr. went home to be with his savior Jesus Christ on Monday, April 18 in West Palm Beach after a short battle with cancer. Joe was born Sept. 18, 1941 in Chicago. He proudly served his country in the Navy traveling the world. The Bohnen family moved to Sebring in 1971 where Joe was a plumbing contractor for many years. He was a loving father, husband, brother, and friend. He loved the Lord, served as deacon in the church, enjoyed golf, boating, and was a member of the VFWand Moose Lodge Joe is survived by his daughters Lori (Kyle) OConnor and Kimberly (Charles) Dorman; grandchildren: Devon Durham and Victoria Swift; siblings: Robert (Shirley) Rees, Jack (Dina) Rees, Roy (Colleen) Rees, Sharon (Ron) Quale, Richard (Becky) Bohnen, Jenann Patz, Larry (Sandy) Bohnen, Jeffrey Pouliot. Joe was preceded in death by his parents Joseph & Shirley, and wives Suzie (Margaret) and Joni. Acelebration of Joes life will be held Saturday, April 23 at 12 p.m. at Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring. Arrangements made by National Cremation & Burial Society 1032 N. Dixie Hwy. Lake Worth, FL33460 EVELYN JOHNSON Evelyn Pearce Johnson, 87, passed away April 20, 2011. She was born Aug. 1, 1923 in DeSoto City, Fla. to Leland Clifford and Clara Williams Pearce. She was preceded in death by her husband, Charles D. (Charlie) Johnson, in 2007. She is survived by her son, Dan (Becky) Johnson; daughters, Carol (Terry) Wolfe and Patricia (Stu) Guthrie, both of Sebring and Colleen (Dave) Ricketts, Lakeland, Fla.; nine grandchildren and one greatgrandson; sisters, Patty Durrance, Knoxville, Tenn. and Ruth Fulton, Sebring. Evelyn was a devoted wife, mother and grandmother and sister, who will be deeply missed by her family and friends. She was a member of First United Methodist Church of Sebring; a charter member of the Patriots Chapter of the Daughter of the American Revolution; Sebring Historical Society and a fourth generation Floridian. Visitation will be from 5-7 p.m. Friday, April 22 at Morris Funeral Chapel, Sebring. Funeral service will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, April 23 at First United Methodist Church of Sebring with burial immediately following at Pinecrest Cemetery. The family requests memorials to First United Methodist Church, Family Life Center, 126 S. Pine St, Sebring, Fla. 33870. Condolences may be expressed at www.morrisfu neralchapel.com. Morris Funeral Chapel 307 S. Commerce Ave Sebring, FL33870 (863) 385-0101 EUNICE MARTIN Eunice Mildred Martin o f Sebring passed away Tuesday, April 5, 2011. She was preceded in death by h er parents, Arlie and Izora (Armstorng) Williams; her sons, Wayne and Roger Martin; and daughter, Ruby Martin. She is survived by her si ster, Lorine (Ed) Summer of North Carolina; seven gran dchildren, Dawn of Texas, Shannon of Texas, Shelby o f Texas, Stephanie of Florida Christy of Florida, Avery o f Florida and Ron of New York; 20 great-grandchildren; and her best friend an d daughter-in-law, Kathy Martin of Sebring. Interment at Lakeview Memorial Gardens. DOROTHYROY Dorothy Roy, 94, passed away Tuesday, April 19 in Lecanto, Fla. Dottie was a previous long-time resident of Lake Placid and enjoyed shuffleboard, dancing, the VFWand the Elks. Dottie is survived by her son, Jim Lewis (Judy), Homosassa, Fla.; granddaughter, Jill Lewis; grandson, Jim Lewis (Holly); great-granddaughters, Nico le and Katelyn; and nephew, Tom Hageman. Donations in memory of Dottie can be made to Hospice of Citrus County. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011Page 5A t he mother of two and a l ifelong resident of Avon P ark. Tickets can be purchased f or $8 at EMCI Wireless ( Verizon), Dr. Abanillas o ffice (next to Turner F urniture) or Mane Salon. Donations can also be m ade to the Renae Massey H eart Transplant Fund at H eartland National Bank in A von Park.FDLRS annual parent conference setLAKE PLACID F lorida Diagnostic and L earning Resources System H eartland will hold its a nnual parent conference on T uesday, May 17 at the F DLRS Office in Lake P lacid. Guest speakers will a ddress Living with A utism and The Internet: H ow Safe is It? The program will begin a t 9 a.m. and conclude at 1 p .m., with refreshments b etween the presentations. C all (800) 316-7057 to regi ster. The FDLRS office is a t the Heartland E ducational Consortium, 1 099 U.S. 27 North, in L ake Placid. The confere nce is free, but space is l imited, so register early. ( Register by Friday, May 6; t ransportation is provided).Saving Archives, Centennial Book is theme of Sebring Historical eventSEBRING Allen A ltvater III and Gary L amperelli, members of the S ebring Historical Society B oard of Directors, will h ost the quarterly luncheon m eeting to be held at noon S aturday at the Sebring C ivic Center. The covered d ish luncheon is open to the p ublic; bring a dish to share a nd $1.50 per person, w hich covers beverage and t able service. This presentat ion will also include a tour o f the archives, hosted by C arole Goad, and barbec ued chicken by our own C hef Allen (Altvater). Altvater and Lamperelli w ill give a PowerPoint p resentation on Sebring and t he upcoming Sebring C entennial book that is curr ently being written. Local c itizens and business peop le are welcome to attend t his event where they will h ave the opportunity to disc uss and purchase advertisi ng space in the book, w hich may include business a dvertisements, business or f amily histories, or memoria l tributes to family memb ers. The tour of the Sebring H istorical Societys A rchives will illustrate exactly what this historical archive contains. This history of our community and county, of our individuals and families and their accomplishments, of our schools and other major institutions will be highlighted. Boil water notice rescinded, another issued in LPLAKE PLACID The April 15 Precautionary Boil Water Notice for the emergency water shut-down on that day has been rescinded following the repair of a 10-inch water line and the satisfactory completion of the bacteriological survey showing that the water is safe to drink. Placid Utility Water system customers in the Citrus Lakes Colony area, however, experienced an emergency water shut-down from 2-3 p.m. Wednesday to make emergency repairs to a four-inch water line on Lemon Lane. Effected areas include Citrus Lakes Drive, Grape Lane, Lemon Lane, Cherry Lane, Tidewater Drive, Redwater Lane and Tall Oaks Trail. As a precaution, those affected by this shut down should bring all water used for drinking, cooking or brushing teeth to a folling boil for one minute. As an alternate, bottled water may be used. This Precautionary Boil Water Notice will remain in effect for two consecutive days until the bacteriological samples show that the water is safe to drink. At that time, expected to be today, a rescind notice will be issued. If you have any questions, contact the Placid Utilities Water Department at 402-6786 or 699-3716.Events planned at lodges, postsAVON PARK The Combat Veterans Memorial VFWPost 9853, 75 N. Olivia Drive, will host a baked fish dinner for $7, served from 5-7 p.m. today. Music by L&LDuo from 5-8 p.m. Karaoke by Peg and Perry from 5-8 p.m. Saturday. For any questions, call the lodge at 452-9853. LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Moose 2374 will host a game of Texas Hold-em at 2 p.m. today. Music with Larry Musgrave will be from 6-10 p.m. Bingo-bango is set for 2 p.m. Saturday. Music with Big Freddie will follow at 6-10 p.m. For details, call the lodge at 465-0131. The Veterans of Foreign Wars 3880 will host music with Tom today. Breakfast will be served from 8-11 a.m. Saturday. Bingo is at 2 p.m. Horse races at 5:30 p.m. Aham dinner will be served Sunday. Tickets are $7. For details, call the lodge at 699-5444. The Lake Placid American Legion Placid Post 25 will host a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. today. Music by Chrissy from 6:30-9:30 p.m. The Auxiliary will serve burgers from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday. Texas Hold-em is set for 1:30 p.m. Karaoke Bill will play from 5-8 p.m. For more information, call 4650975. The Lake Placid Elks 2661 will host a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. today. Music will follow by Chrissy Harriman and Frankie. For details, call 465-2661.Henscratch Farms plans Easter FestivalSEBRING The Henscratch Farms Easter Festival will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Back by popular demand there will be an Easter egg hunt at 11 a.m. The Easter Bunny will be on the front porch taking pictures with the guests. By the bunny station there will be an Easter-themed craft tent. Hot dogs, chips and lemonade are on the lunch menu for $3. Included in the day is the farms walking tour, feeding the chickens, the presentation in the winery and complimentary wine tasting and nibbles. Any questions, call 6992060 or go online www.henscratchfarms.com.New group to make debut at DuffersSEBRING Heartland Idols recent winner Shannon Marrero and Jim Helwig will team up to perform for their first time at Duffers Sports Grille from 6-9 p.m. today Together they comprise Silhouette, which is an excellent mix of older standards as well as the top hits of today. After the dinner entertainment, Billy "Griff" Griffis with Southern Style Karaoke will be entertaining from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. The He Said She Said duo will be on stage from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Saturday. They play a variety of rock and Top 40 dance tunes to keep everyone moving on the floor. here is no cover charge for any of the entertainment this weekend. Duffers is at 6940 U.S. 27 North, Sebring. For details, call 382-6339. Continued from page 2A COMMUNITYBRIEFS y ou cut a tree down, plant another one. I ts not okay to go out and just shoot an a nimal and let it die. People should just d o the right thing, Stone said. Stone was set to begin his trek from h is Spring Lake home at 4 a.m. today a nd hoped to arrive at Bernie Little D istribution Center in south Sebring by 8 a.m. Im going to pace myself but I figure I can make it there by the time Im supposed to be at work, Stone said before his walk. Stone doesnt have too much to worry about regarding being at work on time. His boss fully supports his decision and is proud of that Stone is taking the walk for Earth Day. As for the future, Stone is already thinking about next years walk and how he can make an impact in the community. Im trying to think of ideas for next year. I want to get more people involved and hopefully more people will walk with me. My wife wanted to join me but thatd be a little hard with our four boys, Stone said with a laugh. Continued from page 1A Walking to work mans way of honoring Earth Day Bohnen OBITUARIES Johnson LP zoning rules the same, despite wording changes Classified ads get results! Call 314-9876

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Page 6ANews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.com It doesnt get much worse than the ferocious battle that killed Faulkner and five fellow comrades and left many more wounded. Many casualties of those chaotic moments were just weeks from finishing their Afghanistan deployments. Its quite a shock to us, Berry said. Being that close to coming home is just tragic. In one of the services most poignant moments, the fallen heros mother, Judy Berry, and father, Joel Faulkner, were presented the Bronze Star and Purple Heart, awarded to their son posthumously. The momentous events of March 29 in eastern Afghanistan received nowhere near the level of deserved attention from the national media. For too long, the public has languished in the darkness during the daily victories and struggles of Americas post-9/11 conflicts, which marks a great injustice to those who serve and sacrifice. Our job is not over after today, Little reminded mourners at the services conclusion. Families of the fallen, as well as those wounded or suffering from the incalculable psychological toll of war, need more than our sympathy. They need and merit our constant focus. It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died, said renowned tough-as-nails Gen. George S. Patton, whose quote was read aloud at the service. Rather, we should thank God that such men lived. The grace shown by Pfc. Jeremy P. Faulkner and his fellow troops, who volunteered to serve during a tim e of genuine peril, is truly amazing. Im going, the brave soldier said before heading off to war. But if the wors t happens, I know where Im going. Was blind, but now I see To find out more about Tom Sileo, or to read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com. Continued from page 2A Soldier was almost on his way home Image courtesy of Sgt. 1st Class Mark Burr ell Spc. Brit Jacobs of Task Force No Slack bids farewell to six fellow soldiers, including Pfc. Jeremy Faulkner, at an April 9 memorial service in eastern Afghanistan. h orses that they receive are v ery debilitated maln ourished, underweight, u ntrimmed and one even a rrived with a broken nose a nd fractured teeth. The time and effort that i t takes to nurse an animal o f such size is immeasurab le, but Carnahan and her v olunteers are happy to do i t. Carnahan is usually i nformed by neighbors, vets a nd sometimes even the o wners of the condition of t he horses and Promise A cres wastes no time and t aking the horses into the c enter on a temporary a nd in some cases perman ent basis. They are all started on s enior feed, it doesnt matt er their age. Its easier to d igest and better for their s tomachs at these states. T hey are feed small a mounts, several meals a d ay, and slowly build their way back up, explained Carnahan. Promise Acres is a place that functions off the hard work and dedication of the family. Funding for the establishment is not readily available, leaving the Carnahans and volunteers to foot most of the bill. The establishment is currently working on becoming a non-profit organization. Currently, Promised Acres offers numerous programs for the community to enjoy, ranging from various riding lessons to character development programs. The development program teaches children to interact with other individuals accordingly and how to become a stand-up citizen, all while intermingling with the horses at the rescue under the close supervision of trainers, local volunteers and club members including the Highlands County 4H. These programs we have here help offset some of the funds that we need. We have to pay for feed and supplies and the vet and check-ups. But it is also something we offer just to get people familiar with horses, Carnahan said. Carnahan believes in the facility and the work that she and everyone involved is doing. The biggest mission of Promised Acres is to inform those who have horses and those who plan to own one in the future. We try to educate the public about horses. We are trying to prevent these problems, Carnahan said. Donations and sponsorships can be mailed to P.O. Box 1144 Avon Park, Fl 33826-1144. For more information visit promiseacres.com Continued from page 1A he said, meaning a HUDapproved lender. Calibre was unable to find one, so the application was returned. I have three attorneys who have told me Ive fulfilled my obligations, but I can spend more money than you. I didnt come here unarmed, DePugh said. Council member John Griffin told DePugh he felt misled, because DePugh had convinced Griffin he had powerful investors lined up. Griffin also pointed out the amount of that has time passed. Its been three, almost four years. Why even consider asking for your money back? he said. In the end everyone back ed down from the increasing ly strong language, agreeing to extend the discussion by ha ving city staff negotiate wi th Calibre. We hope to bring a res olution instead of going to court, DePugh said. The issue will be back o n the May 3 agenda. Continued from page 1A Former Harder Hall developer wants deposit money back News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS J ennifer Carnahan walks with Patches a 15-year-old horse that was brought to Promise A cres Equine Rescue. The horse was physically abused and neglected before coming to Promise Acres. The horse has suffered substantial emotional damage, but is now physically healed and ready to be adopted. Horses have a place to heal

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Page 7ANews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.com TODAYBright and sunny88 / 65Winds: ESE at 7-14 mphMostly sunny88 / 65Winds: ESE at 7-14 mphSATURDAYSunny to partly cloudy88 / 65Winds: E at 8-16 mphSUNDAYMostly sunny and pleasant87 / 65Winds: ESE at 8-16 mphMONDAYPartly sunny, a t-storm possible90 / 69Winds: ESE at 10-20 mphTUESDAY City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. Washington Washington 54/48 54/48 New Yor k NewYork 54/45 54/45 Miami Miami 85/73 85/73 Atlanta Atlanta 79/62 79/62 Detroit Detroit 50/47 50/47 Houston Houston 86/74 86/74 Chicago Chicago 54/49 54/49 Minneapolis Minneapolis 50/39 50/39 Kansas City KansasCity 73/49 73/49 El Paso ElPaso 88/62 88/62 Denver Denver 64/29 64/29 Billings Billings 42/29 42/29 Los Angeles LosAngeles 67/54 67/54 San Francisco SanFrancisco 61/48 61/48 Seattle Seattle 58/40 58/40 Washington 54/48 New Yor k 54/45 Miami 85/73 Atlanta 79/62 Detroit 50/47 Houston 86/74 Chicago 54/49 Minneapolis 50/39 Kansas City 73/49 El Paso 88/62 Denver 64/29 Billings 42/29 Los Angeles 67/54 San Francisco 61/48 Seattle 58/40 A potent storm system across the nations midsection will bring heavy rain to the Ohio Valley today. The same system will trigger an outbreak of severe weather, including tornadoes, from the mid-Mississippi Valley to eastern Oklahoma. The violent thunderstorms will expand into the Ohio Valley at night. Meanwhile during the day, rain will also wet the mid-Atlantic and northern Plains. Enough cold air will be in place for the rain to fall as wet snow in some areas. U.S. Cities National Forecast for April 22Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. World Cities National SummaryCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Weather (W):s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rrain, sf-snow urries, sn-snow, i-ice. Albuquerque 76/47/s 74/47/c 71/45/pc Atlanta 79/62/t 83/63/s 83/62/s Baltimore 50/44/r 70/57/c 75/58/pc Birmingham 86/64/pc 83/62/pc 84/62/s Boston 51/37/pc 52/48/r 56/45/c Charlotte 66/57/c 81/60/pc 85/59/pc Cheyenne 55/26/r 50/32/c 55/34/pc Chicago 54/49/r 63/40/c 60/45/c Cleveland 54/49/r 70/45/c 55/45/r Columbus 60/57/r 76/52/t 62/52/r Dallas 88/71/c 89/68/pc 86/70/pc Denver 64/29/pc 53/34/c 63/38/pc Detroit 50/47/r 66/42/pc 58/45/c Harrisburg 48/42/r 67/55/t 68/49/c Honolulu 87/71/pc 85/70/s 85/71/s Houston 86/74/pc 86/74/pc 87/74/pc Indianapolis 64/58/r 72/49/c 64/54/sh Jackson, MS 84/65/pc 85/66/pc 84/66/pc Kansas City 73/49/t 62/47/pc 68/55/sh Lexington 76/61/r 79/57/t 76/59/t Little Rock 81/63/c 82/63/c 83/64/pc Los Angeles 67/54/pc 69/54/pc 69/55/pc Louisville 76/65/r 78/59/t 75/60/t Memphis 83/65/c 84/66/c 81/65/pc Milwaukee 52/45/r 59/39/c 54/42/c Minneapolis 50/39/r 56/39/pc 61/43/pc Nashville 82/64/t 81/63/t 82/62/pc New Orleans 84/68/pc 84/70/pc 84/69/pc New York City 54/45/pc 61/52/r 66/53/r Norfolk 58/52/r 74/62/pc 81/61/pc Oklahoma City 84/59/c 69/54/t 73/62/pc Philadelphia 52/42/r 65/58/t 71/55/c Phoenix 90/63/s 88/64/pc 84/62/s Pittsburgh 50/45/r 72/51/t 65/50/r Portland, ME 52/33/s 48/41/r 59/38/pc Portland, OR 61/38/pc 62/45/c 57/45/sh Raleigh 65/58/r 83/65/pc 86/62/pc Rochester 48/39/pc 65/43/r 56/42/c St. Louis 73/56/t 71/52/c 67/60/t San Francisco 61/48/pc 61/53/c 62/52/pc Seattle 58/40/s 59/43/pc 56/43/sh Wash., DC 54/48/r 73/62/c 81/59/pc Cape Coral 90/65/s 90/66/s 88/66/s Clearwater 89/68/s 88/68/s 86/69/s Coral Springs 85/71/s 83/73/s 84/73/pc Daytona Beach 83/67/s 83/66/s 82/64/pc Ft. Laud. Bch 85/74/s 84/74/s 85/74/pc Fort Myers 89/67/s 91/68/s 89/66/s Gainesville 86/63/pc 86/62/s 87/61/s Hollywood 86/71/s 85/71/s 86/71/pc Homestead AFB 84/70/s 84/72/s 83/72/pc Jacksonville 84/63/pc 83/63/s 82/61/pc Key West 85/76/s 84/76/s 84/76/s Miami 85/73/s 85/74/s 86/74/pc Okeechobee 83/67/s 83/69/s 84/69/s Orlando 86/64/s 86/66/s 86/65/s Pembroke Pines 86/71/s 85/71/s 86/71/pc St. Augustine 81/65/pc 81/65/s 79/64/pc St. Petersburg 89/68/s 88/69/s 86/70/s Sarasota 89/65/s 89/66/s 87/66/s Tallahassee 88/62/pc 87/62/s 87/60/s Tampa 88/70/s 88/69/s 86/68/s W. Palm Bch 83/71/s 83/72/s 83/73/pc Winter Haven 88/66/s 89/66/s 87/65/s Acapulco 90/72/s 90/72/s 88/75/t Athens 63/45/s 65/49/s 65/48/s Beirut 60/52/sh 63/53/sh 68/54/s Berlin 73/53/s 73/49/pc 70/48/s Bermuda 70/61/sh 66/63/pc 71/67/pc Calgary 45/26/s 51/24/s 52/35/pc Dublin 64/46/pc 57/41/r 61/45/pc Edmonton 47/21/s 51/23/s 56/30/s Freeport 84/68/s 84/69/s 85/68/pc Geneva 73/50/pc 71/52/pc 65/54/sh Havana 90/65/pc 89/65/s 89/68/s Hong Kong 80/69/pc 80/72/r 82/73/s Jerusalem 54/45/sh 60/49/sh 66/44/s Johannesburg 68/49/t 63/49/sh 65/49/r Kiev 56/42/c 59/45/c 60/45/r London 72/50/sh 75/52/sh 73/56/sh Montreal 50/37/s 52/43/r 53/41/pc Moscow 52/37/sh 54/39/pc 59/45/s Nice 69/56/r 69/57/r 70/59/pc Ottawa 54/35/s 57/41/r 47/39/pc Quebec 48/33/s 44/37/r 54/33/pc Rio de Janeiro 89/76/s 91/77/s 83/72/s Seoul 57/38/sh 55/41/s 56/39/sh Singapore 87/78/t 88/77/t 87/78/sh Sydney 75/54/c 70/53/sh 74/57/sh Toronto 48/42/c 69/42/c 52/39/pc Vancouver 56/37/s 58/46/pc 52/44/sh Vienna 75/55/s 75/57/s 69/49/sh Warsaw 65/44/s 61/43/sh 61/43/sh Winnipeg 49/33/c 51/33/pc 61/26/pc A lmanac Readings at Palm Beach High ............................................ 12:34 a.m. Low ............................................... 6:27 a.m. High ............................................ 12:45 p.m. Low ............................................... 6:50 p.m. Bright and sunny today. Mostly clear tonight. Mostly sunny tomorrow. Sunday: sunny to partly cloudy. Monday: mostly sunny and pleasant. Tuesday: partly sunny and warm with a shower or thunderstorm possible. April 22 marks the latest ever that the temperature dropped to freezing in Baltimore, Md. Freezing temperatures have been noted in the outlying suburbs well into May. Bright and sunny today. Winds east 7-14 mph. Expect a full day of sunshine with relative humidity 75% early, 40% in the afternoon and good drying conditions. Mostly clear tonight. Even addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday. Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and Saturday. All watering should take place before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. LastNewFirstFull Apr 24May 3May 10May 17 Today Saturday Sunrise 6:57 a.m. 6:56 a.m. Sunset 7:53 p.m. 7:53 p.m. Moonrise 12:01 a.m. 12:53 a.m. Moonset 10:49 a.m. 11:48 a.m. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Jacksonville 84/63 Gainesville 86/63 Ocala 88/64 Daytona Beach 83/67 Orlando 86/64 Winter Haven 88/66 Tampa 88/70 Clearwater 89/68 St. Petersburg 89/68 Sarasota 89/65 Fort Myers 89/67 Naples 90/65 Okeechobee 83/67 West Palm Beach 83/71 Fort Lauderdale 85/74 Miami 85/73 Tallahassee 88/62 Apalachicola 82/66 Pensacola 82/68 Key West Avon Park 88/65 Sebring 88/65 Lorida 85/67 Lake Placid 89/63 Venus 89/63 Brighton 85/65 TidesReadings at St. Petersburg High .............................................. 4:45 p.m. Low ............................................. 12:21 a.m. High .....................................................none Low ......................................................none UV Index TodayThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m. 6 10 10 6 Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional SummaryShown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Five-Day forecast for Highlands County 85/76 Lake Levels Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 11.30 Normal ...............................................14.51 Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterdayTemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHigh Sunday .......................................... 89 Low Sunday ........................................... 62 High Monday ......................................... 93 Low Monday .......................................... 59 High Tuesday ......................................... 91 Low Tuesday .......................................... 59 High Wednesday .................................... 91 Low Wednesday .................................... 54Heat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayRelative humidity .................................. 40% Expected air temperature ....................... 86 Makes it feel like .................................... 86BarometerMonday ...............................................30.18 Tuesday ...............................................30.08 Wednesday .........................................30.11PrecipitationMonday ...............................................0.49 Tuesday ...............................................0.00 Wednesday .........................................0.00 Month to date ..................................... 2.03 Year to date ......................................... 9.87

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Associated PressTALLAHASSEE A drifter who prosecutors have said abducted two women and then waited hours or even days to kill and behead them in remote forests was sentenced to death on Thursday. The judge came to his decision in less than 15 minutes. Gary Michael Hilton, in a blue jail uniform, showed no emotion as the judge imposed the sentence. Deputies then walked Hilton over to a side table to fingerprint him. The 64-year-old was convicted in February of the 2007 death of Cheryl Dunlap of Crawfordville. The beheaded body of Dunlap a 46-year-old nurse and Sunday school teacher was found in north Floridas Apalachicola National Forest. In a sense, the death penalty was a foregone conclusion. Ajury had unanimously recommended a death sentence in Dunlaps killing, and Florida judges must give great weight to a jurys sentencing recommendation. And judges usually follow that recommendation in capital cases. May God have mercy on your soul, Circuit Judge James C. Hankinson told Hilton before leaving the courtroom. Hilton already had been sentenced to life in prison in Georgia after pleading guilty to killing 24-year-old hiker Meredith Emerson of Buford, Ga. The headless bodies of both women were found in wooded areas where Hilton had camped in Georgia and Florida. Hilton was arrested at a north Georgia convenience store where he had tried to get rid of Dunlaps boots. He still is a suspect in three other killings in Florida and North Carolina. Assistant Public Defender Robert Friedman, Hiltons lawyer, said he would appeal the sentence. The Florida Supreme Court automatically reviews death sentence appeals. Friedman said he will challenge, among other things, the fact the judge allowed some jurors to sit on the ca se even though they said th ey knew about Emersons mu rder. State Attorney Will ie Meggs, who prosecut ed Hilton, shrugged off que stions about spending mon ey to prosecute the case wh en Hilton already had plead ed guilty to killing Emerson. Page 8ANews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.com The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Wednesday, April 20: Nicole Giovanni Berry, 26, of Baltimore, Md., was charged with resisting an officer without violence. April Marie Castro, 31, of Avon Park, was booked on an out-of-county warrant for violation of probation. Linda Sue Elwell, 48, of Lakeland, was charged with two counts of probation violation. Clifford Claud Melvin, 42, of Venus, was sentenced to 270 days in jail for two counts possession of drug equipment, battery, larceny, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. George Richard Miquel, 47, of Delray Beach, was charged with probation violation. Barbarito Delgado Ramos, 44, of Sebring, was booked on an immigration detainer. Thomas Gordon Ramsey, 49, of Avon Park, was charged with battery. Harold James Rhinehardt, 47, of Avon Park, was charged with battery. Melchor Ruiz-Sanchez, 35, of Avon Park, was booked on an immigration detainer. Steven Michael Thornton, 25, of Sebring, was charged with driving with a suspended license. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Tuesday, April 19: Steve Campbell, 56, of Elkhart, Ind., was charged with loitering or prowling. Christine Marie Carter, 35, of Sebring, was charged with DUI. Tamara Kaye Chapman, 48, of Okeechobee, was charged with violation of probation reference aggravated battery with deadly weapon. Daniel George Cook, 49, of Cape Coral, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference possession of cannabis. Anastasia Dominique Gibbs, 24, of Avon Park, was charged with battery. Justin Ray Griffin, 22, of Sebring, was charged with violation of probation reference possession of cocaine. Brandon Wesley Hyatt, 28, of Sebring, registered as a sex offender. Reginald McDonald Jones, 36, of Lake Placid, was charged with driving while license suspended. Joseph Jude ONeill, 46, of Sebring, was charged with possession of marijuana. Natasha Torres, 28, of Sebring, was charged with hit and run, DUI and DUI and damage property. Marcus Waugh, 20, of Lake Placid, was charged with violation of probation reference burglary of a dwelling/occupied conve y ance. POLICEBLOTTER u nanimously at its first readi ng on April 5, but it immedia tely became clear Tuesday n ight Stanley and Fells had c hanged their minds, and by t he end of the discussion, the r equest was denied by a 2-1 v ote. With members John Clark a nd Bud Whitlock absent C lark due to a relatives medi cal procedure and Whitlock t o a personal illness A ndrew Fells, John Griffin a nd Council President Scott S tanley faced a close to c apacity audience, which t urned out to have strong o pinions. Stanley opened the discuss ion saying he had approved t he district earlier because he h ad been under some false a ssumptions, and that he no l onger supported the idea. I dont see (the present ordinance) precluding anything but package stores and bars, he said. Before proceeding, Griffin argued that any discussion or action should wait until Clark and Whitlock were present. Its not fair to the other council members, he said. Stanley said the room was filled with people who had something to say. It wasnt fair to delay. We can hardly get people (to come to meetings), he said, and now that we have people youre going to send them away? Among those waiting to speak were David Richardson, pastor at the First Baptist Church; Eugene Sauls, a former council member; Mike Karl, of the New Testament Mission; Gene Brenner, chairman of the CRAAdvisory Committee and a major property owner on the Circle; and Cindy Stanley, Scott Stanleys wife. Respect all churches of all denominations, Richardson said. Allowing a bar as a neighbor (to a church) is a cold, hard insult. It sends a thankless message. We dont need bars, said Sauls. We need professionals and businesses to bring people downtown. Karl sounded a warning, If you dont listen to us we dont need to come (to council meetings). Well just go to the voting booth. Cindy Stanley, who had made a passionate plea against the district during the first hearing, fought tears as she spoke again, closing her remarks by looking at Griffin and saying, John, please dont vote for this. Brenner and Kristi Olsen, who has a business downtown, spoke in favor of the district. Brenner pointed to the economy and the need to do something for a depressed downtown. Im upside down on two buildings, he said. I try to rent but applicants walk away. It is too difficult to get licenses. Weve spent millions of dollars to revitalize downtown, we need enticement packages. Im hearing a lot of judgment, Olsen said. Im just asking people to be real release that Bible belt buckle just one notch. This isnt about anything outrageous or off the wall. Griffin moved to table discussion to the next meeting, which Stanley and Fells defeated. That led to a sharp exchange between Griffin and Fells. You dont want them (Clark and Whitlock) here because theyll vote again st you, Griffin said to Fells. And you only want the m here because theyd vote wi th you, Fells said back. Continued from page 1A Entertainment district a no-go for Sebring News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLE Y Pastor Mike Karl, of the New Testament Mission, addressed the Sebring city council Tuesday night. He is strongly opposed to allowing bars downtown. Drinking causes enough problems, he said, we dont need people drinking more. a follow-up, striking out the w ords ongoing investigat ion and replacing them w ith outstanding review of t he Department. Sheriff Susan Benton and S heriffs Office Attorney M ike Durham have both c laimed that there is no crimi nal investigation into R owan, that they are just taki ng over operational cont rol of the citys police d epartment at Deleons r equest. E-mails and memos b etween Deleon and Rowan l eading up to the suspension c learly show that Rowan f eared retaliation from the c ity council for investigat ions into city officials i ncluding Mayor Sharon S chuler, Deputy Mayor B renda Gray, former assist ant city manager and now P roject Manager Maria S utherland and her husband, C ouncilman Parke S utherland. On April 12, 2011, you a nd I met to discuss some c oncerns in more detail. D uring the past two weeks, it h as been my observation that y ou have a great deal of conc ern and worry over your employment with the city, Deleon stated in his memo to Rowan. Another e-mail from Deleon to Rowan indicates that the chief was considering going to the governors office to seek protection. You mentioned going to Tallahassee and filing with the Governors office seeking protection from city officials. Later in this same day, you retracted this option after discussing further with your wife, Deleon wrote. Deleon confirmed that there were investigations involving other city officials, but was not clear what was being investigated or if those investigations held merit. Aspokesman for the State Attorneys Office in Bartow, Chip Thulberry, said an investigation into Avon Parks city officials began in January and ended in March, but that his office closed the investigation without taking any action. Requests to see investigations into city council members from city hall have not been forwarded at press time. Rowan was not available for comment on Thursday. Continued from page 1A APPD under control of sheriff after Rowan placed on leave Death for drifter convicted in forest slaying

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, April 22, 2011Page 9 A LYKES CITRUSMANAGEMENT has an opening for a full time Parts Person at their Basinger Grove Shop. Duties include answering phones, parts, ordering, inventory control, distribution/stocking, invoicing of incoming/outgoing parts, ability to lift 25 lbs. Successful applicants should possess 1 year experience in parts inventory or related field and have compute r skills. Lykes Citrus Management Division offers competitive wages and benefit package including Medical, Dental, Vision, Life, AD&D and LTD insurance plus paid vacation and holidays. Interested applicants should apply in person at: Lykes Citrus Managemanent Division 490 Buckhorn Road Lorida, Fl. 33857 or 7 Lykes Road Lake Placid, Flo. 33852 Lykes Citrus Management Division is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer/Affirmative Action/Drug Free Workplace/M/F/D/V 2100Help Wanted 2000 Employment 1100Announcements NOTICE OF DISPOSITION ACCORDING TO THE FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT THE FOLLOWING STORAGE UNITS LOCATED AT THE STORAGE PLACE OF AVON PARK, 395 CR 17A WEST, AVON PARK, FL 33825 WILL BE DISPOSED OF ON MAY 16, 2011, AT 10:00AM. ALL UNITS ARE SAID TO CONTAIN HOUSEHOLD GOODS UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED. Names and unit numbers are as follows: NAME UNIT NUMBER Maude Amy Hall #266 Calvin Crowell II #339 DISPOSITION BEING MADE TO SATISFY LANDLORD'S LIEN, MANAGEMENT RESERVES ALL RIGHTS, UNDER FLORIDA LAW, ALL PAYMENTS MUST BE IN CASH. April 22, 29, 2011 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is hereby given that on 5/23/2011 at 10:30 am the following vehicles will be sold for towing & storage charges pursuant to F.S. 713.78. 1982 Chev TK # 2GCGK24J8C1209597 ALL Sales to be held at Alan Jay Automotive Network 441 US 27N Sebring, Fl 33870 863 402 4210 April 22, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 09000433GCS SAXON MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC., Plaintiff, vs MELYNDA E. RIGDON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MELYNDA E. RIGDON; EARL T. RIGDON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF EARL T. RIGDON; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THOUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Highlands County, Florida, described as: LOT 11, BLOCK 26, SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on May 2, 2011. DATED THIS 4th DAY OF April, 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 4th day of April, 2011. CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk April 15, 22, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-000777 DIVISION: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR NOVASTAR MORTGAGE FUNDING TRUST, SERIES 2007-1, Plaintiff, vs. ESTHER CALLAHAN, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated February 14, 2011, and entered in Case No. 28-2010-CA-000777 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for NovaStar Mortgage Funding Trust, Series 2007-1, is the Plaintiff and Esther Callahan, Greg Callahan, Tenant #1 n/k/a Helen Alexander, are the defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 18th day of May, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 75, BLOCK 196 OF REPLAT OF BLOCKS 183, 184 AND 196, SUN N LAKE ESTATES (SAID SUBDIVISION ALSO BEING KNOWN AS REPLAT A PORTION OF SUN N LAKES ESTATES, SECTION 17, 18 AND 19), ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 99, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 512 MORNINGSIDE DR., LAKE PLACID, FL 33852-4301 A/K/A 2501 SUNRISE DRIVE, SEBRING, FL 33872 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 14th day of February, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk March 15, 22, 2011 AS OF APRIL 22, 2011, I WILL NO LONGER BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DEBTS INCURRED BY ANYONE OTHER THAN MYSELF. /s/ Gilbert M. Firtz, Jr. April 22, 24, 27, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001078 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. ROBERTA L. BONFIGLIO A/K/A ROBERTA BREMSER; UNKNOWN TENANTS(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 6th day of April, 2011, and entered in Case No. 28-2009-CA-001078, of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and ROBERTA L. BONFIGLIO A/K/A ROBERTA BREMSER; and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL 33870 at the Highlands County Courthouse in Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 6th day of May, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: SEE EXHIBIT ``A'' ATTACHED. EXHIBIT A TRACT 5 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF SOUTH BEAR POINTE BOULEVARD AND THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF S.C.F.E. RAILROAD; THENCE SOUTH 12 DEGREES 38'45'' WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 2244.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 12 DEGREES 38'45'' WEST ALONG SAID LINE, A DISTANCE OF 163.56 FEET; THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 05'01'' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1198.43 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 35'13'' WEST A DISTANCE OF 276.40 FEET; THENCE NORTH 90 DEGREES 00'00'' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 54.42 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF SOUTH BEAR POINT DRIVE AND TO A POINT ON A NON TANGENT CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 60.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 10 DEGREES 41'25'' AND A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 23 DEGREES 12'32'' WEST, 11.18 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG THE ARC A DISTANCE OF 11.19 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF 25.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 49 DEGREES 40'47'', AND A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 03 DEGREES 42'51'' WEST, 21.00 FEET; THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG THE ARC A DISTANCE OF 21.68 FEET; THENCE NORTH 21 DEGREES 07'33'' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 167.51 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A A RADIUS 520.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 09 DEGREES 47'59''; AND A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 26 DEGREES 01'32'' EAST, 88.83 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG THE ARC A DISTANCE OF 88.94 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 55 DEGREES 42'48'' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1371.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 10 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N. Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863) 534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 6th day of April, 2011. Robert W. Germaine Clerk Of The Circuit Court By: /s/ Lisa Tantillo Deputy Clerk April 22, 29, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-163 Division ________ IN RE: ESTATE OF DORIS GREY BENSON a.k.a. DORIS G. BENSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS A GAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of DORIS GREY BENSON a.k.a. DORIS G. BENSON, deceased, File Number PC 11-163, by the Circuit Court for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce A venue, Sebring, Florida 33870; that the decedent's date of death was February 19, 2011; that the total value of the estate is $30,669.14 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address W.R. Benson 2921 Wynstone Drive, Sebring, FL 33875 Terri Stone 228 Coventry Court Ormond Beach, FL 32174 A LL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is A pril 22, 2011. Persons Giving Notice: /s/ W.R. Benson 2921 Wynstone Drive Sebring, Florida 33875 /s/ Terri Stone 228 Coventry Court Ormond Beach, Florida 32174 A ttorney for Persons Giving Notice: / s/ David F. Lanier E-Mail Address: lanier30@embarqmail.com Florida Bar No. 045399 DAVID F. LANIER P.O. Box 400 A von Park, Florida 33826-0400 Telephone: (863)453-4457 April 22, 29, 2011 1050LegalsCHECK YOUR ADPlease check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:314-9876 News-Sun Classified Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under the Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be placed under the Bargain Buy category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com 863-314-9876 DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 314-9876. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 1050Legals Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 LOOKING FOR THAT SPECIAL HOME?Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 385-6155. Then shop till you drop! DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 385-6155Having something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what youre doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 314-9876

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Page 10ANews-Sun Friday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.co m SEBRING -Downtown on the Circle. Monthy rates starting at $400. payable wkly. Includes elec. & water. No Pets. 306 circle. 863-386-9100 or 954-295-7194. Or go to Bldg. and ask for John. 863-414-7535 REDUCED RENTfor doing maintenance. Upstairs furnished apartment. Need references. 863-385-1806. 6150FurnishedApartments SEBRING 3024Spinks Rd. 2/1 Completely refurnished. New Wood Floors. Patio. Washer & Dryer. $600. mo. Call 561-967-7161 SEBRING VILLA 3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage. Wood floors, vaulted ceilings, screened porch. Convenient location near Hospital. Gated community, Clubhouse & pool, lawn maint. incl. $900. mo. RENTED!!! 6100Villas & CondosFor Rent 6000 RentalsFURNISHED -55 plus Francis II Park. 2BR, 1BA, carport, air. $500 deposit, $475 monthly plus utilities. 1 year contract. Call 419-408-8821 5150Mobile HomesFor Rent PALM HARBORHOMES Call about our Extreme Makeover Home Sale As See On TV!! 800-622-2832 LAKE PLACIDWell insulated home on Paradise corner lot. Five furn. rooms, two baths, plus lg. utility room, tolls incl. Call for info. 863-202-6325 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesCEMETARY LOTSPinecrest. 4 Joining. Old Section. $1,500. obo. Call 904-287-7110 or 615-653-1118 4280Cemetery LotsLAKE PLACID Tropical Harbor 55+ Lakeside Park, w/all ammenities. 2/2 DW. Tile Sunroom, Laundry & Utility. Lg. Carport. Scenic open location. Moving. Open to offers. Call 863-465-5129. 4100Homes for SaleLake PlacidSEBRING NO NEED FOR A BANK! Owner Financing 3BR, 1BA remodeled, NICE HOME! Woodlawn Elem. area. 1243 Fernvale Ave. 863-227-2717 4080Homes for SaleSebring 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial WAIT STAFF NEEDED! Full Time & Part Time. Experience preferred / mature. Lunch & Dinner shifts, Apply in person at Zeno's Sun 'n Lake Blvd., Sebring. V ETERINARY RECEPTIONIST/ASSISTANTneeded for small animal clinic. A compassionate and enthusiastic team player needed for a full time position. Must have a positive attitude and take pride in providing exceptional client service. Multi-tasking, organization, attention to detail & computer skills necessary. Must be able to work flexible hrs. & weekends. Stop by and fill out an application at 11751 Twitty Rd. Sebring 33876. Hours M-F 7:30-6. SEEKING WELLEXPERIENCED MEDICAL OFFICE HELP P/T. Excellent billing/collection, communication, typing, computer skills & medical terminology are A MUST Fax resume to: 863-471-3206 or email to: medicalofficebilling@yahoo.com MEAL SITEMANAGER needed in Sebring. Reliable transportation and caring attitude towards the elderly are a must. Some lifting is required, 8:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m., M F. Apply in person at NU-HOPE Elder Care Services, Inc. 6414 U.S. 27 South, Sebring. EOE. DFWP. COOKS W/EXPERIENCEpreferred at Spring Lake Golf Resort. Apply in Person. Call for directions only 863-655-0900. LIFEGAURDS NEEDED.Lake Placid Camp and Conference Center is hiring Lifegaurds. Please call 863-465-2197 Mon-Fri 9-5pm. EXPERIENCED. ROOFERS 863-385-0351 CNA PRIVATEduty $150. per day. Sat.-Mon. Ask for Laura 863-709-5333. 2100Help Wanted AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL: $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 SEBRING -2BR, 2BA. Tile floors, fresh paint. Includes water. $600/mo. Call Gary Johnson, 863-381-1861. RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartments Having something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what youre doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 314-9876

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, April 22, 2011Page 11 A Call 385-6155 and a Sales Representative will be glad to assist you! LINCOLN TOWNCAR '97 Blk/blk. Leather, Presidentail Series. Call 863-459-9899 LINCOLN TOWNCAR '97 Blk/blk. leather. Presidential Series. $2,500. Call 863-452-9899. 1998 NISSANMAXIMA, Burgundy, 4Dr, 6 cylinder, automatic, 62K, cold air, CLEAN, Very Good Condition. $5200 Sorry Sold! 9450Automotive for Sale1973 NORTON850 COMMANDO One Owner* RareFind 10K miles New paint & chrome Will Accept reasonable offer. 863-382-8985 or 863-465-9100 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation 8000 Recreation PUPS STANDARDPoodles. 3 Colors. 11 wks. We're cute, playful, Pedigree. Free Range, loving, Guarenteed. In training, learning fast. $900. Call 305-731-6242. We won't last. NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. HAND RAISEDIndian Ring Neck Parrots. Very sweet. Great gifts. $200. Call 863-697-3418 7520Pets & Supplies SEBRING SAT.only 4/23/11 8-5. 2225 Croydon Rd. Puzzles, clothes, books, DVD's, a bike Cardio Fit, & lots of misc. for everyone. Behind Sr. Center, off Sebring Pkwy., N. On Avalon to Rt. on Oakwood, rt. on Croydon. SEBRING -Pine & Lake Estates 2110 Pinewood Blvd. Fri & Sat 4/22 & 23, 9am ? Lots of Decorative accessories, some furniture, sail boat, 3 wheel bike, tools, household items. SEBRING -Multi Family Sale! 1377 Lake Josephine Dr. Sat. Apr. 23rd, 8am ? Children's clothing, games & toys, household items. Much Much More! AVON PARK(RIVERGREENS) 152 Hillcrest Dr. Sat Apr. 23, 8am ? Twin bed, small furniture, boys clothes & games, household items, books, DVDs & CDs. 7320Garage &Yard SalesAVON PARK1955 Torrington Rd. Thur. & Fri 4/21 & 22, 8am-4pm. computer desk, book shelves, sofa tables, furniture, clothing and household items. 7320Garage &Yard Sales WEBER BBQ,OT silver, NIB. $75 863-385-3199 RECIPROCATING SAWDeWalt 304P, Paid $93., used 1 time, $75. 386-273-3731 PICNIC TABLERed, fits in trunk $24 863-385-3199 LOVESEAT BLUEPlaid $40. Call 863-201-3769 ELECTRIC WIRERomex 12 / 2 /W / ground, Paid $40. Asking $30. 863-273-3731 COFFEE TABLE 4' x 20". Glass top & bottom is a basket weave. $50. Call 863-465-4284 BOOKS WESTERNS,20 for $12. CALL 863-385-1563 BAR, WOOD& Leather $50. Call 863-201-3769 7310Bargain BuysWINDOWS -White, Tinted & Tempered Alum. (2) 4'X8' $350 / (1) 6'X3' $175 / Cabinets w/ Formica Top (3) $150. Call 863-385-3199 7300MiscellaneousDINING ROOMSET Broyhil w/2 leafs, dark oak & formica top. 6 chairs, 1 captain. All good shape seats need recovered. $350. Call 863-465-4284 7180Furniture 7000 Merchandise SEBRING (2)Available 3926 Kenilworth Blvd, 1500 sq ft, $550/mo : A/C, office, BA, lg overhead door, near Sebring High School. 640 Park St, 6400 sq ft, $2500/mo : A/C, office, BA, 8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric, fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway. 941-416-2813 AVON PARKLarge Retail/Office Building, 100 E. Main St. A MUST SEE! 863-295-9272 6750Commercial RentalSEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, Satellite, split plan house, share kitchen & laundry room. Full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for Rent SPRING LAKE3BR, 2BA, 2CG, CHA, patio, ceramic tiled liv. room, din. room, kitchen, bath & halls, SS appliances, refrigerator has water on door, micro., W/D hook up. No pets. 863-655-0136 SEBRING 3BR (possible 4BR), 1BA LARGEfenced yard with Citrus trees. Nice area, Indian Streets off Lakeview Dr $600 mo., + 1st & Sec. 863-446-1861 SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 6300Unfurnished HousesSEBRING 2240Avalon Rd. 3/2 furn. Small animals ok. Near Shopping Center & Senior Club References $700. first/last. Call 305-387-6863 after 4pm. or 863-237-3129. 6250Furnished Houses LAKE PLACID2/BR, 2/BA Apt / Duplex, Washer / Dryer, screend porch. Excellent Conditio n. Includes water. $500 monthly plus 1 mo. security. 954-695-8348 BEAUTIFUL APTSSEBRING 2BR, 1BA, tile floors, screen back porch, beautiful landscaping, building 5 yrs. new. Pets OK. $595 month. 3106 Medical Way. RENTED AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; Washer/Dryer, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook ups. Students/Seniors Discount Call 863-452-0469. 6200UnfurnishedApartments LOOKING FOR AN APARTMENT? Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. NEED AHELPING HAND? CALL NEWS-SUN CLASSIFIEDS THEY GET RESULTS (863)314-9876CASTLE HILL Apartments of Avon ParkAccepting Applications for 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts. Available to individuals 62 years or older, handicap/disabled, regardless of age. For rental information & applications please call: 863-452-6565 TDD: 711 THIS INSTITUTION IS AN Equal Opportunity Provider and EmployerLos Apt. de Castle Hill de Avon ParkEstan aceptando aplicaciones para Apts. de 1 y 2 recamaras. Disponible a personas de 62 ancs o mas, incapacidad fisica/mental, no importa la edad. Para mas informacion favor de llamar 863-452-6565. TDD: 711 Esta Institucion Es De Igualdad De Oportunidad Al Proveedor, Y Empleador

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Page 12ANews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.com

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By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comLAKE WALES We j ust told the girls to leave it a ll out on the field tonight, S ebring head softball coach J oe Sinness related after W ednesdays District 5-5A T ournament game against t op-seeded Lake Wales. And while they did do j ust that, against a team they n ever came close to during t o regular season routs, in t he end it wasnt quite e nough in an 8-5 loss to the L ady Highlanders. Physically, we outplayed them tonight, theres no doubt in my mind, Sinness said. Mentally, it caught up with us. We had some m ental mistakes on the b ases and some mental mist akes in the field. But there was no quest ioning the effort put forth a s the Streaks put together o ne of their best all-around p erformances of the season. There were contributions f rom every part of the lineu p with every starter getting a t least one hit on the night. Haley Pack, as Sinness stated, had perhaps her best outing on the mound since returning from an early season foot injury. Oh, Lake Wales took a 10 lead in the second, without a hit, as a walk, passed ball and dropped third strike allowed the first tally to come across, but that alone showed Pack wasnt having too much trouble limiting a potent line-up. The potency showed in the third with two sharp hits pushing the lead to 2-0, but Sebring soon answered back. In the top of the fourth, Amanda Grimaldo singled to lead off and came around when Dino Lower blasted one to right. Even against a steady breeze blowing straight in from right field, the shot looked like it still might carry out. It fell just short, but Lower made it home anyway when, after reaching third with a triple, the incoming throw got away, to knot things at 2-2. The Highlanders would take the lead back with a run in the bottom of the frame, but Pack got out of it with no further damage, notching a bases-loaded strike out to end the inning. The fifth showed a combination of the effort, and mental lapses, as the first two hitters singled to put runners on first and second. Grimaldo then launched one deep down the left-field line, sending the Lake Wales left fielder on a long run to the convergence of SPORTS B SECTION News-Sun Friday, April 22, 2011 Page 3B News-Sun photo courtesy of KIM GAUGE R Alex Griffin goes airborne to make this catch, helping support the shutout pitching of Aaron Hart in Sebrings 6-0 win at Lake Placid Tuesday. News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE A von Parks Calego Hipps is joined by his parents Calego Sr and Lakisha, Thursday morning as he signed on to attend school and play football at Beloit College in Beloit, WI. By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comLAKE PLACID Afif th inning rally helped t he Streaks to overpower La ke Placid 6-0, splitting the seri es Tuesday for the two coun ty rivals. We just didnt get the jo b done despite having t he opportunities. Weve got to take advantage of everythin g we do, said Dan Coomes. But there is no shame lo sing to Sebring. They pl ay hard ball, and they are thi rd in a district with Lake Wal es and Winter Haven, Coom es added. The 20-4 Streaks, lost 3 -1 to the 13-8 Dragons in Sebring earlier in the yea r, setting the stage for som e hard earn ed payback, b ut both offens es were held to just one h it until the fif th inning. It was kin d of ragged wi th both of us, but both team s played hard. One big innin g, we were fortunate that w e picked up three in the fift h. They hit balls right at us an d we hit the holes, sa id Sebring coach Hoppy Rewi s. Lake Placids Dyl an Weber-Callahan gave up ju st one hit in the first fo ur innings, but with two outs in the fifth, Sebrings Gunn er Westergom singled to sco re Nate Green, who h ad stretched a single into a do uble on a wild pitch. Thats when Sebring s Matt Randall went to wo rk and pulled in two RBI on a single to put the Streaks o ut front 3-0. Callahan was retired at t he end of the inning, pitchin g his way out of a jam befo re taking a seat. Aaron Hart started an d ended the game for Sebrin g, and gave up two hits and n o runs. We are still a young team You have to remember th at we have a freshman at sho rtstop and a sophomore at se cond base, Coomes sai d. Guess what? You are goin g to have some problems som etimes. Well get it togethe r, and well be all right. Lake Placids Colb y Delaney took the mound in the sixth and gave up a sing le to Jonathan Knight, wh o turned it into two steals and a Streaks overpower Dragons Sebring6Lake Placid0 News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Carly Hoffner takes the throw to first, from left-fielder Cat Ostrander, to double off this Lake Wales runner Wednesday night. Lady Streaks leave it on the field Lake Wales8Sebring5 By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK Red Devils defensive back Calego Hipps signed on Thursday with Beloit College in Wisconsin for a four-year stint. It was a good choice. They have a good team, and they have good academics. Thats what I wanted, Hipps said during the ceremony. Hipps said that he plans to use the athletic opportunity to pursue a Pre-Med degree at Beloit, and that he thinks he can play all four years there. They graduated eight defensive players this year, and that opens the door for anyone who wants to work hard, Hipps said. I think I have a legitimate chance to some time on the field as a freshman. But I am planning on getting there early to get started with their conditioning program. When asked about the drastic change in the weather hell see in moving to the upper Midwest, Hipps was confident that it would not be a problem. I lived in Maryland when I was younger and I am used to the snow. It actually snowed when we visited there recently. I dont think it will be a problem, Hipps said. Hipps heading north, signs with Beloit News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Breauna Corley swatted a double and triple in Lake Placids near upset of Tenoroc in District 9-3A Tournament play Tuesday. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comFROSTPROOF The turnaround was almost complete and would have been miraculous. And even after a late collapse allowed Mulberry to come back for an 11-10 win in the District 9-3A Softball Tournament Tuesday, the turnaround for Lake Placid was, after all was said and done, quite impressive. This was a Mulberry squad that had trounced the Lady Dragons 17-0 in their first meeting this season. Improvement was shown in the next meeting as again Lake Placid fell, but by a 9-3 score. And then on Tuesday, when it mattered most, in the district tournament in Frostproof, the Dragons nearly flipped the script entirely. They started with a run, thanks to an infield RBI single from Ashley Wells, for a 1-0 lead in the first. Laine Weber-Callahan cruised through the Panther line-up, retiring them in order through each of the first three innings. And in the third, Lake Placid looked to blow it open. Taylor Test started it with a bunt single and came all the way around when Breauna Corley walloped a triple to the rightcenter field fence. Arnetia Gobourned took a pitch in the arm to reach and Wells ground-out brought Corley in. Lady Dragons cant hang on Tenoroc11Lake Placid10 See SEBRING, page 3B See STREAKS, page 4B See LP, page 4B

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Dunning TributeAVON PARK On Monday, April 25, South Florida Community College will honor the memory of the first coach in school history, Coach Dunning Terrell. Coach Terrell coached basketball and baseball at what was then SFJC from 19661974, and continued to teach physical education until he retired in 1986. Coach Terrell started the mens basketball and baseball programs in 1966 even before SFJC had a gym on campus. Several of Coach Terrells former players still live in the Heartland area. SFCC Athletics will pay tribute to the family of Coach Terrell by recognizing his daughter Judy and their family at a short mound ceremony prior to the game against State College of Florida. State College of Florida head baseball coach Tim Hill will be in attendance as well, a former colleague of coach Terrell from his days at SFJC. SFCC would like to invite all former players of Coach Terrell, colleagues, as well as family and friends to come out this night to be a part of this tribute. Game time is 6 p.m. and the ceremony will start at 5:45.SYFS BBQ and registrationSEBRING Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is hosting our 2nd Annual BBQ Fundraiser and Tournament on Saturday, April 30 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The BBQ Lunch is $7 and will include a Pulled Pork Sandwich, Baked Beans, Coleslaw, Cookies and a glass of tea. Pick up your meal to go or stay and watch our girls play while you eat. For further information, please email dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201. Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is also conducting registrations for girls ages 10 to 15 now through April 1. Registration is $65 for the first child / $45 for any siblings. For further information, please visit us on Facebook, check out our website at www.eteamz.com/sebringyouthfastpitchsoftball, email us at dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201.Golf for God TournamentSEBRING The Golf for God Tournament will kick off with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start on Saturday, May 7 at Golf Hammock Golf and Country Club. It will be a 2-Person scramble at $65 a person, which includes golf, cart, a $25 dry cleaning certificate, a golf certificate for two rounds of golf and a ball for the ball-drop. You can purchase additional balls for the ball-drop which will take place by helicopter at 1 p.m. over the driving range. It will be a 50/50 cash prize, up to $500. Mulligans will also be available. First, second and third-place winners will receive additional balls for the balldrop. This is a fundraiser for Kayla Griffin who will be on a missionary journey to 11 countries over an 11 month period, spreading the Word of God to the people of these lands. Call the course at 382-2151 to have a registration form faxed to you or pick one up at a near-by course. YMCA Sign-UpsSEBRING The Highlands County YMCAand Eagles Football is doing sign-ups for Youth Flag Football ages 5 14. Healthy Kids Day is Saturday, April 16 from 9am to 1pm. Lifeguard Certification Class sign-up s are taking place now for an April 25-3 0 class.APProject GraduationAVONPARK The APHSProject Graduation 2011 Benefit Golf Tournament will be held Saturday, May 21 at 8:30 a.m. at River Greens Golf Course. The flighted, four-person scramble costs $60 per person and includes green s fee, cart, lunch and prizes. In addition to the action, there will b e mulligans, a 50/50 and raffles for purchase the day of the tournament. The grand prize raffle is for a round of golf for two at Doral Golf Resort and Spa. Tee sign sponsorships are going for $50, for a sign and player, it is $100. For more information, contact Suzie Gentry at 446-7368.SFCC Summer Youth CampsAVONPARK South Florida Panthe r Baseball will be holding Summer Youth Camps from June 13-16 and June 20-23 for children aged 6-13. Each camp runs from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and costs $80 per camp or $150 fo r both. Registration and sign-in begin at 8 a.m. with the camp to follow, including baseball fundamentals, position instruction, station rotation, games, swimming pool time and a camp T-shirt. SFCC head coach Rick Hitt will serv e as camp director with Panther assistant coach Andy Polk and members of the Panther baseball team will be on hand a s instructors. Campers should bring their individua l baseball attire as well as a bathing suit and towel. The camps will be held at the SFCC Panther field at the Highlands County campus in Avon Park. For more information, call Coach Hit t at the following campus phone numbers at extension 7036: Avon Park/Sebring, 453-6661; Lake Placid, 465-5300; Arcadia, 494-7500; Wauchula, 773-2252.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING Wings of Faith Worship Center presents the First Annual Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one team of four golfers, one tee sign and tw o green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includes one team of four golfers, one green sign; Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $100 includes one green sign. Individual player $60 includes gree n fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26). Team of Four Golfers $240 include s green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after March 26). Make checks payable to: Wings of Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL 33871, or register online at wingsoffaithchristianworshipcenter.com. Proceeds to be donated to scholarship program for graduates attending Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center. For more information, call Jason Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhankerson@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at 381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com. FIRST ROUND (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEChicago 2, Indiana 0 Saturday: Chicago 104, Indiana 99 Monday: Chicago 96, Indiana 90 Thursday: Chicago at Indiana, late Saturday, April 23: Chicago at Indiana, 2:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Indiana at Chicago, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Chicago at Indiana, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Indiana at Chicago, TBD Miami 2, Philadelphia 0 Saturday: Miami 97, Philadelphia 89 Monday: Miami 94, Philadelphia 73 Thursday: Miami at Philadelphia, late Sunday, April 24: Miami at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 27: Philadelphia at Miami, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Miami at Philadelphia, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Philadelphia at Miami, TBD Boston 2, New York 0 Sunday: Boston 87, New York 85 Tuesday: Boston 96, New York 93 Friday: Boston at N.Y., 7 p.m. Sunday, April 24: Boston at N.Y., 3 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: N.Y. at Boston, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Boston at N.Y., TBD x-Sunday, May 1: N.Y. at Boston, TBD Atlanta 1, Orlando 1 Saturday: Atlanta 103, Orlando 93 Tuesday: Orlando 88, Atlanta 82 Friday: Orlando at Atlanta, 8 p.m. Sunday, April 24: Orlando at Atlanta, 7 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Atlanta at Orlando, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Orlando at Atlanta, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Atlanta at Orlando, TBDWESTERN CONFERENCEMemphis 1, San Antonio 1 Sunday: Memphis 101, San Antonio 98 Wednesday: San Antonio 93, Memphis 87 Saturday, April 23: San Antonio at Memphis, 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 25: San Antonio at Memphis, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Memphis at San Antonio, TBD x-Friday, April 29: San Antonio at Memphis, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Memphis at San Antonio, TBD New Orleans 1, L.A. Lakers 1 Sunday: New Orleans 109, L.A. Lakers 100 Wednesday: L.A. Lakers 87, New Orleans 78 Friday, April 22: L.A. at New Orleans, 9:30 p.m. Sunday, April 24: L.A. at New Orleans, 9:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: New Orleans at L.A., TBD x-Thursday, April 28: L.A. at New Orleans, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: New Orleans at L.A., TBD Dallas 2, Portland 0 Saturday: Dallas 89, Portland 81 Tuesday: Dallas 101, Portland 89 Thursday: Dallas at Portland, late Saturday, April 23: Dallas at Portland, 5 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: Portland at Dallas, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Dallas at Portland, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Portland at Dallas, TBD Oklahoma City 2, Denver 0 Sunday: Oklahoma City 107, Denver 103 Wednesday: Oklahoma City 106, Denver 89 Saturday, April 23: Oklahoma City at Denver, 10 p.m. Monday, April 25: Oklahoma City at Denver, 10:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 27: Denver at Oklahoma City, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Oklahoma City at Denver, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Denver at Oklahoma City, TBD FIRST ROUND (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEWashington 3, New York Rangers 1 Washington 2, Rangers 1, OT Washington 2, Rangers 0 Sunday: N.Y. Rangers 3, Washington 2 Wednesday: Washington 4, N.Y. Rangers 3, 2OT x-Saturday, April 23: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 3 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, TBD Philadelphia 2, Buffalo 2 Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0 Philadelphia 5, Buffalo 4 Monday: Philadelphia 4, Buffalo 2. Wednesday: Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0 x-Friday, April 22: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 3 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Buffalo at Philadelphia, TBD Montreal 2, Boston 1 Montreal 2, Boston 0 Montreal 3, Boston 1 Monday: Boston 4, Montreal 2 Thursday: Boston at Montreal, late x-Saturday, April 23: Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Boston at Montreal, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Montreal at Boston TBD Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 1 Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 0 Tampa Bay 5, Pittsburgh 1 Monday: Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 2 Wednesday: Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 2, 2OT x-Saturday, April 23: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBD x-Monday, April 25: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBDWESTERN CONFERENCEVancouver 3, Chicago 1 Vancouver 2, Chicago 0 Vancouver 4, Chicago 3 Sunday: Vancouver 3, Chicago 2 Tuesday: Chicago 7, Vancouver 2 x-Thursday: Chicago at Vancouver, 10 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Vancouver at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Chicago at Vancouver, TBD San Jose 2, Los Angeles 1 San Jose 3, L.A. 2, OT Saturday: Los Angeles 4, San Jose 0 Tuesday: San Jose 6, Los Angeles 5, OT Thursday: San Jose at L.A., late x-Saturday, April 23: L.A. at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: San Jose at L.A., TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: L.A. at San Jose, TBD Detroit 4, Phoenix 0 Wednesday: Detroit 4, Phoenix 2 Saturday: Detroit 4, Phoenix 3 Monday: Detroit 4, Phoenix 2 Wednesday: Detroit 6, Phoenix 3 Nashville 2, Anaheim 2 Wednesday: Nashville 4, Anaheim 1 Friday: Anaheim 5, Nashville 3 Sunday: Nashville 4, Anaheim 3 Wednesday: Anaheim 6, Nashville 3 x-Friday, April 22: Nashville at Anaheim, 10 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD x-Tuesday, April 26: Nashville at Anaheim, TBDAMERICANLEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB New York106.625 Tampa Bay99.5002 Baltimore89.471212Toronto 810.4443 Boston 611.353412Central Division WLPctGB Cleveland135.722 Kansas City117.6112 Detroit910.474412Chicago 711.3896 Minnesota612.3337 West Division WLPctGB Los Angeles126.667 Texas 117.6111 Oakland 99.5003 Seattle 613.316612___ Wednesdays Games Boston 5, Oakland 3 Detroit 3, Seattle 2 Tampa Bay 4, Chicago White Sox 1 Baltimore 5, Minnesota 4 N.Y. Yankees 6, Toronto 2 L.A. Angels 4, Texas 1 Cleveland 7, Kansas City 5 Thursdays Games Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay, late Minnesota at Baltimore, late Cleveland at Kansas City, late Boston at L.A. Angels, late Oakland at Seattle, late Fridays Games Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Kansas City at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Cleveland at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Boston at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Oakland at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB Philadelphia116.647 Florida106.62512Washington98.5292 Atlanta811.4214 New York513.278612Central Division WLPctGB Chicago99.500 Cincinnati99.500 Milwaukee99.500 St. Louis99.500 Pittsburgh810.4441 Houston711.3892 West Division WLPctGB Colorado135.722 San Francisco108.5563 Arizona88.5004 Los Angeles910.474412San Diego810.4445 ___ Wednesdays Games Philadelphia 4, Milwaukee 3 Washington 8, St. Louis 6, 1st game Chicago Cubs 2, San Diego 1, 11 innings, 1st game Colorado 10, San Francisco 2 San Diego 5, Chicago Cubs 4, 2nd game Arizona 3, Cincinnati 1 Houston 4, N.Y. Mets 3 Florida 6, Pittsburgh 0 St. Louis 5, Washington 3, 2nd game L.A. Dodgers 6, Atlanta 1 Thursdays Games Arizona at Cincinnati, late Washington at St. Louis, late Atlanta at L.A. Dodgers, late Houston at N.Y. Mets, late Pittsburgh at Florida, late Philadelphia at San Diego, late Fridays Games L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. Washington at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Arizona at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Colorado at Florida, 7:10 p.m. Houston at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Cincinnati at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Philadelphia at San Diego, 10:05 p.m. Atlanta at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid TUESDAY: Baseball at District Tournament,Avon Park,vs.Mulberry,TBA WEDNESDAY: Baseball at District Tournament,Avon Park,TBD,if necessary THURSDAY: Baseball at District Tournament,Avon Park,TBD,if necessary Sebring TUESDAY: Baseball hosts District Tournament,vs.Haines City,7:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball hosts District Tournament,vs.Lake Wales/Ridge winner,7:30 p.m.,if necessary THURSDAY: Baseball hosts District Tournament,Championship Game,7 p.m.,if necessary SFCC TODAY: Baseball vs.Hillsborough,6 p.m. SATURDAY: Baseball at Hillsborough,1 p.m. MONDAY: Baseball vs.State College of Florida,6 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball at Hillsborough,3 p.m. Avon Park MONDAY: Baseball hosts District Tournament,TBA TUESDAY: Baseball hosts District Tournament,TBA WEDNESDAY: Baseball hosts District Tournament,TBA A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n NASCAR Nashville 300, Qualifying. . E E S S P P N N 3 3 p p . m m . NASCAR Nashville 300 . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NN N H H L L P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p . m m . N.Y. Rangers at Washington . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CM M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs . . . . . . . . . W W G G N N 7 7 p p . m m . Tampa Bay at Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Tampa Bay at Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 4 4 p p . m m . Regional Atlanta at San Francisco, . . . Cincinnati at St Louis or Chicago White Sox at Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X XTimes, games, channels all subject to change C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 4 4 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . LSU at Vanderbilt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 6 6 p p . m m . Alabama at Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 7 7 p p . m m . Arkansas at Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NG G O O L L F F F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Volvo China Open . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Legends of Golf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA The Heritage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F FS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Volvo China Open . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Legends of Golf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 3 3 p p . m m . PGA The Heritage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S SN N B B A A P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Boston at New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 8 8 p p . m m . Orlando at Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . L.A. Lakers at New Orleans . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Chicago at Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 5 5 p p . m m . Dallas at Portland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . San Antonio at Memphis . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 1 1 0 0 : : 0 0 0 0 p p . m m . Oklahoma City at Denver . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NC C O O L L L L E E G G E E S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . Alabama at Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2B B O O X X I I N N G G F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . Bayan Jargal vs. Breidis Prescott . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Joseph Agbeko vs. Abner Mares . . . . . . S S H H O O W W LIVESPORTSONTV NBA Playoffs Major League Baseball NHL Playoffs Page 2BNews-Sun Friday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.co m

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Golf HammockThe Golf Hammock Ladies played a Best 9 of 18 holes 1/2 handicap event Wednesday, April 20. Taking first in First Flight was Bonnie Nigh, with an 18, including a hole-in-one on No. 17 with a four iron. Florence Towell took second in the flight with a 20, Ruth Harris and Ruth Kirk tied for third with a 23 and Shirley Enochs finished fifth with a 24. In the Second Flight, Mary Cripps and Nancy Senior tied to top honors with 22 each, while Jo Thornburgs 25 was good for third. A three-way tie for fifth was then seen as Joan Armburster, Cindy Dall and Nancy Porcari each came in at 26. On Monday, April 18, the Mezza Group played Individual Pro-Am Points at Golf Hammock Country Club. Denis won first place at plus 3 in A group and Mike Anselm had a plus 2 for second. Doug Haire shot a plus 6 to take first place in B group and Pat Dell plus 4 for second place. Joe Hyzny also had a plus 6 to take first place in Cgroup and David Mulligan in second place with a plus 5. Ken Porter finished in first place with a plus 3 in D group andBilly Parr at even in second place. Larry Holzwarth had a plus 1 to take first place in E group while Bob Hughes settled with even for second place. Pete Mezza scored a plus 6 in E Group for first place and Jean Terrell with a plus 4 for second place. Janet Howland scored a plus 3 to win first place with plus 3 in G group and Don Tiemens had plus 1, good for second place. Next Monday the Mezza Group will have a shotgun start beginning at 8 a.m. at Golf Hammock CC. Please note that this is a change in the start time. Arrive early to register and call Pete Mezza at 382-1280 for more information.Harder HallThe Ladies League played a pro am points event on Monday, April 18. The winners were: First place, Dori Landrum with plus-7; and second place, Wendy Lake with plus-6. Tying for third/fourth places were Donna Maki and Joyce Fleming with plus-3 each. Chip-in: No. 7, Liz Reinhardt; and No. 3, Wendy Lake. The Ladies League played a low net event on Thursday, April 14. The winners were: First place, Wendy Lake. Tying for second/third places were Helen Sayre and Dori Landrum.Lake June West Golf ClubA scramble was played on Thursday, April 14. Winning first place was the team of Doyan and Donna Eades, John and Sue Ruffo, Larry and Jane Roush with 46; second place, Cal Billingsley, Jane Westorfield, Ken and Norma Colyer and Ken Rowen with 48; and third place, John and Shelly Byron, Dick and Norma Denhart and John Howarth with 49. Closest to the pin: (Ladies), No. 8, Sue Ruffo, 5-feet-10-inches; (Men), No. 2, Walt Nagel, 5-feet-11-inches; and No. 4, John Simmons, 5-feet-4inches. The Mens Association played a Mens Best Ball event on Wednesday, April 13. Winning first place was the team of Ron West, Cal Billingsley, Tim Lynch and Ken Strong with 39; and second place, John Byron, John Simmons, Orville Huffman and Fred Neer with 40. Closest to the pin: No. 2, Ron West, 1-foot-4-inches; No. 4, Dick Denhart, 3-feet-7-inches; and No. 8, Orville Huffman, 4-feet. The Ladies Association played a Ladies League event on Monday, April 11. Winning first place was the team of Virginia Simmons, Betty Billau and Laurie Lorig with 36; second place, Hellen Mellon, Gloria Huggett and Pat Asmus with 37; and third place, Margaret Schultz, Elaine Orr and Janice Barringer with 38. Closest to the pin: No. 2, Sylvia West, Hole-In-One! No. 4, Helen Mellon, 9-feet-1-inch; and No. 8, Eva Huffman, 7-feet-6-inches.PinecrestThe Mens Association played team and individual Pro-Am Points Wednesday, April 20, with Bob Kistler and JW McCamic winning the team event with +10 points. John Joffman, Dick Botelho and Dorrell Herron totaled +6, but so did Don Lamb, Jim Elliott and Bob Colandre as well as the team of Jim Gulick, John ONeill and Vern Gates for a three-way tie for second. Lamb and Wayne Gordener tied for the tops in A Division, individually, with +7 apiece, while Gerry Geouque headed up B Division with +7. Botelho, Greg Mitchell and Larry Holzworth tied for second in B Division with each totaling +3. Gates was the C Division leader at +7 while McCamic and Chuck Primeau were tied for second at +5.Placid LakesThe Mens Association played an individual quota points event on Wednesday, April 13. The winners were: First place, John Rosettis with plus-12; and second place, Howard Ticknor with plus-9. Tying for third/fourth places are Darrell Horney and Cliff Moore with plus-7 each. The Mens Golf Association played an Odd Holes Half Handicap event Wednesday, April 13 with Bob McMillian winning with a 71. Roger Thompson carded a 73 for second and the dueling 74s brought in by John Goble and Russ Isaacs went to a match of cards with Goble thus claiming third place. Ed Bartusch took fifth witha 75 while Cliff Moore was closest to the pin on No. 11, getting to 12-feet, 6-inches.River GreensThe Morrison Group played a game on Monday, April 18. Winning first place was the team of Vince Boever, Gil Heier and Jim Cercy with minus-21. Tying for second/third/fourth places were Cecil Lemons, Butch Smith and Bob Stevens; Bill Mountford, John Smutnick and Tom Morway; Ed Mosser, Bob Biever and Cliff Aubin with minus-19 each. A Bye-Bye-Birdie event was played Sunday, April 17. Winning first place the team of Donna and Paul Johnson, Mary Beth Carby and Don Ethan with minus-34; second place, Carol and Larry Roy, Helen Ochala and Lefty St. Pierre with minus-33; and third place, Michele and Ken Koon, Jeanine and Leo Persails with minus30. The Mens Association played a Mens Day event Saturday, April 16. Winning first place was the team of Larry Roy, Jim Cercy and G.L. Heier with plus-30; second place, Cliff Aubin, Butch Smith, Fred Evans and Neil Purcell with plus-21; and third place, Cliff Steele, Ken Brunswick, Bob Stevens and Keith Kincer. Closest to the pin: No. 3, Dave Kelly, 7-feet-6-inches; No. 5, Larry Roy, 1foot-6.5 inches; No. 12, Cliff Aubin, 3feet-7.5 inches; and No. 17, Larry Roy, 25-feet. A morning scramble was played on Friday, April 15. Winning first place was the team of David and Anne Kelly, Lee and Leo Persails. An evening scramble was played Friday, April 15. Dennis Dunn, Charlie Seralde. Jack Sayre, Phil Kozak, John Yoder and Annie Kozak with minus-16; and second place, John and Laura Smutnick, Tim Thomas, Joe Graf and Bob Mitchell. The Morridson Group played a game on Thursday, April 14. Winning first place was the team of Cliff Aubin, Gerald Bergeron, Harold Kline and Bill Mountford with minus30; and second place, Ed Mosser, Jim Cercy, Lefty St. Pierre and Butch Smith with minus-28. Tying for third/fourth places were the teams of Paul Johnson, Romy Febre, Russ Rudd and Ed Mosser with minus-27; and Ken Brunswick, Tom Morway, Dave Kelly and guest of Kelly with minus-27 each. The Ladies Association played a pro am on Thursday, April 14. Winning first place was the team of Betty Leblanc, Nancy Long and Helen Ochala with plus-7.5; second place, Marybeth Carby, Mary McDonald, Janet Regan and Fran Neil with plus3.5; and third place, Donna Johnson, Elaine Keppler and Lucy Roberts with plus-3.5. Individual winners were: First place, Barb Stuber with plus-5.5; second place, Nancy Long with plus-4; and third place, Betty Leblanc with plus3.5. The Mens Association played a pro am tournament on Wednesday, April 13. Winning first place was the team of Romy Febre, Cliff Aubin, Gerald Bergeron and Stan Oaths with plus-14; and second place, Tim Thomas, Glenn Nelson, Peter Bridge and B.C. Roberts with plus-11; and third place, Peter March, Jim Wright, Ed Mosser and Russ Rudd with plus-6. Individual winners: A Flight (27over): First place, Larry Roy with plus9.5; and second place, Cecil Lemons with plus-3.5. B Flight (23-28): First place, Cliff Aubin with plus-6.5; and second place, B.C. Roberts with plus5. C Flight (17-22): Tying for first/second/third places were Gil Heier, Jim Wright and Dick McClay with plus-1.5 each. D Flight (16-under): First place, Gerald Bergeron with plus-5; and second place, Glenn Nelson. The Morrison Group played a game on Tuesday, April 12. Winning first place was the team of Romy Febre, Joe Graf, David Kelly and Cliff Steele with minus-34; second place, Gil Heier, Lefty St. Pierre, John Smutnick and Butch Smith with minus-29; and third place, Bob Stevens, Jim Cercy, Ken Koon and Gil Heier with minus-25. The Golfettes played a game on Tuesday, April 12. The winners were: Flight I Gross 83, Linda Therrien; Net 60, Peggy Wehunt. Flight 2 Gross 99, tying for first/second places were Carol Roy and Fran Neil; Net 70, Kay Conkle. Flight 3 Gross 104, Jeannine Persails; Net 69, Sally Dworak. The Morrison Group played a game on Monday, April 11. Tying for first/second places were the team of Ken Brunswick, Aurel Mack and Bob Stevens; Tim Thomas, Butch Smith and Vince Boever with minus-21 each. The Limited Member event was played Monday, April 11. Winning first place was the team of Ed Ward, Tom Brouwer, Don Sherman and Milu Weth with plus-18. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011Page 3B run for home on a catcher overthrow. An error and double steal in the seventh put two more on the board for Sebring, capping the game at 6-0 when the Dragons could not rally back at their last at bat. Both teams had a Thursday contest to wrap up the regular season, with the Streaks hosting Port Saint Lucie and Lake Placid welcoming Clewiston to town, before the Dragons head to the District 9-3A Tournament in Avon Park and face Mulberry Tuesday. Sebring will be hosting t he District 5-5ATournament at Firemens Field and beg in play Tuesday against Hain es City. Continued from 1B Sebring, Lake Placid head to District Tourneys next week

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An error on a hard hit from Cheyenne Wise brought Gobourne in and Bailey Beeson drew a walk. Bria Wilson then lofted a deep fly to left that was gotten to, but couldnt be held, bring both Wise and Beeson in for a 6-0 Dragon lead. Two more were added in the fourth with Gobourne and Wells each driving home a run for an 8-0 lead. Abig lead that could have been even bigger if not for two diving catches that recorded the last two outs of the inning. One might have thought the sparkling defensive plays might be the spark that Mulberry needed to get going, but other than a oneout single in the bottom of the fourth, Weber-Callahan got through the inning relatively easily. But while the spark didnt click then, it did an inning later as the comeback began. Two walks, three singles and a wild pitch brought three in and an error brought it two more. An error on a pick-off attempt from catcher to third allowed one more to come in before the inning ended and suddenly the lead was a scant 8-6. But the Lady Dragons answered back in the top of the sixth, adding two more with Corley hitting a rocket-shot double to left center moving to third on Gobournes ground-out and scoring on a wild pitch. Wells reached on a swinging bunt and when the throw to first sailed all the way into the right-field corner, Wells raced all the way around to score and the lead was back to a slightly more comfortable 10-6. The comfort level didnt last long, however, as the Lady Panthers answered with two of their own to make it 10-8 heading into the last inning. Michelle Hunter, Wilson and Weber-Callahan all singled with one out to load the bases and a liner off of Tests bat looked like it might buffer up the lead yet again. But that line-drive went right back to pitcher Rose Stevens, who snared it for the out and leaving the runners where they were. The next out was soon recorded and Mulberry soon came up with itslast rally. AMontana Fulkerson infield single started the bottom of the seventh and with one out, a Stevens push-bunt, hit-and-run started some chaos with overthrows allowing Fulkerson to come around to score and Stevens to get to third. Achopper at the plate started a run down that was run down cleanly and Stevens came in with the tying run. Awalk and a sacrifice bunt then put the winning run at third and Rebecca Wise came through with a clean single to left to bring home the game winner. We pushed them all the way, Lake Placid head coach Alesia Cheshire said. They just had some hitters that we couldnt hold back. But the way I see it is, we havent had a winning season since 1998 and we were 11-9 this year, a winning season. Its going to continue to get better and better from here, she continued. The girls have worked hard and it shows. Im proud of them. Special to the News-SunSEBRING The fourth a nnual Last Chance Ranch 1 0K/5K Run-Walk is set for H ighlands Hammock State P ark on Saturday, April 23 at 7 :30 a.m. The run/walk benefits the L ast Chance Education F oundation for the Venus, F lorida institution. Race organizer Darrell J ensen may be reached at 4 41-3357 and Central Florida S triders president Chet B rojek at 385-4736 or cbroj ek@comcast.net to sign up f or the event. Entry fee is $25 and i ncludes a dri-fit tee, awards i n both events, and refreshm ents post race. Tee shirt sizes can only be g uaranteed for pre-registered e ntrants. Checks made payable to: A MIKids-Last Chance Ranch. Page 4BNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.com This summer the South Florida Community Colle ge volleyball program has more camps to offer than ev er before. Listed below you will see opportunities for sand an d indoor camps. If there is a camp date that you could attend but t he age group is different than yours please call and speci al arrangements could be made. Individual private sessions for indoor and sand a re available year-round. Call/Email to schedule today! June 2011 Sand: 13th-16th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:3 010:30 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor: 13th16th (4 days) Monday-Thursda y, 11:30-1:30 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps June 13-16t h: $100 July 2011 Sand: 11th -14th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor: 11th-14th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 11:3 01:30 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps July 11-1 4: $100 July 2011 Indoor: 25th-28th (4 days) Monday-Thursday Morning Session (Grades 5-8) 9:30-11:30 a.m. $60 Afternoon Session (Grades 9-12) 2-4:30 p.m. $75 Contact Coach Crawford with any questions at kim.crawford@southflorida.edu, cell: 863-835-2377, or Office: 863-784-7037. Panther Volleyball Camps Special to the News-SunAVON PARK SFCC A thleticswill host a Two D ay Fun Sport Selection c amp on Thursday and F riday, June 9 and 10 for g irls and boys aged 6-16. Each day the camp runs f rom 9 a.m.-3 p.m., with c ampers choosing their own s port, whether Beach V olleyball, Basketball, B aseball, Softball or Soccer. During the morning port ion each day, campers will s tretch, do plyometrics, agilit y drills, work on strength a nd flexibility, learn arm and b ody care and get introduced t o the Fitness Center. Lunch is then provided w ith the campers then delvi ng into the sport they chose a nd wrapping it up with a ctivities in the SFCC pool. Registration and check-in f rom 8:15-8:55 a.m., and prer egistration is not necessary a s walk-ups are accepted. The rate for one day is $50 a nd $95 for both days. The camp will be aminist ered by SFCC head and a ssistant coaches, with help f rom SFCC student-athletes. For questions or more inform ation, contact Camp D irector and SFCC Athletic D irector Rick Hitt at 7847 036. SFCC Fun Camps Last Chance Ranch 5/10K Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Highlands Youth Football and Cheer Organization (HYF) will be having a Car Wash fundraiser at Advanced Auto Parts at the corner of US 27 and the Sebring Parkway on Saturday, April 23, from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. All monies earned or donated will be used to purchase equipment and uniforms for the boys and girls. HYF is a new league to Sebring and is looking forward to providing a rewarding youth sports program to foster these boys and girls to develop sportsmanship, physical fitness and build their self esteem as well as provide them an opportunity to be part of a team. The team name is the Highlands Eagles and team colors are black, yellow and white. Come on down and get registered while your car is being washed. HYF will also be offering registration during our car wash for cheerleade rs and football players. Any registered play er that needs to turn in regi stration information or pa yment can come to the c ar wash to do so. Several of our coach es and board members w ill be there to meet or answ er any questions you m ay have. Available for Ages 5 15 years old (8th Gra de maximum). Registration fees a re $75 each for Football an d Cheer or $65 each if yo u are signing up multip le children, Limited spots are ava ilable for Mighty-Mite, P ee Wee and Junior Varsi ty Divisions Flag an d Varsity players are nee ded. All divisions are op en for Cheerleading Please come on down to support your youth foo tball organization. For football, please ca ll Tim Hooks at 414-287 3, Cliff Howell at 253-707 0 or Becky Grippo at 38 19760 for Cheerleading. HYFC Car Wash t he fence and the foul line. With the ball hanging up in t he air and the fielder giving c hase, the runners had little c hoice but to hold. When the ball dropped in s afely, it went for a very long s ingle to load the bases. With Lower now up and s eemingly in the zone after h er third-inning blast, the r unner on third was caught o ff guard when the H ighlander catcher fired b ehind her for a pick-off. Within a few pitches, L ower showed she was l ocked in, ripping a two-run d ouble into the left-center f ield gap to put the Streaks o n top, 4-3. The bottom of the fifth was a mix of mistakes and s parkling effort as the H ighlanders broke it open. With two on, a fly ball to l eft couldnt be corralled, l oading the bases. Grimaldo then made a divi ng stop on a grounder heade d up the middle and alertly t agged the baserunner for a r un-scoring fielders choice. But a hit-by-pitch, a strike o ut and a walk were followed b y two run-scoring passed b alls and a two-run single to c enter for a five-run rally to take an 8-4 lead. Asingle to start the sixth showed Sebring was not about to go quietly, even after the deflating previous inning. But another mental mistake halted the progress when a fly to right and throw to first behind the runner caused an inning-ending double play. Grimaldo then turned in another sterling effort in the bottom of the sixth when, with a runner on first, she dove full out to snare a liner in the hole at short and, from her knees, threw across the infield to double off the runner. And the senior would continue her stellar night with a lead-off single in the seventh, her fourth hit of the night. Pack then caught hold of one, rocketing it over the left-fielders head for an RBI double. But the effort, the game and the season would soon come to an end with consecutive ground outs. Ive seen her for four years now and that was the best Ive seen Amanda play, Sinness said. She made highlight plays and she was outstanding at the bat. We hit the ball, top to bottom, he continued. (The Highlanders) were in more fear than they probably have been in a while. We had them at each others throats a couple times. The mental mistakes caught us, but physically, we beat that team tonight and I commend all our girls for what they did. And so the season ends, with the game marking the last for Grimaldo, Cat Ostrander and Lauren Welborn, but with a host of strong performers coming back next season, with an outstanding level of effort to learn from. Continued from 1B Streaks put up strong effort, fall short News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Amanda Grimaldo lofts this double to left, one of her four hits, to go with a handful of highlight plays in the field in Wednesdays 8-5 loss at Lake Wales. Continued from 1B LP nearly pulls off upset News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Leigha Gersper makes the tag of this Tenoroc runner in Tuesdays District Tournament in Frostproof.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011Page 5B

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By ALICIACHANG APScience WriterLOS ANGELES For the first time in five years, Emily Fennell has two hands. The 26-year-old single mother, who lost her right hand in a car accident, showed off her newly donated hand Tuesday while flanked by a team of transplant doctors. Wearing a protective cast with her fingers poking out, Fennell admitted shes still getting used to it. I do feel like its mine. Slowly but surely, every day it becomes more and more mine, she said. Fennell received the donor limb in a marathon surgery last month at the Ronald Reagan UCLAMedical Center in Los Angeles. She had been living with a prosthetic limb, but wanted a hand transplant to better care for her daughter. During the 14?-hour operation on March 5, a team of nearly 20 surgeons, nurses and support staff grafted a hand from a deceased donor and intricately connected bones, blood vessels, nerves and tendons. The transplant was the 13th such case in the United States and the first for the hospital, which launched its hand transplant program last year. With the surgery successful, Fennell begins the long journey of learning to use her transplanted hand. Emily hasnt used her hand in a long time, said chief surgeon Dr. Kodi Azari. The muscles have not worked. Theyve become weak. At Fennells first public appearance Tuesday, she rested her right hand over the left one. When it came time to thank her doctors, she managed to clap her hands. Fennells right hand was crushed in 2006 in a rollover accident in which her hand went through the open sunroof of the car in which she was riding. After the amputation, Fennell learned to use her left hand to do daily chores such as driving, tying her shoelaces and even typing 45 words a minute in her job as an office assistant. Though she wore a prosthesis, she found it bulky and not useful. Fennell was able to move her new fingers soon after the surgery, but does not yet have feeling in her hand. Doctors said it could take up to a year for the nerves to regenerate before she can feel anything. For the past month, Fennell has been undergoing extensive rehabilitation in Los Angeles that includes eight hours of occupational therapy a day. She practices simple tasks such as grasping and gripping objects in an effort to improve her dexterity and gain strength. Fennell hopes to return to her hometown of Yuba City near Sacramento next month to be with her 6-year-old daughter and continue rehab at home. During a recent visit home, her daughter saw the new hand for the first time and exclaimed: Mommy, its cool. Though Fennells donated hand will never be as strong as the one she lost, doctors said she should regain about 60 percent of the function of a normal hand with continued therapy. Fennell hopes that means she could tie her hair in a ponytail again, catch a ball and type even faster. Like other transplant recipients, Fennell has to take drugs for the rest of her life to prevent rejection. UCLAis testing whether a less-toxic combination of medications is effective. Hand transplantation has come a long way since the first one was carried out in Ecuador in 1964 before the development of modern immunosuppressive therapy. The transplant failed after two weeks and the patient had to have the new hand amputated. More than three decades later, French doctors in 1998 performed a hand transplant that lasted two years. The recipient did not take medications as ordered and his body rejected the limb. Since then, more than 40 hand transplants have been performed around the world including several double hand transplants. The recipient of the first U.S. hand transplant in 1999 has lived with a donor hand for a little over a decade. Its clear that its achievable, said Dr. Warren Breidenbach, who performed the historic surgery. The UCLAoperation cost about $800,000, but since it was experimental, the patient did not have to pay. Little has been revealed about the donor except that the hand matched the patients in terms of blood type, size and color. Aweek after the UCLA operation, doctors at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta performed the 14th hand transplant in the country. The recipient was 21year-old Linda Lu, who had her left hand amputated as a baby. Page 6BNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.com HEALTHYLIVING Outreach scheduleAce Homecare commun ity outreach events for t his week are: Monday: 1 p.m., C aregivers Support Group, C rown Pointe Assisted L iving Community, Sun n L ake Boulevard, Sebring. Tuesday: 9 a.m., Health F air, Groves at Victoria P ark behind Sebring Diner, U .S. 27, Sebring. Wednesday: 9 a.m., e alth Fair, Groves at V ictoria Park behind S ebring Diner, U.S. 27, S ebring; 1 p.m., Health F air, Tanglewood, U.S. 27, S ebring. Thursday: 10 a.m., H ealth Fair, Lake Placid Meal Site, Interlake Boulevard, Lake Placid.Amplified telephones distributionSEBRING Hearing Impaired Persons will distribute amplified telephones to Florida residents who have a hearing or speech loss, in the conference room at Nu-Hope Elder Care Services, 6414 U.S. 27 South in Sebring, on Thursday, April 28, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Important: By appointment only, please call (941) 743-8347. Snapshots DearPharmacist: I have b een experiencing what my c ardiologist calls benign a rrhythmias for 2 years. T hey come and go, and I a m unable to link them to a ny activities, foods or m edicines. Weve tried d igoxin and beta blockers, w hich didnt work. He says h e can fix them with ablat ion and a pacemaker or j ust leave them alone for n ow. Sometimes they make m e lightheaded and I get f rightened. Do you think I s hould do the procedure? S.C., Denver, Colorado Answer: I feel a second o pinion is in order; perhaps y ou need to see an electrop hysiologist or a neurolog ist to get more informat ion. The standard of care is t o do ablation (which is sort o f like burningone of the n odes in your heart) and t hen install a pacemaker w hich forces your heart to b eat in rhythm. I just bang my head tryi ng to figure out why it i snt the standard of care t o determine underlying c ause of heart disease b efore all the invasive irrev ersible procedures like a blation, angioplasty, stenti ng and pacemakers! These p rocedures have a place and s ometimes save lives, but is i t ever wrong to check for i mbalances of essential m inerals, vitamins and a mino acids? I wish that t esting RBC magnesium w as routinely done because a deficiency of magnesium i s a contributing factor in h eart attack. Its often used t o resuscitate someone w hose flatlined. Recently, I went to the c ardiologist with a friend of m ine who had an arrhythm ia like yours. He was o ffered the same procedure b y his cardiologist. On my r ecommendation, he saw a f unctional medicine physic ian who ordered a blood t est (NutrEval by Genova D iagnostics) to evaluate his m icronutrient status. Lo and b ehold, he was found to be d eficient in taurine and m agnesium. Both of these were purc hased at the health food s tore along with hawthorn e xtract. His heart sank into a near-perfect rhythm within two weeks. Had he gone for the ablation procedure, he would have become pacemaker dependent and the underlying deficiencies would have gone undetected! Here are some hearthealthy nutrients to discuss them with your cardiologist: Aged Garlic Extract by Kyolic: Arecent UCLA study found that this supplement slows and may even reverse atherosclerosis, even in people with moderate plaque build up. Aged garlic is a rock star when it comes to heart health. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10): This antioxidant stabilizes your heart beat by maintaining sinus rhythm. It prevents and may reverse symptoms of congestive heart failure. You can now buy the active form of this nutrient as ubiquinol. Statins and blood pressure pills are drug muggers of this nutrient. Taurine: The most abundant amino acid in the heart, it improves contractions, dampens down the sympathetic nervous system and may help with PACs, PVCs, pauses and tachycardia. Aspartame and MSG are food additives that are drug muggers of taurine. Ive posted an extended version of this article with other heart-healthy nutrients to consider. To read the rest of my column, please visit my website, www.SuzyCohen.com. Suzy Cohen is a registered pharmacist and the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and Real Solutions. For more information, visit www. DearPharmacist. com. This information is not intended to treat, diagnose or cure your condition. Lets have a heartto-heart talk Dear Pharmacist Suzy Cohen Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/MCT Emily Fennell, 26, of Yuba City, Calif., became the first person to undergo a hand transplant at UCLA in March. Here, she laughs as she picks up a checker piece during occupational therapy at the UCLA Outpatient Rehabilitation in Westwood, Calif. Calif. woman shows off newly transplanted hand By LINDAA. JOHNSON APBusiness WriterTRENTON, N.J. T he national tab for prescri ption drugs last year grew at the second-slowest pa ce ever measured by a prom inent health data firm. Americans and the ir insurers spent $307.4 b illion on prescription dru gs in 2010, up just 2.3 pe rcent from the previo us year, according to da ta released Tuesday by IM S Health Inc. Thats a slow down from a 5.1 perce nt increase in 2009. Earlier in the decade, annual increa ses went as high as 13 pe rcent. Only 2008, the depths of the recession, saw dru g spending grow more slow ly. Thats bad news f or drugmakers facing eve rgrowing competition to their pricey brand-nam e medications, but the slow down also may be bad f or doctors, and patien ts delaying needed medic ation. Anumber of factors a re slowing the growth: People are visitin g their doctors less. Visi ts slowed 4.2 percent to 1.5 4 billion in 2010. Th at downward trend began in mid-2009, as the emplo yment rate remained stu bbornly high and more pe ople lost health insurance Patients are getting a bigger share of their pr escriptions filled wi th lower-priced generic me dicines. Generics account ed for 78 percent of retail pr escriptions in 2010, up fro m 63 percent in 2006. Use of generic drug s, which can cost a fractio n of the price of brand-nam e medications, is skyrocke ting, according to the IM S report. Growth in drug spending slows

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011Page 7B RELIGION Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID The Women of St. James, who belong to the St. James Catholic Church in Lake Placid, held their Installation of new officers March 29. The event took place during a special Mass concelebrated by three priests, including the Pastor, Father Michael Cannon, plus Father Luis Albarracin and Father Don Jacquees. These new officers were officially swornin following the Mass. The new President is Rae Burmaster, the First Vice President is Joan Penn; the Second Vice President is Martha Roseman, the Secretary is Sharon Pritz, the Assistant Secretary is Mary Jane Neliusl, the treasurer is Helen Stobaugh and the Assistant Treasurer is Jackie Gunderson. The members continued the celebration by meeting at the Placid Lakes Country Club for a delicious luncheon and an afternoon of fellowship. The Women of St. James is an organization dedicated to providing service to the parish in many different ways. Their out-reach projects touch the lives of the community and beyond. For more information about becoming a member, please call the St. James parish office at 465-3215. St. James Womens Club installs new officers Courtesy photo The Women of St. James held their installation of new officers on March 29. Atonement Lutheran SEBRING The Holy Week Schedule is as follows: Maundy Thursday service will be at 7 p.m., led by the Rev. Jefferson Cox. The Holy Eucharist will be followed by the stripping of the altar in preparation of the Good Friday Service which will be held at 7 p.m. Friday. The sermon for the Good Friday Service will be a reading of the Passion of Jesus according to John 18:1-19; 42. Readers will be Tom Portz, Ed Graff, Lois Hess and Ron Fitzpatrick. The Procession of the Cross and the Reverence to the Cross will end the service. Easter Sunday celebration Service with Holy Communion will be led by the Rev. Jefferson Cox at the 9:30 a.m. service. Brunch will follow service.Avon Park Church of ChristAVON PARK What Other Hope? The Resurrection! (John 11:2327), will be the message presented by Ministerr Larry Roberts on Sunday. The Lords Supper is served every Sunday. Morning worship begins at 10:30 a.m. The Sunday evening service will be a Bible study from the Book of Psalms. Avon Park Church of Christ is at 200 S. Forest Ave. Call 453-4692.Christian Science ChurchSEBRING The lesson sermon on Sunday morning is titled Probation After Death. The keynote is from Psalms 118:17, I shall not die, but live, and declare the works of the Lord. The church is at 146 N. Franklin St.Christian Training Church SEBRING The Rev. Linda M. Downing will bring the message titled Easter Seals at the Sunday morning service. The Wednesday night Bible study will continue the book of Hebrews. Covenant Presbyterian ChurchSEBRING The Easter worship service will be held at 10:30 a.m. There will be no 8 a.m. service. Pastor Darrell Arnold will deliver the Easter message. The Easter musical The Risen Christ will be presented. The musical helps us remember the life of Christ but brings the message of the importance of the resurrection. Covenant Presbyterian Church is at 4500 Sun n Lake Blvd., Sebring. www.cpcsebring.org.Eastside Christian LAKE PLACID The worship schedule for Easter Sunday will remain the same. At the Community Easter Services at Memorial United Methodist Church, Pastor Ray Culpepper will be presenting the Gospel reading and Skook Wright of Stepping Out in Faith will be performing the offertory song. Sunday morning Worship Celebration begins at 10:15 a.m., with a traditional style of worship music. Communion is offered weekly. The Agape Cafe is open from 9:45-10 a.m. Emmanuel United Church of ChristSEBRING The Rev. George Miller will deliver the Sunday morning sermon Letting Go to Hold On with Scripture from John 20:1-18. There will be an Easter egg hunt after the 9:30 a.m. Easter service. All are welcome. The church is 1.7 miles west of U.S. 27 on County Road 634 (Hammock Road). Call 471-1999 or visit sebringemmanuelucc.com.First Baptist Church of Lake PlacidLAKE PLACID Easter Services will be as follows: Sunrise service set on the CircleSEBRING The Way Church will be hosting a sunrise service on the Circle in historic downtown Sebring at 7 a.m. on Easter Sunday. Breakfast will follow at the church. All who come to the sunrise service are welcome to join the Way Family for breakfast.Fellowship Baptist plans sunrise service, concertAVON PARK Fellowship Baptist Church will hold an Easter sunrise service at 8 a.m. and worship service at 9:30 a.m. featuring Allison and Spencer in concert on Sunday. Coffee and doughnuts will be served after the sunrise service. The church is at 1000 Maxwell St.Sumner in concert SundaySEBRING Gaither Homecoming artist Donnie Sumner will be in concert Sunday at 11 a.m. at First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd. Prior to receiving Christ into his life, Sumner traveled with the late Elvis Presley as one of his backup singers and as a cast member of the Grand Ole Opry. Since becoming a Christian, all his talents have been used to spread the message of Gods love. Sumner says he is a minister by profession, Gods child by forgiveness and a messenger of good news by calling. The public is invited to this special Easter musical presentation. There is no admission charge. An offering will be taken. Call 385-6431.First Baptist plans Easter serviceSEBRING Easter morning First Baptist, Sebring will hold Bible study/Sunday school at 9:15 a.m., with blended service beginning at 10:30 a.m. The choir will present a mini-concert during that service. There will be no evening service. Wednesday at 5 p.m.will be the last church supper until September. Musical Easter celebration planned SEBRING Amusical celebration of the resurrection, The Risen Christ, will be presented on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 4500 Sun n Lake Blvd. Easter program at LP NazareneLAKE PLACID The Church of the Nazarene in Lake Placid will present its annual Easter program at 10:45 a.m. on Sunday. Th e program will consist of musical numbers interspersed with narration based on the Resurrection of Jesus Christ. Pastor Tim Taylor will bring a message entitled An Encounter With The Living Christ! All are invited. The church is located at 512 W. Interlak e Blvd. There will be no evening service on Easter Sunday. For more informa tion, call 446-1339.Community Good Friday service plannedSEBRING Community Good Friday service will be from 1:303 p.m. Friday at St. John United Methodist Church Grand Prix Drive (behind Walmart). The theme of the servic e is Tracing the Steps of Jesus and will follow the path of Christ from the Upper Room to the burial in six brief segments. Eac h segment will include a Scripture, meditation and congregational response. Participants will come from 14 different churche s. Special music will includ e the Sounds of Sebring Male Quartet; the choir o f the host church and solois t Robert Faldorf. The freewill offering received will benefit the ministerial relief fund of the Sebring Ministerial Association, which is spo nsoring this annual service The public is cordially invited to participate in th is ecumenical service. For further information, call 382-1737.Community sunrise service at Memorial United MethodistLAKE PLACID Memorial United Methodist Church will ho st the annual sunrise service on Sunday at 6:30 a.m. The Rev. Fred Ball from Memorial United Methodist will begin the service with the welcome and invocation. Rev. Elizabeth Myers from St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal Church, Rev. Ray Culpepper of Eastsid e Christian Church, and Re v. Manny Padilla from Igles ia de Dios will read Scriptur e. Skook Wright of Stepping Out in Faith Ministries and Eastside Christian Church will sing during the offering. The offering will benefit Samaritan's Touch Care Center in Lake Placid to help needy people with medical needs. The message The Changing Power of the Resurrection will be give n by Jimmy Goins of Lake Placid Church of Christ using John 20. The benediction will be given by Rev. Mike Ford of First Baptist Church. Church News Continued on page 8B RELIGION GUIDELINES: The News-Sunpublishes religion news on Fridays. The submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday to be considered for publication in the following Fridays paper. Submit items to theNews-Sunsfrom 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays; fax to 385-2453; send e-mail to editor@newssun.com; or mail to Lifestyle Editor,News-Sun,2227 U.S. 27 South,Sebring,FL 33870. For information, call 385-6155,ext. 516. Continued on page 10B By MARK S. SMITH Associated PressWASHINGTON P ausing to observe Holy W eek amid war and policy s truggles, President B arack Obama said on T uesday that the agony of J esus Christ through death a nd resurrection puts m ere political struggle in p erspective. For the second year r unning, Obama hosted an E aster prayer breakfast at t he White House, and the E ast Room was filled with a dministration officials a nd clergy from across the c ountry. Obama said critical n ational debates are ragi ng, and my plate has b een full as well. The inb ox keeps accumulating. B ut then comes Holy W eek ... As busy as we are, as m any tasks as pile up, d uring this season, we are r eminded that there is s omething about the resu rrection ... of Our Savior J esus Christ that puts e verything else in pers pective. Obama spoke just b efore heading to a town m eeting in Virginia on his d eficit plan the start of a cost-to-coast tour prom oting his fiscal blueprint a s more balanced than the o ne advocated by cong ressional Republicans. Obama has used previo us prayer breakfasts to u nderscore the depth of h is Christian faith in the f ace of polls indicating s ome Americans question h is religious beliefs. Last A ugust, a Pew Research C enter poll found 18 perc ent wrongly believe that O bama is a Muslim. On Tuesday, Obama r ecounted the story of C hrists march to Calvary, t he crucifixion and resurr ection, the unfatho mable grace of taking o n the sins of the world. This amazing grace c alls me to reflect, and it c alls me to pray, he said. Obama said his daught ers help keep things in p erspective for him, and s o does having a strong s pouse.... But nothing b eats Scripture and the r eminder of the Eternal. Obama: Christs travails put others in perspective Book of Mormon has sold 150 million copies SALTLAKE CITY ( AP) The Book of M ormon has reached a p ublishing milestone with 1 50 million copies sold. The Church of Jesus C hrist of Latter-day Saints r eleased the information t his week on its website. The book was first p rinted in 1830 and is now a vailable fully translated i n 82 languages. Its official title is The B ook of Mormon: Another T estament of Christ.

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Page 8BNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. childrens choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. childrens mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and womens prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Saturday 3-3:45 p.m. or first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life! Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church.Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP t raditional service from 8-9 a .m.; and contemporary servi ce from 9:15-10:30 a.m. and 1 0:45-noon. There will be no evening s ervice.First Baptist Church of Placid LakesLAKE PLACID On S unday at 10:45 a.m., Pastor D arryl George will preach t he sermon entitled The E aster Resurrected Life! b ased on Luke 24:1-7. Acontinental breakfast h osted by Women On M issions will be served at 8 :30 a.m. There will be no S unday evening service. The church is at the corner o f Washington and Kemper A venues in Placid Lakes. F or more information, call 4 65-5126 from 8 a.m. to n oon, Monday through T hursday or e-mail the c hurch at placidlakes@hotm ail.com.First Christian ChurchAVON PARK Pastor G reg will be bringing the E aster Message And Were S till Talking About It Today. Looking to the Word of God and realizing that when God shakes things up, He does it for a reason. Matthew 28:2 describes the resurrection of Christ like this: There was a violent earthquake, for an angel of the Lord came down from heaven and, going to the tomb, rolled back the stone and sat on it. (NIV) Ladies are still meeting on Monday evening at 6:30 p.m. for a time of study, prayer and fellowship. First Christian Church of Avon Park is at 1016 W. Camphor St. (behind the Wachovia Bank). Call 4535334 or e-mail firstchristianap@embarqmail.com. The church website is www.firstchristianap.com.First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)SEBRING At the Lords Table this Sunday morning will be Howard Lewis and Linda Correll. Communion will be served by Joyce Winstel, Chris Baker, Carol Chandler and Mike Graves. Greeting the congregation will be Clara Moore. Leading the Call to Worship will be Bill Hineline. Michael and Carol Graves will be working with Childrens Church. Lighting the candles during the month of April will be Daniel Thibodeau. Sherry Kunsak will be with the children in the nursery during the month of April. Rev. Ron will present the Easter message, He is Risen! from Luke 24:1-8.First Presbyterian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK For Easter Sunday, Pastor Johnsons sermon is entitled Resurrection of the Dead based on I Corinthians 15:12-19. The choirs introit is He Is Exalted and the anthem is Rise Up Singing. Sunday School is available for all ages. Maxine Johnson, adult teacher, continues the study of David in II Samuel 12 in which Nathan rebukes David. Wendy Garcia teaches the youth class and discusses issues of today and how the Bible instructs us. There will be no Youth Band or Youth Group this week. On Wednesday, April 27 there will be no Bible study as Pastor Johnson and several members will be away at Bonclarken in Flat Rock, N.C. for Volunteer Work Week. Choir practice will be at 6:30 p.m. On Thursday, April 28, Mens Fellowship will meet at The Depot at 7 a.m. for breakfast and then return to the church for a short Bible study and then to a members house for a work project. The church is at 215 E. Circle St. Call the church office at 453-3242.First Presbyterian Church of SebringSEBRING The Easter message for Sunday morning will be delivered by the Rev. Darrell A. Peer. Session meeting is Monday at 2 p.m. in the conference room. Grief support group meets 3 p.m. Tuesday in adult classroom. The Womens Ministries Board Meeting is Thursday at 4:30 p.m. in the adult classroom.First United Methodist Church of SebringSEBRING The Easter celebration and egg hunt for children is Saturday at 10 a.m. Pastor A.C. Bryant will bring the Easter message The Grave Gives Him Up with Scripture from John 20:1-18 on Sunday. Family Fellowship Dinner is Wednesday evening with dinner at 5:30 p.m. in the Family Life Center. The Mother Daughter Banquet will be May 3, sponsored by the Methodist Women. Tickets ($10 for adults and $6 for children) are on sale now. Listen Live on WITS-AM 1340 each Sunday to hear the 10:50 a.m. service. Call the church office for information at 385-5184. The church is downtown at 126 South Pine St. www.sebringfirstumc.com.Heartland Christian ChurchSEBRING Pastor Ted Moores sermon this special Easter Sunday at 10 a.m. will be: The Tomb is Still Empty with Scripture from John 20:1-7. Communion is offered. Service will also include Heartland Singers singing Beyond The Cross, Little Heartland Singers singing Blessed be the Name and Shout to the Lord, Mary VanHooreweghe and Flossi Moore singing Sing to the King, Vic Anderson playin g Hes Alive and Up From the Grave, Ralph Sylveste r playing The Holy City an d George Kelly singing Rise Again. Tuesday nights adult Bible study will be taught b y Pastor Ted Moore. Wednesday night are the young adult and childrens programs taught by George Kelly, Jon and Amanda Armentrout and Toby Cribbs. It features a free meal. The church is at 2705 Alternate Route 17 South in Sebring (behind Publix). Chone 314-9693. Look for the lighthouse.Memorial United Methodist ChurchLAKE PLACID Sunrise Service sponsored by the Lake Placid Christia n Ministerial Association wil l be at the church at 6:30 a.m Everyone is welcome. The Rev. Fred Ball will preach on the Resurrection of Jesus Christ at the 8:30 a.m. Heritage (traditional) Worship service and the 10:45 a.m. Celebration Continued from page 7B RELIGION Church News Continued on page 9B

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011Page 9B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer.Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howes Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer Kid C ity Childrens Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, prime-timers, and Bible s tudies in Spanish. Kid City Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always w elcome. Come grow with us. P hone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Childrens Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturers Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m. in the sanctuary. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Childrens Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church, 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL33870. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pastor. Traditional Worship Service at 8:10 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuary, Contemporary Worship in the FLC at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist Youth Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sundays with Rick Heilig, youth director. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worship service is broadcast over WITS 1340 on AM dial. There is a nursery available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on lifes journey, youre we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP ( blended) worship service. C laude Burnett, pastoral a ssistant, will preach on C elebrating the Resurrection o f Jesus Christ as the 10:45 a .m. New Song C ontemporary Service in R ob Reynolds Hall. Nursery care is available f or all regular morning e vents of the church at the C reepy Crawly Clubhouse. Childrens Church will c onvene during the 10:45 s ervice. Children meet in the S anctuary for Wiggle Time a nd then move to the S onShine Clubhouse. The Church is at 500 Kent A ve. Visitors are welcome. C all 465-2422 for informat ion. There will be no e vening events this week.Parkway Free Will Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Sunday morning Bible lesson Christ is Risen The Easter Message is taken from the book of Matthew 28. Pastor Jim Scaggs will bring the Resurrection Day message in the Sunday morning service. The Sunday evening service will be the regular endof-the-month-sing and fellowship. The Wednesday evening service will be praise, prayer and Bible study.Resurrection Lutheran ChurchAVON PARK On Easter Sunday, the sermon will be based on the 28th chapter of Matthew. The second service will be followed by Easter dinner in Burke Hall. The Busy Bodies meet at 9 a.m. Monday to make and stuff teddy bears to be given to the children in Florida Hospital.St. John United Methodist ChurchSEBRING On Easter Sunday at the 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. services, the Rev. Ronald De Genaros sermon will be All Fear is Gone taken from Matthew 28:1-10. The Chancel Choir will sing at all three services. Nursery is provided at all three services. Boy Scouts meet Monday at 7 p.m. Mens Fellowship and Prayer Breakfast is Wednesday at 7:45 a.m. St. John Youth meet at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.Sebring Church of the BrethrenSEBRING Easter Sunday, Pastor Keith Simmons will be preaching on Empty Tomb Full of Joy! The Scripture reading will be from John 20:1-18. Sunday school will be studying Christ is Risen. They will be looking at the Scripture Matthew 28:1-17. The Kids Zone meets Sundays and Wednesdays. All Christians are welcome to the Easter Sunrise Service to be held at the First Presbyterian Church at 7 a.m. Four churches will be participating: Presbyterian, Church of the Nazarene, First United Methodist and Church of the Brethren.Southside Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Rev. David Altman will bring an Easter message of hope in the Sunday morning worship service. Childrens church and a nursery are available. The evening service will be a focus on prayer for all nations. Forever Friends will meet at 11 a.m. Tuesday with Pastor Randy Smith speaking on Understanding Middle East Turmoil. Wednesday, student ministry starts at 6:30 p.m. and adult Bible study and prayer meeting begins at 7 p.m. The church is at 379 South Commerce Ave. Call 385-0752.Spring Lake Presbyterian ChurchSEBRING The Spring Lake Choir will present an Easter cantata, It Is Well With My Soul this Sunday morning; Revs. Barbara and Phil Laucks.Spring Lake United Methodist ChurchSEBRING The 7 a.m. sunrise service on Sundat, the Rev. Clyde Weavers sermon will be An Easter Religion. Breakfast will follow the sunrise service. At the 9:55 a.m. service, the Rev. Clyde Weavers sermon will be: My Redeemer Lives. No fellowship following the service Sunday. Spring Lake United Methodist Church, 8170 Cozumel Lane.The Way ChurchSEBRING Easter serv ices will begin with a sunri se service on the Circle at 7 a.m. Breakfast will follow a t the church for all who atten d the sunrise service. There will be a film at 9 a.m. and Easter worship will begin a t 10 a.m. Please note change of time of worship for East er Sunday only. May 1 will be the quarte rly meeting following worship and includes a covered dish meal. The Way Church is at 1005 North Ridgewood Drive. Church phone is 471 6140 and the pastors cell phone is 214-6190. For church information and the pastors messages go to www.thewaychurch.org. Continued from page 8B RELIGION Church News

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The Community Calendar provides a brief listing of local clubs and organizations who meet on a regular basis. It is the responsibility of the group to update the News-Sunon any changes in this listing by calling 3856155, ext. 516; send any changes by e-mail toeditor@newssun.com;or mail them to News-SunCommunity Calendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870.FRIDAY Alcoholics Anonymous One Day At ATime group meets for a closed discussion at 9:30 a.m. Monday and Friday at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 4500 Sun N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. Call 314-0891. American Legion Post 25 hosts a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. at the post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake Placid. Cost is $6. Shrimp also is available for same price. Open to the public. Tickets in the lounge on Friday night. Lounge hours are from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 has karaoke from 7 p.m. until final call at the post, 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Post open at noon. Happy Hour from 4-6 p.m. Members and guests only. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Breakfast Rotary Club meets 7 a.m., Rotary Club building. Better Breathers Club Support Group. This American Lung Association affiliated group meets the last Friday of each month, at 12:00 pm in Conference Room 3 at Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center, 4200 Sun n Lake Blvd. Contact Mike Napper, RRTat (863)402-3450. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118. Grand Prix Cloggers Beginner classes are at 9 a.m., EZ Intermediate classes are at 10 a.m., and Intermediate classes are at 11 a.m. every Friday at Reflection on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club offers a class in Lake Placid at the Sunshine RV Resort from 9-11 a.m. Friday. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or e-mail him atsamdunn@samdunn.net. Highlands Social Dance Club hosts ballroom dancing every Friday, October through March from 7-9:30 p.m. at the Senior Center on Sebring Parkway. Dance the night away to the music of the areas Big Bands. All club dances are open to the public. Appropriate dress required. Admission is $5 for members and $7 for non-members. Call 385-6671. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 has lounge hours beginning at 1 p.m. There is a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. Cost is $8.50 per person. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Hi-12 Club meets at noon on the fourth Friday at the Lake Placid Elks, except in June, July and August. All Masons and their ladies are welcome. Call 465-3038. Lake Placid Moose serves wings, fish and burgers at 6 p.m. Music provided from 7-11 p.m. Pool tournament is at 8 p.m. Loyal Order of Moose, Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Karaoke from 7-10 p.m. Lodge phone number 452-0579. Narcotics Anonymous New Day Group meets at 6 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave, Sebring. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Sebring Bridge Club has Bridge, ACBLDuplicate at the clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Fridays. For details or info on lessons, call 385-8118. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves chicken or fish baskets from 5-7 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring, for a $4 donation. Blind darts is played at 7 p.m. Call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 serving buffet dinner at 5-7 p.m. Elks and guests invited. Dance music in ballroom at 7 p.m. Dinner and dance is $10 donation. For reservations, call 3858647 or 471-3557. Lounge is open from 3-10 p.m. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave. Call 3852966. Teamster Retirees meet at the Teamsters Local 444 Union Hall at 211 Potontoc St., Auburndale at 11 a.m. on the last Friday of the month (except June, July and August). Call Paul Thomas at 471-9684. U.S. Military Vets Motorcycle Club serves a steak dinner on the fourth Friday of every month for $7 at VFW Post 9853, State Road 64 West and North Oliva Drive. For information call Hocky at (954) 592-4847 Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3800 serves steak by the ounce from 5:30-7 p.m. every fourth Friday at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Texas Hold em lessons, 2 p.m. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 serves pizza from 5:30-7 p.m. and music is from 69 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902.SATURDAY American Legion Post 25 serves sirloin burgers from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake Placid. Jam session is from 2-4 p.m. The lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Members and guests invited. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 69 in AvonPark serves dinner at 5 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Public Library has a free Adult Film Series at noon. Call 452-3803. Citrus Ridge Decorative Artists is a chapter of the Society of Decorative Painters. The chapter meets the fourth Saturday of the month at Waters Edge of Lake Wales, 10 Grove Ave. West in Lake Wales. Doors open at 9 a.m. and meeting begins at 10 a.m. Bring a bagged lunch with painting to follow. Guests are welcome to come and join the fun, meet the members and fellowship with the chapter. Call Vickie Alley, Frotproof area at (863) 6321472, or Judy Nicewicz, Highlands County area at 2731339.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. provides free assisted riding sessions for adults and children with special needs from 9-11 a.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday at 118 W. College Drive, AvonPark. For details or to volunteer, call Mary McClelland, coordinator, 4520006. Highlands County Democratic Womens Club typically meets the fourth Saturday of each month unless there is a DWC event planned. Call 214-4680 to confirm the next meeting date. Meetings are from 9-11:30 a.m. at Democratic Headquarters, 4216 Sebring Parkway (beside Ruby Tuesdays). The morning includes a continental breakfast, a speaker, a political action discussion and the regular business meeting. Highlands County Housing Authority meets 7 p.m., 3909 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. Highlands Shrine Club, 2606 State Road 17 South, Avon Park (between Avon Park and Sebring) has a flea market from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., country store open from 8 a.m. to noon and pancake breakfast served from 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Vendors are welcome. No setup fee is charged for the summer months. Plenty of off road parking. Call 382-2208. Highlands Woodcarvers meet from 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays at 825 Sunbird Terr. (Community Center off Thunderbird Road). Call Bob Seybolt at 471-6077. Lake Placid Art League has a class in Pastels/Acrylics taught by Llewellyn Rinald from from 9 a.m. to noon at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 opens the lounge at 1 p.m. Card games are played at 1 p.m., and Bar Bingo is at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Call 4652661. Narcotics Anonymous New Day Group meets at 7 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave, Sebring. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Overeaters Anonymous meets at 10:30 a.m. at First Presbyterian Church, Oak Street, Lake Placid. For more details, call 382-1821. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves dinner from 5-7 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Music is from 7-10 p.m. Call 655-4007. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3800 serves breakfast from 8-11 a.m. and horse raicing at 5:30 p.m. every second and fourth Saturday at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 serves a meal for $6 from 5:30-7 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call 385-8902. SUNDAY American Legion Post 25 Lake Placid has lounge hours from 1-9 p.m. Live music is from 5-8 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Members and guests only Post is at 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Call 471-1448. Inerstate chapter of A.B.A.T.E. meets the last Sunday of every month at The Blue Crab, 825 Ridgewood Dr. Sebring at 11 a.m. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 lounge is open from 1-7 p.m. Card games start at 1:30 p.m. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has karaoke in the pavilion. Horseshoes played at 9:30 a.m Food available at 4 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Loyal Order of Moose, Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Cards start at 4 p.m. Music outside Tiki Hut at 3 p.m Lodge phone number 452-057 9. Overeaters Anonymous, meets from 4-5 p.m. in second floor conference roomNo. 3 at Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center, 4200 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 3827731. No dues, fees or weighins. For details on the organiza tion, go to www.oa.org. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves lunch at 2 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 225 9 offers NASCAR racing in the pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar open and kitchen open from 2-5 p.m Lodge is at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-3920. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 serves hamburgers from 4-5:30 p.m. and plays poker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 Karaoke is from 5-8 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Call Page 10BNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011www.newssun.com There will be some f olding chairs, but those a ttending may bring their f avorite lawn chair. The p ublic is cordially invited t o attend this service. The c hurch is at 500 Kent A ve. in Lake Placid. It is s outh of U.S. 27 overl ooking Lake Clay.Special speaker and author at Highlands Community ChurchSEBRING Chad V arga, a former profess ional basketball player, w ill be at Highlands C ommunity Church on E aster Sunday at 10 a.m. Varga is an incredibly d ynamic and gifted s peaker, who connects w ith all ages, backg rounds and every ethnici ty. His hard, surreal u pbringing, his former p rofessional basketball c areer and his ministry to h undreds of thousands of p eople each year has s haped this man and his m essage. You will not f ind anyone who is more r eal, honest and impacti ng in their approach to p eople. His passion and h eart for church is what s ets him apart. Varga is anointed and c alled of God to chall enge, motivate and r evive the complacent C hristian and lost alike. Highlands Community C hurch is at 3005 New L ife Way. For more inform ation, call 402-1684.First Presbyterian hosting sunrise serviceSEBRING All C hristians are welcome to t he Easter sunrise service t o be held at the First P resbyterian Church at 7 a .m. Four churches will be p articipating P resbyterian, The Church o f the Nazarene, The F irst United Methodist a nd the Church of the B rethren. Continued from page 7B Snapshots RELIGION COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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By CHRISTYLEMIRE APMovie CriticIts a genius little gimm ick, really: a clever, knowi ng twist that isnt so obnoxi ously meta as to be off-putt ing. Morgan Spurlock made a d ocumentary about product p lacement, marketing and a dvertising, and he funded it e ntirely through product p lacement, marketing and a dvertising starting with t he title. And so it isnt just: The Greatest Movie Ever S old. Its: POM Wonderful P resents: The Greatest Movie E ver Sold. Now, you may not necess arily walk out of the theater c raving pomegranate juice o r itching to book a flight on J etBlue Airways, or nibble on s ome Amys Kitchen pizza, o r drive a Mini Cooper (or f ill up that Mini Cooper at a S heetz convenience store). A nd those are just a few of t he two dozen or so sponsors S purlock amassed, despite e nduring many, many more r ejections. (The ones that s hot him down also get s hout-outs, but probably not i n the way they would have l iked, which is one of many c auses for laughter here.) But while Spurlocks film i s hugely entertaining, unsurp rising coming from the lika ble maker and star of Super S ize Me and Where in the W orld is Osama Bin Laden?, S purlock also doesnt conn ect the dots sufficiently e nough to prove that product p lacement actually influe nces consumer habits. Still, he has fun trying, even going so far as to insert affectionately over-the-top ads for some of the brands that are sponsoring him; the ones for Hyatt Hotels and Mane n Tail hair products which are good for both humans and horses are especially amusing. And he does shine a light on a trend thats only getting more prevalent, and more shameless. The average viewer probably doesnt know, for example, about the kind of wrangling that goes on behind the scenes to get those products into movies that strongarming can occur during shooting to ensure that you see a certain brand of soda at just the right time. Rush Hour director Brett Ratner, one of many filmmakers who add their insight, phrases it well: Artistic integrity? Whatever. But he also explains that if saying yes to product placement means that you get the kind of money you need to make the kind of movie you envision ... well, then its a win-win. This is, after all, a business. Spurlock also aims to achieve transparency by including footage from the pitch meetings with various companies so we know how much Ban deodorant paid to be involved in his movie, for example. And when the owner of Sheetz asks, Is there a plot? Spurlock doesnt miss a beat in responding, This is the movie right now. Of course, theyre in on the joke, too. Thankfully, Ralph Nader also shows up to serve as the voice of reason. He figures that the only place to escape the onslaught of advertising is during sleep but he also finds himself engaged with Spurlock in a discussion of Merrell shoes, which the director just happens to be wearing during his interview with Nader. Just by being himself, Spurlock is a big reason The Greatest Movie Ever Sold is so enjoyable, and his presence is powerful enough to make you overlook the films shortcomings. (Avisit to Florida, where cash-strapped public schools have given into advertising, feels like an unfocused detour.) Unlike Michael Moore, who inserts himself front and center in his documentaries to stridently prove his points, Spurlocks folksy affability creates the sensation that hes truly going on a journey, that he doesnt necessarily know all the answers to the questions hes posing, and hed like nothing more for us than to go along for the ride. As long as that ride is in a Mini Cooper, of course, and not a Volkswagen. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 22, 2011Page 11B DIVERSIONS DearAbby: My father is a state worker who has furlough Fridays. My sister, Dee, went home early from school last Friday because she wasnt feeling well and found him in bed with one of his coworkers. Mom was at work, so apparently Dad thought he was safe. If Mom ever found out, their marriage would be over. Dad is begging Dee not to tell. Dee and I have been saving for a large HDTV for our bedroom. Dad is now offering to pay for it. He says hell tell Mom hes helping us because we have been working so hard to save the money. Actually, hed pay for the whole thing and let us keep our money. Dee is all for it. She says we can use Dads affair to get more from him in the future. Im shocked and disappointed in my father, and while I dont want to see my parents marriage destroyed, I dont feel right about letting him bribe us. What should I do? California Girl DearCalifornia Girl: Your father is a piece of work. That he would attempt to rope his daughters in as co-conspirators shows the extent of his lack of character. And if you didnt realize it, you wouldnt have written to me. Please do not go along with your sisters plan to accept the payoff. Its extortion. If you keep the secret, there is nothing to prevent your father from continuing his adulterous affairs. As difficult as hearing about this from you may be to your mother, if she should find out whats been going on and it ALWAYS comes out and realize her daughters were aware of it, her pain will be magnified. DearAbby: My fiance has a daughter in college. Kimberly emails her essays to her father, always saying, I need you to spell-check, check grammar and fix everything. Then send it back to me. As a teacher, I have told him this is unethical. His daughter is working for a grade and there are resources available at the university. She has no dis ability and time is not an issue. When this happens my blood boils. Am I wrong? Or is it wrong of her to expect Daddy to fix her papers so she can get a good grade? He thinks Im overreacting. Not Fooled in Michiga n DearNot Fooled: Of course youre not wrong. As well-intended as your fiance may be, by correct ing his daughters assignments hes preventing her from learning skills she will need once she graduates. Warning: If you plan to marry this man, be pre pared for a future filled with him solving one prob lem after another for her, because hes not going to change and neither will she. Acollege girl being this dependent on Daddy isnt healthy. DearAbby: How long after you are married can you take a honeymoon? My husband and I dream of going to Venice so we can kiss on the Bridge of Sighs. Weve heard if you do that, youll be in love forever. Were saving our mone y, but wont be able to affor d to go until after our first anniversary. Is there a rul e that a honeymoon must b e taken within the first year of marriage? Liza in Alas ka DearLiza: Theres no such rule that I know of. Because its your first big trip together as man and wife, call it a deferred honeymoon (after all, thats what it is), and you need not apologize for doing so. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Adulterous dads TV bribe doesnt offer pretty picture Dear Abby By DAVID BAUDER APTelevision WriterNEWYORK After a s eason of earthquakes, t sunamis and political viol ence, television networks f rom ABC to E! are betting t hat many Americans will w ant to rise before dawn next w eek to bask in the splendor o f the royal wedding between P rince William and Kate M iddleton. Coverage generally begins a t 4 a.m. EDTfor the April 2 9 wedding, or 1 a.m. PDT o n the West Coast, where the i ssue may be whether to stay u p very, very late. Collectively people are e ager for a bit of a break, s aid Mark Lukasiewicz, NBC N ews executive in charge of p lanning coverage for that n etwork and its cable offs hoots. It will be a chance to f ocus on something that has a l ittle bit of fun and pageantry i n the grand British style. Nobody, agreed ABCs B arbara Walters, does a w edding like the British. Cable television was in its i nfancy when Williams pare nts, Prince Charles and Lady D iana Spencer, were married i n 1981. The broadcast netw orks were the place to see t hat wedding, and theyll be b ack this year. But viewers w ill have several other o ptions, including bypassing t elevision altogether by w atching an online stream. Lukasiewiczs assignment f or NBC Universal alone i llustrates the variety. On NBC, the Today s how team will be in London f or live coverage, joined by t he networks top anchor, B rian Williams. MSNBC will h ave its own team, led by M artin Bashir and Chris J ansing at first, then the Morning Joe cast. Cable s ister E! Entertainment will s how the ceremony live, led b y Giuliana Rancic. T elemundo is covering the e vent for Spanish-speaking viewers. The MSNBC.com website is streaming the wedding live. NBC News is also producing a royal wedding app for the iPad, whose features include shortcuts to connect people following the wedding through social media. Most of the stars of U.S. television news will be in London next week not only to cover the wedding itself but the advanced preparations. Their bet is that interest in the royal nuptials will approach that of Charles and Dianas wedding. The young people in my office are very excited, said Walters, who was on hand for the 1981 wedding and will team with Diane Sawyer to lead ABCs coverage next week. Walters said her head is already filling with royal trivia to use during the live broadcast. She noted the contrast between the relationships: Diana, a virginal 20-year-old who barely knew her prince, compared with Kate, a 29year-old who met her prince while they were in college together and had an off-andon relationship with him ever since. Its much more reflective of the times and it seems like theres a much better chance of the marriage lasting, she said. U.S. interest in the wedding has been slow to catch fire, but BBC America has noticed improving ratings for its pre-wedding programming lately, said Perry Simon, general manager of channels for BBC Worldwide America. Americans dont really start paying attention until it gets closer to the actual event, he said. BBC Americas job, he said, has been to stoke that interest. Simon was riding in a cab in London when word of the royal engagement came down. He immediately pulled out his smartphone to contact fellow executives; he wanted BBC America to own the story of the wedding on U.S. TV. Rather than appeal specifically to a U.S. audience on the day of the wedding, BBC America will air a commercial-free simulcast of what the main BBC network is showing. Americans will be able to experience the wedding the way many British citizens will be in their own living rooms. BBC One news anchor Huw Edwards will lead the BBCs team. There is nobody better prepared and more appropriate to present the event in all of its grandeur, Simon said. Other networks offer a farewell of sorts, a coming out party and a chance to see an old friend. Katie Couric, who is taking her CBS Evening News broadcast to London midweek, will anchor CBSwedding coverage starting at 4 a.m. on Friday. Not only is the morning hour familiar to many of her fans from the Today show, theres a good chance it will be the last major news event where she is CBSlead anchor. Her CBS contract expires on June 4. Networks girding for wall-towall royal wedding coverage Spurlock sells out for Greatest Movie Movie Review POMWonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold Rating: PG-13 (for some language and sexual material) Running time: 88 minutes Review: (of 4) MCTphoto The royal wedding will be held at Westminster Abbey in London on April 29.

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LIVING 12B PAGE News-Sun Friday, April 22, 2011 An alien member of the Green Lantern Corps an intergalactic peacekeeping force crash lands on Earth after a fierce battle against an enemy that threatens the universe. Mortally wounded, the dying alien calls upon his power ring to search the planet for a worthy successor, someone honest and without fear. The ring selects daring, but arrogant, test pilot Hal Jordan. But Jordan, the first human picked to join the Green Lantern Corps, isnt as fearless as he seems. Can he learn to harness his power ring and tackle his insecurities in time to help thwart the cosmic menace?POWERS AND WEAPONS Power ring:Astandard issue of all Green Lanterns, the power ring allows its bearer to fly, project energy and create hard-light constructs of any shape or size from the users imagination. Its abilities are limited only by the ring-bearers willpower and creativity. The power ring has one weakness, however it doesnt work against anything colored yellow. The ring must be recharged every 24 hours by a lanternshaped power battery. Mighty, but arrogant, Thor is banished from the realm of Asgard by his father Odin, ruler of the Norse gods, when his actions threaten the peace of the mystical kingdom. Forced to live on Earth, will the outcast god learn what it takes to be a true hero in time to save both Earth and Asgard from a common threat?POWERS AND WEAPONS Mjolnir:Virtually indestructible, this magically enchanted hammer allows Thor to channel the forces of weather such as lightning, rain, wind and thunder. Mjolnir can obey Thors mental commands and will return to him if thrown. Only those deemed worthy can lift Mjolnir from the ground. Superhuman strength:Thor possesses super strength enabling him to lift up to 100 tons. Resistance to injury:Thors skin and bones are several times denser than a normal human, making him extremely resilient. Amplified Asgardian physiology:While all Norse gods are extremely long-lived, have other-wordly endurance and are immune to disease, Thors physiology exceeds even that.MOVIE INFOMovie title:ThorRelease date:May 6Starring:Natalie Portman, Chris Hemsworth, Anthony HopkinsDirector:Kenneth BranaghBy Eric Goodwin, McClatchy TribuneMOVIE INFOMovie title:Green LanternRelease date:June 17Starring:Ryan Reynolds, Blake Lively, Peter SarsgaardDirector:Martin CampbellAskinny, frail Steve Rogers volunteers to become the first test subject for a topsecret U.S. government project to create an army of physically enhanced soldiers to fight in World War II. The combination of a special serum and exposure to controlled bursts of Vita-Rays radiation transforms the feeble Rogers into a specimen of physical perfection. Captain America is born! As the United Statesfirst super soldier jumps into action, an ominous threat from the Nazis looms in the background.POWERS AND WEAPONS Shield:Forged from a special metal alloy, this concave disk is impervious to nearly all forms of artillery providing excellent protection in battle. If thrown, the shields aerodynamic shape allows it to cut through the air with minimal wind resistance. Peak human strength, speed, agility and endurance:Captain America has been physiologically altered to be as strong, fast and flexible as any human being can possibly be. He can press up to 800 pounds and run at top speeds approaching 30 mph. His body eliminates the excessive build-up of fatigue-producing poisons in his muscles, granting him remarkable endurance.MOVIE INFOMovie title:Captain America: The First AvengerRelease date:July 22Starring:Chris Evans, Hugo Weaving, Tommy Lee JonesDirector:Joe JohnsonMOVIE INFOMovie title:X-Men: First ClassRelease date:June 3Starring:James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Jennifer LawrenceDirector:Matthew VaughnPROFILEAs young men, Charles Xavier and Erik Lehnsherr (better known by their alter egos Professor X and Magneto) are close allies, sharing a mutual dream of helping other mutants learn how to harness their special powers. However, while their goals are similar, their approaches are not. What begins as a difference of opinion between one-time best friends grows into a full-fledged feud as they battle to put an end to a global crisis.POWERSCharles Xavier Telepathy:One of the most powerful telepaths on the planet, Xavier can read and manipulate the minds of others.Erik Lehnsherr Magnetism:Lehnsherr can generate and control the electromagnetic force, allowing him to manipulate metal, levitate, form powerful force fields and shoot pulses of electromagnetic energy.James McAvoy as Charles XavierLeap into action with this seasons batch of comic book superhero moviesChris Evans as Captain America Ryan Reynolds as Green LanternWARNER BROS.PARAMOUNT PICTURES PARAMOUNT PICTURESChris Hemsworth as Thor