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The news-sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01030
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 04-17-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:01030
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING "They are people, they matter, and they vote," said Cindy Marshall, Ridge Area Arc employee, on Friday. Marshall was helping her Arc consumers hold a rally at Duffer's Bar and Grille to raise awareness, and money, to help replace proposed budget cuts from the state supported agency. The Ridge Area Arc received notice that emergency cuts in state funding has slashed its budget $30,000 per month effective April 1. News agencies are now reporting that the governor has reversed his decision for this year and will fund the deficit, replacing the Arc budget through June, but that NEWS-SUN Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 45 | 75 cents www.newssun .com HighLow 83 60Complete Forecast PAGE 7A Partly sunny and warm Forecast Question: as the recent surge in gas prices made you drive less? Next question: Should congress vote to raise the federal debt limit? www.newssun .com Make your voice heard at Online Inside Phone ... 385-6155Fax ... 385-2453Online: www.newssun.com Yes 84.4% No 15.6% 099099401007 Total votes: 96 Arts & Leisure6B Best Sellers10B Business9A Chalk Talk8B Classifieds10A Community Briefs2A Community Calendar5B Crossword Puzzle13B Dear Abby13B Editorial & Opinion4A Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times13B Police Blotter2A School Menus8B Sports On TV2B Index PAGE12B 2011 $3.792010 $3.112009 $2.312008 $3.692007 $3.092006 $2.972005 $2.472004 $2.012003 $1.852002 $1.622001 $1.75 Up, Up and Away Average U.S. gas prices in April Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics; Energy Information Administration Dragons rollingLake Placid cruises to win & second seed in district tourney SPORTS, 1B Paying more, driving less By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING With gasoline prices once again rising as they did during the summer of 2008, when a gallon of regular gas averaged $4.11, the NewsSun went out Thursday and Friday to discover what people think, and if people are changing their driving habits as a result. "I will not be traveling as much," said Margaret Meder firmly, who lives south of Sebring. To save money she has begun to make a list of everything she needs and everywhere she has to go, then sets out on a single trip, going to locations in geographical order. "And I won't be driving my truck any time soon," she said. "It's a Dodge Ram and it gets 11 miles a gallon and costs $65 to fill up. I'm driving my Toyota Corolla, it only costs $30 to fill. The truck is staying parked unless it's really necessary." Kathy Parks, who was listening, agreed. "Definitely," she said, "you need to cut back and try to shop all in one shot." Tammy Fox, who works at Sebring City Hall, went further. "You know," she said, "you're thinking I'll go to Walmart,'and then you don't because you don't want any unnecessary trips." Fox is doing more than planning shorter trips, or cutting them out altogether. She is changing the way she drives. "I've lowered my speed," she said. "I keep my RPMs under 2,000. I may start to carpool, some of (my coworkers) live near me. Gas prices go up, gas use goes down If you see a crazy woman on a horse, that's me.'TAMMYFOX Sebring resident Drive less, that's what we're going to have to do.'JIMSZELAGOWSKI By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Employment figures for the month of March were released by the Agency for Workforce Innovation Friday morning. The good news is a drop in unemployment on the national, state and county levels, although the gains were not large. Highlands County's unemployment lowered by .3 percent from 11.0 percent in February to 10.7 percent. By comparison, the state of Florida's unemployment figure, its lowest sin ce 2009, was 10.6 percen t. That was down from 11 pe rcent in February, whi le nationally the March ra te was 9.2 percent unemplo yment, compared to 9.5 pe rcent in February. These fi gures are not seasonal ly adjusted. For Highlands Count y, the percentage means 17 3 individuals found jobs in March. According to a pre ss release issued by the AW I on Friday, the March fi gures show the first over-th eCounty's jobless rate creeps down News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE A large crowd seeks support from oncoming traffic along U.S. 27 on Friday, showing support for the Ridge Area Arc. Arc rally draws support See ARC, page 6A See GAS, page 8A See JOBLESS, page 8A By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK Areca ll committee filed petitions o n Thursday in order to seek t he removal of three Avon Pa rk council members, and ea ch member has chosen to respon d in their own way. Deputy Mayor Brenda Gray, as well as council members Terry Heston and Paul Miller, were named in each petition seeking their removal from office. Gray responded to the petition by countering each of the accusations individually, and by questioning the motivations of the committee. "I would just like to say that the citizens put me in office, and if the citizens don't want me in office, they have every right to remove me. If they don't want me, then that's fine. I have done the best I can do," Gray said. "If these complaints is t he best they can give me, well ha ve at it. I asked myself why th ey would they want to recall m e, other than these stated things. Is it because I am black? Because I am female? "My telephone number is public, and none of these peop le AP's Gray wonders if recall based on race, sex I asked myself why they would want to recall me ... Is it because I'm black? Because I am female?'BRENDA GRAY APcounci l member See GRAY, page 8A ManhuntFleeing suspect found in attic in Avon Park PAGE2ARelay for LifePhotos from Saturday's Sebring event PAGE3A Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun andMoms killing their kidsIt's not as rare as we'd like to think it is News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Drivers have had to change their habits as gas prices have climbed back toward the $4 per gallon mark.

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By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK Avon Park officers and Highlands County Sheriff's Office deputies worked hand in hand on Friday to track down a suspect on the run, and finally talked him out of an attic. Johnny Clyde Davis, 22, was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without intent to kill, burglary of a dwelling or conveyance while armed and trespassing while armed after a chase that led officers to three different houses. According to Lt. John King of the APPD, officers saw Davis entering an orange grove south of Ridgedale Apartments just before 8 a.m. as they were responding to a call about the assault. The HCSO K-9 unit responded to the call and the search was on for Davis. "Tips from the local community really helped us out on this one," King said on Saturday. "Several residents help to locate Davis, and the incident ended without injury. The department is grateful for the assistance and the care shown by the residents," King added. The search for Davis initially led to a house at 611 Overlook Terrace around 8:30 a.m., based on reports from two witnesses. But when the officers arrived Davis was not there, King said. Asecond tip led the APPD to a house on Ebi Street, and Davis was reported to be in the attic. "Since the St. Petersburg incident (when two police officers were shot and killed trying to arrest a man in an attic), we are extra careful when we have to respond to a call like this," King said. Davis was in the attic, but agreed to come out peacefully when the officers called up to him. "I am glad this ended without incident, and I appreciate the assistance from the citizens," King said. Davis'record shows that he was on probation in 2007 for an unlisted crime and was arrested in 2008 for battery. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.com April 13 1815324043x:5Next jackpot $11 millionApril 9 101114184041x:4 April 6 21521222445x:5 April 15 1316182633 April 14 1223293233 April 13 27113033 April 12 918212224 April 15 (n) 8617 April 15 (d) 2721 April 14 (n) 7701 April 14 (d) 6848 April 15(n) 44 7 April 15 (d) 68 2 April 14 (n) 65 9 April 14(d) 76 1 April 17 259314 April 12 216224014 April 8 112436379 April 5 213212418 April 13 423394950 PB: 39 PP: 3Next jackpot $43 millionApril 9 514325356 PB: 11 PP: 4 April 6 1018415556 PB: 15 PP: 2 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center Sparrow Avenue to be closedSEBRING Sparrow Avenue from Limpkin Street to U.S. 27 will be closed for vehicular and pedestrian traffic beginning at 6 a.m. on Monday due to the widening and reconstruction project. Detour routes will be posted. Businesses within the closed portion of Sparrow Ave. will be accessible from other routes during the construction. Call the Highlands County Engineering Department at 402-6877 for more information.Lake Josephine boat ramp temporarily closesLAKE PLACID Lake Josephine boat ramp at 1540 Lake Josephine Drive will be closed from Wednesday through May 15 for tussock removal from the lake. For further information contact the Highlands County Parks and Recreation Department at 402-6812.RSVP needs volunteers SEBRING The Retired and Senior Volunteer Program, administered by South Florida Community College, is seeking volunteers for afterschool homework helpers and elementary school tutors, food sorters, meal delivery, reception and clerical support, special event volunteers, and thrift store cashiers and sorters RSVPis a volunteer program that is offered throughout the country for adults ages 55 and older. It provides free volunteer placement at nonprofit agencies of the volunteer’s choice, as well as free supplemental accident and liability insurance. Highlands County’s RSVPvolunteers share their time, experience, and talents with non-profit organizations and areas of critical need. Many volun teer opportunities are avai lable through RSVPinclud ing mobilizing other volu nteers, mentoring or tutorin g children, and leading fundraising efforts. For more information o r to volunteer with RSVP, contact Kris Schmidt, coo rdinator, RSVP, at 784-718 9 or visit the Web site at www.southflorida.edu/rsv p. South Florida Community College hosts improv comedy showAVON PARK South Florida Community College (SFCC) presents a night of comedy by the Upright Citizen's Brigade at 7 p.m. Thursday in the SFCC University Center Auditorium, Highlands Campus. The UCB Theatr e is one of the greatest producers of comedic talent i n America today and the Upright Citizens Brigade Touring Company brings the best of theatres in New York City and Los Angele s to nationwide audiences. This performance, now entering its fifth season, has played at universities, rock clubs, and festivals across the United States. It's a great chance to see stars of today and tomorrow live on stage from the theatre that produced com edy greats like Horatio Sanz, Amy Poehler, Rob Corddry, Ed Helms, MTV 's Human Giant, and the Daily Show's Rob Riggle This improv comedy show, sponsored by the SFCC Student Governmen t Association (SGA), is free to SFCC students, staff an d faculty and $5 per person for the general public. Th e show is one hour and gua ranteed to be a laugh-outloud affair, so come check out and support student entertainment at SFCC. F or more information, contact Laura Wade, coordinator, Student Life, at 784-7435 COMMUNITYBRIEFS Continued on page 5B The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Thursday, April 14: Moses Anderson, 53, was charged with two counts of fraud-impersonation unlawful use of a police badge and of a law enforcement officer. Reshawna Jkeira Hawkins, 28, of Lake Placid, was charged with two counts of failure to appear reference give false name/identification to a law enforcement officer and knowingly driving with license suspended/revoked. Timothy Dale Landers, 43, of Lake Placid, was charged with DUI. Stanley Moore, 54, of Lake Placid, was charged with possession of cocaine, possession and or use of drug equipment and five counts of failure to appear reference introducing contraband into a detention facility, possession of cannabis, use or possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of cocaine. Jerome Antonio Oliver, 23, of Avon Park, was char g ed with DUI. POLICEBLOTTER Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The Avon Park C ommunity Redevelopment Agency ( CRA) is offering financial assistance to i mprove the exterior, or facade, of resid ential homes and businesses located w ithin the city's three CRAdistricts. Free Home Facade Grants are availa ble for homeowners who meet very l ow, low or moderate income requirem ents. Total allowable funds are up to $ 2,500 per owner-occupied home every t wo years. For homeowners who do not q ualify for the Free Home Facade Grant, a Matching Facade Grant is available. Total allowable funds for this grant are 50 percent of costs up to a maximum of $2,500 per residence per year and the homes do not have to be owner occupied. Business Matching Grants are available for the improvement of storefronts. Total allowable funds per business are 50 percent of costs up to a maximum of $5,000. Interested parties must complete a Facade Grant Application, which is available at city hall. Grant funds will not be considered for projects already under renovation and is based on appropriated funding designated for the CRA program and are on a first come, first serve basis. For more information about the Facade Grant Application process or to obtain an application form, contact Wes Hoaglund, CRARedevelopment director, at (321) 287-6543 or 452-2039. The application is also available online at www.AvonPark.cc in the Resources Section under Publications. Avon Park CRA offers facade grants News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE A Highlands County Sheriff's Office K-9 unit discusses strategy with Avon Park's Police Department during a recent manhunt on Overlook Terrace, just northease of the intersection of State Road 17 and Memorial Drive on Friday Morning. Manhunt in Avon Park ends with peaceful arrest Special to the News-SunSEBRING "Starting Your Business" is a free seminar presented by the Small Business Development Center at USF. It will be held from 2-4 p.m. Wednesday, April 27 at South Florida Community College Corporate and Continuing Education Room T05. It is designed for persons thinking of starting a small business or who have started a business and want to make sure they did it correctly. Licenses, marketing, entity selection, and business planning are among the items discussed. The seminar will be presented by David Noel, Certified Business Analyst with the SBDC. Seating is limited, so call Noel at 784-7378 to reserve a seat in the seminar or for further information. Seminar set to help start a business Associated PressORLANDO R epublican U.S. Sen. M arco Rubio got a standi ng ovation Friday from t ea party supporters at a T ax Day rally in downt own Orlando when he t old them he had voted a gainst a budget deal b ecause it didn't cut s pending enough and Gov. R ick Scott urged tea p artiers in Jacksonville to p ressure lawmakers to l ower taxes. Acrowd of more than 1 ,000 people cheered at t he Lake Eola amphithea ter when Rubio told them h e had voted against the 2 011 budget deal. "This is not just another d ebate. That's why yesterd ay I voted against that b udget," he said. "I think o ur leaders up there, a lot o f them worked very hard. T hey think they did the b est they could. I get all t hat. But let me tell you s omething. We're running o ut of time. This is a m ajor, major, major m oment in American hist ory, and we no longer h ave the luxury of small s olutions for this big probl em." Rubio, a Tea Party darl ing, was joined at the r ally by other Republicans a nd Joe Wurzelbacher, b etter known as Joe the P lumber, who became f amous campaigning with G OPpresidential candid ate John McCain in 2008. R ubio was scheduled to be t he keynote speaker at a nother Tax Day rally in T ampa later in the day. At one point, Rubio was i nterrupted by a heckler w ho shouted out that the s enator was a pawn of corp orations. The heckler was e scorted outside the a mphitheater by a police o fficer where he joined a bout a dozen other antiR ubio protesters. In Jacksonville, Scott a ddressed about 600 peop le at a rally along the St. J ohns River, urging them t o tell lawmakers to lower t axes and reduce regulat ions on businesses. "Stop raising our taxes. S top regulating our lives. S o, what do we have to d o? We have to vote," S cott said. Tea partiers cheer Scott, Rubio

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 3A News-sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY T he Sebring High School Junior Air Force Revere Officer Training Corps Color Guard cross Fireman's Field to get into place for the opening ceremonies Saturday, during Sebring's Relay-For-Life. News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLE Y Aron Hall, who is in the tenth grade at Sebring High School, takes practice throws at the Walgreen station dunk tank. The chain's store managers, from all three cities were all wet, all afternoon. News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLE Y Savanah Demeri rides the bounce house slide. Savanah is in the 1st grade at Cracker Trail Elementary School. News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY (From left) Garrett Johnson, 2, and his friend Kalee Desazo, almost 3, blow bubbles while Debbie Taylor supervises. They are part of the Highlands Independent Bank Team. News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFELY T he Highlands independent Bank Team joins hands to raise the Relay-For-Life branch bank. Sebring walks for a cure in Relay for Life

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F riday we asked some hard questions t he gist of which a mounted to why w ealthier American c itizens are not being a sked to help save t he nation, while the p oor, the sick, the y oung and the elderl y have been told t hey must give their a ll.The answer, we think, is s elf-evident those individu als making the hard decis ions, our elected officers at e very level of government, n eed money, lots of money, t o stay in office. When a candidate running for tax collector in Highlands County spends tens of thousands of dollars on a campaign, you know things are getting out of whack and that's nothing compared to the millions of dollars spent on obtaining state or national level positions. Think of what could happen if people donated dollars so schools or neighborhood clinics could be built, instead of donating those dollars to pay for a politician's attack ads. As long as it costs as much as it does now to run for office, the writers of the $500 to $5,000 checks will be protected by those who cash the $500 to $5,000 checks. Those of us in the $15 to $35 check writing range might as well hang it up we are simply not of enough use to our politicians for them to be concerned about what we think. As for the millionaires, too few seem inclined to patriotism sorry, throwing a barbecue on the 4th of July, or choking up during the national anthem doesn't count. Too few millionaires seem willing to be true patriots and sacrifice for their country as if living honestly and taking turns was a sacrifice. Anyway you look at it, we've arrived at a critical time. We need to change our way of doing things. Alogical place to start is cleaning up the electoral process. It is the only way to protect ourselves from those men and women with hidden agendas and an elected official in their pocket. Page 4ANews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.comTODAY'SEDITORIALTODAY'SLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION A better use for the money I raised my eyebrows the other day w hen I heard that a Chicago school was b anning lunches brought from home, m andating that all students buy the s chool lunch. According to a Chicago Tribune artic le, the principal of Little Village A cademy made this decision based on t he belief that the school provided l unch had better nutritional quality than w hat could be brought from home. Kids with a doctor's note can opt out o f the mandate. But without that note, i t's eat what's provided or go hungry. According to an article at time.com ( Time magazine's website) the policy h as been in place for six years. It is not p opular. Kids claim that the food tastes b ad, and some even choose to go witho ut lunch rather than eat the school's f are. I don't want to get all cynical here, b ut it is a fact that the more free or r educed price lunches the public school s erves, the more money the federal m oney supplies the district. The princip al denies that's a motivation, but you d o have to wonder. I admit that I often partook of school l unches in my time, both as a student a nd a teacher. Let's be honest no o ffense to those who make this food, w e're not talking fine dining here. It's s chool cafeteria food. My memories of lunches at school d on't include the lunches the school p rovided. My good memories of eating at school stems from the lunches I brought from home. To this day I remember the meatloaf sandwiches my mother would pack for us. They were something to look forward to, because my mom's meatloaf was something special. Afriend once commented that it was because she actually put meat into it. School lunches also provides a funny family story. I've tried to remember if I've shared this with you readers, but I don't think I have. When we got to high school, the fixing of lunches was passed along to my younger sister, Anita. One morning my brother Carl started complaining to her because all we had in the house to fix was peanut butter. Carl made it clear that he was unhappy, muttering "choke sandwiches" under his breath and being generally cranky. My sister kept a cheerful attitude, however, and fixed the peanut butter sandwiches one for each of us, and two for my brother. She placed his in a paper sack, standing them sideways so they'd fit. "Carl," she asked in a sweet voice, "would you like an apple with your lunch?" "Yeah," my brother answered, eating breakfast, his back to the kitchen. My sister promptly got an apple for him. She held it up a few inches from the top of the sack and then dropped the heavy piece of fruit into the bag. Smiling, she closed the sack without another word. You can imagine the condition of the sandwiches. I don't recall my brother's reaction when he examined his lunch later, but I never heard him complain after that. I would like to say that I gave my sons lunches to remember, but alas, this is not the case. Questioning both of them revealed that they remembered little if anything about school lunches. John referred to them as "morally neutral." James did point out that the school lunches were not conducive to a low-carb diet. Yes, I was one of those moms who chose to write lunch checks instead of packing nutritious lunches for my offspring. Here's the thing, though: I chose to let them buy lunch. And I think that parents in Chicago should be allowed to make the same choices. Maybe they will build memories for their kids the way my mom did for me. Just don't complain about peanut butter sandwiches. Apples are heavy. Laura Ware is a Sebring resident. She can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady@ embarqmail.com What do you want for lunch? Laura's Look Laura Ware Regretting vote for council membersEditor: Two articles published in Friday's News-Sun (April 8) are on separate pages, in separate sections, but are obviously related. The second article states "Downing five or more alcoholic drinks nearly every day isn't seen as a big problem for many of the nation's teens ... Almost half the teens questioned 45 percentdidn't see it as a big deal." The caption of article number one on the front page states: "Proposed entertainment district would open downtown to restaurants, taverns and pubs." These alcohol-selling establishments on and near our Circle will be promoted as family-friendly places for our citizens to gather. Doesn't anyone see the connection? George Sebring envisioned Sebring as a church-friendly, alcohol-free community. Now the alcohol sellers will be encroaching on our downtown churches. I'm already regretting my vote for the present members of the City Council. Jean Cobb Conrad SebringDeep pocket' target drives billing Editor: The unspoken "elephant in the room" with respect to healthcare costs is the virtually universal billing practice of "all the traffic will bear" employed by most providers of goods and services in the healthcare industry. The concept of competition or reasonable return is unknown. What is needed is something akin to the excess profit tax employed during World War II to keep costs reasonable and realistic. Inflating billing rates to three or four times the reasonable expectations knowing that there will be discounts and rebates negated to a favored class, operates as an acceleraant to the usual inflationary pressures. Healthcare costs increase annually at twice the rate of inflation. As long as there is a targeted "deep pocket" driving the billing practices, fairness and reasonableness will remain as concepts foreign to costs in the industry. By looking to reduce eligibility for services rather than attempting to reduce the costs we will continue to be victimized by those who place "sky's the limit" profits above seeking a sensible fair costing practice. Randy Ludacer Lake Placid Where are the emergency vets?Editor: I am the owner of four furbabies, and this weekend our friends from Broward County visited my husband and myself with their Maltese dog. Their Maltese suddenly took ill during the wee hours of Sunday (2 a.m.), so my friends attempted calling every vet and animal hospital listed in the yellow pages in the Lake Placid, Sebring and Avon Park areas all to no avail. They did find an emergency animal hospital in Winter Haven, which was over an hour drive from Lake Placid. Jazz was in such distress by the time my friends arrived at the emergency an imal hospital, that it was too late to help save her. Why doesn't any of the animal hospitals in Lake Placid, Sebring and Avon Park have emergency service? We have emergency rooms for people and large animals (horses and cows etc.), why not for dogs and cats? Many of the elderly consider their dogs and cats as companions and their babies. There are certainly enough vets in the area to provide this type of service. Why can't the vets get together and work out a schedule to provide for eme rgency services to help these innocent furbabies, instead o f making them suffer and letting them die. Arlene Jorda n Lake Plac id Crooks will continue to rob our elderlyEditor: Over the past several years, Florida has been at th e center of some highly publi cized cases of health care companies defrauding Medicare and Medicaid. These actions cost taxpayer s millions and in some cases billions of dollars. Yet many times the executives of the companies involved claim they didn't know this theft i n the form of over-billing and charging for nonexistent patients was happening. These criminals reap ill-got ten millions and use the "I didn't know what was going on at my company" defense to avoid prosecution. It is high time that lawmakers at the state and fede ral level address this and ma ndate accountability of these CEOs. Laws need to be passed to make both crimina l and civil prosecution of thes e CEOs a priority. They shoul d do real time in prison and a ll their assets should be seized to repay taxpayers. Thousands of seniors depend on Medicare, to allo w these crooks to continue to steal without consequence i n unconscionable. Law enforcement and the Attorne y General should review prior cases of proven fraud where no one went to prison and make every effort to ensure someone is prosecuted and pays for these crimes. Until there is a price to b e paid, these crooks will continue to rob our seniors of these vital resources. Dana B. O rr Avon Pa rk BouquetGood Samaritan comes to the rescueEditor: On Saturday, April 2 at about 5:30 p.m. at a local grocery store in Sebring, my mother fell, due to no fault of the store. When we reached her she was on the floor and had a large bleeding gash on her nose and knee. An unknown woman was on the floor next to her orchestrating ice, bandages and a wheelchair. As we we re leaving the store for the hos pital I realized the woman was not a store employee bu t a good Samaritan. In the confusion we did n ot get her name or properly thank her, so I hope she is reading this so we can thank her publicly for the concern and compassion she showed to our mother. P. Speck in Sebrin g LETTERSPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically reject ed. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870; drop it of f at the same address; fax 385-1954; or e-ma il editor@newssun.com.

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Associated PressBIRMINGHAM, Ala. Vicious storms smacked the Deep South and toppled trees like dominoes as tornadoes howled through towns. Seven deaths were reported in Alabama, including a man killed when the storm tossed a mobile home nearly a quarter of a mile across a state highway. Combined with earlier reported fatalities in Arkansas and Oklahoma, the confirmed death toll had risen to 16 by early Saturday the nation's deadliest storm of the season. Autauga County Chief Deputy Sheriff Joe Sedinger said three adult family members were killed around 11 p.m. Friday when a tornado ripped through homes in the Boone's Chapel community 24 miles north of the state capital of Montgomery. Two side-by-side trailers were torn from their foundations and tossed into nearby woods. On Saturday morning, wooden steps and flowerbeds were all that remained where one mobile home had once stood. "The trailer was anchored down and the anchors are gone," Sedinger said. "But the steps are still there and the blooms are still on the flowers." Seven people were hurt in the storm, including a fir efighter injured during t he emergency respons e, Sedinger said. Another three deaths we re reported early Saturday in Washington County in sout hern Alabama, said Yasam ie Richardson, spokeswom an for the Alabama Emergen cy Management Agency. Chamber sponsors A dministrative Professional LunchLAKE PLACID The G reater Lake Placid C hamber of Commerce A nnual Administrative P rofessional Luncheon will b e held Wednesday, April 2 7 at the Lake Placid Camp & Conference Center. This e vent is sponsored by Home & Office Essentials, Miller C entral Air and Wauchula S tate Bank. The luncheon will be c atered by the renown chefs a t the Lake Placid Camp & C onference Center. R eservations are required. R eservation form and menu s election is posted on the C hamber web site at w ww.visitlakeplacidflorid a.com. For additional i nformation, contact the G reater Lake Placid C hamber of Commerce at 4 65-4331.Events planned at lodges, postsAVON PARK The Combat Veterans M emorial VFWPost 9853 w ill have NASCAR on the s creen at 1 p.m. today. For a ny questions, call the l odge at 452-9853. LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Moose 2 374 will have NASCAR T alladega on the screen at 1 p .m. today. Karaoke with B ama Jam. Loyal Order of t he Moose officers, Women o f the Moose and the House C ommittee meet at 7 p.m. M onday. Loyal Order of the M oose general meeting is s et for 7:30 p.m. For d etails, call the lodge at 4 65-0131. The Lake Placid A merican Legion Placid P ost 25 will host a Riders I talian feast from 4:30-6 p .m. today. Music by J immy Black from 5-8 p.m. S huffleboard is set for 1 p .m. Monday. Boy Scouts m eet at 7 p.m. Free blood p ressure checks from 1-3 p .m. Tuesday. For more i nformation, call 465-0975. The Lake Placid Elks 2 661 will host music by F rankie Monday. BPOE I ndoctrination will be at 7 p .m. Tuesday. For details, c all 465-2661. SEBRING Sebring Lodge 249 F &AM will serve an "ally ou-can-eat (dine in only)" c hicken dinner. The dinner w ill be served from 11 a.m. t o 2 p.m. at the Masonic L odge, 1809 Home Ave., f or an $8 donation. Take out i s available. W oman's Club plans BUNCO partySEBRING The GFWC W oman's Club of Sebring w ill host a Bunco party on W ednesday at 4260 L akeview Drive. Game s tarts at 12:30 p.m.; cost is $ 3, which includes dessert. P hone 382-6103 or 3826 007 for reservations and i nformation. A rt Leage plans open houseLAKE PLACID The L ake Placid Art League is h aving an open house from 1 -4 p.m. today where Bob a nd Harriet Porter of the L ake Placid Mural Society w ill be honored for their v ision and long years of l abor in putting Lake Placid o n the map, making it "The T own With History All A round." The murals have b een viewed and enjoyed b y millions people, past, p resent and future, includi ng visitors from around the w orld. The league's beautiful o utdoor mural art gallery w as started in 1993 with the Tea at Southwinds" mural, which is on the Caladium Arts Cooperative at 132 Interlake Blvd. Harriet was one of the original founders of the Co-op. This mural was sponsored and painted by artist Thomas Freeman and the project had life. There are now 44 murals depicting the history of the area and its pioneers. The Porters deserve thunderous applause for creating an environment that stimulates the economy and improves the quality of life for the community. Truly a legacy that will last for generations to come. There will be a members art exhibit and refreshments will be served.Elvis Wade does May showAVON PARK Elvis Wade will do a dinner show at the Bella Vista Restaurant on Friday, May 13. Dinner is served from 4:30-6:30 p.m. with the show starting at 7:30 p.m. The price is $20 with dinner; $10 without. All seats reserved with payment only. Call 4533331 for reservations.Recreation Club plans activitiesSEBRING The Sebring Recreation Club, 333 Pomegranate Ave., will host the following events for the duration of April: Monday Ice cream shuffleboard, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Ice cream shuffleboard and line dancing, 6:30 p.m. Saturday Pin shuffleboard, 6:30 p.m. Any information, call 385-2966.Reading Series continues with Florida author AVON PARK The South Florida Community College Humanities Reading Series will hold an open mic night at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday in Building H, Room 110, SFCC Highlands Campus. Community writers are invited to attend and share their stories. Five-minute time slots must be reserved in advance. The series is free and open to the public. For more information or to reserve a spot, call Dr. Charlotte Pressler, professor, philosophy and SFCC Honors Program coordinator, at 784-7247. Tea Party Rally set for MondaySEBRING The Highlands Tea Party will have their "Tax Day" Flag Wave from 4-6 p.m. Monday at 2700 U.S. 27 South, U.S. 27 and Bayview Street (across from ALDI's Grocery Store).NARFE Chapter meets TuesdaySEBRING NARFE Chapter 288 of Highlands County will meet Tuesday at Homer's Buffet in Sebring Square. Lunch is at 11 a.m., followed by the speaker and business meeting at noon. The guest speaker will be Suzanne Crews, RN, Florida Hospital. She will speak on "Caregivers." All current and retired federal employees (and spouses) are invited.Barbecue to benefit new dual purpose police canineAVON PARK Robert Strenth will offer his services from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday to help the Avon Park Police Department Canine Unit on its efforts to raise money for a new dual purpose police canine. Strenth will offer a full meal of smoked pulled pork, chips and drink for $6 or one rack of St. Louis style ribs for $15. Pre-sale tickets can be purchased at the Avon Park Police Department, 304 W. Pleasant St., or call Canine Officer J. Molina at 8734663. The barbecue will take place at Walgreens, 93 U.S. 27 South.Drum Circle gathers todaySEBRING The Community Drum Circle will take place behind the Sebring Civic Center, 355 W. Center Ave. overlooking Lake Jackson, from 3-5 p.m. today. Bring a chair or blanket, an instrument if you have one, something to drink and a friend if you'd like. This activity is for all ages Join the Primal Connection and make a joyous sound. No experience necessary. Play along, dance or just enjoy the music. Some percussion instruments will be available for the public to use. For more information contact Fred Leavitt, Primal Connection, at 402-8238, or e-mail fred@primalconnection.org. For more information on the Primal Connection go to their Web site at www.primalconnection.org.Precautionary boil water notice issuedLAKE PLACID Placid Utility Water system customers in the Tomoka Heights subdivision experienced at emergency water shut-down from 3 p.m. to 5:30 a.m. Friday to make emergency repairs to a 10inch water line on Crestview Court North. The effected areas were Grandview Boulevard and Crestview Terrace from the Rosewood Drive North/Crestview Terrace intersection to the Tomoka Boulevard north intersection, including Crestview Court North. As a precaution, those affected by this shut down should boil all water used for drinking, cooking or brushing teeth at a rolling boil for one minute. This includes ice machines, soda fountains, and drinking water fountains. For information, contact the Placid Utilities Water Department at 402-6786. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 5A Continued from page 2A COMMUNITYBRIEFS Courtesy pho to Heartland Christian School celebratedanother batch ofStudents of the Month and Character Award winners (character trait joy)recently, including the front row of Aly Smyth, Caleb Hess, Catrina Lim, Chris Balfour and Chris Cardoso; back row, Aly Strength, Logan Aubrey, Sarah Nortelus, Sierra Smith, Alex Lobozzo and Roberto Tagui.Kyle Wilson alsowas honoredbut was absent for the picture. Top students Death toll up to 16 in Southern storms

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Page 6ANews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.com still leaves the next budget season up in the air, according to Rhonda Beckman, CEO of the Arc. "Come July 1, anything can happen. We are now funded through the next 77 days, but we have no idea what will happen after that," Beckman said Friday at the rally. "I just wanted to help out my friends," said Angie Luft, organizer for the event and an Arc consumer. Luft, 26, lives with her grandparents in Sebring, attends Arc for day training and serves as the president of the Arc Advocacy Group. "I signed up to vote today," Luft said proudly. "We want to let Gov. Scott know that we will fight back. We are people too." Almost 60 Highlands County residents gathered in front of Duffer's and As Good As New Furniture and Appliance Store along U.S. 27 to gain support for the Arc. Others came and went during the lunch hour getting the pizza buffet at Duffer's, which gave Arc $1 for every buffet meal sold. Some individuals, including local caterer Gerald Snell of Avon Park, held a bake sale to help with the program. "They are not just a number that can be cut. Most of our clients just need assistance, they are not like folks who won't help themselves. Most of these folks can't," Marshall added. "But that doesn't mean they are not people." Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE Cindy Marshall (left) holds a sign designed by Arc client Angie Luft during the recent rally at Duffer's Bar and grill. Luft came up with the idea to hold the rally to protest Governor Scott's recent budget cuts. Rally protests cuts to Arc budget They are not like folks who won't help themselves. Most of these folks can't. But that doesn't mean they are not people.'CINDYMARSHALL Arc employee By JOCELYN NOVECK APNational WriterNEWYORK "How c ould she?" It's the headline du jour w henever a horrific case e merges of a mother killing h er kids, as Lashanda A rmstrong did when she p iled her children into her m inivan and drove straight i nto the frigid Hudson R iver. Our shock at such stories i s, of course, understanda ble: They seem to go a gainst everything we intui tively feel about the mothe r-child bond. But mothers kill their c hildren in this country m uch more often than most p eople would realize by s imply reading the headl ines; by conservative estim ates it happens every few d ays, at least 100 times a y ear. Experts say more m others than fathers kill t heir children under 5 years o f age. And some say our r eluctance as a society to b elieve mothers would be c apable of killing their offs pring is hindering our abili ty to recognize warning s igns, intervene and prevent m ore tragedies. And so the problem r emains. "We've learned how to r educe auto fatalities a mong kids, through seatb elt use. We've learned how t o stop kids from strangling o n the strings of their hoodi es. But with this phenomen on, we struggle," says Jill K orbin, an anthropologist at C ase Western Reserve U niversity who has studied m others who kill children. The solution is not so r eadily apparent." How common is filicide, or killing one's child, among mothers? Finding accurate records is nearly impossible, experts say. One problem is classification: The legal disposition of these cases varies enormously. Also, many cases doubtless go unreported or undetected, such as very young mothers who kill their newborns by smothering them or drowning them in a toilet after hiding the entire pregnancy. "I'd say a mother kills a child in this country once every three days, and that's a low estimate," says Cheryl Meyer, co-author of "Mothers Who Kill Their Children." Several databases track such killings but do not separate mothers from fathers or stepfathers. At the Department of Health and Human Services, the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System reported an estimated 1,740 child fatalities meaning when a child dies from an injury caused by abuse or neglect in 2008. And according to numbers compiled from 16 states by the National Violent Death Reporting System at the CDC Injury Center, 130 children were killed in those states by a parent in 2008, the last year for which numbers were available. "The horrific stories make the headlines, so we believe it hardly ever happens," says Meyer, a professor of psychology at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. "But it's not a rare thing." Moms killing kids not nearly as rare as we think it is Associated PressCHICAGO Preside nt Barack Obama, insisting a politically divided gover nment will not risk tankin g the world economy, sa ys Congress will once aga in raise the amount of de bt the country can pile up to ensure it has money to p ay its bills. For the first tim e, though, he signaled th at he will have to go alon g with more spending cu ts to ensure a deal wi th Republicans. In an interview Frid ay with The Associat ed Press, the president al so spoke in his most con fident terms yet that vote rs will reward him wi th another four years in t he White House for his wo rk to turn around the econ omy. Speaking from h is hometown and the site of his newly launched r eelection bid, Obama sa id he thinks voters w ill determine he is the be st prepared person "to fini sh the job." On America's wars, he said that a significa nt number of troops wou ld begin coming home fro m Afghanistan in Ju ly despite many expectatio ns that the withdrawal wou ld be modest. He said t he U.S. would not expand its military role to end a bloody stalemate in Lib ya but insisted that Moamm ar Gadhafi would, in time, be forced from power. Obama was just a we ek removed from a maratho n showdown with Hou se Republicans that almo st led to a government shu tdown. Obama: Congress will raise debt limit

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 7A

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Page 8ANews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.com Not everyone, however, has made adjustments. "I would (change) if I could," said Tom Jacker, who was gassing up a heavy truck. He needs it for work, and can't shift to something smaller. Shelly Jackson is also not changing her driving habits. "I share a vehicle," she said. "The car is always in use. There's nothing I can do. Right now, with the season being over it is going to be a lot harder." Johnson is a server at a local restaurant. Several people said gas prices were not the only problem. "My groceries went up nearly $20 in a week," one woman said. Fox also said higher food prices were as painful as the cost of gasoline. "Aloaf of bread is now $3.19," she said. "That's a loaf of Nature's Own whole wheat. Everything is more expensive." The decision to drive less appears to be nationwide. On April 11, an Associated Press article by Chris Khan stated that Americans are buying approximately 2.4 millions fewer gallons of gasoline a week than they were in April 2010 a 3.6 percent drop. Khan wrote part of the drop is due to the high snow winter season, which kept many people home for extended periods of time, but that 70 percent of major chain gasoline stations reported fewer sales, with over half those reporting saying they experienced a 3 percent drop or more. Paradoxically though, falling demand in the United States is not keeping the price of gasoline down. One reason is because of increased worldwide demand. Already, Khan wrote, gas prices are 41 cents higher than they were in April of 2008. Gas peaked in July of that year. Americans as a whole are paying $340 million more a day to fill up than they did a year ago and gasoline is 32 percent more expensive than it was in April 2010. Unrest in the Middle East has also affected prices. According to Khan, crude has jumped 28 percent since the rebellion began in Libya. Jim Szelagowski, now a permanent Sebring resident, is planning an extended visit to his native Wisconsin. When he was asked if a reporter could take his photograph while he filled his SUV, he replied, "Take a picture? Of me fainting?" He said he doesn't wait for the tank to be empty. He fills it when it's still half full so he won't faint at the bill. "Drive less, that's what we're going to have to do," he said, adding that he faced a 1,600 mile drive and would probably need to fill his tank six times. "It's going to be an experience," he said. It was Fox who had the ultimate back-up plan. "If you see a crazy woman on a horse," she said laughing, "that's me." Continued from page 1A year decline in Florida's unemployment rate since November 2006. The number of nonagricultural jobs in the state is up 51,500 from last year. Most of those jobs came in the areas of food service and drinking places, food and beverage stores, ambulatory health care services and personal and laundry services. Jobs were also created in management and science and technology. Construction continued to lose ground 14,700 jobs were lost overall in the state. Highlands County's unemployment rate ranks 29th out of Florida's 6 7 counties. Flagler County has t he highest number of unem ployed, 14.5 percent, an d Monroe County the lowe st at 6.6 percent. According to AWI, "mo st of the counties with t he lowest unemployment rat es are those with relative ly high proportions of gover nment employment. The re are 38 Florida counties wi th double-digit unemployme nt rates in March, down fro m 43 in February." March figures reveal th at out of the Highlands Coun ty workforce, numberin g 41,243, a total 4,404 peop le are still seeking unemplo yment compensation. Continued from page 1A h ave never called me. I k new nothing about this u ntil I picked up a copy of t he petition today. No one h as called me about this o r talked to me about t hese," Gray said. "To item number one, w hich says because I f ailed to interpret and a ccurately apply the prov isions of the ordinances a n city charter, which one a re they talking about? T hat book is three inches t hink, it's a big book. W hich one did I break?" The second grievance l isted on the petition conc erned the $12,500 raise t o Julian Deleon without a v ote. "We took care of that o ne last Monday," Gray s aid referring to the vote t o ratify former City mana ger Maria Sutherland's d ecision to give Deleon a p ay hike. In reference to the third g rievance, which states after gaining first hand k nowledge of a current e mployees'fear of retaliat ion from other city e mployees, councilpers ons Gray refused/failed t o initiate an investigation i nto the allegations," Gray s tated she did respond to t hat issue. "I don't know how the o ther council members h andled it, but I seconded t he motion to dismiss B ruce Behrens," Gray s aid. Grievance four refers to t he council's failure to m aintain a civil service b oard, which is outlined i n the city charter. "That o ne is correct. We disb anded that board four or f ive years ago when Mr. ( Tom) Macklin was m ayor. It is correct, but I 'm not the only one g uilty of that." On item five, concerni ng Deleon's residency in L ake Placid, Gray stated t hat was also handled in t he Monday meeting. On item six, Gray r esponded that she acted u pon the advice of City A ttorney Gerald Buhr a bout the line of success ion from city manager to c ity clerk when City Clerk C heryl Tietjen refused the j ob of interim city manage r after Behrens was r eleased last month in a p ublic meeting. "That was also handled M onday night. I followed t he advice of the attorn ey," Gray said. Finally, Gray stressed t hat item seven, which c laims that she interfered w ith the day-to-day opera tions of the city, was not c orrect. "I have never interfered w ith the operations of the c ity. I can't speak for anyo ne else, but I have not t ried to direct the city in t he day-to-day operations i n any way," she said. Continued from page 1A Gray responds to recall complaints Jobless rate goes down in state, county News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Jim Szelagowski, of Sebring, fills his tank, which he never lets get half a tank that way he won't faint at the sight of the total price. Gas prices changing habits Associated PressFORTPIERCE Police are investigating the deaths of three people found in a home north of Port St. Lucie. Officers were called to a Fort Pierce home Friday at about 7 p.m. The bodies of two women and a man were found inside. Investigators believe the man shot and killed the women before killing himself. Aneighbor told WPTVa couple and their 3-year-old daughter lived at the home, and that the woman was pregnant. 3 found dead in Fort Pierce home The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN SEBRING Rob Miller, public works director for the city of Sebring, announced that all the public beaches on Lake Jackson are cleared for swimming, except Crescent Beach, which still has bacteria issues. Veterans Beach and Hidden Beach are clear ed for use. City Pier Beach's wat er has also tested clear, b ut because of the deep tren ch running parallel to t he shore, no swimming is allowed. Christopher Tuffl ey Veteran's Beach open for swimmers

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Special to the News-Sun LAKELAND Mark S essums of Sessums Law G roup has been rated 10.0 o ut of 10.0 by the lawyer rati ng service of AVVO. The 1 0.0 distinction is a rare h onor and the highest-ranki ng possible. AVVO rating is a n unbiased rating system, w hich uses a mathematical m odel that considers the foll owing information: years in p ractice, disciplinary history, p rofessional achievements a nd industry recognition. Sessums Law Group is a c ivil law firm. Mark A. S essums is the principal partn er and is Board Certified by t he Florida Bar in General C ivil Law and Marital and F amily Law. Steven Sessums i s Board Certified by the F lorida Bar in Marital and F amily Law and Brian Monk, a former prosecutor, and L acy Littlejohn are associa tes of the firm. The firm has 7 5 years of legal experience a nd is an AVrated firm, the h ighest rating from M artindale Hubbell. Mark A. S essums, also AVrated, has b een named a Super Lawyer f or every year since its incept ion in 2006. Sessums Law Group is a highly experienced and credentialed firm that offers effective representation for individuals, businesses and families throughout Florida. The firm has locations in Polk and Highlands counties. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 9A BUSINESS By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING "Stop here and you won't have to go anywhere else," said Hector Ramos with a proud smile. He is the manager of the One Stop Mini-Mart at 5116 Schumacher Road, right next to Hill-Gustat Middle School. It is much more than a convenience store, Ramos said, showing a visitor around. Not only are there the typical variety of candy and snacks, canned goods, beer and soda, but items like eggs, milk, juice, bacon, cheese, butter, frozen fish, hot dogs and cold cuts. Ramos sells an extensive line of Goya products, has a large spice rack, and bins of fresh fruit and vegetables from onions to bananas. In a back corner tables and chairs are set up in front of a deli counter, where sandwiches like pulled pork, Phillie steak, Cuban and ham and cheese are available from 7 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. There is WiFi and people may take their time to enjoy expresso, slush puppies, iced coffee and iced tea. In the morning, a breakfast of eggs, ham or bacon and toast is available for $3.49. In the near future he will have a sports channel up and working. But wait, that's not all. In another corner he has a mailing center where customers may buy stamps at post office prices, and mail packages. He has a copier and fax machine, a specialized computer where all manner of bills may be paid, from Florida Power to GMAC mortgages to Comcast. The store accepts food stamps and credit cards and has an ATM machine. "I want to serve the community and at the same time make a living," he said. "We try to be competitive and carry a little of everything. The customer is the boss. I'd rather make a little bit on all sales, than a whole lot on one sale." He pulled the visitor to the back, opening the door to the rest room. "I'm proud of the bathroom," he said, which was spotless and had a marble floor. "We just opened on January 12th," he said. "We're still babies, still learning. We welcome suggestions and will try to get specific brands or special requests." One Stop Mini-Mart is open from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. seven days a week. The telephone number is 386-9406. One Stop Mini Mart more than a convenience store News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS The One Stop Mini Mart is at 5116 Schumacher Road in Sebring. I wouldn't trade t he experience of r aising my two k ids for anything, b ut I must admit t hat when my wife a nd I started plann ing our family, w e had no idea h ow expensive it w ould be. A ccording to a D epartment of A griculture report, a typical middle-income f amily will spend over $ 280,000 in inflationa djusted dollars to raise a c hild born in 2009 until age 1 8 and that doesn't even i nclude prenatal care or coll ege costs. Take it from one who k nows, you'll want to have the money talk" well b efore the baby is born and y ou're bleary-eyed from l ack of sleep. Here are a f ew budgeting tips: Create a health budge t. Before the baby is born, f ind out what benefits your i nsurance will cover taking i nto account monthly prem iums, deductibles and c opayments. For example, a re prenatal exams, baby c heck-ups and immunizat ions covered? Ask what y our share of delivery costs w ill be. If complications a rise, such as needing a C aesarian delivery or prem ature baby incubation, c osts could skyrocket. Parental leave. Learn y our employer's policies, s ince some require up to a y ear's employment before c ertain benefits like paid l eave, short-term disability a nd unpaid leave kick in. In a ddition, the federal Family a nd Medical Leave Act a llows up to 12 weeks of u npaid leave for births or a doptions, so check with y our benefits department to s ee if you're eligible. Know what things c ost. We were amazed how m any "things" our babies n eeded. Must-haves include a car seat (required by law), c rib and bedding, stroller, d iapers, baby formula, medi cal and grooming supplies, c lothing and home babyp roofing. Add in things like a baby bathtub, baby monit or and safety gates and w e're talking thousands of d ollars before the kid is e ven crawling. Practical Money Skills for Life, a free personal financial management program run by Visa Inc., contains a handy calculator that can help estimate baby-related expenses (www.practicalmoneyskills.com). Anticipate lost wages. When budgeting for living costs, factor in lost earnings that typically occur when a parent either temporarily leaves the workplace or chooses a job more open to flex hours or part-time work. Down the road, you'll also need to weigh the cost of child care versus returning to work. Investigate tax advantages. Ask whether your employer offers health care and dependent care flexible spending accounts (FSAs). These accounts let you pay for eligible out-of-pocket medical and child care expenses on a pre-tax basis that is, before federal, state and Social Security taxes have been deducted. This lowers your taxable income, and therefore, your taxes. You could save hundreds or thousands of dollars on expenses you'd have to pay for anyway. And remember, you're typically allowed to change benefit coverage after having a baby, so you could probably add FSAs midyear. Depending on your income, number of eligible dependents and other factors, the dependent care tax credit for federal income taxes may be preferable, although Dependent Care FSAs usually provide the greater tax advantage for most people, especially at higher incomes. IRS Form 2441 at www.irs.gov can help you calculate whether the tax credit is preferable. Or, ask your tax advisor which method is best for you. Raising a family is one of life's most rewarding experiences. Just be sure you plan carefully for the financial bumps in the road. Jason Alderman directs Visa's financial education programs. Having a baby? Get your finances in order Personal Finance Jason Alderman Sessums receives highest AVVO rating WASHINGTON (AP) Americans are paying more for food and gas, a trend that could slow economic growth in the months ahead. The Consumer Price Index rose 0.5 percent in March, the Labor Department said Friday. That matched February's increase, the largest since the recession ended in June 2009. In the past 12 months, the index has increased 2.7 percent, the biggest rise since December 2009. Excluding the volatile food and gas categories, the so-called core index rose 0.1 percent and it is up only 1.2 percent in the past year. Consumers are spending more, but the steep rise in food and gas prices could limit their ability to purchase discretionary goods and services. Consumer spending makes up 70 percent of economic activity. Rising inflation has caused many an alysts to reduce their estimates for ec onomic growth in the January-Mar ch quarter from roughly 3 percent or hig her to as low as 1.5 percent. Gasoline jumped 5.6 percent la st month and has risen nearly 28 percent in the past year. Consumers paid an ave rage price of $3.81 a gallon nationwi de on Friday according to the travel grou p AAA. Food and gas costs push consumer prices 0.5% higher Associated PressWASHINGTON T he Internal Revenue Servi ce has paid out more than a half-billion dollars in homebuyer tax credits to people who probably di dn't qualify, a governme nt investigator said Friday. Most of the money about $326 million went to more than 47,00 0 taxpayers who didn't qua lify as first-time homebu yers, said the report by J. Russell George, t he Treasury inspector gener al for tax administratio n. Other credits went to prison inmates, taxpaye rs younger than 18 and pe ople who did not actual ly buy homes. "The IRS has taken po sitive steps to strength en controls and help preve nt the issuance of inapprop riate homebuyer credits ," George said. "Howeve r, many of the actio ns occurred after hundreds of thousands of homebuy er credits had already be en issued, including fraud ulent and erroneous cre dits." The popular credit pr ovided up to $8,000 to firs ttime homebuyers and up to $6,500 to qualified curre nt owners who bought anot her home during parts of 2009 and 2010. The IRS said it work ed hard to enforce a comp licated tax credit that pr ovided more than $27 b illion to almost 3.9 millio n taxpayers. IRS paid $513M in undeserved homebuyer tax credits

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Page 10ANews-Sun Sunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.co m IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 10-1147 GCS ANNETTE MANGIERO, TRUSTEE OF THE MANGIERO FAMILY TRUST DATED 5-4-90 and DAVID MANGIERO Plaintiff vs. TIMOTHY B. RUGGIERO; JEANNE C. RUGGIERO JOHN DOE AND ALL OTHERS IN POSSESSION; CHOROWSKI & MOORE P.A. Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment April 11, 2011 and entered in case 10-1147 GCS in the Circuit Court of the Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida wherein Annette Mangiero and David Mangiero are Plaintiffs and Timothy B. Ruggiero, Jeanne C. Ruggiero and Chorowski & Moore P.A. are the defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM BASEMENT OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE 430 S. COMMERCE AVENUE SEBRING, FLORIDA on the 10th day of May, 2011 at 11:00 am the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: The North 25 feet of Lot 4 and all of Lots 5 and 6 LAKE CHARLOTTE SHORES, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Boo k 6 Page 24 of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Address: 7317 Sparta Road Sebring, FL 33875 Dated at Highlands County, Florida this 12th day of April, 2011. BOB GERMAINE As Clerk, Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michala k As Deputy Cler k April 17, 24, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-103 IN RE: ESTATE OF MARIE F. VENINI NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of MARIE F. VENINI, deceased, whose date of death was January 20, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870-3867. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 10, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Susan Alexander 1110 SW 9th Avenue Boca Raton, Florida 33486 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Seth E. Ellis, Esq. Attorney for Personal Representative Florida Bar Number: 0060933 ELLIS & GOLDBERG, P.L. 4755 Technology Way Suite 205 Boca Raton, FL 33431 Telephone: (561)910-7500 Fax: (561)910-7501 E-Mail: seth@egpl-law.com April 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-153 Division Tenth IN RE: ESTATE OF MARY LEE CHAGNOT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of MARY LEE CHAGNOT, deceased, whose date of death was October 19, 2008, and whose social security number is 266-40-1642, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 17, 2011. Personal Representative: Christine M. Miller 755 S. Broadway Avenue Bartow, Florida 33830 Attorney for Personal Representative: STEPHEN M. MARTIN Florida Bar No. 0308234 STEPHEN M. MARTIN, P.A. 200 Lake Morton Drive, 2nd Floor Lakeland, Florida 33801 Telephone: (863)683-8765 April 17, 24, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-147 IN RE: ESTATE OF SURDAM, LEONARD C. Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LEONARD C. SURDAM, deceased, whose date of death was February 26, 2011, and whose social security number is 573-24-5652, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 10, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Herschel E. Surdam 1643 Lexington Ave. San Mateo, CA 94402 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Robert E. Livingston Florida Bar No. 0031259 445 S. Commerce Avenue Sebring, FL 33870 Telephone: (863)385-5156 April 10, 17, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-168 IN RE: ESTATE OF EDITH H. ROGERS, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of EDITH H. ROGERS, deceased, whose date of death was March 13, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 17, 2011. Personal Representative: KENNETH P. JOHNSON 1018 TRIUMPH DRIVE SEBRING, FL 33870 /s/ Kenneth P. Johnson Attorney for Personal Representative: CLIFFORD M. ABLES, III, P.A. 551 SOUTH COMMERCE AVE. SEBRING, FL 33870 Telephone: (863) 385-0112 /s/ Clifford M. Ables, III FLORIDA BAR NUMBER 178379 April 17, 24, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-150 IN RE: ESTATE OF LUTISHIE J. FRANK, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LUTISHIE J. FRANK, deceased, File Number PC 11-150, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 10, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Ozalene Chapman Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Michael L. Keiber MICHAEL L. KEIBER, ESQUIRE 129 South Commerce Avenue Sebring, FL 33870 V. (863)385-5188 F. (863)471-1111 Florida Bar No. 620610 April 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-80 IN RE: ESTATE OF BRUCE THOMAS HALL aka BRUCE T. HALL, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BRUCE THOMAS HALL aka BRUCE T. HALL, deceased, whose date of death was November 6, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is APRIL 10, 2011. Personal Representatives: /s/ Rhoda E. Wolfe 2441 LAKEVIEW DRIVE SEBRING, FL 33870 /s/ Barbara L. Tillman 118 EVANS ST. ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 Attorney for Personal Representatives: CLIFFORD M. ABLES, III, PA 551 S. COMMERCE AVE. SEBRING, FL 33870 (863)385-0112 /s/ Clifford M. Ables III Florida Bar Number: 178379 JANE M. HANCOCK FLORIDA BAR NUMBER 341002 April 10, 17, 2011 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 10-1340 GCS FINANCIAL FREEDOM ACQUISITION, LLC, Plantiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF MARJORIE A. BUTTON, DECEASED, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF MARJORIE A. BUTTON, DECEASED LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: Unknown CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 19, BLOCK 282, OF SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, UNIT 13, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 71, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before MAY 2, 2011 a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in THE NEWS SUN and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N. Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863) 534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this 28th day of March, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Lisa Tantillo As Deputy Clerk April 10,17, 2011 1050LegalsHIGHLANDS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING INVITATION TO BID (ITB) The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), Highlands County, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed bids in the County Purchasing Department for: ITB No. 11-037 SEBRING PARKWAY PHASE III RIGHT OF-WAY CLEARING PROJECT No. 09021 Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, Acting Director, Highlands County General Services/ Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 Telephone: 863-402-6524, E-Mail: dgilbert@hcbcc.org A NON-MANDATORY Pre-Bid meeting will be held at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, April 27, 2011 in the Engineering Conference Room, 505 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. All potential bidders are encouraged attend this meeting. Submit one (1) original and three (3) copies of your bid form, bid security and other required data in a sealed envelope and marked with the bid number and name so as to identify the enclosed bid submittal. Bids must be delivered to Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., Thursday, May 12, 2011 at which time they will be opened. Bids received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The Board will not be responsible for the late deliveries of bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service. One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at either or both of the above meetings. Highlands County Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this bid. Vendors submitting responses must submit bids on all work to receive consideration. A Bid Bond or Cashier's Check in an amount of five percent (5%) of the bid must be included on bids over $100,000.00. If the successful bid is greater than $200,000.00, a Public Construction Bond will be required. Bid must be accompanied by evidence of bidder's qualifications to do business in the State of Florida, in accordance with F.S. 489. The principal features of the Project are: LUMP SUM PRICE BID: (A) THE PROJECT CONSISTS OF THE REMOVAL OF TREES, CLEARING AND GRUBBING WITHIN THE RIGHT-OF-WAY FOR THE FUTURE CONSTRUCTION OF SEBRING PARKWAY PHASE III PROJECT, WHICH RUNS NORTH OF SEBRING PARKWAY PHASE I AT THE 90 DEGREE CURVE THROUGH THE 130 FEET WIDE STRIP OF THE ABANDONED RAILROAD RIGHT-OF-WAY TO APPROXIMATELY COLLEGE DRIVE. THE PROPOSED WORK AREA IS WITHIN THE ABANDONED RAILROAD & AND THEREFORE THERE IS NO ANTICIPATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS.HOWEVER, ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT IS BEING PERFORMED. (B) THE EXISTING STOCKPILE OR BACKFILL MATERIAL LOCATED ON THE PROJECT SITE JUST NORTH OF THE 90 DEGREE CURVE OF SEBRING PARKWAY (PHASE I) SHALL BE UTILIZED BY THE AWARDED BIDDER (CONTRACTOR) TO FILL THE IMMEDIATE PORTION OF THE ABANDONED RAILROAD BED. All workmanship and materials shall meet the requirement of the Florida Department of Transportation Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge Construction (dated 2010) and be in compliance with all permits issued. The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners (HCBCC/COUNTY) reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsive and responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of Highlands County. The Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. The Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Highlands County is an equal opportunity employer, a fair housing advocate and a handicap accessible jurisdiction. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John Minor, ADA Coordinator at: 863402-6509 (Voice), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by email: jminor@hcbcc.org. Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service. Board of County Commissioners Purchasing Department Highlands County, Florida Website: www.hcbcc.net April 17, 24, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CASE NO.: 2010-CA-001029 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, A S TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2006-OPT2, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OPT2 Plaintiff, vs. DANIEL N. WILSON AND MARCIAL L. WILSON, HIS WIFE; OPTION ONE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION #1; UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION #2; IF LIVING, A ND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order OF Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated A pril 11, 2011 entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-001029 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOMELOAN TRUST 2006-OPT2, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OPT2, Plaintiff and DANIEL N. WILSON AND MARCIA L. WILSON, HIS WIFE, are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORIDA AT 11:00 A .M., May 11, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: PARTS OF LOTS 18, 19 AND 20, OF BLOCK 190, WOODLAWN TERRACE, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 96, AND TRANSCRIPT BOOK 1, PAGE 1, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: START AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF WAY LINE OF BELLEVUE AVENUE WITH THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF EVANSTON STREET; RUN THENCE ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF EVANSTON STREET IN A SOUTHWESTERLY DIRECTION FOR A DISTANCE OF 75 FEETFOR A POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY, A DISTANCE OF 75 FEET, THENCE AT RIGHT ANGLES NORTHWESTERLY, A DISTANCE OF 125 FEET; THENCE AT RIGHT ANGLES NORTHEASTERLY AND PARALLEL TO SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY LINE OF EVANSTON STREET, A DISTANCE OF 75 FEET; THENCE AT RIGHT ANGLES SOUTHEASTERLY, A DISTANCEOF 125 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A NY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at 430 S.Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, telephone (863)534-4690, within two (2) working days of receipt of this Notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk of Court A TTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813)880-8888 (813)880-8800 May 17, 24, 2011 Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or le ss. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads p laced under the Bargain BuysŽ discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom se t ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad st ating Each,Ž the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open RateŽ pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain BuysŽ specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home,Ž are allowed to be pla ced under the Bargain BuyŽ category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com 863-314-9876 DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS € Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 314-9876. € The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 1050Legals 1050Legals 1050Legals Classified ads get fast results Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 LOOKING FOR THAT SPECIAL HOME? Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday.

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, April 17, 2011Page 11 A IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 282007CA000845A000XX COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs JONATHAN B. MIELE AND ___ MIELE, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JONATHAN B. MIELE, IF MARRIED; SEBRING RIDGE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1;UNKNOWN TENANTS NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated April 11, 2011 and entered in Case No. 282007CA000845A000XX of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB, is Plaintiff and JONATHAN B. MIELE AND __ MIELE, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JONATHAN B. MIELE, IF MARRIED; SEBRING RIDGE OWNERS A SSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1;UNKNOWN TENANTS NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, at Highlands County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 10th day of May, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 739 OF SEBRING RIDGE, SECTION E, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, AT PAGE 53, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Highlands County Courthouse. Telephone 863-386-6565 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Sebring, Florida, on April 12, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk, Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak As Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, 2011 IN THE COUNTY CIVIL COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001064 BANK OF AMERICA, NA, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB Plaintiff, vs. ESPERANZA ESPINOSA AND UNKNOWN TENA NTS/OWNERS, ET AL Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on April 11, 2011, in the Circuit Court of HIGHLANDS County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida described as: LOT 20, IN BLOCK 259, OF SUN 'N LAKES ESTATES SECTION 20, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 89, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 124 HAPPINESS AVE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, on May 11, 2011 at 11 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 12th day of April, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, 2011 IN THE COUNTY CIVIL COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001742 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff, vs. A RTHUR L. JONES, PINE & LAKE OF SEBRING HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ARTHUR L. JONES, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, ET AL Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on April 11, 2011, in the Circuit Court of HIGHLANDS County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida described as: LOT 56, OF PINE AND LAKE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 14, PAGE 3, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 2235 PINEWOOD BLVD, SEBRING, FL 33870; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, on May 11, 2011 at 11 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 12th day of April, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, 2011 1050Legals Having something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what you're doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 314-9876

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Page 12ANews-Sun Sunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.co m LYKES CITRUSMANAGEMENT has an opening for a full time Parts Person at their Basinger Grove Shop. Duties include answering phones, parts, ordering, inventory control, distribution/stocking, invoicing of incoming/outgoing parts, ability to lift 25 lbs. Successful applicants should possess 1 year experience in parts inventory or related field and have compute r skills. Lykes Citrus Management Division offers competitive wages and benefit package including Medical, Dental, Vision, Life, AD&D and LTD insurance plus paid vacation and holidays. Interested applicants should apply in person at: Lykes Citrus Managemanent Division 490 Buckhorn Road Lorida, Fl. 33857 or 7 Lykes Road Lake Placid, Flo. 33852 Lykes Citrus Management Division is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer/Affirmative Action/Drug Free Workplace/M/F/D/V FRONT DESKCLERK (PT), assists hotel & restaurant guests w/reservations, registration & accommodations. Hotel/Restaurant & Cashiering exp. preferred. $8.76/hr. (16-24 hr/wk.) Typical work schedule: Sat. & Sun. 6 am 2 pm. Open until filled. Visit www.southflorida.edu/hr for position announcement. (863) 453-2211. Apply at the HOTEL JACARANDA, 19 E. Main St., Avon Park. EA/EO/Vet. Pref. EXPERIENCED. ROOFERS 863-385-0351 COOKS W/EXPERIENCEpreferred at Spring Lake Golf Resort. Apply in Person. Call for directions only 863-655-0900. 2100Help Wanted 2000 Employment*RECORDS CLERKTemp position *PRN MA (w/Phebotomy skills) Details @ www.flcancer.com 1400Health CareServicesLOST SPAYEDblack male cat. Losing belly hair, 2 patches of hair off hind leg. Sebring Country Estates. 863-382-1464 1200Lost & FoundCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:314-9876 News-Sun Classified 1100AnnouncementsNORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 1; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 46'47'' EAST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 1, A DISTANCE OF 425.06 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 15.05 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. DATED this 11th day of April, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, 2011 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-281GCS HAMMOCK LAND & CATTLE CO., INC., A Florida Corporation, Plaintiff, vs. DOUGLAS C. KEIP and YVONNE R. KEIP, Husband and Wife, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to Final Default Judgment and Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure and for Attorney's Fees and Costs entered by the Court on April 11, 2011, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the jury assembly room in the courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, on the 6th day of May, 2011, at 11:00 a.m., the following-described property: PARCEL 14 COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH, RANGE 29 EAST, HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 46'47'' WEST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SECTION 1, A DISTANCE OF 1,715.53 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 13 DEGREES 43'47'' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1,308.34 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF ARBUCKLE ROAD; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 40'38'' WEST ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 516.52 FEET; THENCE NORTH 13 DEGREES 50'06'' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1,307.97 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 1; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 46'47'' EAST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SECTION 1, A DISTANCE OF 514.28 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 15.05 ACRES, MORE OF LESS. AND PARCEL 15 COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH, RANGE 29 EAST, HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 46'47'' WEST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 1, A DISTANCE OF 2,229.81 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 13 DEGREES 50'06'' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1,307.97 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF ARBUCKLE ROAD; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 40'38'' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 516.52 FEET; THENCE NORTH 13 DEGREES 54'30'' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1,307.56 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 1; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 41'45'' EAST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 89.92 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 10-1082-GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, Plaintiff, vs. SIBREL ENTERPRISES, INC., a Florida Corporation, GEORGE DAVID SIBREL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, and STATE AND FLORIDA, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the ``Final Judgment of Foreclosure'' (the ``Final Judgment''), entered in the above-styled action on January 10, 2011, the Clerk of Highlands County will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida, as described below at a Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, on May 6, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. SEE EXHIBIT ``A'' SCHEDULE ``A'' Parcel 1 South 25 feet of Lot 13, Block 48, ORIGINAL TOWN OF SEBRING, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 1, of the Public Records of DeSoto County (of which Highlands County was formerly a part), Florida, and in Transcript Book, page 6, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Parcel 2 Lot 2, Block 427, Highlands Towers Subdivision Revised, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 5, page 29, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. BOB GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida /s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, 2011 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813)880-8888 (813)880-8800 May 17, 24, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CASE NO.: 2010-CA-001145 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, A S TRUSTEE FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES, INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-R9 Plaintiff, vs. REINALDO L. RIVERA AND LUZ E. RIVERA, HUSBAND AND WIFE; UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION #1; UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION #2; IF LIVING, AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order OF Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated A pril 11, 2011 entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-001145 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES, INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-R9, Plaintiff and REINALDO L. RIVERA AND LUZ E. RIVERA, HUSBAND AND WIFE, are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORIDA AT 11:00 A .M., May 11, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 7, BLOCK 2, LAGO VISTA SUBDIVISION, A CCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 11, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A NY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at 430 S.Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, telephone (863)534-4690, within two (2) working days of receipt of this Notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk of Court A TTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CASE NO.: 2010-CA-001221 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, A S TRUSTEE FOR ARGENT SECURITIES, INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-M2 Plaintiff, vs. FRANCES VIRGINIA WHITTEN /A/K/A FRANCES V. WHITTEN AND MACK ARTHUR WHITTEN A/K/A MAC ARTHUR WHITTEN A/K/A McARTHUR WHITTEN A/K/A MCAURHUR WHITTEN Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order OF Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated A pril 11, 2011 entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-001221 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR ARGENT SECURITIES, INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-M2, Plaintiff and FRANCES VIRGINIA WHITTEN /A/K/A FRANCES V. WHITTEN AND MACK ARTHUR WHITTEN A/K/A MAC ARTHUR WHITTEN A/K/A McARTHUR WHITTEN A/K/A MCAURHUR WHITTEN are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORIDA AT 11:00 A .M., May 11, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 8, BLOCK 3, K.F. SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 51, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A NY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at 430 S.Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, telephone (863)534-4690, within two (2) working days of receipt of this Notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk of Court A TTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813)880-8888 (813)880-8800 May 17, 24, 2011 1050Legals LOOKING FOR THAT SPECIAL HOME? Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 314-9876 Then shop till you drop!

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, April 17, 2011Page 13 A LINCOLN TOWNCAR '97 Blk/blk. leather. Presidential Series. $2,500. Call 863-452-9899. LINCOLN TOWNCAR '97 Blk/blk. Leather, Presidentail Series. Call 863-459-9899 9450Automotive for SaleCHEST -All aluminum with locking lid. 48" long, fits in pickup bed or on a trailer. Very Nice! $140. 863-453-7027 9350Automotive Parts& AccessoriesENCLOSED TRAILER6 x 15. Almost new tires. Single axle. $1,800. Call 863-699-5517 9220Utility Trailers1973 NORTON850 COMMANDO One Owner* RareFind 10K miles New paint & chrome Will Accept reasonable offer. 863-382-8985 or 863-465-9100 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation R.V. COVERNEW fits trailes 28' 7" to 31' 6". Never opened! A Bargain at $170. 863-453-7027 2001 JAYCOEAGLE 26' 5th Wheeler. Good Shape $6400. 863-381-9159 8400RecreationalVehiclesCANOE 14'high Impact, polyethylene hull, 3 seats (insulated cooler, center seat) spare paddle tie down ( or for fishing rod or shotgun) 3 drink holders. Dry storage area. Includes: Minn Kota trolling motor, 2 seat cushions, 4 life jackets, 3 paddles and kayak paddle. Great cond. $380. Call Jay 863-452-6583. 8050Boats & Motors 8000 Recreation NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. DOG GERMANShepherd. 2 yr.old Free to good home. Call 863-452-1777 7520Pets & Supplies LAWN MOWERSnapper / Rider. Runs Good! $200 SOLD! JOHN DEERE'05 4310 w/loader & mower, 4 x 4. $4800. details @ desmdw1@msn.com or 386-246-7461 7400Lawn & GardenSEBRING -Moving Out Sale! 2010 Village Grove Blvd., apt 305. Sat & Sun Apr. 16 & 17. call for appointment. 863-385-2250 7320Garage &Yard Sales TIRES -Goodyear Assurance, (4) 195 / 60R15. $100 SORRY SOLD! STEREO, CONSOLE& Television console $100. Call 863-453-3032 STAINED GLASS,hobby suppl.. grinder, glass, chopper foil, solderleadless, misc. $100 863-402-2285 RECIPROCATING SAWDeWalt 340P, Paid $93., used 1 time. $75. Call 863-273-3731 RECIPROCATING SAWDeWalt 304P, Paid $93., used 1 time, $75. 386-273-3731 METAL DETECTORTechna model DX-1200, rarely used.Works excellent. $20 863-402-2285 LAWN MOWERBoy self-propelled, 21" cut. $45. Call SOLD!!! FREEZER 16'upright $75. Call 863-453-3032 ELECTRIC WIRERomex 12 / 2 /W / ground, Paid $40. Asking $30. 863-273-3731 DISHWASHER GEProfile. White. Digital display. Worked great, has been stored indoors since 2004. "Scratch & Dent" otherwise like new. $45. 863-873-4939 COFFEE TABLE 4' x 20". Glass top & bottom is a basket weave. $50. Call 863-465-4284 A/C UNITColeman 4 ton. Cools only. This unit attaches to an air handler. $100. Call 863-655-0881 7310Bargain BuysWASHER &DRYER / WHIRLPOOL Stack, electric 220. Excellent Condition, $425 863-257-1402 7300Miscellaneous PIANOBOSTON5'1 Baby Grand w/bench. Model GP-156. Ebony Polish finish. Excel. cond. $11,000. Call 863-449-0243 DINING ROOMSET Broyhil w/2 leafs, dark oak & formica top. 6 chairs, 1 captain. All good shape seats need recovered. $350. Call 863-465-4284 7180Furniture 7180Furniture 7000 Merchandise SEBRING (2)Available 3926 Kenilworth Blvd, 1500 sq ft, $550/mo : A/C, office, BA, lg overhead door, near Sebring High School. 640 Park St, 6400 sq ft, $2500/mo : A/C, office, BA, 8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric, fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway. 941-416-2813 AVON PARKLarge Retail/Office Building, 100 E. Main St. A MUST SEE! 863-295-9272 6750Commercial RentalSEBRING 600sq. ft. office, Central A/C. 3905 Kenilworth Blvd. $450/month + $450. deposit. Call 863-385-2519 6600Business & OfficesFor RentSEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, Satellite, split plan house, share kitchen & laundry room. Full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for RentSEBRING -Weekly/Multi-Week Condo Rentals Avail. Now. Located on Little Lake Jackson across from Harder Hall Golf Club. Lots of ammenities. Starting @ $500/wk. 863-385-5005, ext. 0 6320Seasonal Property SPRING LAKE3BR, 2BA, 2CG, CHA, patio, ceramic tiled liv. room, din. room, kitchen, bath & halls, SS appliances, refrigerator has water on door, micro., W/D hook up. No pets. 863-655-0136 SEBRING -SPRING LAKE AREA. 3/BR, 2/BA on Golf Course. $850 monthly. 1st / last / security / references. Call anytime. SORRY RENTED! SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 6300Unfurnished HousesSEBRING 2240Avalon Rd. 3/2 furn. Small animals ok. Near Shopping Center & Senior Club. References $700. first/last. Call 305-387-6863 after 4pm. or 863-237-3129. 6250Furnished Houses LIVE ONDINNER LAKE 12 min. from SFCC. Cute spotless newly painted apartments 1/1 from $350. incl. water & garbage. Efficiency $425. incl. water & garbage maintenance man on call laundry on premises. Small pets w/approval by landlord. $35. app feewe check criminal history. Call for appt. 863-381-3610 or 863-385-8242. LAKE PLACID2/BR, 2/BA Apt / Duplex, Washer / Dryer, screend porch. Excellent Conditio n. Includes water. $500 monthly plus 1 mo. security. 954-695-8348 BEAUTIFUL APTSSEBRING 2BR, 1BA, tile floors, screen back porch, beautiful landscaping, building 5 yrs. new. Pets OK. $595 month. 3106 Medical Way. 863-446-1822 AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; Washer/Dryer, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook ups. Students/Seniors Discount Call 863-452-0469. AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL : $325/mo. 863-453-8598 6200UnfurnishedApartments AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 SEBRING -2BR, 2BA. Tile floors, fresh paint. Includes water. $600/mo. Call Gary Johnson, 863-381-1861. RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartments SEBRING -Downtown on the Circle. Monthy rates starting at $400. payable wkly. Includes elec. & water. No Pets. 306 circle. 863-386-9100 or 954-295-7194. Or go to Bldg. and ask for John. 863-414-7535 REDUCED RENTfor doing maintenance. Upstairs furnished apartment. Need references. 863-385-1806. A PFURNISHED APT FOR RENT Avon Mobile Home Park 1350 N Lake Ave 55 Plus Park Sorry No Pets 863-453-3415 6150FurnishedApartmentsSEBRING VILLA 3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage. Wood floors, vaulted ceilings, screened porch. Convenient location near Hospital. Gated community, Clubhouse & pool, lawn maint. incl. $900. mo. RENTED!!! 6100Villas & CondosFor Rent 6000 Rentals PALM HARBORHOMES Call about our Extreme Makeover Home Sale As See On TV!! 800-622-2832 A PPARK MODEL FOR SALE Low Lot Rent 55 Plus Park Sorry No Pets 863-449-1072 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesLAKE PLACID Tropical Harbor 55+ Lakeside Park, w/all ammenities. 2/2 DW. Tile Sunroom, Laundry & Utility. Lg. Carport. Scenic open location. Moving. Open to offers. Call 863-465-5129. 4100Homes for SaleLake PlacidSEBRING NO NEED FOR A BANK! Owner Financing 3BR, 1BA remodeled, NICE HOME! Woodlawn Elem. area. 1243 Fernvale Ave. 863-227-2717 4080Homes for SaleSebring 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial WAIT STAFF NEEDED! Full Time & Part Time. Experience preferred / mature. Lunch & Dinner shifts, Apply in person at Zeno's Sun 'n Lake Blvd., Sebring. V ETERINARY RECEPTIONIST /ASSISTANTneeded for small animal clinic. A compassionate and enthusiastic team player needed for a full time position. Must have a positive attitude and take pride in providing exceptional client service. Multi-tasking, organization, attention to detail & computer skills necessary. Must be able to work flexible hrs. & weekends. Stop by and fill out an application at 11751 Twitty Rd. Sebring 33876. Hours M-F 7:30-6. RESIDENTIAL CLEANINGCo. Needs part time help, 15-25 hrs., week days only. Must be reliable, outgoing & highly motivated. Call 863-414-2244. MATH INSTRUCTORS PT positions to teach developmental math (daytime classes). Bachelor's degree in math or related field required. Open until filled. V isit www.southflorida.edu/hr for details. 863-784-7132. EA/EO MATH INSTRUCTORS PT positions to teach developmental math (daytime classes). Bachelor's degree in math or related field required. Open until filled. V isit www.southflorida.edu/hr for details. 863-784-7132. EA/EO LIFEGAURDS NEEDED.Lake Placid Camp and Conference Center is hiring Lifegaurds. Please call 863-465-2197 Mon-Fri 9-5pm. CNA PRIVATEduty $150. per day. Sat.-Mon. Ask for Laura 863-709-5333. 2100Help Wanted Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155

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Page 14ANews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.com

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Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Lady Blue Streak softball team celebrated Senior Night as they hosted Frostproof, however perhaps not as traditionally as previous years. Seniors Amanda Grimaldo, Kaitlyn Ostrander and Lauren Welborn were recognized with a personal biography as they stood by home plate for one of the last times of their high school careers. Upon receiving flowers from their selected underclassmen, it was a mad dash to the locker room. Fans looked around in confusion, but soon were in an uproar as the girls returned to the field. These girls strutted their stuff in the First Annual Joe Sinness Look-Alike Contest, in honor of the teams'head coach. Padded shirts, shoulder pads and little skits at the plate made for some great entertainment. It was Amanda Grimaldo's cunning performance that would award her the crown. The fun and games were left for the pre-game, however. Lady Streak pitcher Haley Pack and the Sebring defense would start the game on a strong note with three batters and three straight outs. The girls'usually late bats were woken up early on the night, as they ended the first inning with a comfortable 2-0 lead over the Lady Bulldogs. Frostproof, however, would return fire and close the gap by adding their own run during the top of the second. Tensions were high from there on out, with a neckand-neck performance as Sebring battled hard to keep the lead. Atriple from Jayme Faircloth would increase this gap one last time in the Streak's favor. "Ever since we lost Tayla Dasilva, we've been looking for a strong bat to take the leadoff spot," SPORTS B SECTION News-Sun Sunday, April 17, 2011 News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Green Dragon Colby Delaney blasted a three-run home run and threw six innings of one-hit ball in Friday's 6-0 win over Frostproof to lock up second place in the district standings. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comLAKE PLACID The Green Dragons closed out the district schedule in fine fashion, powering past Frostproof 6-0 Friday after mauling Mulberry 12-3 on Thursday, to lay claim to second place in the District 9-3Astandings. Friday's starting pitcher, Colby Delaney, was a model of efficiency, throwing just 71 pitches in his six innings of work needing just 22 pitches to work through the first three innings giving up just one hit and striking out six. Lake Placid then got on the board in the bottom of the second, with Dylan WeberCallahan doubling deep into the gap in left center, moving to third when Brandon Wells reached on an error and coming home on a Nathan Stanley single to left. After retiring the side on eight pitches in the top of the third, Delaney then helped his own cause with a thre erun blast over the scoreboa rd in left center, driving hom e Terry Coyne and Ky le Barber, who had both draw n walks to start the inning. Two outs later, Webe rCallahan hit one in near t he same direction as his doub le an inning earlier, but this o ne was a little more el evated with a litt le more oomph behind it, and cleared the fen ce for a solo home run to push the lead to 5 -0 for the Dragons. Delaney then tec hnically struck out the side in the fourth, though o ne Frostproof batter reached o n a dropped third strike, befo re Wells caught that runn er stealing to end the inning. Lake Placid's defense th en flashed some fancy leather in the sixth to back u p Delaney's effort. With two on and one out in the sixth, a wicked line dri ve was sent toward Barber at Shutout secures second seed See DRAGONS, page 4 B News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Sebring's Shannon Williams signed to play basketball at Rollins College Tuesday. Joining her on the big day, back row, left to right, father Tealy Williams, Sebring Athletic Director T erry Quarles, Blue Streak head coach Mike Lee and Sebring Principal Toni Stivender. Front row, mother Angela Williams, Shannon and brother Terrell Williams. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING "I've been dreaming about this since my freshman year," Sebring senior Shannon Williams said this past week upon signing to attend and play basketball at Rollins College in Orlando. "It feels great and I'm excited to get the chance to play basketball in college." Astandout on the court, Williams averaged a doubledouble this past season, 14 points and 10 rebounds, despite being the focus of every defense Sebring faced. "We asked her to do a lot this year," Lady Streak head coach Mike Lee said. "She worked hard on every aspect of her game to help us improve as a team." And it's that work ethic that has brought her to this point and will continue to help her grow and become a part of a very strong Tar team next season. Rollins started out the season strong and rose to as high as No. 14 in the Division II polls before injures slowed things down a bit. The team still finish ed with a 21-8 record und er head coach Glenn Wilkes, J r. "Coach Wilkes seems to be an amazing guy," William s father Tealy said. "He's be en very focused in on keeping us informed and responding to all of Shannon's question s. He knew early on it would be a good fit and she felt ve ry comfortable that this was t he right place to be." The fact that it is just an hour and a half away help s, giving her a chance to g et away, just not too far. What dreams may come See WILLIAMS, page 4 B By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK In the last h ome game of the season, the L ady Devils suffered a 12-0 l oss to Hardee on Friday n ight, but are still looking f orward. "We really didn't play a b ad game. We just couldn't g et our bats going," said L ady Devil coach Krystle L awson. "We had a great p ractice, and the girls were h itting everything earlier this w eek, but we just could not g et it going." To compound the problem, a ccording to Lawson, the L ady Devils are losing seven s eniors with just two players r eturning next year. "Recruitment is going to t he key to next year. We have a lot of talent in Avon Park, w e just need to get them m otivated to get out here," s aid Lawson. The Devil defense came o ut strong, playing tight until t he sixth when Hardee's bats s eemed to find every weak s pot on the field for six runs. "We really did not play a b ad game until the end. We h ung in there, but could not s eem to get consistent hits," L awson said. The Devils only captured t hree hits and no walks off of H ardee hurler Karlee H enderson. The Lady Devils were not t otally discouraged by the l oss. "We started the season w ith just seven players, and t he girls have struggled here o ver the last couple of years. T hey had to endure coaching c hanges every year, but I r ecently bought a house here a nd I am going to be here a w hile. I hope that brings a litt le stability to the program," L awson said. "We have the talent here, b ut have not put it together y et, the game in Lake Placid s howed that. I am hoping that w e can put together a traveli ng team and work on techn ique before next season," L awson said. The Lady Devils travel to F rostproof for district play on M onday, facing Mulberry at 7 p.m. Lady Devils look forward We have the talent here, but have not put it together yet.'KRYSTLELAWSON Lady Devil head coach News-Sun photo courtesy of KIM GAUGE R Alex Griffin fields this grounder for an out at first as a Haines City runner advances to second in the second inning of Friday's 10-8 win for Sebring. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSebring baseball bounced back from Thursday's disappointing loss at Lake Wales to hold off Haines City in a 10-8, comeback win Friday, giving the Streaks a shot at second in the district standings. But that was contingent upon the Highlanders handling Winter Haven Friday, and the Blue Devils gummed up the works with a 3-2 win, putting them in first, Lake Wales second and Sebrin g third in the final distri ct seeding. In Friday's game, a le tdown might have be en somewhat expected, b ut the Streaks came out h ot right out of the gate, sco ring three in the first with a two-run Corbin Hoffn er double and a Nate Gree ne RBI single. Hoffner was strong o n the mound despite givin g up a second-inning ru n and would complete h is day after three innings of Streaks settle for third seed Lake Placid6Frostproof0 See SEBRING, page 4 B News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Amanda Grimaldo and head coach Joe Sinness were all smiles Friday after Grimaldo won the First Annual Joe Sinness Look-Alike contest during Senior Night ceremonies. Lady Streaks all smiles on Senior Night See STREAKS, page 3B

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Dunning TributeAVON PARK On Monday, April 25, South Florida Community College will honor the memory of the first coach in school history, Coach Dunning Terrell. Coach Terrell coached basketball and baseball at what was then SFJC from 19661974, and continued to teach physical education until he retired in 1986. Coach Terrell started the men's basketball and baseball programs in 1966 even before SFJC had a gym on campus. Several of Coach Terrell's former players still live in the Heartland area. SFCC Athletics will pay tribute to the family of Coach Terrell by recognizing his daughter Judy and their family at a short mound ceremony prior to the game against State College of Florida. State College of Florida head baseball coach Tim Hill will be in attendance as well, a former colleague of coach Terrell from his days at SFJC. SFCC would like to invite all former players of Coach Terrell, colleagues, as well as family and friends to come out this night to be a part of this tribute. Game time is 6 p.m. and the ceremony will start at 5:45.SYFS BBQ and registrationSEBRING Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is hosting our 2nd Annual BBQ Fundraiser and Tournament on Saturday, April 30 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The BBQ Lunch is $7 and will include a Pulled Pork Sandwich, Baked Beans, Coleslaw, Cookies and a glass of tea. Pick up your meal to go or stay and watch our girls play while you eat. For further information, please email dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201. Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is also conducting registrations for girls ages 10 to 15 now through April 1. Registration is $65 for the first child / $45 for any siblings. For further information, please visit us on Facebook, check out our website at www.eteamz.com/sebringyouthfastpitchsoftball email us at dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201.Golf for God TournamentSEBRING The Golf for God Tournament will kick off with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start on Saturday, May 7 at Golf Hammock Golf and Country Club. It will be a 2-Person scramble at $65 a person, which includes golf, cart, a $25 dry cleaning certificate, a golf certificate for two rounds of golf and a ball for the ball-drop. You can purchase additional balls for the ball-drop which will take place by helicopter at 1 p.m. over the driving range. It will be a 50/50 cash prize, up to $500. Mulligan's will also be available. First, second and third-place winners will receive additional balls for the balldrop. This is a fundraiser for Kayla Griffin who will be on a missionary journey to 11 countries over an 11 month period, spreading the Word of God to the people of these lands. Call the course at 382-2151 to have a registration form faxed to you or pick one up at a near-by course. YMCA Sign-UpsSEBRING The Highlands County YMCAand Eagles Football is doing sign-ups for Youth Flag Football ages 5 14. Healthy Kids Day is Saturday, April 1 6 from 9am to 1pm. Lifeguard Certification Class sign-up s are taking place now for an April 25-30 class.APProject GraduationAVONPARK The APHSProject Graduation 2011 Benefit Golf Tournament will be held Saturday, May 21 at 8:30 a.m. at River Greens Golf Course. The flighted, four-person scramble costs $60 per person and includes green s fee, cart, lunch and prizes. In addition to the action, there will be mulligans, a 50/50 and raffles for purchase the day of the tournament. The grand prize raffle is for a round o f golf for two at Doral Golf Resort and Spa. Tee sign sponsorships are going for $50, for a sign and player, it is $100. For more information, contact Suzie Gentry at 446-7368.SFCC Summer Youth CampsAVONPARK South Florida Panthe r Baseball will be holding Summer Youth Camps from June 13-16 and June 20-23 for children aged 6-13. Each camp runs from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and costs $80 per camp or $150 fo r both. Registration and sign-in begin at 8 a.m. with the camp to follow, including baseball fundamentals, position instruction, station rotation, games, swimming pool time and a camp T-shirt. SFCC head coach Rick Hitt will serv e as camp director with Panther assistant coach Andy Polk and members of the Panther baseball team will be on hand a s instructors. Campers should bring their individua l baseball attire as well as a bathing suit and towel. The camps will be held at the SFCC Panther field at the Highlands County campus in Avon Park. For more information, call Coach Hit t at the following campus phone numbers at extension 7036: Avon Park/Sebring, 453-6661; Lake Placid, 465-5300; Arcadia, 494-7500; Wauchula, 773-2252.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING Wings of Faith Worship Center presents the First Annual Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one team of four golfers, one tee sign and tw o green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includ es one team of four golfers, one green sign; Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $10 0 includes one green sign. Individual player $60 includes gree n fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26). Team of Four Golfers $240 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after March 26). Make checks payable to: Wings of Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL 33871, or register online at wingsoffaithchristianworshipcenter.com Proceeds to be donated to scholarship program for graduates attending Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center. For more information, call Jason Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhankerson@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at 381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com FIRST ROUND (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEChicago vs. Indiana Saturday: Indiana at Chicago, late Monday: Indiana at Chicago, 9:30 p.m. Thursday: Chicago at Indiana, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 23: Chicago at Indiana, 2:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Indiana at Chicago, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Chicago at Indiana, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Indiana at Chicago, TBD Miami vs. Philadelphia Saturday: Philadelphia at Miami, late Monday: Philadelphia at Miami, 7 p.m. Thursday: Miami at Philadelphia, 8 p.m. Sunday, April 24: Miami at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 27: Philadelphia at Miami, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Miami at Philadelphia, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Philadelphia at Miami, TBD Boston vs. New York Sunday: N.Y. at Boston, 7 p.m. Tuesday: N.Y. at Boston, 7 p.m. Friday: Boston at N.Y., 7 p.m. Sunday, April 24: Boston at N.Y., 3 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: N.Y. at Boston, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Boston at N.Y., TBD x-Sunday, May 1: N.Y. at Boston, TBD Orlando vs. Atlanta Saturday: Atlanta at Orlando, late Tuesday: Atlanta at Orlando, 7:30 p.m. Friday: Orlando at Atlanta, 8 p.m. Sunday, April 24: Orlando at Atlanta, 7 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Atlanta at Orlando, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Orlando at Atlanta, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Atlanta at Orlando, TBDWESTERN CONFERENCESan Antonio vs. Memphis Sunday: Memphis at San Antonio, 1 p.m. Wednesday: Memphis at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Saturday, April 23: San Antonio at Memphis, 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 25: San Antonio at Memphis, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Memphis at San Antonio, TBD x-Friday, April 29: San Antonio at Memphis, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Memphis at San Antonio, TBD L.A. Lakers vs. New Orleans Sunday: New Orleans at L.A., 3:30 p.m. Wednesday: New Orleans at L.A., 10 p.m. Friday, April 22: L.A. at New Orleans, 9:30 p.m. Sunday, April 24: L.A. at New Orleans, 9:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: New Orleans at L.A., TBD x-Thursday, April 28: L.A. at New Orleans, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: New Orleans at L.A., TBD Dallas vs. Portland Saturday: Portland at Dallas, late Tuesday: Portland at Dallas, 9:30 p.m. Thursday: Dallas at Portland, 10 p.m. Saturday, April 23: Dallas at Portland, 5 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: Portland at Dallas, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Dallas at Portland, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Portland at Dallas, TBD Oklahoma City vs. Denver Sunday: Denver at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday: Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Saturday, April 23: Oklahoma City at Denver, 10 p.m. Monday, April 25: Oklahoma City at Denver, 10:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 27: Denver at Oklahoma City, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Oklahoma City at Denver, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Denver at Oklahoma City, TBD FIRST ROUND (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEWashington 2, New York Rangers 0 Wednesday: Washington 2, Rangers 1, OT Friday: Washington 2, Rangers 0 Sunday: Washington at Rangers, 3 p.m. Wednesday: Washington at Rangers, 7 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 3 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, TBD Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0 Thursday: Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0 Saturday: Buffalo at Philadelphia, late Monday: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 7 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 3 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Buffalo at Philadelphia, TBD Montreal 1, Boston 0 Thursday: Montreal 2, Boston 0 Saturday: Montreal at Boston, late Monday: Boston at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. Thursday: Boston at Montreal, 7 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Boston at Montreal, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Montreal at Boston TBD Pittsburgh 1, Tampa Bay 1 Wednesday: Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 0 Friday: Tampa Bay 5, Pittsburgh 1 Monday: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBD x-Monday, April 25: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBDWESTERN CONFERENCEVancouver 2, Chicago 0 Wednesday: Vancouver 2, Chicago 0 Friday: Vancouver 4, Chicago 3 Sunday: Vancouver at Chicago, 8 p.m. Tuesday: Vancouver at Chicago, 8 p.m. x-Thursday: Chicago at Vancouver, 10 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Vancouver at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Chicago at Vancouver, TBD San Jose 1, Los Angeles 0 Thursday: San Jose 3, L.A. 2, OT Saturday: L.A. at San Jose, late Tuesday: San Jose at L.A., 10:30 p.m. Thursday: San Jose at L.A., 10:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: L.A. at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: San Jose at L.A., TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: L.A. at San Jose, TBD Detroit 1, Phoenix 0 Wednesday: Detroit 4, Phoenix 2 Saturday: Phoenix at Detroit, late Monday: Detroit at Phoenix, 10 p.m. Wednesday: Detroit at Phoenix, 10 p.m. x-Friday: Phoenix at Detroit, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Detroit at Phoenix, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Phoenix at Detroit, TBD Nashville 1, Anaheim 1 Wednesday: Nashville 4, Anaheim 1 Friday: Anaheim 5, Nashville 3 Sunday: Anaheim at Nashville, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Anaheim at Nashville, 8 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Nashville at Anaheim, 10 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD x-Tuesday, April 26: Nashville at Anaheim, TBDAMERICANLEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB New York75.583 Toronto76.53812Baltimore66.5001 Tampa Bay58.385212Boston210.1675 Central Division WLPctGB Cleveland94.692 Kansas City94.692 Chicago76.5382 Detroit77.500212Minnesota49.3085 West Division WLPctGB Texas103.769 Los Angeles85.6152 Oakland68.429412Seattle410.286612___ Friday's Games Cleveland 8, Baltimore 2 Texas 5, N.Y. Yankees 3 Tampa Bay 5, Minnesota 2 Toronto 7, Boston 6 L.A. Angels 4, Chicago White Sox 3 Kansas City 6, Seattle 5 Detroit 8, Oakland 4, 10 innings Saturday's Games Baltimore at Cleveland, late Texas at N.Y. Yankees, late Seattle at Kansas City, late Toronto at Boston, late L.A. Angels at Chicago White Sox, late Minnesota at Tampa Bay, late Detroit at Oakland, late Sunday's Games Baltimore at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 1:35 p.m. Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m. L.A. Angels at Chi White Sox, 2:10 p.m. Seattle at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m. Detroit at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Texas at N.Y. Yankees, 8:05 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB Philadelphia94.692 Florida85.6151 Washington67.4623 Atlanta58.3854 New York49.3085 Central Division WLPctGB Cincinnati85.615 Milwaukee76.5381 St. Louis77.500112Chicago67.4622 Pittsburgh67.4622 Houston410.286412West Division WLPctGB Colorado112.846 San Francisco76.5384 San Diego67.4625 Los Angeles68.429512Arizona57.417512___ Friday's Games Florida 4, Philadelphia 3 Washington 4, Milwaukee 3, 10 innings Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 1 N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, ppd., rain San Diego 4, Houston 2 Colorado 5, Chicago Cubs 0 San Francisco 5, Arizona 2 St. Louis 11, L.A. Dodgers 2 Saturday's Games Milwaukee at Washington, late Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, late N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, late, 1st game Florida at Philadelphia, late San Diego at Houston, late N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, late, 2nd game Chicago Cubs at Colorado, late San Francisco at Arizona, late St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, late Sunday's Games Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m. Florida at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m. Milwaukee at Washington, 1:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m. San Diego at Houston, 2:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Colorado, 3:10 p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 4:10 p.m. St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid MONDAY: Softball at District Tournament,Frostproof,TBA TUESDAY: Baseball vs.Sebring,7 p.m.; Softball at District Tournament,Frostproof,TBA THURSDAY: Baseball vs.Clewiston,7 p.m.; Softball at District Tournament,Frostproof, TBA Sebring MONDAY: Softball at District Tournament,Lake Wales,vs.Winter Haven,7 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball at Lake Placid,7 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Softball at District Tournament,Lake Wales,vs.Lake Wales,7 p.m.,if necessary THURSDAY: Baseball vs.Pt.St.Lucie,7 p.m.; Track and Field at District Meet,Winter Haven,11 a.m. SFCC MONDAY: Baseball vs.Polk State College,6 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball at Hillsborough,3 p.m. FRIDAY: Baseball vs.Hillsborough,6 p.m. SATURDAY: Baseball at Hillsborough,1 p.m. Avon Park MONDAY: Baseball vs.Santa Fe Catholic,7 p.m.; Softball at District Tournament, Frostproof,TBA TUESDAY: Softball at District Tournament,Frostproof,TBA THURSDAY: Baseball at Hardee,7 p.m. A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n NASCAR Aaron's 499. . . . . . . F F O O X X 5 5 p p . m m . ALMS LeMans at Long Beach . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 7 7 p p . m m . NHRA VisitMyrtleBeach Nationals . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2N N H H L L P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Washington at N.Y. Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CM M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Minnesota at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 1 1 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Toronto at Boston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T B B S S 3 3 p p . m m . Chicago Cubs at Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . W W G G N N 8 8 p p . m m . Texas at N.Y. Yankees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 6 6 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay . . . . . . S S U U N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 6 6 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay . . . . . . S S U U N NP P R R E E M M I I E E R R L L E E A A G G U U E E S S O O C C C C E E R R T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Newcastle U vs. Manchester United . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2Times, games, channels all subject to change C C O O L L L L E E G G E E S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . Oklahoma at Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NG G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Malaysian Open . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 1 1 p p . m m . PGA Outback Steakhouse Pro-Am . . . . . N N B B C C 1 1 p p . m m . PGA Valero Texas Open . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . mm . PGA Valero Texas Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 7 7 p p . m m . PGA Fresh Express Classic . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F FN N B B A A P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Memphis at San Antonio . . . . . . . . . . . . . A A B B C C 3 3 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . New Orleans at L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 7 7 p p . m m . N.Y. Knicks at Boston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Denver at Oklahoma City . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Philadelphia at Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Indiana at Chicago . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T TT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . N.Y. Knicks at Boston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Portland at Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TT N N T TB B O O W W L L I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . PBA Dick Weber Playoffs . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Championship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N LIVESPORTSONTV NBA Playoffs NHLPlayoffs Major League Baseball Page 2BNews-Sun Sunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.co m

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 3B This summer the South Florida Community Colle ge volleyball program has more camps to offer than ev er before. Listed below you will see opportunities for sand an d indoor camps. If there is a camp date that you could attend but t he age group is different than yours please call and speci al arrangements could be made. Individual private sessions for indoor and sand a re available year-round. Call/Email to schedule today! June 2011 Sand: 13th-16th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:3 010:30 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor: 13th16th (4 days) Monday-Thursda y, 11:30-1:30 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps June 13-16t h: $100 July 2011 Sand: 11th -14th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor: 11th-14th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 11:3 01:30 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps July 11-1 4: $100 July 2011 Indoor: 25th-28th (4 days) Monday-Thursday Morning Session (Grades 5-8) 9:30-11:30 a.m. $60 Afternoon Session (Grades 9-12) 2-4:30 p.m. $75 Contact Coach Crawford with any questions at kim.crawford@southflorida.edu, cell: 863-835-2377, or Office: 863-784-7037. Panther Volleyball Camps Special to the News-SunSEBRING The fourth annual Last Chance Ranch 10K/5K Run-Walk is set for Highlands Hammock State Park on Saturday, April 23 at 7:30 a.m. The run/walk benefits the Last Chance Education Foundation for the Venus, Florida institution. Race organizer Darrell Jensen may be reached at 441-3357 and Central Florida Striders president Chet Brojek at 385-4736 or cbrojek@comcast.net to sign up for the event. Entry fee is $25 and includes a dri-fit tee, awards in both events, and refres hments post race. Tee shirt sizes can only be guaranteed for pre-register ed entrants. Checks made payable t o: AMIKids-Last Chance Ran ch should be included with ent ry form. Last Chance Ranch 5/10K S inness said. "I put Jayme in t here, and she did just that. I w as very impressed with her p erformance tonight." Their efforts kept them up f or most of the game, until o ne Bulldog slugger found t he left-center gap. Despite the diving effort of l eft fielder Kaitlyn Ostrander, t his hit would give F rostproof their first advant age of the night, bringing the score to 5-4. The Streaks would not be defeated just yet. The defense was holding strong, with numerous catches by center fielder Dino Lower and an exciting double-play by Amanda Grimaldo. Unfortunately, that was how the game ended as well and while the loss was upsetting, very few heads were held down. "We hit the ball hard against a very good pitcher," explained Sinness. "We had a few dropped balls defensively that hurt us, but overall had a great outing. Now all we have to do is adjust to a slower pitcher for Monday night's game." In this, he referenced the first round of districts, in which the girls will take on Winter Haven. "We've beaten them twice already, but we still need to come hard and shut them down early," agreed seniors Ostrander and Grimaldo. "If we do that, we stand a good chance. "We've got a strong team and we can beat anyone that comes our way if we just set our minds to it." Sebring squares off with the Lady Blue Devils Monday at 7 p.m. in Lake Wales. Continued from 1B Streaks face Winter Haven in District Tourney opener Special to the News-SunAVON PARK SFCC A thleticswill host a Two D ay Fun Sport Selection c amp on Thursday and F riday, June 9 and 10 for g irls and boys aged 6-16. Each day the camp runs f rom 9 a.m.-3 p.m., with c ampers choosing their own sport, whether it is Beach Volleyball, Basketball, Baseball, Softball or Soccer. During the morning portion each day, campers will stretch, do plyometrics, agility drills, work on strength and flexibility, learn arm and body care and get introduced to the Fitness Center. Lunch is then provided with the campers then delving into the sport they chose and wrapping it up with activities in the SFCC pool. Registration and check-in from 8:15-8:55 a.m., and preregistration is not necessary as walk-ups are accepted. The rate for one day is $50 and $95 for both days. The camp will be aministered by SFCC head and assistant coaches, with help from SFCC student-athletes. For questions or more information, contact Camp Director and SFCC Athletic Director Rick Hitt at 7847036. SFCC Panther Fun Camps Special to the News-SunSEBRING Aleague m eeting for Highlands C ounty softball teams has b een scheduled for T uesday, April 19, at 6:30 p .m. The meeting will be held a t the Highlands County S ports Complex off Sheriff's Tower Road. Leagues will begin playing again on Monday, May 9. Open registration for all adult softball players, men and women, is ongoing until April 26. The charge is $350 and a $15 sanction fee. If you are interested in playing organized softball, please sign up at the Highlands County Sports Complex. For more information, please contact Dan Jamison at the Highlands County Sports Complex (863) 4026755. County Softball Meeting Associated PressWASHINGTON Acongressional committee that investigated drugs in baseball says former All-Star pitcher Roger Clemens cannot look into its files for more material to use at his upcoming federal trial. The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee said there is no "carve-out" for criminal defendants like Clemens to look into its internal files. Clemens wants notes and research from the House committee to defend himself on charges that he lied about using performance-enhancing drugs when he testified before Congress. Afederal judge has sche duled an April 21 hearing o n whether Clemens can g et access to the material. Clemens can't see files for trial

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Page 4BNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.com Special to the News-SunSEBRING The H ighlands Youth Football a nd Cheer Organization ( HYF) will be having a Car W ash fundraiser at Advanced A uto Parts at the corner of U S 27 and the Sebring P arkway on Saturday, April 2 3, from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. All monies earned or d onated will be used to purc hase equipment and unif orms for the boys and girls. HYF is a new league to S ebring and is looking forw ard to providing a rewarding youth sports program to foster these boys and girls to develop sportsmanship, physical fitness and build their self esteem as well as provide them an opportunity to be part of a team. The team name is the "Highlands Eagles" and team colors are black, yellow and white. Come on down and get registered while your car is being washed. HYF will also be offering registration during our car wash for cheerleaders and football players. Any registered player that needs to turn in registration information or payment can come to the car wash to do so. Several of our coaches and board members will be there to meet or answer any questions you may have. Available for Ages 5 15 years old (8th Grade maximum). Registration fees are $75 each for Football and Cheer or $65 each if you are signing up multiple children, Limited spots are available for Mighty-Mite, Pee Wee and Junior Varsity Divisions Flag and Varsity players are needed. All divisions are open for Cheerleading Please come on down to support your youth football organization. For football, please call Tim Hooks at 414-2873, Cliff Howell at 253-7070 or Becky Grippo at 381-9760 for Cheerleading. Highlands Youth Football Car Wash third. He initially got his glove on it, but it was so hard hit, it instantly ricocheted into foul territory. So hard hit that by the time the ball was landing on the grass, the batter was barely out of the box. Keeping his wits about him, Barber retrieved the ball and, too late to force the runner coming to third, fired across for the out at first. Tyler Carr then finished the inning on a fine, charging pick-up of a slow chopper, scooping and firing side-arm on the run to retire the side. The Dragons then added on more in the sixth with Coyne singling to left to bring home Wells before Weber-Callahan came on in relief to close out the 6-0 win. "We're still not quite as solid as we were heading into the Sebring game," head coach Dan Coomes said. "But we're getting closer. We're still a little banged up and Colby isn't 100-percent, but he's a bulldog and he'll battle. "This is big for us, to get the second seed," Coomes continued. "That means we get the seventh seed, Mulberry, who we've handled pretty well both times we played them this year." That includes Thursday's 12-3 win which saw Pike Cloninger and Heath Harris combine for the win on the mound while Delaney and Rick Miller both went yard to pace the offense. The team closes out t he district schedule with an 8 -4 record and finishes up t he regular season this we ek with two home game s, Tuesday against Sebring an d Thursday against Clewisto n, before heading to the distri ct tournament the followin g week in Avon Park. Continued from 1B The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN "I was looking at other schools in other states, but felt most comfortable at Rollins," Williams said. "It's a great school and it's not far away, so my family will get a chance to see me play." An aspect not lost on her mother. "She has to get out on her own eventually," mother Angela said. "It will be hard, but she's close enough and we'll be able to see her play every chance we get." And so now it comes down to putting the time in to be ready to play at the next level. "The team is losing two post players to graduation, so there's a chance I could get some playing time," Williams said. "I'm working hard in the weight room to get stronger and am working on my moves around the basket." Dreams are what propel us forward, but it is the work put forth toward those dreams that allow them to be reached. This is something Shannon Williams knows as one dream has be en reached, with more to com e. Continued from 1B Dragons on the move News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHN E Lake Placid head coach Dan Coomes congratulates Dylan Weber-Callahan as he rounds third base after his solo home run in Friday's 6-0 win over Frostproof. Williams hard work pays off w ork to keep him fresh as the d istrict tournament looms. ASebring run was added i n the fourth with Hoffner g etting plunked and Steven D unn taking over as a court esy runner. An error and two wild p itches later, Dunn was in to m ake it a 4-1 lead. The Streaks then looked to h ave broken it open with t hree more in the fifth, but t he Hornets answered back w ith a four-spot in their half o f the frame to cut the lead to 7 -5. Sebring went down in o rder in the sixth and another t hree came across for Haines C ity to take an 8-7 lead headi ng into the Blue Streaks f inal at bat. But that's when Hoffner c ame through again, belting a nother two-run double as S ebring tallied three before G reene retired the side to s ecure the win. "It was one of those games w here we had to battle back, a nd the kids were just a little t ired after the loss to Lake Wales," assistant coach Buck Rapp said. "We did not pitch extremely well, but we got some hits when we needed them and Corbin came up with a big one in the seventh." The Lake Wales game, a 43 loss Thursday, was reminiscent of the 9-8 loss Sebring suffered to the Highlanders on March 11. In the one, Lake Wales got up big early, only to see the Streaks mount a furious rally that come up just short. Similarly, some spotty defense allowed the Highlanders to put up two runs in each of the first two innings, with only one being earned. "Our defense gave up a few early that hurt a bit, ones that we usually get," Rapp said. "The next thing you know, we are down 4-0." The comeback would start in the fourth, with a Johnny Knight double bringing a run in. Aground-out RBI was collected by Greene in the fifth and an error of a hard Matt Randall grounder brought Gunnar Westergom home in the sixth to cut the deficit to 4-3. But Florida signee Justin Shafer stranded two runners in the seventh to hang on for the win. "(Shafer) pitched a really good game," Rapp said. "They got out ahead of us and we just could not come back. We had the tying run on base in the last inning, but could not get it done." But bouncing back for the win Friday got things going back in a positive direction. "We have a little momentum heading into districts," Rapp said. "These guys have matured a lot since the spring, but that will be win or go home. I think we have an opportunity here." But before then, the Streaks travel to Lake Placid Tuesday and host Port Saint Lucie Thursday to close out the regular season before hosting the district tournament starting Monday, April 25. Continued from 1B News-Sun photo courtesy of KIM GAUGER J esse Baker sets to fire to first as part of a 6-2-3 double play in Thursday's 4-3 loss at Lake Wales. Sebring set for season's final week News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE J amie Ross goes all out, diving for this grounder to the right side Thursday, but that, like the season itself for the Lady Panthers, was just out of reach as SFCCs season concluded with a sweep at the hands of Polk State College. Just beyond the grasp News-Sun file photo by DAN HOEHN E Shannon Williams averaged a double-double this past season and will be taking her talents to Rollins College in Orlando. Today in Baseball HistoryApril 17 1953 Mickey Mantle cleared the bleachers at Griffith Stadium with a 565-fo ot home run off Chuck Stobbs. The shot came in the fifth inning of a 7-3 win over t he Senators. 2008 Chipper Jones, Mark Teixeira and Brian McCann hit consecutive home ru ns in a span of 12 pitches in the fifth inning off Florida's Ricky Nolasco in Atlanta's 8 -0 win.

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T he Community Calendar prov ides a brief listing of local c lubs and organizations who m eet on a regular basis. It is t he responsibility of the group t o update the News-Sunon a ny changes in this listing by c alling 385-6155, ext. 516; s end any changes by e-mail to e ditor@newssun.com;or mail t hem to News-SunCommunity C alendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, S ebring, FL33870. S UNDAY American Legion Post 25 L ake Placid has lounge hours f rom 1-9 p.m. Live music is f rom 5-8 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 o pen 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p .m. Members and guests o nly. Post is at 528 N. Pine S t., Sebring. Call 471-1448. Heartland Interfaith A lliance meets 1:30 p.m., first F riday, St. Frances of Assisi E piscopal Church, 43 Lake J une Road, Lake Placid. Call 4 65-0051. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2 661 lounge is open from 1-7 p .m. Card games start at 1:30 p .m. The lodge is open to m embers and their guests. C all 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has k araoke in the pavilion. H orseshoes played at 9:30 a .m. Food available at 4 p.m. O pen to members and qualif ied guests only. Loyal Order of Moose H ighlands County Lodge No. 2 494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon P ark. Cards start at 4 p.m. M usic outside Tiki Hut at 3 p .m. Lodge phone number 4 52-0579. Overeaters Anonymous, m eets from 4-5 p.m. in second f loor conference roomNo. 3 at F lorida Hospital Heartland M edical Center, 4200 Sun N L ake Blvd., Sebring. Call 3827 731. No dues, fees or weighi ns. For details on the organiz ation, go to www.oa.org. Ridge Area Missionary S oldiers Avon Park P athfinder Club meets from 9 a .m. to noon every first and t hird Sunday at 58 E. Sixth S t., Avon Park. Call 471-2143. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 s erves lunch at 2 p.m. at the c lub, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. C all 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2 259 offers NASCAR racing in t he pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar o pen and kitchen open from 25 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S. 9 8, Sebring. Call 655-3920. Society for Creative A nachronism (Local C hapter: Shire of Stagridge) m eets at 2 p.m. first and third S unday at Brewster's Coffee H ouse on U.S. 27 in Sebring. C all 214-5522. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 3880 serves hamburgers f rom 4-5:30 p.m. and plays p oker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1 224 County Road 621 East, L ake Placid. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 4300 Karaoke is from 58 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE L akeview Drive, Sebring. Call 3 85-8902. MONDAY Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN W ITH ME family group meets a t 10:30 a.m. every Monday at t he Heartland Christian C hurch on Alt. 27 in Sebring. T he church is behind S outhgate Shopping Center w here Publix is. F or more information call 3855 714. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal C hurch, Lakeshore Drive, S ebring. Call 385-8807. Alcoholics Anonymous O ne Day At ATime group m eets for a closed discussion a t 9:30 a.m. Monday and F riday at Covenant P resbyterian Church, 4500 S un N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. C all 314-0891. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 6:30 p.m. at R osewood Center, 517 U.S. 2 7 South, Lake Placid. Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at S t. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. C all 202-0647. American Legion Placid P ost 25Lake Placid has s huffleboard at 1 p.m. Lounge h ours are 12-9 p.m. Call 4657 940. American Legion Post 74 o pen noon to 8 p.m. Happy h our from 4-6 p.m. Call 4711448. AmVets Post 21 plays darts at 7:30 p.m. for members and guests. Call 3850234. Avon Park Lakes Association has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m. The clubhouse is at 2714 Nautilus Drive in Avon Park. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118. Corvette Cruisers meets at 6:30 p.m. first and third Monday at the Dairy Queen in front of The Home Depot, Sebring. Call Ed Robson at 655-2092. Florida Association Home and Community Education meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly on Mondays at The AgriCenter. The group of sewers and crafters make items for residents of adult congregate living facilities. Call Penny Bucher at 385-0949. Garden Club of Sebring meets noon, Sebring Civic Center. Call 385-2044 or 3822063 for details. Grand Prix Cloggers EZ Intermediate and Intermediate Clogging class are held at 9 a.m. every Monday at Reflections on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club meets from 7:30-9:30 p.m. the first and third Monday at Sebring Civic Center from December through April. There will be alternating mainstream and plus dancing with rounds. Casual dress or square dance attire is acceptable. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or e-mail him atsamdunn@samdunn.net.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September.Heartland Pops rehearses at 7 p.m. Mondays at Avon Park High School Band Room, 700 E. Main St., under the direction of Anthony Jones. Musicians of all ages are welcome. For information, call 314-8877. Highlands County Amateur Radio Club meets at 7:30 p.m. third Monday in conference room 3 at the Highlands County Agri-Civic Center, Sebring. Call Don Roberts at 402-0554 or Darrell Koranda at 471-0226. Highlands County Concert Band rehearses 7-9 p.m. every Monday at Sebring High School band room. All musicians are welcome. Vic Anderson, musical director. Call Bill Varner at 386-0855. Highlands County Sewing Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Highlands County AgriCivic Center in the 4-H laboratory, Sebring. Call 402-6540. Highlands Delta Chorale rehearses 7 p.m., Sebring Church of the Brethren, 700 S. Pine St., Sebring (September throughMay). No auditions are required to join and all ages are welcome. For details or to book a concert, call Cheryl Cometta at 699-2663. Highlands Sertoma Club meets noon, Takis Family Restaurant, Sebring. La Leche League breastfeeding support for Highlands and southern Polk counties, meets at 7 p.m. every third Monday at the Florida Hospital Heartland conference rooms. Pregnant and nursing mothers and their babies are welcome. For more information, call 6556617 or 638-3954. Lake Placid American Legion Post 25 meets 8 p.m., Legion Hall. Lake Placid Art League will have classes in Drawing and Painting, conducted by Anne Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart will teach Fabric Painting at the center. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2 p.m. Sign up for darts is at 6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m. It is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m. Let It Begin With Me Alanon Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Monday at Heartland Christian Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South, Sebring. For details about Alanon, a self-help group for families and friends of alcoholics, call 385-5714. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Meetings held first and third Mondays at 8 p.m. Lodge phone number 452-0579. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Highlands County Branch meets 7 p.m. third Monday for a general meeting at Sebring Chamber of Commerce, 227 U.S. 27 North, Sebring. For information, call All Hinson at 3992243, Rev. Robert Walker at 414-6474 or Davette Thompson at (312) 543-5983.. National Association of Retired Veteran Railway Employees (NARVRE) meets at 11:30 a.m. third Monday fromOctober through May at Homer's Smorgasbord in Sebring.All current and retired railroad employees and their spouses are invited to attend. Call Jerry at 441-4418. Rotary Club of Highlands County meets at 6:15 p.m. at Beef O Brady's, Sebring. Sebring Bridge Club has Bridge, ACBLDuplicate at the clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Mondays. For details or info on lessons, call 385-8118. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 has pizza and darts at 7:30 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has the lounge open from 127 p.m. Smoke-free environment. Call 471-3557. Sebring Historical Society open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Located in back side of Sebring Public Library building on Lake Jackson. For information, call 471-2522. Sebring Optimist Club meets at 6:15 p.m. first and third Mondays at Jim's house. Call Jim Harrison at 381-9767 or Gabriel Read at 453-2859. Sebring Moose Club 2259 serves beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Women of the Moose meets at 7 p.m. third Monday for a business meeting, snacks and trivia pursuit. Call 655-3920. Sebring Women of the Moose has a business meeting at 7 p.m. at the lodge, 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 382-8782. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL632, Sebring meets at 3:30 p.m. at the fellowship hall at the First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, Sebring. Call Judy O'Boyle at 260-0831. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 meets 7 p.m. third Monday, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring.TUESDAY Al-Anon Family Groups meet for discussion and Twelve Step study at noon, Union Congregational Church, 105 N. Forest Ave., Avon Park. Parking available south of old church. All Sebring Model Railroad Club meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway, unless otherwise directed. Members build and run an "HO" Guage model railroad layout. Railbuffs interested in other model railroad gauges are welcomed. For information, or updates on meeting locations, call Gene Archer, 452-0334, or Curtis Petersen, 382-6967. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard and euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Boy Scout Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30 p.m. in the Scout Lodge, 202 Robert Britt St., AvonPark. Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to join. Call 452-2385. Avon Park Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Avon Park Lions Club meets 6:45 p.m., in the Lions Club, 1218 W. Bell St. Brown Bag Book Bunch book reader's group meets at noon on the third Tuesday of the month at Emmanuel United Church of Christ, 3115 Hope St., Sebring. Read the selected book, bring your bag lunch, and join in the lively and interesting discussions. Call 471-1999. Busy Bee Craft Club meets 9-11 a.m., Fairway Pines, Sun N Lakes Boulevard, Sebring. Everyone is welcome. Call 382-8431. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday night at "The Rock," Union Congregational Church, 28 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park. Abarbecue meal is served at 6 p.m. for a donation. At 6:45 p.m., members meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group breaks up into small groups for men and women. The program is designed for drug and alcohol addiction, divorce, death or illness grief, low or lost self-esteem or identity due to dysfunctional relationships, depression/anxiety, or any other need for healing. Call Celebrate Recovery coordinator Pam Sim at 453-3345, ext. 106. Fletcher Music Club meets every Thursday and Tuesday at Fletcher Music Center in Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. Call 385-3288. Friends of Highlands Hammock meets at 6:30 p.m. third Tuesday, Highlands Hammock State Park, Sebring. Call 386-6099. Heartland Avian Society meets every fourth Tuesday, 7:30 p.m., at Huntington National Bank, 126 Center Ave., Sebring. Call 465-9358. Heartland Dolittle Miniature Build meets 7 p.m., third Tuesday, St. Johns Methodist Church social hall, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring. Call 3823553. Heartland Harmonizers Barbershop Chorus meets from 7-9:30 p.m. in the Sebring High School Music Room, Sebring. All men who enjoy singing are invited. Reading music is not required. Call 471-2294 or 386-5098. Heartland Symphony Orchestra rehearsals from 5:30-7 p.m. Tuesdays in the Green Room in the South Florida Community College auditorium building. Bring music and instruments. New members welcome. Call conductor Bryan Johnson at 800949-7248, ext. 7231. Highlands County Community Orchestra rehearses each Tuesday in the Green Room of the South Florida Community College Performing Arts Theater, 5:307:30 p.m. Entrance is at the rear of the building. String players especially needed. Strings call Eugene Longo at 699-1975; winds call Kim Houser at 453-6049 for more information. Highlands County Quilt Guild meets on the first and third Tuesday of each month at the Women's Club of Sebring, 4260 Lakeview Drive, across from Veterans' Beach, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For information, call 471-0694 or e-mail sbringquilter@embarqmail.com Highlands Tea Party has an educational and informational meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Quality Inn, 6525 U.S. 27 in Sebring. Call 699-0743. Highlands County Veterans Council meets 7 p.m., third Tuesday in the conference room at the Veterans Services Office. The meeting is for the appointed delegate from each veteran organization in the county to meet to discuss current issues regarding veterans and veterans activities. Hope Hospice grief support group meets at 11 a.m. at 319 W. Center Ave., Sebring; and 4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle ALF, across U.S. 27 from Florida Hospital Lake Placid. Call 382-0312. Lake HavenHomeowners Association meets the third Tuesday of the month, 5400 N. Lake Huckleberry Drive, Sebring. Covered dish dinner is at 6:30 p.m. and meeting is at 7:30 p.m. Call 382-4858. Lake Placid Art League has classes in Parchment Embossing from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant. For information, call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Happy hour is from 2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Grief Support (Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, with Charlie Stroup. Refreshments served. Door prize given. Call 465-0568. Lake Placid Jaycees meet 7:30 p.m., first and third Tuesdays, Jaxson's. Board meetings at 6:30 p.m., second Tuesday. Call Joe Collins, 655-5545. Lake Placid Moose has an officers meeting at 7:30 p.m. the third Tuesday at the lodge. Lake Placid Toastmasters meet the first and third Tuesday at 6 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 101 S. Oak Ave. in Lake Placid. The web address is www.toastmasters.org. For information call Cathy Schreima at 382-3574 or Linda Udall at 386-6495. Lorida Community Club meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Lorida Community Center to plan events. Masonic Lodge meets 8 p.m., 106 N. Main St., Lake Placid. Nar-Anon Support Group for family members or friends of someone with a drug problem or addiction. Nar-Anon helps attain serenity and a more normal life for those affected by the addictions of loved ones, regardless of whether or not he/she has stopped using. 6 p.m. every Tuesday at First Baptist Chuch of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 W. Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup. c om. Call 382-7731. Visit www.oa.org for more informa tion on OA. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday and has blood pressure screening from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. first and third Tuesday at Placid Lakes Tow n Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd Call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Sebring (Noon) meets at noon at the Sebring Civic Center, near th e library in downtown Sebring. For information, call 385-382 9 or 471-9900. Sebring Bridge Club will have Duplicate Bridge games every Tuesday evening. If interested in playing Duplicat e Bridge, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 plays darts, beginning with sign in at 6 p.m. Games start at 6:30 p.m. No experience necessary. Cost is $2. Smoke free environment. Call 4713557. Sebring Lions Club meet s at noon at Dot's Restaurant, 950 Sebring Square. For info rmation call 382-2333. Sebring Lodge 249 F&AM meets 7:30 p.m., 1809 Home Ave., Sebring. Sebring Meals on Wheels Inc. hosts board of directors meeting at 1:30 p.m. the third Tuesday each month at the Sebring Hills Association Clubhouse, 200 Lark Ave., Sebring. Call Jim Smith at 382-8453. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves soft shell tacos 57 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing.Euchre is played at 6:30 p.m. Call 6553920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. an d table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. Call 385-2966 or leave a name, number and message SertomaClub meets at 7 a.m. at Dee's Restaurant, Sebring. Call Scott Albritton a t 402-1819. "Souper" Book Group meets the third Tuesday of each month at noon at Emmanuel United Church of Christ to discuss the monthly book selection and enjoy a soup, salad and dessert lunc h. All book lovers are welcome. The church is at 3115 Hope St., Sebring (1.8 miles west from corner of Highway 27 and Hammock Rd.) For info rmation about the book of the month and reservations, call the church office 471-1999 o r 452-2697. Take Off Pounds Sensibl y Chapter FL99 meets from 6 7 p.m. at the Atonement Lutheran Church, 1744 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Take Off Pounds Sensibl y Chapter FL618 has weigh in from 4-430 p.m. at Communi ty Bible Church, 1400 CR-17A N., AvonPark. Meeting is at 4:45 p.m. Call 452-1093. U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary meets 7 p.m., third Tuesday, Sebring Jaycees building. Call 471-0393 or 385-2459. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, plays darts 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. House Committee meets at 5:30 p.m www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 5B COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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Page 6BNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.com ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Special to the News-Sun"Self-Therapy for the Stutterer" is the classic self-help guide by t he founder of The Stuttering Foundatio n, Malcolm Fraser. It is written to an d for the many adults and teens wh o stutter. The 192-page book is availab le at most public libraries including t he Avon Park Public Library and t he Lake Placid Memorial Librar y, Florida. If you stutter, you do not need to surrender helplessly to your spee ch difficulty because you can change t he way you talk. You can learn to com municate with ease rather than wi th effort. There is no quick and easy w ay to tackle the problem, but with t he right approach, self-therapy can be effective. This book outlines a self-therap y program, which describes what t he person who stutters can do to wo rk towards better communication. It is often used as a supplement to spee ch therapy. Atimely feature on page 16 4 is information about King George V I and how inspirational his speech es were during World War II as depict ed in the new movie, "The King 's Speech." Writes Charles Van Riper, Ph.D ., about this book: "There are alwa ys some who stutter who are unable to get professional help and others wh o do not seem to be able to profit fro m it. "There are some who prefer to be their own therapist. In this boo k, Malcolm Fraser has provided gui dance for those who must help them selves. Knowing well from his ow n experience as a stutterer the difficu lties of self-therapy, he outlines a seri es of objectives and challenges th at should serve as a map for the perso n who is lost in the dismal swamp of stuttering and wants to find a w ay out." If your library doesn't have it, a sk them to contact the Stutterin g Foundation toll-free at 800-992-939 2. Self-Therapy for the Stutterer' available at most libraries Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Highlands Art L eague opened a new and exciting e xhibit on April 8. The exhibit is t itled Five Fine Artists'. The a rtists featured in this exhibit are a ll members of the Art League. E ach of these individuals has a l ong history of enthusiasm for crea ting art; some have worked as p rofessional artists while others h ave been art educators. The artists participating in this e xhibit include Tom Bruha, Mary B outeiller, Norma Evans, Agnes L aiosa and Ingrid Strope. Bruha is from LaCrosse, Wis. a nd spent many years as a comm ercial artist in advertising and p rinting. He now works out of his h ome studio creating enhanced d esigns with his computer. Bouteiller had the opportunity a s a young woman to travel to I taly where she fell in love with t he art and culture of the country. S he studied art for several years in N ew York after her travels abroad a nd has been an active artist t hroughout her life. She is a magn ificent portrait painter. Evans did not pursue a profess ion in art, however, she served at M ount St. Mary College in N ewburgh, N.Y. on the committee f or the Artist on the Campus'art s how for 11 years. She has been s tudying pastel and watercolor painting for many years. Over those years her work has reached a high level of maturity and consequently she has received numerous awards, including Woman of the Year in 2002 from the Plantation Art Guild. Laiosa graduated with honors in Art Education from Hunter College. She has taught painting and sculpture at the Staten Island Museum of Art and the Sailor Snug Harbor on Staten Island. In Florida, Laiosa owned and operated Guys & Dolls Jeans'on North Ridgewood Boulevard and taught at Sebring High School. In recent years she has been able to dedicate more of her time and talents to creating art and enjoys painting in all media. Strope spent her professional years in secondary education teaching science and mathematics. She learned to use a milk base medium called casein while in junior high school. To this day she continues to use this medium in combination with watercolor. They lend a special softness'to her work. Together these artists present an exhibit with range and significant talent. For the month of April their work will be on exhibit at the Yellow House Gallery on Lakeview Drive next to the Sebring Library. The gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Admission is free. Five Fine Artists' exhibit at Highlands Art League Landscape paintings by Agnes Laiosa Works by Ingrid Strope in casein and watercolor Portraits in pastels by Norma Evans Portrait by Mary Bouteiller Prints by Tom Bruha

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 7B Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The South F lorida Community College M useum of Florida Art and C ulture (SFCC MOFAC) p resents its final exhibition o f the season, SFCC Juried S tudent Art Exhibit, now t hrough May 7 from 12:304 :30 p.m. in the lower lobby g allery of the SFCC Theatre f or the Performing Arts and i n SFCC MOFAC, Highlands C ampus. The exhibition showcases t he outstanding art created by S FCC art students in a juried a rt exhibition featuring painti ng, drawing, graphic design, a nd photography. Students n ot only created the art feat ured in the exhibition, they m atted, framed, and hung the work as well. "It was a whole new experience working behind the scenes this time," SFCC art student Ivan Delgado said. "It really feels like I am a part of the exhibit having been involved in the entire process." The exhibition was juried by Joey Sacco and curated by SFCC art instructor Cathy Futral and SFCC MOFAC curator Mollie Doctrow. The awards will be presented during a reception from noon to 2 p.m. Thursday in SFCC MOFAC. The exhibition is sponsored by the SFCC Foundation and Anne and Charles Reynolds. The current MOFAC exhibition, Celebrating the Lake Wales Ridge, will be held over through May 7. The group exhibition celebrates the Lake Wales Ridge through art and photography. Artists include Reed Bowman, David Price, John Moran, Diane Pierce, and Carlton Ward. SFCC MOFAC is open to the public from 12:30-4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, one hour prior to each Artist and Matinee Series performance and by appointment for group tours. For more information about the museum and its exhibitions and workshops or to request a museum tour, contact Mollie Doctrow, curator, MOFAC, at ext. 7240 at 4536661, 465-5300, 773-2252, or 494-7500. SFCC MOFAC presents Juried Student Art Exhibition Courtesy photo T he final exhibit of the season at South Florida Community College Museum of Florida Art and Culture will be a Juried Student Art Exhibit from now through May 7. ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Revolution, the band that goes beyond Beatlemania will perform at 7:30 p.m. Monday, May 9 in the South Florida Community College Theatre for the Performing Arts, Highlands Campus. Relive the music of one of the greatest rock n'roll groups of all time. Travel back to the 1960s, where the show begins with a recreation of the famous 1964 Ed Sullivan television show introducing the Fab Four to America. Hear the songs that provided the soundtrack for an era such as "Hey Jude," "She Loves Me," "I Want To Hold Your Hand," "Penny Lane," "That Thing You Do," "Yesterday," "Strawberry Fields Forever," "Sgt. Pepper," "Revolution," and many more. Revolution is the leading worldwide touring show that captures the Beatles with authentic instruments, costumes, a visual impact, sound and excitement that can only be described as incredible. Revolution takes on the personalities of the Beatles while wearing slick, collarless suits, Beatle boots, and mop-tops. They go beyond wigs and mere impersonations of most Beatle Acts; they capture the very essence of four young men whose music continues to win the hearts of millions. Portraying John Lennon is Tim Piper, who was selected by Hollywood casting directors to portray Lennon in the E! Channel Television production of the John Lennon Story. He brings authenticity, compassion, and power to the role of the late, great John Lennon, keeping the legend alive. Jim Neil portrays Paul McCartney. Fans are often impressed by his powerful, realistic vocal ability. His talent extends beyond the essentials of mere looks. He is a talented bass player, vocalist, and recording engineer who runs his own studio. Neil has performed in many original and tribute bands. His baby-faced charm, skill, and attention to musicianship make him a great choice for portraying McCartney. Greg Piper as George Harrison is an outstanding guitarist and has been a professional musician, singer and actor since the age of 11. He has toured the world since 1989 portraying the mystical Beatle. Completing this quartet is Mike Sarafian as Ringo Starr. He provides t he unique, yet undeniab le backbeat as the one and on ly Starr. He has been hailed as the best in the business in replicating Starr’s drum ming style. Beatle drum mers and celebrities ali ke from around the world com e to him for tips and advice o n Starr’s style of playing. The performance is a be nefit concert for the Avo n Park Breakfast Rotary an d SFCC Performing Arts. Tickets range from $25 to $35 and may be purchas ed online 24 hours a day, sev en days a week, at http://perform ances.southflorida.ed u. Tickets may also be pu rchased by calling the SFC C Box Office at 784-7178 or by visiting the SFCC Bo x Office in the front of t he Theatre for the Performin g Arts, 600 W. College Driv e, from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m Monday, Wednesday an d Thursday. SFCC performance of Revolution' goes beyond Beatlemania Courtesy pho to Travel back to the 1960's with Revolution, the band that goes beyond Beatlemania. Revolution will perform Monday, May 9 in the South Florida Community College Theatre for the Performing Arts, Highlands Campus. By DAVID BAUDER APTelevision WriterNEWYORK ABC canc eled two of its three soap o peras on Thursday, consigni ng "One Life to Live" and All My Children" and S usan Lucci, daytime's most f amous actress to televis ion history. The move leaves "General H ospital" as ABC's only dayt ime drama, one of only four t hat will remain on ABC, C BS and NBC's daytime s chedule. Soap operas have slowly b een fading as a TVforce, w ith many of the women who m ade up the target audience n ow in the work force. In p lace of the two canceled d ramas, ABC will air shows a bout food and lifestyle t ransformations. Brian Frons, head of ABC's daytime department, went to the California set of "All My Children" to deliver the news on Thursday, where a video link was also set up to the New York set of "One Life to Live." He said the shows were doing well creatively, but falling ratings indicated they had a bleak future. "If you have a show in severe decline, you're trying to catch a falling knife," Frons said. Daytime dramas have suffered recently as cable networks like TLC, Bravo and Oxygen aggressively seek viewers in those hours, he said. Soaps are popular with viewers from the post-World War II baby boom, but younger viewers are more interested in other programming, he said. Both canceled shows were created by Agnes Nixon, one of daytime TV's most famous creative forces, and modeled after fictional Philadelphiaarea towns. "One Life to Live" debuted on July 15, 1968, as a half-hour, expanding to an hour 10 years later. "All My Children" premiered on Jan. 5, 1970, expanding to an hour seven years later. They were both known for incorporating social issues into their stories, with Lucci's character of Erica Kane the first regular TV character to undergo a legal abortion in 1973, said Carolyn Hinsey, author of "Afternoon Delight: Why Soaps Still Matter," due to be published next month. ABC cancels 2 longtime soaps from daytime lineup

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Special to the News-SunAVON PARK High school students from Highlands and Hardee counties are invited to South Florida Community College's Summer Bridge Program, which will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday, June 20July 28, at the SFCC Highlands Campus. The Summer Bridge Program is open to 10thand 11th-graders who are interested in dual enrollment as well as new high school graduates. Applicants must have College Placement Test (CPT) scores that are slightly lower than the college admission requirement. Using the theme, "Florida: AChanging Land," SFCC faculty teach classes that improve reading, writing, math, and student success skills, such as note-taking, active listening, and test-taking. Students will participate in team-building exercises, explore career opportunities, receive academic advising, attend Science Day and Fine Arts Day, and visit local attractions of educational interest. The Summer Bridge Program prepares students for college and helps them improve their academic performance and test scores while in high school. Students who successfully complete the program should be equipped to take dual enrollment or standard college courses. The program is free to qualified applicants. Lunch is provided, and transport ation is available fro m Hardee Senior High Schoo l. Applications are availab le from high school guidan ce counselors or by callin g Beth Andrews at 784-714 7 or Dr. Kimberly Batt yHerbert at 784-7329. "The faculty and sta ff involved in the Summ er Bridge Program want to make a lasting impressio n on high school students an d to motivate them to succe ed and attend college," Batt yHerbert said. Breakfasts and lunches being served in the Highlands County School District for the upcoming week of April 18-21 (no school on Friday) include: HIGH SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast French toast sticks, sausage patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Penne pasta, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked french fries, orange glazed carrots, cheddar cheese stick, tossed salad, applesauce snacking cake, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's cheeseburger, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, cocoa clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Turkey enchiladas, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, grilled chicken sandwich, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, carrots and dip, great northern beans, diced pears, dried blueberries, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast frittata, breakfast pizza, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's cheeseburger pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, broccoli, potato wedges, Colby Jack cheese stick, salsa, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. ACADEMY SCHOOLS Monday Lunch Homestyle pork roast, dinner roll, mashed potatoes, brown gravy, green beans, apple crisp, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, scalloped potatoes, corn cobbettes, rosy applesauce, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Lunch Beefaroni, garlic breadstick, orange glazed carrots, tossed salad, cocoa clodhoppers, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Lunch Cheeseburger, dill stack, potato puffs, carrots and dip, fruited Jell-O, vanilla clodhoppers, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. MIDDLE SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast French toast sticks, sausage patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Penne pasta, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, orange glazed carrots, cheddar cheese stick, tossed salad, applesauce snacking cake, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, cocoa clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Breakfast pizza, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Turkey enchiladas, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, grilled chicken sandwich, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, carrots and dip, great northern beans, diced pears, dried blueberries, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast frittata, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, broccoli, potato wedges, Colby Jack cheese stick, salsa, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast French toast sticks, sausage patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Cinnamon Toast Crisp, string cheese, orange juice, chocolate milk. Lunch Homestyle pork roast, dinner roll, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, turkey chef salad, mashed potatoes, brown gravy, green beans, apple crisp, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Blueberry/sausage pancake, strawberry cup, chocolate milk, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, peach cup, chocolate milk. Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef meal, scalloped potatoes, corn cobbettes, rosy applesauce, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, peach cup, chocolate milk, blueberry/sausage pancake, strawberry cup, chocolate milk. Lunch Beefaroni, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, orange glazed carrots, tossed salad, cocoa clodhoppers, fresh apple slices, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast frittata, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Breakfast frittata, orange juice, chocolate milk, Whole Grain PopTarts, apple juice, chocolate milk. Lunch Cheeseburger, dill stack, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, potato puffs, carrots and dip, fruited Jell-O, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. KINDERGARTEN LEARNING CENTER Monday Lunch Homestyle pork roast, dinner roll, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, mashed potatoes, brown gravy, green beans, apple crisp, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, scalloped potatoes, corn cobbettes, rosy applesauce, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Lunch Beefaroni, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, orange glazed carrots, cocoa clodhoppers, fresh apple slices, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Lunch Cheeseburger, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, potato puffs, carrots and dip, fruited Jell-O, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Page 8BNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.com CHALKTALK School Menus Summer Bridge Program prepares students for college Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South Florida Community College student Christopher Jennings was recently named a Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team Gold Scholar. Jennings will receive a $1,500 stipend, a special medallion, and was listed along with all CocaCola Community College Academic Team Scholars in the April 11 issue of USA TODAY. The Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation sponsors the Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team program by recognizing 50 Gold, 50 Silver and 50 Bronze scholars, and providing nearly $187,500 in stipends annually. Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) is the international honor society of two year schools. PTK administers the CocaCola Community College Academic Team Program and recognizes Coca-Cola Community College scholars during All-State Community College Academic Team Recognition ceremonies held in 37 states. An independent panel of judges considers outstanding academic rigor, grade point average, academic and leadership awards, and engagement in college and community service in the selection process. Jennings was nominated for the PTK scholarship because of his service to his local community. "The PTK scholarship process emph asizes a student "endeavor ," which is a project to bene fit the community initiated an d completed by the student ," said Dr. Charotte Pressle r, SFCC Honors Progra m coordinator and philosoph y instructor. "Through the Hono rs Program at SFCC, Chr is Jennings engaged in ser vice-learning projects su pporting biofuels resear ch and the Lake Wales Rid ge ecology." SFCC student named Gold Scholar Courtesy pho to Christopher Jennings was recently named a Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team Gold Scholar. He will receive a $1,500 stipend, a special medallion, and was listed with Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team Scholars in the April 11 issue of USA Today.'

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Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South F lorida Community College s tudents were honored for a cademic excellence and c ommunity services during t he College’s recent annual A wards Day ceremony in the S FCC University Center A uditorium, Highlands C ampus. Each year, faculty h onor students who exhibit t alent and exemplary qualities t hat go beyond academic stand ards. Students, in turn, pay h omage to outstanding facult y. Ricki Albritton was hono red with the Joseph E. J ohnston/Bette L. M cDearman Student Services A ward for outstanding acad emic achievement and i nvolvement in student related a ctivities on campus, outs tanding leadership ability b oth on and off campus, and h er contribution to fellow stud ents and the college. During her time at SFCC, A lbritton has played on the P anther Volleyball team, is a m ember of Phi Theta Kappa ( PTK) honor society, and s erves on the Student G overnment Association ( SGA). She also spends much o f her time volunteering with h er church as a youth leader b y helping middle and high s chool students with relations hip building and teaching v olleyball. She is a camp c ounselor during the summer a t Lake Denton and works as a disk jockey on Friday nights f or WWOJ. "I enjoy being with and h elping people," Albritton s aid. "I really don't think of anyt hing I do as being special, so i t was humbling to receive t his award. It's also very e ncouraging. It makes me w ant to work harder and help e ven more." Albritton graduates in May a nd will attend the University o f Florida. She plans to study t elecommunications. Students who received spec ial honors for participation in t he following academic prog rams are: Duhee Hwang, English For Speakers of Other Languages; Maria Velasquez Del Pilar, English For Speakers of Other Languages; Lourvina Grace Ramos, Humanities Survey II; Allen McPherson, Drawing II, Painting II and Watercolor I; Bailey Gornto, Honors Abnormal Psychology; Katherine Whitacre, Honors Abnormal Psychology; Charika Hodo, Human Development; Marcus Manderino, General Psychology Avon Park Campus 2 way; Benjamin Stupka, General Psychology Lake Placid Center 2 way; Michele Kerth, General Psychology Desoto Center 2 way; Vanette See, General Psychology Hardee Center 2 way; Efren Campos, Abnormal Psychology Hardee Center; Nathan Schwan, General Psychology Desoto Center; Tammy Hunt, General Psychology Hardee Center; Luis Rodriguez, General Psychology Hardee Center; Closere Damis, Ryan Duffy, Scott Earley, Justin Finch, Damara Hutchins, Ethan Johnson, Andria Mass, Alex Nichols, Grant Roberts, Sergio Vigil, Keiaria Williams, GeorgeWolfe IV and Robert Wright, 2010 2011 Brain Bowl Team; Terica Clark, Freshman English I; Christie Davis, John Vincent III, Josh Ball, Kyle Halvorsen, Laura Salisbury and Shane Donglasen, Service Learning Program; Kevin Wilson, Introduction to Philosophy; Amanda Girofalo, Honors Introduction to Philosophy; Christopher Jennings, Honors Program Service Learning; Josean Cruz, Freshman English I; Ramond Hancok, Computer Science; Zachary Thomas, Humanities Survey I; Tracy Small, Freshman English I; Matthew Broxson, General Biology; Larry Rios, American National Government Fall 2010; Natalia R. Terreros and Samantha A. Cochran, General Chemistry; William C. Yelvington, Organic Chemistry; Allison N. Smith, General Biology; John Adams and Carolyn Cwalinski, Freshman English II; Nicole Harkins and William Lamar Jahna, Academic Foundations Writing; Christina Pace and Ariel Bowers, Developmental Reading II; Brittney Davis, Developmental Reading I; Samantha Cochran, General Physics W/Calculus I & II; Trenton Haralson, Descriptive Astronomy; Mary Rose Heston, Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 & 2; Suzannah Beiner, Fundamentals of Speech Communication; Gabriel Lambert, General Psychology; Hyla Thompson, Human Development; Kristina Turner, Education Award; Travis McPherson, Academic Foundations Writing; Nolan Jahna, American National Government Fall 2010; Trenton Haralson and Shane Donglason, Honors Seminar III: "The Democratization of Information"; Mathew Jordon, Honors Comparative Politics; Shane Donglasan, American National Government Online; and Suzannah Beiner, American State and Local Government Online. SFCC students chose Brian Deery as the 2011 Full-time Faculty of the Year and Jim Houseknecht as Adjunct Faculty of the Year for the Division of Arts and Sciences. Joel Boydston was chosen as Full-time Faculty of the Year and Christopher Woods as Adjunct Faculty of the Year for Applied Sciences and Technologies. Linda Tagesson was chosen as Full-time Faculty of the Year and Ashley Rivera was chosen as Adjunct Faculty of the Year for Adult and Community Education. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 9B CHALKTALK Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The Career Academy at South Florida Community College invites high school students and their parents to information sessions at 6 p.m. Tuesday, May 3, and Thursday, May 5, in Building G, Room 101, at SFCC Highlands Campus. Representatives from The Career Academy and SFCC will explain Career Academy programs, the benefits of enrollment, and eligibility requirements for the 2011-12 school year. Acooperative effort of The School Board of Highlands County and SFCC, The Career Academy allows 10th-, 11th-, and 12th-graders to complete high school classes and college-level technical training entirely at the Highlands Campus. Career Academy students can ea rn occupational certificates in numerous technical pr ograms and can be prepar ed to enter the workforce b y the time they graduate fro m high school. The cost of colle ge tuition and books is deferred for Care er Academy students. Eligib le students may participate in extracurricular activiti es and commencement cer emonies at their local hig h school, while enjoying a ll of the activities, facilitie s, and privileges offered to SFCC students. For information an d applications, call T he Career Academy at SFCC at 784-7209, talk to your hig h school guidance counselo r, or visit the Web si te www.southflorida.edu/ca re eracademy. Career Academy hosting information sessions in May SFCC students and instructors recognized on Awards Day Courtesy photo SFCC student Ricki Albritton (left) is presented the Joseph E. Johnston/Bette L. McDearman Student Services Award by Annie Alexander-Harvey, dean, student services. Albritton received the award for her outstanding academic achievement and involvement in student related activities on campus, outstanding leadership ability both on and off campus, and her contribution to fellow students and the college. Courtesy photo Trenton Haralson and Shane Donglason received awards for their success in a variety of classes as well as their participation in the Student Government Association during SFCC Awards Day ceremony. Courtesy photo Students chose psychology professor Dr. Brian Deery as the Full-time Faculty of the Year for the Division of Arts and Sciences. Follow the News-Sun online on www.twitter.com/thenewssun

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Page 10BNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. children's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. children's mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing God's Heart and Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and women's prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the "Place to discover God's love." For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mother's Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) "Where the old fashion gospel is preached." Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the "Son" always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. JosŽ Gonz‡lez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Friday 5-7 p.m., every Saturday 9-11 a.m. and 3-3:45 p.m., first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lord's Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building God's Kingdom for Everyone." "Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!" Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is "Jesus is First at First Christian Church."Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures'by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP Publishers Weekly best-sellersHARDCOVER FICTION 1. "The Fifth Witness" by Michael Connelly (Little, Brown) 2. "The Land of Painted Caves: A Novel" by Jean M. Auel (Crown) 3. "I'll Walk Alone" by Mary Higgins Clark (Simon & Schuster) 4. "44 Charles Street" by Danielle Steel (Delacorte) 5. "Lover Unleashed" by J.R. Ward (NAL) 6. "Miles to Go" by Richard Paul Evans (Simon & Schuster) 7. "Toys" by James Patterson and Neil McMahon (Little, Brown) 8. "Live Wire" by Harlan Coben (Dutton) 9. "Crunch Time" by Diane Mott Davidson (William Morrow) 10. "Sing You Home: A Novel" by Jodi Picoult (Atria) 11. "Mystery: An Alex Deleware Novel" by Jonathan Kellerman (Ballantine) 12. "The Secret Life of Damian Spinelli" by Carolyn Hennesy (Hyperion) 13. "The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest" by Stieg Larsson (Knopf) 14. "She Walks in Beauty" by Caroline Kennedy (Voice) 15. "The Saturday Big Tent Wedding Party" by Alexander McCall Smith (Pantheon) HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. "Bossypants" by Tina Fey (Reagan Arthur) 2. "The 17 Day Diet: A Doctor's Plan Design for Rapid Results" by Dr. Mike Moreno (Free Press) 3. "Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption" by Laura Hillenbrand (Random House) 4. "63 Documents the Government Doesn't Want You to Read" by Jesse Ventura with Dick Russell (Skyhorse) 5. "Malcolm X" by Manning Marable (Viking) 6. "Love Wins: A Book About Heaven, Hell, and the Fate of Every Person Who Ever Lived" by Rob Bell (HarperOne) 7. "All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir" by Ashley Judd, with Maryanne Vollers (Ballantine) 8. "The Healthy Home" by Myron Wentz, Dave Wentz (Vanguard Press) 9. "The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement" by David Brooks (Random House) 10. "Unlimited" by Jillian Michaels (Crown) 11. "Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life Without Losing Its Soul" by Howard Schultz and Joanne Gordon (Rodale Press) 12. "Red: My Uncensored Life in Rock" by Sammy Hagar (It Books) 13. "Eva's Kitchen" by Eva Longoria (Clarkson Potter) 14. "Moonwalking with Eintstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything" by Joshua Foer (The Penguin Press) 15. "The Bond" by Wayne Pacelle (Morrow) MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS 1. "Water for Elephants: A Novel" by Sara Gruen (Algonquin) 2. "Navarro's Promise" by Lora Leigh (Berkley) 3. "The Shadow of Your Smile" by Mary Higgins Clark (Pocket) 4. "Indulgence in Death" by J.D. Robb (Berkley) 5. "Caught" by Harlan Coben (Signet) 6. "Dead in the Family" by Charlaine Harris (Ace) 7. "Home Free" by Fern Michaels (Zebra) 8. "The Lincoln Lawyer" by Michael Connelly (Grand Central Publishing) 9. "Game of Thrones" by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 10. "The Darkest Secret" by Gena Showalter (HQN) 11. "Fever Dream" by Lincoln Child & Douglas Preston (Mira) 12. "Driftwood Cottage" by Sherryl Woods (Mira) 13. "Santa Fe Edge" by Stuart Woods (Signet) 14. "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo" by Stieg Larsson (Vintage) 15. "Taken by the Prince" by Christina Dodd (Signet) TRADE PAPERBACKS 1. "Heaven is for Real: A Little Boy's Astounding Story of His Trip to Heaven and Back" by Todd Burpo, Sonja Burpo, Colton Burpo and Lynn Vincent (Thomas Nelson) 2. "The Help" by Kathryn Stockett (Putnam Adult)3. "Water for Elephants: A Novel" by Sara Gruen (Algonquin) 4. "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" by Rebecca Skloot (Broadway) 5. "Cutting for Stone" by Abraham Verghese (Vintage) 6. "Inside of a Dog" by Alexandra Horowitz (Scribner) 7. "The Judgment" by Beverly Lewis (Bethany House) 8. "The Art of Racing in the Rain: A Novel" by Garth Stein (Harper) 9. "The Postmistress" by Sarah Blake (Berkley) 10. "Just Kids" by Patti Smith (Ecco) 11. "Have a Little Faith: A True Story" by Mitch Albom (Hyperion) 12. "Spoken from the Heart" by Barbara Bush (Scribner) 13. "Drive" by Daniel H. Pink (Riverhead) 14. "Heart of the Matter" by Emily Giffin (St. Martin's Griffin) 15. "Every Last One" by Anna Quindlen (Random House)Wall Street Journal best-sellersFICTION 1. "City of Fallen Angels" by Cassandra Clare (Margaret K. McElderry) 2. "The Fifth Witness" by Michael Connelly (Little, Brown) 3. "The Land of Painted Caves: A Novel" by Jean M. Auel (Crown) 4. "I'll Walk Alone" by Mary Higgins Clark (Simon & Schuster) 5. "44 Charles Street" by Danielle Steel (Delacorte) 6. "The 39 Clues: Vespers Rising" by Peter Lerangis, Jude Watson, Gordon Korman, Rick Riordan (Scholastic Press) 7. "Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Ugly Truth" by Jeff Kinney (Abrams) 8. "Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules" by Jeff Kinney (Amulet) 9. "Toys" by James Patterson and Neil McMahon (Little, Brown) 10. "Miles to Go" by richard Paul Evans (Simon & Schuster) NONFICTION 1. "The 17 Day Diet: A Doctor's Plan Design for Rapid Results" by Dr. Mike Moreno (Free Press) 2. "Bossypants" by Tina Fey (Reagan Arthur) 3. "Unbroken" by Laura Hillenbrand (Random House) 4. "The Healthy Home" by Myron Wentz, Dave Wentz (Vanguard Press) 5. "Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life Without Losing Its Soul" by Howard Schultz and Joanne Gordon (Rodale Press) 6. "All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir" by Ashley Judd, with Maryanne Vollers (Ballantine) 7. "Malcolm X" by Manning Marable (Viking) 8. "StrengthsFinder 2.0" by Tom Rath (Gallup Press) 9. "63 Documents the Government Doesn't Want You to Read" by Jesse Ventura with Dick Russell (Skyhorse) 10. "Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Do-ItYourself Book" by Jeff Kinney (Abrams) BOOKS

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 11B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer .Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun 'N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid C ity" Children's Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, "prime-timers," and Bible s tudies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Children's Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and children's church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Children's & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kid's World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturer's Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Children's Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of God's Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and children's church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Women's Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m. in the sanctuary. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Children's Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on life's journey, you're we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP The Highlands Soil and W ater Conservation District ( HSWCD) wants to give you a n April shower and save w ater at the same time. The District is the recipie nt of a Community E ducation Grant from the S outhwest Florida Water M anagement District. The a warded funds have been u sed to purchase low-flow s hower heads to give away t o those who wish to help in t he battle to conserve our p recious water. Here is your c hance to help the environm ent and save yourself lots o f money on water and elect ric bills. All you have to do is c ome by the H SWCD/Natural Resources D epartment office located in t he Bert J. Harris Agriculture C enter at 4505 George Blvd. i n Sebring on April 21 b etween the hours of 9 a.m. a nd 3 p.m. with your old s howerhead. We'll happily e xchange your old guzzler for a brand new, shiny, water efficient showerhead! There is no cost to you. It is HSWCD's goal to educate people and promote water resources protection. What better way to celebrate Earth Day than by saving one of our most precious resources? According to Don Vandervort's Home Tip's on Saving Water, "Three billion gallons of water flow through showerheads every day in this country half of it unnecessarily. Most showerheads use twice the water needed for a thorough, enjoyable shower. This drain on one of our most precious resources, clean water, exacts an unnecessary toll on both the environment and your pocketbook. "To get clean water, we tap lakes, build dams and reservoirs and construct processing plants. By using more than we need, we overload sewer and septic systems and leach fields. Both the water itself and the energy needed to heat it cost you money." But you can do something about it! There are many ways to conserve water whether you are a landowner or a homeowner. The April Showers Program allows you to convert your old water guzzling shower head into a new low-flow efficient one. It will only take a small amount of your time to install and in addition to saving water, it will save you money. You can save as much as $50-75 per year on water bills and as much as $20-50 on your energy bill. And the best part is that you don't even have to pay for the shower head! You can't lose. Your shower uses about 22 percent of the total water used in your home. Alarge portion of that water goes through your hot water heater, which, in turn, makes your electric bill higher. Generally, an old standard shower head with a five minute shower would use approximately 30 gallons of water. With these low-flow devices you can cut your shower water use by twothirds. And if you go a step further and keep your shower under five minutes, you'll save even more water. New low-flow shower heads deliver about two and a half gallons of water per minute; older fixtures can deliver as high as eight gallons per minute. You may be concerned that the new low-flow device won't give you the water pressure you are accustomed to. Not so, these new designs are engineered so that the water is sent through special orifices that control drop size, focus the stream and mix in air, which creates turbulence and a pulsating action. So you really shouldn't notice much difference. Installation is simple and the shower head is free so what are you waiting for? You can be conserving water in no time while still enjoying a soothing shower! Be a part of the solution, no t part of the problem in conserving water. And remember, every drop counts. For additional informatio n please call our office at 863 402-6545. Corine Burgess is the Natural Resources Specialist for the Highlands County Natural Resources Department assisting the Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District (www.highlandsswcd.org). Have an April shower for Earth Day and receive your free low-flow showerhead Courtesy pho to Receive your free low-flow showerhead by bringing in your old one to exchange at the Highlands Soil and Water Conservation District on April 21 between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. while supplies last. News From The Watershed Corine Burgess

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B y CAIN BURDEAU and S ETH BORENSTEIN A ssociated PressBAYJIMMY, La. S cientists judge the overall h ealth of the Gulf of Mexico a s nearly back to normal one y ear after the BPoil spill, but w ith glaring blemishes that r estrain their optimism about n ature's resiliency, an A ssociated Press survey of r esearchers shows. More than three dozen scie ntists grade the Gulf's big p icture health a 68 on avera ge, using a 1-to-100 scale. W hat's remarkable is that t hat's just a few points below t he 71 the same researchers g ave last summer when asked w hat grade they would give t he ecosystem before the s pill. And it's an improvem ent from the 65 given back i n October. At the same time, scientists a re worried. They cite signific ant declines in key health i ndicators such as the sea f loor, dolphins and oysters. I n interviews, dozens of Gulf e xperts emphasized their conc erns, pointing to the myster ious deaths of hundreds of y oung dolphins and turtles, s trangely stained crabs and d ead patches on the sea floor. The survey results mirror i mpressions Jane Lubchenco, t he head of the National O ceanic and Atmospheric A dministration, gave on the h ealth of the Gulf in an interv iew with the APThursday. The Gulf is "much better t han people feared, but the j ury is out about what the end r esult will be," she said. "It's p remature to conclude that t hings are good ... There are s urprises coming up we're f inding dead baby dolphins." Just as it was before the A pril 20 accident when the D eepwater Horizon oil rig e xploded, ultimately spewing 1 72 million gallons of oil, the G ulf continues to be a place o f contradictions: The surface l ooks as if nothing ever happ ened while potentially big p roblems are hidden deep b elow the surface, in hard-tog et-to marshes and in the s low-moving food web. S ome may not even be k nown for years. "When considering the e ntire Gulf of Mexico, I think t he natural restoration of the G ulf is back to close to w here it was before the s pill," said Wes Tunnell at T exas A&M University, who w rote a scientific advisory r eport for the federal arbitrat or who is awarding money to r esidents and businesses b ecause of the oil spill. T unnell's grades are typical. H e says the Gulf's overall h ealth before the spill was a 7 0; he gives it a 69 now. If that pre-spill grade isn't i mpressive, it's because the G ulf has long been an envir onmental victim oil from d rilling and natural seepage, o verfishing, hurricanes and a h uge oxygen-depleted dead z one caused by absorbing 40 p ercent of America's farm a nd urban runoff from the M ississippi River. Today, a dozen scientists g ive the Gulf as good a grade a s they did before the spill. O ne of those is Louisiana S tate University professor Ed O verton, a veteran of oil s pills. He described a recent t rip to Gulf Shores, Ala.: "I w alked a half-mile down the b each and there wasn't a tar b all in sight. It was as pretty a s I've ever seen it." In the survey, some categ ories, such as red snapper a nd king mackerel, even a verage out to higher grades t han before the spill, mostly b ecause months of partial f ishing bans have helped p opulations thrive. While that sounds good, t he average grades for the sea f loor plunged from 68 pres pill to a failing grade of 57 n ow. Dolphins initially s eemed to be OK, but as m ore carcasses than usual kept washing up almost 300 since the spill the grade fell to 66, compared to a pre-spill 75. Oysters, always under siege, dropped 10 points, crabs dropped 6 points. And the overall food web slid from 70 before the spill to 64 now. "Everything may be fine in some places, but definitely not fine everywhere," said University of Georgia researcher Samantha Joye who found dead patches of oiled sea bottom in expeditions near the busted well where 11 men lost their lives. "The oil isn't gone; it's just not where we can see it." Joye said before the oil spill she would have given the sea floor an "A" grade of 90. Now she gives it a 30. Overall, Joye, who has been one of the more hands-on researchers exploring Gulf damage, said its health has plunged from an 80 before the spill to a 50 now, but she was the most pessimistic of the researchers. In five different expeditions, the last one in December, she and her colleagues took 250 cores of the sea floor and travelled 2,600 square miles. She says much of the invisible oil in the water and on the sea bottom has been chemically fingerprinted and traced to the BP spill. She also has pictures of oil-choked bottom-dwelling creatures like crabs and brittle stars starfish-like critters that are normally bright orange but now are pale and dead. This is hidden from view. Eugene Turner, an LSU wetlands scientist, has looked at marshes in Louisiana's Barataria basin, and found oil buried in the mud and sand. "You can't smell it. You can't see it. It's not this big black scum out there, but it's there," Turner said. At this point, the oil is only obvious in a couple of places with Bay Jimmy the worst-hit. Today, a crust of oil still lines miles of the outer fringe of marsh in the bay, a remote spot deep visited by the occasional fisherman and oil worker. Still, it's nothing compared to the black gunk stuck on beaches and marshes last summer or the multi-colored slicks so massive they could be tracked by satellite. Those images, along with the pictures of pelicans and seagulls with gobs of oil oozing down their beaks, are now history. "Even though some coastal areas were hit hard," says NOAA's Lubchenco, "the oil did not penetrate as far into the marshes as people feared." Despite the picture on the surface, Dana Wetzel at the Mote Marine Laboratory in Florida, adds: "Anyone who says the Gulf is fine is being precipitous.... It's out-ofsight, out-of-mind, but in my humble opinion this is not over." While BPmoney has flowed for immediate cleanup and compensation, the bigger bill for environmental damage and federal penalties is still being calculated. The federal government is collecting data on that, but much is kept from outside scientists. Trying to quantify the scale of the injury to the Gulf ecosystem "is absolutely the right question," said Robert Haddad, who heads the scientific process for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. "One of the outcomes from the Exxon Valdez was that they tried to estimate the damage too quickly." The spill itself lasted nearly three months. Then there was the clean-up. Then federal officials pronounced the oil mostly but not completely gone, eaten by microbes, dispersed by chemicals or diluted. Lubchenco told reporters in February that "it's not a contradiction to say that although most of the oil is gone, there still remains oil out there." Now, only a year later scientists are starting to see signs and they are far from conclusive of possible long-term problems. Florida State University oceanographer Ian MacDonald warned his fellow scientists to be on the watch for deaths of big marine mammals. That was in October. Since January, 155 young or fetal dolphins and small whales have washed up on Gulf beaches more than four times the typical number according to NOAA. Anew study estimates that for every dead dolphin that washes ashore there are 50 dolphins that are never found. That suggests more than 7,500 dolphin deaths the first three months of this year alone. Blair Mase, NOAA's marine mammal stranding coordinator, says dolphin deaths began to rise in February 2010 before the BPspill. That slowed in November, but in January dolphins began dying at a much faster rate, higher than before the spill. Lubchenco said oil contamination could be the culprit: "It is logical that maybe their moms were affected by the spill." Other culprits could be algae blooms, temperature changes or other environmental toxins. Fifteen of this year's dead dolphins had oil on them, and NOAAchemically linked six of those to the BPwell. It's not just dolphins that are dying. NOAAreports in the first few months of this year, 141 endangered sea turtles were stranded a higher than normal number. On top of that, Monty Graham, a researcher at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab in Alabama, noticed fewer jellyfish last year. "We are looking at how the food web could have shifted in general," Graham said. "We think we have growing evidence that the system shifted and became starved for food" for larger sea animals. At Tulane University, scientist Caroline Taylor is investigating strange orange droplets inside crab larvae. Her team has taken samples from thousands of crabs, but they have not begun to analyze the abnormalities. Jessica Henkel, a Tulane population ecologist, is spending long days rigging up nets to catch birds for fecal, blood and feather samples, looking for effects that aren't immediately lethal. "It's much easier to see a dead pelican on the beach" than it is to see more chronic population-wide effects, she said. This sounds all too familiar to Craig Matkin, a marin e mammals biologist at the North Gulf Oceanic Society in Alaska. He studied what happened to whales in Princ e William Sound after the 198 9 Exxon Valdez spill. Some whales died immediately after being coated with oil, but then a year later scientis ts noticed lots of whale deaths 13 out of 35 of the main whale pod. Matkin said it was likely the whales died from oil ingested over months. Similarly, the herring fish ery in the region crashed, no t immediately, but over time. "There's a real tendency t o do this out-of-sight, out-ofmind thing until someone shows you that it's not the truth," Matkin said. "It does n't go away. There are going to be effects down the line." But John Harding, chief scientist at the Northern Gu lf Institute in Mississippi, said "We're way better off than the Exxon Valdez. We had the oil-eating microbes." Larry McKinney, who heads a Gulf research center at Texas A&M University in Corpus Christi, has days when he's confident in the Gulf's resilience and days when he's pessimistic. Page 12BNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.com CROSSWORDSOLUTION Scientists: Gulf health nearly at pre-spill level MCTphoto Beaches in Pensacola have recovered from the oil spill a year ago.

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DearAbby: Amember of m y gym brings her newborn i n with her every morning. S he sets the carrier down n ext to her treadmill, puts in h er earplugs and runs. The b aby usually cries on and off, b ut today he cried nonstop d uring my entire 20-minute w orkout. It drove me crazy. I'm a mom, too. Acrying b aby, especially a newborn, i s heartbreaking. This woman n ever stops to see why her l ittle one is crying or to cons ole him. This situation doesn 't seem to bother the other g ym members. Should I talk t o her and risk a hostile r esponse, or speak to the gym m anager? Heavy-Hearted Gym Bunny in Riverview, Fla. DearGym Bunny: Talk to t he manager. The crying i nfant may not bother the o ther gym members, but it b others you. The woman isn't s topping her workout to see w hat may be wrong because w ith her earbuds in she can't h ear the child, which doesn't m ake her a candidate for mother of the year. She's causing a distraction and an inconvenience to you, so speak up. DearAbby: I have been married to my high school sweetheart, "Don," for 10 years. I love him dearly. We were very young when we married, and at the time he said he didn't want kids. I didn't give it much thought because back then we weren't ready to start a family. Now, Don still doesn't want kids but I do. He says if children are that important to me, I should leave him and find someone who does want to be a parent. Of course, I don't want just any man's baby. I want his baby. Don has warned me that if I become pregnant, he'll probably leave. He's planning to have a vasectomy even though I'm against it. I don't know what to do. This is the only problem we have. He won't agree to counseling I've already suggested it. I can't picture myself starting over with another man or going my whole life without being a mother. Please help. Unfulilled in Louisville DearUnfulfilled: Your husband has given you fair warning. Your now have an important choice to make. Because having a child is so important to you, my advice is to start "picturing" yourself with another husband, and do it in enough time that you won't be racing against your biological clock. DearAbby: My partner has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's. As time goes on, I know I will lose him more and more. How do I do this and allow him to keep his dignity? Life comes full circle, and I understand that. I keep trying to dwell in the present and not think too far ahead. I don't know where to turn. How do you start the long goodbye? Lost in Phoenix DearLost: The first thing you need to do is contact the Alzheimer's Association. The Alzheimer's Association can guide you on the journey ahead of you and provide a source of emotional support if you join one of its caregiver's groups. The toll-free phone number is (800) 2723900 and the website is alz.org. You and your partner should also make certain NOWthat his wishes for endof-life care are clearly stated in writing, so that when the time comes, they will be respected. Then take each day as it comes, thank God for the good ones, have patience when they are less so, and take good care of yourself because that will be key to ensuring your partner gets the best care possible. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. What teens need to know about sex, drugs, AIDS and getting along with peers and parents is in "What Every Teen Should Know." To order, send a business-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby Teen Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 610540447. (Postage is included in the price.) www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 13B DIVERSIONS AUDIOVISUALAIDSBy DAN NADDOR ACROSS 1 "This __ fine mess you've gotten us into, Ollie!" 4 Clean the deck 7 Military team 12 Office teams 18 Three-time all-star closer Robb 19 Mandlikova of tennis 20 Blocker in a TV 21 Note in a B major scale 22 Hunter attachment? 24 Salon tool for recalcitrant customers? 26 Tony winner for her Daisy Mae portrayal in "Li'l Abner" (1956) 28 Baroque dance 29 Suffix with malt 30 Not the best purple flower? 33 "Artaxerxes" composer 34 Statistical hypothesis trial 35 Word before old, and after it 36 Web address letters 37 Illinois city, site of the last Lincoln-Douglas debate 38 M.O. 39 Birch leaf eater 43 Algiers citadel 45 Where the experts hang out? 47 Corrida hero 50 Like fifth and sixth 53 "Mad About You" costar 56 Golfer Crenshaw 57 Answer skillfully 58 Sault __ Marie 61 Boss's address? 62 Give-go link 63 Pawn 64 Colorado brewer's rodent mascot? 66 Cheater's device 67 Ike's arena: Abbr. 68 Was allowed to pay later 69 D-Day craft 70 Military chaplain 71 Directed 72 Brew made in Zoeterwoude 73 Super Bowl party centerpiece, briefly 75 Short fall? 77 Culinary product of a French-Italian region? 82 Semicircular antenna housing 85 See 46-Down 86 "I'm impressed!" 89 Natasha's partner in crime 91 "Rhoda" production co. 93 Highly caloric 94 Former "Today" medical expert Art __ 96 Abba of Israel 97 Group that ruins commercials? 101 Ohio, e.g.: Abbr. 102 Enjoys doing 103 Russian Orthodox ruling body 104 Bad news about a tooth? 108 Rhinestone piano player 109 Sent to the gallows 110 String quartet member 111 Get an __ effort 112 What's expected 113 Wool variety 114 Dispatched, as a dragon 115 "L.A. Law" actress 116 The orig. 13, e.g. DOWN 1 Eats 2 Naval assignment 3 C™te d'Azur resort 4 __ Gras 5 Wee hr. 6 Pasta topper 7 Walgreens rival 8 Columbus Day mo. 9 Run, for one? 10 Pier support 11 PR specialist 12 More judicious 13 USAF E-6 14 "Now I understand!" 15 Prefer Hitchcock's Bodega Bay classic to his other films? 16 City in California's Central Valley 17 Ill humor 19 California's Central Valley, e.g. 23 Marching words 25 New, in Nicaragua 27 Poetry competitions 31 Love, to Virgil 32 Turn down 33 Old orchard spray 37 Keep from ending normally 40 Sch. founded by Jefferson 41 Wrestling holds 42 Trigger, for one 44 Take the tiller 45 "Got __?" 46 With 85-Across, beachcomber's device 48 Hang it up, so to speak 49 Even if challenged 50 Be __: assist 51 Mob member 52 Cryptologist's rant? 54 Journalist Kupcinet and sportscaster Cross 55 "I told you, didn't I?!" 59 Precisely 60 Some Deco collectibles 61 Fall back 64 __ santo: Spanish graveyard 65 Light lunch 66 Spelunker's spot 68 Police operations 70 Recently discontinued retro Chrysler 74 Pair 76 Number one son? 78 __ Beach, Florida 79 Neurending 80 "Ick factor 10!" 81 Taught 83 MCCLII doubled 84 Ones with a common heritage 86 Wings eaters' needs 87 Sandlot game 88 Garden tools 89 Krupp with a howitzer named for her 90 Luke's mentor 92 Magic 8 Ball maker 95 Interstellar dist. 97 Carne __: Mexican dish 98 "Presto!" cousin 99 MGM Resorts casino loyalty program 100 "Lad ..." 102 "Congratulations" writer, maybe 105 "Stop-__": UGK hit 106 Yalie 107 Michael, to Kirk Solution on page 12B Metro ServicesAries (March 21-April 20) Aries, a change in scenery would be well timed. While it's not good to run away from your problems, some time away could provide a new perspective. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Taurus, foster closer relationships with family this week because you might need them in the days to come. It always helps to have someone you can trust nearby. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Think again before you make a large purchase, Gemini. Overspending may not be prudent at this juncture in time. Big expenses loom on the horizon, and you need to be prepared. Cancer(June 22-July 22) Someone is thinking about you, Cancer, and it could lead to romantic endeavors. The excitement will be in discovering just who has his or her eyes pointed in your direction. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Leo, a complete change of direction is possible this week. Indecision could cause you to act rashly and that could lead to irreversible damage. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Virgo, stop trying to prove yourself to others. Be your own person and live your own life and you will be much happier for it. Realize that you can't compete on the same level all the time. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Preparation is essential to avoid feeling out of control, Libra. Don't worry, when you put your mind to it, you can accomplish just about anything. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 2 2) Scorpio, it may be time fo r you to start over, but this is not necessarily a bad thing. You may find a new path that is much more to your liking and new relationship s to boot. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-De c. 21) Don't try to push you r point of view on someone else, Sagittarius. It won't b e well received at this junctu re in time. Let others have the ir opinions for the moment. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan 20) There's no time to relax, Capricorn. Just when you tackle one project, another takes its place. Fortunately, you have an abundance of energy to kee p you going. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) Aquarius, you may ge t some news you didn't expe ct and it will take a while to absorb all of this information. When you think about it, the change could be goo d. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Pisces, soliciting help doesn't mean you are abandoning your independence. It just means you're smart. Famous birthdaysApril 17 Jennifer Garne r, actress, 39; April 18 Melissa Joan Hart, actress, 35; April 19 Ashley Judd, actress, 43; April 20 Joey Lawrence, actor, 35; April 21 Tony Danza, actor, 60; April 22 John Waters, director, 65; April 23 John Cena, wrestler, 34. Think before you make a large purchase, Gemini Newborn wails while mom works up a sweat at the gym Snapshots Dear Abby My Mom has often said that tears are t he safety valve of the heart. They are the silent evidence of r eleased emotions sometimes happy, s ad or both. The father of the radiant bride on his a rm holds his emotions in check as he g ives his little girl away; while a few f eet from them a silent tear slides down h er mother's cheek. Her heart has released a tear of joy f or her daughter's happiness mingled w ith sorrow for an era not to be recapt ured. Tears aren't usually apparent to the e ar unless a person is sobbing. So, when t ears fall silently; they remain unheard a nd perhaps unnoticed unless one is l ooking at the person's face. But, what if through love, we could h ear the sound of a tear. What would it s ound like? Would it splash loudly?Would it drip a nnoyingly?Or, would it fall in a cleansing torrent like a waterfall? We read in Luke 19:37b, NKJVthat as Jesus descended the Mount of Olives riding on a young colt, the people cried out, "Blessed is the King who comes in the name of the Lord!Peace in heaven and glory in the highest." The religious teachers of the day should have known through the Law and the Prophets who it was that was in their midst. They, too, should have joined in the exhilarating display of emotions at Jesus'approach. Instead they called to him and asked that he rebuke his disciples. Jesus answer was astonishing (verse 40). "I tell you that if these should keep silent, the stones would immediately cry out." Cry out with voice?Cry out in tears? Inanimate objects displaying human emotions?When we remind ourselves that the Creator said it and with him all things are possible, it's not as out of the ordinary as we may as first have thought! As Jesus approaches Jerusalem, he looks upon the city and weeps over it. We read of another time in Luke 13: 34 when he said, "O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the one who kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to her!How often I wanted to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her brood under her wings; but you were not willing!" He will not force himself on us; but extends an invitation for each one of us to come. Do we feel the love in his voice?Through that love are we willing to receive the cleansing and hear the sound of his tears?Selah Hearing the sound of God's tears Pause And Consider Jan Merop Classified ads get results! Call 314-9876

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LIVING 14B PAGE News-Sun Sunday, April 17, 2011 1. Keep it small."It is all new stuff to them," Savedge said. "So when they come down the stairs in the morning, they're like, Whoo-hoo!'So my first tip is to reign yourself in. If you can keep it small, that's one of the best things you can do to go a little greener." She said she understands the pressure that parents are under, but says it is of little consequence. "My kids see all that same stuff in the stores the giant bunny baskets filled to the brim with chocolate," Savedge said. "I want them to be excited and have a lot of stuff, but I have found when I make it small, they're just as excited; they've never once complained." 2. DIY baskets.Savedge suggests rifling through the recycling bin to come up with materials for your Easter basket. Milk gallon jugs are great places to start. With some cutting and pasting, you can make an orange juice carton into a cute pink bunny. (See instructions from Disney FamilyFun magazine, http://familyfun.go.com/easter/eastercrafts/easter-baskets/bunny-basket-665124/.) Savedge said she also scavenges the containers already in use around the house. "I have several pretty baskets with napkins or whatnot, and I just empty them for a week or so. Then you don't have to keep track of where the Easter baskets are stored from year to year." 3. Grow your own grass.Instead of using plastic grass, grow your own grass from seed that is found at most nurseries and hardware stores. Just sprinkle the seeds into a couple of inches of potting soil in a shallow dish. Keep it in the sun and water daily for two or three weeks. Put the whole thing into the basket your kids made, or use a terra cotta pot that they have painted. If you don't have a green thumb, use your shredder to carve up newspaper, magazines or tissue paper. You can even compost it after the holiday.4.Use natural foods to dye the eggs. Savedge said she feels more comfortable letting her family eat the eggs when she skips chemical dyes and colors Easter eggs with red cabbage leaves (blue); yellow onions (earthy brown), beets (pink), spinach (light green) and turmeric (bright yellow). Find help coloring your eggs the natural way at www. instructables.com. "The kids love it even better (than using the kits) because it's just so cool; they think it's the craziest thing to dye an egg pink with a beet," Savedge said. You also can use up the crayon nubs by drawing designs on the eggs when they are still warm from being boiled. And, skip the plastic eggs entirely. Instead, decorate old Altoids tins and fill with candy.5.Fill the baskets with something more than junk.Sure, kids love candy, and who doesn't? To ease your mind a bit, you can find locally produced chocolates, and there are organic lollipops or all-natural jelly beans you can find online. But you also can make sure the basket is largely filled with things that they will use more than once, and will encourage them to go outside. Here are a few ideas: Books or activity books Homemade bubbles made with dishwashing soap and a little bit of glycerin Art supplies or stickers Ajump rope, kite or ball Astarter kit for gardening with kid-sized gloves, a trowel and seeds Something they need anyway, such as new sunglasses or flip-flops for the warmer monthsEmbroidery Hoop BasketFrom Disney FamilyFun magazine http://familyfun.go.com/Recycle old T-shirts and make these colorful baskets. Before you begin, some terms you need to know: the warp is the material you string on the hoop, the weft is the material you weave with.MATERIALS: Sleeves from 2 or 3 adult large T-shirts Tacky glue Scissors 12-inch round embroidery hoop. Make large baskets on a hula hoop by weaving a base (ours are 8 inches in diameter) then pulling the weft tight to create sides.DIRECTIONS: 1.Turn the shirts or just shirt sleeves inside out and lay them flat on your work surface. Run a line of glue along the seam of each sleeve. If you're using adult Tshirts, glue the body seams the same way. This is so that the seam stitching doesn't come undone when you cut them.2.When the glue is dry, cut 1/2-inch-wide loops from the sleeves. Discard the hems. You'll need nine sleeve loops for the warp. For the weft, you'll need about 50 loops. If you're using shirt-body loops, you'll need far fewer (depending on the size of the shirt).3.Stretch one sleeve warp loop over the embroidery hoop. Add and secure a second loop, perpendicular to the first.4.Repeat, filling in the spaces, until all nine loops are in place. 5.Push together two warp loops at the top of hoop. This creates an odd number of warp spokes in your wheel, which allows the over/under pattern of the weft to alternate with each new row.6.Then begin weaving. When your weaving is about 4 inches across, begin treating each warp spoke as two individual strips instead of a single unit, weaving over or under each strand instead of going over or under the doubled spoke. This increases the number of warp spokes, improving the structure of the project. When you get to the two warp spokes that you pushed together at the top of the loom, separate them. Treat one of the spokes as two individual strips, but continue to treat the other as a single spoke. This maintains the odd number of warp spokes.7.To form the sides of your basket, begin stretching the weft material tightly and pulling it snugly against the weaving as you work. The sides should start to bend up.8.When the basket is the size you want, snip open your weft loop. Tie the ends around a warp spoke.9.Cut the warp spokes off the hoop one at a time. Tie the ends in pairs, then trim them to make a fringe or tuck them back into the basket.BYMERRIELEININGERMcClatchy-TribuneKids soon will be clamoring for baskets overflowing with jelly beans, chocolate bunnies and Robin Eggs candies not to mention that plastic green grass that immediately goes in the garbage (if it's not all over the carpet first). And, while fun, it all seems a little less than environmentally friendly. Fortunately there are some other options. Jenn Savedge, author of "The Green Parent: AKid-Friendly Guide to Earth-Friendly Living," and blogger at www. thegreenparent.comand www.mnn.com, says greening our Easter baskets is not only good for the Earth, it's a great chance to be creative and bond with our kids, too. Here are her tips for creating a fun and green Easter: Tips and ideas for an environmentally friendly holiday celebrationWEAVEYOUR OWNBASKET "Eco People on the Go!" and "The Little Composter" from the Teenie Greenies series by Jan Gerardi. These board books are printed on 80 percent recycled paper with soy inks and water-based varnish. "Garden Crafts for Kids: 50 Great Reasons to Get Your Hands Dirty," by Diane Rhoades, ages 9-12. "The Secret Garden," by Frances Hodgson Burnett, ages 912. "Bunnicula," by Deborah and James Howe, ages 9-12. PHOTOS FROM DISNEYFAMILYFUN MAGAZINETurn old T-shirts into colorful Easter baskets with this weaving craft. MCTNatural foods can be used to dye eggs different colors including green (spinach), yellow (tumeric), blue (red cabbage) or brown (onions). PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BYERIC GOODWIN/MCT HANDOUTThe Teenie Greenies'"Eco People on the Go!" and "The Little Composter" books are both printed on 80 percent recycled paper and use soy inks.



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By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING They are people, they matter, and they vote, said Cindy Marshall, Ridge Area Arc employee, on Friday. Marshall was helping her Arc consumers hold a rally at Duffers Bar and Grille to raise awareness, and money, to help replace proposed budget cuts from the state supported agency. The Ridge Area Arc received notice that emergency cuts in state funding has slashed its budget $30,000 per month effective April 1. News agencies are now reporting that the governor has reversed his decision for this year and will fund the deficit, replacing the Arc budget through June, but that NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, April 17, 2011 www.newssun.com Volume 92/Number 45 | 75 cents www.newssun.com HighLow 83 60Complete Forecast PAGE 7A Partly sunny and warm Forecast Question: as the recent surge in gas prices made you drive less? Next question: Should congress vote to raise the federal debt limit? www.newssun.comMake your voice heard at Online Inside Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453 Online: www.newssun.com Yes 84.4% No 15.6% 099099401007 Total votes: 96 Arts & Leisure 6B Best Sellers 10B Business 9A Chalk Talk 8B Classifieds 10A Community Briefs2A Community Calendar5B Crossword Puzzle13B Dear Abby 13B Editorial & Opinion4A Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times 13B Police Blotter 2A School Menus 8B Sports On TV 2B Index PAGE12B 2011 $3.792010 $3.112009 $2.312008 $3.692007 $3.092006 $2.972005 $2.472004 $2.012003 $1.852002 $1.622001 $1.75 Up, Up and Away Average U.S. gas prices in April Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics; Energy Information Administration Dragons rollingLake Placid cruises to win & second seed in district tourney SPORTS, 1B Paying more, driving less By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING With gasoline prices once again rising as they did during the summer of 2008, when a gallon of regular gas averaged $4.11, the NewsSun went out Thursday and Friday to discover what people think, and if people are changing their driving habits as a result. I will not be traveling as much, said Margaret Meder firmly, who lives south of Sebring. To save money she has begun to make a list of everything she needs and everywhere she has to go, then sets out on a single trip, going to locations in geographical order. And I wont be driving my truck any time soon, she said. Its a Dodge Ram and it gets 11 miles a gallon and costs $65 to fill up. Im driving my Toyota Corolla, it only costs $30 to fill. The truck is staying parked unless its really necessary. Kathy Parks, who was listening, agreed. Definitely, she said, you need to cut back and try to shop all in one shot. Tammy Fox, who works at Sebring City Hall, went further. You know, she said, youre thinking Ill go to Walmart,and then you dont because you dont want any unnecessary trips. Fox is doing more than planning shorter trips, or cutting them out altogether. She is changing the way she drives. Ive lowered my speed, she said. I keep my RPMs under 2,000. I may start to carpool, some of (my coworkers) live near me. Gas prices go up, gas use goes down If you see a crazy woman on a horse, thats me.TAMMYFOX Sebring resident Drive less, thats what were going to have to do.JIMSZELAGOWSKI By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Employment figures for the month of March were released by the Agency for Workforce Innovation Friday morning. The good news is a drop in unemployment on the national, state and county levels, although the gains were not large. Highlands Countys unemployment lowered by .3 percent from 11.0 percent in February to 10.7 percent. By comparison, the state of Floridas unemployment figure, its lowest sin ce 2009, was 10.6 percen t. That was down from 11 pe rcent in February, whi le nationally the March ra te was 9.2 percent unemplo yment, compared to 9.5 pe rcent in February. These fi gures are not seasonal ly adjusted. For Highlands Count y, the percentage means 17 3 individuals found jobs in March. According to a pre ss release issued by the AW I on Friday, the March fi gures show the first over-th eCountys jobless rate creeps down News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE A large crowd seeks support from oncoming traffic along U.S. 27 on Friday, showing support for the Ridge Area Arc. Arc rally draws support See ARC, page 6A See GAS, page 8A See JOBLESS, page 8A By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK Areca ll committee filed petitions o n Thursday in order to seek t he removal of three Avon Pa rk council members, and ea ch member has chosen to respon d in their own way. Deputy Mayor Brenda Gray, as well as council members Terry Heston and Paul Miller, were named in each petition seeking their removal from office. Gray responded to the petition by countering each of the accusations individually, and by questioning the motivations of the committee. I would just like to say that the citizens put me in office, and if the citizens dont want me in office, they have every right to remove me. If they dont want me, then thats fine. I have done the best I can do, Gray said. If these complaints is t he best they can give me, well ha ve at it. I asked myself why th ey would they want to recall m e, other than these stated things. Is it because I am black? Because I am female? My telephone number is public, and none of these peop le APs Gray wonders if recall based on race, sex I asked myself why they would want to recall me ... Is it because Im black? Because I am female?BRENDA GRAY APcounci l member See GRAY, page 8A ManhuntFleeing suspect found in attic in Avon Park PAGE2ARelay for LifePhotos from Saturdays Sebring event PAGE3A Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun andMoms killing their kidsIts not as rare as wed like to think it is News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Drivers have had to change their habits as gas prices have climbed back toward the $4 per gallon mark.

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By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK Avon Park officers and Highlands County Sheriffs Office deputies worked hand in hand on Friday to track down a suspect on the run, and finally talked him out of an attic. Johnny Clyde Davis, 22, was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without intent to kill, burglary of a dwelling or conveyance while armed and trespassing while armed after a chase that led officers to three different houses. According to Lt. John King of the APPD, officers saw Davis entering an orange grove south of Ridgedale Apartments just before 8 a.m. as they were responding to a call about the assault. The HCSO K-9 unit responded to the call and the search was on for Davis. Tips from the local community really helped us out on this one, King said on Saturday. Several residents help to locate Davis, and the incident ended without injury. The department is grateful for the assistance and the care shown by the residents, King added. The search for Davis initially led to a house at 611 Overlook Terrace around 8:30 a.m., based on reports from two witnesses. But when the officers arrived Davis was not there, King said. Asecond tip led the APPD to a house on Ebi Street, and Davis was reported to be in the attic. Since the St. Petersburg incident (when two police officers were shot and killed trying to arrest a man in an attic), we are extra careful when we have to respond to a call like this, King said. Davis was in the attic, but agreed to come out peacefully when the officers called up to him. I am glad this ended without incident, and I appreciate the assistance from the citizens, King said. Davisrecord shows that he was on probation in 2007 for an unlisted crime and was arrested in 2008 for battery. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.com April 13 1815324043x:5Next jackpot $11 millionApril 9 101114184041x:4 April 6 21521222445x:5 April 15 1316182633 April 14 1223293233 April 13 27113033 April 12 918212224 April 15 (n) 8617 April 15 (d) 2721 April 14 (n) 7701 April 14 (d) 6848 April 15(n) 44 7 April 15 (d) 68 2 April 14 (n) 65 9 April 14(d) 76 1 April 17 259314 April 12 216224014 April 8 112436379 April 5 213212418 April 13 423394950 PB: 39 PP: 3Next jackpot $43 millionApril 9 514325356 PB: 11 PP: 4 April 6 1018415556 PB: 15 PP: 2 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center Sparrow Avenue to be closedSEBRING Sparrow Avenue from Limpkin Street to U.S. 27 will be closed for vehicular and pedestrian traffic beginning at 6 a.m. on Monday due to the widening and reconstruction project. Detour routes will be posted. Businesses within the closed portion of Sparrow Ave. will be accessible from other routes during the construction. Call the Highlands County Engineering Department at 402-6877 for more information.Lake Josephine boat ramp temporarily closesLAKE PLACID Lake Josephine boat ramp at 1540 Lake Josephine Drive will be closed from Wednesday through May 15 for tussock removal from the lake. For further information contact the Highlands County Parks and Recreation Department at 402-6812.RSVP needs volunteers SEBRING The Retired and Senior Volunteer Program, administered by South Florida Community College, is seeking volunteers for afterschool homework helpers and elementary school tutors, food sorters, meal delivery, reception and clerical support, special event volunteers, and thrift store cashiers and sorters RSVPis a volunteer program that is offered throughout the country for adults ages 55 and older. It provides free volunteer placement at nonprofit agencies of the volunteers choice, as well as free supplemental accident and liability insurance. Highlands Countys RSVPvolunteers share their time, experience, and talents with non-profit organizations and areas of critical need. Many volun teer opportunities are avai lable through RSVPinclud ing mobilizing other volu nteers, mentoring or tutorin g children, and leading fundraising efforts. For more information o r to volunteer with RSVP, contact Kris Schmidt, coo rdinator, RSVP, at 784-718 9 or visit the Web site at www.southflorida.edu/rsv p. South Florida Community College hosts improv comedy showAVON PARK South Florida Community College (SFCC) presents a night of comedy by the Upright Citizens Brigade at 7 p.m. Thursday in the SFCC University Center Auditorium, Highlands Campus. The UCB Theatr e is one of the greatest producers of comedic talent i n America today and the Upright Citizens Brigade Touring Company brings the best of theatres in New York City and Los Angele s to nationwide audiences. This performance, now entering its fifth season, has played at universities, rock clubs, and festivals across the United States. Its a great chance to see stars of today and tomorrow live on stage from the theatre that produced com edy greats like Horatio Sanz, Amy Poehler, Rob Corddry, Ed Helms, MTV 's Human Giant, and the Daily Shows Rob Riggle This improv comedy show, sponsored by the SFCC Student Governmen t Association (SGA), is free to SFCC students, staff an d faculty and $5 per person for the general public. Th e show is one hour and gua ranteed to be a laugh-outloud affair, so come check out and support student entertainment at SFCC. F or more information, contact Laura Wade, coordinator, Student Life, at 784-7435 COMMUNITYBRIEFS Continued on page 5B The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Thursday, April 14: Moses Anderson, 53, was charged with two counts of fraud-impersonation unlawful use of a police badge and of a law enforcement officer. Reshawna Jkeira Hawkins, 28, of Lake Placid, was charged with two counts of failure to appear reference give false name/identification to a law enforcement officer and knowingly driving with license suspended/revoked. Timothy Dale Landers, 43, of Lake Placid, was charged with DUI. Stanley Moore, 54, of Lake Placid, was charged with possession of cocaine, possession and or use of drug equipment and five counts of failure to appear reference introducing contraband into a detention facility, possession of cannabis, use or possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of cocaine. Jerome Antonio Oliver, 23, of Avon Park, was char g ed with DUI. POLICEBLOTTER Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The Avon Park C ommunity Redevelopment Agency ( CRA) is offering financial assistance to i mprove the exterior, or facade, of resid ential homes and businesses located w ithin the citys three CRAdistricts. Free Home Facade Grants are availa ble for homeowners who meet very l ow, low or moderate income requirem ents. Total allowable funds are up to $ 2,500 per owner-occupied home every t wo years. For homeowners who do not q ualify for the Free Home Facade Grant, a Matching Facade Grant is available. Total allowable funds for this grant are 50 percent of costs up to a maximum of $2,500 per residence per year and the homes do not have to be owner occupied. Business Matching Grants are available for the improvement of storefronts. Total allowable funds per business are 50 percent of costs up to a maximum of $5,000. Interested parties must complete a Facade Grant Application, which is available at city hall. Grant funds will not be considered for projects already under renovation and is based on appropriated funding designated for the CRA program and are on a first come, first serve basis. For more information about the Facade Grant Application process or to obtain an application form, contact Wes Hoaglund, CRARedevelopment director, at (321) 287-6543 or 452-2039. The application is also available online at www.AvonPark.cc in the Resources Section under Publications. Avon Park CRA offers facade grants News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE A Highlands County Sheriffs Office K-9 unit discusses strategy with Avon Parks Police Department during a recent manhunt on Overlook Terrace, just northease of the intersection of State Road 17 and Memorial Drive on Friday Morning. Manhunt in Avon Park ends with peaceful arrest Special to the News-SunSEBRING Starting Your Business is a free seminar presented by the Small Business Development Center at USF. It will be held from 2-4 p.m. Wednesday, April 27 at South Florida Community College Corporate and Continuing Education Room T05. It is designed for persons thinking of starting a small business or who have started a business and want to make sure they did it correctly. Licenses, marketing, entity selection, and business planning are among the items discussed. The seminar will be presented by David Noel, Certified Business Analyst with the SBDC. Seating is limited, so call Noel at 784-7378 to reserve a seat in the seminar or for further information. Seminar set to help start a business Associated PressORLANDO R epublican U.S. Sen. M arco Rubio got a standi ng ovation Friday from t ea party supporters at a T ax Day rally in downt own Orlando when he t old them he had voted a gainst a budget deal b ecause it didnt cut s pending enough and Gov. R ick Scott urged tea p artiers in Jacksonville to p ressure lawmakers to l ower taxes. Acrowd of more than 1 ,000 people cheered at t he Lake Eola amphithea ter when Rubio told them h e had voted against the 2 011 budget deal. This is not just another d ebate. Thats why yesterd ay I voted against that b udget, he said. I think o ur leaders up there, a lot o f them worked very hard. T hey think they did the b est they could. I get all t hat. But let me tell you s omething. Were running o ut of time. This is a m ajor, major, major m oment in American hist ory, and we no longer h ave the luxury of small s olutions for this big probl em. Rubio, a Tea Party darl ing, was joined at the r ally by other Republicans a nd Joe Wurzelbacher, b etter known as Joe the P lumber, who became f amous campaigning with G OPpresidential candid ate John McCain in 2008. R ubio was scheduled to be t he keynote speaker at a nother Tax Day rally in T ampa later in the day. At one point, Rubio was i nterrupted by a heckler w ho shouted out that the s enator was a pawn of corp orations. The heckler was e scorted outside the a mphitheater by a police o fficer where he joined a bout a dozen other antiR ubio protesters. In Jacksonville, Scott a ddressed about 600 peop le at a rally along the St. J ohns River, urging them t o tell lawmakers to lower t axes and reduce regulat ions on businesses. Stop raising our taxes. S top regulating our lives. S o, what do we have to d o? We have to vote, S cott said. Tea partiers cheer Scott, Rubio

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 3A News-sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY T he Sebring High School Junior Air Force Revere Officer Training Corps Color Guard cross Firemans Field to get into place for the opening ceremonies Saturday, during Sebrings Relay-For-Life. News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLE Y Aron Hall, who is in the tenth grade at Sebring High School, takes practice throws at the Walgreen station dunk tank. The chains store managers, from all three cities were all wet, all afternoon. News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLE Y Savanah Demeri rides the bounce house slide. Savanah is in the 1st grade at Cracker Trail Elementary School. News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY (From left) Garrett Johnson, 2, and his friend Kalee Desazo, almost 3, blow bubbles while Debbie Taylor supervises. They are part of the Highlands Independent Bank Team. News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFELY T he Highlands independent Bank Team joins hands to raise the Relay-For-Life branch bank. Sebring walks for a cure in Relay for Life

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F riday we asked some hard questions t he gist of which a mounted to why w ealthier American c itizens are not being a sked to help save t he nation, while the p oor, the sick, the y oung and the elderl y have been told t hey must give their a ll.The answer, we think, is s elf-evident those individu als making the hard decis ions, our elected officers at e very level of government, n eed money, lots of money, t o stay in office. When a candidate running for tax collector in Highlands County spends tens of thousands of dollars on a campaign, you know things are getting out of whack and thats nothing compared to the millions of dollars spent on obtaining state or national level positions. Think of what could happen if people donated dollars so schools or neighborhood clinics could be built, instead of donating those dollars to pay for a politicians attack ads. As long as it costs as much as it does now to run for office, the writers of the $500 to $5,000 checks will be protected by those who cash the $500 to $5,000 checks. Those of us in the $15 to $35 check writing range might as well hang it up we are simply not of enough use to our politicians for them to be concerned about what we think. As for the millionaires, too few seem inclined to patriotism sorry, throwing a barbecue on the 4th of July, or choking up during the national anthem doesnt count. Too few millionaires seem willing to be true patriots and sacrifice for their country as if living honestly and taking turns was a sacrifice. Anyway you look at it, weve arrived at a critical time. We need to change our way of doing things. Alogical place to start is cleaning up the electoral process. It is the only way to protect ourselves from those men and women with hidden agendas and an elected official in their pocket. Page 4ANews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.comTODAYSEDITORIALTODAYSLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION A better use for the money I raised my eyebrows the other day w hen I heard that a Chicago school was b anning lunches brought from home, m andating that all students buy the s chool lunch. According to a Chicago Tribune artic le, the principal of Little Village A cademy made this decision based on t he belief that the school provided l unch had better nutritional quality than w hat could be brought from home. Kids with a doctors note can opt out o f the mandate. But without that note, i ts eat whats provided or go hungry. According to an article at time.com ( Time magazines website) the policy h as been in place for six years. It is not p opular. Kids claim that the food tastes b ad, and some even choose to go witho ut lunch rather than eat the schools f are. I dont want to get all cynical here, b ut it is a fact that the more free or r educed price lunches the public school s erves, the more money the federal m oney supplies the district. The princip al denies thats a motivation, but you d o have to wonder. I admit that I often partook of school l unches in my time, both as a student a nd a teacher. Lets be honest no o ffense to those who make this food, w ere not talking fine dining here. Its s chool cafeteria food. My memories of lunches at school d ont include the lunches the school p rovided. My good memories of eating at school stems from the lunches I brought from home. To this day I remember the meatloaf sandwiches my mother would pack for us. They were something to look forward to, because my moms meatloaf was something special. Afriend once commented that it was because she actually put meat into it. School lunches also provides a funny family story. Ive tried to remember if Ive shared this with you readers, but I dont think I have. When we got to high school, the fixing of lunches was passed along to my younger sister, Anita. One morning my brother Carl started complaining to her because all we had in the house to fix was peanut butter. Carl made it clear that he was unhappy, muttering choke sandwiches under his breath and being generally cranky. My sister kept a cheerful attitude, however, and fixed the peanut butter sandwiches one for each of us, and two for my brother. She placed his in a paper sack, standing them sideways so theyd fit. Carl, she asked in a sweet voice, would you like an apple with your lunch? Yeah, my brother answered, eating breakfast, his back to the kitchen. My sister promptly got an apple for him. She held it up a few inches from the top of the sack and then dropped the heavy piece of fruit into the bag. Smiling, she closed the sack without another word. You can imagine the condition of the sandwiches. I dont recall my brothers reaction when he examined his lunch later, but I never heard him complain after that. I would like to say that I gave my sons lunches to remember, but alas, this is not the case. Questioning both of them revealed that they remembered little if anything about school lunches. John referred to them as morally neutral. James did point out that the school lunches were not conducive to a low-carb diet. Yes, I was one of those moms who chose to write lunch checks instead of packing nutritious lunches for my offspring. Heres the thing, though: I chose to let them buy lunch. And I think that parents in Chicago should be allowed to make the same choices. Maybe they will build memories for their kids the way my mom did for me. Just dont complain about peanut butter sandwiches. Apples are heavy. Laura Ware is a Sebring resident. She can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady@ embarqmail.com What do you want for lunch? Lauras Look Laura Ware Regretting vote for council membersEditor: Two articles published in Fridays News-Sun (April 8) are on separate pages, in separate sections, but are obviously related. The second article states Downing five or more alcoholic drinks nearly every day isnt seen as a big problem for many of the nations teens ... Almost half the teens questioned 45 percentdidnt see it as a big deal. The caption of article number one on the front page states: Proposed entertainment district would open downtown to restaurants, taverns and pubs. These alcohol-selling establishments on and near our Circle will be promoted as family-friendly places for our citizens to gather. Doesnt anyone see the connection? George Sebring envisioned Sebring as a church-friendly, alcohol-free community. Now the alcohol sellers will be encroaching on our downtown churches. Im already regretting my vote for the present members of the City Council. Jean Cobb Conrad SebringDeep pocket target drives billing Editor: The unspoken elephant in the room with respect to healthcare costs is the virtually universal billing practice of all the traffic will bear employed by most providers of goods and services in the healthcare industry. The concept of competition or reasonable return is unknown. What is needed is something akin to the excess profit tax employed during World War II to keep costs reasonable and realistic. Inflating billing rates to three or four times the reasonable expectations knowing that there will be discounts and rebates negated to a favored class, operates as an acceleraant to the usual inflationary pressures. Healthcare costs increase annually at twice the rate of inflation. As long as there is a targeted deep pocket driving the billing practices, fairness and reasonableness will remain as concepts foreign to costs in the industry. By looking to reduce eligibility for services rather than attempting to reduce the costs we will continue to be victimized by those who place skys the limit profits above seeking a sensible fair costing practice. Randy Ludacer Lake Placid Where are the emergency vets?Editor: I am the owner of four furbabies, and this weekend our friends from Broward County visited my husband and myself with their Maltese dog. Their Maltese suddenly took ill during the wee hours of Sunday (2 a.m.), so my friends attempted calling every vet and animal hospital listed in the yellow pages in the Lake Placid, Sebring and Avon Park areas all to no avail. They did find an emergency animal hospital in Winter Haven, which was over an hour drive from Lake Placid. Jazz was in such distress by the time my friends arrived at the emergency an imal hospital, that it was too late to help save her. Why doesnt any of the animal hospitals in Lake Placid, Sebring and Avon Park have emergency service? We have emergency rooms for people and large animals (horses and cows etc.), why not for dogs and cats? Many of the elderly consider their dogs and cats as companions and their babies. There are certainly enough vets in the area to provide this type of service. Why cant the vets get together and work out a schedule to provide for eme rgency services to help these innocent furbabies, instead o f making them suffer and letting them die. Arlene Jorda n Lake Plac id Crooks will continue to rob our elderlyEditor: Over the past several years, Florida has been at th e center of some highly publi cized cases of health care companies defrauding Medicare and Medicaid. These actions cost taxpayer s millions and in some cases billions of dollars. Yet many times the executives of the companies involved claim they didnt know this theft i n the form of over-billing and charging for nonexistent patients was happening. These criminals reap ill-got ten millions and use the I didnt know what was going on at my company defense to avoid prosecution. It is high time that lawmakers at the state and fede ral level address this and ma ndate accountability of these CEOs. Laws need to be passed to make both crimina l and civil prosecution of thes e CEOs a priority. They shoul d do real time in prison and a ll their assets should be seized to repay taxpayers. Thousands of seniors depend on Medicare, to allo w these crooks to continue to steal without consequence i n unconscionable. Law enforcement and the Attorne y General should review prior cases of proven fraud where no one went to prison and make every effort to ensure someone is prosecuted and pays for these crimes. Until there is a price to b e paid, these crooks will continue to rob our seniors of these vital resources. Dana B. O rr Avon Pa rk BouquetGood Samaritan comes to the rescueEditor: On Saturday, April 2 at about 5:30 p.m. at a local grocery store in Sebring, my mother fell, due to no fault of the store. When we reached her she was on the floor and had a large bleeding gash on her nose and knee. An unknown woman was on the floor next to her orchestrating ice, bandages and a wheelchair. As we we re leaving the store for the hos pital I realized the woman was not a store employee bu t a good Samaritan. In the confusion we did n ot get her name or properly thank her, so I hope she is reading this so we can thank her publicly for the concern and compassion she showed to our mother. P. Speck in Sebrin g LETTERSPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically reject ed. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870; drop it of f at the same address; fax 385-1954; or e-ma il editor@newssun.com.

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Associated PressBIRMINGHAM, Ala. Vicious storms smacked the Deep South and toppled trees like dominoes as tornadoes howled through towns. Seven deaths were reported in Alabama, including a man killed when the storm tossed a mobile home nearly a quarter of a mile across a state highway. Combined with earlier reported fatalities in Arkansas and Oklahoma, the confirmed death toll had risen to 16 by early Saturday the nations deadliest storm of the season. Autauga County Chief Deputy Sheriff Joe Sedinger said three adult family members were killed around 11 p.m. Friday when a tornado ripped through homes in the Boones Chapel community 24 miles north of the state capital of Montgomery. Two side-by-side trailers were torn from their foundations and tossed into nearby woods. On Saturday morning, wooden steps and flowerbeds were all that remained where one mobile home had once stood. The trailer was anchored down and the anchors are gone, Sedinger said. But the steps are still there and the blooms are still on the flowers. Seven people were hurt in the storm, including a fir efighter injured during t he emergency respons e, Sedinger said. Another three deaths we re reported early Saturday in Washington County in sout hern Alabama, said Yasam ie Richardson, spokeswom an for the Alabama Emergen cy Management Agency. Chamber sponsors A dministrative Professional LunchLAKE PLACID The G reater Lake Placid C hamber of Commerce A nnual Administrative P rofessional Luncheon will b e held Wednesday, April 2 7 at the Lake Placid Camp & Conference Center. This e vent is sponsored by Home & Office Essentials, Miller C entral Air and Wauchula S tate Bank. The luncheon will be c atered by the renown chefs a t the Lake Placid Camp & C onference Center. R eservations are required. R eservation form and menu s election is posted on the C hamber web site at w ww.visitlakeplacidflorid a.com. For additional i nformation, contact the G reater Lake Placid C hamber of Commerce at 4 65-4331.Events planned at lodges, postsAVON PARK The Combat Veterans M emorial VFWPost 9853 w ill have NASCAR on the s creen at 1 p.m. today. For a ny questions, call the l odge at 452-9853. LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Moose 2 374 will have NASCAR T alladega on the screen at 1 p .m. today. Karaoke with B ama Jam. Loyal Order of t he Moose officers, Women o f the Moose and the House C ommittee meet at 7 p.m. M onday. Loyal Order of the M oose general meeting is s et for 7:30 p.m. For d etails, call the lodge at 4 65-0131. The Lake Placid A merican Legion Placid P ost 25 will host a Riders I talian feast from 4:30-6 p .m. today. Music by J immy Black from 5-8 p.m. S huffleboard is set for 1 p .m. Monday. Boy Scouts m eet at 7 p.m. Free blood p ressure checks from 1-3 p .m. Tuesday. For more i nformation, call 465-0975. The Lake Placid Elks 2 661 will host music by F rankie Monday. BPOE I ndoctrination will be at 7 p .m. Tuesday. For details, c all 465-2661. SEBRING Sebring Lodge 249 F &AM will serve an ally ou-can-eat (dine in only) c hicken dinner. The dinner w ill be served from 11 a.m. t o 2 p.m. at the Masonic L odge, 1809 Home Ave., f or an $8 donation. Take out i s available. W omans Club plans BUNCO partySEBRING The GFWC W omans Club of Sebring w ill host a Bunco party on W ednesday at 4260 L akeview Drive. Game s tarts at 12:30 p.m.; cost is $ 3, which includes dessert. P hone 382-6103 or 3826 007 for reservations and i nformation. A rt Leage plans open houseLAKE PLACID The L ake Placid Art League is h aving an open house from 1 -4 p.m. today where Bob a nd Harriet Porter of the L ake Placid Mural Society w ill be honored for their v ision and long years of l abor in putting Lake Placid o n the map, making it The T own With History All A round. The murals have b een viewed and enjoyed b y millions people, past, p resent and future, includi ng visitors from around the w orld. The leagues beautiful o utdoor mural art gallery w as started in 1993 with the Tea at Southwinds mural, which is on the Caladium Arts Cooperative at 132 Interlake Blvd. Harriet was one of the original founders of the Co-op. This mural was sponsored and painted by artist Thomas Freeman and the project had life. There are now 44 murals depicting the history of the area and its pioneers. The Porters deserve thunderous applause for creating an environment that stimulates the economy and improves the quality of life for the community. Truly a legacy that will last for generations to come. There will be a members art exhibit and refreshments will be served.Elvis Wade does May showAVON PARK Elvis Wade will do a dinner show at the Bella Vista Restaurant on Friday, May 13. Dinner is served from 4:30-6:30 p.m. with the show starting at 7:30 p.m. The price is $20 with dinner; $10 without. All seats reserved with payment only. Call 4533331 for reservations.Recreation Club plans activitiesSEBRING The Sebring Recreation Club, 333 Pomegranate Ave., will host the following events for the duration of April: Monday Ice cream shuffleboard, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Ice cream shuffleboard and line dancing, 6:30 p.m. Saturday Pin shuffleboard, 6:30 p.m. Any information, call 385-2966.Reading Series continues with Florida author AVON PARK The South Florida Community College Humanities Reading Series will hold an open mic night at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday in Building H, Room 110, SFCC Highlands Campus. Community writers are invited to attend and share their stories. Five-minute time slots must be reserved in advance. The series is free and open to the public. For more information or to reserve a spot, call Dr. Charlotte Pressler, professor, philosophy and SFCC Honors Program coordinator, at 784-7247. Tea Party Rally set for MondaySEBRING The Highlands Tea Party will have their Tax Day Flag Wave from 4-6 p.m. Monday at 2700 U.S. 27 South, U.S. 27 and Bayview Street (across from ALDI's Grocery Store).NARFE Chapter meets TuesdaySEBRING NARFE Chapter 288 of Highlands County will meet Tuesday at Homers Buffet in Sebring Square. Lunch is at 11 a.m., followed by the speaker and business meeting at noon. The guest speaker will be Suzanne Crews, RN, Florida Hospital. She will speak on Caregivers. All current and retired federal employees (and spouses) are invited.Barbecue to benefit new dual purpose police canineAVON PARK Robert Strenth will offer his services from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday to help the Avon Park Police Department Canine Unit on its efforts to raise money for a new dual purpose police canine. Strenth will offer a full meal of smoked pulled pork, chips and drink for $6 or one rack of St. Louis style ribs for $15. Pre-sale tickets can be purchased at the Avon Park Police Department, 304 W. Pleasant St., or call Canine Officer J. Molina at 8734663. The barbecue will take place at Walgreens, 93 U.S. 27 South.Drum Circle gathers todaySEBRING The Community Drum Circle will take place behind the Sebring Civic Center, 355 W. Center Ave. overlooking Lake Jackson, from 3-5 p.m. today. Bring a chair or blanket, an instrument if you have one, something to drink and a friend if youd like. This activity is for all ages Join the Primal Connection and make a joyous sound. No experience necessary. Play along, dance or just enjoy the music. Some percussion instruments will be available for the public to use. For more information contact Fred Leavitt, Primal Connection, at 402-8238, or e-mail fred@primalconnection.org. For more information on the Primal Connection go to their Web site at www.primalconnection.org.Precautionary boil water notice issuedLAKE PLACID Placid Utility Water system customers in the Tomoka Heights subdivision experienced at emergency water shut-down from 3 p.m. to 5:30 a.m. Friday to make emergency repairs to a 10inch water line on Crestview Court North. The effected areas were Grandview Boulevard and Crestview Terrace from the Rosewood Drive North/Crestview Terrace intersection to the Tomoka Boulevard north intersection, including Crestview Court North. As a precaution, those affected by this shut down should boil all water used for drinking, cooking or brushing teeth at a rolling boil for one minute. This includes ice machines, soda fountains, and drinking water fountains. For information, contact the Placid Utilities Water Department at 402-6786. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 5A Continued from page 2A COMMUNITYBRIEFS Courtesy pho to Heartland Christian School celebratedanother batch ofStudents of the Month and Character Award winners (character trait joy)recently, including the front row of Aly Smyth, Caleb Hess, Catrina Lim, Chris Balfour and Chris Cardoso; back row, Aly Strength, Logan Aubrey, Sarah Nortelus, Sierra Smith, Alex Lobozzo and Roberto Tagui.Kyle Wilson alsowas honoredbut was absent for the picture. Top students Death toll up to 16 in Southern storms

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Page 6ANews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.com still leaves the next budget season up in the air, according to Rhonda Beckman, CEO of the Arc. Come July 1, anything can happen. We are now funded through the next 77 days, but we have no idea what will happen after that, Beckman said Friday at the rally. I just wanted to help out my friends, said Angie Luft, organizer for the event and an Arc consumer. Luft, 26, lives with her grandparents in Sebring, attends Arc for day training and serves as the president of the Arc Advocacy Group. I signed up to vote today, Luft said proudly. We want to let Gov. Scott know that we will fight back. We are people too. Almost 60 Highlands County residents gathered in front of Duffers and As Good As New Furniture and Appliance Store along U.S. 27 to gain support for the Arc. Others came and went during the lunch hour getting the pizza buffet at Duffers, which gave Arc $1 for every buffet meal sold. Some individuals, including local caterer Gerald Snell of Avon Park, held a bake sale to help with the program. They are not just a number that can be cut. Most of our clients just need assistance, they are not like folks who wont help themselves. Most of these folks cant, Marshall added. But that doesnt mean they are not people. Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by ED BALDRIDGE Cindy Marshall (left) holds a sign designed by Arc client Angie Luft during the recent rally at Duffers Bar and grill. Luft came up with the idea to hold the rally to protest Governor Scotts recent budget cuts. Rally protests cuts to Arc budget They are not like folks who wont help themselves. Most of these folks cant. But that doesnt mean they are not people.CINDYMARSHALL Arc employee By JOCELYN NOVECK APNational WriterNEWYORK How c ould she? Its the headline du jour w henever a horrific case e merges of a mother killing h er kids, as Lashanda A rmstrong did when she p iled her children into her m inivan and drove straight i nto the frigid Hudson R iver. Our shock at such stories i s, of course, understanda ble: They seem to go a gainst everything we intui tively feel about the mothe r-child bond. But mothers kill their c hildren in this country m uch more often than most p eople would realize by s imply reading the headl ines; by conservative estim ates it happens every few d ays, at least 100 times a y ear. Experts say more m others than fathers kill t heir children under 5 years o f age. And some say our r eluctance as a society to b elieve mothers would be c apable of killing their offs pring is hindering our abili ty to recognize warning s igns, intervene and prevent m ore tragedies. And so the problem r emains. Weve learned how to r educe auto fatalities a mong kids, through seatb elt use. Weve learned how t o stop kids from strangling o n the strings of their hoodi es. But with this phenomen on, we struggle, says Jill K orbin, an anthropologist at C ase Western Reserve U niversity who has studied m others who kill children. The solution is not so r eadily apparent. How common is filicide, or killing ones child, among mothers? Finding accurate records is nearly impossible, experts say. One problem is classification: The legal disposition of these cases varies enormously. Also, many cases doubtless go unreported or undetected, such as very young mothers who kill their newborns by smothering them or drowning them in a toilet after hiding the entire pregnancy. Id say a mother kills a child in this country once every three days, and thats a low estimate, says Cheryl Meyer, co-author of Mothers Who Kill Their Children. Several databases track such killings but do not separate mothers from fathers or stepfathers. At the Department of Health and Human Services, the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System reported an estimated 1,740 child fatalities meaning when a child dies from an injury caused by abuse or neglect in 2008. And according to numbers compiled from 16 states by the National Violent Death Reporting System at the CDC Injury Center, 130 children were killed in those states by a parent in 2008, the last year for which numbers were available. The horrific stories make the headlines, so we believe it hardly ever happens, says Meyer, a professor of psychology at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. But its not a rare thing. Moms killing kids not nearly as rare as we think it is Associated PressCHICAGO Preside nt Barack Obama, insisting a politically divided gover nment will not risk tankin g the world economy, sa ys Congress will once aga in raise the amount of de bt the country can pile up to ensure it has money to p ay its bills. For the first tim e, though, he signaled th at he will have to go alon g with more spending cu ts to ensure a deal wi th Republicans. In an interview Frid ay with The Associat ed Press, the president al so spoke in his most con fident terms yet that vote rs will reward him wi th another four years in t he White House for his wo rk to turn around the econ omy. Speaking from h is hometown and the site of his newly launched r eelection bid, Obama sa id he thinks voters w ill determine he is the be st prepared person to fini sh the job. On Americas wars, he said that a significa nt number of troops wou ld begin coming home fro m Afghanistan in Ju ly despite many expectatio ns that the withdrawal wou ld be modest. He said t he U.S. would not expand its military role to end a bloody stalemate in Lib ya but insisted that Moamm ar Gadhafi would, in time, be forced from power. Obama was just a we ek removed from a maratho n showdown with Hou se Republicans that almo st led to a government shu tdown. Obama: Congress will raise debt limit

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 7A

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Page 8ANews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.com Not everyone, however, has made adjustments. I would (change) if I could, said Tom Jacker, who was gassing up a heavy truck. He needs it for work, and cant shift to something smaller. Shelly Jackson is also not changing her driving habits. I share a vehicle, she said. The car is always in use. Theres nothing I can do. Right now, with the season being over it is going to be a lot harder. Johnson is a server at a local restaurant. Several people said gas prices were not the only problem. My groceries went up nearly $20 in a week, one woman said. Fox also said higher food prices were as painful as the cost of gasoline. Aloaf of bread is now $3.19, she said. Thats a loaf of Natures Own whole wheat. Everything is more expensive. The decision to drive less appears to be nationwide. On April 11, an Associated Press article by Chris Khan stated that Americans are buying approximately 2.4 millions fewer gallons of gasoline a week than they were in April 2010 a 3.6 percent drop. Khan wrote part of the drop is due to the high snow winter season, which kept many people home for extended periods of time, but that 70 percent of major chain gasoline stations reported fewer sales, with over half those reporting saying they experienced a 3 percent drop or more. Paradoxically though, falling demand in the United States is not keeping the price of gasoline down. One reason is because of increased worldwide demand. Already, Khan wrote, gas prices are 41 cents higher than they were in April of 2008. Gas peaked in July of that year. Americans as a whole are paying $340 million more a day to fill up than they did a year ago and gasoline is 32 percent more expensive than it was in April 2010. Unrest in the Middle East has also affected prices. According to Khan, crude has jumped 28 percent since the rebellion began in Libya. Jim Szelagowski, now a permanent Sebring resident, is planning an extended visit to his native Wisconsin. When he was asked if a reporter could take his photograph while he filled his SUV, he replied, Take a picture? Of me fainting? He said he doesnt wait for the tank to be empty. He fills it when its still half full so he wont faint at the bill. Drive less, thats what were going to have to do, he said, adding that he faced a 1,600 mile drive and would probably need to fill his tank six times. Its going to be an experience, he said. It was Fox who had the ultimate back-up plan. If you see a crazy woman on a horse, she said laughing, thats me. Continued from page 1A year decline in Floridas unemployment rate since November 2006. The number of nonagricultural jobs in the state is up 51,500 from last year. Most of those jobs came in the areas of food service and drinking places, food and beverage stores, ambulatory health care services and personal and laundry services. Jobs were also created in management and science and technology. Construction continued to lose ground 14,700 jobs were lost overall in the state. Highlands Countys unemployment rate ranks 29th out of Floridas 6 7 counties. Flagler County has t he highest number of unem ployed, 14.5 percent, an d Monroe County the lowe st at 6.6 percent. According to AWI, mo st of the counties with t he lowest unemployment rat es are those with relative ly high proportions of gover nment employment. The re are 38 Florida counties wi th double-digit unemployme nt rates in March, down fro m 43 in February. March figures reveal th at out of the Highlands Coun ty workforce, numberin g 41,243, a total 4,404 peop le are still seeking unemplo yment compensation. Continued from page 1A h ave never called me. I k new nothing about this u ntil I picked up a copy of t he petition today. No one h as called me about this o r talked to me about t hese, Gray said. To item number one, w hich says because I f ailed to interpret and a ccurately apply the prov isions of the ordinances a n city charter, which one a re they talking about? T hat book is three inches t hink, its a big book. W hich one did I break? The second grievance l isted on the petition conc erned the $12,500 raise t o Julian Deleon without a v ote. We took care of that o ne last Monday, Gray s aid referring to the vote t o ratify former City mana ger Maria Sutherlands d ecision to give Deleon a p ay hike. In reference to the third g rievance, which states after gaining first hand k nowledge of a current e mployeesfear of retaliat ion from other city e mployees, councilpers ons Gray refused/failed t o initiate an investigation i nto the allegations, Gray s tated she did respond to t hat issue. I dont know how the o ther council members h andled it, but I seconded t he motion to dismiss B ruce Behrens, Gray s aid. Grievance four refers to t he councils failure to m aintain a civil service b oard, which is outlined i n the city charter. That o ne is correct. We disb anded that board four or f ive years ago when Mr. ( Tom) Macklin was m ayor. It is correct, but I m not the only one g uilty of that. On item five, concerni ng Deleons residency in L ake Placid, Gray stated t hat was also handled in t he Monday meeting. On item six, Gray r esponded that she acted u pon the advice of City A ttorney Gerald Buhr a bout the line of success ion from city manager to c ity clerk when City Clerk C heryl Tietjen refused the j ob of interim city manage r after Behrens was r eleased last month in a p ublic meeting. That was also handled M onday night. I followed t he advice of the attorn ey, Gray said. Finally, Gray stressed t hat item seven, which c laims that she interfered w ith the day-to-day opera tions of the city, was not c orrect. I have never interfered w ith the operations of the c ity. I cant speak for anyo ne else, but I have not t ried to direct the city in t he day-to-day operations i n any way, she said. Continued from page 1A Gray responds to recall complaints Jobless rate goes down in state, county News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Jim Szelagowski, of Sebring, fills his tank, which he never lets get half a tank that way he wont faint at the sight of the total price. Gas prices changing habits Associated PressFORTPIERCE Police are investigating the deaths of three people found in a home north of Port St. Lucie. Officers were called to a Fort Pierce home Friday at about 7 p.m. The bodies of two women and a man were found inside. Investigators believe the man shot and killed the women before killing himself. Aneighbor told WPTVa couple and their 3-year-old daughter lived at the home, and that the woman was pregnant. 3 found dead in Fort Pierce home The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN SEBRING Rob Miller, public works director for the city of Sebring, announced that all the public beaches on Lake Jackson are cleared for swimming, except Crescent Beach, which still has bacteria issues. Veterans Beach and Hidden Beach are clear ed for use. City Pier Beachs wat er has also tested clear, b ut because of the deep tren ch running parallel to t he shore, no swimming is allowed. Christopher Tuffl ey Veterans Beach open for swimmers

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Special to the News-Sun LAKELAND Mark S essums of Sessums Law G roup has been rated 10.0 o ut of 10.0 by the lawyer rati ng service of AVVO. The 1 0.0 distinction is a rare h onor and the highest-ranki ng possible. AVVO rating is a n unbiased rating system, w hich uses a mathematical m odel that considers the foll owing information: years in p ractice, disciplinary history, p rofessional achievements a nd industry recognition. Sessums Law Group is a c ivil law firm. Mark A. S essums is the principal partn er and is Board Certified by t he Florida Bar in General C ivil Law and Marital and F amily Law. Steven Sessums i s Board Certified by the F lorida Bar in Marital and F amily Law and Brian Monk, a former prosecutor, and L acy Littlejohn are associa tes of the firm. The firm has 7 5 years of legal experience a nd is an AVrated firm, the h ighest rating from M artindale Hubbell. Mark A. S essums, also AVrated, has b een named a Super Lawyer f or every year since its incept ion in 2006. Sessums Law Group is a highly experienced and credentialed firm that offers effective representation for individuals, businesses and families throughout Florida. The firm has locations in Polk and Highlands counties. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 9A BUSINESS By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Stop here and you wont have to go anywhere else, said Hector Ramos with a proud smile. He is the manager of the One Stop Mini-Mart at 5116 Schumacher Road, right next to Hill-Gustat Middle School. It is much more than a convenience store, Ramos said, showing a visitor around. Not only are there the typical variety of candy and snacks, canned goods, beer and soda, but items like eggs, milk, juice, bacon, cheese, butter, frozen fish, hot dogs and cold cuts. Ramos sells an extensive line of Goya products, has a large spice rack, and bins of fresh fruit and vegetables from onions to bananas. In a back corner tables and chairs are set up in front of a deli counter, where sandwiches like pulled pork, Phillie steak, Cuban and ham and cheese are available from 7 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. There is WiFi and people may take their time to enjoy expresso, slush puppies, iced coffee and iced tea. In the morning, a breakfast of eggs, ham or bacon and toast is available for $3.49. In the near future he will have a sports channel up and working. But wait, thats not all. In another corner he has a mailing center where customers may buy stamps at post office prices, and mail packages. He has a copier and fax machine, a specialized computer where all manner of bills may be paid, from Florida Power to GMAC mortgages to Comcast. The store accepts food stamps and credit cards and has an ATM machine. I want to serve the community and at the same time make a living, he said. We try to be competitive and carry a little of everything. The customer is the boss. Id rather make a little bit on all sales, than a whole lot on one sale. He pulled the visitor to the back, opening the door to the rest room. Im proud of the bathroom, he said, which was spotless and had a marble floor. We just opened on January 12th, he said. Were still babies, still learning. We welcome suggestions and will try to get specific brands or special requests. One Stop Mini-Mart is open from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. seven days a week. The telephone number is 386-9406. One Stop Mini Mart more than a convenience store News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS The One Stop Mini Mart is at 5116 Schumacher Road in Sebring. I wouldnt trade t he experience of r aising my two k ids for anything, b ut I must admit t hat when my wife a nd I started plann ing our family, w e had no idea h ow expensive it w ould be. A ccording to a D epartment of A griculture report, a typical middle-income f amily will spend over $ 280,000 in inflationa djusted dollars to raise a c hild born in 2009 until age 1 8 and that doesnt even i nclude prenatal care or coll ege costs. Take it from one who k nows, youll want to have the money talk well b efore the baby is born and y oure bleary-eyed from l ack of sleep. Here are a f ew budgeting tips: Create a health budge t. Before the baby is born, f ind out what benefits your i nsurance will cover taking i nto account monthly prem iums, deductibles and c opayments. For example, a re prenatal exams, baby c heck-ups and immunizat ions covered? Ask what y our share of delivery costs w ill be. If complications a rise, such as needing a C aesarian delivery or prem ature baby incubation, c osts could skyrocket. Parental leave. Learn y our employers policies, s ince some require up to a y ears employment before c ertain benefits like paid l eave, short-term disability a nd unpaid leave kick in. In a ddition, the federal Family a nd Medical Leave Act a llows up to 12 weeks of u npaid leave for births or a doptions, so check with y our benefits department to s ee if youre eligible. Know what things c ost. We were amazed how m any things our babies n eeded. Must-haves include a car seat (required by law), c rib and bedding, stroller, d iapers, baby formula, medi cal and grooming supplies, c lothing and home babyp roofing. Add in things like a baby bathtub, baby monit or and safety gates and w ere talking thousands of d ollars before the kid is e ven crawling. Practical Money Skills for Life, a free personal financial management program run by Visa Inc., contains a handy calculator that can help estimate baby-related expenses (www.practicalmoneyskills.com). Anticipate lost wages. When budgeting for living costs, factor in lost earnings that typically occur when a parent either temporarily leaves the workplace or chooses a job more open to flex hours or part-time work. Down the road, youll also need to weigh the cost of child care versus returning to work. Investigate tax advantages. Ask whether your employer offers health care and dependent care flexible spending accounts (FSAs). These accounts let you pay for eligible out-of-pocket medical and child care expenses on a pre-tax basis that is, before federal, state and Social Security taxes have been deducted. This lowers your taxable income, and therefore, your taxes. You could save hundreds or thousands of dollars on expenses youd have to pay for anyway. And remember, youre typically allowed to change benefit coverage after having a baby, so you could probably add FSAs midyear. Depending on your income, number of eligible dependents and other factors, the dependent care tax credit for federal income taxes may be preferable, although Dependent Care FSAs usually provide the greater tax advantage for most people, especially at higher incomes. IRS Form 2441 at www.irs.gov can help you calculate whether the tax credit is preferable. Or, ask your tax advisor which method is best for you. Raising a family is one of lifes most rewarding experiences. Just be sure you plan carefully for the financial bumps in the road. Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. Having a baby? Get your finances in order Personal Finance Jason Alderman Sessums receives highest AVVO rating WASHINGTON (AP) Americans are paying more for food and gas, a trend that could slow economic growth in the months ahead. The Consumer Price Index rose 0.5 percent in March, the Labor Department said Friday. That matched Februarys increase, the largest since the recession ended in June 2009. In the past 12 months, the index has increased 2.7 percent, the biggest rise since December 2009. Excluding the volatile food and gas categories, the so-called core index rose 0.1 percent and it is up only 1.2 percent in the past year. Consumers are spending more, but the steep rise in food and gas prices could limit their ability to purchase discretionary goods and services. Consumer spending makes up 70 percent of economic activity. Rising inflation has caused many an alysts to reduce their estimates for ec onomic growth in the January-Mar ch quarter from roughly 3 percent or hig her to as low as 1.5 percent. Gasoline jumped 5.6 percent la st month and has risen nearly 28 percent in the past year. Consumers paid an ave rage price of $3.81 a gallon nationwi de on Friday according to the travel grou p AAA. Food and gas costs push consumer prices 0.5% higher Associated PressWASHINGTON T he Internal Revenue Servi ce has paid out more than a half-billion dollars in homebuyer tax credits to people who probably di dnt qualify, a governme nt investigator said Friday. Most of the money about $326 million went to more than 47,00 0 taxpayers who didnt qua lify as first-time homebu yers, said the report by J. Russell George, t he Treasury inspector gener al for tax administratio n. Other credits went to prison inmates, taxpaye rs younger than 18 and pe ople who did not actual ly buy homes. The IRS has taken po sitive steps to strength en controls and help preve nt the issuance of inapprop riate homebuyer credits , George said. Howeve r, many of the actio ns occurred after hundreds of thousands of homebuy er credits had already be en issued, including fraud ulent and erroneous cre dits. The popular credit pr ovided up to $8,000 to firs ttime homebuyers and up to $6,500 to qualified curre nt owners who bought anot her home during parts of 2009 and 2010. The IRS said it work ed hard to enforce a comp licated tax credit that pr ovided more than $27 b illion to almost 3.9 millio n taxpayers. IRS paid $513M in undeserved homebuyer tax credits

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Page 10ANews-Sun Sunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.co m IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 10-1147 GCS ANNETTE MANGIERO, TRUSTEE OF THE MANGIERO FAMILY TRUST DATED 5-4-90 and DAVID MANGIERO Plaintiff vs. TIMOTHY B. RUGGIERO; JEANNE C. RUGGIERO JOHN DOE AND ALL OTHERS IN POSSESSION; CHOROWSKI & MOORE P.A. Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment April 11, 2011 and entered in case 10-1147 GCS in the Circuit Court of the Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida wherein Annette Mangiero and David Mangiero are Plaintiffs and Timothy B. Ruggiero, Jeanne C. Ruggiero and Chorowski & Moore P.A. are the defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM BASEMENT OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE 430 S. COMMERCE AVENUE SEBRING, FLORIDA on the 10th day of May, 2011 at 11:00 am the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: The North 25 feet of Lot 4 and all of Lots 5 and 6 LAKE CHARLOTTE SHORES, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Boo k 6 Page 24 of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Address: 7317 Sparta Road Sebring, FL 33875 Dated at Highlands County, Florida this 12th day of April, 2011. BOB GERMAINE As Clerk, Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michala k As Deputy Cler k April 17, 24, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-103 IN RE: ESTATE OF MARIE F. VENINI NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of MARIE F. VENINI, deceased, whose date of death was January 20, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870-3867. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 10, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Susan Alexander 1110 SW 9th Avenue Boca Raton, Florida 33486 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Seth E. Ellis, Esq. Attorney for Personal Representative Florida Bar Number: 0060933 ELLIS & GOLDBERG, P.L. 4755 Technology Way Suite 205 Boca Raton, FL 33431 Telephone: (561)910-7500 Fax: (561)910-7501 E-Mail: seth@egpl-law.com April 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-153 Division Tenth IN RE: ESTATE OF MARY LEE CHAGNOT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of MARY LEE CHAGNOT, deceased, whose date of death was October 19, 2008, and whose social security number is 266-40-1642, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 17, 2011. Personal Representative: Christine M. Miller 755 S. Broadway Avenue Bartow, Florida 33830 Attorney for Personal Representative: STEPHEN M. MARTIN Florida Bar No. 0308234 STEPHEN M. MARTIN, P.A. 200 Lake Morton Drive, 2nd Floor Lakeland, Florida 33801 Telephone: (863)683-8765 April 17, 24, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-147 IN RE: ESTATE OF SURDAM, LEONARD C. Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LEONARD C. SURDAM, deceased, whose date of death was February 26, 2011, and whose social security number is 573-24-5652, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 10, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Herschel E. Surdam 1643 Lexington Ave. San Mateo, CA 94402 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Robert E. Livingston Florida Bar No. 0031259 445 S. Commerce Avenue Sebring, FL 33870 Telephone: (863)385-5156 April 10, 17, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-168 IN RE: ESTATE OF EDITH H. ROGERS, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of EDITH H. ROGERS, deceased, whose date of death was March 13, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 17, 2011. Personal Representative: KENNETH P. JOHNSON 1018 TRIUMPH DRIVE SEBRING, FL 33870 /s/ Kenneth P. Johnson Attorney for Personal Representative: CLIFFORD M. ABLES, III, P.A. 551 SOUTH COMMERCE AVE. SEBRING, FL 33870 Telephone: (863) 385-0112 /s/ Clifford M. Ables, III FLORIDA BAR NUMBER 178379 April 17, 24, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-150 IN RE: ESTATE OF LUTISHIE J. FRANK, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LUTISHIE J. FRANK, deceased, File Number PC 11-150, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 10, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Ozalene Chapman Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Michael L. Keiber MICHAEL L. KEIBER, ESQUIRE 129 South Commerce Avenue Sebring, FL 33870 V. (863)385-5188 F. (863)471-1111 Florida Bar No. 620610 April 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-80 IN RE: ESTATE OF BRUCE THOMAS HALL aka BRUCE T. HALL, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BRUCE THOMAS HALL aka BRUCE T. HALL, deceased, whose date of death was November 6, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is APRIL 10, 2011. Personal Representatives: /s/ Rhoda E. Wolfe 2441 LAKEVIEW DRIVE SEBRING, FL 33870 /s/ Barbara L. Tillman 118 EVANS ST. ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 Attorney for Personal Representatives: CLIFFORD M. ABLES, III, PA 551 S. COMMERCE AVE. SEBRING, FL 33870 (863)385-0112 /s/ Clifford M. Ables III Florida Bar Number: 178379 JANE M. HANCOCK FLORIDA BAR NUMBER 341002 April 10, 17, 2011 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 10-1340 GCS FINANCIAL FREEDOM ACQUISITION, LLC, Plantiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF MARJORIE A. BUTTON, DECEASED, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF MARJORIE A. BUTTON, DECEASED LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: Unknown CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 19, BLOCK 282, OF SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, UNIT 13, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 71, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before MAY 2, 2011 a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in THE NEWS SUN and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N. Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863) 534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this 28th day of March, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Lisa Tantillo As Deputy Clerk April 10,17, 2011 1050LegalsHIGHLANDS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING INVITATION TO BID (ITB) The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), Highlands County, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed bids in the County Purchasing Department for: ITB No. 11-037 SEBRING PARKWAY PHASE III RIGHT OF-WAY CLEARING PROJECT No. 09021 Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, Acting Director, Highlands County General Services/ Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 Telephone: 863-402-6524, E-Mail: dgilbert@hcbcc.org A NON-MANDATORY Pre-Bid meeting will be held at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, April 27, 2011 in the Engineering Conference Room, 505 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. All potential bidders are encouraged attend this meeting. Submit one (1) original and three (3) copies of your bid form, bid security and other required data in a sealed envelope and marked with the bid number and name so as to identify the enclosed bid submittal. Bids must be delivered to Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., Thursday, May 12, 2011 at which time they will be opened. Bids received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The Board will not be responsible for the late deliveries of bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service. One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at either or both of the above meetings. Highlands County Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this bid. Vendors submitting responses must submit bids on all work to receive consideration. A Bid Bond or Cashiers Check in an amount of five percent (5%) of the bid must be included on bids over $100,000.00. If the successful bid is greater than $200,000.00, a Public Construction Bond will be required. Bid must be accompanied by evidence of bidder's qualifications to do business in the State of Florida, in accordance with F.S. 489. The principal features of the Project are: LUMP SUM PRICE BID: (A) THE PROJECT CONSISTS OF THE REMOVAL OF TREES, CLEARING AND GRUBBING WITHIN THE RIGHT-OF-WAY FOR THE FUTURE CONSTRUCTION OF SEBRING PARKWAY PHASE III PROJECT, WHICH RUNS NORTH OF SEBRING PARKWAY PHASE I AT THE 90 DEGREE CURVE THROUGH THE 130 FEET WIDE STRIP OF THE ABANDONED RAILROAD RIGHT-OF-WAY TO APPROXIMATELY COLLEGE DRIVE. THE PROPOSED WORK AREA IS WITHIN THE ABANDONED RAILROAD & AND THEREFORE THERE IS NO ANTICIPATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS.HOWEVER, ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT IS BEING PERFORMED. (B) THE EXISTING STOCKPILE OR BACKFILL MATERIAL LOCATED ON THE PROJECT SITE JUST NORTH OF THE 90 DEGREE CURVE OF SEBRING PARKWAY (PHASE I) SHALL BE UTILIZED BY THE AWARDED BIDDER (CONTRACTOR) TO FILL THE IMMEDIATE PORTION OF THE ABANDONED RAILROAD BED. All workmanship and materials shall meet the requirement of the Florida Department of Transportation Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge Construction (dated 2010) and be in compliance with all permits issued. The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners (HCBCC/COUNTY) reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsive and responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of Highlands County. The Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. The Board of County Commissioners of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Highlands County is an equal opportunity employer, a fair housing advocate and a handicap accessible jurisdiction. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John Minor, ADA Coordinator at: 863402-6509 (Voice), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by email: jminor@hcbcc.org. Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service. Board of County Commissioners Purchasing Department Highlands County, Florida Website: www.hcbcc.net April 17, 24, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CASE NO.: 2010-CA-001029 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, A S TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2006-OPT2, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OPT2 Plaintiff, vs. DANIEL N. WILSON AND MARCIAL L. WILSON, HIS WIFE; OPTION ONE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION #1; UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION #2; IF LIVING, A ND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order OF Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated A pril 11, 2011 entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-001029 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOMELOAN TRUST 2006-OPT2, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OPT2, Plaintiff and DANIEL N. WILSON AND MARCIA L. WILSON, HIS WIFE, are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORIDA AT 11:00 A .M., May 11, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: PARTS OF LOTS 18, 19 AND 20, OF BLOCK 190, WOODLAWN TERRACE, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 96, AND TRANSCRIPT BOOK 1, PAGE 1, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: START AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF WAY LINE OF BELLEVUE AVENUE WITH THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF EVANSTON STREET; RUN THENCE ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF EVANSTON STREET IN A SOUTHWESTERLY DIRECTION FOR A DISTANCE OF 75 FEETFOR A POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY, A DISTANCE OF 75 FEET, THENCE AT RIGHT ANGLES NORTHWESTERLY, A DISTANCE OF 125 FEET; THENCE AT RIGHT ANGLES NORTHEASTERLY AND PARALLEL TO SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY LINE OF EVANSTON STREET, A DISTANCE OF 75 FEET; THENCE AT RIGHT ANGLES SOUTHEASTERLY, A DISTANCEOF 125 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A NY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at 430 S.Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, telephone (863)534-4690, within two (2) working days of receipt of this Notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk of Court A TTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813)880-8888 (813)880-8800 May 17, 24, 2011 Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under the Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be placed under the Bargain Buy category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com 863-314-9876 DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 314-9876. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 1050Legals 1050Legals 1050Legals Classified ads get fast results Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 LOOKING FOR THAT SPECIAL HOME? Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday.

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, April 17, 2011Page 11 A IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 282007CA000845A000XX COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs JONATHAN B. MIELE AND ___ MIELE, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JONATHAN B. MIELE, IF MARRIED; SEBRING RIDGE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1;UNKNOWN TENANTS NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated April 11, 2011 and entered in Case No. 282007CA000845A000XX of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB, is Plaintiff and JONATHAN B. MIELE AND __ MIELE, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JONATHAN B. MIELE, IF MARRIED; SEBRING RIDGE OWNERS A SSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1;UNKNOWN TENANTS NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, at Highlands County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 10th day of May, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 739 OF SEBRING RIDGE, SECTION E, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, AT PAGE 53, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Highlands County Courthouse. Telephone 863-386-6565 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Sebring, Florida, on April 12, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk, Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak As Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, 2011 IN THE COUNTY CIVIL COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001064 BANK OF AMERICA, NA, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB Plaintiff, vs. ESPERANZA ESPINOSA AND UNKNOWN TENA NTS/OWNERS, ET AL Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on April 11, 2011, in the Circuit Court of HIGHLANDS County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida described as: LOT 20, IN BLOCK 259, OF SUN 'N LAKES ESTATES SECTION 20, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 89, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 124 HAPPINESS AVE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, on May 11, 2011 at 11 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 12th day of April, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, 2011 IN THE COUNTY CIVIL COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-001742 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff, vs. A RTHUR L. JONES, PINE & LAKE OF SEBRING HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ARTHUR L. JONES, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, ET AL Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on April 11, 2011, in the Circuit Court of HIGHLANDS County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida described as: LOT 56, OF PINE AND LAKE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 14, PAGE 3, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 2235 PINEWOOD BLVD, SEBRING, FL 33870; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, on May 11, 2011 at 11 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 12th day of April, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, 2011 1050Legals Having something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what youre doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 314-9876

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Page 12ANews-Sun Sunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.co m LYKES CITRUSMANAGEMENT has an opening for a full time Parts Person at their Basinger Grove Shop. Duties include answering phones, parts, ordering, inventory control, distribution/stocking, invoicing of incoming/outgoing parts, ability to lift 25 lbs. Successful applicants should possess 1 year experience in parts inventory or related field and have compute r skills. Lykes Citrus Management Division offers competitive wages and benefit package including Medical, Dental, Vision, Life, AD&D and LTD insurance plus paid vacation and holidays. Interested applicants should apply in person at: Lykes Citrus Managemanent Division 490 Buckhorn Road Lorida, Fl. 33857 or 7 Lykes Road Lake Placid, Flo. 33852 Lykes Citrus Management Division is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer/Affirmative Action/Drug Free Workplace/M/F/D/V FRONT DESKCLERK (PT), assists hotel & restaurant guests w/reservations, registration & accommodations. Hotel/Restaurant & Cashiering exp. preferred. $8.76/hr. (16-24 hr/wk.) Typical work schedule: Sat. & Sun. 6 am 2 pm. Open until filled. Visit www.southflorida.edu/hr for position announcement. (863) 453-2211. Apply at the HOTEL JACARANDA, 19 E. Main St., Avon Park. EA/EO/Vet. Pref. EXPERIENCED. ROOFERS 863-385-0351 COOKS W/EXPERIENCEpreferred at Spring Lake Golf Resort. Apply in Person. Call for directions only 863-655-0900. 2100Help Wanted 2000 Employment*RECORDS CLERKTemp position *PRN MA (w/Phebotomy skills) Details @ www.flcancer.com 1400Health CareServicesLOST SPAYEDblack male cat. Losing belly hair, 2 patches of hair off hind leg. Sebring Country Estates. 863-382-1464 1200Lost & FoundCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:314-9876 News-Sun Classified 1100AnnouncementsNORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 1; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 46'47'' EAST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 1, A DISTANCE OF 425.06 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 15.05 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. DATED this 11th day of April, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, 2011 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-281GCS HAMMOCK LAND & CATTLE CO., INC., A Florida Corporation, Plaintiff, vs. DOUGLAS C. KEIP and YVONNE R. KEIP, Husband and Wife, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to Final Default Judgment and Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure and for Attorney's Fees and Costs entered by the Court on April 11, 2011, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the jury assembly room in the courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, on the 6th day of May, 2011, at 11:00 a.m., the following-described property: PARCEL 14 COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH, RANGE 29 EAST, HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 46'47'' WEST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SECTION 1, A DISTANCE OF 1,715.53 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 13 DEGREES 43'47'' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1,308.34 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF ARBUCKLE ROAD; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 40'38'' WEST ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 516.52 FEET; THENCE NORTH 13 DEGREES 50'06'' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1,307.97 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 1; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 46'47'' EAST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SECTION 1, A DISTANCE OF 514.28 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 15.05 ACRES, MORE OF LESS. AND PARCEL 15 COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH, RANGE 29 EAST, HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 46'47'' WEST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 1, A DISTANCE OF 2,229.81 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 13 DEGREES 50'06'' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1,307.97 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF ARBUCKLE ROAD; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 40'38'' WEST, A DISTANCE OF 516.52 FEET; THENCE NORTH 13 DEGREES 54'30'' EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1,307.56 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 1; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 41'45'' EAST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 89.92 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 10-1082-GCS HIGHLANDS INDEPENDENT BANK, Plaintiff, vs. SIBREL ENTERPRISES, INC., a Florida Corporation, GEORGE DAVID SIBREL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, and STATE AND FLORIDA, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the ``Final Judgment of Foreclosure'' (the ``Final Judgment''), entered in the above-styled action on January 10, 2011, the Clerk of Highlands County will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida, as described below at a Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, on May 6, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. SEE EXHIBIT ``A'' SCHEDULE ``A'' Parcel 1 South 25 feet of Lot 13, Block 48, ORIGINAL TOWN OF SEBRING, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 1, of the Public Records of DeSoto County (of which Highlands County was formerly a part), Florida, and in Transcript Book, page 6, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Parcel 2 Lot 2, Block 427, Highlands Towers Subdivision Revised, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 5, page 29, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. BOB GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida /s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, 2011 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813)880-8888 (813)880-8800 May 17, 24, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CASE NO.: 2010-CA-001145 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, A S TRUSTEE FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES, INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-R9 Plaintiff, vs. REINALDO L. RIVERA AND LUZ E. RIVERA, HUSBAND AND WIFE; UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION #1; UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION #2; IF LIVING, AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order OF Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated A pril 11, 2011 entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-001145 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES, INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-R9, Plaintiff and REINALDO L. RIVERA AND LUZ E. RIVERA, HUSBAND AND WIFE, are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORIDA AT 11:00 A .M., May 11, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 7, BLOCK 2, LAGO VISTA SUBDIVISION, A CCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 11, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A NY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at 430 S.Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, telephone (863)534-4690, within two (2) working days of receipt of this Notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk of Court A TTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CASE NO.: 2010-CA-001221 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, A S TRUSTEE FOR ARGENT SECURITIES, INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-M2 Plaintiff, vs. FRANCES VIRGINIA WHITTEN /A/K/A FRANCES V. WHITTEN AND MACK ARTHUR WHITTEN A/K/A MAC ARTHUR WHITTEN A/K/A McARTHUR WHITTEN A/K/A MCAURHUR WHITTEN Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order OF Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated A pril 11, 2011 entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-001221 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR ARGENT SECURITIES, INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-M2, Plaintiff and FRANCES VIRGINIA WHITTEN /A/K/A FRANCES V. WHITTEN AND MACK ARTHUR WHITTEN A/K/A MAC ARTHUR WHITTEN A/K/A McARTHUR WHITTEN A/K/A MCAURHUR WHITTEN are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORIDA AT 11:00 A .M., May 11, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 8, BLOCK 3, K.F. SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 51, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A NY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at 430 S.Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, telephone (863)534-4690, within two (2) working days of receipt of this Notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk of Court A TTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813)880-8888 (813)880-8800 May 17, 24, 2011 1050Legals LOOKING FOR THAT SPECIAL HOME? Search the News-Sun Classifieds every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 314-9876 Then shop till you drop!

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, April 17, 2011Page 13 A LINCOLN TOWNCAR '97 Blk/blk. leather. Presidential Series. $2,500. Call 863-452-9899. LINCOLN TOWNCAR '97 Blk/blk. Leather, Presidentail Series. Call 863-459-9899 9450Automotive for SaleCHEST -All aluminum with locking lid. 48" long, fits in pickup bed or on a trailer. Very Nice! $140. 863-453-7027 9350Automotive Parts& AccessoriesENCLOSED TRAILER6 x 15. Almost new tires. Single axle. $1,800. Call 863-699-5517 9220Utility Trailers1973 NORTON850 COMMANDO One Owner* RareFind 10K miles New paint & chrome Will Accept reasonable offer. 863-382-8985 or 863-465-9100 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation R.V. COVERNEW fits trailes 28' 7" to 31' 6". Never opened! A Bargain at $170. 863-453-7027 2001 JAYCOEAGLE 26' 5th Wheeler. Good Shape $6400. 863-381-9159 8400RecreationalVehiclesCANOE 14'high Impact, polyethylene hull, 3 seats (insulated cooler, center seat) spare paddle tie down ( or for fishing rod or shotgun) 3 drink holders. Dry storage area. Includes: Minn Kota trolling motor, 2 seat cushions, 4 life jackets, 3 paddles and kayak paddle. Great cond. $380. Call Jay 863-452-6583. 8050Boats & Motors 8000 Recreation NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. DOG GERMANShepherd. 2 yr.old Free to good home. Call 863-452-1777 7520Pets & Supplies LAWN MOWERSnapper / Rider. Runs Good! $200 SOLD! JOHN DEERE'05 4310 w/loader & mower, 4 x 4. $4800. details @ desmdw1@msn.com or 386-246-7461 7400Lawn & GardenSEBRING -Moving Out Sale! 2010 Village Grove Blvd., apt 305. Sat & Sun Apr. 16 & 17. call for appointment. 863-385-2250 7320Garage &Yard Sales TIRES -Goodyear Assurance, (4) 195 / 60R15. $100 SORRY SOLD! STEREO, CONSOLE& Television console $100. Call 863-453-3032 STAINED GLASS,hobby suppl.. grinder, glass, chopper foil, solderleadless, misc. $100 863-402-2285 RECIPROCATING SAWDeWalt 340P, Paid $93., used 1 time. $75. Call 863-273-3731 RECIPROCATING SAWDeWalt 304P, Paid $93., used 1 time, $75. 386-273-3731 METAL DETECTORTechna model DX-1200, rarely used.Works excellent. $20 863-402-2285 LAWN MOWERBoy self-propelled, 21" cut. $45. Call SOLD!!! FREEZER 16'upright $75. Call 863-453-3032 ELECTRIC WIRERomex 12 / 2 /W / ground, Paid $40. Asking $30. 863-273-3731 DISHWASHER GEProfile. White. Digital display. Worked great, has been stored indoors since 2004. "Scratch & Dent" otherwise like new. $45. 863-873-4939 COFFEE TABLE 4' x 20". Glass top & bottom is a basket weave. $50. Call 863-465-4284 A/C UNITColeman 4 ton. Cools only. This unit attaches to an air handler. $100. Call 863-655-0881 7310Bargain BuysWASHER &DRYER / WHIRLPOOL Stack, electric 220. Excellent Condition, $425 863-257-1402 7300Miscellaneous PIANOBOSTON5'1 Baby Grand w/bench. Model GP-156. Ebony Polish finish. Excel. cond. $11,000. Call 863-449-0243 DINING ROOMSET Broyhil w/2 leafs, dark oak & formica top. 6 chairs, 1 captain. All good shape seats need recovered. $350. Call 863-465-4284 7180Furniture 7180Furniture 7000 Merchandise SEBRING (2)Available 3926 Kenilworth Blvd, 1500 sq ft, $550/mo : A/C, office, BA, lg overhead door, near Sebring High School. 640 Park St, 6400 sq ft, $2500/mo : A/C, office, BA, 8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric, fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway. 941-416-2813 AVON PARKLarge Retail/Office Building, 100 E. Main St. A MUST SEE! 863-295-9272 6750Commercial RentalSEBRING 600sq. ft. office, Central A/C. 3905 Kenilworth Blvd. $450/month + $450. deposit. Call 863-385-2519 6600Business & OfficesFor RentSEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, Satellite, split plan house, share kitchen & laundry room. Full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for RentSEBRING -Weekly/Multi-Week Condo Rentals Avail. Now. Located on Little Lake Jackson across from Harder Hall Golf Club. Lots of ammenities. Starting @ $500/wk. 863-385-5005, ext. 0 6320Seasonal Property SPRING LAKE3BR, 2BA, 2CG, CHA, patio, ceramic tiled liv. room, din. room, kitchen, bath & halls, SS appliances, refrigerator has water on door, micro., W/D hook up. No pets. 863-655-0136 SEBRING -SPRING LAKE AREA. 3/BR, 2/BA on Golf Course. $850 monthly. 1st / last / security / references. Call anytime. SORRY RENTED! SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 6300Unfurnished HousesSEBRING 2240Avalon Rd. 3/2 furn. Small animals ok. Near Shopping Center & Senior Club. References $700. first/last. Call 305-387-6863 after 4pm. or 863-237-3129. 6250Furnished Houses LIVE ONDINNER LAKE 12 min. from SFCC. Cute spotless newly painted apartments 1/1 from $350. incl. water & garbage. Efficiency $425. incl. water & garbage maintenance man on call laundry on premises. Small pets w/approval by landlord. $35. app feewe check criminal history. Call for appt. 863-381-3610 or 863-385-8242. LAKE PLACID2/BR, 2/BA Apt / Duplex, Washer / Dryer, screend porch. Excellent Conditio n. Includes water. $500 monthly plus 1 mo. security. 954-695-8348 BEAUTIFUL APTSSEBRING 2BR, 1BA, tile floors, screen back porch, beautiful landscaping, building 5 yrs. new. Pets OK. $595 month. 3106 Medical Way. 863-446-1822 AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; Washer/Dryer, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook ups. Students/Seniors Discount Call 863-452-0469. AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL: $325/mo. 863-453-8598 6200UnfurnishedApartments AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 SEBRING -2BR, 2BA. Tile floors, fresh paint. Includes water. $600/mo. Call Gary Johnson, 863-381-1861. RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartments SEBRING -Downtown on the Circle. Monthy rates starting at $400. payable wkly. Includes elec. & water. No Pets. 306 circle. 863-386-9100 or 954-295-7194. Or go to Bldg. and ask for John. 863-414-7535 REDUCED RENTfor doing maintenance. Upstairs furnished apartment. Need references. 863-385-1806. A PFURNISHED APT FOR RENT Avon Mobile Home Park 1350 N Lake Ave 55 Plus Park Sorry No Pets 863-453-3415 6150FurnishedApartmentsSEBRING VILLA 3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage. Wood floors, vaulted ceilings, screened porch. Convenient location near Hospital. Gated community, Clubhouse & pool, lawn maint. incl. $900. mo. RENTED!!! 6100Villas & CondosFor Rent 6000 Rentals PALM HARBORHOMES Call about our Extreme Makeover Home Sale As See On TV!! 800-622-2832 A PPARK MODEL FOR SALE Low Lot Rent 55 Plus Park Sorry No Pets 863-449-1072 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesLAKE PLACID Tropical Harbor 55+ Lakeside Park, w/all ammenities. 2/2 DW. Tile Sunroom, Laundry & Utility. Lg. Carport. Scenic open location. Moving. Open to offers. Call 863-465-5129. 4100Homes for SaleLake PlacidSEBRING NO NEED FOR A BANK! Owner Financing 3BR, 1BA remodeled, NICE HOME! Woodlawn Elem. area. 1243 Fernvale Ave. 863-227-2717 4080Homes for SaleSebring 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial WAIT STAFF NEEDED! Full Time & Part Time. Experience preferred / mature. Lunch & Dinner shifts, Apply in person at Zeno's Sun 'n Lake Blvd., Sebring. V ETERINARY RECEPTIONIST/ASSISTANTneeded for small animal clinic. A compassionate and enthusiastic team player needed for a full time position. Must have a positive attitude and take pride in providing exceptional client service. Multi-tasking, organization, attention to detail & computer skills necessary. Must be able to work flexible hrs. & weekends. Stop by and fill out an application at 11751 Twitty Rd. Sebring 33876. Hours M-F 7:30-6. RESIDENTIAL CLEANINGCo. Needs part time help, 15-25 hrs., week days only. Must be reliable, outgoing & highly motivated. Call 863-414-2244. MATH INSTRUCTORS PT positions to teach developmental math (daytime classes). Bachelor's degree in math or related field required. Open until filled. V isit www.southflorida.edu/hr for details. 863-784-7132. EA/EO MATH INSTRUCTORS PT positions to teach developmental math (daytime classes). Bachelor's degree in math or related field required. Open until filled. V isit www.southflorida.edu/hr for details. 863-784-7132. EA/EO LIFEGAURDS NEEDED.Lake Placid Camp and Conference Center is hiring Lifegaurds. Please call 863-465-2197 Mon-Fri 9-5pm. CNA PRIVATEduty $150. per day. Sat.-Mon. Ask for Laura 863-709-5333. 2100Help Wanted Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155

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Page 14ANews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.com

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Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Lady Blue Streak softball team celebrated Senior Night as they hosted Frostproof, however perhaps not as traditionally as previous years. Seniors Amanda Grimaldo, Kaitlyn Ostrander and Lauren Welborn were recognized with a personal biography as they stood by home plate for one of the last times of their high school careers. Upon receiving flowers from their selected underclassmen, it was a mad dash to the locker room. Fans looked around in confusion, but soon were in an uproar as the girls returned to the field. These girls strutted their stuff in the First Annual Joe Sinness Look-Alike Contest, in honor of the teamshead coach. Padded shirts, shoulder pads and little skits at the plate made for some great entertainment. It was Amanda Grimaldos cunning performance that would award her the crown. The fun and games were left for the pre-game, however. Lady Streak pitcher Haley Pack and the Sebring defense would start the game on a strong note with three batters and three straight outs. The girlsusually late bats were woken up early on the night, as they ended the first inning with a comfortable 2-0 lead over the Lady Bulldogs. Frostproof, however, would return fire and close the gap by adding their own run during the top of the second. Tensions were high from there on out, with a neckand-neck performance as Sebring battled hard to keep the lead. Atriple from Jayme Faircloth would increase this gap one last time in the Streaks favor. Ever since we lost Tayla Dasilva, weve been looking for a strong bat to take the leadoff spot, SPORTS B SECTION News-Sun Sunday, April 17, 2011 News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Green Dragon Colby Delaney blasted a three-run home run and threw six innings of one-hit ball in Fridays 6-0 win over Frostproof to lock up second place in the district standings. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comLAKE PLACID The Green Dragons closed out the district schedule in fine fashion, powering past Frostproof 6-0 Friday after mauling Mulberry 12-3 on Thursday, to lay claim to second place in the District 9-3Astandings. Fridays starting pitcher, Colby Delaney, was a model of efficiency, throwing just 71 pitches in his six innings of work needing just 22 pitches to work through the first three innings giving up just one hit and striking out six. Lake Placid then got on the board in the bottom of the second, with Dylan WeberCallahan doubling deep into the gap in left center, moving to third when Brandon Wells reached on an error and coming home on a Nathan Stanley single to left. After retiring the side on eight pitches in the top of the third, Delaney then helped his own cause with a thre erun blast over the scoreboa rd in left center, driving hom e Terry Coyne and Ky le Barber, who had both draw n walks to start the inning. Two outs later, Webe rCallahan hit one in near t he same direction as his doub le an inning earlier, but this o ne was a little more el evated with a litt le more oomph behind it, and cleared the fen ce for a solo home run to push the lead to 5 -0 for the Dragons. Delaney then tec hnically struck out the side in the fourth, though o ne Frostproof batter reached o n a dropped third strike, befo re Wells caught that runn er stealing to end the inning. Lake Placids defense th en flashed some fancy leather in the sixth to back u p Delaneys effort. With two on and one out in the sixth, a wicked line dri ve was sent toward Barber at Shutout secures second seed See DRAGONS, page 4 B News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Sebrings Shannon Williams signed to play basketball at Rollins College Tuesday. Joining her on the big day, back row, left to right, father Tealy Williams, Sebring Athletic Director T erry Quarles, Blue Streak head coach Mike Lee and Sebring Principal Toni Stivender. Front row, mother Angela Williams, Shannon and brother Terrell Williams. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING Ive been dreaming about this since my freshman year, Sebring senior Shannon Williams said this past week upon signing to attend and play basketball at Rollins College in Orlando. It feels great and Im excited to get the chance to play basketball in college. Astandout on the court, Williams averaged a doubledouble this past season, 14 points and 10 rebounds, despite being the focus of every defense Sebring faced. We asked her to do a lot this year, Lady Streak head coach Mike Lee said. She worked hard on every aspect of her game to help us improve as a team. And its that work ethic that has brought her to this point and will continue to help her grow and become a part of a very strong Tar team next season. Rollins started out the season strong and rose to as high as No. 14 in the Division II polls before injures slowed things down a bit. The team still finish ed with a 21-8 record und er head coach Glenn Wilkes, J r. Coach Wilkes seems to be an amazing guy, William s father Tealy said. Hes be en very focused in on keeping us informed and responding to all of Shannons question s. He knew early on it would be a good fit and she felt ve ry comfortable that this was t he right place to be. The fact that it is just an hour and a half away help s, giving her a chance to g et away, just not too far. What dreams may come See WILLIAMS, page 4 B By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK In the last h ome game of the season, the L ady Devils suffered a 12-0 l oss to Hardee on Friday n ight, but are still looking f orward. We really didnt play a b ad game. We just couldnt g et our bats going, said L ady Devil coach Krystle L awson. We had a great p ractice, and the girls were h itting everything earlier this w eek, but we just could not g et it going. To compound the problem, a ccording to Lawson, the L ady Devils are losing seven s eniors with just two players r eturning next year. Recruitment is going to t he key to next year. We have a lot of talent in Avon Park, w e just need to get them m otivated to get out here, s aid Lawson. The Devil defense came o ut strong, playing tight until t he sixth when Hardees bats s eemed to find every weak s pot on the field for six runs. We really did not play a b ad game until the end. We h ung in there, but could not s eem to get consistent hits, L awson said. The Devils only captured t hree hits and no walks off of H ardee hurler Karlee H enderson. The Lady Devils were not t otally discouraged by the l oss. We started the season w ith just seven players, and t he girls have struggled here o ver the last couple of years. T hey had to endure coaching c hanges every year, but I r ecently bought a house here a nd I am going to be here a w hile. I hope that brings a litt le stability to the program, L awson said. We have the talent here, b ut have not put it together y et, the game in Lake Placid s howed that. I am hoping that w e can put together a traveli ng team and work on techn ique before next season, L awson said. The Lady Devils travel to F rostproof for district play on M onday, facing Mulberry at 7 p.m. Lady Devils look forward We have the talent here, but have not put it together yet.KRYSTLELAWSON Lady Devil head coach News-Sun photo courtesy of KIM GAUGE R Alex Griffin fields this grounder for an out at first as a Haines City runner advances to second in the second inning of Fridays 10-8 win for Sebring. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSebring baseball bounced back from Thursdays disappointing loss at Lake Wales to hold off Haines City in a 10-8, comeback win Friday, giving the Streaks a shot at second in the district standings. But that was contingent upon the Highlanders handling Winter Haven Friday, and the Blue Devils gummed up the works with a 3-2 win, putting them in first, Lake Wales second and Sebrin g third in the final distri ct seeding. In Fridays game, a le tdown might have be en somewhat expected, b ut the Streaks came out h ot right out of the gate, sco ring three in the first with a two-run Corbin Hoffn er double and a Nate Gree ne RBI single. Hoffner was strong o n the mound despite givin g up a second-inning ru n and would complete h is day after three innings of Streaks settle for third seed Lake Placid6Frostproof0 See SEBRING, page 4 B News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Amanda Grimaldo and head coach Joe Sinness were all smiles Friday after Grimaldo won the First Annual Joe Sinness Look-Alike contest during Senior Night ceremonies. Lady Streaks all smiles on Senior Night See STREAKS, page 3B

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Dunning TributeAVON PARK On Monday, April 25, South Florida Community College will honor the memory of the first coach in school history, Coach Dunning Terrell. Coach Terrell coached basketball and baseball at what was then SFJC from 19661974, and continued to teach physical education until he retired in 1986. Coach Terrell started the mens basketball and baseball programs in 1966 even before SFJC had a gym on campus. Several of Coach Terrells former players still live in the Heartland area. SFCC Athletics will pay tribute to the family of Coach Terrell by recognizing his daughter Judy and their family at a short mound ceremony prior to the game against State College of Florida. State College of Florida head baseball coach Tim Hill will be in attendance as well, a former colleague of coach Terrell from his days at SFJC. SFCC would like to invite all former players of Coach Terrell, colleagues, as well as family and friends to come out this night to be a part of this tribute. Game time is 6 p.m. and the ceremony will start at 5:45.SYFS BBQ and registrationSEBRING Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is hosting our 2nd Annual BBQ Fundraiser and Tournament on Saturday, April 30 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The BBQ Lunch is $7 and will include a Pulled Pork Sandwich, Baked Beans, Coleslaw, Cookies and a glass of tea. Pick up your meal to go or stay and watch our girls play while you eat. For further information, please email dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201. Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is also conducting registrations for girls ages 10 to 15 now through April 1. Registration is $65 for the first child / $45 for any siblings. For further information, please visit us on Facebook, check out our website at www.eteamz.com/sebringyouthfastpitchsoftball, email us at dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201.Golf for God TournamentSEBRING The Golf for God Tournament will kick off with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start on Saturday, May 7 at Golf Hammock Golf and Country Club. It will be a 2-Person scramble at $65 a person, which includes golf, cart, a $25 dry cleaning certificate, a golf certificate for two rounds of golf and a ball for the ball-drop. You can purchase additional balls for the ball-drop which will take place by helicopter at 1 p.m. over the driving range. It will be a 50/50 cash prize, up to $500. Mulligans will also be available. First, second and third-place winners will receive additional balls for the balldrop. This is a fundraiser for Kayla Griffin who will be on a missionary journey to 11 countries over an 11 month period, spreading the Word of God to the people of these lands. Call the course at 382-2151 to have a registration form faxed to you or pick one up at a near-by course. YMCA Sign-UpsSEBRING The Highlands County YMCAand Eagles Football is doing sign-ups for Youth Flag Football ages 5 14. Healthy Kids Day is Saturday, April 1 6 from 9am to 1pm. Lifeguard Certification Class sign-up s are taking place now for an April 25-30 class.APProject GraduationAVONPARK The APHSProject Graduation 2011 Benefit Golf Tournament will be held Saturday, May 21 at 8:30 a.m. at River Greens Golf Course. The flighted, four-person scramble costs $60 per person and includes green s fee, cart, lunch and prizes. In addition to the action, there will be mulligans, a 50/50 and raffles for purchase the day of the tournament. The grand prize raffle is for a round o f golf for two at Doral Golf Resort and Spa. Tee sign sponsorships are going for $50, for a sign and player, it is $100. For more information, contact Suzie Gentry at 446-7368.SFCC Summer Youth CampsAVONPARK South Florida Panthe r Baseball will be holding Summer Youth Camps from June 13-16 and June 20-23 for children aged 6-13. Each camp runs from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and costs $80 per camp or $150 fo r both. Registration and sign-in begin at 8 a.m. with the camp to follow, including baseball fundamentals, position instruction, station rotation, games, swimming pool time and a camp T-shirt. SFCC head coach Rick Hitt will serv e as camp director with Panther assistant coach Andy Polk and members of the Panther baseball team will be on hand a s instructors. Campers should bring their individua l baseball attire as well as a bathing suit and towel. The camps will be held at the SFCC Panther field at the Highlands County campus in Avon Park. For more information, call Coach Hit t at the following campus phone numbers at extension 7036: Avon Park/Sebring, 453-6661; Lake Placid, 465-5300; Arcadia, 494-7500; Wauchula, 773-2252.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING Wings of Faith Worship Center presents the First Annual Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one team of four golfers, one tee sign and tw o green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includ es one team of four golfers, one green sign; Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $10 0 includes one green sign. Individual player $60 includes gree n fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26). Team of Four Golfers $240 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after March 26). Make checks payable to: Wings of Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL 33871, or register online at wingsoffaithchristianworshipcenter.com. Proceeds to be donated to scholarship program for graduates attending Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center. For more information, call Jason Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhankerson@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at 381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com. FIRST ROUND (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEChicago vs. Indiana Saturday: Indiana at Chicago, late Monday: Indiana at Chicago, 9:30 p.m. Thursday: Chicago at Indiana, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 23: Chicago at Indiana, 2:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Indiana at Chicago, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Chicago at Indiana, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Indiana at Chicago, TBD Miami vs. Philadelphia Saturday: Philadelphia at Miami, late Monday: Philadelphia at Miami, 7 p.m. Thursday: Miami at Philadelphia, 8 p.m. Sunday, April 24: Miami at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 27: Philadelphia at Miami, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Miami at Philadelphia, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Philadelphia at Miami, TBD Boston vs. New York Sunday: N.Y. at Boston, 7 p.m. Tuesday: N.Y. at Boston, 7 p.m. Friday: Boston at N.Y., 7 p.m. Sunday, April 24: Boston at N.Y., 3 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: N.Y. at Boston, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Boston at N.Y., TBD x-Sunday, May 1: N.Y. at Boston, TBD Orlando vs. Atlanta Saturday: Atlanta at Orlando, late Tuesday: Atlanta at Orlando, 7:30 p.m. Friday: Orlando at Atlanta, 8 p.m. Sunday, April 24: Orlando at Atlanta, 7 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Atlanta at Orlando, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Orlando at Atlanta, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Atlanta at Orlando, TBDWESTERN CONFERENCESan Antonio vs. Memphis Sunday: Memphis at San Antonio, 1 p.m. Wednesday: Memphis at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Saturday, April 23: San Antonio at Memphis, 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 25: San Antonio at Memphis, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Memphis at San Antonio, TBD x-Friday, April 29: San Antonio at Memphis, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Memphis at San Antonio, TBD L.A. Lakers vs. New Orleans Sunday: New Orleans at L.A., 3:30 p.m. Wednesday: New Orleans at L.A., 10 p.m. Friday, April 22: L.A. at New Orleans, 9:30 p.m. Sunday, April 24: L.A. at New Orleans, 9:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: New Orleans at L.A., TBD x-Thursday, April 28: L.A. at New Orleans, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: New Orleans at L.A., TBD Dallas vs. Portland Saturday: Portland at Dallas, late Tuesday: Portland at Dallas, 9:30 p.m. Thursday: Dallas at Portland, 10 p.m. Saturday, April 23: Dallas at Portland, 5 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: Portland at Dallas, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Dallas at Portland, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Portland at Dallas, TBD Oklahoma City vs. Denver Sunday: Denver at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday: Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Saturday, April 23: Oklahoma City at Denver, 10 p.m. Monday, April 25: Oklahoma City at Denver, 10:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 27: Denver at Oklahoma City, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Oklahoma City at Denver, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Denver at Oklahoma City, TBD FIRST ROUND (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEWashington 2, New York Rangers 0 Wednesday: Washington 2, Rangers 1, OT Friday: Washington 2, Rangers 0 Sunday: Washington at Rangers, 3 p.m. Wednesday: Washington at Rangers, 7 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 3 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, TBD Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0 Thursday: Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0 Saturday: Buffalo at Philadelphia, late Monday: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 7 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 3 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Buffalo at Philadelphia, TBD Montreal 1, Boston 0 Thursday: Montreal 2, Boston 0 Saturday: Montreal at Boston, late Monday: Boston at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. Thursday: Boston at Montreal, 7 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Boston at Montreal, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Montreal at Boston TBD Pittsburgh 1, Tampa Bay 1 Wednesday: Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 0 Friday: Tampa Bay 5, Pittsburgh 1 Monday: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBD x-Monday, April 25: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBDWESTERN CONFERENCEVancouver 2, Chicago 0 Wednesday: Vancouver 2, Chicago 0 Friday: Vancouver 4, Chicago 3 Sunday: Vancouver at Chicago, 8 p.m. Tuesday: Vancouver at Chicago, 8 p.m. x-Thursday: Chicago at Vancouver, 10 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Vancouver at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Chicago at Vancouver, TBD San Jose 1, Los Angeles 0 Thursday: San Jose 3, L.A. 2, OT Saturday: L.A. at San Jose, late Tuesday: San Jose at L.A., 10:30 p.m. Thursday: San Jose at L.A., 10:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: L.A. at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: San Jose at L.A., TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: L.A. at San Jose, TBD Detroit 1, Phoenix 0 Wednesday: Detroit 4, Phoenix 2 Saturday: Phoenix at Detroit, late Monday: Detroit at Phoenix, 10 p.m. Wednesday: Detroit at Phoenix, 10 p.m. x-Friday: Phoenix at Detroit, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Detroit at Phoenix, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Phoenix at Detroit, TBD Nashville 1, Anaheim 1 Wednesday: Nashville 4, Anaheim 1 Friday: Anaheim 5, Nashville 3 Sunday: Anaheim at Nashville, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Anaheim at Nashville, 8 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Nashville at Anaheim, 10 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD x-Tuesday, April 26: Nashville at Anaheim, TBDAMERICANLEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB New York75.583 Toronto76.53812Baltimore66.5001 Tampa Bay58.385212Boston 210.1675 Central Division WLPctGB Cleveland94.692 Kansas City94.692 Chicago 76.5382 Detroit 77.500212Minnesota49.3085 West Division WLPctGB Texas103.769 Los Angeles85.6152 Oakland68.429412Seattle 410.286612___ Fridays Games Cleveland 8, Baltimore 2 Texas 5, N.Y. Yankees 3 Tampa Bay 5, Minnesota 2 Toronto 7, Boston 6 L.A. Angels 4, Chicago White Sox 3 Kansas City 6, Seattle 5 Detroit 8, Oakland 4, 10 innings Saturdays Games Baltimore at Cleveland, late Texas at N.Y. Yankees, late Seattle at Kansas City, late Toronto at Boston, late L.A. Angels at Chicago White Sox, late Minnesota at Tampa Bay, late Detroit at Oakland, late Sundays Games Baltimore at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 1:35 p.m. Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m. L.A. Angels at Chi White Sox, 2:10 p.m. Seattle at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m. Detroit at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Texas at N.Y. Yankees, 8:05 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB Philadelphia94.692 Florida85.6151 Washington67.4623 Atlanta58.3854 New York49.3085 Central Division WLPctGB Cincinnati85.615 Milwaukee76.5381 St. Louis77.500112Chicago 67.4622 Pittsburgh67.4622 Houston410.286412West Division WLPctGB Colorado112.846 San Francisco76.5384 San Diego67.4625 Los Angeles68.429512Arizona 57.417512___ Fridays Games Florida 4, Philadelphia 3 Washington 4, Milwaukee 3, 10 innings Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 1 N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, ppd., rain San Diego 4, Houston 2 Colorado 5, Chicago Cubs 0 San Francisco 5, Arizona 2 St. Louis 11, L.A. Dodgers 2 Saturdays Games Milwaukee at Washington, late Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, late N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, late, 1st game Florida at Philadelphia, late San Diego at Houston, late N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, late, 2nd game Chicago Cubs at Colorado, late San Francisco at Arizona, late St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, late Sundays Games Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m. Florida at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m. Milwaukee at Washington, 1:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m. San Diego at Houston, 2:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Colorado, 3:10 p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 4:10 p.m. St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid MONDAY: Softball at District Tournament,Frostproof,TBA TUESDAY: Baseball vs.Sebring,7 p.m.; Softball at District Tournament,Frostproof,TBA THURSDAY: Baseball vs.Clewiston,7 p.m.; Softball at District Tournament,Frostproof, TBA Sebring MONDAY: Softball at District Tournament,Lake Wales,vs.Winter Haven,7 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball at Lake Placid,7 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Softball at District Tournament,Lake Wales,vs.Lake Wales,7 p.m.,if necessary THURSDAY: Baseball vs.Pt.St.Lucie,7 p.m.; Track and Field at District Meet,Winter Haven,11 a.m. SFCC MONDAY: Baseball vs.Polk State College,6 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball at Hillsborough,3 p.m. FRIDAY: Baseball vs.Hillsborough,6 p.m. SATURDAY: Baseball at Hillsborough,1 p.m. Avon Park MONDAY: Baseball vs.Santa Fe Catholic,7 p.m.; Softball at District Tournament, Frostproof,TBA TUESDAY: Softball at District Tournament,Frostproof,TBA THURSDAY: Baseball at Hardee,7 p.m. A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n NASCAR Aarons 499. . . . . . . F F O O X X 5 5 p p . m m . ALMS LeMans at Long Beach . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 7 7 p p . m m . NHRA VisitMyrtleBeach Nationals . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2N N H H L L P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Washington at N.Y. Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CM M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Minnesota at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N N 1 1 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Toronto at Boston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T B B S S 3 3 p p . m m . Chicago Cubs at Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . W W G G N N 8 8 p p . m m . T exas at N.Y. Yankees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 6 6 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay . . . . . . S S U U N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 6 6 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay . . . . . . S S U U N NP P R R E E M M I I E E R R L L E E A A G G U U E E S S O O C C C C E E R R T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Newcastle U vs. Manchester United . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2Times, games, channels all subject to change C C O O L L L L E E G G E E S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . Oklahoma at Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NG G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Malaysian Open . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 1 1 p p . m m . PGA Outback Steakhouse Pro-Am . . . . . N N B B C C 1 1 p p . m m . PGA Valero Texas Open . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA Valero Texas Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 7 7 p p . m m . PGA Fresh Express Classic . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F FN N B B A A P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Memphis at San Antonio . . . . . . . . . . . . . A A B B C C 3 3 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . New Orleans at L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 7 7 p p . m m . N.Y. Knicks at Boston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Denver at Oklahoma City . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Philadelphia at Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Indiana at Chicago . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T TT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . N.Y. Knicks at Boston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Portland at Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T TB B O O W W L L I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . PBA Dick Weber Playoffs . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Championship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N LIVESPORTSONTV NBA Playoffs NHLPlayoffs Major League Baseball Page 2BNews-Sun Sunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.co m

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 3B This summer the South Florida Community Colle ge volleyball program has more camps to offer than ev er before. Listed below you will see opportunities for sand an d indoor camps. If there is a camp date that you could attend but t he age group is different than yours please call and speci al arrangements could be made. Individual private sessions for indoor and sand a re available year-round. Call/Email to schedule today! June 2011 Sand: 13th-16th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:3 010:30 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor: 13th16th (4 days) Monday-Thursda y, 11:30-1:30 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps June 13-16t h: $100 July 2011 Sand: 11th -14th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor: 11th-14th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 11:3 01:30 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps July 11-1 4: $100 July 2011 Indoor: 25th-28th (4 days) Monday-Thursday Morning Session (Grades 5-8) 9:30-11:30 a.m. $60 Afternoon Session (Grades 9-12) 2-4:30 p.m. $75 Contact Coach Crawford with any questions at kim.crawford@southflorida.edu, cell: 863-835-2377, or Office: 863-784-7037. Panther Volleyball Camps Special to the News-SunSEBRING The fourth annual Last Chance Ranch 10K/5K Run-Walk is set for Highlands Hammock State Park on Saturday, April 23 at 7:30 a.m. The run/walk benefits the Last Chance Education Foundation for the Venus, Florida institution. Race organizer Darrell Jensen may be reached at 441-3357 and Central Florida Striders president Chet Brojek at 385-4736 or cbrojek@comcast.net to sign up for the event. Entry fee is $25 and includes a dri-fit tee, awards in both events, and refres hments post race. Tee shirt sizes can only be guaranteed for pre-register ed entrants. Checks made payable t o: AMIKids-Last Chance Ran ch should be included with ent ry form. Last Chance Ranch 5/10K S inness said. I put Jayme in t here, and she did just that. I w as very impressed with her p erformance tonight. Their efforts kept them up f or most of the game, until o ne Bulldog slugger found t he left-center gap. Despite the diving effort of l eft fielder Kaitlyn Ostrander, t his hit would give F rostproof their first advant age of the night, bringing the score to 5-4. The Streaks would not be defeated just yet. The defense was holding strong, with numerous catches by center fielder Dino Lower and an exciting double-play by Amanda Grimaldo. Unfortunately, that was how the game ended as well and while the loss was upsetting, very few heads were held down. We hit the ball hard against a very good pitcher, explained Sinness. We had a few dropped balls defensively that hurt us, but overall had a great outing. Now all we have to do is adjust to a slower pitcher for Monday nights game. In this, he referenced the first round of districts, in which the girls will take on Winter Haven. Weve beaten them twice already, but we still need to come hard and shut them down early, agreed seniors Ostrander and Grimaldo. If we do that, we stand a good chance. Weve got a strong team and we can beat anyone that comes our way if we just set our minds to it. Sebring squares off with the Lady Blue Devils Monday at 7 p.m. in Lake Wales. Continued from 1B Streaks face Winter Haven in District Tourney opener Special to the News-SunAVON PARK SFCC A thleticswill host a Two D ay Fun Sport Selection c amp on Thursday and F riday, June 9 and 10 for g irls and boys aged 6-16. Each day the camp runs f rom 9 a.m.-3 p.m., with c ampers choosing their own sport, whether it is Beach Volleyball, Basketball, Baseball, Softball or Soccer. During the morning portion each day, campers will stretch, do plyometrics, agility drills, work on strength and flexibility, learn arm and body care and get introduced to the Fitness Center. Lunch is then provided with the campers then delving into the sport they chose and wrapping it up with activities in the SFCC pool. Registration and check-in from 8:15-8:55 a.m., and preregistration is not necessary as walk-ups are accepted. The rate for one day is $50 and $95 for both days. The camp will be aministered by SFCC head and assistant coaches, with help from SFCC student-athletes. For questions or more information, contact Camp Director and SFCC Athletic Director Rick Hitt at 784-7036. SFCC Panther Fun Camps Special to the News-SunSEBRING Aleague m eeting for Highlands C ounty softball teams has b een scheduled for T uesday, April 19, at 6:30 p .m. The meeting will be held a t the Highlands County S ports Complex off Sheriffs Tower Road. Leagues will begin playing again on Monday, May 9. Open registration for all adult softball players, men and women, is ongoing until April 26. The charge is $350 and a $15 sanction fee. If you are interested in playing organized softball, please sign up at the Highlands County Sports Complex. For more information, please contact Dan Jamison at the Highlands County Sports Complex (863) 4026755. County Softball Meeting Associated PressWASHINGTON Acongressional committee that investigated drugs in baseball says former All-Star pitcher Roger Clemens cannot look into its files for more material to use at his upcoming federal trial. The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee said there is no carve-out for criminal defendants like Clemens to look into its internal files. Clemens wants notes and research from the House committee to defend himself on charges that he lied about using performance-enhancing drugs when he testified before Congress. Afederal judge has sche duled an April 21 hearing o n whether Clemens can g et access to the material. Clemens cant see files for trial

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Page 4BNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.com Special to the News-SunSEBRING The H ighlands Youth Football a nd Cheer Organization ( HYF) will be having a Car W ash fundraiser at Advanced A uto Parts at the corner of U S 27 and the Sebring P arkway on Saturday, April 2 3, from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. All monies earned or d onated will be used to purc hase equipment and unif orms for the boys and girls. HYF is a new league to S ebring and is looking forw ard to providing a rewarding youth sports program to foster these boys and girls to develop sportsmanship, physical fitness and build their self esteem as well as provide them an opportunity to be part of a team. The team name is the Highlands Eagles and team colors are black, yellow and white. Come on down and get registered while your car is being washed. HYF will also be offering registration during our car wash for cheerleaders and football players. Any registered player that needs to turn in registration information or payment can come to the car wash to do so. Several of our coaches and board members will be there to meet or answer any questions you may have. Available for Ages 5 15 years old (8th Grade maximum). Registration fees are $75 each for Football and Cheer or $65 each if you are signing up multiple children, Limited spots are available for Mighty-Mite, Pee Wee and Junior Varsity Divisions Flag and Varsity players are needed. All divisions are open for Cheerleading Please come on down to support your youth football organization. For football, please call Tim Hooks at 414-2873, Cliff Howell at 253-7070 or Becky Grippo at 381-9760 for Cheerleading. Highlands Youth Football Car Wash third. He initially got his glove on it, but it was so hard hit, it instantly ricocheted into foul territory. So hard hit that by the time the ball was landing on the grass, the batter was barely out of the box. Keeping his wits about him, Barber retrieved the ball and, too late to force the runner coming to third, fired across for the out at first. Tyler Carr then finished the inning on a fine, charging pick-up of a slow chopper, scooping and firing side-arm on the run to retire the side. The Dragons then added on more in the sixth with Coyne singling to left to bring home Wells before Weber-Callahan came on in relief to close out the 6-0 win. Were still not quite as solid as we were heading into the Sebring game, head coach Dan Coomes said. But were getting closer. Were still a little banged up and Colby isnt 100-percent, but hes a bulldog and hell battle. This is big for us, to get the second seed, Coomes continued. That means we get the seventh seed, Mulberry, who weve handled pretty well both times we played them this year. That includes Thursdays 12-3 win which saw Pike Cloninger and Heath Harris combine for the win on the mound while Delaney and Rick Miller both went yard to pace the offense. The team closes out t he district schedule with an 8 -4 record and finishes up t he regular season this we ek with two home game s, Tuesday against Sebring an d Thursday against Clewisto n, before heading to the distri ct tournament the followin g week in Avon Park. Continued from 1B The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN I was looking at other schools in other states, but felt most comfortable at Rollins, Williams said. Its a great school and its not far away, so my family will get a chance to see me play. An aspect not lost on her mother. She has to get out on her own eventually, mother Angela said. It will be hard, but shes close enough and well be able to see her play every chance we get. And so now it comes down to putting the time in to be ready to play at the next level. The team is losing two post players to graduation, so theres a chance I could get some playing time, Williams said. Im working hard in the weight room to get stronger and am working on my moves around the basket. Dreams are what propel us forward, but it is the work put forth toward those dreams that allow them to be reached. This is something Shannon Williams knows as one dream has be en reached, with more to com e. Continued from 1B Dragons on the move News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHN E Lake Placid head coach Dan Coomes congratulates Dylan Weber-Callahan as he rounds third base after his solo home run in Fridays 6-0 win over Frostproof. Williams hard work pays off w ork to keep him fresh as the d istrict tournament looms. ASebring run was added i n the fourth with Hoffner g etting plunked and Steven D unn taking over as a court esy runner. An error and two wild p itches later, Dunn was in to m ake it a 4-1 lead. The Streaks then looked to h ave broken it open with t hree more in the fifth, but t he Hornets answered back w ith a four-spot in their half o f the frame to cut the lead to 7 -5. Sebring went down in o rder in the sixth and another t hree came across for Haines C ity to take an 8-7 lead headi ng into the Blue Streaks f inal at bat. But thats when Hoffner c ame through again, belting a nother two-run double as S ebring tallied three before G reene retired the side to s ecure the win. It was one of those games w here we had to battle back, a nd the kids were just a little t ired after the loss to Lake Wales, assistant coach Buck Rapp said. We did not pitch extremely well, but we got some hits when we needed them and Corbin came up with a big one in the seventh. The Lake Wales game, a 43 loss Thursday, was reminiscent of the 9-8 loss Sebring suffered to the Highlanders on March 11. In the one, Lake Wales got up big early, only to see the Streaks mount a furious rally that come up just short. Similarly, some spotty defense allowed the Highlanders to put up two runs in each of the first two innings, with only one being earned. Our defense gave up a few early that hurt a bit, ones that we usually get, Rapp said. The next thing you know, we are down 4-0. The comeback would start in the fourth, with a Johnny Knight double bringing a run in. Aground-out RBI was collected by Greene in the fifth and an error of a hard Matt Randall grounder brought Gunnar Westergom home in the sixth to cut the deficit to 4-3. But Florida signee Justin Shafer stranded two runners in the seventh to hang on for the win. (Shafer) pitched a really good game, Rapp said. They got out ahead of us and we just could not come back. We had the tying run on base in the last inning, but could not get it done. But bouncing back for the win Friday got things going back in a positive direction. We have a little momentum heading into districts, Rapp said. These guys have matured a lot since the spring, but that will be win or go home. I think we have an opportunity here. But before then, the Streaks travel to Lake Placid Tuesday and host Port Saint Lucie Thursday to close out the regular season before hosting the district tournament starting Monday, April 25. Continued from 1B News-Sun photo courtesy of KIM GAUGER J esse Baker sets to fire to first as part of a 6-2-3 double play in Thursdays 4-3 loss at Lake Wales. Sebring set for seasons final week News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE J amie Ross goes all out, diving for this grounder to the right side Thursday, but that, like the season itself for the Lady Panthers, was just out of reach as SFCCs season concluded with a sweep at the hands of Polk State College. Just beyond the grasp News-Sun file photo by DAN HOEHN E Shannon Williams averaged a double-double this past season and will be taking her talents to Rollins College in Orlando. Today in Baseball HistoryApril 17 1953 Mickey Mantle cleared the bleachers at Griffith Stadium with a 565-fo ot home run off Chuck Stobbs. The shot came in the fifth inning of a 7-3 win over t he Senators. 2008 Chipper Jones, Mark Teixeira and Brian McCann hit consecutive home ru ns in a span of 12 pitches in the fifth inning off Florida's Ricky Nolasco in Atlantas 8 -0 win.

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T he Community Calendar prov ides a brief listing of local c lubs and organizations who m eet on a regular basis. It is t he responsibility of the group t o update the News-Sunon a ny changes in this listing by c alling 385-6155, ext. 516; s end any changes by e-mail to e ditor@newssun.com;or mail t hem to News-SunCommunity C alendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, S ebring, FL33870. S UNDAY American Legion Post 25 L ake Placid has lounge hours f rom 1-9 p.m. Live music is f rom 5-8 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 o pen 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p .m. Members and guests o nly. Post is at 528 N. Pine S t., Sebring. Call 471-1448. Heartland Interfaith A lliance meets 1:30 p.m., first F riday, St. Frances of Assisi E piscopal Church, 43 Lake J une Road, Lake Placid. Call 4 65-0051. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2 661 lounge is open from 1-7 p .m. Card games start at 1:30 p .m. The lodge is open to m embers and their guests. C all 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has k araoke in the pavilion. H orseshoes played at 9:30 a .m. Food available at 4 p.m. O pen to members and qualif ied guests only. Loyal Order of Moose, H ighlands County Lodge No. 2 494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon P ark. Cards start at 4 p.m. M usic outside Tiki Hut at 3 p .m. Lodge phone number 4 52-0579. Overeaters Anonymous, m eets from 4-5 p.m. in second f loor conference roomNo. 3 at F lorida Hospital Heartland M edical Center, 4200 Sun N L ake Blvd., Sebring. Call 3827 731. No dues, fees or weighi ns. For details on the organiz ation, go to www.oa.org. Ridge Area Missionary S oldiers Avon Park P athfinder Club meets from 9 a .m. to noon every first and t hird Sunday at 58 E. Sixth S t., Avon Park. Call 471-2143. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 s erves lunch at 2 p.m. at the c lub, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. C all 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2 259 offers NASCAR racing in t he pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar o pen and kitchen open from 25 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S. 9 8, Sebring. Call 655-3920. Society for Creative A nachronism (Local C hapter: Shire of Stagridge) m eets at 2 p.m. first and third S unday at Brewsters Coffee H ouse on U.S. 27 in Sebring. C all 214-5522. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 3880 serves hamburgers f rom 4-5:30 p.m. and plays p oker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1 224 County Road 621 East, L ake Placid. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 4300 Karaoke is from 58 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE L akeview Drive, Sebring. Call 3 85-8902. MONDAY Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN W ITH ME family group meets a t 10:30 a.m. every Monday at t he Heartland Christian C hurch on Alt. 27 in Sebring. T he church is behind S outhgate Shopping Center w here Publix is. F or more information call 3855 714. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal C hurch, Lakeshore Drive, S ebring. Call 385-8807. Alcoholics Anonymous O ne Day At ATime group m eets for a closed discussion a t 9:30 a.m. Monday and F riday at Covenant P resbyterian Church, 4500 S un N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. C all 314-0891. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 6:30 p.m. at R osewood Center, 517 U.S. 2 7 South, Lake Placid. Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at S t. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. C all 202-0647. American Legion Placid P ost 25Lake Placid has s huffleboard at 1 p.m. Lounge h ours are 12-9 p.m. Call 4657 940. American Legion Post 74 o pen noon to 8 p.m. Happy h our from 4-6 p.m. Call 4711448. AmVets Post 21 plays darts at 7:30 p.m. for members and guests. Call 3850234. Avon Park Lakes Association has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m. The clubhouse is at 2714 Nautilus Drive in Avon Park. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. Call 385-8118. Corvette Cruisers meets at 6:30 p.m. first and third Monday at the Dairy Queen in front of The Home Depot, Sebring. Call Ed Robson at 655-2092. Florida Association Home and Community Education meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly on Mondays at The AgriCenter. The group of sewers and crafters make items for residents of adult congregate living facilities. Call Penny Bucher at 385-0949. Garden Club of Sebring meets noon, Sebring Civic Center. Call 385-2044 or 3822063 for details. Grand Prix Cloggers EZ Intermediate and Intermediate Clogging class are held at 9 a.m. every Monday at Reflections on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club meets from 7:30-9:30 p.m. the first and third Monday at Sebring Civic Center from December through April. There will be alternating mainstream and plus dancing with rounds. Casual dress or square dance attire is acceptable. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or e-mail him atsamdunn@samdunn.net.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September.Heartland Pops rehearses at 7 p.m. Mondays at Avon Park High School Band Room, 700 E. Main St., under the direction of Anthony Jones. Musicians of all ages are welcome. For information, call 314-8877. Highlands County Amateur Radio Club meets at 7:30 p.m. third Monday in conference room 3 at the Highlands County Agri-Civic Center, Sebring. Call Don Roberts at 402-0554 or Darrell Koranda at 471-0226. Highlands County Concert Band rehearses 7-9 p.m. every Monday at Sebring High School band room. All musicians are welcome. Vic Anderson, musical director. Call Bill Varner at 386-0855. Highlands County Sewing Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Highlands County AgriCivic Center in the 4-H laboratory, Sebring. Call 402-6540. Highlands Delta Chorale rehearses 7 p.m., Sebring Church of the Brethren, 700 S. Pine St., Sebring (September throughMay). No auditions are required to join and all ages are welcome. For details or to book a concert, call Cheryl Cometta at 699-2663. Highlands Sertoma Club meets noon, Takis Family Restaurant, Sebring. La Leche League, breastfeeding support for Highlands and southern Polk counties, meets at 7 p.m. every third Monday at the Florida Hospital Heartland conference rooms. Pregnant and nursing mothers and their babies are welcome. For more information, call 6556617 or 638-3954. Lake Placid American Legion Post 25 meets 8 p.m., Legion Hall. Lake Placid Art League will have classes in Drawing and Painting, conducted by Anne Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart will teach Fabric Painting at the center. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2 p.m. Sign up for darts is at 6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m. It is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m. Let It Begin With Me Alanon Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Monday at Heartland Christian Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South, Sebring. For details about Alanon, a self-help group for families and friends of alcoholics, call 385-5714. Loyal Order of Moose, Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Meetings held first and third Mondays at 8 p.m. Lodge phone number 452-0579. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Highlands County Branch meets 7 p.m. third Monday for a general meeting at Sebring Chamber of Commerce, 227 U.S. 27 North, Sebring. For information, call All Hinson at 3992243, Rev. Robert Walker at 414-6474 or Davette Thompson at (312) 543-5983.. National Association of Retired Veteran Railway Employees (NARVRE) meets at 11:30 a.m. third Monday fromOctober through May at Homers Smorgasbord in Sebring.All current and retired railroad employees and their spouses are invited to attend. Call Jerry at 441-4418. Rotary Club of Highlands County meets at 6:15 p.m. at Beef O Bradys, Sebring. Sebring Bridge Club has Bridge, ACBLDuplicate at the clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Mondays. For details or info on lessons, call 385-8118. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 has pizza and darts at 7:30 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has the lounge open from 127 p.m. Smoke-free environment. Call 471-3557. Sebring Historical Society open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Located in back side of Sebring Public Library building on Lake Jackson. For information, call 471-2522. Sebring Optimist Club meets at 6:15 p.m. first and third Mondays at Jims house. Call Jim Harrison at 381-9767 or Gabriel Read at 453-2859. Sebring Moose Club 2259 serves beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Women of the Moose meets at 7 p.m. third Monday for a business meeting, snacks and trivia pursuit. Call 655-3920. Sebring Women of the Moose has a business meeting at 7 p.m. at the lodge, 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Call 382-8782. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL632, Sebring meets at 3:30 p.m. at the fellowship hall at the First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, Sebring. Call Judy OBoyle at 260-0831. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 meets 7 p.m. third Monday, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring.TUESDAY Al-Anon Family Groups meet for discussion and Twelve Step study at noon, Union Congregational Church, 105 N. Forest Ave., Avon Park. Parking available south of old church. All Sebring Model Railroad Club meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Church of Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkway, unless otherwise directed. Members build and run an HO Guage model railroad layout. Railbuffs interested in other model railroad gauges are welcomed. For information, or updates on meeting locations, call Gene Archer, 452-0334, or Curtis Petersen, 382-6967. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard and euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Boy Scout Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30 p.m. in the Scout Lodge, 202 Robert Britt St., AvonPark. Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to join. Call 452-2385. Avon Park Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Avon Park Lions Club meets 6:45 p.m., in the Lions Club, 1218 W. Bell St. Brown Bag Book Bunch book readers group meets at noon on the third Tuesday of the month at Emmanuel United Church of Christ, 3115 Hope St., Sebring. Read the selected book, bring your bag lunch, and join in the lively and interesting discussions. Call 471-1999. Busy Bee Craft Club meets 9-11 a.m., Fairway Pines, Sun N Lakes Boulevard, Sebring. Everyone is welcome. Call 382-8431. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday night at The Rock, Union Congregational Church, 28 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park. Abarbecue meal is served at 6 p.m. for a donation. At 6:45 p.m., members meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group breaks up into small groups for men and women. The program is designed for drug and alcohol addiction, divorce, death or illness grief, low or lost self-esteem or identity due to dysfunctional relationships, depression/anxiety, or any other need for healing. Call Celebrate Recovery coordinator Pam Sim at 453-3345, ext. 106. Fletcher Music Club meets every Thursday and Tuesday at Fletcher Music Center in Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. Call 385-3288. Friends of Highlands Hammock meets at 6:30 p.m. third Tuesday, Highlands Hammock State Park, Sebring. Call 386-6099. Heartland Avian Society meets every fourth Tuesday, 7:30 p.m., at Huntington National Bank, 126 Center Ave., Sebring. Call 465-9358. Heartland Dolittle Miniature Build meets 7 p.m., third Tuesday, St. Johns Methodist Church social hall, 3214 Grand Prix Drive, Sebring. Call 3823553. Heartland Harmonizers Barbershop Chorus meets from 7-9:30 p.m. in the Sebring High School Music Room, Sebring. All men who enjoy singing are invited. Reading music is not required. Call 471-2294 or 386-5098. Heartland Symphony Orchestra rehearsals from 5:30-7 p.m. Tuesdays in the Green Room in the South Florida Community College auditorium building. Bring music and instruments. New members welcome. Call conductor Bryan Johnson at 800949-7248, ext. 7231. Highlands County Community Orchestra rehearses each Tuesday in the Green Room of the South Florida Community College Performing Arts Theater, 5:307:30 p.m. Entrance is at the rear of the building. String players especially needed. Strings call Eugene Longo at 699-1975; winds call Kim Houser at 453-6049 for more information. Highlands County Quilt Guild meets on the first and third Tuesday of each month at the Women's Club of Sebring, 4260 Lakeview Drive, across from Veterans' Beach, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For information, call 471-0694 or e-mail sbringquilter@embarqmail.com Highlands Tea Party has an educational and informational meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Quality Inn, 6525 U.S. 27 in Sebring. Call 699-0743. Highlands County Veterans Council meets 7 p.m., third Tuesday in the conference room at the Veterans Services Office. The meeting is for the appointed delegate from each veteran organization in the county to meet to discuss current issues regarding veterans and veterans activities. Hope Hospice grief support group meets at 11 a.m. at 319 W. Center Ave., Sebring; and 4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle ALF, across U.S. 27 from Florida Hospital Lake Placid. Call 382-0312. Lake HavenHomeowners Association meets the third Tuesday of the month, 5400 N. Lake Huckleberry Drive, Sebring. Covered dish dinner is at 6:30 p.m. and meeting is at 7:30 p.m. Call 382-4858. Lake Placid Art League has classes in Parchment Embossing from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant. For information, call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Happy hour is from 2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Call 465-2661. Lake Placid Grief Support (Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, with Charlie Stroup. Refreshments served. Door prize given. Call 465-0568. Lake Placid Jaycees meet 7:30 p.m., first and third Tuesdays, Jaxsons. Board meetings at 6:30 p.m., second Tuesday. Call Joe Collins, 655-5545. Lake Placid Moose has an officers meeting at 7:30 p.m. the third Tuesday at the lodge. Lake Placid Toastmasters meet the first and third Tuesday at 6 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 101 S. Oak Ave. in Lake Placid. The web address is www.toastmasters.org. For information call Cathy Schreima at 382-3574 or Linda Udall at 386-6495. Lorida Community Club meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Lorida Community Center to plan events. Masonic Lodge meets 8 p.m., 106 N. Main St., Lake Placid. Nar-Anon Support Group for family members or friends of someone with a drug problem or addiction. Nar-Anon helps attain serenity and a more normal life for those affected by the addictions of loved ones, regardless of whether or not he/she has stopped using. 6 p.m. every Tuesday at First Baptist Chuch of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 W. Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup. c om. Call 382-7731. Visit www.oa.org for more informa tion on OA. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday and has blood pressure screening from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. first and third Tuesday at Placid Lakes Tow n Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd Call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Sebring (Noon) meets at noon at the Sebring Civic Center, near th e library in downtown Sebring. For information, call 385-382 9 or 471-9900. Sebring Bridge Club will have Duplicate Bridge games every Tuesday evening. If interested in playing Duplicat e Bridge, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 plays darts, beginning with sign in at 6 p.m. Games start at 6:30 p.m. No experience necessary. Cost is $2. Smoke free environment. Call 4713557. Sebring Lions Club meet s at noon at Dots Restaurant, 950 Sebring Square. For info rmation call 382-2333. Sebring Lodge 249 F&AM meets 7:30 p.m., 1809 Home Ave., Sebring. Sebring Meals on Wheels Inc. hosts board of directors meeting at 1:30 p.m. the third Tuesday each month at the Sebring Hills Association Clubhouse, 200 Lark Ave., Sebring. Call Jim Smith at 382-8453. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves soft shell tacos 57 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing.Euchre is played at 6:30 p.m. Call 6553920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. an d table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. Call 385-2966 or leave a name, number and message SertomaClub meets at 7 a.m. at Dees Restaurant, Sebring. Call Scott Albritton a t 402-1819. Souper Book Group meets the third Tuesday of each month at noon at Emmanuel United Church of Christ to discuss the monthly book selection and enjoy a soup, salad and dessert lunc h. All book lovers are welcome. The church is at 3115 Hope St., Sebring (1.8 miles west from corner of Highway 27 and Hammock Rd.) For info rmation about the book of the month and reservations, call the church office 471-1999 o r 452-2697. Take Off Pounds Sensibl y Chapter FL99 meets from 6 7 p.m. at the Atonement Lutheran Church, 1744 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Take Off Pounds Sensibl y Chapter FL618 has weigh in from 4-430 p.m. at Communi ty Bible Church, 1400 CR-17A N., AvonPark. Meeting is at 4:45 p.m. Call 452-1093. U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary meets 7 p.m., third Tuesday, Sebring Jaycees building. Call 471-0393 or 385-2459. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, plays darts 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. House Committee meets at 5:30 p.m www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 5B COMMUNITYCALENDAR

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Page 6BNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.com ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Special to the News-SunSelf-Therapy for the Stutterer is the classic self-help guide by t he founder of The Stuttering Foundatio n, Malcolm Fraser. It is written to an d for the many adults and teens wh o stutter. The 192-page book is availab le at most public libraries including t he Avon Park Public Library and t he Lake Placid Memorial Librar y, Florida. If you stutter, you do not need to surrender helplessly to your spee ch difficulty because you can change t he way you talk. You can learn to com municate with ease rather than wi th effort. There is no quick and easy w ay to tackle the problem, but with t he right approach, self-therapy can be effective. This book outlines a self-therap y program, which describes what t he person who stutters can do to wo rk towards better communication. It is often used as a supplement to spee ch therapy. Atimely feature on page 16 4 is information about King George V I and how inspirational his speech es were during World War II as depict ed in the new movie, The King s Speech. Writes Charles Van Riper, Ph.D ., about this book: There are alwa ys some who stutter who are unable to get professional help and others wh o do not seem to be able to profit fro m it. There are some who prefer to be their own therapist. In this boo k, Malcolm Fraser has provided gui dance for those who must help them selves. Knowing well from his ow n experience as a stutterer the difficu lties of self-therapy, he outlines a seri es of objectives and challenges th at should serve as a map for the perso n who is lost in the dismal swamp of stuttering and wants to find a w ay out. If your library doesnt have it, a sk them to contact the Stutterin g Foundation toll-free at 800-992-939 2. Self-Therapy for the Stutterer available at most libraries Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Highlands Art L eague opened a new and exciting e xhibit on April 8. The exhibit is t itled Five Fine Artists. The a rtists featured in this exhibit are a ll members of the Art League. E ach of these individuals has a l ong history of enthusiasm for crea ting art; some have worked as p rofessional artists while others h ave been art educators. The artists participating in this e xhibit include Tom Bruha, Mary B outeiller, Norma Evans, Agnes L aiosa and Ingrid Strope. Bruha is from LaCrosse, Wis. a nd spent many years as a comm ercial artist in advertising and p rinting. He now works out of his h ome studio creating enhanced d esigns with his computer. Bouteiller had the opportunity a s a young woman to travel to I taly where she fell in love with t he art and culture of the country. S he studied art for several years in N ew York after her travels abroad a nd has been an active artist t hroughout her life. She is a magn ificent portrait painter. Evans did not pursue a profess ion in art, however, she served at M ount St. Mary College in N ewburgh, N.Y. on the committee f or the Artist on the Campusart s how for 11 years. She has been s tudying pastel and watercolor painting for many years. Over those years her work has reached a high level of maturity and consequently she has received numerous awards, including Woman of the Year in 2002 from the Plantation Art Guild. Laiosa graduated with honors in Art Education from Hunter College. She has taught painting and sculpture at the Staten Island Museum of Art and the Sailor Snug Harbor on Staten Island. In Florida, Laiosa owned and operated Guys & Dolls Jeanson North Ridgewood Boulevard and taught at Sebring High School. In recent years she has been able to dedicate more of her time and talents to creating art and enjoys painting in all media. Strope spent her professional years in secondary education teaching science and mathematics. She learned to use a milk base medium called casein while in junior high school. To this day she continues to use this medium in combination with watercolor. They lend a special softnessto her work. Together these artists present an exhibit with range and significant talent. For the month of April their work will be on exhibit at the Yellow House Gallery on Lakeview Drive next to the Sebring Library. The gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Admission is free. Five Fine Artists exhibit at Highlands Art League Landscape paintings by Agnes Laiosa Works by Ingrid Strope in casein and watercolor Portraits in pastels by Norma Evans Portrait by Mary Bouteiller Prints by Tom Bruha

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 7B Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The South F lorida Community College M useum of Florida Art and C ulture (SFCC MOFAC) p resents its final exhibition o f the season, SFCC Juried S tudent Art Exhibit, now t hrough May 7 from 12:304 :30 p.m. in the lower lobby g allery of the SFCC Theatre f or the Performing Arts and i n SFCC MOFAC, Highlands C ampus. The exhibition showcases t he outstanding art created by S FCC art students in a juried a rt exhibition featuring painti ng, drawing, graphic design, a nd photography. Students n ot only created the art feat ured in the exhibition, they m atted, framed, and hung the work as well. It was a whole new experience working behind the scenes this time, SFCC art student Ivan Delgado said. It really feels like I am a part of the exhibit having been involved in the entire process. The exhibition was juried by Joey Sacco and curated by SFCC art instructor Cathy Futral and SFCC MOFAC curator Mollie Doctrow. The awards will be presented during a reception from noon to 2 p.m. Thursday in SFCC MOFAC. The exhibition is sponsored by the SFCC Foundation and Anne and Charles Reynolds. The current MOFAC exhibition, Celebrating the Lake Wales Ridge, will be held over through May 7. The group exhibition celebrates the Lake Wales Ridge through art and photography. Artists include Reed Bowman, David Price, John Moran, Diane Pierce, and Carlton Ward. SFCC MOFAC is open to the public from 12:30-4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, one hour prior to each Artist and Matinee Series performance and by appointment for group tours. For more information about the museum and its exhibitions and workshops or to request a museum tour, contact Mollie Doctrow, curator, MOFAC, at ext. 7240 at 4536661, 465-5300, 773-2252, or 494-7500. SFCC MOFAC presents Juried Student Art Exhibition Courtesy photo T he final exhibit of the season at South Florida Community College Museum of Florida Art and Culture will be a Juried Student Art Exhibit from now through May 7. ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Revolution, the band that goes beyond Beatlemania will perform at 7:30 p.m. Monday, May 9 in the South Florida Community College Theatre for the Performing Arts, Highlands Campus. Relive the music of one of the greatest rock nroll groups of all time. Travel back to the 1960s, where the show begins with a recreation of the famous 1964 Ed Sullivan television show introducing the Fab Four to America. Hear the songs that provided the soundtrack for an era such as Hey Jude, She Loves Me, I Want To Hold Your Hand, Penny Lane, That Thing You Do, Yesterday, Strawberry Fields Forever, Sgt. Pepper, Revolution, and many more. Revolution is the leading worldwide touring show that captures the Beatles with authentic instruments, costumes, a visual impact, sound and excitement that can only be described as incredible. Revolution takes on the personalities of the Beatles while wearing slick, collarless suits, Beatle boots, and mop-tops. They go beyond wigs and mere impersonations of most Beatle Acts; they capture the very essence of four young men whose music continues to win the hearts of millions. Portraying John Lennon is Tim Piper, who was selected by Hollywood casting directors to portray Lennon in the E! Channel Television production of the John Lennon Story. He brings authenticity, compassion, and power to the role of the late, great John Lennon, keeping the legend alive. Jim Neil portrays Paul McCartney. Fans are often impressed by his powerful, realistic vocal ability. His talent extends beyond the essentials of mere looks. He is a talented bass player, vocalist, and recording engineer who runs his own studio. Neil has performed in many original and tribute bands. His baby-faced charm, skill, and attention to musicianship make him a great choice for portraying McCartney. Greg Piper as George Harrison is an outstanding guitarist and has been a professional musician, singer and actor since the age of 11. He has toured the world since 1989 portraying the mystical Beatle. Completing this quartet is Mike Sarafian as Ringo Starr. He provides t he unique, yet undeniab le backbeat as the one and on ly Starr. He has been hailed as the best in the business in replicating Starrs drum ming style. Beatle drum mers and celebrities ali ke from around the world com e to him for tips and advice o n Starrs style of playing. The performance is a be nefit concert for the Avo n Park Breakfast Rotary an d SFCC Performing Arts. Tickets range from $25 to $35 and may be purchas ed online 24 hours a day, sev en days a week, at http://perform ances.southflorida.ed u. Tickets may also be pu rchased by calling the SFC C Box Office at 784-7178 or by visiting the SFCC Bo x Office in the front of t he Theatre for the Performin g Arts, 600 W. College Driv e, from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m Monday, Wednesday an d Thursday. SFCC performance of Revolution goes beyond Beatlemania Courtesy pho to Travel back to the 1960s with Revolution, the band that goes beyond Beatlemania. Revolution will perform Monday, May 9 in the South Florida Community College Theatre for the Performing Arts, Highlands Campus. By DAVID BAUDER APTelevision WriterNEWYORK ABC canc eled two of its three soap o peras on Thursday, consigni ng One Life to Live and All My Children and S usan Lucci, daytimes most f amous actress to televis ion history. The move leaves General H ospital as ABCs only dayt ime drama, one of only four t hat will remain on ABC, C BS and NBCs daytime s chedule. Soap operas have slowly b een fading as a TVforce, w ith many of the women who m ade up the target audience n ow in the work force. In p lace of the two canceled d ramas, ABC will air shows a bout food and lifestyle t ransformations. Brian Frons, head of ABCs daytime department, went to the California set of All My Children to deliver the news on Thursday, where a video link was also set up to the New York set of One Life to Live. He said the shows were doing well creatively, but falling ratings indicated they had a bleak future. If you have a show in severe decline, youre trying to catch a falling knife, Frons said. Daytime dramas have suffered recently as cable networks like TLC, Bravo and Oxygen aggressively seek viewers in those hours, he said. Soaps are popular with viewers from the post-World War II baby boom, but younger viewers are more interested in other programming, he said. Both canceled shows were created by Agnes Nixon, one of daytime TVs most famous creative forces, and modeled after fictional Philadelphiaarea towns. One Life to Live debuted on July 15, 1968, as a half-hour, expanding to an hour 10 years later. All My Children premiered on Jan. 5, 1970, expanding to an hour seven years later. They were both known for incorporating social issues into their stories, with Luccis character of Erica Kane the first regular TV character to undergo a legal abortion in 1973, said Carolyn Hinsey, author of Afternoon Delight: Why Soaps Still Matter, due to be published next month. ABC cancels 2 longtime soaps from daytime lineup

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Special to the News-SunAVON PARK High school students from Highlands and Hardee counties are invited to South Florida Community Colleges Summer Bridge Program, which will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday, June 20July 28, at the SFCC Highlands Campus. The Summer Bridge Program is open to 10thand 11th-graders who are interested in dual enrollment as well as new high school graduates. Applicants must have College Placement Test (CPT) scores that are slightly lower than the college admission requirement. Using the theme, Florida: AChanging Land, SFCC faculty teach classes that improve reading, writing, math, and student success skills, such as note-taking, active listening, and test-taking. Students will participate in team-building exercises, explore career opportunities, receive academic advising, attend Science Day and Fine Arts Day, and visit local attractions of educational interest. The Summer Bridge Program prepares students for college and helps them improve their academic performance and test scores while in high school. Students who successfully complete the program should be equipped to take dual enrollment or standard college courses. The program is free to qualified applicants. Lunch is provided, and transport ation is available fro m Hardee Senior High Schoo l. Applications are availab le from high school guidan ce counselors or by callin g Beth Andrews at 784-714 7 or Dr. Kimberly Batt yHerbert at 784-7329. The faculty and sta ff involved in the Summ er Bridge Program want to make a lasting impressio n on high school students an d to motivate them to succe ed and attend college, Batt yHerbert said. Breakfasts and lunches being served in the Highlands County School District for the upcoming week of April 18-21 (no school on Friday) include: HIGH SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast French toast sticks, sausage patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Penne pasta, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked french fries, orange glazed carrots, cheddar cheese stick, tossed salad, applesauce snacking cake, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias cheeseburger, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, cocoa clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Turkey enchiladas, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, grilled chicken sandwich, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, carrots and dip, great northern beans, diced pears, dried blueberries, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast frittata, breakfast pizza, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias cheeseburger pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, broccoli, potato wedges, Colby Jack cheese stick, salsa, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. ACADEMY SCHOOLS Monday Lunch Homestyle pork roast, dinner roll, mashed potatoes, brown gravy, green beans, apple crisp, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, scalloped potatoes, corn cobbettes, rosy applesauce, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Lunch Beefaroni, garlic breadstick, orange glazed carrots, tossed salad, cocoa clodhoppers, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Lunch Cheeseburger, dill stack, potato puffs, carrots and dip, fruited Jell-O, vanilla clodhoppers, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. MIDDLE SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast French toast sticks, sausage patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Penne pasta, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, orange glazed carrots, cheddar cheese stick, tossed salad, applesauce snacking cake, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, cocoa clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Breakfast pizza, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Turkey enchiladas, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, grilled chicken sandwich, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, carrots and dip, great northern beans, diced pears, dried blueberries, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast frittata, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Turkey and gravy, egg noodles, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, broccoli, potato wedges, Colby Jack cheese stick, salsa, apple crisp, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast French toast sticks, sausage patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Cinnamon Toast Crisp, string cheese, orange juice, chocolate milk. Lunch Homestyle pork roast, dinner roll, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, turkey chef salad, mashed potatoes, brown gravy, green beans, apple crisp, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Blueberry/sausage pancake, strawberry cup, chocolate milk, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, peach cup, chocolate milk. Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef meal, scalloped potatoes, corn cobbettes, rosy applesauce, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, peach cup, chocolate milk, blueberry/sausage pancake, strawberry cup, chocolate milk. Lunch Beefaroni, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, orange glazed carrots, tossed salad, cocoa clodhoppers, fresh apple slices, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast frittata, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Breakfast frittata, orange juice, chocolate milk, Whole Grain PopTarts, apple juice, chocolate milk. Lunch Cheeseburger, dill stack, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, potato puffs, carrots and dip, fruited Jell-O, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. KINDERGARTEN LEARNING CENTER Monday Lunch Homestyle pork roast, dinner roll, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, mashed potatoes, brown gravy, green beans, apple crisp, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, scalloped potatoes, corn cobbettes, rosy applesauce, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Lunch Beefaroni, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, orange glazed carrots, cocoa clodhoppers, fresh apple slices, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Lunch Cheeseburger, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, potato puffs, carrots and dip, fruited Jell-O, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Page 8BNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.com CHALKTALK School Menus Summer Bridge Program prepares students for college Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South Florida Community College student Christopher Jennings was recently named a Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team Gold Scholar. Jennings will receive a $1,500 stipend, a special medallion, and was listed along with all CocaCola Community College Academic Team Scholars in the April 11 issue of USA TODAY. The Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation sponsors the Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team program by recognizing 50 Gold, 50 Silver and 50 Bronze scholars, and providing nearly $187,500 in stipends annually. Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) is the international honor society of two year schools. PTK administers the CocaCola Community College Academic Team Program and recognizes Coca-Cola Community College scholars during All-State Community College Academic Team Recognition ceremonies held in 37 states. An independent panel of judges considers outstanding academic rigor, grade point average, academic and leadership awards, and engagement in college and community service in the selection process. Jennings was nominated for the PTK scholarship because of his service to his local community. The PTK scholarship process emph asizes a student endeavor , which is a project to bene fit the community initiated an d completed by the student , said Dr. Charotte Pressle r, SFCC Honors Progra m coordinator and philosoph y instructor. Through the Hono rs Program at SFCC, Chr is Jennings engaged in ser vice-learning projects su pporting biofuels resear ch and the Lake Wales Rid ge ecology. SFCC student named Gold Scholar Courtesy pho to Christopher Jennings was recently named a Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team Gold Scholar. He will receive a $1,500 stipend, a special medallion, and was listed with Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team Scholars in the April 11 issue of USA Today.

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Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South F lorida Community College s tudents were honored for a cademic excellence and c ommunity services during t he Colleges recent annual A wards Day ceremony in the S FCC University Center A uditorium, Highlands C ampus. Each year, faculty h onor students who exhibit t alent and exemplary qualities t hat go beyond academic stand ards. Students, in turn, pay h omage to outstanding facult y. Ricki Albritton was hono red with the Joseph E. J ohnston/Bette L. M cDearman Student Services A ward for outstanding acad emic achievement and i nvolvement in student related a ctivities on campus, outs tanding leadership ability b oth on and off campus, and h er contribution to fellow stud ents and the college. During her time at SFCC, A lbritton has played on the P anther Volleyball team, is a m ember of Phi Theta Kappa ( PTK) honor society, and s erves on the Student G overnment Association ( SGA). She also spends much o f her time volunteering with h er church as a youth leader b y helping middle and high s chool students with relations hip building and teaching v olleyball. She is a camp c ounselor during the summer a t Lake Denton and works as a disk jockey on Friday nights f or WWOJ. I enjoy being with and h elping people, Albritton s aid. I really dont think of anyt hing I do as being special, so i t was humbling to receive t his award. Its also very e ncouraging. It makes me w ant to work harder and help e ven more. Albritton graduates in May a nd will attend the University o f Florida. She plans to study t elecommunications. Students who received spec ial honors for participation in t he following academic prog rams are: Duhee Hwang, English For Speakers of Other Languages; Maria Velasquez Del Pilar, English For Speakers of Other Languages; Lourvina Grace Ramos, Humanities Survey II; Allen McPherson, Drawing II, Painting II and Watercolor I; Bailey Gornto, Honors Abnormal Psychology; Katherine Whitacre, Honors Abnormal Psychology; Charika Hodo, Human Development; Marcus Manderino, General Psychology Avon Park Campus 2 way; Benjamin Stupka, General Psychology Lake Placid Center 2 way; Michele Kerth, General Psychology Desoto Center 2 way; Vanette See, General Psychology Hardee Center 2 way; Efren Campos, Abnormal Psychology Hardee Center; Nathan Schwan, General Psychology Desoto Center; Tammy Hunt, General Psychology Hardee Center; Luis Rodriguez, General Psychology Hardee Center; Closere Damis, Ryan Duffy, Scott Earley, Justin Finch, Damara Hutchins, Ethan Johnson, Andria Mass, Alex Nichols, Grant Roberts, Sergio Vigil, Keiaria Williams, GeorgeWolfe IV and Robert Wright, 2010 2011 Brain Bowl Team; Terica Clark, Freshman English I; Christie Davis, John Vincent III, Josh Ball, Kyle Halvorsen, Laura Salisbury and Shane Donglasen, Service Learning Program; Kevin Wilson, Introduction to Philosophy; Amanda Girofalo, Honors Introduction to Philosophy; Christopher Jennings, Honors Program Service Learning; Josean Cruz, Freshman English I; Ramond Hancok, Computer Science; Zachary Thomas, Humanities Survey I; Tracy Small, Freshman English I; Matthew Broxson, General Biology; Larry Rios, American National Government Fall 2010; Natalia R. Terreros and Samantha A. Cochran, General Chemistry; William C. Yelvington, Organic Chemistry; Allison N. Smith, General Biology; John Adams and Carolyn Cwalinski, Freshman English II; Nicole Harkins and William Lamar Jahna, Academic Foundations Writing; Christina Pace and Ariel Bowers, Developmental Reading II; Brittney Davis, Developmental Reading I; Samantha Cochran, General Physics W/Calculus I & II; Trenton Haralson, Descriptive Astronomy; Mary Rose Heston, Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 & 2; Suzannah Beiner, Fundamentals of Speech Communication; Gabriel Lambert, General Psychology; Hyla Thompson, Human Development; Kristina Turner, Education Award; Travis McPherson, Academic Foundations Writing; Nolan Jahna, American National Government Fall 2010; Trenton Haralson and Shane Donglason, Honors Seminar III: The Democratization of Information; Mathew Jordon, Honors Comparative Politics; Shane Donglasan, American National Government Online; and Suzannah Beiner, American State and Local Government Online. SFCC students chose Brian Deery as the 2011 Full-time Faculty of the Year and Jim Houseknecht as Adjunct Faculty of the Year for the Division of Arts and Sciences. Joel Boydston was chosen as Full-time Faculty of the Year and Christopher Woods as Adjunct Faculty of the Year for Applied Sciences and Technologies. Linda Tagesson was chosen as Full-time Faculty of the Year and Ashley Rivera was chosen as Adjunct Faculty of the Year for Adult and Community Education. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 9B CHALKTALK Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The Career Academy at South Florida Community College invites high school students and their parents to information sessions at 6 p.m. Tuesday, May 3, and Thursday, May 5, in Building G, Room 101, at SFCC Highlands Campus. Representatives from The Career Academy and SFCC will explain Career Academy programs, the benefits of enrollment, and eligibility requirements for the 2011-12 school year. Acooperative effort of The School Board of Highlands County and SFCC, The Career Academy allows 10th-, 11th-, and 12th-graders to complete high school classes and college-level technical training entirely at the Highlands Campus. Career Academy students can ea rn occupational certificates in numerous technical pr ograms and can be prepar ed to enter the workforce b y the time they graduate fro m high school. The cost of colle ge tuition and books is deferred for Care er Academy students. Eligib le students may participate in extracurricular activiti es and commencement cer emonies at their local hig h school, while enjoying a ll of the activities, facilitie s, and privileges offered to SFCC students. For information an d applications, call T he Career Academy at SFCC at 784-7209, talk to your hig h school guidance counselo r, or visit the Web si te www.southflorida.edu/ca re eracademy. Career Academy hosting information sessions in May SFCC students and instructors recognized on Awards Day Courtesy photo SFCC student Ricki Albritton (left) is presented the Joseph E. Johnston/Bette L. McDearman Student Services Award by Annie Alexander-Harvey, dean, student services. Albritton received the award for her outstanding academic achievement and involvement in student related activities on campus, outstanding leadership ability both on and off campus, and her contribution to fellow students and the college. Courtesy photo Trenton Haralson and Shane Donglason received awards for their success in a variety of classes as well as their participation in the Student Government Association during SFCC Awards Day ceremony. Courtesy photo Students chose psychology professor Dr. Brian Deery as the Full-time Faculty of the Year for the Division of Arts and Sciences. Follow the News-Sun online on www.twitter.com/thenewssun

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Page 10BNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. childrens choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. childrens mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and womens prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Friday 5-7 p.m., every Saturday 9-11 a.m. and 3-3:45 p.m., first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life! Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church.Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP Publishers Weekly best-sellersHARDCOVER FICTION 1. The Fifth Witness by Michael Connelly (Little, Brown) 2. The Land of Painted Caves: A Novel by Jean M. Auel (Crown) 3. Ill Walk Alone by Mary Higgins Clark (Simon & Schuster) 4. Charles Street by Danielle Steel (Delacorte) 5. Lover Unleashed by J.R. Ward (NAL) 6. Miles to Go by Richard Paul Evans (Simon & Schuster) 7. Toys by James Patterson and Neil McMahon (Little, Brown) 8. Live Wire by Harlan Coben (Dutton) 9. Crunch Time by Diane Mott Davidson (William Morrow) 10. Sing You Home: A Novel by Jodi Picoult (Atria) 11. Mystery: An Alex Deleware Novel by Jonathan Kellerman (Ballantine) 12. The Secret Life of Damian Spinelli by Carolyn Hennesy (Hyperion) 13. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets Nest by Stieg Larsson (Knopf) 14. She Walks in Beauty by Caroline Kennedy (Voice) 15. The Saturday Big Tent Wedding Party by Alexander McCall Smith (Pantheon) HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. Bossypants by Tina Fey (Reagan Arthur) 2. The 17 Day Diet: A Doctors Plan Design for Rapid Results by Dr. Mike Moreno (Free Press) 3. Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand (Random House) 4. Documents the Government Doesnt Want You to Read by Jesse Ventura with Dick Russell (Skyhorse) 5. Malcolm X by Manning Marable (Viking) 6. Love Wins: A Book About Heaven, Hell, and the Fate of Every Person Who Ever Lived by Rob Bell (HarperOne) 7. All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir by Ashley Judd, with Maryanne Vollers (Ballantine) 8. The Healthy Home by Myron Wentz, Dave Wentz (Vanguard Press) 9. The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement by David Brooks (Random House) 10. Unlimited by Jillian Michaels (Crown) 11. Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life Without Losing Its Soul by Howard Schultz and Joanne Gordon (Rodale Press) 12. Red: My Uncensored Life in Rock by Sammy Hagar (It Books) 13. Evas Kitchen by Eva Longoria (Clarkson Potter) 14. Moonwalking with Eintstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer (The Penguin Press) 15. The Bond by Wayne Pacelle (Morrow) MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS 1. Water for Elephants: A Novel by Sara Gruen (Algonquin) 2. Navarros Promise by Lora Leigh (Berkley) 3. The Shadow of Your Smile by Mary Higgins Clark (Pocket) 4. Indulgence in Death by J.D. Robb (Berkley) 5. Caught by Harlan Coben (Signet) 6. Dead in the Family by Charlaine Harris (Ace) 7. Home Free by Fern Michaels (Zebra) 8. The Lincoln Lawyer by Michael Connelly (Grand Central Publishing) 9. Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 10. The Darkest Secret by Gena Showalter (HQN) 11. Fever Dream by Lincoln Child & Douglas Preston (Mira) 12. Driftwood Cottage by Sherryl Woods (Mira) 13. Santa Fe Edge by Stuart Woods (Signet) 14. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson (Vintage) 15. Taken by the Prince by Christina Dodd (Signet) TRADE PAPERBACKS 1. Heaven is for Real: A Little Boys Astounding Story of His Trip to Heaven and Back by Todd Burpo, Sonja Burpo, Colton Burpo and Lynn Vincent (Thomas Nelson) 2. The Help by Kathryn Stockett (Putnam Adult) 3. Water for Elephants: A Novel by Sara Gruen (Algonquin) 4. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot (Broadway) 5. Cutting for Stone by Abraham V erghese (Vintage) 6. Inside of a Dog by Alexandra Horowitz (Scribner) 7. The Judgment by Beverly Lewis (Bethany House) 8. The Art of Racing in the Rain: A Novel by Garth Stein (Harper) 9. The Postmistress by Sarah Blake (Berkley) 10. Just Kids by Patti Smith (Ecco) 11. Have a Little Faith: A True Story by Mitch Albom (Hyperion) 12. Spoken from the Heart by Barbara Bush (Scribner) 13. Drive by Daniel H. Pink (Riverhead) 14. Heart of the Matter by Emily Giffin (St. Martins Griffin) 15. Every Last One by Anna Quindlen (Random House)Wall Street Journal best-sellersFICTION 1. City of Fallen Angels by Cassandra Clare (Margaret K. McElderry) 2. The Fifth Witness by Michael Connelly (Little, Brown) 3. The Land of Painted Caves: A Novel by Jean M. Auel (Crown) 4. Ill Walk Alone by Mary Higgins Clark (Simon & Schuster) 5. Charles Street by Danielle Steel (Delacorte) 6. The 39 Clues: Vespers Rising by Peter Lerangis, Jude Watson, Gordon Korman, Rick Riordan (Scholastic Press) 7. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Ugly Truth by Jeff Kinney (Abrams) 8. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules by Jeff Kinney (Amulet) 9. Toys by James Patterson and Neil McMahon (Little, Brown) 10. Miles to Go by richard Paul Evans (Simon & Schuster) NONFICTION 1. The 17 Day Diet: A Doctors Plan Design for Rapid Results by Dr. Mike Moreno (Free Press) 2. Bossypants by Tina Fey (Reagan Arthur) 3. Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand (Random House) 4. The Healthy Home by Myron Wentz, Dave Wentz (Vanguard Press) 5. Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life Without Losing Its Soul by Howard Schultz and Joanne Gordon (Rodale Press) 6. All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir by Ashley Judd, with Maryanne Vollers (Ballantine) 7. Malcolm X by Manning Marable (Viking) 8. StrengthsFinder 2.0 by Tom Rath (Gallup Press) 9. Documents the Government Doesnt Want You to Read by Jesse Ventura with Dick Russell (Skyhorse) 10. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Do-ItYourself Book by Jeff Kinney (Abrams) BOOKS

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 11B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer.Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howes Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer Kid C ity Childrens Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, prime-timers, and Bible s tudies in Spanish. Kid City Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Childrens Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturers Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m. in the sanctuary. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Childrens Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on lifes journey, youre we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP The Highlands Soil and W ater Conservation District ( HSWCD) wants to give you a n April shower and save w ater at the same time. The District is the recipie nt of a Community E ducation Grant from the S outhwest Florida Water M anagement District. The a warded funds have been u sed to purchase low-flow s hower heads to give away t o those who wish to help in t he battle to conserve our p recious water. Here is your c hance to help the environm ent and save yourself lots o f money on water and elect ric bills. All you have to do is c ome by the H SWCD/Natural Resources D epartment office located in t he Bert J. Harris Agriculture C enter at 4505 George Blvd. i n Sebring on April 21 b etween the hours of 9 a.m. a nd 3 p.m. with your old s howerhead. Well happily e xchange your old guzzler for a brand new, shiny, water efficient showerhead! There is no cost to you. It is HSWCDs goal to educate people and promote water resources protection. What better way to celebrate Earth Day than by saving one of our most precious resources? According to Don Vandervorts Home Tips on Saving Water, Three billion gallons of water flow through showerheads every day in this country half of it unnecessarily. Most showerheads use twice the water needed for a thorough, enjoyable shower. This drain on one of our most precious resources, clean water, exacts an unnecessary toll on both the environment and your pocketbook. To get clean water, we tap lakes, build dams and reservoirs and construct processing plants. By using more than we need, we overload sewer and septic systems and leach fields. Both the water itself and the energy needed to heat it cost you money. But you can do something about it! There are many ways to conserve water whether you are a landowner or a homeowner. The April Showers Program allows you to convert your old water guzzling shower head into a new low-flow efficient one. It will only take a small amount of your time to install and in addition to saving water, it will save you money. You can save as much as $50-75 per year on water bills and as much as $20-50 on your energy bill. And the best part is that you dont even have to pay for the shower head! You cant lose. Your shower uses about 22 percent of the total water used in your home. Alarge portion of that water goes through your hot water heater, which, in turn, makes your electric bill higher. Generally, an old standard shower head with a five minute shower would use approximately 30 gallons of water. With these low-flow devices you can cut your shower water use by twothirds. And if you go a step further and keep your shower under five minutes, youll save even more water. New low-flow shower heads deliver about two and a half gallons of water per minute; older fixtures can deliver as high as eight gallons per minute. You may be concerned that the new low-flow device wont give you the water pressure you are accustomed to. Not so, these new designs are engineered so that the water is sent through special orifices that control drop size, focus the stream and mix in air, which creates turbulence and a pulsating action. So you really shouldnt notice much difference. Installation is simple and the shower head is free so what are you waiting for? You can be conserving water in no time while still enjoying a soothing shower! Be a part of the solution, no t part of the problem in conserving water. And remember, every drop counts. For additional informatio n please call our office at 863 402-6545. Corine Burgess is the Natural Resources Specialist for the Highlands County Natural Resources Department assisting the Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District (www.highlandsswcd.org). Have an April shower for Earth Day and receive your free low-flow showerhead Courtesy pho to Receive your free low-flow showerhead by bringing in your old one to exchange at the Highlands Soil and Water Conservation District on April 21 between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. while supplies last. News From The Watershed Corine Burgess

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B y CAIN BURDEAU and S ETH BORENSTEIN A ssociated PressBAYJIMMY, La. S cientists judge the overall h ealth of the Gulf of Mexico a s nearly back to normal one y ear after the BPoil spill, but w ith glaring blemishes that r estrain their optimism about n atures resiliency, an A ssociated Press survey of r esearchers shows. More than three dozen scie ntists grade the Gulfs big p icture health a 68 on avera ge, using a 1-to-100 scale. W hats remarkable is that t hats just a few points below t he 71 the same researchers g ave last summer when asked w hat grade they would give t he ecosystem before the s pill. And its an improvem ent from the 65 given back i n October. At the same time, scientists a re worried. They cite signific ant declines in key health i ndicators such as the sea f loor, dolphins and oysters. I n interviews, dozens of Gulf e xperts emphasized their conc erns, pointing to the myster ious deaths of hundreds of y oung dolphins and turtles, s trangely stained crabs and d ead patches on the sea floor. The survey results mirror i mpressions Jane Lubchenco, t he head of the National O ceanic and Atmospheric A dministration, gave on the h ealth of the Gulf in an interv iew with the APThursday. The Gulf is much better t han people feared, but the j ury is out about what the end r esult will be, she said. Its p remature to conclude that t hings are good ... There are s urprises coming up were f inding dead baby dolphins. Just as it was before the A pril 20 accident when the D eepwater Horizon oil rig e xploded, ultimately spewing 1 72 million gallons of oil, the G ulf continues to be a place o f contradictions: The surface l ooks as if nothing ever happ ened while potentially big p roblems are hidden deep b elow the surface, in hard-tog et-to marshes and in the s low-moving food web. S ome may not even be k nown for years. When considering the e ntire Gulf of Mexico, I think t he natural restoration of the G ulf is back to close to w here it was before the s pill, said Wes Tunnell at T exas A&M University, who w rote a scientific advisory r eport for the federal arbitrat or who is awarding money to r esidents and businesses b ecause of the oil spill. T unnells grades are typical. H e says the Gulfs overall h ealth before the spill was a 7 0; he gives it a 69 now. If that pre-spill grade isnt i mpressive, its because the G ulf has long been an envir onmental victim oil from d rilling and natural seepage, o verfishing, hurricanes and a h uge oxygen-depleted dead z one caused by absorbing 40 p ercent of Americas farm a nd urban runoff from the M ississippi River. Today, a dozen scientists g ive the Gulf as good a grade a s they did before the spill. O ne of those is Louisiana S tate University professor Ed O verton, a veteran of oil s pills. He described a recent t rip to Gulf Shores, Ala.: I w alked a half-mile down the b each and there wasnt a tar b all in sight. It was as pretty a s Ive ever seen it. In the survey, some categ ories, such as red snapper a nd king mackerel, even a verage out to higher grades t han before the spill, mostly b ecause months of partial f ishing bans have helped p opulations thrive. While that sounds good, t he average grades for the sea f loor plunged from 68 pres pill to a failing grade of 57 n ow. Dolphins initially s eemed to be OK, but as m ore carcasses than usual kept washing up almost 300 since the spill the grade fell to 66, compared to a pre-spill 75. Oysters, always under siege, dropped 10 points, crabs dropped 6 points. And the overall food web slid from 70 before the spill to 64 now. Everything may be fine in some places, but definitely not fine everywhere, said University of Georgia researcher Samantha Joye who found dead patches of oiled sea bottom in expeditions near the busted well where 11 men lost their lives. The oil isnt gone; its just not where we can see it. Joye said before the oil spill she would have given the sea floor an A grade of 90. Now she gives it a 30. Overall, Joye, who has been one of the more hands-on researchers exploring Gulf damage, said its health has plunged from an 80 before the spill to a 50 now, but she was the most pessimistic of the researchers. In five different expeditions, the last one in December, she and her colleagues took 250 cores of the sea floor and travelled 2,600 square miles. She says much of the invisible oil in the water and on the sea bottom has been chemically fingerprinted and traced to the BP spill. She also has pictures of oil-choked bottom-dwelling creatures like crabs and brittle stars starfish-like critters that are normally bright orange but now are pale and dead. This is hidden from view. Eugene Turner, an LSU wetlands scientist, has looked at marshes in Louisianas Barataria basin, and found oil buried in the mud and sand. You cant smell it. You cant see it. Its not this big black scum out there, but its there, Turner said. At this point, the oil is only obvious in a couple of places with Bay Jimmy the worst-hit. Today, a crust of oil still lines miles of the outer fringe of marsh in the bay, a remote spot deep visited by the occasional fisherman and oil worker. Still, its nothing compared to the black gunk stuck on beaches and marshes last summer or the multi-colored slicks so massive they could be tracked by satellite. Those images, along with the pictures of pelicans and seagulls with gobs of oil oozing down their beaks, are now history. Even though some coastal areas were hit hard, says NOAAs Lubchenco, the oil did not penetrate as far into the marshes as people feared. Despite the picture on the surface, Dana Wetzel at the Mote Marine Laboratory in Florida, adds: Anyone who says the Gulf is fine is being precipitous.... Its out-ofsight, out-of-mind, but in my humble opinion this is not over. While BPmoney has flowed for immediate cleanup and compensation, the bigger bill for environmental damage and federal penalties is still being calculated. The federal government is collecting data on that, but much is kept from outside scientists. Trying to quantify the scale of the injury to the Gulf ecosystem is absolutely the right question, said Robert Haddad, who heads the scientific process for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. One of the outcomes from the Exxon Valdez was that they tried to estimate the damage too quickly. The spill itself lasted nearly three months. Then there was the clean-up. Then federal officials pronounced the oil mostly but not completely gone, eaten by microbes, dispersed by chemicals or diluted. Lubchenco told reporters in February that its not a contradiction to say that although most of the oil is gone, there still remains oil out there. Now, only a year later scientists are starting to see signs and they are far from conclusive of possible long-term problems. Florida State University oceanographer Ian MacDonald warned his fellow scientists to be on the watch for deaths of big marine mammals. That was in October. Since January, 155 young or fetal dolphins and small whales have washed up on Gulf beaches more than four times the typical number according to NOAA. Anew study estimates that for every dead dolphin that washes ashore there are 50 dolphins that are never found. That suggests more than 7,500 dolphin deaths the first three months of this year alone. Blair Mase, NOAAs marine mammal stranding coordinator, says dolphin deaths began to rise in February 2010 before the BPspill. That slowed in November, but in January dolphins began dying at a much faster rate, higher than before the spill. Lubchenco said oil contamination could be the culprit: It is logical that maybe their moms were affected by the spill. Other culprits could be algae blooms, temperature changes or other environmental toxins. Fifteen of this years dead dolphins had oil on them, and NOAAchemically linked six of those to the BPwell. Its not just dolphins that are dying. NOAAreports in the first few months of this year, 141 endangered sea turtles were stranded a higher than normal number. On top of that, Monty Graham, a researcher at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab in Alabama, noticed fewer jellyfish last year. We are looking at how the food web could have shifted in general, Graham said. We think we have growing evidence that the system shifted and became starved for food for larger sea animals. At Tulane University, scientist Caroline Taylor is investigating strange orange droplets inside crab larvae. Her team has taken samples from thousands of crabs, but they have not begun to analyze the abnormalities. Jessica Henkel, a Tulane population ecologist, is spending long days rigging up nets to catch birds for fecal, blood and feather samples, looking for effects that arent immediately lethal. Its much easier to see a dead pelican on the beach than it is to see more chronic population-wide effects, she said. This sounds all too familiar to Craig Matkin, a marin e mammals biologist at the North Gulf Oceanic Society in Alaska. He studied what happened to whales in Princ e William Sound after the 198 9 Exxon Valdez spill. Some whales died immediately after being coated with oil, but then a year later scientis ts noticed lots of whale deaths 13 out of 35 of the main whale pod. Matkin said it was likely the whales died from oil ingested over months. Similarly, the herring fish ery in the region crashed, no t immediately, but over time. Theres a real tendency t o do this out-of-sight, out-ofmind thing until someone shows you that its not the truth, Matkin said. It does nt go away. There are going to be effects down the line. But John Harding, chief scientist at the Northern Gu lf Institute in Mississippi, said Were way better off than the Exxon Valdez. We had the oil-eating microbes. Larry McKinney, who heads a Gulf research center at Texas A&M University in Corpus Christi, has days when hes confident in the Gulfs resilience and days when hes pessimistic. Page 12BNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011www.newssun.com CROSSWORDSOLUTION Scientists: Gulf health nearly at pre-spill level MCTphoto Beaches in Pensacola have recovered from the oil spill a year ago.

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DearAbby: Amember of m y gym brings her newborn i n with her every morning. S he sets the carrier down n ext to her treadmill, puts in h er earplugs and runs. The b aby usually cries on and off, b ut today he cried nonstop d uring my entire 20-minute w orkout. It drove me crazy. Im a mom, too. Acrying b aby, especially a newborn, i s heartbreaking. This woman n ever stops to see why her l ittle one is crying or to cons ole him. This situation doesn t seem to bother the other g ym members. Should I talk t o her and risk a hostile r esponse, or speak to the gym m anager? Heavy-Hearted Gym Bunny in Riverview, Fla. DearGym Bunny: Talk to t he manager. The crying i nfant may not bother the o ther gym members, but it b others you. The woman isnt s topping her workout to see w hat may be wrong because w ith her earbuds in she cant h ear the child, which doesnt m ake her a candidate for mother of the year. Shes causing a distraction and an inconvenience to you, so speak up. DearAbby: I have been married to my high school sweetheart, Don, for 10 years. I love him dearly. We were very young when we married, and at the time he said he didnt want kids. I didnt give it much thought because back then we werent ready to start a family. Now, Don still doesnt want kids but I do. He says if children are that important to me, I should leave him and find someone who does want to be a parent. Of course, I dont want just any mans baby. I want his baby. Don has warned me that if I become pregnant, hell probably leave. Hes planning to have a vasectomy even though Im against it. I dont know what to do. This is the only problem we have. He wont agree to counseling Ive already suggested it. I cant picture myself starting over with another man or going my whole life without being a mother. Please help. Unfulilled in Louisville DearUnfulfilled: Your husband has given you fair warning. Your now have an important choice to make. Because having a child is so important to you, my advice is to start picturing yourself with another husband, and do it in enough time that you wont be racing against your biological clock. DearAbby: My partner has been diagnosed with Alzheimers. As time goes on, I know I will lose him more and more. How do I do this and allow him to keep his dignity? Life comes full circle, and I understand that. I keep trying to dwell in the present and not think too far ahead. I dont know where to turn. How do you start the long goodbye? Lost in Phoenix DearLost: The first thing you need to do is contact the Alzheimers Association. The Alzheimers Association can guide you on the journey ahead of you and provide a source of emotional support if you join one of its caregivers groups. The toll-free phone number is (800) 2723900 and the website is alz.org. You and your partner should also make certain NOWthat his wishes for endof-life care are clearly stated in writing, so that when the time comes, they will be respected. Then take each day as it comes, thank God for the good ones, have patience when they are less so, and take good care of yourself because that will be key to ensuring your partner gets the best care possible. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. What teens need to know about sex, drugs, AIDS and getting along with peers and parents is in What Every Teen Should Know. To order, send a business-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby Teen Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 610540447. (Postage is included in the price.) www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 17, 2011Page 13B DIVERSIONS AUDIOVISUALAIDSBy DAN NADDOR ACROSS 1 This __ fine mess youve gotten us into, Ollie! 4 Clean the deck 7 Military team 12 Office teams 18 Three-time all-star closer Robb 19 Mandlikova of tennis 20 Blocker in a TV 21 Note in a B major scale 22 Hunter attachment? 24 Salon tool for recalcitrant customers? 26 Tony winner for her Daisy Mae portrayal in Lil Abner (1956) 28 Baroque dance 29 Suffix with malt 30 Not the best purple flower? 33 Artaxerxes composer 34 Statistical hypothesis trial 35 Word before old, and after it 36 Web address letters 37 Illinois city, site of the last Lincoln-Douglas debate 38 M.O. 39 Birch leaf eater 43 Algiers citadel 45 Where the experts hang out? 47 Corrida hero 50 Like fifth and sixth 53 Mad About You costar 56 Golfer Crenshaw 57 Answer skillfully 58 Sault __ Marie 61 Bosss address? 62 Give-go link 63 Pawn 64 Colorado brewers rodent mascot? 66 Cheaters device 67 Ikes arena: Abbr. 68 Was allowed to pay later 69 D-Day craft 70 Military chaplain 71 Directed 72 Brew made in Zoeterwoude 73 Super Bowl party centerpiece, briefly 75 Short fall? 77 Culinary product of a French-Italian region? 82 Semicircular antenna housing 85 See 46-Down 86 Im impressed! 89 Natashas partner in crime 91 Rhoda production co. 93 Highly caloric 94 Former Today medical expert Art __ 96 Abba of Israel 97 Group that ruins commercials? 101 Ohio, e.g.: Abbr. 102 Enjoys doing 103 Russian Orthodox ruling body 104 Bad news about a tooth? 108 Rhinestone piano player 109 Sent to the gallows 110 String quartet member 111 Get an __ effort 112 Whats expected 113 Wool variety 114 Dispatched, as a dragon 115 L.A. Law actress 116 The orig. 13, e.g. DOWN 1 Eats 2 Naval assignment 3 Cte dAzur resort 4 __ Gras 5 Wee hr. 6 Pasta topper 7 Walgreens rival 8 Columbus Day mo. 9 Run, for one? 10 Pier support 11 PR specialist 12 More judicious 13 USAF E-6 14 Now I understand! 15 Prefer Hitchcocks Bodega Bay classic to his other films? 16 City in Californias Central Valley 17 Ill humor 19 Californias Central Valley, e.g. 23 Marching words 25 New, in Nicaragua 27 Poetry competitions 31 Love, to Virgil 32 Turn down 33 Old orchard spray 37 Keep from ending normally 40 Sch. founded by Jefferson 41 Wrestling holds 42 Trigger, for one 44 Take the tiller 45 Got __? 46 With 85-Across, beachcombers device 48 Hang it up, so to speak 49 Even if challenged 50 Be __: assist 51 Mob member 52 Cryptologists rant? 54 Journalist Kupcinet and sportscaster Cross 55 I told you, didnt I?! 59 Precisely 60 Some Deco collectibles 61 Fall back 64 __ santo: Spanish graveyard 65 Light lunch 66 Spelunkers spot 68 Police operations 70 Recently discontinued retro Chrysler 74 Pair 76 Number one son? 78 __ Beach, Florida 79 Neurending 80 Ick factor 10! 81 Taught 83 MCCLII doubled 84 Ones with a common heritage 86 Wings eaters needs 87 Sandlot game 88 Garden tools 89 Krupp with a howitzer named for her 90 Lukes mentor 92 Magic 8 Ball maker 95 Interstellar dist. 97 Carne __: Mexican dish 98 Presto! cousin 99 MGM Resorts casino loyalty program 100 Lad ... 102 Congratulations writer, maybe 105 Stop-__: UGK hit 106 Yalie 107 Michael, to Kirk Solution on page 12B Metro ServicesAries (March 21-April 20) Aries, a change in scenery would be well timed. While its not good to run away from your problems, some time away could provide a new perspective. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Taurus, foster closer relationships with family this week because you might need them in the days to come. It always helps to have someone you can trust nearby. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Think again before you make a large purchase, Gemini. Overspending may not be prudent at this juncture in time. Big expenses loom on the horizon, and you need to be prepared. Cancer(June 22-July 22) Someone is thinking about you, Cancer, and it could lead to romantic endeavors. The excitement will be in discovering just who has his or her eyes pointed in your direction. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Leo, a complete change of direction is possible this week. Indecision could cause you to act rashly and that could lead to irreversible damage. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Virgo, stop trying to prove yourself to others. Be your own person and live your own life and you will be much happier for it. Realize that you cant compete on the same level all the time. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Preparation is essential to avoid feeling out of control, Libra. Dont worry, when you put your mind to it, you can accomplish just about anything. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 2 2) Scorpio, it may be time fo r you to start over, but this is not necessarily a bad thing. You may find a new path that is much more to your liking and new relationship s to boot. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-De c. 21) Dont try to push you r point of view on someone else, Sagittarius. It wont b e well received at this junctu re in time. Let others have the ir opinions for the moment. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan 20) Theres no time to relax, Capricorn. Just when you tackle one project, another takes its place. Fortunately, you have an abundance of energy to kee p you going. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) Aquarius, you may ge t some news you didnt expe ct and it will take a while to absorb all of this information. When you think about it, the change could be goo d. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Pisces, soliciting help doesnt mean you are abandoning your independence. It just means youre smart. Famous birthdaysApril 17 Jennifer Garne r, actress, 39; April 18 Melissa Joan Hart, actress, 35; April 19 Ashley Judd, actress, 43; April 20 Joey Lawrence, actor, 35; April 21 Tony Danza, actor, 60; April 22 John Waters, director, 65; April 23 John Cena, wrestler, 34. Think before you make a large purchase, Gemini Newborn wails while mom works up a sweat at the gym Snapshots Dear Abby My Mom has often said that tears are t he safety valve of the heart. They are the silent evidence of r eleased emotions sometimes happy, s ad or both. The father of the radiant bride on his a rm holds his emotions in check as he g ives his little girl away; while a few f eet from them a silent tear slides down h er mothers cheek. Her heart has released a tear of joy f or her daughters happiness mingled w ith sorrow for an era not to be recapt ured. Tears arent usually apparent to the e ar unless a person is sobbing. So, when t ears fall silently; they remain unheard a nd perhaps unnoticed unless one is l ooking at the persons face. But, what if through love, we could h ear the sound of a tear. What would it s ound like? Would it splash loudly?Would it drip a nnoyingly?Or, would it fall in a cleansing torrent like a waterfall? We read in Luke 19:37b, NKJVthat as Jesus descended the Mount of Olives riding on a young colt, the people cried out, Blessed is the King who comes in the name of the Lord!Peace in heaven and glory in the highest. The religious teachers of the day should have known through the Law and the Prophets who it was that was in their midst. They, too, should have joined in the exhilarating display of emotions at Jesusapproach. Instead they called to him and asked that he rebuke his disciples. Jesus answer was astonishing (verse 40). I tell you that if these should keep silent, the stones would immediately cry out. Cry out with voice?Cry out in tears? Inanimate objects displaying human emotions?When we remind ourselves that the Creator said it and with him all things are possible, its not as out of the ordinary as we may as first have thought! As Jesus approaches Jerusalem, he looks upon the city and weeps over it. We read of another time in Luke 13: 34 when he said, O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the one who kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to her!How often I wanted to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her brood under her wings; but you were not willing! He will not force himself on us; but extends an invitation for each one of us to come. Do we feel the love in his voice?Through that love are we willing to receive the cleansing and hear the sound of his tears?Selah Hearing the sound of Gods tears Pause And Consider Jan Merop Classified ads get results! Call 314-9876

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LIVING 14B PAGE News-Sun Sunday, April 17, 2011 1.Keep it small.It is all new stuff to them, Savedge said. So when they come down the stairs in the morning, theyre like, Whoo-hoo!So my first tip is to reign yourself in. If you can keep it small, thats one of the best things you can do to go a little greener. She said she understands the pressure that parents are under, but says it is of little consequence. My kids see all that same stuff in the stores the giant bunny baskets filled to the brim with chocolate, Savedge said. I want them to be excited and have a lot of stuff, but I have found when I make it small, theyre just as excited; theyve never once complained. 2.DIY baskets.Savedge suggests rifling through the recycling bin to come up with materials for your Easter basket. Milk gallon jugs are great places to start. With some cutting and pasting, you can make an orange juice carton into a cute pink bunny. (See instructions from Disney FamilyFun magazine, http://familyfun.go.com/easter/eastercrafts/easter-baskets/bunny-basket-665124/.) Savedge said she also scavenges the containers already in use around the house. I have several pretty baskets with napkins or whatnot, and I just empty them for a week or so. Then you dont have to keep track of where the Easter baskets are stored from year to year.3.Grow your own grass.Instead of using plastic grass, grow your own grass from seed that is found at most nurseries and hardware stores. Just sprinkle the seeds into a couple of inches of potting soil in a shallow dish. Keep it in the sun and water daily for two or three weeks. Put the whole thing into the basket your kids made, or use a terra cotta pot that they have painted. If you dont have a green thumb, use your shredder to carve up newspaper, magazines or tissue paper. You can even compost it after the holiday.4.Use natural foods to dye the eggs. Savedge said she feels more comfortable letting her family eat the eggs when she skips chemical dyes and colors Easter eggs with red cabbage leaves (blue); yellow onions (earthy brown), beets (pink), spinach (light green) and turmeric (bright yellow). Find help coloring your eggs the natural way at www. instructables.com. The kids love it even better (than using the kits) because its just so cool; they think its the craziest thing to dye an egg pink with a beet, Savedge said. You also can use up the crayon nubs by drawing designs on the eggs when they are still warm from being boiled. And, skip the plastic eggs entirely. Instead, decorate old Altoids tins and fill with candy.5.Fill the baskets with something more than junk.Sure, kids love candy, and who doesnt? To ease your mind a bit, you can find locally produced chocolates, and there are organic lollipops or all-natural jelly beans you can find online. But you also can make sure the basket is largely filled with things that they will use more than once, and will encourage them to go outside. Here are a few ideas: Books or activity books Homemade bubbles made with dishwashing soap and a little bit of glycerin Art supplies or stickers Ajump rope, kite or ball Astarter kit for gardening with kid-sized gloves, a trowel and seeds Something they need anyway, such as new sunglasses or flip-flops for the warmer monthsEmbroidery Hoop BasketFrom Disney FamilyFun magazine, http://familyfun.go.com/Recycle old T-shirts and make these colorful baskets. Before you begin, some terms you need to know: the warp is the material you string on the hoop, the weft is the material you weave with.MATERIALS: Sleeves from 2 or 3 adult large T-shirts Tacky glue Scissors 12-inch round embroidery hoop. Make large baskets on a hula hoop by weaving a base (ours are 8 inches in diameter) then pulling the weft tight to create sides.DIRECTIONS: 1.Turn the shirts or just shirt sleeves inside out and lay them flat on your work surface. Run a line of glue along the seam of each sleeve. If youre using adult Tshirts, glue the body seams the same way. This is so that the seam stitching doesnt come undone when you cut them.2.When the glue is dry, cut 1/2-inch-wide loops from the sleeves. Discard the hems. Youll need nine sleeve loops for the warp. For the weft, youll need about 50 loops. If youre using shirt-body loops, youll need far fewer (depending on the size of the shirt).3.Stretch one sleeve warp loop over the embroidery hoop. Add and secure a second loop, perpendicular to the first.4.Repeat, filling in the spaces, until all nine loops are in place. 5.Push together two warp loops at the top of hoop. This creates an odd number of warp spokes in your wheel, which allows the over/under pattern of the weft to alternate with each new row.6.Then begin weaving. When your weaving is about 4 inches across, begin treating each warp spoke as two individual strips instead of a single unit, weaving over or under each strand instead of going over or under the doubled spoke. This increases the number of warp spokes, improving the structure of the project. When you get to the two warp spokes that you pushed together at the top of the loom, separate them. Treat one of the spokes as two individual strips, but continue to treat the other as a single spoke. This maintains the odd number of warp spokes.7.To form the sides of your basket, begin stretching the weft material tightly and pulling it snugly against the weaving as you work. The sides should start to bend up.8.When the basket is the size you want, snip open your weft loop. Tie the ends around a warp spoke.9.Cut the warp spokes off the hoop one at a time. Tie the ends in pairs, then trim them to make a fringe or tuck them back into the basket.BYMERRIELEININGERMcClatchy-TribuneKids soon will be clamoring for baskets overflowing with jelly beans, chocolate bunnies and Robin Eggs candies not to mention that plastic green grass that immediately goes in the garbage (if its not all over the carpet first). And, while fun, it all seems a little less than environmentally friendly. Fortunately there are some other options. Jenn Savedge, author of The Green Parent: AKid-Friendly Guide to Earth-Friendly Living, and blogger at www. thegreenparent.comand www.mnn.com, says greening our Easter baskets is not only good for the Earth, its a great chance to be creative and bond with our kids, too. Here are her tips for creating a fun and green Easter: Tips and ideas for an environmentally friendly holiday celebrationWEAVEYOUR OWNBASKET Eco People on the Go! and The Little Composter from the Teenie Greenies series by Jan Gerardi. These board books are printed on 80 percent recycled paper with soy inks and water-based varnish. Garden Crafts for Kids: 50 Great Reasons to Get Your Hands Dirty, by Diane Rhoades, ages 9-12. The Secret Garden, by Frances Hodgson Burnett, ages 912. Bunnicula, by Deborah and James Howe, ages 9-12. PHOTOS FROM DISNEYFAMILYFUN MAGAZINETurn old T-shirts into colorful Easter baskets with this weaving craft. MCTNatural foods can be used to dye eggs different colors including green (spinach), yellow (tumeric), blue (red cabbage) or brown (onions). PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BYERIC GOODWIN/MCT HANDOUTThe Teenie GreeniesEco People on the Go! and The Little Composter books are both printed on 80 percent recycled paper and use soy inks.