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The news-sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01027
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 04-10-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:01027
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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News-Sun photo by SAMANTH A GHOLA R Fred Wild fourth grade instructor, Erica Ashley, assists herstudent Jasmin Mitchell as she tries to locate a simile in herFCAT NEWS-SUN Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 42 | 75 cents www.newssun .com HighLow 90 67Complete Forecast PAGE 10A Mostly sunny and very warm Forecast Question: Have you seen signs that the local economy is improving? Next question: Should teachers have continuing contracts? www.newssun .com Make your voice heard at Online Online Obituaries Alana Hathaway Heflin Age 94, of Lake Placid Obituaries, Page 5A Phone ... 385-6155Fax ... 385-2453Online: www.newssun.com Yes 17% No 83% 099099401007 Total votes: 106 Arts12B Business9A Chalk Talk8B Classifieds11A Community Briefs2A Community Calendar5B Crossword Puzzle13B Dear Abby13B Editorial & Opinion4A Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times13B School Menus8B Senior Scene6B Sports On TV2B Index PAGE14B Creative messy cooking is good for kids Teachers dismayed over merit pay, tenure changes News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Steve Picklesimer, a teacher at Sebring High School who is also the district's union president, shares a laugh with his students. Pickelseimer said the passage of SB 736 creates major problems for his fellow teachers. By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING The decision has been made. Florida's legislature has joined with Governor Rick Scott and passed Senate Bill 736, which does away with extended teacher contracts and predicates pay on standardized student test scores. Teacher tenure will disappear. Teachers whose students do well on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test will be eligible for merit pay. One of the primary arguments used by the politicians in favor of the bill is the difficulty administrators have in removing incompetent tenured teachers, and the need to reward quality teachers. Steven Picklesimer teaches science at Sebring High School. He has taught for 26 years, still loves the challenge of the classroom, and currently serves as president of the Highlands County Education Association, which represents teachers in the district. He sat down for an interview with the News-Sun recently to discuss these ideas from the point of We don't want to railroad teachers out' In my opinion, this is very dangerous legislation that would have serious unintended circumstances.'DR. NORM STEPHENS SFCC president By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comAVON PARK Dr. Norm Stephens, president of South Florida Community College, was at a loss Tuesday afternoon to explain Florida House Bill 7193. The bill passed out of the K-12 Competitiveness Subcom-mittee on March 29, and onto the Education Committee. The bill, sponsored by Erik Fresen (RMiami), came "out of the blue," said Stephens. It calls for the removal of tenure and the end of continuing contracts for faculty members working within the Florida College System meaning those at community colleges or community colleges that have expanded with baccalaureate programs. Stephens said he had read in some media accounts that Fresen proposed the bill at the urging of community college presidents who want to change the tenure system. Shaking his head, however, he said he'd never heard any such concerns. In a letter to the Highlands County legislative delegation, Stephens wrote, "The Council of Presidents of the Florida College System has not discussed this bill or the notion of the elimination of tenure in our system, nor Community college faculties are also under fire over continuing contracts See TEACHERS, page 8A See COLLEGE, page 8A By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK When gover nments run short on money, there h as to be cuts in services. But som etimes, those cuts hit a little close to home. While firemen and school teac hers wrangle with Gov. Rick Sco tt over pensions and budget cuts, an d state legislators take off time to attend sporting events, in Highlan ds County, five women each o ne with disabilities are strugglin g with the latest round of state cu tbacks. Struggling to just find a place to call home. Something everyo ne should have. The Ridge Area Arc was notifi ed on April 1 that it was losing $30,00 0 per month in state revenue, effecti ve Arc consumers face uncertain future due to budget cutsFCAT starts MondayTeachers work hard to get students ready PAGE2AReal FloridaState parks ready for spring PAGE12BNative son gets nodLaVaar Scott named Sebring football coach PAGE1BFatal crash S ebring man dies w hen tanker truck hits tree PAGE2A News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Highlands County Crime Scene Technician Cathy Perez (left) enters Heartland National Bank on US Highway 27 North on Friday afternoon following a robbery. By SAMANTHAGHOLAR and ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING Highlands County Sheriff's Deputies responded to a bank robbery on Friday afternoon and Heartland National bank, and the suspect is still at large. HCSO Public Information Officer Nell Hayes confirmed that a single person fled on foot around 1:20 with an undisclosed amount of money and headed south from the bank. According to initial reports, a black male demanded money at the bank at 6011 U.S. 27 North, claiming he had a gun, and then fled south towards Tanglewood Drive. The suspect was wearing all black and had a black bandanna around his head. Hayes would not confirm lat er on Friday that the suspect w as black or white or Hispanic, but d id state that no one was injured. "His face was covered in t he video, as was his hands, so we ca nnot confirm his race yet. We d o have leads and are working o n those," Hayes said. Man robs bank in Sebring See BANK, page 6A See ARC, page 6A By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comLAKE PLACID Two men we re killed Thursday when a 300,000-ga llon water tank burst and sent a floo d through a nearby building whe re they were working, according to t he Highlands County Sheriff's Office The Occupational Safety an d Health Administration (OSHA), w as on site investigating the 300,00 0gallon water tank on Friday, accor ding to Nell Hayes, public inform ation officer for the Highlan ds County Sheriff's Office. "I can confirm that OSHAwas o ut there, but the ME (medical exami ner) report is not in yet on the tw o victims," Hayes said on Saturday. Eric Torres, Director of Marketin g for United Fire Protection stated in a 2 killed when LP water tank collapses See WATER, page 6A

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By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Monday marks the first day of the two-week-long FCATtesting period and students have been studying hard the past few weeks. "It's a long process," said Fred Wild Assistant Principal Harvey Wilder. "The test is 70 minutes long. The students go for 40 minutes have a break then finish up. They just started giving the long breaks and it helps." Wilder is confident that the students will be wellprepared for the test this year. "We've been preparing them and they are ready. All that's left to do is wait for Monday. We send out a ConnectEd phone call on Sunday night just reminding the parents. The kids should get to bed early, get plenty of sleep and be here on Monday on time," said Wilder. Students who are late during the FCATare not allowed to enter classrooms as it disrupts classmates. "If they're late they have to sit in the office and do the retake, which is just more stress, so we want everyone to be on time and be prepared," Wilder said. Erica Ashley, a fourthgrade instructor at Fred Wild, was busy reviewing similes on Friday morning. Ashley is one of many elementary instructors who were putting in the lastminute effort to get students ready for the test. Ashley's class was fully engaged in the review and were eager to answer questions and participate. Hands were flying up from almost every student when Ashley asked her class who could identify the simile in the paragraph. The students then all got up from their chairs and walked to a part of the room where the letters A, B, C, D were hung above their heads. "This gets them involved. They get to move around and it keeps the information fresh in their heads. They aren't just sitting down answering questions, they are participating," explained Ashley. "This is my first time teaching fourth grade so this is my first time preparing for the FCAT, but I've had a lot of help. The team of teachers I work with. Mrs. Kirby, Mrs. Tomblin, and Mrs. Eisinger have helped me tremendously. We bounce and share ideas with one another," Ashley said. The students reading guides that are titled "Buckle Down" and are not the traditional FCATprep guides, but Ashley knows that more and different material couldn't hurt the students. "These aren't the official FCATguides but they are very similar. They are in the same format as the FCAT and it just helps to have something else to enrich what we already use," Ashley said. Ashley is confident that her students will excel on the FCATthis year. "We are a C'school so there is a lot of pressure on us and on them, but I know they have everything they need to rock this test," Ashley said. The enthusiasm comes from the classes motto which the students recite daily both at school and in their home. Jasmin Mitchell was happy to say it out loud for her teacher: "Success depends on your attitude," Mitchell said confidently. The rest of the class echoed the statement. Ashley was pleased. "All right guys, now, let's get back to work," she said. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.com April 6 21521222445x:5Next jackpot $7 millionApril 2 82134353740x:4 March 30 3910203152x:3 April 8 16283034 April 7 913202934 April 6 324293435 April 5 412263336 April 8 (n) 1791 April 8 (d) 8283 April 7 (n) 2566 April 7 (d) 5175 April 8(n) 61 5 April 8 (d) 19 0 April 7 (n) 38 9 April 7(d) 13 1 April 8 112436379 April 5 213212418 April 1 723323617 March 29 2726319 April 6 1018415556 PB: 15 PP: 2Next jackpot $20 millionApril 2 622344345 PB: 23 PP: 2 March 30 1920425658 PB: 37 PP: 4 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comZOLFO SPRINGS A Sebring man was killed Wednesday when his tanker truck struck a tree. According to a report from the Florida Highway Patrol, Robert Lee Eldridge, 54, was traveling eastbound on State Road 66 west of Whistler Woods Way when his 2008 International Tanker left the road onto the north shoulder after crossing the center line. The tanker truck continued onto the north should er until it struck a large o ak tree but still continued fo rward for some distan ce finally facing east. Although the incide nt happened around 7:40 p.m on Wednesday, Eldrid ge and his truck were n ot located until 7:53 a.m Thursday morning. The report prepared b y Trooper Patrick J. Rober ts stated that Eldridge was n ot wearing his seat belt an d alcohol was not a factor. Sebring man killed in tanker accident near Zolfo Springs News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Fourth-grade instructor Erica Ashley reviews reading material with her Fred Wild Elementary class in preparation for the FCAT. Ashley has been using different techniques to engage the students and boost their confidence for the exam, which starts Monday. Preparation time is over; FCAT starts Monday The kids should get to bed early, get plenty of sleep and be here on Monday on time.'HARVEYWILDER Fred Wild Elementary assistant principal Special to the News-SunFor the second consecutive year, more than 800 McDonald's restaurants across the state of Florida will provide a free breakfast to students on the first day of the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). Local students in grades 3 through 11 will receive a complimentary Egg McMuffin, Apple Dippers and a low-fat milk or orange juice at any participating McDonald's location on Monday between 6 and 9 a.m. "Whether students eat at home, at their school or at McDonald's, it's important to have a well-balanced breakfast every morning" said Cindy Goody, PhD, the Senior Director of Nutrition for McDonald's USA. Dr. Goody, a registered and licensed dietitian, says a wholesome breakfast that includes food groups like fruit, whole grains and lowfat milk or lean protein helps children meet daily nutritional needs, while providing much-needed energy to start the day. As local business leaders and parents themselves, McDonald's 120 Florida franchise owners are committed to contributing to the well-being of children in their communities. In 2010, more than 190,000 students across the state including over 40,000 in the greater Tampa Bay area alone enjoyed a free McDonald's breakfast before the FCAT. If parents are unable to bring their children to McDonald's, many local schools also serve free breakfast throughout the week of testing. For more information, parents are encouraged to check with their school. The breakfast offer is available in-store at participating McDonald's restaurants in Florida on Monday. No substitutions or group redemptions are permitted. Students under the age of 15 must be present and accompanied by a parent. McDonald's offers students free breakfast before FCAT The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Thursday, April 7: Danielle Theresa Abel, 37, of Orlando, was charged with violation of probation reference driving with license suspended or revoked. Joshua Alan Baker, 26, of Sebring, was charged with withholding support of children or spouse. Benjamin Michael Benchina, 19, of Sebring, was charged with possession and or use of drug equipment. Teresa Byrd, 54, of Miami, was charged with fraud/insufficient funds. Norris John Deveaux, 20, of Lake Placid, was charged with failure to appear reference no motor vehicle registration. Rony Rodeli FuentesVasquez, 20, of Avon Park, was charged with violation of a municipal ordinance. Jessica Lane Gavagni, 26, of Lake Placid, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference resisting/obstructing an officer without violence, and battery. Justin Michael Hamilton, 23, of Sebring, was charged with two counts of petit theft. James Royce Hicks, 40, of Lorida, was charged with DUI. Nathaniel Jay Hutchison, 25, of Lake Placid, was charged with battery. Audrey Jean McIver, 40, of Frostproof, was charged with three counts of failure to appear reference possession of cocaine, use or possession of drug paraphernalia and nonsupport. Qweleco Janvontay McKeithan, 28, of Lake Placid, was charged with possession of marijuana. Drew McNeil Moon, 44, was charged with violation of probation reference aggravated battery with a deadly weapon. Robin Wright Smothers, 46, of Wauchula, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference battery on a law enforcement officer and resisting an officer without violence. Samantha Jo Whitehead, 22, of Avon Park, was charged with DUI, hit and run, and DUI and damage property. POLICEBLOTTER LP Historical Society launches new Web siteLAKE PLACID The L ake Placid Historical S ociety has now officiall y entered the Internet a ge by hosting an impress ive multipage Web site. T he Web site has been an o ngoing project and prim ary goal of museum d irector Kay Tarr. The s ite was created by prof essional designer Laurie G reenly, the daughter of d evoted and loyal memb er Johny Zadek. The site features the D epot Museum collection h ighlights, a history of t he museum, a special p age devoted to Melvil D ewey, Web site links of l ocal interest, and a listi ng of Lake Placid events t o help visitors plan their v isit. Watch for new feat ures to be added in the f uture as well as ongoing c hanges to the society's e vents calendar. Find the site at w ww.lphsdepotmuseum.o r g. For further informat ion, call the Depot M useum at 465-1771. Noel to speak at LP Chamber lunchLAKE PLACID M ichael Noel, Thrivent F inancial for Lutherans w ill be the featured s peaker at the April G reater Lake Placid C hamber of Commerce m embership luncheon. T he luncheon is spons ored by Indigo Builders o f Lake Placid, Inc. The luncheon will be h eld at noon Wednesday a t the Lake Placid Elks L odge. Cost is $8 per p erson. Noel will present an i nformative overview of t he features and benefits o ffered by Thrivent F inancial Services for L utherans. As a chamber d irector, he will also c over What Your C hamber Can Do For Y ou. RSVPthe chamber by 5 p.m. Monday. Menu s election is vegetable l asagna. For further i nformation, contact the c hamber at 465-4331 or c hamber@lpfla.com.Homeowners A ssociation meets MondaySEBRING The H ighlands County H omeowners Association w ill meet from 9-11 a.m. M onday at the Sebring C ountry Estates Club H ouse, 3240 Grand Prix A ve. The meeting is open t o the public. Free coffee, h ot tea and donuts are p rovided. Dr. Reed Bowman, a ssociate research biolog ist and director of the A vian Ecology program a t the Archbold B iological Station, will p resent an updated o verview of the developi ng Highlands County M ulti-Species Scrub H abitat Conservation P lan and explain why p eople must prepare and i mplement it for future g enerations. Highlands C ounty is home to many r are and endangered s pecies unique to the L ake Wales Ridge. The M SHCPwill develop s pecies lists; create scrub h abitat mapping and a r eserve design that will p rotect scrub and its h abitat. Corine Burgess, envir onmental specialist with t he Highlands County P arks and Natural COMMUNITYBRIEFS Continued on page 5A

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011Page 3A By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Hundreds of s tudents, instructors, and dign itaries came together T hursday for the I nternational Baccalaureate B anquet. The IB program is the b rainchild of a handful of a dministrators and instruct ors and has already made an i mpact on Highlands County s tudents after only its second y ear. The program is a magnet p rogram that provides coll ege-bound students an even d eeper motivation to excel b efore stepping foot on a coll ege campus. The rigorous l iberal arts curriculum takes p lace over the four-year high s chool career providing two p hases for students to demons trate their academic excell ence. Students apply for the IB program in the eighth grade and upon acceptance in ninth grade, students begin taking baccalaureate preparation classes in the core subjects through 10th grade. As students enter their last two years of high school, they become IB program diploma hopefuls. The six higher-level subjects range from a second language to experimental math and sciences. An independent research paper (4,000 words) along with 150 hours of participation in the Creativity, Action and Service activities are also required for graduation with an IB diploma. Guests of the banquet were continually impressed with the high level at which these students are learning. "I can't even read the title of some of these thesis," said IB Coordinator Jo Anna Cochlin. She wasn't alone. Many guests were in awe of the impressive research the students are doing. One of the 20 juniors enrolled in the IB program is Justin Smith. Smith is the 2010-2011 Sunshine State Scholar, president of Students Against Tobacco, a National Honor Society member, a member of the student government, an alto saxophone player and a bag boy at Publix. Smith addressed the crowded room, sharing his thoughts about what the IB program means to him as a student and what he is taking from the experience. "It is a lot of work, but I know it will pay off one day. I'm involved in so many different things and by doing these things I have already become an active member of this community. I'm not just learning things, I am helping others too," said Smith. The class of 2012 will hand out 20 IB diplomas. The class of 2013 will hand out 21 IB diplomas. There are 19 freshmen who will receive IB diplomas in 2014 and the most astounding figure is the class of 2015, when there will be 43 IB students. The IB program has grown immensely in the last year, raising more than $93,000 in only its first two years. The IB Banquet silent auction alone raised $4,680 on Thursday evening. For more information about the IB program contact IB Coordinator Jo Anna Cochlin at 471-5500. Guests enjoy 2nd annual IB Banquet News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Guests at the 2nd annual IB Benefit Banquet place their bids during the silent auction portion of the banquet on T hursday evening. Guests were able to bid on various prizes w ith the proceeds going to the IB program. News Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR 11th grade IB student and the 2010-2011 Sunshine State Scholar, Justin Smith, addresses the crowd at the 2nd annual IB Benefit Banquet. Smith is one of 20 juniors that are currently enrolled in the program. By JIM KUHNHENN Associated PressWASHINGTON A last-minute budget deal forged amid bluster and tough bargaining averted an embarrassing federal shutdown, cut billions in spending and provided the first major test of the divided government that voters ushered in five months ago. Working late into Friday night, congressional and White House negotiators finally agreed on a plan to pay for government operations through the end of September while trimming $38.5 billion in spending. Lawmakers then approved a measure to keep the government running for a few more days while the details of the new spending plan are written into legislation. Actual approval of the deal is expected in the middle of next week. "Americans of different beliefs came together again," President Barack Obama said from the White House Blue Room, a setting chosen to offer a clear view of the Washington Monument over his right shoulder. The agreement was negotiated by Obama, House Speaker John Boehner, ROhio, and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev. The administration was poised to shutter federal services, from national parks to tax-season help centers, and to send furlough notices to hundreds of thousands of federal workers. All sides insisted they wanted to avoid that ou tcome, which at tim es seemed inevitable. Shortly after midnigh t, White House budget dire ctor Jacob Lew issued a memo instructing depar tments and agencies to co ntinue normal operations. Boehner said the de al came after "a lot of discu ssion and a long fight." H e won an ovation from h is rank and file, including t he new tea party adheren ts whose victories la st November shifted contr ol of the House to the GOP. Reid declared the de al "historic." The deal marked the en d of a three-way clash of wills. It also set the tone f or coming confrontations ov er raising the government 's borrowing limit, the spen ding plan for the budget ye ar that begins Oct. 1 and lon gterm deficit reduction. In the end, all sid es claimed victory. For Republicans, it w as the sheer size of the spen ding cuts. For Obama an d Reid, it was casting asi de GOPpolicy initiatives th at would have blocked env ironmental rules an d changed a program that pr ovides family planning ser vices. Not all policy provisio ns were struck. One in the final de al would ban the use of fede ral or local governme nt funds to pay for abortions in the District of Columbia. A program dear to Boehn er that lets District of Columbia students use fe dFederal shutdown avoided, 2012 budget fight looms See BUDGET, page 8A

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Page 4ANews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.comTODAY'SEDITORIALTODAY'SLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION Bills that would give the s tate's largest electric compan ies incentives to essentially m onopolize the renewable e nergy market are on the m ove. Lawmakers are e mbracing legislation that is a gift to the utilities, leaving i t to the companies to make d ecisions on their renewable e nergy commitments while m aking it harder for the little g uy to enter the field. Twenty-nine states and the D istrict of Columbia have set t argets for production of r enewable energy, such as s olar, wind and biomass. Not F lorida. Other states have e xpanded opportunities for c ompetition by directing p ublic utilities to buy cons umer-generated energy at a c ompetitive price. Not F lorida. As a result, there is l ittle incentive for big-box r etailers to invite solar energy companies to install rooftop solar panels and sell the energy. If Florida got its rules right, it could drive private investment in clean energy technology to the state, even as it encouraged public utilities to expand their renewable energy portfolio. But the state's lawmakers are too beholden to the monopolistic utilities to listen. Since 2009, Florida Power & Light and its affiliates have spent at least $4 million on campaign contributions to legislators and candidates for governor. The utility gave more than $1 million to the Republican Party. This has spawned predicable political games. For example, a fleeting attempt in the Senate to include a provision that would open the market to renewable energy competitors was quickly squashed by Senate leaders when FP&Lexpressed strong opposition. Sen. Lizbeth Benacquisto, R-Wellington, chairwoman of the Senate Committee on Communications, Energy and Public Utilities, said including the provision initially was "a technical glitch" a Tallahassee euphemism for upsetting a major campaign contributor. ... Asking ratepayers to pay a little more for a major expansion of renewable energy is appropriate when there are guaranteed targets and a competitive pricing schedule for all such energy producers. But nothing like that is likely to come from a Legislature addicted to the big campaign dollars doled out by public utilities. That's something to remember come the next election. An editorial from the St. Petersburg Times. Another viewpoint M arket forces and competition are favorite conservative watchwords, except when it comes to p ublic utilities. By the time you read this, our government may be undergoing a partial shutdown. I thought seriously about devoting this week's column to the situation. It was tempting, especially since it is the top news story all over the place. I decided not to write that particular column for a couple of reasons. One is I'm pretty fed up with everyone involved in the budget process. Everyone is quick to pass the blame on this one, but from where I stand there is enough blame for everyone to share a piece of it. While anger can fuel good columns, I am really not in the mood to spend a few hundred words excoriating a good number of our elected officials. Another reason is that the whole topic is depressing. Our government is spending more money then it has, we don't have a budget at the moment, and instead of doing something about this it's business as usual. That's enough to dim the cheeriest spirit. So instead of writing that particular column, I have taken a deep breath and went online surfing one of my favorite topics stupid criminal stories. No, we're not still talking about elected officials. We're talking about people who break the law, but do it in a way that makes one question their IQ. Stories like these are encouraging to me, because it's comforting to think I am smarter than many of this nation's criminals. For example, there is a story I found on this is a real website www.dumbcriminals.com. There was a man in Oregon who allegedly broke into a house to rob it. Well, it was apparently dirty work, because while he was there he chose to take a shower. While he was cleaning himself up, the family returned home. This upset the criminal in our tale. According to the story, he was concerned that the family might have a gun on them. So, he called the police. Seriously. The police wisely arreste d the robber instead of the family. The man is charged with first-degree criminal trespass. No word on if he left the shower running. Our next story can be found at www.journalstar.com. It involves apartment laundro mats, quarters and a vacuum cleaner. You see, several Lincoln apartment complex laundry rooms discovered that some one was stealing the quarte rs out of the machines. They apparently didn't know who or how it was being done, s o one owner installed a came ra in an attempt to solve the mystery. Images from the camera taken on March 4 show a man entering the laundry room with a bike and a bac kpack. He removed a vacuum cleaner from the backpack. After prying open the coin tray, the video shows him suctioning out the quarters from the machine. The photos were released to the public, and several tips led the police to Willia m Logan Jr., who has prior convictions for theft and w as cited on suspicion of misde meanor theft. The vacuum cleaner was not found with Logan, and is apparently still out there somewhere, hopefully not graduating to vending machines. If you know where it's located, you mig ht urge it to give itself up before a tragedy occurs. Like I said, I enjoy storie s like these. Do you have a favorite stupid criminal story? Send it to me at bookwormlady@embarqmail.com. The really good ones will be put in a future column with credit (or blame) going to you. If nothing else, stories lik e these might make you smil e. Given what's going on in Washington, DC, that's not a bad thing. Laura Ware is a Sebring re sident. She can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady @ embarqmail.com Strange and criminal Laura's Look Laura Ware EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. We have to make room for everybody. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 3851954; or e-maileditor@newssun.com. To make sure the editorial pages aren't dominated by the same writers, letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months. Language of Ashdod E ditor: When Nehemiah returned to J erusalem (Nehemiah 13:6), he f ound a mess a spiritual mess, t hat is and he went to work immed iately to correct the problems. O ne of the problems is stated in v erses 23 and 24: "In those days I a lso saw Jews who had married w omen of Ashdod, Ammon and M oab, and half of their children s poke the language of Ashdod and c ould not speak the language of J udah, but spoke according to the l anguage of one or the other peop le." They had been warned of this d anger many, many years ago by G od through Moses in Exodus 3 4:16 and Deuteronomy 7:3,4. This unholy alliance/defection ( v. 23) led to their downward slide ( vss 25-27). Language of Ashdod w as a Philistine language and the p roblem was a mixed dialect of A shdodite and Aramaic for the c hildren of Israel. This would g reatly hinder the law of M oses/God being taught and o beyed as they were instructed in D euteronomy 6:6-9. But the "language of Ashdod" is a live and well today. Consider the f ollowing: born again Christian; C ovenant Theology; rapture; R everend; church of your choice; L ent; Baptismal Regeneration; C hurch Age; Millennium reign; P ope, etc.! All these terms and t itles have come out of denominat ional/sectarian doctrines and could b e correctly called jargon! Amuch needed admonition from t he first century is relevant today: "And my speech and my preaching were not with persuasive words of human wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power, that your faith should not be in the wisdom of men but in the power of God" (First Corinthians 2:4,5). Now listen carefully to the Spirit by the pen of the apostle Paul: "Preach the word! Be ready in season and out of season. Convince, rebuke, exhort, with all longsuffering and teaching. For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine, but according to their own desires, because they have itching ears, they will heap up for themselves teachers; and they will turn their ears away from the truth, and be turned aside to fables." (Second Timothy 4:2-4) Finally, a prophet of old, Jeremiah, speaks loud and clear even for today: "Stand in the ways and see, and ask for the old paths, where the good way is, and walk in it; then you will find rest for your souls. But they said, We will not walk in it'." (Jeremiah 6:16) Frank Parker SebringWorking on a school projectEditor: Dear Floridians, My name is Jensen McKly. I'm a fourth-grader who goes to Upham School in Massachusetts. Since I am now in the fourth grade, we learn about states. My teacher had a cup and we all picked out states. Guess what my one is. Florida! I was so happy when I got it. Florida is one of my favorite states. I have only been to Florida once and we went to the Everglades. It was awesome. When I was there I also saw a lot of alligators. Anyway, I have written to you to wonder whether I could get some cool facts on Florida. It would be so great. This might sound a little greedy, but could you send me a few souvenirs. Please! It would be great if you could send me something. I would be so happy. Maybe a little key chain or a few postcards. Maybe even some cool pictures of Florida and a newspaper with this article if it makes in. But I really need facts. Jensen McKly carolyn_collins@wellesley.k12.m a.usWhat has happened to our leadership?Editor: Has our leadership gone completely insane? Where is the wisdom of borrowing money from our social programs, namely Social Security, where all Americans have invested their wages most of their lives. The taking of this money to fight other nations'wars is insane. This has disabled millions of our youth and yet our Veteran Administration hires hatchet men or claims' adjusters to be more polite at huge wage and pension packages to deny the veteran of his or her just claim. Example: I am 81 years old and have been disabled and unable to work since 1993 due to asbestos damage I received in the military. I have asbestos and asbestos related injuries. Yet my claim has been denied many times. New health care study for veterans raises mixed feelings. Lawmakers borrowing money from all over the world and all of our social programs are feeling reluctant to increase healthcare fees for military retirees have a new reason to hold off. The Defense Department has ordered yet another review of ways to cut its medical cost. Hire more Hatchet men or claim adjusters if you will, who will deny more "just claims." John Baldacci, a Democrat former member of Congress and former governor of Maine, has been hired for $165,000 plus a huge expense account to serve as director of the military health care reform initiative, a Hatchet man if you will. Aproject aimed at overhauling the medical system for the military. Rep. Joe Wilson R.S.C., the chairman of the Armed Service Committee's Military Personnel Panel, has never been a fan of the Defense Department, made this statement to the proposed new Hatchet's man hiring: The governor should ... "step down." That would immediate save about $200,000. I am an 81-year-old veteran who would ask that the Administration rid itself of the many hatchetmen, claims adjusters who have huge wage and pension packages in favor of servicing and veteran and leaving no veteran behind. Billie E. Jewe tt Sebrin g BouquetFrustrating becomes wonderfulEditor: I recently went to Raceway Gas Station in Lake Placid and was having a problem at the pump wit h my credit card. Since I am quite elderly and handicapped (use a Mobility Scooter as I have difficu lty standing) another customer vol unteered to go into the store and get someone to assist me. Agentleman came out of the mart. He not only got my credit card working but insisted on pum ping my gas. We made small talk and the gentleman was Tom Allaire, the owner/operator of this family owned business. After he handed me my receipt he asked me to wait in my car. When he returned he gave me his business card with his cell phone number and also the cell phone number of his son. Mr. Allaire tol d me next time I needed gas, just to stay in my car and phone Racewa y and either he or his son would come to my assistance and fuel m y vehicle. What was a frustrating situation turned out to be a wonderful expe rience. There should be more con siderate people. I truly found a friend and Mr. Allaire has a loyal customer. Delta Blan ey Lake Plac id

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R esources Department, will s peak about Highland C ounty's natural resources a nd the importance of proper m anagement of these areas. S he will discuss the Sun 'N L ake Preserve and other simi lar areas that need conservat ion and protection in ways o ther than land management. Lola and Saints perform at TanglewoodSEBRING Tanglewood w ill present today a longr unning group that has sello uts wherever they perform. Lola and the Saints" have r ecorded numerous hit songs f rom the Doo Wop period a nd their popularity continu es. This is the final show of t he winter season. Originally formed in the T hroggs Neck section of The B ronx, N.Y. in August 1964, b y Lola and Tom Foy, "The S aints" have enjoyed a long a nd magnificent career in s how business. They sing a w ide variety of hits from the p ast with precision harmony. T his will be a sit back, close y our eyes and just enjoy this f ive-piece group as they b ring back the hits of the p ast. Opening for the Saints is J immy and Eckard. This tale nted duo is sure to entertain u s. Doors and snack bar open a t 6:15 p.m.; the show starts a t 7 p.m. Tickets may be p urchased at the Activities D irector's office or at the d oor on show night for $10. Tanglewood is one-half m ile north of Walmart on U .S. 27. Call 402-0763.Sebring Hills plan business meetingSEBRING The Sebring H ills monthly business meeti ng will be held at Monday a t the Sebring Hills C lubhouse, 200 Lark Ave. B oard members meet at 7 p .m., and the rest of the m embers meet at 7:30 p.m. Acaller for bingo on T hursday nights is needed. If y ou live in Sebring Hills and a re interested call Doris S teele at 314-8905 or Jack P helan at 385-3819. Jack is w illing to train.Tea Party meets for short videoSEBRING The H ighlands Tea Party will h ave a business meeting and w atch a short video, Political Correctness," at 6 :30 p.m. Tuesday at the Q uality Inn, 6525 U.S. 27 N orth. The usual buffet will most l ikely not be served at this m eeting. Bring your own b everage or purchase somet hing from the bar.Gem and Mineral Club meets TuesdaySEBRING Tuesday is t he date to remember for the H ighlands Gem and Mineral C lub meeting. The group m eets at 7 p.m. at the C hurch of Christ, 3800 S ebring Parkway, rear fell owship hall. There are no d ues or fees to join and all a re welcome, whether you are a rockhound or just interested in learning about that rock or fossil you picked up on your last vacation. Members or attendees will be setting up tables of materials to sell, trade or barter. Much of the material will be at reasonable prices. The birthstone for April is the diamond, which has been one of the most valued gemstones for thousands of years. For more information, call 453-7054.Woman's Club meets to hear CoxSEBRING The GFWC Woman's Club of Sebring, 4260 Lakeview Drive, will meet at noon Monday. The Education Department will host the event. The lunch will be catered by Mae Lee's Deli. The menu will be an assortment of subs, pasta salad, fruit salad and cake for a $7 donation. Reservations are required; phone 471-3295 or 3823559. The speaker for the meeting will be Wally Cox, superintendent of Highlands County Schools. The GFWC Woman's Club of Sebring has been involved with the Reading is Fundamental program at Woodlawn Elementary School for many years. Club volunteers meet throughout the year to distribute $500 worth of books to their students which they are allowed to keep. The Safe House endeavor this month will be disposable diapers; sizes 3, 4 and 5 are the most popular. Phone 385-7268.Events planned at lodges, postsAVON PARK American Legion Highlands Post 69 will have its annual election of officers at 7 p.m. Monday, May 9 at their regular meeting at the post home, 1301 W. Bell St. This meeting will be open to only Post 69 members. To be eligible to hold office one must be a member in good standing at Post 69 with a DD 214 or equivalent on file. Asign-up sheet is posted at the Post. LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Moose 2374 will host karaoke with BobKat at 1 p.m. today. For details, call the lodge at 4650131. The American Legion Placid Post 25 will have music by Dave and Peggy from 5-8 p.m. today. The Legion Executive Board meeting is at 6 p.m. Monday, following by the Auxiliary Executive Board meeting at 6:30 p.m. and the Legion General meeting at 7:30 p.m. Free blood pressure checks will be offered from 1-3 p.m. Tuesday. For more information, call 465-0975. The Lake Placid Elks 2661 will host music by Chrissy Harriman on Monday. The BPOE Board meets at 7:30 p.m. The BPOE meets again at 7 p.m. Tuesday. Call 465-2661. SEBRING AMVETS Post 21 Ladies Auxiliary is having a breakfast from 8-11 a.m. Saturday, April 16 at the Post, 2029 U.S. 27 South. Tickets are $5 and available at the Post. Sun 'N Lake Manor Hill meets MondaySEBRING The Sun 'N Lake Manor Hill Property Owners will hold their quarterly meeting at 7 p.m. Monday at the Community Center.Recration Club plans eventsSEBRING The Sebring Recreation Club, 333 Pomegranate Ave., will host the following events this week: Monday Ice cream shuffleboard, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Ice cream shuffleboard, 6:30 p.m.; line dancing, 6:30 p.m. Saturday Pin shuffleboard, 6:30 p.m. Any information, call 385-2966.MARSP meets TuesdaySEBRING The Michigan Association of Retired School Personnel (MARSP) will meet in the Sebring Public Library conference room at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. Members will go over the year in review and plan for the 2012 meetings. Officers would welcome any input. All retired school personnel from Michigan are invited to attend. Information will be provided on legislation that is being considered in Michigan. Call 655-6825.Frostproof prepares for Egg HuntFROSTPROOF The Frostproof Middle/Senior High School track and field will be the place to be at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 23 for children up to 10 years old and their parents. Afree Community Egg Hunt with thousands of candies and treasure filled eggs will be scattered for the little ones to find. Four age categories means there will be four different areas to search. Infants 23 months could win a gift basket. The golden egg finder in age group of 2-4, 5-7 and 8-10, each wins a $75 Toys R Us gift card. Silver egg finders win a $50 Toys R Us gift card provided by the Frostproof Ministerial Association. The event is sponsored by Family Life Church and Pastor Kelly and Angela Galati. This year there will also be prizes for parents, an assortment of gift certificates good at Frostproof businesses and a grand prize of three $100 Walmart gift cards. For more information contact Family Life Church at (863) 635-2704. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011Page 5A Continued from page 2A COMMUNITYBRIEFS The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Special to the News-SunSEBRING Apassion for music and performing on stage continues to drive long-time local resident Tiffany Elliott to succeed in the music industry. She spent her first years performing on the Highlands Little Theatre stage taking on roles in musical productions. Elliott has taken part not only in local vocal competitions such as Heartland Idol, but has competed in the finales in the national competition Colgate Country Showdown. Trying to juggle a regular job by day at Dr.Vinod Thakkar's office and doing musical gigs and rehearsals each week continues to keep Elliott one busy lady. Singing many genres, she has settled very comfortably into singing country music. This year she joined forces as the backup singer for country recording artist April Phillips. April Phillips and her band are mostly known for their bold edgy country sound. The band has opened for many wellknown artists such as Charlie Daniels, Blake Shelton, Josh Thompson, Easton Corbin, Craig Morgan, and just last weekend for Nashville recording artist Matt Stillwell. Last month, April and her band won the Battle of the Bands held at the famous Barn in Sanford. Still living in Highlands County, Elliott is having the time of her life on this journey touring with her new band mates and getting to meet some of country music's favorites. S he appeared on stage wi th April Phillips at 97 Count ry presents Country Rocks at Orlando House of Blue s, located in downtow n Disney, last night. To follow Tiffan y Elliott's music, follow h er on Facebook, MySpace or at Aprilphillipsonline.co m under "Contact Us". From Highlands to House of Blues Courtesy pho to Sebring's Tiffany Elliott goes from Highlands County to House of Blues last Saturday when she performed with country recording artist April Phillips. Courtesy pho to The sixth annual Hairpin Spin raised $15,100 for the 2011 event. After expenses, each charity received a check for $2,700. Representing those charities are (from left) Kevin Roberts, Champion for Children; Jan Shoop, Sebring Hall of Fame; Nancy Hensley, Champion for Children; Lisa Celentano, Hairpin Spin organizer; Judy Spiegel, Highlands County Humane Society; and Jeri Wohl, Highlands Art League. Hairpin Spin gives back

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Associated PressTOKYO Once Japan's l eaky nuclear complex stops s pewing radiation and its r eactors cool down, making t he site safe and removing t he ruined equipment is going t o be a messy ordeal that c ould take decades and cost h undreds of millions of doll ars. Radiation has covered the a rea around the Fukushima D ai-ichi plant and blanketed p arts of the complex, making t he job of "decommissioni ng" the plant rendering it s afe so it doesn't threaten p ublic health and the envir onment a bigger task than u sual. Toshiba Corp., which supp lied four of Fukushima's six r eactors, including two on w hich General Electric Co. c ollaborated, submitted a r oadmap this past week to the p lant's operator for decomm issioning the crippled react ors. The study, done with t hree other companies, proje cts that it would take about 1 0 years to remove the fuel r ods and the reactors and c ontain other radioactivity at t he site, said Keisuke Omori o f Toshiba. That timeline is far faster t han those for other nuclear a ccidents and contains a big c aveat: The reactors must f irst be stabilized and cooled, g oals that have eluded emerg ency teams struggling with cascading problems in the month since the devastating tsunami damaged their cooling systems. Omori said the extent of damage to the reactors and other problems still need to be assessed. "Of course decommissioning the four reactors would be more challenging than retiring one from an ordinary operation. We still have a lot to examine," Omori said. He declined to provide details on the costs and the timeframe, citing business confidentiality. Getting a quick resolution to the Fukushima crisis would give a boost to a nation trying to recover from the severe disasters and to the tens of thousands forced to evacuate communities near the plant and already wearying of living in shelters. Page 6ANews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.com By Saturday, the HCSO was working the suspect as a black male, but Hayes said they were not ruling out any options. Hayes also stated that the suspect allegedly left the scene at some point in an unidentified vehicle. "If you saw a male entering a vehicle with haste, please contact the HCSO. If you wish to remain anonymous, call Crime Stoppers," Hayes advised. The HCSO K-9 unit was on the scene and started the rack at 1:39 p.m. on the south side of the bank, searching the woods and the golf cart path that runs behind the bank. Students at Sun 'N Lakes were briefly detained until after 2 p.m. as deputies searched the area for the suspect. On Saturday, the Hayes stated that the HCSO had some positive leads on the robbery, but did not think th at an earlier bomb threat at Sebring High School w as related. "There are theories abo ut that out there, and we are fo llowing all of the leads w e have. We have isolated whe re the phone call has com e from, but we are workin g them as isolated cases rig ht now because there is a tw ohour time gap," Hayes said Call 1-800-226-TIPS if you have any information. Continued from page 1A News Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLA R Highlands County Sheriff's Office investigators scope the scene at Heartland National Bank on US 27 North on Friday afternoon. HCSO is investigating the robbery that took place at the bank. i mmediately, forcing the o rganization to cut services t o their consumers, includi ng the Valencia Group H ome in Avon Park. Five women, each worki ng towards independence, w ill be forced to move from t heir safe and secure envir onment to somewhere yet t o be determined. Although they are going i nto the future with dignity, t he five women are not g oing quietly. Arc consumer Sue Talios i s one of those effected by t he budget cuts, and she is at a loss at what to do next a bout housing. But she and h er roommates are letting G ov. Scott know about it in e -mails, currently their only r ecourse. "I feel crappy because the s tate is cutting our money f or my group home in Avon P ark. Arc will be closing it. I d on't like moving. I already m oved two other times b ecause of cuts," Talios in a n e-mail statement to the N ews-Sun on Friday. "I l ived in an institution before a nd it was bad and I got beat u p. One staff pushed me in t he shower and busted my h ead open. Clients were r ough on me because they h ad bad behaviors... "My group home is nice a nd so are the people. I have m y own bedroom and I like t hat I can sleep on my own a nd watch my own TV. I like w atching the Food Network. I have been learning how to m ake desserts in my home. I a m going to miss my friends i n the group home because w e will be split up into other h omes in the area," Talios s aid. Roommate Francis Goff a lso had something to say, a nd something to write Scott a bout. "I am mad about the cuts. I don't like it that they are c losing my home. I like my s taff and friends at the h ome. No one tells me nothi ng. I don't even know where I am going. I don't like packing up boxes. I hate it. It makes me sad and I have been crying a lot," Goff said. Sarah Moore, also a resident, was choked up over the announcement, but wanted the governor to know that his decisions effected real people in real situations. "I am upset about the cuts. I feel bad. I will not see my friends. I like to do stuff and don't want that taken away," Moore said. Amelia Titus showed an different emotion, one that motivated her to work on an e-mail as well. "I am mad! I am upset! The government is taking our money. It is not right. I live in an Arc group home. It is not just a house, it is my home. I have to move out. There is no money to run it. I don't like it all. I am sad. Please help me," Titus begged. Debbie Baxter is the other resident living at the home, but is not verbal, unable to express her feelings, according to Arc staff. "My heart just goes out to the consumers. It hurts me as a staff to see them hurting," said Nicole Stephens, a part-time staff member at the home. "Agroup home is more of a home environment and gives them a sense of belonging, you are a part of it. It is a family lifestyle as opposed to an institution which they are being put in because no one wants to deal with them." Another staff member at the residence also expressed her feelings about the budget cuts. "It makes me feel bad too when I see how they are feeling," said resident staff member Wanda Colon. "They live in the group home and we are their family. When they close the group home, where are they going...an institution? My job is not as important as the people who are being affected by this," Colon added. Rhonda Beckman, CEO of the Arc said on Thursday that she is trying to get extended licensing so that a couple of the women can move into another home, but she was not positive a short-term solution could be found without help. "It doesn't look good," Beckman said about the budget cuts. "I am not sure where they could end up." Anyone wishing to seek more information about the ladies, or those who wish to help, can contact Beckman at 863-452-1295 X112 or email rbeckman @ridgeareaarc.org Continued from page 1A press release on Friday that his company was "deeply saddened to report the passing of two valued employees: Mr. Jon Martinez and Mr. Jason Steele." Martinez, 34, was a resident of the Tampa Bay area. No further information about Steele was available at press time, and Hayes said that the HCSO was still seeking positive identification. The accident occurred at the former Georgia Pacific Plant on State Road 70, west of U.S. 27 in Lake Placid just after 2 p.m. "United Fire Protection has been in constant contact and is in full cooperation with the Highlands County Sheriff's Office. Our thoughts and prayers are with the families of Mr. Martinez and Mr. Steele. United Fi re Protection will release an additional statement at a lat er date," Torres wrote. The two workers we re completing repairs on t he pump designed to fill t he large tank when the incide nt occurred. It was unknown how mu ch water was released from t he tank, or why the tank bur st, Hayes said. Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Ridge Area Arc consumer Frances Goff is distraught Thursday after learning that the Valencia Group Home, where she resides, will be closing due to lack of funding. Arc left looking for answers after cuts Water tank collapse kills two Bank robbery suspect sought End to Japan nuke crisis is years, a fortune away

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011Page 7A

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v iew of the classroom t eacher. The general reaction a mong his colleagues, he s aid, is dismay over the bill. He reviewed major conc erns, starting with the issue o f tenure. State statutes already prov ide for the release of incomp etent teachers, even those w ith tenure, Picklesimer e xplained. He has seen situat ions where teachers were r eleased within 90 days. "I've seen people go out t he door with tenure," but, he a dded, "if they can't do the j ob, they must be taken out of t he classroom. "Like a doctor, they have t o be able to do the work. O therwise we're just shooti ng ourselves in the foot. We w ant to be respected as a prof ession," he said. The real difficulty, he a dded, isn't getting rid of i ncompetent teachers it is t he process by which individu als are determined to be i ncompetent. "We don't want to railroad t eachers out," he said. He does not believe using F CATscores as the measure o f quality teaching is either f air or accurate. Beyond question of the standardized test's value and usefulness, however, is the fact that teachers are being made to carry the burden of perceived failure all by themselves, said Picklesimer "If a teacher is not performing, there are two people responsible the teacher and the teacher's administrator." Policies were in place that warned under-performing teachers of their shortfalls and provided resources and peer mentoring to help them improve. With the new bill, teachers who might be able to adjust and grow into the job will not have that opportunity. And all teachers, no matter how skilled or experienced, will be denied the security of an extended contract. Picklesimer added that just as it becomes more difficult to maintain a career, teachers face pay cuts due to benefits once paid by the state that will now be borne by them. He said teachers do not mind paying into their retirement funds or health insurance, but the cost is high 5 percent of a check for retirement and another $110 to $150 for individual insurance, a family will pay more. He pointed out that teachers have made significant sacrifices over the last few years, working longer hours, taking on additional tasks and responsibilities. Some schools have hired people whose only job is to relieve classroom teachers so they can go to the bathroom too many work the entire day without a break. More sacrifice lies ahead. Gov. Scott and the state legislature are considering deeper cuts in education statewide. They hope to pay each school district $156 less per student. Estimates run around 6 to 7 percent fewer state dollars for the 2011-2012 school year. At the same time federal financing, in the form of stimulus dollars, is disappearing. Already district faculties have been hit. From a high of 978 teachers in 2007-08, there are 867 teachers currently at work in Highlands County. As many as another dozen might be gone by the 2011-12 school year. Picklesimer said, "Education is a three legged stool the teachers, the administrators and the school board. We all need to look realistically at where the challenges are." When the News-Sun attempted to reach out to individual educators to learn what they think and feel, no one was willing to say anything meaningful on the record, saying they feared losing their jobs if they spoke out. While some individuals were willing to share their thoughts, none would allow their names to be used. One teacher described how tired, demoralized and depressed teachers are, but would not go on the record out of a fear of retribution and job loss. This individu al believes that more exper ienced, higher paid, teache rs will be let go so school di stricts may hire younge r, lower paid teachers as a w ay of balancing the budget. Another teacher worri es that students are succumbin g to "test fatigue" and are lo sing the motivation to even t ry doing well on the FCAT. There was a final iron y about SB 736 Picklesim er said as yet the bill pr ovides no funding. "We will have to comp ly even though we won't ha ve the funds to deal with t he changes we've been makin g to address SB 736," he said Page 8ANews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.com Continued from page 1A h ave I ever heard a president i n our system make such a c ase." In fact, he said he was s trongly opposed to the bill, a nd for several reasons. "There is a great deal of m isunderstanding regarding t enure and continuing cont racts, which are not the same t hing," Stephens said. Tenure means a (faculty m ember) cannot be fired w ithout due process. It prot ects excellent faculty and a cademic freedom. It does n ot protect faculty who are i ncompetent or unsatisfactor y." Unsatisfactory faculty m embers may be fired, he e mphasized, but often resign f irst. To earn tenure a faculty m ember has to teach successf ully for three years. Continuing contracts, on t he other hand, are simply an e xtended employment cont ract. All new faculty members a re monitored for a 90 day p robation period when teache rs are closely observed and e valuated for student success. Tenure is part of the c hecks and balances that protects academic freedom, Stephens said. Without tenure or continuing contracts, he added, SFCC would have a difficult time hiring excellent faculty, or keeping one without continuing contracts. Stephens said there is another, equally important factor. SFCC has to be accredited for its students to be recognized and respected by other schools. Accreditation requires compliance with the comprehensive standards of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. In order to earn that accreditation, "the institution ensures adequate procedures for safeguarding and protecting academic freedom," he said, quoting the association's rules. "Eliminating tenure in our system in our system could jeopardize our accreditation." His final major concern has to do with local control over education. "We have local boards of trustees with the ultimate authority to hire and fire employees, including faculty. This bill dangerously usurps that authority," he wrote in his letter to the legislative delegation. He pointed out to the legislators that the U. S. Supreme Court has already found earlier attacks on tenure to be unconstitutional, and would likely that way again. "In my opinion, this is very dangerous legislation that would have serious unintended circumstances." The News-Sun contacted Representative Fresen for comment by e-mail. This was his complete response: "I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge and thank you for your e-mail. I appreciate you taking the time to contact me and express your thoughts and concerns. While I am unable to respond to each correspondence personally due to the large volume of e-mail my office receives, they do help me to know what issues are of concern to you. "If you live in House District 111 and are requesting assistance, please telephone my office ... Thank you." Continued from page 1A Teachers worried about merit pay, contract changes If a teacher is not performing, there are two people responsible the teacher and the teacher's administrator.'STEVEPICKLESIMER teacher's union president Colleges also facing changes e rally funded vouchers to a ttend private schools also s urvived. Republicans had included l anguage to deny federal m oney to put in place O bama's year-old health care l aw. The deal only requires s uch a proposal to be voted o n by the Democratic-cont rolled Senate, where it is c ertain to fall short of the n ecessary 60 votes. The deal came together a fter six grueling weeks as n egotiators virtually dared e ach other to shut down the g overnment. Boehner faced pressure f rom his GOPcolleagues to s tick as closely possible to t he $61 billion in cuts and the c onservative policy positions t hat the House had passed. At one point, Democrats a nnounced negotiators had l ocked into a spending cut f igure $33 billion. B oehner pushed back and s aid there was no deal. D uring a meeting at the W hite House this past week, B oehner said he wanted $40 b illion. The final number fell j ust short of that. In one dramatic moment, Obama called Boehner on Friday morning after learning that the outline of a deal they had reached with Reid in the Oval Office the night before was not reflected in the predawn staff negotiations. The whole package was in peril. According to a senior administration official, Obama told Boehner that they were the two most consequential leaders and if they had any hope of keeping the government open, their bargain had to be honored and could not be altered by staff. The official described the scene on condition of anonymity to reveal behindthe-scenes negotiations. The accomplishment set the stage for even tougher confrontations. House Republicans intend to pass a 2012 budget in the coming week that calls for sweeping changes in the Medicare and Medicaid health programs and even deeper cuts in domestic programs to gain control over soaring deficits. In the Republican radio address, House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., warned of a coming crisis. "Unless we act soon, government spending on health and retirement programs will crowd out spending on everything else, including national security. It will literally take every cent of every federal tax dollar just to pay for these programs," Ryan said Saturday. That debate could come soon. The Treasury has told Congress it must vote to raise the debt limit by summer. Republicans hope to use this issue to force Obama to accept long-term deficitreduction measures. Associated Press writers David Espo, Andrew Taylor, Erica Werner, Julie Pace and Ben Feller contributed to this story. Online: Obama weekly address: www.whitehouse.gov GOP address: www.youtube.com/republicanconference Continued from page 3A Budget battle is far from over

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Each spring, millions of Americans look forward to receiving a hefty income tax refund. And it truly is "hefty" with the average federal refund in 2010 hovering around $3,000. That's a lot of money to be giving the government through what is essentially a year-long, interest-free loan. If you regularly receive large refunds, you're probably having too much tax withheld from your paycheck. Instead, you might want to withhold less and put the money to work for you, by either saving or investing a comparable amount each month, or using it to pay down debt. Your goal should be to receive little or no refund at the end of the year. Ask your employer for a new W-4 form and recalculate your withholding allowance using the IRS Withholding Calculator available at www.irs.gov. This is also a good idea whenever your pay or family situation changes significantly (e.g., pay increase, marriage, divorce, new child, etc.) Just be careful, because if too little is deducted, you might end up owing more tax next April, and possibly even interest or penalty fees. IRS Publication 919 can help guide you through the decision-making process. Some people received larger-than-normal tax refunds in 2009 and 2010 thanks to the Making Work Pay credit, which expired December 31, 2010. In its place, most taxpayers will see a 2 percent reduction in the amount being withheld for Social Security in 2011 paychecks. Another change this year was a Treasury Department pilot program that offered 600,000 randomly selected lowand moderateincome families an opportunity to have their tax refunds directdeposited into a prepaid debit card issued through Bonneville Bank. The pilot explored ways to save the government money (direct deposits cost 1/10th as much to process as paper checks) as well as to give people with no bank account easier and more cost-effective access to their tax refunds. Here are ways to put your refund to good use: Pay down debt. By increasing your payment amount on outstanding loan or credit card balances you can significantly lower the total amount of interest paid. Say you're paying $80 a month on a $2,000 credit card balance at 18 percent interest. By doubling your payment to $160, you'll reduce the payoff time from 32 months to 14, and shave $295 off the total amount of interest paid. Start an emergency fund. To protect your family against the impact of a layoff or other unexpected financial crisis (such as a medical emergency, car accident or theft), set aside enough cash to cover at least six months of living expenses. Save for retirement. If your debt and emergency savings are under control, add to your IRAor 401(k) accounts, particularly if your employer matches contributions a 50 percent match corresponds to a 50 percent rate of return. Invest in yourself. Enroll in college courses or vocational training to ensure you have additional skills to fall back on should you lose your job or want to change careers. Invest in your family's future. Another good use for your refund is to set up a 529 Qualified State Tuition Plan or a Coverdell Education Savings Account to fund your children's or grandchildren's education all while ensuring your contributions will grow tax-free until withdrawn. Jason Alderman directs Visa's financial education programs. www.practicalmoneyskills.com www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011Page 9A BUSINESS Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Heartland Rural Health Network Inc. is proud to announce the Winn-Dixie Foundation has donated $4,500 to help support its Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Outreach Program. The purpose of this outreach program is to assist low income seniors in Highlands, Hardee, and DeSoto counties apply for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits, more commonly known as food stamps. According to the Florida Department of Elder Affairs, nearly 67 percent of potentially eligible seniors in the tri-county area are currently not accessing SNAPbenefits. Although there are many reasons why participation rates are lower for seniors, the most common factor that program staff hear from individua ls is the difficulty and conf usion with the applicatio n process. Through the Network 's SNAPOutreach Progra m staff is available to ass ist seniors in Highland s, Hardee, and DeSoto cou nties through the applicatio n process and teach them ho w to utilize the online applic ation and steps for recerti fication. The Winn-Dix ie Foundation realizes t he importance of giving ba ck to the communities w e serve, especially in times of need," said Ma ry Kellmanson, president of Winn-Dixie Foundatio n. "For more than 85 year s, Winn-Dixie has be en known as the company wi th a heart." Visit ww w. winndixie.com. To conta ct the Network's SNAPsp ecialist call 452-0638. Health Network receives Winn Dixie Foundation grant Smart uses for your tax refund Courtesy photo South Florida Community College hosted the Sebring Chamber of Commerce mixer on April 7, in the SFCC Theatre for the Performing. SFCC's Gaylin Thomas (left), Don Appelquist, and Jane Hancock represent the college at the mixer. SFCC hosts chamber mixer Personal Finance Jason Alderman Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID Shelagh Byatt and Jerry Sochacki welcome Carole Polk, CRS, GRI to Tomoka Heights Realty Inc. Polk has been a resident of Highlands County for more than 30 years and is well respected within the county. Her top goal is customer service and her motto is Dedication and Integrity. Polk looks forward to serving her customers through the office at Tomoka Heights Realty Inc., 13 Oakwood Cou rt. She can be reached b y phone at 465-6411 or 84 01083, or via email at threa lty@earthlink.net or ca role@CarolePolk.com. The residents of Tomo ka Heights and staff of Tomoka Heights Realty al so congratulate Bill Richter o n his retirement. Richt er decided that after nine-pl us years of working at Tomo ka Heights it was time for hi m to take his third retireme nt and enjoy the fruits of li fe and his family. Polk joins Tomoka Heights Realty Associated PressPHILADELPHIA A n in-house accountant w ho raised a red flag a bout a tax lapse that his e mployer then ignored, l eading him to tip off the I RS, has received $4.5 m illion in the first IRS w histleblower award. The accountant's tip n etted the IRS $20 mill ion in taxes and interest f rom the errant financials ervices firm. The award represents a 2 2 percent cut of the taxes r ecovered. The program, d esigned to encourage t ips in large-scale cases, m andates awards of 15 to 3 0 percent of the amount r ecouped. "It ought to encourage a lot of other people to s queal," Sen. Charles G rassley told The A ssociated Press. The I owa Republican helped g et the IRS W histleblower Office a uthorized in 2006. The IRS mailed the a ccountant's lawyer a $ 3.24 million check that a rrived in suburban P hiladelphia by first-class m ail Thursday. The sum r epresents the award m inus a 28 percent tax h it. The lawyer, Eric L. Y oung of Blue Bell, won't r elease the name of his c lient or the firm because h is client remains a smallt own accountant, and h opes to continue to work i n his field. "It's a win-win for both t he government and taxp ayers. These are dollars t hat are being returned to t he Treasury that otherw ise wouldn't be," Young s aid. "It's very difficult to be a whistleblower," said Y oung, who has repres ented more than a dozen s uch tipsters, including o ne in a $2 billion Pfizer c ase involving off-label d rug marketing. "Most people would be i nclined to turn a blind e ye to it. The process can b e time-consuming, arduo us and stressful, from b oth a personal and prof essional standpoint," he s aid. The accountant filed a c omplaint with the IRS in 2 007, just as the IRS W histleblower Office o pened, but heard nothing f or two years. Frustrated, h e hired Young to help p ush the issue. "We were able to help h im get it back on track," Y oung said. In the accountant's c ase, the IRS did not d eem the issues he raised c omplex. IRS awards $4.5M to whistleblower

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Page 10ANews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.com TODAYMostly sunny and very warm90 / 67Winds: SE at 4-8 mphMostly sunny and remaining warm90 / 67Winds: S at 6-12 mphMONDAYMostly sunny, a t-storm possible87 / 65Winds: WSW at 7-14 mphTUESDAYPartly sunny, a t-storm possible87 / 64Winds: NE at 8-16 mphWEDNESDAYWarm with partial sunshine87 / 64Winds: ENE at 8-16 mphTHURSDAY City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. Washington Washington 70/63 70/63 New York NewYork 60/56 60/56 Miami Miami 86/73 86/73 Atlanta Atlanta 86/63 86/63 Detroit Detroit 79/60 79/60 Houston Houston 87/68 87/68 Chicago Chicago 82/56 82/56 Minneapolis Minneapolis 74/45 74/45 Kansas City KansasCity 76/48 76/48 El Paso ElPaso 66/42 66/42 Denver Denver 54/29 54/29 Billings Billings 54/35 54/35 Los Angeles LosAngeles 67/52 67/52 San Francisco SanFrancisco 59/49 59/49 Seattle Seattle 55/40 55/40 Washington 70/63 New York 60/56 Miami 86/73 Atlanta 86/63 Detroit 79/60 Houston 87/68 Chicago 82/56 Minneapolis 74/45 Kansas City 76/48 El Paso 66/42 Denver 54/29 Billings 54/35 Los Angeles 67/52 San Francisco 59/49 Seattle 55/40 A series of storms charging across the Plains will stir up trouble from the interior of New England to the central Rockies today. Rain will drench the Upper Midwest, while showers and thunderstorms dampen areas farther east. As cold air arriving with the storms clashes with the unusually warm air in place, violent thunderstorms will erupt from Wisconsin to northeastern Texas during the afternoon. The warm air will be centered over the Southeast, where highs in the 80s will abound, and some locations could hit 90. U.S. Cities National Forecast for April 10Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. World Cities National SummaryCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. Weather (W):ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Albuquerque 55/35/pc 67/42/s 74/45/s Atlanta 86/63/s 81/53/t 75/53/s Baltimore 68/57/pc 85/60/pc 68/41/pc Birmingham 88/66/s 76/51/t 74/53/s Boston 57/46/c 72/53/pc 66/42/pc Charlotte 82/60/s 86/56/pc 73/46/s Cheyenne 51/30/r 60/33/pc 59/31/c Chicago 82/56/pc 62/39/c 60/41/s Cleveland 80/59/t 66/41/t 52/37/pc Columbus 82/60/pc 66/43/t 61/42/pc Dallas 92/55/t 83/54/s 80/59/s Denver 54/29/r 66/35/s 64/34/pc Detroit 79/60/t 68/39/sh 57/40/pc Harrisburg 66/57/t 84/51/t 65/38/pc Honolulu 84/71/c 85/71/pc 84/71/s Houston 87/68/pc 83/59/s 81/65/s Indianapolis 84/61/pc 64/41/c 65/43/s Jackson, MS 86/67/pc 79/52/t 79/52/s Kansas City 76/48/t 66/44/s 71/49/s Lexington 84/62/pc 67/44/t 63/43/pc Little Rock 85/62/pc 77/48/s 75/52/s Los Angeles 67/52/pc 69/52/s 67/52/pc Louisville 86/65/pc 69/46/t 66/45/s Memphis 86/65/pc 76/54/t 74/54/s Milwaukee 76/52/t 58/39/c 55/40/s Minneapolis 74/45/t 59/40/pc 67/47/pc Nashville 86/67/pc 71/49/t 68/48/s New Orleans 85/72/pc 83/64/t 82/62/s New York City 60/56/r 80/58/pc 68/46/pc Norfolk 68/61/pc 80/59/pc 66/50/pc Oklahoma City 84/47/t 79/48/s 78/50/s Philadelphia 63/58/c 84/58/pc 68/46/pc Phoenix 70/52/s 80/57/s 84/59/s Pittsburgh 80/62/t 76/45/t 59/38/pc Portland, ME 52/41/c 60/49/pc 60/33/sh Portland, OR 57/43/r 52/38/r 55/41/c Raleigh 80/65/s 87/58/pc 72/46/pc Rochester 68/56/t 73/43/t 55/33/pc St. Louis 84/57/pc 68/45/pc 69/49/s San Francisco 59/49/pc 58/45/pc 58/45/s Seattle 55/40/r 50/38/r 52/41/c Wash., DC 70/63/pc 85/55/pc 65/45/pc Cape Coral 90/69/s 90/68/s 87/67/s Clearwater 89/72/s 88/71/s 85/68/pc Coral Springs 87/71/s 86/72/s 87/70/s Daytona Beach 86/67/s 86/66/s 83/64/pc Ft. Laud. Bch 85/73/s 85/74/s 86/73/s Fort Myers 90/69/s 90/69/s 87/69/s Gainesville 89/64/s 87/66/pc 84/57/pc Hollywood 86/72/s 88/72/s 88/70/s Homestead AFB 83/72/s 85/70/s 83/68/s Jacksonville 87/63/s 87/65/pc 81/56/pc Key West 84/76/s 85/76/s 84/74/s Miami 86/73/s 86/72/s 87/71/s Okeechobee 86/67/s 84/66/s 85/67/s Orlando 90/67/s 88/68/s 87/65/s Pembroke Pines 86/72/s 88/72/s 88/70/s St. Augustine 83/65/s 84/65/pc 79/62/pc St. Petersburg 89/72/s 88/71/s 85/68/pc Sarasota 86/69/s 87/70/s 85/67/s Tallahassee 90/59/s 86/64/pc 83/53/s Tampa 88/70/s 87/70/s 85/68/s W. Palm Bch 86/71/s 85/71/s 85/71/s Winter Haven 91/69/s 90/67/s 87/66/s Acapulco 88/72/s 88/76/s 88/77/s Athens 69/55/s 68/45/s 64/54/s Beirut 66/57/sh 67/54/sh 60/47/sh Berlin 62/46/s 67/52/pc 57/35/sh Bermuda 73/67/pc 72/69/s 74/67/s Calgary 52/30/s 51/23/c 44/26/pc Dublin 64/49/pc 53/33/sh 50/38/sh Edmonton 46/28/pc 45/17/pc 42/21/pc Freeport 85/69/s 86/69/s 85/70/s Geneva 75/48/s 71/51/pc 57/34/r Havana 90/66/s 89/67/s 90/66/s Hong Kong 82/70/pc 84/72/pc 77/68/pc Jerusalem 66/49/s 69/50/s 57/40/sh Johannesburg 73/51/s 74/52/pc 71/52/pc Kiev 45/36/sh 46/34/t 54/36/pc London 70/48/pc 62/38/sh 55/42/pc Montreal 59/46/r 63/45/t 57/36/sh Moscow 45/32/sh 38/25/sf 38/31/sf Nice 79/63/s 77/62/s 76/58/s Ottawa 58/53/r 70/48/t 58/37/c Quebec 57/43/c 59/43/r 52/32/sh Rio de Janeiro 81/74/t 85/75/t 88/77/pc Seoul 59/37/sh 61/39/s 61/39/s Singapore 86/75/t 88/79/t 88/79/t Sydney 81/57/sh 72/55/s 73/57/s Toronto 70/57/t 67/42/t 58/37/pc Vancouver 49/41/r 51/41/sh 49/42/sh Vienna 62/44/s 62/54/pc 68/38/sh Warsaw 50/27/c 50/50/r 57/36/r Winnipeg 50/33/sh 58/35/pc 51/26/c A lmanac Readings at Palm Beach High .............................................. 1:53 a.m. Low ............................................... 7:37 a.m. High .............................................. 1:59 p.m. Low ............................................... 8:02 p.m.Mostly sunny and very warm today. Clear and warm tonight. Mostly sunny and remaining warm tomorrow. Tuesday: mostly sunny with a thunderstorm possible. Wednesday: partly sunny with a thunderstorm possible. Thursday: partial sunshine.So much dust became airborne in Kansas and Iowa on April 10, 1935, that schools and highways closed. The Dust BowlŽ of the 1930s is blamed on land misuse and climate. Mostly sunny and very warm today. Winds south-southeast 4-8 mph. Expect 8-12 hours of sunshine with relative humidity 75% early, 45% in the afternoon and good drying conditions. € Even addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday. € Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and Saturday. € All watering should take place before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. FirstFullLastNew Apr 11Apr 17Apr 24May 3 Today Monday Sunrise 7:08 a.m. 7:07 a.m. Sunset 7:47 p.m. 7:47 p.m. Moonrise 12:12 p.m. 1:12 p.m. Moonset 1:20 a.m. 2:08 a.m. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2011Jacksonville 87/63 Gainesville 89/64 Ocala 90/63 Daytona Beach 86/67 Orlando 90/67 Winter Haven 91/69 Tampa 88/70 Clearwater 89/72 St. Petersburg 89/72 Sarasota 86/69 Fort Myers 90/69 Naples 88/69 Okeechobee 86/67 West Palm Beach 86/71 Fort Lauderdale 85/73 Miami 86/73 Tallahassee 90/59 Apalachicola 80/64 Pensacola 82/70 Key West Avon Park 90/67 Sebring 90/67 Lorida 89/69 Lake Placid 90/66 Venus 90/66 Brighton 88/66 TidesReadings at St. Petersburg High .............................................. 6:30 p.m. Low ............................................... 2:04 a.m. High .....................................................none Low ......................................................none UV Index TodayThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m. 5 9 9 5 Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional SummaryShown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Five-Day forecast for Highlands County 84/76 Lake Levels Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 11.59 Normal ...............................................14.51 Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterdayTemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHigh Tuesday ......................................... 84 Low Tuesday .......................................... 50 High Wednesday .................................... 83 Low Wednesday .................................... 56 High Thursday ....................................... 91 Low Thursday ........................................ 58Heat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayRelative humidity .................................. 41% Expected air temperature ....................... 89 Makes it feel like .................................... 91BarometerTuesday ...............................................30.13 Wednesday .........................................30.11 Thursday .............................................30.07PrecipitationTuesday ...............................................0.56Ž Wednesday .........................................0.00Ž Thursday .............................................0.00Ž Month to date ..................................... 1.54Ž Year to date ......................................... 9.38Ž

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, April 10, 2011Page 11 A IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2008-CA-001329 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR RASC 2007KS3, Plaintiff, vs. SALLIE WOODEN, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 18, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2008-CA-001329 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR RASC 2007KS3, is the Plaintiff and SALLIE WOODEN; TENANT #1 N/K/A ERICA WOODEN are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 18th day of April, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS 13, 14, 15 AND 16, BLOCK 1, AVON PARK LAKES RED HILL FARMS ADDITION, UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 68, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 2388 WEST HAVILAND ROAD, AVON PARK, FL 33825 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on March 31, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michala k Deputy Cler k Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F08084798 GMAC-CONV--Team 3 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. April 3, 10, 2011 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the ficitious name of JB MARKETING VENTURES located at 12001 Arbuckle Cr Rd, in the County of Highlands, in the City of Sebring, Florida 33870 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Sebring, Florida, this 7th day of April, 2011. Judith A. Bryan April 10, 2011 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of ``AT&L Granite and Marble'' located at 4504 US HWY 27 South, in the County of Highlands, in the City of Sebring, Florida 33870 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Sebring, Florida, this 10th day of April, 2011. DC Improvements, Inc. April 10, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-000364 TAYLOR, BEAN AND WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. AIXA DEJESUS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated March 14, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2009-CA-000364 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, is the Plaintiff and AIXA DEJESUS; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF AIXA DEJESUS N/K/A JUAN DEJESUS; TENANT #1 N/K/A BRANDI SCHNEIDER are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 18th day of April, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 1, IN BLOCK 99,OF PLACID LAKES SECTION FOURTEEN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 19, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 560 LAKE AUGUST DRIVE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on March 14, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAIN Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F09026216 OCWEN-SPECFHLMC--Team 5 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. April 3, 10, 2011 for HIGHLANDS County, Florida. ONEWEST BANK, FSB, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., is Plaintiff and MARC C. CRAM; ZOVEIDA CRAM A/K/A ZOBEIDA CRAM; LEISURE LAKES HOME OWNERS CIVIC ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM, IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL, IN HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA, at 11:00 a.m., on the 18th day of April, 2011, the following described property as set forth ins aid Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 9, IN BLOCK 161, OF LEISURE LAKES SECTION TWO, AS PER PLAT THEREOF IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 14, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of MARCH, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of said Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak As Deputy Clerk April 3, 10, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 09001470GCS ONEWEST BANK, FSB, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B. Plaintiff, vs. MARC C. CRAM; ZOVEIDA CRAM A/K/A ZOBEIDA CRAM; LEISURE LAKES HOME OWNERS CIVIC ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 18, 2011, and entered in Case No. 09001470GCS, of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-000792 GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID A. BLAKE A/K/A DAVID BLAKE, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated March 14, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2010-CA-000792 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC, is the Plaintiff and DAVID A. BLAKE A/K/A DAVID BLAKE; DIANA M. BLAKE; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 18th day of April, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 38, SUNSET LAKE ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 13, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 3143 GLACIER AVENUE, AVON PARK, FL 33825 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on March 16, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10042178 GMAC-FHA--Team 3 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. April 3, 10, 2011 ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 Attorney for Personal Representatives: CLIFFORD M. ABLES, III, PA 551 S. COMMERCE AVE. SEBRING, FL 33870 (863)385-0112 /s/ Clifford M. Ables III Florida Bar Number: 178379 JANE M. HANCOCK FLORIDA BAR NUMBER 341002 April 10, 17, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-80 IN RE: ESTATE OF BRUCE THOMAS HALL aka BRUCE T. HALL, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BRUCE THOMAS HALL aka BRUCE T. HALL, deceased, whose date of death was November 6, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is APRIL 10, 2011. Personal Representatives: /s/ Rhoda E. Wolfe 2441 LAKEVIEW DRIVE SEBRING, FL 33870 /s/ Barbara L. Tillman 118 EVANS ST. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-103 IN RE: ESTATE OF MARIE F. VENINI NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of MARIE F. VENINI, deceased, whose date of death was January 20, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870-3867. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 10, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Susan Alexander 1110 SW 9th Avenue Boca Raton, Florida 33486 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Seth E. Ellis, Esq. Attorney for Personal Representative Florida Bar Number: 0060933 ELLIS & GOLDBERG, P.L. 4755 Technology Way Suite 205 Boca Raton, FL 33431 Telephone: (561)910-7500 Fax: (561)910-7501 E-Mail: seth@egpl-law.com April 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-150 IN RE: ESTATE OF LUTISHIE J. FRANK, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LUTISHIE J. FRANK, deceased, File Number PC 11-150, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 10, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Ozalene Chapman Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Michael L. Keiber MICHAEL L. KEIBER, ESQUIRE 129 South Commerce Avenue Sebring, FL 33870 V. (863)385-5188 F. (863)471-1111 Florida Bar No. 620610 April 10, 17, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-147 IN RE: ESTATE OF SURDAM, LEONARD C. Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LEONARD C. SURDAM, deceased, whose date of death was February 26, 2011, and whose social security number is 573-24-5652, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 10, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Herschel E. Surdam 1643 Lexington Ave. San Mateo, CA 94402 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Robert E. Livingston Florida Bar No. 0031259 445 S. Commerce Avenue Sebring, FL 33870 Telephone: (863)385-5156 April 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CASE NO.: 2009-CA-001711 NATIONAL CITY MORTGAGE CO., A DIVISION OF NATIONAL CITY BANK Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES HARRY LINDSAY, JR. A/K/A CHARLES H. LINDSAY AND TAMRA L. LINDSAY, HIS WIFE. Defendant(s). AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated March 22, 2011 entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-001711 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein NATIONAL CITY MORTGAGE CO., A DIVISION OF NATIONAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff and are CHARLES HARRY LINDSAY, JR. A/K/A CHARLES H. LINDSAY AND TAMRA L. LINDSAY, HIS WIFE are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORIDA AT 11:00 A.M., April 18, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOTS 15 AND 16, IN BLOCK 10, OF ORANGE BLOSSOM ESTATES UNIT NO. 4, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 44, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at SEBRING, Florida, this 23rd day of March, 2011. /s/ Priscilla Michalak ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Highlands County, Florida ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813)880-8888 April 3, 10, 2011 Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE UNDER NOVASTAR MORTGAGE FUNDING TRUST, SERIES 2006-4, is Plaintiff and EDUARDO VAZQUEZ; ___ UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF EDUARDO VAZQUEZ, IF ANY; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.; NOVASTAR MORTGAGE, INC, CORPORATION; HIGHLANDS COUNTY CODE ENFORCEMENT; JOHN DOE OR ANY OTHER PERSON IN POSSESSION; all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s), whether living or not, and whether said unknown parties claims as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, or in any other capacity, claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s) are the Defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 a.m., on the 21st day of APRIL 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 3, BLOCK 172, OF PLACID LAKES, A REPLAT OF BLOCKS 115-116-169-171-172-173 AND PORTIONS OF BLOCKS 170 AND 175, PLACID LAKES, SECTION SIXTEEN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8 AT PAGE 98, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA Street Address: 114 BARBARA AVE. NW, LAKE PLACID, FLORIDA 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this 25th day of March, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK By: /s/ Annette E. Daff As Deputy Clerk April 3, 10, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2008-CA-001528 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE UNDER NOVASTAR MORTGAGE FUNDING TRUST, SERIES 2006-4, Plaintiff, vs. EDUARDO VAZQUEZ, ET AL, Defendants, AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment in Foreclosure dated January 20, 2011 and entered in Case No. 2008-CA-001528 of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 10-1340 GCS FINANCIAL FREEDOM ACQUISITION, LLC, Plantiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND A LL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF MARJORIE A. BUTTON, DECEASED, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND A LL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF MARJORIE A. BUTTON, DECEASED LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: Unknown CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 19, BLOCK 282, OF SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, UNIT 13, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 71, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before MAY 2, 2011 a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in THE NEWS SUN and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N. Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863) 534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this 28th day of March, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Lisa Tantillo As Deputy Clerk April 10,17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC-11-116 Division IN RE: ESTATE OF DAVID VINIK Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS A GAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of DAVID VINIK, deceased, File Number PC-11-116, by the Circuit Court for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870; that the decedent's date of death was October 5, 2010; that the total value of the estate is $18,692.40 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Gene Vinik 509 Macallan Court Conway, South Carolina 29526 TEMPLE ISRAEL OF 1305 Temple Israel Dr HIGHLANDS COUNTY Sebring, Florida 33870 BART VINIK 10 Westland Street Worcester, MA 01602 LYNN VINIK 651 Vanderbilt Street Apt 5-Z Brooklyn, NY 11218 JAMIN WILLIAMSON 8A Ball Drive Highlands, NY 12528 FLORENCE GREENSTEIN 125 Grandview Boulevard Lake Placid, Florida 33852 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) Y EARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is A pril 3, 2011. Person Giving Notice: /s/ Paul Klemow Paul Klemow, Attorney at Law Florida Bar Number: 18375 Post Office Box 16396 West Palm Beach,FL 33416 Telephone: (561)506-5569 Fax: 561-253-0451 E-Mail: theklemowlawfirm@aol.com April 3, 10, 2011 1050Legals 1000 Announcements Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155

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Page 12ANews-Sun Sunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.co m V ETERINARY RECEPTIONIST /ASSISTANTneeded for small animal clinic. A compassionate and enthusiastic team player needed for a full time position. Must have a positive attitude and take pride in providing exceptional client service. Multi-tasking, organization, attention to detail & computer skills necessary. Must be able to work flexible hrs. & weekends. Stop by and fill out an application at 11751 Twitty Rd. Sebring 33876. Hours M-F 7:30-6. RESIDENTIAL CLEANINGCo. Needs part time help, 15-25 hrs., week days only. Must be reliable, outgoing & highly motivated. Call 863-414-2244. PAGE DESIGNERIf you enjoy Page Design, this is for you. The News Sun is looking for the right person to help design its news page. Candidates must be exp'd in Quark and Photoshop, as well as have good news judgment. Able to work quickly with min. supervision is necessary. Exp. in Illustrator and In Design is a plus. This position is 20 hrs. hrs. may be flexible. Send sample of work with resume to: humanresources@new ssun.com or Fax to: 352-365-1951 Attn. Human Resources Director, or drop off at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL. Drug test and background check required. EOE MATH INSTRUCTORS PT positions to teach developmental math (daytime classes). Bachelor's degree in math or related field required. Open until filled. V isit www.southflorida.edu/hr for details. 863-784-7132. EA/EO MATH INSTRUCTORS PT positions to teach developmental math (daytime classes). Bachelor's degree in math or related field required. Open until filled. V isit www.southflorida.edu/hr for details. 863-784-7132. EA/EO HOME CARERN, CNA, PT, OT for local visits in Highlands Great Salary/Excellent benefits Immediate Need!! (863) 401-3550 or fax resume (863) 401-8199 FRONT DESKCLERK (PT), assists hotel & restaurant guests w/reservations, registration & accommodations. Hotel/Restaurant & Cashiering exp. preferred. $8.76/hr. (16-24 hr/wk.) Typical work schedule: Sat. & Sun. 6 am 2 pm. Open until filled. Visit www.southflorida.edu/hr for position announcement. (863) 453-2211. Apply at the HOTEL JACARANDA, 19 E. Main St., Avon Park. EA/EO/Vet. Pref. COOKS W/EXPERIENCEpreferred at Spring Lake Golf Resort. Apply in Person. Call for directions only 863-655-0900.CAREGIVERSNOW HIRINGFor caring, compassionate caregivers. You must be 21 yrs old with a HS Diploma/GED, pass a criminal & driving record check. Call HR between 9am and 4 pm M-F. 863-385-8558 or visit: ck381.ersp.biz/employment A MMUNITION RELOADINGF/T. submit resume & current photo to sales@anderson-arms.com or fax 863-453-7454 2100Help Wanted 2000 Employment*RECORDS CLERKTemp. position. *PRN MA (w/phlebotomy skills) Details @ www.flcancer.com 1400Health CareServicesLOST DIAMONDrings. Possibly at Sebring North Publix. Engagement & wedding band. Call 863-382-1037. Reward if found. 1200Lost & FoundHIGHLANDS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS (HCBCC) GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING INVITATION TO BID (ITB) The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), Highlands County as the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District Board of Supervisors, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed bids in the County Purchasing Department for: ITB 11-036 LEASE OF 350 ACRES OF PROPERTY AT 200 Caladium Drive, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 NIGP CODE COMMODITY/SERVICES CODE: 971-35 Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, CPPB, Highlands County General Services/Purchasing Department Assistant Purchasing Director 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33875?5803 Phone: 863?402?6524 Fax: 863-402-6735; or E?Mail: dgilbert@hcbcc.org Bidder will submit one (1) original and two (2) copies of their bid, in an envelope that must be sealed and marked with the bid number and name so as to identify the enclosed bid. Bids must be delivered to Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., THURSDAY, A pril 28, 2010, at which they will be opened. Bids received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The BCC will not be responsible for the late deliveries of bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service. One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at the above meeting. Highlands County Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this bid. The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners as the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District Board of Supervisors (IMWID) reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsive and responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District. The IMWID Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. The Board of County Commissioners as the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District Board of Supervisors of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John Minor, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: j minor@hcbcc.org. Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service. Board of County Commissioners as the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District Board of Supervisors, Purchasing Department; Highlands County, Florida Website: www.hcbcc.net April 10, 17, 2011CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day y our ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us: 314-9876 News-Sun Classified

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, April 10, 2011Page 13 A its not just about making the sale anymoreƒ ƒits about building trustƒits about being a part of the communityƒits about helping businesses grow Do you love selling a product you believe in? Are you committed to excellence? If so, were interested in talking to you!The News-Sun is actively seeking a dynamic sales professional that knows the difference between just making a saleŽ and building a solid and dependable relationship with a client.Ž If you are a sales oriented individual who is self-motivated, customer oriented and possess exceptional communication and organizational skills, consider joining our team. Candidates will be required to maintain established accounts while developing new clientele and working closely with area business organizations. Transportation required. Base salary plus commission, mileage, paid time off, health insurance, 401K & more. Email resumes to humanresources@newssun.com or fax to 352.365.1951 Attention: Human Resources Director or drop off at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring its about finding the right person If you enjoy page design, this job is for you. The News-Sun is looking for the right person to help design its news pages. The right candidate must be experienced in Quark and Photoshop, as well as have good news judgment. The ability to work fast with minimal supervision is also necessary. Experience in Illustrator and InDesign is a plus. This position is for 20 hours hours may be flexible. Send sample of work with resume to humanresources@newssun.com or fax to 3852.365.1951 Attention: HumanResources Director, or drop off at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring. Drug test and background check required. EOE 1993 CHEVYS10 Blazer 4dr, 2wd, 104k, V6, loaded, leather, CD, new brakes & tires. Many new arts with receipts. Must see! 22mpg $2600 obo 863-202-6394 9450Automotive for Sale TOOL BOXFits Ford F-150 Trucks $100. 863-382-4722 CHEST -All aluminum with locking lid. 48" long, fits in pickup bed or on a trailer. Very Nice! $140. 863-453-7027 9350Automotive Parts& AccessoriesENCLOSED TRAILER6 x 15. Almost new tires. Single axle. $1,800. Call 863-699-5517 9220Utility Trailers1973 NORTON850 COMMANDO A-1, low miles, *Owner's Manual, One Owner,* RareFind Will Accept reasonable offer. 863-382-8985 or 863-465-9100 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation2002 EZGOCustom Golf Cart, gas, lots of extras, new mag wheels & tires. Must See Nice! $2700 obo or will trade for an on / off Road Dirt Bike. 863-202-6394 8500Golf Carts R.V. COVERNEW fits trailes 28' 7" to 31' 6". Never opened! A Bargain at $170. 863-453-7027 2001 JAYCOEAGLE 26' 5th Wheeler. Good Shape $6400. 863-381-9159 8400RecreationalVehicles CANOE 14'high Impact, polyethylene hull, 3 seats (insulated cooler, center seat) spare paddle tie down ( or for fishing rod or shotgun) 3 drink holders. Dry storage area. Includes: Minn Kota trolling motor, 2 seat cushions, 4 life jackets, 3 paddles and kayak paddle. Great cond. $380. Call Jay 863-452-6583. 16 FT.Flat Bottom Flats type aluminum with console, 35hp Yamaha motor plus trailer, needs spring service. $1600 obo 863-202-6394 8050Boats & Motors 8000 RecreationNOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states tha t all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & Supplies MOWER DIXONSpeedztr 36" cut, electric clutch, rear wheels independently driven, by Hydro Gear, 14.5 B&S overhead. valve vertical shaft w/ cast iron cyl. $1450 obo 863-452-5607 LAWN MOWERSnapper / Rider. Runs Good! $200 863-471-9509 JOHN DEERE'05 4310 w/loader & mower, 4 x 4. $4800. details @ desmdw1@msn.com or 386-246-7461 2009 -Cub Cadet Enforcer commercial 48" Cut, Zero Turn, 300 hrs. Good Shape. $3000 obo 863-202-6394 7400Lawn & GardenPOWER WASHERDeWalt Commercial DP 3750. Perfect cond. on a 4 wheel trailer $1,100. Call 863-452-0393 7380Machinery & Tools AVON PARKORANGEWOOD ACRES 1628 W Orangewood Ct. Sun. Apr. 10, 8am-? Computer furn, Good quality Miscellaneous Items!! Toys & stuffed Animals. Too Much To List! AVON PARKMult Family Sale! 2301 N Carpenter Rd. Fri & Sat 4/15 &16, 8am 1pm. Tools, furniture, household items, clothes. Much Much More! 7320Garage &Yard Sales TYPEWRITER -Olympica with case. $20 863-655-0342 SWIVEL ROCKERlite sand color. Like New! $75. Call Richard 863-414-2784 LUGGAGE -Swiss Air / many compartments 17". $15. 863-471-2502 FLOOR LAMP/ Modern style / white. $20 863-471-2502 FISHING REELNew Baitrunner, 10 BB-$42.00 Call 863-273-1846. CALCULATOR XL-121.Good Cond.! $20. 863-655-0342 7310Bargain Buys WORKBENCH (FULL) DP ALPHA FLEX. Excellent condition. $75 863-382-4722 WASHER &DRYER / WHIRLPOOL Stack, electric 220. Excellent Condition, $425 863-257-1402 STAINED GLASSequipment & materials, patterns, books, tools, various size glass & colors, grinder, cutter, foil etc. $275 obo. 863-382-8198 7300MiscellaneousPIANOBOSTON5'1 Baby Grand w/bench. Model GP-156. Ebony Polish finish. Excel. cond. $11,000. Call 863-449-0243 7180Furniture 7180FurnitureDISHWASHERGEProfile. White. Digital display. Works great-been in safe, indoor storage since 2004. "Scratch & dent" otherwise like new. $45. Andy 863-873-4939 7040Appliances 7000 Merchandise SEBRING (2)Available 3926 Kenilworth Blvd, 1500 sq ft, $550/mo : A/C, office, BA, lg overhead door, near Sebring High School. 640 Park St, 6400 sq ft, $2500/mo : A/C, office, BA, 8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric, fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway. 941-416-2813 AVON PARKLarge Retail/Office Building, 100 E. Main St. A MUST SEE! 863-295-9272 6750Commercial RentalSEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, Satellite, split plan house, share kitchen & laundry room. Full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for RentSEBRING -Weekly/Multi-Week Condo Rentals Avail. Now. Located on Little Lake Jackson across from Harder Hall Golf Club. Lots of ammenities. Starting @ $500/wk. 863-385-5005, ext. 0 6320Seasonal Property SPRING LAKE3BR, 2BA, 2CG, CHA, patio, ceramic tiled liv. room, din. room, kitchen, bath & halls, SS appliances, refrigerator has water on door, micro., W/D hook up. No pets. 863-655-0136 SEBRING -SPRING LAKE AREA. 3/BR, 2/BA on Golf Course. $850 monthly. 1st / last / security / references. Call anytime. 863-273-3704 SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 LAKE PLACIDNEAT & CLEAN 2BR, 2BA $475 2BR, 1BA $450 863-465-2924 6300Unfurnished HousesSEBRING 2240Avalon Rd. 3/2 furn. Small animals ok. Near Shopping Center & Senior Club. References $700. first/last. Call 305-387-6863 after 4pm. or 863-237-3129. 6250Furnished Houses LIVE ONDINNER LAKE 12 min. from SFCC. Cute spotless newly painted apartments 1/1 from $350. incl. water & garbage. Efficiency $425. incl. water & garbage maintenance man on call laundry on premises. Small pets w/approval by landlord. $35. app feewe check criminal history. Call for appt. 863-381-3610 or 863-385-8242. BEAUTIFUL APTSSEBRING 2BR, 1BA, tile floors, screen back porch, beautiful landscaping, building 5 yrs. new. Pets OK. $595 month. 3106 Medical Way. 863-446-1822 AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; Washer/Dryer, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 6200UnfurnishedApartments AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook ups. Students/Seniors Discount Call 863-452-0469. AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL : $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 SEBRING -2BR, 2BA. Tile floors, fresh paint. Includes water. $600/mo. Call Gary Johnson, 863-381-1861. RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartments SEBRING -Downtown on the Circle. Monthy rates starting at $400. payable wkly. Includes elec. & water. No Pets. 306 circle. 863-386-9100 or 954-295-7194. Or go to Bldg. and ask for John. 863-414-7535 A PFURNISHED APT FOR RENT Avon Mobile Home Park 1350 N Lake Ave 55 Plus Park Sorry No Pets 863-453-3415 6150FurnishedApartmentsSEBRING VILLA3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage. Wood floors, vaulted ceilings, screened porch. Convenient location near Hospital. Gated community, Clubhouse & pool, lawn maint. incl. $900. mo. Call 863-840-1083. Carole Polk 6100Villas & CondosFor Rent 6000 Rentals SEBRING VILLAGE55 + PARK Must Sell! 2BR, 2BA, furnished, new furniture, enclosed sun room w/ shed & outside patio, $25,000 for more info. Call 863-402-0565. PALM HARBORHOMES Repo's/Used Homes/Short Sales 3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides Won't Last!! 3,500-40K Call Today! 800-622-2832 A PPARK MODEL FOR SALE Low Lot Rent 55 Plus Park Sorry No Pets 863-449-1072 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesSEBRING -Quiet Neighborhood on great fishing lake; 2,000 sf, 3BR, 2.5BA remodeled home with large garage & boat house. $219,000. 863-655-2278 MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE! 4080Homes for SaleSebringSEBRING -RURAL LIVING adjacent to great fishing lake close to Sebring. 3BR, 2BA home, pole barn, 5 acres fenced, zoned agriculture $150,000. 863-655-2278 Make Offer! 4040Homes For Sale 4040Homes For SaleAVON PARK3BR, 2BA, 1CG 1400 sq ft home. $72,000. Available after Feb. 28, 2011. Owner Financing possible w/ at least 10% down, good credit report and work record. 863-453-5631 Classified ads get fast results DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a NewsSun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 385-6155 WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 385-6155. Then shop till you drop!

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Page 14ANews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.com

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011Page 7B SENIORSCENE b ecause the chemical comp ound does occur naturally i n many fruits and vegetab les. But the quantity of c hemicals required for i ndustrial decaffeination m eans the almost 100 perc ent of the time, syntheticall y manufactured ethyl a cetate is used. So far, there a re no known health risks l inked to the use of ethyl a cetate in direct or indirect d ecaffeination methods." Supercritical carbon dioxi de fluid has both gas-like a nd liquid-like physical p roperties. You may have a lso heard of superheated or l iquefied gas. Supercritical f luid fills the container like a g lass, but can dissolve subs tances like a liquid maki ng it an excellent agent for s eparating an element such a s caffeine from a coffee bean. The highly pressurized carbon dioxide is forced through the beans and penetrates deeply, dissolving up to 99 percent of the caffeine. The carbon dioxide residue evaporates from the coffee beans as they return to room temperature. Frankly I did not understand the above quote so I called Maxwell House Coffee telephone number on my can of "Naturalmente Descafinado." Adrienne answered the line and I inquired what that meant. She put me on hold and came back with the following information. I asked if I could quote her and what she said which was: "Naturally decaffeinated was the process used. They use water to prepare the beans and gently remove caffeine. They expose the beans to natural effervescent in the form of carbon dioxide which is a naturally occurring substance in the air." I went back to the first paragraph quoted from the Web to the last sentence: "But the quantity of chemical required for industrial decaffeination means that almost 100 percent of the time, synthetically manufactured ethyl acetate is used." Ethyl acetate is a colorless liquid used in glues and nail polish removers. It is manufactured on a large scale for use as a solvent. Now it began to make sense to me why I didn't need to give up the wondrous cup of coffee that sat with me through the writing of this article. I am so happy. Continued on page 19 Pearl Carter is writer, poet and a Lake Placid resident. E-mail her at timely87@comcast.net. Coffee or decaf? Which is best We live in a mobile park and they usually have a yard sale in the park recreation hall yearly to help us get rid of all the junk we accumulate. This year they did it a little differently. They decided in addition to the park hall, they would let us have individual sales on our home lots. Very good. We won't have to make two or three trips from home to the hall. We will just set up in the driveway and carport. No problem! That's what we thought until we started getting ready. First we had to go to the county courthouse to get a permit for the sale! That was $5 and a trip across town to the courthouse. The permit had to be posted conspicuously during the sale. No problem. Next we had to devise a display system to show our wares by moving the table from our screened room in the driveway a rigging a couple of tables from arm chairs with some lumber that was in the workshop, we cobbled up a satisfactory showroom. Almost all the stuff we were going to display was in the storeroom in the rear of our trailer so it entailed quite a few trips from backyard to driveway to get to the stuff ready to sell. But wait a minute! We have to separate the junk and decide what we want to ask for it when we sell it. We had a lot left from previous sales along with our year accumulation for the past year. So we started putting the stuff in plastic freezer bags, Kmart shopping bags and boxes that we have been saving for the sale. It just happens that the weather had turned cold about the time we started to work so we made numerous trips to the house for warmth and coffee (I managed to clumsily set my favorite cup on the table and have it drop to the floor and break into several pieces). The process of setting up took the best part of three days and now on the night before the sales, we are standing in the driveway looking at our efforts when a neighbor walks up wanting to know if we are open for business yet. Since everything was all set up we told them to take a look. As a result, we made our first sale and more than covered our monetary expenses. We had learned from previous experience that you would have to watch people closely during the sale since some people seem to pick up items and forget to pay for them. One case today happened when a little boy about eight or 10 years old saw some Mardis Gras beads that were on sale for a quarter apiece. He put two of them around his neck and started to walk away. I got his attention and informed him that the beads would cost him 50 cents. He quickly removed the beads and ran off to his folks'car. That was the only incident of that sort that I saw but there were other antics I watched with wonder. One lady shopper picked up a bag of table cloths we had for sale at 50 cents a bag. No sale. The usual dickering went on throughout the sale, but in the end we got enoug h from the sale to satisfy o ur needs. During the sale a chur ch group approached us an d said that they would be grateful anything we want ed to get rid of after the sal e. All we would have to do is place it by the curb and th ey would pick it up. We had a few things that we didn 't want to put back in stora ge so we put it on the curb f or them. The carport and driv eway were cleaned up and w e were sitting in a chair in t he carport when a car drove u p to the driveway and start ed picking up the items in t he pile. I called to them as t he got the first item into the c ar and told them that wou ld cost them $1. He look ed startled but reached into h is pocket and handed me $ 1. That was our last sale of t he day. Now all we had to d o was return all the unso ld stuff to the shed in the bac kyard. Since the park put a 1 2 p.m. closing time on t he sale, we had plenty of tim e to get all that remained ba ck in storage and go in t he house and count our profi ts. Since most of the stuff w e had on sale was junk that w e really didn't want but w as too good to throw away w e figured that all we took in was profit. So if you are going to venture into a yard sal e, think the process throug h from start to finish. Yo u may save yourself a goo d headache! By ESTHER HARRIS Special to the News-SunQuestion: Is it illegal to l aminate your Social Security c ard? Answer: No, it is not illeg al, but we discourage it. It's b est not to laminate your c ard. Laminated cards make i t difficult, sometimes even i mpossible; to detect import ant security features and an e mployer may refuse to a ccept them. The Social S ecurity Act requires the C ommissioner of Social S ecurity to issue cards that c annot be counterfeited. We i ncorporate many features t hat protect the card's integrit y. They include highly spec ialized paper and printing t echniques some visible to the naked eye and some not. Keep your Social Security card in a safe place with your other important papers. Do not carry it with you. Learn more at www.social security.gov Question: I have two minor children at home and I plan to retire next fall. Will my children be eligible for monthly Social Security benefits after I retire? Answer: Monthly Social Security payments may be made to your children if: They are unmarried and under age 18; Age 18 or 19 and still in high school; or Age 18 or older, became disabled before age 22, and continues to be disabled. Children who may qualify include a biological child, adopted child, or dependent stepchild. (In some cases, your grandchild also could be eligible for benefits on your record if you are supporting them.). For more information, see our online publication, Benefits for Children, at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/ 10085.html Question: I've been turned down for disability benefits. How do I appeal? Answer: It's easy to appeal the decision online. Go to www.socialsecurity.gov and select "Appeal a disability decision." It's best not to laminate SS card Woody's Wisdom Woody Jackson The art of hitting the yard sales

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Breakfasts and lunches being served in the Highlands County School District for the upcoming week of April 11-15 include: HIGH SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Chili, saltine crackers, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked french fries, corn cobbettes, tossed salad, Colby Jack cheese stick, cherry berry fruit bar, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's cheeseburger pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, dried blueberries, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Barbecue sandwich, burger, cheeseburger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, grilled chicken sandwich, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, mixed vegetables, carrots and dip, vanilla clodhoppers, diced pears, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast burrito, salsa, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's cheeseburger pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, great northern beans, cheddar cheese stick, rosy applesauce, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Breakfast Maple waffle stick, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Asian chicken nuggets, salsa, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked french fries, corn, carrots and dip, tossed salad, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. ACADEMY SCHOOLS Monday Lunch Chicken nuggets, dinner roll, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, carrots and dip, strawberry cup, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Lunch Meat sauce, spaghetti, green beans, garlic breadstick, fresh apple slices, vanilla clodhoppers, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Lunch Macaroni and cheese, dinner roll, broccoli, diced pears, cherry berry fruit bar, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Lunch Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, corn, fruit cocktail cup, very berry juice bar, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Lunch Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Mama Sofia's pepperoni pizza, fresh apple slices, peach cup, chocolate chip cookie, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. MIDDLE SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Chili, saltine crackers, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, corn cobbettes, tossed salad, Colby Jack cheese stick, cherry berry fruit bar, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, dried blueberries, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Breakfast pizza, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Barbecue sandwich, burger, cheeseburger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, grilled chicken sandwich, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, mixed vegetables, carrots and dip, vanilla clodhoppers, diced pears, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast burrito, salsa, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, great northern beans, cheddar cheese stick, rosy applesauce, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Breakfast Maple waffle stick, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, assorted juice, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Mama Sofia's cheeseburger pizza, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, burger, cheeseburger, chicken tenders, salsa, dinner roll, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, corn, carrots and dip, tossed salad, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Maple waffle stick, string cheese, orange juice, chocolate milk. Lunch Chicken nuggets, dinner roll, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich, turkey chef salad, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, carrots and dip, strawberry cup, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast Breakfast burrito, salsa, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Chicken biscuit, strawberry cup, chocolate milk, hard cooked egg, giant graham, apple juice, chocolate milk. Lunch Spaghetti, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, green beans, vanilla clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit, fresh apple slices, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Hard cooked egg, giant graham, apple juice, chocolate milk, chicken biscuit, strawberry cup, chocolate milk. Lunch Macaroni and cheese, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, broccoli, diced pears, cherry berry fruit bar, very berry juice, bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Sausage biscuit, apricot cup, chocolate milk, Ultimate Breakfast Round, apple juice, chocolate milk. Lunch Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, corn, great northern beans, fruit cocktail cup, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Breakfast Maple waffle stick, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Ultimate Breakfast Round, apple juice, chocolate milk, sausage biscuit, apricot cup, chocolate milk. Lunch Mama Sofia'spepperoni pizza, Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, carrots and dip, salsa, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, fresh apple slices, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. KINDERGARTEN LEARNING CENTER Monday Lunch Chicken nuggets, dinner roll, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, carrots and dip, strawberry cup, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Lunch Spaghetti, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, green beans, vanilla clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Lunch Macaroni and cheese, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, broccoli, diced pears, cherry berry fruit bar, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Lunch Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, great northern beans, fruit cocktail cup, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Lunch Mama Sofia's cheese pizza, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, carrots and dip, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Page 8BNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.com CHALKTALK School Menus Associated PressTALLAHASSEE The Legislature has voted to loosen Florida's class size limits but the two chambers differ on the details. The Senate voted 31-7 and the House 79-39 on Thursday for a bill (SB 2120) that would shrink the number of core courses covered by class size requirements and let schools break the caps for students who enroll after an annual head count. The Senate on Wednesday had agreed to restore social studies as core classes and ensure th at all prekindergarten throug h third grade classes are co vered by the caps. The Hou se didn't accept those change s. Aconference committ ee will try to resolve the d ifferences. Both versions wou ld remove other courses n ot required for graduation or tested by the state includin g foreign languages an d advanced classes. Lawmakers vote to loosen class size limits Associated PressTAMPA The Florida Board of Education has taken the first steps toward hiring a new education commissioner after Gov. Rick Scott ousted the previous one. The board met in Tampa Thursday to choose a vendor to conduct the candidate search. They also set the deadline for applications for May 25. Interviews with the top three candidates w ill be June 1. Scott forced the resign ation of Educatio n Commissioner Eric J. Smi th last month without consu lting the board, leading cha irman T. Willard Fair to resign in protest. Scott an d Smith did not agree on ed ucation policies. The education commi ssioner oversees Florida 's public school system. Candidates for education commissioner sought NEWS-SUN Courtesy pho to The second-grade students of Heartland Christan School, along with their teacher, James Smiley, experience hands-on paleontology at Dinosaur World in Plant City. They uncovered the fossil remains of a Stegasauros and collected fossils at a fossil dig. Gemma Sauls explores the mouth of a dinosaur. Trip to Dinosaur World

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Special to the News-SunSEBRING Sebring High S chool participated in the FFA H orticulture Demonstration C areer Development Event ( CDE) in Okeechobee April 4, w hich included chapters from H ighlands, Okeechobee, St. L ucie and Miami-Dade count ies. The top two in each categor y advances to the State Finals i n Gainesville on April 22 on t he University of Florida camp us. The purpose of the event was designed to stimulate careful planning, thorough knowledge and the ability to explain, by work and action, the "how and why" of various horticulture practices. The short demonstrations took place in five divisions including: Production, Marketing, Consumer Use, Artistic Arrangement of Horticulture Crops and Landscaping. Savanna Fisher demonstrated production of pomegranites, Megan Stein demonstrated how to make hair spray from citrus in the Consumer Use division and Elton Gargano and Sarah Orrell teamed up with their Artistic Arrangement demonstration. Stein and Gargano/Orrell team qualified for the state finals in their respective divisions. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South F lorida Community College P resident Dr. Norm Stephens w as recently awarded the N ational Bronze Leadership A ward for his work with J unior Achievement (JA) of W est Central Florida Inc. The JAWorldwide L eadership Award recognizes t he most passionate volunt eers throughout the United S tates, representing the top o ne percentile of all volunt eers. "Dr. Stephens was nomin ated for the award because h e has served as an outstandi ng board member for the p ast five years," said Lily R omine, JAexecutive direct or of Highlands and Polk c ounties. "Since he became c hairman two years ago, our e nrollment has increased and we have expanded our programs into local elementary schools. He is always available, whether for conference calls, fundraising, planning, and events, and he has even taken the time to recognize and train future JAleaders. Dr. Stephens is the mark of a true leader." JAis the world's largest organization dedicated to educating students about work readiness, entrepreneurship, and financial literacy through experiential, hands-on programs. JAprograms help prepare young people for the real world by showing them how to generate wealth and effectively manage it, how to create jobs which make their communities more robust, and how to apply entrepreneurial thinking to the workplace. Stephens received his award during the Hall of Achievement Celebration Dinner held at Busch Gardens on March 24. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011Page 9B CHALKTALK Courtesy photo Sebring High School's Reece O'Connor, Jennifer Swain, Kayla Hart and Ashley Palmer took second place in the State Aquaculture Career Development Event. Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Sebring High School F FAaquaculture team competed in the State A quaculture CDE (Career Development E vent) held in April 2 Gainesville at the V eterinary Science complex on the University o f Florida campus. The four-member team consisted of J ennifer Swain, Reece O'Connor, Kayla Hart a nd Ashley Palmer. O'Connor took high indiv idual honors in the state with Swain taking t hird and the team placing second in the competition. The top five teams in the state were East Bay, Sebring, East Ridge, Kathleen and Mulberry. The event is designed to stimulate student interest in the aquaculture industry, encourage aquaculture instruction in the agricultural education curriculum, and to provide recognition for those who have demonstrated skills and competencies in the area of aquaculture management and consisted of a written exam, individual problem solving practicums and team activites. Sebring FFA aquaculture team shines at state Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Thirtytwo FFAmembers converged on the Leadership Training Center in Haines City April 5-6 for the purpose of screening potential candidates to determine two candidates in each of the five areas of the state eligible to run for state office at the 83rd Florida FFA Convention, June 13-17 in Orlando. Additionally, the top two candidates were selected to run at-large campaigns for the offices of President and Secretary; the top vote getter will be the 2011-12 State President and the runner-up will serve as Secretary. Candidates from Highlands County included Lauren Welborn from Sebring and Charlie Brown from Avon Park. The candidates showed their skills in a written exam, SAE (Supervised Agricultural Experience) presentation, agricultural education interview, conversational exercise, individual personal interview and a group problem solving exercise. Following the two-day event, Brown was selected, along with Haley Webb from the Charlotte Chapter, as the top two candidates and will be seeking the Presidency of the Florida FFAAssociation, which has more than 15,000 members in more than 300 chapters. The National FFA Organization, formerly known as the Future Farmers of America, is a national youth organization of 523,309 student members-as part of 7,487 local FFAchapters in all 5 0 states, Puerto Rico an d Virgin Islands. The National FF A Organization changed to its present name in 1988, in recognition of the grow th and diversity of agricultu re and agriculture educatio n. The FFAmission is to ma ke a positive difference in t he lives of students by deve loping their potential for pr emier leadership, person al growth, and career succe ss through agricultural educ ation. For more informatio n visit www.flaffa.org. APHS's Brown in running for state FFA presidency Courtesy pho to A total of 14 officer candidates that screened to run for state FFA office (two from each of the six areas, plus two at-large candiates. Stephens receives Leadership Award Courtesy photo South Florida Community College President Dr. Norm Stephens was recently awarded the National Bronze Leadership Award SHS competes in Area VI FFA Horticulture Demonstration Contest Courtesy photo Sebring High School's Savanna Fisher, Sarah Orrell, Elton Gargano and Megan Stein competed in the FFA Horticulture Demonstration Career Development Event. The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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Page 10BNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. children's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. children's mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing God's Heart and Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and women's prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the "Place to discover God's love." For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mother's Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) "Where the old fashion gospel is preached." Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the "Son" always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. JosŽ Gonz‡lez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Friday 5-7 p.m., every Saturday 9-11 a.m. and 3-3:45 p.m., first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lord's Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building God's Kingdom for Everyone." "Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!" Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is "Jesus is First at First Christian Church."Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures'by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP Special to the News-SunSEBRING The 2011 Highlands Soil and Water Conservation District Speaking Contest was held on April 5 at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agricultural Center. The topic for this year's speech contest was, "What is the Economic Impact of Florida Forest?" First-place winner Alexis Merlo was presented a cash prize of $150. A$100 prize went to second-place contestant Rachel Shattler and third-place Hayden Nielander was awarded a $50 prize. All contestants attend Lake Placid Christian School. Organizers thanked Judy Filler and David Griffin, who each year coach the students at their school and prepare them to participate in our event. The Speaking Contest educates the public on agricultural conservation needs. It also provides valuable experience to young speakers who, conceivably, could become our future leaders. The winners said they enjoyed researching the subject matter and plan to stay in the environmental and agricultural field in the future. The judges were Charles Reynolds; owner of Reynolds Farms Inc.; Mike Jensen, director of the Highlands County Extension Office; and Audrey Driggers, Conservation Technician form Okeechobee Soil and Water Conservation District. Corine Burgess, Environmental Specialist, was the timekeeper for the contest. Merlo will represent Highlands County at the Area Speaking Contest that will be held on April 20. The winner of the area contest will go on to the state contest. The top prize at the state competition is $500. Merlo wins HSWCD speaking contest Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Retired Sou th Florida Community College mathema tics instructor Carol Emery recent ly donated $10,000 to the existing Car ol Emery Endowed Teaching Chair in Mathematics corpus. "I created th is award because I wanted to promo te SFCC's outstanding faculty," Emo ry said. "SFCC did so much for me when I was an instructor; I wanted to gi ve something back to the college." Endowed Teaching Chair nomine es are chosen by their peers. Candidat es submit an application describing a pro ject for which they intend to use t he endowment to SFCC's Faculty Counc il. The council then recommends the wi nner to SFCC President Dr. Nor m Stephens. "The endowment is awarded over a period of two years, half of which is to be used to support a project related to their profession and the other half as an honorarium," said Don Appelquis t, executive director of the South Flori da Community College Foundation, In c., which manages the endowment. "The endowed teaching chair pr ogram helps us attract evermore qua lified faculty members to our instit ution," Appelquist said. "It also gives us a way to show our appreciation to t he outstanding faculty members w e already have." Emery donates to endowed chair at SFCC CHALKTALK Courtesy photo Winners of the 2011 Highlands Soil and Water Conservation District Speaking Contest. Associated PressPALM HARBOR The P inellas County Sheriff's O ffice says a school r esource officer was injured m ore seriously that initially t hought when he was s tabbed repeatedly by a seve nth grader earlier this w eek. The sheriff's office r eleased more information T hursday about the attack, w hich occurred Tuesday at a m iddle school in Palm H arbor, northwest of Tampa. T he officer, Kenneth F ridlund, suffered internal i njuries in what the sheriff's o ffice described as an unrel enting attack by the 13y ear-old boy. The officer w as stabbed at least three t imes. The new information was r eleased after the boy's g randmother claimed the o fficer was stabbed accident ally while scuffling with h im. Reports said the boy t urned on the officer with t he knife after bringing bott les filled with gasoline to s chool. Officer seriously hurt in middle school attack

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011Page 11B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer .Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun 'N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid C ity" Children's Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, "prime-timers," and Bible s tudies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Children's Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and children's church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Children's & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kid's World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturer's Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Children's Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of God's Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and children's church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Women's Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m. in the sanctuary. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Children's Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on life's journey, you're we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP We've all heard the saying April Showers bring May F lowers." But in sunny F lorida, that's not always the c ase. In fact, we don't usuall y start getting the heavy r ains until summer! Spring t ime may be an extra dry p eriod and we all need to p itch in and save water in e very way possible. With s ummer around the corner a nd visions of swimming p ools filled with glimmering w ater sparkling in the sun a nd sprinklers going full t hrottle soaking our thirsty l awns, it's easy to get carried a way with the wet stuff. But c onservation isn't as tough as y ou might think and just a f ew small steps we can all t ake will make a huge differe nce. After all, April is Water C onservation Month, so let's a ll take the challenge and see h ow much water we can s ave. In this day and age, water c onservation is more import ant than ever. So much so t hat the Legislature has desi gnated April as Water C onservation Month because "this is the time of year when water needs are most acute and temperatures begin to rise." According to South Florida Water Management District, "Floridians consume more than 7.9 billion gallons of fresh water each day, with more than 90 percent of it supplied by underground aquifers. We are experiencing the third driest-dry season since recordkeeping began in 1932, with a rainfall deficit of 8.27 inches as of March's end. Dry conditions are expected to continue." Many experts believe that the Floridan Aquifer, which supplies almost all of our drinking water, is incapable of sustaining the fast paced growth of our state. Conservation is the most cost effective and easiest way to overcome this issue. It is very expensive to use other water sources and bring them up to drinking water standards. There are many ways that we can conserve water and not be inconvenienced. Lowflow showerheads are a great way to start. In fact, the Southwest Florida Water Management District has awarded a grant to the Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District to purchase these devices. They will be given away to citizens who bring in their old high-flow models at events that are forthcoming. These low-flow devices can cut your shower water usage by about two-thirds and you probably won't even notice any difference. Watch your local papers for information about give-a-way days! Another way to conserve water is to capture it. That's right, I did say capture! During a typical rain storm that produces one inch of rain in a 24-hour period, approximately 700 gallons of water will run off your roof. If you have a rain barrel, you could collect that water and use it to water plants, saving plenty of water and money on your utility bill! Rain barrels are inexpensive and no trouble. They just sit there and capture water. You can purchase one at your local County Extension Office located at the Bert J. Harris Agricultural Center in Sebring for a very small amount of money. Now here is an unpopular subject, but we all need to follow the water restrictions! It is estimated that over 50 percent of residential water is used for irrigation purposes. Everyone wants a beautiful, lush, green lawn, but there are ways you can conserve and still have one. Never water between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. This is the hottest part of the day and most of the water will simply evaporate anyway. In the winter months between December and February, the grass is dormant so you don't need to water it as often. Once every two weeks is usually sufficient. When we do get those heavy rains, turn off your sprinkler system! No need for overkill. Make sure your irrigation system is in top shape by having it inspected or checking it out yourself. If a sprinkler is aimed toward the driveway or road, change the position and water the grass instead. If you have a leak or other water wasting issue, get it fixed. Not only will you save water, but your bill will be less. And if you're like me, you don't water your lawn and have the ugliest yard in the neighborhood because you don't want to use up all that precious liquid. There are still ways to save! If you have kids, you know they love to keep that faucet running when they're in the bathroom. Don't allow it; turn the water off when brushing teeth, washing the face and hands. Wet it, turn it off, lather and turn it back on when ready to rinse! Once they get used to it, it will become a good habit! SWFWMD Lawn watering schedule Lawn watering is limit ed to twice per week. Lawn watering days and times are as follows unless your city or county has a different schedule or stricter hours in effect: Even addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Locations without a di scernable address, such as rights-of-way and other com mon areas inside a subdivision, may water on Tuesday and/or Friday before 10 a.m or after 4 p.m. Corine Burgess is the Natural Resources Specialist for the Highlands County Natural Resources Department assisting the Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District (www.highlandsswcd.org). April is Water Conservation Month, so watch your usage News From The Watershed Corine Burgess

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By PAULDERGARABEDIAN For The Associated PressLOS ANGELES U niversal's animated "Hop" h ad a much-better-thane xpected $37.5 million debut l ast weekend at the nation's t heaters and should be the f irst film this year to repeat at t he top of the chart, munchi ng on a gross in the low to m id $20 million range. Russell Brand is the voice o f "Hop's" E.B., the wannabe r ockstar son of the Easter B unny. He could also be the king o f the box office if he mana ges a one-two finish this w eekend as the star of the d ebuting "Arthur." The W arner Bros.'remake of the m assively successful Dudley M oore classic is expected to e arn about $15 million. As the drunken and spoiled r ich kid, Brand is the perfect c hoice to take over the title r ole, and Helen Mirren elev ates the proceedings with a n ew twist on John Gielgud's H obson. Both the family audience a nd comedy fans are theref ore covered this weekend, so "Hanna" from Focus Features will fill the action bill with a take-no-prisoners thriller that features Saoirse Ronan in the title role as a 16-year-old assassin. Channeling the spirit of such female-based action films as "La Femme Nikita" and "The Professional," "Hanna" should draw both men and women to the multiplex with a gross in the low to mid teens. Two more newcomers are expected to round out the top five: Universal's R-rated comedy "Your Highness," and Sony's inspirational "Soul Surfer." Spring has arrived and the park is bursting with life. Gaze into the lush green canopy of the Hammock or come delight o ver wildflowers springing u p in the flatwoods. Spring b irds are abundant now. L ook for swallow-tailed k ites, yellow-billed cuckoos, r ed-headed woodpeckers, g reat crested flycatchers and n orthern parulas. Whitet ailed deer are seen nearly e very day and alligators laze a bout in the swamps. What a wonderful time to v isit the park. It's not too h ot and there's no worry a bout afternoon thunders torms for another six weeks o r so. Come take advantage o f the extra daylight hours. B ring the kids out in the late a fternoon and toss a football o r ride your bikes. Take a c ruise around the Loop D rive's bike path or enjoy t he off-road bicycle trail. Haven't been camping in a w hile? Make a reservation to r elax by the campfire while t he kids enjoy the playg round and make new f riends. This time of year is p erfect-no pesky bugs to b other you and weekdays are q uiet and peaceful. W eekends remain busy until t he end of May. It's also a great time of y ear for enjoying an evening c oncert. Saturday, April 16, B illy Glades performs his F lorida Folk music beginn ing at 7 p.m. Concert ticke ts are just $5 per person a nd accompanied kids age 1 2 and under are admitted f ree of charge. Park admiss ion is waived after 6 p.m. o n concert nights, making t his an affordable evening o ut. Why not camp that w eekend so you can relax all d ay, enjoy the concert and s till have time for smore's b efore bed. If camping's not your t hing, plan a picnic for M other's Day. Park admiss ion is reduced for any famil y bringing "mom" with t hem on Mother's Day. Dad d oesn't need to feel left out b ecause he'll receive the s ame discount on Father's D ay. Pack a picnic or bring a c ooler of BBQ fixings and grill with the family. Don't forget to check out the new Seven Lakes day use area on County Road 635. Admission to this picnic area is included with your regular park admission. The lake front offers a relaxing vista to enjoy during your meal. Tram tours continue to be scheduled at 1 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 1 and 2:30 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays throughout the summer season. Tours offer a chance to enjoy remote areas of the park from the comfort of an open-air tram with a ranger narrating along the way. Alligators, turtles and wading birds are often seen, making this an extremely popular way to enjoy the park. As our snowbirds depart for the north, demand for this popular program decreases and tickets are more widely available. Tickets may be purchased the day of the tram at the Ranger Station beginning at 8 a.m. Adult tickets are just $5 per person and youth tickets (ages 6-12) are $3. Accompanied children age five and under may ride free of charge. Private tours can be scheduled according to staff availability and arrangements may be made by calling the ranger station at 386-6094. With all there is to do, perhaps the simplest thing gets overlooked. Daily park admission is still just $6.00 per vehicle for up to eight people per car. The park offers nine different nature trails to explore and I bet it's been a long time since you've walked some of them. Do you remember the 1,000-year-old tree at the Big Oak Trail? Chances are it looks quite a bit different than you remember. The huge oak on the Hickory Trail with the burned out bottom is still there waiting for you to step inside. Have you seen the Fern Garden Trail now that the historic waterway's been restored? Fern the alligator is back and maybe you'll even see the otters swimming around. Don't forget that you are always welcome to bring your dog out for a walk or borrow a pair of binoculars at the ranger station to see what's out here in "the Real Florida". For more information about the park, contact the Ranger Station at 386-6094 or visit our Web site at www.FloridaStateParks.org/h ighlandshammock. Florida's state parks will be fee-free or discounted on the following days in 2011: Sunday, May 8 Mothers Day 50 percent entry fee for families with mothers* Sunday, June 19 Fathers Day 50 percent entry fee for families with fathers* Sunday, July 17 National Park and Recreation Day Free for all* Sunday, September 11 Literacy Month Free with library card, library book or donation of family-friendly book* Friday, November 11 Veterans Day Free for all* (*Excludes the Skyway Fishing Pier State Park.) Dorothy L. Harris is a Park Services Specialist at Highlands Hammock State Park. Page 12BNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.com CROSSWORDSOLUTION ARTS& LEISURE Save some money, make some memories with a trip to a state park Courtesy photo Highlands Hammock State Park's newest picnic area off of County Road 635 has opened recently on the Seven Lakes property. The Real Florida Dorothy L. Harris Courtesy photo A group of red-bellied turtles sun themselves along the tram tour route at Highlands Hammock State Park. Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID The Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative is excited that pergamano artist Mary Behler has been selected as the Artist of the Month for April. Parchment was invented in Turkey and used throughout Europe for books, maps and other important documents until the 18th century. The Catholic church used parchment to decorate devotional pictures with perforations and lovely elements in relief. Real parchment was expensive and very difficult to find so people started using parchment paper in the 19th century and from the moment parchment paper was introduced, parchment craft began developing into a creative handcraft. Behler has been a pa rt time resident of Lake Plac id for the past 17 years. S he first became acquaint ed with the Caladium Arts an d Crafts Co-op when s he signed up for fabric pain ting classes with Ma ry Gephart, a long-time mem ber and instructor. After 1 4 years, she discover ed pergamano (parchme nt craft). It has become h er passion. It is a unique for m of artwork and Behler us es fabric, flowers and oth er embellishments to make h er creations interesting. You can find her card s, pictures and free standin g art forms on display at t he Caladium Arts and Craf ts Cooperative at 132 E. Interlake Blvd. in La ke Placid. Call 699-5940 or visit the website www.cal adiumarts.org for furth er information. Behler named Co-op Artist of the Month Courtesy pho to The work of pergamano artist Mary Behler is on display at the Caldium Co-op in Lake Placid. NEWS-SUN Box office preview: 'Hop' on top again

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011Page 13B DIVERSIONS THEPLAY'STHETHINGBy DOUG PETERSON ACROSS 1 Cause for fishing hole excitement 5 Gate approx. 8 Fleshy-snouted mammal 13 Fearless Fosdick's creator 19 Airline with a Ben Gurion hub 20 Book flap feature 21 Ridiculous 22 Comfortable shoe 23 *They're educational and stackable 26 Unlearned 27 Long-tailed songbird 28 Shade of green 29 It's done in some circles 31 Sturdy wagon 32 Santa __ winds 33 Actor Estevez 36 "A Taste of Honey" dramatist 38 *Construction set invented by Frank Lloyd Wright's son 41 DMV document 42 Vaquero's plain 46 Arles affirmatives 47 *Street hockey gear 50 Port-du-__: French cheese 53 Script section 55 Word between surnames 56 PBS series since 1974 57 City SSW of Moscow 58 Breezy good-byes 60 QB's try 62 First name among disrespected comedians? 64 Pollution-free power sources 66 Links highlight 67 Itty-bitty, in Inverness 68 Rochester, N.Y., institution whose inductees include the eight answers to the starred clues 75 Jenny, e.g. 76 "Reliable Sources" airer 77 Picnic favorite 78 Tiny bit 82 Tool used in a bed 83 Swedish imports 84 Winged goddess 85 War of 1812 shipbuilding port 86 Half a dance 88 "Gone With the Wind" Oscar winner 90 Dramatist Chekhov 91 *Shipping container 94 "How __ refuse?" 96 Hardly posh 97 '80s missile shield prog. 98 *Dual-knobbed drawing device 104 Home of ChichŽn Itz‡ 107 Hullabaloo 108 "Bingo!" 109 Crime lab item 112 Not spontaneous 114 Come up short 115 "King Lear" daughter 117 Ripped to pieces 119 *Kindergartner's boxful 122 Mystical secrets 123 "True Grit," for one 124 20th-century composer Harris 125 Logical connector 126 1943 Allied conference site 127 Campout treat 128 34th pres. 129 Look to be DOWN 1 "Little help here, bud?" 2 "Fighting" team 3 __ Zee Bridge 4 Pre-coll. catchall 5 Flow's counterpart 6 Ascot fasteners 7 "I'm listening!" 8 Up to, in brief 9 "__ Amours": 1984 CŽsar Award-winning film 10 Walked worriedly 11 Bygone writing aid 12 Able to overcome adversity 13 Bring into harmony 14 Contemporary of Boris 15 *Board game with color-coded cards 16 Where some worship from 17 Anti-leather gp. 18 Zebras, to lions 24 Did lunch, say 25 Scott of "Happy Days" 30 Iridescent jewelry material 34 1,051, to Hadrian 35 Fiends of fantasy 37 Buckskin source 39 "What else __ do?" 40 Elroy, to George Jetson 43 Oodles 44 Snow in Milano 45 Anthem beginning 48 Percolate 49 Sunday deliveries 50 Planted 51 "Turandot" highlight 52 Period of sacrifice 53 O.T. prophet 54 Bulk-purchase club 58 1988 A.L. MVP 59 Funds for later yrs. 61 Leaves home? 63 Bozos 65 Newborn Arabian 66 Objectivism advocate Rand 67 Healthy portion 69 Spaghetti pkg. unit 70 Remini of "The King of Queens" 71 Author Flagg 72 Hit the ground 73 Speedy shark 74 Idyllic setting 78 Gumshoes 79 "Dies __" 80 Flag 81 *Cuddly bedmate 82 Crunchy Mexican munchies 83 NBA's __ Man of the Year Award 87 Tackles 89 Classified letters 90 Capital south of the Black Sea 92 Mitt Romney's alma mater: Abbr. 93 Family tree, e.g. 94 Peninsula north of Martha's Vineyard 95 Silent communication syst. 99 "Groovy!" 100 Three Stooges family name 101 First non-European literature Nobelist (1913) 102 Meter feeder's need 103 Quaint carriage 105 It covers D.C. 106 "Groovy!" 109 Fan's factoid 110 Modeled 111 Raise, as an eyebrow 113 Tannery worker 116 Checks out 118 Uruguayan article 120 Stuff in a seam 121 Sourdough alternative Solution on page 12B DearAbby: I am currently d eployed in Afghanistan. My best f riend's little sister, "Brittany," has h ad a crush on me for years. She h as been straightforward about what s he wants marriage, kids, white p icket fence, etc. She has always b een like a little sister, so it has b een awkward. I thought it was w eird for a 15-year-old (at the time) t o say that to an older soldier on R &R. During my deployment Brittany h as sent me care packages loaded w ith cookies. Maybe I should have k ept my mouth shut about my w eakness for homemade cookies, b ut hindsight is 20/20. Brittany has n ow called in the bribe by inviting m e to her senior prom. Not wanting t o mess with the steady supply of b aked goods, I said yes. I figure it's a n appropriate way to say thanks for t he cookies. I intend to make sure Brittany enjoys her prom with her medalcovered arm candy, but I need to let her know that while I'm flattered she thinks so highly of me, I'm not interested in dating her. I love her like a sister. I don't want to break her heart. Any suggestions for a guy who's about as subtle as a tank rolling down a cobblestone road on a Sunday? Medal-Covered Eye Candy DearEye Candy: How long has it been since you've seen Brittany? When you return for that prom, she will no longer be that precocious 15-year-old you remember. By all means show her a nice evening. But don't say anything you might regret or you may have to eat your words instead of those cookies. If you're not romantically interested, you'll date other women and Brittany will catch on soon enough. And you may find that after her glamorous evening with her medal-covered war hero, she sets her sights on someone other than you. Stranger things have happened. DearAbby: Spring is here, and with it comes the wedding season. Would you please inform your readers about the importance of answering wedding RSVPs? Alot of people appear to need reminding about the need to respond. Thanks! Mother of a Bride and Groom DearMother: I'm glad to oblige and congratulations on the double blessing that's coming your way in gaining both a daughter and a son! Readers: When a formal invitation is received, you should immediately return the RSVPcard that's enclosed with it. RSVPis the abbreviation for the French phrase "Repondez s'il vous plait," which means "Please reply." It's important for the people planning the affair to know how many guests will attend so they can be properly provided for for obvious reasons. So please be polite and don't keep them wondering. DearAbby: I'm in love with a woman named "Camille" who has three children from three different fathers. She has never been married. She also has a male "friend" whom she has her children calling "Daddy" even though he's not. I have loved Camille for 20 years, and our paths recently crossed again. When I first meet her, she had only one child. Camille says she loves me and wants us to be married, but I'm having a hard time accepting that a ll of these children's fathers will be part of our life as well as the "friend." Can a psychologist help me get past this? Devoted in Bloomingto n, Min n. DearDevoted: I don't know. B ut before you take this relationship further, you should DEFINITELY see one. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Soldier going to senior prom practices back off boogaloo' Violence knocks at our d oors through the nightly n ews; television programs a nd movies; video and comp uter games; music; newspap er headlines, and, for some, t he actual living of it. Whether we want to a ccept it or not, evil exists a nd manifests itself through p eople's selfish and tainted m otives that are the evidence o f sin. We don't use the word sin v ery often. It seems archaic t o us. But ignoring it doesn't c hange the facts. Sin has disi ntegrated the world we live i n and how we think and act. A nd that is why we need to a cknowledge that we can't m anage on our own; but, n eed a Savior. When man first sinned in t he Garden of Eden by heedi ng the devil's question, Did God really say?" he m entally doubted God and g ave into the temptation to b e in control overruling what h e knew to be true. Sin i nstantly gripped man's soul i n that act of disobedience. But, God, in his great mercy, still longing for a relationship with his creation, made a way of escape. In due time, God took on human form through Jesus and gave himself as a ransom for our sin. By so doing, he bridged the gap that sin had created. But, it's still our choice to receive his free gift. Once we come into relationship with God again, things change for us. Though we remain in this sin tainted world, we are not of it. And God gives us peace with him and peace within ourselves even when things seem out of control. That's why it is so important to teach our children to know and love God. The more we speak of him and praise him, the more likely it is that they, too, will want a relationship with him. They will want what they see we have. The school of thought that children should be free to find their own way has proven as false as it was at the outset. Children need loving discipline, guidelines and direction. And they look to us to give it to them. They mature and develop best within parameters that ensure safety, love and freedom. Once again, we see the truth of this as we go back to God's word in Isaiah 54:13, NKJV, where we are reminded, "All your children shall be taught by the Lord, and great shall be the peace of your children." What a wonderful promise. Do we want our children to have God's peace within and be children of peace? Help them be taught of the Lord. Selah Jan Merop of Sebring is a NewsSun correspondent and an award-winning writer. Teaching children the way of peace Pause And Consider Jan Merop Dear Abby Metro ServicesAries (March 21-April 20) Aries, it's hard to concentrate this week but you have to try to devote your attention to the task at hand. Avoid distractions and focus on the job that needs to be done. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Taurus, you're itching for a change but you don't know whether it should be a career change or a change in location. Think it over a little more. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Gemini, a cloud of uncertainty is looming over an important relationship. There's no surefire way to know if this person is a keeper. You can only hang in there. Cancer(June 22-July 22) Cancer, just when you thought you had your mind made up something changes your entire line of thinking. Embrace this new line of thought. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Leo, return to your comfort zone to ease some nerves and concerns. Take a calm, methodical approach to life this week and reap the rewards. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Virgo, take some time to yourself the next few days because the coming days figure to be hectic. It's time to start thinking about a vacation. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Libra, opportunities to further your education present themselves in the coming days. Think about these opportunities carefully before making any decisions. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 2 2) Scorpio, until you sett le down, expect your finances to be in a bit of disarray. It m ay be good to sit down with a planner and work through t he bigger issues. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-De c. 21) Unless you open up to others, you won't be makin g many friends this week. T ry to explore other opportuniti es for socialization, Sagittariu s. It could get lonely. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Ja n. 20) There's more to yo u than you let others se e, Capricorn. Sometimes lea ving a little mystery can be a good thing. But don't let it g et in the way of relationships. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Fe b. 18) Don't hold out on som eone who has been counting o n you, Aquarius. When yo u look at your schedule, yo u will find you have time to fit everything in. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 2 0) You may have to do a litt le damage control, Pisces. Th is week simply swallow yo ur pride and get things done. Famous birthdaysApril 10 Mandy Moor e, singer, 27; April 11 Jo ss Stone, singer, 24; April 12 Claire Danes, actress, 3 2; April 13 Rick Schrode r, actor, 41; April 14 Adri en Brody, actor, 38; April 15 Seth Rogen, actor, 29; Ap ril 16 Ellen Barkin, actress, 5 6. You may have to do a little damage control this week, Pisces Horoscope

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LIVING 14B PAGE News-Sun Sunday, April 10, 2011 FAMILYFEATURES I t seems as if parents spend a lot of time trying to get their kids to clean up or, better yet, to not make a mess in the first place. But guess what? Getting messy can actually be good for kids. Clinical research shows that creative, messy activities like c ooking and baking engage all of a child's senses, helping t hem explore new ideas and teaching them how to solve probl ems. It a lso provides valuable time together, as well as an opportunity t o teach basic math skills, cleaning habits and nutrition. "To unlock a child's fullest potential, cooking activities, even a s simple as pouring and mixing, are recommended at least t hree to four times a week," said Karen Deerwester, child d evelopment expert and founder of Family Time, Inc. According to Deerwester, children shape their own learning b y transforming unpredictable, messy experiences into crea tive, purposeful action. "These mess-to-morsel experiences t each children a critical life skill called executive function," s he said, "which is a child's ability to self-manage behavior a nd negotiate age-appropriate challenges and obstacles. F urthermore, these types of activities teach kids to take risks, l earn from mistakes and create out-of-the-box solutions." Children learn through play, so Deerwester encourages pare nts t o cook up a mess with their children on a regular basis. These t ips and ideas will help you create a powerful and fun l earning experience for your child. For more information and ideas for messy play activities, v isit www.facebook.com/clorox.Photo courtesy of Getty Images Photo courtesy of Getty ImagesCreativemessycookingisgoodforkids HowtocookupamesswithkidsnBaking and basic food assembly is the easiest way to branch into messy culinary play. Cut up fruits and vegetables to make fun faces, or simply mix together homemade dough to play with and shape. (See recipes.)nAge is just a number! Allow even the youngest chef to help by pouring ingredients like flour, sugar and eggs into a bowl.nStart simple. No-bake cookies, smoothies and sandwiches are a great start. If using a cookbook, start with one that has pictures for each instruction.nPour on the praise! No matter the outcome, always encourage their effort. Remember, practice makes perfect. nSpills happen. Take it in stride and simply use the opportunity to teach clean-up. Clean applicable surfaces with Clorox Clean-Up Cleaner with Bleach, especially after using eggs or raw meat. Get started on some creative kitchen play with these homemade play doughs and fun toast art. Love ToastToast is for more than just eating. White bread is an excellent canvas for making mealtime extra special. Simply paint bread with milk mixed with food coloring and then toast. For some extra fun, cut toast into a special shape using a seasonal cookie cutter. For a fruity flavor twist, create paint out of water and flavored powdered gelatin mix.Best Play Dough Ever2 cups flour 1 cup salt 1 teaspoon cream of tartar 2 tablespoons oil 1 teaspoon food coloring 2 cups water Mix ingredients in saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly until dough leaves sides of the pan. Remove from pan. When cool to the touch, knead for a few minutes. Play dough can be stored in the refrigerator for weeks in an airtight container.Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough*1 cup peanut butter 1 cup powdered milk 1/4 cup honey Optional texture items: raisins, coconut, crushed graham crackers Mix the first three ingredients in a large bowl until smooth. Add optional texture items. *Not forchildren with peanut allergies.Chocolate Play Dough1 1/4 cup flour 1/2 cup cocoa powder 1/2 cup salt 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar 1 1/2 tablespoons cooking oil 1 cup boiling water Combine flour, cocoa powder, salt, and cream of tartar. Add cooking oil and boiling water. Stir quickly and mix well. Cook over low heat until dough forms a ball. When cool, knead with hands. Refrigerate and store in an airtight container. Smells great, but is not really sweet enough to eat.



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News-Sun photo by SAMANTH A GHOLA R Fred Wild fourth grade instructor, Erica Ashley, assists herstudent Jasmin Mitchell as she tries to locate a simile in herFCAT NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, April 10, 2011 www.newssun.com Volume 92/Number 42 | 75 cents www.newssun.com HighLow 90 67Complete Forecast PAGE 10A Mostly sunny and very warm Forecast Question: Have you seen signs that the local economy is improving? Next question: Should teachers have continuing contracts? www.newssun.comMake your voice heard at Online Online Obituaries Alana Hathaway Heflin Age 94, of Lake Placid Obituaries, Page 5A Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453 Online: www.newssun.com Yes 17% No 83% 099099401007 Total votes: 106 Arts 12B Business 9A Chalk Talk 8B Classifieds 11A Community Briefs2A Community Calendar5B Crossword Puzzle13B Dear Abby 13B Editorial & Opinion4A Lottery Numbers2A Movie Times 13B School Menus 8B Senior Scene 6B Sports On TV 2B Index PAGE14B Creative messy cooking is good for kids Teachers dismayed over merit pay, tenure changes News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Steve Picklesimer, a teacher at Sebring High School who is also the districts union president, shares a laugh with his students. Pickelseimer said the passage of SB 736 creates major problems for his fellow teachers. By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING The decision has been made. Floridas legislature has joined with Governor Rick Scott and passed Senate Bill 736, which does away with extended teacher contracts and predicates pay on standardized student test scores. Teacher tenure will disappear. Teachers whose students do well on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test will be eligible for merit pay. One of the primary arguments used by the politicians in favor of the bill is the difficulty administrators have in removing incompetent tenured teachers, and the need to reward quality teachers. Steven Picklesimer teaches science at Sebring High School. He has taught for 26 years, still loves the challenge of the classroom, and currently serves as president of the Highlands County Education Association, which represents teachers in the district. He sat down for an interview with the News-Sun recently to discuss these ideas from the point of We dont want to railroad teachers out In my opinion, this is very dangerous legislation that would have serious unintended circumstances.DR. NORM STEPHENS SFCC president By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comAVON PARK Dr. Norm Stephens, president of South Florida Community College, was at a loss Tuesday afternoon to explain Florida House Bill 7193. The bill passed out of the K-12 Competitiveness Subcom-mittee on March 29, and onto the Education Committee. The bill, sponsored by Erik Fresen (RMiami), came out of the blue, said Stephens. It calls for the removal of tenure and the end of continuing contracts for faculty members working within the Florida College System meaning those at community colleges or community colleges that have expanded with baccalaureate programs. Stephens said he had read in some media accounts that Fresen proposed the bill at the urging of community college presidents who want to change the tenure system. Shaking his head, however, he said hed never heard any such concerns. In a letter to the Highlands County legislative delegation, Stephens wrote, The Council of Presidents of the Florida College System has not discussed this bill or the notion of the elimination of tenure in our system, nor Community college faculties are also under fire over continuing contracts See TEACHERS, page 8A See COLLEGE, page 8A By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK When gover nments run short on money, there h as to be cuts in services. But som etimes, those cuts hit a little close to home. While firemen and school teac hers wrangle with Gov. Rick Sco tt over pensions and budget cuts, an d state legislators take off time to attend sporting events, in Highlan ds County, five women each o ne with disabilities are strugglin g with the latest round of state cu tbacks. Struggling to just find a place to call home. Something everyo ne should have. The Ridge Area Arc was notifi ed on April 1 that it was losing $30,00 0 per month in state revenue, effecti ve Arc consumers face uncertain future due to budget cutsFCAT starts MondayTeachers work hard to get students ready PAGE2AReal FloridaState parks ready for spring PAGE12BNative son gets nodLaVaar Scott named Sebring football coach PAGE1BFatal crash S ebring man dies w hen tanker truck hits tree PAGE2A News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Highlands County Crime Scene Technician Cathy Perez (left) enters Heartland National Bank on US Highway 27 North on Friday afternoon following a robbery. By SAMANTHAGHOLAR and ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING Highlands County Sheriffs Deputies responded to a bank robbery on Friday afternoon and Heartland National bank, and the suspect is still at large. HCSO Public Information Officer Nell Hayes confirmed that a single person fled on foot around 1:20 with an undisclosed amount of money and headed south from the bank. According to initial reports, a black male demanded money at the bank at 6011 U.S. 27 North, claiming he had a gun, and then fled south towards Tanglewood Drive. The suspect was wearing all black and had a black bandanna around his head. Hayes would not confirm lat er on Friday that the suspect w as black or white or Hispanic, but d id state that no one was injured. His face was covered in t he video, as was his hands, so we ca nnot confirm his race yet. We d o have leads and are working o n those, Hayes said. Man robs bank in Sebring See BANK, page 6A See ARC, page 6A By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comLAKE PLACID Two men we re killed Thursday when a 300,000-ga llon water tank burst and sent a floo d through a nearby building whe re they were working, according to t he Highlands County Sheriffs Office The Occupational Safety an d Health Administration (OSHA), w as on site investigating the 300,00 0gallon water tank on Friday, accor ding to Nell Hayes, public inform ation officer for the Highlan ds County Sheriffs Office. I can confirm that OSHAwas o ut there, but the ME (medical exami ner) report is not in yet on the tw o victims, Hayes said on Saturday. Eric Torres, Director of Marketin g for United Fire Protection stated in a 2 killed when LP water tank collapses See WATER, page 6A

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By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Monday marks the first day of the two-week-long FCATtesting period and students have been studying hard the past few weeks. Its a long process, said Fred Wild Assistant Principal Harvey Wilder. The test is 70 minutes long. The students go for 40 minutes have a break then finish up. They just started giving the long breaks and it helps. Wilder is confident that the students will be wellprepared for the test this year. Weve been preparing them and they are ready. All thats left to do is wait for Monday. We send out a ConnectEd phone call on Sunday night just reminding the parents. The kids should get to bed early, get plenty of sleep and be here on Monday on time, said Wilder. Students who are late during the FCATare not allowed to enter classrooms as it disrupts classmates. If theyre late they have to sit in the office and do the retake, which is just more stress, so we want everyone to be on time and be prepared, Wilder said. Erica Ashley, a fourthgrade instructor at Fred Wild, was busy reviewing similes on Friday morning. Ashley is one of many elementary instructors who were putting in the lastminute effort to get students ready for the test. Ashleys class was fully engaged in the review and were eager to answer questions and participate. Hands were flying up from almost every student when Ashley asked her class who could identify the simile in the paragraph. The students then all got up from their chairs and walked to a part of the room where the letters A, B, C, D were hung above their heads. This gets them involved. They get to move around and it keeps the information fresh in their heads. They arent just sitting down answering questions, they are participating, explained Ashley. This is my first time teaching fourth grade so this is my first time preparing for the FCAT, but Ive had a lot of help. The team of teachers I work with. Mrs. Kirby, Mrs. Tomblin, and Mrs. Eisinger have helped me tremendously. We bounce and share ideas with one another, Ashley said. The students reading guides that are titled Buckle Down and are not the traditional FCATprep guides, but Ashley knows that more and different material couldnt hurt the students. These arent the official FCATguides but they are very similar. They are in the same format as the FCAT and it just helps to have something else to enrich what we already use, Ashley said. Ashley is confident that her students will excel on the FCATthis year. We are a Cschool so there is a lot of pressure on us and on them, but I know they have everything they need to rock this test, Ashley said. The enthusiasm comes from the classes motto which the students recite daily both at school and in their home. Jasmin Mitchell was happy to say it out loud for her teacher: Success depends on your attitude, Mitchell said confidently. The rest of the class echoed the statement. Ashley was pleased. All right guys, now, lets get back to work, she said. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.com April 6 21521222445x:5Next jackpot $7 millionApril 2 82134353740x:4 March 30 3910203152x:3 April 8 16283034 April 7 913202934 April 6 324293435 April 5 412263336 April 8 (n) 1791 April 8 (d) 8283 April 7 (n) 2566 April 7 (d) 5175 April 8(n) 61 5 April 8 (d) 19 0 April 7 (n) 38 9 April 7(d) 13 1 April 8 112436379 April 5 213212418 April 1 723323617 March 29 2726319 April 6 1018415556 PB: 15 PP: 2Next jackpot $20 millionApril 2 622344345 PB: 23 PP: 2 March 30 1920425658 PB: 37 PP: 4 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comZOLFO SPRINGS A Sebring man was killed Wednesday when his tanker truck struck a tree. According to a report from the Florida Highway Patrol, Robert Lee Eldridge, 54, was traveling eastbound on State Road 66 west of Whistler Woods Way when his 2008 International Tanker left the road onto the north shoulder after crossing the center line. The tanker truck continued onto the north should er until it struck a large o ak tree but still continued fo rward for some distan ce finally facing east. Although the incide nt happened around 7:40 p.m on Wednesday, Eldrid ge and his truck were n ot located until 7:53 a.m Thursday morning. The report prepared b y Trooper Patrick J. Rober ts stated that Eldridge was n ot wearing his seat belt an d alcohol was not a factor. Sebring man killed in tanker accident near Zolfo Springs News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Fourth-grade instructor Erica Ashley reviews reading material with her Fred Wild Elementary class in preparation for the FCAT. Ashley has been using different techniques to engage the students and boost their confidence for the exam, which starts Monday. Preparation time is over; FCAT starts Monday The kids should get to bed early, get plenty of sleep and be here on Monday on time.HARVEYWILDER Fred Wild Elementary assistant principal Special to the News-SunFor the second consecutive year, more than 800 McDonalds restaurants across the state of Florida will provide a free breakfast to students on the first day of the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). Local students in grades 3 through 11 will receive a complimentary Egg McMuffin, Apple Dippers and a low-fat milk or orange juice at any participating McDonalds location on Monday between 6 and 9 a.m. Whether students eat at home, at their school or at McDonalds, its important to have a well-balanced breakfast every morning said Cindy Goody, PhD, the Senior Director of Nutrition for McDonalds USA. Dr. Goody, a registered and licensed dietitian, says a wholesome breakfast that includes food groups like fruit, whole grains and lowfat milk or lean protein helps children meet daily nutritional needs, while providing much-needed energy to start the day. As local business leaders and parents themselves, McDonalds 120 Florida franchise owners are committed to contributing to the well-being of children in their communities. In 2010, more than 190,000 students across the state including over 40,000 in the greater Tampa Bay area alone enjoyed a free McDonalds breakfast before the FCAT. If parents are unable to bring their children to McDonalds, many local schools also serve free breakfast throughout the week of testing. For more information, parents are encouraged to check with their school. The breakfast offer is available in-store at participating McDonalds restaurants in Florida on Monday. No substitutions or group redemptions are permitted. Students under the age of 15 must be present and accompanied by a parent. McDonalds offers students free breakfast before FCAT The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Thursday, April 7: Danielle Theresa Abel, 37, of Orlando, was charged with violation of probation reference driving with license suspended or revoked. Joshua Alan Baker, 26, of Sebring, was charged with withholding support of children or spouse. Benjamin Michael Benchina, 19, of Sebring, was charged with possession and or use of drug equipment. Teresa Byrd, 54, of Miami, was charged with fraud/insufficient funds. Norris John Deveaux, 20, of Lake Placid, was charged with failure to appear reference no motor vehicle registration. Rony Rodeli FuentesVasquez, 20, of Avon Park, was charged with violation of a municipal ordinance. Jessica Lane Gavagni, 26, of Lake Placid, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference resisting/obstructing an officer without violence, and battery. Justin Michael Hamilton, 23, of Sebring, was charged with two counts of petit theft. James Royce Hicks, 40, of Lorida, was charged with DUI. Nathaniel Jay Hutchison, 25, of Lake Placid, was charged with battery. Audrey Jean McIver, 40, of Frostproof, was charged with three counts of failure to appear reference possession of cocaine, use or possession of drug paraphernalia and nonsupport. Qweleco Janvontay McKeithan, 28, of Lake Placid, was charged with possession of marijuana. Drew McNeil Moon, 44, was charged with violation of probation reference aggravated battery with a deadly weapon. Robin Wright Smothers, 46, of Wauchula, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference battery on a law enforcement officer and resisting an officer without violence. Samantha Jo Whitehead, 22, of Avon Park, was charged with DUI, hit and run, and DUI and damage property. POLICEBLOTTER LP Historical Society launches new Web siteLAKE PLACID The L ake Placid Historical S ociety has now officiall y entered the Internet a ge by hosting an impress ive multipage Web site. T he Web site has been an o ngoing project and prim ary goal of museum d irector Kay Tarr. The s ite was created by prof essional designer Laurie G reenly, the daughter of d evoted and loyal memb er Johny Zadek. The site features the D epot Museum collection h ighlights, a history of t he museum, a special p age devoted to Melvil D ewey, Web site links of l ocal interest, and a listi ng of Lake Placid events t o help visitors plan their v isit. Watch for new feat ures to be added in the f uture as well as ongoing c hanges to the societys e vents calendar. Find the site at w ww.lphsdepotmuseum.o r g. For further informat ion, call the Depot M useum at 465-1771. Noel to speak at LP Chamber lunchLAKE PLACID M ichael Noel, Thrivent F inancial for Lutherans w ill be the featured s peaker at the April G reater Lake Placid C hamber of Commerce m embership luncheon. T he luncheon is spons ored by Indigo Builders o f Lake Placid, Inc. The luncheon will be h eld at noon Wednesday a t the Lake Placid Elks L odge. Cost is $8 per p erson. Noel will present an i nformative overview of t he features and benefits o ffered by Thrivent F inancial Services for L utherans. As a chamber d irector, he will also c over What Your C hamber Can Do For Y ou. RSVPthe chamber by 5 p.m. Monday. Menu s election is vegetable l asagna. For further i nformation, contact the c hamber at 465-4331 or c hamber@lpfla.com.Homeowners A ssociation meets MondaySEBRING The H ighlands County H omeowners Association w ill meet from 9-11 a.m. M onday at the Sebring C ountry Estates Club H ouse, 3240 Grand Prix A ve. The meeting is open t o the public. Free coffee, h ot tea and donuts are p rovided. Dr. Reed Bowman, a ssociate research biolog ist and director of the A vian Ecology program a t the Archbold B iological Station, will p resent an updated o verview of the developi ng Highlands County M ulti-Species Scrub H abitat Conservation P lan and explain why p eople must prepare and i mplement it for future g enerations. Highlands C ounty is home to many r are and endangered s pecies unique to the L ake Wales Ridge. The M SHCPwill develop s pecies lists; create scrub h abitat mapping and a r eserve design that will p rotect scrub and its h abitat. Corine Burgess, envir onmental specialist with t he Highlands County P arks and Natural COMMUNITYBRIEFS Continued on page 5A

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011Page 3A By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Hundreds of s tudents, instructors, and dign itaries came together T hursday for the I nternational Baccalaureate B anquet. The IB program is the b rainchild of a handful of a dministrators and instruct ors and has already made an i mpact on Highlands County s tudents after only its second y ear. The program is a magnet p rogram that provides coll ege-bound students an even d eeper motivation to excel b efore stepping foot on a coll ege campus. The rigorous l iberal arts curriculum takes p lace over the four-year high s chool career providing two p hases for students to demons trate their academic excell ence. Students apply for the IB program in the eighth grade and upon acceptance in ninth grade, students begin taking baccalaureate preparation classes in the core subjects through 10th grade. As students enter their last two years of high school, they become IB program diploma hopefuls. The six higher-level subjects range from a second language to experimental math and sciences. An independent research paper (4,000 words) along with 150 hours of participation in the Creativity, Action and Service activities are also required for graduation with an IB diploma. Guests of the banquet were continually impressed with the high level at which these students are learning. I cant even read the title of some of these thesis, said IB Coordinator Jo Anna Cochlin. She wasnt alone. Many guests were in awe of the impressive research the students are doing. One of the 20 juniors enrolled in the IB program is Justin Smith. Smith is the 2010-2011 Sunshine State Scholar, president of Students Against Tobacco, a National Honor Society member, a member of the student government, an alto saxophone player and a bag boy at Publix. Smith addressed the crowded room, sharing his thoughts about what the IB program means to him as a student and what he is taking from the experience. It is a lot of work, but I know it will pay off one day. Im involved in so many different things and by doing these things I have already become an active member of this community. Im not just learning things, I am helping others too, said Smith. The class of 2012 will hand out 20 IB diplomas. The class of 2013 will hand out 21 IB diplomas. There are 19 freshmen who will receive IB diplomas in 2014 and the most astounding figure is the class of 2015, when there will be 43 IB students. The IB program has grown immensely in the last year, raising more than $93,000 in only its first two years. The IB Banquet silent auction alone raised $4,680 on Thursday evening. For more information about the IB program contact IB Coordinator Jo Anna Cochlin at 471-5500. Guests enjoy 2nd annual IB Banquet News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Guests at the 2nd annual IB Benefit Banquet place their bids during the silent auction portion of the banquet on T hursday evening. Guests were able to bid on various prizes w ith the proceeds going to the IB program. News Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR 11th grade IB student and the 2010-2011 Sunshine State Scholar, Justin Smith, addresses the crowd at the 2nd annual IB Benefit Banquet. Smith is one of 20 juniors that are currently enrolled in the program. By JIM KUHNHENN Associated PressWASHINGTON A last-minute budget deal forged amid bluster and tough bargaining averted an embarrassing federal shutdown, cut billions in spending and provided the first major test of the divided government that voters ushered in five months ago. Working late into Friday night, congressional and White House negotiators finally agreed on a plan to pay for government operations through the end of September while trimming $38.5 billion in spending. Lawmakers then approved a measure to keep the government running for a few more days while the details of the new spending plan are written into legislation. Actual approval of the deal is expected in the middle of next week. Americans of different beliefs came together again, President Barack Obama said from the White House Blue Room, a setting chosen to offer a clear view of the Washington Monument over his right shoulder. The agreement was negotiated by Obama, House Speaker John Boehner, ROhio, and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev. The administration was poised to shutter federal services, from national parks to tax-season help centers, and to send furlough notices to hundreds of thousands of federal workers. All sides insisted they wanted to avoid that ou tcome, which at tim es seemed inevitable. Shortly after midnigh t, White House budget dire ctor Jacob Lew issued a memo instructing depar tments and agencies to co ntinue normal operations. Boehner said the de al came after a lot of discu ssion and a long fight. H e won an ovation from h is rank and file, including t he new tea party adheren ts whose victories la st November shifted contr ol of the House to the GOP. Reid declared the de al historic. The deal marked the en d of a three-way clash of wills. It also set the tone f or coming confrontations ov er raising the government s borrowing limit, the spen ding plan for the budget ye ar that begins Oct. 1 and lon gterm deficit reduction. In the end, all sid es claimed victory. For Republicans, it w as the sheer size of the spen ding cuts. For Obama an d Reid, it was casting asi de GOPpolicy initiatives th at would have blocked env ironmental rules an d changed a program that pr ovides family planning ser vices. Not all policy provisio ns were struck. One in the final de al would ban the use of fede ral or local governme nt funds to pay for abortions in the District of Columbia. A program dear to Boehn er that lets District of Columbia students use fe dFederal shutdown avoided, 2012 budget fight looms See BUDGET, page 8A

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Page 4ANews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.comTODAYSEDITORIALTODAYSLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION Bills that would give the s tates largest electric compan ies incentives to essentially m onopolize the renewable e nergy market are on the m ove. Lawmakers are e mbracing legislation that is a gift to the utilities, leaving i t to the companies to make d ecisions on their renewable e nergy commitments while m aking it harder for the little g uy to enter the field. Twenty-nine states and the D istrict of Columbia have set t argets for production of r enewable energy, such as s olar, wind and biomass. Not F lorida. Other states have e xpanded opportunities for c ompetition by directing p ublic utilities to buy cons umer-generated energy at a c ompetitive price. Not F lorida. As a result, there is l ittle incentive for big-box r etailers to invite solar energy companies to install rooftop solar panels and sell the energy. If Florida got its rules right, it could drive private investment in clean energy technology to the state, even as it encouraged public utilities to expand their renewable energy portfolio. But the states lawmakers are too beholden to the monopolistic utilities to listen. Since 2009, Florida Power & Light and its affiliates have spent at least $4 million on campaign contributions to legislators and candidates for governor. The utility gave more than $1 million to the Republican Party. This has spawned predicable political games. For example, a fleeting attempt in the Senate to include a provision that would open the market to renewable energy competitors was quickly squashed by Senate leaders when FP&Lexpressed strong opposition. Sen. Lizbeth Benacquisto, R-Wellington, chairwoman of the Senate Committee on Communications, Energy and Public Utilities, said including the provision initially was a technical glitch a Tallahassee euphemism for upsetting a major campaign contributor. ... Asking ratepayers to pay a little more for a major expansion of renewable energy is appropriate when there are guaranteed targets and a competitive pricing schedule for all such energy producers. But nothing like that is likely to come from a Legislature addicted to the big campaign dollars doled out by public utilities. Thats something to remember come the next election. An editorial from the St. Petersburg Times. Another viewpoint M arket forces and competition are favorite conservative watchwords, except when it comes to p ublic utilities. By the time you read this, our government may be undergoing a partial shutdown. I thought seriously about devoting this weeks column to the situation. It was tempting, especially since it is the top news story all over the place. I decided not to write that particular column for a couple of reasons. One is Im pretty fed up with everyone involved in the budget process. Everyone is quick to pass the blame on this one, but from where I stand there is enough blame for everyone to share a piece of it. While anger can fuel good columns, I am really not in the mood to spend a few hundred words excoriating a good number of our elected officials. Another reason is that the whole topic is depressing. Our government is spending more money then it has, we dont have a budget at the moment, and instead of doing something about this its business as usual. Thats enough to dim the cheeriest spirit. So instead of writing that particular column, I have taken a deep breath and went online surfing one of my favorite topics stupid criminal stories. No, were not still talking about elected officials. Were talking about people who break the law, but do it in a way that makes one question their IQ. Stories like these are encouraging to me, because its comforting to think I am smarter than many of this nations criminals. For example, there is a story I found on this is a real website www.dumbcriminals.com. There was a man in Oregon who allegedly broke into a house to rob it. Well, it was apparently dirty work, because while he was there he chose to take a shower. While he was cleaning himself up, the family returned home. This upset the criminal in our tale. According to the story, he was concerned that the family might have a gun on them. So, he called the police. Seriously. The police wisely arreste d the robber instead of the family. The man is charged with first-degree criminal trespass. No word on if he left the shower running. Our next story can be found at www.journalstar.com. It involves apartment laundro mats, quarters and a vacuum cleaner. You see, several Lincoln apartment complex laundry rooms discovered that some one was stealing the quarte rs out of the machines. They apparently didnt know who or how it was being done, s o one owner installed a came ra in an attempt to solve the mystery. Images from the camera taken on March 4 show a man entering the laundry room with a bike and a bac kpack. He removed a vacuum cleaner from the backpack. After prying open the coin tray, the video shows him suctioning out the quarters from the machine. The photos were released to the public, and several tips led the police to Willia m Logan Jr., who has prior convictions for theft and w as cited on suspicion of misde meanor theft. The vacuum cleaner was not found with Logan, and is apparently still out there somewhere, hopefully not graduating to vending machines. If you know where its located, you mig ht urge it to give itself up before a tragedy occurs. Like I said, I enjoy storie s like these. Do you have a favorite stupid criminal story? Send it to me at bookwormlady@embarqmail.com. The really good ones will be put in a future column with credit (or blame) going to you. If nothing else, stories lik e these might make you smil e. Given whats going on in Washington, DC, thats not a bad thing. Laura Ware is a Sebring re sident. She can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady @ embarqmail.com Strange and criminal Lauras Look Laura Ware EDITORIALPAGEPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. We have to make room for everybody. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 3851954; or e-maileditor@newssun.com. To make sure the editorial pages arent dominated by the same writers, letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months. Language of Ashdod E ditor: When Nehemiah returned to J erusalem (Nehemiah 13:6), he f ound a mess a spiritual mess, t hat is and he went to work immed iately to correct the problems. O ne of the problems is stated in v erses 23 and 24: In those days I a lso saw Jews who had married w omen of Ashdod, Ammon and M oab, and half of their children s poke the language of Ashdod and c ould not speak the language of J udah, but spoke according to the l anguage of one or the other peop le. They had been warned of this d anger many, many years ago by G od through Moses in Exodus 3 4:16 and Deuteronomy 7:3,4. This unholy alliance/defection ( v. 23) led to their downward slide ( vss 25-27). Language of Ashdod w as a Philistine language and the p roblem was a mixed dialect of A shdodite and Aramaic for the c hildren of Israel. This would g reatly hinder the law of M oses/God being taught and o beyed as they were instructed in D euteronomy 6:6-9. But the language of Ashdod is a live and well today. Consider the f ollowing: born again Christian; C ovenant Theology; rapture; R everend; church of your choice; L ent; Baptismal Regeneration; C hurch Age; Millennium reign; P ope, etc.! All these terms and t itles have come out of denominat ional/sectarian doctrines and could b e correctly called jargon! Amuch needed admonition from t he first century is relevant today: And my speech and my preaching were not with persuasive words of human wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power, that your faith should not be in the wisdom of men but in the power of God (First Corinthians 2:4,5). Now listen carefully to the Spirit by the pen of the apostle Paul: Preach the word! Be ready in season and out of season. Convince, rebuke, exhort, with all longsuffering and teaching. For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine, but according to their own desires, because they have itching ears, they will heap up for themselves teachers; and they will turn their ears away from the truth, and be turned aside to fables. (Second Timothy 4:2-4) Finally, a prophet of old, Jeremiah, speaks loud and clear even for today: Stand in the ways and see, and ask for the old paths, where the good way is, and walk in it; then you will find rest for your souls. But they said, We will not walk in it. (Jeremiah 6:16) Frank Parker SebringWorking on a school projectEditor: Dear Floridians, My name is Jensen McKly. Im a fourth-grader who goes to Upham School in Massachusetts. Since I am now in the fourth grade, we learn about states. My teacher had a cup and we all picked out states. Guess what my one is. Florida! I was so happy when I got it. Florida is one of my favorite states. I have only been to Florida once and we went to the Everglades. It was awesome. When I was there I also saw a lot of alligators. Anyway, I have written to you to wonder whether I could get some cool facts on Florida. It would be so great. This might sound a little greedy, but could you send me a few souvenirs. Please! It would be great if you could send me something. I would be so happy. Maybe a little key chain or a few postcards. Maybe even some cool pictures of Florida and a newspaper with this article if it makes in. But I really need facts. Jensen McKly carolyn_collins@wellesley.k12.m a.usWhat has happened to our leadership?Editor: Has our leadership gone completely insane? Where is the wisdom of borrowing money from our social programs, namely Social Security, where all Americans have invested their wages most of their lives. The taking of this money to fight other nationswars is insane. This has disabled millions of our youth and yet our Veteran Administration hires hatchet men or claims adjusters to be more polite at huge wage and pension packages to deny the veteran of his or her just claim. Example: I am 81 years old and have been disabled and unable to work since 1993 due to asbestos damage I received in the military. I have asbestos and asbestos related injuries. Yet my claim has been denied many times. New health care study for veterans raises mixed feelings. Lawmakers borrowing money from all over the world and all of our social programs are feeling reluctant to increase healthcare fees for military retirees have a new reason to hold off. The Defense Department has ordered yet another review of ways to cut its medical cost. Hire more Hatchet men or claim adjusters if you will, who will deny more just claims. John Baldacci, a Democrat former member of Congress and former governor of Maine, has been hired for $165,000 plus a huge expense account to serve as director of the military health care reform initiative, a Hatchet man if you will. Aproject aimed at overhauling the medical system for the military. Rep. Joe Wilson R.S.C., the chairman of the Armed Service Committees Military Personnel Panel, has never been a fan of the Defense Department, made this statement to the proposed new Hatchets man hiring: The governor should ... step down. That would immediate save about $200,000. I am an 81-year-old veteran who would ask that the Administration rid itself of the many hatchetmen, claims adjusters who have huge wage and pension packages in favor of servicing and veteran and leaving no veteran behind. Billie E. Jewe tt Sebrin g BouquetFrustrating becomes wonderfulEditor: I recently went to Raceway Gas Station in Lake Placid and was having a problem at the pump wit h my credit card. Since I am quite elderly and handicapped (use a Mobility Scooter as I have difficu lty standing) another customer vol unteered to go into the store and get someone to assist me. Agentleman came out of the mart. He not only got my credit card working but insisted on pum ping my gas. We made small talk and the gentleman was Tom Allaire, the owner/operator of this family owned business. After he handed me my receipt he asked me to wait in my car. When he returned he gave me his business card with his cell phone number and also the cell phone number of his son. Mr. Allaire tol d me next time I needed gas, just to stay in my car and phone Racewa y and either he or his son would come to my assistance and fuel m y vehicle. What was a frustrating situation turned out to be a wonderful expe rience. There should be more con siderate people. I truly found a friend and Mr. Allaire has a loyal customer. Delta Blan ey Lake Plac id

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R esources Department, will s peak about Highland C ountys natural resources a nd the importance of proper m anagement of these areas. S he will discuss the Sun N L ake Preserve and other simi lar areas that need conservat ion and protection in ways o ther than land management. Lola and Saints perform at TanglewoodSEBRING Tanglewood w ill present today a longr unning group that has sello uts wherever they perform. Lola and the Saints have r ecorded numerous hit songs f rom the Doo Wop period a nd their popularity continu es. This is the final show of t he winter season. Originally formed in the T hroggs Neck section of The B ronx, N.Y. in August 1964, b y Lola and Tom Foy, The S aints have enjoyed a long a nd magnificent career in s how business. They sing a w ide variety of hits from the p ast with precision harmony. T his will be a sit back, close y our eyes and just enjoy this f ive-piece group as they b ring back the hits of the p ast. Opening for the Saints is J immy and Eckard. This tale nted duo is sure to entertain u s. Doors and snack bar open a t 6:15 p.m.; the show starts a t 7 p.m. Tickets may be p urchased at the Activities D irectors office or at the d oor on show night for $10. Tanglewood is one-half m ile north of Walmart on U .S. 27. Call 402-0763.Sebring Hills plan business meetingSEBRING The Sebring H ills monthly business meeti ng will be held at Monday a t the Sebring Hills C lubhouse, 200 Lark Ave. B oard members meet at 7 p .m., and the rest of the m embers meet at 7:30 p.m. Acaller for bingo on T hursday nights is needed. If y ou live in Sebring Hills and a re interested call Doris S teele at 314-8905 or Jack P helan at 385-3819. Jack is w illing to train.Tea Party meets for short videoSEBRING The H ighlands Tea Party will h ave a business meeting and w atch a short video, Political Correctness, at 6 :30 p.m. Tuesday at the Q uality Inn, 6525 U.S. 27 N orth. The usual buffet will most l ikely not be served at this m eeting. Bring your own b everage or purchase somet hing from the bar.Gem and Mineral Club meets TuesdaySEBRING Tuesday is t he date to remember for the H ighlands Gem and Mineral C lub meeting. The group m eets at 7 p.m. at the C hurch of Christ, 3800 S ebring Parkway, rear fell owship hall. There are no d ues or fees to join and all a re welcome, whether you are a rockhound or just interested in learning about that rock or fossil you picked up on your last vacation. Members or attendees will be setting up tables of materials to sell, trade or barter. Much of the material will be at reasonable prices. The birthstone for April is the diamond, which has been one of the most valued gemstones for thousands of years. For more information, call 453-7054.Womans Club meets to hear CoxSEBRING The GFWC Womans Club of Sebring, 4260 Lakeview Drive, will meet at noon Monday. The Education Department will host the event. The lunch will be catered by Mae Lees Deli. The menu will be an assortment of subs, pasta salad, fruit salad and cake for a $7 donation. Reservations are required; phone 471-3295 or 3823559. The speaker for the meeting will be Wally Cox, superintendent of Highlands County Schools. The GFWC Womans Club of Sebring has been involved with the Reading is Fundamental program at Woodlawn Elementary School for many years. Club volunteers meet throughout the year to distribute $500 worth of books to their students which they are allowed to keep. The Safe House endeavor this month will be disposable diapers; sizes 3, 4 and 5 are the most popular. Phone 385-7268.Events planned at lodges, postsAVON PARK American Legion Highlands Post 69 will have its annual election of officers at 7 p.m. Monday, May 9 at their regular meeting at the post home, 1301 W. Bell St. This meeting will be open to only Post 69 members. To be eligible to hold office one must be a member in good standing at Post 69 with a DD 214 or equivalent on file. Asign-up sheet is posted at the Post. LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Moose 2374 will host karaoke with BobKat at 1 p.m. today. For details, call the lodge at 4650131. The American Legion Placid Post 25 will have music by Dave and Peggy from 5-8 p.m. today. The Legion Executive Board meeting is at 6 p.m. Monday, following by the Auxiliary Executive Board meeting at 6:30 p.m. and the Legion General meeting at 7:30 p.m. Free blood pressure checks will be offered from 1-3 p.m. Tuesday. For more information, call 465-0975. The Lake Placid Elks 2661 will host music by Chrissy Harriman on Monday. The BPOE Board meets at 7:30 p.m. The BPOE meets again at 7 p.m. Tuesday. Call 465-2661. SEBRING AMVETS Post 21 Ladies Auxiliary is having a breakfast from 8-11 a.m. Saturday, April 16 at the Post, 2029 U.S. 27 South. Tickets are $5 and available at the Post. Sun N Lake Manor Hill meets MondaySEBRING The Sun N Lake Manor Hill Property Owners will hold their quarterly meeting at 7 p.m. Monday at the Community Center.Recration Club plans eventsSEBRING The Sebring Recreation Club, 333 Pomegranate Ave., will host the following events this week: Monday Ice cream shuffleboard, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Ice cream shuffleboard, 6:30 p.m.; line dancing, 6:30 p.m. Saturday Pin shuffleboard, 6:30 p.m. Any information, call 385-2966.MARSP meets TuesdaySEBRING The Michigan Association of Retired School Personnel (MARSP) will meet in the Sebring Public Library conference room at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. Members will go over the year in review and plan for the 2012 meetings. Officers would welcome any input. All retired school personnel from Michigan are invited to attend. Information will be provided on legislation that is being considered in Michigan. Call 655-6825.Frostproof prepares for Egg HuntFROSTPROOF The Frostproof Middle/Senior High School track and field will be the place to be at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 23 for children up to 10 years old and their parents. Afree Community Egg Hunt with thousands of candies and treasure filled eggs will be scattered for the little ones to find. Four age categories means there will be four different areas to search. Infants 23 months could win a gift basket. The golden egg finder in age group of 2-4, 5-7 and 8-10, each wins a $75 Toys R Us gift card. Silver egg finders win a $50 Toys R Us gift card provided by the Frostproof Ministerial Association. The event is sponsored by Family Life Church and Pastor Kelly and Angela Galati. This year there will also be prizes for parents, an assortment of gift certificates good at Frostproof businesses and a grand prize of three $100 Walmart gift cards. For more information contact Family Life Church at (863) 635-2704. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011Page 5A Continued from page 2A COMMUNITYBRIEFS The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Special to the News-SunSEBRING Apassion for music and performing on stage continues to drive long-time local resident Tiffany Elliott to succeed in the music industry. She spent her first years performing on the Highlands Little Theatre stage taking on roles in musical productions. Elliott has taken part not only in local vocal competitions such as Heartland Idol, but has competed in the finales in the national competition Colgate Country Showdown. Trying to juggle a regular job by day at Dr.Vinod Thakkars office and doing musical gigs and rehearsals each week continues to keep Elliott one busy lady. Singing many genres, she has settled very comfortably into singing country music. This year she joined forces as the backup singer for country recording artist April Phillips. April Phillips and her band are mostly known for their bold edgy country sound. The band has opened for many wellknown artists such as Charlie Daniels, Blake Shelton, Josh Thompson, Easton Corbin, Craig Morgan, and just last weekend for Nashville recording artist Matt Stillwell. Last month, April and her band won the Battle of the Bands held at the famous Barn in Sanford. Still living in Highlands County, Elliott is having the time of her life on this journey touring with her new band mates and getting to meet some of country musics favorites. S he appeared on stage wi th April Phillips at 97 Count ry presents Country Rocks at Orlando House of Blue s, located in downtow n Disney, last night. To follow Tiffan y Elliotts music, follow h er on Facebook, MySpace or at Aprilphillipsonline.co m under Contact Us. From Highlands to House of Blues Courtesy pho to Sebrings Tiffany Elliott goes from Highlands County to House of Blues last Saturday when she performed with country recording artist April Phillips. Courtesy pho to The sixth annual Hairpin Spin raised $15,100 for the 2011 event. After expenses, each charity received a check for $2,700. Representing those charities are (from left) Kevin Roberts, Champion for Children; Jan Shoop, Sebring Hall of Fame; Nancy Hensley, Champion for Children; Lisa Celentano, Hairpin Spin organizer; Judy Spiegel, Highlands County Humane Society; and Jeri Wohl, Highlands Art League. Hairpin Spin gives back

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Associated PressTOKYO Once Japans l eaky nuclear complex stops s pewing radiation and its r eactors cool down, making t he site safe and removing t he ruined equipment is going t o be a messy ordeal that c ould take decades and cost h undreds of millions of doll ars. Radiation has covered the a rea around the Fukushima D ai-ichi plant and blanketed p arts of the complex, making t he job of decommissioni ng the plant rendering it s afe so it doesnt threaten p ublic health and the envir onment a bigger task than u sual. Toshiba Corp., which supp lied four of Fukushimas six r eactors, including two on w hich General Electric Co. c ollaborated, submitted a r oadmap this past week to the p lants operator for decomm issioning the crippled react ors. The study, done with t hree other companies, proje cts that it would take about 1 0 years to remove the fuel r ods and the reactors and c ontain other radioactivity at t he site, said Keisuke Omori o f Toshiba. That timeline is far faster t han those for other nuclear a ccidents and contains a big c aveat: The reactors must f irst be stabilized and cooled, g oals that have eluded emerg ency teams struggling with cascading problems in the month since the devastating tsunami damaged their cooling systems. Omori said the extent of damage to the reactors and other problems still need to be assessed. Of course decommissioning the four reactors would be more challenging than retiring one from an ordinary operation. We still have a lot to examine, Omori said. He declined to provide details on the costs and the timeframe, citing business confidentiality. Getting a quick resolution to the Fukushima crisis would give a boost to a nation trying to recover from the severe disasters and to the tens of thousands forced to evacuate communities near the plant and already wearying of living in shelters. Page 6ANews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.com By Saturday, the HCSO was working the suspect as a black male, but Hayes said they were not ruling out any options. Hayes also stated that the suspect allegedly left the scene at some point in an unidentified vehicle. If you saw a male entering a vehicle with haste, please contact the HCSO. If you wish to remain anonymous, call Crime Stoppers, Hayes advised. The HCSO K-9 unit was on the scene and started the rack at 1:39 p.m. on the south side of the bank, searching the woods and the golf cart path that runs behind the bank. Students at Sun N Lakes were briefly detained until after 2 p.m. as deputies searched the area for the suspect. On Saturday, the Hayes stated that the HCSO had some positive leads on the robbery, but did not think th at an earlier bomb threat at Sebring High School w as related. There are theories abo ut that out there, and we are fo llowing all of the leads w e have. We have isolated whe re the phone call has com e from, but we are workin g them as isolated cases rig ht now because there is a tw ohour time gap, Hayes said Call 1-800-226-TIPS if you have any information. Continued from page 1A News Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLA R Highlands County Sheriffs Office investigators scope the scene at Heartland National Bank on US 27 North on Friday afternoon. HCSO is investigating the robbery that took place at the bank. i mmediately, forcing the o rganization to cut services t o their consumers, includi ng the Valencia Group H ome in Avon Park. Five women, each worki ng towards independence, w ill be forced to move from t heir safe and secure envir onment to somewhere yet t o be determined. Although they are going i nto the future with dignity, t he five women are not g oing quietly. Arc consumer Sue Talios i s one of those effected by t he budget cuts, and she is at a loss at what to do next a bout housing. But she and h er roommates are letting G ov. Scott know about it in e -mails, currently their only r ecourse. I feel crappy because the s tate is cutting our money f or my group home in Avon P ark. Arc will be closing it. I d on't like moving. I already m oved two other times b ecause of cuts, Talios in a n e-mail statement to the N ews-Sun on Friday. I l ived in an institution before a nd it was bad and I got beat u p. One staff pushed me in t he shower and busted my h ead open. Clients were r ough on me because they h ad bad behaviors... My group home is nice a nd so are the people. I have m y own bedroom and I like t hat I can sleep on my own a nd watch my own TV. I like w atching the Food Network. I have been learning how to m ake desserts in my home. I a m going to miss my friends i n the group home because w e will be split up into other h omes in the area, Talios s aid. Roommate Francis Goff a lso had something to say, a nd something to write Scott a bout. I am mad about the cuts. I dont like it that they are c losing my home. I like my s taff and friends at the h ome. No one tells me nothi ng. I dont even know where I am going. I dont like packing up boxes. I hate it. It makes me sad and I have been crying a lot, Goff said. Sarah Moore, also a resident, was choked up over the announcement, but wanted the governor to know that his decisions effected real people in real situations. I am upset about the cuts. I feel bad. I will not see my friends. I like to do stuff and dont want that taken away, Moore said. Amelia Titus showed an different emotion, one that motivated her to work on an e-mail as well. I am mad! I am upset! The government is taking our money. It is not right. I live in an Arc group home. It is not just a house, it is my home. I have to move out. There is no money to run it. I dont like it all. I am sad. Please help me, Titus begged. Debbie Baxter is the other resident living at the home, but is not verbal, unable to express her feelings, according to Arc staff. My heart just goes out to the consumers. It hurts me as a staff to see them hurting, said Nicole Stephens, a part-time staff member at the home. Agroup home is more of a home environment and gives them a sense of belonging, you are a part of it. It is a family lifestyle as opposed to an institution which they are being put in because no one wants to deal with them. Another staff member at the residence also expressed her feelings about the budget cuts. It makes me feel bad too when I see how they are feeling, said resident staff member Wanda Colon. They live in the group home and we are their family. When they close the group home, where are they going...an institution? My job is not as important as the people who are being affected by this, Colon added. Rhonda Beckman, CEO of the Arc said on Thursday that she is trying to get extended licensing so that a couple of the women can move into another home, but she was not positive a short-term solution could be found without help. It doesnt look good, Beckman said about the budget cuts. I am not sure where they could end up. Anyone wishing to seek more information about the ladies, or those who wish to help, can contact Beckman at 863-452-1295 X112 or email rbeckman @ridgeareaarc.org Continued from page 1A press release on Friday that his company was deeply saddened to report the passing of two valued employees: Mr. Jon Martinez and Mr. Jason Steele. Martinez, 34, was a resident of the Tampa Bay area. No further information about Steele was available at press time, and Hayes said that the HCSO was still seeking positive identification. The accident occurred at the former Georgia Pacific Plant on State Road 70, west of U.S. 27 in Lake Placid just after 2 p.m. United Fire Protection has been in constant contact and is in full cooperation with the Highlands County Sheriffs Office. Our thoughts and prayers are with the families of Mr. Martinez and Mr. Steele. United Fi re Protection will release an additional statement at a lat er date, Torres wrote. The two workers we re completing repairs on t he pump designed to fill t he large tank when the incide nt occurred. It was unknown how mu ch water was released from t he tank, or why the tank bur st, Hayes said. Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Ridge Area Arc consumer Frances Goff is distraught Thursday after learning that the Valencia Group Home, where she resides, will be closing due to lack of funding. Arc left looking for answers after cuts Water tank collapse kills two Bank robbery suspect sought End to Japan nuke crisis is years, a fortune away

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011Page 7A

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v iew of the classroom t eacher. The general reaction a mong his colleagues, he s aid, is dismay over the bill. He reviewed major conc erns, starting with the issue o f tenure. State statutes already prov ide for the release of incomp etent teachers, even those w ith tenure, Picklesimer e xplained. He has seen situat ions where teachers were r eleased within 90 days. Ive seen people go out t he door with tenure, but, he a dded, if they cant do the j ob, they must be taken out of t he classroom. Like a doctor, they have t o be able to do the work. O therwise were just shooti ng ourselves in the foot. We w ant to be respected as a prof ession, he said. The real difficulty, he a dded, isnt getting rid of i ncompetent teachers it is t he process by which individu als are determined to be i ncompetent. We dont want to railroad t eachers out, he said. He does not believe using F CATscores as the measure o f quality teaching is either f air or accurate. Beyond question of the standardized tests value and usefulness, however, is the fact that teachers are being made to carry the burden of perceived failure all by themselves, said Picklesimer If a teacher is not performing, there are two people responsible the teacher and the teachers administrator. Policies were in place that warned under-performing teachers of their shortfalls and provided resources and peer mentoring to help them improve. With the new bill, teachers who might be able to adjust and grow into the job will not have that opportunity. And all teachers, no matter how skilled or experienced, will be denied the security of an extended contract. Picklesimer added that just as it becomes more difficult to maintain a career, teachers face pay cuts due to benefits once paid by the state that will now be borne by them. He said teachers do not mind paying into their retirement funds or health insurance, but the cost is high 5 percent of a check for retirement and another $110 to $150 for individual insurance, a family will pay more. He pointed out that teachers have made significant sacrifices over the last few years, working longer hours, taking on additional tasks and responsibilities. Some schools have hired people whose only job is to relieve classroom teachers so they can go to the bathroom too many work the entire day without a break. More sacrifice lies ahead. Gov. Scott and the state legislature are considering deeper cuts in education statewide. They hope to pay each school district $156 less per student. Estimates run around 6 to 7 percent fewer state dollars for the 2011-2012 school year. At the same time federal financing, in the form of stimulus dollars, is disappearing. Already district faculties have been hit. From a high of 978 teachers in 2007-08, there are 867 teachers currently at work in Highlands County. As many as another dozen might be gone by the 2011-12 school year. Picklesimer said, Education is a three legged stool the teachers, the administrators and the school board. We all need to look realistically at where the challenges are. When the News-Sun attempted to reach out to individual educators to learn what they think and feel, no one was willing to say anything meaningful on the record, saying they feared losing their jobs if they spoke out. While some individuals were willing to share their thoughts, none would allow their names to be used. One teacher described how tired, demoralized and depressed teachers are, but would not go on the record out of a fear of retribution and job loss. This individu al believes that more exper ienced, higher paid, teache rs will be let go so school di stricts may hire younge r, lower paid teachers as a w ay of balancing the budget. Another teacher worri es that students are succumbin g to test fatigue and are lo sing the motivation to even t ry doing well on the FCAT. There was a final iron y about SB 736 Picklesim er said as yet the bill pr ovides no funding. We will have to comp ly even though we wont ha ve the funds to deal with t he changes weve been makin g to address SB 736, he said Page 8ANews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.com Continued from page 1A h ave I ever heard a president i n our system make such a c ase. In fact, he said he was s trongly opposed to the bill, a nd for several reasons. There is a great deal of m isunderstanding regarding t enure and continuing cont racts, which are not the same t hing, Stephens said. Tenure means a (faculty m ember) cannot be fired w ithout due process. It prot ects excellent faculty and a cademic freedom. It does n ot protect faculty who are i ncompetent or unsatisfactor y. Unsatisfactory faculty m embers may be fired, he e mphasized, but often resign f irst. To earn tenure a faculty m ember has to teach successf ully for three years. Continuing contracts, on t he other hand, are simply an e xtended employment cont ract. All new faculty members a re monitored for a 90 day p robation period when teache rs are closely observed and e valuated for student success. Tenure is part of the c hecks and balances that protects academic freedom, Stephens said. Without tenure or continuing contracts, he added, SFCC would have a difficult time hiring excellent faculty, or keeping one without continuing contracts. Stephens said there is another, equally important factor. SFCC has to be accredited for its students to be recognized and respected by other schools. Accreditation requires compliance with the comprehensive standards of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. In order to earn that accreditation, the institution ensures adequate procedures for safeguarding and protecting academic freedom, he said, quoting the associations rules. Eliminating tenure in our system in our system could jeopardize our accreditation. His final major concern has to do with local control over education. We have local boards of trustees with the ultimate authority to hire and fire employees, including faculty. This bill dangerously usurps that authority, he wrote in his letter to the legislative delegation. He pointed out to the legislators that the U. S. Supreme Court has already found earlier attacks on tenure to be unconstitutional, and would likely that way again. In my opinion, this is very dangerous legislation that would have serious unintended circumstances. The News-Sun contacted Representative Fresen for comment by e-mail. This was his complete response: I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge and thank you for your e-mail. I appreciate you taking the time to contact me and express your thoughts and concerns. While I am unable to respond to each correspondence personally due to the large volume of e-mail my office receives, they do help me to know what issues are of concern to you. If you live in House District 111 and are requesting assistance, please telephone my office ... Thank you. Continued from page 1A Teachers worried about merit pay, contract changes If a teacher is not performing, there are two people responsible the teacher and the teachers administrator.STEVEPICKLESIMER teachers union president Colleges also facing changes e rally funded vouchers to a ttend private schools also s urvived. Republicans had included l anguage to deny federal m oney to put in place O bamas year-old health care l aw. The deal only requires s uch a proposal to be voted o n by the Democratic-cont rolled Senate, where it is c ertain to fall short of the n ecessary 60 votes. The deal came together a fter six grueling weeks as n egotiators virtually dared e ach other to shut down the g overnment. Boehner faced pressure f rom his GOPcolleagues to s tick as closely possible to t he $61 billion in cuts and the c onservative policy positions t hat the House had passed. At one point, Democrats a nnounced negotiators had l ocked into a spending cut f igure $33 billion. B oehner pushed back and s aid there was no deal. D uring a meeting at the W hite House this past week, B oehner said he wanted $40 b illion. The final number fell j ust short of that. In one dramatic moment, Obama called Boehner on Friday morning after learning that the outline of a deal they had reached with Reid in the Oval Office the night before was not reflected in the predawn staff negotiations. The whole package was in peril. According to a senior administration official, Obama told Boehner that they were the two most consequential leaders and if they had any hope of keeping the government open, their bargain had to be honored and could not be altered by staff. The official described the scene on condition of anonymity to reveal behindthe-scenes negotiations. The accomplishment set the stage for even tougher confrontations. House Republicans intend to pass a 2012 budget in the coming week that calls for sweeping changes in the Medicare and Medicaid health programs and even deeper cuts in domestic programs to gain control over soaring deficits. In the Republican radio address, House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., warned of a coming crisis. Unless we act soon, government spending on health and retirement programs will crowd out spending on everything else, including national security. It will literally take every cent of every federal tax dollar just to pay for these programs, Ryan said Saturday. That debate could come soon. The Treasury has told Congress it must vote to raise the debt limit by summer. Republicans hope to use this issue to force Obama to accept long-term deficitreduction measures. Associated Press writers David Espo, Andrew Taylor, Erica Werner, Julie Pace and Ben Feller contributed to this story. Online: Obama weekly address: www.whitehouse.gov GOP address: www.youtube.com/republicanconference Continued from page 3A Budget battle is far from over

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Each spring, millions of Americans look forward to receiving a hefty income tax refund. And it truly is hefty with the average federal refund in 2010 hovering around $3,000. Thats a lot of money to be giving the government through what is essentially a year-long, interest-free loan. If you regularly receive large refunds, youre probably having too much tax withheld from your paycheck. Instead, you might want to withhold less and put the money to work for you, by either saving or investing a comparable amount each month, or using it to pay down debt. Your goal should be to receive little or no refund at the end of the year. Ask your employer for a new W-4 form and recalculate your withholding allowance using the IRS Withholding Calculator available at www.irs.gov. This is also a good idea whenever your pay or family situation changes significantly (e.g., pay increase, marriage, divorce, new child, etc.) Just be careful, because if too little is deducted, you might end up owing more tax next April, and possibly even interest or penalty fees. IRS Publication 919 can help guide you through the decision-making process. Some people received larger-than-normal tax refunds in 2009 and 2010 thanks to the Making Work Pay credit, which expired December 31, 2010. In its place, most taxpayers will see a 2 percent reduction in the amount being withheld for Social Security in 2011 paychecks. Another change this year was a Treasury Department pilot program that offered 600,000 randomly selected lowand moderateincome families an opportunity to have their tax refunds directdeposited into a prepaid debit card issued through Bonneville Bank. The pilot explored ways to save the government money (direct deposits cost 1/10th as much to process as paper checks) as well as to give people with no bank account easier and more cost-effective access to their tax refunds. Here are ways to put your refund to good use: Pay down debt. By increasing your payment amount on outstanding loan or credit card balances you can significantly lower the total amount of interest paid. Say youre paying $80 a month on a $2,000 credit card balance at 18 percent interest. By doubling your payment to $160, youll reduce the payoff time from 32 months to 14, and shave $295 off the total amount of interest paid. Start an emergency fund. To protect your family against the impact of a layoff or other unexpected financial crisis (such as a medical emergency, car accident or theft), set aside enough cash to cover at least six months of living expenses. Save for retirement. If your debt and emergency savings are under control, add to your IRAor 401(k) accounts, particularly if your employer matches contributions a 50 percent match corresponds to a 50 percent rate of return. Invest in yourself. Enroll in college courses or vocational training to ensure you have additional skills to fall back on should you lose your job or want to change careers. Invest in your familys future. Another good use for your refund is to set up a 529 Qualified State Tuition Plan or a Coverdell Education Savings Account to fund your childrens or grandchildrens education all while ensuring your contributions will grow tax-free until withdrawn. Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. www.practicalmoneyskills.com www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011Page 9A BUSINESS Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Heartland Rural Health Network Inc. is proud to announce the Winn-Dixie Foundation has donated $4,500 to help support its Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Outreach Program. The purpose of this outreach program is to assist low income seniors in Highlands, Hardee, and DeSoto counties apply for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits, more commonly known as food stamps. According to the Florida Department of Elder Affairs, nearly 67 percent of potentially eligible seniors in the tri-county area are currently not accessing SNAPbenefits. Although there are many reasons why participation rates are lower for seniors, the most common factor that program staff hear from individua ls is the difficulty and conf usion with the applicatio n process. Through the Network s SNAPOutreach Progra m staff is available to ass ist seniors in Highland s, Hardee, and DeSoto cou nties through the applicatio n process and teach them ho w to utilize the online applic ation and steps for recerti fication. The Winn-Dix ie Foundation realizes t he importance of giving ba ck to the communities w e serve, especially in times of need, said Ma ry Kellmanson, president of Winn-Dixie Foundatio n. For more than 85 year s, Winn-Dixie has be en known as the company wi th a heart. Visit ww w. winndixie.com. To conta ct the Networks SNAPsp ecialist call 452-0638. Health Network receives Winn Dixie Foundation grant Smart uses for your tax refund Courtesy photo South Florida Community College hosted the Sebring Chamber of Commerce mixer on April 7, in the SFCC Theatre for the Performing. SFCCs Gaylin Thomas (left), Don Appelquist, and Jane Hancock represent the college at the mixer. SFCC hosts chamber mixer Personal Finance Jason Alderman Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID Shelagh Byatt and Jerry Sochacki welcome Carole Polk, CRS, GRI to Tomoka Heights Realty Inc. Polk has been a resident of Highlands County for more than 30 years and is well respected within the county. Her top goal is customer service and her motto is Dedication and Integrity. Polk looks forward to serving her customers through the office at Tomoka Heights Realty Inc., 13 Oakwood Cou rt. She can be reached b y phone at 465-6411 or 84 01083, or via email at threa lty@earthlink.net or ca role@CarolePolk.com. The residents of Tomo ka Heights and staff of Tomoka Heights Realty al so congratulate Bill Richter o n his retirement. Richt er decided that after nine-pl us years of working at Tomo ka Heights it was time for hi m to take his third retireme nt and enjoy the fruits of li fe and his family. Polk joins Tomoka Heights Realty Associated PressPHILADELPHIA A n in-house accountant w ho raised a red flag a bout a tax lapse that his e mployer then ignored, l eading him to tip off the I RS, has received $4.5 m illion in the first IRS w histleblower award. The accountants tip n etted the IRS $20 mill ion in taxes and interest f rom the errant financials ervices firm. The award represents a 2 2 percent cut of the taxes r ecovered. The program, d esigned to encourage t ips in large-scale cases, m andates awards of 15 to 3 0 percent of the amount r ecouped. It ought to encourage a lot of other people to s queal, Sen. Charles G rassley told The A ssociated Press. The I owa Republican helped g et the IRS W histleblower Office a uthorized in 2006. The IRS mailed the a ccountants lawyer a $ 3.24 million check that a rrived in suburban P hiladelphia by first-class m ail Thursday. The sum r epresents the award m inus a 28 percent tax h it. The lawyer, Eric L. Y oung of Blue Bell, wont r elease the name of his c lient or the firm because h is client remains a smallt own accountant, and h opes to continue to work i n his field. Its a win-win for both t he government and taxp ayers. These are dollars t hat are being returned to t he Treasury that otherw ise wouldnt be, Young s aid. Its very difficult to be a whistleblower, said Y oung, who has repres ented more than a dozen s uch tipsters, including o ne in a $2 billion Pfizer c ase involving off-label d rug marketing. Most people would be i nclined to turn a blind e ye to it. The process can b e time-consuming, arduo us and stressful, from b oth a personal and prof essional standpoint, he s aid. The accountant filed a c omplaint with the IRS in 2 007, just as the IRS W histleblower Office o pened, but heard nothing f or two years. Frustrated, h e hired Young to help p ush the issue. We were able to help h im get it back on track, Y oung said. In the accountants c ase, the IRS did not d eem the issues he raised c omplex. IRS awards $4.5M to whistleblower

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Page 10ANews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.com TODAYMostly sunny and very warm90 / 67Winds: SE at 4-8 mphMostly sunny and remaining warm90 / 67Winds: S at 6-12 mphMONDAYMostly sunny, a t-storm possible87 / 65Winds: WSW at 7-14 mphTUESDAYPartly sunny, a t-storm possible87 / 64Winds: NE at 8-16 mphWEDNESDAYWarm with partial sunshine87 / 64Winds: ENE at 8-16 mphTHURSDAY City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. Washington Washington 70/63 70/63 New York NewYork 60/56 60/56 Miami Miami 86/73 86/73 Atlanta Atlanta 86/63 86/63 Detroit Detroit 79/60 79/60 Houston Houston 87/68 87/68 Chicago Chicago 82/56 82/56 Minneapolis Minneapolis 74/45 74/45 Kansas City KansasCity 76/48 76/48 El Paso ElPaso 66/42 66/42 Denver Denver 54/29 54/29 Billings Billings 54/35 54/35 Los Angeles LosAngeles 67/52 67/52 San Francisco SanFrancisco 59/49 59/49 Seattle Seattle 55/40 55/40 Washington 70/63 New York 60/56 Miami 86/73 Atlanta 86/63 Detroit 79/60 Houston 87/68 Chicago 82/56 Minneapolis 74/45 Kansas City 76/48 El Paso 66/42 Denver 54/29 Billings 54/35 Los Angeles 67/52 San Francisco 59/49 Seattle 55/40 A series of storms charging across the Plains will stir up trouble from the interior of New England to the central Rockies today. Rain will drench the Upper Midwest, while showers and thunderstorms dampen areas farther east. As cold air arriving with the storms clashes with the unusually warm air in place, violent thunderstorms will erupt from Wisconsin to northeastern Texas during the afternoon. The warm air will be centered over the Southeast, where highs in the 80s will abound, and some locations could hit 90. U.S. Cities National Forecast for April 10Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. World Cities National SummaryCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue. Today Mon. Tue. Weather (W):s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rrain, sf-snow urries, sn-snow, i-ice. Albuquerque 55/35/pc 67/42/s 74/45/s Atlanta 86/63/s 81/53/t 75/53/s Baltimore 68/57/pc 85/60/pc 68/41/pc Birmingham 88/66/s 76/51/t 74/53/s Boston 57/46/c 72/53/pc 66/42/pc Charlotte 82/60/s 86/56/pc 73/46/s Cheyenne 51/30/r 60/33/pc 59/31/c Chicago 82/56/pc 62/39/c 60/41/s Cleveland 80/59/t 66/41/t 52/37/pc Columbus 82/60/pc 66/43/t 61/42/pc Dallas 92/55/t 83/54/s 80/59/s Denver 54/29/r 66/35/s 64/34/pc Detroit 79/60/t 68/39/sh 57/40/pc Harrisburg 66/57/t 84/51/t 65/38/pc Honolulu 84/71/c 85/71/pc 84/71/s Houston 87/68/pc 83/59/s 81/65/s Indianapolis 84/61/pc 64/41/c 65/43/s Jackson, MS 86/67/pc 79/52/t 79/52/s Kansas City 76/48/t 66/44/s 71/49/s Lexington 84/62/pc 67/44/t 63/43/pc Little Rock 85/62/pc 77/48/s 75/52/s Los Angeles 67/52/pc 69/52/s 67/52/pc Louisville 86/65/pc 69/46/t 66/45/s Memphis 86/65/pc 76/54/t 74/54/s Milwaukee 76/52/t 58/39/c 55/40/s Minneapolis 74/45/t 59/40/pc 67/47/pc Nashville 86/67/pc 71/49/t 68/48/s New Orleans 85/72/pc 83/64/t 82/62/s New York City 60/56/r 80/58/pc 68/46/pc Norfolk 68/61/pc 80/59/pc 66/50/pc Oklahoma City 84/47/t 79/48/s 78/50/s Philadelphia 63/58/c 84/58/pc 68/46/pc Phoenix 70/52/s 80/57/s 84/59/s Pittsburgh 80/62/t 76/45/t 59/38/pc Portland, ME 52/41/c 60/49/pc 60/33/sh Portland, OR 57/43/r 52/38/r 55/41/c Raleigh 80/65/s 87/58/pc 72/46/pc Rochester 68/56/t 73/43/t 55/33/pc St. Louis 84/57/pc 68/45/pc 69/49/s San Francisco 59/49/pc 58/45/pc 58/45/s Seattle 55/40/r 50/38/r 52/41/c Wash., DC 70/63/pc 85/55/pc 65/45/pc Cape Coral 90/69/s 90/68/s 87/67/s Clearwater 89/72/s 88/71/s 85/68/pc Coral Springs 87/71/s 86/72/s 87/70/s Daytona Beach 86/67/s 86/66/s 83/64/pc Ft. Laud. Bch 85/73/s 85/74/s 86/73/s Fort Myers 90/69/s 90/69/s 87/69/s Gainesville 89/64/s 87/66/pc 84/57/pc Hollywood 86/72/s 88/72/s 88/70/s Homestead AFB 83/72/s 85/70/s 83/68/s Jacksonville 87/63/s 87/65/pc 81/56/pc Key West 84/76/s 85/76/s 84/74/s Miami 86/73/s 86/72/s 87/71/s Okeechobee 86/67/s 84/66/s 85/67/s Orlando 90/67/s 88/68/s 87/65/s Pembroke Pines 86/72/s 88/72/s 88/70/s St. Augustine 83/65/s 84/65/pc 79/62/pc St. Petersburg 89/72/s 88/71/s 85/68/pc Sarasota 86/69/s 87/70/s 85/67/s Tallahassee 90/59/s 86/64/pc 83/53/s Tampa 88/70/s 87/70/s 85/68/s W. Palm Bch 86/71/s 85/71/s 85/71/s Winter Haven 91/69/s 90/67/s 87/66/s Acapulco 88/72/s 88/76/s 88/77/s Athens 69/55/s 68/45/s 64/54/s Beirut 66/57/sh 67/54/sh 60/47/sh Berlin 62/46/s 67/52/pc 57/35/sh Bermuda 73/67/pc 72/69/s 74/67/s Calgary 52/30/s 51/23/c 44/26/pc Dublin 64/49/pc 53/33/sh 50/38/sh Edmonton 46/28/pc 45/17/pc 42/21/pc Freeport 85/69/s 86/69/s 85/70/s Geneva 75/48/s 71/51/pc 57/34/r Havana 90/66/s 89/67/s 90/66/s Hong Kong 82/70/pc 84/72/pc 77/68/pc Jerusalem 66/49/s 69/50/s 57/40/sh Johannesburg 73/51/s 74/52/pc 71/52/pc Kiev 45/36/sh 46/34/t 54/36/pc London 70/48/pc 62/38/sh 55/42/pc Montreal 59/46/r 63/45/t 57/36/sh Moscow 45/32/sh 38/25/sf 38/31/sf Nice 79/63/s 77/62/s 76/58/s Ottawa 58/53/r 70/48/t 58/37/c Quebec 57/43/c 59/43/r 52/32/sh Rio de Janeiro 81/74/t 85/75/t 88/77/pc Seoul 59/37/sh 61/39/s 61/39/s Singapore 86/75/t 88/79/t 88/79/t Sydney 81/57/sh 72/55/s 73/57/s Toronto 70/57/t 67/42/t 58/37/pc Vancouver 49/41/r 51/41/sh 49/42/sh Vienna 62/44/s 62/54/pc 68/38/sh Warsaw 50/27/c 50/50/r 57/36/r Winnipeg 50/33/sh 58/35/pc 51/26/c A lmanac Readings at Palm Beach High .............................................. 1:53 a.m. Low ............................................... 7:37 a.m. High .............................................. 1:59 p.m. Low ............................................... 8:02 p.m.Mostly sunny and very warm today. Clear and warm tonight. Mostly sunny and remaining warm tomorrow. Tuesday: mostly sunny with a thunderstorm possible. Wednesday: partly sunny with a thunderstorm possible. Thursday: partial sunshine.So much dust became airborne in Kansas and Iowa on April 10, 1935, that schools and highways closed. The Dust Bowl of the 1930s is blamed on land misuse and climate. Mostly sunny and very warm today. Winds south-southeast 4-8 mph. Expect 8-12 hours of sunshine with relative humidity 75% early, 45% in the afternoon and good drying conditions. Even addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday. Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and Saturday. All watering should take place before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. FirstFullLastNew Apr 11Apr 17Apr 24May 3 Today Monday Sunrise 7:08 a.m. 7:07 a.m. Sunset 7:47 p.m. 7:47 p.m. Moonrise 12:12 p.m. 1:12 p.m. Moonset 1:20 a.m. 2:08 a.m. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Jacksonville 87/63 Gainesville 89/64 Ocala 90/63 Daytona Beach 86/67 Orlando 90/67 Winter Haven 91/69 Tampa 88/70 Clearwater 89/72 St. Petersburg 89/72 Sarasota 86/69 Fort Myers 90/69 Naples 88/69 Okeechobee 86/67 West Palm Beach 86/71 Fort Lauderdale 85/73 Miami 86/73 Tallahassee 90/59 Apalachicola 80/64 Pensacola 82/70 Key West Avon Park 90/67 Sebring 90/67 Lorida 89/69 Lake Placid 90/66 Venus 90/66 Brighton 88/66 TidesReadings at St. Petersburg High .............................................. 6:30 p.m. Low ............................................... 2:04 a.m. High .....................................................none Low ......................................................none UV Index TodayThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m. 5 9 9 5 Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional SummaryShown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Five-Day forecast for Highlands County 84/76 Lake Levels Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 11.59 Normal ...............................................14.51 Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterdayTemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHigh Tuesday ......................................... 84 Low Tuesday .......................................... 50 High Wednesday .................................... 83 Low Wednesday .................................... 56 High Thursday ....................................... 91 Low Thursday ........................................ 58Heat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayRelative humidity .................................. 41% Expected air temperature ....................... 89 Makes it feel like .................................... 91BarometerTuesday ...............................................30.13 Wednesday .........................................30.11 Thursday .............................................30.07PrecipitationTuesday ...............................................0.56 Wednesday .........................................0.00 Thursday .............................................0.00 Month to date ..................................... 1.54 Year to date ......................................... 9.38

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, April 10, 2011Page 11 A IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2008-CA-001329 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR RASC 2007KS3, Plaintiff, vs. SALLIE WOODEN, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 18, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2008-CA-001329 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR RASC 2007KS3, is the Plaintiff and SALLIE WOODEN; TENANT #1 N/K/A ERICA WOODEN are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 18th day of April, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS 13, 14, 15 AND 16, BLOCK 1, AVON PARK LAKES RED HILL FARMS ADDITION, UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 68, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 2388 WEST HAVILAND ROAD, AVON PARK, FL 33825 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on March 31, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michala k Deputy Cler k Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F08084798 GMAC-CONV--Team 3 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. April 3, 10, 2011 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the ficitious name of JB MARKETING VENTURES located at 12001 Arbuckle Cr Rd, in the County of Highlands, in the City of Sebring, Florida 33870 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Sebring, Florida, this 7th day of April, 2011. Judith A. Bryan April 10, 2011 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of ``AT&L Granite and Marble'' located at 4504 US HWY 27 South, in the County of Highlands, in the City of Sebring, Florida 33870 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Sebring, Florida, this 10th day of April, 2011. DC Improvements, Inc. April 10, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2009-CA-000364 TAYLOR, BEAN AND WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. AIXA DEJESUS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated March 14, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2009-CA-000364 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, is the Plaintiff and AIXA DEJESUS; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF AIXA DEJESUS N/K/A JUAN DEJESUS; TENANT #1 N/K/A BRANDI SCHNEIDER are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 18th day of April, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 1, IN BLOCK 99,OF PLACID LAKES SECTION FOURTEEN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 19, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 560 LAKE AUGUST DRIVE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on March 14, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAIN Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F09026216 OCWEN-SPECFHLMC--Team 5 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. April 3, 10, 2011 for HIGHLANDS County, Florida. ONEWEST BANK, FSB, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., is Plaintiff and MARC C. CRAM; ZOVEIDA CRAM A/K/A ZOBEIDA CRAM; LEISURE LAKES HOME OWNERS CIVIC ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM, IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FL, IN HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA, at 11:00 a.m., on the 18th day of April, 2011, the following described property as set forth ins aid Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 9, IN BLOCK 161, OF LEISURE LAKES SECTION TWO, AS PER PLAT THEREOF IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 14, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of MARCH, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of said Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak As Deputy Clerk April 3, 10, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 09001470GCS ONEWEST BANK, FSB, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B. Plaintiff, vs. MARC C. CRAM; ZOVEIDA CRAM A/K/A ZOBEIDA CRAM; LEISURE LAKES HOME OWNERS CIVIC ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 18, 2011, and entered in Case No. 09001470GCS, of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-000792 GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID A. BLAKE A/K/A DAVID BLAKE, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated March 14, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2010-CA-000792 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC, is the Plaintiff and DAVID A. BLAKE A/K/A DAVID BLAKE; DIANA M. BLAKE; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 18th day of April, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 38, SUNSET LAKE ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 13, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 3143 GLACIER AVENUE, AVON PARK, FL 33825 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on March 16, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10042178 GMAC-FHA--Team 3 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. April 3, 10, 2011 ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 Attorney for Personal Representatives: CLIFFORD M. ABLES, III, PA 551 S. COMMERCE AVE. SEBRING, FL 33870 (863)385-0112 /s/ Clifford M. Ables III Florida Bar Number: 178379 JANE M. HANCOCK FLORIDA BAR NUMBER 341002 April 10, 17, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-80 IN RE: ESTATE OF BRUCE THOMAS HALL aka BRUCE T. HALL, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BRUCE THOMAS HALL aka BRUCE T. HALL, deceased, whose date of death was November 6, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is APRIL 10, 2011. Personal Representatives: /s/ Rhoda E. Wolfe 2441 LAKEVIEW DRIVE SEBRING, FL 33870 /s/ Barbara L. Tillman 118 EVANS ST. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-103 IN RE: ESTATE OF MARIE F. VENINI NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of MARIE F. VENINI, deceased, whose date of death was January 20, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870-3867. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 10, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Susan Alexander 1110 SW 9th Avenue Boca Raton, Florida 33486 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Seth E. Ellis, Esq. Attorney for Personal Representative Florida Bar Number: 0060933 ELLIS & GOLDBERG, P.L. 4755 Technology Way Suite 205 Boca Raton, FL 33431 Telephone: (561)910-7500 Fax: (561)910-7501 E-Mail: seth@egpl-law.com April 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-150 IN RE: ESTATE OF LUTISHIE J. FRANK, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LUTISHIE J. FRANK, deceased, File Number PC 11-150, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 10, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Ozalene Chapman Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Michael L. Keiber MICHAEL L. KEIBER, ESQUIRE 129 South Commerce Avenue Sebring, FL 33870 V. (863)385-5188 F. (863)471-1111 Florida Bar No. 620610 April 10, 17, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-147 IN RE: ESTATE OF SURDAM, LEONARD C. Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LEONARD C. SURDAM, deceased, whose date of death was February 26, 2011, and whose social security number is 573-24-5652, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 10, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Herschel E. Surdam 1643 Lexington Ave. San Mateo, CA 94402 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Robert E. Livingston Florida Bar No. 0031259 445 S. Commerce Avenue Sebring, FL 33870 Telephone: (863)385-5156 April 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY CASE NO.: 2009-CA-001711 NATIONAL CITY MORTGAGE CO., A DIVISION OF NATIONAL CITY BANK Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES HARRY LINDSAY, JR. A/K/A CHARLES H. LINDSAY AND TAMRA L. LINDSAY, HIS WIFE. Defendant(s). AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated March 22, 2011 entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-001711 of the Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, wherein NATIONAL CITY MORTGAGE CO., A DIVISION OF NATIONAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff and are CHARLES HARRY LINDSAY, JR. A/K/A CHARLES H. LINDSAY AND TAMRA L. LINDSAY, HIS WIFE are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE, SEBRING, FLORIDA AT 11:00 A.M., April 18, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOTS 15 AND 16, IN BLOCK 10, OF ORANGE BLOSSOM ESTATES UNIT NO. 4, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 44, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at SEBRING, Florida, this 23rd day of March, 2011. /s/ Priscilla Michalak ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Highlands County, Florida ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813)880-8888 April 3, 10, 2011 Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE UNDER NOVASTAR MORTGAGE FUNDING TRUST, SERIES 2006-4, is Plaintiff and EDUARDO VAZQUEZ; ___ UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF EDUARDO VAZQUEZ, IF ANY; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.; NOVASTAR MORTGAGE, INC, CORPORATION; HIGHLANDS COUNTY CODE ENFORCEMENT; JOHN DOE OR ANY OTHER PERSON IN POSSESSION; all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s), whether living or not, and whether said unknown parties claims as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, or in any other capacity, claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s) are the Defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Jury Assembly Room in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 a.m., on the 21st day of APRIL 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 3, BLOCK 172, OF PLACID LAKES, A REPLAT OF BLOCKS 115-116-169-171-172-173 AND PORTIONS OF BLOCKS 170 AND 175, PLACID LAKES, SECTION SIXTEEN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8 AT PAGE 98, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA Street Address: 114 BARBARA AVE. NW, LAKE PLACID, FLORIDA 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this 25th day of March, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE, CLERK By: /s/ Annette E. Daff As Deputy Clerk April 3, 10, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2008-CA-001528 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE UNDER NOVASTAR MORTGAGE FUNDING TRUST, SERIES 2006-4, Plaintiff, vs. EDUARDO VAZQUEZ, ET AL, Defendants, AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment in Foreclosure dated January 20, 2011 and entered in Case No. 2008-CA-001528 of the Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 10-1340 GCS FINANCIAL FREEDOM ACQUISITION, LLC, Plantiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND A LL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF MARJORIE A. BUTTON, DECEASED, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND A LL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF MARJORIE A. BUTTON, DECEASED LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: Unknown CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 19, BLOCK 282, OF SUN 'N LAKE ESTATES OF SEBRING, UNIT 13, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 71, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before MAY 2, 2011 a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in THE NEWS SUN and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, 255 N. Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863) 534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this 28th day of March, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Lisa Tantillo As Deputy Clerk April 10,17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC-11-116 Division IN RE: ESTATE OF DAVID VINIK Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS A GAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of DAVID VINIK, deceased, File Number PC-11-116, by the Circuit Court for HIGHLANDS County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870; that the decedent's date of death was October 5, 2010; that the total value of the estate is $18,692.40 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Gene Vinik 509 Macallan Court Conway, South Carolina 29526 TEMPLE ISRAEL OF 1305 Temple Israel Dr HIGHLANDS COUNTY Sebring, Florida 33870 BART VINIK 10 Westland Street Worcester, MA 01602 LYNN VINIK 651 Vanderbilt Street Apt 5-Z Brooklyn, NY 11218 JAMIN WILLIAMSON 8A Ball Drive Highlands, NY 12528 FLORENCE GREENSTEIN 125 Grandview Boulevard Lake Placid, Florida 33852 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) Y EARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is A pril 3, 2011. Person Giving Notice: /s/ Paul Klemow Paul Klemow, Attorney at Law Florida Bar Number: 18375 Post Office Box 16396 West Palm Beach,FL 33416 Telephone: (561)506-5569 Fax: 561-253-0451 E-Mail: theklemowlawfirm@aol.com April 3, 10, 2011 1050Legals 1000 Announcements Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155

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Page 12ANews-Sun Sunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.co m V ETERINARY RECEPTIONIST/ASSISTANTneeded for small animal clinic. A compassionate and enthusiastic team player needed for a full time position. Must have a positive attitude and take pride in providing exceptional client service. Multi-tasking, organization, attention to detail & computer skills necessary. Must be able to work flexible hrs. & weekends. Stop by and fill out an application at 11751 Twitty Rd. Sebring 33876. Hours M-F 7:30-6. RESIDENTIAL CLEANINGCo. Needs part time help, 15-25 hrs., week days only. Must be reliable, outgoing & highly motivated. Call 863-414-2244. PAGE DESIGNERIf you enjoy Page Design, this is for you. The News Sun is looking for the right person to help design its news page. Candidates must be expd in Quark and Photoshop, as well as have good news judgment. Able to work quickly with min. supervision is necessary. Exp. in Illustrator and In Design is a plus. This position is 20 hrs. hrs. may be flexible. Send sample of work with resume to: humanresources@new ssun.com or Fax to: 352-365-1951 Attn. Human Resources Director, or drop off at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL. Drug test and background check required. EOE MATH INSTRUCTORS PT positions to teach developmental math (daytime classes). Bachelor's degree in math or related field required. Open until filled. V isit www.southflorida.edu/hr for details. 863-784-7132. EA/EO MATH INSTRUCTORS PT positions to teach developmental math (daytime classes). Bachelor's degree in math or related field required. Open until filled. V isit www.southflorida.edu/hr for details. 863-784-7132. EA/EO HOME CARERN, CNA, PT, OT for local visits in Highlands Great Salary/Excellent benefits Immediate Need!! (863) 401-3550 or fax resume (863) 401-8199 FRONT DESKCLERK (PT), assists hotel & restaurant guests w/reservations, registration & accommodations. Hotel/Restaurant & Cashiering exp. preferred. $8.76/hr. (16-24 hr/wk.) Typical work schedule: Sat. & Sun. 6 am 2 pm. Open until filled. Visit www.southflorida.edu/hr for position announcement. (863) 453-2211. Apply at the HOTEL JACARANDA, 19 E. Main St., Avon Park. EA/EO/Vet. Pref. COOKS W/EXPERIENCEpreferred at Spring Lake Golf Resort. Apply in Person. Call for directions only 863-655-0900.CAREGIVERSNOW HIRINGFor caring, compassionate caregivers. You must be 21 yrs old with a HS Diploma/GED, pass a criminal & driving record check. Call HR between 9am and 4 pm M-F. 863-385-8558 or visit: ck381.ersp.biz/employment A MMUNITION RELOADINGF/T. submit resume & current photo to sales@anderson-arms.com or fax 863-453-7454 2100Help Wanted 2000 Employment*RECORDS CLERKTemp. position. *PRN MA (w/phlebotomy skills) Details @ www.flcancer.com 1400Health CareServicesLOST DIAMONDrings. Possibly at Sebring North Publix. Engagement & wedding band. Call 863-382-1037. Reward if found. 1200Lost & FoundHIGHLANDS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS (HCBCC) GENERAL SERVICES & PURCHASING INVITATION TO BID (ITB) The Board of County Commissioners (BCC), Highlands County as the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District Board of Supervisors, Sebring, Florida, will receive sealed bids in the County Purchasing Department for: ITB 11-036 LEASE OF 350 ACRES OF PROPERTY AT 200 Caladium Drive, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 NIGP CODE COMMODITY/SERVICES CODE: 971-35 Specifications may be obtained by downloading from our website: www.hcbcc.net or by contacting: Danielle Gilbert, CPPB, Highlands County General Services/Purchasing Department Assistant Purchasing Director 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33875?5803 Phone: 863?402?6524 Fax: 863-402-6735; or E?Mail: dgilbert@hcbcc.org Bidder will submit one (1) original and two (2) copies of their bid, in an envelope that must be sealed and marked with the bid number and name so as to identify the enclosed bid. Bids must be delivered to Highlands County Purchasing Department, 4320 George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33875-5803 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M., THURSDAY, A pril 28, 2010, at which they will be opened. Bids received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The BCC will not be responsible for the late deliveries of bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service. One or more County Commissioners may be in attendance at the above meeting. Highlands County Local Preference Policy will apply to the award of this bid. The Highlands County Board of County Commissioners as the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District Board of Supervisors (IMWID) reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if an award is made, will be made to the most responsive and responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District. The IMWID Board reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. The Board of County Commissioners as the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District Board of Supervisors of Highlands County, Florida, does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including one's access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Mr. John Minor, ADA Coordinator at: 863-402-6509 (Voice), or via Florida Relay Service 711, or by e-mail: j minor@hcbcc.org. Requests for CART or interpreter services should be made at least 24 hours in advance to permit coordination of the service. Board of County Commissioners as the Istokpoga Marsh Watershed Improvement District Board of Supervisors, Purchasing Department; Highlands County, Florida Website: www.hcbcc.net April 10, 17, 2011CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day y our ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us: 314-9876 News-Sun Classified

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, April 10, 2011Page 13 A its not just about making the sale anymore its about building trustits about being a part of the communityits about helping businesses grow Do you love selling a product you believe in? Are you committed to excellence? If so, were interested in talking to you!The News-Sun is actively seeking a dynamic sales professional that knows the difference between just making a sale and building a solid and dependable relationship with a client. If you are a sales oriented individual who is self-motivated, customer oriented and possess exceptional communication and organizational skills, consider joining our team. Candidates will be required to maintain established accounts while developing new clientele and working closely with area business organizations. Transportation required. Base salary plus commission, mileage, paid time off, health insurance, 401K & more. Email resumes to humanresources@newssun.com or fax to 352.365.1951 Attention: Human Resources Director or drop off at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring its about finding the right person If you enjoy page design, this job is for you. The News-Sun is looking for the right person to help design its news pages. The right candidate must be experienced in Quark and Photoshop, as well as have good news judgment. The ability to work fast with minimal supervision is also necessary. Experience in Illustrator and InDesign is a plus. This position is for 20 hours hours may be flexible. Send sample of work with resume to humanresources@newssun.com or fax to 3852.365.1951 Attention: HumanResources Director, or drop off at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring. Drug test and background check required. EOE 1993 CHEVYS10 Blazer 4dr, 2wd, 104k, V6, loaded, leather, CD, new brakes & tires. Many new arts with receipts. Must see! 22mpg $2600 obo 863-202-6394 9450Automotive for Sale TOOL BOXFits Ford F-150 Trucks $100. 863-382-4722 CHEST -All aluminum with locking lid. 48" long, fits in pickup bed or on a trailer. Very Nice! $140. 863-453-7027 9350Automotive Parts& AccessoriesENCLOSED TRAILER6 x 15. Almost new tires. Single axle. $1,800. Call 863-699-5517 9220Utility Trailers1973 NORTON850 COMMANDO A-1, low miles, *Owner's Manual, One Owner,* RareFind Will Accept reasonable offer. 863-382-8985 or 863-465-9100 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation2002 EZGOCustom Golf Cart, gas, lots of extras, new mag wheels & tires. Must See Nice! $2700 obo or will trade for an on / off Road Dirt Bike. 863-202-6394 8500Golf Carts R.V. COVERNEW fits trailes 28' 7" to 31' 6". Never opened! A Bargain at $170. 863-453-7027 2001 JAYCOEAGLE 26' 5th Wheeler. Good Shape $6400. 863-381-9159 8400RecreationalVehicles CANOE 14'high Impact, polyethylene hull, 3 seats (insulated cooler, center seat) spare paddle tie down ( or for fishing rod or shotgun) 3 drink holders. Dry storage area. Includes: Minn Kota trolling motor, 2 seat cushions, 4 life jackets, 3 paddles and kayak paddle. Great cond. $380. Call Jay 863-452-6583. 16 FT.Flat Bottom Flats type aluminum with console, 35hp Yamaha motor plus trailer, needs spring service. $1600 obo 863-202-6394 8050Boats & Motors 8000 RecreationNOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states tha t all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & Supplies MOWER DIXONSpeedztr 36" cut, electric clutch, rear wheels independently driven, by Hydro Gear, 14.5 B&S overhead. valve vertical shaft w/ cast iron cyl. $1450 obo 863-452-5607 LAWN MOWERSnapper / Rider. Runs Good! $200 863-471-9509 JOHN DEERE'05 4310 w/loader & mower, 4 x 4. $4800. details @ desmdw1@msn.com or 386-246-7461 2009 -Cub Cadet Enforcer commercial 48" Cut, Zero Turn, 300 hrs. Good Shape. $3000 obo 863-202-6394 7400Lawn & GardenPOWER WASHERDeWalt Commercial DP 3750. Perfect cond. on a 4 wheel trailer $1,100. Call 863-452-0393 7380Machinery & Tools AVON PARKORANGEWOOD ACRES 1628 W Orangewood Ct. Sun. Apr. 10, 8am-? Computer furn, Good quality Miscellaneous Items!! Toys & stuffed Animals. Too Much To List! AVON PARKMult Family Sale! 2301 N Carpenter Rd. Fri & Sat 4/15 &16, 8am 1pm. Tools, furniture, household items, clothes. Much Much More! 7320Garage &Yard Sales TYPEWRITER -Olympica with case. $20 863-655-0342 SWIVEL ROCKERlite sand color. Like New! $75. Call Richard 863-414-2784 LUGGAGE -Swiss Air / many compartments 17". $15. 863-471-2502 FLOOR LAMP/ Modern style / white. $20 863-471-2502 FISHING REELNew Baitrunner, 10 BB-$42.00 Call 863-273-1846. CALCULATOR XL-121.Good Cond.! $20. 863-655-0342 7310Bargain Buys WORKBENCH (FULL) DP ALPHA FLEX. Excellent condition. $75 863-382-4722 WASHER &DRYER / WHIRLPOOL Stack, electric 220. Excellent Condition, $425 863-257-1402 STAINED GLASSequipment & materials, patterns, books, tools, various size glass & colors, grinder, cutter, foil etc. $275 obo. 863-382-8198 7300MiscellaneousPIANOBOSTON5'1 Baby Grand w/bench. Model GP-156. Ebony Polish finish. Excel. cond. $11,000. Call 863-449-0243 7180Furniture 7180FurnitureDISHWASHERGEProfile. White. Digital display. Works great-been in safe, indoor storage since 2004. "Scratch & dent" otherwise like new. $45. Andy 863-873-4939 7040Appliances 7000 Merchandise SEBRING (2)Available 3926 Kenilworth Blvd, 1500 sq ft, $550/mo : A/C, office, BA, lg overhead door, near Sebring High School. 640 Park St, 6400 sq ft, $2500/mo : A/C, office, BA, 8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric, fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway. 941-416-2813 AVON PARKLarge Retail/Office Building, 100 E. Main St. A MUST SEE! 863-295-9272 6750Commercial RentalSEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, Satellite, split plan house, share kitchen & laundry room. Full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for RentSEBRING -Weekly/Multi-Week Condo Rentals Avail. Now. Located on Little Lake Jackson across from Harder Hall Golf Club. Lots of ammenities. Starting @ $500/wk. 863-385-5005, ext. 0 6320Seasonal Property SPRING LAKE3BR, 2BA, 2CG, CHA, patio, ceramic tiled liv. room, din. room, kitchen, bath & halls, SS appliances, refrigerator has water on door, micro., W/D hook up. No pets. 863-655-0136 SEBRING -SPRING LAKE AREA. 3/BR, 2/BA on Golf Course. $850 monthly. 1st / last / security / references. Call anytime. 863-273-3704 SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 LAKE PLACIDNEAT & CLEAN 2BR, 2BA $475 2BR, 1BA $450 863-465-2924 6300Unfurnished HousesSEBRING 2240Avalon Rd. 3/2 furn. Small animals ok. Near Shopping Center & Senior Club. References $700. first/last. Call 305-387-6863 after 4pm. or 863-237-3129. 6250Furnished Houses LIVE ONDINNER LAKE 12 min. from SFCC. Cute spotless newly painted apartments 1/1 from $350. incl. water & garbage. Efficiency $425. incl. water & garbage maintenance man on call laundry on premises. Small pets w/approval by landlord. $35. app feewe check criminal history. Call for appt. 863-381-3610 or 863-385-8242. BEAUTIFUL APTSSEBRING 2BR, 1BA, tile floors, screen back porch, beautiful landscaping, building 5 yrs. new. Pets OK. $595 month. 3106 Medical Way. 863-446-1822 AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; Washer/Dryer, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 6200UnfurnishedApartments AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook ups. Students/Seniors Discount Call 863-452-0469. AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL: $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 SEBRING -2BR, 2BA. Tile floors, fresh paint. Includes water. $600/mo. Call Gary Johnson, 863-381-1861. RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartments SEBRING -Downtown on the Circle. Monthy rates starting at $400. payable wkly. Includes elec. & water. No Pets. 306 circle. 863-386-9100 or 954-295-7194. Or go to Bldg. and ask for John. 863-414-7535 A PFURNISHED APT FOR RENT Avon Mobile Home Park 1350 N Lake Ave 55 Plus Park Sorry No Pets 863-453-3415 6150FurnishedApartmentsSEBRING VILLA3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage. Wood floors, vaulted ceilings, screened porch. Convenient location near Hospital. Gated community, Clubhouse & pool, lawn maint. incl. $900. mo. Call 863-840-1083. Carole Polk 6100Villas & CondosFor Rent 6000 Rentals SEBRING VILLAGE55 + PARK Must Sell! 2BR, 2BA, furnished, new furniture, enclosed sun room w/ shed & outside patio, $25,000 for more info. Call 863-402-0565. PALM HARBORHOMES Repo's/Used Homes/Short Sales 3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides Won't Last!! 3,500-40K Call Today! 800-622-2832 A PPARK MODEL FOR SALE Low Lot Rent 55 Plus Park Sorry No Pets 863-449-1072 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesSEBRING -Quiet Neighborhood on great fishing lake; 2,000 sf, 3BR, 2.5BA remodeled home with large garage & boat house. $219,000. 863-655-2278 MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE! 4080Homes for SaleSebringSEBRING -RURAL LIVING adjacent to great fishing lake close to Sebring. 3BR, 2BA home, pole barn, 5 acres fenced, zoned agriculture $150,000. 863-655-2278 Make Offer! 4040Homes For Sale 4040Homes For SaleAVON PARK3BR, 2BA, 1CG 1400 sq ft home. $72,000. Available after Feb. 28, 2011. Owner Financing possible w/ at least 10% down, good credit report and work record. 863-453-5631 Classified ads get fast results DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a NewsSun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 385-6155 WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 385-6155. Then shop till you drop!

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Page 14ANews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.com

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011Page 7B SENIORSCENE b ecause the chemical comp ound does occur naturally i n many fruits and vegetab les. But the quantity of c hemicals required for i ndustrial decaffeination m eans the almost 100 perc ent of the time, syntheticall y manufactured ethyl a cetate is used. So far, there a re no known health risks l inked to the use of ethyl a cetate in direct or indirect d ecaffeination methods. Supercritical carbon dioxi de fluid has both gas-like a nd liquid-like physical p roperties. You may have a lso heard of superheated or l iquefied gas. Supercritical f luid fills the container like a g lass, but can dissolve subs tances like a liquid maki ng it an excellent agent for s eparating an element such a s caffeine from a coffee bean. The highly pressurized carbon dioxide is forced through the beans and penetrates deeply, dissolving up to 99 percent of the caffeine. The carbon dioxide residue evaporates from the coffee beans as they return to room temperature. Frankly I did not understand the above quote so I called Maxwell House Coffee telephone number on my can of Naturalmente Descafinado. Adrienne answered the line and I inquired what that meant. She put me on hold and came back with the following information. I asked if I could quote her and what she said which was: Naturally decaffeinated was the process used. They use water to prepare the beans and gently remove caffeine. They expose the beans to natural effervescent in the form of carbon dioxide which is a naturally occurring substance in the air. I went back to the first paragraph quoted from the Web to the last sentence: But the quantity of chemical required for industrial decaffeination means that almost 100 percent of the time, synthetically manufactured ethyl acetate is used. Ethyl acetate is a colorless liquid used in glues and nail polish removers. It is manufactured on a large scale for use as a solvent. Now it began to make sense to me why I didnt need to give up the wondrous cup of coffee that sat with me through the writing of this article. I am so happy. Continued on page 19 Pearl Carter is writer, poet and a Lake Placid resident. E-mail her at timely87@comcast.net. Coffee or decaf? Which is best We live in a mobile park and they usually have a yard sale in the park recreation hall yearly to help us get rid of all the junk we accumulate. This year they did it a little differently. They decided in addition to the park hall, they would let us have individual sales on our home lots. Very good. We wont have to make two or three trips from home to the hall. We will just set up in the driveway and carport. No problem! Thats what we thought until we started getting ready. First we had to go to the county courthouse to get a permit for the sale! That was $5 and a trip across town to the courthouse. The permit had to be posted conspicuously during the sale. No problem. Next we had to devise a display system to show our wares by moving the table from our screened room in the driveway a rigging a couple of tables from arm chairs with some lumber that was in the workshop, we cobbled up a satisfactory showroom. Almost all the stuff we were going to display was in the storeroom in the rear of our trailer so it entailed quite a few trips from backyard to driveway to get to the stuff ready to sell. But wait a minute! We have to separate the junk and decide what we want to ask for it when we sell it. We had a lot left from previous sales along with our year accumulation for the past year. So we started putting the stuff in plastic freezer bags, Kmart shopping bags and boxes that we have been saving for the sale. It just happens that the weather had turned cold about the time we started to work so we made numerous trips to the house for warmth and coffee (I managed to clumsily set my favorite cup on the table and have it drop to the floor and break into several pieces). The process of setting up took the best part of three days and now on the night before the sales, we are standing in the driveway looking at our efforts when a neighbor walks up wanting to know if we are open for business yet. Since everything was all set up we told them to take a look. As a result, we made our first sale and more than covered our monetary expenses. We had learned from previous experience that you would have to watch people closely during the sale since some people seem to pick up items and forget to pay for them. One case today happened when a little boy about eight or 10 years old saw some Mardis Gras beads that were on sale for a quarter apiece. He put two of them around his neck and started to walk away. I got his attention and informed him that the beads would cost him 50 cents. He quickly removed the beads and ran off to his folkscar. That was the only incident of that sort that I saw but there were other antics I watched with wonder. One lady shopper picked up a bag of table cloths we had for sale at 50 cents a bag. No sale. The usual dickering went on throughout the sale, but in the end we got enoug h from the sale to satisfy o ur needs. During the sale a chur ch group approached us an d said that they would be grateful anything we want ed to get rid of after the sal e. All we would have to do is place it by the curb and th ey would pick it up. We had a few things that we didn t want to put back in stora ge so we put it on the curb f or them. The carport and driv eway were cleaned up and w e were sitting in a chair in t he carport when a car drove u p to the driveway and start ed picking up the items in t he pile. I called to them as t he got the first item into the c ar and told them that wou ld cost them $1. He look ed startled but reached into h is pocket and handed me $ 1. That was our last sale of t he day. Now all we had to d o was return all the unso ld stuff to the shed in the bac kyard. Since the park put a 1 2 p.m. closing time on t he sale, we had plenty of tim e to get all that remained ba ck in storage and go in t he house and count our profi ts. Since most of the stuff w e had on sale was junk that w e really didnt want but w as too good to throw away w e figured that all we took in was profit. So if you are going to venture into a yard sal e, think the process throug h from start to finish. Yo u may save yourself a goo d headache! By ESTHER HARRIS Special to the News-SunQuestion: Is it illegal to l aminate your Social Security c ard? Answer: No, it is not illeg al, but we discourage it. It's b est not to laminate your c ard. Laminated cards make i t difficult, sometimes even i mpossible; to detect import ant security features and an e mployer may refuse to a ccept them. The Social S ecurity Act requires the C ommissioner of Social S ecurity to issue cards that c annot be counterfeited. We i ncorporate many features t hat protect the card's integrit y. They include highly spec ialized paper and printing t echniques some visible to the naked eye and some not. Keep your Social Security card in a safe place with your other important papers. Do not carry it with you. Learn more at www.social security.gov. Question: I have two minor children at home and I plan to retire next fall. Will my children be eligible for monthly Social Security benefits after I retire? Answer: Monthly Social Security payments may be made to your children if: They are unmarried and under age 18; Age 18 or 19 and still in high school; or Age 18 or older, became disabled before age 22, and continues to be disabled. Children who may qualify include a biological child, adopted child, or dependent stepchild. (In some cases, your grandchild also could be eligible for benefits on your record if you are supporting them.). For more information, see our online publication, Benefits for Children, at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/ 10085.html. Question: Ive been turned down for disability benefits. How do I appeal? Answer: Its easy to appeal the decision online. Go to www.socialsecurity.gov and select Appeal a disability decision. Its best not to laminate SS card Woodys Wisdom Woody Jackson The art of hitting the yard sales

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Breakfasts and lunches being served in the Highlands County School District for the upcoming week of April 11-15 include: HIGH SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Chili, saltine crackers, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked french fries, corn cobbettes, tossed salad, Colby Jack cheese stick, cherry berry fruit bar, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias cheeseburger pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, dried blueberries, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Barbecue sandwich, burger, cheeseburger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, grilled chicken sandwich, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, mixed vegetables, carrots and dip, vanilla clodhoppers, diced pears, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast burrito, salsa, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias cheeseburger pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, great northern beans, cheddar cheese stick, rosy applesauce, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Breakfast Maple waffle stick, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Asian chicken nuggets, salsa, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked french fries, corn, carrots and dip, tossed salad, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. ACADEMY SCHOOLS Monday Lunch Chicken nuggets, dinner roll, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, carrots and dip, strawberry cup, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Lunch Meat sauce, spaghetti, green beans, garlic breadstick, fresh apple slices, vanilla clodhoppers, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Lunch Macaroni and cheese, dinner roll, broccoli, diced pears, cherry berry fruit bar, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Lunch Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, corn, fruit cocktail cup, very berry juice bar, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Lunch Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, fresh apple slices, peach cup, chocolate chip cookie, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. MIDDLE SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Chili, saltine crackers, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich meal, chef salad meal, corn cobbettes, tossed salad, Colby Jack cheese stick, cherry berry fruit bar, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Baked chicken, dinner roll, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, green beans, carrots and dip, dried blueberries, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Breakfast pizza, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Barbecue sandwich, burger, cheeseburger, hot and spicy chicken sandwich, grilled chicken sandwich, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, baked buffalo chips, mixed vegetables, carrots and dip, vanilla clodhoppers, diced pears, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast burrito, salsa, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Chicken biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, burger, cheeseburger, chicken patty on bun, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, great northern beans, cheddar cheese stick, rosy applesauce, cut fresh fruit, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Breakfast Maple waffle stick, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, assorted juice, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast on the Patio: Sausage biscuit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Lunch Mama Sofias cheeseburger pizza, Mama Sofias cheese pizza, burger, cheeseburger, chicken tenders, salsa, dinner roll, ham sub meal, turkey sub meal, dill stack, PBJ sandwich meal, chef salad meal, corn, carrots and dip, tossed salad, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, assorted juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Monday Breakfast Egg and Cheese Daybreaker, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, pear fruit cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Maple waffle stick, string cheese, orange juice, chocolate milk. Lunch Chicken nuggets, dinner roll, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich, turkey chef salad, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, carrots and dip, strawberry cup, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Breakfast Breakfast burrito, salsa, hash brown patty, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, strawberry cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Chicken biscuit, strawberry cup, chocolate milk, hard cooked egg, giant graham, apple juice, chocolate milk. Lunch Spaghetti, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, green beans, vanilla clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit, fresh apple slices, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Breakfast Chicken biscuit, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, apricot cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Hard cooked egg, giant graham, apple juice, chocolate milk, chicken biscuit, strawberry cup, chocolate milk. Lunch Macaroni and cheese, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, broccoli, diced pears, cherry berry fruit bar, very berry juice, bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Breakfast Breakfast pizza, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, cheese filled breadstick, peach cup, assorted fresh fruit, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Sausage biscuit, apricot cup, chocolate milk, Ultimate Breakfast Round, apple juice, chocolate milk. Lunch Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, ham chef salad, corn, great northern beans, fruit cocktail cup, very berry juice bar, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Breakfast Maple waffle stick, Cheerios, Trix cereal, Frosted Flakes, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, string cheese, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Breakfast in the Classroom: Ultimate Breakfast Round, apple juice, chocolate milk, sausage biscuit, apricot cup, chocolate milk. Lunch Mama Sofias pepperoni pizza, Mama Sofia s cheese pizza, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, turkey chef salad, carrots and dip, salsa, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, fresh apple slices, apple juice, orange juice, fruit blend juice, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. KINDERGARTEN LEARNING CENTER Monday Lunch Chicken nuggets, dinner roll, Uncrustable Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich, mashed potatoes, chicken gravy, carrots and dip, strawberry cup, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Tuesday Lunch Spaghetti, meat sauce, garlic breadstick, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, green beans, vanilla clodhoppers, cut fresh fruit, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Wednesday Lunch Macaroni and cheese, dinner roll, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, broccoli, diced pears, cherry berry fruit bar, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Thursday Lunch Tacos, taco toppers, salsa, yellow rice, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, great northern beans, fruit cocktail cup, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Friday Lunch Mama Sofias cheese pizza, Uncrustable PBJ sandwich, carrots and dip, chocolate chip cookie, peach cup, chocolate milk, white milk, strawberry milk. Page 8BNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.com CHALKTALK School Menus Associated PressTALLAHASSEE The Legislature has voted to loosen Floridas class size limits but the two chambers differ on the details. The Senate voted 31-7 and the House 79-39 on Thursday for a bill (SB 2120) that would shrink the number of core courses covered by class size requirements and let schools break the caps for students who enroll after an annual head count. The Senate on Wednesday had agreed to restore social studies as core classes and ensure th at all prekindergarten throug h third grade classes are co vered by the caps. The Hou se didnt accept those change s. Aconference committ ee will try to resolve the d ifferences. Both versions wou ld remove other courses n ot required for graduation or tested by the state includin g foreign languages an d advanced classes. Lawmakers vote to loosen class size limits Associated PressTAMPA The Florida Board of Education has taken the first steps toward hiring a new education commissioner after Gov. Rick Scott ousted the previous one. The board met in Tampa Thursday to choose a vendor to conduct the candidate search. They also set the deadline for applications for May 25. Interviews with the top three candidates w ill be June 1. Scott forced the resign ation of Educatio n Commissioner Eric J. Smi th last month without consu lting the board, leading cha irman T. Willard Fair to resign in protest. Scott an d Smith did not agree on ed ucation policies. The education commi ssioner oversees Florida s public school system. Candidates for education commissioner sought NEWS-SUN Courtesy pho to The second-grade students of Heartland Christan School, along with their teacher, James Smiley, experience hands-on paleontology at Dinosaur World in Plant City. They uncovered the fossil remains of a Stegasauros and collected fossils at a fossil dig. Gemma Sauls explores the mouth of a dinosaur. Trip to Dinosaur World

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Special to the News-SunSEBRING Sebring High S chool participated in the FFA H orticulture Demonstration C areer Development Event ( CDE) in Okeechobee April 4, w hich included chapters from H ighlands, Okeechobee, St. L ucie and Miami-Dade count ies. The top two in each categor y advances to the State Finals i n Gainesville on April 22 on t he University of Florida camp us. The purpose of the event was designed to stimulate careful planning, thorough knowledge and the ability to explain, by work and action, the how and why of various horticulture practices. The short demonstrations took place in five divisions including: Production, Marketing, Consumer Use, Artistic Arrangement of Horticulture Crops and Landscaping. Savanna Fisher demonstrated production of pomegranites, Megan Stein demonstrated how to make hair spray from citrus in the Consumer Use division and Elton Gargano and Sarah Orrell teamed up with their Artistic Arrangement demonstration. Stein and Gargano/Orrell team qualified for the state finals in their respective divisions. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South F lorida Community College P resident Dr. Norm Stephens w as recently awarded the N ational Bronze Leadership A ward for his work with J unior Achievement (JA) of W est Central Florida Inc. The JAWorldwide L eadership Award recognizes t he most passionate volunt eers throughout the United S tates, representing the top o ne percentile of all volunt eers. Dr. Stephens was nomin ated for the award because h e has served as an outstandi ng board member for the p ast five years, said Lily R omine, JAexecutive direct or of Highlands and Polk c ounties. Since he became c hairman two years ago, our e nrollment has increased and we have expanded our programs into local elementary schools. He is always available, whether for conference calls, fundraising, planning, and events, and he has even taken the time to recognize and train future JAleaders. Dr. Stephens is the mark of a true leader. JAis the worlds largest organization dedicated to educating students about work readiness, entrepreneurship, and financial literacy through experiential, hands-on programs. JAprograms help prepare young people for the real world by showing them how to generate wealth and effectively manage it, how to create jobs which make their communities more robust, and how to apply entrepreneurial thinking to the workplace. Stephens received his award during the Hall of Achievement Celebration Dinner held at Busch Gardens on March 24. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011Page 9B CHALKTALK Courtesy photo Sebring High Schools Reece O'Connor, Jennifer Swain, Kayla Hart and Ashley Palmer took second place in the State Aquaculture Career Development Event. Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Sebring High School F FAaquaculture team competed in the State A quaculture CDE (Career Development E vent) held in April 2 Gainesville at the V eterinary Science complex on the University o f Florida campus. The four-member team consisted of J ennifer Swain, Reece OConnor, Kayla Hart a nd Ashley Palmer. OConnor took high indiv idual honors in the state with Swain taking t hird and the team placing second in the competition. The top five teams in the state were East Bay, Sebring, East Ridge, Kathleen and Mulberry. The event is designed to stimulate student interest in the aquaculture industry, encourage aquaculture instruction in the agricultural education curriculum, and to provide recognition for those who have demonstrated skills and competencies in the area of aquaculture management and consisted of a written exam, individual problem solving practicums and team activites. Sebring FFA aquaculture team shines at state Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Thirtytwo FFAmembers converged on the Leadership Training Center in Haines City April 5-6 for the purpose of screening potential candidates to determine two candidates in each of the five areas of the state eligible to run for state office at the 83rd Florida FFA Convention, June 13-17 in Orlando. Additionally, the top two candidates were selected to run at-large campaigns for the offices of President and Secretary; the top vote getter will be the 2011-12 State President and the runner-up will serve as Secretary. Candidates from Highlands County included Lauren Welborn from Sebring and Charlie Brown from Avon Park. The candidates showed their skills in a written exam, SAE (Supervised Agricultural Experience) presentation, agricultural education interview, conversational exercise, individual personal interview and a group problem solving exercise. Following the two-day event, Brown was selected, along with Haley Webb from the Charlotte Chapter, as the top two candidates and will be seeking the Presidency of the Florida FFAAssociation, which has more than 15,000 members in more than 300 chapters. The National FFA Organization, formerly known as the Future Farmers of America, is a national youth organization of 523,309 student members-as part of 7,487 local FFAchapters in all 5 0 states, Puerto Rico an d Virgin Islands. The National FF A Organization changed to its present name in 1988, in recognition of the grow th and diversity of agricultu re and agriculture educatio n. The FFAmission is to ma ke a positive difference in t he lives of students by deve loping their potential for pr emier leadership, person al growth, and career succe ss through agricultural educ ation. For more informatio n visit www.flaffa.org. APHSs Brown in running for state FFA presidency Courtesy pho to A total of 14 officer candidates that screened to run for state FFA office (two from each of the six areas, plus two at-large candiates. Stephens receives Leadership Award Courtesy photo South Florida Community College President Dr. Norm Stephens was recently awarded the National Bronze Leadership Award SHS competes in Area VI FFA Horticulture Demonstration Contest Courtesy photo Sebring High Schools Savanna Fisher, Sarah Orrell, Elton Gargano and Megan Stein competed in the FFA Horticulture Demonstration Career Development Event. The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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Page 10BNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. childrens choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. childrens mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and womens prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Friday 5-7 p.m., every Saturday 9-11 a.m. and 3-3:45 p.m., first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life! Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church.Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP Special to the News-SunSEBRING The 2011 Highlands Soil and Water Conservation District Speaking Contest was held on April 5 at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agricultural Center. The topic for this years speech contest was, What is the Economic Impact of Florida Forest? First-place winner Alexis Merlo was presented a cash prize of $150. A$100 prize went to second-place contestant Rachel Shattler and third-place Hayden Nielander was awarded a $50 prize. All contestants attend Lake Placid Christian School. Organizers thanked Judy Filler and David Griffin, who each year coach the students at their school and prepare them to participate in our event. The Speaking Contest educates the public on agricultural conservation needs. It also provides valuable experience to young speakers who, conceivably, could become our future leaders. The winners said they enjoyed researching the subject matter and plan to stay in the environmental and agricultural field in the future. The judges were Charles Reynolds; owner of Reynolds Farms Inc.; Mike Jensen, director of the Highlands County Extension Office; and Audrey Driggers, Conservation Technician form Okeechobee Soil and Water Conservation District. Corine Burgess, Environmental Specialist, was the timekeeper for the contest. Merlo will represent Highlands County at the Area Speaking Contest that will be held on April 20. The winner of the area contest will go on to the state contest. The top prize at the state competition is $500. Merlo wins HSWCD speaking contest Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Retired Sou th Florida Community College mathema tics instructor Carol Emery recent ly donated $10,000 to the existing Car ol Emery Endowed Teaching Chair in Mathematics corpus. I created th is award because I wanted to promo te SFCCs outstanding faculty, Emo ry said. SFCC did so much for me when I was an instructor; I wanted to gi ve something back to the college. Endowed Teaching Chair nomine es are chosen by their peers. Candidat es submit an application describing a pro ject for which they intend to use t he endowment to SFCCs Faculty Counc il. The council then recommends the wi nner to SFCC President Dr. Nor m Stephens. The endowment is awarded over a period of two years, half of which is to be used to support a project related to their profession and the other half as an honorarium, said Don Appelquis t, executive director of the South Flori da Community College Foundation, In c., which manages the endowment. The endowed teaching chair pr ogram helps us attract evermore qua lified faculty members to our instit ution, Appelquist said. It also gives us a way to show our appreciation to t he outstanding faculty members w e already have. Emery donates to endowed chair at SFCC CHALKTALK Courtesy photo Winners of the 2011 Highlands Soil and Water Conservation District Speaking Contest. Associated PressPALM HARBOR The P inellas County Sheriffs O ffice says a school r esource officer was injured m ore seriously that initially t hought when he was s tabbed repeatedly by a seve nth grader earlier this w eek. The sheriffs office r eleased more information T hursday about the attack, w hich occurred Tuesday at a m iddle school in Palm H arbor, northwest of Tampa. T he officer, Kenneth F ridlund, suffered internal i njuries in what the sheriffs o ffice described as an unrel enting attack by the 13y ear-old boy. The officer w as stabbed at least three t imes. The new information was r eleased after the boys g randmother claimed the o fficer was stabbed accident ally while scuffling with h im. Reports said the boy t urned on the officer with t he knife after bringing bott les filled with gasoline to s chool. Officer seriously hurt in middle school attack

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011Page 11B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer.Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howes Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer Kid C ity Childrens Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, prime-timers, and Bible s tudies in Spanish. Kid City Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Childrens Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturers Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m. in the sanctuary. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Childrens Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on lifes journey, youre we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP Weve all heard the saying April Showers bring May F lowers. But in sunny F lorida, thats not always the c ase. In fact, we dont usuall y start getting the heavy r ains until summer! Spring t ime may be an extra dry p eriod and we all need to p itch in and save water in e very way possible. With s ummer around the corner a nd visions of swimming p ools filled with glimmering w ater sparkling in the sun a nd sprinklers going full t hrottle soaking our thirsty l awns, its easy to get carried a way with the wet stuff. But c onservation isnt as tough as y ou might think and just a f ew small steps we can all t ake will make a huge differe nce. After all, April is Water C onservation Month, so lets a ll take the challenge and see h ow much water we can s ave. In this day and age, water c onservation is more import ant than ever. So much so t hat the Legislature has desi gnated April as Water C onservation Month because this is the time of year when water needs are most acute and temperatures begin to rise. According to South Florida Water Management District, Floridians consume more than 7.9 billion gallons of fresh water each day, with more than 90 percent of it supplied by underground aquifers. We are experiencing the third driest-dry season since recordkeeping began in 1932, with a rainfall deficit of 8.27 inches as of Marchs end. Dry conditions are expected to continue. Many experts believe that the Floridan Aquifer, which supplies almost all of our drinking water, is incapable of sustaining the fast paced growth of our state. Conservation is the most cost effective and easiest way to overcome this issue. It is very expensive to use other water sources and bring them up to drinking water standards. There are many ways that we can conserve water and not be inconvenienced. Lowflow showerheads are a great way to start. In fact, the Southwest Florida Water Management District has awarded a grant to the Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District to purchase these devices. They will be given away to citizens who bring in their old high-flow models at events that are forthcoming. These low-flow devices can cut your shower water usage by about two-thirds and you probably wont even notice any difference. Watch your local papers for information about give-a-way days! Another way to conserve water is to capture it. Thats right, I did say capture! During a typical rain storm that produces one inch of rain in a 24-hour period, approximately 700 gallons of water will run off your roof. If you have a rain barrel, you could collect that water and use it to water plants, saving plenty of water and money on your utility bill! Rain barrels are inexpensive and no trouble. They just sit there and capture water. You can purchase one at your local County Extension Office located at the Bert J. Harris Agricultural Center in Sebring for a very small amount of money. Now here is an unpopular subject, but we all need to follow the water restrictions! It is estimated that over 50 percent of residential water is used for irrigation purposes. Everyone wants a beautiful, lush, green lawn, but there are ways you can conserve and still have one. Never water between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. This is the hottest part of the day and most of the water will simply evaporate anyway. In the winter months between December and February, the grass is dormant so you dont need to water it as often. Once every two weeks is usually sufficient. When we do get those heavy rains, turn off your sprinkler system! No need for overkill. Make sure your irrigation system is in top shape by having it inspected or checking it out yourself. If a sprinkler is aimed toward the driveway or road, change the position and water the grass instead. If you have a leak or other water wasting issue, get it fixed. Not only will you save water, but your bill will be less. And if youre like me, you dont water your lawn and have the ugliest yard in the neighborhood because you dont want to use up all that precious liquid. There are still ways to save! If you have kids, you know they love to keep that faucet running when theyre in the bathroom. Dont allow it; turn the water off when brushing teeth, washing the face and hands. Wet it, turn it off, lather and turn it back on when ready to rinse! Once they get used to it, it will become a good habit! SWFWMD Lawn watering schedule Lawn watering is limit ed to twice per week. Lawn watering days and times are as follows unless your city or county has a different schedule or stricter hours in effect: Even addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Locations without a di scernable address, such as rights-of-way and other com mon areas inside a subdivision, may water on Tuesday and/or Friday before 10 a.m or after 4 p.m. Corine Burgess is the Natural Resources Specialist for the Highlands County Natural Resources Department assisting the Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District (www.highlandsswcd.org). April is Water Conservation Month, so watch your usage News From The Watershed Corine Burgess

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By PAULDERGARABEDIAN For The Associated PressLOS ANGELES U niversals animated Hop h ad a much-better-thane xpected $37.5 million debut l ast weekend at the nations t heaters and should be the f irst film this year to repeat at t he top of the chart, munchi ng on a gross in the low to m id $20 million range. Russell Brand is the voice o f Hops E.B., the wannabe r ockstar son of the Easter B unny. He could also be the king o f the box office if he mana ges a one-two finish this w eekend as the star of the d ebuting Arthur. The W arner Bros.remake of the m assively successful Dudley M oore classic is expected to e arn about $15 million. As the drunken and spoiled r ich kid, Brand is the perfect c hoice to take over the title r ole, and Helen Mirren elev ates the proceedings with a n ew twist on John Gielguds H obson. Both the family audience a nd comedy fans are theref ore covered this weekend, so Hanna from Focus Features will fill the action bill with a take-no-prisoners thriller that features Saoirse Ronan in the title role as a 16-year-old assassin. Channeling the spirit of such female-based action films as La Femme Nikita and The Professional, Hanna should draw both men and women to the multiplex with a gross in the low to mid teens. Two more newcomers are expected to round out the top five: Universals R-rated comedy Your Highness, and Sonys inspirational Soul Surfer. Spring has arrived and the park is bursting with life. Gaze into the lush green canopy of the Hammock or come delight o ver wildflowers springing u p in the flatwoods. Spring b irds are abundant now. L ook for swallow-tailed k ites, yellow-billed cuckoos, r ed-headed woodpeckers, g reat crested flycatchers and n orthern parulas. Whitet ailed deer are seen nearly e very day and alligators laze a bout in the swamps. What a wonderful time to v isit the park. Its not too h ot and theres no worry a bout afternoon thunders torms for another six weeks o r so. Come take advantage o f the extra daylight hours. B ring the kids out in the late a fternoon and toss a football o r ride your bikes. Take a c ruise around the Loop D rives bike path or enjoy t he off-road bicycle trail. Havent been camping in a w hile? Make a reservation to r elax by the campfire while t he kids enjoy the playg round and make new f riends. This time of year is p erfect-no pesky bugs to b other you and weekdays are q uiet and peaceful. W eekends remain busy until t he end of May. Its also a great time of y ear for enjoying an evening c oncert. Saturday, April 16, B illy Glades performs his F lorida Folk music beginn ing at 7 p.m. Concert ticke ts are just $5 per person a nd accompanied kids age 1 2 and under are admitted f ree of charge. Park admiss ion is waived after 6 p.m. o n concert nights, making t his an affordable evening o ut. Why not camp that w eekend so you can relax all d ay, enjoy the concert and s till have time for smores b efore bed. If campings not your t hing, plan a picnic for M others Day. Park admiss ion is reduced for any famil y bringing mom with t hem on Mothers Day. Dad d oesnt need to feel left out b ecause hell receive the s ame discount on Fathers D ay. Pack a picnic or bring a c ooler of BBQ fixings and grill with the family. Dont forget to check out the new Seven Lakes day use area on County Road 635. Admission to this picnic area is included with your regular park admission. The lake front offers a relaxing vista to enjoy during your meal. Tram tours continue to be scheduled at 1 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 1 and 2:30 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays throughout the summer season. Tours offer a chance to enjoy remote areas of the park from the comfort of an open-air tram with a ranger narrating along the way. Alligators, turtles and wading birds are often seen, making this an extremely popular way to enjoy the park. As our snowbirds depart for the north, demand for this popular program decreases and tickets are more widely available. Tickets may be purchased the day of the tram at the Ranger Station beginning at 8 a.m. Adult tickets are just $5 per person and youth tickets (ages 6-12) are $3. Accompanied children age five and under may ride free of charge. Private tours can be scheduled according to staff availability and arrangements may be made by calling the ranger station at 386-6094. With all there is to do, perhaps the simplest thing gets overlooked. Daily park admission is still just $6.00 per vehicle for up to eight people per car. The park offers nine different nature trails to explore and I bet its been a long time since youve walked some of them. Do you remember the 1,000-year-old tree at the Big Oak Trail? Chances are it looks quite a bit different than you remember. The huge oak on the Hickory Trail with the burned out bottom is still there waiting for you to step inside. Have you seen the Fern Garden Trail now that the historic waterways been restored? Fern the alligator is back and maybe youll even see the otters swimming around. Dont forget that you are always welcome to bring your dog out for a walk or borrow a pair of binoculars at the ranger station to see whats out here in the Real Florida. For more information about the park, contact the Ranger Station at 386-6094 or visit our Web site at www.FloridaStateParks.org/h ighlandshammock. Floridas state parks will be fee-free or discounted on the following days in 2011: Sunday, May 8 Mothers Day 50 percent entry fee for families with mothers* Sunday, June 19 Fathers Day 50 percent entry fee for families with fathers* Sunday, July 17 National Park and Recreation Day Free for all* Sunday, September 11 Literacy Month Free with library card, library book or donation of family-friendly book* Friday, November 11 Veterans Day Free for all* (*Excludes the Skyway Fishing Pier State Park.) Dorothy L. Harris is a Park Services Specialist at Highlands Hammock State Park. Page 12BNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011www.newssun.com CROSSWORDSOLUTION ARTS& LEISURE Save some money, make some memories with a trip to a state park Courtesy photo Highlands Hammock State Parks newest picnic area off of County Road 635 has opened recently on the Seven Lakes property. The Real Florida Dorothy L. Harris Courtesy photo A group of red-bellied turtles sun themselves along the tram tour route at Highlands Hammock State Park. Special to the News-SunLAKE PLACID The Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative is excited that pergamano artist Mary Behler has been selected as the Artist of the Month for April. Parchment was invented in Turkey and used throughout Europe for books, maps and other important documents until the 18th century. The Catholic church used parchment to decorate devotional pictures with perforations and lovely elements in relief. Real parchment was expensive and very difficult to find so people started using parchment paper in the 19th century and from the moment parchment paper was introduced, parchment craft began developing into a creative handcraft. Behler has been a pa rt time resident of Lake Plac id for the past 17 years. S he first became acquaint ed with the Caladium Arts an d Crafts Co-op when s he signed up for fabric pain ting classes with Ma ry Gephart, a long-time mem ber and instructor. After 1 4 years, she discover ed pergamano (parchme nt craft). It has become h er passion. It is a unique for m of artwork and Behler us es fabric, flowers and oth er embellishments to make h er creations interesting. You can find her card s, pictures and free standin g art forms on display at t he Caladium Arts and Craf ts Cooperative at 132 E. Interlake Blvd. in La ke Placid. Call 699-5940 or visit the website www.cal adiumarts.org for furth er information. Behler named Co-op Artist of the Month Courtesy pho to The work of pergamano artist Mary Behler is on display at the Caldium Co-op in Lake Placid. NEWS-SUN Box office preview: Hop on top again

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, April 10, 2011Page 13B DIVERSIONS THEPLAYSTHETHINGBy DOUG PETERSON ACROSS 1 Cause for fishing hole excitement 5 Gate approx. 8 Fleshy-snouted mammal 13 Fearless Fosdicks creator 19 Airline with a Ben Gurion hub 20 Book flap feature 21 Ridiculous 22 Comfortable shoe 23 *Theyre educational and stackable 26 Unlearned 27 Long-tailed songbird 28 Shade of green 29 Its done in some circles 31 Sturdy wagon 32 Santa __ winds 33 Actor Estevez 36 A Taste of Honey dramatist 38 *Construction set invented by Frank Lloyd Wrights son 41 DMV document 42 Vaqueros plain 46 Arles affirmatives 47 *Street hockey gear 50 Port-du-__: French cheese 53 Script section 55 Word between surnames 56 PBS series since 1974 57 City SSW of Moscow 58 Breezy good-byes 60 QBs try 62 First name among disrespected comedians? 64 Pollution-free power sources 66 Links highlight 67 Itty-bitty, in Inverness 68 Rochester, N.Y., institution whose inductees include the eight answers to the starred clues 75 Jenny, e.g. 76 Reliable Sources airer 77 Picnic favorite 78 Tiny bit 82 Tool used in a bed 83 Swedish imports 84 Winged goddess 85 War of 1812 shipbuilding port 86 Half a dance 88 Gone With the Wind Oscar winner 90 Dramatist Chekhov 91 *Shipping container 94 How __ refuse? 96 Hardly posh 97 s missile shield prog. 98 *Dual-knobbed drawing device 104 Home of Chichn Itz 107 Hullabaloo 108 Bingo! 109 Crime lab item 112 Not spontaneous 114 Come up short 115 King Lear daughter 117 Ripped to pieces 119 *Kindergartners boxful 122 Mystical secrets 123 True Grit, for one 124 20th-century composer Harris 125 Logical connector 126 1943 Allied conference site 127 Campout treat 128 34th pres. 129 Look to be DOWN 1 Little help here, bud? 2 Fighting team 3 __ Zee Bridge 4 Pre-coll. catchall 5 Flows counterpart 6 Ascot fasteners 7 Im listening! 8 Up to, in brief 9 __ Amours: 1984 Csar Award-winning film 10 Walked worriedly 11 Bygone writing aid 12 Able to overcome adversity 13 Bring into harmony 14 Contemporary of Boris 15 *Board game with color-coded cards 16 Where some worship from 17 Anti-leather gp. 18 Zebras, to lions 24 Did lunch, say 25 Scott of Happy Days 30 Iridescent jewelry material 34 1,051, to Hadrian 35 Fiends of fantasy 37 Buckskin source 39 What else __ do? 40 Elroy, to George Jetson 43 Oodles 44 Snow in Milano 45 Anthem beginning 48 Percolate 49 Sunday deliveries 50 Planted 51 Turandot highlight 52 Period of sacrifice 53 O.T. prophet 54 Bulk-purchase club 58 1988 A.L. MVP 59 Funds for later yrs. 61 Leaves home? 63 Bozos 65 Newborn Arabian 66 Objectivism advocate Rand 67 Healthy portion 69 Spaghetti pkg. unit 70 Remini of The King of Queens 71 Author Flagg 72 Hit the ground 73 Speedy shark 74 Idyllic setting 78 Gumshoes 79 Dies __ 80 Flag 81 *Cuddly bedmate 82 Crunchy Mexican munchies 83 NBAs __ Man of the Year Award 87 Tackles 89 Classified letters 90 Capital south of the Black Sea 92 Mitt Romneys alma mater: Abbr. 93 Family tree, e.g. 94 Peninsula north of Marthas Vineyard 95 Silent communication syst. 99 Groovy! 100 Three Stooges family name 101 First non-European literature Nobelist (1913) 102 Meter feeders need 103 Quaint carriage 105 It covers D.C. 106 Groovy! 109 Fans factoid 110 Modeled 111 Raise, as an eyebrow 113 Tannery worker 116 Checks out 118 Uruguayan article 120 Stuff in a seam 121 Sourdough alternative Solution on page 12B DearAbby: I am currently d eployed in Afghanistan. My best f riends little sister, Brittany, has h ad a crush on me for years. She h as been straightforward about what s he wants marriage, kids, white p icket fence, etc. She has always b een like a little sister, so it has b een awkward. I thought it was w eird for a 15-year-old (at the time) t o say that to an older soldier on R &R. During my deployment Brittany h as sent me care packages loaded w ith cookies. Maybe I should have k ept my mouth shut about my w eakness for homemade cookies, b ut hindsight is 20/20. Brittany has n ow called in the bribe by inviting m e to her senior prom. Not wanting t o mess with the steady supply of b aked goods, I said yes. I figure its a n appropriate way to say thanks for t he cookies. I intend to make sure Brittany enjoys her prom with her medalcovered arm candy, but I need to let her know that while Im flattered she thinks so highly of me, Im not interested in dating her. I love her like a sister. I dont want to break her heart. Any suggestions for a guy whos about as subtle as a tank rolling down a cobblestone road on a Sunday? Medal-Covered Eye Candy DearEye Candy: How long has it been since youve seen Brittany? When you return for that prom, she will no longer be that precocious 15-year-old you remember. By all means show her a nice evening. But dont say anything you might regret or you may have to eat your words instead of those cookies. If youre not romantically interested, youll date other women and Brittany will catch on soon enough. And you may find that after her glamorous evening with her medal-covered war hero, she sets her sights on someone other than you. Stranger things have happened. DearAbby: Spring is here, and with it comes the wedding season. Would you please inform your readers about the importance of answering wedding RSVPs? Alot of people appear to need reminding about the need to respond. Thanks! Mother of a Bride and Groom DearMother: Im glad to oblige and congratulations on the double blessing thats coming your way in gaining both a daughter and a son! Readers: When a formal invitation is received, you should immediately return the RSVPcard thats enclosed with it. RSVPis the abbreviation for the French phrase Repondez sil vous plait, which means Please reply. Its important for the people planning the affair to know how many guests will attend so they can be properly provided for for obvious reasons. So please be polite and dont keep them wondering. DearAbby: Im in love with a woman named Camille who has three children from three different fathers. She has never been married. She also has a male friend whom she has her children calling Daddy even though hes not. I have loved Camille for 20 years, and our paths recently crossed again. When I first meet her, she had only one child. Camille says she loves me and wants us to be married, but Im having a hard time accepting that a ll of these childrens fathers will be part of our life as well as the friend. Can a psychologist help me get past this? Devoted in Bloomingto n, Min n. DearDevoted: I dont know. B ut before you take this relationship further, you should DEFINITELY see one. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Soldier going to senior prom practices back off boogaloo Violence knocks at our d oors through the nightly n ews; television programs a nd movies; video and comp uter games; music; newspap er headlines, and, for some, t he actual living of it. Whether we want to a ccept it or not, evil exists a nd manifests itself through p eoples selfish and tainted m otives that are the evidence o f sin. We dont use the word sin v ery often. It seems archaic t o us. But ignoring it doesnt c hange the facts. Sin has disi ntegrated the world we live i n and how we think and act. A nd that is why we need to a cknowledge that we cant m anage on our own; but, n eed a Savior. When man first sinned in t he Garden of Eden by heedi ng the devils question, Did God really say? he m entally doubted God and g ave into the temptation to b e in control overruling what h e knew to be true. Sin i nstantly gripped mans soul i n that act of disobedience. But, God, in his great mercy, still longing for a relationship with his creation, made a way of escape. In due time, God took on human form through Jesus and gave himself as a ransom for our sin. By so doing, he bridged the gap that sin had created. But, its still our choice to receive his free gift. Once we come into relationship with God again, things change for us. Though we remain in this sin tainted world, we are not of it. And God gives us peace with him and peace within ourselves even when things seem out of control. Thats why it is so important to teach our children to know and love God. The more we speak of him and praise him, the more likely it is that they, too, will want a relationship with him. They will want what they see we have. The school of thought that children should be free to find their own way has proven as false as it was at the outset. Children need loving discipline, guidelines and direction. And they look to us to give it to them. They mature and develop best within parameters that ensure safety, love and freedom. Once again, we see the truth of this as we go back to Gods word in Isaiah 54:13, NKJV, where we are reminded, All your children shall be taught by the Lord, and great shall be the peace of your children. What a wonderful promise. Do we want our children to have Gods peace within and be children of peace? Help them be taught of the Lord. Selah Jan Merop of Sebring is a NewsSun correspondent and an award-winning writer. Teaching children the way of peace Pause And Consider Jan Merop Dear Abby Metro ServicesAries (March 21-April 20) Aries, its hard to concentrate this week but you have to try to devote your attention to the task at hand. Avoid distractions and focus on the job that needs to be done. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Taurus, youre itching for a change but you dont know whether it should be a career change or a change in location. Think it over a little more. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Gemini, a cloud of uncertainty is looming over an important relationship. Theres no surefire way to know if this person is a keeper. You can only hang in there. Cancer(June 22-July 22) Cancer, just when you thought you had your mind made up something changes your entire line of thinking. Embrace this new line of thought. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Leo, return to your comfort zone to ease some nerves and concerns. Take a calm, methodical approach to life this week and reap the rewards. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Virgo, take some time to yourself the next few days because the coming days figure to be hectic. Its time to start thinking about a vacation. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Libra, opportunities to further your education present themselves in the coming days. Think about these opportunities carefully before making any decisions. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 2 2) Scorpio, until you sett le down, expect your finances to be in a bit of disarray. It m ay be good to sit down with a planner and work through t he bigger issues. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-De c. 21) Unless you open up to others, you wont be makin g many friends this week. T ry to explore other opportuniti es for socialization, Sagittariu s. It could get lonely. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Ja n. 20) Theres more to yo u than you let others se e, Capricorn. Sometimes lea ving a little mystery can be a good thing. But dont let it g et in the way of relationships. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Fe b. 18) Dont hold out on som eone who has been counting o n you, Aquarius. When yo u look at your schedule, yo u will find you have time to fit everything in. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 2 0) You may have to do a litt le damage control, Pisces. Th is week simply swallow yo ur pride and get things done. Famous birthdaysApril 10 Mandy Moor e, singer, 27; April 11 Jo ss Stone, singer, 24; April 12 Claire Danes, actress, 3 2; April 13 Rick Schrode r, actor, 41; April 14 Adri en Brody, actor, 38; April 15 Seth Rogen, actor, 29; Ap ril 16 Ellen Barkin, actress, 5 6. You may have to do a little damage control this week, Pisces Horoscope

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LIVING 14B PAGE News-Sun Sunday, April 10, 2011 FAMILYFEATURES I t seems as if parents spend a lot of time trying to get their kids to clean up or, better yet, to not make a mess in the first place. But guess what? Getting messy can actually be good for kids. Clinical research shows that creative, messy activities like c ooking and baking engage all of a childs senses, helping t hem explore new ideas and teaching them how to solve probl ems. It a lso provides valuable time together, as well as an opportunity t o teach basic math skills, cleaning habits and nutrition. To unlock a childs fullest potential, cooking activities, even a s simple as pouring and mixing, are recommended at least t hree to four times a week, said Karen Deerwester, child d evelopment expert and founder of Family Time, Inc. According to Deerwester, children shape their own learning b y transforming unpredictable, messy experiences into crea tive, purposeful action. These mess-to-morsel experiences t each children a critical life skill called executive function, s he said, which is a childs ability to self-manage behavior a nd negotiate age-appropriate challenges and obstacles. F urthermore, these types of activities teach kids to take risks, l earn from mistakes and create out-of-the-box solutions. Children learn through play, so Deerwester encourages pare nts t o cook up a mess with their children on a regular basis. These t ips and ideas will help you create a powerful and fun l earning experience for your child. For more information and ideas for messy play activities, v isit www.facebook.com/clorox.Photo courtesy of Getty Images Photo courtesy of Getty ImagesCreativemessycookingisgoodforkids HowtocookupamesswithkidsnBaking and basic food assembly is the easiest way to branch into messy culinary play. Cut up fruits and vegetables to make fun faces, or simply mix together homemade dough to play with and shape. (See recipes.)nAge is just a number! Allow even the youngest chef to help by pouring ingredients like flour, sugar and eggs into a bowl.nStart simple. No-bake cookies, smoothies and sandwiches are a great start. If using a cookbook, start with one that has pictures for each instruction.nPour on the praise! No matter the outcome, always encourage their effort. Remember, practice makes perfect. nSpills happen. Take it in stride and simply use the opportunity to teach clean-up. Clean applicable surfaces with Clorox Clean-Up Cleaner with Bleach, especially after using eggs or raw meat. Get started on some creative kitchen play with these homemade play doughs and fun toast art. Love ToastToast is for more than just eating. White bread is an excellent canvas for making mealtime extra special. Simply paint bread with milk mixed with food coloring and then toast. For some extra fun, cut toast into a special shape using a seasonal cookie cutter. For a fruity flavor twist, create paint out of water and flavored powdered gelatin mix.Best Play Dough Ever2 cups flour 1 cup salt 1 teaspoon cream of tartar 2 tablespoons oil 1 teaspoon food coloring 2 cups water Mix ingredients in saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly until dough leaves sides of the pan. Remove from pan. When cool to the touch, knead for a few minutes. Play dough can be stored in the refrigerator for weeks in an airtight container.Edible Peanut Butter Play Dough*1 cup peanut butter 1 cup powdered milk 1/4 cup honey Optional texture items: raisins, coconut, crushed graham crackers Mix the first three ingredients in a large bowl until smooth. Add optional texture items. *Not forchildren with peanut allergies.Chocolate Play Dough1 1/4 cup flour 1/2 cup cocoa powder 1/2 cup salt 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar 1 1/2 tablespoons cooking oil 1 cup boiling water Combine flour, cocoa powder, salt, and cream of tartar. Add cooking oil and boiling water. Stir quickly and mix well. Cook over low heat until dough forms a ball. When cool, knead with hands. Refrigerate and store in an airtight container. Smells great, but is not really sweet enough to eat.