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The news-sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01029
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 04-15-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:01029
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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NEWS-SUN Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Friday-Saturday, April 15-16, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 44 | 50 cents www.newssun .com 079099401001 HighLow 87 67Complete Forecast PAGE 7A Storms possible in the afternoon Forecast Question: Do you agree with Gov. Scott that state workers should move to a 401K plan instead of pensions? Next question: Has the recent surge in gas prices made you drive less? www.newssun .com Make your voice heard at Online Inside Phone ... 385-6155Fax ... 385-2453Online: www.newssun.com Yes 54.6% No 45.4% Total votes: 130 Classifieds9A Community Briefs2A Dear Abby11B Editorial & Opinion4A Healthy Living5B Lottery Numbers2A Movie Review/Times11B Police Blotter2A Religion7B Sports On TV2B Index Tips to kee p you and you r property secure PAGE12B Nail biter againPanthers eke out another close win SPORTS, 1BAFA awardsMath and science honors handed out PAGE2A Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and Unknown SoldiersThis Rudy played football, too PAGE2A News-Sun staffAVON PARK Two people were arrested and $3,000 worth of methamphetamine were seized in a raid across the street from the Avon Park High School campus Wednesday night. According to the Highlands County Sheriff's Office, members of the Special Investigations Unit and the Special Response Team served a search warrant on a unit at the Las Palmas complex at 600 E. Canfield St. at around 7 p.m. Inside the apartment, deputies found 27-yearold Terry Lee Light and 22-year-old Kristy Ann Williams. They also found about 31 grams of methamphetamine, a small amount of mariju ana, drug paraphernal ia and several 12-gau ge shotgun shells. Light was charged wi th trafficking in metham phetamine, possession of methamphetamin e with intent to se ll or distribute with in 1,000 feet of a school, possessio n of a weapon or ammunition by a convicted felo n, possession of dru g paraphernalia an d possession of cannab is less than 20 grams. Williams was charg ed with possession of le ss than 20 grams of cannabis. "I have personal know ledge of the time and effo rt Meth bust made near Avon Park HS Light Honoring excellence 201 1 Summit A wards See METH, page page 6 A By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER Associated PressWASHINGTON For all the complaining this time of year, most Americans actually think the taxes they pay are fair. Not that they're cheering. Fewer people expect refunds this year than in previous years, a new Associated Press-GfK poll shows. But as Monday's filing deadline approaches, the poll shows that 54 percent believe their tax bills are either somewhat fair or very fair, compared with 46 percent who say they are unfair. Should taxes be raised to eat into huge federal deficits? Among the public, 62 percent say they favor cutting government services to sop up the red ink. Just 29 percent say raise taxes. That's sure to be a major issue as Congre ss takes up budget legislatio n for next year and the 201 2 presidential campaign ge ts under way in earnest. O n Wednesday, Preside nt Barack Obama revived h is proposal to raise taxes o n the wealthiest America ns to help reduce governme nt borrowing. In the poll, Democra ts were more likely th an Republicans to think the ir tax bills were fa ir. Liberals and moderat es were more likely to thin k so than conservative s. Women more likely th an men. Most whites thoug ht their tax bills were fa ir; most non-whites didn't. The young and the o ld adults under 30 an d seniors 65 and above were much more likely to say their taxes were fa ir than those in their prim e Are your taxes fair? Most polled say yes See TAXES, page 3A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Lake Country Elementary School teacher Katherine Robinson was named Teach of the Year earlier this week during the Summit Awards. By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING The following individuals were honored by their respective schools as teachers of the year:District officeMary Asciutto works at the district providing support to 52 teachers and more than 500 ESE students. Elementary schoolsJill Compton is an ESE resource and guidance teacher at the Kindergarten Learning Center; Susan "Gay" Cook, of Avon Elementary School, taught first and second grade and is now in her first year as a physical education teacher; Ruth Lind, first grade teacher at Cracker Trail Elementary School; Berthani Hanks, second-grade teacher at Fred Wild Elementary School; Diane Noel, third grade at Lake Placid Elementary School; Pam Lanier the ESE The winners are ... See WINNERS, page 8A By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING According to florida.educationbug.org, Highlands County has 17 public schools and a total staff of 1,493 individuals who serve 11,666 students from pre-K through 12th grade. Of the nearly 1,500 employees, 697 are full-time teachers, and the balance work in direct support of the learning process or indirectly, by managing the public education bureaucracy. These people keep classrooms clean and in good repair, feed the children, keep the records and fill in mandated forms, get students safely to and from school, write grants, council students and bandage scraped knees. Thirty-six of this large and diverse group were honored during the Summit Awards Monday night 18 teachers and 18 school-related employees, each selected by their respective schools and two by the district office. Two of those 36, Teacher of the Year Katherine Robinson and SchoolRelated Employee of the Year David Lind, were selected by Robinson, Lind earn top awards See TOP, page 8A By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK The committee assembled to recall three Avon Park Council members filed their petition on Thursday morning, according to City Clerk Cheryl Tietjen. "I have received three petitions and I have contacted the Supervisor of Elections," Tietjen said. The three petitions were filed around 9 a.m., she said, which starts the clock ticking for the committee to collect at least 500 signatures to get a recall vote. Recall Committee Chairperson Jennifer Aviles filed petitions on Deputy Mayor Brenda Gray and Councilmen Terry Heston and Paul Miller Thursday, and stated that she has scheduled a "signing party" on Saturday from 1-5 p.m. in Donaldson Park to address questions. "We are planning on having several meetings over the next 30 days to organize those who have committed to getting the signatures and to educate the public. We will have several groups going door to door seeking signatures, and some have said the will host signing parties at their homes so that several can be collec ted at once," Aviles said. "We will be notifying people via e-mail in t he next couple of days to assign are as where they will seek signatures." Originally, the Recall Committ ee had left Miller out of the process, b ut decided to add him because of h is overall participation in other counc il decisions. Former Avon Park Mayor To m Recall petitions filed in Avon Park Miller added to list See RECALL, page 3A News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY David Lind, Avon Elementary School's plant operator has no trouble rounding up students for a photograph. He is as trusted as he is well-liked. (Clockwise, beginning left front) Hannah Loomis, Yari Vegas, Chase Doty, Zach Best, Allison Franza, Kate Vegas, Lind and Jaymi Culpepper.

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Page 2ANews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.com April 13 1815324043x:5Next jackpot $11 millionApril 9 101114184041x:4 April 6 21521222445x:5 April 13 27113033 April 12 918212224 April 11 913182431 April 10 1314212324 April 13 (n) 5635 April 13 (d) 9943 April 12 (n) 3283 April 12 (d) 4128 April 13(n) 00 9 April 13 (d) 98 3 April 12 (n) 91 9 April 12(d) 07 6 April 12 216224014 April 8 112436379 April 5 213212418 April 1 723323617 April 13 423394950 PB: 39 PP: 3Next jackpot $43 millionApril 9 514325356 PB: 11 PP: 4 April 6 1018415556 PB: 15 PP: 2 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The NewsSun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Wednesday, April 13: Reginald Bonds, 54, of Lake Wales, was charged with petit theft. Lamar Tyrone Chester, 24, of Avon Park, was charged with kidnap-false imprisonment of an adult, burglary with assault or battery, and battery. Drew Eli Fellin, 29, of Sebring, was charged with failure to appear reference resisting an officer without violence, possession and or use of drug equipment, and possession of marijuana. Randy Wayne Gore, 21, of Lake Placid, was charged with possession of cocaine, possession of marijuana and possession and or use of drug equipment. Dermot Healy, 47, of Lake Placid, was charged with resisting an officer, and assault on an officer, firefighter, EMT, etc. Terry Lee Light, 27, of Avon Park, was charged with possession of marijuana, possession of drug equipment, possession of amphetamine, trafficking of amphetamine or methamphetamine, and possession of a weapon or ammunition by a convicted Florida felon. John Carroll Meredith, 42, of Sebring, was charged with three counts of violation of a municipal ordinance. Cornell Randolph, 55, of Fishburg, Mass., was charged with violation of probation reference tamper/fabricate with physical evidence. George Clements Robertson, 43, of Hollywood, was charged with cruelty toward a child. Kristy Ann Williams, 22, of Avon Park, was charged with possession of marijuana. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Tuesday, April 12: Carolyn Armstead, 23, of Lake Placid, was charged with two counts of controlled substance without a prescription, petit theft, and possession and or use of drug equipment. Jesus Gilberto Avitia, 26, of Sebring, was charged with operating a motor vehicle without a valid license, and resisting an officer without violence. Pedro Fuentes-Cordero, 23, of Lake Placid, was charged with violation of a municipal ordinance. Davion Cortel Holmes, 24, of Sebring, was charged with possession of marijuana. Daiton Clark Johnson, 38, of Moore Haven, was charged with violation of probation reference knowingly driving with license suspended or revoked. Gerardo Anthony Legree, 19, of Lake Placid, was charged with battery. Jason Lee Ludwig, 34, of Avon Park, was charged with failure to appear reference purchase of cannabis. Quention Isaiha Massaline, 21, of Sebring, was charged with attempted second degree murder. Theordore McKeithan, 45, of Lake Placid, was POLICEBLOTTER Continued on page 8A Garbage pick-up change in APAVON PARK There will be no garbage pick-up on Friday, April 22. Friday garbage pick-up will move to Thursday, April 21. Thursday's garbage pickup and move to Wednesday, April 20. Please contact Public Works Sanitation Department at 452-4427 if you have questions.Butler Road closes for maintenanceAVON PARK Butler Road from County Road 64 to Riverdale Road will be closed for county maintenance from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday. Adetour will be posted. For further information, contact the Highlands County Engineering Department at 402-6877.Wauchula Idol winner performs at Dee'sSEBRING Agospel concert featuring former Wauchula Idol winner Tony Stockton will be held at Dee's Place Restaurant on Saturday. Dinner will be served at 6 p.m. Cost is donations only. Call for reservations. Cal 471-2228.LP Merchants plan Easter egg huntLAKE PLACID The annual community Easter egg hunt will be at 9 a.m. Saturday, sponsored by the Lake Placid Merchants Association. Location is the Lake June ballfields off West Interlake Boulevard. The event is for walking babies to fifth-graders. One age group on a field at a time. Lots of toys and surprises. Call 465-1661 for more information.Ransom Band plays at Duffer'sSEBRING The Ransom Band will play at Duffer's Sports Grille from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday. This local four-piece band will play a variety of rock, country and Top 40 tunes to keep everyone dancing. The Longshot Band wil l be at Duffer's from 6-9 p.m., Friday. They will play a variety of country and original hits during dinner. Southern Style Karaoke will take to the stage after that from 9 p.m to 1 a.m. There is no cover charg e for any musical entertainment at Duffer's. It is a smoke-free facility and after 9 p.m. guests must b e 21 years old or older to enter. Duffer's is at 6940 U.S 27 North. For details, call 382-6339.Billy Glades plays at Music in the ParkSEBRING Billy Glades and his Florida Folk music will be at the Friends of Highlands Hammock's concert in the park's picnic area on Saturday. Concert admission is just $5 per person (accompanied children 12 and under admitted free o f charge.) Picnic baskets/coolers are welcome. Bring lawn chairs o r blankets, flashlight and bu g spray. All ticket proceeds ben efit park improvements via the Friends of Highlands Hammock. Concert performances are scheduled from 7-9 p.m. Park entrance fee of $6 per car is waived after 6 p.m. on concert nights. Call the Ranger Station fo r more information at 3866094. Benton to dedicate SRT Obstacle Course WednesdaySEBRING At 2 p.m. Wednesday Sheriff Susan Benton will dedicate the new Highlands County Sheriff's Office Special Response Team's Obstacl e Course. The course is at 12700 Arbuckle Creek Road. Lieutenant Jack Bailey, SRTleader, will be honor ing all those who aided in the development and construction of the course. Th e Special Response Team COMMUNITYBRIEFS Continued on page 5A If you've seen the 1993 film "Rudy," based on a true story about a gutsy, undersized Notre Dame practice squad player who is carried off the field as a hero after the only game of his college football career, you probably haven't forgotten this scene. "Rudy, are you ready for this, champ?" a teammate asks in the tunnel before the big game. "I've been ready for this my whole life," Rudy responds. "Then you take us out on the field," the player says. On March 19, a different Rudy who once played football, Spc. Rudy Acosta, was asked by his sergeant to join him for an important mission on the treacherous battlefields of Afghanistan's Kandahar province. Acosta, a 19-year-old Army medic who loved his job, had his eye on eventually practicing medicine back home in Canyon Country, Calif., after serving his country. "Instead of putting on a Band-Aid, he would really treat a wound," the soldier's father, Dante Acosta, told The Unknown Soldiers. "He'd really take the time to make sure a person was in good shape. "That just spoke to his faith." Rudy, nearing the end of his first combat deployment, also had faith in the Afghan people. "His sergeant told me that when Rudy would help the Afghans they came across, he looked at them as people in need, not as potential enemies," his dad said. By all accounts, Acosta was focused on his March 19 mission. Amid the relative calm of his base, he was also cracking jokes with a fellow soldier as they cleaned their weapons before heading into battle. Then, the battle came to Acosta and his friends. "One of the guards walked past them, turned around from the hip and just started shooting," Rudy's father said. "I'm told that this guy was hired about nine or 10 days prior. His intent all along was probably to hit as many Remembering Rudy Special to the News-SunSEBRING On Saturday, the Air Force Association of Highlands County, Chapter 17, in partnership with the School Board of Highlands County, was able to recognize Outstanding Math and Science students from all of the public schools in Highlands County along with their teachers and parents. In addition, Outstanding JROTC students and their Instructors were recognized from the three high schools. The event was an honors breakfast held at the Smith Center at Sebring High School. The guest speaker was Lt. Col. Charles "Buck" MacLaughlin, the current commander of the Avon Park Air Force Bombing Range and an Air Force Academy graduate. MacLaughlin talked about how the power of knowledge is significant to today's students as they compete their schooling and he also challenged the students to seek to become the next Albert Einstien or Steve Jobs. He reminded them by using a quote that can be found as the inscription by Austin Dusty Miller on the Eagle and Fledging statue located outside Mitchell Hall at the Academy: "Man's Flight Through Life Is Sustained by the Power of his Knowledge." The students and their teachers were called to the stage by AFAVice President Michael Haley, where they each received congratulations from School Board Superintendent Wally Cox and AFAPresident Bill Hutchison. In addition, they were each given a certificate of recognition and a calculator memento. Here are the names of those who were recognized: Avon Elementary: math student, Dalton Whitman; science student, Francis Arnan. Cracker Trail Elementary: math teacher, Ian Belanger; math student, Grant Ritenour; science teacher, Ian Belanger; science student, Miguel Descartin. Fred Wild Elementary: math teacher, Alejandra Knott; math student, Jennifer Morales; science teacher, Alejandra Knott; science student, Eli Collins. Lake Country Elementary: math teacher, Linda Veley; math student, Kyle Petteys; science teacher, Doreen Diefendorf science student, Kendall Prescott. Lake Placid Elementary: math teacher, Cathe Gibney; math student, Sarah Lethbridge; science teacher, Dianne Jarvis; science student, Gracie Smoak. Memorial Elementary: math teacher, Patricia Skipper; math student, Nordia Simmonds; science teacher, Patricia Skipper; science student, Toni Clark. Park Elementary: math teacher, Lesley Bonini; math student, Bryce Langston; science teacher, Lynn Heacock; science student, Vijay Sharma. Sun 'N Lake Elementary: math teacher, Mary Comers; math student, Rachel Boyd; science teacher, Jeannie Inagawa; science student, Patrick Baker. Woodlawn Elementary; math teacher, Tim Bowers; math student, Chandler Gowan; science teacher, Tim Bowers; science student, Rachel Caldwell. Avon Park Middle: AFA honors math and science students, teachers Courtesy photo Bill Hutchison (left), Air Force Association president, congratulates Outstanding APHS JROTC student Allison Prestwood, Wally Cox, school superintendent, shakes the hand of APHS JROTC Instructor CMSGT Dennis Green (center) and Lt, Col. Buck MacLaughlin greets Maj. James Galloway (right), APHS Senior JROTC instructor, during the AFA math awards on Saturday. See AWARDS, page 6A See TAKE, page 6A

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Page 4ANews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.comTODAY'SEDITORIALTODAY'SLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION One trip to the grocery store is enough to remind me that the recent uptick in the stock market has no bearing on the cost of living these days. And yet, Federal Reserve Chairman, Ben Bernanke could suggest with a straight face to Congress that we are experiencing a "temporary and relatively modest increase in U.S. consumer-price inflation." I suppose compared to an annual salary of close to $200,000, the price of a cucumber wouldn't matter much to an ou t of touch Washington bureaucrat. Over the last six months, crude oil, co rn and cotton rose a visibly immodest 35 pe rcent, 38 percent and 89 percent, respectively. Arecent Bureau of Labor Statistic s report confirms what our flattened wallet s already told us: food and energy prices a re on the rise. According to the report, food prices in March made the biggest gain since 1974 with a 3.9 percent increase In February, energy prices rose 3.3 perce nt and gasoline, 3.7 percent. Bernanke's "relatively modest" comment conjures up images of the "two Americas" Senator John Edwards once described. On one side, you have the Washington bureaucrats, and on the othe r side are those you see roaming the groce ry aisles with clipped coupons in their hand s and corn flakes sticker-shock in their eye s. To be fair, Bernanke is technically cor rect to say that we do not have an inflation problem because, due to their pric ing volatility, the Federal Reserve does not include food and gasoline prices purchased by consumers in its calculation. But Americans aren't much interested in federal government technicalities these days. They are instead focused on the newfound art of stretching those "noninflated" dollars to provide for their fami lies. The same people who tell us this whol e inflation business is over-inflated (pardo n the pun) also tell us the economy is on th e upswing. They call it a "jobless recovery ." They brag that unemployment numbers recently dropped, but somehow failed to mention that many of the jobs people recently accepted offer lower pay, fewer hours and inferior benefits in comparison to many of the 8.75 million jobs wiped o ut by the recent recession. Sure, they have jobs, but those jobs pa y much less with an ever-weaker dollar to cover much pricier consumables. So, are you feeling the positive vibes from the economic recovery yet? Me nei ther. But, we are not alone. The Bloomberg Consumer Comfort Index is a weekly poll taken since 1985 to measure Americans'perceptions of the economy, personal finances and overall confidence in purchasing needed goods or services. On April 7, the index was -44.5 compare d to -43.0 a year ago, reflecting the lack of confidence Americans currently have in the economy. Something's got to give if President Obama wants to be re-elected in 2012. And if Harvard University Economics Professor Robert J. Barro's Misery Index calculations are correct, the probability o f an Obama second term is unlikely. Barro 's book, "Getting it Right" measures what h e calls the "change in misery" over a presi dent's term utilizing a precise formula including metrics like: the difference between the average inflation rate over a president's term and the average inflation rate during the previous president's term ; and the difference between the average unemployment rate over a president's ter m and the unemployment rate during the la st month of the previous president's term. Barro's calculations are on the money. Barro's Misery Index found Reagan's "free market years" to be very good and Clinton's "era of big government is over" (thanks to his Republican-controlled Congress) the same. Barro's predictions do not look good for Obama and his anti free market advisors, which may be the reason why the administration pads unem ployment numbers and Bernanke is hesitant to admit that inflation is on the rise. Maybe someone should tell Bernanke he would get a much better view if he'd spend some time in the "other America." Susan Stamper Brown is a motivational speaker and military advocate and can be reached at writesusan@gmail.com her website www.susanstamperbrown.com and Facebook and Twitter. Representations of fact and opinions are solely those of the author. Relatively modest inflation? Guest Column Susan Stamper Brown Why is it we're favoring the w ealthy, while abandoning school c hildren, the disabled and the elde rly? Why have so many of our e lected officials turned their b acks on our most vulnerable citi zens? It isn't as if the cuts to s ocial services will even come c lose to balancing the budget. Welcome to another example o f the "Irrational Age," which is w hat future historians will be c alling this era. How rational is it, after all, to t reat our children like soda bott les on an assembly line? As if l earning is something poured into t hem one method fits all. How rational is it to scapegoat t heir teachers, treating the profession with suspicion and disrespect, as if all teachers are lazy, poorly trained and stupid? How rational is it to turn people out onto the street? Or end home programs providing support for caregivers or the house bound helping people who are working hard to build fulfilling lives, despite coping with disabilities or adversity? How rational is it to end drug programs, guaranteeing more addicts on the street? Have so many of us Americans become so insecure and hardhearted we need to create pain for others in order to feel good ourselves? In trying to gain control of our various budgets, we have long since passed the point of cutting fat. We've even moved past cutting muscle, tendon and sinew now we're dismantling the skeleton. In the process, we are killing the middle class and putting our nation at risk. When a society consciously decides to solve its problems by pushing its neediest citizens aside those with Down Syndrome, or cerebral palsy, for example, or the baby born addicted to pain killers, or the elderly individual with Alzheimer's disease the time has come for true soul searching. Is there another way of doing things? Is the Pentagon wasteful? Do millionaires pay a fair share? What has become of the great American vision those bygone days when we were generous with each other and could still stand in another person's shoes? Why are we picking on the weak? W e understand the need to re-examine the nation's budget. We understand the need to make difficult decisions. N o one here argues against that. It is the h ypocrisy of the process that is driving us c razy. Leave the innocent people alone E ditor: Today I learned that Valencia Group H ome will be shut down along with in-home a nd personal care services due to state fundi ng. This is very disturbing to me. Sixteen consumers will be affected. S ixteen consumers will be alone, confused a nd taken away from the only family they h ave, which is Ridge Area Arc. Although I do not work closely with these c onsumers, I am a big part of their daily r outine. I usually am the first they see b efore they get to work or school. I am the t ransportation driver. Some don't speak, some speak too much a nd some just make a lot of noise. I unders tand these individuals and respect their disa bilities. I also know that when I am not a ble to pick them up it is sometimes confusi ng to them and their behavior can be abnorm al. Most consumers do not like change and i t could be very difficult for them in their e veryday routines. I speak with experience because I have f amily members with disabilities. Put yours elf in their shoes for one week. Take away y our home, car, fancy clothing and see how y ou react. This is not the first budget cut for The R idge Area Arc Foundation. There has to be another way to cut fundi ng and not include our persons with disa bilities. Why don't you come and visit for a day? I bet you would have a change of h eart and would find other places for budget c uts. Patti Foster Sebring A nother tale of Pinocchio E ditor: Did you receive a postcard from a local c emetery? Make an appointment, take a tour o f the cemetery, listen to a presentation of s ervices, receive a $25 gift certificate from a prominent local supermarket. The $25 cert ificate would be sent in the mail, you are t old after the tour (repeating the certificate w ill be sent to you in the mail. The certific ate does not come). The manager of this prominent supermarket has no knowledge of this program, although the store was referenced on the postcard. Another call was placed to the cemetery where is the gift certificate? Reply, "It was sent March 25 (of course the certificate was not received). Same conversation only moments later, (quote) "We do not mail certificates out, they get lost." Surely you've heard of Pinocchio. Did I hear someone say scam? These are the facts, you be the judge. Audra Aubin Sebring BouquetsChildren learn about transportationEditor: Recently the Kindergarten Learning Center held our annual Transportation Day. The students and staff were amazed by the generosity of local businesses and individuals who sacrificed their valuable time explaining their equipment and jobs. Utilizing our parking lot and bus loop to display their trucks, cranes, and many other vehicles, the following people spent the better part of the morning with us: Greg Bubb with the Bureau of Fire and Arson Investigations, Choice Environmental's Charles Curtin, Matt Drury, Willie Knox, Cory Lindsey, Division of Forestry's Mike Liecht, Highlands County EMS's Kelly Duppenthlar, Highlands County Sheriff's Department Sergeant Chris Myers, Kenny Long and Don Welch from Long's Air Conditioning, William Sebring from Lykes Citrus, Frank Carillo from Positive Medical Transport, Billy Perez from Precision Pest Management, Progress Energy's Robert Lundy Sean McManus, Troy Taylor from Truly Nolen, Justin Dumbleton Rob Singles of the West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department, and Brian Bradley, Ian Cordero, Jack Dunham, Robert Walker of the City of Sebring Public Works Department. Several parents and grandparents brought out vehicles including John Barrett, John Buice, Hoz Compton, Leo Howard, Bill Nolen, and Lance Truax. On behalf of the staff and students of the Kindergarten Learning Center, we would like to thank everyone for taking the time to reach out to everyone on our campus. It is truly a blessing to have such generous businesses donate their time to the students of Highlands County. Andrew Lethbridge Kindergarten Learning Center principalSupport of winter residents is appreciatedEditor: The tourist season is winding down with many of our snowbird friends heading back north for the summer. Your friends at the American Legion Post 74 in Sebring would like to give a hardy shout-out and many thanks to those who participated in all of the events we offered this season. For the month of March, Commander Harry Harsh did a fantastic job cooking one of the greatest corn beef and cabbage offered for St. Patrick's Day. Randy (S.A.L. commander) and Doreen (Lady's Auxiliary) pitched in to help serve with nothing but compliments to the chef. The American Legion Post 74 with the help from the Kitchen Staff, offered "Customer Appreciation Day" on March 24. There was a wide variety of covered dishes, many from members who brought a dish to pass. Thanks to everyone who participated and for the many donations of toys and candy to help the Lady's Auxiliary put together Easter baskets for the children of veterans who are less fortunate. Thank you once again for the overwhelming response of donations to help the S.A.L. and Lady's Auxiliary with their effort to collect clothing for the month of April, for the American Red Cross. Have a safe and fun summer; we look forward to seeing you next season. Randy Sallis Commander Sons of the American Legion Squadron 74 American Legion Post 74 Sebring LETTERSPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. We have to make room for everybody. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 3851954; or e-maileditor@newssun.com. Letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011Page 5A w ill also give a demonstration followed b y closing remarks from Benton. The public is invited to attend. If you h ave further questions about the O bstacle Course or this event, contact B ailey at 402-7228. Main Street Avon Park goes socialAVON PARK Main Street Avon P ark has gone social...social medai that i s. Through the Community R edevelopment Agency (CRA) Main S treet District's marketing initiatives, M ain Street Avon Park now has a F acebook Fan Page and a Twitter Page. What's the benefit of social media? I n addition to acting as another comm unication avenue to get information a nd messages out about events, prog rams and happenings, social media is a lso beneficial because target audiences c an interact and provide helpful feedb ack to City leaders. Main Street Avon P ark has already gained valuable i nsight from its nearly 60 Facebook F ans when asked, "What's your f avorite thing about Main Street Avon P ark?" Comments ranged from specific b usinesses, the charm of the City, to c hildhood memories. Become a Main Street Avon Park F acebook Fan (www.Facebook.com) a nd search Main Street Avon Park). A lso visit Main Street Avon Park on T witter at w ww.Twitter.com/MainStAvonPark.Free low-flow showerheadsSEBRING The Highlands Soil a nd Water Conservation District ( HSWCD) presents "April Showers." T he district has been awarded a C ommunity Education Grant from the S outhwest Florida Water Management D istrict. The funds were used to purc hase low-flow shower heads to be e xchanged for citizen's high-flow d evices. From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday at t he Bert J. Harris Jr. Agriculture C enter/Highlands Natural R esources/Soil and Water Conservation D istrict office at 4505 George Blvd. in S ebring, free low flow showerheads w ill be given out to all who bring in t heir old one. Celebrate Earth Day by joining the b attle to conserve water. Call 402-6545 f or more information.LPMS plans student talent showLAKE PLACID Lake Placid M iddle School is hosting a silent auct ion and student talent show. The event will be held today. The silent auction will begin at 6 p.m.; talent show begins at 7 p.m.Workshop offered on water conservationSEBRING AWater Conservation Workshop will be offered from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at Highlands County Extension Service, Bert J. Harris Agriculture Center, 4509 George Blvd. Registration is $20 at the door (make all checks payable to Horticulture Advisory Committee). Learn how: to adjust and retrofit your irrigation system; water shortages are impacting your water supply; to build your own rainbarrel (extra $25 fee for barrel and supplies, need to preregister); to exchange your shower head for a low-flow shower head; to sign up for the Mobile Irrigation Lab; and to select and grow "Florida-friendly" plant material. There will be workshops and vendors present. Lunch will be provided. For more information, call Dee Dee Jacobson, Urban Horticulture agent, at 402-7140.Blood mobile makes move this weekendThe Florida Blood CentersHighlands blood mobile will be at the following locations this weekend: Friday Lake Placid Elks Lodge from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday Sebring Relay for Life at Sebring Football Field from 2-6:30 p.m. Sunday Bible Fellowship Church off Hammock Road from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Every time you donate blood you are saving three local lives. Consider donating blood. Call 382-4499 with questions.Events planned at lodges, postsLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Moose 2374 will host music with BobKat from 6-10 p.m. today. Bingo-bango will be played at 2 p.m. Saturday. AMen's Spring Fashion Show is set for evening. Dinner will be chicken cordon bleu at 6 p.m.; show will be at 7:30 p.m. with reserved seating. Tickets will be $12 per person. For details, call the lodge at 465-0131. The American Legion Placid Post 25 will host music by Gary and Shirley from 6:30-9:30 p.m. today. Karaoke with Bill will be from 5-8 p.m. Saturday. For more information, call 465-0975. The Veterans of Foreign Wars 3880 will host music by Lora Patton from 58 p.m. today. Karaoke by Cowbells from 5-8 p.m. Saturday. For details, call the lodge at 452-9853. The Lake Placid Elks 2661 will have a blood drive today. Music by Don and Allen will follow in the evening. For details, call 465-2661. SEBRING AMVETS Post 21 Ladies Auxiliary is having a breakfast from 8-11 a.m. Saturday at the Post, 2029 U.S. 27 South. Tickets are $5 and available at the Post. AMVETS Post 21 is having karaoke by Bill and Di from 7-10 p.m. Saturday at the Post. Sunday dinner at Placid Lodge canceledLAKE PLACID The Sunday dinner scheduled at Placid Lodge No. 282 F&AM has been canceled due to an outage of the air conditioning unit in the lodge. The lodge apologizes for any inconvenience and hopes to have the air conditioning working for the May 22 dinner. YMCA needs vehicle donationsSEBRING The Highlands County Family YMCAis asking for vehicle donations to help sustain the scholarship program that benefits children in the community. This scholarship program gives assistance to families that want their children to participate in a variety of programs at the Highlands County Family YMCAsuch as swim lessons, flag football, soccer, gymnastics ,summer camp etc. The YMCAis hoping to receive a donation before summer camp begins. LP Chamber prepares for Administrative Professional LuncheonLAKE PLACID The Greater Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce annual Administrative Professional Luncheon will be held on Wednesday, April 27 at the Lake Placid Camp & Conference Center. This event is sponsored by Home & Office Essentials, Miller Central Air and Wauchula State Bank. The luncheon will be catered by the renown chefs at the Lake Placid Camp & Conference Center. Reservations are required. The eservation form and menu selection is posted on the chamber Web site at www.visitlakeplacidflorida.com. For additional information, contact the Greater Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce at 465-4331. Continued from page 5A COMMUNITYBRIEFS NEWS-SUN Special to the News-Sun"Change, change, r earrange, the only thing for s ure is change," said Dr. J udith Bilsky, executive vice c hancellor for academic a ffairs and student success, D ivision of Florida Colleges, F lorida Department of E ducation, in her keynote p resentation to attendees of t he Association of Florida C olleges (AFC) Region IV S pring Conference. The conf erence, "Shaping the Future: I t Starts Now," was hosted by S outh Florida Community C ollege (SFCC) on April 8 o n its Highlands Campus. Bilsky presented the chall enges that people must deal w ith in both their personal a nd professional lives when f aced with change, tips to t ake control of changes, and a c hallenge to start changing c ollege students'lives. The conference's opening s ession kicked off in the S FCC University Center A uditorium, with a warm w elcome by Dr. Norm S tephens, SFCC president, a nd Dr. Robert Flores, AFC R egion IVdirector, and S FCC's director of remodeli ng, renovation, and mainten ance, followed by Bilsky's k eynote presentation. Several c oncurrent break-out sess ions were held immediately f ollowing the keynote prese ntation and featured topics s uch as, "More with Less P eople," "Integrating Math i nto Introductory Science C lasses," "Motivating Others AGood Supervisor's T oolbox," "New Employees are Special People," "Search and Ye Shall Find: College and Statewide Online Library Sources," "Serving Those Who Serve: From Solider to Student," "Pediatric Simulations: Making it Real," "Smarthinking Implementation and Training for Online Tutoring," "Stress Management," "Taking Educational Operations from Good to Great," "The Millennial Student," and "You + Video= YouTube: Making the Most of an Underutilized Educational Resource." The conference provided AFC members a legislative update by Traci Steen, lobbyist, associate vice president, Facilities Management and Government Relations, State College of Florida. "Personality changes in this year's legislative session have made the process very interesting," said Steen. Her presentation briefly highlighted bills that currently impact the Florida College System including tenure, funding, governance, and retirement and benefits. "It is hard to comment on what bills will survive at this point in the legislative session," said Steen. "We have an idea on the outcome of some, but with the session only at its halfway point anything could happen." The conference concluded with closing remarks from guest speaker Tom Cain, Cain and Company, whose topic was "Learn How to Treat Others the Way They Need to be Treated." Cain's speech centered on a book, "Five Love Languages," by Gary Chapman. "This book focuses on how to learn to use five key categories, or five love languages, that have proved to be universal and comprehensive when learning how to treat others the way they need to be treated," said Cain. AFC is the professional Association for Florida's 28 public community colleges, their boards, employees, retirees, and associates. The association actively promotes, democratically represents, supports, and serves the individual members and institutions in their endeavors to provide their students and the citizens of Florida with the best possible comprehensive community college educational system. For more information about AFC, visit www.myafchome.org SFCC hosts AFC Region IV Spring Conference Courtesy photo Adam Martin, South Florida Community College's coordinator of criminal justice training, speaks about the unique needs of military personnel who are returning to college in his presentation titled, Serving Those Who Serve: From Soldier to Student.'

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Page 6ANews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.com Special to the News-SunAVON PARK For m ore than 20 years, the F lorida Highlands Chapter o f the Air Force Association h as recognized individuals a nd groups that have supp orted the military presence i n south central Florida. On Saturday, eight indiv iduals from the area will b e honored at a luncheon at t he Avon Park Air Force R ange dining facility for t heir contributions in supp ort of the local aviation as w ell as the area's military f acilities. The public is i nvited but reservations are a must. Retired Air Force C olonel Roy P. Whitton, a p ast president of the AFA C hapter, explained this year t hat eight individuals from e ight different categories w ill be honored for their e fforts. The AFACommunity S ervice Awards will be pres ented to the following pers ons: Col. William Hutchison, U SAF (Ret.) will receive t he Tommy McGuire award. M cGuire was a graduate of S ebring High School and a M edal of Honor recipient d uring World War II. Col. H utchison retired from the A ir Force and was selected t o head up the first Air F orce Junior ROTC in H ighlands County at Avon P ark High School. F ollowing retirement from t he Junior ROTC, he has d evoted his time to the supp ort of the military in the s urrounding area. Larry McClain, a memb er of the staff of Avon Park R ange, will be presented t he Ken Beers Award. B eers, a retired Air Force C hief Master Sergeant, s erved at the Range both in t he military and civil servi ce. He also was active in t he AFAduring his long s ervice in the Avon Park a rea. Matty Laird was a pion eer pilot and aircraft b uilder who lived in H ighlands County in his l ater years. Laird cont ributed to the growth of c ivil aviation throughout h is life. Mike Willingham, g eneral manager of the S ebring International Airport, has been a leader to make the airport a vital part of the area's transportation facilities. Willingham will be presented the Matty Laird Outstanding Support of Aviation Award. For many years, Highlands County has been a focal point for the Civil Air Patrol and its contributions to aviation and its role that started in 1941. A Vietnam era Air Force pilot, Sam Shames is recognized for his continuing role in CAPand it's role in area in support of civil aviation. He will receive the Outstanding Support of Aviation by a Government Official Award. Along with the Community Service Awards, there is a category for Teacher of the Year. This year, a high school teacher is being recognized. John Rousch has been instrumental in the providing young students in all aspects of aviation and making it interesting as well. He has been recognized not only locally, but also on the Florida scene as well. News Media Support of Aviation Award this year will go to Briana Washington, a reporter for the News-Sun, for her reporting on aviation as well as military activities in the area. Lt. Col. Charles "Buck" MacLaughlin, USAF, is being recognized for his role as the commander of the Avon Park Range and how he has shown outstanding support of aviation, USAF and the Air Force Association during his fouryear tenure at the Avon Park Range.Col. MacLaughlin has demonstrated how a military installation can be a partner with its community. The public is invited for the luncheon and program that follows, however, reservations are a must. The luncheon is $15 per person. Reservations may be made by calling Captain Lou Brough at 655-2344 or Col. Whitton at (863) 659-4170, no later than Thursday at 4:30 p.m. AFA annual Community Service Awards Saturday m ath teacher, Crystal V aughn; math student, B randi Best; science t eacher, Jenn DeWitt; scie nce student, Hannah Farr. Hill-Gustat Middle: m ath teacher, Trish Portis; m ath student, Tim Koning; s cience teacher, Amy Bubb; s cience student, Michael R uiz. Lake Placid Middle: m ath teacher, Jane Keyser; m ath student, Maria G onzalez; science teacher, T racy Robinson; science s tudent, Alec Sassin. Sebring Middle: math t eacher, Lyle Pontious; m ath student, Austin D ukes; science teacher, D onna Tomlinson; science s tudent, Laura Eshelman. Avon Park High: math t eacher, Janice Newton; m ath student, Argenis P eralta; science teacher, C edric Bullard; science stud ent, Laura Patino; JROTC i nstructor, Major James G alloway and CMSgt D ennis Green; JROTC stud ent, Josh Gaidos and A llison Prestwood. Lake Placid High: math teacher, Shirley Rebuck; math student, Kathryn Lethbridge; science teacher, Cindy Rivers; science student, Kyle LeBlanc; JROTC instructor, Col (ret) Warren Johnson; JROTC student, Connor Tibedo and Zachary Hogan. Sebring High: math teacher, Carolyn Campbell; math student, Matthew Juve; science student, Landon Willey; JROTC instructor, SMSgt Larry Fergerson; JROTC student, Bruce Kimball and Ivan Santos. This event was only made possible based on the generous donations of the following sponsors: Air Force Association, Highlands Florida Chapter 173; Breakfast Rotary, Avon Park; Captain Louis J. Brough, USAF, Ret.; Colonel Neal Winters, USAF, Ret.; Dr. Edwin Cary Pigman, MD; Dr. George D. Leidel, MD; Dr. Marie Rosy Toussaint, MD; Dr. Tina Thomas, DMD; Mid Florida Federal Credit Union; Military Officers Association of America and Progress Energy. Continued from page 2A Awards presented to top math, science teachers and students soldiers as possible." The terrorist, who reportedly infiltrated the base by working on it as a contractor, killed Rudy and a fellow soldier, Cpl. Donald Mickler, 29, before U.S. troops killed him. The tragic incident is under investigation. Four Americans were injured, including the soldier Acosta was kidding around with before a hail of bullets turned their laughter into screams. Rudy's father spoke with his son's wounded comrade the night before our conversation. "He has some movement in his toes, but there is nerve damage; this guy shot him up pretty good," Dante said. "This kind of thing is just terrible ... this kind of guy can't be armed on our bases." The grieving father, while outraged by the way his son and Mickler died, spoke peacefully about Rudy's love for his parents, siblings, friends and God, as well as his decision to join the military. "I felt very proud, and as a father, I was very nervous," Dante said. "He wanted to become a medic, and when he said he wouldn't settle for anything else, they let him." Rudy, still a teenager, never let the hardening of his Army-strong biceps trump his sense of compassion. "The last Sunday he was here, he left a note with one of our church's pastors," his dad said. "It does not say pray for me'; it says pray for the Afghan people'and pray for our soldiers.'" Despite the cruel irony of his son dying at the hands of an Afghan terrorist disguised as a friend, Dante's patriotism and respect for the military is unflinching. "I get choked up when I see the flag," he said. "I know and now I really know the sacrifice that has went on." Between two packed Santa Clarita Baptist Church services, which many troops in Afghanistan watched online, and supporters lining Southern California streets, tens of thousands have paid their respects to Spc. Rudy Acosta, who never got his chance to take the field on March 19. Chants of "Rudy, Rudy, Rudy," echo through the hit sports film's final scene as teammates carry their hero back into the tunnel. On March 20 at Delaware's Dover Air Force Base, fellow soldiers carried a real hero back onto American soil. The same chants echoed from the heavens. Take us out on the field, Rudy. To find out more about Tom Sileo, or to read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com. Continued from page 2A Take us out on the field, Rudy Image courtesy U.S. Air Force/Jason Minto The casket containing fallen soldier Spc. Rudy Acosta is carried back onto American soil by fellow troops. put into this investigation by the members of the Highlands County Sheriff's Office's Special Investigation Unit," HCSO Capt. Randy LaBelle said. "I want to commend these members and the Special Response Team for a successful conclusion to this investigation, as evidenced by the amount of methamphetamine that was seized." LaBelle said that the 31 grams of meth seized is a second-level trafficking offense, and that 14 grams is the amount needed for a trafficking charge. The typical amount purchased for personal use is either an eight or a 16th of a gram, LaBelle said. The paraphernalia found was the typical items associated with sales such as ledgers, bags, scales and needles LaBelle said. There was no evidence that the meth was being made at the apartment. Continued from page 1A Meth bust made near APHS Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Bo b Graham, a former govern or and U.S. senator fro m Florida, said on Thursd ay that a legislative plan to ove rhaul Florida's courts is a "solution seeking to find a problem." The retired Democr at spoke during a conferen ce call with reporters o n Thursday. He joined wi th retired Supreme Court ju stices including tho se appointed by Republic an governors and other leg al figures to denounce the pla n. They've formed a bipartis an coalition called Floridians f or Fair and Impartial Courts. House Speaker De an Cannon supports the ove rhaul package, including a proposal to split the Suprem e Court into separate divisio ns for criminal and civ il appeals. It is scheduled for a House floor vote on Friday Graham, who served in t he U.S. Senate from 1987-200 5, suggested that the chang es were political payback f or the high court's 5-2 rejectio n of three constitutiona lamendment questions. Those questions a ll backed by the Republica ncontrolled Legislature were tossed from the 201 0 ballot because of confusin g or misleading ballot sum maries. "If the Legislature is upse t, then the approach they oug ht to take is to put another co nstitutional amendment on t he ballot and let the peop le decide if they made a mista ke in their earlier action," sa id Graham. Graham, others speak out on courts The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011Page 7A TODAYA t-storm in spots in the afternoon87 / 67Winds: SSE at 7-14 mphSunny to partly cloudy and breezy88 / 66Winds: SW at 10-20 mphSATURDAYMostly sunny83 / 63Winds: WNW at 7-14 mphSUNDAYPartly sunny87 / 64Winds: ENE at 7-14 mphMONDAYChance of a p.m. thunderstorm88 / 66Winds: E at 8-16 mphTUESDAY City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. Washington Washington 61/47 61/47 New York NewYork 57/40 57/40 Miami Miami 87/74 87/74 Atlanta Atlanta 75/56 75/56 Detroit Detroit 52/44 52/44 Houston Houston 81/53 81/53 Chicago Chicago 53/48 53/48 Minneapolis Minneapolis 48/32 48/32 Kansas City KansasCity 56/38 56/38 El Paso ElPaso 82/52 82/52 Denver Denver 58/31 58/31 Billings Billings 54/35 54/35 Los Angeles LosAngeles 81/58 81/58 San Francisco SanFrancisco 65/54 65/54 Seattle Seattle 53/37 53/37 Washington 61/47 New York 57/40 Miami 87/74 Atlanta 75/56 Detroit 52/44 Houston 81/53 Chicago 53/48 Minneapolis 48/32 Kansas City 56/38 El Paso 82/52 Denver 58/31 Billings 54/35 Los Angeles 81/58 San Francisco 65/54 Seattle 53/37 A potent storm moving through the nations midsection will ignite severe thunderstorms from the Ohio Valley to the central Gulf Coast today. Tornadoes are a serious concern from the strongest thunderstorms, as well as ” ooding downpours. The same system will spread over the central Plains with rain, while wet snow returns to the northern Plains. Strong winds will blast the central and southern Plains. High pressure from Canada will direct cooler air into the Northeast. Warm air will remain over the Southeast. U.S. Cities National Forecast for April 15Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. World Cities National SummaryCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. Weather (W):ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Albuquerque 68/42/s 77/48/s 77/51/pc Atlanta 75/56/t 71/46/t 72/52/s Baltimore 61/47/pc 60/50/r 70/43/pc Birmingham 77/54/t 68/45/pc 75/51/s Boston 47/33/pc 47/43/pc 60/42/c Charlotte 72/55/pc 73/46/t 73/48/s Cheyenne 55/31/pc 61/35/pc 57/37/pc Chicago 53/48/r 53/38/r 53/36/pc Cleveland 57/46/c 57/40/r 51/36/pc Columbus 66/49/c 61/41/r 60/40/pc Dallas 77/47/s 77/53/s 81/64/pc Denver 58/31/s 68/37/pc 64/38/pc Detroit 52/44/c 55/38/r 50/35/pc Harrisburg 59/43/pc 52/46/r 64/39/pc Honolulu 84/70/s 84/70/pc 85/71/s Houston 81/53/pc 80/55/s 81/65/pc Indianapolis 62/50/t 57/39/sh 58/40/pc Jackson, MS 79/51/t 71/47/s 77/55/s Kansas City 56/38/r 60/44/pc 61/41/pc Lexington 68/51/t 60/39/sh 64/44/pc Little Rock 73/46/c 68/47/s 75/55/pc Los Angeles 81/58/s 86/59/s 82/56/s Louisville 69/53/t 59/41/sh 65/47/pc Memphis 74/50/t 65/50/pc 74/56/s Milwaukee 46/41/r 48/38/r 52/35/pc Minneapolis 48/32/c 51/35/c 52/34/pc Nashville 71/52/t 61/42/c 70/51/pc New Orleans 83/61/t 76/57/s 79/63/s New York City 57/40/pc 53/44/r 64/44/pc Norfolk 63/53/pc 70/55/t 70/51/s Oklahoma City 64/37/pc 72/48/s 76/55/pc Philadelphia 58/42/pc 56/48/r 67/48/pc Phoenix 90/65/s 96/67/s 94/68/s Pittsburgh 62/45/pc 58/42/r 58/37/pc Portland, ME 47/28/s 47/37/pc 58/34/c Portland, OR 55/41/r 60/41/sh 60/38/sh Raleigh 75/55/pc 73/49/t 70/48/s Rochester 52/35/pc 50/39/r 54/31/pc St. Louis 68/47/t 58/45/sh 61/45/pc San Francisco 65/54/pc 64/52/pc 60/54/pc Seattle 53/37/pc 56/37/sh 54/37/pc Wash., DC 61/47/pc 59/52/r 69/48/pc Cape Coral 88/68/pc 86/68/s 84/64/s Clearwater 87/69/pc 86/68/pc 84/65/s Coral Springs 85/72/pc 86/72/s 86/70/s Daytona Beach 82/67/pc 87/63/pc 78/61/s Ft. Laud. Bch 85/75/pc 87/74/s 85/71/s Fort Myers 88/69/pc 86/68/s 84/65/s Gainesville 85/62/pc 86/59/t 82/55/s Hollywood 87/72/pc 87/72/s 88/71/s Homestead AFB 83/73/pc 85/71/s 85/70/s Jacksonville 80/63/pc 86/58/t 79/54/s Key West 84/77/pc 86/76/s 85/75/s Miami 87/74/pc 87/74/s 86/72/s Okeechobee 82/70/pc 86/68/s 82/63/s Orlando 86/65/pc 87/66/pc 84/62/s Pembroke Pines 87/72/pc 87/72/s 88/71/s St. Augustine 80/67/pc 86/60/t 77/59/s St. Petersburg 87/68/pc 86/68/pc 82/65/s Sarasota 84/67/pc 86/68/s 81/62/s Tallahassee 84/63/pc 81/50/t 83/49/s Tampa 86/69/pc 84/66/pc 81/64/s W. Palm Bch 85/72/pc 86/70/s 84/71/s Winter Haven 87/68/pc 88/67/s 84/64/s Acapulco 90/73/s 91/75/s 88/76/t Athens 66/54/pc 61/57/r 61/48/sh Beirut 71/60/s 76/68/pc 84/72/s Berlin 56/40/sh 60/42/pc 62/44/c Bermuda 72/65/pc 70/67/s 72/67/s Calgary 39/29/c 39/23/sf 38/24/c Dublin 57/43/pc 54/41/pc 55/43/pc Edmonton 34/14/c 33/21/pc 34/23/pc Freeport 82/70/pc 85/72/s 83/71/s Geneva 57/39/s 63/41/s 65/46/pc Havana 88/69/pc 89/68/pc 90/68/sh Hong Kong 83/74/pc 84/75/t 81/71/t Jerusalem 74/54/s 80/62/s 87/64/s Johannesburg 68/52/sh 59/49/t 65/50/t Kiev 54/35/pc 53/38/c 56/42/c London 61/46/pc 64/46/sh 65/45/pc Montreal 42/28/s 45/33/c 45/37/r Moscow 45/34/pc 49/33/c 51/31/sh Nice 56/52/r 67/53/sh 68/55/sh Ottawa 42/28/s 41/33/r 44/35/r Quebec 39/19/s 41/32/c 45/35/r Rio de Janeiro 90/76/pc 89/75/s 89/74/s Seoul 63/37/c 64/37/s 54/37/s Singapore 90/76/t 88/77/t 87/78/pc Sydney 74/58/pc 69/58/t 72/56/c Toronto 43/39/pc 47/35/r 47/35/pc Vancouver 51/39/pc 49/39/sh 54/41/c Vienna 53/43/sh 57/43/sh 62/45/pc Warsaw 53/39/pc 55/38/sh 55/43/c Winnipeg 39/24/c 40/23/c 38/24/c A lmanac Readings at Palm Beach High .............................................. 6:51 a.m. Low ............................................. 12:22 a.m. High .............................................. 7:27 p.m. Low ............................................. 12:47 p.m. Partly sunny today with a shower or thunderstorm in the area in the afternoon. A shower or thunderstorm in the evening; a moonlit sky tonight. Sunny to partly cloudy and breezy tomorrow. Sunday: mostly sunny. Silver Lake, Colo., had 75.80 inches of snow on April 15, 1921. This was the most intense 24-hour snowfall in United States history. A shower or thunderstorm in the area this afternoon. Winds south-southeast 7-14 mph. Expect 6-10 hours of sunshine with a 40% chance of precipitation. € Even addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday. € Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and Saturday. € All watering should take place before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. FullLastNewFirst Apr 17Apr 24May 3May 10 Today Saturday Sunrise 7:03 a.m. 7:02 a.m. Sunset 7:49 p.m. 7:50 p.m. Moonrise 5:27 p.m. 6:34 p.m. Moonset 4:56 a.m. 5:37 a.m. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2011Jacksonville 80/63 Gainesville 85/62 Ocala 86/62 Daytona Beach 82/67 Orlando 86/65 Winter Haven 87/68 Tampa 86/69 Clearwater 87/69 St. Petersburg 87/68 Sarasota 84/67 Fort Myers 88/69 Naples 86/69 Okeechobee 82/70 West Palm Beach 85/72 Fort Lauderdale 85/75 Miami 87/74 Tallahassee 84/63 Apalachicola 81/68 Pensacola 80/64 Key West Avon Park 87/67 Sebring 87/67 Lorida 86/68 Lake Placid 87/66 Venus 88/66 Brighton 84/68 TidesReadings at St. Petersburg High ............................................ 12:21 a.m. Low ............................................... 6:43 a.m. High ............................................ 12:54 p.m. Low ............................................... 7:10 p.m. UV Index TodayThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m. 5 10 10 5 Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional SummaryShown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Five-Day forecast for Highlands County 84/77 Lake Levels Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 11.54 Normal ...............................................14.51 Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterdayTemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHigh Sunday .......................................... 93 Low Sunday ........................................... 59 High Monday ......................................... 92 Low Monday .......................................... 60 High Tuesday ......................................... 90 Low Tuesday .......................................... 58 High Wednesday .................................... 87 Low Wednesday .................................... 53Heat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayRelative humidity .................................. 42% Expected air temperature ....................... 86 Makes it feel like .................................... 87BarometerMonday ...............................................29.96 Tuesday ...............................................29.98 Wednesday .........................................30.01PrecipitationMonday ...............................................0.00Ž Tuesday ...............................................0.00Ž Wednesday .........................................0.00Ž Month to date ..................................... 1.54Ž Year to date ......................................... 9.38Ž

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Page 8ANews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.com i nclusion teacher for first and t hird grades at Memorial E lementary School. This is h er second honor as teachero f-the-year; Scott King, third a nd fourth grades at Park E lementary School; Tracy S chuknecht, ESE curriculum t eam leader at Sun 'N Lake E lementary School; Candice D ickens, teaches third grade a t Woodlawn Elementary S chool.Middle schoolsMargaret Voskian teaches l anguage arts at Avon Middle S chool; Mary Pinson teaches i ntensive reading at HillG ustat Middle School; R asauna Portee, sixth grade r eading, language arts, social s tudies and science at Lake P lacid Middle School; Gay V aughn teaches sixth and s eventh grade math, science, w orld cultures and geography a t Sebring Middle School.High schoolsJoy Loomis is the chorus d irector at Avon Park High S chool; Joanne Bostanche t he literacy curriculum resource teacher at Lake Placid High School and Colleen Polatty teaches social studies at Sebring High School. The school-relatedemployees of the year are:District officeLinda Scholl. who is an accounts payable clerk at the district office.Elementary schoolsBonnie Johns, a bookkeeper at the Kindergarten Learning Center; Beverly Lyter, a Title 1 intervention paraprofessional at Cracker Trail Elementary School who serves students directly tutoring reading; Dollie Franklin is a custodian at Fred Wild Elementary; Lisa Moss is an ESE/IDEAparaprofessional at Lake Country Elementary School, and among other duties she works with autistic children; Martha Acevedois an ESOLparaprofessional at Lake Placid Elementary School; Betsy Cruz is the front desk clerk at Memorial Elementary; Ezekiel Acosta is a custodian at Park Elementary School; Cheryl Jahna is a bookkeeper at Sun 'N Lake Elementary School; Ginger McIntyre is a school secretary at Woodlawn Elementary.Middle schoolsLaurie Stoll is a paraprofessional working in the front office of Avon Middle School; Erin Halvorsen is the intensive reading paraprofessional at Hill-Gustat Middle School; Angie Pollard is an administrative secretary and bookkeeper at Lake Placid Middle School; Holly Tyson is a paraprofessional working in the remedial reading room at Sebring Middle School.High schoolsTammy Williams is a bookkeeper at Avon Park High School; Wendy Gervais is a shared management information system technician at Lake Placid High School and Lake Placid Middle School; Olivia Sliwicki is a paraprofessional working with English language learners at Sebring High School. Continued from page 1A a special committee to repres ent the best of Highlands C ounty Robinson started in the d istrict as a paraprofessional. L ike so many educators, she w as drawn in from the beginn ing, going back to school a nd getting a degree and cert ification, then continuing h er education and becoming a National Board Certified T eacher. She works now as a readi ng coach at Lake Country E lementary School and is a r esource to other teachers. Robinson believes in c rossing disciplines, using m ath or science, for example, w hen making her reading less on plans. She teaches child ren how to read non-fiction, w hich requires a different a pproach from the reader. Robinson comes from a f amily of teachers, including s isters, daughter and several i n-laws. "When we get t ogether (teaching) is all we t alk about," she said. "The reward isn't about the m oney," she added. "I thrive a s much on the relationships. I love seeing the light bulb go o ff as a student understands something new. That I personally make a difference, that's the reward. "Very few teachers leave at 3 p.m.," she said. "You can tell a teacher by the two or three tote bags they carry one for work to grade that night, one with projects that need to be finished, another for books or journal articles. Most teachers have a pile of books by their bed." Robinson isn't happy about standardized tests. As a tool to evaluate a student's progress they have uses, she said. "It informs our teaching. But when it generalizes kids who are working as hard as they can, it can be unfair. "In our school, 54 percent of the population speaks English as a second language. How can a child who has been here only a year possibly do well?" She sighed. "It's been a rough year. But our school is such a fantastic group it is an honor to represent them. I'd love for people to visit." Lind has worked for the school board 22 years, first in the warehouse and then as the plant operator at Avon Elementary School. He has been there for almost 20 years. Plant operators supervise the custodians, make repairs, set up for special events and otherwise make sure the campus is safe and well maintained. Avon Elementary has 35 classrooms, plus the cafeteria, media center and offices. Like many individuals working for the school district, Lind does much more than what his job description requires. It is the breadth of those extras, his working relationship with his fellow employees and especially his way with children that made him stand out from the others. For example, Lind enjoys photography and has a special photography program for interested fifth-graders. "I let them use my camera," he said and laughed. "I stay close to them. But they show respect." While Lind lives south of Sebring, he commutes to Avon Elementary willingly. "It has always been a happy school," he said. "It's fun to be around the kids. That's the reward." Continued from page 1A Top honors go to Robinson, Lind at annual Summit Awards charged with driving while license suspended and failure to register motor vehicle. Milagros Burgos Ramirez, 29, of Lake Placid, was charged with battery. Justin Boyd Rhodes, 22, of Okeechobee, was charged with driving while license suspended, possession and or use of drug equipment, and possession of marijuana. Bobby Lynn Starks, 44, of Sebring, was arrested on three out-of-county warrants reference fraudulent use of credit card, and grand theft. Dontavia Shayaza Strange, 19, of Avon Park, was arrested on an out-of-county warrant reference giving false name to law enforcement officer, and petit theft. Adam Edward Yoder, 32, of Avon Park, was charged with violation of probation reference DUI. Continued from page 2A POLICEBLOTTER Teachers, school-related workers honored at Summit Awards Associated PressTALLAHASSEE The F lorida Supreme Court has r uled that police must get a w arrant before they can do a sniff test" by a drug-detect ion dog at the front door of a h ome. The court released its 5-2 o pinion on Thursday. Police w ent to a Miami-Dade home i n 2006 with a drug-sniffing d og after getting an unverif ied tip that marijuana was b eing grown inside. They l ater arrested the resident and seized marijuana plants and growing equipment. The court's majority said police should have gotten a warrant before showing up. Those justices said a drug dog's sniff test at a private residence is a search under the Constitution. But dissenters said there's no expectation of privacy regarding illegal substances in one's home. The case is SC08-2101, Joelis Jardines v. State of Florida. Court rules on drug dogs' sniff test'

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, April 15, 2011Page 9 A The City of Sebring will receive sealed bids in the City Purchasing Department for: R R F F P P 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 4 4 : : V V e e t t e e r r a a n n s s B B e e a a c c h h B B e e a a c c h h C C o o n n c c e e s s s s i i o o n n s s L L a a n n d d L L e e a a s s e e Specifications & General Terms and Conditions may be obtained from our website at: mysebring.com or by contacting Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB by phone 863-471-5110, Fax 863-471-5168, or e-mail: kirkzimmerman@mysebring.com at the City purchasing office located at 368 South Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. If obtaining documents via the website, it shall be the bidders responsibility to check for amendments/changes made to the document. Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked with the bid number and name as to identify the enclosed bid. Bids must be delivered to the City of Sebring Purchasing Office Attn: Kirk Zimmerman so as to reach the said office no later than 2 2 : : 0 0 0 0 P P M M , T T h h u u r r s s d d a a y y , A A p p r r i i l l 2 2 1 1 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 o o f f t t h h e e o o f f f f i i c c i i a a l l t t i i m m e e c c l l o o c c k k i i n n t t h h e e p p u u r r c c h h a a s s i i n n g g o o f f f f i i c c e e Proposals received later than the date and time specified will be rejected. The City will not be responsible for the late delivery of any bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail, or any other type of delivery service. The submitting firm will be required to comply with all applicable laws, regulations, rules and ordinances of local, state and federal authorities having jurisdiction, including, but not limited to: all provisions of the Federal Government Equal Employment Opportunity clauses issued by the Secretary of Labor on May 21, 1968 and published in the Federal Register (41 CFR Part 60-1, 33 F.2 7804); all provisions of the Public Entity Crimes (Fla. Stat. 287.133, e t seq, as amended) and the provisions in Fla. Stat287.134,et seq,as amended, regarding discrimination. The Sebring City Council reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts Thereof; and the award; if an award is made, will be made to the most responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of the City of Sebring. The council reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB Purchasing Agent Sebring, Florida April 8, 15, 2011 1055HighlandsCounty LegalsNOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Highlands County, Florida, described as: LOT 11, BLOCK 26, SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on May 2, 2011. DATED THIS 4th DAY OF April, 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 4th day of April, 2011. CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk April 15, 22, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-000777 DIVISION: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, A S TRUSTEE FOR NOVASTAR MORTGAGE FUNDING TRUST, SERIES 2007-1, Plaintiff, vs. ESTHER CALLAHAN, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated February 14, 2011, and entered in Case No. 28-2010-CA-000777 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for NovaStar Mortgage Funding Trust, Series 2007-1, is the Plaintiff and Esther Callahan, Greg Callahan, Tenant #1 n/k/a Helen Alexander, are the defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 18th day of May, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 75, BLOCK 196 OF REPLAT OF BLOCKS 183, 184 AND 196, SUN N LAKE ESTATES (SAID SUBDIVISION ALSO BEING KNOWN AS REPLAT A PORTION OF SUN N LAKES ESTATES, SECTION 17, 18 AND 19), ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 99, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 512 MORNINGSIDE DR., LAKE PLACID, FL 33852-4301 A /K/A 2501 SUNRISE DRIVE, SEBRING, FL 33872 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 14th day of February, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk March 15, 22, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 10-498 IN RE: ESTATE OF BRADLEY K. NEUBAUER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BRADLEY K. NEUBAUER, File Number PC 10-498, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 South Commerce Ave., Sebring, Florida 33870-3867. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is APRIL 8, 2011. /s/ Gail S. Reid Personal Representative 3070 Orange Grove Trail Naples, Florida 34120 /s/ Antonio Faga Antonio Faga, Esq. Attorney for Personal Representative Florida Bar No. 43280 7955 Airport Road, N., #101 Naples, Florida 34109 (239)597-9999 (239)597-9974 fax April 8, 15, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-120 IN RE: ESTATE OF J. LOIS NAVIK-WILSON Deceased. AMENDED NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of J. LOIS NAVIK-WILSON, deceased, whose date of death was March 16, 2011, File Number PC 11-120, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 8, 2011. Personal Representative: CLIFFORD R. RHOADES 2141 Lakeview Drive Sebring, FL 33870 Attorney for Personal Representative: CLIFFORD R. RHOADES, ESQ. Attorney for Personal Representative Florida Bar No.: 308714 Clifford R. Rhoades, P.A. 2141 Lakeview Drive Sebring, Floirda 33870 (863)385-0346 April 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-111 IN RE: ESTATE OF DOMENICO ANDOLINA a/k/a DOMINICK ANDOLINA, Deceased. AMENDED NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of DOMENICO ANDOLINA a/k/a DOMINICK ANDOLINA, deceased, File Number PC 11-111, by the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 430 S. Commerce Avenue; that the decedent's date of death was October 29, 2009; that the total value of the estate is estimated at $12,072.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom is has been assigned by such order are: NAME ADDRESS MARIA ANDOLINA 98 Stoneleigh Avenue Yonkers, NY 10583 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claim with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 8, 2011. Person Giving Notice: MARIA ANDOLINA 98 Stoneleigh Avenue Yonkers, NY 10583 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: CLIFFORD R. RHOADES, ESQ. Florida Bar No.: 308714 2141 Lakeview Drive Sebring, Floirda 33870 (863)385-0346 April 8, 15, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 11-000054-GCS SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, CREDITORS OR OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST MARGARET B. HOOKS, DECEASED; VIVIAN BIGNEY; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, and all unknown parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against any Defendant, or claiming any right, title, and interest in the subject property, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, CREDITORS OR OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST MARGARET B. HOOKS, DECEASED 2312 Palm Key Court Sebring, FL 33870 ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST ANY DEFENDANT, OR CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, AND INTEREST IN THE SUBJECT PROPERTY YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to enforce a lien on a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County, Florida: LOT 17, BLOCK 7, LAKE BLUE ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 59, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on PHILIP D. STOREY, Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is ALVAREZ, SAMBOL & WINTHROP, P.A., 100 South Orange Avenue, Suite 200, Orlando, FL 32801, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: April1, 2011 ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE COURT By: /s/ Toni Kopp As Deputy Clerk This is an attempt to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. April 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-001307 DIVISION: BANKUNITED, Plaintiff, vs. DEIRDRE K. LEXOW A/K/A DEIRDRE KERI LEXOW, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: RYAN PORTER LEXOW Last Known Address: 1121 S Park Rd Apt #308S Hollywood, FL 33021 Current Address: 1121 S Park Rd Apt #308S Hollywood, FL 33021 ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County, Florida: LOT 8, OF TYSON LAKE FRONT PARK LOTS, A CCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 52, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 147 ALDERMAN DRIVE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852-6962 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the News-Sun WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 24th day of March, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Lisa Tantillo Deputy Clerk April 8, 15, 2011 1050Legals Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or le ss. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads p laced under the Bargain BuysŽ discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom se t ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad st ating Each,Ž the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open RateŽ pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain BuysŽ specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home,Ž are allowed to be pla ced under the Bargain BuyŽ category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com 863-314-9876 DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS € Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 314-9876. € The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 09000433GCS SAXON MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC., Plaintiff, vs MELYNDA E. RIGDON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MELYNDA E. RIGDON; EARL T. RIGDON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF EARL T. RIGDON; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THOUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendants. 1055HighlandsCounty Legals Classified ads get fast results Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, April 15, 2011Page 11 A Call 385-6155 and a Sales Representative will be glad to assist you! LINCOLN TOWNCAR '97 Blk/blk. leather. Presidential Series. $2,500. Call 863-452-9899. LINCOLN TOWNCAR '97 Blk/blk. Leather, Presidentail Series. Call 863-459-9899 9450Automotive for SaleCHEST -All aluminum with locking lid. 48" long, fits in pickup bed or on a trailer. Very Nice! $140. 863-453-7027 9350Automotive Parts& AccessoriesENCLOSED TRAILER6 x 15. Almost new tires. Single axle. $1,800. Call 863-699-5517 9220Utility Trailers 9000 Transportation R.V. COVERNEW fits trailes 28' 7" to 31' 6". Never opened! A Bargain at $170. 863-453-7027 2001 JAYCOEAGLE 26' 5th Wheeler. Good Shape $6400. 863-381-9159 8400RecreationalVehiclesCANOE 14'high Impact, polyethylene hull, 3 seats (insulated cooler, center seat) spare paddle tie down ( or for fishing rod or shotgun) 3 drink holders. Dry storage area. Includes: Minn Kota trolling motor, 2 seat cushions, 4 life jackets, 3 paddles and kayak paddle. Great cond. $380. Call Jay 863-452-6583. 8050Boats & Motors 8000 Recreation NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states tha t all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. DOG GERMANShepherd. 2 yr.old Free to good home. Call 863-452-1777 7520Pets & Supplies LAWN MOWERSnapper / Rider. Runs Good! $200 SOLD! JOHN DEERE'05 4310 w/loader & mower, 4 x 4. $4800. details @ desmdw1@msn.com or 386-246-7461 7400Lawn & GardenPOWER WASHERDeWalt Commercial DP 3750. Perfect cond. on a 4 wheel trailer $1,100. Call 863-452-0393 7380Machinery & Tools SEBRING -MULTI FAMILY SALE! 4021 THOMPSON AVE. FRI & SAT 4/15 & 16, 8AM 2PM. NO JUNK ALL GOOD STUFF. SEBRING -Moving Out Sale! 2010 Village Grove Blvd., apt 305. Sat & Sun Apr. 16 & 17. call for appointment. 863-385-2250 SEBRING -Fri & Sat. 12pm. 6pm. 4441 Leaf Rd. off Golfview. Furniture, toys, New toiletries & Tons Of Misc! SEBRING -6024 Lake Front Dr. Sat Apr. 16th, 8am -? Hard back mystery books, glass ware, household items. Too Much To List SEBRING -4610 Sturgeon Dr. Fri & Sat 4/15 & 16, 7am 2pm. TV, vacuum cleaner, clothing, household items, toaster oven, Geo. forman grill. Much More! SEBRING -3360 Lakeview Dr. (corner) Fri & Sat 4/15 & 16, 7am ? Antiques, furniture, household items, boat parts, lots of Good misc. items! SEBRING -219 Wren Ave. Fri & Sat 4/15 &16, 8am 2pm. Household items, some tools, tools, lamps, TV. Much More! SEBRING -133 Tortise Rd. Fri & Sat Apr. 15 & 16 8am 3pm. New wheel chair, small appliances, name brand clothes. Some Of Everything! AVON PARKLAKES Down Sizing Sale! 2047 Hartman Rd. (follow sign from corner Stryker Rd. & Olivia. Thur. & Fri. 4/14 & 15, 8am 4pm. Lazy Boy lift chair, diabetic ck. bks, collectibles. door hanging equip, household misc AVON PARKMulti Family Sale! Walker Memorial Academy 1525 W Avon Blvd., Sun. Apr 17th, 7:30 am ? Large sale inside gym. Many items for sale. Also plants & food for sale. AVON PARKHUGE SALE! Church Of The Nazarene 707 W Main St. Fri & Sat 4/15 & 16 8am3pm. Furniture, lots of linens, silk flower arrangements, crafts, artificial trees, dishes, collectible plates, tools, pictures, TV's, jewelry, like new portable dishwasher, floor safe, lots of children's & adults clothing. Questions call: Cheri 863-214-3448 7320Garage &Yard Sales TIRES -Goodyear Assurance, (4) 195 / 60R15. $100 SORRY SOLD! SWIVEL ROCKERlite sand color. Like New! $75. Call Richard 863-414-2784 STEREO, CONSOLE& Television console $100. Call 863-453-3032 STAINED GLASS,hobby suppl.. grinder, glass, chopper foil, solderleadless, misc. $100 863-402-2285 METAL DETECTORTechna model DX-1200, rarely used.Works excellent. $20 863-402-2285 LAWN MOWERBoy self-propelled, 21" cut. $45. Call SOLD!!! FREEZER 16'upright $75. Call 863-453-3032 DISHWASHER GEProfile. White. Digital display. Worked great, has been stored indoors since 2004. "Scratch & Dent" otherwise like new. $45. 863-873-4939 A/C UNITColeman 4 ton. Cools only. This unit attaches to an air handler. $100. Call 863-655-0881 7310Bargain BuysWASHER &DRYER / WHIRLPOOL Stack, electric 220. Excellent Condition, $425 863-257-1402 7300MiscellaneousPIANOBOSTON5'1 Baby Grand w/bench. Model GP-156. Ebony Polish finish. Excel. cond. $11,000. Call 863-449-0243 7180FurnitureDISHWASHERGEProfile. White. Digital display. Works great-been in safe, indoor storage since 2004. "Scratch & dent" otherwise like new. $45. Andy 863-873-4939 7040Appliances 7000 Merchandise SEBRING (2)Available 3926 Kenilworth Blvd, 1500 sq ft, $550/mo : A/C, office, BA, lg overhead door, near Sebring High School. 640 Park St, 6400 sq ft, $2500/mo : A/C, office, BA, 8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric, fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway. 941-416-2813 AVON PARKLarge Retail/Office Building, 100 E. Main St. A MUST SEE! 863-295-9272 6750Commercial RentalSEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, Satellite, split plan house, share kitchen & laundry room. Full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for Rent SPRING LAKE3BR, 2BA, 2CG, CHA, patio, ceramic tiled liv. room, din. room, kitchen, bath & halls, SS appliances, refrigerator has water on door, micro., W/D hook up. No pets. 863-655-0136 SEBRING -SPRING LAKE AREA. 3/BR, 2/BA on Golf Course. $850 monthly. 1st / last / security / references. Call anytime. SORRY RENTED! SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 LAKE PLACIDNEAT & CLEAN 2BR, 2BA $475 2BR, 1BA $450 863-465-2924 6300Unfurnished HousesSEBRING 2240Avalon Rd. 3/2 furn. Small animals ok. Near Shopping Center & Senior Club. References $700. first/last. Call 305-387-6863 after 4pm. or 863-237-3129. 6250Furnished HousesAVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; Washer/Dryer, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 6200UnfurnishedApartments LIVE ONDINNER LAKE 12 min. from SFCC. Cute spotless newly painted apartments 1/1 from $350. incl. water & garbage. Efficiency $425. incl. water & garbage maintenance man on call laundry on premises. Small pets w/approval by landlord. $35. app feewe check criminal history. Call for appt. 863-381-3610 or 863-385-8242. LAKE PLACID2/BR, 2/BA Apt / Duplex, Washer / Dryer, screend porch. Excellent Conditio n. Includes water. $500 monthly plus 1 mo. security. 954-695-8348 BEAUTIFUL APTSSEBRING 2BR, 1BA, tile floors, screen back porch, beautiful landscaping, building 5 yrs. new. Pets OK. $595 month. 3106 Medical Way. 863-446-1822 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook ups. Students/Seniors Discount Call 863-452-0469. AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL : $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 SEBRING -2BR, 2BA. Tile floors, fresh paint. Includes water. $600/mo. Call Gary Johnson, 863-381-1861. RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartments SEBRING -Downtown on the Circle. Monthy rates starting at $400. payable wkly. Includes elec. & water. No Pets. 306 circle. 863-386-9100 or 954-295-7194. Or go to Bldg. and ask for John. 863-414-7535 REDUCED RENTfor doing maintenance. Upstairs furnished apartment. Need references. 863-385-1806. A PFURNISHED APT FOR RENT Avon Mobile Home Park 1350 N Lake Ave 55 Plus Park Sorry No Pets 863-453-3415 6150FurnishedApartmentsSEBRING VILLA3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage. Wood floors, vaulted ceilings, screened porch. Convenient location near Hospital. Gated community, Clubhouse & pool, lawn maint. incl. $900. mo. Call 863-840-1083. Carole Polk 6100Villas & CondosFor Rent 6000 Rentals PALM HARBORHOMES Repo's/Used Homes/Short Sales 3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides Won't Last!! 3,500-40K Call Today! 800-622-2832 A PPARK MODEL FOR SALE Low Lot Rent 55 Plus Park Sorry No Pets 863-449-1072 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesSEBRING NO NEED FOR A BANK! Owner Financing 3BR, 1BA remodeled, NICE HOME! Woodlawn Elem. area. 1243 Fernvale Ave. 863-227-2717 4080Homes for SaleSebring 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial WAIT STAFF NEEDED! Full Time & Part Time. Experience preferred / mature. Lunch & Dinner shifts, Apply in person at Zeno's Sun 'n Lake Blvd., Sebring. AMMUNITION RELOADINGF/T. submit resume & current photo to sales@anderson-arms.com or fax 863-453-7454 2100Help WantedNOW HIRING Electrician. Must have own tools & some experience. Call 863-471-2373 2100Help WantedEXPERIENCED. ROOFERS 863-385-0351 2100Help Wanted

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Page 12ANews-SunSunday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.com

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By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comAVON PARK In what h as become the nail-biting n orm, it seems, the South F lorida Panthers kept things o n edge yet again in scratchi ng to a 7-6, 12-inning win o ver the Manatees of the S tate College of Florida to s alvage the last game of the s eries after dropping the first t wo. And while Kyle N ewton couldn't quite g et the double he n eeded to hit for the c ycle, there wasn't m uch he didn't do W ednesday night. The sophomore s hortstop had five hits, i ncluding a home run, triple a nd three singles, while drivi ng in three and scoring t hree. Newton was also solid on d efense, turning in a spectacu lar play in the fourth, gett ing to a hard chopper and f iring across from his knees t o record an out. And while he was the stand o ut, there were other valuable c ontributions given by othe rs. Such as reliever Adam Q uiles coming into a bases l oaded situation in the seve nth and striking out his batt er And Corey Topa, after six and two-thirds innings of phenomenal relief work Saturday, came in and did another stellar job through extras to give the Panthers the chances they would need. "For the third outing in a row, (Topa) did a very good job for us out of the bullpen," head coach Rick Hitt said. "And then Sam came up with the big hit in the 12th." Sam would be Morgan, the freshman third baseman, who with two outs came up with the big hit of the night, a single to drive in, guess who, Newton with the walk-off, winning run. "We had chances to bust it open, but weren't able to," Hitt said. "It's got to be some kind of record, the amount of one-run games we've played in our last 15." That would be the 10th one-run game in those last 15 for Hitt and his squad. "But I'm happy for our players, it was a good win for us and we'll keep working at it." Now 24-21-1 overall, SFCC is 4-9 in Suncoast Conference play, one and one-half game behind Hillsborough for third place. The Panthers will look to move up a bit and bring Polk State down a notch or two as they host the first-place Vikings Friday in the start of a three-game series that continues Saturday in Winter Haven and concludes Monday at home. SPORTS B SECTION News-Sun Friday, April 15, 2011 Page 3B News-Sun photos by DAN HOEHNE A s a personification of the tough season the Lady Panthers have gone through, Christian Luciano, #7, and Allie Herring miscommunicated on this pop fly on the infield, resulting in a mild collision and the ball dropping safely during Tuesday night's double-header sweep by the State College of Florida Lady Manatees. A sign of the times News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE J essica Young signed on to continue her cheer career at Liberty University Tuesday, on hand for the bid moment were, back row, left to right: Sebring principal Toni Stivender, assistant cheerleading coach Maurice Williams, head cheer coach Carolyn Shoemaker and A thletic Director Terry Quarles. Flanking Young were here parents, Laura and Chris. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING The ideal is for dedication and hard work to reap success and for success then to bring about further reward. Those ideals all came together for Jessica Young Tuesday as the high-flyer for the Sebring Cheer squad signed to continue her cheer career at Liberty University in Lynchburg, VA. "It was the only school I applied for, it was the only school I tried out for," the soon-to-be graduate said. "They have a good program in athletic training which is what I want to go into." Athree-year member of the Blue Streak varsity competition squad, Young was part of the continuing run of state championships that is now up to four, including this past season's Class 1ALarge Co-ed division win. The team went on to finish ninth at Nationals and the competitive aspect will not drop off as a member of Liberty as the Flames took fifth at the UCACollege Cheerleading National Championships. "It's something I've always done and it's great to know that I'll be getting money for it to get an education," Young said. "It's exciting to have an opportunity to continue to do what I love." The Flames compete as a Small Co-ed squad in the Division I Big South Conference among schools such as Charleston Southern, Coastal Carolina, GardnerWebb and Radford. Head coach Carolyn Shoemaker, with 26 years at the helm of Sebring's powerhouse program, sees her se cond cheerer heading to Liberty. "Meredith Bohn went to Liberty and cheered and it's a great program," she sai d. "They're very competiti ve and will be a very good fit f or Jessica. "It's all about the kids an d any time you can send the m in the right direction in th is day and age, is fantastic." And while as Young sai d, she "can't wait" to make t he trek to Virginia despite t he distance and snowy winter s, the transition is one that h er parents will certainly feel. "This is what she want ed and it's a dream for her ," mother Laura said. "It will be a huge adjustment, her bein g so far from home, but it's a Christian school with goo d morals and character and w e are just real proud." Young to cheer for Liberty News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Kyle Newton chats with assistant coach Andy Polk at first after one of his five hits in Wednesday's win over the State College of Florida Manatees. By TIM REYNOLDS Associated PressMIAMI Thursday was originally intended to be a somewhat relaxing day for the Miami Heat. A quick meeting. Ateam dinner. Abit of rest after the grind of 82 regularseason games and a long night of travel home from Toronto. The NBAschedulemakers had other plans. When the postseason schedule was released, the Heat got a bit of a surprise: Game 1 against the Philadelphia 76ers is set for Saturday, and that meant coach Erik Spoelstra needed to trim 24 hours of preparation time from his plans for the playoff opener. "It's a quick turnaround," Spoelstra said in Toronto on Wednesday night after Miami finished a 58-win regular season by topping the Raptors 97-79. "We were expecting a Sunday game and it ended up being a Saturday afternoon game. We're going into our preparation (Thursday) afternoon ... to start this process of getting ready for Philly." In fairness, that proce ss already started. The He at did some work on t he 76ers in Toronto o n Wednesday mornin g, hours before the regula rseason finale. At th at shootaround practic e, Miami stars LeBro n James, Dwyane Wade an d Chris Bosh all participa ted. In the actual gam e against Toronto, they d id not. "They legitimately a re nicked-up right now ," Spoelstra said. "We ha ve to look at the big picture ." Even with the "Big 3" on the sidelines, Miam i wrapped up the NBA 's third-best record wi th Eddie House scoring a career-high 35 points an d lightly used Jama al Magloire returning to h is hometown to grab 1 9 rebounds, something on ly nine other Heat playe rs had ever done in a regula rseason game. The Heat will ha ve home-court advantage in the playoffs over an y team, except Chicago or San Antonio. "Aday of rest," Bo sh Heat have little time to prepare See MIAMI, page 4B Panthers eke out another close one SFCC7SCF6

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Dunning TributeAVON PARK On Monday, April 25, South Florida Community College will honor the memory of the first coach in school history, Coach Dunning Terrell. Coach Terrell coached basketball and baseball at what was then SFJC from 19661974, and continued to teach physical education until he retired in 1986. Coach Terrell started the men's basketball and baseball programs in 1966 even before SFJC had a gym on campus. Several of Coach Terrell's former players still live in the Heartland area. SFCC Athletics will pay tribute to the family of Coach Terrell by recognizing his daughter Judy and their family at a short mound ceremony prior to the game against State College of Florida. State College of Florida head baseball coach Tim Hill will be in attendance as well, a former colleague of coach Terrell from his days at SFJC. SFCC would like to invite all former players of Coach Terrell, colleagues, as well as family and friends to come out this night to be a part of this tribute. Game time is 6 p.m. and the ceremony will start at 5:45.SYFS BBQ and registrationSEBRING Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is hosting our 2nd Annual BBQ Fundraiser and Tournament on Saturday, April 30 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The BBQ Lunch is $7 and will include a Pulled Pork Sandwich, Baked Beans, Coleslaw, Cookies and a glass of tea. Pick up your meal to go or stay and watch our girls play while you eat. For further information, please email dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201. Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is also conducting registrations for girls ages 10 to 15 now through April 1. Registration is $65 for the first child / $45 for any siblings. For further information, please visit us on Facebook, check out our website at www.eteamz.com/sebringyouthfastpitchsoftball email us at dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201."Doc Owen" Golf TourneyAVON PARK The Avon Park Noon Rotary Club will host its Second Annual David "Doc Owen" Golf tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Highlands Ridge North. The two-person scramble-format entry fee is $60 per person with prizes in flight groups, lunch, goodie bag and refreshments on the course. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Entry information and check payable to Avon Park Noon Rotary mailed to Chet Brojek, 3310 Par Rd, Sebring, FL 33872. Golfers should include their names and handicaps along with their check. Those needing a form may email Brojek at cbrojek@comcast.net or call at 385-4736. Business entry of two-persons plus a hole sign for a total of $200 is available for the first time this year. All Rotary club members are urged to support participate in the event that benefits local Rotary charity projects. Business hole signs for $100 are also available by contacting Chet via email or phone. YMCA Sign-UpsSEBRING The Highlands County YMCAand Eagles Football is doing sign-ups for Youth Flag Football ages 5 14. Healthy Kids Day is Saturday, April 1 6 from 9am to 1pm. Lifeguard Certification Class sign-up s are taking place now for an April 25-30 class.APProject GraduationAVONPARK The APHSProject Graduation 2011 Benefit Golf Tournament will be held Saturday, May 21 at 8:30 a.m. at River Greens Golf Course. The flighted, four-person scramble costs $60 per person and includes green s fee, cart, lunch and prizes. In addition to the action, there will be mulligans, a 50/50 and raffles for purchase the day of the tournament. The grand prize raffle is for a round o f golf for two at Doral Golf Resort and Spa. Tee sign sponsorships are going for $50, for a sign and player, it is $100. For more information, contact Suzie Gentry at 446-7368.SFCC Summer Youth CampsAVONPARK South Florida Panthe r Baseball will be holding Summer Youth Camps from June 13-16 and June 20-23 for children aged 6-13. Each camp runs from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and costs $80 per camp or $150 fo r both. Registration and sign-in begin at 8 a.m. with the camp to follow, including baseball fundamentals, position instruction, station rotation, games, swimming pool time and a camp T-shirt. SFCC head coach Rick Hitt will serv e as camp director with Panther assistant coach Andy Polk and members of the Panther baseball team will be on hand a s instructors. Campers should bring their individua l baseball attire as well as a bathing suit and towel. The camps will be held at the SFCC Panther field at the Highlands County campus in Avon Park. For more information, call Coach Hit t at the following campus phone numbers at extension 7036: Avon Park/Sebring, 453-6661; Lake Placid, 465-5300; Arcadia, 494-7500; Wauchula, 773-2252.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING Wings of Faith Worship Center presents the First Annual Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one team of four golfers, one tee sign and tw o green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includ es one team of four golfers, one green sign; Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $10 0 includes one green sign. Individual player $60 includes gree n fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26). Team of Four Golfers $240 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after March 26). Make checks payable to: Wings of Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL 33871, or register online at wingsoffaithchristianworshipcenter.com Proceeds to be donated to scholarship program for graduates attending Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center. For more information, call Jason Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhankerson@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at 381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB y-Boston5626.683 x-New York4240.51214 x-Philadelphia4141.50015 New Jersey2458.29332 Toronto2260.26834 Southeast Division WLPctGB y-Miami5824.707 x-Orlando5230.6346 x-Atlanta4438.53714 Charlotte3448.41524 Washington2359.28035 Central Division WLPctGB z-Chicago6220.756 x-Indiana3745.45125 Milwaukee3547.42727 Detroit3052.36632 Cleveland1963.23243WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB z-San Antonio6121.744 x-Dallas5725.6954 x-New Orleans4636.56115 x-Memphis4636.56115 Houston4339.52418 Northwest Division WLPctGB y-Oklahoma City5527.671 x-Denver5032.6105 x-Portland4834.5857 Utah3943.47616 Minnesota1765.20738 Pacific Division WLPctGB y-L.A. Lakers5725.695 Phoenix4042.48817 Golden State3646.43921 L.A. Clippers3250.39025 Sacramento2458.29333 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division ___ Tuesday's Games Chicago 103, New York 90 Portland 102, Memphis 89 L.A. Lakers 102, San Antonio 93 Wednesday's Games Utah 107, Denver 103 Chicago 97, New Jersey 92 Dallas 121, New Orleans 89 Houston 121, Minnesota 102 Milwaukee 110, Oklahoma City 106, OT Boston 112, New York 102 Charlotte 96, Atlanta 85 Cleveland 100, Washington 93 Orlando 92, Indiana 74 Detroit 104, Philadelphia 100 Miami 97, Toronto 79 Golden State 110, Portland 86 L.A. Clippers 110, Memphis 103 Phoenix 106, San Antonio 103 L.A. Lakers 116, Sacramento 108, OT End of Regular SeasonNBA PlayoffsSaturday's Games Indiana at Chicago, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at Miami, 3:30 p.m. Atlanta at Orlando, 7 p.m. Portland at Dallas, 9:30 p.m. FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEWashington 1, New York Rangers 0 Wednesday: Washington 2, N.Y. Rangers 1, OT Friday, April 15: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 3 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 3 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, TBD Philadelphia vs. Buffalo Thursday: Buffalo at Philadelphia, late Saturday, April 16: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Monday, April 18: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 3 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Buffalo at Philadelphia, TBD Boston vs. Montreal Thursday: Montreal at Boston, late Saturday, April 16: Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m. Monday, April 18: Boston at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: Boston at Montreal, 7 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Boston at Montreal, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Montreal at Boston TBD Pittsburgh 1, Tampa Bay 0 Wednesday: Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 0 Friday, April 15: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Monday, April 18: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBD x-Monday, April 25: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBDWESTERN CONFERENCEVancouver 1, Chicago 0 Wednesday: Vancouver 2, Chicago 0 Friday, April 15: Chicago at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Vancouver at Chicago, 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: Vancouver at Chicago, 8 p.m. x-Thursday, April 21: Chicago at Vancouver, 10 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Vancouver at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Chicago at Vancouver, TBD San Jose vs. Los Angeles Thursday: Los Angeles at San Jose, late Saturday, April 16: Los Angeles at San Jose, 10 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Los Angeles at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: San Jose at Los Angeles, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Los Angeles at San Jose, TBD Detroit 1, Phoenix 0 Wednesday: Detroit 4, Phoenix 2 Saturday, April 16: Phoenix at Detroit, 1 p.m. Monday, April 18: Detroit at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Detroit at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Phoenix at Detroit, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Detroit at Phoenix, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Phoenix at Detroit, TBD Nashville 1, Anaheim 0 Wednesday: Nashville 4, Anaheim 1 Friday, April 15: Nashville at Anaheim, 10:30 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Anaheim at Nashville, 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Anaheim at Nashville, 8:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Nashville at Anaheim, 10 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD x-Tuesday, April 26: Nashville at Anaheim, TBDAMERICAN LEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB Baltimore64.600 New York64.600 Toronto66.5001 Tampa Bay38.273312Boston29.182412Central Division WLPctGB Cleveland84.667 Kansas City74.63612Chicago75.5831 Detroit57.4173 Minnesota47.364312West Division WLPctGB Texas93.750 Los Angeles75.5832 Oakland66.5003 Seattle48.3335 ___ Wednesday's Games Detroit 3, Texas 2 Kansas City 10, Minnesota 5 Oakland 7, Chicago White Sox 4, 10 innings Toronto 8, Seattle 3 N.Y. Yankees 7, Baltimore 4 L.A. Angels 4, Cleveland 3, 12 innings Tampa Bay at Boston, ppd., rain Thursday's Games Minnesota at Tampa Bay, late Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, late Seattle at Kansas City, late Detroit at Oakland, late Friday's Games Baltimore at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Texas at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 7:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Seattle at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Detroit at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB Philadelphia83.727 Florida65.5452 Washington56.4553 Atlanta57.417312New York47.3644 Central Division WLPctGB Cincinnati84.667 Milwaukee65.545112Chicago66.5002 Pittsburgh56.455212St. Louis57.4173 Houston39.2505 West Division WLPctGB Colorado82.800 Los Angeles66.5003 San Francisco66.5003 Arizona56.455312San Diego56.455312___ Wednesday's Games San Diego 3, Cincinnati 2 Milwaukee 6, Pittsburgh 0 Philadelphia 3, Washington 2 Colorado 5, N.Y. Mets 4 Florida 5, Atlanta 1 Chicago Cubs 9, Houston 5 St. Louis 15, Arizona 5 San Francisco 4, L.A. Dodgers 3 Thursday's Games Colorado at N.Y. Mets, late, 1st game Colorado at N.Y. Mets, late, 2nd game Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, late Philadelphia at Washington, late Florida at Atlanta, late San Diego at Houston, late St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, late Friday's Games Florida at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. San Diego at Houston, 8:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.BASEBALLMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLNamed Chuck Meriwether and Ed Montague umpire supervisors. 1B Carlos Delgado announced his retirement. American League TEXAS RANGERSPlaced OF Josh Hamilton on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Chris Davis from Round Rock (PCL). LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid TODAY: Baseball vs.Frostproof,7 p.m.; Softball at Moore Haven,5/7 p.m.; Track and Field at Districts,Poincianna,TBA MONDAY: Softball at District Tournament,Frostproof,TBA TUESDAY: Baseball vs.Sebring,7 p.m.; Softball at District Tournament,Frostproof,TBA Sebring TODAY: Baseball at Haines City,7 p.m.; Softball vs.Frostproof,6:30 p.m. MONDAY: Softball at District Tournament,Lake Wales,TBA TUESDAY: Baseball at Lake Placid,7 p.m.; Softball at District Tournament,Lake Wales, TBA SFCC TODAY: Baseball vs.Polk State College,6 p.m. SATURDAY: Baseball at Polk State College,1 p.m. MONDAY: Baseball vs.Polk State College,6 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball at Hillsborough,3 p.m. Avon Park TODAY: Baseball at Tenoroc,7 p.m.; Softball vs.Hardee,5:30/7:30 p.m. MONDAY: Baseball vs.Santa Fe Catholic,7 p.m.; Softball at District Tournament, Frostproof,TBA TUESDAY: Softball at District Tournament,Frostproof,TBA A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p . m m . NASCAR Aaron's 312. . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 6 6 p p . m m . NHRA VisitMyrtleBeach Nationals . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2N N H H L L P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Phoenix at Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CM M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Minnesota at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . Minnesota at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X X 8 8 p p . m m . Chicago Cubs at Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . W W G G N NTimes, games, channels all subject to change C C O O L L L L E E G G E E S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n Tennessee at LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 1 1 p p . m m . South Carolina at Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NG G O O L L F F F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Malaysian Open . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Outback Steakhouse Pro-Am . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA Valero Texas Open . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 6 6 : : 3 3 00 p p . m m . PGA Fresh Express Classic . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F FS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Malaysian Open . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 1 1 p p . m m . PGA Valero Texas Open . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA Valero Texas Open . . . . . . . . .. . . . . C C B B S S 4 4 p p . m m . PGA Outback Steakhouse Pro-Am . . . . . N N B B C C 6 6 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Fresh Express Classic . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F FH H I I G G H H S S C C H H O O O O L L B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . 2011 Jordan Brand Classic . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2N N B B A A P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Indiana at Chicago . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 3 3 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Philadelphia at Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A A B B C C 7 7 p p . m m . Atlanta at Orlando . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Portland at Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NB B O O W W L L I I N N G G F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 9 9 p p . m m . Ivan Popoca vs. Rusian Provodnikov . . E E S S P P N N 2 2S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 9 9 : : 4 4 5 5 p p . m m . Andre Berto vs. Victor Ortiz . . . . . . . . . . . H H B B O O 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Juan Manuel Lopez vs. Orlando Salido . S S H H O O W W LIVESPORTSONTV NBA NHL Playoffs Major League Baseball Transactions Page 2BNews-Sun Friday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.co m

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Golf HammockThe Golf Hammock Ladies played a Low Gross/Low Net event Monday, April 11, with Laura Kebberly taking low gross in the First Flight at 82, and Wanda Hastie winning low net with a 65. Taking second in low gross in the flight was Marian Passafume, at 85, with Jean Haig in third at 93. Finishing second in low net was Trudy Stowe and her 68, and Bonnie Nigh was third with 70. Winning Second Flight low gross was Marge Pederson at 100, with Cindy Dall in second at 105 and Mary Cripps third with 107. Winning low net for the flight was Mary Lindsay at 64, while Nancy Senior was second at 69 and Audrey Walther third at 70. Last Monday, April 11, the Mezza Group played Individual Pro-Am golf at GolfHammock Country Club. Taking first place in A group was Jim Gulick with plus 3 and Mike Anselm in second place with plus 2. Joe Martini had plus 4 to take first place in B group while Bobby Culbert finished in second place with minus 2. Doug Haire took first place with a plus 4 in C group and David Mulligan came in with plus 1 for second place. There was a tie for first place in D group between Bill Alesi and Janet Reganat plus 4. There was also a tie in E group for first place at plus 3 between Bob Hughes and Terry Embleton. In F group Dick Botelho made plus 6 for first place and there was a tie for second place between Terry Yandle and Lee Stark with plus 3 apiece. Jim Reed had a greatscore with a plus 8 for first place and second place with plus 4 went to Joe O'Block in G group. Les Layton made plus 7 to take first place in H group and second place went to Jean Terrell with aplus 5. There was a tie in I group for first place between Don Tiemans and Frank Branca with a score of plus 3... Next Monday there will be a shotgun start start beginning at 8:30 a.m. at Golf Hammock. Please arrive early to register. For more information, call PeteMezza at 382-1280.Harder HallThe Harder Hall Ladies League played an A Flight, Low Gross, B Flight, Low Net and C Flight, Low Putts on Thursday, April 7. The winners were: A Flight Jackie Christopher, 90 Gross. B Flight Carol Grimm 66, Net. C Flight Patty Forrest, 29 Putts.Lake June West Golf ClubA scramble was played on Thursday, April 7. Tying for first and second places were Ron and Sylvia West, Ken and Norma Colyer, John and Sue Ruffo; John and Virginia Simmons, Art Onstad, Jans Roush, Tom and Margaret Schultz with 47 each. Winning third place were Pete and Mary McNamee, Joe Swartz, Del and Dee Block with 51. Closest to the pin: (Ladies), No. 2, Joyce Swartz, 3-feet-2-inches; and No. 8, Helen Mellon, 8-feet-11-inches. (Men), No. 4, John Simmons, 5-feet-2inches. The men's association played a Men's Best Ball event on April 6. Winning first place was team of Ron West, Joe Swartz Bob Orr and John Ruffo with 40; and second place, Pete Otway, Orville Huffman, Ken Strong and Ben Tarr with 42. Closest to the pin: No. 2, Roger Childers, 8-fee-4-inches; No. 4, Pete Otway, 39-feet-10-inches; and No. 8, Don Boulton, 5-feet-3-inches. The ladies association played a ladies league event on April 4. Winning first place was the team of Annie Hall, Elaine Orr, Gloria Huggett and Pat Asmus with 37; second place, Helene Mellon, Dee Block, Verna Knishka and J. Roush with 38; and third place, Joyce Swartz, Sylvia West, Betty Billau and Laurie Luwig with 41. Closest to the pin: No. 2, Mary McNamee with 4-feet; No. 4, Margaret Schultz, 5-feet-5-inches; and No. 8, Eva Huffman, 1-foot-9-inches.PinecrestThe Men's Association played Team and Individual Pro-Am Points on Wednesday, April 13, with a two-way tie coming in the team portion of the event. Terry Crocker, Wayne Gordener, Earl Plemmons and Bob Fidlin came in with a whopping +20, only to see it matched by Bob Luttrell, John O'Neill, Greg Mitchell and Paul DuBrule. Things were nearly as tight in the individual side of the action as Luttrell won A Division with +9, three ahead of the +6 Brian Snowball posted for second. Gordener won B Division with +8 over Gene Patenaude's +6 for second and Doug Hagan and Russ Treibor tied for the lead in C Division with +12 each. Fidlin edged out DuBrule in D Division with his +9 winning by one point. On Wednesday, April 6, the Men's Association played team and individual pro am points. The team of Tom Rockola, David Reasoner, Dan Bean and Gerry Grogan with plus-13. Tying for second/third places were the teams of Don Billy, John Hoffman, Gary Rogres and Ron Geoque; Brian Snowball, Paul Brown, Bill Ringo and Dick Botelho with plus-10 each. Individual winners were: A division First place, Tom Rockola with plus-5; and second place, Matt Ryan with plus-4. B division First place, Rex Smolek with plus-7; and second place, Terry Crocker with plus-6. C division First place, Keith Strickland with plus9; and second place, Gary Rogers with plus-6. D division First place, Frank Hocott with plus-7. Tying for second/third places were Bob Wimmers and Dick Botelho with plus6 each.River GreensThe Men's Association played a Men's Day event on Saturday, April 9. Winning first place was the team of Jim Anderson, Lefty St. Pierre, Cliff Steele and Fred Evans with minus-29. Tying for second/third places were Russ Rudd, Donald McDonald, J.R. Messier and Gil Heier; Tom Morway, Butch Smith, Ray Knauf and Leo Persails with minus-22 each. Closest to the pin: No. 3, Bob Streeter, 9-feet-8.5-inches; No. 5, Jim Cercy, 4-feet-1-inch; No. 12, Jim Anderson, 6-feet-2.25-inches; and No. 17, Cecil Lemons, 2-feet. The Morrison Group played a game on Thursday, April 7. The winners were: First place, Gil Heier and Ed Mosser with minus-16; and second place, Harold Plagens and Paul Johnson with minus-13. Tying for third/fourth places were Romy Febre and Ken Brunswick; John Smutnick and Butch Smith with minus-12. The Ladies Association played a pro am tournament on Thursday, April 7. Winning first place was the team of Jo Sherman, Fran Neil and Barb Stuber with plus-16.5; second place, Lucy Roberts, Donna Johnson, Elaine Keppler and Linda Therrien with plus9.5; and third place, Karen Speaker, Janet Regan and Carol Roy with plus8.5. Individual winners were: First place, Barb Stuber with plus-10. Tying for second/third/fourth places were Carol Roy, Donna Johnson and Linda Therrian with plus-5 each. The Men's Association played a pro am tournament on Wednesday, April 6. Winning first place was the team of Harold Kline, Bill Mountford, Cecil Lemons and Larry Roy with plus-7; second place, Peter March, Bob Streeter, Vince Boever and Russ Rudd with plus-6; and third place, Bob Brown, Dick Sherman, Peter Bridge and Ken Brunswick with plus-5. Individual winners: A Flight (29over): First place, Larry Roy with plus3; and second place, Dave Stoddart with minus-1.5. B Flight (23-28): First place, Bob Streeter with plus-10; and second place, Cecil Lemons with plus8.5. C Flight (18-22): First place, Bob Bicker with plus-5.5; and second place, Dick Sherman with plus-3. D Flight (17-under): First place, Donna Pelfrey with plus-6; and second place, Robert Harris with plus-3. The Golfettes played a game on Tuesday, April 5. Winning first place was the team of Peggy Wehunt, Carol Roy, Pat Graf and Sally Dworak with minus-3. Tying for second/third/fourth/fifth places were the teams of Betty Leblanc, Fran Neil, Jo Sherman and Lucy Roberts; Joan Brode, Carole McClay, Bev Rudd and Jan Stevens; Anne Kelly, Babe McDonald, Pat Gower and Helen Ochala; Linda Therrien, Mary Beth Carby, Colleen Posey and Peggy Nicholson with minus-1 each. The Morrison Group played a game www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011Page 3B See GOLF, page 4B By JOHN WAWROW APSports WriterPITTSBURGH Rest easy, Sid. The P ittsburgh Penguins appear to be in good h ands. With Sidney Crosby watching from the c oaching box upstairs, the Penguins opened t he playoffs much like they did in finishing t he last half of the regular season by proving t hey can win without their captain. Leaving the ice to chants of "MVP! MVP!" M arc-Andre Fleury was perfect in making 32 s aves including a blind stop on Ryan M alone in a 3-0 win over the Tampa Bay Lightning on Wednesday night. Add in a pair of third-period goals scored 18 seconds apart by newly reacquired forward Alex Kovalev and Arron Asham, and there's just no telling how far the Penguins can go even if Crosby is unable to return for the playoffs because of lingering concussion symptoms. "Whatever needs to be done," Fleury said. "I just tried to do my thing, and the players up front got some big goals for us and it worked out all right." In earning his fifth career playoff shutout to move to within one of tying Tom Barrasso's franchise record, Fleury blanked a Lightning team that finished second in the Eastern Conference with 247 goals. No worries, said Lightning forward Steven Stamkos, who was already looking ahead to Game 2 at Pittsburgh on Friday. "That's the beauty of a seven-game series," said Stamkos, who led the Lightning with 45 goals. "It's one game. It's not the end of the world." The fifth-seeded Lightning had better hope so in making their first playoff appearance in four years. They were stymied by a fourth-seeded Penguins team that has become far mo re defensive-minded to counter the losses of Crosby and fellow offensive threat Evge ni Malkin, who sustained a season-ending kn ee injury in February. Pittsburgh finished the season allowing 19 9 goals, which were the third-fewest in the Ea st and second-fewest in franchise history. An d Fleury's play had much to do with that in going 35-14-5 with a 2.13 goals-against ave rage since Nov. 12. "He repeats it over and over again, ho w good he is and how well he can play und er pressure," Kovalev said. No Sidney, no problem as Fleury blanks Lightning

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Special to the News-SunSEBRING The H ighlands Youth Football a nd Cheer Organization ( HYF) will be having a Car W ash fundraiser at Advanced A uto Parts at the corner of U S 27 and the Sebring P arkway on Saturday, April 2 3, from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. All monies earned or d onated will be used to purc hase equipment and unif orms for the boys and girls. HYF is a new league to S ebring and is looking forw ard to providing a rewarding youth sports program to foster these boys and girls to develop sportsmanship, physical fitness and build their self esteem as well as provide them an opportunity to be part of a team. The team name is the "Highlands Eagles" and team colors are black, yellow and white. Come on down and get registered while your car is being washed. HYF will also be offering registration during our car wash for cheerleaders and football players. Any registered player that needs to turn in registration information or payment can come to the car wash to do so. Several of our coaches and board members will be there to meet or answer any questions you may have. Available for Ages 5 15 years old (8th Grade maximum). Registration fees are $75 each for Football and Cheer or $65 each if you are signing up multiple children, Limited spots are available for Mighty-Mite, Pee Wee and Junior Varsity Divisions Flag and Varsity players are needed. All divisions are open for Cheerleading Please come on down to support your youth football organization. For football, please call Tim Hooks at 414-2873, Cliff Howell at 253-7070 or Becky Grippo at 381-9760 for Cheerleading. Page 4BNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.com This summer the South Florida Community Colle ge volleyball program has more camps to offer than ev er before. Listed below you will see opportunities for sand an d indoor camps. If there is a camp date that you could attend but t he age group is different than yours please call and speci al arrangements could be made. Individual private sessions for indoor and sand a re available year-round. Call/Email to schedule today! June 2011 Sand: 13th-16th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:3 010:30 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor: 13th16th (4 days) Monday-Thursda y, 11:30-1:30 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps June 13-16t h: $100 July 2011 Sand: 11th -14th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor: 11th-14th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 11:3 01:30 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps July 11-1 4: $100 July 2011 Indoor: 25th-28th (4 days) Monday-Thursday Morning Session (Grades 5-8) 9:30-11:30 a.m. $60 Afternoon Session (Grades 9-12) 2-4:30 p.m. $75 Contact Coach Crawford with any questions at kim.crawford@southflorida.edu, cell: 863-835-2377, or Office: 863-784-7037. Panther Volleyball Camps Special to the News-SunSEBRING Aleague meeting for Highlands County softball teams has been scheduled for Tuesday, April 19, at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Highlands County Sports Complex off Sheriff's Tower Road. Leagues will begin playing again on Monday, May 9. Open registration for all adult softball players, m en and women, is ongoin g until April 26. The charge is $350 an d a $15 sanction fee. If you are interested in playing organized softba ll, please sign up at t he Highlands County Spor ts Complex. For more informatio n, please contact D an Jamison at the Highlan ds County Sports Compl ex (863) 402-6755. County Softball Meeting Highlands Youth Football Car Wash Special to the News-SunAVON PARK SFCC A thleticswill host a Two D ay Fun Sport Selection c amp on Thursday and F riday, June 9 and 10 for g irls and boys aged 6-16. Each day the camp runs f rom 9 a.m.-3 p.m., with c ampers choosing their own s port, whether it is Beach V olleyball, Basketball, B aseball, Softball or Soccer. During the morning portion each day, campers will stretch, do plyometrics, agility drills, work on strength and flexibility, learn arm and body care and get introduced to the Fitness Center. Lunch is then provided with the campers then delving into the sport they chose and wrapping it up with activities in the SFCC pool. Registration and check-in from 8:15-8:55 a.m., and preregistration is not necessary as walk-ups are accepted. The rate for one day is $50 and $95 for both days. The camp will be aministered by SFCC head and assistant coaches, with help from SFCC student-athletes. For questions or more information, contact Camp Director and SFCC Athletic Director Rick Hitt at 7847036. SFCC Panther Fun Camps on Tuesday, April 5. Winning first place was the team of Romy Febre, Joe Graf, Gil Heier and Frank Conroy with minus-12; and second place, Lefty St. Pierre, Harold Plagens, Hank Wunderlich and Butch Smith with minus-10. The Men's Association played a Men's Day on Monday, April 4. The winners were: Front 9 First place, Cliff Steele, Cecil Lemons, Bob Stevens and Ed Mosser with minus20; and second place, John Smutnick, J.R. Messier, Frank Conroy a nd Harold Kline with minus-19. Back 9 First place, John Smutnick, C.L. Misser, Frank Conroy and Harold Kline with minus-18; and second place, Tom Morway, Bob Streeter, Fred Evans and Lefty St. Pierre with minus-11. Closest to the pin: No. 3, Russ Rudd, 6-feet-7.5-inches; No. 5, Johnny Wehunt, 17-feet-3-inches; No. 12, Cliff Steele, 8-feet-8.5-inches; and No. 17, Gil Heier, 11feet-8-inches. A Limited Member event was played on Monday, April 4. Winning first place was the team of Judy and Ed Ward, Don and Bea Sherman with plus-16.5. Individual winners: First place, Don Sherman with plus-7.5.SpringLakeOn Tuesday, April 12, the Spring Lake Men's Golf Association held a 4 Man Team / 3 Best Balls competition. The teams included an A, B, C and a D playersuch thatthe team handicaps were 69 or 70 and it was played on the Panther Creek course. The winning team, with a net 193 strokes, was Bob Hinde, Jay Payne, Howard Weekley and a Blind Draw C player to replace a no-show. Mr. Weekley (the D player) was the backbone of this lineup with a net 61. In Second Place was the team of Bob Rogers, Pat Shatney, Charlie Keniston and Richie Eastep, who accumulated 199 strokes. The story here is that Mr. Eastep, recovering from a stroke and starting to play some good golf, also scored a net 61. Third Place went to John Delaney, Ron Brochu, Larry Miesner and Leon Van. They came in with 201 strokes, primarily due to John's net 68 and Ron's net 70. Continued from 3B t old Toronto radio station Fan 5 90 after the game. "That w as the best thing for us." And on second thought, S poelstra decided more rest w ould be needed Thursday as w ell. It's highly unusual for the H eat to practice the day after a long flight. Spoelstra was going to b uck that trend, but after the t eam landed in Miami at 3 a .m. Thursday, he changed h is mind and canceled the w orkout. Some players will be in for t reatment of various injuries, a nd plenty of film will be b roken down throughout the d ay. But the bulk of the onc ourt work has been postponed until Friday. Nonetheless, Thursday is going to be a bustling day at 601 Biscayne Blvd. in Miami, where the Heat play their home games. The building will be converted back to basketballready, after hosting a Lady Gaga concert on Wednesday night. New banners will be hoisted all around the outside of the facility. Many people will begin a contest to see if they can remain seated outside for 48 straight hours, with playoff tickets going to the winner. And white covers will be installed over just about all 19,600 seats the playoff marketing theme is "White Hot," with fans encouraged to wear white to all home games, just as they did during the run to the 2006 NBAtitle. "I'm sure it will be a whiteout," 76ers coach Doug Collins said. "I'm guessing it's going to be a total whiteout in there. Usually in the playoffs, that's the way it is. ... It's going to be Hollywood. It's going to be the place to be." Miami won all three games against Philadelphia this season, though none of them were romps: The victory margins were 10, 9 and 12 points, respectively. And the 76ers were 3-13 after losing to the Heat on Nov. 26; they were 38-28 from there, the East's fifthbest record during that span. If there is one thing that makes the short window of playoff preparation easier, it's the fact that the teams played for the third and last time during the regular-season on March 25. Neither has changed much since. "We have to get into the video prep, walk through some things and start to put together our game plan for a challenging series that we can expect," Spoelstra said. "We have full respect for what they're capable of, particularly with their speed and athleticism and really what they've done since the AllStar break." AP Sports Writer Dan Gelston in Philadelphia contributed to this story. Continued from 1B Miami getting set for Sixers Golf scores from around the county Courtesy photo Jean Foster addresses the field prior to last Saturday's NuHope Golf Tournament as, Pastor Andrew Katsanis, NuHope Executive Director, Ingra Gardner and President of the Nu-Hope Board, Luis Fresquez look on. The Sandy Foster Memorial Nu-Hope Golf Tournament had a tremendous turn out of 148 golfers. Nu-Hope was honored to have Jean Foster present for the shot gun start at 8:30 a.m. All of the donations from the event will go back to Nu-Hope to provide approximately 1,500 home delivered meals and 530 hours of In-Home Services; such as personal care and homemaking and respite services for caregivers of seniors in Highlands and Hardee Counties. The Nu-Hope staff and Board of Directors thank the sponsors and participants for making the Inaugural Sandy Foster Memorial Nu-Hope Golf Tournament such a successful event. NuHope Tourney offers new hope By KYLE HIGHTOWER Associated PressORLANDO Ryan Anderson scored 14 points, and Dwight Howard had 13 points and 13 rebounds in a short night of work as the Orlando Magic cruised to a 92-74 victory over the Indiana Pacers on Wednesday night. Mike Dunleavy and Brandon Rush both scored 16 points for Indiana. Orlando beat Indiana for the fifth straight time, including three victori es this season. The Magic also co ncluded their fourth conse cutive 50-win season b y winning four of their fin al five games. The Pacers open the ir first playoff series in fi ve years on Saturday afte rnoon against top-seed ed Chicago. The Magic host Atlan ta on Saturday night in a matchup of the fourth an d fifth seeds. Magic run past Pacers in regular-season finale

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Class offered in Diabetes SelfManagement SEBRING The Highlands County Health Department is offering Diabetes Self-Management Education classes as part of its Wellness and Diabetes Education Program. This program serves Highlands County residents of all ages, especially those with diabetes or at risk for developing diabetes. These classes are free of charge and provided by a certified diabetes educator. Classes are scheduled in Sebring from 8:30-11:30 a.m.Monday through Wednesday at the Highlands County Health Department (7205 S. George Blvd., conference room B). Enrollment is limited and registration is required. To register and for more information, contact the HCHD Wellness and Diabetes Education Program, at 382-7294. Amplified telephones distributionSEBRING Hearing Impaired Persons will distribute amplified telephones to Florida residents who have a hearing or speech loss, in the conference room at Nu-Hope Elder Care Services, 6414 U.S. 27 South in Sebring, from10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday. By appointment only. Call (941) 743-8347.Community outreach events plannedAce Homecare offers community outreach events for April include: Friday 9 a.m., Health Fair, Avon Park Meal Site, Main Street, Avon Park. Monday 9 a.m., Health Fair, Highland Village, Villa Road, Sebring; and 1 p.m., Caregivers Support Group, Crown Pointe Assisted Living Community, Sun 'N Lake Boulevard, Sebring. Tuesday 8 a.m., Health Fair, Sebring Bluffs, U.S. 27, Sebring; 10:30 a.m., Health Fair, Fair Havens, Apartments, Spinks Road, Sebring; and 1 p.m., Health Fair, Groves, behind Sebring Diner, U.S. 27, Sebring. Wednesday 9 a.m., Health Fair, Avon Park Meal Site, Main Street, Avon Park. Thursday 9 a.m., Health Fair, Maranatha Village, Arbuckle Creek Road, Sebring; and 10:30 a.m., caregivers support group, Balmoral Assisted Living Facility, 93 Balmoral Road, County Road 621, Lake Placid.Better Breathers Club meetsSEBRING The American Lung Association's Better Breathers Club is a Lung Health Support Club for adults with lung disease, and their families and friends. The club offers educational information on COPD, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, asthma, sleep apnea, and other lung diseases. Different speakers are scheduled for each meeting on topics ranging from living with lung diseases, equipment use, managing and coping with your disease, and more. The meeting is facilitated by Carol Watson, RRT. The next meeting is at noon Friday, April 22 in Conference Room 3, second floor at Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center in Sebring, on Sun 'N Lake Boulevard. This month's speaker is Mary Alexander with Good Shepherd Hospice. She will be speaking on Hospice and end-oflife choices for patients with COPD. She will also provide information on Good Shepherd's COPD program, and the new Bud and Donna Somers Hospice House on Hammock Road. Ahealthy snack and beverage will be provided. For more information about the support group call Mike Napper at 402-3450. Special to the News-SunSEBRING Affinity H ealth Professionals held the a wards ceremony for their f ourth annual Biggest Loser C ompetition on April 8.The 1 3-week contest, which b egan Jan. 4 and ended April 4 was celebrated by the three r emaining contestants. The t hird place winner, Mary F ranklin, lost 6.5 percent of h er total body weight. S econd place went to Lana P uckorious, with a total w eight loss of 10.28 percent. T he first place winner was B etty Springsteen, with a t otal weight loss of 12.5 perc ent. The first place prize packa ge included $100, a full h our massage, one month of f ree lawn care courtesy of C utting Edge LLC, and an m p3 player. When asked the biggest difference between her life now and her life before starting the contest, Springsteensaid, "Feeling better about myself." She said she would not have been able to accomplish her goal without the competition. "I knew I had to do something and this was the vehicle, plus having the competition helped. And I got connected with John at 108 degree fitness through the office and that helped with my diet and exercise program." Thethree finalists agreed that getting started andbeing fully committedare important parts of being successful in your weight loss goals."Make sure that you have a strong support group, because that makes all the difference," Puckorious said. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011Page 5B HEALTHYLIVING Courtesy photo Betty Springsteen was the first place winner in Affinity Health Professionals' Biggest Loser Competition. She had a total weight loss of 12.5 percent, as shown in these before and after pictures. Springsteen is Affinity's Biggest Loser Shingles, also known as the herpes zoster virus, is simply a reactivation of the virus that caused your chicken pox earlier in life. The virus lies dormant in the spinal nerve cells and can be reactivated years later when the immune system is challenged or suppressed by fatigue, physical/emotional trauma, serious illness, or certain medications. Between 20 and 30 percent of the population will be effected by shingles at some point in their lifetime. The first symptom most patients notice is a tingling or pain similar to having a sun burn on one side of the face or body. Painful skin blisters begin to appear several days later, also on one side of the face or body. This skin rash is typically found on the chest, abdomen, back, or face, although it can also affect the neck, limbs, and lower back as well. The blisters, or eruptions, are very painful, itchy and tender. If the face becomes involved, eye pain, red eye, headache, fever, or fatigue may precede the rash. After one to two weeks, the blisters begin to heal and form scabs; however, the pain often continues. When the rash affects the face, it usually affects one side of the forehead and scalp, does not cross the midline of the face, and involves only the upper eyelid. About 10-20 percent of the population will have this presentation at some point. Upon exam, the eye doctor will evaluate both the surface of the eye as well as the optic nerve and retina looking for any signs of viral involvement in those tissues. The doctor will also check the pressure in the eye at that time. After the infection has run its course, some patients will develop a deep pain known as post-herpetic neuralgia that can continue for months and sometimes years. This is more common in the elderly. The incidence of shingles increases with age. More than 50 percent of cases develop in patients older than 60. In patients younger than 40, a medical evaluation should be conducted to determine whether the patient may be immunocompromised. Shingles usually only occurs once. The treatment for shingles consists of taking an oral antiviral agent such as acyclovir, usually several times a day for a week to 10 days. If the condition is severe, the patien t may need to be hospitalized on this medication f or 5-10 days. An antibiotic ointme nt is prescribed to keep the skin eru ptions from becom ing infected, and warm compresses are usually applie d to the skin about three times a day to keep the area clean. If the eye is involved, w e usually recommend artificial tears three to four tim es a day to keep it as comfor table as possible. Topical steroid eye drops are occa sionally helpful as well. There is a vaccine designed to help prevent shingles. It is recommende d for persons 60 years old o r older whether or not the patient reported a prior episode of shingles. Unles s a contraindication exists, patients with chronic med ical conditions may also b e vaccinated. The vaccine should not be administered to those who are allergic t o gelatin, neomycin, or any other component of the va ccine, those with a history of a primary or acquired immunodeficiency state (i.e. leukemia, lymphoma, etc.), those who are receiv ing immunosuppressive therapy, or those who are or may be pregnant. In a clinical trial involv ing more than 38,000 adul ts 60 years of age or older, th e vaccine reduced the overa ll incidence of shingles by 5 1 percent and the incidence of neuralgia by 67 percent The effectiveness of the vaccine was higher in the younger age group (60-69 years) at 64 percent than the older age group (older than 70) at 38 percent. Sid e effects of the vaccine included redness at the sit e of injection, pain, and swelling. No vaccine-relat ed deaths were reported. Acetominophen with or without codeine is sometimes required during the first two weeks as pain from post-herpetic neuralgia can be severe. In addition, depression can be quite common during the initial phase of infection, s o an antidepressant may be prescribed. Shingles is contagious for children and adults wh o have not had chicken pox, and can be spread by inhalation. Pregnant women who have not had chicken pox must exercise extreme caution. Valerie Moulds is a board certified optometric physician practicing in Sebring and is Arizona and Florida certified in diagnostics and therapeutics. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat or cure your condition. Shingles can affect the eyes Focal Point Dr. Valerie Moulds Courtesy photo At Sun 'N Lake Elementary School, FCAT means not only Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test but also Free Cookie After Test.' Florida Hospital partnered with Sun 'N Lake Elementary to reward students with a big chocolate chip cookie after completion of the test. Sun 'N Lake Elementary's Lisa Colon (from left) and Dr. Linda Laye collect the cookies from Florida Hospital Nutritional Services staff members Claudette Ramikisoon, Brian Sweat, Andrew Hernandez and Dawn Hill. Florida Hospital rewards students Snapshots Associated PressATLANTA About h alf of U.S. adults take v itamins and other dietary s upplements a level t hat's been holding steady f or much of the past d ecade, new government f igures show. But the data also show a b ooming number of older w omen are taking calcium. Federal officials r eleased figures W ednesday showing that t he use of dietary supplem ents has grown since the e arly 1990s when it was a bout 42 percent. The data s hows use leveled off in 2 003 through 2008, with a bout half of adults 20 and o lder taking at least one d ietary supplement. The biggest change was f or calcium. Two-thirds of w omen 60 and older take i t, up from 28 percent in t he early 1990s. Experts note the ranks o f the elderly have been g rowing, and include m any women who have b een encouraged for years t o take calcium to help p rotect against osteoporos is. The information comes f rom national, in-home s urveys in 1988-1994 and 2 003-2008. The surveys in t he past decade included m ore than 2,000 people e ach year. Interviewers not o nly asked participants w hat supplements they t ook, but also asked to see t he bottles to verify their a nswers. Use of multivitamins t he most popular supplem ent crept up to nearly 4 0 percent. Most people who take v itamins and other supplem ents are educated, have g ood incomes, eat pretty w ell and already get the n utrients they need from t heir diets, the surveys s uggests. "It's almost like the p eople who are taking t hem aren't the people w ho need them," said R egan Bailey, a nutritional e pidemiologist with the N ational Institutes of H ealth. Federal surveys have o nly recently started aski ng people why they take s upplements, Bailey said. The government supp orts some supplements as a n option for certain peop le such as iron for w omen who are pregnant, f olic acid for women t hinking of getting pregn ant and calcium for older w omen. Vitamins, supplements taken by half of US adults

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DearPharmacist: I'm plagued by urinary tract infections (UTIs) and I hate the side effects of the Septra antibiotic that I take daily. I've heard that drinking cranberry juice cocktail can help. Should I try that? B.K., New York City Answer: Chronic UTIs are miserable. You've no sooner escorted one out the door, than a new infection rears its ugly itch. It's hard to believe that something delicious can help prevent such a painfully persistent disease, but cranberries get the job done. Women and it is mostly women who experience the itching, burning and pain of recurrent UTIs are motivated to try just about anything to gain comfort and avoid sulfa antibiotics such as "Septra DS" or "Bactrim." Studies prove that UTIcausing bacteria adhere easily to the bladder and urinary tract of chronic sufferers. FYI, if you are prone, this could be a sign of diabetes. Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) actually helps prevent bacterial adhesion. Researchers in Australia and Scotland recently reviewed the results of numerous scientific studies and gave cranberry a thumbsup as a preventive treatment. I think they can help you, but you still may need your antibiotic for a while longer. Please don't destroy your gut with antibiotics. Protect yourself with a high-quality probiotic to replace the beneficial bacteria that gets killed off by your antibiotic. There are many. I personally take "Dr. Ohhira's Probiotic" because it helps me grow my own "flora fingerprint," rather than taking a gazillion organisms that may (or may not) be part of my personal gut microflora. We are all individuals when it comes to gut bugs. See last week's column for more on that, posted at my Web site. Eat sauerkraut, kombucha and kefir to help restore probiotics with food. I read a new study at NutraIngredients.com about cranberries that studied 60 women aged 18 to 40, over 90 days. The participants received either placebo, 500 to 1,000 mg of whole cranberry powder each day. When the urine was cultured, there was a 25-45 percent reduction in E. Coli bacteria after 10 days in the group that took cranberry, and this was maintained for weeks. The control group showed no improvement. I'm not fond of "cocktails" because they contain sugar, which promotes infection. But drinking pure cranberry juice straight is a decidedly mouth-puckering experience. Try diluting it with sparklin g water, or add 2 tablespoons of pure juice to your water bottle each day. I think supplements are ideal because they contain concentrated amounts of the healing compounds (proanthocyanidins), which offer other health benefits such as lowering cholesterol, contro lling weight, reducing H. pylori infections (ulcers) an d even preventing gum diseas e. "D-Mannose" is another cranberry-related supplemen t that is enormously helpful. Avoid perfumed soaps, stay hydrated, wipe from front to back and wear cotto n undies. Drinking stinging nettle tea during infections i s important. And finally, a medicine called phenazopyr idine (brand names are AZO Standard and Cystex) are sold OTC at pharmacies nationwide; these immediate ly relieve pain. Suzy Cohen is a registered pharmacist and the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist' and Real Solutions.' For more information, visit www. DearPharmacist. com. This information is not intended to treat, diagnose or cure your condition. Page 6BNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.com HEALTHYLIVING Special to the News-Sun SEBRING For the third c onsecutive year, Florida H ospital Heartland Medical C enter has earned Quality R espiratory Care Recognition ( QRCR) under a national prog ram aimed at helping p atients and families make i nformed decisions about the q uality of the respiratory care s ervices available in hospit als. Only 15 percent of hospit als in the United States have r eceived this award. "We are blessed to be able t o achieve this recognition a gain. Our great respiratory t herapists and staff members a re very caring hard workers," s aid Florida Hospital M anager of Cardio P ulmonary Services Mike N apper. The QRCR program was s tarted by the American A ssociation for Respiratory C are (AARC) in 2003 to help c onsumers identify those f acilities using qualified resp iratory therapists to provide r espiratory care. Hospitals e arning the QRCR designat ion ensure patient safety by a greeing to adhere to a strict s et of criteria governing their r espiratory care services. Respiratory therapists are s pecially trained health care p rofessionals who work under p hysician's orders to provide a w ide range of breathing treatm ents and other services to p eople with asthma, chronic o bstructive pulmonary dise ase, cystic fibrosis, lung canc er, AIDS, and other lung or l ung-related conditions. They a lso care for premature i nfants and are key members o f lifesaving response teams c harged with handling medi cal emergencies To qualify for the recognit ion, Florida Hospital H eartland Medical Center p rovided documentation s howing it meets the followi ng conditions: All respiratory therapists employed by the hospital to deliver bedside respiratory care services are legally recognized by the state as competent to provide respiratory care services and hold the CRTor RRTcredential. Respiratory therapists are available 24 hours. Adoctor of medicine or osteopathy is designated as medical director of respiratory care services. Hospital policy prohibits the routine delivery of medicated aerosol treatments utilizing small volume nebulizers and metered dose inhalers to multiple patients simultaneously. Use a process that periodically compares performance of your respiratory department on efficiency and quality metrics with similar departments for the purpose of identifying and achieving best practice. The QQRCR program grew out of growing concerns among health care leaders and the general public regarding the safety and quality of health care services provided to patients. Hospitals that meet the QRCR requirements provide a level of respiratory care consistent with national standards and guidelines, and should be commended for their commitment to quality care. For more information, visit www.FHeartland.org or Facebook. Florida Hospital cardio pulmonary care earns national recognition UTI remedies to the rescue Dear Pharmacist Suzy Cohen Courtesy photo Pictured in front row: Lead Therapist Vickie Glass RRT and Yvonne Garza RRT. Back row: Terry Lahr RRT, Coy Bryson CRT, Supervisor Jay Johnston RRT, Manager Mike Napper RRT, and Clarence Cook CRT. As kids explore different sports, parents buy bats, gloves, helmets and jerseys. But new sports should mean new shoes, too. Buying a generic athletic shoe no longer makes the grade. Sport-specific shoes, which are designed for the e xact sport in which a child will partici pate, boost performance and protect a gainst foot and ankle injuries. The American Podiatric Medical A ssociation, the country's leading h ealth resource representing 80 percent o f podiatric physicians nationally, r ecently surveyed parents. According to t he survey, 48 percent of children under t he age of 17 have experienced a s ports-related foot disorder. With so many children falling victim t o foot injuries caused by playing s ports, parents should be reminded that t he proper sports footwear can make t he difference between fun and serious i njury. These guidelines are offered for p arents looking to keep their children r unning, dribbling and sprinting strong and injury-free. Dribbles and dunks: Many kids p lay basketball as their organized sport o f choice. But with so many feet running around a court, kids'basketball shoes should have a thick, stiff sole to support running and jumping. Basketball players also make sharp direction changes, so shoes must feature high ankle constructions. The best basketball shoes offer strong, support on either side of a child's ankle. Making a racket: Court shoes designed for tennis and racquetball might look like other sneakers, but they feature invisible support for lateral moves. Children's court shoes should support both sides of the foot, since children must make quick movements and weight shifts as they chase after tennis balls. Flexible soles help children change directions quickly. Sprinting toward the finish: Every runner, no matter their age, requires a shoe fitted to their style and speed. Good running shoes provide maximum shock protection to avoid leg and knee injuries. They make sure that feet hit the ground correctly. Parents should look for the APMA Seal of Approval on footwear, which guarantees that shoes meet guidelines for stability and safety. They also shouldn't forget to buy synthetic-blended socks without large seams, which work away moisture and help prevent odor. Don't forget to check your child's shoes to make certain they still fit. A child's feet grow at an amazing pace until their growth plates are closed. How to tell if a shoe fits a child or an adult: The shoe should be a thumb's width longer than the end of the longest toe, after walking around in the shoe store. All feet will move forward in shoes with any activity. Shoes should have a padded tongue, good laces, a place on the back for the Achilles tendon and plenty of shock absorption. Some shoe fitting knowledge and a few precautions will lead to happy feet for all ages. Dr. Joni Jones is a podiatrist in Sebring who can be reached at 382-3228, stop by her office at 206 West Center Avenue, Sebring or mail to P.O. Box 1719, Sebring, FL 338711719. Finding the right sports shoes for your child Foot Care Dr. Joni Jones Metro Services Finding a good fit for your child's sports shoes is important.

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A tonement Lutheran Church, ELCASEBRING The Holy W eek Schedule with Holy E ucharist will be at 9:30 a .m., led by Deacon David T horesen and several memb ers of the congregation who w ill be reading The Passion o f Jesus according to M atthew 26:36, 27:66. Maundy Thursday Service w ill be at 7 p.m., led by the R ev Jefferson Cox. The Holy E ucharist will be followed b y the stripping of the altar i n preparation of the Good F riday service which will be a t 7 p.m. on April 22. The sermon for the Good F riday service will be a r eading of the passion of J esus according to John 1 8:1-19:42. Readers will be T om Portz, Ed Graff, Lois H ess and Ron Fitzpatrick. T he Procession of the Cross a nd the Reverence to the C ross will end the service. Easter Sunday celebration s ervice with Holy C ommunion will be led by R ev. Jefferson Cox at the 9 :30 a.m. Sunday service. B runch will follow service i n fellowship hall. A von Park Church of ChristAVON PARK "The C ross: Our Greatest I mprinting" (Galatians 6: 14) w ill be the Sunday morning m essage presented by M inister Larry Roberts. The L ord's Supper is served e very Sunday. The Sunday evening servi ce will be a devotional with a fingerfood fellowship to f ollow. The church is at 200 S. F orest Ave. Call 453-4692.Christian Science ChurchSEBRING The lesson s ermon on Sunday morning i s titled "Doctrine of A tonement." The keynote is f rom I Corinthians 8:6, ...there is but one God, the F ather, of whom are all t hings, and we in him; and o ne Lord Jesus Christ, by w hom are all things, and we b y him." The church is at 146 N. F ranklin St.Christian Training Church SEBRING The Rev. Linda M. Downing will bring the message titled "More Seals Opened: Part 2" at the Sunday morning service. The Wednesday night Bible study will continue the book of Hebrews. Eastside Christian ChurchLAKE PLACID Bill Lewis will be in concert on Wednesday at 6 p.m. After the concert, there will be a time of refreshment and fellowship in Agape Hall. Wednesday evening's midweek adult Bible study and discussion time is an informal setting with open discussion and studying the Scriptures. This Sunday will be the monthly potluck, so there will not be Agape Cafe before worship.Emmanuel United Church of ChristSEBRING The Rev. George Miller will deliver the Sunday morning message "...and Afterwards" with Scripture taken from Matthew 21:1-11 on Sunday. There will be an Easter egg hunt after the 9:30 a.m. Easter service on Sunday, April 24. The church is 1.7 miles west of U.S. 27 on Country Road (Hammock Road). Call 471-1999 or visit sebringemmanuelucc.comFirst Baptist Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK The Worship Choir will be presenting the Easter Cantata "Evidence of Grace" on Sunday. Rev. Jon Beck will be speaking at the evening service. Nursery is available for the morning service. The church is at 100 N. Lake Ave. Call 453-6681 or email infor@fbcap.netFirst Baptist Church of Placid LakesLAKE PLACID On Sunday morning, Pastor Darryl George will preach the sermon entitled "John's Milieu & Message!" There will be no Sunday evening service. The Hands of Christ Food Ministry will distribute food to the needy at 4 p.m. The church is at the corner of Washington and Kemper Avenues in Placid Lakes. Call 465-5126 from 8 a.m. to noon, Monday through Thursday or e-mail the church at placidlakes@hotmail.com.First Baptist Church of SebringSEBRING First Baptist Church will host an Easter egg hunt and covered dish luncheon at the City Pier from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday for all families that have attended First Baptist activities this past year. This is Palm Sunday, and the church will celebrate with communion at the morning service. Areminder that Sunday school/Bible study is now at 9:15 a.m. and the blended church service begins at 10:30 a.m. The preschool will hold its Easter celebration in the Sanctuary at 9 a.m. on Wednesday. On Good Friday, April 22, the church office will be closed.First Christian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK Easter is quickly approaching and the choir at First Christian Church will be sharing through song this Sunday in an Easter Cantata at 10 a.m. Everyone is invited to attend the Easter worship celebration, April 25 at 10 a.m. First Christian Church of Avon Park is at 1016 W. Camphor (behind the Wachovia Bank). Call 4535334 or e-mail firstchristianap@embarqmail.com. The church website is www.firstchristianap.com.First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)SEBRING At the Lord's Table on Sunday will be Johnny Johnston and Juanita Roberts. Communion will be served by Joyce Winstel, Sandra Laufer, Carol Chandler and Jayne Weldy. Greeting the congregation will be Bill and Carolyn Hineline. Leading the Call to Worship will be Carolyn Hineline. Michael and Carol Graves will be working with Children's Church. Lighting the candles during the month of April will be Daniel Thibodeau. Sherry Kunsak will be with the children in the nursery during the month of April. The guest speaker for Sunday is Dr. Desmond Walke,r whose message is from Matthew 21:1-11, "Sharing in the Passion of Christ."First Presbyterian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK On Sunday, the choir will present the Easter cantata during the worship service entitled "Where Are the Shepherds Now?" Maxine Johnson, adult Sunday school teacher, continues the study of David in II Samuel 12 in which Nathan rebukes David. Wendy Garcia teaches the youth class and discusses issues of today and how the Bible instructs us. On Wednesday morning, Bible study with Pastor Johnson continues the study of Revelation. On Thursday, en's Fellowship will meet at The Depot at 7 a.m. for breakfast and then return to the church www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011Page 7B RELIGION The Bible puts a lot of e mphasis on family. It is the b ackbone of the church and t he backbone of any nation. O nce upon a time we were c onsidered the greatest n ation in the world. That w as a time when divorce w as frowned upon and peop le learned to work through t heir problems. That was b ack when we still had p rayer in school, the Pledge o f Allegiance, and corporal p unishment. We became a nation of anything goes," and "no o ne can tell me what to do." R ebellion and selfishness c ause us to become immune t o life's teachings and b ecome bigger fools than we a lready were. Now we have a nation that i s primarily filled with sing le parent homes and having m ultiple partners and child ren who have no idea who t heir fathers are, or they h ave fathers who don't want t o be part of the children's l ives. We have lost our backb one. There is no family u nity. Many of the families I do s ee are in crisis and picking e ach other apart. Is it any w onder our nation is falling a part? We make heroes and idols o ut of celebrities who don't h ave a clue how to be happy. W e place all of our value on the outward appearance and the things money can buy. We hold our hands out to our government and expect the government to take care of us so we can spend our money any way we want to. Philippians 4:19 says, "But my God shall supply all of your needs according to His riches in glory by Christ Jesus." It doesn't say the government will supply all of our needs. But the government has decided to kick the church out of the caring business and it took over. But there is hope. 2 Chronicles 7:14 says, "If my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways, then will I hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin, and I will heal their land." This is the answer to having strong families, to getting our backbone back in place. What are you willing to do to have a strong family and help our nation get back on the right track? Aleta Kay can be reached at themarriagementor@yahoo.com We've lost our backbone The Marriage Mentor Aleta Kay Church News Continued on page 8B Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Maranatha Baptist Church Choir and Drama Team will present an Easter musical drama, "Rise Again," at 7 p.m. Friday, April 22 and 6 p.m. Sunday, April 24. The drama depicts the followers of Christ giving their account of the events leading up to the crucifixion, their emotions at his death and their joy at his resurrection. It closes with the anticipation of Jesus'return to earth to claim those who have believed in Him. Directed by Jan Burgess, she is assisted by Pat Seddon, who directs t he drama. Accompanists a re Judy Tinkham and An n Truax. Soloists are Joan ne Snyder, Joe Chapman, Ga ry Hanson, David Waite an d Stan Mohr. Drama parts a re played by Joanne Snyde r, Virgil Ertle, Way ne Mattson, Leon Moody, St an Mohr, Valene Douglas an d Jim Sheppard. The public is invited to attend. The church is at 3 5 Maranatha Blvd., o ff Arbuckle Creek Road, tw o miles east of SR-17 Nor th in Sebring. For more info rmation, call 382-4301 or 382-8594. Maranatha Baptist presents Rise Again' Courtesy pho to Gary Hanson (from left), Joe Chapman, David Waite, as the Pharisees, in a song segment from the Maranatha Baptist Church musical Rise Again'. The drama will be presented Friday, April 22 and Sunday, April 24.

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Page 8BNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. children's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. children's mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing God's Heart and Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and women's prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the "Place to discover God's love." For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mother's Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) "Where the old fashion gospel is preached." Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the "Son" always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. JosŽ Gonz‡lez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Friday 5-7 p.m., every Saturday 9-11 a.m. and 3-3:45 p.m., first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lord's Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building God's Kingdom for Everyone." "Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!" Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is "Jesus is First at First Christian Church."Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures'by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP f or a short Bible study and then to a member's house for a work proje ct. AMaundy Thursday service w ill be at 6:30 p.m. Holy C ommunion will be observed. The church is at 215 E. Circle S treet (with two entrances on L agrande Street). Call 453-3242.First Presbyterian Church of SebringSEBRING "Are We Ready F or the King to Come?" is the title o f Sunday morning's sermon given b y the Rev. Darrell A. Peer. Deacon's meeting is Monday at 4 p.m. in the conference room. T uesday, Grief Support Group m eets at 3 p.m., adult classroom. M en's Prayer Breakfast on T hursday is at 8 a.m. at Sandy's on t he highway. Maundy Thursday Communion S ervice will be at 7 p.m. in the s anctuary. The Easter Sunrise Community S ervice, April 24, 7 a.m. in the s anctuary. Good Friday Community service w ill be held from 1:30-3 p.m. at St. J ohn Methodist Church on April 2 2.Heartland Christian ChurchSEBRING Pastor Ted Moore's sermon this week will be "How Great The Love" with Scripture from I John 3:1-3. Service will also include Heartland Singers depicting The Last Supper and singing "The Broken Rose;" Ernest Scheeres singing "I'm Free;" Mina West singing "The Holy City;" and Walle Woodworth singing "I Walked Today Where Jesus Walked." There will be a special program on Easter Sunday. The Adult Bible Study on Tuesday will be taught by Pastor Ted Moore Wednesday night are the Young Adult and Children's Programs taught by George Kelly, Jon & Amanda Armentrout and Toby Cribbs. It features a free meal. The church is at 2705 Alternate Route 17 South in Sebring (behind Publix) Look for the lighthouse. Call 314-9693.Memorial United Methodist ChurchLAKE PLACID On Palm/Passion Sunday, the sermon topic will be "What Will You Leave at the Cross?" using Mark 15:12-41. The Rev. Fred Ball will preach in the Sanctuary at the Heritage (traditional) service and the Celebration (blended) service. Claude Burnett, pastoral assistant, will preach at the New Song (Contemporary) Service in Rob Reynolds Fellowship Hall. Nursery care is available for all morning events in the Creepy Crawly Clubhouse. Children's Church meets in the Sanctuary for Wiggletime and then moves to the SonShine Clubhouse. Youth Group for sixth through 12th grade meets at the Lighthouse and Sunday evening Bible fellowship, with the Rev. Fred Ball, meets at the Chapel. The church is at 500 Kent Ave. Call 465-2422.Parkway Free Will Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Sunday morning Bible lesson, "Hosanna!" is taken from the book of Mark 11. Pastor Jim Scaggs will bring the Sunday morning and evening messages. The Wednesday evening service will be praise, prayer and Bible study. The end-of-the-month-sing is next April 24.Resurrection Lutheran ChurchAVON PARK On Palm Sunday, the sermon will be based on Matthew 26. Coffee and fellowship follows the last service in Burke Hall. The Busy Bodies meet Monday in Burke Hall. Choir practice is Thursday afternoon.St. John United Methodist ChurchSEBRING On Palm Sunday, Rev. Ronald De Genaro's sermon will be "The Triumph of Jesus" taken from Matthew 21:1-11. Maundy Thursday's sermon at 7 p.m. is "Jesus, the Servant" with Scripture from John 13:1-17. Holy Communion will be served. Community Good Friday service is at 1:30 p.m., April 22.Sebring Church of the BrethrenSEBRING This is Palm Sunday. Pastor will be preaching on "The Sign of Humility." The Scripture reading will be from Matthew 21:1-11. Sunday school meets n the Fidelis Room. They will be studying "Hosanna!" They will also be looking at the Scripture Mark 11:111. Southside Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Rev. David Altman will speak in the morning worship service on "Heart Issues" from Colossians 3:12-17. Children's church and a nursery are available. The Sunday evening service will be focused on "A House of Prayer For All Nations." Monday at 1 p.m., Women for Missions will meet. The church is at 379 S. Commerce Ave. Call 385-0752.The Way ChurchSEBRING Pastor Reinhold Buxbaum will be bringing a Palm Sunday message. The Lord's Supper will be celebrated. Amovie will be shown at 6:30 p.m. Sunrise Service on the Circle a t is at 7 a.m. Sunday morning. Breakfast following at the church The Way Church is at 1005 North Ridgewood Drive. Church phone is 471-6140. Pastor's cell i s 214-6190. For church informatio n and the pastor's messages go to www.thewaychurch.org .Union Congregational ChurchAVON PARK Saturday nigh t service in Millennium Church is with Pastor Tiger Gullett. Sunday morning services are in Historic Church early, followed b y two services in the Millennium Church with Pastor Bill Breylinge r. There are two Wednesday night services: "Life Is Now" with Past or Gullett in Solid Grounds and "Crosstalk" in the Historic Churc h with Pastor Breylinger. Nursery/childcare up to fifth grade is available for all services in portables across from Millennium Church with Jerry Lee Wright. Continued from page 7B RELIGION Church News

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011Page 9B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer .Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun 'N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid C ity" Children's Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, "prime-timers," and Bible s tudies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Children's Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and children's church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Children's & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kid's World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturer's Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Children's Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of God's Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and children's church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Women's Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m. in the sanctuary. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Children's Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on life's journey, you're we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP RELIGION Garage sale planned for Benevolence MinistryLAKE PLACID The F irst Presbyterian Church, 1 17 N. Oak Ave., is having a B enevolence Ministry garage s ale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. t oday and Saturday in F riendship Hall.Palm Sunday Concert includes Praise MusicSEBRING Praise Music e xpressed in sign language a nd interpretive dance will be f eatured at 6 p.m. Sunday at W hisper Lake Mobile Home C lubhouse on Memorial D rive. Afree-will offering w ill be received.Danny Ray Harris in concertLAKE PLACID Christian Country Male V ocalist of the Year for 2010, D anny Ray Harris, will be in c oncert Sunday at Leisure Lakes Baptist Church. Harris has delighted groups across America with his country gospel music. Danny, who has a large following in cowboy churches and rodeo's, will share music and testimony during the 11 a.m. service, followed by dinner on the grounds. The church is just off Miller Road at the western end of Lake June in the Leisure Lakes section of Lake Placid. Everyone is welcome. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information.Kiwanis hosts Good Friday Prayer BreakfastSEBRING The Kiwanis Club of Sebring will present its annual Good Friday Prayer Breakfast, a nondenominational event, at 7 a.m. Friday, April 22 at Florida Hospital Heartland in Conference Room 1. The program will be emceed by Joe Delph, youth minister for First Baptist Church of Sebring, and the featured speaker will be Dr. David Richardson, pastor for First Baptist Church of Sebring. Richard Barron, executive director of Mission & Ministries of Florida Hospital, will deliver the invocation and pledge of allegiance. The flag presentation will be done by Cub Scout Pack 846 and special music will be performed the Sebring High School Show Choir. The price for breakfast will be $10 and profits will be used to benefit Youth for Christ, Cub Scout Pack 846 and the Sebring High School Show Choir. Everyone is encouraged to attend and invite their clergy to this special event. For more information or to purchase tickets, contact chairman Alan Kent at 3816901, Tayna Taylor at 3813973 or Grace Plants at 2731421.LP Ministerial Association plans Holy Week servicesLAKE PLACID Sponsored by the Lake Placid Christian Ministerial Association, Holy Week 2011 Community Services are as follows: Worship service at noon at First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, 119 E. Royal Palm St. The phone number is 4653721. Lunch served daily at 12:30 p.m., immediately following service in fellowship hall. Cost is $5 per person. Music daily by Bill Lewis Ministries. Monday, April 18: Message by Fred Ball of Memorial United Methodist Church. Menu includes burger or hot-dog with sauerkraut, macaroni and cheese, coleslaw, chips and coconut chocolate cake. Tuesday, April 19: Message by Willie Mincey, Cornerstone Hospice. Menu includes turkey tetrazinni, broccoli cauliflower carrot mix, green salad, roll and strawberry dessert. Wednesday, April 20: Message by Ray Cameron, First Presbyterian Church. Menu includes: Greek chicken, roasted potatoes, carrots, green/Greek salad, roll and banana cake. Thursday, April 21: Message by Richard Norris, Trinity Lutheran Church. Menu includes meatloaf, rice/tomato gravy, collards, biscuit, eclair dessert. Friday, April 22: Message by Brett Morey, First Baptist Church of Lake Placid. Menu includes baked ham, sweet potatoes, scalloped cabbage, cranberry Jell-O salad, roll and pumpkin dessert.Easter Week Services at FPCLAKE PLACID First Presbyterian Church in Lake Placid will host the following services this Easter Week: On Palm Sunday, April 17: Special music featuring children's choir, Worship Singers, and Praise Ringers. Maundy Thursday, Apri l 21 (Friendship Hall), a potluck dinner at 6:30 p.m., (m-z, side dish, vegetable, salad, or dessert; a-l, main dish or meat) followed by a Communion service. There will be special music by the Praise Trio as well as congr egational singing of both con temporary and traditional music. Anursery from infant to 4 year-olds will be available. Friday, April 22 at 7 p.m., Good Friday Service Anursery from infant to 4 years old will be available. In addition to congregational songs, there will be special music from the Worship Singers, the Gospel Heirs an d a contemporary flute solo. Saturday, April 23 from 9-11 a.m. Easter Family Celebration. Atime for children, to learn about the true meaning of Easter through fun and games. Snapshots Continued on page 10B

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Page 10BNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.com Sunday, April 24 Easter Sunday, 8 :15, 9:30, and 11 a.m. worship service s. Worship Singers and the Orchestra w ill provide special music at the tradit ional worship services and the Praise t eam at the contemporary worship servi ce. On Easter Morning, the Special E vents/ Celebration Committee will be h osting a refreshment stand under the t ent on the front lawn. The committee will be serving, coff ee, juice, and pastries after each servi ce. Plan to stop by and join in the cele bration of "The Risen Christ" and fell owship with one another. The church is at 117 N. Oak Ave. ( phone 465-2742).Frostproof Good Friday ServiceFROSTPROOF Each year the F rostproof Ministerial Association h osts an evening Good Friday Service a t an area church. Due to larger attend ance, this year the service will be held a t the American Legion Post 95 auditor ium in the historic City Hall building, 1 11 W. First St. in downtown F rostproof. The service begins at 7 p .m. Friday, April 22, The message will b e "The Road to Calvary Jesus'Final W eek." Members of the Ministerial A ssociation will each bring Scripture a nd a five-minute teaching. This style o f tag team teaching has become a popu lar format for the Frostproof commun ity services held Good Friday, T hanksgiving and Christmas each year. B ring a friend or family member for t his special evening. For more information, contact Pastor B rian Smith at First United Methodist C hurch at (863) 635-3107.Community Good Friday service plannedSEBRING Community Good F riday service will be held on April 22 from 1:30-3 p.m. at St. John United Methodist Church, Grand Prix Drive (behind Walmart). The theme of the service is "Tracing the Steps of Jesus" and will follow the path of Christ from the Upper Room to the burial in six brief segments. Each segment will include a Scripture, meditation and congregational response. Participants include: Major Bruce Stefanik, Salvation Army; Rev. Gary Kindle, Faith Lutheran; Deacon James McGarry, St. Catherine Catholic; Rev. Lester Osbeck, Calvary Church; Rev. Cecil Hess, Palms of Sebring; Rev. George Miller, Emmanuel United Church of Christ; Rev. Keith Simmons, Sebring Church of the Brethren; Rev. Fred Jeans, Kenilworth Care Center; Rev. Ronald DeGenaro, Host Pastor; Rev. Steve Hagen, Alliance Church; Rev. Darrell Peer, First Presbyterian; Rev. A.C. Bryant, First United Methodist; Rev. David Springer, Hope Hospice; Rev. Sheila Swanger, St. John United Methodist; Mr. David Averill, St. John United Methodist. Special music will include the Sounds of Sebring Male Quartet; the choir of the host church and Soloist, Robert Faldorf. The freewill offering received will benefit the ministerial relief fund of the Sebring Ministerial Association, which is sponsoring this annual service. The public is cordially invited to participate in this ecumenical service. For further information, call 382-1737.First Baptist announces Easter service timesLAKE PLACID First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, 119 E. Royal Palm St., will host the following services for Easter: Sunday, April 24 8-9 a.m. traditional service; 9:15-10:30 a.m., contemporary service; and 10:45 a.m. to noon, contemporary service. There will be no evening service.Church Women United meet May 6SEBRING The next meeting of Church Women United will be held on Friday, May 6 at Spring Lake Presbyterian Church, 5887 U.S. 98. This location is about seven miles east of U.S. 27 and the church is on the south side. The doors will open at 10 a.m. and the celebration will begin at 10:30 a.m. This celebration is open to the public. At this meeting refreshments will be delayed until after the program. Bring a sandwich wrapped to share. The group will provide something to drink. This is a special service to collect the "least coin" (pennies) that members have collected during the past year. Bring a friend and a sandwich and enjoy the company of fellow church women. For additional information call Alice Koster at 382-2819.St. Agnes announces Holy Week plansSEBRING The schedule for St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3840 Lakeview Drive, for Holy Week services is as follows: April 17, Palm Sunday 7:45 and 10 a.m. April 21, Maundy Thursday 7 p.m. April 22, Good Friday noon April 24, Easter Sunday Sunrise Lakefront Service, 6:30 a.m.; Rite I, 7:45 a.m.; and Rite II, 10 a.m. There will be an egg hunt between Rite I and Rite II services for all children.Easter Sunrise Service on Lake Reedy FROSTPROOF The Frostproof Ministerial Association's Community Easter Sunrise Service will be held at 6:30 a.m. Sunday, April 24 at the east end of Wall Street in historic downtown Frostproof. This year the event is hosted by the First Baptist Church of Frostproof. Watch the sunrise over Lake Reedy, renew your relationship with your heavenly Father and fellowship with friends and neighbors. Bring your own chair if you can. For more information, call (863) 635-3603. Continued from page 9B Courtesy photo The Front, a youth ministry from Bradenton, will take time from working with as many as 42 churches in the Bradenton/Sarasota area to come to Crossroads Fellowship Church on Sunday. RELIGION Special to the News-SunSEBRING All generat ions are invited to gather for a n event with The Front, a y outh ministry from B radenton. The Front embraces b elievers from all walks of l ife, passionately pursuing t he presence of Lord in wors hip. They work together w ith as many as 42 churches i n the Bradenton/Sarasota area. The Front gathers for worship, ministry of the Word, intercession for different causes, they promote life, do outreaches and are involved in missions as well as other ministries. Come join leaders John and Michelle Storsky at 6 p.m. Sunday at Crossroads Fellowship Church, 605 State Road 66 in Sebring. The Front in concert at Crossroads Fellowship Snapshots Since the fall of man in the Garden of Eden, God has reached out to reconcile humanity to himself. After man had disobeyed God by taking the forbidden fruit, God demanded that an animal be killed for his atonement. After God delivered the Commandments to Moses, He had Aaron make a sacrifice for himself, his house, and for the people. This was a sanctifying act of consecration. The slain animal would provide a covering for the sin of the people. The entire ritual of the high priest sacrificing the animal, entering into the Holy place, and sprinkling the blood on the mercy seat, would hold a powerful symbolic meaning. You see, this was a part of God's unfolding plan of Redemption. Our sin is intolerable to a righteous holy God. Sin leads to death: therefore, no sinful person deserves a place in heaven and the hope of eternal life. But God in His mercy, had one option to spare mankind from condemnation: that is, to allow a perfect substitute be punished in the stead of sinful man. In the Old Testament, the goat would be that sacrifice on the Day of Atonement. The blood of a goat would be shed for the sin of the people. Leviticus 17:11 says, "For the life of the flesh is in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the altar to make an atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul." Another goat would be the sin-bearer and would be freed outside the camp, hence signifying their sins were gone, to be remembered no more. The high priest had to perform this ceremony every year for the sins committed. But the final sac rifice came centuri es later in the person of Jesus Christ. Having fulfilled hundreds of prophe cies that He indeed was the Messiah, Jesus died in the place of man. He was proclaimed by John the Baptist as "the Lamb of God which taketh away the sin of the world." He was our High Priest wh o entered into the Holy of Holies in the presence of God and sprinkled his own blood on the mercy seat. This appeased God and per mitted His favor on man whose sin is forgiven. Jesus died once and for all. As he died upon the cross at Calvary, He cried, "It is finished." Indeed, the debt for sin had been paid i n full. Hebrews 10:12 says of Jesus, "But this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God." "The Father sent the Son to be the Saviour of the world." Do you realize that Jesus died in your place? You cannot pay for your sin by being a good person or trusting religion. You must acknowledge your sin debt and need of forgiveness through Jesus Christ. Belie ve on Jesus alone for your soul's salvation. It was his blood that purchased your soul's pardon. Why neglect so great a salvation? Must two be pun ished for the sin of one? Le t not Christ's death in your place be in vain. He did no t remain dead, but arose from the grave, just as He said H e would. Is there room in you r heart for Him? Luke Knickerbocker is the pastor of Bethel Baptist Church in Lake Placid, 216 E. Park St. E-mail him at knickprint@yahoo.com. The church Web site is visitbethelbaptist.com. The final sacrifice Timeless Treasure Luke Knickerbocker Are you are the kind of p erson who thrives off of s uccess, rewards and recogn ition? If so, I can relate. In r ecent years, I have learned t hat there is nothing wrong w ith achieving great things i n life or being gifted in vari ous areas of life. However, I came to the r ealization through studying G od's word and developing a personal relationship with J esus Christ that my heart a nd motives needed to be c hanged. I needed to learn w hat true humility was and t hat everything I do in life s hould be for God's honor a nd glory. Finally, my outw ard actions needed to e xemplify Christ-like chara cter. As believers, God takes g reat delight in making us m ore like Christ. One particu lar quality in our lives that i s very pleasing to the Lord i s humility. Achieving C hrist-like humility can be d ifficult due to our human s in nature we are born with. T he big question to consider i s "what is true humility?" G od's word has given many e xamples of Jesus modeling h umility for us. As human beings, many o f us may have the tendency t o consider ourselves better t han others or that we should not have to do certain things in life that others do. Sometimes, we may even choose to disassociate with certain people because of status. Galatians 6:3 says, "For if anyone thinks himself to be something, when he is nothing, he deceives himself." Another way to describe this kind of attitude that some of us may have is pride. God tells us in I Peter 5: 5 that in submitting to Him, we should choose to humble ourselves. "Yes, all of you be submissive to one another, and be clothed with humility, for God resists the proud, But gives grace to the humble.'" Jesus was our greatest example of someone who showed true humility. He was the Son of God, but He still remained humble. Jesus knew the high position that He would have with His Father as our Wonderful Counselor, Prince of Peace, Mighty God, and Everlasting Father. However, even though He would hold such a title as this, He portrayed Himself to be just like us. Matthew 21:1-11 tells about Jesus'entry into Jerusalem. The people praised Him as He was passing through by shouting in Verse 9, "Hosanna to the Son of David! Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the Highest!" Verse 10 tells how the people were so amazed and some questioned who He was. From our perspective in today's society, we would expect someone of this status to drive through in a limousine. In Jesus'day maybe it would have been expected that He would have entered in by carriage decorated with fine jewels or something similar. However, he rode in on a donkey to display the same humility leaving this life just as He entered it. Following the celebration of Jesus'entry into Jerusalem, Jesus spent some extra time with His disciples at a Passover Feast as He knew His time with them on earth would be coming to an end soon. He wanted to show His true unconditional love and faithfulness to them all the way to the end of His life on earth (Matthew13:1). Jesus modeled His love and humility in Verse 4 by washing the disciples'feet, and wiped them with a towel that had been tied around His own body. Doesn't it seem as though the disciples should have been washing His feet? After all, He was the son of God! Jesus sat with His disciples and explained why He washed their feet in John 13:12-17. "Do you know what I have done to you? You call Me Teacher and Lord, and you say well, for so I am. If I then, your Lord and Teacher; have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another's feet. For I have given you an example, and that you should do as I have done to you. Most assuredly, I say to you, a servant is not greater than his master; nor is he who is sent greater than he who sent him. If you know these things, blessed are you if you do them." Finally, let's remember what Jesus has said, "For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many." (Mark 10:45) Bible shows us what true humility is Come To The River Leslie Deese Courtesy pho to Jeanne Johnson of the Women of St James Catholic Church presents proceeds from a recent charity drive known as Undies Sundays Drive to Manna volunteer Pauline Vogt. Undies Sundays Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun

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Associated PressNEWYORK Apress conference for John Travolta's latest project, "Gotti: Three Generations," had a surprise guest: Lindsay Lohan. The 24-year-old actress has been rumored to be up for the role of Victoria Gotti, daughter of the infamous "Dapper Don" John Gotti. Producer Marc Fiore confirmed Tuesday that he's in talks with Lohan, whom he called "a terrific actress," but said nothing had been finalized. Lohan, who has starred in such films as "Mean Girls" and "Freaky Friday," sat in the front row at the press conference and posed for photos with the cast and crew but didn't talk to the press. She has been plagued by legal problems in recent years and is now battling a felony grand theft charge in California over a $2,500 necklace. Travolta, 57, will star as John Gotti, the well-dressed leader of the legendary Gambino crime family, who had a knack for evading convictions on a variety of mob indictments brought against him, earning him the nicknames Dapper Don and Teflon Don. Gotti finally was convicted in 1992 of murder and racketeering and died in prison a decade later. At the press conferenc e, Travolta talked about co nnecting to the Gotti role on a deeper level. He said he h ad talked to one of Gotti's su rviving sons, John "Junio r" Gotti. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011Page 11B By CHRISTYLEMIRE APMovie CriticRobert Redford's latest film, "The Conspirator," explores a time in American history that most of us probably never knew about, or at least forgot: the 1865 trial of Mary Surratt, a boarding house owner whose son was suspected of helping John Wilkes Booth assassinate Abraham Lincoln. It should be tense and thrilling, full of rich, powerful performances; instead, it'll make you feel like you should be taking notes in preparation for a high-school exam. And like the last film Redford directed, the terrorism drama "Lions for Lambs," it's painfully preachy and sanctimonious. James McAvoy stars as Frederick Aiken, a 28-yearold Civil War hero for the Union who's now the lawyer assigned to defend Mary (Robin Wright), the lone woman charged in the case. Being young and idealistic and functioning as the kind of character Redford himself would have played decades ago Aiken says he doesn't know whether Mary is guilty of conspiracy, but he feels she deserves a fair trial. The entire nation is against her and against him, too, by association. But Kevin Kline, as the power-hungry Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, makes it clear that someone must pay for the president's death. It may as well be Mary Surratt. Redford's film, based on a script by James D. Solomon, is stately and respectable to a fault: It's too safe. It feels the need to bang us over the head with how important it is. And Redford is trying way too hard to make these events from a century and a half ago seem like a relevant metaphor for where we are as a nation post-9/11. Nobody ever evolves here; "The Conspirator" doesn't offer characters so much as human representations of principles. Aiken is always determined and high-minded (and Alexis Bledel as his girlfriend is always sweet and boring.) Mary remains the stoic martyr, proudly prepared to do whatever she must to protect her son, until the very end. Stanton is always unscrupulously conniving and out for blood. Even the film's aesthetic motif is static and suffocating. Redford (with the help of cinematographer Newton Thomas Sigel) shoots nearly all his interiors the same way: dark rooms pierced with shafts of misty, unforgivin g sunlight. Whether they' re meant to provide enlighte nment or cast blame, they fe el repetitive. Sure, "The Conspirato r" has an excellent, pedigre ed supporting cast includin g Tom Wilkinson, Col m Meaney, Danny Huston an d Stephen Root in one gre at scene. (Justin Long, mea nwhile, shows up with t he worst fake facial hair know n to mankind as one of Aiken 's fellow soldiers, and his pre sence feels awkward and w ay too contemporary.) But then, Wilkinson, as Aiken's superior, is saddl ed with clunky lines like: "I t's time to heal the nation, n ot wage more war." Even an actor of his vers atility and stature can't ma ke that sound like anything b ut what it is: a lecture. DIVERSIONS DearAbby: C ould you please r eprint a letter you r an a few years a go about the dang ers of purchasing a pet rabbit for c hildren at Easter? A s a rabbit owner f or eight years, I 'm all too famili ar with the misconceptions a nd ridiculous theories a ssociated with these d elightful creatures. Every p oint in that letter rang t rue to me, and I beg anyo ne considering giving a c hild a rabbit to reconsider. When I bought my b unny, it was near Easter t ime. Most pet stores didn 't offer them, and I was t old it was because of the l arge number of rabbits f ound dead or abandoned o n the streets because the s elfish, inhumane people w ho bought them for the h oliday disposed of them t he next day. These dear l ittle animals deserve owne rs who will love and r espect them. Please don't w aste their lives. Caitlin in L.A. DearCaitlin: I'm happy t o oblige. The letter you r equested carries an import ant message that can't be r epeated often enough: DearAbby: Easter is c oming. Many families s till purchase live rabbits a s pets for their children. P arents often think rabbits a re good "starter" pets and d on't understand what they a re getting into. As a r esult, many of these poor c reatures end up in animal s helters, and children learn t hat pets are disposable. Before getting rabbits, p eople should consider: 1. Are they willing to m ake a seven-to-10-year c ommitment? That is the a verage lifespan of a rabb it. 2. What will happen if t heir child gets bored with t he bunny after six m onths? 3. Is there a place in t heir house for a rabbit c age? 4. Are they willing to p ay to get it s payed/neutered and prov ide vet care? 5. Do they know that m ost rabbits hate to be h eld? Will their child a ccept that? 6. Are they willing to ensure that children under 7 won't pick up the rabbit without supervision? Rabbits are fragile; their legs or spine will break if accidentally dropped. 7. Can they provide three hours of exercise every day in an escapeproof area outside its cage? 8. Do the adults want the rabbit, too? Arabbit should be a family pet. If people have questions about rabbits and their care, please ask them to contact my organization. We are happy to answer questions. Our Web site is www.rabbitnetwork.org, and our phone number is (781) 431-1211. Finally, if a rabbit is right for you and your family, please adopt one from a shelter or rescue group. You'll enrich your family with a new member and also teach your kids the value of saving a life. Thank you. Suzanne Trayhan, president, House Rabbit Network DearSuzanne: The topic of bunnies, baby chicks and ducklings as Easter gifts is one that recurs every year. I hear from people who work in animal shelters deploring the fact that these helpless little creatures are later dumped when they cease to be novelties. I hope readers will take to heart what you have written, particularly the suggestion that if a rabbit is going to be adopted, a shelter or rescue group can be an excellent resource. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. To receive a collection of Abby's most memorable and most frequently requested poems and essays, send a business-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby Keepers Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included in the price.) Bunnies bought for Easter often wind up in shelters Dear Abby The American Film Compa ny Robin Wright Penn stars as Mary Surratt in The Conspirator.' The Conspirator' is stately to a fault Movie Review The Conspirator' Rating: PG-13 (some violent content) Running time: 122minutes Review: (of 4) Lohan in talks for role in Travolta's Gotti biopic By DAVID BAUDER APTelevision WriterNEWYORK What do ABC's "Off the M ap," NBC's "America's Next Great R estaurant" and CBS'"Chaos" have in comm on? It won't be longevity, based on last week's N ielsen Co. ratings. Every television season h as more failures than successes, and these n ew shows appear to be misses. The medical drama "Off the Map" had 3.8 m illion viewers last Wednesday, a little more t han a third of the audience for another new s how, the CBS spinoff "Criminal Minds: S uspect Behavior" in the same 10 p.m. ET t ime slot. That time is becoming increasingly d ifficult for the networks to program, with only CBS'"The Mentalist" on Thursday finishing among Nielsen's top 10 shows. "America's Next Great Restaurant," an attempt at creating a new reality franchise, has flopped for NBC. The new CBS drama "Chaos" had 5.7 million viewers last week, considered a weak showing for that network. Competition dominated prime-time network TV, with the top shows being "American Idol," "Dancing With the Stars" and CBS'airing of Connecticut's victory over Butler in the NCAAmen's basketball championship. The premiere of Fox's "Breaking In" was the most-watched new Fox sitcom in five years, although it kept less than half the audience from its "Idol" lead-in. Not every new show is ratings winner for networks

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LIVING 12B PAGE News-Sun Friday, April 15, 2011 WHEN SHOPPING Reduce distractions, such as using a cellphone, while walking to your car. Always park in well-lit areas. Limit the amount of valuables you carry to minimize potential loss. Do not leave packages in your car and return to stores. If you make a valuable purchase, go straight home. Do not overload yourself with packages. Use will-call and curbside package pickup services instead. Make a plan ahead of time in case your children become separated from you.WITH YOUR VEHICLE When your vehicle is unattended, don't leave the windows down. And remember to lock the car. Take valuables with you and lock anything you must leave behind in your trunk. Don't leave anything in plain sight. If you can't hide an item in your trunk or car, take it home before going elsewhere, suggests Sgt. Thomas Palmer of the Broward (Fla.) Sheriff's Office. Don't forget about cellphones or other electronics you are charging in the console. Copy down serial numbers on any electronics to make recovery easier. Take as little with you as necessary when making routine trips to the store, school and other places. If you can, park inside your garage instead of in the driveway. AT THE ATM Use ATMs you are most familiar with in well-lit, wellplaced areas. Be aware of your surroundings, particularly at night. If you see suspicious people, do not use the machine. Have your card in hand as you approach the ATM. Don't wait to get to the ATM and then look for it. Be careful that no one can see you enter your PIN on the keyboard. Use your body to shield the keyboard. Do not count or display money from the ATM. Put your money into a pocket or purse and count it later. Be cautious when strangers offer to help if you are having difficulty with a transaction. If using a drive-up ATM, be sure passenger windows are rolled up and all doors are locked.AROUND TOWN If you notice another car following you, drive to the nearest police station or busy, well-lit area. Call 911. Make a habit of locking your car doors and closing your windows immediately when you get in your car, even before you fasten your seatbelt. Always lock car doors and take the keys when you leave your car, even if you'll be gone for just a short time. Don't leave valuables in view in the car, even if the vehicle is locked. Thieves can smash your window and grab your purse or computer in a matter of seconds. As you walk down the street or through the parking area, walk alertly and assertively. Don't weigh yourself down with too many parcels. Do not talk on your cell phone while walking through parking areas. Thieves will assume you are distracted by the conversation and perceive you as an easy mark. If you carry a purse, hold it close to your body; if a wallet, keep it in a front pocket. When carrying a purse, take only the essentials (a driver's license, a limited amount of cash, one credit or debit card and a check or two). Don't carry irreplaceable items such as photos of grandchildren, and don't carry your original Social Security card in your purse or wallet. Don't display your cash or any other inviting targets such as cellphones, hand-held electronic games or expensive jewelry. Never leave your purse or wallet unattended in a shopping cart. Have car keys out and ready when approaching your car. Check the back seat and floor before you get in. Complete an inventory. If your valuables or credit cards are lost or stolen, you will have serial numbers and phone numbers handy.AT HOME Add decorative reinforcement plate to your doors. They can be found at most homeimprovement stores and cost around $10. Don't hide spare keys outside your home. Thieves are good snoops, especially when time is on their side. Light up your home. Use motion detectors outside and timers inside (when you're not home). Maintain landscaping. Overgrown trees and shrubs can provide hiding spaces for wouldbe thieves. Be really kind to a favorite neighbor or relative who lives nearby. Having someone you trust check on your home regularly goes a long way toward protecting your house.IN YOUR YARD Trim those trees: Keep your bushes (including hedges) trimmed to 2 or 3 feet tall. Taller bushes provide burglars good hiding spots. In addition, experts recommend the first 7 feet of branches be pruned to prevent someone from climbing to an attic or second floor. Also, you don't want your bushes or trees to obscure your view of your yard. Protect your windows: To deter break-ins, you can plant thorny bushes under windows. Bougainvillea, barberries and roses work well. Using gravel stones under windows eliminates a criminal's ability to silently prowl near your house. Anyone who walks on those will make a loud crunching noise with each step. Shine a light: Install motionactivated floodlights in out-ofreach places around your home. Lights scare away burglars and alert homeowners to potential problems outside. Just make sure they're installed so no one can tamper with them. Get a survey: Some local police departments have free survey programs for homes and businesses. Just ask for the department's crime prevention folks. Officers can look at a wide range of security issues during these evaluations, including doors, locks, windows and garages. To see if evaluation is available in your area, call your local police department.SOURCES: AMERICAN BANKING ASSOCIATION; ATMONGUARD; NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION COUNCIL; SOUTH FLORIDALAW ENFORCEMENTAGENCIES; TOM KRAEUTLER, HOSTOF THE NATIONALLY SYNDICATED RADIO SHOW "THE MONEYPIT"BYBRIANHAAS, MARIACHERCOLES ANDDANIELVASQUEZSun Sentinelhether it's a fast run to the mall to pick up a birthday gift, a stop at the ATM for some walking-around cash or merely darting out of the house to get to an appointment, too often our minds are on a million different things. Amillion different things, that is, except for one thing we should be thinking of: safety. And while we're not paying attention, we can face a vehicle break-in, a stolen PIN number or even a burglary at home. Sometimes crime is unavoidable, but there is plenty you can to do to help keep yourself, your family and your property secure. Here are some safety tips from the experts to help you prevent crime.A few reminders to keep you and your property secure Illustrations by Mark Mattern/MCTSafeguarding your vehicle requires vigilance. Create an inventory of your valuable items to keep handy in case of emergency.



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NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Friday-Saturday, April 15-16, 2011 www.newssun.com Volume 92/Number 44 | 50 cents www.newssun.com 079099401001 HighLow 87 67Complete Forecast PAGE 7A Storms possible in the afternoon Forecast Question: Do you agree with Gov. Scott that state workers should move to a 401K plan instead of pensions? Next question: Has the recent surge in gas prices made you drive less? www.newssun.comMake your voice heard at Online Inside Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453 Online: www.newssun.com Yes 54.6% No 45.4% Total votes: 130 Classifieds 9A Community Briefs2A Dear Abby 11B Editorial & Opinion4A Healthy Living 5B Lottery Numbers2A Movie Review/Times11B Police Blotter 2A Religion 7B Sports On TV 2B Index Tips to kee p you and you r property secure PAGE12B Nail biter againPanthers eke out another close win SPORTS, 1BAFA awardsMath and science honors handed out PAGE2A Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and Unknown SoldiersThis Rudy played football, too PAGE2A News-Sun staffAVON PARK Two people were arrested and $3,000 worth of methamphetamine were seized in a raid across the street from the Avon Park High School campus Wednesday night. According to the Highlands County Sheriffs Office, members of the Special Investigations Unit and the Special Response Team served a search warrant on a unit at the Las Palmas complex at 600 E. Canfield St. at around 7 p.m. Inside the apartment, deputies found 27-yearold Terry Lee Light and 22-year-old Kristy Ann Williams. They also found about 31 grams of methamphetamine, a small amount of mariju ana, drug paraphernal ia and several 12-gau ge shotgun shells. Light was charged wi th trafficking in metham phetamine, possession of methamphetamin e with intent to se ll or distribute with in 1,000 feet of a school, possessio n of a weapon or ammunition by a convicted felo n, possession of dru g paraphernalia an d possession of cannab is less than 20 grams. Williams was charg ed with possession of le ss than 20 grams of cannabis. I have personal know ledge of the time and effo rt Meth bust made near Avon Park HS Light Honoring excellence 201 1 Summit A wards See METH, page page 6 A By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER Associated PressWASHINGTON For all the complaining this time of year, most Americans actually think the taxes they pay are fair. Not that theyre cheering. Fewer people expect refunds this year than in previous years, a new Associated Press-GfK poll shows. But as Mondays filing deadline approaches, the poll shows that 54 percent believe their tax bills are either somewhat fair or very fair, compared with 46 percent who say they are unfair. Should taxes be raised to eat into huge federal deficits? Among the public, 62 percent say they favor cutting government services to sop up the red ink. Just 29 percent say raise taxes. Thats sure to be a major issue as Congre ss takes up budget legislatio n for next year and the 201 2 presidential campaign ge ts under way in earnest. O n Wednesday, Preside nt Barack Obama revived h is proposal to raise taxes o n the wealthiest America ns to help reduce governme nt borrowing. In the poll, Democra ts were more likely th an Republicans to think the ir tax bills were fa ir. Liberals and moderat es were more likely to thin k so than conservative s. Women more likely th an men. Most whites thoug ht their tax bills were fa ir; most non-whites didnt. The young and the o ld adults under 30 an d seniors 65 and above were much more likely to say their taxes were fa ir than those in their prim e Are your taxes fair? Most polled say yes See TAXES, page 3A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Lake Country Elementary School teacher Katherine Robinson was named Teach of the Year earlier this week during the Summit Awards. By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING The following individuals were honored by their respective schools as teachers of the year:District officeMary Asciutto works at the district providing support to 52 teachers and more than 500 ESE students. Elementary schoolsJill Compton is an ESE resource and guidance teacher at the Kindergarten Learning Center; Susan Gay Cook, of Avon Elementary School, taught first and second grade and is now in her first year as a physical education teacher; Ruth Lind, first grade teacher at Cracker Trail Elementary School; Berthani Hanks, second-grade teacher at Fred Wild Elementary School; Diane Noel, third grade at Lake Placid Elementary School; Pam Lanier the ESE The winners are ... See WINNERS, page 8A By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING According to florida.educationbug.org, Highlands County has 17 public schools and a total staff of 1,493 individuals who serve 11,666 students from pre-K through 12th grade. Of the nearly 1,500 employees, 697 are full-time teachers, and the balance work in direct support of the learning process or indirectly, by managing the public education bureaucracy. These people keep classrooms clean and in good repair, feed the children, keep the records and fill in mandated forms, get students safely to and from school, write grants, council students and bandage scraped knees. Thirty-six of this large and diverse group were honored during the Summit Awards Monday night 18 teachers and 18 school-related employees, each selected by their respective schools and two by the district office. Two of those 36, Teacher of the Year Katherine Robinson and SchoolRelated Employee of the Year David Lind, were selected by Robinson, Lind earn top awards See TOP, page 8A By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK The committee assembled to recall three Avon Park Council members filed their petition on Thursday morning, according to City Clerk Cheryl Tietjen. I have received three petitions and I have contacted the Supervisor of Elections, Tietjen said. The three petitions were filed around 9 a.m., she said, which starts the clock ticking for the committee to collect at least 500 signatures to get a recall vote. Recall Committee Chairperson Jennifer Aviles filed petitions on Deputy Mayor Brenda Gray and Councilmen Terry Heston and Paul Miller Thursday, and stated that she has scheduled a signing party on Saturday from 1-5 p.m. in Donaldson Park to address questions. We are planning on having several meetings over the next 30 days to organize those who have committed to getting the signatures and to educate the public. We will have several groups going door to door seeking signatures, and some have said the will host signing parties at their homes so that several can be collec ted at once, Aviles said. We will be notifying people via e-mail in t he next couple of days to assign are as where they will seek signatures. Originally, the Recall Committ ee had left Miller out of the process, b ut decided to add him because of h is overall participation in other counc il decisions. Former Avon Park Mayor To m Recall petitions filed in Avon Park Miller added to list See RECALL, page 3A News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY David Lind, Avon Elementary Schools plant operator has no trouble rounding up students for a photograph. He is as trusted as he is well-liked. (Clockwise, beginning left front) Hannah Loomis, Yari Vegas, Chase Doty, Zach Best, Allison Franza, Kate Vegas, Lind and Jaymi Culpepper.

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Page 2ANews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.com April 13 1815324043x:5Next jackpot $11 millionApril 9 101114184041x:4 April 6 21521222445x:5 April 13 27113033 April 12 918212224 April 11 913182431 April 10 1314212324 April 13 (n) 5635 April 13 (d) 9943 April 12 (n) 3283 April 12 (d) 4128 April 13(n) 00 9 April 13 (d) 98 3 April 12 (n) 91 9 April 12(d) 07 6 April 12 216224014 April 8 112436379 April 5 213212418 April 1 723323617 April 13 423394950 PB: 39 PP: 3Next jackpot $43 millionApril 9 514325356 PB: 11 PP: 4 April 6 1018415556 PB: 15 PP: 2 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The NewsSun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Wednesday, April 13: Reginald Bonds, 54, of Lake Wales, was charged with petit theft. Lamar Tyrone Chester, 24, of Avon Park, was charged with kidnap-false imprisonment of an adult, burglary with assault or battery, and battery. Drew Eli Fellin, 29, of Sebring, was charged with failure to appear reference resisting an officer without violence, possession and or use of drug equipment, and possession of marijuana. Randy Wayne Gore, 21, of Lake Placid, was charged with possession of cocaine, possession of marijuana and possession and or use of drug equipment. Dermot Healy, 47, of Lake Placid, was charged with resisting an officer, and assault on an officer, firefighter, EMT, etc. Terry Lee Light, 27, of Avon Park, was charged with possession of marijuana, possession of drug equipment, possession of amphetamine, trafficking of amphetamine or methamphetamine, and possession of a weapon or ammunition by a convicted Florida felon. John Carroll Meredith, 42, of Sebring, was charged with three counts of violation of a municipal ordinance. Cornell Randolph, 55, of Fishburg, Mass., was charged with violation of probation reference tamper/fabricate with physical evidence. George Clements Robertson, 43, of Hollywood, was charged with cruelty toward a child. Kristy Ann Williams, 22, of Avon Park, was charged with possession of marijuana. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Tuesday, April 12: Carolyn Armstead, 23, of Lake Placid, was charged with two counts of controlled substance without a prescription, petit theft, and possession and or use of drug equipment. Jesus Gilberto Avitia, 26, of Sebring, was charged with operating a motor vehicle without a valid license, and resisting an officer without violence. Pedro Fuentes-Cordero, 23, of Lake Placid, was charged with violation of a municipal ordinance. Davion Cortel Holmes, 24, of Sebring, was charged with possession of marijuana. Daiton Clark Johnson, 38, of Moore Haven, was charged with violation of probation reference knowingly driving with license suspended or revoked. Gerardo Anthony Legree, 19, of Lake Placid, was charged with battery. Jason Lee Ludwig, 34, of Avon Park, was charged with failure to appear reference purchase of cannabis. Quention Isaiha Massaline, 21, of Sebring, was charged with attempted second degree murder. Theordore McKeithan, 45, of Lake Placid, was POLICEBLOTTER Continued on page 8A Garbage pick-up change in APAVON PARK There will be no garbage pick-up on Friday, April 22. Friday garbage pick-up will move to Thursday, April 21. Thursdays garbage pickup and move to Wednesday, April 20. Please contact Public Works Sanitation Department at 452-4427 if you have questions.Butler Road closes for maintenanceAVON PARK Butler Road from County Road 64 to Riverdale Road will be closed for county maintenance from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday. Adetour will be posted. For further information, contact the Highlands County Engineering Department at 402-6877.Wauchula Idol winner performs at DeesSEBRING Agospel concert featuring former Wauchula Idol winner Tony Stockton will be held at Dees Place Restaurant on Saturday. Dinner will be served at 6 p.m. Cost is donations only. Call for reservations. Cal 471-2228.LP Merchants plan Easter egg huntLAKE PLACID The annual community Easter egg hunt will be at 9 a.m. Saturday, sponsored by the Lake Placid Merchants Association. Location is the Lake June ballfields off West Interlake Boulevard. The event is for walking babies to fifth-graders. One age group on a field at a time. Lots of toys and surprises. Call 465-1661 for more information.Ransom Band plays at DuffersSEBRING The Ransom Band will play at Duffers Sports Grille from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday. This local four-piece band will play a variety of rock, country and Top 40 tunes to keep everyone dancing. The Longshot Band wil l be at Duffers from 6-9 p.m., Friday. They will play a variety of country and original hits during dinner. Southern Style Karaoke will take to the stage after that from 9 p.m to 1 a.m. There is no cover charg e for any musical entertainment at Duffers. It is a smoke-free facility and after 9 p.m. guests must b e 21 years old or older to enter. Duffers is at 6940 U.S 27 North. For details, call 382-6339.Billy Glades plays at Music in the ParkSEBRING Billy Glades and his Florida Folk music will be at the Friends of Highlands Hammocks concert in the parks picnic area on Saturday. Concert admission is just $5 per person (accompanied children 12 and under admitted free o f charge.) Picnic baskets/coolers are welcome. Bring lawn chairs o r blankets, flashlight and bu g spray. All ticket proceeds ben efit park improvements via the Friends of Highlands Hammock. Concert performances are scheduled from 7-9 p.m. Park entrance fee of $6 per car is waived after 6 p.m. on concert nights. Call the Ranger Station fo r more information at 3866094. Benton to dedicate SRT Obstacle Course WednesdaySEBRING At 2 p.m. Wednesday Sheriff Susan Benton will dedicate the new Highlands County Sheriffs Office Special Response Teams Obstacl e Course. The course is at 12700 Arbuckle Creek Road. Lieutenant Jack Bailey, SRTleader, will be honor ing all those who aided in the development and construction of the course. Th e Special Response Team COMMUNITYBRIEFS Continued on page 5A If youve seen the 1993 film Rudy, based on a true story about a gutsy, undersized Notre Dame practice squad player who is carried off the field as a hero after the only game of his college football career, you probably havent forgotten this scene. Rudy, are you ready for this, champ? a teammate asks in the tunnel before the big game. Ive been ready for this my whole life, Rudy responds. Then you take us out on the field, the player says. On March 19, a different Rudy who once played football, Spc. Rudy Acosta, was asked by his sergeant to join him for an important mission on the treacherous battlefields of Afghanistans Kandahar province. Acosta, a 19-year-old Army medic who loved his job, had his eye on eventually practicing medicine back home in Canyon Country, Calif., after serving his country. Instead of putting on a Band-Aid, he would really treat a wound, the soldiers father, Dante Acosta, told The Unknown Soldiers. Hed really take the time to make sure a person was in good shape. That just spoke to his faith. Rudy, nearing the end of his first combat deployment, also had faith in the Afghan people. His sergeant told me that when Rudy would help the Afghans they came across, he looked at them as people in need, not as potential enemies, his dad said. By all accounts, Acosta was focused on his March 19 mission. Amid the relative calm of his base, he was also cracking jokes with a fellow soldier as they cleaned their weapons before heading into battle. Then, the battle came to Acosta and his friends. One of the guards walked past them, turned around from the hip and just started shooting, Rudys father said. Im told that this guy was hired about nine or 10 days prior. His intent all along was probably to hit as many Remembering Rudy Special to the News-SunSEBRING On Saturday, the Air Force Association of Highlands County, Chapter 17, in partnership with the School Board of Highlands County, was able to recognize Outstanding Math and Science students from all of the public schools in Highlands County along with their teachers and parents. In addition, Outstanding JROTC students and their Instructors were recognized from the three high schools. The event was an honors breakfast held at the Smith Center at Sebring High School. The guest speaker was Lt. Col. Charles Buck MacLaughlin, the current commander of the Avon Park Air Force Bombing Range and an Air Force Academy graduate. MacLaughlin talked about how the power of knowledge is significant to todays students as they compete their schooling and he also challenged the students to seek to become the next Albert Einstien or Steve Jobs. He reminded them by using a quote that can be found as the inscription by Austin Dusty Miller on the Eagle and Fledging statue located outside Mitchell Hall at the Academy: Mans Flight Through Life Is Sustained by the Power of his Knowledge. The students and their teachers were called to the stage by AFAVice President Michael Haley, where they each received congratulations from School Board Superintendent Wally Cox and AFAPresident Bill Hutchison. In addition, they were each given a certificate of recognition and a calculator memento. Here are the names of those who were recognized: Avon Elementary: math student, Dalton Whitman; science student, Francis Arnan. Cracker Trail Elementary: math teacher, Ian Belanger; math student, Grant Ritenour; science teacher, Ian Belanger; science student, Miguel Descartin. Fred Wild Elementary: math teacher, Alejandra Knott; math student, Jennifer Morales; science teacher, Alejandra Knott; science student, Eli Collins. Lake Country Elementary: math teacher, Linda Veley; math student, Kyle Petteys; science teacher, Doreen Diefendorf science student, Kendall Prescott. Lake Placid Elementary: math teacher, Cathe Gibney; math student, Sarah Lethbridge; science teacher, Dianne Jarvis; science student, Gracie Smoak. Memorial Elementary: math teacher, Patricia Skipper; math student, Nordia Simmonds; science teacher, Patricia Skipper; science student, Toni Clark. Park Elementary: math teacher, Lesley Bonini; math student, Bryce Langston; science teacher, Lynn Heacock; science student, Vijay Sharma. Sun N Lake Elementary: math teacher, Mary Comers; math student, Rachel Boyd; science teacher, Jeannie Inagawa; science student, Patrick Baker. Woodlawn Elementary; math teacher, Tim Bowers; math student, Chandler Gowan; science teacher, Tim Bowers; science student, Rachel Caldwell. Avon Park Middle: AFA honors math and science students, teachers Courtesy photo Bill Hutchison (left), Air Force Association president, congratulates Outstanding APHS JROTC student Allison Prestwood, Wally Cox, school superintendent, shakes the hand of APHS JROTC Instructor CMSGT Dennis Green (center) and Lt, Col. Buck MacLaughlin greets Maj. James Galloway (right), APHS Senior JROTC instructor, during the AFA math awards on Saturday. See AWARDS, page 6A See TAKE, page 6A

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Page 4ANews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.comTODAYSEDITORIALTODAYSLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION One trip to the grocery store is enough to remind me that the recent uptick in the stock market has no bearing on the cost of living these days. And yet, Federal Reserve Chairman, Ben Bernanke could suggest with a straight face to Congress that we are experiencing a temporary and relatively modest increase in U.S. consumer-price inflation. I suppose compared to an annual salary of close to $200,000, the price of a cucumber wouldnt matter much to an ou t of touch Washington bureaucrat. Over the last six months, crude oil, co rn and cotton rose a visibly immodest 35 pe rcent, 38 percent and 89 percent, respectively. Arecent Bureau of Labor Statistic s report confirms what our flattened wallet s already told us: food and energy prices a re on the rise. According to the report, food prices in March made the biggest gain since 1974 with a 3.9 percent increase In February, energy prices rose 3.3 perce nt and gasoline, 3.7 percent. Bernankes relatively modest comment conjures up images of the two Americas Senator John Edwards once described. On one side, you have the Washington bureaucrats, and on the othe r side are those you see roaming the groce ry aisles with clipped coupons in their hand s and corn flakes sticker-shock in their eye s. To be fair, Bernanke is technically cor rect to say that we do not have an inflation problem because, due to their pric ing volatility, the Federal Reserve does not include food and gasoline prices purchased by consumers in its calculation. But Americans arent much interested in federal government technicalities these days. They are instead focused on the newfound art of stretching those noninflated dollars to provide for their fami lies. The same people who tell us this whol e inflation business is over-inflated (pardo n the pun) also tell us the economy is on th e upswing. They call it a jobless recovery . They brag that unemployment numbers recently dropped, but somehow failed to mention that many of the jobs people recently accepted offer lower pay, fewer hours and inferior benefits in comparison to many of the 8.75 million jobs wiped o ut by the recent recession. Sure, they have jobs, but those jobs pa y much less with an ever-weaker dollar to cover much pricier consumables. So, are you feeling the positive vibes from the economic recovery yet? Me nei ther. But, we are not alone. The Bloomberg Consumer Comfort Index is a weekly poll taken since 1985 to measure Americansperceptions of the economy, personal finances and overall confidence in purchasing needed goods or services. On April 7, the index was -44.5 compare d to -43.0 a year ago, reflecting the lack of confidence Americans currently have in the economy. Somethings got to give if President Obama wants to be re-elected in 2012. And if Harvard University Economics Professor Robert J. Barros Misery Index calculations are correct, the probability o f an Obama second term is unlikely. Barro s book, Getting it Right measures what h e calls the change in misery over a presi dents term utilizing a precise formula including metrics like: the difference between the average inflation rate over a presidents term and the average inflation rate during the previous presidents term ; and the difference between the average unemployment rate over a presidents ter m and the unemployment rate during the la st month of the previous presidents term. Barros calculations are on the money. Barros Misery Index found Reagans free market years to be very good and Clintons era of big government is over (thanks to his Republican-controlled Congress) the same. Barros predictions do not look good for Obama and his anti free market advisors, which may be the reason why the administration pads unem ployment numbers and Bernanke is hesitant to admit that inflation is on the rise. Maybe someone should tell Bernanke he would get a much better view if hed spend some time in the other America. Susan Stamper Brown is a motivational speaker and military advocate and can be reached at writesusan@gmail.com her website www.susanstamperbrown.com and Facebook and Twitter. Representations of fact and opinions are solely those of the author. Relatively modest inflation? Guest Column Susan Stamper Brown Why is it were favoring the w ealthy, while abandoning school c hildren, the disabled and the elde rly? Why have so many of our e lected officials turned their b acks on our most vulnerable citi zens? It isnt as if the cuts to s ocial services will even come c lose to balancing the budget. Welcome to another example o f the Irrational Age, which is w hat future historians will be c alling this era. How rational is it, after all, to t reat our children like soda bott les on an assembly line? As if l earning is something poured into t hem one method fits all. How rational is it to scapegoat t heir teachers, treating the profession with suspicion and disrespect, as if all teachers are lazy, poorly trained and stupid? How rational is it to turn people out onto the street? Or end home programs providing support for caregivers or the house bound helping people who are working hard to build fulfilling lives, despite coping with disabilities or adversity? How rational is it to end drug programs, guaranteeing more addicts on the street? Have so many of us Americans become so insecure and hardhearted we need to create pain for others in order to feel good ourselves? In trying to gain control of our various budgets, we have long since passed the point of cutting fat. Weve even moved past cutting muscle, tendon and sinew now were dismantling the skeleton. In the process, we are killing the middle class and putting our nation at risk. When a society consciously decides to solve its problems by pushing its neediest citizens aside those with Down Syndrome, or cerebral palsy, for example, or the baby born addicted to pain killers, or the elderly individual with Alzheimers disease the time has come for true soul searching. Is there another way of doing things? Is the Pentagon wasteful? Do millionaires pay a fair share? What has become of the great American vision those bygone days when we were generous with each other and could still stand in another persons shoes? Why are we picking on the weak? W e understand the need to re-examine the nations budget. We understand the need to make difficult decisions. N o one here argues against that. It is the h ypocrisy of the process that is driving us c razy. Leave the innocent people alone E ditor: Today I learned that Valencia Group H ome will be shut down along with in-home a nd personal care services due to state fundi ng. This is very disturbing to me. Sixteen consumers will be affected. S ixteen consumers will be alone, confused a nd taken away from the only family they h ave, which is Ridge Area Arc. Although I do not work closely with these c onsumers, I am a big part of their daily r outine. I usually am the first they see b efore they get to work or school. I am the t ransportation driver. Some dont speak, some speak too much a nd some just make a lot of noise. I unders tand these individuals and respect their disa bilities. I also know that when I am not a ble to pick them up it is sometimes confusi ng to them and their behavior can be abnorm al. Most consumers do not like change and i t could be very difficult for them in their e veryday routines. I speak with experience because I have f amily members with disabilities. Put yours elf in their shoes for one week. Take away y our home, car, fancy clothing and see how y ou react. This is not the first budget cut for The R idge Area Arc Foundation. There has to be another way to cut fundi ng and not include our persons with disa bilities. Why dont you come and visit for a day? I bet you would have a change of h eart and would find other places for budget c uts. Patti Foster Sebring A nother tale of Pinocchio E ditor: Did you receive a postcard from a local c emetery? Make an appointment, take a tour o f the cemetery, listen to a presentation of s ervices, receive a $25 gift certificate from a prominent local supermarket. The $25 cert ificate would be sent in the mail, you are t old after the tour (repeating the certificate w ill be sent to you in the mail. The certific ate does not come). The manager of this prominent supermarket has no knowledge of this program, although the store was referenced on the postcard. Another call was placed to the cemetery where is the gift certificate? Reply, It was sent March 25 (of course the certificate was not received). Same conversation only moments later, (quote) We do not mail certificates out, they get lost. Surely youve heard of Pinocchio. Did I hear someone say scam? These are the facts, you be the judge. Audra Aubin Sebring BouquetsChildren learn about transportationEditor: Recently the Kindergarten Learning Center held our annual Transportation Day. The students and staff were amazed by the generosity of local businesses and individuals who sacrificed their valuable time explaining their equipment and jobs. Utilizing our parking lot and bus loop to display their trucks, cranes, and many other vehicles, the following people spent the better part of the morning with us: Greg Bubb with the Bureau of Fire and Arson Investigations, Choice Environmentals Charles Curtin, Matt Drury, Willie Knox, Cory Lindsey, Division of Forestrys Mike Liecht, Highlands County EMSs Kelly Duppenthlar, Highlands County Sheriffs Department Sergeant Chris Myers, Kenny Long and Don Welch from Longs Air Conditioning, William Sebring from Lykes Citrus, Frank Carillo from Positive Medical Transport, Billy Perez from Precision Pest Management, Progress Energys Robert Lundy Sean McManus, Troy Taylor from Truly Nolen, Justin Dumbleton Rob Singles of the West Sebring Volunteer Fire Department, and Brian Bradley, Ian Cordero, Jack Dunham, Robert Walker of the City of Sebring Public Works Department. Several parents and grandparents brought out vehicles including John Barrett, John Buice, Hoz Compton, Leo Howard, Bill Nolen, and Lance Truax. On behalf of the staff and students of the Kindergarten Learning Center, we would like to thank everyone for taking the time to reach out to everyone on our campus. It is truly a blessing to have such generous businesses donate their time to the students of Highlands County. Andrew Lethbridge Kindergarten Learning Center principalSupport of winter residents is appreciatedEditor: The tourist season is winding down with many of our snowbird friends heading back north for the summer. Your friends at the American Legion Post 74 in Sebring would like to give a hardy shout-out and many thanks to those who participated in all of the events we offered this season. For the month of March, Commander Harry Harsh did a fantastic job cooking one of the greatest corn beef and cabbage offered for St. Patricks Day. Randy (S.A.L. commander) and Doreen (Ladys Auxiliary) pitched in to help serve with nothing but compliments to the chef. The American Legion Post 74 with the help from the Kitchen Staff, offered Customer Appreciation Day on March 24. There was a wide variety of covered dishes, many from members who brought a dish to pass. Thanks to everyone who participated and for the many donations of toys and candy to help the Ladys Auxiliary put together Easter baskets for the children of veterans who are less fortunate. Thank you once again for the overwhelming response of donations to help the S.A.L. and Ladys Auxiliary with their effort to collect clothing for the month of April, for the American Red Cross. Have a safe and fun summer; we look forward to seeing you next season. Randy Sallis Commander Sons of the American Legion Squadron 74 American Legion Post 74 Sebring LETTERSPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. We have to make room for everybody. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 3851954; or e-maileditor@newssun.com. Letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011Page 5A w ill also give a demonstration followed b y closing remarks from Benton. The public is invited to attend. If you h ave further questions about the O bstacle Course or this event, contact B ailey at 402-7228. Main Street Avon Park goes socialAVON PARK Main Street Avon P ark has gone social...social medai that i s. Through the Community R edevelopment Agency (CRA) Main S treet Districts marketing initiatives, M ain Street Avon Park now has a F acebook Fan Page and a Twitter Page. Whats the benefit of social media? I n addition to acting as another comm unication avenue to get information a nd messages out about events, prog rams and happenings, social media is a lso beneficial because target audiences c an interact and provide helpful feedb ack to City leaders. Main Street Avon P ark has already gained valuable i nsight from its nearly 60 Facebook F ans when asked, Whats your f avorite thing about Main Street Avon P ark? Comments ranged from specific b usinesses, the charm of the City, to c hildhood memories. Become a Main Street Avon Park F acebook Fan (www.Facebook.com) a nd search Main Street Avon Park). A lso visit Main Street Avon Park on T witter at w ww.Twitter.com/MainStAvonPark.Free low-flow showerheadsSEBRING The Highlands Soil a nd Water Conservation District ( HSWCD) presents April Showers. T he district has been awarded a C ommunity Education Grant from the S outhwest Florida Water Management D istrict. The funds were used to purc hase low-flow shower heads to be e xchanged for citizens high-flow d evices. From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday at t he Bert J. Harris Jr. Agriculture C enter/Highlands Natural R esources/Soil and Water Conservation D istrict office at 4505 George Blvd. in S ebring, free low flow showerheads w ill be given out to all who bring in t heir old one. Celebrate Earth Day by joining the b attle to conserve water. Call 402-6545 f or more information.LPMS plans student talent showLAKE PLACID Lake Placid M iddle School is hosting a silent auct ion and student talent show. The event will be held today. The silent auction will begin at 6 p.m.; talent show begins at 7 p.m.Workshop offered on water conservationSEBRING AWater Conservation Workshop will be offered from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at Highlands County Extension Service, Bert J. Harris Agriculture Center, 4509 George Blvd. Registration is $20 at the door (make all checks payable to Horticulture Advisory Committee). Learn how: to adjust and retrofit your irrigation system; water shortages are impacting your water supply; to build your own rainbarrel (extra $25 fee for barrel and supplies, need to preregister); to exchange your shower head for a low-flow shower head; to sign up for the Mobile Irrigation Lab; and to select and grow Florida-friendly plant material. There will be workshops and vendors present. Lunch will be provided. For more information, call Dee Dee Jacobson, Urban Horticulture agent, at 402-7140.Blood mobile makes move this weekendThe Florida Blood CentersHighlands blood mobile will be at the following locations this weekend: Friday Lake Placid Elks Lodge from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday Sebring Relay for Life at Sebring Football Field from 2-6:30 p.m. Sunday Bible Fellowship Church off Hammock Road from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Every time you donate blood you are saving three local lives. Consider donating blood. Call 382-4499 with questions.Events planned at lodges, postsLAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Moose 2374 will host music with BobKat from 6-10 p.m. today. Bingo-bango will be played at 2 p.m. Saturday. AMens Spring Fashion Show is set for evening. Dinner will be chicken cordon bleu at 6 p.m.; show will be at 7:30 p.m. with reserved seating. Tickets will be $12 per person. For details, call the lodge at 465-0131. The American Legion Placid Post 25 will host music by Gary and Shirley from 6:30-9:30 p.m. today. Karaoke with Bill will be from 5-8 p.m. Saturday. For more information, call 465-0975. The Veterans of Foreign Wars 3880 will host music by Lora Patton from 58 p.m. today. Karaoke by Cowbells from 5-8 p.m. Saturday. For details, call the lodge at 452-9853. The Lake Placid Elks 2661 will have a blood drive today. Music by Don and Allen will follow in the evening. For details, call 465-2661. SEBRING AMVETS Post 21 Ladies Auxiliary is having a breakfast from 8-11 a.m. Saturday at the Post, 2029 U.S. 27 South. Tickets are $5 and available at the Post. AMVETS Post 21 is having karaoke by Bill and Di from 7-10 p.m. Saturday at the Post. Sunday dinner at Placid Lodge canceledLAKE PLACID The Sunday dinner scheduled at Placid Lodge No. 282 F&AM has been canceled due to an outage of the air conditioning unit in the lodge. The lodge apologizes for any inconvenience and hopes to have the air conditioning working for the May 22 dinner. YMCA needs vehicle donationsSEBRING The Highlands County Family YMCAis asking for vehicle donations to help sustain the scholarship program that benefits children in the community. This scholarship program gives assistance to families that want their children to participate in a variety of programs at the Highlands County Family YMCAsuch as swim lessons, flag football, soccer, gymnastics ,summer camp etc. The YMCAis hoping to receive a donation before summer camp begins. LP Chamber prepares for Administrative Professional LuncheonLAKE PLACID The Greater Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce annual Administrative Professional Luncheon will be held on Wednesday, April 27 at the Lake Placid Camp & Conference Center. This event is sponsored by Home & Office Essentials, Miller Central Air and Wauchula State Bank. The luncheon will be catered by the renown chefs at the Lake Placid Camp & Conference Center. Reservations are required. The eservation form and menu selection is posted on the chamber Web site at www.visitlakeplacidflorida.com. For additional information, contact the Greater Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce at 465-4331. Continued from page 5A COMMUNITYBRIEFS NEWS-SUN Special to the News-SunChange, change, r earrange, the only thing for s ure is change, said Dr. J udith Bilsky, executive vice c hancellor for academic a ffairs and student success, D ivision of Florida Colleges, F lorida Department of E ducation, in her keynote p resentation to attendees of t he Association of Florida C olleges (AFC) Region IV S pring Conference. The conf erence, Shaping the Future: I t Starts Now, was hosted by S outh Florida Community C ollege (SFCC) on April 8 o n its Highlands Campus. Bilsky presented the chall enges that people must deal w ith in both their personal a nd professional lives when f aced with change, tips to t ake control of changes, and a c hallenge to start changing c ollege studentslives. The conferences opening s ession kicked off in the S FCC University Center A uditorium, with a warm w elcome by Dr. Norm S tephens, SFCC president, a nd Dr. Robert Flores, AFC R egion IVdirector, and S FCCs director of remodeli ng, renovation, and mainten ance, followed by Bilskys k eynote presentation. Several c oncurrent break-out sess ions were held immediately f ollowing the keynote prese ntation and featured topics s uch as, More with Less P eople, Integrating Math i nto Introductory Science C lasses, Motivating Others AGood Supervisors T oolbox, New Employees are Special People, Search and Ye Shall Find: College and Statewide Online Library Sources, Serving Those Who Serve: From Solider to Student, Pediatric Simulations: Making it Real, Smarthinking Implementation and Training for Online Tutoring, Stress Management, Taking Educational Operations from Good to Great, The Millennial Student, and You + Video= YouTube: Making the Most of an Underutilized Educational Resource. The conference provided AFC members a legislative update by Traci Steen, lobbyist, associate vice president, Facilities Management and Government Relations, State College of Florida. Personality changes in this years legislative session have made the process very interesting, said Steen. Her presentation briefly highlighted bills that currently impact the Florida College System including tenure, funding, governance, and retirement and benefits. It is hard to comment on what bills will survive at this point in the legislative session, said Steen. We have an idea on the outcome of some, but with the session only at its halfway point anything could happen. The conference concluded with closing remarks from guest speaker Tom Cain, Cain and Company, whose topic was Learn How to Treat Others the Way They Need to be Treated. Cains speech centered on a book, Five Love Languages, by Gary Chapman. This book focuses on how to learn to use five key categories, or five love languages, that have proved to be universal and comprehensive when learning how to treat others the way they need to be treated, said Cain. AFC is the professional Association for Floridas 28 public community colleges, their boards, employees, retirees, and associates. The association actively promotes, democratically represents, supports, and serves the individual members and institutions in their endeavors to provide their students and the citizens of Florida with the best possible comprehensive community college educational system. For more information about AFC, visit www.myafchome.org. SFCC hosts AFC Region IV Spring Conference Courtesy photo Adam Martin, South Florida Community Colleges coordinator of criminal justice training, speaks about the unique needs of military personnel who are returning to college in his presentation titled, Serving Those Who Serve: From Soldier to Student.

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Page 6ANews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.com Special to the News-SunAVON PARK For m ore than 20 years, the F lorida Highlands Chapter o f the Air Force Association h as recognized individuals a nd groups that have supp orted the military presence i n south central Florida. On Saturday, eight indiv iduals from the area will b e honored at a luncheon at t he Avon Park Air Force R ange dining facility for t heir contributions in supp ort of the local aviation as w ell as the areas military f acilities. The public is i nvited but reservations are a must. Retired Air Force C olonel Roy P. Whitton, a p ast president of the AFA C hapter, explained this year t hat eight individuals from e ight different categories w ill be honored for their e fforts. The AFACommunity S ervice Awards will be pres ented to the following pers ons: Col. William Hutchison, U SAF (Ret.) will receive t he Tommy McGuire award. M cGuire was a graduate of S ebring High School and a M edal of Honor recipient d uring World War II. Col. H utchison retired from the A ir Force and was selected t o head up the first Air F orce Junior ROTC in H ighlands County at Avon P ark High School. F ollowing retirement from t he Junior ROTC, he has d evoted his time to the supp ort of the military in the s urrounding area. Larry McClain, a memb er of the staff of Avon Park R ange, will be presented t he Ken Beers Award. B eers, a retired Air Force C hief Master Sergeant, s erved at the Range both in t he military and civil servi ce. He also was active in t he AFAduring his long s ervice in the Avon Park a rea. Matty Laird was a pion eer pilot and aircraft b uilder who lived in H ighlands County in his l ater years. Laird cont ributed to the growth of c ivil aviation throughout h is life. Mike Willingham, g eneral manager of the S ebring International Airport, has been a leader to make the airport a vital part of the areas transportation facilities. Willingham will be presented the Matty Laird Outstanding Support of Aviation Award. For many years, Highlands County has been a focal point for the Civil Air Patrol and its contributions to aviation and its role that started in 1941. A Vietnam era Air Force pilot, Sam Shames is recognized for his continuing role in CAPand its role in area in support of civil aviation. He will receive the Outstanding Support of Aviation by a Government Official Award. Along with the Community Service Awards, there is a category for Teacher of the Year. This year, a high school teacher is being recognized. John Rousch has been instrumental in the providing young students in all aspects of aviation and making it interesting as well. He has been recognized not only locally, but also on the Florida scene as well. News Media Support of Aviation Award this year will go to Briana Washington, a reporter for the News-Sun, for her reporting on aviation as well as military activities in the area. Lt. Col. Charles Buck MacLaughlin, USAF, is being recognized for his role as the commander of the Avon Park Range and how he has shown outstanding support of aviation, USAF and the Air Force Association during his fouryear tenure at the Avon Park Range.Col. MacLaughlin has demonstrated how a military installation can be a partner with its community. The public is invited for the luncheon and program that follows, however, reservations are a must. The luncheon is $15 per person. Reservations may be made by calling Captain Lou Brough at 655-2344 or Col. Whitton at (863) 659-4170, no later than Thursday at 4:30 p.m. AFA annual Community Service Awards Saturday m ath teacher, Crystal V aughn; math student, B randi Best; science t eacher, Jenn DeWitt; scie nce student, Hannah Farr. Hill-Gustat Middle: m ath teacher, Trish Portis; m ath student, Tim Koning; s cience teacher, Amy Bubb; s cience student, Michael R uiz. Lake Placid Middle: m ath teacher, Jane Keyser; m ath student, Maria G onzalez; science teacher, T racy Robinson; science s tudent, Alec Sassin. Sebring Middle: math t eacher, Lyle Pontious; m ath student, Austin D ukes; science teacher, D onna Tomlinson; science s tudent, Laura Eshelman. Avon Park High: math t eacher, Janice Newton; m ath student, Argenis P eralta; science teacher, C edric Bullard; science stud ent, Laura Patino; JROTC i nstructor, Major James G alloway and CMSgt D ennis Green; JROTC stud ent, Josh Gaidos and A llison Prestwood. Lake Placid High: math teacher, Shirley Rebuck; math student, Kathryn Lethbridge; science teacher, Cindy Rivers; science student, Kyle LeBlanc; JROTC instructor, Col (ret) Warren Johnson; JROTC student, Connor Tibedo and Zachary Hogan. Sebring High: math teacher, Carolyn Campbell; math student, Matthew Juve; science student, Landon Willey; JROTC instructor, SMSgt Larry Fergerson; JROTC student, Bruce Kimball and Ivan Santos. This event was only made possible based on the generous donations of the following sponsors: Air Force Association, Highlands Florida Chapter 173; Breakfast Rotary, Avon Park; Captain Louis J. Brough, USAF, Ret.; Colonel Neal Winters, USAF, Ret.; Dr. Edwin Cary Pigman, MD; Dr. George D. Leidel, MD; Dr. Marie Rosy Toussaint, MD; Dr. Tina Thomas, DMD; Mid Florida Federal Credit Union; Military Officers Association of America and Progress Energy. Continued from page 2A Awards presented to top math, science teachers and students soldiers as possible. The terrorist, who reportedly infiltrated the base by working on it as a contractor, killed Rudy and a fellow soldier, Cpl. Donald Mickler, 29, before U.S. troops killed him. The tragic incident is under investigation. Four Americans were injured, including the soldier Acosta was kidding around with before a hail of bullets turned their laughter into screams. Rudys father spoke with his sons wounded comrade the night before our conversation. He has some movement in his toes, but there is nerve damage; this guy shot him up pretty good, Dante said. This kind of thing is just terrible ... this kind of guy cant be armed on our bases. The grieving father, while outraged by the way his son and Mickler died, spoke peacefully about Rudys love for his parents, siblings, friends and God, as well as his decision to join the military. I felt very proud, and as a father, I was very nervous, Dante said. He wanted to become a medic, and when he said he wouldnt settle for anything else, they let him. Rudy, still a teenager, never let the hardening of his Army-strong biceps trump his sense of compassion. The last Sunday he was here, he left a note with one of our churchs pastors, his dad said. It does not say pray for me; it says pray for the Afghan peopleand pray for our soldiers. Despite the cruel irony of his son dying at the hands of an Afghan terrorist disguised as a friend, Dantes patriotism and respect for the military is unflinching. I get choked up when I see the flag, he said. I know and now I really know the sacrifice that has went on. Between two packed Santa Clarita Baptist Church services, which many troops in Afghanistan watched online, and supporters lining Southern California streets, tens of thousands have paid their respects to Spc. Rudy Acosta, who never got his chance to take the field on March 19. Chants of Rudy, Rudy, Rudy, echo through the hit sports films final scene as teammates carry their hero back into the tunnel. On March 20 at Delawares Dover Air Force Base, fellow soldiers carried a real hero back onto American soil. The same chants echoed from the heavens. Take us out on the field, Rudy. To find out more about Tom Sileo, or to read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com. Continued from page 2A Take us out on the field, Rudy Image courtesy U.S. Air Force/Jason Minto The casket containing fallen soldier Spc. Rudy Acosta is carried back onto American soil by fellow troops. put into this investigation by the members of the Highlands County Sheriff's Offices Special Investigation Unit, HCSO Capt. Randy LaBelle said. I want to commend these members and the Special Response Team for a successful conclusion to this investigation, as evidenced by the amount of methamphetamine that was seized. LaBelle said that the 31 grams of meth seized is a second-level trafficking offense, and that 14 grams is the amount needed for a trafficking charge. The typical amount purchased for personal use is either an eight or a 16th of a gram, LaBelle said. The paraphernalia found was the typical items associated with sales such as ledgers, bags, scales and needles LaBelle said. There was no evidence that the meth was being made at the apartment. Continued from page 1A Meth bust made near APHS Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Bo b Graham, a former govern or and U.S. senator fro m Florida, said on Thursd ay that a legislative plan to ove rhaul Floridas courts is a solution seeking to find a problem. The retired Democr at spoke during a conferen ce call with reporters o n Thursday. He joined wi th retired Supreme Court ju stices including tho se appointed by Republic an governors and other leg al figures to denounce the pla n. Theyve formed a bipartis an coalition called Floridians f or Fair and Impartial Courts. House Speaker De an Cannon supports the ove rhaul package, including a proposal to split the Suprem e Court into separate divisio ns for criminal and civ il appeals. It is scheduled for a House floor vote on Friday Graham, who served in t he U.S. Senate from 1987-200 5, suggested that the chang es were political payback f or the high courts 5-2 rejectio n of three constitutiona lamendment questions. Those questions a ll backed by the Republica ncontrolled Legislature were tossed from the 201 0 ballot because of confusin g or misleading ballot sum maries. If the Legislature is upse t, then the approach they oug ht to take is to put another co nstitutional amendment on t he ballot and let the peop le decide if they made a mista ke in their earlier action, sa id Graham. Graham, others speak out on courts The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011Page 7A TODAYA t-storm in spots in the afternoon87 / 67Winds: SSE at 7-14 mphSunny to partly cloudy and breezy88 / 66Winds: SW at 10-20 mphSATURDAYMostly sunny83 / 63Winds: WNW at 7-14 mphSUNDAYPartly sunny87 / 64Winds: ENE at 7-14 mphMONDAYChance of a p.m. thunderstorm88 / 66Winds: E at 8-16 mphTUESDAY City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. Washington Washington 61/47 61/47 New York NewYork 57/40 57/40 Miami Miami 87/74 87/74 Atlanta Atlanta 75/56 75/56 Detroit Detroit 52/44 52/44 Houston Houston 81/53 81/53 Chicago Chicago 53/48 53/48 Minneapolis Minneapolis 48/32 48/32 Kansas City KansasCity 56/38 56/38 El Paso ElPaso 82/52 82/52 Denver Denver 58/31 58/31 Billings Billings 54/35 54/35 Los Angeles LosAngeles 81/58 81/58 San Francisco SanFrancisco 65/54 65/54 Seattle Seattle 53/37 53/37 Washington 61/47 New York 57/40 Miami 87/74 Atlanta 75/56 Detroit 52/44 Houston 81/53 Chicago 53/48 Minneapolis 48/32 Kansas City 56/38 El Paso 82/52 Denver 58/31 Billings 54/35 Los Angeles 81/58 San Francisco 65/54 Seattle 53/37 A potent storm moving through the nations midsection will ignite severe thunderstorms from the Ohio Valley to the central Gulf Coast today. Tornadoes are a serious concern from the strongest thunderstorms, as well as ooding downpours. The same system will spread over the central Plains with rain, while wet snow returns to the northern Plains. Strong winds will blast the central and southern Plains. High pressure from Canada will direct cooler air into the Northeast. Warm air will remain over the Southeast. U.S. Cities National Forecast for April 15Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. World Cities National SummaryCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Weather (W):s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rrain, sf-snow urries, sn-snow, i-ice. Albuquerque 68/42/s 77/48/s 77/51/pc Atlanta 75/56/t 71/46/t 72/52/s Baltimore 61/47/pc 60/50/r 70/43/pc Birmingham 77/54/t 68/45/pc 75/51/s Boston 47/33/pc 47/43/pc 60/42/c Charlotte 72/55/pc 73/46/t 73/48/s Cheyenne 55/31/pc 61/35/pc 57/37/pc Chicago 53/48/r 53/38/r 53/36/pc Cleveland 57/46/c 57/40/r 51/36/pc Columbus 66/49/c 61/41/r 60/40/pc Dallas 77/47/s 77/53/s 81/64/pc Denver 58/31/s 68/37/pc 64/38/pc Detroit 52/44/c 55/38/r 50/35/pc Harrisburg 59/43/pc 52/46/r 64/39/pc Honolulu 84/70/s 84/70/pc 85/71/s Houston 81/53/pc 80/55/s 81/65/pc Indianapolis 62/50/t 57/39/sh 58/40/pc Jackson, MS 79/51/t 71/47/s 77/55/s Kansas City 56/38/r 60/44/pc 61/41/pc Lexington 68/51/t 60/39/sh 64/44/pc Little Rock 73/46/c 68/47/s 75/55/pc Los Angeles 81/58/s 86/59/s 82/56/s Louisville 69/53/t 59/41/sh 65/47/pc Memphis 74/50/t 65/50/pc 74/56/s Milwaukee 46/41/r 48/38/r 52/35/pc Minneapolis 48/32/c 51/35/c 52/34/pc Nashville 71/52/t 61/42/c 70/51/pc New Orleans 83/61/t 76/57/s 79/63/s New York City 57/40/pc 53/44/r 64/44/pc Norfolk 63/53/pc 70/55/t 70/51/s Oklahoma City 64/37/pc 72/48/s 76/55/pc Philadelphia 58/42/pc 56/48/r 67/48/pc Phoenix 90/65/s 96/67/s 94/68/s Pittsburgh 62/45/pc 58/42/r 58/37/pc Portland, ME 47/28/s 47/37/pc 58/34/c Portland, OR 55/41/r 60/41/sh 60/38/sh Raleigh 75/55/pc 73/49/t 70/48/s Rochester 52/35/pc 50/39/r 54/31/pc St. Louis 68/47/t 58/45/sh 61/45/pc San Francisco 65/54/pc 64/52/pc 60/54/pc Seattle 53/37/pc 56/37/sh 54/37/pc Wash., DC 61/47/pc 59/52/r 69/48/pc Cape Coral 88/68/pc 86/68/s 84/64/s Clearwater 87/69/pc 86/68/pc 84/65/s Coral Springs 85/72/pc 86/72/s 86/70/s Daytona Beach 82/67/pc 87/63/pc 78/61/s Ft. Laud. Bch 85/75/pc 87/74/s 85/71/s Fort Myers 88/69/pc 86/68/s 84/65/s Gainesville 85/62/pc 86/59/t 82/55/s Hollywood 87/72/pc 87/72/s 88/71/s Homestead AFB 83/73/pc 85/71/s 85/70/s Jacksonville 80/63/pc 86/58/t 79/54/s Key West 84/77/pc 86/76/s 85/75/s Miami 87/74/pc 87/74/s 86/72/s Okeechobee 82/70/pc 86/68/s 82/63/s Orlando 86/65/pc 87/66/pc 84/62/s Pembroke Pines 87/72/pc 87/72/s 88/71/s St. Augustine 80/67/pc 86/60/t 77/59/s St. Petersburg 87/68/pc 86/68/pc 82/65/s Sarasota 84/67/pc 86/68/s 81/62/s Tallahassee 84/63/pc 81/50/t 83/49/s Tampa 86/69/pc 84/66/pc 81/64/s W. Palm Bch 85/72/pc 86/70/s 84/71/s Winter Haven 87/68/pc 88/67/s 84/64/s Acapulco 90/73/s 91/75/s 88/76/t Athens 66/54/pc 61/57/r 61/48/sh Beirut 71/60/s 76/68/pc 84/72/s Berlin 56/40/sh 60/42/pc 62/44/c Bermuda 72/65/pc 70/67/s 72/67/s Calgary 39/29/c 39/23/sf 38/24/c Dublin 57/43/pc 54/41/pc 55/43/pc Edmonton 34/14/c 33/21/pc 34/23/pc Freeport 82/70/pc 85/72/s 83/71/s Geneva 57/39/s 63/41/s 65/46/pc Havana 88/69/pc 89/68/pc 90/68/sh Hong Kong 83/74/pc 84/75/t 81/71/t Jerusalem 74/54/s 80/62/s 87/64/s Johannesburg 68/52/sh 59/49/t 65/50/t Kiev 54/35/pc 53/38/c 56/42/c London 61/46/pc 64/46/sh 65/45/pc Montreal 42/28/s 45/33/c 45/37/r Moscow 45/34/pc 49/33/c 51/31/sh Nice 56/52/r 67/53/sh 68/55/sh Ottawa 42/28/s 41/33/r 44/35/r Quebec 39/19/s 41/32/c 45/35/r Rio de Janeiro 90/76/pc 89/75/s 89/74/s Seoul 63/37/c 64/37/s 54/37/s Singapore 90/76/t 88/77/t 87/78/pc Sydney 74/58/pc 69/58/t 72/56/c Toronto 43/39/pc 47/35/r 47/35/pc Vancouver 51/39/pc 49/39/sh 54/41/c Vienna 53/43/sh 57/43/sh 62/45/pc Warsaw 53/39/pc 55/38/sh 55/43/c Winnipeg 39/24/c 40/23/c 38/24/c A lmanac Readings at Palm Beach High .............................................. 6:51 a.m. Low ............................................. 12:22 a.m. High .............................................. 7:27 p.m. Low ............................................. 12:47 p.m. Partly sunny today with a shower or thunderstorm in the area in the afternoon. A shower or thunderstorm in the evening; a moonlit sky tonight. Sunny to partly cloudy and breezy tomorrow. Sunday: mostly sunny. Silver Lake, Colo., had 75.80 inches of snow on April 15, 1921. This was the most intense 24-hour snowfall in United States history. A shower or thunderstorm in the area this afternoon. Winds south-southeast 7-14 mph. Expect 6-10 hours of sunshine with a 40% chance of precipitation. Even addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday. Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and Saturday. All watering should take place before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. FullLastNewFirst Apr 17Apr 24May 3May 10 Today Saturday Sunrise 7:03 a.m. 7:02 a.m. Sunset 7:49 p.m. 7:50 p.m. Moonrise 5:27 p.m. 6:34 p.m. Moonset 4:56 a.m. 5:37 a.m. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Jacksonville 80/63 Gainesville 85/62 Ocala 86/62 Daytona Beach 82/67 Orlando 86/65 Winter Haven 87/68 Tampa 86/69 Clearwater 87/69 St. Petersburg 87/68 Sarasota 84/67 Fort Myers 88/69 Naples 86/69 Okeechobee 82/70 West Palm Beach 85/72 Fort Lauderdale 85/75 Miami 87/74 Tallahassee 84/63 Apalachicola 81/68 Pensacola 80/64 Key West Avon Park 87/67 Sebring 87/67 Lorida 86/68 Lake Placid 87/66 Venus 88/66 Brighton 84/68 TidesReadings at St. Petersburg High ............................................ 12:21 a.m. Low ............................................... 6:43 a.m. High ............................................ 12:54 p.m. Low ............................................... 7:10 p.m. UV Index TodayThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m. 5 10 10 5 Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional SummaryShown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Five-Day forecast for Highlands County 84/77 Lake Levels Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 11.54 Normal ...............................................14.51 Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterdayTemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHigh Sunday .......................................... 93 Low Sunday ........................................... 59 High Monday ......................................... 92 Low Monday .......................................... 60 High Tuesday ......................................... 90 Low Tuesday .......................................... 58 High Wednesday .................................... 87 Low Wednesday .................................... 53Heat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayRelative humidity .................................. 42% Expected air temperature ....................... 86 Makes it feel like .................................... 87BarometerMonday ...............................................29.96 Tuesday ...............................................29.98 Wednesday .........................................30.01PrecipitationMonday ...............................................0.00 Tuesday ...............................................0.00 Wednesday .........................................0.00 Month to date ..................................... 1.54 Year to date ......................................... 9.38

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Page 8ANews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.com i nclusion teacher for first and t hird grades at Memorial E lementary School. This is h er second honor as teachero f-the-year; Scott King, third a nd fourth grades at Park E lementary School; Tracy S chuknecht, ESE curriculum t eam leader at Sun N Lake E lementary School; Candice D ickens, teaches third grade a t Woodlawn Elementary S chool.Middle schoolsMargaret Voskian teaches l anguage arts at Avon Middle S chool; Mary Pinson teaches i ntensive reading at HillG ustat Middle School; R asauna Portee, sixth grade r eading, language arts, social s tudies and science at Lake P lacid Middle School; Gay V aughn teaches sixth and s eventh grade math, science, w orld cultures and geography a t Sebring Middle School.High schoolsJoy Loomis is the chorus d irector at Avon Park High S chool; Joanne Bostanche t he literacy curriculum resource teacher at Lake Placid High School and Colleen Polatty teaches social studies at Sebring High School. The school-relatedemployees of the year are:District officeLinda Scholl. who is an accounts payable clerk at the district office.Elementary schoolsBonnie Johns, a bookkeeper at the Kindergarten Learning Center; Beverly Lyter, a Title 1 intervention paraprofessional at Cracker Trail Elementary School who serves students directly tutoring reading; Dollie Franklin is a custodian at Fred Wild Elementary; Lisa Moss is an ESE/IDEAparaprofessional at Lake Country Elementary School, and among other duties she works with autistic children; Martha Acevedois an ESOLparaprofessional at Lake Placid Elementary School; Betsy Cruz is the front desk clerk at Memorial Elementary; Ezekiel Acosta is a custodian at Park Elementary School; Cheryl Jahna is a bookkeeper at Sun N Lake Elementary School; Ginger McIntyre is a school secretary at Woodlawn Elementary.Middle schoolsLaurie Stoll is a paraprofessional working in the front office of Avon Middle School; Erin Halvorsen is the intensive reading paraprofessional at Hill-Gustat Middle School; Angie Pollard is an administrative secretary and bookkeeper at Lake Placid Middle School; Holly Tyson is a paraprofessional working in the remedial reading room at Sebring Middle School.High schoolsTammy Williams is a bookkeeper at Avon Park High School; Wendy Gervais is a shared management information system technician at Lake Placid High School and Lake Placid Middle School; Olivia Sliwicki is a paraprofessional working with English language learners at Sebring High School. Continued from page 1A a special committee to repres ent the best of Highlands C ounty Robinson started in the d istrict as a paraprofessional. L ike so many educators, she w as drawn in from the beginn ing, going back to school a nd getting a degree and cert ification, then continuing h er education and becoming a National Board Certified T eacher. She works now as a readi ng coach at Lake Country E lementary School and is a r esource to other teachers. Robinson believes in c rossing disciplines, using m ath or science, for example, w hen making her reading less on plans. She teaches child ren how to read non-fiction, w hich requires a different a pproach from the reader. Robinson comes from a f amily of teachers, including s isters, daughter and several i n-laws. When we get t ogether (teaching) is all we t alk about, she said. The reward isnt about the m oney, she added. I thrive a s much on the relationships. I love seeing the light bulb go o ff as a student understands something new. That I personally make a difference, thats the reward. Very few teachers leave at 3 p.m., she said. You can tell a teacher by the two or three tote bags they carry one for work to grade that night, one with projects that need to be finished, another for books or journal articles. Most teachers have a pile of books by their bed. Robinson isnt happy about standardized tests. As a tool to evaluate a students progress they have uses, she said. It informs our teaching. But when it generalizes kids who are working as hard as they can, it can be unfair. In our school, 54 percent of the population speaks English as a second language. How can a child who has been here only a year possibly do well? She sighed. Its been a rough year. But our school is such a fantastic group it is an honor to represent them. Id love for people to visit. Lind has worked for the school board 22 years, first in the warehouse and then as the plant operator at Avon Elementary School. He has been there for almost 20 years. Plant operators supervise the custodians, make repairs, set up for special events and otherwise make sure the campus is safe and well maintained. Avon Elementary has 35 classrooms, plus the cafeteria, media center and offices. Like many individuals working for the school district, Lind does much more than what his job description requires. It is the breadth of those extras, his working relationship with his fellow employees and especially his way with children that made him stand out from the others. For example, Lind enjoys photography and has a special photography program for interested fifth-graders. I let them use my camera, he said and laughed. I stay close to them. But they show respect. While Lind lives south of Sebring, he commutes to Avon Elementary willingly. It has always been a happy school, he said. Its fun to be around the kids. Thats the reward. Continued from page 1A Top honors go to Robinson, Lind at annual Summit Awards charged with driving while license suspended and failure to register motor vehicle. Milagros Burgos Ramirez, 29, of Lake Placid, was charged with battery. Justin Boyd Rhodes, 22, of Okeechobee, was charged with driving while license suspended, possession and or use of drug equipment, and possession of marijuana. Bobby Lynn Starks, 44, of Sebring, was arrested on three out-of-county warrants reference fraudulent use of credit card, and grand theft. Dontavia Shayaza Strange, 19, of Avon Park, was arrested on an out-of-county warrant reference giving false name to law enforcement officer, and petit theft. Adam Edward Yoder, 32, of Avon Park, was charged with violation of probation reference DUI. Continued from page 2A POLICEBLOTTER Teachers, school-related workers honored at Summit Awards Associated PressTALLAHASSEE The F lorida Supreme Court has r uled that police must get a w arrant before they can do a sniff test by a drug-detect ion dog at the front door of a h ome. The court released its 5-2 o pinion on Thursday. Police w ent to a Miami-Dade home i n 2006 with a drug-sniffing d og after getting an unverif ied tip that marijuana was b eing grown inside. They l ater arrested the resident and seized marijuana plants and growing equipment. The courts majority said police should have gotten a warrant before showing up. Those justices said a drug dogs sniff test at a private residence is a search under the Constitution. But dissenters said theres no expectation of privacy regarding illegal substances in ones home. The case is SC08-2101, Joelis Jardines v. State of Florida. Court rules on drug dogs sniff test

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, April 15, 2011Page 9 A The City of Sebring will receive sealed bids in the City Purchasing Department for: R R F F P P 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 4 4 : : V V e e t t e e r r a a n n s s B B e e a a c c h h B B e e a a c c h h C C o o n n c c e e s s s s i i o o n n s s L L a a n n d d L L e e a a s s e e Specifications & General Terms and Conditions may be obtained from our website at: mysebring.com or by contacting Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB by phone 863-471-5110, Fax 863-471-5168, or e-mail: kirkzimmerman@mysebring.com at the City purchasing office located at 368 South Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. If obtaining documents via the website, it shall be the bidders responsibility to check for amendments/changes made to the document. Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked with the bid number and name as to identify the enclosed bid. Bids must be delivered to the City of Sebring Purchasing Office Attn: Kirk Zimmerman so as to reach the said office no later than 2 2 : : 0 0 0 0 P P M M , T T h h u u r r s s d d a a y y , A A p p r r i i l l 2 2 1 1 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 o o f f t t h h e e o o f f f f i i c c i i a a l l t t i i m m e e c c l l o o c c k k i i n n t t h h e e p p u u r r c c h h a a s s i i n n g g o o f f f f i i c c e e Proposals received later than the date and time specified will be rejected. The City will not be responsible for the late delivery of any bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail, or any other type of delivery service. The submitting firm will be required to comply with all applicable laws, regulations, rules and ordinances of local, state and federal authorities having jurisdiction, including, but not limited to: all provisions of the Federal Government Equal Employment Opportunity clauses issued by the Secretary of Labor on May 21, 1968 and published in the Federal Register (41 CFR Part 60-1, 33 F.2 7804); all provisions of the Public Entity Crimes (Fla. Stat. 287.133, e t seq, as amended) and the provisions in Fla. Stat287.134,et seq,as amended, regarding discrimination. The Sebring City Council reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts Thereof; and the award; if an award is made, will be made to the most responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of the City of Sebring. The council reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB Purchasing Agent Sebring, Florida April 8, 15, 2011 1055HighlandsCounty LegalsNOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Highlands County, Florida, described as: LOT 11, BLOCK 26, SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on May 2, 2011. DATED THIS 4th DAY OF April, 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 4th day of April, 2011. CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk April 15, 22, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-000777 DIVISION: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, A S TRUSTEE FOR NOVASTAR MORTGAGE FUNDING TRUST, SERIES 2007-1, Plaintiff, vs. ESTHER CALLAHAN, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated February 14, 2011, and entered in Case No. 28-2010-CA-000777 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida in which Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for NovaStar Mortgage Funding Trust, Series 2007-1, is the Plaintiff and Esther Callahan, Greg Callahan, Tenant #1 n/k/a Helen Alexander, are the defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room in the basement, Highlands County Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870, Highlands County, Florida at 11:00 AM on the 18th day of May, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 75, BLOCK 196 OF REPLAT OF BLOCKS 183, 184 AND 196, SUN N LAKE ESTATES (SAID SUBDIVISION ALSO BEING KNOWN AS REPLAT A PORTION OF SUN N LAKES ESTATES, SECTION 17, 18 AND 19), ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 99, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 512 MORNINGSIDE DR., LAKE PLACID, FL 33852-4301 A /K/A 2501 SUNRISE DRIVE, SEBRING, FL 33872 A ny person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Highlands County, Florida this 14th day of February, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court Highlands County, Florida By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk March 15, 22, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 10-498 IN RE: ESTATE OF BRADLEY K. NEUBAUER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BRADLEY K. NEUBAUER, File Number PC 10-498, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 South Commerce Ave., Sebring, Florida 33870-3867. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is APRIL 8, 2011. /s/ Gail S. Reid Personal Representative 3070 Orange Grove Trail Naples, Florida 34120 /s/ Antonio Faga Antonio Faga, Esq. Attorney for Personal Representative Florida Bar No. 43280 7955 Airport Road, N., #101 Naples, Florida 34109 (239)597-9999 (239)597-9974 fax April 8, 15, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-120 IN RE: ESTATE OF J. LOIS NAVIK-WILSON Deceased. AMENDED NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of J. LOIS NAVIK-WILSON, deceased, whose date of death was March 16, 2011, File Number PC 11-120, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 8, 2011. Personal Representative: CLIFFORD R. RHOADES 2141 Lakeview Drive Sebring, FL 33870 Attorney for Personal Representative: CLIFFORD R. RHOADES, ESQ. Attorney for Personal Representative Florida Bar No.: 308714 Clifford R. Rhoades, P.A. 2141 Lakeview Drive Sebring, Floirda 33870 (863)385-0346 April 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-111 IN RE: ESTATE OF DOMENICO ANDOLINA a/k/a DOMINICK ANDOLINA, Deceased. AMENDED NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of DOMENICO ANDOLINA a/k/a DOMINICK ANDOLINA, deceased, File Number PC 11-111, by the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 430 S. Commerce Avenue; that the decedent's date of death was October 29, 2009; that the total value of the estate is estimated at $12,072.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom is has been assigned by such order are: NAME ADDRESS MARIA ANDOLINA 98 Stoneleigh Avenue Yonkers, NY 10583 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claim with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 8, 2011. Person Giving Notice: MARIA ANDOLINA 98 Stoneleigh Avenue Yonkers, NY 10583 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: CLIFFORD R. RHOADES, ESQ. Florida Bar No.: 308714 2141 Lakeview Drive Sebring, Floirda 33870 (863)385-0346 April 8, 15, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 11-000054-GCS SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, CREDITORS OR OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST MARGARET B. HOOKS, DECEASED; VIVIAN BIGNEY; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, and all unknown parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against any Defendant, or claiming any right, title, and interest in the subject property, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, CREDITORS OR OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST MARGARET B. HOOKS, DECEASED 2312 Palm Key Court Sebring, FL 33870 ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST ANY DEFENDANT, OR CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, AND INTEREST IN THE SUBJECT PROPERTY YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to enforce a lien on a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County, Florida: LOT 17, BLOCK 7, LAKE BLUE ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 59, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on PHILIP D. STOREY, Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is ALVAREZ, SAMBOL & WINTHROP, P.A., 100 South Orange Avenue, Suite 200, Orlando, FL 32801, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: April1, 2011 ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE COURT By: /s/ Toni Kopp As Deputy Clerk This is an attempt to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. April 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-001307 DIVISION: BANKUNITED, Plaintiff, vs. DEIRDRE K. LEXOW A/K/A DEIRDRE KERI LEXOW, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: RYAN PORTER LEXOW Last Known Address: 1121 S Park Rd Apt #308S Hollywood, FL 33021 Current Address: 1121 S Park Rd Apt #308S Hollywood, FL 33021 ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County, Florida: LOT 8, OF TYSON LAKE FRONT PARK LOTS, A CCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 52, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 147 ALDERMAN DRIVE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852-6962 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the News-Sun WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 24th day of March, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Lisa Tantillo Deputy Clerk April 8, 15, 2011 1050Legals Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under the Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be placed under the Bargain Buy category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com 863-314-9876 DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 314-9876. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 09000433GCS SAXON MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC., Plaintiff, vs MELYNDA E. RIGDON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MELYNDA E. RIGDON; EARL T. RIGDON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF EARL T. RIGDON; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THOUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendants. 1055HighlandsCounty Legals Classified ads get fast results Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, April 15, 2011Page 11 A Call 385-6155 and a Sales Representative will be glad to assist you! LINCOLN TOWNCAR '97 Blk/blk. leather. Presidential Series. $2,500. Call 863-452-9899. LINCOLN TOWNCAR '97 Blk/blk. Leather, Presidentail Series. Call 863-459-9899 9450Automotive for SaleCHEST -All aluminum with locking lid. 48" long, fits in pickup bed or on a trailer. Very Nice! $140. 863-453-7027 9350Automotive Parts& AccessoriesENCLOSED TRAILER6 x 15. Almost new tires. Single axle. $1,800. Call 863-699-5517 9220Utility Trailers 9000 Transportation R.V. COVERNEW fits trailes 28' 7" to 31' 6". Never opened! A Bargain at $170. 863-453-7027 2001 JAYCOEAGLE 26' 5th Wheeler. Good Shape $6400. 863-381-9159 8400RecreationalVehiclesCANOE 14'high Impact, polyethylene hull, 3 seats (insulated cooler, center seat) spare paddle tie down ( or for fishing rod or shotgun) 3 drink holders. Dry storage area. Includes: Minn Kota trolling motor, 2 seat cushions, 4 life jackets, 3 paddles and kayak paddle. Great cond. $380. Call Jay 863-452-6583. 8050Boats & Motors 8000 Recreation NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states tha t all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. DOG GERMANShepherd. 2 yr.old Free to good home. Call 863-452-1777 7520Pets & Supplies LAWN MOWERSnapper / Rider. Runs Good! $200 SOLD! JOHN DEERE'05 4310 w/loader & mower, 4 x 4. $4800. details @ desmdw1@msn.com or 386-246-7461 7400Lawn & GardenPOWER WASHERDeWalt Commercial DP 3750. Perfect cond. on a 4 wheel trailer $1,100. Call 863-452-0393 7380Machinery & Tools SEBRING -MULTI FAMILY SALE! 4021 THOMPSON AVE. FRI & SAT 4/15 & 16, 8AM 2PM. NO JUNK ALL GOOD STUFF. SEBRING -Moving Out Sale! 2010 Village Grove Blvd., apt 305. Sat & Sun Apr. 16 & 17. call for appointment. 863-385-2250 SEBRING -Fri & Sat. 12pm. 6pm. 4441 Leaf Rd. off Golfview. Furniture, toys, New toiletries & Tons Of Misc! SEBRING -6024 Lake Front Dr. Sat Apr. 16th, 8am -? Hard back mystery books, glass ware, household items. Too Much To List SEBRING -4610 Sturgeon Dr. Fri & Sat 4/15 & 16, 7am 2pm. TV, vacuum cleaner, clothing, household items, toaster oven, Geo. forman grill. Much More! SEBRING -3360 Lakeview Dr. (corner) Fri & Sat 4/15 & 16, 7am ? Antiques, furniture, household items, boat parts, lots of Good misc. items! SEBRING -219 Wren Ave. Fri & Sat 4/15 &16, 8am 2pm. Household items, some tools, tools, lamps, TV. Much More! SEBRING -133 Tortise Rd. Fri & Sat Apr. 15 & 16 8am 3pm. New wheel chair, small appliances, name brand clothes. Some Of Everything! AVON PARKLAKES Down Sizing Sale! 2047 Hartman Rd. (follow sign from corner Stryker Rd. & Olivia. Thur. & Fri. 4/14 & 15, 8am 4pm. Lazy Boy lift chair, diabetic ck. bks, collectibles. door hanging equip, household misc AVON PARKMulti Family Sale! Walker Memorial Academy 1525 W Avon Blvd., Sun. Apr 17th, 7:30 am ? Large sale inside gym. Many items for sale. Also plants & food for sale. AVON PARKHUGE SALE! Church Of The Nazarene 707 W Main St. Fri & Sat 4/15 & 16 8am3pm. Furniture, lots of linens, silk flower arrangements, crafts, artificial trees, dishes, collectible plates, tools, pictures, TV's, jewelry, like new portable dishwasher, floor safe, lots of children's & adults clothing. Questions call: Cheri 863-214-3448 7320Garage &Yard Sales TIRES -Goodyear Assurance, (4) 195 / 60R15. $100 SORRY SOLD! SWIVEL ROCKERlite sand color. Like New! $75. Call Richard 863-414-2784 STEREO, CONSOLE& Television console $100. Call 863-453-3032 STAINED GLASS,hobby suppl.. grinder, glass, chopper foil, solderleadless, misc. $100 863-402-2285 METAL DETECTORTechna model DX-1200, rarely used.Works excellent. $20 863-402-2285 LAWN MOWERBoy self-propelled, 21" cut. $45. Call SOLD!!! FREEZER 16'upright $75. Call 863-453-3032 DISHWASHER GEProfile. White. Digital display. Worked great, has been stored indoors since 2004. "Scratch & Dent" otherwise like new. $45. 863-873-4939 A/C UNITColeman 4 ton. Cools only. This unit attaches to an air handler. $100. Call 863-655-0881 7310Bargain BuysWASHER &DRYER / WHIRLPOOL Stack, electric 220. Excellent Condition, $425 863-257-1402 7300MiscellaneousPIANOBOSTON5'1 Baby Grand w/bench. Model GP-156. Ebony Polish finish. Excel. cond. $11,000. Call 863-449-0243 7180FurnitureDISHWASHERGEProfile. White. Digital display. Works great-been in safe, indoor storage since 2004. "Scratch & dent" otherwise like new. $45. Andy 863-873-4939 7040Appliances 7000 Merchandise SEBRING (2)Available. 3926 Kenilworth Blvd, 1500 sq ft, $550/mo : A/C, office, BA, lg overhead door, near Sebring High School. 640 Park St, 6400 sq ft, $2500/mo : A/C, office, BA, 8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric, fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway. 941-416-2813 AVON PARKLarge Retail/Office Building, 100 E. Main St. A MUST SEE! 863-295-9272 6750Commercial RentalSEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, Satellite, split plan house, share kitchen & laundry room. Full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for Rent SPRING LAKE3BR, 2BA, 2CG, CHA, patio, ceramic tiled liv. room, din. room, kitchen, bath & halls, SS appliances, refrigerator has water on door, micro., W/D hook up. No pets. 863-655-0136 SEBRING -SPRING LAKE AREA. 3/BR, 2/BA on Golf Course. $850 monthly. 1st / last / security / references. Call anytime. SORRY RENTED! SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 LAKE PLACIDNEAT & CLEAN 2BR, 2BA $475 2BR, 1BA $450 863-465-2924 6300Unfurnished HousesSEBRING 2240Avalon Rd. 3/2 furn. Small animals ok. Near Shopping Center & Senior Club. References $700. first/last. Call 305-387-6863 after 4pm. or 863-237-3129. 6250Furnished HousesAVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; Washer/Dryer, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 6200UnfurnishedApartments LIVE ONDINNER LAKE 12 min. from SFCC. Cute spotless newly painted apartments 1/1 from $350. incl. water & garbage. Efficiency $425. incl. water & garbage maintenance man on call laundry on premises. Small pets w/approval by landlord. $35. app feewe check criminal history. Call for appt. 863-381-3610 or 863-385-8242. LAKE PLACID2/BR, 2/BA Apt / Duplex, Washer / Dryer, screend porch. Excellent Conditio n. Includes water. $500 monthly plus 1 mo. security. 954-695-8348 BEAUTIFUL APTSSEBRING 2BR, 1BA, tile floors, screen back porch, beautiful landscaping, building 5 yrs. new. Pets OK. $595 month. 3106 Medical Way. 863-446-1822 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook ups. Students/Seniors Discount Call 863-452-0469. AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL: $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 SEBRING -2BR, 2BA. Tile floors, fresh paint. Includes water. $600/mo. Call Gary Johnson, 863-381-1861. RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartments SEBRING -Downtown on the Circle. Monthy rates starting at $400. payable wkly. Includes elec. & water. No Pets. 306 circle. 863-386-9100 or 954-295-7194. Or go to Bldg. and ask for John. 863-414-7535 REDUCED RENTfor doing maintenance. Upstairs furnished apartment. Need references. 863-385-1806. A PFURNISHED APT FOR RENT Avon Mobile Home Park 1350 N Lake Ave 55 Plus Park Sorry No Pets 863-453-3415 6150FurnishedApartmentsSEBRING VILLA3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage. Wood floors, vaulted ceilings, screened porch. Convenient location near Hospital. Gated community, Clubhouse & pool, lawn maint. incl. $900. mo. Call 863-840-1083. Carole Polk 6100Villas & CondosFor Rent 6000 Rentals PALM HARBORHOMES Repo's/Used Homes/Short Sales 3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides Won't Last!! 3,500-40K Call Today! 800-622-2832 A PPARK MODEL FOR SALE Low Lot Rent 55 Plus Park Sorry No Pets 863-449-1072 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesSEBRING NO NEED FOR A BANK! Owner Financing 3BR, 1BA remodeled, NICE HOME! Woodlawn Elem. area. 1243 Fernvale Ave. 863-227-2717 4080Homes for SaleSebring 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial WAIT STAFF NEEDED! Full Time & Part Time. Experience preferred / mature. Lunch & Dinner shifts, Apply in person at Zeno's Sun 'n Lake Blvd., Sebring. AMMUNITION RELOADINGF/T. submit resume & current photo to sales@anderson-arms.com or fax 863-453-7454 2100Help WantedNOW HIRING Electrician. Must have own tools & some experience. Call 863-471-2373 2100Help WantedEXPERIENCED. ROOFERS 863-385-0351 2100Help Wanted

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Page 12ANews-SunSunday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.com

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By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comAVON PARK In what h as become the nail-biting n orm, it seems, the South F lorida Panthers kept things o n edge yet again in scratchi ng to a 7-6, 12-inning win o ver the Manatees of the S tate College of Florida to s alvage the last game of the s eries after dropping the first t wo. And while Kyle N ewton couldnt quite g et the double he n eeded to hit for the c ycle, there wasnt m uch he didnt do W ednesday night. The sophomore s hortstop had five hits, i ncluding a home run, triple a nd three singles, while drivi ng in three and scoring t hree. Newton was also solid on d efense, turning in a spectacu lar play in the fourth, gett ing to a hard chopper and f iring across from his knees t o record an out. And while he was the stand o ut, there were other valuable c ontributions given by othe rs. Such as reliever Adam Q uiles coming into a bases l oaded situation in the seve nth and striking out his batt er And Corey Topa, after six and two-thirds innings of phenomenal relief work Saturday, came in and did another stellar job through extras to give the Panthers the chances they would need. For the third outing in a row, (Topa) did a very good job for us out of the bullpen, head coach Rick Hitt said. And then Sam came up with the big hit in the 12th. Sam would be Morgan, the freshman third baseman, who with two outs came up with the big hit of the night, a single to drive in, guess who, Newton with the walk-off, winning run. We had chances to bust it open, but werent able to, Hitt said. Its got to be some kind of record, the amount of one-run games weve played in our last 15. That would be the 10th one-run game in those last 15 for Hitt and his squad. But Im happy for our players, it was a good win for us and well keep working at it. Now 24-21-1 overall, SFCC is 4-9 in Suncoast Conference play, one and one-half game behind Hillsborough for third place. The Panthers will look to move up a bit and bring Polk State down a notch or two as they host the first-place Vikings Friday in the start of a three-game series that continues Saturday in Winter Haven and concludes Monday at home. SPORTS B SECTION News-Sun Friday, April 15, 2011 Page 3B News-Sun photos by DAN HOEHNE A s a personification of the tough season the Lady Panthers have gone through, Christian Luciano, #7, and Allie Herring miscommunicated on this pop fly on the infield, resulting in a mild collision and the ball dropping safely during Tuesday nights double-header sweep by the State College of Florida Lady Manatees. A sign of the times News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE J essica Young signed on to continue her cheer career at Liberty University Tuesday, on hand for the bid moment were, back row, left to right: Sebring principal Toni Stivender, assistant cheerleading coach Maurice Williams, head cheer coach Carolyn Shoemaker and A thletic Director Terry Quarles. Flanking Young were here parents, Laura and Chris. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING The ideal is for dedication and hard work to reap success and for success then to bring about further reward. Those ideals all came together for Jessica Young Tuesday as the high-flyer for the Sebring Cheer squad signed to continue her cheer career at Liberty University in Lynchburg, VA. It was the only school I applied for, it was the only school I tried out for, the soon-to-be graduate said. They have a good program in athletic training which is what I want to go into. Athree-year member of the Blue Streak varsity competition squad, Young was part of the continuing run of state championships that is now up to four, including this past seasons Class 1ALarge Co-ed division win. The team went on to finish ninth at Nationals and the competitive aspect will not drop off as a member of Liberty as the Flames took fifth at the UCACollege Cheerleading National Championships. Its something Ive always done and its great to know that Ill be getting money for it to get an education, Young said. Its exciting to have an opportunity to continue to do what I love. The Flames compete as a Small Co-ed squad in the Division I Big South Conference among schools such as Charleston Southern, Coastal Carolina, GardnerWebb and Radford. Head coach Carolyn Shoemaker, with 26 years at the helm of Sebrings powerhouse program, sees her se cond cheerer heading to Liberty. Meredith Bohn went to Liberty and cheered and its a great program, she sai d. Theyre very competiti ve and will be a very good fit f or Jessica. Its all about the kids an d any time you can send the m in the right direction in th is day and age, is fantastic. And while as Young sai d, she cant wait to make t he trek to Virginia despite t he distance and snowy winter s, the transition is one that h er parents will certainly feel. This is what she want ed and its a dream for her , mother Laura said. It will be a huge adjustment, her bein g so far from home, but its a Christian school with goo d morals and character and w e are just real proud. Young to cheer for Liberty News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Kyle Newton chats with assistant coach Andy Polk at first after one of his five hits in Wednesdays win over the State College of Florida Manatees. By TIM REYNOLDS Associated PressMIAMI Thursday was originally intended to be a somewhat relaxing day for the Miami Heat. A quick meeting. Ateam dinner. Abit of rest after the grind of 82 regularseason games and a long night of travel home from Toronto. The NBAschedulemakers had other plans. When the postseason schedule was released, the Heat got a bit of a surprise: Game 1 against the Philadelphia 76ers is set for Saturday, and that meant coach Erik Spoelstra needed to trim 24 hours of preparation time from his plans for the playoff opener. Its a quick turnaround, Spoelstra said in Toronto on Wednesday night after Miami finished a 58-win regular season by topping the Raptors 97-79. We were expecting a Sunday game and it ended up being a Saturday afternoon game. Were going into our preparation (Thursday) afternoon ... to start this process of getting ready for Philly. In fairness, that proce ss already started. The He at did some work on t he 76ers in Toronto o n Wednesday mornin g, hours before the regula rseason finale. At th at shootaround practic e, Miami stars LeBro n James, Dwyane Wade an d Chris Bosh all participa ted. In the actual gam e against Toronto, they d id not. They legitimately a re nicked-up right now , Spoelstra said. We ha ve to look at the big picture . Even with the Big 3 on the sidelines, Miam i wrapped up the NBA s third-best record wi th Eddie House scoring a career-high 35 points an d lightly used Jama al Magloire returning to h is hometown to grab 1 9 rebounds, something on ly nine other Heat playe rs had ever done in a regula rseason game. The Heat will ha ve home-court advantage in the playoffs over an y team, except Chicago or San Antonio. Aday of rest, Bo sh Heat have little time to prepare See MIAMI, page 4B Panthers eke out another close one SFCC7SCF6

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Dunning TributeAVON PARK On Monday, April 25, South Florida Community College will honor the memory of the first coach in school history, Coach Dunning Terrell. Coach Terrell coached basketball and baseball at what was then SFJC from 19661974, and continued to teach physical education until he retired in 1986. Coach Terrell started the mens basketball and baseball programs in 1966 even before SFJC had a gym on campus. Several of Coach Terrells former players still live in the Heartland area. SFCC Athletics will pay tribute to the family of Coach Terrell by recognizing his daughter Judy and their family at a short mound ceremony prior to the game against State College of Florida. State College of Florida head baseball coach Tim Hill will be in attendance as well, a former colleague of coach Terrell from his days at SFJC. SFCC would like to invite all former players of Coach Terrell, colleagues, as well as family and friends to come out this night to be a part of this tribute. Game time is 6 p.m. and the ceremony will start at 5:45.SYFS BBQ and registrationSEBRING Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is hosting our 2nd Annual BBQ Fundraiser and Tournament on Saturday, April 30 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The BBQ Lunch is $7 and will include a Pulled Pork Sandwich, Baked Beans, Coleslaw, Cookies and a glass of tea. Pick up your meal to go or stay and watch our girls play while you eat. For further information, please email dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201. Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is also conducting registrations for girls ages 10 to 15 now through April 1. Registration is $65 for the first child / $45 for any siblings. For further information, please visit us on Facebook, check out our website at www.eteamz.com/sebringyouthfastpitchsoftball, email us at dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201.Doc Owen Golf TourneyAVON PARK The Avon Park Noon Rotary Club will host its Second Annual David Doc Owen Golf tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Highlands Ridge North. The two-person scramble-format entry fee is $60 per person with prizes in flight groups, lunch, goodie bag and refreshments on the course. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Entry information and check payable to Avon Park Noon Rotary mailed to Chet Brojek, 3310 Par Rd, Sebring, FL 33872. Golfers should include their names and handicaps along with their check. Those needing a form may email Brojek at cbrojek@comcast.net or call at 385-4736. Business entry of two-persons plus a hole sign for a total of $200 is available for the first time this year. All Rotary club members are urged to support participate in the event that benefits local Rotary charity projects. Business hole signs for $100 are also available by contacting Chet via email or phone. YMCA Sign-UpsSEBRING The Highlands County YMCAand Eagles Football is doing sign-ups for Youth Flag Football ages 5 14. Healthy Kids Day is Saturday, April 1 6 from 9am to 1pm. Lifeguard Certification Class sign-up s are taking place now for an April 25-30 class.APProject GraduationAVONPARK The APHSProject Graduation 2011 Benefit Golf Tournament will be held Saturday, May 21 at 8:30 a.m. at River Greens Golf Course. The flighted, four-person scramble costs $60 per person and includes green s fee, cart, lunch and prizes. In addition to the action, there will be mulligans, a 50/50 and raffles for purchase the day of the tournament. The grand prize raffle is for a round o f golf for two at Doral Golf Resort and Spa. Tee sign sponsorships are going for $50, for a sign and player, it is $100. For more information, contact Suzie Gentry at 446-7368.SFCC Summer Youth CampsAVONPARK South Florida Panthe r Baseball will be holding Summer Youth Camps from June 13-16 and June 20-23 for children aged 6-13. Each camp runs from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and costs $80 per camp or $150 fo r both. Registration and sign-in begin at 8 a.m. with the camp to follow, including baseball fundamentals, position instruction, station rotation, games, swimming pool time and a camp T-shirt. SFCC head coach Rick Hitt will serv e as camp director with Panther assistant coach Andy Polk and members of the Panther baseball team will be on hand a s instructors. Campers should bring their individua l baseball attire as well as a bathing suit and towel. The camps will be held at the SFCC Panther field at the Highlands County campus in Avon Park. For more information, call Coach Hit t at the following campus phone numbers at extension 7036: Avon Park/Sebring, 453-6661; Lake Placid, 465-5300; Arcadia, 494-7500; Wauchula, 773-2252.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING Wings of Faith Worship Center presents the First Annual Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one team of four golfers, one tee sign and tw o green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includ es one team of four golfers, one green sign; Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $10 0 includes one green sign. Individual player $60 includes gree n fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26). Team of Four Golfers $240 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after March 26). Make checks payable to: Wings of Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL 33871, or register online at wingsoffaithchristianworshipcenter.com. Proceeds to be donated to scholarship program for graduates attending Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center. For more information, call Jason Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhankerson@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at 381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com. EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB y-Boston5626.683 x-New York4240.51214 x-Philadelphia4141.50015 New Jersey2458.29332 Toronto2260.26834 Southeast Division WLPctGB y-Miami5824.707 x-Orlando5230.6346 x-Atlanta4438.53714 Charlotte3448.41524 Washington2359.28035 Central Division WLPctGB z-Chicago6220.756 x-Indiana3745.45125 Milwaukee3547.42727 Detroit3052.36632 Cleveland1963.23243WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB z-San Antonio6121.744 x-Dallas5725.6954 x-New Orleans4636.56115 x-Memphis4636.56115 Houston4339.52418 Northwest Division WLPctGB y-Oklahoma City5527.671 x-Denver5032.6105 x-Portland4834.5857 Utah3943.47616 Minnesota1765.20738 Pacific Division WLPctGB y-L.A. Lakers5725.695 Phoenix4042.48817 Golden State3646.43921 L.A. Clippers3250.39025 Sacramento2458.29333 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division ___ Tuesdays Games Chicago 103, New York 90 Portland 102, Memphis 89 L.A. Lakers 102, San Antonio 93 Wednesdays Games Utah 107, Denver 103 Chicago 97, New Jersey 92 Dallas 121, New Orleans 89 Houston 121, Minnesota 102 Milwaukee 110, Oklahoma City 106, OT Boston 112, New York 102 Charlotte 96, Atlanta 85 Cleveland 100, Washington 93 Orlando 92, Indiana 74 Detroit 104, Philadelphia 100 Miami 97, Toronto 79 Golden State 110, Portland 86 L.A. Clippers 110, Memphis 103 Phoenix 106, San Antonio 103 L.A. Lakers 116, Sacramento 108, OT End of Regular SeasonNBA PlayoffsSaturdays Games Indiana at Chicago, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at Miami, 3:30 p.m. Atlanta at Orlando, 7 p.m. Portland at Dallas, 9:30 p.m. FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary)EASTERN CONFERENCEWashington 1, New York Rangers 0 Wednesday: Washington 2, N.Y. Rangers 1, OT Friday, April 15: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 3 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 3 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, TBD Philadelphia vs. Buffalo Thursday: Buffalo at Philadelphia, late Saturday, April 16: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Monday, April 18: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 3 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Buffalo at Philadelphia, TBD Boston vs. Montreal Thursday: Montreal at Boston, late Saturday, April 16: Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m. Monday, April 18: Boston at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: Boston at Montreal, 7 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Boston at Montreal, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Montreal at Boston TBD Pittsburgh 1, Tampa Bay 0 Wednesday: Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 0 Friday, April 15: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Monday, April 18: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBD x-Monday, April 25: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBDWESTERN CONFERENCEVancouver 1, Chicago 0 Wednesday: Vancouver 2, Chicago 0 Friday, April 15: Chicago at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Vancouver at Chicago, 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: Vancouver at Chicago, 8 p.m. x-Thursday, April 21: Chicago at Vancouver, 10 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Vancouver at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Chicago at Vancouver, TBD San Jose vs. Los Angeles Thursday: Los Angeles at San Jose, late Saturday, April 16: Los Angeles at San Jose, 10 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Los Angeles at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: San Jose at Los Angeles, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Los Angeles at San Jose, TBD Detroit 1, Phoenix 0 Wednesday: Detroit 4, Phoenix 2 Saturday, April 16: Phoenix at Detroit, 1 p.m. Monday, April 18: Detroit at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Detroit at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Phoenix at Detroit, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Detroit at Phoenix, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Phoenix at Detroit, TBD Nashville 1, Anaheim 0 Wednesday: Nashville 4, Anaheim 1 Friday, April 15: Nashville at Anaheim, 10:30 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Anaheim at Nashville, 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Anaheim at Nashville, 8:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Nashville at Anaheim, 10 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD x-Tuesday, April 26: Nashville at Anaheim, TBDAMERICAN LEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB Baltimore64.600 New York64.600 Toronto66.5001 Tampa Bay38.273312Boston 29.182412Central Division WLPctGB Cleveland84.667 Kansas City74.63612Chicago 75.5831 Detroit 57.4173 Minnesota47.364312West Division WLPctGB Texas93.750 Los Angeles75.5832 Oakland66.5003 Seattle48.3335 ___ Wednesdays Games Detroit 3, Texas 2 Kansas City 10, Minnesota 5 Oakland 7, Chicago White Sox 4, 10 innings Toronto 8, Seattle 3 N.Y. Yankees 7, Baltimore 4 L.A. Angels 4, Cleveland 3, 12 innings Tampa Bay at Boston, ppd., rain Thursdays Games Minnesota at Tampa Bay, late Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, late Seattle at Kansas City, late Detroit at Oakland, late Fridays Games Baltimore at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Texas at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 7:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Seattle at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Detroit at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB Philadelphia83.727 Florida65.5452 Washington56.4553 Atlanta57.417312New York47.3644 Central Division WLPctGB Cincinnati84.667 Milwaukee65.545112Chicago 66.5002 Pittsburgh56.455212St. Louis57.4173 Houston39.2505 West Division WLPctGB Colorado82.800 Los Angeles66.5003 San Francisco66.5003 Arizona56.455312San Diego56.455312___ Wednesdays Games San Diego 3, Cincinnati 2 Milwaukee 6, Pittsburgh 0 Philadelphia 3, Washington 2 Colorado 5, N.Y. Mets 4 Florida 5, Atlanta 1 Chicago Cubs 9, Houston 5 St. Louis 15, Arizona 5 San Francisco 4, L.A. Dodgers 3 Thursdays Games Colorado at N.Y. Mets, late, 1st game Colorado at N.Y. Mets, late, 2nd game Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, late Philadelphia at Washington, late Florida at Atlanta, late San Diego at Houston, late St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, late Fridays Games Florida at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. San Diego at Houston, 8:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.BASEBALLMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLNamed Chuck Meriwether and Ed Montague umpire supervisors. 1B Carlos Delgado announced his retirement. American League TEXAS RANGERSPlaced OF Josh Hamilton on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Chris Davis from Round Rock (PCL). LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid TODAY: Baseball vs.Frostproof,7 p.m.; Softball at Moore Haven,5/7 p.m.; Track and Field at Districts,Poincianna,TBA MONDAY: Softball at District Tournament,Frostproof,TBA TUESDAY: Baseball vs.Sebring,7 p.m.; Softball at District Tournament,Frostproof,TBA Sebring TODAY: Baseball at Haines City,7 p.m.; Softball vs.Frostproof,6:30 p.m. MONDAY: Softball at District Tournament,Lake Wales,TBA TUESDAY: Baseball at Lake Placid,7 p.m.; Softball at District Tournament,Lake Wales, TBA SFCC TODAY: Baseball vs.Polk State College,6 p.m. SATURDAY: Baseball at Polk State College,1 p.m. MONDAY: Baseball vs.Polk State College,6 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball at Hillsborough,3 p.m. Avon Park TODAY: Baseball at Tenoroc,7 p.m.; Softball vs.Hardee,5:30/7:30 p.m. MONDAY: Baseball vs.Santa Fe Catholic,7 p.m.; Softball at District Tournament, Frostproof,TBA TUESDAY: Softball at District Tournament,Frostproof,TBA A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p . m m . NASCAR Aarons 312. . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 6 6 p p . m m . NHRA VisitMyrtleBeach Nationals . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2N N H H L L P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Phoenix at Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CM M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Minnesota at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . Minnesota at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X X 8 8 p p . m m . Chicago Cubs at Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . W W G G N NTimes, games, channels all subject to change C C O O L L L L E E G G E E S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n Tennessee at LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 1 1 p p . m m . South Carolina at Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NG G O O L L F F F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Malaysian Open . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Outback Steakhouse Pro-Am . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA Valero Texas Open . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 6 6 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Fresh Express Classic . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F FS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Malaysian Open . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 1 1 p p . m m . PGA Valero Texas Open . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA Valero Texas Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 4 4 p p . m m . PGA Outback Steakhouse Pro-Am . . . . . N N B B C C 6 6 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Fresh Express Classic . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F FH H I I G G H H S S C C H H O O O O L L B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . 2011 Jordan Brand Classic . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2N N B B A A P P L L A A Y Y O O F F F F S S S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Indiana at Chicago . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 3 3 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Philadelphia at Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A A B B C C 7 7 p p . m m . Atlanta at Orlando . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Portland at Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NB B O O W W L L I I N N G G F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 9 9 p p . m m . Ivan Popoca vs. Rusian Provodnikov . . E E S S P P N N 2 2S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 9 9 : : 4 4 5 5 p p . m m . Andre Berto vs. Victor Ortiz . . . . . . . . . . . H H B B O O 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Juan Manuel Lopez vs. Orlando Salido . S S H H O O W W LIVESPORTSONTV NBA NHL Playoffs Major League Baseball Transactions Page 2BNews-Sun Friday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.co m

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Golf HammockThe Golf Hammock Ladies played a Low Gross/Low Net event Monday, April 11, with Laura Kebberly taking low gross in the First Flight at 82, and Wanda Hastie winning low net with a 65. Taking second in low gross in the flight was Marian Passafume, at 85, with Jean Haig in third at 93. Finishing second in low net was Trudy Stowe and her 68, and Bonnie Nigh was third with 70. Winning Second Flight low gross was Marge Pederson at 100, with Cindy Dall in second at 105 and Mary Cripps third with 107. Winning low net for the flight was Mary Lindsay at 64, while Nancy Senior was second at 69 and Audrey Walther third at 70. Last Monday, April 11, the Mezza Group played Individual Pro-Am golf at GolfHammock Country Club. Taking first place in A group was Jim Gulick with plus 3 and Mike Anselm in second place with plus 2. Joe Martini had plus 4 to take first place in B group while Bobby Culbert finished in second place with minus 2. Doug Haire took first place with a plus 4 in C group and David Mulligan came in with plus 1 for second place. There was a tie for first place in D group between Bill Alesi and Janet Reganat plus 4. There was also a tie in E group for first place at plus 3 between Bob Hughes and Terry Embleton. In F group Dick Botelho made plus 6 for first place and there was a tie for second place between Terry Yandle and Lee Stark with plus 3 apiece. Jim Reed had a greatscore with a plus 8 for first place and second place with plus 4 went to Joe OBlock in G group. Les Layton made plus 7 to take first place in H group and second place went to Jean Terrell with aplus 5. There was a tie in I group for first place between Don Tiemans and Frank Branca with a score of plus 3... Next Monday there will be a shotgun start start beginning at 8:30 a.m. at Golf Hammock. Please arrive early to register. For more information, call PeteMezza at 382-1280.Harder HallThe Harder Hall Ladies League played an A Flight, Low Gross, B Flight, Low Net and C Flight, Low Putts on Thursday, April 7. The winners were: A Flight Jackie Christopher, 90 Gross. B Flight Carol Grimm 66, Net. C Flight Patty Forrest, 29 Putts.Lake June West Golf ClubA scramble was played on Thursday, April 7. Tying for first and second places were Ron and Sylvia West, Ken and Norma Colyer, John and Sue Ruffo; John and Virginia Simmons, Art Onstad, Jans Roush, Tom and Margaret Schultz with 47 each. Winning third place were Pete and Mary McNamee, Joe Swartz, Del and Dee Block with 51. Closest to the pin: (Ladies), No. 2, Joyce Swartz, 3-feet-2-inches; and No. 8, Helen Mellon, 8-feet-11-inches. (Men), No. 4, John Simmons, 5-feet-2inches. The mens association played a Mens Best Ball event on April 6. Winning first place was team of Ron West, Joe Swartz Bob Orr and John Ruffo with 40; and second place, Pete Otway, Orville Huffman, Ken Strong and Ben Tarr with 42. Closest to the pin: No. 2, Roger Childers, 8-fee-4-inches; No. 4, Pete Otway, 39-feet-10-inches; and No. 8, Don Boulton, 5-feet-3-inches. The ladies association played a ladies league event on April 4. Winning first place was the team of Annie Hall, Elaine Orr, Gloria Huggett and Pat Asmus with 37; second place, Helene Mellon, Dee Block, Verna Knishka and J. Roush with 38; and third place, Joyce Swartz, Sylvia West, Betty Billau and Laurie Luwig with 41. Closest to the pin: No. 2, Mary McNamee with 4-feet; No. 4, Margaret Schultz, 5-feet-5-inches; and No. 8, Eva Huffman, 1-foot-9-inches.PinecrestThe Mens Association played Team and Individual Pro-Am Points on Wednesday, April 13, with a two-way tie coming in the team portion of the event. Terry Crocker, Wayne Gordener, Earl Plemmons and Bob Fidlin came in with a whopping +20, only to see it matched by Bob Luttrell, John ONeill, Greg Mitchell and Paul DuBrule. Things were nearly as tight in the individual side of the action as Luttrell won A Division with +9, three ahead of the +6 Brian Snowball posted for second. Gordener won B Division with +8 over Gene Patenaudes +6 for second and Doug Hagan and Russ Treibor tied for the lead in C Division with +12 each. Fidlin edged out DuBrule in D Division with his +9 winning by one point. On Wednesday, April 6, the Mens Association played team and individual pro am points. The team of Tom Rockola, David Reasoner, Dan Bean and Gerry Grogan with plus-13. Tying for second/third places were the teams of Don Billy, John Hoffman, Gary Rogres and Ron Geoque; Brian Snowball, Paul Brown, Bill Ringo and Dick Botelho with plus-10 each. Individual winners were: A division First place, Tom Rockola with plus-5; and second place, Matt Ryan with plus-4. B division First place, Rex Smolek with plus-7; and second place, Terry Crocker with plus-6. C division First place, Keith Strickland with plus9; and second place, Gary Rogers with plus-6. D division First place, Frank Hocott with plus-7. Tying for second/third places were Bob Wimmers and Dick Botelho with plus6 each.River GreensThe Mens Association played a Mens Day event on Saturday, April 9. Winning first place was the team of Jim Anderson, Lefty St. Pierre, Cliff Steele and Fred Evans with minus-29. Tying for second/third places were Russ Rudd, Donald McDonald, J.R. Messier and Gil Heier; Tom Morway, Butch Smith, Ray Knauf and Leo Persails with minus-22 each. Closest to the pin: No. 3, Bob Streeter, 9-feet-8.5-inches; No. 5, Jim Cercy, 4-feet-1-inch; No. 12, Jim Anderson, 6-feet-2.25-inches; and No. 17, Cecil Lemons, 2-feet. The Morrison Group played a game on Thursday, April 7. The winners were: First place, Gil Heier and Ed Mosser with minus-16; and second place, Harold Plagens and Paul Johnson with minus-13. Tying for third/fourth places were Romy Febre and Ken Brunswick; John Smutnick and Butch Smith with minus-12. The Ladies Association played a pro am tournament on Thursday, April 7. Winning first place was the team of Jo Sherman, Fran Neil and Barb Stuber with plus-16.5; second place, Lucy Roberts, Donna Johnson, Elaine Keppler and Linda Therrien with plus9.5; and third place, Karen Speaker, Janet Regan and Carol Roy with plus8.5. Individual winners were: First place, Barb Stuber with plus-10. Tying for second/third/fourth places were Carol Roy, Donna Johnson and Linda Therrian with plus-5 each. The Mens Association played a pro am tournament on Wednesday, April 6. Winning first place was the team of Harold Kline, Bill Mountford, Cecil Lemons and Larry Roy with plus-7; second place, Peter March, Bob Streeter, Vince Boever and Russ Rudd with plus-6; and third place, Bob Brown, Dick Sherman, Peter Bridge and Ken Brunswick with plus-5. Individual winners: A Flight (29over): First place, Larry Roy with plus3; and second place, Dave Stoddart with minus-1.5. B Flight (23-28): First place, Bob Streeter with plus-10; and second place, Cecil Lemons with plus8.5. C Flight (18-22): First place, Bob Bicker with plus-5.5; and second place, Dick Sherman with plus-3. D Flight (17-under): First place, Donna Pelfrey with plus-6; and second place, Robert Harris with plus-3. The Golfettes played a game on Tuesday, April 5. Winning first place was the team of Peggy Wehunt, Carol Roy, Pat Graf and Sally Dworak with minus-3. Tying for second/third/fourth/fifth places were the teams of Betty Leblanc, Fran Neil, Jo Sherman and Lucy Roberts; Joan Brode, Carole McClay, Bev Rudd and Jan Stevens; Anne Kelly, Babe McDonald, Pat Gower and Helen Ochala; Linda Therrien, Mary Beth Carby, Colleen Posey and Peggy Nicholson with minus-1 each. The Morrison Group played a game www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011Page 3B See GOLF, page 4B By JOHN WAWROW APSports WriterPITTSBURGH Rest easy, Sid. The P ittsburgh Penguins appear to be in good h ands. With Sidney Crosby watching from the c oaching box upstairs, the Penguins opened t he playoffs much like they did in finishing t he last half of the regular season by proving t hey can win without their captain. Leaving the ice to chants of MVP! MVP! M arc-Andre Fleury was perfect in making 32 s aves including a blind stop on Ryan M alone in a 3-0 win over the Tampa Bay Lightning on Wednesday night. Add in a pair of third-period goals scored 18 seconds apart by newly reacquired forward Alex Kovalev and Arron Asham, and theres just no telling how far the Penguins can go even if Crosby is unable to return for the playoffs because of lingering concussion symptoms. Whatever needs to be done, Fleury said. I just tried to do my thing, and the players up front got some big goals for us and it worked out all right. In earning his fifth career playoff shutout to move to within one of tying Tom Barrassos franchise record, Fleury blanked a Lightning team that finished second in the Eastern Conference with 247 goals. No worries, said Lightning forward Steven Stamkos, who was already looking ahead to Game 2 at Pittsburgh on Friday. Thats the beauty of a seven-game series, said Stamkos, who led the Lightning with 45 goals. Its one game. Its not the end of the world. The fifth-seeded Lightning had better hope so in making their first playoff appearance in four years. They were stymied by a fourth-seeded Penguins team that has become far mo re defensive-minded to counter the losses of Crosby and fellow offensive threat Evge ni Malkin, who sustained a season-ending kn ee injury in February. Pittsburgh finished the season allowing 19 9 goals, which were the third-fewest in the Ea st and second-fewest in franchise history. An d Fleurys play had much to do with that in going 35-14-5 with a 2.13 goals-against ave rage since Nov. 12. He repeats it over and over again, ho w good he is and how well he can play und er pressure, Kovalev said. No Sidney, no problem as Fleury blanks Lightning

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Special to the News-SunSEBRING The H ighlands Youth Football a nd Cheer Organization ( HYF) will be having a Car W ash fundraiser at Advanced A uto Parts at the corner of U S 27 and the Sebring P arkway on Saturday, April 2 3, from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. All monies earned or d onated will be used to purc hase equipment and unif orms for the boys and girls. HYF is a new league to S ebring and is looking forw ard to providing a rewarding youth sports program to foster these boys and girls to develop sportsmanship, physical fitness and build their self esteem as well as provide them an opportunity to be part of a team. The team name is the Highlands Eagles and team colors are black, yellow and white. Come on down and get registered while your car is being washed. HYF will also be offering registration during our car wash for cheerleaders and football players. Any registered player that needs to turn in registration information or payment can come to the car wash to do so. Several of our coaches and board members will be there to meet or answer any questions you may have. Available for Ages 5 15 years old (8th Grade maximum). Registration fees are $75 each for Football and Cheer or $65 each if you are signing up multiple children, Limited spots are available for Mighty-Mite, Pee Wee and Junior Varsity Divisions Flag and Varsity players are needed. All divisions are open for Cheerleading Please come on down to support your youth football organization. For football, please call Tim Hooks at 414-2873, Cliff Howell at 253-7070 or Becky Grippo at 381-9760 for Cheerleading. Page 4BNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.com This summer the South Florida Community Colle ge volleyball program has more camps to offer than ev er before. Listed below you will see opportunities for sand an d indoor camps. If there is a camp date that you could attend but t he age group is different than yours please call and speci al arrangements could be made. Individual private sessions for indoor and sand a re available year-round. Call/Email to schedule today! June 2011 Sand: 13th-16th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:3 010:30 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor: 13th16th (4 days) Monday-Thursda y, 11:30-1:30 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps June 13-16t h: $100 July 2011 Sand: 11th -14th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 8:30 10:30 a.m. (Grades 9-12) $60 Indoor: 11th-14th (4 days) Monday-Thursday, 11:3 01:30 p.m. (Grades 5-12) $60 Attend Both Sand and Indoor camps July 11-1 4: $100 July 2011 Indoor: 25th-28th (4 days) Monday-Thursday Morning Session (Grades 5-8) 9:30-11:30 a.m. $60 Afternoon Session (Grades 9-12) 2-4:30 p.m. $75 Contact Coach Crawford with any questions at kim.crawford@southflorida.edu, cell: 863-835-2377, or Office: 863-784-7037. Panther Volleyball Camps Special to the News-SunSEBRING Aleague meeting for Highlands County softball teams has been scheduled for Tuesday, April 19, at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Highlands County Sports Complex off Sheriffs Tower Road. Leagues will begin playing again on Monday, May 9. Open registration for all adult softball players, m en and women, is ongoin g until April 26. The charge is $350 an d a $15 sanction fee. If you are interested in playing organized softba ll, please sign up at t he Highlands County Spor ts Complex. For more informatio n, please contact D an Jamison at the Highlan ds County Sports Compl ex (863) 402-6755. County Softball Meeting Highlands Youth Football Car Wash Special to the News-SunAVON PARK SFCC A thleticswill host a Two D ay Fun Sport Selection c amp on Thursday and F riday, June 9 and 10 for g irls and boys aged 6-16. Each day the camp runs f rom 9 a.m.-3 p.m., with c ampers choosing their own s port, whether it is Beach V olleyball, Basketball, B aseball, Softball or Soccer. During the morning portion each day, campers will stretch, do plyometrics, agility drills, work on strength and flexibility, learn arm and body care and get introduced to the Fitness Center. Lunch is then provided with the campers then delving into the sport they chose and wrapping it up with activities in the SFCC pool. Registration and check-in from 8:15-8:55 a.m., and preregistration is not necessary as walk-ups are accepted. The rate for one day is $50 and $95 for both days. The camp will be aministered by SFCC head and assistant coaches, with help from SFCC student-athletes. For questions or more information, contact Camp Director and SFCC Athletic Director Rick Hitt at 784-7036. SFCC Panther Fun Camps on Tuesday, April 5. Winning first place was the team of Romy Febre, Joe Graf, Gil Heier and Frank Conroy with minus-12; and second place, Lefty St. Pierre, Harold Plagens, Hank Wunderlich and Butch Smith with minus-10. The Mens Association played a Mens Day on Monday, April 4. The winners were: Front 9 First place, Cliff Steele, Cecil Lemons, Bob Stevens and Ed Mosser with minus20; and second place, John Smutnick, J.R. Messier, Frank Conroy a nd Harold Kline with minus-19. Back 9 First place, John Smutnick, C.L. Misser, Frank Conroy and Harold Kline with minus-18; and second place, Tom Morway, Bob Streeter, Fred Evans and Lefty St. Pierre with minus-11. Closest to the pin: No. 3, Russ Rudd, 6-feet-7.5-inches; No. 5, Johnny Wehunt, 17-feet-3-inches; No. 12, Cliff Steele, 8-feet-8.5-inches; and No. 17, Gil Heier, 11feet-8-inches. A Limited Member event was played on Monday, April 4. Winning first place was the team of Judy and Ed Ward, Don and Bea Sherman with plus-16.5. Individual winners: First place, Don Sherman with plus-7.5.SpringLakeOn Tuesday, April 12, the Spring Lake Mens Golf Association held a 4 Man Team / 3 Best Balls competition. The teams included an A, B, C and a D playersuch thatthe team handicaps were 69 or 70 and it was played on the Panther Creek course. The winning team, with a net 193 strokes, was Bob Hinde, Jay Payne, Howard Weekley and a Blind Draw C player to replace a no-show. Mr. Weekley (the D player) was the backbone of this lineup with a net 61. In Second Place was the team of Bob Rogers, Pat Shatney, Charlie Keniston and Richie Eastep, who accumulated 199 strokes. The story here is that Mr. Eastep, recovering from a stroke and starting to play some good golf, also scored a net 61. Third Place went to John Delaney, Ron Brochu, Larry Miesner and Leon Van. They came in with 201 strokes, primarily due to Johns net 68 and Rons net 70. Continued from 3B t old Toronto radio station Fan 5 90 after the game. That w as the best thing for us. And on second thought, S poelstra decided more rest w ould be needed Thursday as w ell. Its highly unusual for the H eat to practice the day after a long flight. Spoelstra was going to b uck that trend, but after the t eam landed in Miami at 3 a .m. Thursday, he changed h is mind and canceled the w orkout. Some players will be in for t reatment of various injuries, a nd plenty of film will be b roken down throughout the d ay. But the bulk of the onc ourt work has been postponed until Friday. Nonetheless, Thursday is going to be a bustling day at 601 Biscayne Blvd. in Miami, where the Heat play their home games. The building will be converted back to basketballready, after hosting a Lady Gaga concert on Wednesday night. New banners will be hoisted all around the outside of the facility. Many people will begin a contest to see if they can remain seated outside for 48 straight hours, with playoff tickets going to the winner. And white covers will be installed over just about all 19,600 seats the playoff marketing theme is White Hot, with fans encouraged to wear white to all home games, just as they did during the run to the 2006 NBAtitle. Im sure it will be a whiteout, 76ers coach Doug Collins said. Im guessing its going to be a total whiteout in there. Usually in the playoffs, thats the way it is. ... Its going to be Hollywood. Its going to be the place to be. Miami won all three games against Philadelphia this season, though none of them were romps: The victory margins were 10, 9 and 12 points, respectively. And the 76ers were 3-13 after losing to the Heat on Nov. 26; they were 38-28 from there, the Easts fifthbest record during that span. If there is one thing that makes the short window of playoff preparation easier, its the fact that the teams played for the third and last time during the regular-season on March 25. Neither has changed much since. We have to get into the video prep, walk through some things and start to put together our game plan for a challenging series that we can expect, Spoelstra said. We have full respect for what theyre capable of, particularly with their speed and athleticism and really what theyve done since the AllStar break. AP Sports Writer Dan Gelston in Philadelphia contributed to this story. Continued from 1B Miami getting set for Sixers Golf scores from around the county Courtesy photo Jean Foster addresses the field prior to last Saturdays NuHope Golf Tournament as, Pastor Andrew Katsanis, NuHope Executive Director, Ingra Gardner and President of the Nu-Hope Board, Luis Fresquez look on. The Sandy Foster Memorial Nu-Hope Golf Tournament had a tremendous turn out of 148 golfers. Nu-Hope was honored to have Jean Foster present for the shot gun start at 8:30 a.m. All of the donations from the event will go back to Nu-Hope to provide approximately 1,500 home delivered meals and 530 hours of In-Home Services; such as personal care and homemaking and respite services for caregivers of seniors in Highlands and Hardee Counties. The Nu-Hope staff and Board of Directors thank the sponsors and participants for making the Inaugural Sandy Foster Memorial Nu-Hope Golf Tournament such a successful event. NuHope Tourney offers new hope By KYLE HIGHTOWER Associated PressORLANDO Ryan Anderson scored 14 points, and Dwight Howard had 13 points and 13 rebounds in a short night of work as the Orlando Magic cruised to a 92-74 victory over the Indiana Pacers on Wednesday night. Mike Dunleavy and Brandon Rush both scored 16 points for Indiana. Orlando beat Indiana for the fifth straight time, including three victori es this season. The Magic also co ncluded their fourth conse cutive 50-win season b y winning four of their fin al five games. The Pacers open the ir first playoff series in fi ve years on Saturday afte rnoon against top-seed ed Chicago. The Magic host Atlan ta on Saturday night in a matchup of the fourth an d fifth seeds. Magic run past Pacers in regular-season finale

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Class offered in Diabetes SelfManagement SEBRING The Highlands County Health Department is offering Diabetes Self-Management Education classes as part of its Wellness and Diabetes Education Program. This program serves Highlands County residents of all ages, especially those with diabetes or at risk for developing diabetes. These classes are free of charge and provided by a certified diabetes educator. Classes are scheduled in Sebring from 8:30-11:30 a.m.Monday through Wednesday at the Highlands County Health Department (7205 S. George Blvd., conference room B). Enrollment is limited and registration is required. To register and for more information, contact the HCHD Wellness and Diabetes Education Program, at 382-7294. Amplified telephones distributionSEBRING Hearing Impaired Persons will distribute amplified telephones to Florida residents who have a hearing or speech loss, in the conference room at Nu-Hope Elder Care Services, 6414 U.S. 27 South in Sebring, from10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday. By appointment only. Call (941) 743-8347.Community outreach events plannedAce Homecare offers community outreach events for April include: Friday 9 a.m., Health Fair, Avon Park Meal Site, Main Street, Avon Park. Monday 9 a.m., Health Fair, Highland Village, Villa Road, Sebring; and 1 p.m., Caregivers Support Group, Crown Pointe Assisted Living Community, Sun N Lake Boulevard, Sebring. Tuesday 8 a.m., Health Fair, Sebring Bluffs, U.S. 27, Sebring; 10:30 a.m., Health Fair, Fair Havens, Apartments, Spinks Road, Sebring; and 1 p.m., Health Fair, Groves, behind Sebring Diner, U.S. 27, Sebring. Wednesday 9 a.m., Health Fair, Avon Park Meal Site, Main Street, Avon Park. Thursday 9 a.m., Health Fair, Maranatha Village, Arbuckle Creek Road, Sebring; and 10:30 a.m., caregivers support group, Balmoral Assisted Living Facility, 93 Balmoral Road, County Road 621, Lake Placid.Better Breathers Club meetsSEBRING The American Lung Associations Better Breathers Club is a Lung Health Support Club for adults with lung disease, and their families and friends. The club offers educational information on COPD, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, asthma, sleep apnea, and other lung diseases. Different speakers are scheduled for each meeting on topics ranging from living with lung diseases, equipment use, managing and coping with your disease, and more. The meeting is facilitated by Carol Watson, RRT. The next meeting is at noon Friday, April 22 in Conference Room 3, second floor at Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center in Sebring, on Sun N Lake Boulevard. This months speaker is Mary Alexander with Good Shepherd Hospice. She will be speaking on Hospice and end-oflife choices for patients with COPD. She will also provide information on Good Shepherds COPD program, and the new Bud and Donna Somers Hospice House on Hammock Road. Ahealthy snack and beverage will be provided. For more information about the support group call Mike Napper at 402-3450. Special to the News-SunSEBRING Affinity H ealth Professionals held the a wards ceremony for their f ourth annual Biggest Loser C ompetition on April 8.The 1 3-week contest, which b egan Jan. 4 and ended April 4 was celebrated by the three r emaining contestants. The t hird place winner, Mary F ranklin, lost 6.5 percent of h er total body weight. S econd place went to Lana P uckorious, with a total w eight loss of 10.28 percent. T he first place winner was B etty Springsteen, with a t otal weight loss of 12.5 perc ent. The first place prize packa ge included $100, a full h our massage, one month of f ree lawn care courtesy of C utting Edge LLC, and an m p3 player. When asked the biggest difference between her life now and her life before starting the contest, Springsteensaid, Feeling better about myself. She said she would not have been able to accomplish her goal without the competition. I knew I had to do something and this was the vehicle, plus having the competition helped. And I got connected with John at 108 degree fitness through the office and that helped with my diet and exercise program. Thethree finalists agreed that getting started andbeing fully committedare important parts of being successful in your weight loss goals.Make sure that you have a strong support group, because that makes all the difference, Puckorious said. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011Page 5B HEALTHYLIVING Courtesy photo Betty Springsteen was the first place winner in Affinity Health Professionals Biggest Loser Competition. She had a total weight loss of 12.5 percent, as shown in these before and after pictures. Springsteen is Affinitys Biggest Loser Shingles, also known as the herpes zoster virus, is simply a reactivation of the virus that caused your chicken pox earlier in life. The virus lies dormant in the spinal nerve cells and can be reactivated years later when the immune system is challenged or suppressed by fatigue, physical/emotional trauma, serious illness, or certain medications. Between 20 and 30 percent of the population will be effected by shingles at some point in their lifetime. The first symptom most patients notice is a tingling or pain similar to having a sun burn on one side of the face or body. Painful skin blisters begin to appear several days later, also on one side of the face or body. This skin rash is typically found on the chest, abdomen, back, or face, although it can also affect the neck, limbs, and lower back as well. The blisters, or eruptions, are very painful, itchy and tender. If the face becomes involved, eye pain, red eye, headache, fever, or fatigue may precede the rash. After one to two weeks, the blisters begin to heal and form scabs; however, the pain often continues. When the rash affects the face, it usually affects one side of the forehead and scalp, does not cross the midline of the face, and involves only the upper eyelid. About 10-20 percent of the population will have this presentation at some point. Upon exam, the eye doctor will evaluate both the surface of the eye as well as the optic nerve and retina looking for any signs of viral involvement in those tissues. The doctor will also check the pressure in the eye at that time. After the infection has run its course, some patients will develop a deep pain known as post-herpetic neuralgia that can continue for months and sometimes years. This is more common in the elderly. The incidence of shingles increases with age. More than 50 percent of cases develop in patients older than 60. In patients younger than 40, a medical evaluation should be conducted to determine whether the patient may be immunocompromised. Shingles usually only occurs once. The treatment for shingles consists of taking an oral antiviral agent such as acyclovir, usually several times a day for a week to 10 days. If the condition is severe, the patien t may need to be hospitalized on this medication f or 5-10 days. An antibiotic ointme nt is prescribed to keep the skin eru ptions from becom ing infected, and warm compresses are usually applie d to the skin about three times a day to keep the area clean. If the eye is involved, w e usually recommend artificial tears three to four tim es a day to keep it as comfor table as possible. Topical steroid eye drops are occa sionally helpful as well. There is a vaccine designed to help prevent shingles. It is recommende d for persons 60 years old o r older whether or not the patient reported a prior episode of shingles. Unles s a contraindication exists, patients with chronic med ical conditions may also b e vaccinated. The vaccine should not be administered to those who are allergic t o gelatin, neomycin, or any other component of the va ccine, those with a history of a primary or acquired immunodeficiency state (i.e. leukemia, lymphoma, etc.), those who are receiv ing immunosuppressive therapy, or those who are or may be pregnant. In a clinical trial involv ing more than 38,000 adul ts 60 years of age or older, th e vaccine reduced the overa ll incidence of shingles by 5 1 percent and the incidence of neuralgia by 67 percent The effectiveness of the vaccine was higher in the younger age group (60-69 years) at 64 percent than the older age group (older than 70) at 38 percent. Sid e effects of the vaccine included redness at the sit e of injection, pain, and swelling. No vaccine-relat ed deaths were reported. Acetominophen with or without codeine is sometimes required during the first two weeks as pain from post-herpetic neuralgia can be severe. In addition, depression can be quite common during the initial phase of infection, s o an antidepressant may be prescribed. Shingles is contagious for children and adults wh o have not had chicken pox, and can be spread by inhalation. Pregnant women who have not had chicken pox must exercise extreme caution. Valerie Moulds is a board certified optometric physician practicing in Sebring and is Arizona and Florida certified in diagnostics and therapeutics. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat or cure your condition. Shingles can affect the eyes Focal Point Dr. Valerie Moulds Courtesy photo At Sun N Lake Elementary School, FCAT means not only Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test but also Free Cookie After Test. Florida Hospital partnered with Sun N Lake Elementary to reward students with a big chocolate chip cookie after completion of the test. Sun N Lake Elementarys Lisa Colon (from left) and Dr. Linda Laye collect the cookies from Florida Hospital Nutritional Services staff members Claudette Ramikisoon, Brian Sweat, Andrew Hernandez and Dawn Hill. Florida Hospital rewards students Snapshots Associated PressATLANTA About h alf of U.S. adults take v itamins and other dietary s upplements a level t hats been holding steady f or much of the past d ecade, new government f igures show. But the data also show a b ooming number of older w omen are taking calcium. Federal officials r eleased figures W ednesday showing that t he use of dietary supplem ents has grown since the e arly 1990s when it was a bout 42 percent. The data s hows use leveled off in 2 003 through 2008, with a bout half of adults 20 and o lder taking at least one d ietary supplement. The biggest change was f or calcium. Two-thirds of w omen 60 and older take i t, up from 28 percent in t he early 1990s. Experts note the ranks o f the elderly have been g rowing, and include m any women who have b een encouraged for years t o take calcium to help p rotect against osteoporos is. The information comes f rom national, in-home s urveys in 1988-1994 and 2 003-2008. The surveys in t he past decade included m ore than 2,000 people e ach year. Interviewers not o nly asked participants w hat supplements they t ook, but also asked to see t he bottles to verify their a nswers. Use of multivitamins t he most popular supplem ent crept up to nearly 4 0 percent. Most people who take v itamins and other supplem ents are educated, have g ood incomes, eat pretty w ell and already get the n utrients they need from t heir diets, the surveys s uggests. Its almost like the p eople who are taking t hem arent the people w ho need them, said R egan Bailey, a nutritional e pidemiologist with the N ational Institutes of H ealth. Federal surveys have o nly recently started aski ng people why they take s upplements, Bailey said. The government supp orts some supplements as a n option for certain peop le such as iron for w omen who are pregnant, f olic acid for women t hinking of getting pregn ant and calcium for older w omen. Vitamins, supplements taken by half of US adults

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DearPharmacist: Im plagued by urinary tract infections (UTIs) and I hate the side effects of the Septra antibiotic that I take daily. Ive heard that drinking cranberry juice cocktail can help. Should I try that? B.K., New York City Answer: Chronic UTIs are miserable. Youve no sooner escorted one out the door, than a new infection rears its ugly itch. Its hard to believe that something delicious can help prevent such a painfully persistent disease, but cranberries get the job done. Women and it is mostly women who experience the itching, burning and pain of recurrent UTIs are motivated to try just about anything to gain comfort and avoid sulfa antibiotics such as Septra DS or Bactrim. Studies prove that UTIcausing bacteria adhere easily to the bladder and urinary tract of chronic sufferers. FYI, if you are prone, this could be a sign of diabetes. Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) actually helps prevent bacterial adhesion. Researchers in Australia and Scotland recently reviewed the results of numerous scientific studies and gave cranberry a thumbsup as a preventive treatment. I think they can help you, but you still may need your antibiotic for a while longer. Please dont destroy your gut with antibiotics. Protect yourself with a high-quality probiotic to replace the beneficial bacteria that gets killed off by your antibiotic. There are many. I personally take Dr. Ohhiras Probiotic because it helps me grow my own flora fingerprint, rather than taking a gazillion organisms that may (or may not) be part of my personal gut microflora. We are all individuals when it comes to gut bugs. See last weeks column for more on that, posted at my Web site. Eat sauerkraut, kombucha and kefir to help restore probiotics with food. I read a new study at NutraIngredients.com about cranberries that studied 60 women aged 18 to 40, over 90 days. The participants received either placebo, 500 to 1,000 mg of whole cranberry powder each day. When the urine was cultured, there was a 25-45 percent reduction in E. Coli bacteria after 10 days in the group that took cranberry, and this was maintained for weeks. The control group showed no improvement. Im not fond of cocktails because they contain sugar, which promotes infection. But drinking pure cranberry juice straight is a decidedly mouth-puckering experience. Try diluting it with sparklin g water, or add 2 tablespoons of pure juice to your water bottle each day. I think supplements are ideal because they contain concentrated amounts of the healing compounds (proanthocyanidins), which offer other health benefits such as lowering cholesterol, contro lling weight, reducing H. pylori infections (ulcers) an d even preventing gum diseas e. D-Mannose is another cranberry-related supplemen t that is enormously helpful. Avoid perfumed soaps, stay hydrated, wipe from front to back and wear cotto n undies. Drinking stinging nettle tea during infections i s important. And finally, a medicine called phenazopyr idine (brand names are AZO Standard and Cystex) are sold OTC at pharmacies nationwide; these immediate ly relieve pain. Suzy Cohen is a registered pharmacist and the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and Real Solutions. For more information, visit www. DearPharmacist. com. This information is not intended to treat, diagnose or cure your condition. Page 6BNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.com HEALTHYLIVING Special to the News-Sun SEBRING For the third c onsecutive year, Florida H ospital Heartland Medical C enter has earned Quality R espiratory Care Recognition ( QRCR) under a national prog ram aimed at helping p atients and families make i nformed decisions about the q uality of the respiratory care s ervices available in hospit als. Only 15 percent of hospit als in the United States have r eceived this award. We are blessed to be able t o achieve this recognition a gain. Our great respiratory t herapists and staff members a re very caring hard workers, s aid Florida Hospital M anager of Cardio P ulmonary Services Mike N apper. The QRCR program was s tarted by the American A ssociation for Respiratory C are (AARC) in 2003 to help c onsumers identify those f acilities using qualified resp iratory therapists to provide r espiratory care. Hospitals e arning the QRCR designat ion ensure patient safety by a greeing to adhere to a strict s et of criteria governing their r espiratory care services. Respiratory therapists are s pecially trained health care p rofessionals who work under p hysician's orders to provide a w ide range of breathing treatm ents and other services to p eople with asthma, chronic o bstructive pulmonary dise ase, cystic fibrosis, lung canc er, AIDS, and other lung or l ung-related conditions. They a lso care for premature i nfants and are key members o f lifesaving response teams c harged with handling medi cal emergencies To qualify for the recognit ion, Florida Hospital H eartland Medical Center p rovided documentation s howing it meets the followi ng conditions: All respiratory therapists employed by the hospital to deliver bedside respiratory care services are legally recognized by the state as competent to provide respiratory care services and hold the CRTor RRTcredential. Respiratory therapists are available 24 hours. Adoctor of medicine or osteopathy is designated as medical director of respiratory care services. Hospital policy prohibits the routine delivery of medicated aerosol treatments utilizing small volume nebulizers and metered dose inhalers to multiple patients simultaneously. Use a process that periodically compares performance of your respiratory department on efficiency and quality metrics with similar departments for the purpose of identifying and achieving best practice. The QQRCR program grew out of growing concerns among health care leaders and the general public regarding the safety and quality of health care services provided to patients. Hospitals that meet the QRCR requirements provide a level of respiratory care consistent with national standards and guidelines, and should be commended for their commitment to quality care. For more information, visit www.FHeartland.org or Facebook. Florida Hospital cardio pulmonary care earns national recognition UTI remedies to the rescue Dear Pharmacist Suzy Cohen Courtesy photo Pictured in front row: Lead Therapist Vickie Glass RRT and Yvonne Garza RRT. Back row: Terry Lahr RRT, Coy Bryson CRT, Supervisor Jay Johnston RRT, Manager Mike Napper RRT, and Clarence Cook CRT. As kids explore different sports, parents buy bats, gloves, helmets and jerseys. But new sports should mean new shoes, too. Buying a generic athletic shoe no longer makes the grade. Sport-specific shoes, which are designed for the e xact sport in which a child will partici pate, boost performance and protect a gainst foot and ankle injuries. The American Podiatric Medical A ssociation, the countrys leading h ealth resource representing 80 percent o f podiatric physicians nationally, r ecently surveyed parents. According to t he survey, 48 percent of children under t he age of 17 have experienced a s ports-related foot disorder. With so many children falling victim t o foot injuries caused by playing s ports, parents should be reminded that t he proper sports footwear can make t he difference between fun and serious i njury. These guidelines are offered for p arents looking to keep their children r unning, dribbling and sprinting strong and injury-free. Dribbles and dunks: Many kids p lay basketball as their organized sport o f choice. But with so many feet running around a court, kidsbasketball shoes should have a thick, stiff sole to support running and jumping. Basketball players also make sharp direction changes, so shoes must feature high ankle constructions. The best basketball shoes offer strong, support on either side of a childs ankle. Making a racket: Court shoes designed for tennis and racquetball might look like other sneakers, but they feature invisible support for lateral moves. Childrens court shoes should support both sides of the foot, since children must make quick movements and weight shifts as they chase after tennis balls. Flexible soles help children change directions quickly. Sprinting toward the finish: Every runner, no matter their age, requires a shoe fitted to their style and speed. Good running shoes provide maximum shock protection to avoid leg and knee injuries. They make sure that feet hit the ground correctly. Parents should look for the APMA Seal of Approval on footwear, which guarantees that shoes meet guidelines for stability and safety. They also shouldnt forget to buy synthetic-blended socks without large seams, which work away moisture and help prevent odor. Dont forget to check your childs shoes to make certain they still fit. A childs feet grow at an amazing pace until their growth plates are closed. How to tell if a shoe fits a child or an adult: The shoe should be a thumbs width longer than the end of the longest toe, after walking around in the shoe store. All feet will move forward in shoes with any activity. Shoes should have a padded tongue, good laces, a place on the back for the Achilles tendon and plenty of shock absorption. Some shoe fitting knowledge and a few precautions will lead to happy feet for all ages. Dr. Joni Jones is a podiatrist in Sebring who can be reached at 382-3228, stop by her office at 206 West Center Avenue, Sebring or mail to P.O. Box 1719, Sebring, FL 338711719. Finding the right sports shoes for your child Foot Care Dr. Joni Jones Metro Services Finding a good fit for your childs sports shoes is important.

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A tonement Lutheran Church, ELCASEBRING The Holy W eek Schedule with Holy E ucharist will be at 9:30 a .m., led by Deacon David T horesen and several memb ers of the congregation who w ill be reading The Passion o f Jesus according to M atthew 26:36, 27:66. Maundy Thursday Service w ill be at 7 p.m., led by the R ev Jefferson Cox. The Holy E ucharist will be followed b y the stripping of the altar i n preparation of the Good F riday service which will be a t 7 p.m. on April 22. The sermon for the Good F riday service will be a r eading of the passion of J esus according to John 1 8:1-19:42. Readers will be T om Portz, Ed Graff, Lois H ess and Ron Fitzpatrick. T he Procession of the Cross a nd the Reverence to the C ross will end the service. Easter Sunday celebration s ervice with Holy C ommunion will be led by R ev. Jefferson Cox at the 9 :30 a.m. Sunday service. B runch will follow service i n fellowship hall. A von Park Church of ChristAVON PARK The C ross: Our Greatest I mprinting (Galatians 6: 14) w ill be the Sunday morning m essage presented by M inister Larry Roberts. The L ords Supper is served e very Sunday. The Sunday evening servi ce will be a devotional with a fingerfood fellowship to f ollow. The church is at 200 S. F orest Ave. Call 453-4692.Christian Science ChurchSEBRING The lesson s ermon on Sunday morning i s titled Doctrine of A tonement. The keynote is f rom I Corinthians 8:6, ...there is but one God, the F ather, of whom are all t hings, and we in him; and o ne Lord Jesus Christ, by w hom are all things, and we b y him. The church is at 146 N. F ranklin St.Christian Training Church SEBRING The Rev. Linda M. Downing will bring the message titled More Seals Opened: Part 2 at the Sunday morning service. The Wednesday night Bible study will continue the book of Hebrews. Eastside Christian ChurchLAKE PLACID Bill Lewis will be in concert on Wednesday at 6 p.m. After the concert, there will be a time of refreshment and fellowship in Agape Hall. Wednesday evenings midweek adult Bible study and discussion time is an informal setting with open discussion and studying the Scriptures. This Sunday will be the monthly potluck, so there will not be Agape Cafe before worship.Emmanuel United Church of ChristSEBRING The Rev. George Miller will deliver the Sunday morning message ...and Afterwards with Scripture taken from Matthew 21:1-11 on Sunday. There will be an Easter egg hunt after the 9:30 a.m. Easter service on Sunday, April 24. The church is 1.7 miles west of U.S. 27 on Country Road (Hammock Road). Call 471-1999 or visit sebringemmanuelucc.comFirst Baptist Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK The Worship Choir will be presenting the Easter Cantata Evidence of Grace on Sunday. Rev. Jon Beck will be speaking at the evening service. Nursery is available for the morning service. The church is at 100 N. Lake Ave. Call 453-6681 or email infor@fbcap.netFirst Baptist Church of Placid LakesLAKE PLACID On Sunday morning, Pastor Darryl George will preach the sermon entitled Johns Milieu & Message! There will be no Sunday evening service. The Hands of Christ Food Ministry will distribute food to the needy at 4 p.m. The church is at the corner of Washington and Kemper Avenues in Placid Lakes. Call 465-5126 from 8 a.m. to noon, Monday through Thursday or e-mail the church at placidlakes@hotmail.com.First Baptist Church of SebringSEBRING First Baptist Church will host an Easter egg hunt and covered dish luncheon at the City Pier from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday for all families that have attended First Baptist activities this past year. This is Palm Sunday, and the church will celebrate with communion at the morning service. Areminder that Sunday school/Bible study is now at 9:15 a.m. and the blended church service begins at 10:30 a.m. The preschool will hold its Easter celebration in the Sanctuary at 9 a.m. on Wednesday. On Good Friday, April 22, the church office will be closed.First Christian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK Easter is quickly approaching and the choir at First Christian Church will be sharing through song this Sunday in an Easter Cantata at 10 a.m. Everyone is invited to attend the Easter worship celebration, April 25 at 10 a.m. First Christian Church of Avon Park is at 1016 W. Camphor (behind the Wachovia Bank). Call 4535334 or e-mail firstchristianap@embarqmail.com. The church website is www.firstchristianap.com.First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)SEBRING At the Lords Table on Sunday will be Johnny Johnston and Juanita Roberts. Communion will be served by Joyce Winstel, Sandra Laufer, Carol Chandler and Jayne Weldy. Greeting the congregation will be Bill and Carolyn Hineline. Leading the Call to Worship will be Carolyn Hineline. Michael and Carol Graves will be working with Childrens Church. Lighting the candles during the month of April will be Daniel Thibodeau. Sherry Kunsak will be with the children in the nursery during the month of April. The guest speaker for Sunday is Dr. Desmond Walke,r whose message is from Matthew 21:1-11, Sharing in the Passion of Christ.First Presbyterian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK On Sunday, the choir will present the Easter cantata during the worship service entitled Where Are the Shepherds Now? Maxine Johnson, adult Sunday school teacher, continues the study of David in II Samuel 12 in which Nathan rebukes David. Wendy Garcia teaches the youth class and discusses issues of today and how the Bible instructs us. On Wednesday morning, Bible study with Pastor Johnson continues the study of Revelation. On Thursday, ens Fellowship will meet at The Depot at 7 a.m. for breakfast and then return to the church www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011Page 7B RELIGION The Bible puts a lot of e mphasis on family. It is the b ackbone of the church and t he backbone of any nation. O nce upon a time we were c onsidered the greatest n ation in the world. That w as a time when divorce w as frowned upon and peop le learned to work through t heir problems. That was b ack when we still had p rayer in school, the Pledge o f Allegiance, and corporal p unishment. We became a nation of anything goes, and no o ne can tell me what to do. R ebellion and selfishness c ause us to become immune t o lifes teachings and b ecome bigger fools than we a lready were. Now we have a nation that i s primarily filled with sing le parent homes and having m ultiple partners and child ren who have no idea who t heir fathers are, or they h ave fathers who dont want t o be part of the childrens l ives. We have lost our backb one. There is no family u nity. Many of the families I do s ee are in crisis and picking e ach other apart. Is it any w onder our nation is falling a part? We make heroes and idols o ut of celebrities who dont h ave a clue how to be happy. W e place all of our value on the outward appearance and the things money can buy. We hold our hands out to our government and expect the government to take care of us so we can spend our money any way we want to. Philippians 4:19 says, But my God shall supply all of your needs according to His riches in glory by Christ Jesus. It doesnt say the government will supply all of our needs. But the government has decided to kick the church out of the caring business and it took over. But there is hope. 2 Chronicles 7:14 says, If my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways, then will I hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin, and I will heal their land. This is the answer to having strong families, to getting our backbone back in place. What are you willing to do to have a strong family and help our nation get back on the right track? Aleta Kay can be reached at themarriagementor@yahoo.com Weve lost our backbone The Marriage Mentor Aleta Kay Church News Continued on page 8B Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Maranatha Baptist Church Choir and Drama Team will present an Easter musical drama, Rise Again, at 7 p.m. Friday, April 22 and 6 p.m. Sunday, April 24. The drama depicts the followers of Christ giving their account of the events leading up to the crucifixion, their emotions at his death and their joy at his resurrection. It closes with the anticipation of Jesusreturn to earth to claim those who have believed in Him. Directed by Jan Burgess, she is assisted by Pat Seddon, who directs t he drama. Accompanists a re Judy Tinkham and An n Truax. Soloists are Joan ne Snyder, Joe Chapman, Ga ry Hanson, David Waite an d Stan Mohr. Drama parts a re played by Joanne Snyde r, Virgil Ertle, Way ne Mattson, Leon Moody, St an Mohr, Valene Douglas an d Jim Sheppard. The public is invited to attend. The church is at 3 5 Maranatha Blvd., o ff Arbuckle Creek Road, tw o miles east of SR-17 Nor th in Sebring. For more info rmation, call 382-4301 or 382-8594. Maranatha Baptist presents Rise Again Courtesy pho to Gary Hanson (from left), Joe Chapman, David Waite, as the Pharisees, in a song segment from the Maranatha Baptist Church musical Rise Again. The drama will be presented Friday, April 22 and Sunday, April 24.

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Page 8BNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. childrens choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. childrens mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and womens prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Friday 5-7 p.m., every Saturday 9-11 a.m. and 3-3:45 p.m., first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life! Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church.Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP f or a short Bible study and then to a members house for a work proje ct. AMaundy Thursday service w ill be at 6:30 p.m. Holy C ommunion will be observed. The church is at 215 E. Circle S treet (with two entrances on L agrande Street). Call 453-3242.First Presbyterian Church of SebringSEBRING Are We Ready F or the King to Come? is the title o f Sunday mornings sermon given b y the Rev. Darrell A. Peer. Deacons meeting is Monday at 4 p.m. in the conference room. T uesday, Grief Support Group m eets at 3 p.m., adult classroom. M ens Prayer Breakfast on T hursday is at 8 a.m. at Sandys on t he highway. Maundy Thursday Communion S ervice will be at 7 p.m. in the s anctuary. The Easter Sunrise Community S ervice, April 24, 7 a.m. in the s anctuary. Good Friday Community service w ill be held from 1:30-3 p.m. at St. J ohn Methodist Church on April 2 2.Heartland Christian ChurchSEBRING Pastor Ted Moores sermon this week will be How Great The Love with Scripture from I John 3:1-3. Service will also include Heartland Singers depicting The Last Supper and singing The Broken Rose; Ernest Scheeres singing Im Free; Mina West singing The Holy City; and Walle Woodworth singing I Walked Today Where Jesus Walked. There will be a special program on Easter Sunday. The Adult Bible Study on Tuesday will be taught by Pastor Ted Moore Wednesday night are the Young Adult and Childrens Programs taught by George Kelly, Jon & Amanda Armentrout and Toby Cribbs. It features a free meal. The church is at 2705 Alternate Route 17 South in Sebring (behind Publix) Look for the lighthouse. Call 314-9693.Memorial United Methodist ChurchLAKE PLACID On Palm/Passion Sunday, the sermon topic will be What Will You Leave at the Cross? using Mark 15:12-41. The Rev. Fred Ball will preach in the Sanctuary at the Heritage (traditional) service and the Celebration (blended) service. Claude Burnett, pastoral assistant, will preach at the New Song (Contemporary) Service in Rob Reynolds Fellowship Hall. Nursery care is available for all morning events in the Creepy Crawly Clubhouse. Childrens Church meets in the Sanctuary for Wiggletime and then moves to the SonShine Clubhouse. Youth Group for sixth through 12th grade meets at the Lighthouse and Sunday evening Bible fellowship, with the Rev. Fred Ball, meets at the Chapel. The church is at 500 Kent Ave. Call 465-2422.Parkway Free Will Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Sunday morning Bible lesson, Hosanna! is taken from the book of Mark 11. Pastor Jim Scaggs will bring the Sunday morning and evening messages. The Wednesday evening service will be praise, prayer and Bible study. The end-of-the-month-sing is next April 24.Resurrection Lutheran ChurchAVON PARK On Palm Sunday, the sermon will be based on Matthew 26. Coffee and fellowship follows the last service in Burke Hall. The Busy Bodies meet Monday in Burke Hall. Choir practice is Thursday afternoon.St. John United Methodist ChurchSEBRING On Palm Sunday, Rev. Ronald De Genaros sermon will be The Triumph of Jesus taken from Matthew 21:1-11. Maundy Thursdays sermon at 7 p.m. is Jesus, the Servant with Scripture from John 13:1-17. Holy Communion will be served. Community Good Friday service is at 1:30 p.m., April 22.Sebring Church of the BrethrenSEBRING This is Palm Sunday. Pastor will be preaching on The Sign of Humility. The Scripture reading will be from Matthew 21:1-11. Sunday school meets n the Fidelis Room. They will be studying Hosanna! They will also be looking at the Scripture Mark 11:111. Southside Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Rev. David Altman will speak in the morning worship service on Heart Issues from Colossians 3:12-17. Childrens church and a nursery are available. The Sunday evening service will be focused on A House of Prayer For All Nations. Monday at 1 p.m., Women for Missions will meet. The church is at 379 S. Commerce Ave. Call 385-0752.The Way ChurchSEBRING Pastor Reinhold Buxbaum will be bringing a Palm Sunday message. The Lords Supper will be celebrated. Amovie will be shown at 6:30 p.m. Sunrise Service on the Circle a t is at 7 a.m. Sunday morning. Breakfast following at the church The Way Church is at 1005 North Ridgewood Drive. Church phone is 471-6140. Pastors cell i s 214-6190. For church informatio n and the pastors messages go to www.thewaychurch.org .Union Congregational ChurchAVON PARK Saturday nigh t service in Millennium Church is with Pastor Tiger Gullett. Sunday morning services are in Historic Church early, followed b y two services in the Millennium Church with Pastor Bill Breylinge r. There are two Wednesday night services: Life Is Now with Past or Gullett in Solid Grounds and Crosstalk in the Historic Churc h with Pastor Breylinger. Nursery/childcare up to fifth grade is available for all services in portables across from Millennium Church with Jerry Lee Wright. Continued from page 7B RELIGION Church News

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www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011Page 9B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer.Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howes Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer Kid C ity Childrens Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, prime-timers, and Bible s tudies in Spanish. Kid City Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Childrens Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturers Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m. in the sanctuary. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Childrens Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on lifes journey, youre we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP RELIGION Garage sale planned for Benevolence MinistryLAKE PLACID The F irst Presbyterian Church, 1 17 N. Oak Ave., is having a B enevolence Ministry garage s ale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. t oday and Saturday in F riendship Hall.Palm Sunday Concert includes Praise MusicSEBRING Praise Music e xpressed in sign language a nd interpretive dance will be f eatured at 6 p.m. Sunday at W hisper Lake Mobile Home C lubhouse on Memorial D rive. Afree-will offering w ill be received.Danny Ray Harris in concertLAKE PLACID Christian Country Male V ocalist of the Year for 2010, D anny Ray Harris, will be in c oncert Sunday at Leisure Lakes Baptist Church. Harris has delighted groups across America with his country gospel music. Danny, who has a large following in cowboy churches and rodeos, will share music and testimony during the 11 a.m. service, followed by dinner on the grounds. The church is just off Miller Road at the western end of Lake June in the Leisure Lakes section of Lake Placid. Everyone is welcome. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information.Kiwanis hosts Good Friday Prayer BreakfastSEBRING The Kiwanis Club of Sebring will present its annual Good Friday Prayer Breakfast, a nondenominational event, at 7 a.m. Friday, April 22 at Florida Hospital Heartland in Conference Room 1. The program will be emceed by Joe Delph, youth minister for First Baptist Church of Sebring, and the featured speaker will be Dr. David Richardson, pastor for First Baptist Church of Sebring. Richard Barron, executive director of Mission & Ministries of Florida Hospital, will deliver the invocation and pledge of allegiance. The flag presentation will be done by Cub Scout Pack 846 and special music will be performed the Sebring High School Show Choir. The price for breakfast will be $10 and profits will be used to benefit Youth for Christ, Cub Scout Pack 846 and the Sebring High School Show Choir. Everyone is encouraged to attend and invite their clergy to this special event. For more information or to purchase tickets, contact chairman Alan Kent at 3816901, Tayna Taylor at 3813973 or Grace Plants at 2731421.LP Ministerial Association plans Holy Week servicesLAKE PLACID Sponsored by the Lake Placid Christian Ministerial Association, Holy Week 2011 Community Services are as follows: Worship service at noon at First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, 119 E. Royal Palm St. The phone number is 4653721. Lunch served daily at 12:30 p.m., immediately following service in fellowship hall. Cost is $5 per person. Music daily by Bill Lewis Ministries. Monday, April 18: Message by Fred Ball of Memorial United Methodist Church. Menu includes burger or hot-dog with sauerkraut, macaroni and cheese, coleslaw, chips and coconut chocolate cake. Tuesday, April 19: Message by Willie Mincey, Cornerstone Hospice. Menu includes turkey tetrazinni, broccoli cauliflower carrot mix, green salad, roll and strawberry dessert. Wednesday, April 20: Message by Ray Cameron, First Presbyterian Church. Menu includes: Greek chicken, roasted potatoes, carrots, green/Greek salad, roll and banana cake. Thursday, April 21: Message by Richard Norris, Trinity Lutheran Church. Menu includes meatloaf, rice/tomato gravy, collards, biscuit, eclair dessert. Friday, April 22: Message by Brett Morey, First Baptist Church of Lake Placid. Menu includes baked ham, sweet potatoes, scalloped cabbage, cranberry Jell-O salad, roll and pumpkin dessert.Easter Week Services at FPCLAKE PLACID First Presbyterian Church in Lake Placid will host the following services this Easter Week: On Palm Sunday, April 17: Special music featuring childrens choir, Worship Singers, and Praise Ringers. Maundy Thursday, Apri l 21 (Friendship Hall), a potluck dinner at 6:30 p.m., (m-z, side dish, vegetable, salad, or dessert; a-l, main dish or meat) followed by a Communion service. There will be special music by the Praise Trio as well as congr egational singing of both con temporary and traditional music. Anursery from infant to 4 year-olds will be available. Friday, April 22 at 7 p.m., Good Friday Service Anursery from infant to 4 years old will be available. In addition to congregational songs, there will be special music from the Worship Singers, the Gospel Heirs an d a contemporary flute solo. Saturday, April 23 from 9-11 a.m. Easter Family Celebration. Atime for children, to learn about the true meaning of Easter through fun and games. Snapshots Continued on page 10B

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Page 10BNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011www.newssun.com Sunday, April 24 Easter Sunday, 8 :15, 9:30, and 11 a.m. worship service s. Worship Singers and the Orchestra w ill provide special music at the tradit ional worship services and the Praise t eam at the contemporary worship servi ce. On Easter Morning, the Special E vents/ Celebration Committee will be h osting a refreshment stand under the t ent on the front lawn. The committee will be serving, coff ee, juice, and pastries after each servi ce. Plan to stop by and join in the cele bration of The Risen Christ and fell owship with one another. The church is at 117 N. Oak Ave. ( phone 465-2742).Frostproof Good Friday ServiceFROSTPROOF Each year the F rostproof Ministerial Association h osts an evening Good Friday Service a t an area church. Due to larger attend ance, this year the service will be held a t the American Legion Post 95 auditor ium in the historic City Hall building, 1 11 W. First St. in downtown F rostproof. The service begins at 7 p .m. Friday, April 22, The message will b e The Road to Calvary JesusFinal W eek. Members of the Ministerial A ssociation will each bring Scripture a nd a five-minute teaching. This style o f tag team teaching has become a popu lar format for the Frostproof commun ity services held Good Friday, T hanksgiving and Christmas each year. B ring a friend or family member for t his special evening. For more information, contact Pastor B rian Smith at First United Methodist C hurch at (863) 635-3107.Community Good Friday service plannedSEBRING Community Good F riday service will be held on April 22 from 1:30-3 p.m. at St. John United Methodist Church, Grand Prix Drive (behind Walmart). The theme of the service is Tracing the Steps of Jesus and will follow the path of Christ from the Upper Room to the burial in six brief segments. Each segment will include a Scripture, meditation and congregational response. Participants include: Major Bruce Stefanik, Salvation Army; Rev. Gary Kindle, Faith Lutheran; Deacon James McGarry, St. Catherine Catholic; Rev. Lester Osbeck, Calvary Church; Rev. Cecil Hess, Palms of Sebring; Rev. George Miller, Emmanuel United Church of Christ; Rev. Keith Simmons, Sebring Church of the Brethren; Rev. Fred Jeans, Kenilworth Care Center; Rev. Ronald DeGenaro, Host Pastor; Rev. Steve Hagen, Alliance Church; Rev. Darrell Peer, First Presbyterian; Rev. A.C. Bryant, First United Methodist; Rev. David Springer, Hope Hospice; Rev. Sheila Swanger, St. John United Methodist; Mr. David Averill, St. John United Methodist. Special music will include the Sounds of Sebring Male Quartet; the choir of the host church and Soloist, Robert Faldorf. The freewill offering received will benefit the ministerial relief fund of the Sebring Ministerial Association, which is sponsoring this annual service. The public is cordially invited to participate in this ecumenical service. For further information, call 382-1737.First Baptist announces Easter service timesLAKE PLACID First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, 119 E. Royal Palm St., will host the following services for Easter: Sunday, April 24 8-9 a.m. traditional service; 9:15-10:30 a.m., contemporary service; and 10:45 a.m. to noon, contemporary service. There will be no evening service.Church Women United meet May 6SEBRING The next meeting of Church Women United will be held on Friday, May 6 at Spring Lake Presbyterian Church, 5887 U.S. 98. This location is about seven miles east of U.S. 27 and the church is on the south side. The doors will open at 10 a.m. and the celebration will begin at 10:30 a.m. This celebration is open to the public. At this meeting refreshments will be delayed until after the program. Bring a sandwich wrapped to share. The group will provide something to drink. This is a special service to collect the least coin (pennies) that members have collected during the past year. Bring a friend and a sandwich and enjoy the company of fellow church women. For additional information call Alice Koster at 382-2819.St. Agnes announces Holy Week plansSEBRING The schedule for St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3840 Lakeview Drive, for Holy Week services is as follows: April 17, Palm Sunday 7:45 and 10 a.m. April 21, Maundy Thursday 7 p.m. April 22, Good Friday noon April 24, Easter Sunday Sunrise Lakefront Service, 6:30 a.m.; Rite I, 7:45 a.m.; and Rite II, 10 a.m. There will be an egg hunt between Rite I and Rite II services for all children.Easter Sunrise Service on Lake Reedy FROSTPROOF The Frostproof Ministerial Associations Community Easter Sunrise Service will be held at 6:30 a.m. Sunday, April 24 at the east end of Wall Street in historic downtown Frostproof. This year the event is hosted by the First Baptist Church of Frostproof. Watch the sunrise over Lake Reedy, renew your relationship with your heavenly Father and fellowship with friends and neighbors. Bring your own chair if you can. For more information, call (863) 635-3603. Continued from page 9B Courtesy photo The Front, a youth ministry from Bradenton, will take time from working with as many as 42 churches in the Bradenton/Sarasota area to come to Crossroads Fellowship Church on Sunday. RELIGION Special to the News-SunSEBRING All generat ions are invited to gather for a n event with The Front, a y outh ministry from B radenton. The Front embraces b elievers from all walks of l ife, passionately pursuing t he presence of Lord in wors hip. They work together w ith as many as 42 churches i n the Bradenton/Sarasota area. The Front gathers for worship, ministry of the Word, intercession for different causes, they promote life, do outreaches and are involved in missions as well as other ministries. Come join leaders John and Michelle Storsky at 6 p.m. Sunday at Crossroads Fellowship Church, 605 State Road 66 in Sebring. The Front in concert at Crossroads Fellowship Snapshots Since the fall of man in the Garden of Eden, God has reached out to reconcile humanity to himself. After man had disobeyed God by taking the forbidden fruit, God demanded that an animal be killed for his atonement. After God delivered the Commandments to Moses, He had Aaron make a sacrifice for himself, his house, and for the people. This was a sanctifying act of consecration. The slain animal would provide a covering for the sin of the people. The entire ritual of the high priest sacrificing the animal, entering into the Holy place, and sprinkling the blood on the mercy seat, would hold a powerful symbolic meaning. You see, this was a part of Gods unfolding plan of Redemption. Our sin is intolerable to a righteous holy God. Sin leads to death: therefore, no sinful person deserves a place in heaven and the hope of eternal life. But God in His mercy, had one option to spare mankind from condemnation: that is, to allow a perfect substitute be punished in the stead of sinful man. In the Old Testament, the goat would be that sacrifice on the Day of Atonement. The blood of a goat would be shed for the sin of the people. Leviticus 17:11 says, For the life of the flesh is in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the altar to make an atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul. Another goat would be the sin-bearer and would be freed outside the camp, hence signifying their sins were gone, to be remembered no more. The high priest had to perform this ceremony every year for the sins committed. But the final sac rifice came centuri es later in the person of Jesus Christ. Having fulfilled hundreds of prophe cies that He indeed was the Messiah, Jesus died in the place of man. He was proclaimed by John the Baptist as the Lamb of God which taketh away the sin of the world. He was our High Priest wh o entered into the Holy of Holies in the presence of God and sprinkled his own blood on the mercy seat. This appeased God and per mitted His favor on man whose sin is forgiven. Jesus died once and for all. As he died upon the cross at Calvary, He cried, It is finished. Indeed, the debt for sin had been paid i n full. Hebrews 10:12 says of Jesus, But this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God. The Father sent the Son to be the Saviour of the world. Do you realize that Jesus died in your place? You cannot pay for your sin by being a good person or trusting religion. You must acknowledge your sin debt and need of forgiveness through Jesus Christ. Belie ve on Jesus alone for your souls salvation. It was his blood that purchased your souls pardon. Why neglect so great a salvation? Must two be pun ished for the sin of one? Le t not Christs death in your place be in vain. He did no t remain dead, but arose from the grave, just as He said H e would. Is there room in you r heart for Him? Luke Knickerbocker is the pastor of Bethel Baptist Church in Lake Placid, 216 E. Park St. E-mail him at knickprint@yahoo.com. The church Web site is visitbethelbaptist.com. The final sacrifice Timeless Treasure Luke Knickerbocker Are you are the kind of p erson who thrives off of s uccess, rewards and recogn ition? If so, I can relate. In r ecent years, I have learned t hat there is nothing wrong w ith achieving great things i n life or being gifted in vari ous areas of life. However, I came to the r ealization through studying G ods word and developing a personal relationship with J esus Christ that my heart a nd motives needed to be c hanged. I needed to learn w hat true humility was and t hat everything I do in life s hould be for Gods honor a nd glory. Finally, my outw ard actions needed to e xemplify Christ-like chara cter. As believers, God takes g reat delight in making us m ore like Christ. One particu lar quality in our lives that i s very pleasing to the Lord i s humility. Achieving C hrist-like humility can be d ifficult due to our human s in nature we are born with. T he big question to consider i s what is true humility? G ods word has given many e xamples of Jesus modeling h umility for us. As human beings, many o f us may have the tendency t o consider ourselves better t han others or that we should not have to do certain things in life that others do. Sometimes, we may even choose to disassociate with certain people because of status. Galatians 6:3 says, For if anyone thinks himself to be something, when he is nothing, he deceives himself. Another way to describe this kind of attitude that some of us may have is pride. God tells us in I Peter 5: 5 that in submitting to Him, we should choose to humble ourselves. Yes, all of you be submissive to one another, and be clothed with humility, for God resists the proud, But gives grace to the humble. Jesus was our greatest example of someone who showed true humility. He was the Son of God, but He still remained humble. Jesus knew the high position that He would have with His Father as our Wonderful Counselor, Prince of Peace, Mighty God, and Everlasting Father. However, even though He would hold such a title as this, He portrayed Himself to be just like us. Matthew 21:1-11 tells about Jesusentry into Jerusalem. The people praised Him as He was passing through by shouting in Verse 9, Hosanna to the Son of David! Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the Highest! Verse 10 tells how the people were so amazed and some questioned who He was. From our perspective in todays society, we would expect someone of this status to drive through in a limousine. In Jesusday maybe it would have been expected that He would have entered in by carriage decorated with fine jewels or something similar. However, he rode in on a donkey to display the same humility leaving this life just as He entered it. Following the celebration of Jesusentry into Jerusalem, Jesus spent some extra time with His disciples at a Passover Feast as He knew His time with them on earth would be coming to an end soon. He wanted to show His true unconditional love and faithfulness to them all the way to the end of His life on earth (Matthew13:1). Jesus modeled His love and humility in Verse 4 by washing the disciplesfeet, and wiped them with a towel that had been tied around His own body. Doesnt it seem as though the disciples should have been washing His feet? After all, He was the son of God! Jesus sat with His disciples and explained why He washed their feet in John 13:12-17. Do you know what I have done to you? You call Me Teacher and Lord, and you say well, for so I am. If I then, your Lord and Teacher; have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one anothers feet. For I have given you an example, and that you should do as I have done to you. Most assuredly, I say to you, a servant is not greater than his master; nor is he who is sent greater than he who sent him. If you know these things, blessed are you if you do them. Finally, lets remember what Jesus has said, For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many. (Mark 10:45) Bible shows us what true humility is Come To The River Leslie Deese Courtesy pho to Jeanne Johnson of the Women of St James Catholic Church presents proceeds from a recent charity drive known as Undies Sundays Drive to Manna volunteer Pauline Vogt. Undies Sundays Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun

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Associated PressNEWYORK Apress conference for John Travoltas latest project, Gotti: Three Generations, had a surprise guest: Lindsay Lohan. The 24-year-old actress has been rumored to be up for the role of Victoria Gotti, daughter of the infamous Dapper Don John Gotti. Producer Marc Fiore confirmed Tuesday that hes in talks with Lohan, whom he called a terrific actress, but said nothing had been finalized. Lohan, who has starred in such films as Mean Girls and Freaky Friday, sat in the front row at the press conference and posed for photos with the cast and crew but didnt talk to the press. She has been plagued by legal problems in recent years and is now battling a felony grand theft charge in California over a $2,500 necklace. Travolta, 57, will star as John Gotti, the well-dressed leader of the legendary Gambino crime family, who had a knack for evading convictions on a variety of mob indictments brought against him, earning him the nicknames Dapper Don and Teflon Don. Gotti finally was convicted in 1992 of murder and racketeering and died in prison a decade later. At the press conferenc e, Travolta talked about co nnecting to the Gotti role on a deeper level. He said he h ad talked to one of Gottis su rviving sons, John Junio r Gotti. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 15, 2011Page 11B By CHRISTYLEMIRE APMovie CriticRobert Redfords latest film, The Conspirator, explores a time in American history that most of us probably never knew about, or at least forgot: the 1865 trial of Mary Surratt, a boarding house owner whose son was suspected of helping John Wilkes Booth assassinate Abraham Lincoln. It should be tense and thrilling, full of rich, powerful performances; instead, itll make you feel like you should be taking notes in preparation for a high-school exam. And like the last film Redford directed, the terrorism drama Lions for Lambs, its painfully preachy and sanctimonious. James McAvoy stars as Frederick Aiken, a 28-yearold Civil War hero for the Union whos now the lawyer assigned to defend Mary (Robin Wright), the lone woman charged in the case. Being young and idealistic and functioning as the kind of character Redford himself would have played decades ago Aiken says he doesnt know whether Mary is guilty of conspiracy, but he feels she deserves a fair trial. The entire nation is against her and against him, too, by association. But Kevin Kline, as the power-hungry Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, makes it clear that someone must pay for the presidents death. It may as well be Mary Surratt. Redfords film, based on a script by James D. Solomon, is stately and respectable to a fault: Its too safe. It feels the need to bang us over the head with how important it is. And Redford is trying way too hard to make these events from a century and a half ago seem like a relevant metaphor for where we are as a nation post-9/11. Nobody ever evolves here; The Conspirator doesnt offer characters so much as human representations of principles. Aiken is always determined and high-minded (and Alexis Bledel as his girlfriend is always sweet and boring.) Mary remains the stoic martyr, proudly prepared to do whatever she must to protect her son, until the very end. Stanton is always unscrupulously conniving and out for blood. Even the films aesthetic motif is static and suffocating. Redford (with the help of cinematographer Newton Thomas Sigel) shoots nearly all his interiors the same way: dark rooms pierced with shafts of misty, unforgivin g sunlight. Whether they re meant to provide enlighte nment or cast blame, they fe el repetitive. Sure, The Conspirato r has an excellent, pedigre ed supporting cast includin g Tom Wilkinson, Col m Meaney, Danny Huston an d Stephen Root in one gre at scene. (Justin Long, mea nwhile, shows up with t he worst fake facial hair know n to mankind as one of Aiken s fellow soldiers, and his pre sence feels awkward and w ay too contemporary.) But then, Wilkinson, as Aikens superior, is saddl ed with clunky lines like: I ts time to heal the nation, n ot wage more war. Even an actor of his vers atility and stature cant ma ke that sound like anything b ut what it is: a lecture. DIVERSIONS DearAbby: C ould you please r eprint a letter you r an a few years a go about the dang ers of purchasing a pet rabbit for c hildren at Easter? A s a rabbit owner f or eight years, I m all too famili ar with the misconceptions a nd ridiculous theories a ssociated with these d elightful creatures. Every p oint in that letter rang t rue to me, and I beg anyo ne considering giving a c hild a rabbit to reconsider. When I bought my b unny, it was near Easter t ime. Most pet stores didn t offer them, and I was t old it was because of the l arge number of rabbits f ound dead or abandoned o n the streets because the s elfish, inhumane people w ho bought them for the h oliday disposed of them t he next day. These dear l ittle animals deserve owne rs who will love and r espect them. Please dont w aste their lives. Caitlin in L.A. DearCaitlin: Im happy t o oblige. The letter you r equested carries an import ant message that cant be r epeated often enough: DearAbby: Easter is c oming. Many families s till purchase live rabbits a s pets for their children. P arents often think rabbits a re good starter pets and d ont understand what they a re getting into. As a r esult, many of these poor c reatures end up in animal s helters, and children learn t hat pets are disposable. Before getting rabbits, p eople should consider: 1. Are they willing to m ake a seven-to-10-year c ommitment? That is the a verage lifespan of a rabb it. 2. What will happen if t heir child gets bored with t he bunny after six m onths? 3. Is there a place in t heir house for a rabbit c age? 4. Are they willing to p ay to get it s payed/neutered and prov ide vet care? 5. Do they know that m ost rabbits hate to be h eld? Will their child a ccept that? 6. Are they willing to ensure that children under 7 wont pick up the rabbit without supervision? Rabbits are fragile; their legs or spine will break if accidentally dropped. 7. Can they provide three hours of exercise every day in an escapeproof area outside its cage? 8. Do the adults want the rabbit, too? Arabbit should be a family pet. If people have questions about rabbits and their care, please ask them to contact my organization. We are happy to answer questions. Our Web site is www.rabbitnetwork.org, and our phone number is (781) 431-1211. Finally, if a rabbit is right for you and your family, please adopt one from a shelter or rescue group. Youll enrich your family with a new member and also teach your kids the value of saving a life. Thank you. Suzanne Trayhan, president, House Rabbit Network DearSuzanne: The topic of bunnies, baby chicks and ducklings as Easter gifts is one that recurs every year. I hear from people who work in animal shelters deploring the fact that these helpless little creatures are later dumped when they cease to be novelties. I hope readers will take to heart what you have written, particularly the suggestion that if a rabbit is going to be adopted, a shelter or rescue group can be an excellent resource. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. To receive a collection of Abbys most memorable and most frequently requested poems and essays, send a business-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby Keepers Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included in the price.) Bunnies bought for Easter often wind up in shelters Dear Abby The American Film Compa ny Robin Wright Penn stars as Mary Surratt in The Conspirator. The Conspirator is stately to a fault Movie Review The Conspirator Rating: PG-13 (some violent content) Running time: 122minutes Review: (of 4) Lohan in talks for role in Travoltas Gotti biopic By DAVID BAUDER APTelevision WriterNEWYORK What do ABCs Off the M ap, NBCs Americas Next Great R estaurant and CBSChaos have in comm on? It wont be longevity, based on last weeks N ielsen Co. ratings. Every television season h as more failures than successes, and these n ew shows appear to be misses. The medical drama Off the Map had 3.8 m illion viewers last Wednesday, a little more t han a third of the audience for another new s how, the CBS spinoff Criminal Minds: S uspect Behavior in the same 10 p.m. ET t ime slot. That time is becoming increasingly d ifficult for the networks to program, with only CBSThe Mentalist on Thursday finishing among Nielsens top 10 shows. Americas Next Great Restaurant, an attempt at creating a new reality franchise, has flopped for NBC. The new CBS drama Chaos had 5.7 million viewers last week, considered a weak showing for that network. Competition dominated prime-time network TV, with the top shows being American Idol, Dancing With the Stars and CBSairing of Connecticuts victory over Butler in the NCAAmens basketball championship. The premiere of Foxs Breaking In was the most-watched new Fox sitcom in five years, although it kept less than half the audience from its Idol lead-in. Not every new show is ratings winner for networks

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LIVING 12B PAGE News-Sun Friday, April 15, 2011 WHEN SHOPPING Reduce distractions, such as using a cellphone, while walking to your car. Always park in well-lit areas. Limit the amount of valuables you carry to minimize potential loss. Do not leave packages in your car and return to stores. If you make a valuable purchase, go straight home. Do not overload yourself with packages. Use will-call and curbside package pickup services instead. Make a plan ahead of time in case your children become separated from you.WITH YOUR VEHICLE When your vehicle is unattended, dont leave the windows down. And remember to lock the car. Take valuables with you and lock anything you must leave behind in your trunk. Dont leave anything in plain sight. If you cant hide an item in your trunk or car, take it home before going elsewhere, suggests Sgt. Thomas Palmer of the Broward (Fla.) Sheriffs Office. Dont forget about cellphones or other electronics you are charging in the console. Copy down serial numbers on any electronics to make recovery easier. Take as little with you as necessary when making routine trips to the store, school and other places. If you can, park inside your garage instead of in the driveway.AT THE ATM Use ATMs you are most familiar with in well-lit, wellplaced areas. Be aware of your surroundings, particularly at night. If you see suspicious people, do not use the machine. Have your card in hand as you approach the ATM. Dont wait to get to the ATM and then look for it. Be careful that no one can see you enter your PIN on the keyboard. Use your body to shield the keyboard. Do not count or display money from the ATM. Put your money into a pocket or purse and count it later. Be cautious when strangers offer to help if you are having difficulty with a transaction. If using a drive-up ATM, be sure passenger windows are rolled up and all doors are locked.AROUND TOWN If you notice another car following you, drive to the nearest police station or busy, well-lit area. Call 911. Make a habit of locking your car doors and closing your windows immediately when you get in your car, even before you fasten your seatbelt. Always lock car doors and take the keys when you leave your car, even if youll be gone for just a short time. Dont leave valuables in view in the car, even if the vehicle is locked. Thieves can smash your window and grab your purse or computer in a matter of seconds. As you walk down the street or through the parking area, walk alertly and assertively. Dont weigh yourself down with too many parcels. Do not talk on your cell phone while walking through parking areas. Thieves will assume you are distracted by the conversation and perceive you as an easy mark. If you carry a purse, hold it close to your body; if a wallet, keep it in a front pocket. When carrying a purse, take only the essentials (a drivers license, a limited amount of cash, one credit or debit card and a check or two). Dont carry irreplaceable items such as photos of grandchildren, and dont carry your original Social Security card in your purse or wallet. Dont display your cash or any other inviting targets such as cellphones, hand-held electronic games or expensive jewelry. Never leave your purse or wallet unattended in a shopping cart. Have car keys out and ready when approaching your car. Check the back seat and floor before you get in. Complete an inventory. If your valuables or credit cards are lost or stolen, you will have serial numbers and phone numbers handy.AT HOME Add decorative reinforcement plate to your doors. They can be found at most homeimprovement stores and cost around $10. Dont hide spare keys outside your home. Thieves are good snoops, especially when time is on their side. Light up your home. Use motion detectors outside and timers inside (when youre not home). Maintain landscaping. Overgrown trees and shrubs can provide hiding spaces for wouldbe thieves. Be really kind to a favorite neighbor or relative who lives nearby. Having someone you trust check on your home regularly goes a long way toward protecting your house.IN YOUR YARD Trim those trees: Keep your bushes (including hedges) trimmed to 2 or 3 feet tall. Taller bushes provide burglars good hiding spots. In addition, experts recommend the first 7 feet of branches be pruned to prevent someone from climbing to an attic or second floor. Also, you dont want your bushes or trees to obscure your view of your yard. Protect your windows: To deter break-ins, you can plant thorny bushes under windows. Bougainvillea, barberries and roses work well. Using gravel stones under windows eliminates a criminals ability to silently prowl near your house. Anyone who walks on those will make a loud crunching noise with each step. Shine a light: Install motionactivated floodlights in out-ofreach places around your home. Lights scare away burglars and alert homeowners to potential problems outside. Just make sure theyre installed so no one can tamper with them. Get a survey: Some local police departments have free survey programs for homes and businesses. Just ask for the departments crime prevention folks. Officers can look at a wide range of security issues during these evaluations, including doors, locks, windows and garages. To see if evaluation is available in your area, call your local police department.SOURCES: AMERICAN BANKING ASSOCIATION; ATMONGUARD; NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION COUNCIL; SOUTH FLORIDALAW ENFORCEMENTAGENCIES; TOM KRAEUTLER, HOSTOF THE NATIONALLY SYNDICATED RADIO SHOW THE MONEYPITBYBRIANHAAS, MARIACHERCOLES ANDDANIELVASQUEZSun Sentinelhether its a fast run to the mall to pick up a birthday gift, a stop at the ATM for some walking-around cash or merely darting out of the house to get to an appointment, too often our minds are on a million different things. Amillion different things, that is, except for one thing we should be thinking of: safety. And while were not paying attention, we can face a vehicle break-in, a stolen PIN number or even a burglary at home. Sometimes crime is unavoidable, but there is plenty you can to do to help keep yourself, your family and your property secure. Here are some safety tips from the experts to help you prevent crime.A few reminders to keep you and your property secure Illustrations by Mark Mattern/MCTSafeguarding your vehicle requires vigilance. Create an inventory of your valuable items to keep handy in case of emergency.