<%BANNER%>
The news-sun
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01026
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 04-08-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:01026
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

NEWS-SUN Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Friday-Saturday, April 8-9, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 41 | 50 cents www.newssun .com 079099401001 HighLow 88 67Complete Forecast PAGE 6A Mostly sunny and a little warmer Forecast Question: Do you think you will be able to retire with financial security? Next question: Have you seen signs that the local economy is improving? www.newssun .com Make your voice heard at Online Phone ... 385-6155Fax ... 385-2453Online: www.newssun.com Yes 18.7% No 81.3% Total votes: 91 Classifieds11A Community Briefs2A Community Calendar12B Dear Abby13B Editorial & Opinion4A Healthy Living10B Lottery Numbers2A Movie Reviews13B Religion5B Police Blotter2A Sports On TV2B Index Greet the season with some serious scrubbing PAGE14B Streaking StreaksSebring stays hot for sixth straight victory SPORTS, 1BTesting TimeStudents, teachers ready for FCAT, which starts Monday PAGE2A Photo by INGRID UTECH Dr. Priyamvada Gujjar takes a patient's vital signsat the Highlands County Health Department. Editor's Note: This is the second of a three-part series about the medically uninsured.By INGRID UTECH Special to the News-SunApatient came to the Highlands County Health Department experiencing pain. He was diagnosed with a hernia and needed surgery. He had been unemployed for several months, had no health insurance, and could not afford an operation. The Health Department arranged for a local surgeon to perform the surgery at no charge to the patient. Apatient at Samaritan's Touch Care Center, a free clinic that serves the uninsured, had a growth on her lung. STCC referred her to Florida Hospital Heartland Division for a free biopsy, which showed that she had cancer. Through STCC's intervention, she was admitted to Moffitt Cancer Center, where she had surgery to remove the cancerous growth and where she stayed until the lung healed. Moffitt did not charge for its services. These patients were fortunate to get the assistance they needed from clinics, hospitals, and doctors in Highlands County, where the number of uninsured children stands at 20 percent and the number of uninsured adults at 36 percent. Highlands County Health DepartmentThe Highlands County Health Department operates medical clinics i n Sebring and Lake Placid and dental clinics for clients six months to 20 years of age in Sebring, Lake Placid and Avon Park. Uninsured clients whose incomes ar e at or below 100 percent of the Federal Plenty of challenges face local agencies that serve medically uninsured See AGENCIES, page 9A By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK The Avon Park Exploratory Recall Committee made several announcements during a meeting on Wednesday night. The exploratory committee publicly announced their selection of a committee chair, naming Avon Park citizen Jennifer Aviles to head their efforts. Aviles, a registered nurse, stated that she was a long time resident of Avon Park who was not pleased with the current events. "I am happy to do this. I have lived here most of my life, and I am currently seeing things I do not agree with," Aviles said at the meeting. "There are some major violations of the (city) charter, city ordinances and personnel rules and regulations and the council is part of that problem. Something has to be done to fix this, and the council is ignoring these obvious violations. "Most of the items that are being ignored have been presented to the council on more than one occasion in an open meeting, and they are still ignoring them. When the council ignores these things, it is up to the people to fix the problem. There is no other recourse," said Aviles. "I am concerned with the flagrant violations of city policy and the law. This has got to stop. Although the firing of Bruce Behrens was a trigger, a lot of these grievances have been going on f or some time," she said. About 15 people show ed up to express their ang er under the pavilion in t he warm evening air behind t he Moose Lodge, claiming th at poor communications ke pt the group from getting bi gger, but each individual pre sRecall group announces committee chair and filing date News-Sun file photo by KATARASIMMON S The Circle will be the center of a proposed entertainment district in downtown Sebring. By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK The Ridge Area Arc received notice that emergency cuts in state funding has slashed its budget $30,000 per month effective Apr. 1. "It was no April Fool's joke. That's that we thought it was, but it's no joke," said Rhonda Beckman, CEO of the Arc on Thursday. "The Arc has discontinued companion, in-home, and personal care services and has given notice to the Agency for Persons with Disabilities of our intent to close the Valencia Group Home," Beckman said in an e-mail to consumers and their families. The Ridge Area Arc is a private, not for profit 501(c)3 organization, which was founded in 1957 by Franklyn and Mary Ellen Ward for their son Rob. Arc provides services to people with developmental disabilities throughout Central Florida. Beckman said that all told, every one of the 190 consumers will feel the crunch, but immediately 16 consumers are directly effected. "We have five ladies in a group home that need to be It does not look good' Slashed funding cuts Arc services We can survive the 90 days until July 1, but I am not sure what happens after that.'RHONDABECKMAN Arc CEO See RECALL, page 8A By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEYchristopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Members of the City Council unanimously voted to proceed with the creation of a Community Redevelopment Entertainment District during their regular Tuesday night meeting. Pete Pollard, executive director of the CRA, spoke before the council to explain why the CRA supported the idea. "An entertainment district has been under discussion for several years," he said. "We wanted to create a more conducive investment environment downtown and it seemed to make the most sense." Pollard added, "There is a move back downtow n. The trend in the country is toward mixed use. Aclu ster of restaurants creates a destination, creating a li fe after five." Basically, an entertai nment district is a defin ed area where, "a major p riority for business recru itment is established f or restaurants, sports bar s, taverns, and pubs." Other businesses li ke night clubs, offering li ve music, dancing or karao ke are also encouraged. Gene Brenner, chairm an of the CRAadvisory com mittee and downtow n property owner, echo ed Sebring seeks life after five' Proposed entertainment district would open downtown to restaurants, taverns and pubs See SEBRING, page 7A See ARC, page 8A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Ridge Area arc consumer Amelia Titus is upset Thursday because of state funding cuts that will affect her current living arrangements in Avon Park. Titus lives at the Valencia Group Home, which will be shut down due to funding. Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and PAGE2A

PAGE 2

Page 2ANews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com April 6 21521222445x:5Next jackpot $7 millionApril 2 82134353740x:4 March 30 3910203152x:3 April 6 324293435 April 5 412263336 April 4 2125313233 April 3 1924283136 April 6 (n) 5865 April 6 (d) 9482 April 5 (n) 3531 April 5 (d) 7723 April 6(n) 13 0 April 6 (d) 05 3 April 5 (n) 14 9 April 5(d) 98 3 April 5 213212418 April 1 723323617 March 29 2726319 March 25 623323618 April 6 1018415556 PB: 15 PP: 2Next jackpot $20 millionApril 2 622344345 PB: 23 PP: 2 March 30 1920425658 PB: 37 PP: 4 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center After becoming the f irst female soldier since W orld War II to be a warded the Silver Star, S gt. Leigh Ann Hester w as asked about the hist oric nature of her a chievement. "It really doesn't have a nything to do with being a female," the humble h ero told the American F orces Press Service in 2 005. "It's about the d uties I performed that d ay as a soldier." Hester, now a police o fficer in Tennessee who r ecently re-enlisted in the A rmy National Guard, w as only 23 years old w hen terrorists ambushed h er convoy on March 20, 2 005 in Iraq. After several soldiers i n her military police unit s uffered gunshot wounds, H ester, along with Sgt. 1 st Class Timothy Nein, l ater awarded the D istinguished Service C ross, and Sgt. Jason M ike, later awarded the S ilver Star, bravely c harged out of their H umvees. The soldiers, p utting themselves b etween the enemy and t heir exposed convoy, led a ferocious counterattack t hat killed 27 insurgents a nd led to the capture of s even more. While Hester's remarka ble story is one of the m ost prominent examples o f post-9/11 heroism by a w oman, many more s hould also touch the h eart of a nation that o ften holds up actresses, s ingers and models as e xamples of women at the p innacle of American s ociety. Spc. Faith Hinkley, 23, w as excited about her u pcoming return home w hen a rocket struck the I raqi office building she w as working inside on A ug. 7, 2010. The former h igh school cheerleader, w ho volunteered to leave h er loved ones behind a nd serve our nation, r eturned home to C olorado in a flag-draped c asket. "As a soldier, she died f ighting for our country," C helsea Bowsher-Venable w rote to me four days a fter her best friend's d eath. "But through her p assing, I know she will s ave so many lives just b y inspiring others t hrough her goodness, s elflessness, and sincerit y." Sgt. Trista Moretti s tarted Army basic traini ng on June 12, 2003, less t han three months after t he invasion of Iraq. In a t rue act of bravery, she r e-enlisted in 2005, one t he conflict's toughest y ears, fully aware that a d eployment was probably o n the horizon. Moretti, w ho was known for her d istinctive laugh and r elentless pursuit of a dventure, was killed in I raq on June 25, 2007. "I would have chosen T rista above almost all o ther soldiers I had the p leasure of serving with i n the Army, to be the one w atching my back in a f oxhole," Austin G oodman posted on F acebook last month. She was an awesome American women See MY, page 9B POLICEBLOTTER The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Wednesday, April 6: Deborah Sue Batson, 52, of Sebring, was charged with driving while license suspended. Jack Wiliard Bish, 65, of Avon Park, was charged with battery. Georgia Benita Cocca, 21, of Sebring was charged with battery. Geraldine Cummings, 53, of Lakeland, was charged with probation violation. Abbi Melissa Gray, 23, of Lake Placid, was charged with probation violation. Michael Scott Knapp, 31, of Lake Placid, was charged with possession of drug equipment and possession of marijuana. Benny Jose Madison, 27, of Lake Placid, was booked on an out-of-county warrant for non-support. Guillermo Martinez, 27, of Avon Park, was charged with driving with an expired license. Kimyatta Monique Pringle, 27, of Avon Park, was charged with failure to appear. Maria Sue Robinson, 37, of Sebring, was charged with removing a minor, interfering with custody of a minor, perjury, neglecting a child without great harm and obstructing a criminal investigation. Sherly Lynn Secory, 51, of Sebring, was charged with possession of cocaine. Susan Willis Trammell, 48, of Lake Placid, was charged with possession of a controlled substance without a prescription. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Tuesday, April 5: Giovonnie Boada, 21, of Sebring, was charged with failure to appear reference driving with license suspended/removed. Melissa Ashley Crawford, 27, of Fort Meade, was arrested an out-of-county warrant reference no support. Joseph Leroy Francione, 18, of Avon Park, was charged with controlled substance without prescription, operating a motor vehicle without a valid license, and possession and or use of drug equipment. Troy Leon Gordon, 23, of Continued on page 8A By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Elementary and middle schoolers have been happy about not having homework this week, but the same can not be said about the upcoming week. Beginning Monday, students from grades 3 to 11 will be knee deep in science, math and reading questions. Of course, most students aren't too thrilled about it. "We don't have homework this week so school was great today, but that's because we have FCAT next week," said Woodlawn third grader Jarek Kitchens, his smile turning to a slight frown. The Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test is scheduled to begin Monday and end April 22. Students will take different portions of the test during the next two weeks, according to grade level. Following this summer's two separate audits of the FCATscores, many administrators and teachers hav e found themselves a little on edge regarding the assessment. Teachers are hopeful that this year's te st goes smoothly. Parents and students have also been buckling down and preparing for th e test. Moms like Jenny Stephens have their hands full trying to balance stud y time and fun time leading up to next week. Stephens has two boys revving up for the FCAT. Kayne Kitchens is a fourth-grader at Woodlaw n, the younger son. Jarek Kitchens, will be taking the assessment for the firs t time as a third-grader. The boys haven't been riding their bikes or tossing the football around in the yard as much in the afternoons as they have in prior weeks. Oldest son Kayne did quite well on the FCAT last year, however the mathematics portion of th e FCATwas his lowest scor Students, teachers prepare for upcoming FCAT Chalk Walk Art Competition to highlight Gallery WalkSEBRING The Sebring High School Art Students will be competing in a Chalk Walk Art Competition on today in Historic Downtown Sebring. The chalk art will take place on the sidewalks from 5:007:45 p.m. as 12 teams, comprised of four students each, create themed art for the public to enjoy. The winners will be chosen by the public who will vote for their favorite Chalk Walk Art. The Downtown Sebring merchants have contributed money that will be awarded to the winning team. Historic Downtown Sebring's monthly Gallery Walk will be also be held today from 5-8 p.m. Many Downtown Sebring merchants offer extended hours so attendees can shop in Sebring's charming boutiques and art galleries. Street vendors will offer art and jewelry along the sidewalks. For more information visit GalleryWalkSebring.com. Five artists of the month honoredSEBRING For April's Gallery Walk, the Yellow House Gallery and Gift Shop will be featuring not just one, but five Artists of the Month. The aptly-named Five Fine Artists show will feature the paintings of Mary Bouteiller, Tom Bruha, Norma Evans, Agnes Laiosa, and Ingrid Strope. There is sure to be something to delight everyone in the different styles of these five painters. The reception will be from 5-8 p.m. today at the Yellow House and the work will continue to be exhibited throughout the month of April. There will be light food and beverages as well as music and admission is free to the public. The Best of Pops' concert tonightSEBRING The Heartland Pops will present "Best of the Pops" today at 7 p.m., at Faith Lutheran COMMUNITYBRIEFS By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEYchristopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING As of Monday, a search committee of 11 members had received 51 applications for the Industrial Development Authority/Economic Development Commission's position of executive director, which opened when Dan Murphy left the office. "It looks like a strong field," said South Florida Community College President Norm Stephens, who chairs the committee, adding that applications have arrived from all over. He said the committee's responsibility is to narrow the field to a list of three to seven finalists, each of whom will be interview ed by the board of directors. While applications w ill be accepted until the pos ition is filled, Stephens sa id there is a schedule and it is already almost too late to apply. The screening committ ee has already started wor k. The finalists should be ch osen by early May, at whi ch time interviews will begi n. The goal is to make a fin al selection by the first we ek in June. The Heartland Workfor ce has and will continue to assist in the proces s, Stephens said for exam ple, communicating wi th applicants, developing eva luation tools and intervie w questions. Search on for IDA/EDC director Continued on page 5A News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Sebring Mayor George Hensley and members of Jack Stroup's family unveil a commerative plaque honoring Stroup at the civic center, now named in his honor. (From left) Charlie Stroup, Jack Stroup's wife; Hensley; Lori Macclain, his daughter; and Jack Jr. and Matt Stroup, his sons. By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Current officials, former coworkers, past mayors, friends and family turned out Wednesday evening to dedicate the city's civic center to the memory of long time city clerk Jack Stroup, who died in 2009. Speakers told anecdotes that described the kind of man Stroup was, and why so many people would gather to honor him. Mayor George Hensley spoke of the simpler days, back in the 1950s and early '60s, when there were fewer rules and regulations, and nothing like unfunded mandates. He added it sometimes made for complications. "(Stroup) had to herd all those people because everybody wanted to do their own thing," Hensley said. Shirley Kitchings, who worked with Stroup for 28 years, and followed him as city clerk, remembered Stroup as loving the town and a good laugh, but hating change orders making changes in building plans after they had been finalized and approved. When it came time to build the civic center now being named after him, Kitchings said Stroup decreed there would be no change orders. None. Civic center officially renamed in memory of Jack Stroup See FCAT, page 8A See STROUP, page 8A

PAGE 3

www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 3A

PAGE 4

Cannon wants to overhaul t he Florida Supreme Court, d ividing the seven-member b ody into two five-member c ourts. One would handle c ivil cases, the other criminal a ppeals, mostly death-penalt y cases. And force the c ourt's three senior justices a ppointed by Gov. Lawton C hiles Fred Lewis, B arbara Pariente and Peggy Q uince to sit on the crimin al appeals court. Cannon and his supporters s ay the measure, which w ould require voter approval i n 2012, is an efficiency m ove, because the high court i s hopelessly backlogged w ith death-penalty cases that c log the system and delay c ivil cases. That's a smoke screen. ... Here's what's really inspiring Cannon: Payback, and a broader desire to undermine the equal power of the judiciary and hand more over to the legislative and executive branches. The Supreme Court last year properly tossed off 2010 ballots three constitutional amendments proposed by the Legislature, stating they were unclear or deceptive, including one devised to block two anti-gerrymandering measures voters later passed by 63 percent. That angered Cannon, who is now fighting the popular Fair Districts mandates with a lawsuit. Splitting the high court in two tiers also would give Gov. Rick Scott the chance to stack it, appointing far-right ideologues to the three new seats. Keep in mind four of Florida's seven Supreme Court justices were appointed by Republican Govs. Jeb Bush and Charlie Crist, so its bench is hardly liberal. ... These and other measures gut the justice system's independence and deserve to be forcefully opposed by citizens. Only strong separation of powers in state government can prevent excesses by any one branch, a system of checks and balances that shouldn't be dismantled. There has been little noise from the Florida Senate about the court-bashing reforms, and Senate President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island, has not endorsed the proposals. He shouldn't allow the attack on judicial independence to gain steam, including as bargaining chips between the House and Senate in the session's last days. Page 4ANews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.comTODAY'SEDITORIALTODAY'SLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION Being a parent of high school and middle school children and also working within the school system, I find it hard to understand why more parents are not involved in their kids'education. From day one of my kids starting school I've always been involved and checked at the school on their progress or any other problems they are having in school. You hear parents complain about the system, but I can only speak of the school in which I'm employed. You hardly ever see parents coming to the school and check on their children's behavior or just to be there to see what's going on. Yes, you can check their grades at home on the computer if you're fortunate enough to own one, but being at the school and talking with the teachers and administrators face to face is a sure way to know what's really going on. You may think the teachers and administration don't want to be bothered, but trust me they welcome your cares and concerns. With the way things are going and the direction our governor and other politicians are wanting to take our education system, I suggest that you parents who sit back and only go to the school when your kid(s) come home and tell you the teacher, dean of students, or the assistant principal or principal did this or did that, just go to the school yourself before any of these problems occur. We all, me included, would love to believe everything our children tell us, but on the real we know our kids don't always tell us the entire story, just the parts that make them look good and the school look bad. We as parents have to be more involved in our children's education nowadays Back when we were in school, we had time to lear n and more teachers within o ur neighborhoods to help us along the way and there wa sn't as many tests and restric tions on our teachers and students as there are today. In order to make our schools and students more interesting, we have to be more involved in what's ha ppening at our kid's school. Don't just go eat lunch with them, sit in on some of thei r classes if it's allowed and i t is. Now, your high school kid(s) may not want you ea ting lunch with him/her but go eat with your grade school or middle school kid(s). I don't claim to be the best parent in the world, bu t I'm involved in my kid's education. And since I'm also at one of the schools here in Highlands County everyday, I try to help all o f our children as much as I can. If you're only involved i n your children's education when they're in trouble, that's not enough. With FCAT, shortage of teachers and all of the nonsense that goes on in our schools, let' s come together and help all our children and that's "Th e Bottom Line!" DeCaris T. Jones Sr. is an Avon Park resident and a retired Sebring police officer. Your kids' education ... get involved Another viewpoint A ttempted power grabs are everyday events from Florida lawmakers in Tallahassee, but this one is a stunner: An unprecedented, dangerous a ttack on the state judiciary system and c onstitutionally required separation of g overnmental powers coming from F lorida House Speaker Dean Cannon, RW inter Park, and other GOPlawmakers. The Bottom Line DeCaris T. Jones Sr. Obama care scam E ditor: Did you know that Obama gave t o GE billions for early retirement f rom our tax dollars when GE p ayed no tax. They had a $14 bill ion profit this year, and also to the U AW. He intends to give out $5 bill ion of our money for our grandkids t o try and pay for, while we are borr owing money. Is he trying to buy votes for 2 012? It can only be the reason. We h ave to stop Obama and Obama c are. C.F. Neeley Sebring A living document? E ditor: I recently attended a meeting of a n organization I belong to; what I h eard sent a chill through me. Adisc ussion ensued about changing the b y-laws of this particular entity, and t he term a "living document" was u sed. I do not have a problem with t he phrase itself; it is the underlying m eaning that may have prompted its u se. As with our Constitution, we h ave heard the phrase used, the idea o f it being a living document was a lready inherent in the constitution ( Article 5), in that it could be a mended by the will and vote of the p eople. What the progressive liberal c amp believes is that the law of the l and is set by case law or the opini ons of a majority of the nine judges o n the Supreme Court, rather than t he constitution. George Washington s tated, "The fundamental principle o f our Constitution ... enjoins that t he will of the majority shall prev ail." Not the majority of nine just ices setting on the Supreme Court. Thomas Jefferson agreed with George Washington: "The will of the majority [is] the natural law of every society [and] is the only sure guardian of the rights of man. Perhaps even this may sometimes err. But its errors are honest, solitary and short-lived." History has shown that it was the will of the majority that brought about the emancipation of slaves in this country, not by the minority decision of the courts, who by the way kept that bondage legal before the people outlawed it. The right of women to vote was made law by the majority of the people, not by a minority of women. The right of 18year-olds to vote was made possible by the majority of the people, not by a minority of 18-year-olds. Those who propose a living constitution point to the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education that banned segregation. The truth is congress passed a bill that banned segregation in 1875; in 1882 the unelected Supreme Court struck down this law, which congress could have annulled according to the Constitution. In 1896 the Court reaffirmed its position; however in 1954 the Court finally reversed itself, eighty years after the people had abolished segregation. The Supreme Court is subject to the Legislative & the Executive branches of government; these two branches are subject to the will of the people. Read your constitution. Larry J. Overfield SebringWedding Singer' worth a night outEditor: Highlands Little Theatre has done it one more time. "The Wedding Singer" was super. The people who don't go to watch it before its run ends April 10, just don't know what they will be missing. Anice night out with a chance to meet new people. Plus the opportunity to see a lot of great acting and dancing. "The Wedding Singer" has it all. Patty Young did a fine job as director. The set construction people sure knew what they were doing. As did sound and costume. Christoper Hayes, Christa Dorman, RoseMarie Tippins-Beringer, to name a few of the actors, were all outstanding. I do hope all of you out there who can afford a night out on the town will take in "The Wedding Singer." I am sure you will be glad you did. It sure beat setting home glued to the telly. Judee VanBrookhoven SebringWedding Singer' is full of humorEditor: "The Wedding Singer" is playing now at Highlands Little Theatre, and what a fun evening I had on Friday. The show is filled with adult humor, but it is laugh-out-loud humor. "The Wedding Singer" is high energy from the dancers, singers and all of the many characters in the musical. If you liked the movie, as I did, you will really like the stage version. It takes the movie a step further with lots of original music and over the top humor. The director, Patty Young, should be very proud of her cast and crew as this is a stellar production. The audience showed their pleasure with the experience by giving the performers a standing ovation, the ultimate theater compliment. The show I attended was pretty full, but did not appear to be sold out. Call the box office today or go online and reserve your seat before the show closes on Sunday. This is one show that you do not want to miss. Congratulations Highlands Little Theatre! Olivia Scott Avon Park BouquetWhat a great business community Editor: Forty-two businesses and private individuals provided products, gift certificates or discount cards in support of the 17th annual Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce Golf Classic held at the Placid Lakes Country Club last Saturday. Despite the difficult economy, businesses willingly provide unselfish support to the community and the chamber of commerce. Although the tournament was highly successful, the unseen winner is the community, given that the chamber uses gains from such events to sponsor civic events throughout the year, which anyone in the community can and do attend. Without our business community support, many chamber sponsored events would not be possible. Other events, when combined with the chamber's Web site, bring thousands of people to the community each year, helping to keep our businesses viable and infusing significant tax dollars into the county's economy. Please shop at or enlist the services of the following businesses. They make a difference in the com munity, so let's make a difference for them. Gift sponsors Above & Beyond Hair & Body, Ace Hardware/W& WLumber Company, Allaire's Hair & Nail Designs, Alpha Natural Food Company, Beef O Brady's, Blueberry Patch, Chef Buddy's Italian American Deli, Drafting Design of Lake Placid, Florida Hospital, Golden Corral Family Steak House, GHC Motorsports. Heartland Association of Realtors, Heartland National Bank, Heron's Garden Restaurant & Lounge, Highlands Independent Bank, Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites, Holiday Trinkets & Treasures, Home Depot, Home & Office Essentials, Home Town Network, Interlake Boulevard CafŽ Kasie's Collections, Ruth & Lione l LaGrow, Lake Country Jewelers, Lake Placid Embroidery & Boutique, Lake Placid Journal, La ke Placid Marine, Lockhart Service Center, Make'n the Dough, MIDFLORIDAFederal Credit Union, Moe's Coffee House, Molly's Trea ts & Ice Cream Shoppe, The 1 Park Place Company, Progress Energy, ReZultz Fitness 24/7, Salsa's Mexican Restaurant, Scrap, Paper, Scissors, Seacoast National Bank, Sebring International Raceway, Southern Lifestyle Assisted Living Facility, TD Bank, NATropical Island Wear, and Wings of Eagles. Thanks to all of the above businesses owners/managers, organiza tions, and private citizens for contributing to a successful golf tourn ament and bettering the community Marlene Barg er Lake Plac id LETTERSPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your addres s and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automati cally rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum o f 400 words. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; o r e-mail editor@newssun.com.

PAGE 5

Associated PressTOKYO Amagnitude7.4 aftershock rattled Japan on Thursday night, knocking out power across a large swath of the northern part of the country nearly a month after the devastating earthquake and tsunami that flattened the northeastern coast. Japan's meteorological agency issued a tsunami warning but canceled it about 90 minutes later. Officials said power was out in all of three northern prefectures (states) and in parts of two others. There were no immediate reports of serious injuries or damage. The aftershock was the strongest since the March 11 megaquake and tsunami that killed some 25,000 people, tore apart hundreds of thousands of homes and caused an ongoing crisis at a nuclear power plant. The operator of the tsunami-ravaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant said there was no immediate sign of new problems caused by the aftershock, and Japan's nuclear safety agency says workers there retreated to a quake-resistant shelter in the complex. None were injured. The crisis there started when the tsunami knocked out cooling systems. Workers have not been able to restore them. Thursday's quake knocked out several power lines at the Onagawa nuclear power plant north of Sendai, which has been shut dow n since the tsunami. O ne remaining line was suppl ying power to the plant an d radiation monitoring devic es detected no abnormalitie s. The plant's spent fuel poo ls briefly lost cooling capaci ty but an emergency diesel ge nerator quickly kicked in. Officials said the afte rshock hit 30 miles under t he water and off the coast of Miyagi prefecture. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 5A C hurch, 2740 Lakeview Ave. U nder the direction of A nthony Jones, the Pops will p lay favorite selections from t heir 2011 concert season. The concert will feature s elections from the Big Band e ra, patriotic selections, s oloists DAniel Burke and L aura Wade singing excerpts f rom "Oklahoma!" and will s potlight saxophone soloist, J ohn Leighty playing Harlem Nocturne." Afree-will offering will b e taken. For further inform ation, call 314-8877. A P Elementary Spring Carnival todayAVON PARK Avon E lementary to host Spring C arnival from 5-8 p.m. t oday. There will be plenty o f games, food, prizes, grab b ags, Home Depot "Make a nd Take," a bounce house, a g iant slide, a Chrysler Drive f or the Kids by Wells Dodge C hrysler and much more. E veryone is welcome. All students must be a ccompanied by a parent or a n adult. This includes midd le school students as well. W acaster Family in concert tonightSEBRING Benefit S inging, a night of music, f ood and fun featuring N ashville recording artists T he Wacaster Family will be a t 6 p.m. today at 3414 Beck A ve., Sebring. Call 253-0771 for direct ions. All benefits go to R elay for Life/American C ancer Society.Spaghetti dinner SaturdaySEBRING There will b e a Spaghetti Dinner at St. C atherine Parish Hall on S aturday from 4:30-7 p.m. T he hall is located at 827 H ickory St. in Sebring. The meal consists of s alad, spaghetti w/meat s auce, meatballs, breadstick, d essert and beverages at a c ost of $8 for adults and $4 f or children. Singles having monthly danceSEBRING The H ighlands County Social S ingles will be sponsoring a m onthly dance Saturday at T he Sebring Woman's Club o n Lakeview Drive, at 7 p .m. Everyone welcome. U ptown Country will prov ide the music. For more information, go t o: h ttp://www.strato.net/~sing les/ssdance.html.Introduction to Smart Phones W orkshopAVON PARK Tired of t echnology leaving you b ehind? South Florida C ommunity College's C orporate and Continuing Education is offering an Introduction to Smart Phones workshop today from 1-5 p.m. in Building T, Room 120, SFCC Highlands Campus. The workshop will provide a comprehensive look at the use and applications of smart phones and tablet PCs. The cost is $35. For more information, call Lorrie Key, coordinator, Corporate and Continuing Education, at (863) 7847033. To register for this workshop, call SFCC Registration at (863)-7847405.RTA meeting open to everyone curious about county trailsSEBRING The Ridge Trails Association will provide an overview of the efforts in the past and present to include Highlands County in the statewide plans for a network of trails designed to enhance the lifestyle of Floridians at the Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce, 227 U.S. 27 North, on Saturday. Any questions, feel free to call 381-7281. There will be an opportunity to become a new member of the RTAbut no pressure to do so. Community Outreach Membership is only $1 and $20 brings active membership status. Please put Saturday, April 9 on your calendar. This invitation is issued by the RTABoard. John Chess, Marcia Percy, Greg Harris, Mary Jane O'Brien, Gaylin Thomas, Ron Estabrook, Dave Greenslade, Sarah Pallone, Bob Hesselink and Merritt O'Brien.Tour of yards is SaturdayAVON PARK The Avon Park Founders Garden Club is sponsoring a Garden Tour of five yards in the Avon Park area, on Saturday from 12 noon until 3 p.m. The yards on the tour will not be announced in the newspaper in consideration of the homeowners. Addresses of the homes are printed on the tickets and a map will be furnished to ticket purchasers. The cost of the tour is $5. Yards on the tour include an all green yard, a professionally landscaped yard, one with a variety of palms, a yard with shade-loving plants and a beautifully landscaped yard done by the homeowner. Tickets can be purchased by calling 381-5929 or 4521927.Events at local lodges, postsAVON PARK The Combat Veterans Memorial VFWPost 9853 in Avon Park, 75 N. Olivia Drive, will host the following events this week: Today Swiss steak dinner served for $7, served from 57 p.m. Music by Uptown Country from 5-8 p.m. Saturday, April 9 Member Appreciation Day free pork dinner for all Post 9853 members all others will be $3, served from 4-6 p.m. Karaoke by Peg and Perry from 5-8 p.m. No bar menu on this day. NASCAR at 7:30 p.m. For any questions, call the lodge at 452-9853. LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Moose 2374, will host the following events this week: Today Texas Hold-em 2 p.m. Shrimp, fish and wings served at 6 p.m. Music with Tom McGannon 6-10 p.m. Saturday, April 9 Bingo bango 2 p.m. Baby-back ribs 6 p.m. Music with Steve and Peggy 6-10 p.m. NASCAR Texas 7:30 p.m. For details, call the lodge at 465-0131. The Veterans of Foreign Wars 3880 in Lake Placid, will host the following events this week: Today Steak-by-theounce served 5:30-7 p.m. with L&LDuo. Saturday Breakfast served 8-11 a.m. Bingo 2 p.m., with early bird 1:30 p.m. Horse races 5:30 p.m. For details, call the lodge at 699-5444. American Legion Placid Post 25 in Lake Placid, will host the following events this week: Today Fish fry from 5-7 p.m. Music by Frank E. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Saturday Auxiliary burgers served 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Texas Hold-em 1:30 p.m. Karaoke Bill 5-8 p.m. For more information, call 465-0975. The Lake Placid Elks 2661, will host the following events this week: Friday, April 8 Fish fry 5-7 p.m. Music by Buddy Canova. For details, call 465-2661.Recreation Club plans pin shuffleboardSEBRING The Sebring Recreation Club, located at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring, will host pin shuffleboard at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday. Any information, call 3852966.Sebring Hills plans pancake breakfastSEBRING There will be a pancake breakfast Saturday at the Sebring Hills Clubhouse, 200 Lark Ave., from 8-10 a.m. All the pancakes, sausage, orange juice, coffee or tea you want for only $3 members and $3.50 non-members. Continued from page 2A Courtesy photo T he Easter Bunny will be in town Sunday, April 24 to lead the Easter Boat Parade on Lake J osephine. Set for 4 p.m., residents with boats are asked to join in the parade. Those without boats are invited to sit along any of the three boat ramps and cheer the parade on. Last y ear more than 20 boats and three water bikes participated. This marks the 11th year for the parade. For information, call 655-1267. Easter boat parade planned News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLE Y Andrew Fells, newly elected member of the Sebring City Council, takes part in his first meeting Tuesday night. The other council members are John Clark, John Griffin, Scott Stanley, and Bud Whitlock. Stanley was elected president of the council. COMMUNITYBRIEFS Fells officially joins Sebring council By BRENTKALLESTAD Associated PressTALLAHASSEE President Barack Obama has some work to do with Florida voters if he hopes to win the state's 29 electoral votes next year, a Quinnipiac University poll released Thursday shows. Slightly more than half of registered voters said they disapprove of the job Obama is doing and that he doesn't deserve a second term, according to a random telephone survey of 1,499 registered voters March 29 to April 4. While 52 percent of Florida voters disapprove of Obama's job performance, 44 percent approve, the poll found. Only 42 percent favor a second Obama term, compared to 51 percent who do not. The poll, which has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.9 percentage points, also shows any unnamed Republican challenger would be in a dead heat with the president. But there was a bit of a silver lining for Obama, pollster Peter Brown noted. "Despite questions about his policies, the president is personally popular with Floridians," Brown said, noting that 70 percent responded they like Obama personally, a figure that included 30 percent who disagree with Obama's policies. Obama carried Florida in 2008 by nearly 250,000 votes over Republican John McCain. However, voters were split on whether they approved of Obama's handling of the situation in Libya, with 46 percent each in support and opposed. Obama has announced his intention to seek re-election. Several Republicans are considering a run. including Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, who is coming to Tallahassee for a meeting with GOPlawmakers Thursday evening at the Capitol. Former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty has already made that trip while former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, who unsuccessfully sought the GOPnomination in 2008 and now has his own TVshow, lives in Florida. U.S. Sen. Bill Nelso n, who is seeking a third ter m in 2012, fared better than t he president. Forty-seven pe rcent said they approved of Nelson's job performanc e, compared to 26 percent wh o disapproved. Forty-thr ee percent said Nelson deserv ed a third term. Three in five voters to ld Quinnipiac they favor ed increased drilling for of fshore oil and natural ga s, compared to 35 percent wh o were opposed. Republica ns and independents support ed offshore drilling by bett er than a 5-to-1 margin whi le Democrats were opposed 5 8 percent to 38 percent. Voters were almost even ly divided on building ne w nuclear plants in Florida, b ut they opposed building the m in their community, 56 pe rcent to 39 percent. Nearly half of those que stioned by Quinnipiac, 4 9 percent, said they favor ed repealing the health car la w passed by Congress last yea r. Forty-one percent we re opposed to its repeal. Obama has work to do to win Florida again in '12 Another strong quake rattles Japan

PAGE 6

Page 6ANews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com TODAYMostly sunny and warm88 / 67Winds: SE at 6-12 mphPartly sunny and warm89 / 67Winds: NW at 4-8 mphSATURDAYMostly sunny and warm89 / 67Winds: SSE at 7-14 mphSUNDAYMostly sunny and remaining warm89 / 67Winds: SSW at 8-16 mphMONDAYPartly sunny, a t-storm possible87 / 65Winds: W at 7-14 mphTUESDAY City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. Washington Washington 54/45 54/45 New Yor k NewYork 56/42 56/42 Miami Miami 85/73 85/73 Atlanta Atlanta 82/65 82/65 Detroit Detroit 52/38 52/38 Houston Houston 86/72 86/72 Chicago Chicago 58/43 58/43 Minneapolis Minneapolis 64/47 64/47 Kansas City KansasCity 74/64 74/64 El Paso ElPaso 82/59 82/59 Denver Denver 68/37 68/37 Billings Billings 44/28 44/28 Los Angeles LosAngeles 61/45 61/45 San Francisco SanFrancisco 56/43 56/43 Seattle Seattle 54/40 54/40 Washington 54/45 New Yor k 56/42 Miami 85/73 Atlanta 82/65 Detroit 52/38 Houston 86/72 Chicago 58/43 Minneapolis 64/47 Kansas City 74/64 El Paso 82/59 Denver 68/37 Billings 44/28 Los Angeles 61/45 San Francisco 56/43 Seattle 54/40 A storm system crossing the East will bring showers and thunderstorms to the central Appalachians today. Rain will fall across the mid-Atlantic, while showers extend to the lower Mississippi Valley. Temperatures will remain chilly in the Northeast. Farther west, showers will spread from North Dakota to Arizona, while a mix of rain and snow extends across eastern Montana. Snow will fall in the central Rockies and across much of Nevada and southeastern Oregon. Showers will continue in much of central California. U.S. Cities National Forecast for April 8Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. World Cities National SummaryCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. Weather (W):ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Albuquerque 68/44/pc 61/32/c 58/37/pc Atlanta 82/65/pc 85/63/pc 81/63/s Baltimore 54/42/r 58/48/sh 73/57/pc Birmingham 84/65/pc 87/64/pc 82/63/s Boston 48/38/s 56/44/pc 60/49/c Charlotte 78/57/pc 82/60/t 88/63/s Cheyenne 64/34/c 55/34/c 50/30/r Chicago 58/43/c 72/58/c 77/53/t Cleveland 50/39/r 63/55/sh 80/56/pc Columbus 60/48/t 74/61/t 84/60/pc Dallas 87/70/pc 89/66/pc 81/53/t Denver 68/37/pc 68/34/pc 57/32/r Detroit 52/38/r 61/54/c 79/58/c Harrisburg 50/38/r 58/47/sh 74/57/pc Honolulu 82/70/sh 85/71/pc 86/71/pc Houston 86/72/pc 86/72/pc 87/64/pc Indianapolis 68/54/sh 82/63/t 83/56/pc Jackson, MS 84/66/pc 86/69/pc 84/63/s Kansas City 74/64/pc 84/66/t 76/45/t Lexington 74/60/t 81/61/t 83/59/pc Little Rock 83/64/pc 86/64/pc 80/56/pc Los Angeles 61/45/t 64/50/pc 65/52/pc Louisville 74/62/t 82/65/t 84/62/pc Memphis 82/68/pc 88/68/pc 80/61/pc Milwaukee 53/41/c 60/55/c 73/52/t Minneapolis 64/47/pc 71/55/c 68/45/r Nashville 78/64/c 85/66/pc 85/62/s New Orleans 86/71/pc 83/71/s 85/72/s New York City 56/42/pc 57/47/pc 65/56/r Norfolk 58/51/t 61/55/pc 69/61/pc Oklahoma City 86/66/t 86/57/t 75/47/pc Philadelphia 53/42/r 59/49/sh 70/58/pc Phoenix 71/52/pc 63/47/t 72/52/s Pittsburgh 54/45/r 68/56/sh 80/62/pc Portland, ME 46/30/s 57/36/pc 57/45/c Portland, OR 56/41/pc 57/43/sh 57/41/r Raleigh 74/55/t 73/60/pc 88/65/s Rochester 48/35/c 58/44/c 72/53/c St. Louis 76/64/pc 87/65/t 81/51/pc San Francisco 56/43/pc 60/48/pc 61/49/pc Seattle 54/40/pc 53/43/sh 52/38/r Wash., DC 54/45/r 58/53/c 76/61/pc Cape Coral 90/69/s 90/68/s 88/68/s Clearwater 88/71/s 89/70/s 88/72/s Coral Springs 85/70/s 86/71/s 85/71/s Daytona Beach 84/63/s 84/67/pc 85/67/s Ft. Laud. Bch 85/71/s 85/75/s 84/73/s Fort Myers 90/69/s 89/70/s 88/69/s Gainesville 84/61/pc 88/62/pc 89/64/s Hollywood 86/71/s 87/71/s 87/72/s Homestead AFB 84/72/s 84/71/s 84/72/s Jacksonville 82/63/pc 87/64/pc 89/65/s Key West 85/76/s 85/76/s 84/74/s Miami 85/73/s 86/74/s 87/73/s Okeechobee 83/63/s 85/66/pc 84/67/s Orlando 88/65/s 89/68/pc 90/69/s Pembroke Pines 86/71/s 87/71/s 87/72/s St. Augustine 80/62/pc 82/67/pc 83/67/s St. Petersburg 88/71/s 88/71/s 88/72/s Sarasota 88/67/s 87/69/s 86/69/s Tallahassee 86/61/pc 89/60/s 88/61/s Tampa 87/70/s 88/70/s 87/72/s W. Palm Bch 84/70/s 85/71/s 86/71/s Winter Haven 88/68/s 90/69/pc 89/69/s Acapulco 90/70/s 90/72/s 88/71/s Athens 75/63/s 75/62/s 69/55/s Beirut 63/54/sh 66/56/pc 66/57/sh Berlin 57/42/pc 60/41/s 62/45/s Bermuda 66/57/pc 63/62/r 72/66/sh Calgary 44/24/pc 51/30/pc 56/32/s Dublin 61/45/s 57/46/pc 59/45/pc Edmonton 40/26/s 45/24/pc 45/30/s Freeport 83/69/s 84/68/s 85/69/s Geneva 72/49/s 73/50/s 75/50/s Havana 88/69/s 90/68/s 90/66/s Hong Kong 81/71/s 79/70/pc 84/72/pc Jerusalem 66/47/sh 59/47/r 64/49/s Johannesburg 64/51/sh 69/50/sh 73/51/s Kiev 46/38/r 48/38/sh 48/36/r London 66/48/pc 65/50/s 65/50/pc Montreal 50/35/pc 54/43/pc 60/42/r Moscow 41/34/sh 36/28/sn 44/28/sn Nice 69/63/s 76/64/pc 79/63/s Ottawa 52/33/pc 56/44/c 63/42/r Quebec 48/35/s 52/37/pc 57/39/r Rio de Janeiro 81/72/s 80/71/t 81/72/t Seoul 64/35/pc 61/40/s 59/35/r Singapore 88/76/sh 86/76/r 84/75/r Sydney 76/58/pc 80/59/s 82/58/pc Toronto 52/36/c 60/51/c 70/46/r Vancouver 56/41/pc 51/42/sh 51/41/r Vienna 62/49/pc 62/44/s 64/46/s Warsaw 56/41/sh 51/31/sh 52/30/pc Winnipeg 50/28/sh 49/26/pc 52/32/s A lmanac Readings at Palm Beach High ............................................ 12:18 a.m. Low ............................................... 5:57 a.m. High ............................................ 12:19 p.m. Low ............................................... 6:13 p.m. Mostly sunny and warm today. Mainly clear tonight. Partly sunny and warm tomorrow. Sunday and Monday: mostly sunny and warm. Tuesday: some sun with a thunderstorm possible. In the middle of the nation on April 8, 1963, Williston, N.D., had 5 inches of snow, while Laredo, Texas, had a record high of 104 degrees. Mostly sunny and warm today. Winds southeast 6-12 mph. Expect 8-12 hours of sunshine with relative humidity 75% early, 45% in the afternoon and good drying conditions. € Even addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday. € Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and Saturday. € All watering should take place before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. FirstFullLastNew Apr 11Apr 17Apr 24May 3 Today Saturday Sunrise 7:10 a.m. 7:09 a.m. Sunset 7:46 p.m. 7:46 p.m. Moonrise 10:21 a.m. 11:15 a.m. Moonset none 12:29 a.m. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2011Jacksonville 82/63 Gainesville 84/61 Ocala 86/60 Daytona Beach 84/63 Orlando 88/65 Winter Haven 88/68 Tampa 87/70 Clearwater 88/71 St. Petersburg 88/71 Sarasota 88/67 Fort Myers 90/69 Naples 90/71 Okeechobee 83/63 West Palm Beach 84/70 Fort Lauderdale 85/71 Miami 85/73 Tallahassee 86/61 Apalachicola 80/65 Pensacola 82/70 Key West Avon Park 88/66 Sebring 88/67 Lorida 85/65 Lake Placid 89/65 Venus 88/65 Brighton 86/64 TidesReadings at St. Petersburg High .............................................. 6:48 a.m. Low ............................................... 9:52 a.m. High .............................................. 4:42 p.m. Low ......................................................none UV Index TodayThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m. 5 9 9 4 Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional SummaryShown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Five-Day forecast for Highlands County 85/76 Lake Levels Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 11.66 Normal ...............................................14.51 Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterdayTemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHigh Sunday .......................................... 88 Low Sunday ........................................... 59 High Monday ......................................... 92 Low Monday .......................................... 65 High Tuesday ......................................... 84 Low Tuesday .......................................... 50 High Wednesday .................................... 83 Low Wednesday .................................... 56Heat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayRelative humidity .................................. 43% Expected air temperature ....................... 87 Makes it feel like .................................... 88BarometerMonday ...............................................29.88 Tuesday ...............................................30.13 Wednesday .........................................30.11PrecipitationMonday ...............................................0.00Ž Tuesday ...............................................0.56Ž Wednesday .........................................0.00Ž Month to date ..................................... 1.54Ž Year to date ......................................... 9.38Ž

PAGE 7

P ollard's enthusiasm T hursday morning. "I think it's a fantastic idea f or revitalizing downtown," h e said. "I'm not for bars where p eople hang out all day, but I t hink sport bars, wine bars a nd places serving food are e ssential. "Look at Atlantic Avenue i n Delray," he added. "It's a f antastic destination." The overlay entertainment d istrict is a sub-portion withi n the larger CRAdistrict. Centered on Circle Park, it r adiates down spoke streets: C enter Avenue from L akeview Drive to 500 feet f rom Sebring Middle School, a bout half a block past Circle P ark (the school is protected w ith the buffer zone by state l aw); Commerce Avenue f rom South Pine Street west t o Pomegranate; and R idgewood Drive from the i ntersection with Franklin S treet up to North Pine S treet. Acity ordinance currently b ans the sale of alcohol withi n 300 feet of a house of wors hip, so the council also u nanimously passed an ordin ance allowing for the sale of a lcohol within the district w hich includes the Salvation A rmy's church, and is close t o the Southside Baptist C hurch and the Church of the B rethren. Pollard told the council t hat measuring the buffers o ften comes down to a measu ring wheel and a matter of i nches. He added that there was s ome controversy as where to s tart and stop measuring f rom property line to property line? Door to door? And if a door, then which door? "The furthest one," said council member Bud Whitlock to laughter, adding "I'm 100 percent behind this." Not everyone in the audience agreed with Whitlock. Cindy Stanley, wife of council member Scott Stanley, spoke out against the idea of drinking establishments. "I no way want to go to a church next to a bar," she said. "Bars draw crime. Bars create crime. I am against it completely. I wish you would not do this." After the meeting, Mrs. Stanley was asked if her husband was in trouble for voting to pass the ordinance. "I'm not cooking dinner for him tonight," she said, but smiled. "In fact, I may not cook for him for a long time." Stanley, standing near her, laughed. "I should have abstained," he said. This was the first reading of the revised alcohol ordinance. It will be up for a second reading on April 19. The council referred the idea of the entertainment district to the city's Planning Zoning Committee for its input. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 7A Courtesy illustration The proposed area for the entertainment district in downtown Sebring. Continued from page 1A Sebring CRA pushes for entertainment district Classified ads get results! Call 314-9876 WHATS HOPPIN AROUND TOWN?Subscribe today and “nd out! Call 863-385-6155 for free home delivery www.newssun.com

PAGE 8

Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The Air Force Association Highlands 173 Chapter has selected eight outstanding citizens for their annual Blue Suit and Civilian Awards. The following who will be honored at the AFAAnnual Awards Luncheon April 16 at the Avon Park Bombing Range dining facility. Mike Willingham: AFA Matty Laird Outstanding Support to Civil Aviation Award Larry McLain: AFA Avon Park AF Range Ken Beers Award Bill Hutchison: AFA Major Tommy McGuire Outstanding Citizen Award Briana Washington: AFAOutstanding News Medium Support of USAF and AFA Sam Shames: AFA Senior Civil Air Patrol Award John Rousch: AFA Chapter STEM Teacher of the Year Award Lt. Col. Charles "Buck" MacLaughlin: AFA Outstanding Support of Aviation, USAF and AFAby a Government Agency Congressman Tom Rooney: AFAOutstanding Support To Armed Services Award Reservations are required no later than Wednesday, April 13. For further information, please call Roy Whitton at (863) 659-4170. Page 8ANews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com Avon Park, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference domestic violence battery. Kevin Wayne Grice, 23, of Avon Park, was charged with possession of a controlled substance without a prescription, and possession and or use of drug equipment. Cordey D. Jumper, 19, of Okeechobee, was charged with three counts of failure to appear reference no valid driver license, leavin g the scene of an accident without giving information, and use or possession of drug paraphernalia. Jessy Renee Linton, 26, of Sebring, was charged with possession of marijuana and possession and or use of drug paraphernalia. Thomas Joseph Lynch, 22, of Sebring, was charged with possession and or use of drug equipment, and possession of a controlled substance without a prescription. Rachelle Lynn Pruneau, 23, of Sebrin g was char g ed with possession and or use of drug equipment, possession of marijuana and possession of a controlled substance without a prescription. Enrique Rameriez, 32, of Sebring, was charged with violation of a municipal ordinance. Rachel Elizabeth Smith, 25, of Orlando, was charged with violation of probation reference grand theft. Steven Ray Smith, 42, of Avon Park, was charged with DUI. Continued from page 2A ent produced a list of at least 10 names they would approach for signatures after the petition was filed with the city clerk on their target date of April 14. Aviles also stated there were about 50 people who would hit the ground seeking signatures and there has been some response from the website www.recallapcouncil.com as well. "We have over 400 views and hits on the website, but only 40 or so have signed up to receive the e-mails. We hare hoping to improve that now. Our goal is to organize individuals for the signatures. Once the filing happens, we have 30 days to get the 500 signatures we need. That is the goal," she said. "There is no plan to put anyone into office after the recall. Our goal is to send a message that the citizens have to be heard and listened to," Aviles said. Aviles also announced that there would be a meeting weekly at the Moose Lodge on Wednesday at 7 p.m., everyone is invited and that there would be an upcoming signing party which would be announced after the petition was filed. Response from Councilman Terry Heston and Deputy Mayor Brenda Gray was slightly different on Wednesday concerning the recall efforts. "I don't know anything about it," Gray said in a phone interview before the meeting. "I mean I have heard that there may be something going on, but I have not heard exactly what. I have not seen any of their complaints." Heston stated that he w as aware of the effort from t he public, but stated on t he record that he was baffl ed why he was targeted for a recall. "Citizens have a right to recall an official if th ey want. That is their right, b ut I am not sure what I ha ve done to warrant a recall. I did not vote to remove M r. Behrens," Heston said. Heston said that he h ad not seen the News-Sun ar ticle about the recall effo rt, nor has he read the sev en complaints filed by t he group, but was optimist ic about the strides the ci ty was making. "We are making gre at strides in changing the ou tlook in Avon Park. We on ly have about $207,000 in o ur rainy day fund, but we a re working to make positi ve changes within the city. W e just saved the citizens abo ut $1 million in changes to t he landfill and we just voted to lower the garbage rates. I think there are some pos itive stories in Avon Par k, not just negative ones ," Heston said. Heston also mention ed that anyone who wanted to sit down and discuss an y issues was free to conta ct him directly. Heston's e-mail is th eston@avonpark.cc an d Gray can be reached at bgray@avonpark.cc. Continued from page 1A relocated immediately. I have asked for an increase in licensing capacity at another home so that some of them can find refuge there, but I am not sure that can happen," Beckman said. "If we cannot find them spots, they will have to seek shelter outside the county," she added. "The Arc board of directors held an emergency board meeting on Tuesday, April 5th to determine the next steps. Afeasibility study will be conducted over the next two weeks to determine The Arc's ability to provide its remaining services," Beckman said in her email. Beckman explained that the changes were not only immediate, but come July 1, when a state budget is passed, the money probably will not be replaced. "The letter from Bryan Vaughn, who is the acting director for the Agency for Persons with Disabilities (APD) said that all service payments would be cut by 15 percent to 40 percent. I do not want to speculate what will happen with our agency if that continues, but it does not look good," Beckman said over the phone. According to Beckman, Vaughn's announcement was due to a $169 million budget deficit for the 2010-11 fiscal year that ends in June. "We can survive the 90 days until July 1, but I am not sure what happens after that," Beckman said. Continued from page 1A i ng category. "They know math, but all o f the effort isn't there, I d on't think," explained S tephens. Last year, Kitchens was w ell prepared for the test, b ut Stephens feels that this y ear more could've been d one at the school. "They spend the whole year up to this point studying. I've been getting math sheets for them here at home because that's where they are weakest," said Stephens. Stephens is hoping that Woodlawn isn't content to sit at its B'grade and continues to prepare the students in every way possible. With Woodlawn being a lower grade school in previous years, Stephens maintains the faith that her kids are being prepared as an A' school and nothing lower. "I think they are both ready. I'm a little worried about math but I know they both will do well," Stephens said. Continued from page 2A But, with him one day on a n inspection of the work in p rogress, Kitchings had to be b rave and challenge him. Just as she said, "Jack we n eed a change order," he s aid, "I know. We need a bigg er kitchen." "So now, when I walk into t hat tiny kitchen I wish I'd p ushed harder," said Kitchings, as the audience laughed, knowing Stroup would stick to his guns. Stroup's children, Jack Jr., Matt, and Lori Macclain helped unveil the commemorative plaque, and Charlie Stroup, his wife, also spoke. She said Stroup had once talked to her about his wartime service in the Navy. He served in the North Atlantic where sailors dealt with cold wind and rough seas. "He made a pact with God," Charlie Stroup said. "If God would just make sure he returned to Sebring, he promised to never leave Sebring again. "God kept his promise," said Charlie Stroup, "and Jack kept his." Continued from page 2A POLICEBLOTTER Stroup honored with ceremony FCAT testing starts on Monday News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Ridge Area arc consumers and Valencia Group Home residents Sarah Moore (from left), Amelia Titus, Frances Goff, Debbie Baxter and Sue Talios (seated at computer) work together to write a letter to Gov. Rick Scott's office about recent funding cuts. The cuts will shut down the Valencia Group Home and leave residents without housing. Recall committee names chairperson Arc struggles with funding cuts AFA announces award recipients We are making great strides at changing the outlook in Avon Park.'TERRYHESTON city councilman By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY c hristopher.tuffley@newssun.comLAKE PLACID The f irst of Highlands County's R elay for Life events b egins at noon Saturday at t he Lake Placid High S chool football field off of D al Hall Boulevard. Organizer Ginger K eimel hopes for a a large g athering. The event is open to the p ublic, and she doesn't w ant people to think everyo ne has to walk the track walking is up the memb ers of the 20 teams that a re taking part. Folks can also relax and p lay games, listen to m usic, enjoy the entertainm ent, take part in the cont ests, and eat the homem ade food. The theme this year, K eimel said, was "Tune in t o tune out cancer." The Relays for Life are t he major fund raising e vent for the American C ancer Society, Keimel e xplained. The relays have r aised $3 billion in the 26 y ears of their existence, s he said. Money raised in Lake P lacid stays in the commun ity, she added, helping p rovide transportation to d octor appointments, supp ort for the children's c amp run by Reaching Out t o Cancer Children and H ope Lodge, which prov ides free rooms for outp atients being treated by t he Moffitt Cancer Center. So stuff some dollar b ills in your pocket and c ome have a good time. Take a moment to feel g ratitude for good health b y applauding cancer surv ivors as the open the 18h our event with the first w alk around the track. Survivors are being t reated to a free celebrator y lunch they should a rrive early in order to regi ster. LP Relay for Life is Saturday

PAGE 9

P overty Level (FPL) receive s ervices at no charge. Those w hose incomes are between 1 00 and 200 percent FPLare c harged on a sliding fee s cale, and those with i ncomes above 200 percent F PLpay in full. For clients r eceiving family planning s ervices, the sliding fee scale g oes up to 250 percent FPL. In fiscal year 2009-2010, t he medical clinics served c lose to 8,000 patients, and t he dental clinics served 5 ,900 patients. Fifty percent o f patients were uninsured. O f the remainder, 45 percent w ere on Medicaid, 3 percent o n Medicare and 2 percent h ad private insurance. The Health Department f aces several challenges. "It i s difficult recruiting doctors t o staff the medical clinics. M ost doctors want their own p ractices or want to be affilia ted with one of the hospit als," Health Department A dministrator Robert P alussek said. Lack of patient transportat ion is another challenge and t he main reason for appointm ent no-shows. "So recently, t he Department instituted a n ew booking policy which h as helped to lower the nos how rates and increased p atient satisfaction," P alussek said. But the biggest challenge i s financial. "Most of our c lients are low-income worki ng individuals and families. W e don't collect a lot from t hem, and although we r eceive some non-categorical f unds from the state, which w e channel into primary care s ervices, we still don't break e ven. Last fiscal year, we h ad a deficit of about $ 600,000," Palussek said.Central Florida Health CareCentral Florida Health C are (CFHC), another vital s ervice for the uninsured, is a federally qualified commun ity health center headquart ered in Avon Park. CFHC operates seven cent ers. The only one in H ighlands County is located i n Avon Park in the same b uilding as CFHC's headq uarters. Other centers i nclude one in Hardee C ounty and five in Polk C ounty, plus one under cons truction in Polk County. CFHC's eligibility r equirements are similar to t hose at the Health D epartment. Uninsured c lients are not charged for s ervices if their incomes are a t or below 100 percent FPL, a nd they are charged on a s liding fee scale if their i ncomes are between 100 a nd 200 percent FPL. Those w ith incomes above 200 perc ent FPLpay in full. CFHC h as a minimum fee of $15, b ut clients who can't pay are n ot turned away. In 2009, the most recent y ear for which figures are a vailable, CFHC served m ore than 32,000 patients at i ts centers in Hardee, Polk, a nd Highlands counties. A t otal of 53 percent were uninsured, 28 percent were on Medicaid and 6 percent were on Medicare. CFHC would not disclose how many patients were from Highlands County and how many were seen at the Avon Park Center. CFHC has several advantages over the Health Department. First, it has more access to doctors. As a federally qualified community health center, it can partner with the National Health Service Corps. By agreeing to work at a community health center at a lower salary for a period of one to five years, doctors, dentists, family nurse practitioners and physician assistants can get part or all of their medical school tuition paid for or reimbursed. As a federally qualified community health center, CFHC is also eligible to receive substantial government funding to offset the cost of services provided to the low income, medically uninsured. In 2009, CFHC received $5.8 million in federal, state, and local grants and contracts, and $9.5 million in program income, including public insurance programs, private insurance, and self pay. Revenue totaled $15.339 million. Expenses totaled $15.441 million, according to CFHC's 990 IRS return.Samaritan's Touch Care CenterSamaritan's Touch Care Center (STCC) differs in many ways from the County Health Department and Central Florida Health Care. It is a free, multi-service, faith-based clinic, which only accepts uninsured patients and those whose incomes are at or below 200 percent FPL. STCC opened in 2007. In the past 3 1/2 years, the Center has served more than 1,100 patients. In addition to providing primary care services, STCC has arranged specialty care for many patients at no charge, "thanks to the generous donation of time and services by many local health providers," STCC Executive Director Rachel Nawrocki said In addition, Florida Hospital has donated imaging and diagnostic services, and Highlands Regional Medical Center and Lab Corps have provided free lab work. Patients also get prescription medications free of charge. Nawrocki estimates that the value of medical care donated by the local community is just over $10.5 million, and that Samaritan's Touch Care Center has saved local hospitals more than $14 million in patient care and treatment. But STCC has a waiting list of 1,000 individuals. "Florida Hospital is assisting the Center with a search for grants to expand the Center's operations and to fund a center in Lake Placid which will open on a parttime basis in the next several months," said Kim Schlosser, president of the STCC Board of Directors and a Florida Hospital employee. "We're also assisting STCC in its search for a larger, more modern facility." Dr. Luis Pena, who closed his medical practice to join STCC, serves as medical director. The clinic is also assisted by Dr. Nahead Nagib, who donates several hours each week and six other full-time staff, two part-time staff, and volunteers. Highlands County Human Services DepartmentThe Highlands County Human Services Department has a budget of $84,000 to fund medical services for low income, uninsured individuals. But clients must be referred by doctors, the Health Department or other providers. Providers agree to be paid at Medicare rates, which are lower than private insurance rates. "We estimate that we get $11 of service for every $1 spent," said Billie Hetherton, administrative assistant. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 9A Continued from page 1AAvon Park Health Department400 S. Lake Ave.WIC: 382-7351 Immunizations: 382-7272 Dental : 382-7355 Hours: Monday-Friday, 7:45 a.m.4:45 p.m.Central Florida Health Care950 CR 17AWest, Avon ParkPhone: 452-3000 Hours: Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., ; Saturday, 7:30 a.m. to 12 noon A fter hours: Answering service available to speak with a physician.Lake Placid Health Department106 N. Main Ave.WIC: 382-7317 Medical: 382-7272 Dental: 382-7305 Hours: Monday-Friday, 7:45 a.m.-4:45 p.m.Samaritan's Touch Care Center3015 Herring Ave., Avon ParkPhone: 471-1870 Hours: Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.5 p.m. (Closed 12-1:30 p.m.)Sebring Health Department7205 S. George Blvd.Maine phone: 386-6040 WIC: 382-7216 Medical: 382-7272 Dental: 382-7257 Hours: Monday-Friday, 7:45 a.m.-4:45 p.m.Resources For The Medically Uninsured Agencies that serve medically uninsured face difficulties soldier, was hard to keep up with in physical training, and she had a huge heart." While walking through Arlington National Cemetery on Jan. 21, 2010, I noticed a particularly striking headstone inscription: "Be bold, be brief, be gone." It was the grave of Maj. Megan McClung, who I later learned was the first female U.S. Marine to be killed in the Iraq war, as well as the first female U.S. Naval Academy graduate to die in combat. The motto on her headstone, which embodied how McClung lived for 34 years, has guided me every day since. Her father, who also served in the Marines, told me about something he learned in the years following his daughter's Dec. 6, 2006 death that inspires him. "Another indication of how Meg touched so many lives are the seven little girls running around now who were named after her ," Mike McClung said in a Jan. 23, 2010 e-mail. "In at least one case (and maybe more), the wife did know Meg. I can just imagine th e scene when the husband says, Honey, I would like us to name our daughter (after) a girl I once knew. '" When Lt. Gen. John Vines awarded Sgt. Leigh Ann Hester and her fellow soldiers their medals in 2005, he said something that resonates six years later. "My heroes don't play in the NBAand don't play in the U.S. Open," the gener al said. "They're standing in front of me today." As my daughter grows up, she will not hear talk at the dinner table about Snooki, Britney, Paris or Lindsay. She will instead hear names like Leigh An n, Faith, Trista and Megan. To find out more about Tom Sileo, or to read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com. Continued from page 2A Photo courtesy U.S. Army/Spc. Jeremy Cri sp Sgt. Leigh Ann Hester is the first female soldier to be awarded the Silver Star since World War II. My heroes don't play in the WNBA'

PAGE 10

Page 10ANews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com

PAGE 11

www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, April 8, 2011Page 11 A its not just about making the sale anymoreƒ ƒits about building trustƒits about being a part of the communityƒits about helping businesses grow Do you love selling a product you believe in? Are you committed to excellence? If so, were interested in talking to you!The News-Sun is actively seeking a dynamic sales professional that knows the difference between just making a saleŽ and building a solid and dependable relationship with a client.Ž If you are a sales oriented individual who is self-motivated, customer oriented and possess exceptional communication and organizational skills, consider joining our team. Candidates will be required to maintain established accounts while developing new clientele and working closely with area business organizations. Transportation required. Base salary plus commission, mileage, paid time off, health insurance, 401K & more. Email resumes to humanresources@newssun.com or fax to 352.365.1951 Attention: Human Resources Director or drop off at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring its about finding the right person IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: GC 07-747 JOSE QUINONES, Plaintiff, v. GREGORY LEON CORRELL, Defendant v. DOUG SPINELLA, et al, Third Party Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final decree of foreclosure entered in the above-entitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida, described as: PARCEL 1: Lot 11, in Block 1, of BETTER HOMES SUBDIVISION, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 84, of the Public Records of Highlands County, FL; and PARCEL 2: Lot 2, in Block 39, of SEBRING HILLS SOUTH UNIT No. 2, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 9, Page 7, of the Public Records of Highlands County, FL at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room of the Basement of the Highlands County Courthouse, in Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 a.m., on April 13, 2011. Signed this 15th day of March, 2011. (Seal) BOB GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, a no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, (863)534-4690, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice of Hearing; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call TDD (863)534-7777 or Florida Relay Service 711. April 1, 8, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-140 IN RE: ESTATE OF JANET LEE McREYNOLDS NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JANET LEE McREYNOLDS, deceased, whose date of death was January 15, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 1, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Douglas J. McMichael 9523 Tahoe Dr. Centerville, Ohio 45458 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Charlotte C. Stone Attorney for Douglas J. McMichael Florida Bar Number: 21297 Stone & Walder, P.L. 3200 US Hwy 27 S., Suite 304 Sebring, FL 33870 Telephone: (863)402-5424 Fax: (863)402-5425 E-Mail: Charlotte@StoneandWalder.com April 1, 8, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 10-498 IN RE: ESTATE OF BRADLEY K. NEUBAUER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BRADLEY K. NEUBAUER, File Number PC 10-498, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 South Commerce Ave., Sebring, Florida 33870-3867. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is APRIL 8, 2011. /s/ Gail S. Reid Personal Representative 3070 Orange Grove Trail Naples, Florida 34120 /s/ Antonio Faga Antonio Faga, Esq. Attorney for Personal Representative Florida Bar No. 43280 7955 Airport Road, N., #101 Naples, Florida 34109 (239)597-9999 (239)597-9974 fax April 8, 15, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-120 IN RE: ESTATE OF J. LOIS NAVIK-WILSON Deceased. AMENDED NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of J. LOIS NAVIK-WILSON, deceased, whose date of death was March 16, 2011, File Number PC 11-120, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 8, 2011. Personal Representative: CLIFFORD R. RHOADES 2141 Lakeview Drive Sebring, FL 33870 Attorney for Personal Representative: CLIFFORD R. RHOADES, ESQ. Attorney for Personal Representative Florida Bar No.: 308714 Clifford R. Rhoades, P.A. 2141 Lakeview Drive Sebring, Floirda 33870 (863)385-0346 April 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-111 IN RE: ESTATE OF DOMENICO ANDOLINA a/k/a DOMINICK ANDOLINA, Deceased. AMENDED NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of DOMENICO ANDOLINA a/k/a DOMINICK ANDOLINA, deceased, File Number PC 11-111, by the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 430 S. Commerce Avenue; that the decedent's date of death was October 29, 2009; that the total value of the estate is estimated at $12,072.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom is has been assigned by such order are: NAME ADDRESS MARIA ANDOLINA 98 Stoneleigh Avenue Yonkers, NY 10583 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claim with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 8, 2011. Person Giving Notice: MARIA ANDOLINA 98 Stoneleigh Avenue Yonkers, NY 10583 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: CLIFFORD R. RHOADES, ESQ. Florida Bar No.: 308714 2141 Lakeview Drive Sebring, Floirda 33870 (863)385-0346 April 8, 15, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 11-000054-GCS SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, CREDITORS OR OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST MARGARET B. HOOKS, DECEASED; VIVIAN BIGNEY; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, and all unknown parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against any Defendant, or claiming any right, title, and interest in the subject property, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, CREDITORS OR OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST MARGARET B. HOOKS, DECEASED 2312 Palm Key Court Sebring, FL 33870 A LL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST ANY DEFENDANT, OR CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, AND INTEREST IN THE SUBJECT PROPERTY Y OU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to enforce a lien on a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County, Florida: LOT 17, BLOCK 7, LAKE BLUE ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 59, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on PHILIP D. STOREY, Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is ALVAREZ, SAMBOL & WINTHROP, P.A., 100 South Orange Avenue, Suite 200, Orlando, FL 32801, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: April1, 2011 ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE COURT By: /s/ Toni Kopp As Deputy Clerk This is an attempt to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. April 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-001307 DIVISION: BANKUNITED, Plaintiff, vs. DEIRDRE K. LEXOW A/K/A DEIRDRE KERI LEXOW, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: RYAN PORTER LEXOW Last Known Address: 1121 S Park Rd Apt #308S Hollywood, FL 33021 Current Address: 1121 S Park Rd Apt #308S Hollywood, FL 33021 ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County, Florida: LOT 8, OF TYSON LAKE FRONT PARK LOTS, A CCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 52, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 147 ALDERMAN DRIVE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852-6962 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the News-Sun WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 24th day of March, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Lisa Tantillo Deputy Clerk April 8, 15, 2011 1050Legals Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or le ss. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads p laced under the Bargain BuysŽ discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom se t ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad st ating Each,Ž the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open RateŽ pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain BuysŽ specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home,Ž are allowed to be pla ced under the Bargain BuyŽ category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com 863-314-9876 DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS € Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 314-9876. € The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155

PAGE 12

Page 12ANews-Sun Friday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.co m MATH INSTRUCTORS PT positions to teach developmental math (daytime classes). Bachelor's degree in math or related field required. Open until filled. V isit www.southflorida.edu/hr for details. 863-784-7132. EA/EO HOME CARERN, CNA, PT, OT for local visits in Highlands Great Salary/Excellent benefits Immediate Need!! (863) 401-3550 or fax resume (863) 401-8199 FRONT DESKCLERK (PT), assists hotel & restaurant guests w/reservations, registration & accommodations. Hotel/Restaurant & Cashiering exp. preferred. $8.76/hr. (16-24 hr/wk.) Typical work schedule: Sat. & Sun. 6 am 2 pm. Open until filled. Visit www.southflorida.edu/hr for position announcement. (863) 453-2211. Apply at the HOTEL JACARANDA, 19 E. Main St., Avon Park. EA/EO/Vet. Pref.CAREGIVERSNOW HIRINGFor caring, compassionate caregivers. You must be 21 yrs old with a HS Diploma/GED, pass a criminal & driving record check. Call HR between 9am and 4 pm M-F. 863-385-8558 or visit: ck381.ersp.biz/employment 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentLOST DIAMONDrings. Possibly at Sebring North Publix. Engagement & wedding band. Call 863-382-1037. Reward if found. 1200Lost & FoundCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day y our ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us: 314-9876 News-Sun Classified 1100Announcements The City of Sebring will receive sealed bids in the City Purchasing Department for: R R F F P P 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 4 4 : : V V e e t t e e r r a a n n s s B B e e a a c c h h B B e e a a c c h h C C o o n n c c e e s s s s i i o o n n s s L L a a n n d d L L e e a a s s e e Specifications & General Terms and Conditions may be obtained from our website at: mysebring.com or by contacting Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB by phone 863-471-5110, Fax 863-471-5168, or e-mail: kirkzimmerman@mysebring.com at the City purchasing office located at 368 South Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. If obtaining documents via the website, it shall be the bidders responsibility to check for amendments/changes made to the document. Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked with the bid number and name as to identify the enclosed bid. Bids must be delivered to the City of Sebring Purchasing Office A ttn: Kirk Zimmerman so as to reach the said office no later than 2 2 : : 0 0 0 0 P P M M , T T h h u u r r s s d d a a y y , A A p p r r i i l l 2 2 1 1 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 o o f f t t h h e e o o f f f f i i c c i i a a l l t t i i m m e e c c l l o o c c k k i i n n t t h h e e p p u u r r c c h h a a s s i i n n g g o o f f f f i i c c e e Proposals received later than the date and time specified will be rejected. The City will not be responsible for the late delivery of any bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail, or any other type of delivery service. The submitting firm will be required to comply with all applicable laws, regulations, rules and ordinances of local, state and federal authorities having jurisdiction, including, but not limited to: all provisions of the Federal Government Equal Employment Opportunity clauses issued by the Secretary of Labor on May 21, 1968 and published in the Federal Register (41 CFR Part 60-1, 33 F.2 7804); all provisions of the Public Entity Crimes (Fla. Stat. 287.133, et seq, as amended) and the provisions in Fla. Stat287.134, et seq,as amended, regarding discrimination. The Sebring City Council reserves the right to accept or rej ect any or all bids or any parts Thereof; and the award; if an award is made, will be made to the most responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of the City of Sebring. The council reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB Purchasing Agent Sebring, Florida April 8, 15, 2011 1055HighlandsCounty Legals PUBLIC AUCTION: MAY 06, 2011 AT: 9:00 AM LOCATION: AVON TOWING: 1102 KERSEY ST. A VON PARK, FL 33825 Y EAR MAKE VIN # 1999 MERCURY 1MEFM66LXXK600816 April 8, 2011 PUBLIC AUCTION: APRIL 29, 2011 AT: 9:00 AM LOCATION: AVON TOWING: 1102 KERSEY ST. A VON PARK, FL 33825 Y EAR MAKE VIN # 1990 BMW WBAGC431XLDC26609 April 8, 2011 NOTICE OF SALE The following vehicles will be sold at public sale or auction to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78(2) of the Florida Statutes at 10:00 a.m. on 4/25/11 at 1118 WEIGLE AVE. Sebring, FL 33870 1994 TOYT JT3VN29V6R0036245 April 8, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 10000815GCS CIVIL DIVISION VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee corporation authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. CESAR RODRIGUEZ, a single man; THE STATE OF FLORIDA; and EMELIA MORALES OBO, MARTHA MARTINEZ, Defendants. CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiff's Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered March 14, 2011 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on A pril 13, 2011 at 11:00 A.M. (EST), in the BASEMENT OF THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM of the HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 430 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, Florida, the following described property: Lot 1, Block 250, Sun 'N Lakes Estates of Sebring, Unit 13, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 9, Page(s) 71, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Property Address: 4937 Vilabella Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: March 15, 2011. BOB GERMAINE, CLERK HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) April 1, 8, 2011

PAGE 13

www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, April 8, 2011Page 13 A If you enjoy page design, this job is for you. The News-Sun is looking for the right person to help design its news pages. The right candidate must be experienced in Quark and Photoshop, as well as have good news judgment. The ability to work fast with minimal supervision is also necessary. Experience in Illustrator and InDesign is a plus. This position is for 20 hours hours may be flexible. Send sample of work with resume to humanresources@newssun.com or fax to 3852.365.1951 Attention: HumanResources Director, or drop off at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring. Drug test and background check required. EOE 1993 CHEVYS10 Blazer 4dr, 2wd, 104k, V6, loaded, leather, CD, new brakes & tires. Many new arts with receipts. Must see! 22mpg $2600 obo 863-202-6394 9450Automotive for Sale TOOL BOXFits Ford F-150 Trucks $100. 863-382-4722 CHEST -All aluminum with locking lid. 48" long, fits in pickup bed or on a trailer. Very Nice! $140. 863-453-7027 9350Automotive Parts& AccessoriesENCLOSED TRAILER6 x 15. Almost new tires. Single axle. $1,800. Call 863-699-5517 9220Utility Trailers1973 NORTON850 COMMANDO A-1, low miles, *Owner's Manual, One Owner,* RareFind Will Accept reasonable offer. 863-382-8985 or 863-465-9100 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation2002 EZGOCustom Golf Cart, gas, lots of extras, new mag wheels & tires. Must See Nice! $2700 obo or will trade for an on / off Road Dirt Bike. 863-202-6394 8500Golf Carts R.V. COVERNEW fits trailes 28' 7" to 31' 6". Never opened! A Bargain at $170. 863-453-7027 2001 JAYCOEAGLE 26' 5th Wheeler. Good Shape $6400. 863-381-9159 8400RecreationalVehiclesCONCEALED WEAPONSCLASS JIM'S PISTOLARROW 12135 US Hwy 98 April 15th, 6 p.m. Call for Info: 863-655-4505 8350Sporting Goods16 FT.Flat Bottom Flats type aluminum with console, 35hp Yamaha motor plus trailer, needs spring service. $1600 obo 863-202-6394 8050Boats & Motors 8000 RecreationSCOOTER -Like new Guardian 3 TEK scooter & Harmar lift for inside vehicle. New would be $1200. Will sell both for $600 863-655-6212 7560Medical Supplies& EquipmentNOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & Supplies MOWER DIXONSpeedztr 36" cut, electric clutch, rear wheels independently driven, by Hydro Gear, 14.5 B&S overhead. valve vertical shaft w/ cast iron cyl. $1450 obo 863-452-5607 LAWN MOWERSnapper / Rider. Runs Good! $200 863-471-9509 JOHN DEERE'05 4310 w/loader & mower, 4 x 4. $4800. details @ desmdw1@msn.com or 386-246-7461 2009 -Cub Cadet Enforcer commercial 48" Cut, Zero Turn, 300 hrs. Good Shape. $3000 obo 863-202-6394 7400Lawn & GardenPOWER WASHERDeWalt Commercial DP 3750. Perfect cond. on a 4 wheel trailer $1,100. Call 863-452-0393 7380Machinery & ToolsSEBRNG -CHARITY EVENT! 1810 Jackson Heights, Fri & Sat 4/8 & 4/9 8am-1pm. Furn, electronics, Lowrey organ, household items, children's clothes & toys, exercise equip., plants. SEBRINGESTATE MOVINGSALE! 5040 Oak Cir. (opposite Raintree Antique Mall) Sat & Sun 4/9 & 4/10, 8am-4pm. Sofas, trundle bed, lamps, antique chairs, drop leaf table & gate leg table, burlap advertising sacks, books, tackle & tools, live plants and bicycles. SEBRING 4321Maserati St. behind Wal-Mart, Fri & Sat, Apr. 8 & 9, 8am 4pm. Something for everyone. Too much to list. Priced to sell! SEBRING 526Spoonbill Dr. Buttonwood Bay. Moving Sale. Fri. Apr.8th. 7am-2pm. & Sat. Apr. 9th. 9 am -3pm. Computer desk, 3 televisions w/remotes, television stand, buffet cookware, glassware, chairs, lamps, lawn mower, trimmer, edger, floral. Lots of housewares, clothes & more. SEBRING -Multi Fanily Sale! 4201 Thompson Ave. Sat. Apr 9th, 8am ? Something For Everyone!! SEBRING -MOVING SALE! 3704 Sunbird Cir. off Thunderbird Rd. Thur. Fri Sat, 4/7-8-9, 8am ? Everything Must Go! SEBRING -Large Church Sale! 1660 Vicki Dr ( My Jewelry Box) Fri & Sat 4/8 & 9, 8am ? Mirrors stove, refrigerator, King bed, furn.. Too Much To List! SEBRING -Joint Sale! 2505 Sunset Dr. Fri 4/8 8am 12pm & Sat 4/9 8am -1pm. OUTSIDE & INSIDE HOME, bicycles, furn., tools, household items. Much Much Morel! SEBRING -4026 Skipper Rd, Fri & sat 4/8 & 4/9, 9am 2pm. Crib clothes (adult & baby),household items, Much More! 7320Garage &Yard Sales SEBRING -1910 Jackson Heights Dr. Thr Fri Sat 4/7-8-9, 8am -4pm. Tools, sm appliances, household items, new ball caps, pocket knives bird, bird cages, pop up canopy. Much More! SBRING -Multi Family Sale! 2620 Karen Blvd Fri & Sat Apr. 8 & 9 8am -? Tools, adult & children's clothes, toys, small appliances, household items. Too Much To List! LAKE PLACIDMulti Family Sale! 512 W. Interlake Blvd., Sat Apr. 9th 8am3pm. Entertainment center, freezer, clothes, electronics. Much More! AVON PARKORANGEWOOD ACRES 1628 W Orangewood Ct. Sun. Apr. 10, 8am-? Computer furn, Good quality Miscellaneous Items!! Toys & stuffed Animals. Too Much To List! AVON PARKMulti Family Sale! 1116 S Carolina Ave., Sat 4/10 Something For Everyone! AVON PARKMOVING SALE! Everything Must Go! Fri-Sat-Sun, April 6,7,8, 8am-? AVON PARKLarge Yard Sale! Fri & Sat 4/8 & 9, 8am 2pm. Antique mirrors, crystal, silver, furniture. Everything from Nuts To Bolts! Hwy 27 to Main, to N Lake Ave to Jackson St. R & follow signs OR Hwy 27 N to Stryker Rd. E to Oak Park Ave. follow signs to field. 7320Garage &Yard Sales TYPEWRITER -Olympica with case. $20 863-655-0342 LUGGAGE -Swiss Air / many compartments 27". $15. 863-4471-2502 FLOOR LAMP/ Modern style / white. $20 863-471-2502 FISHING REELNew Baitrunner, 10 BB-$42.00 Call 863-273-1846. CALCULATOR XL-121.Good Cond.! $20. 863-655-0342 7310Bargain Buys WORKBENCH (FULL) DP ALPHA FLEX. Excellent condition. $75 863-382-4722 WASHER &DRYER / WHIRLPOOL Stack, electric 220. Excellent Condition, $425 863-257-1402 STAINED GLASSequipment & materials, patterns, books, tools, various size glass & colors, grinder, cutter, foil etc. $275 obo. 863-382-8198 7300MiscellaneousPIANOBOSTON5'1 Baby Grand w/bench. Model GP-156. Ebony Polish finish. Excel. cond. $11,000. Call 863-449-0243 7180Furniture 7000 Merchandise SEBRING (2)Available 3926 Kenilworth Blvd, 1500 sq ft, $550/mo : A/C, office, BA, lg overhead door, near Sebring High School. 640 Park St, 6400 sq ft, $2500/mo : A/C, office, BA, 8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric, fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway. 941-416-2813 AVON PARKLarge Retail/Office Building, 100 E. Main St. A MUST SEE! 863-295-9272 6750Commercial Rental SPRING LAKE3BR, 2BA, 2CG, CHA, patio, ceramic tiled liv. room, din. room, kitchen, bath & halls, SS appliances, refrigerator has water on door, micro., W/D hook up. No pets. 863-655-0136 SEBRING -SPRING LAKE AREA. 3/BR, 2/BA on Golf Course. $850 monthly. 1st / last / security / references. Call anytime. 863-273-3704 SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 LAKE PLACIDNEAT & CLEAN 2BR, 2BA $475 2BR, 1BA $450 863-465-2924 6300Unfurnished HousesSEBRING 2240Avalon Rd. 3/2 furn. Small animals ok. Near Shopping Center & Senior Club. References $700. first/last. Call 305-387-6863 after 4pm. or 863-237-3129. 6250Furnished Houses AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; Washer/Dryer, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL : $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 6200UnfurnishedApartments SEBRING -2BR, 2BA. Tile floors, fresh paint. Includes water. $600/mo. Call Gary Johnson, 863-381-1861. RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartments SEBRING -Downtown on the Circle. Monthy rates starting at $400. payable wkly. Includes elec. & water. No Pets. 306 circle. 863-386-9100 or 954-295-7194. Or go to Bldg. and ask for John. 863-414-7535 A PFURNISHED APT FOR RENT Avon Mobile Home Park 1350 N Lake Ave 55 Plus Park Sorry No Pets 863-453-3415 6150FurnishedApartmentsSEBRING VILLA3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage. Wood floors, vaulted ceilings, screened porch. Convenient location near Hospital. Gated community, Clubhouse & pool, lawn maint. incl. $900. mo. Call 863-840-1083. Carole Polk 6100Villas & CondosFor Rent 6000 RentalsA PPARK MODEL FOR SALE Low Lot Rent 55 Plus Park Sorry No Pets 863-449-1072 5100Mobile HomeLots for Sale SEBRING VILLAGE55 + PARK Must Sell! 2BR, 2BA, furnished, new furniture, enclosed sun room w/ shed & outside patio, $25,000 for more info. Call 863-402-0565. PALM HARBORHOMES Has 3 Modular Homes Available at HUGE Savings Over 40K Off Call Today! 800-622-2832 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesSEBRING -Quiet Neighborhood on great fishing lake; 2,000 sf, 3BR, 2.5BA remodeled home with large garage & boat house. $219,000. 863-655-2278 MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE! 4080Homes for SaleSebring SEBRING -RURAL LIVING adjacent to great fishing lake close to Sebring. 3BR, 2BA home, pole barn, 5 acres fenced, zoned agriculture $150,000. 863-655-2278 Make Offer! A VON PARK3BR, 2BA, 1CG 1400 sq ft home. $72,000. Available after Feb. 28, 2011. Owner Financing possible w/ at least 10% down, good credit report and work record. 863-453-5631 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial SALES/ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Central Florida Ag News Magazine, Highlands County Edition. Advertising experience required. Email resume to: nelson@centralfloridamediagroup.com RESIDENTIAL CLEANINGCo. Needs part time help, 15-25 hrs., week days only. Must be reliable, outgoing & highly motivated. Call 863-414-2244. PAGE DESIGNERIf you enjoy Page Design, this is for you. The News Sun is looking for the right person to help design its news page. Candidates must be exp'd in Quark and Photoshop, as well as have good news judgment. Able to work quickly with min. supervision is necessary. Exp. in Illustrator and In Design is a plus. This position is 20 hrs. hrs. may be flexible. Send sample of work with resume to: humanresources@new ssun.com or Fax to: 352-365-1951 Attn. Human Resources Director, or drop off at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL. Drug test and background check required. EOE MATH INSTRUCTORS PT positions to teach developmental math (daytime classes). Bachelor's degree in math or related field required. Open until filled. V isit www.southflorida.edu/hr for details. 863-784-7132. EA/EO A MMUNITION RELOADINGF/T. submit resume & current photo to sales@anderson-arms.com or fax 863-453-7454 2100Help Wanted

PAGE 14

Page 14ANews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com

PAGE 15

ALMS.com 2012 Chevrolet Centennial E dition Corvette celebrates r acing heritage Chevrolet, founded by a r acing pioneer 100 years ago, c elebrates its performance h eritage with the 2012 C hevrolet Centennial Edition C orvette, which features a s leek black color scheme, u nique design elements and C orvette's trademark sports c ar technology. The 2012 Centennial E dition package will be a vailable on all Corvette m odels including Grand S port, Z06 and ZR1 starti ng this summer. In a very special gesture, C hevrolet chooses to debut t he Centennial Edition C orvette at the BarrettJ ackson car auction in West P alm Beach on Saturday n ight. The manufacturer will auct ion a Corvette Z06 Centennial Edition with proceeds going to the Austin Hatcher Foundation for Pediatric Cancer, the official charity of the American Le Mans Series presented by Tequila Patr—n. This foundation supporting children and families dealing with cancer is a key partner with the American Le Mans Series, in which Corvette Racing is an integral participant. "The Austin Hatcher Foundation is honored to be a part of Chevrolet's 100th anniversary celebration" said Dr. James M. Osborn, cofounder and Chairman of the Board at the Austin Hatcher Foundation, "and we look forward to using this generous donation to make a difference in the lives of pediatric cancer patients and their families." The model will be the 100th 2012 Corvette off the assembly line with a vehicle identification number ending in "00100." The sale of the car, lot number 654.1, will air live on SPEED in primetime. Lot details can be found online through the BarrettJackson Web site. The special Centennial Corvette package was inspired by Chevrolet's racing-bred foundation, which continues with Corvette's international racing excellence and production sports car prominence. "Racing and performance are the roots of Chevrolet, a tradition carried forward today by Corvette," said Rick Scheidt, vice president of Chevrolet marketing. "The Centennial Edition not only celebrates our 100 years, it once again pushes Corvette forward for a new generation of sports car fans." The Chevrolet Centennial Edition Corvette expresses racing heritage, but does so with a sleek, modern, even sinister-looking appearance. The Centennial Edition package comes exclusively in Carbon Flash Metallic, with satin-black graphics and unique Centennial Satin Black wheels and red brake calipers. The wheels are constructed of lightweight cast-spun aluminum and include a thin red outline around the perimet er of its surface on the Z06. The wheels are specific to the respective Corvette mo dels, including 18-inch/1 9inch for Coupe, Convertib le SPORTS B SECTION News-Sun Friday, April 8, 2011 Page 3B By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comAVON PARK It wasn't c learly evident under his b lack cap, but there would be l ittle reason to wonder why S outh Florida Community C ollege head coach Rick Hitt w as getting a few extra gray h airs. Wednesday's 8-7 win over v isiting Pasco-Hernando w as, after all, the ninth oner un game his Panther squad h ad been involved in during the last 11 games of their schedule. "It's be nice if we could just put someone away early for a change," Hitt s aid. "So I won't have to add t o my gray hair." And adding more worry t his night was the fact that it w as the Conquistadors who s eemed to put SFCC away e arly, courtesy of a seven-run s econd inning. The fashion in which those r uns were scored was sure to c ause some anxiety as well, g iven that it took just three h its to do so. Three hits, all singles, t hree walks, one hit batter, one error and one sacrifice fly were what got the job done and had South Florida looking up at a big, early deficit. "We just played very poorly those first couple innings," Hitt said. "I don't think we even got our first hit until the fourth inning." But it was in that fourth inning that the clawing comeback began. Brett Clements started it with a single to left before Kyle Jackson hit what would have been a fielder's choice, but a moment of hesitation by the defense and hustle by the Panthers saw everyone safe. Kyle Newton then made the most of the opportunity by belting a three-run tater over the fence. Sam Morgan followed with a double and two outs later would score on a Cody Higgins single to cut the lead South Florida squeaks out another one News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Angel Vargas laces this RBI double down the first-base line in SFCC's 8-7 win over visiting Pasco-Hernando Wednesday night. SFCC8Pasco7 See PANTHERS, page 4B Photo courtesy of ALMS.co m A Centennial Edition 2012 Chevy Corvette will be auctioned of Saturday in WestPalm Beach to benefit the Austin Hatcher Foundation for Pediatric Cancer. Chevrolet to auction special Corvette See VETTE, page 4B By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comTuesday's torrents may have pushed things back a day, but in the end it just meant that the Sebring baseball squad would notch its' sixth in a row Wednesday night. Though the extra day's wait did seem to dampen the Blue Streak scoring a bit, though the pitching and defense were in strong form in the 4-3 win over visiting Osceola. The scoring started, in fact, without the benefit of a hit when Sebring plated two in the first. Seth Abeln walked and was bunted over to second by Matt Randall. Evan Lewis reached when his grounder couldn't be handled, moving Abeln to third and a passed ball soon moved both runners up for the first run. Jesse Baker then hit a hard grounder which the Kowboys tried to get a force on, but the hustling Lewis beat the play and now there were runners on the corners. Lewis soon came home on a Nate Greene sacrifice fly and it was 2-0 Sebring after one inning of play. While Aaron Hart cruised through a one, two, three first, the southpaw ran into some trouble in the second, hitting the first batter of the inning to somewhat set the tone. Hart walked the next batter and they moved to second and third on a passed ball before a single brought one in. Hart soon induced a double play grounder to Randall at short, though the tying run came in on the play. Sebring would break the tie in their half of the second with Gunnar Westergom doubling, stealing third and scoring on a wild pitch, but then both offenses would be held in check over the next three innings with the slim margin seeming even slimmer as the innings went by. It was then, in the top of the sixth, the Osceola evened things up again on a single, walk, passed ball and sacrifice fly. But the Streaks answered right back when Lewis walked, Baker singled and Corbin Hoffner drove Lewis home with a ground-ball single through the left side of the infield. Hart then got the first tw o outs of the top of the sevent h, but put the tying run on wi th a walk, leading to a pitchin g change before Hoffner fi nished things up, getting a grounder for the final out. The win is the sixth in a row for the Streaks, after t he shocking March 15, extr ainning loss to Lake Plac id and has the team on a h ot streak at an opportune time For coming up are gam es against the teams that ma rk Sebring's only district loss es of the season, Winter Hav en at home tonight and on t he road at Lake Wales Thursda y, April 14. The Blue Devils topped t he Streaks 5-2 on March 8 an d the Highlanders held off a furious comeback for a 9 -8 win three days later. Streaks take sixth straight Sebring4Osceola3 By TIM REYNOLDS Associated PressMIAMI The final sliver of postseason hope for the Milwaukee Bucks went away Wednesday night, that long-expected word coming while they played the Miami Heat. They were undeterred and wound up dealing Miami a fairly severe blow. John Salmons scored 17 points before leaving late in the game with a head gash that needed 12 stitches, Luc Richard Mbah a Moute added 14 points and 12 rebounds, and the Bucks beat the Heat 90-85 about an hour or so after they were eliminated from playoff contention. "We knew sooner or later that was going to come, but that lets you know where we stand as a team as competitors also," Bucks forward Drew Gooden said. The Bucks only trailed for 9 minutes, 46 seconds against the Heat, who were 3-0 against Milwaukee this season. They knocked the Heat a half-game back of Boston in the chase for the No. 2 seed in the Easte rn Conference. "Nobody said this w as going to be easy," He at coach Erik Spoelstra sai d. Even if Miami (54-2 4) wins its final four game s, it will need the Celtics to lose at least twice in ord er to pass them in the stan dings. Boston holds t he tiebreaker over the He at by having won all thr ee meetings this season; t he fourth is Sunday in Miam i. Carlos Delfino's 3pointer with 24 secon ds left helped seal it for t he Bucks, who got 14 poin ts from Corey Maggette an d 10 from Keyon Dooling. LeBron James scored 2 9 points for Miami, whi ch played without injur ed guard Dwyane Wade, t he NBA's No. 3 scorer. Chris Bosh added 18 f or the Heat, who had no o ne else reach double figures Miami shot only 41 pe rcent, and its 16 turnove rs led to 18 Milwauk ee points. "Every time you pl ay them, it's going to be o ne Bucks beat Heat, hurting Miami in East chase See HEAT, page 4B News-Sun file photo by DAN HOEHNE Corbin Hoffner drove in the go-ahead run and then recorded the final out in relief in Sebring's 4-3 win Wednesday.

PAGE 16

SYFS BBQ and registrationSEBRING Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is hosting our 2nd Annual BBQ Fundraiser and Tournament on Saturday, April 30 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The BBQ Lunch is $7 and will include a Pulled Pork Sandwich, Baked Beans, Coleslaw, Cookies and a glass of tea. Pick up your meal to go or stay and watch our girls play while you eat. For further information, please email dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201. Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is also conducting registrations for girls ages 10 to 15 now through April 1. Registration is $65 for the first child / $45 for any siblings. For further information, please visit us on Facebook, check out our website at www.eteamz.com/sebringyouthfastpitchsoftball email us at dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING Wings of Faith Worship Center presents the First Annual Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one team of four golfers, one tee sign and two green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includes one team of four golfers, one green sign; Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $100 includes one green sign. Individual player $60 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26). Team of Four Golfers $240 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after March 26). Make checks payable to: Wings of Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL 33871, or register online at wingsoffaithchristianworshipcenter.com Proceeds to be donated to scholarship program for graduates attending Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center. For more information, call Jason Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhankerson@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at 381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com ."Doc Owen" Golf TourneyAVON PARK The Avon Park Noon Rotary Club will host its Second Annual David "Doc Owen" Golf tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Highlands Ridge North. The two-person scramble-format entry fee is $60 per person with prizes in flight groups, lunch, goodie bag and refreshments on the course. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Entry information and check payable to Avon Park Noon Rotary mailed to Chet Brojek, 3310 Par Rd, Sebring, FL 33872. Golfers should include their names and handicaps along with their check. Those needing a form may email Brojek at cbrojek@comcast.net or call at 385-4736. Business entry of two-persons plus a hole sign for a total of $200 is available for the first time this year. All Rotary club members are urged to support participate in the event that benefits local Rotary charity projects. Business hole signs for $100 are also available by contacting Chet via email o r phone.Sandy Foster MemorialSEBRING NU-HOPE Elder Care Services annual golf tournament is just around the corner. The NU-HOPE Board of Directors ha s chosen to rename the golf tournament this year in memory of Sandy Foster, fo rmer Executive Director of NU-HOPE Elder Care Services. Sandy passed away very unexpectedl y in September of last year. Sandy loved golf and ran a very successful golf tournament for 13 years; in his memory the tournament will be renamed the "Sandy Foster Memorial/NU-HOPE golf tournament." This year we are continuing with Sandy's passion for the tournament with flight, raffle and door prizes. In the last three years the field was full, with a wait list, so sign up soon! The first annual Sandy Foster Memorial/NU-HOPE golf tournament will be held on Saturday, April 9, with a n 8:30 a.m. shotgun start, at the Country Club of Sebring. The tournament will be a two-person scramble format. Entry fee will be $60 per person ($12 0 per team) which includes lunch afterwards and refreshments during the tournament. Registration forms are availab le at the Country Club of Sebring Pro Sho p (John Vickers) or can be obtained via mail or fax by calling Debbie Slade at 382-2134. Business sponsorships are also available for this event. The revenue from this event is used for the local match'amount this organi zation needs each year to secure federal and state grant funds in our effort to co ntinue providing home and communitybased services to the frail and needy eld erly residents of Highlands and Hardee Counties. Elks Lodge Golf TourneySEBRING This month's Elks go lf tournament will be held on Monday Ap ril 4th at Harder Hall Country Club. Cost for the 8 a.m. shotgun start is $2 6 per player. To register either your team or as an individual player, contact Ja ck McLaughlin at 471-3295 or by email at jacknjudy33872@gmail.com Check in not later than 7:40 a.m. in t he Harder Hall Golf Course restaurant area Barefoot Waterski TourneyFORTMYERS The 10th annual Deuceapalooza Barefoot Endurance Tournament is set for Saturday, April 9 in Fort Myers. This tournament is open to waterski enthusiasts of all ages. Trophies and cash prizes will be hand ed out. Participants will receive a free T shirt. For information, call Deuce at (239) 693-1975.YMCA Sign-UpsSEBRING The Highlands County YMCAand Eagles Football is doing sign-ups for Youth Flag Football ages 5 14. Healthy Kids Day is Saturday, April 1 6 from 9am to 1pm. Lifeguard Certification Class sign-up s are taking place now for an April 25-30 class. EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB y-Boston5423.701 x-New York4038.5131412x-Philadelphia4039.50615 New Jersey2454.3083012Toronto2157.2693312Southeast Division WLPctGB y-Miami5424.692 x-Orlando5029.633412x-Atlanta4434.56410 Charlotte3246.41022 Washington2157.26933 Central Division WLPctGB y-Chicago5720.740 x-Indiana3643.45622 Milwaukee3246.4102512Detroit2751.3463012Cleveland1761.2184012WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB z-San Antonio6019.759 x-Dallas5325.679612x-New Orleans4533.5771412Memphis4434.5641512Houston4138.51919 Northwest Division WLPctGB y-Oklahoma City5226.667 x-Denver4830.6154 x-Portland4533.5777 Utah3741.47415 Minnesota1762.2153512Pacific Division WLPctGB y-L.A. Lakers5523.705 Phoenix3840.48717 Golden State3544.4432012L.A. Clippers3148.3922412Sacramento2355.29532 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division ___ Tuesday's Games San Antonio 97, Atlanta 90 Cleveland 99, Charlotte 89 New Jersey 107, Minnesota 105 Orlando 78, Milwaukee 72 Washington 107, Detroit 105 Boston 99, Philadelphia 82 New York 131, Toronto 118 Chicago 97, Phoenix 94 L.A. Clippers 82, Memphis 81 Sacramento 104, Houston 101 Oklahoma City 101, Denver 94 Golden State 108, Portland 87 Utah 86, L.A. Lakers 85 Wednesday's Games Orlando 111, Charlotte 102, OT Indiana 136, Washington 112 New York 97, Philadelphia 92 Cleveland 104, Toronto 96 Detroit 116, New Jersey 109 Phoenix 108, Minnesota 98 New Orleans 101, Houston 93 Oklahoma City 112, L.A. Clippers 108 Milwaukee 90, Miami 85 San Antonio 124, Sacramento 92 Denver 104, Dallas 96 Golden State 95, L.A. Lakers 87 Thursday's Games Boston at Chicago, late Portland at Utah, late Friday's Games Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m. New York at New Jersey, 7 p.m. Toronto at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Washington at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Chicago at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Charlotte at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Sacramento at Memphis, 8 p.m. Phoenix at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Portland, 10 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA x-Philadelphia462311103249215 x-Pittsburgh47258102229194 N.Y. Rangers4332591228193 New Jersey3738579169202 N.Y. Islanders30381272222253 Northeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA y-Boston452411101241191 x-Montreal4330793210205 Buffalo41291092236222 Toronto37331185217247 Ottawa31391072188245 Southeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA y-Washington482211107224196 x-Tampa Bay44251199237236 Carolina39301189228232 Atlanta33341278217258 Florida29391270192225WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA y-Detroit462410102255234 Nashville43261197215191 Chicago4328995251219 St. Louis37331185238234 Columbus34331381210249 Northwest Division WLOTPtsGFGA z-Vancouver52199113254183 Calgary41291193248234 Minnesota3734882198224 Colorado2942866219278 Edmonton25441161189262 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA y-San Jose47249103242208 x-Los Angeles4628698217193 Phoenix42251397226220 Anaheim4530595234233 Dallas40281191217224 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot z-clinched conference ___ Tuesday's Games Washington 3, Toronto 2, SO Buffalo 4, Tampa Bay 2 Pittsburgh 4, New Jersey 2 Montreal 2, Chicago 1, OT Ottawa 5, Philadelphia 2 St. Louis 3, Colorado 1 Nashville 6, Atlanta 3 Dallas 3, Columbus 0 Edmonton 2, Vancouver 0 Wednesday's Games Los Angeles 3, Phoenix 2, SO Boston 3, N.Y. Islanders 2 New Jersey 4, Toronto 2 Washington 5, Florida 2 Carolina 3, Detroit 0 Chicago 4, St. Louis 3, OT Calgary 6, Edmonton 1 Anaheim 6, San Jose 2 Thursday's Games Atlanta at N.Y. Rangers, late Montreal at Ottawa, late Colorado at Dallas, late Minnesota at Vancouver, late Friday's Games Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m. Carolina at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Florida at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Columbus at Nashville, 8 p.m. Dallas at Colorado, 9 p.m. Minnesota at Edmonton, 9 p.m. San Jose at Phoenix, 10 p.m. Los Angeles at Anaheim, 10 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB Baltimore41.800 Toronto41.800 New York32.6001 Boston05.0004 Tampa Bay05.0004 Central Division WLPctGB Kansas City42.667 Chicago32.60012Cleveland32.60012Detroit23.400112Minnesota23.400112West Division WLPctGB Texas601.000 Los Angeles33.5003 Seattle24.3334 Oakland14.200412___ Tuesday's Games L.A. Angels 5, Tampa Bay 3 Cleveland 3, Boston 1 Minnesota 5, N.Y. Yankees 4, 10 innings Toronto 7, Oakland 6, 10 innings Texas 3, Seattle 2 Kansas City 7, Chicago White Sox 6, 12 innings Wednesday's Games L.A. Angels 5, Tampa Bay 1 Texas 7, Seattle 3 Chicago White Sox 10, Kansas City 7, 12 innings Cleveland 8, Boston 4 Detroit 7, Baltimore 3 Minnesota at New York, ppd., rain Toronto 5, Oakland 3 Thursday's Games Boston at Cleveland, late Oakland at Toronto, late Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, late Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, late Detroit at Baltimore, late Friday's Games N.Y. Yankees at Boston, 2:05 p.m. Kansas City at Detroit, 3:05 p.m. Oakland at Minnesota, 4:10 p.m. Texas at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Toronto at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Cleveland at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB Philadelphia41.800 Florida32.6001 New York32.6001 Atlanta33.500112Washington14.2003 Central Division WLPctGB Cincinnati501.000 Pittsburgh42.667112Chicago33.500212Milwaukee24.333312St. Louis24.333312Houston05.0005 West Division WLPctGB Colorado31.750 San Diego32.60012Los Angeles33.5001 Arizona23.400112San Francisco24.3332 ___ Tuesday's Games Chicago Cubs 6, Arizona 5 San Diego 3, San Francisco 1 N.Y. Mets 7, Philadelphia 1 Cincinnati 8, Houston 2 Florida 3, Washington 2, 10 innings Milwaukee 1, Atlanta 0 St. Louis 3, Pittsburgh 2 Colorado 3, L.A. Dodgers 0 Wednesday's Games Pittsburgh 3, St. Louis 1 Arizona 6, Chicago Cubs 4 Colorado 7, L.A. Dodgers 5 San Francisco 8, San Diego 4 Philadelphia 10, N.Y. Mets 7 Cincinnati 12, Houston 4 Florida 7, Washington 4 Milwaukee 5, Atlanta 4 Thursday's Games Houston at Cincinnati, late Colorado at Pittsburgh, late Atlanta at Milwaukee, late N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, late Washington at Florida, late Friday's Games Washington at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m. St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:35 p.m. Colorado at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Florida at Houston, 7:05 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Cincinnati at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.BASEBALLAmerican League OAKLAND ATHLETICSPlaced RHP Michael Wuertz on 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Tyler Ross from Sacramento (PCL). National League COLORADO ROCKIES Placed RHP Ubaldo Jimenez on 15-day DL, retroactive to April 2. Recalled RHP Grag Reynolds from Colorado Springs (PCL). LOS ANGELES DODGERSActivated 3B Casey Blake from 15-day DL. Optioned INF Ivan De Jesus to Albuquerque (PCL). SAN FRANCISCO GIANTSActivated RHP Brian Wilson. Placed RHP Santiago Casillo on 15-day DL, retroactive to April 1.BASKETBALLNational Basketball Association LOS ANGELES LAKERSAssigned F Derrick Caracter to Bakersfield (NBADL). WASHINGTON WIZARDSSigned F Larry Owens. Re-signed F Othyus Jeffers. Waived G/F Cartier Martin.HOCKEYNational Hockey League BOSTON BRUINSAssigned D Steven Kampfer to Providence (AHL). CHICAGO BLACK HAWKSRecalled F Ben Smith from Rockford (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS Reassigned D Andre Benoit, D David Hale, D Patrick Wiercioch, F Erik Condra and F Roman Wick to Binghamton (AHL). PHILADELPHIA FLYERSRecalled G Michael Leighton from Adirondack (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTESSigned G Mark Visentin to an entry-level contract. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid TODAY: Baseball vs.Avon Park,7 p.m.; Softball at Tenoroc,6:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Softball at Clewiston,6 p.m. THURSDAY,April 14: Baseball at Mulberry,7 p.m. FRIDAY,April 15: Baseball vs.Frostproof,7 p.m.; Softball at Moore Haven,5/7 p.m.; Track and Field at Districts,Poincianna,TBA Sebring TODAY: Baseball vs.Winter Haven,7 p.m.; Softball at Liberty,7 p.m. THURSDAY,April 14: Baseball at Lake Wales,7 p.m. FRIDAY,April 15: Baseball at Haines City,7 p.m.; Softball vs.Frostproof,6:30 p.m. SFCC SATURDAY: Baseball vs.State College of Florida,2 p.m. MONDAY: Baseball at State College of Florida,6 p.m. TUESDAY: Softball vs.State College of Florida,5 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball vs.State College of Florida,6 p.m. Avon Park TODAY: Baseball at Lake Placid,7 p.m.; Softball vs.Mulberry,5/7 p.m. THURSDAY,April 14: Baseball at Frostproof,7 p.m. FRIDAY,April 15: Baseball at Tenoroc,7 p.m.; Softball vs.Hardee,5:30/7:30 p.m. A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 5 5 p p . m m . NASCAR O'Reilly 300, Qualifying. . E E S S P P N N 2 2 8 8 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NASCAR O'Reilly Auto Parts 300 . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NASCAR Samsung Mobile 500. . . . F F O O X XN N H H L L F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Florida at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NM M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox . . . . . . S S U U N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Regional N.Y. Yankees at Boston or . . . Philadelphia at Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X X 4 4 p p . m m . Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox . . S S U U N N / / W W G G N NC C O O L L L L E E G G E E H H O O C C K K E E Y Y S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament Final . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NT T E E N N N N I I S S F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . WTA Family Circle Cup, Quarterfinal E E S S P P N N 2 2S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . WTA Family Circle Cup, Semifinal . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2Times, games, channels all subject to change G G O O L L F F F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p . m m . 2011 Masters Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 3 3 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . 2011 Masters Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S SB B O O X X I I N N G G F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 1 1 1 1 p p . m m . David Lemieux vs. Marco Rubio . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 1 1 1 1 p p . m m . Marcus Johnson vs. Dyah Davis . . . . . . S S H H O O W W LIVESPORTSONTV Major League Baseball NHL Major League Baseball Transactions Page 2BNews-Sun Friday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.co m The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

PAGE 17

Golf HammockThe Ladies played their Farewell Tournament Wednesday, April 6, a Step Aside Scramble. First place went to the foursome of Ruth Harris. Millie Grime, Jo Thornburg and Cindy Dall. Finishing in second were Laura Kebberly, Mary Bond, Trudy Stowe and Marge Pederson, while Jeanne Fivecoat, Betty Clarke, Nancy Porcari and MaryLindsay took third. Last Monday, April 4, the Mezza group played Pro-Am Individual Points at Golf Hammock Country Club. Doug Haire played an outstanding game and aced the 129 yard 17th hole using a seven-iron making his first hole-in-one. Playing with Haire was Billy Parr,Joe Hyzny and Jerry Patterson CongratulationsDoug. Mike Lajiness had a minus 3 to take first place in A group and there was a three way tie for second at minus 4 with Jim Gulick, Harvey Kecskes and Bobby Culbert. Pat Dell made plus 3 to take first place in B group and second place was Mike Winchester at plus 2. Doug Haire made plus 6 for first place ingroup and Mike anselm had a plus 4 for second place. Billy Parr tyook first place in D group with a plus 5 and second place went to Sal Sboto with even. Janet Regan had plus 4 to take first place in E group while Doc Thomas had a plus 3 for second place. In f group Jim Reed had plus 3 for firat place and Mac McKenzie was plus 1 for second place. Pete Mezza made plus 2 for first place in G group and Johnnie Labarge in second at even. In H groupLee Stark had plus 8 for first place while Don Tiemens was second with plus 3. Next Monday will be a shotgun start at Golf Hammock CC beginning at 8:30 a.m. Please arrive early to register. For more information, call Pete Mezza at 382-1280 The Golf Hammock Club Championship was completed Monday, April 4 as part of a three-day, Low Gross, Low Net tournament. Crowned the Club Champion with a score of 257 was Marian Passafume, while the runner-up was Laura Kebberly with a 258. Winning Low Gross in First Flight was Ruth Kirk at 270 with Ruth Harris in second at 279. Taking Low Net in the flight was Carol Troup with a 198 total while Florence Towell was second at 205. In Second Flight action, Trudy Stowe went low in the gross with a 294 for first, staying ahead of Eleanor Short's 307, and Jo Thornburg won Low Net with a 204 while Mary Lindsay was second at 212.Lake June West Golf ClubA scramble was played on Thursday, March 31. Winning first place was the team of Ron and Sylvia West, Dick and Nancy Reaney, Margaret Schultz and Bill Brouhle with 48; second place, John and Virginia Simmons, Cal Billingsley, Don Boulton, Charlotte Mathew and Jane Roush with 49; and third place, Doyan and Wayne Eades, Bob and Verna Knishka, Joe and Joyce Swartz with 51. Closest to the pin: (Ladies), No. 2, Sylvia West, 2-feet-7-inches; and Nancy Reaney, 6-feet-10-inches. (Men), No. 4, Don Boulton, 10-feet-2inches. The men's association played a Best Ball on Wednesday, March 30. Winning first place was the team of Orville Huffman, Art Schmeltz, Fred Neer and Larry Angell with 39; second place, John Byron, Sonny Shelton, Bob Williams and Pat Houlihan with 40; and third place, Bill Hintz, Pete McNamee, Rex Simmons, Dave Colvin and Walt Nagel with 41. Closest to the pin: No. 2, Dave Colvin, 4-feet-3-inches; No. 4, Larry Angell, 7-feet-9-inches; and No. 8, Bill Hintz, 7-feet-6-inches.PinecrestThe Ladies Association played the Club Championship Tourrnament Tuesday and Thursday, March 15 and 17, with Sammie Long winning the A Division with a two-day total of 174 and Lois Kistler taking second with 178. Brad Kurek took B Division with a 190, with Betty Ulrich finishing in second with a 198 total. Beckie Gillies got a hole in one on the 10th hole Tuesday, Feb. 15 and Barb Hall got an ace of her own at #12 on Thursday, March 24.Placid LakesThe Men's Association played a One Best Ball plus all Net Birdies event Wednesday, April 6. The quartet of Jim Hays, John Rosettis, John Goble and Al Verhage won the day's play with a -32, three ahead of the -29 brought in by Bruce Miseno, Bob McMillian, Chuck Fortunato and David Raciti. Taft Green, Ed Bartusch, Bill Lockwood and Gene Ransom finished third with a -28 with Raciti getting closest to the pin on #13 at 17-feet, 2-inches. The Men's Association played a scramble fundraiser for Manna Ministries. Winning first place was the team of Bob McMillian, Dick Wellman, Charlie Allen and Pat Haas with minus-13; second place, Ed Bartusch, Betty Near, Russ Isaacs and Russ Isaacs Jr. with minus-12; and third place, Frank Fisher, Tony Toma, David Moiles and Taft Green with minus-10. Closest to the pin: Women, No. 2, Von Lacy, 13-feet-2-inches; and Men, No. 13, Bruce Miseno, 16-inches. PLCC Women's Golf Association not only made a generous donation, they also raised more money from the sale of Mulligans. Individual donations and 50/50 added to the total which will top $1,000 after expenses.River GreensA morning scramble was played Friday, April 1. Tying for first/second/third places were Romy Febre, Jack Sayre and Bernie with 56 each. The Friday afternoon scramble was played April 1. Winning first place was the team of Austin Smith, Jim Sizemore, Danny Pelfrey, Tom Stewart, Dr. C. Seralde and Aurel Mack with 17-under. The Morrison Group played a game on Thursday, March 31. The winners were: First place, Russ Rudd and Gil Heier with 56; second place, Ed Moser and Hank Wunderlich with 57; and Butch Smith and Gerry Page with 59. The ladies association played a pro am tournament on Thursday, March 31. Winning first place was the team of Michele Koon, Rita Nestor, Linda Therrien and Gerri Leslie with plus-8; and second place, Anne Purcell, Peggy Wehunt and Laura Smutnick with plus7. Individual winners were: First place, Laura Smutnick with plus-5.5; second place, Rita Nestor with plus-4; and third place, Michele Koon with plus3.5. The men's association played a pro am tournament on Wednesday, March 30. Winning first place was the team of Harold Plagens, Al Farrell, Romy Febre and Jim Cercy with plus-15; second place, Tom Morway, Peter March, Ed Mosser and Neil Purcell with plus-11; and third place, Johnny Wehunt, Ken Koon, Greg Nestor and Lefty St. Pierre with plus-3.5. Individual winners were: A Flight (29-over): First place, Romy Febre with plus-12; and second place, Russ Rudd with plus-1.5. B Flight (24-28): First place, Butch Smith; and second place, Stan Griffis. C Flight (19-23): First place, Greg Nestor with plus-10; and second place, Bill Mountford with plus-5. D Flight (18-under): First place, Neil Purcell with plus-6.5; and second place, Fred Evans with plus-1.5. The Golfettes played a game on March 29. The winners were: First place, Jeannine Persails with 49. Tying for second/third/fourth places were Carol Roy, Mary Beth Carby and Michele Koon with 43 each. The Morrison Group played a game on Tuesday, March 29. Winning first place was the team of Ken Brunswick, Bob Stevens, Dave Kelly and Bob Biever with minus-34; second place, Don McDonald, Gerry Page, Romy Febre and Lefty St. Pierre with minus-31; and third place, Cliff Aubin, Auclair, Vince Boeverand Hank Wunderlich with minus-30. A Limited Member event was played on Monday, March 28. Winning first place was the team of Tom and Janeste Brouwer, Ed and Judy Ward. Individual winners were: Tying for www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 3B See GOLF, page 4B

PAGE 18

and Grand Sport; and 19inch/20-inch for Z06 and ZR1. Magnetic Selective Ride Control, the world's fastestreacting suspension and a technology advance initiated by Corvette, is included on all Chevrolet Centennial Edition Corvette models. The Centennial Edition also features special badges that signify Chevrolet's racing history. Agraphic logo featuring an iconic image of Louis Chevrolet appears on the B-pillars, the center caps of the wheels, and the center of the steering wheel. The seat headrests also carry an embossed centennial logo. Aficionados will note one other small detail: The historic crossed flags badge contains a small adaptation, with "100" in place of the traditional fleur-de-lis symbol, only for the Centennial Edition. The exterior color scheme is reinforced inside the car, with the Ebony leather-wrapped instrument panel and doors complimented by red stitching also on the steering wheel, seats, console and shifter. The seats feature microfiber suede accents on seats, steering wheel, shifter and armrests, which were first used on the 2011 Z06 Carbon Limited Edition. The Chevrolet Centennial Edition will be available on all Corvette models via order code ZLC. Pricing will be released this summer prior to the start of availability. "Louis Chevrolet was a fearless racing pioneer who also designed our first car," Scheidt said. "Corvette is a natural fit to honor that legacy, while creating a compelling new package for sports car drivers." Before being auctioned, this special-edition vehicle will be featured in the Chevrolet 100th Anniversary display within the GM booth from today through Saturday. Chevrolet will be utilizing a new social media technology called TimeSplice, which will enable guests to take a stop action photograph of themselves with the vehicle and immediately share it with friends via text, email, Twitter or Facebook. The winning bidder will also receive the Corvette Engine Build Experience program whichallows Z06 or ZR1 buyers to build their own engine alongside expert technicians as well as the opportunity to take delivery of the car at the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Ky. The American Le Ma ns Series presented by Tequi la Patr—n heads west for its next round the Tequi la Patr—n American Le Ma ns Series at Long Beach o n Saturday, April 16. The race will be show n live and in its entirety o n ESPN3.com in the Unit ed States and international ly on americanlemans.co m starting at 7:15 p.m. ET. ESPN2 will provide tel evision coverage from 5 to 7 p.m. ETon Sunday, April 1 7. Visit the American L e Mans Series` schedule pa ge for information on ticke ts and area accommodations You can follow t he Series on Twitter (alm snotes), on our Faceboo k page and the offici al YouTube channel. Page 4BNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Highlands Youth Football and Cheer Organization (HYF) will be having a Car Wash fundraiser at Advanced Auto Parts at the corner of US 27 and the Sebring Parkway on the following Saturdays, April 9 and April 23, from 9 am-3 pm. All monies earned or donated will be used to purchase equipment and uniforms for the boys and girls. HYF is a new league to Sebring and is looking forward to providing a rewarding youth sports program to foster these boys and girls to develop sportsmanship, physical fitness and build their self esteem as well as provide them an opportunity to be part of a team. The team name is the "Highlands Eagles" and team colors are black, yellow and white. Come on down and get registered while your car is being washed. HYF will also be offering registration during our car wash for cheerleaders and football players. Any registered player that needs to turn in registration information or payment can come to the car wash to do so. Several of our coaches and board members will be there to meet or answer any questions you may have. Available for Ages 5 15 years old (8th Grade maximum). Registration fees are $75 each for Football and Cheer or $65 each if you are signing up multiple children, Limited spots are available for Mighty-Mite, Pee Wee and Junior Varsity Divisions Flag and Varsity players are needed. All divisions are open for Cheerleading Please come on down to support your youth football organization. For football, please call Tim Hooks at 414-2873, Cliff Howell at 253-7070 or Becky Grippo at 381-9760 for Cheerleading. HYFC Car Wash Special to the News-SunSEBRING Aleague m eeting for Highlands C ounty softball teams has b een scheduled for T uesday, April 19, at 6:30 p .m. The meeting will be h eld at the Highlands C ounty Sports Complex o ff Sheriff's Tower Road. Leagues will begin p laying again on Monday, M ay 9. Open registration for all adult softball players, men and women, is ongoing until April 26. The charge is $350 and a $15 sanction fee. If you are interested in playing organized softball, please sign up at the Highlands County Sports Complex. For more information, please contact Dan Jamison at the Highlands County Sports Complex (863) 402-6755. County Softball Meeting first/second places were Tom Brouwer and Don Sherman. SpringLakeThe SpringLake Women's Golf Association played an Individual Low Net, Flighted Tournament on Wednesday, April 6, on the Panther Creek course. The winners in Flight A were: Marsi Benson 64, Marilyn Redenbarger 67 and Dotti Blackwell 68. Judy Dunn, 64, won a tiebreaker over Linda Pfleger to take first place in Flight B and Shirley Olnhausen was third with a 66. Flight C winner had a 66 and was determined by a tiebreaker between Mary Cebula and Ann McWilliams. Third place was won by Sharon Warner who had a 71. Margaret Mazzola won first place in Flight D with a 62 and Carole Frederick was second with 65. A 66 gave third place to Carolyn Irvine. Continued from 3B Golf Scores Recap News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Richard Whiteleather delivers to a Conquistador batter Wednesday night. The lefty would prove effective in relief, holding Pasco-Hernando down before the Panthers could rally for the win. t o 7-4. Things stayed that way u ntil the bottom of the sixth w hen Brad Harrison singled t o right with one out and s cored on an Angel Vargas d ouble down the first-base l ine. David Samperi sent a fly d eep enough to right to move V argas to third and Higgins b ounced one through the m iddle for an RBI single. Higgins then stole second a nd when the throw down s ailed into center, he hustled a ll the way in to knot things a t 7-7. Richard Whiteleather, on i n relief since the fifth, w orked through the top of the s eventh, retiring one batter o n a wicked, knee-buckling c urve for a called third strike, b ut the SFCC offense couldn 't carry the momentum in t heir half of the inning. Whiteleather got the first out in the eighth before surrendering a single. He bounced back for a strike out, but when he walked the next batter, Layton Mack was called in and got the final out on a called third strike fastball. The Panthers then were able to break the tie in their half of the eighth when Morgan singled to left and Harrison sent a shot through the right side to put runners on the corners. Vargas then came up with a drawn-in infield and pushed a perfect squeeze bunt toward first that easily brought Morgan in. From there, Mack struck out the opening batter of the ninth before walking the next Conquistador to put the tying run on. But it was quickly settled when a grounder to Newton at short was shoveled to Higgins at second and relayed to Jackson at first for the game-ending double play. "What do you know, another one-run game," Hitt said. "We did a better job with runners in scoring position today and I give the guys credit for continuing to fight. "They know what they need to do to be successful and they know what they don't need to do from the times they haven't succeeded," he continued. "We'll just hope they come to play every day and go about the second half of the conference schedule." That conference schedule picks back up Saturday with the start of a three-game series at home against the State College of Florida Manatees. Continued from 1B Panthers battle back for win Continued from 1B Vette celebrates 100th anniversary o f those grind-it-out tough g ames," James said. "They m ake it very physical. ... I've p layed against Scott Skiles t eams when he was in C hicago and now in M ilwaukee, and it's always t he same effort." The Bucks were officially eliminated when Indiana beat Washington. So the Bucks became spoilers, and played the role to perfection. The fifth and final lead change came with 2:27 left, when Delfino hit a 3-pointer for an 81-79 lead. With the Milwaukee lead at four, James scored the next three Miami points, but the Heat lost a chance to take the lead when Mike Bibby was called for an illegal screen with 41 seconds left. Delfino's third 3-pointer came 17 seconds later, dooming Miami. Miami shot 7 for 21, in the fourth, with Bosh missing six of his nine shots, James four of his six. "You have to give credit to their defense," Bosh said. "They play good defense. ... Things are going to happen like that sometimes." Continued from 1B Heat hurt playoff seeding with loss

PAGE 19

www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 5B RELIGION By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comFORTMEADE Athens Baptist Church is preparing for its 100-year anniversary. The church will celebrate its 100 years of ministry in the Bereah community, located just north of Avon Park. The celebration will begin on April 10 at 10:30 a.m. with normal services but will have a special music performance during the service. The Gulf State Quartet will be present during Athens Pastor Rev. J.L. Howard ministry. Following the traditional service, the Athens Baptist Church family invites members, friends and guests to the social hall for a barbecue chicken and pulled pork lunch. Members and guests are then invited to enjoy the Gospel sounds of the Gulf State Quartet in the sanct uary beginning at 1 p.m. "It's not just for the co ngregation; the public is invited," said Jo Barne s, member and coordinator of the 100 years celebratio n. "We want everyone to be a part of something that 's been a part of the commun ity for so long." Barnes, along with Deb ra Crews, has been workin g diligently to make the cel ebration a success. T he morning church servic e, lunch, and afternoon mus ic entertainment are sure to be something for the comm unity to enjoy. Athens Baptist Church is at 6510 W. Bereah Ro ad just off of Avon Park Cuto ff Road. Howard, Barne s, Crews and the church fam ily hope to see the comm unity out and joining in t he celebration. Athens Baptist to celebrate 100 years of worship Special to the News-SunOn March 19, the Avon Park Florida Avenue Baptist Church's Women On Mission held a shower for The Potter's House in Lake Placid. The women were served a delicious lunch prepared by some of the residents and volunteers of The Potter's House. The Potter's House was founded in 1981 as a refuge for abused, abandoned, troubled pregnant and non-pregnant girls. It is a sanctuary for girls who need acceptance and love in an environment of Christian values. The girls are exposed to activities in the community that train them as service providers. The Scripture behind The Potter's House is "...there I will cause thee to hear my words..." Jeremiah 18:2. Several other ministries have come from the start of The Potter's House include The Alpha Omega Crisis Center, Galatians 6:2; Children of Promise Baby Ministry, Psalms 68:5; American Heritage Private School, II Timothy 2:15; and New Beginnings, Jeremiah 16:3-6. There is a great need for volunteers and donations of supplies and most of all prayers in each of the respective programs. Contact Sandy Lopes at 140 Dunty Road, Lake Placid, FL33852 or call 465-7707. Women on Mission have shower for Potter's House Courtesy photo Women On Mission from Florida Avenue Baptist Church with in-house babies and babies that are in Christian foster care. Atonement Lutheran ChurchSEBRING The Fifth Sunday in Lent worship service will be led by the Rev. Jefferson Cox at the 9:30 a.m. service with Holy Eucharist. Midweek Lenten Service starts with soup, sandwich and pie supper at 5:30 p.m. Service of the Word at 6:15 p.m. led by Lois Hess, Ed Graff and Ron Fitzpatrick. Jim Helwig will be the organist. The Litanies will be titled "Affirming The Ash Heap," a series comparing Jesus with Job. Why do bad things happen to good people?Avon Park Church of ChristAVON PARK "Believe God's Facts" (Romans 10:17), will be the message presented by Larry Roberts, minister. The Sunday evening service will be a Bible study from the book of Psalms. The Youth Group will have a Fellowship Gathering on Sunday night. Avon Park Church of Christ is at 200 S. Forest Ave. For information, call 453-4692.Christian Science ChurchSEBRING The lesson sermon on Sunday morning is titled "Are Sin, Disease, and Death Real?" The keynote is from Deuteronomy 4:39, "Know, recognize, and understand therefore this day and turn your (mind and) heart to it that the Lord is God in the heavens above and upon the earth beneath; there is no other." The church is at 146 N. Franklin St.Christian Training Church SEBRING Associate Minister Casey L. Downing will bring the message titled "Possessed By Vision: Part 3" at the Sunday morning service. The Wednesday night Bible study will continue the book of Hebrews. Emmanuel United Church of ChristSEBRING The Rev. George Miller will deliver the sermon, "Stages," with Scripture taken from John 2:1-45. Bunny Hop on April 24 after the Easter celebration service. There will be an Easter Egg Hunt following the Easter service. The church is 1.7 miles west of U.S. 27 on County Road 634 (Hammock Road). Call 471-1999 or visit sebringemmanuelucc.com.First Baptist Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK Rev. Jon Beck will speak at the 11 a.m. service and the 6 p.m. service. The church is at 100 N. Lake Ave. For more information, call 453-6681 or email infor@fbcap.net.First Baptist Church of Placid LakesLAKE PLACID Pastor Darryl George will preach the sermon titled "The Example of Growing In Grace!" with regards to Luke 2:41-48. The church is at the corner of Washington and Kemper Avenues in Placid Lakes. For more information, call 465-5126 from 8 a.m. to noon Monday through Thursday or e-mail placidlakes@hotmail.com.First Christian ChurchAVON PARK "Running on Empty" is the title of the pastor's sermon this week. Scripture will come from Luke 24:1-12 as he discusses the theme that "No Running no longer applies," building to the Easter message on April 24. First Christian Church of Avon Park is at 1016 W. Camphor (behind the Wachovia Bank). Call 4535334 or e-mail firstchristianap@embarqmail.com. The church Web site is www.firstchristianap.com.First Presbyterian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK On Sunday morning, the pastor's sermon is titled "Declared Righteous" based on Luke 19:1-10. The choir's anthem will be "Thy Will Be Done" with solo by David Blackmon. Maxine Johnson, adult Sunday school teacher, continues the study of David in II Samuel chapter 11 in which David has Uriah (Bathsheda's husband) placed in the battlefield where he knows he will be killed). Wendy Garcia teaches the youth class. At Wednesday Bible study the pastor continues the study on Revelation. Mary Circle meets at 1 p.m. On Thursday, Sarah Circle meets at 4 p.m. The Deacons meet at 6 p.m. On Saturday, April 16 there will be a Church Work Day from 9 a.m. until noon. The church is at 215 E. Circle St. (with two entrances on Lagrande Street). Call 453-3242. Church News In the Scriptures there are many verses that admonish us to help others who are in need. I was about 12 years old in 1933, when Mr. Green, a member of our church, was killed in a farm accident. Mr. Green was preparing the fields for the spring planting when he apparently had a heart attack. He fell from the tractor and was run over by the disc barrow. This tragic event left Mrs. Green a widow with two young girls and no means of support. Ours was a small country church with an attendance of 35-40 members. The church members immediately rallied around Mrs. Green after the funeral, determined to help. The men decided to plant the whole farm to corn. They descended on the farm with tractors, horses, plows, discs and planters. The women came and prepared to feed everybody. In one big day, the whole farm was planted in corn. Now a schedule was set up so that all summer long the men took turns cultivating the corn. The whole project culminated one day in October. Again the whole church membership showed up to help. From the looks of th e table at noon, you would have thought it was Thanksgiving. That day the whole cro p was harvested and delivered to the local grain ele vator. When the bills for seed and fertilizer were paid, the whole crop nette d about $900. Mr. Green wa s a tenant farmer, so one-ha lf of this went to the landlord. Mrs. Green, with tears streaming down her cheek s, was presented a check for $450. In the depression year of 1933, this was the equivalent of about one an d a half years'wages for a working man, if he had a job. Mrs. Green then moved to town, rented a small house and eventually foun d work to help support herself and the girls. Did I mention that Mrs. Green was my Sunday school teacher? What a blessing it is to be a part of a body of believers. Floyd Rider is a Lake Placid resident and a long time Sunday school teacher. Helping one another Breylinger walks for ministry workAVON PARK Pastor B ill Breylinger once more h as put on his walking shoes a nd did a 125-mile walk t hrough many areas of this b eautiful county. The pastor s tarted in Lake Placid and w alked to Avon Park, not to m ention the times around L ake Jackson and throughout t he beautiful Hammock. His goal was to raise m oney for the important m inistries at Union C ongregational Church. T hese ministries help so m any in the county.Kids Club comes to Calvary ChurchSEBRING Calvary C hurch on Hammock Road w ill have Kids Club at 6 p .m. today. Fun, games, Bible study a nd refreshments for ages 51 1. Everyone is welcome. Afun-filled time from 6-8 p .m.Knights plan fish bakeAVON PARK Knights o f Columbus will host a fish b ake from 5:30-7 p.m. today a t Our Lady of Grace, 595 E. M ain St., in the Grogan C enter. Come and bring your f riends, or come and make n ew friends. The dinner c osts $8 per person. For more information, call 4 53-4757.Solid Grounds serves breakfastAVON PARK Starting o n Saturday, and every seco nd Saturday of the months f ollowing, there will be a p ancake breakfast in Solid G rounds (of Union C ongregational Church) f rom 7-10 a.m. consisting of p ancakes, sausage, scramb led eggs, juice and coffee, f or the low price of $5 per p erson. Plan on attending.First Baptist has week of eventsLAKE PLACID First B aptist Church of Lake P lacid, 119 E. Royal Palm S t., will host the following e vents this week: Saturday From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., in support of youth s ummer programs, church m embers will clean vehicles i n the parking lot of the c hurch. Donations are greatl y appreciated. Monday At noon in fell owship hall will be the P rimetimer's Covered Dish l uncheon. Bring a covered d ish and a friend. Speaker w ill be Bill Lewis M inistries. Tuesday At 6:30 p.m., C onfection Connection, a w omen's Bible study in the s anctuary, will meet. The s peaker will be Jennifer R eser.First Baptist Sebring revival services setSEBRING New morni ng worship schedule for Snapshots Guest Column Floyd Rider RELIGION GUIDELINES: The News-Sunpublishes religion news on Fridays. The submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday to be considered for publication in the following Friday's paper. Submit items to the News-Sun'sfrom 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays; fax to 385-2453; send email to editor@newssun.com; or mail to Lifestyle Editor,News-Sun,2227 U.S. 27 South,Sebring,FL 33870. For information,call 385-6155,ext. 516. Continued on page 8B Continued on page 8B

PAGE 20

www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 7B Page 6BNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com MARCH MARKETINGMADNESS The NEWS-SUNstaff would like to thank all of those who participated in the 2011 March Marketing Madness advertising special. We had a great time and look forward to next year.

PAGE 21

Page 8BNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. children's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. children's mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing God's Heart and Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and women's prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the "Place to discover God's love." For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mother's Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) "Where the old fashion gospel is preached." Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the "Son" always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. JosŽ Gonz‡lez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Friday 5-7 p.m., every Saturday 9-11 a.m. and 3-3:45 p.m., first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lord's Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building God's Kingdom for Everyone." "Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!" Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is "Jesus is First at First Christian Church."Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures'by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP RELIGION First Baptist, Sebring is Bible Study for all ages 9:15 a.m., blended worship service at 10:30 a.m. Revival services with Dr. Condy Richardson will be held Sunday through Wednesday with noon luncheon devotionals at 12:15 p.m. Monday through Wednesday. Richardson's theme for the services will be "God's Church Back to the Basics."Spaghetti dinner at St. John UMCSEBRING St. John United Methodist Church will have a spaghetti dinner at 4, 5 and 6 p.m. Tuesday. The cost is $7 per person. Take-outs and walk-ins are welcome. The church is at 3214 Grand Prix Drive. Call 382-1736 for information.Cantata at St. John UMCSEBRING At 7 p.m. Wednesday the Chancel Choir of St. John United Methodist Church with narration and actors in costume will present "Come, Touch the Robe" (encounters with the Healer, the Servant, the Lord of Easter), a cantata for voices and piano written by Pepper Choplin. The cantata will be followed by a Healing Service. St. John United Methodist Church is at 3214 Grand Prix Drive. Call the church at 382-1736 for information.Passover SederSEBRING Temple Israel of Highlands County is having a traditional Seder at 6 p.m. Monday, April 18 at the synagogue at 1305 Temple Israel Drive. Passover receives its name from the last plague inflicted upon the Egyptians the killing of the first born. The Israelites were instructed to mark their doors with the blood of a spring lamb so that the angel of the Lord would pass over their homes. While Passover is remembered mainly for unleavened bread, Matzo, more importantly, it commemorates freedom from slavery and the beginning of people hood for the Jews. This mass of wanderers shrugged off slavery and ultimately elected to bind themselves to an invisible, single Deity Afour-course meal including choice of brisket or chicken, gefilte fish, matzo ball soup and all the trim mings will be served. Everyone is welcome. For more information and reservations, call 382-7744.Special service set for April 21LORIDA An "In Remembranc e of Me" service will be held at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21. Join members as they look back at the upper room. Jesus washed the disciples fe et and communion was established. "In Remembrance of Me" at First Baptist Church Lorida, 1927 Blessings Ave. Call 655-1878.Fellowship Baptist plans sunrise serviceAVON PARK Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell Stree t, is extending an invitation to the pub lic for its sunrise service at 8 a.m. and worship service at 9:30 a.m., fe aturing Allison and Spencer in concert, on Sunday, April 24. Coffee an d doughnuts will be offered after the sunrise service. Continued from page 5B Remember what is was like w hen you first fell in love? It s eemed your every thought w as filled with the one you l oved. Just thinking about him m ade you smile. You used to l augh together, play together, g o places together, just have a l ot of fun. Did you write notes to him? D id you write poetry or verses o f your favorite love songs to s how him? Were you cons tantly thinking of ways to p lease him, to make him h appy? If you've lost that, ask y ourself what happened? W hen did it change? Would y ou like to get it back? Love comes from thinking p ositive things about someo ne. You love their smile, or t he way they interact with o ther people, putting others f irst. You can still do that. Write y our husband a love note and p ut it in his lunch or his pants p ocket. Call him in the middle o f the day (if you can) just to a sk how his day is going. Tell h im you can't wait to see him w hen he gets home. Flirt with h im a little. Give him somet hing good to look forward to. Plan a special treat. Clean t he house super neat and dress u p for him. Be sure to put on his favorite perfume and style your hair just the way he likes it. Let him sit down and relax. Rub his back, neck and shoulders. If his feet usually hurt when he gets home have a pan of warm water with Epsom salts to soak his feet. After about 20 minutes or so dry them off and put some soothing lotion on them. Pamper your man and he will treat you like a queen. But do it because you love him, not just to manipulate. No one likes to be manipulated. If you don't get the response you expected, don't allow yourself to get frustrated or angry. After all, you don't know what the last half of his day has been like, and he may just be too tired to respond. Cut him some slack. Be patient. Keep trying. The sweeter you are every day, the better your marriage will be. Let me know how it's going at themarriagementor@yahoo.co m or on my blog findingmywaycounseling.blogspot.com. I care. Love is thoughtful The Marriage Mentor Aleta Kay Snapshots GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCEƒ

PAGE 22

www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 9B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer .Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun 'N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid C ity" Children's Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, "prime-timers," and Bible s tudies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Children's Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and children's church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Children's & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kid's World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturer's Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Children's Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of God's Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and children's church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Women's Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m. in the sanctuary. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Children's Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on life's journey, you're we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP First Presbyterian ChurchSEBRING "The Folly o f the Galatians" by the Rev. D arrell A. Peer is Sunday's s ermon. Grief Support Group m eets at 3 p.m. Tuedsay in t he adult classroom. Youth G roup (ages 11-18) meets f rom 4-7 p.m. in fellowship h all. Communicant's Class is f rom 3:45-4:45 p.m. T hursday in the adult classr oom.First United Methodist Church of SebringSEBRING The Rev. A .C. Bryant will bring the m essage "Betrayal and A rrest" with the Scripture t aken from John 18:1-40. Fine Food and Fellowship D inner is Sunday after the c hurch services. United Methodist Women circles will meet Tuesday. The "Growing with God" family night continues Wednesday in the Family Life Center. Plan to attend the Easter Celebration and Egg Hunt for children Saturday, April 23. Call the church office for information at 385-5184. The church is downtown at 126 S. Pine St. Visit the Web site at www.sebringfirstumc.com.Grace Pointe MinistriesSEBRING Grace Pointe Ministries is at 200 Lark Ave., Sebring Hills Association Clubhouse. The Future Revealed What's on the Revelation timeline? The Unholy Three will be the lesson Tuesday. Class provided for the children. Call 447-3431 for directions. Special services will be held for Palm Sunday, April 17 and on Resurrection Sunday April 24. All sermons and Bible studies are now available. Live ustream now available at ustreamtv, then enter gracepointetv in the search box.Heartland Christian SEBRING Pastor Ted Moore's sermon this week will be "Only Hope For America" with Scripture from Psalms 121:1-2. Service will also include Walter Malinowski singing "Were You There," Roland Bates singing "Consider the Lilies," and The Heartland Singers will sing "In This Very Room." Palm Sunday will be a reenactment of The Last Supper. Easter Sunday will be a special program. The church is at 2705 Alternate Route 17 South in Sebring (behind Publix). Call 314-9693.Memorial United Methodist ChurchLAKE PLACID Memorial will have a team at Relay For Life at Scarborough Field from noon Saturday until 5 a.m. Sunday. Claude Burnett will preach at the Heritage Worship Service and Celebration Worship Service. Rev. Fred Ball will preach at the New Song Contemporary Service in Rob Reynolds Hall. The church is at 500 Kent Ave. Call 465-2422.Parkway Free Will Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Sunday morning Bible lesson, "Praise Builds Us Up," is taken from the book of Jude. Pastor Jim Scaggs will bring the message. Parkway FWB will host the Central Florida Association of Free Will Baptists in May.St. John United Methodist ChurchSEBRING Rev. Ronald De Genaro's sermon Sunday will be "Song of Redemption" taken from Psalm 130.Sebring Church of the BrethrenSEBRING This is the Fifth Sunday of Lent. Pastor Keith Simmons will preach on "Natural to Supernatural." The Scripture reading will be from Romans 8:6-11. Sunday school will study "Praise Builds Us Up." The class will also be looking at Jude 17:25.Southside Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Rev. David Altman will speak in the morning worship service on "What Were You Thinking?" from Colossians 3:1-11. The pastor will continue speaking on "AHouse of Prayer for All Nations" in the evening service. The church is at 379 S. Commerce Ave. Call 3850752.Spring Lake Presbyterian ChurchSEBRING "Staying Connected" is the title of Sunday morning's sermon (from the Scripture John 15:1-10), given by the Rev. Barbara Laucks.Spring Lake United Methodist ChurchSEBRING Spring Lak e United Methodist Church is at 8170 Cozumel Lane. The Rev. Clyde Weaver's sermo n is "Ambassadors of Love and Reconciliation." The Way ChurchSEBRING Dr. Arden Gilmer will be the guest speaker. April 17 at 6:30 p.m. wil l be Movie Night. The Way Church is at 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive. The church phone is 4716140; the pastor's cell is 214-6190. For the pastor's messages go to www.thewaychurch.org. Continued from page 5B RELIGION Church News

PAGE 23

Page 10BNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com HEALTHYLIVING As a child you may have been told warts were caused by kissing frogs. They are actually caused by a virus that invades the skin through very small cuts and abrasions. Since the virus is lurking on the ground it can be contracted by barefoot walking. Like any other infectious lesion, plantar warts spread by touching, scratching, or even by contact with skin shed from another wart. Warts on the bottom of feet are called plantar warts. Many times they are confused with a corn or callous. Plantar warts tend to be hard, flat, with a rough surface, well-defined boundaries and have pinpoint black areas. On top of the foot they appear fleshier and raised. Although rare, malignant lesions such as carcinomas and melanomas can sometimes be confused as a wart. Plantar warts can cause sharp, burning pain.Tips for wart prevention Avoid barefoot walking. Change shoes and socks daily. Keep feet dry and clean. Check your child's feet regularly. Don't touch warts on other people. Use flip-flops in public showers.If you get a wart Avoid over-the-counter preparations because may contain salycylic acid. See your podiatrist before the wart becomes larger and spreads. Diabetics and people with circulatory or neurological problems should only seek professional care. This year, make your goal to keep your feet virus free by following these suggestions. And remember, don't blame the frogs. Dr. Olga Garcia Luepschen and the Gentle Foot Care Center are at 2 Ryant Blvd. (on U.S. 27). For further information call 314-9255 or www.gentlefootcarecenter.com. Frogs don't cause warts Footprints Dr. Olga GarciaLuepschen Metro Services Contrary to popular myth, handling frogs and toads will not give you warts. DearPharmacist: Confession, I'm a germaphobe, and now avoid power hand dryers in public restrooms because of your recent article. Any other advice to keep pesky germs off my clean body. L.V., Tulsa, Okla. Answer: Sorry to create more concern about germs for you, but those handsfree water faucets may be pouring more bacteria on your hands than old-fashioned tap water faucets. Researchers at Johns Hopkins Hospital tested water samples from their hospital (including patient rooms) and half the samples from hands-free electric faucets tested positive for a bug called legionella, and other bacteria. The water samples from oldfashioned tap faucets tested positive only 15 percent of the time. Engineering may be the problem. Apparently, plumbing for the handsfree automatic models have numerous valves, screens and filters, which provide a nesting camp for bacteria. I have three thoughts about this. One, I'm not sure the research extrapolates to public restrooms, after all, the samples were collected from a hospital where dangerous germs run amok. Two, if you have a strong immune system, your less likely to get sick. Your skin harbors germs on it at all times. The average office desk harbors 400 times more bacteria than a toilet seat. So even though germs are literally everywhere, you have immunity to most germs. And finally, the study didn't account for touching any faucet handles. They only tested water samples. If you think about it, people step out of their personal stall, and then touch the hot or cold handles with their bare fingers. Like you, I'd rather stick my hands under automatic faucets than actually touch the handles other people have touched before me. Some bacteria are beneficial. The good "bugs" protect you from the bad ones. You have this beautiful garden of bacteria in your gastrointestinal tract which protects you from bacterial/fungal infection, gives you energy, makes B vitamins and helps you lose weight. Most people refer to beneficial bacteria as "probiotics." Don't fre ak out, but you're growing them as we speak. You ca n buy them as supplements in health food stores. Listen carefully, this is huge and impacts your health tremendously. Every person manufactures their own probiotics and it becomes a fingerprint for you. Your gut microflora is different tha n mine, is different than you r child's, and so on. I call it your "flora fingerprint." This is why taking billions of organisms, from many different strains is not so good. With probiotics, the more, the messier. Your body doesn 't recognize all the foreign strains in some of those supplements, and could launch an attack on the "bugs" if you don't naturally make them. Taking probiotics that aren't part of your flora fingerprint can make you sick. I discuss this on my Facebook fan page, and in chapter 17 of Drug Muggers. You should nurture your own flora finger print with the right supple ment. Then you can stick your hands under those electric faucets, or in a Dumpster for that matter, and your immune system will be strong enough to protect you. Suzy Cohen is a registered pharmacist and the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist' and Real Solutions.' For more information, visit www. DearPharmacist. com. This information is not intended to treat, diagnose or cure your condition. Your flora fingerprint protects you from germs Dear Pharmacist Suzy Cohen Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun Community Outreach events Ace Homecare community outreach e vents for April include: Today 7 a.m., Health Fair, Arc r esidence, Pleasant Street, Avon Park. Monday 8 a.m., Health Fair, H ammock Estates, Hammock Road, S ebring; and 1 p.m., Caregivers S upport Group, Crown Pointe Assisted L iving Community, Sun 'N Lake B lvd., Sebring. Tuesday 7:30 a.m., Health Fair, L akeside Gardens, County Road 621, L ake Placid; 9 a.m., Health Fair, H eron's Landing, Heron's Landing L ane, Lake Placid; 10 a.m., Health F air, Lake Placid Meal Site, Interlake B oulevard, Lake Placid; and 1 p.m., H ealth Fair, Groves, behind Sebring D iner, U.S. 27, Sebring. Wednesday 8 a.m., Health Fair, N eibert's, U.S. 98, Lake Placid; and 9 a .m., Health Fair, Palm Estates, U.s. 9 8, Lorida.Parkinson's support group meets MondaySEBRING The Parkinson's dise ase support group for the Highlands C ounty area will meet at 10 a.m. M onday at First Baptist Church of S ebring, corner of Lemon and Pine S treet. The program this month will be a s peaker from Florida Hospital H eartland Division with the latest u pdates on Parkinson's treatments. All persons with Parkinson's disease a nd their families are welcome to a ttend. There is no charge. For more i nformation, call 453-6589 or 4536 419. The Highlands County Parkinson's S upport Group is part of the national n etwork of support groups affiliated w ith the American Parkinson's Disease A ssociation. More than one million A mericans have Parkinson's Disease. T oday people with Parkinson's disease a nd their families can find help and i nformation from their local support g roup.MS Support Group meets TuesdaySEBRING The Multiple Sclerosis S upport Group meets at 7 p.m. T uesday at Highlands Regional M edical Group. The meeting will be h eld in the Doctors Board Room, first f loor. Friends and family are welcome. F or more information, call 465-3138. Snapshots WASHINGTON (AP) Asimple t reatment a hormone-containing v aginal gel significantly reduces p remature births among pregnant w omen who are at high risk because of a problem with the cervix, government r esearchers reported Wednesday. Many factors can lead to premature b irth, but Wednesday's study targets o ne subset: the thousands of women w ho develop an unusually shortened c ervix, the gateway to the uterus. The f indings may prompt more doctors to b egin routinely measuring cervical l ength, using an easy and fairly inexp ensive ultrasound scan, midway t hrough pregnancy. "There will never be the'solution to p reterm birth," cautions lead researcher D r. Roberto Romero of the National I nstitutes of Health. "There will be m ultiple solutions, and we believe this i s one important solution." This treatment is not related to an i njection called Makena, a synthetic h ormone that is controversial because o f its high price tag. That drug is aimed a t women who've already had one pree mie and now are pregnant again. Gel reduces preterm births in some women WASHINGTON (AP) Downing five or more alcoholic drinks nearly every day isn't seen as a big problem for many of the nation's teens, says a new report. When asked if they see "great risk" in drinking that much, almost half the teens questioned 45 percent didn't see it as a big deal. The study released Wednesday by The Partnership at Drugfree.org also showed upward trends in marijuana and Ecstasy use among young people in grades 9 through 12. "You're seeing this weakness in this generation of teens'attitudes around drug and alcohol use," says Steve Pasierb, president of the partnership. "It's not like this generation of kids thinks they're more bulletproof than others, but they really don't see any harm in that heavy drinking." And while the numbers suggest many teens do not perceive significant harm in heavy drinking, the percentage of teens drinking is down. "It's important that we not lose sight of the progress our country has made in fighting underage drinking," says Dr. Raymond Scalettar, former chairman of the American Medical Association and a medical adviser to the Washington-based Distilled Spirits Council. "U.S. government data shows underage drinking and binge drinking are at record low levels." The partnership study also shows the percentage of teens drinking alcohol in the past month declining, down to 35 percent last year from a high of 50 percent in 1998. Study: Teens say 5 drinks a day OK

PAGE 24

StatePoint MediaNo matter if you are grabbing a snack from the convenience store, attending a family party or dining out, we all eat away from home. But your favorite restaurant meals or fast foods can be hazardous to your waistline if you're not careful. "We are the most overfed and under-nourished population in the world. So obviously, we have to make smarter choices if we want to lose weight and be healthy," says Jane Percy, author of the new book, "Lighten Up! Win at Losing." Not eating out isn't possible these days, especially if you don't want to stop seeing friends or sharing meals with family. But by making smart choices and sticking to healthy habits, it's possible to enjoy the company of loved ones without gaining weight. Percy offers several tips to help you eat out and stay on the health track: Plan it out Before attending a party or big dinner, eat wisely in the days preceding it. That day, plan breakfast and lunch so that you don't consume too many calories. Don't start a party hungry, as you're likely to overeat. Have a small snack beforehand, such as fruit, nuts and raw vegetables. And drink a glass of water upon arriving, to keep you feeling fuller. Most of all, don't feel like you have to finish everything on your plate. Taking home leftovers will flatter the cook and save you from overeating. Make smart choices When eating out, don't be afraid to exercise your right to choose. Afew smart substitutions can help create a healthy meal at almost any restaurant. Or ask your waiter if the restaurant serves half portions. "Most restaurant owners and waiters really do want customers to have the meal they need and desire, so it's your absolute right to ask for menu adaptations," says Percy. Try to choose restaurants that prepare fresh fish really well. If you add a salad and vegetables and forego starchy potatoes, you can create a healthy meal while enjoying the company of friends and family. Step it up If you've got a big meal or vacation planned, don't forget to exercise! In fact, add a little extra activity if you can, such as walking, to burn off extra calories. Other metabolism-increasing activities are also great for overall weight loss, like eating breakfast every morning. Green tea has also been shown to heat up your metabolism and, given its caffeine content, is a good substitute for coffee. Lastly, things like proper breathing or self-hypnosis can help. Stress hormones like cortisol have been shown to increase belly fat, but slow deep breaths can help lower blood pressure and cortisol levels. And relaxation through self-hypnosis can help reduce stress levels, as well. More tips on healthy living are available in "Lighten Up!" and online at www.RiverLightCenter.com. "Remember, food is fuel," says Percy. "The right choices will give you energy to follow your dreams and live life to the fullest." How to avoid gaining weight when eating out www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 11B HEALTHYLIVING StatePoint Media Don't be afraid to ask for healthy substitutions when eating out. Associated PressINDIANOLA, Iowa S ynthetic substances that m imic marijuana, cocaine a nd other illegal drugs are m aking users across the n ation seriously ill, causing s eizures and hallucinations a nd even killing some peop le. The products are often p ackaged as incense or b ath salts and can be o btained for as little as $10 a t many head shops. As m ore people experiment w ith them, the results are b ecoming evident at hospit als: a sharp spike in the n umber of users who show u p with problems ranging f rom labored breathing and r apid heartbeats to extreme p aranoia and delusions. T he symptoms can persist f or days. At the request of The A ssociated Press, the A merican Association of P oison Control Centers a nalyzed nationwide figu res on calls related to s ynthetic drugs. The findi ngs showed an alarming i ncrease in the number of p eople seeking medical a ttention. At least 2,700 people h ave fallen ill since J anuary, compared with f ewer than 3,200 cases in a ll of 2010. At that pace, m edical emergencies relate d to synthetic drugs could g o up nearly fivefold by t he end of the year. "Many of the users d escribe extreme paran oia," said Dr. Mark Ryan, d irector of the Louisiana P oison Center. "The recurr ing theme is monsters, d emons and aliens. Alot of t hem had suicidal t houghts." The chemicals are susp ected in at least nine U.S. d eaths since last year, i ncluding that of Mike R ozga's 18-year-old son, D avid, an athlete and band s tandout from Indianola. The young man got high l ast June on a marijuana l ook-alike product called K2" and complained to a f riend "that he felt like he w as in hell," his father s aid. Though the teen had n ever suffered from d epression, he went home, f ound a shotgun and killed h imself. "These kids weren't looking for anything bad to happen," Mike Rozga said. "The truth is they didn't know what they had gotten themselves into." The recent surge in activity has not gone unnoticed by authorities. The Drug Enforcement Administration recently used emergency powers to outlaw five chemicals found in synthetic pot, placing them in the same category as heroin and cocaine. But manufacturers are quick to adapt, often cranking out new formulas that are only a single molecule apart from the illegal ones. In the United States, fake marijuana was last year's big seller, marketed under brands such as "K2" or "Spice." This year, the trend is "bath salts" with names like "Purple Wave" and "Bliss." Besides being cheap and easily obtained, they do not show up in common drug tests. Synthetic marijuana typically involves dried plant material sprayed with one of several chemical compounds, most of which were created by a Clemson University scientist for research purposes in the 1990s. The compounds were never tested on humans. It's packaged to look like pot, and users typically smoke it, but experts say the high is more comparable to cocaine or LSD. The bath salts are not water-softening products at all but crystalized chemicals that are snorted, swallowed or smoked. So far in 2011, poison control centers have received nearly 1,300 calls about synthetic pot, compared with 2,874 calls for all of last year, according to the poison control center data. Poison calls for bath salts rose at an even greater rate. The centers took 301 calls in all of 2010, but had more than 1,400 for the first three months of 2011. Most of the calls came from doctors and nurses reporting patients in emergency rooms. Synthetic drugs send thousands to ER Associated PressNEWYORK Recently, worke rs at the stricken Japanese nuclear p lant dumped radioactive water into t he ocean to make room for storing e ven more highly contaminated w ater on the site. The water dumpi ng came after earlier leaks of r adioactive water that had already r aised concerns about its effects in t he ocean, raising questions about h ealth and safety. Here are answers t o some of those questions. Q. How dangerous is radiation? A. We live in a world of radiat ion. It is in the water we drink, the f ood we eat, the very air we breathe. M ost of the radiation we are e xposed to comes from outer space, t he decaying of uranium in the earth, and medical procedures like X-rays and CTscans. Q. How can radiation hurt us? A. Too much radiation in a short time can cause deadly radiation sickness, with its signature symptoms of nausea, dizziness and hair loss. High doses can also cause cancer decades later. It can lead to congenital defects in future children of exposed adults. Q. Can the radioactive water leaking from the Japanese nuclearplant eventually reach the U.S. and be hazardous? A. It's hard to say how that water will move, because it will spread not only on the surface but downward in deep layers of the Pacific Ocean. If it does reach the West Coast, it would probably take at least 18 months to three years, by one estimate. In any case, nobody expects it would pose a radiation hazard upon arrival because of tremendous dilution along the way. Airborne radioactive particles have already reached the United States, but federal authorities say the measured levels aren't dangerous. Q. Weren't the workers at the nuclearplant treated forburns aftercoming into contact with radioactive water? What if someone swam in the ocean off the coast of Japan? A. The kind of radiation levels the workers experienced cause sunburn-like burns in about a half-hour to an hour. But swimming near the plant is banned, and radiation levels of water dumped in the ocean decline quickly with distance from the complex. Q. What radioactive elements are leaking and what are the risks? A. Measurements so far have focused mostly on iodine and cesium, which were responsible for most of the radiation dose to the public at the Chernobyl disaster. Radiation from iodine-131 dissipates quickly, falling by half every eight days, so that it's virtually gone in 80 days. Its danger is that if inhaled or swallowed, it can concentrate in the thyroid and cause cancer. Cesium radiation sticks aroun d much longer, taking 30 years to decline by half and 300 years to v irtually disappear. Cesium can bui ld up in the body and high levels a re thought to be a risk for vario us other cancers. Still, researchers wh o studied Chernobyl could not find an increase in cancers that might be linked to cesium. Q. Will ocean creatures b e harmed by the discharges of th e radioactive water? A. Experts say animals very ne ar the plant may face problems li ke higher rates of genetic mutation s, but that this would probably happ en within only maybe a half a mile or so. Worried about a radioactive ocean? A reality check MIAMI (AP) "Mu ch critical information is lacking" about Florida 's Medicaid privatizatio n experiment, includin g whether it has sav ed money or if patient ca re has suffered, according to a Georgetown Universi ty study released Tuesday. The study comes as Florida lawmakers a re poised to expand the co ntroversial Medicaid priv atization progra m statewide. The Republic an led House approved a b ill to do so last week, despi te opposition fro m Democrats who voic ed concern at the lack of da ta gauging a five-coun ty pilot program. Proponen ts warn Medicaid must be overhauled or it will co nsume the state budget an d estimate managed ca re will save about $1 billio n a year, but those savin gs would not be immediate "There was n o encounter data, at lea st none publicly availabl e, and that had been prom ised and really no up to date data on cost savings ," said Joan Alker, who c owrote the report. Encounter data mea sures what services an d medications patients a re receiving and which on es are being denied accountability that heal th advocates say is critical to ensure for-profit HMO s aren't lining their pocke ts at patients'expense. Study warns data missing in Medicaid pilot program

PAGE 25

B y NEKESAMUMBI MOODY APMusic WriterNEWYORK Men and w omen will compete headt o-head, some of the more e xotic awards like best N ative American album and b est spoken-word children's r ecord have been eliminated, a nd the number of categories h as been reduced by more t han 30 in the biggest overh aul in the 53-year history of t he Grammys. While no musical genres w ill be excluded from G rammy contention, the c hanges will make the a wards a lot more competit ive. "It ups the game in terms o f what it takes to receive a G rammy and preserves the g reat esteem of with its held i n the creative community, w hich is the most important e lement," Recording A cademy President and CEO N eil Portnow said in a telep hone interview Wednesday. While the Academy has a djusted its rules and adapted t o industry changes over the y ears, these changes follow i ts first major examination of t he awards structure, a p rocess that took more than a y ear. The biggest change will c ome in the number of categ ories, cut from 109 to 78. A wards will no longer be g iven in such categories as r ap performance by a duo or g roup; some of the instrum ental categories in pop, r ock and country; traditional g ospel; children's spokenword album; Zydeco or Cajun music album; and best classical crossover album. That doesn't mean that those types of music are ineligible; they will simply compete within larger fields. Portnow said the changes will make the awards process more rigorous. "That's appropriate. We are talking about the most prestigious, coveted award and it should be a high bar in terms of the measurement of receiving that," he said. Separate male and female vocal categories in fields like pop, R&B and country are among those being dropped. Men and women will now compete in each overall field. That is already the case in the field of rock, which does not have male and female vocal categories. "Agreat singer is a great singer is a great singer, and somebody that has a gift in terms of their voice, and is at the top of their game in terms of their delivery and emotion, really isn't necessarily defined by gender," Portnow said. The changes would appear to make it more difficult for artists in lesser-known and less mainstream categories. Tia Carrere won't be taking home any more Grammys for best Hawaiian music album, for example. But she could still win in the new best regional roots music album category, which comprises more genres. Other changes will require each category to have at least 40 entries instead of 25, and categories that receive between 25 and 39 will have only three nominations instead of four or five. If a category gets fewer than 25 entries, it will be removed for that year, and if it happens three years in a row, the category will be discontinued and the material will find a new home in a related genre. Online: http://www.grammy.com T he Community Calendar prov ides a brief listing of local c lubs and organizations who m eet on a regular basis. It is t he responsibility of the group t o update the News-Sunon a ny changes in this listing by c alling 385-6155, ext. 516; s end any changes by e-mail to e ditor@newssun.com;or mail t hem to News-SunCommunity C alendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, S ebring, FL33870.FRIDAY Alcoholics Anonymous O ne Day At ATime group m eets for a closed discussion a t 9:30 a.m. Monday and F riday at Covenant P resbyterian Church, 4500 S un N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. F or details, call 314-0891. Alzheimer's Association S upport Group meets at 6 p .m. second Friday at the O aks of Avon in AvonPark. F or details, call 385-3444. American Legion Post 25 h osts a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. a t the post, 1490 U.S. 27, L ake Placid. Cost is $6. S hrimp also is available for s ame price. Open to the publ ic. Tickets in the lounge on F riday night. Lounge hours are f rom 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For d etails, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 h as karaoke from 7 p.m. until f inal call at the post, 528 N. P ine St., Sebring. Post open at n oon. Happy Hour from 4-6 p .m. Members and guests o nly. For details, call 4711 448. Avon Park Breakfast R otary Club meets 7 a.m., R otary Club building. Bridge Club of Sebring ( American Contract Bridge C lub)plays duplicate games at 1 2:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf A ve., Sebring. For details, call 3 85-8118. Grand Prix Cloggers B eginner classes are at 9 a .m., EZ Intermediate classes a re at 10 a.m., and I ntermediate classes are at 11 a .m. every Friday at Reflection o n Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call J ulie for further information at 3 86-0434. Harmony Hoedowners S quare Dance Club offers a c lass in Lake Placid at the S unshine RV Resort from 9-11 a .m. Friday. For more informat ion, call Sam Dunn at 3826792 or e-mail him at samdunn@samdunn.net. Heartland AIDS Network meets 9 a.m., second Friday, Heartland Professional Plaza Learning Center, Sebring. Heartland Clubs meet at 3:30 p.m. on the second Friday of each month at Placid Lakes Town Hall Building, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. Call 699-6773. Highlands Social Dance Club hosts ballroom dancing every Friday, October through March from 7-9:30 p.m. at the Senior Center on Sebring Parkway. Dance the night away to the music of the area's Big Bands. All club dances are open to the public. Appropriate dress required. Admission is $5 for members and $7 for non-members. Call 385-6671. Lake Country Cruisers has a car show from 5-8 p.m. second Friday at Woody's Bar-BQ parking lot, Lake Placid. There is a live disc jockey and door prizes. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 has lounge hours beginning at 1 p.m. There is a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. Cost is $8.50 per person. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose serves wings, fish and burgers at 6 p.m. Music provided from 7-11 p.m. Pool tournament is at 8 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Karaoke from 7-10 p.m. Lodge phone number 4520579. Narcotics Anonymous New Day Group meets at 6 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave, Sebring. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. S.A.L.T. Council (Seniors and Law Enforcement Together) meets the second Friday each month at 10 a.m. in the conference room of Florida Hospital Home Care Services located at 4005 Sun 'n Lake Blvd. For more information contact Grace Plants at 273-1421. Sebring Bridge Club has Bridge, ACBLDuplicate at the clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Fridays. For details or info on lessons, call 385-8118. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves chicken or fish baskets from 5-7 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring, for a $4 donation. Blind darts is played at 7 p.m. For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 serving buffet dinner at 5-7 p.m. Elks and guests invited. Dance music in ballroom at 7 p.m. Dinner and dance is $10 donation. For reservations, call 385-8647 or 471-3557. Smoke-free environment. Lounge is open from 3-10 p.m. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave. For details, call 385-2966 or leave a name, number and message. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3800 serves steak by the ounce from 5:30-7 p.m. every fourth Friday at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Texas Hold em lessons, 2 p.m. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 serves pizza from 5:30-7 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 385-8902. SATURDAY American Legion Post 25 serves sirloin burgers from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake Placid. Jam session is from 24 p.m. The lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Members and guests invited. For details, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 69 in AvonPark serves dinner at 5 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Public Library has a free Adult Film Series at noon. For details, call 4523803. Cancer Support Group meets from 10-11:30 a.m. at Christ Fellowship Church, 2935 New Life Way, Sebring, hosted by Sue and Kristi Olsen. Call 446-1284 or 3852974.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. provides free assisted riding sessions for adults and children with special needs from 9-11 a.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday at 118 W. College Drive, AvonPark. For details or to volunteer, call Mary McClelland, coordinator, 4520006. Highlands Shrine Club, 2606 State Road 17 South, Avon Park (between Avon Park and Sebring) has a flea market from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., country store open from 8 a.m. to noon and pancake breakfast served from 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Vendors are welcome. No setup fee is charged for the summer months. Plenty of off road parking. Amonthly social is planned at 6:30 p.m. on the second Saturday at the club. There will be dinner and music provided for dancing. Reservations are required by calling 382-2208. Highlands Woodcarvers meet from 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays at 825 Sunbird Terr. (Community Center off Thunderbird Road). Call Bob Seybolt at 471-6077. Lake Placid Art League has a class in Pastels/Acrylics taught by Llewellyn Rinald from from 9 a.m. to noon at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 opens the lounge at 1 p.m. Card games are played at 1 p.m., and Bar Bingo is at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Narcotics Anonymous New Day Group meets at 7 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave, Sebring. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Overeaters Anonymous meets at 10:30 a.m. at First Presbyterian Church, Oak Street, Lake Placid. For more details, call 382-1821. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves dinner from 5-7 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Music is from 7-10 p.m. For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Hills Association has a pancake breakfast from 8-10 a.m. the second Saturday of each month at the clubhouse, 200 Lark Ave. All the pancakes, sausage, OJ, coffee or tea you can eat or drink for $3 for members and $3.50 for non-members. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3800 serves breakfast from 8-11 a.m. and horse racing at 5:30 p.m. every second and fourth Saturday at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 serves a meal for $6 from 5:30-7 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 3858902. SUNDAY American Legion Post 25 Lake Placid has lounge hours from 1-9 p.m. Live music is from 5-8 p.m. For details, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Members and guests only. Post is at 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Call 471-1448. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 lounge is open from 1-7 p.m. Card games start at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Fo r details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has karaoke in the pavilion. Horseshoes played at 9:30 a.m. Food available at 4 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Overeaters Anonymous, meets from 4-5 p.m. in secon d floor conference roomNo. 3 a t Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center, 4200 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring. For details, call 382-7731. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. For details on the organization, g o to www.oa.org. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves lunch at 2 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 offers NASCAR racing i n the pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar open and kitchen open from 2 5 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S 98, Sebring. For details, call 655-3920. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 serves hamburger s from 4-5:30 p.m. and plays poker at 5:30 p.m. at the pos t, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 Karaoke is from 5 -8 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For Page 12BNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com COMMUNITYCALENDAR Grammys drop more than 30 categories, get more competitive www.newssun.com

PAGE 26

By CHRISTYLEMIRE Associated PressHanna" is the girl-power m ovie "Sucker Punch" wante d to be or at least should h ave wanted to be and the t hriller that Angelina Jolie's Salt" only was at times. Director Joe Wright keeps t his story of revenge and surv ival moving in stylish, puls ating fashion. And of course h e has one long, breathtaking t racking shot, which has b ecome a signature for the d irector of such films as 2 007's "Atonement." But at i ts core, this is actually a c oming-of-age drama, and t he fact that it features such g reat performances from s uch a strong cast makes you c are whether these people l ive or die. Saoirse Ronan, who was n ominated for a supportinga ctress Oscar for her portraya l of a sneaky little girl with a secret in "Atonement," r eteams with Wright in a role t hat could not be more differe nt, or more challenging. She s tars as the title character, a b londe-haired, blue-eyed, 16y ear-old killing machine. Hanna lives with her f ather, Erik (Eric Bana), in a r ustic cabin in a remote and u nforgiving forest just below t he Arctic Circle. Blanketed i n snow and bathed in bleak, w intry sunlight, the place has t he magical and frightening f eel of something you'd see i n a fairy tale and the s creenplay from Seth L ochhead and David Farr g oes back to notion of Hanna a s fairy-tale heroine again a nd again. Erik teaches Hanna to h unt, fight and speak in vario us languages. Their handto-hand combat scenes are quick, intense, visceral until one day she tells him, "I'm ready." But who she is and what he's training her for are a tantalizing mystery. Turns out her father is a former CIAman, and the two have been living in isolation for most of her life. Once he leaves her with plans to reunite with her in Berlin, she must embark on the journey that is her destiny. Hanna is captured by government agents who think she's a shy and sheltered little girl. But, uh ... they're wrong. And this sequence, in which she annihilates everyone in her path, is one of many that are punctuated perfectly by an electronic score from The Chemical Brothers. Wright trusts his actors and the choreography, and lets these fight scenes play out without a lot of unnecessary edits. Hanna's purpose is to track down veteran intelligence operative Marissa Wiegler, played by Cate Blanchett in a coldly devious way that's almost over the top, but always fun to watch. Blanchett is all honeyed menace as a ruthless Texan who can turn on the charm when she has to; she's also inordinately adept at running in Prada heels. She's looking for Hanna herself and has a vested interest in keeping her alive. But before they can meet up, Hanna must travel through Morocco and Spain and finally to Germany. That she does this alone, and with no money, is a fact you will have to suspend disbelief to accept. Along the way she gets some help from a British family on holiday. Olivia Williams is lovely, and a rare source of warmth, as the New-Agey mother, while Jessica Barden steals all her scenes here, as she did in "Tamara Drewe," as the sassy teenager who becomes Hanna's first real friend. Hanna responds with a mixture of fascination and fear to the normal elements of our daily life electricity, television, phones and watching her open up is as satisfying as watching her take down armed men. Ronan's face can be placid or it can flash with emotion, and because she's so centered and confident, it helps make some of the more implausible parts of "Hanna" more acceptable. The fact that Ronan is this good at this young age is what's truly frightening here. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 13B By DAVIDGERMAINE Associated PressThe knights-errant s trong emphasize on the e rrant behind the advent ure comedy "Your H ighness" spend more time w allowing in medieval filth t han weaving clever laughs a nd engaging action. Reuniting key players from Pineapple Express" J ames Franco, Danny M cBride, director David G ordon Green "Your H ighness" plays like a M iddle Ages role-playing f antasy dreamed up by the g iggly stoners of that earlier c omedy. Co-writer McBride and his c ollaborators apparently set o ut on a quest to ram as much c oarse language and as many a dolescent sexual gags into a m ovie as possible, maybe to c over the fact that the movie d oesn't contain much else. Ahealthy dose of modern f rat-boy crudeness might h ave been refreshing in this s tory of two princes out to r escue a damsel from an evil w izard. Sort of "The Princess B ride" as retold in colorful s ailor's vernacular. Crassness overwhelms Your Highness," though, the v ulgar language losing all f orce by incessant repetition, d eadening the lingo so that e ven the occasional witty w isecracks aren't funny. This is McBride's show, e xplaining why he has top b illing over Franco and cos tars Natalie Portman and Z ooey Deschanel. McBride, who shares s creenplay credit with longt ime writing partner Ben B est, plays slacker Prince T hadeous, defiler of dwarf q ueens, partaker of illicit a pothecary herbs and allaround palace loser. Older brother Fabious (Franco) is heir to the throne and the kingdom's golden boy, newly returned from a heroic quest with ravishing bride-to-be Belladonna (Deschanel) in tow. After sorcerer Leezar (Justin Theroux) abducts Belladonna as part of his scheme to gain unstoppable powers, Thadeous must reluctantly accompany his brother to fetch her back. On the road, they team with the mysterious Isabel (Portman), a lethal warrior with her own grudge against Leezar. Despite the colorful costumes, mythological beasties and salty language, "Your Highness" is a tired tale whose scattered laughs fail to liven up the lumbering action. Green shows no greater poise directing action here than he did with the repetitive gunplay in "Pineapple Express," only now he adds some humdrum specialeffects pyrotechnics to the mix. Much of the supporting cast, among them Damian Lewis, Toby Jones and Rasmus Hardiker, barely register, even though they're integral to the action. With even a little pep, any one of them could have upstaged the lead players, who are monotonous throughout. McBride sticks to boorish-oaf mode, Portman plays the stoic hero with blandness reminiscent of her "Star Wars" days, and Franco shows about as much verve as he did as co-host of the Academy Awards. If there was a show to steal, Theroux would make off with it, yet even his hammy villain, surrounded as he is by dull heroes, barely raises the pulse of "Your Highness." There's a delightful sense of bawdiness in Chaucer and other medieval literature, but vulgarity seems the main intent of "Your Highness." The movie chokes on its own dreary discourtesies. Here's one of the milder ones: "You smell like the underside of a sheep's scrotum." DIVERSIONS Dear Abby: My son has refused to speak to me ever again because his girlfriend asked me if he had another child from a previous relationship. I didn't think it was right to lie to her, so I told her the truth about his daughter. My son called me yesterday and told me I was "dead to him" and he never wants to see me again. I feel so guilty having betrayed him. I'm not sure how to make amends with my son. Abby, can you help me? Sad Mom in Ohio DearMom: Your son may have preferred his girlfriend be kept in the dark about his daughter, but if the girlfriend didn't have some strong suspicions, she would not have raised the subject with you. Frankly, I admire you for telling the truth and not going along with your son's deception. I'm not sure how you should "make amends" with your son. He is the one who should be making amends with you. His lack of character is lamentable. DearAbby: My wife has been out of work for four months. Last week she applied for a job at a loan office. During the interview, she learned it was a payday loan operation, and she would be expected to get people to sign up for loans they could not afford. This goes against our principles. We have seen family members caught in payday loan schemes that buried them in debt, and we find the whole industry to be immoral and abhorrent. My wife is currently receiving unemployment compensation. One of the rules of unemployment is, if a company offers you work, you must accept it. She said if she knew what the position entailed, she would not have applied. Now she is terrified she may be offered a position in a business she finds repugnant, but she may not be able to decline the offer. What can she do? Please answer fast! Stuck for an Answer in Kansas City DearStuck foran Answer: Your wife should contact the payday loan company an d tell them she is not interested in the position befo re she gets an offer. That way, she won't be breakin g any rules, and th e company can hire a willin g applicant. DearAbby: I have an issue regarding my 18year-old son, "Jake." His father and I divorced seve ral years ago amicably fo r the most part. Since then, and even before, Jake has had emotional problems. My son makes up storie s about himself. On one of his online social network sites he has been talking about a vehicle he doesn' t own. He even invited a friend to go four-wheeling with him in his nonexisten t vehicle. This is only one o f many lies Jake has told. When I call him on it, he admits it but says it's "no big deal." Abby, people believe what my son is telling them. What is going on, and what can I do? Caring Paren t, Littleton, Col o. DearCaring Parent: Your son may lie in order to impress others, or be so emotionally troubled that he can't tell the difference between what he fantasize s and what is real. I assume that because Jake has had emotional difficulties for some time that he has bee n under the care of a therapist. If so, contact the the rapist and explain what's going on. If Jake doesn't have a therapist, find one. Perhaps an intervention will help Jake. If the lying persists, your son will become increasingly isola ted as it gets out that no on e can believe a word he say s. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. To order How to Write Letters for All Occasions,' send a business-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby Letter Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. Mother spills son's secret and is renounced in return Dear Abby Your Highness' drowns in lowbrow humor Universal Pictures James Franco, Zooey Deschanel and Danny McBride star in Your Highness.' Focus Features Saoirse Ronan stars as Hanna.' Movie Review Your Highness' Rating: R (strong crude and sexual content, pervasive language, nudity, violence and some drug use) Running time: 102 minutes Movie Review Hanna' Rating: PG-13 (intense sequences of violence and action, some sexual material, and language) Running time: 114 minutes Ronan rocks in stylish Hanna' Classified ads get results! Call 314-9876

PAGE 27

LIVING 14B PAGE News-Sun Friday, April 8, 2011 BYMARYBETHBRECKENRIDGEAkron Beacon Journaln this age of clean-burning fuels, vacuum cleaners and Scotchgard, you'd think the house-scouring ritual of spring cleaning would have been left in the dust. Yet it hangs on as tenaciously as grime to a miniblind. More than three-quarters of Americans still engage in spring cleaning, according to a survey by the Soap and Detergent Association. That surprised the association, which expected the figure to be a little lower, spokesman Brian Sansoni said. Nevertheless, he thinks he understands why. "Springtime evokes freshness, getting outdoors, being active after being cooped up all winter," Sansoni said. "You want to open the windows. You want your whole house or apartment to be fresh." If the practice of spring cleaning hasn't changed much, the way we approach it has. Cleaning products work more effectively and efficiently than ever. More homeowners have the means to hire out the big jobs. And couples are more likely to share the work rather than relegating it to the woman of the house, said Linda Hallam, editor of the Better Homes and Gardens book "Making a Home: Housekeeping for Real Life." Hallam does her seasonal cleaning with her husband, and she likes the renewal associated with it. Especially in areas with cold winters, where houses are closed up for months, people seem to enjoy greeting spring with a thorough cleaning and freshening, she said. Still, that doesn't mean you have to clean the house from top to bottom just because the calendar says you should, said Jeff Campbell, owner of a San Francisco cleaning company called The Clean Team and author of the book "Spring Cleaning." He advocates cleaning as it's needed instead, and defines spring cleaning as "the stuff that you don't do every week but that you can't ignore forever" big chores like cleaning windows and walls, stripping floors, cleaning carpets and polishing metals. "There's something about a clean house, a clean room," Sansoni said. "It does wonders for the psyche." So, you think your psyche could use a lift? Then dive right in but don't grab the Pine-Sol and the sponge mop just yet. You'll get a lot more done with less energy if you plan your cleaning strategy, the experts said. Hallam's book recommends making the rounds of your house, inside and out, and jotting down every project that needs to be done. Write those chores on three sheets of paper, one for large projects that require a half-day or more, one for projects that require two to three hours, and one for small projects. Then prioritize the projects according to what needs to be done most or, as Campbell suggested, what makes you the craziest. Succeeding at the most odious task will motivate you to tackle others, he said. Once you've decided what you're going to do, make a list of the cleaning supplies you need, the association suggested. When you make your regular trip to the grocery store or drugstore, stock up. But before you even pick up a dust rag, cleaning experts recommend getting rid of clutter and organizing the house. Give away, sell or throw away anything you no longer need. If you're not sure, Ward suggested asking yourself three questions: "When did I use it last?" "Do I really need it?" and "Where will I put it?" If you're still not sure, box the stuff up and seal the carton. After a year, pitch the whole thing if you haven't opened it yet, cleaningcompany owner and author Schar Ward said. When it's time to start cleaning, the experts recommend limiting your steps by finishing an entire room and an entire floor before moving on. Take all your supplies with you, so you don't have to make extra trips back and forth or up and down stairs. Cleaning the whole house will be exercise enough. But just think how good you'll feel when it's done. THE RIGHT SUPPLIESCleaning pros typically recommend carrying most of your supplies with you, which means you need something to carry them in. Some prefer an apron designed to hold cleaning implements, similar to a tool belt. Others prefer a plastic bucket or a caddy with a handle. The pros also differ somewhat about which cleaning supplies should be put in that carrier, but these are commonly recommended: All-purpose cleaner. Glass cleaner. Nonabrasive cleanserfor the bathroom. Disinfectant cleaner. Sponge. Cleaning cloths(heavy-duty cloths for floors and lightweight ones for dusting). Old toothbrush. In addition to the things you carry with you, you'll need supplies for bigger jobs, such as a bucket, a mop (if you don't want to wash floors on your hands and knees), a squeegee for windows and either a vacuum cleaner with attachments or an upright vacuum and a separate portable vacuum with attachments. Other nice-to-have items are a lamb's wool duster on a telescopic pole, a plastic spatula or other scraping tool, a safety razor in a holder for scraping off really stubborn gunk, oil soap, a nylon scrubber, a whisk broom and a dustpan. Even if you carry your supplies in a tote, wear an apron with pockets while you clean. It'll give you a place to stash the things you pick up as you go. WHEN TO HIRESometimes the best approach to spring cleaning is knowing what to do yourself and what to hire out. If you're short on time and helpers, it might be worth the expense to turn some of the big jobs over to professionals. They have the know-how and equipment to tackle the jobs faster and more efficiently than most homeowners can, notes Better Homes and Gardens'"Making a Home: Housekeeping for Real Life." Specifically, the book recommends that you consider hiring out window cleaning, especially if you have a two-story house or storm windows; gutter and/or roof cleaning; and carpet cleaning. Don't overlook neighborhood kids or college students as cheap sources of labor, either. You might hire them to do simple yet labor-intensive tasks, such as helping you move seasonal clothes in or out of storage. 10 CHORES TO DOTake care of these 10 cleaning chores and you'll give your house a fresh start for the warm season.1. Wash windows:Clean storm windows before you store them for the summer, and don't forget to clean screens before you install them.2. Freshen bedding:Strip the beds and launder all the washable bedding, including blankets, mattress pads and pillow protectors. Dry clean the things that can't be washed. Freshen pillows by having them professionally cleaned, hanging them outside or tumbling them in the clothes dryer on the air cycle.3. Clean window treatments:Launder washable curtains, or just tumble them in the dryer to freshen them. Vacuum nonwashable draperies with an upholstery brush, or have them cleaned. Clean blinds and shutters (disposable wipes that fit over a hand are useful for this), or take down blinds and wash them.4. Clean carpets, rugs and floors:Launder washable throw rugs, and have the other rugs professionally cleaned. Clean hard floors using the best method for the finish.5. Clean light fixtures and ceiling fans:Remove and wash glass globes. Wipe light bulbs with a damp cloth, then dry. If a bulb has burned out in a hard-toreach chandelier, change all the bulbs at the same time because the others probably are about to burn out, too.6. Declutter closets and storage areas:Sort out the things you no longer want and the items that don't belong. Store winter tools such as shovels and scrapers, and store out-of-season clothing after attending to garments that need to be cleaned or repaired. Bring out spring clothes and seasonal equipment. Sweep garage and shed floors.7. Wash baseboards:Use a household cleaner and water for painted baseboards. For wood baseboards, use a cleaner designed for wood, such as oil soap. Wipe in the direction of the grain and dry immediately.8. Clean vents and refrigerator coils:Remove the grilles from heating and cooling vents so you can vacuum the vent openings. Clean lint from the dryer vent and the pipe leading to the outside. Vacuum refrigerator coils.9. Declutter and wipe out cabinets, drawers:Get rid of equipment you don't use, and store seldom-used items in less accessible spots. Pitch stale spices, outdated food and old medications.10. Spot-clean or wash walls:Take everything off the walls, then dust or vacuum the ceilings and walls. Remove spots with all-purpose cleaner and water, or by gently rubbing on a thick paste of baking soda and water with a cloth or sponge. (Test in an inconspicuous place first.) Use a commercial putty cleaner to remove spots from nonwashable wallpaper. If necessary, most painted walls can be washed with an all-purpose cleaner or ammonia and water. Walls covered in flat paint, however, often can't be washed successfully. Greet the season with some serious scrubbing ILLUSTRATIONS BY CHRIS WARE/LEXINGTON HERALD-LEADER/MCT



PAGE 1

NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Friday-Saturday, April 8-9, 2011 www.newssun.com Volume 92/Number 41 | 50 cents www.newssun.com 079099401001 HighLow 88 67Complete Forecast PAGE 6A Mostly sunny and a little warmer Forecast Question: Do you think you will be able to retire with financial security? Next question: Have you seen signs that the local economy is improving? www.newssun.comMake your voice heard at Online Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453 Online: www.newssun.com Yes 18.7% No 81.3% Total votes: 91 Classifieds 11A Community Briefs2A Community Calendar12B Dear Abby 13B Editorial & Opinion4A Healthy Living 10B Lottery Numbers2A Movie Reviews13B Religion 5B Police Blotter 2A Sports On TV 2B Index Greet the season with some serious scrubbing PAGE14B Streaking StreaksSebring stays hot for sixth straight victory SPORTS, 1BTesting TimeStudents, teachers ready for FCAT, which starts Monday PAGE2A Photo by INGRID UTECH Dr. Priyamvada Gujjar takes a patients vital signsat the Highlands County Health Department. Editors Note: This is the second of a three-part series about the medically uninsured.By INGRID UTECH Special to the News-SunApatient came to the Highlands County Health Department experiencing pain. He was diagnosed with a hernia and needed surgery. He had been unemployed for several months, had no health insurance, and could not afford an operation. The Health Department arranged for a local surgeon to perform the surgery at no charge to the patient. Apatient at Samaritans Touch Care Center, a free clinic that serves the uninsured, had a growth on her lung. STCC referred her to Florida Hospital Heartland Division for a free biopsy, which showed that she had cancer. Through STCCs intervention, she was admitted to Moffitt Cancer Center, where she had surgery to remove the cancerous growth and where she stayed until the lung healed. Moffitt did not charge for its services. These patients were fortunate to get the assistance they needed from clinics, hospitals, and doctors in Highlands County, where the number of uninsured children stands at 20 percent and the number of uninsured adults at 36 percent. Highlands County Health DepartmentThe Highlands County Health Department operates medical clinics i n Sebring and Lake Placid and dental clinics for clients six months to 20 years of age in Sebring, Lake Placid and Avon Park. Uninsured clients whose incomes ar e at or below 100 percent of the Federal Plenty of challenges face local agencies that serve medically uninsured See AGENCIES, page 9A By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK The Avon Park Exploratory Recall Committee made several announcements during a meeting on Wednesday night. The exploratory committee publicly announced their selection of a committee chair, naming Avon Park citizen Jennifer Aviles to head their efforts. Aviles, a registered nurse, stated that she was a long time resident of Avon Park who was not pleased with the current events. I am happy to do this. I have lived here most of my life, and I am currently seeing things I do not agree with, Aviles said at the meeting. There are some major violations of the (city) charter, city ordinances and personnel rules and regulations and the council is part of that problem. Something has to be done to fix this, and the council is ignoring these obvious violations. Most of the items that are being ignored have been presented to the council on more than one occasion in an open meeting, and they are still ignoring them. When the council ignores these things, it is up to the people to fix the problem. There is no other recourse, said Aviles. I am concerned with the flagrant violations of city policy and the law. This has got to stop. Although the firing of Bruce Behrens was a trigger, a lot of these grievances have been going on f or some time, she said. About 15 people show ed up to express their ang er under the pavilion in t he warm evening air behind t he Moose Lodge, claiming th at poor communications ke pt the group from getting bi gger, but each individual pre sRecall group announces committee chair and filing date News-Sun file photo by KATARASIMMON S The Circle will be the center of a proposed entertainment district in downtown Sebring. By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK The Ridge Area Arc received notice that emergency cuts in state funding has slashed its budget $30,000 per month effective Apr. 1. It was no April Fools joke. Thats that we thought it was, but its no joke, said Rhonda Beckman, CEO of the Arc on Thursday. The Arc has discontinued companion, in-home, and personal care services and has given notice to the Agency for Persons with Disabilities of our intent to close the Valencia Group Home, Beckman said in an e-mail to consumers and their families. The Ridge Area Arc is a private, not for profit 501(c)3 organization, which was founded in 1957 by Franklyn and Mary Ellen Ward for their son Rob. Arc provides services to people with developmental disabilities throughout Central Florida. Beckman said that all told, every one of the 190 consumers will feel the crunch, but immediately 16 consumers are directly effected. We have five ladies in a group home that need to be It does not look good Slashed funding cuts Arc services We can survive the 90 days until July 1, but I am not sure what happens after that.RHONDABECKMAN Arc CEO See RECALL, page 8A By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEYchristopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Members of the City Council unanimously voted to proceed with the creation of a Community Redevelopment Entertainment District during their regular Tuesday night meeting. Pete Pollard, executive director of the CRA, spoke before the council to explain why the CRA supported the idea. An entertainment district has been under discussion for several years, he said. We wanted to create a more conducive investment environment downtown and it seemed to make the most sense. Pollard added, There is a move back downtow n. The trend in the country is toward mixed use. Aclu ster of restaurants creates a destination, creating a li fe after five. Basically, an entertai nment district is a defin ed area where, a major p riority for business recru itment is established f or restaurants, sports bar s, taverns, and pubs. Other businesses li ke night clubs, offering li ve music, dancing or karao ke are also encouraged. Gene Brenner, chairm an of the CRAadvisory com mittee and downtow n property owner, echo ed Sebring seeks life after five Proposed entertainment district would open downtown to restaurants, taverns and pubs See SEBRING, page 7A See ARC, page 8A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Ridge Area arc consumer Amelia Titus is upset Thursday because of state funding cuts that will affect her current living arrangements in Avon Park. Titus lives at the Valencia Group Home, which will be shut down due to funding. Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and PAGE2A

PAGE 2

Page 2ANews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com April 6 21521222445x:5Next jackpot $7 millionApril 2 82134353740x:4 March 30 3910203152x:3 April 6 324293435 April 5 412263336 April 4 2125313233 April 3 1924283136 April 6 (n) 5865 April 6 (d) 9482 April 5 (n) 3531 April 5 (d) 7723 April 6(n) 13 0 April 6 (d) 05 3 April 5 (n) 14 9 April 5(d) 98 3 April 5 213212418 April 1 723323617 March 29 2726319 March 25 623323618 April 6 1018415556 PB: 15 PP: 2Next jackpot $20 millionApril 2 622344345 PB: 23 PP: 2 March 30 1920425658 PB: 37 PP: 4 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center After becoming the f irst female soldier since W orld War II to be a warded the Silver Star, S gt. Leigh Ann Hester w as asked about the hist oric nature of her a chievement. It really doesnt have a nything to do with being a female, the humble h ero told the American F orces Press Service in 2 005. Its about the d uties I performed that d ay as a soldier. Hester, now a police o fficer in Tennessee who r ecently re-enlisted in the A rmy National Guard, w as only 23 years old w hen terrorists ambushed h er convoy on March 20, 2 005 in Iraq. After several soldiers i n her military police unit s uffered gunshot wounds, H ester, along with Sgt. 1 st Class Timothy Nein, l ater awarded the D istinguished Service C ross, and Sgt. Jason M ike, later awarded the S ilver Star, bravely c harged out of their H umvees. The soldiers, p utting themselves b etween the enemy and t heir exposed convoy, led a ferocious counterattack t hat killed 27 insurgents a nd led to the capture of s even more. While Hesters remarka ble story is one of the m ost prominent examples o f post-9/11 heroism by a w oman, many more s hould also touch the h eart of a nation that o ften holds up actresses, s ingers and models as e xamples of women at the p innacle of American s ociety. Spc. Faith Hinkley, 23, w as excited about her u pcoming return home w hen a rocket struck the I raqi office building she w as working inside on A ug. 7, 2010. The former h igh school cheerleader, w ho volunteered to leave h er loved ones behind a nd serve our nation, r eturned home to C olorado in a flag-draped c asket. As a soldier, she died f ighting for our country, C helsea Bowsher-Venable w rote to me four days a fter her best friends d eath. But through her p assing, I know she will s ave so many lives just b y inspiring others t hrough her goodness, s elflessness, and sincerit y. Sgt. Trista Moretti s tarted Army basic traini ng on June 12, 2003, less t han three months after t he invasion of Iraq. In a t rue act of bravery, she r e-enlisted in 2005, one t he conflicts toughest y ears, fully aware that a d eployment was probably o n the horizon. Moretti, w ho was known for her d istinctive laugh and r elentless pursuit of a dventure, was killed in I raq on June 25, 2007. I would have chosen T rista above almost all o ther soldiers I had the p leasure of serving with i n the Army, to be the one w atching my back in a f oxhole, Austin G oodman posted on F acebook last month. She was an awesome American women See MY, page 9B POLICEBLOTTER The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Wednesday, April 6: Deborah Sue Batson, 52, of Sebring, was charged with driving while license suspended. Jack Wiliard Bish, 65, of Avon Park, was charged with battery. Georgia Benita Cocca, 21, of Sebring was charged with battery. Geraldine Cummings, 53, of Lakeland, was charged with probation violation. Abbi Melissa Gray, 23, of Lake Placid, was charged with probation violation. Michael Scott Knapp, 31, of Lake Placid, was charged with possession of drug equipment and possession of marijuana. Benny Jose Madison, 27, of Lake Placid, was booked on an out-of-county warrant for non-support. Guillermo Martinez, 27, of Avon Park, was charged with driving with an expired license. Kimyatta Monique Pringle, 27, of Avon Park, was charged with failure to appear. Maria Sue Robinson, 37, of Sebring, was charged with removing a minor, interfering with custody of a minor, perjury, neglecting a child without great harm and obstructing a criminal investigation. Sherly Lynn Secory, 51, of Sebring, was charged with possession of cocaine. Susan Willis Trammell, 48, of Lake Placid, was charged with possession of a controlled substance without a prescription. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Tuesday, April 5: Giovonnie Boada, 21, of Sebring, was charged with failure to appear reference driving with license suspended/removed. Melissa Ashley Crawford, 27, of Fort Meade, was arrested an out-of-county warrant reference no support. Joseph Leroy Francione, 18, of Avon Park, was charged with controlled substance without prescription, operating a motor vehicle without a valid license, and possession and or use of drug equipment. Troy Leon Gordon, 23, of Continued on page 8A By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Elementary and middle schoolers have been happy about not having homework this week, but the same can not be said about the upcoming week. Beginning Monday, students from grades 3 to 11 will be knee deep in science, math and reading questions. Of course, most students arent too thrilled about it. We dont have homework this week so school was great today, but thats because we have FCAT next week, said Woodlawn third grader Jarek Kitchens, his smile turning to a slight frown. The Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test is scheduled to begin Monday and end April 22. Students will take different portions of the test during the next two weeks, according to grade level. Following this summers two separate audits of the FCATscores, many administrators and teachers hav e found themselves a little on edge regarding the assessment. Teachers are hopeful that this years te st goes smoothly. Parents and students have also been buckling down and preparing for th e test. Moms like Jenny Stephens have their hands full trying to balance stud y time and fun time leading up to next week. Stephens has two boys revving up for the FCAT. Kayne Kitchens is a fourth-grader at Woodlaw n, the younger son. Jarek Kitchens, will be taking the assessment for the firs t time as a third-grader. The boys havent been riding their bikes or tossing the football around in the yard as much in the afternoons as they have in prior weeks. Oldest son Kayne did quite well on the FCAT last year, however the mathematics portion of th e FCATwas his lowest scor Students, teachers prepare for upcoming FCAT Chalk Walk Art Competition to highlight Gallery WalkSEBRING The Sebring High School Art Students will be competing in a Chalk Walk Art Competition on today in Historic Downtown Sebring. The chalk art will take place on the sidewalks from 5:007:45 p.m. as 12 teams, comprised of four students each, create themed art for the public to enjoy. The winners will be chosen by the public who will vote for their favorite Chalk Walk Art. The Downtown Sebring merchants have contributed money that will be awarded to the winning team. Historic Downtown Sebrings monthly Gallery Walk will be also be held today from 5-8 p.m. Many Downtown Sebring merchants offer extended hours so attendees can shop in Sebrings charming boutiques and art galleries. Street vendors will offer art and jewelry along the sidewalks. For more information visit GalleryWalkSebring.com. Five artists of the month honoredSEBRING For Aprils Gallery Walk, the Yellow House Gallery and Gift Shop will be featuring not just one, but five Artists of the Month. The aptly-named Five Fine Artists show will feature the paintings of Mary Bouteiller, Tom Bruha, Norma Evans, Agnes Laiosa, and Ingrid Strope. There is sure to be something to delight everyone in the different styles of these five painters. The reception will be from 5-8 p.m. today at the Yellow House and the work will continue to be exhibited throughout the month of April. There will be light food and beverages as well as music and admission is free to the public. The Best of Pops concert tonightSEBRING The Heartland Pops will present Best of the Pops today at 7 p.m., at Faith Lutheran COMMUNITYBRIEFS By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEYchristopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING As of Monday, a search committee of 11 members had received 51 applications for the Industrial Development Authority/Economic Development Commissions position of executive director, which opened when Dan Murphy left the office. It looks like a strong field, said South Florida Community College President Norm Stephens, who chairs the committee, adding that applications have arrived from all over. He said the committees responsibility is to narrow the field to a list of three to seven finalists, each of whom will be interview ed by the board of directors. While applications w ill be accepted until the pos ition is filled, Stephens sa id there is a schedule and it is already almost too late to apply. The screening committ ee has already started wor k. The finalists should be ch osen by early May, at whi ch time interviews will begi n. The goal is to make a fin al selection by the first we ek in June. The Heartland Workfor ce has and will continue to assist in the proces s, Stephens said for exam ple, communicating wi th applicants, developing eva luation tools and intervie w questions. Search on for IDA/EDC director Continued on page 5A News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Sebring Mayor George Hensley and members of Jack Stroups family unveil a commerative plaque honoring Stroup at the civic center, now named in his honor. (From left) Charlie Stroup, Jack Stroups wife; Hensley; Lori Macclain, his daughter; and Jack Jr. and Matt Stroup, his sons. By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Current officials, former coworkers, past mayors, friends and family turned out Wednesday evening to dedicate the citys civic center to the memory of long time city clerk Jack Stroup, who died in 2009. Speakers told anecdotes that described the kind of man Stroup was, and why so many people would gather to honor him. Mayor George Hensley spoke of the simpler days, back in the 1950s and early s, when there were fewer rules and regulations, and nothing like unfunded mandates. He added it sometimes made for complications. (Stroup) had to herd all those people because everybody wanted to do their own thing, Hensley said. Shirley Kitchings, who worked with Stroup for 28 years, and followed him as city clerk, remembered Stroup as loving the town and a good laugh, but hating change orders making changes in building plans after they had been finalized and approved. When it came time to build the civic center now being named after him, Kitchings said Stroup decreed there would be no change orders. None. Civic center officially renamed in memory of Jack Stroup See FCAT, page 8A See STROUP, page 8A

PAGE 3

www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 3A

PAGE 4

Cannon wants to overhaul t he Florida Supreme Court, d ividing the seven-member b ody into two five-member c ourts. One would handle c ivil cases, the other criminal a ppeals, mostly death-penalt y cases. And force the c ourts three senior justices a ppointed by Gov. Lawton C hiles Fred Lewis, B arbara Pariente and Peggy Q uince to sit on the crimin al appeals court. Cannon and his supporters s ay the measure, which w ould require voter approval i n 2012, is an efficiency m ove, because the high court i s hopelessly backlogged w ith death-penalty cases that c log the system and delay c ivil cases. Thats a smoke screen. ... Heres whats really inspiring Cannon: Payback, and a broader desire to undermine the equal power of the judiciary and hand more over to the legislative and executive branches. The Supreme Court last year properly tossed off 2010 ballots three constitutional amendments proposed by the Legislature, stating they were unclear or deceptive, including one devised to block two anti-gerrymandering measures voters later passed by 63 percent. That angered Cannon, who is now fighting the popular Fair Districts mandates with a lawsuit. Splitting the high court in two tiers also would give Gov. Rick Scott the chance to stack it, appointing far-right ideologues to the three new seats. Keep in mind four of Floridas seven Supreme Court justices were appointed by Republican Govs. Jeb Bush and Charlie Crist, so its bench is hardly liberal. ... These and other measures gut the justice systems independence and deserve to be forcefully opposed by citizens. Only strong separation of powers in state government can prevent excesses by any one branch, a system of checks and balances that shouldnt be dismantled. There has been little noise from the Florida Senate about the court-bashing reforms, and Senate President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island, has not endorsed the proposals. He shouldnt allow the attack on judicial independence to gain steam, including as bargaining chips between the House and Senate in the sessions last days. Page 4ANews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.comTODAYSEDITORIALTODAYSLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION Being a parent of high school and middle school children and also working within the school system, I find it hard to understand why more parents are not involved in their kidseducation. From day one of my kids starting school Ive always been involved and checked at the school on their progress or any other problems they are having in school. You hear parents complain about the system, but I can only speak of the school in which Im employed. You hardly ever see parents coming to the school and check on their childrens behavior or just to be there to see whats going on. Yes, you can check their grades at home on the computer if youre fortunate enough to own one, but being at the school and talking with the teachers and administrators face to face is a sure way to know whats really going on. You may think the teachers and administration dont want to be bothered, but trust me they welcome your cares and concerns. With the way things are going and the direction our governor and other politicians are wanting to take our education system, I suggest that you parents who sit back and only go to the school when your kid(s) come home and tell you the teacher, dean of students, or the assistant principal or principal did this or did that, just go to the school yourself before any of these problems occur. We all, me included, would love to believe everything our children tell us, but on the real we know our kids dont always tell us the entire story, just the parts that make them look good and the school look bad. We as parents have to be more involved in our childrens education nowadays Back when we were in school, we had time to lear n and more teachers within o ur neighborhoods to help us along the way and there wa snt as many tests and restric tions on our teachers and students as there are today. In order to make our schools and students more interesting, we have to be more involved in whats ha ppening at our kids school. Dont just go eat lunch with them, sit in on some of thei r classes if its allowed and i t is. Now, your high school kid(s) may not want you ea ting lunch with him/her but go eat with your grade school or middle school kid(s). I dont claim to be the best parent in the world, bu t Im involved in my kids education. And since Im also at one of the schools here in Highlands County everyday, I try to help all o f our children as much as I can. If youre only involved i n your childrens education when theyre in trouble, thats not enough. With FCAT, shortage of teachers and all of the nonsense that goes on in our schools, let s come together and help all our children and thats Th e Bottom Line! DeCaris T. Jones Sr. is an Avon Park resident and a retired Sebring police officer. Your kids education ... get involved Another viewpoint A ttempted power grabs are everyday events from Florida lawmakers in Tallahassee, but this one is a stunner: An unprecedented, dangerous a ttack on the state judiciary system and c onstitutionally required separation of g overnmental powers coming from F lorida House Speaker Dean Cannon, RW inter Park, and other GOPlawmakers. The Bottom Line DeCaris T. Jones Sr. Obama care scam E ditor: Did you know that Obama gave t o GE billions for early retirement f rom our tax dollars when GE p ayed no tax. They had a $14 bill ion profit this year, and also to the U AW. He intends to give out $5 bill ion of our money for our grandkids t o try and pay for, while we are borr owing money. Is he trying to buy votes for 2 012? It can only be the reason. We h ave to stop Obama and Obama c are. C.F. Neeley Sebring A living document? E ditor: I recently attended a meeting of a n organization I belong to; what I h eard sent a chill through me. Adisc ussion ensued about changing the b y-laws of this particular entity, and t he term a living document was u sed. I do not have a problem with t he phrase itself; it is the underlying m eaning that may have prompted its u se. As with our Constitution, we h ave heard the phrase used, the idea o f it being a living document was a lready inherent in the constitution ( Article 5), in that it could be a mended by the will and vote of the p eople. What the progressive liberal c amp believes is that the law of the l and is set by case law or the opini ons of a majority of the nine judges o n the Supreme Court, rather than t he constitution. George Washington s tated, The fundamental principle o f our Constitution ... enjoins that t he will of the majority shall prev ail. Not the majority of nine just ices setting on the Supreme Court. Thomas Jefferson agreed with George Washington: The will of the majority [is] the natural law of every society [and] is the only sure guardian of the rights of man. Perhaps even this may sometimes err. But its errors are honest, solitary and short-lived. History has shown that it was the will of the majority that brought about the emancipation of slaves in this country, not by the minority decision of the courts, who by the way kept that bondage legal before the people outlawed it. The right of women to vote was made law by the majority of the people, not by a minority of women. The right of 18year-olds to vote was made possible by the majority of the people, not by a minority of 18-year-olds. Those who propose a living constitution point to the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education that banned segregation. The truth is congress passed a bill that banned segregation in 1875; in 1882 the unelected Supreme Court struck down this law, which congress could have annulled according to the Constitution. In 1896 the Court reaffirmed its position; however in 1954 the Court finally reversed itself, eighty years after the people had abolished segregation. The Supreme Court is subject to the Legislative & the Executive branches of government; these two branches are subject to the will of the people. Read your constitution. Larry J. Overfield SebringWedding Singer worth a night outEditor: Highlands Little Theatre has done it one more time. The Wedding Singer was super. The people who dont go to watch it before its run ends April 10, just dont know what they will be missing. Anice night out with a chance to meet new people. Plus the opportunity to see a lot of great acting and dancing. The Wedding Singer has it all. Patty Young did a fine job as director. The set construction people sure knew what they were doing. As did sound and costume. Christoper Hayes, Christa Dorman, RoseMarie Tippins-Beringer, to name a few of the actors, were all outstanding. I do hope all of you out there who can afford a night out on the town will take in The Wedding Singer. I am sure you will be glad you did. It sure beat setting home glued to the telly. Judee VanBrookhoven SebringWedding Singer is full of humorEditor: The Wedding Singer is playing now at Highlands Little Theatre, and what a fun evening I had on Friday. The show is filled with adult humor, but it is laugh-out-loud humor. The Wedding Singer is high energy from the dancers, singers and all of the many characters in the musical. If you liked the movie, as I did, you will really like the stage version. It takes the movie a step further with lots of original music and over the top humor. The director, Patty Young, should be very proud of her cast and crew as this is a stellar production. The audience showed their pleasure with the experience by giving the performers a standing ovation, the ultimate theater compliment. The show I attended was pretty full, but did not appear to be sold out. Call the box office today or go online and reserve your seat before the show closes on Sunday. This is one show that you do not want to miss. Congratulations Highlands Little Theatre! Olivia Scott Avon Park BouquetWhat a great business community Editor: Forty-two businesses and private individuals provided products, gift certificates or discount cards in support of the 17th annual Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce Golf Classic held at the Placid Lakes Country Club last Saturday. Despite the difficult economy, businesses willingly provide unselfish support to the community and the chamber of commerce. Although the tournament was highly successful, the unseen winner is the community, given that the chamber uses gains from such events to sponsor civic events throughout the year, which anyone in the community can and do attend. Without our business community support, many chamber sponsored events would not be possible. Other events, when combined with the chambers Web site, bring thousands of people to the community each year, helping to keep our businesses viable and infusing significant tax dollars into the countys economy. Please shop at or enlist the services of the following businesses. They make a difference in the com munity, so lets make a difference for them. Gift sponsors Above & Beyond Hair & Body, Ace Hardware/W& WLumber Company, Allaires Hair & Nail Designs, Alpha Natural Food Company, Beef O Bradys, Blueberry Patch, Chef Buddys Italian American Deli, Drafting Design of Lake Placid, Florida Hospital, Golden Corral Family Steak House, GHC Motorsports. Heartland Association of Realtors, Heartland National Bank, Herons Garden Restaurant & Lounge, Highlands Independent Bank, Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites, Holiday Trinkets & Treasures, Home Depot, Home & Office Essentials, Home Town Network, Interlake Boulevard Caf Kasies Collections, Ruth & Lione l LaGrow, Lake Country Jewelers, Lake Placid Embroidery & Boutique, Lake Placid Journal, La ke Placid Marine, Lockhart Service Center, Maken the Dough, MIDFLORIDAFederal Credit Union, Moes Coffee House, Mollys Trea ts & Ice Cream Shoppe, The 1 Park Place Company, Progress Energy, ReZultz Fitness 24/7, Salsas Mexican Restaurant, Scrap, Paper, Scissors, Seacoast National Bank, Sebring International Raceway, Southern Lifestyle Assisted Living Facility, TD Bank, NATropical Island Wear, and Wings of Eagles. Thanks to all of the above businesses owners/managers, organiza tions, and private citizens for contributing to a successful golf tourn ament and bettering the community Marlene Barg er Lake Plac id LETTERSPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your addres s and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automati cally rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum o f 400 words. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; o r e-mail editor@newssun.com.

PAGE 5

Associated PressTOKYO Amagnitude7.4 aftershock rattled Japan on Thursday night, knocking out power across a large swath of the northern part of the country nearly a month after the devastating earthquake and tsunami that flattened the northeastern coast. Japans meteorological agency issued a tsunami warning but canceled it about 90 minutes later. Officials said power was out in all of three northern prefectures (states) and in parts of two others. There were no immediate reports of serious injuries or damage. The aftershock was the strongest since the March 11 megaquake and tsunami that killed some 25,000 people, tore apart hundreds of thousands of homes and caused an ongoing crisis at a nuclear power plant. The operator of the tsunami-ravaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant said there was no immediate sign of new problems caused by the aftershock, and Japans nuclear safety agency says workers there retreated to a quake-resistant shelter in the complex. None were injured. The crisis there started when the tsunami knocked out cooling systems. Workers have not been able to restore them. Thursdays quake knocked out several power lines at the Onagawa nuclear power plant north of Sendai, which has been shut dow n since the tsunami. O ne remaining line was suppl ying power to the plant an d radiation monitoring devic es detected no abnormalitie s. The plants spent fuel poo ls briefly lost cooling capaci ty but an emergency diesel ge nerator quickly kicked in. Officials said the afte rshock hit 30 miles under t he water and off the coast of Miyagi prefecture. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 5A C hurch, 2740 Lakeview Ave. U nder the direction of A nthony Jones, the Pops will p lay favorite selections from t heir 2011 concert season. The concert will feature s elections from the Big Band e ra, patriotic selections, s oloists DAniel Burke and L aura Wade singing excerpts f rom Oklahoma! and will s potlight saxophone soloist, J ohn Leighty playing Harlem Nocturne. Afree-will offering will b e taken. For further inform ation, call 314-8877. A P Elementary Spring Carnival todayAVON PARK Avon E lementary to host Spring C arnival from 5-8 p.m. t oday. There will be plenty o f games, food, prizes, grab b ags, Home Depot Make a nd Take, a bounce house, a g iant slide, a Chrysler Drive f or the Kids by Wells Dodge C hrysler and much more. E veryone is welcome. All students must be a ccompanied by a parent or a n adult. This includes midd le school students as well. W acaster Family in concert tonightSEBRING Benefit S inging, a night of music, f ood and fun featuring N ashville recording artists T he Wacaster Family will be a t 6 p.m. today at 3414 Beck A ve., Sebring. Call 253-0771 for direct ions. All benefits go to R elay for Life/American C ancer Society.Spaghetti dinner SaturdaySEBRING There will b e a Spaghetti Dinner at St. C atherine Parish Hall on S aturday from 4:30-7 p.m. T he hall is located at 827 H ickory St. in Sebring. The meal consists of s alad, spaghetti w/meat s auce, meatballs, breadstick, d essert and beverages at a c ost of $8 for adults and $4 f or children. Singles having monthly danceSEBRING The H ighlands County Social S ingles will be sponsoring a m onthly dance Saturday at T he Sebring Womans Club o n Lakeview Drive, at 7 p .m. Everyone welcome. U ptown Country will prov ide the music. For more information, go t o: h ttp://www.strato.net/~sing les/ssdance.html.Introduction to Smart Phones W orkshopAVON PARK Tired of t echnology leaving you b ehind? South Florida C ommunity Colleges C orporate and Continuing Education is offering an Introduction to Smart Phones workshop today from 1-5 p.m. in Building T, Room 120, SFCC Highlands Campus. The workshop will provide a comprehensive look at the use and applications of smart phones and tablet PCs. The cost is $35. For more information, call Lorrie Key, coordinator, Corporate and Continuing Education, at (863) 7847033. To register for this workshop, call SFCC Registration at (863)-7847405.RTA meeting open to everyone curious about county trailsSEBRING The Ridge Trails Association will provide an overview of the efforts in the past and present to include Highlands County in the statewide plans for a network of trails designed to enhance the lifestyle of Floridians at the Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce, 227 U.S. 27 North, on Saturday. Any questions, feel free to call 381-7281. There will be an opportunity to become a new member of the RTAbut no pressure to do so. Community Outreach Membership is only $1 and $20 brings active membership status. Please put Saturday, April 9 on your calendar. This invitation is issued by the RTABoard. John Chess, Marcia Percy, Greg Harris, Mary Jane OBrien, Gaylin Thomas, Ron Estabrook, Dave Greenslade, Sarah Pallone, Bob Hesselink and Merritt OBrien.Tour of yards is SaturdayAVON PARK The Avon Park Founders Garden Club is sponsoring a Garden Tour of five yards in the Avon Park area, on Saturday from 12 noon until 3 p.m. The yards on the tour will not be announced in the newspaper in consideration of the homeowners. Addresses of the homes are printed on the tickets and a map will be furnished to ticket purchasers. The cost of the tour is $5. Yards on the tour include an all green yard, a professionally landscaped yard, one with a variety of palms, a yard with shade-loving plants and a beautifully landscaped yard done by the homeowner. Tickets can be purchased by calling 381-5929 or 4521927.Events at local lodges, postsAVON PARK The Combat Veterans Memorial VFWPost 9853 in Avon Park, 75 N. Olivia Drive, will host the following events this week: Today Swiss steak dinner served for $7, served from 57 p.m. Music by Uptown Country from 5-8 p.m. Saturday, April 9 Member Appreciation Day free pork dinner for all Post 9853 members all others will be $3, served from 4-6 p.m. Karaoke by Peg and Perry from 5-8 p.m. No bar menu on this day. NASCAR at 7:30 p.m. For any questions, call the lodge at 452-9853. LAKE PLACID The Lake Placid Moose 2374, will host the following events this week: Today Texas Hold-em 2 p.m. Shrimp, fish and wings served at 6 p.m. Music with Tom McGannon 6-10 p.m. Saturday, April 9 Bingo bango 2 p.m. Baby-back ribs 6 p.m. Music with Steve and Peggy 6-10 p.m. NASCAR Texas 7:30 p.m. For details, call the lodge at 465-0131. The Veterans of Foreign Wars 3880 in Lake Placid, will host the following events this week: Today Steak-by-theounce served 5:30-7 p.m. with L&LDuo. Saturday Breakfast served 8-11 a.m. Bingo 2 p.m., with early bird 1:30 p.m. Horse races 5:30 p.m. For details, call the lodge at 699-5444. American Legion Placid Post 25 in Lake Placid, will host the following events this week: Today Fish fry from 5-7 p.m. Music by Frank E. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Saturday Auxiliary burgers served 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Texas Hold-em 1:30 p.m. Karaoke Bill 5-8 p.m. For more information, call 465-0975. The Lake Placid Elks 2661, will host the following events this week: Friday, April 8 Fish fry 5-7 p.m. Music by Buddy Canova. For details, call 465-2661.Recreation Club plans pin shuffleboardSEBRING The Sebring Recreation Club, located at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring, will host pin shuffleboard at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday. Any information, call 3852966.Sebring Hills plans pancake breakfastSEBRING There will be a pancake breakfast Saturday at the Sebring Hills Clubhouse, 200 Lark Ave., from 8-10 a.m. All the pancakes, sausage, orange juice, coffee or tea you want for only $3 members and $3.50 non-members. Continued from page 2A Courtesy photo T he Easter Bunny will be in town Sunday, April 24 to lead the Easter Boat Parade on Lake J osephine. Set for 4 p.m., residents with boats are asked to join in the parade. Those without boats are invited to sit along any of the three boat ramps and cheer the parade on. Last y ear more than 20 boats and three water bikes participated. This marks the 11th year for the parade. For information, call 655-1267. Easter boat parade planned News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLE Y Andrew Fells, newly elected member of the Sebring City Council, takes part in his first meeting Tuesday night. The other council members are John Clark, John Griffin, Scott Stanley, and Bud Whitlock. Stanley was elected president of the council. COMMUNITYBRIEFS Fells officially joins Sebring council By BRENTKALLESTAD Associated PressTALLAHASSEE President Barack Obama has some work to do with Florida voters if he hopes to win the states 29 electoral votes next year, a Quinnipiac University poll released Thursday shows. Slightly more than half of registered voters said they disapprove of the job Obama is doing and that he doesnt deserve a second term, according to a random telephone survey of 1,499 registered voters March 29 to April 4. While 52 percent of Florida voters disapprove of Obamas job performance, 44 percent approve, the poll found. Only 42 percent favor a second Obama term, compared to 51 percent who do not. The poll, which has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.9 percentage points, also shows any unnamed Republican challenger would be in a dead heat with the president. But there was a bit of a silver lining for Obama, pollster Peter Brown noted. Despite questions about his policies, the president is personally popular with Floridians, Brown said, noting that 70 percent responded they like Obama personally, a figure that included 30 percent who disagree with Obamas policies. Obama carried Florida in 2008 by nearly 250,000 votes over Republican John McCain. However, voters were split on whether they approved of Obamas handling of the situation in Libya, with 46 percent each in support and opposed. Obama has announced his intention to seek re-election. Several Republicans are considering a run. including Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, who is coming to Tallahassee for a meeting with GOPlawmakers Thursday evening at the Capitol. Former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty has already made that trip while former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, who unsuccessfully sought the GOPnomination in 2008 and now has his own TVshow, lives in Florida. U.S. Sen. Bill Nelso n, who is seeking a third ter m in 2012, fared better than t he president. Forty-seven pe rcent said they approved of Nelsons job performanc e, compared to 26 percent wh o disapproved. Forty-thr ee percent said Nelson deserv ed a third term. Three in five voters to ld Quinnipiac they favor ed increased drilling for of fshore oil and natural ga s, compared to 35 percent wh o were opposed. Republica ns and independents support ed offshore drilling by bett er than a 5-to-1 margin whi le Democrats were opposed 5 8 percent to 38 percent. Voters were almost even ly divided on building ne w nuclear plants in Florida, b ut they opposed building the m in their community, 56 pe rcent to 39 percent. Nearly half of those que stioned by Quinnipiac, 4 9 percent, said they favor ed repealing the health car la w passed by Congress last yea r. Forty-one percent we re opposed to its repeal. Obama has work to do to win Florida again in Another strong quake rattles Japan

PAGE 6

Page 6ANews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com TODAYMostly sunny and warm88 / 67Winds: SE at 6-12 mphPartly sunny and warm89 / 67Winds: NW at 4-8 mphSATURDAYMostly sunny and warm89 / 67Winds: SSE at 7-14 mphSUNDAYMostly sunny and remaining warm89 / 67Winds: SSW at 8-16 mphMONDAYPartly sunny, a t-storm possible87 / 65Winds: W at 7-14 mphTUESDAY City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. Washington Washington 54/45 54/45 New Yor k NewYork 56/42 56/42 Miami Miami 85/73 85/73 Atlanta Atlanta 82/65 82/65 Detroit Detroit 52/38 52/38 Houston Houston 86/72 86/72 Chicago Chicago 58/43 58/43 Minneapolis Minneapolis 64/47 64/47 Kansas City KansasCity 74/64 74/64 El Paso ElPaso 82/59 82/59 Denver Denver 68/37 68/37 Billings Billings 44/28 44/28 Los Angeles LosAngeles 61/45 61/45 San Francisco SanFrancisco 56/43 56/43 Seattle Seattle 54/40 54/40 Washington 54/45 New Yor k 56/42 Miami 85/73 Atlanta 82/65 Detroit 52/38 Houston 86/72 Chicago 58/43 Minneapolis 64/47 Kansas City 74/64 El Paso 82/59 Denver 68/37 Billings 44/28 Los Angeles 61/45 San Francisco 56/43 Seattle 54/40 A storm system crossing the East will bring showers and thunderstorms to the central Appalachians today. Rain will fall across the mid-Atlantic, while showers extend to the lower Mississippi Valley. Temperatures will remain chilly in the Northeast. Farther west, showers will spread from North Dakota to Arizona, while a mix of rain and snow extends across eastern Montana. Snow will fall in the central Rockies and across much of Nevada and southeastern Oregon. Showers will continue in much of central California. U.S. Cities National Forecast for April 8Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun.Today Sat. Sun. World Cities National SummaryCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Sat. Sun. Today Sat. Sun. Weather (W):s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rrain, sf-snow urries, sn-snow, i-ice. Albuquerque 68/44/pc 61/32/c 58/37/pc Atlanta 82/65/pc 85/63/pc 81/63/s Baltimore 54/42/r 58/48/sh 73/57/pc Birmingham 84/65/pc 87/64/pc 82/63/s Boston 48/38/s 56/44/pc 60/49/c Charlotte 78/57/pc 82/60/t 88/63/s Cheyenne 64/34/c 55/34/c 50/30/r Chicago 58/43/c 72/58/c 77/53/t Cleveland 50/39/r 63/55/sh 80/56/pc Columbus 60/48/t 74/61/t 84/60/pc Dallas 87/70/pc 89/66/pc 81/53/t Denver 68/37/pc 68/34/pc 57/32/r Detroit 52/38/r 61/54/c 79/58/c Harrisburg 50/38/r 58/47/sh 74/57/pc Honolulu 82/70/sh 85/71/pc 86/71/pc Houston 86/72/pc 86/72/pc 87/64/pc Indianapolis 68/54/sh 82/63/t 83/56/pc Jackson, MS 84/66/pc 86/69/pc 84/63/s Kansas City 74/64/pc 84/66/t 76/45/t Lexington 74/60/t 81/61/t 83/59/pc Little Rock 83/64/pc 86/64/pc 80/56/pc Los Angeles 61/45/t 64/50/pc 65/52/pc Louisville 74/62/t 82/65/t 84/62/pc Memphis 82/68/pc 88/68/pc 80/61/pc Milwaukee 53/41/c 60/55/c 73/52/t Minneapolis 64/47/pc 71/55/c 68/45/r Nashville 78/64/c 85/66/pc 85/62/s New Orleans 86/71/pc 83/71/s 85/72/s New York City 56/42/pc 57/47/pc 65/56/r Norfolk 58/51/t 61/55/pc 69/61/pc Oklahoma City 86/66/t 86/57/t 75/47/pc Philadelphia 53/42/r 59/49/sh 70/58/pc Phoenix 71/52/pc 63/47/t 72/52/s Pittsburgh 54/45/r 68/56/sh 80/62/pc Portland, ME 46/30/s 57/36/pc 57/45/c Portland, OR 56/41/pc 57/43/sh 57/41/r Raleigh 74/55/t 73/60/pc 88/65/s Rochester 48/35/c 58/44/c 72/53/c St. Louis 76/64/pc 87/65/t 81/51/pc San Francisco 56/43/pc 60/48/pc 61/49/pc Seattle 54/40/pc 53/43/sh 52/38/r Wash., DC 54/45/r 58/53/c 76/61/pc Cape Coral 90/69/s 90/68/s 88/68/s Clearwater 88/71/s 89/70/s 88/72/s Coral Springs 85/70/s 86/71/s 85/71/s Daytona Beach 84/63/s 84/67/pc 85/67/s Ft. Laud. Bch 85/71/s 85/75/s 84/73/s Fort Myers 90/69/s 89/70/s 88/69/s Gainesville 84/61/pc 88/62/pc 89/64/s Hollywood 86/71/s 87/71/s 87/72/s Homestead AFB 84/72/s 84/71/s 84/72/s Jacksonville 82/63/pc 87/64/pc 89/65/s Key West 85/76/s 85/76/s 84/74/s Miami 85/73/s 86/74/s 87/73/s Okeechobee 83/63/s 85/66/pc 84/67/s Orlando 88/65/s 89/68/pc 90/69/s Pembroke Pines 86/71/s 87/71/s 87/72/s St. Augustine 80/62/pc 82/67/pc 83/67/s St. Petersburg 88/71/s 88/71/s 88/72/s Sarasota 88/67/s 87/69/s 86/69/s Tallahassee 86/61/pc 89/60/s 88/61/s Tampa 87/70/s 88/70/s 87/72/s W. Palm Bch 84/70/s 85/71/s 86/71/s Winter Haven 88/68/s 90/69/pc 89/69/s Acapulco 90/70/s 90/72/s 88/71/s Athens 75/63/s 75/62/s 69/55/s Beirut 63/54/sh 66/56/pc 66/57/sh Berlin 57/42/pc 60/41/s 62/45/s Bermuda 66/57/pc 63/62/r 72/66/sh Calgary 44/24/pc 51/30/pc 56/32/s Dublin 61/45/s 57/46/pc 59/45/pc Edmonton 40/26/s 45/24/pc 45/30/s Freeport 83/69/s 84/68/s 85/69/s Geneva 72/49/s 73/50/s 75/50/s Havana 88/69/s 90/68/s 90/66/s Hong Kong 81/71/s 79/70/pc 84/72/pc Jerusalem 66/47/sh 59/47/r 64/49/s Johannesburg 64/51/sh 69/50/sh 73/51/s Kiev 46/38/r 48/38/sh 48/36/r London 66/48/pc 65/50/s 65/50/pc Montreal 50/35/pc 54/43/pc 60/42/r Moscow 41/34/sh 36/28/sn 44/28/sn Nice 69/63/s 76/64/pc 79/63/s Ottawa 52/33/pc 56/44/c 63/42/r Quebec 48/35/s 52/37/pc 57/39/r Rio de Janeiro 81/72/s 80/71/t 81/72/t Seoul 64/35/pc 61/40/s 59/35/r Singapore 88/76/sh 86/76/r 84/75/r Sydney 76/58/pc 80/59/s 82/58/pc Toronto 52/36/c 60/51/c 70/46/r Vancouver 56/41/pc 51/42/sh 51/41/r Vienna 62/49/pc 62/44/s 64/46/s Warsaw 56/41/sh 51/31/sh 52/30/pc Winnipeg 50/28/sh 49/26/pc 52/32/s A lmanac Readings at Palm Beach High ............................................ 12:18 a.m. Low ............................................... 5:57 a.m. High ............................................ 12:19 p.m. Low ............................................... 6:13 p.m. Mostly sunny and warm today. Mainly clear tonight. Partly sunny and warm tomorrow. Sunday and Monday: mostly sunny and warm. Tuesday: some sun with a thunderstorm possible. In the middle of the nation on April 8, 1963, Williston, N.D., had 5 inches of snow, while Laredo, Texas, had a record high of 104 degrees. Mostly sunny and warm today. Winds southeast 6-12 mph. Expect 8-12 hours of sunshine with relative humidity 75% early, 45% in the afternoon and good drying conditions. Even addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday. Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and Saturday. All watering should take place before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. FirstFullLastNew Apr 11Apr 17Apr 24May 3 Today Saturday Sunrise 7:10 a.m. 7:09 a.m. Sunset 7:46 p.m. 7:46 p.m. Moonrise 10:21 a.m. 11:15 a.m. Moonset none 12:29 a.m. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Jacksonville 82/63 Gainesville 84/61 Ocala 86/60 Daytona Beach 84/63 Orlando 88/65 Winter Haven 88/68 Tampa 87/70 Clearwater 88/71 St. Petersburg 88/71 Sarasota 88/67 Fort Myers 90/69 Naples 90/71 Okeechobee 83/63 West Palm Beach 84/70 Fort Lauderdale 85/71 Miami 85/73 Tallahassee 86/61 Apalachicola 80/65 Pensacola 82/70 Key West Avon Park 88/66 Sebring 88/67 Lorida 85/65 Lake Placid 89/65 Venus 88/65 Brighton 86/64 TidesReadings at St. Petersburg High .............................................. 6:48 a.m. Low ............................................... 9:52 a.m. High .............................................. 4:42 p.m. Low ......................................................none UV Index TodayThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m. 5 9 9 4 Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional SummaryShown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Five-Day forecast for Highlands County 85/76 Lake Levels Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 11.66 Normal ...............................................14.51 Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterdayTemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHigh Sunday .......................................... 88 Low Sunday ........................................... 59 High Monday ......................................... 92 Low Monday .......................................... 65 High Tuesday ......................................... 84 Low Tuesday .......................................... 50 High Wednesday .................................... 83 Low Wednesday .................................... 56Heat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayRelative humidity .................................. 43% Expected air temperature ....................... 87 Makes it feel like .................................... 88BarometerMonday ...............................................29.88 Tuesday ...............................................30.13 Wednesday .........................................30.11PrecipitationMonday ...............................................0.00 Tuesday ...............................................0.56 Wednesday .........................................0.00 Month to date ..................................... 1.54 Year to date ......................................... 9.38

PAGE 7

P ollards enthusiasm T hursday morning. I think its a fantastic idea f or revitalizing downtown, h e said. Im not for bars where p eople hang out all day, but I t hink sport bars, wine bars a nd places serving food are e ssential. Look at Atlantic Avenue i n Delray, he added. Its a f antastic destination. The overlay entertainment d istrict is a sub-portion withi n the larger CRAdistrict. Centered on Circle Park, it r adiates down spoke streets: C enter Avenue from L akeview Drive to 500 feet f rom Sebring Middle School, a bout half a block past Circle P ark (the school is protected w ith the buffer zone by state l aw); Commerce Avenue f rom South Pine Street west t o Pomegranate; and R idgewood Drive from the i ntersection with Franklin S treet up to North Pine S treet. Acity ordinance currently b ans the sale of alcohol withi n 300 feet of a house of wors hip, so the council also u nanimously passed an ordin ance allowing for the sale of a lcohol within the district w hich includes the Salvation A rmys church, and is close t o the Southside Baptist C hurch and the Church of the B rethren. Pollard told the council t hat measuring the buffers o ften comes down to a measu ring wheel and a matter of i nches. He added that there was s ome controversy as where to s tart and stop measuring f rom property line to property line? Door to door? And if a door, then which door? The furthest one, said council member Bud Whitlock to laughter, adding Im 100 percent behind this. Not everyone in the audience agreed with Whitlock. Cindy Stanley, wife of council member Scott Stanley, spoke out against the idea of drinking establishments. I no way want to go to a church next to a bar, she said. Bars draw crime. Bars create crime. I am against it completely. I wish you would not do this. After the meeting, Mrs. Stanley was asked if her husband was in trouble for voting to pass the ordinance. Im not cooking dinner for him tonight, she said, but smiled. In fact, I may not cook for him for a long time. Stanley, standing near her, laughed. I should have abstained, he said. This was the first reading of the revised alcohol ordinance. It will be up for a second reading on April 19. The council referred the idea of the entertainment district to the citys Planning Zoning Committee for its input. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 7A Courtesy illustration The proposed area for the entertainment district in downtown Sebring. Continued from page 1A Sebring CRA pushes for entertainment district Classified ads get results! Call 314-9876 WHATS HOPPIN AROUND TOWN?Subscribe today and nd out! Call 863-385-6155 for free home delivery www.newssun.com

PAGE 8

Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The Air Force Association Highlands 173 Chapter has selected eight outstanding citizens for their annual Blue Suit and Civilian Awards. The following who will be honored at the AFAAnnual Awards Luncheon April 16 at the Avon Park Bombing Range dining facility. Mike Willingham: AFA Matty Laird Outstanding Support to Civil Aviation Award Larry McLain: AFA Avon Park AF Range Ken Beers Award Bill Hutchison: AFA Major Tommy McGuire Outstanding Citizen Award Briana Washington: AFAOutstanding News Medium Support of USAF and AFA Sam Shames: AFA Senior Civil Air Patrol Award John Rousch: AFA Chapter STEM Teacher of the Year Award Lt. Col. Charles Buck MacLaughlin: AFA Outstanding Support of Aviation, USAF and AFAby a Government Agency Congressman Tom Rooney: AFAOutstanding Support To Armed Services Award Reservations are required no later than Wednesday, April 13. For further information, please call Roy Whitton at (863) 659-4170. Page 8ANews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com Avon Park, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference domestic violence battery. Kevin Wayne Grice, 23, of Avon Park, was charged with possession of a controlled substance without a prescription, and possession and or use of drug equipment. Cordey D. Jumper, 19, of Okeechobee, was charged with three counts of failure to appear reference no valid driver license, leavin g the scene of an accident without giving information, and use or possession of drug paraphernalia. Jessy Renee Linton, 26, of Sebring, was charged with possession of marijuana and possession and or use of drug paraphernalia. Thomas Joseph Lynch, 22, of Sebring, was charged with possession and or use of drug equipment, and possession of a controlled substance without a prescription. Rachelle Lynn Pruneau, 23, of Sebrin g was char g ed with possession and or use of drug equipment, possession of marijuana and possession of a controlled substance without a prescription. Enrique Rameriez, 32, of Sebring, was charged with violation of a municipal ordinance. Rachel Elizabeth Smith, 25, of Orlando, was charged with violation of probation reference grand theft. Steven Ray Smith, 42, of Avon Park, was charged with DUI. Continued from page 2A ent produced a list of at least 10 names they would approach for signatures after the petition was filed with the city clerk on their target date of April 14. Aviles also stated there were about 50 people who would hit the ground seeking signatures and there has been some response from the website www.recallapcouncil.com as well. We have over 400 views and hits on the website, but only 40 or so have signed up to receive the e-mails. We hare hoping to improve that now. Our goal is to organize individuals for the signatures. Once the filing happens, we have 30 days to get the 500 signatures we need. That is the goal, she said. There is no plan to put anyone into office after the recall. Our goal is to send a message that the citizens have to be heard and listened to, Aviles said. Aviles also announced that there would be a meeting weekly at the Moose Lodge on Wednesday at 7 p.m., everyone is invited and that there would be an upcoming signing party which would be announced after the petition was filed. Response from Councilman Terry Heston and Deputy Mayor Brenda Gray was slightly different on Wednesday concerning the recall efforts. I dont know anything about it, Gray said in a phone interview before the meeting. I mean I have heard that there may be something going on, but I have not heard exactly what. I have not seen any of their complaints. Heston stated that he w as aware of the effort from t he public, but stated on t he record that he was baffl ed why he was targeted for a recall. Citizens have a right to recall an official if th ey want. That is their right, b ut I am not sure what I ha ve done to warrant a recall. I did not vote to remove M r. Behrens, Heston said. Heston said that he h ad not seen the News-Sun ar ticle about the recall effo rt, nor has he read the sev en complaints filed by t he group, but was optimist ic about the strides the ci ty was making. We are making gre at strides in changing the ou tlook in Avon Park. We on ly have about $207,000 in o ur rainy day fund, but we a re working to make positi ve changes within the city. W e just saved the citizens abo ut $1 million in changes to t he landfill and we just voted to lower the garbage rates. I think there are some pos itive stories in Avon Par k, not just negative ones , Heston said. Heston also mention ed that anyone who wanted to sit down and discuss an y issues was free to conta ct him directly. Hestons e-mail is th eston@avonpark.cc an d Gray can be reached at bgray@avonpark.cc. Continued from page 1A relocated immediately. I have asked for an increase in licensing capacity at another home so that some of them can find refuge there, but I am not sure that can happen, Beckman said. If we cannot find them spots, they will have to seek shelter outside the county, she added. The Arc board of directors held an emergency board meeting on Tuesday, April 5th to determine the next steps. Afeasibility study will be conducted over the next two weeks to determine The Arcs ability to provide its remaining services, Beckman said in her email. Beckman explained that the changes were not only immediate, but come July 1, when a state budget is passed, the money probably will not be replaced. The letter from Bryan Vaughn, who is the acting director for the Agency for Persons with Disabilities (APD) said that all service payments would be cut by 15 percent to 40 percent. I do not want to speculate what will happen with our agency if that continues, but it does not look good, Beckman said over the phone. According to Beckman, Vaughns announcement was due to a $169 million budget deficit for the 2010-11 fiscal year that ends in June. We can survive the 90 days until July 1, but I am not sure what happens after that, Beckman said. Continued from page 1A i ng category. They know math, but all o f the effort isnt there, I d ont think, explained S tephens. Last year, Kitchens was w ell prepared for the test, b ut Stephens feels that this y ear more couldve been d one at the school. They spend the whole year up to this point studying. Ive been getting math sheets for them here at home because thats where they are weakest, said Stephens. Stephens is hoping that Woodlawn isnt content to sit at its Bgrade and continues to prepare the students in every way possible. With Woodlawn being a lower grade school in previous years, Stephens maintains the faith that her kids are being prepared as an A school and nothing lower. I think they are both ready. Im a little worried about math but I know they both will do well, Stephens said. Continued from page 2A But, with him one day on a n inspection of the work in p rogress, Kitchings had to be b rave and challenge him. Just as she said, Jack we n eed a change order, he s aid, I know. We need a bigg er kitchen. So now, when I walk into t hat tiny kitchen I wish Id p ushed harder, said Kitchings, as the audience laughed, knowing Stroup would stick to his guns. Stroups children, Jack Jr., Matt, and Lori Macclain helped unveil the commemorative plaque, and Charlie Stroup, his wife, also spoke. She said Stroup had once talked to her about his wartime service in the Navy. He served in the North Atlantic where sailors dealt with cold wind and rough seas. He made a pact with God, Charlie Stroup said. If God would just make sure he returned to Sebring, he promised to never leave Sebring again. God kept his promise, said Charlie Stroup, and Jack kept his. Continued from page 2A POLICEBLOTTER Stroup honored with ceremony FCAT testing starts on Monday News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Ridge Area arc consumers and Valencia Group Home residents Sarah Moore (from left), Amelia Titus, Frances Goff, Debbie Baxter and Sue Talios (seated at computer) work together to write a letter to Gov. Rick Scotts office about recent funding cuts. The cuts will shut down the Valencia Group Home and leave residents without housing. Recall committee names chairperson Arc struggles with funding cuts AFA announces award recipients We are making great strides at changing the outlook in Avon Park.TERRYHESTON city councilman By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY c hristopher.tuffley@newssun.comLAKE PLACID The f irst of Highlands Countys R elay for Life events b egins at noon Saturday at t he Lake Placid High S chool football field off of D al Hall Boulevard. Organizer Ginger K eimel hopes for a a large g athering. The event is open to the p ublic, and she doesnt w ant people to think everyo ne has to walk the track walking is up the memb ers of the 20 teams that a re taking part. Folks can also relax and p lay games, listen to m usic, enjoy the entertainm ent, take part in the cont ests, and eat the homem ade food. The theme this year, K eimel said, was Tune in t o tune out cancer. The Relays for Life are t he major fund raising e vent for the American C ancer Society, Keimel e xplained. The relays have r aised $3 billion in the 26 y ears of their existence, s he said. Money raised in Lake P lacid stays in the commun ity, she added, helping p rovide transportation to d octor appointments, supp ort for the childrens c amp run by Reaching Out t o Cancer Children and H ope Lodge, which prov ides free rooms for outp atients being treated by t he Moffitt Cancer Center. So stuff some dollar b ills in your pocket and c ome have a good time. Take a moment to feel g ratitude for good health b y applauding cancer surv ivors as the open the 18h our event with the first w alk around the track. Survivors are being t reated to a free celebrator y lunch they should a rrive early in order to regi ster. LP Relay for Life is Saturday

PAGE 9

P overty Level (FPL) receive s ervices at no charge. Those w hose incomes are between 1 00 and 200 percent FPLare c harged on a sliding fee s cale, and those with i ncomes above 200 percent F PLpay in full. For clients r eceiving family planning s ervices, the sliding fee scale g oes up to 250 percent FPL. In fiscal year 2009-2010, t he medical clinics served c lose to 8,000 patients, and t he dental clinics served 5 ,900 patients. Fifty percent o f patients were uninsured. O f the remainder, 45 percent w ere on Medicaid, 3 percent o n Medicare and 2 percent h ad private insurance. The Health Department f aces several challenges. It i s difficult recruiting doctors t o staff the medical clinics. M ost doctors want their own p ractices or want to be affilia ted with one of the hospit als, Health Department A dministrator Robert P alussek said. Lack of patient transportat ion is another challenge and t he main reason for appointm ent no-shows. So recently, t he Department instituted a n ew booking policy which h as helped to lower the nos how rates and increased p atient satisfaction, P alussek said. But the biggest challenge i s financial. Most of our c lients are low-income worki ng individuals and families. W e dont collect a lot from t hem, and although we r eceive some non-categorical f unds from the state, which w e channel into primary care s ervices, we still dont break e ven. Last fiscal year, we h ad a deficit of about $ 600,000, Palussek said.Central Florida Health CareCentral Florida Health C are (CFHC), another vital s ervice for the uninsured, is a federally qualified commun ity health center headquart ered in Avon Park. CFHC operates seven cent ers. The only one in H ighlands County is located i n Avon Park in the same b uilding as CFHCs headq uarters. Other centers i nclude one in Hardee C ounty and five in Polk C ounty, plus one under cons truction in Polk County. CFHCs eligibility r equirements are similar to t hose at the Health D epartment. Uninsured c lients are not charged for s ervices if their incomes are a t or below 100 percent FPL, a nd they are charged on a s liding fee scale if their i ncomes are between 100 a nd 200 percent FPL. Those w ith incomes above 200 perc ent FPLpay in full. CFHC h as a minimum fee of $15, b ut clients who cant pay are n ot turned away. In 2009, the most recent y ear for which figures are a vailable, CFHC served m ore than 32,000 patients at i ts centers in Hardee, Polk, a nd Highlands counties. A t otal of 53 percent were uninsured, 28 percent were on Medicaid and 6 percent were on Medicare. CFHC would not disclose how many patients were from Highlands County and how many were seen at the Avon Park Center. CFHC has several advantages over the Health Department. First, it has more access to doctors. As a federally qualified community health center, it can partner with the National Health Service Corps. By agreeing to work at a community health center at a lower salary for a period of one to five years, doctors, dentists, family nurse practitioners and physician assistants can get part or all of their medical school tuition paid for or reimbursed. As a federally qualified community health center, CFHC is also eligible to receive substantial government funding to offset the cost of services provided to the low income, medically uninsured. In 2009, CFHC received $5.8 million in federal, state, and local grants and contracts, and $9.5 million in program income, including public insurance programs, private insurance, and self pay. Revenue totaled $15.339 million. Expenses totaled $15.441 million, according to CFHCs 990 IRS return.Samaritans Touch Care CenterSamaritans Touch Care Center (STCC) differs in many ways from the County Health Department and Central Florida Health Care. It is a free, multi-service, faith-based clinic, which only accepts uninsured patients and those whose incomes are at or below 200 percent FPL. STCC opened in 2007. In the past 3 1/2 years, the Center has served more than 1,100 patients. In addition to providing primary care services, STCC has arranged specialty care for many patients at no charge, thanks to the generous donation of time and services by many local health providers, STCC Executive Director Rachel Nawrocki said In addition, Florida Hospital has donated imaging and diagnostic services, and Highlands Regional Medical Center and Lab Corps have provided free lab work. Patients also get prescription medications free of charge. Nawrocki estimates that the value of medical care donated by the local community is just over $10.5 million, and that Samaritans Touch Care Center has saved local hospitals more than $14 million in patient care and treatment. But STCC has a waiting list of 1,000 individuals. Florida Hospital is assisting the Center with a search for grants to expand the Centers operations and to fund a center in Lake Placid which will open on a parttime basis in the next several months, said Kim Schlosser, president of the STCC Board of Directors and a Florida Hospital employee. Were also assisting STCC in its search for a larger, more modern facility. Dr. Luis Pena, who closed his medical practice to join STCC, serves as medical director. The clinic is also assisted by Dr. Nahead Nagib, who donates several hours each week and six other full-time staff, two part-time staff, and volunteers. Highlands County Human Services DepartmentThe Highlands County Human Services Department has a budget of $84,000 to fund medical services for low income, uninsured individuals. But clients must be referred by doctors, the Health Department or other providers. Providers agree to be paid at Medicare rates, which are lower than private insurance rates. We estimate that we get $11 of service for every $1 spent, said Billie Hetherton, administrative assistant. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 9A Continued from page 1AAvon Park Health Department400 S. Lake Ave.WIC: 382-7351 Immunizations: 382-7272 Dental: 382-7355 Hours: Monday-Friday, 7:45 a.m.4:45 p.m.Central Florida Health Care950 CR 17AWest, Avon ParkPhone: 452-3000 Hours: Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., ; Saturday, 7:30 a.m. to 12 noon A fter hours: Answering service available to speak with a physician.Lake Placid Health Department106 N. Main Ave.WIC: 382-7317 Medical: 382-7272 Dental: 382-7305 Hours: Monday-Friday, 7:45 a.m.-4:45 p.m.Samaritans Touch Care Center3015 Herring Ave., Avon ParkPhone: 471-1870 Hours: Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.5 p.m. (Closed 12-1:30 p.m.)Sebring Health Department7205 S. George Blvd.Maine phone: 386-6040 WIC: 382-7216 Medical: 382-7272 Dental: 382-7257 Hours: Monday-Friday, 7:45 a.m.-4:45 p.m.Resources For The Medically Uninsured Agencies that serve medically uninsured face difficulties soldier, was hard to keep up with in physical training, and she had a huge heart. While walking through Arlington National Cemetery on Jan. 21, 2010, I noticed a particularly striking headstone inscription: Be bold, be brief, be gone. It was the grave of Maj. Megan McClung, who I later learned was the first female U.S. Marine to be killed in the Iraq war, as well as the first female U.S. Naval Academy graduate to die in combat. The motto on her headstone, which embodied how McClung lived for 34 years, has guided me every day since. Her father, who also served in the Marines, told me about something he learned in the years following his daughters Dec. 6, 2006 death that inspires him. Another indication of how Meg touched so many lives are the seven little girls running around now who were named after her , Mike McClung said in a Jan. 23, 2010 e-mail. In at least one case (and maybe more), the wife did know Meg. I can just imagine th e scene when the husband says, Honey, I would like us to name our daughter (after) a girl I once knew. When Lt. Gen. John Vines awarded Sgt. Leigh Ann Hester and her fellow soldiers their medals in 2005, he said something that resonates six years later. My heroes dont play in the NBAand dont play in the U.S. Open, the gener al said. Theyre standing in front of me today. As my daughter grows up, she will not hear talk at the dinner table about Snooki, Britney, Paris or Lindsay. She will instead hear names like Leigh An n, Faith, Trista and Megan. To find out more about Tom Sileo, or to read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com. Continued from page 2A Photo courtesy U.S. Army/Spc. Jeremy Cri sp Sgt. Leigh Ann Hester is the first female soldier to be awarded the Silver Star since World War II. My heroes dont play in the WNBA

PAGE 10

Page 10ANews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com

PAGE 11

www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, April 8, 2011Page 11 A its not just about making the sale anymore its about building trustits about being a part of the communityits about helping businesses grow Do you love selling a product you believe in? Are you committed to excellence? If so, were interested in talking to you!The News-Sun is actively seeking a dynamic sales professional that knows the difference between just making a sale and building a solid and dependable relationship with a client. If you are a sales oriented individual who is self-motivated, customer oriented and possess exceptional communication and organizational skills, consider joining our team. Candidates will be required to maintain established accounts while developing new clientele and working closely with area business organizations. Transportation required. Base salary plus commission, mileage, paid time off, health insurance, 401K & more. Email resumes to humanresources@newssun.com or fax to 352.365.1951 Attention: Human Resources Director or drop off at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring its about finding the right person IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: GC 07-747 JOSE QUINONES, Plaintiff, v. GREGORY LEON CORRELL, Defendant v. DOUG SPINELLA, et al, Third Party Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final decree of foreclosure entered in the above-entitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida, described as: PARCEL 1: Lot 11, in Block 1, of BETTER HOMES SUBDIVISION, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 84, of the Public Records of Highlands County, FL; and PARCEL 2: Lot 2, in Block 39, of SEBRING HILLS SOUTH UNIT No. 2, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 9, Page 7, of the Public Records of Highlands County, FL at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room of the Basement of the Highlands County Courthouse, in Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 a.m., on April 13, 2011. Signed this 15th day of March, 2011. (Seal) BOB GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, a no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator, (863)534-4690, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice of Hearing; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call TDD (863)534-7777 or Florida Relay Service 711. April 1, 8, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-140 IN RE: ESTATE OF JANET LEE McREYNOLDS NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JANET LEE McREYNOLDS, deceased, whose date of death was January 15, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 1, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Douglas J. McMichael 9523 Tahoe Dr. Centerville, Ohio 45458 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Charlotte C. Stone Attorney for Douglas J. McMichael Florida Bar Number: 21297 Stone & Walder, P.L. 3200 US Hwy 27 S., Suite 304 Sebring, FL 33870 Telephone: (863)402-5424 Fax: (863)402-5425 E-Mail: Charlotte@StoneandWalder.com April 1, 8, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 10-498 IN RE: ESTATE OF BRADLEY K. NEUBAUER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BRADLEY K. NEUBAUER, File Number PC 10-498, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 South Commerce Ave., Sebring, Florida 33870-3867. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is APRIL 8, 2011. /s/ Gail S. Reid Personal Representative 3070 Orange Grove Trail Naples, Florida 34120 /s/ Antonio Faga Antonio Faga, Esq. Attorney for Personal Representative Florida Bar No. 43280 7955 Airport Road, N., #101 Naples, Florida 34109 (239)597-9999 (239)597-9974 fax April 8, 15, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-120 IN RE: ESTATE OF J. LOIS NAVIK-WILSON Deceased. AMENDED NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of J. LOIS NAVIK-WILSON, deceased, whose date of death was March 16, 2011, File Number PC 11-120, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 8, 2011. Personal Representative: CLIFFORD R. RHOADES 2141 Lakeview Drive Sebring, FL 33870 Attorney for Personal Representative: CLIFFORD R. RHOADES, ESQ. Attorney for Personal Representative Florida Bar No.: 308714 Clifford R. Rhoades, P.A. 2141 Lakeview Drive Sebring, Floirda 33870 (863)385-0346 April 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-111 IN RE: ESTATE OF DOMENICO ANDOLINA a/k/a DOMINICK ANDOLINA, Deceased. AMENDED NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of DOMENICO ANDOLINA a/k/a DOMINICK ANDOLINA, deceased, File Number PC 11-111, by the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 430 S. Commerce Avenue; that the decedent's date of death was October 29, 2009; that the total value of the estate is estimated at $12,072.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom is has been assigned by such order are: NAME ADDRESS MARIA ANDOLINA 98 Stoneleigh Avenue Yonkers, NY 10583 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claim with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 8, 2011. Person Giving Notice: MARIA ANDOLINA 98 Stoneleigh Avenue Yonkers, NY 10583 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: CLIFFORD R. RHOADES, ESQ. Florida Bar No.: 308714 2141 Lakeview Drive Sebring, Floirda 33870 (863)385-0346 April 8, 15, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 11-000054-GCS SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, CREDITORS OR OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST MARGARET B. HOOKS, DECEASED; VIVIAN BIGNEY; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, and all unknown parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against any Defendant, or claiming any right, title, and interest in the subject property, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, CREDITORS OR OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST MARGARET B. HOOKS, DECEASED 2312 Palm Key Court Sebring, FL 33870 A LL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST ANY DEFENDANT, OR CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, AND INTEREST IN THE SUBJECT PROPERTY Y OU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to enforce a lien on a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County, Florida: LOT 17, BLOCK 7, LAKE BLUE ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 59, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on PHILIP D. STOREY, Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is ALVAREZ, SAMBOL & WINTHROP, P.A., 100 South Orange Avenue, Suite 200, Orlando, FL 32801, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: April1, 2011 ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE COURT By: /s/ Toni Kopp As Deputy Clerk This is an attempt to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. April 8, 15, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2010-CA-001307 DIVISION: BANKUNITED, Plaintiff, vs. DEIRDRE K. LEXOW A/K/A DEIRDRE KERI LEXOW, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: RYAN PORTER LEXOW Last Known Address: 1121 S Park Rd Apt #308S Hollywood, FL 33021 Current Address: 1121 S Park Rd Apt #308S Hollywood, FL 33021 ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Highlands County, Florida: LOT 8, OF TYSON LAKE FRONT PARK LOTS, A CCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 52, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 147 ALDERMAN DRIVE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852-6962 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the News-Sun WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 24th day of March, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Lisa Tantillo Deputy Clerk April 8, 15, 2011 1050Legals Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under the Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be placed under the Bargain Buy category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com 863-314-9876 DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 314-9876. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155

PAGE 12

Page 12ANews-Sun Friday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.co m MATH INSTRUCTORS PT positions to teach developmental math (daytime classes). Bachelor's degree in math or related field required. Open until filled. V isit www.southflorida.edu/hr for details. 863-784-7132. EA/EO HOME CARERN, CNA, PT, OT for local visits in Highlands Great Salary/Excellent benefits Immediate Need!! (863) 401-3550 or fax resume (863) 401-8199 FRONT DESKCLERK (PT), assists hotel & restaurant guests w/reservations, registration & accommodations. Hotel/Restaurant & Cashiering exp. preferred. $8.76/hr. (16-24 hr/wk.) Typical work schedule: Sat. & Sun. 6 am 2 pm. Open until filled. Visit www.southflorida.edu/hr for position announcement. (863) 453-2211. Apply at the HOTEL JACARANDA, 19 E. Main St., Avon Park. EA/EO/Vet. Pref.CAREGIVERSNOW HIRINGFor caring, compassionate caregivers. You must be 21 yrs old with a HS Diploma/GED, pass a criminal & driving record check. Call HR between 9am and 4 pm M-F. 863-385-8558 or visit: ck381.ersp.biz/employment 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentLOST DIAMONDrings. Possibly at Sebring North Publix. Engagement & wedding band. Call 863-382-1037. Reward if found. 1200Lost & FoundCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day y our ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us: 314-9876 News-Sun Classified 1100Announcements The City of Sebring will receive sealed bids in the City Purchasing Department for: R R F F P P 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 4 4 : : V V e e t t e e r r a a n n s s B B e e a a c c h h B B e e a a c c h h C C o o n n c c e e s s s s i i o o n n s s L L a a n n d d L L e e a a s s e e Specifications & General Terms and Conditions may be obtained from our website at: mysebring.com or by contacting Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB by phone 863-471-5110, Fax 863-471-5168, or e-mail: kirkzimmerman@mysebring.com at the City purchasing office located at 368 South Commerce Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. If obtaining documents via the website, it shall be the bidders responsibility to check for amendments/changes made to the document. Bid envelopes must be sealed and marked with the bid number and name as to identify the enclosed bid. Bids must be delivered to the City of Sebring Purchasing Office A ttn: Kirk Zimmerman so as to reach the said office no later than 2 2 : : 0 0 0 0 P P M M , T T h h u u r r s s d d a a y y , A A p p r r i i l l 2 2 1 1 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 o o f f t t h h e e o o f f f f i i c c i i a a l l t t i i m m e e c c l l o o c c k k i i n n t t h h e e p p u u r r c c h h a a s s i i n n g g o o f f f f i i c c e e Proposals received later than the date and time specified will be rejected. The City will not be responsible for the late delivery of any bids that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail, or any other type of delivery service. The submitting firm will be required to comply with all applicable laws, regulations, rules and ordinances of local, state and federal authorities having jurisdiction, including, but not limited to: all provisions of the Federal Government Equal Employment Opportunity clauses issued by the Secretary of Labor on May 21, 1968 and published in the Federal Register (41 CFR Part 60-1, 33 F.2 7804); all provisions of the Public Entity Crimes (Fla. Stat. 287.133, et seq, as amended) and the provisions in Fla. Stat287.134, et seq,as amended, regarding discrimination. The Sebring City Council reserves the right to accept or rej ect any or all bids or any parts Thereof; and the award; if an award is made, will be made to the most responsible bidder whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of the City of Sebring. The council reserves the right to waive irregularities in the bid. Kirk Zimmerman, CPPB Purchasing Agent Sebring, Florida April 8, 15, 2011 1055HighlandsCounty Legals PUBLIC AUCTION: MAY 06, 2011 AT: 9:00 AM LOCATION: AVON TOWING: 1102 KERSEY ST. A VON PARK, FL 33825 Y EAR MAKE VIN # 1999 MERCURY 1MEFM66LXXK600816 April 8, 2011 PUBLIC AUCTION: APRIL 29, 2011 AT: 9:00 AM LOCATION: AVON TOWING: 1102 KERSEY ST. A VON PARK, FL 33825 Y EAR MAKE VIN # 1990 BMW WBAGC431XLDC26609 April 8, 2011 NOTICE OF SALE The following vehicles will be sold at public sale or auction to satisfy lien pursuant to Chapter 713.78(2) of the Florida Statutes at 10:00 a.m. on 4/25/11 at 1118 WEIGLE AVE. Sebring, FL 33870 1994 TOYT JT3VN29V6R0036245 April 8, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 10000815GCS CIVIL DIVISION VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee corporation authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. CESAR RODRIGUEZ, a single man; THE STATE OF FLORIDA; and EMELIA MORALES OBO, MARTHA MARTINEZ, Defendants. CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiff's Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered March 14, 2011 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on A pril 13, 2011 at 11:00 A.M. (EST), in the BASEMENT OF THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM of the HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 430 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring, Florida, the following described property: Lot 1, Block 250, Sun 'N Lakes Estates of Sebring, Unit 13, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 9, Page(s) 71, of the Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. Property Address: 4937 Vilabella Drive, Sebring, FL 33872. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: March 15, 2011. BOB GERMAINE, CLERK HIGHLANDS COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) April 1, 8, 2011

PAGE 13

www.newssun.comNews-Sun Friday, April 8, 2011Page 13 A If you enjoy page design, this job is for you. The News-Sun is looking for the right person to help design its news pages. The right candidate must be experienced in Quark and Photoshop, as well as have good news judgment. The ability to work fast with minimal supervision is also necessary. Experience in Illustrator and InDesign is a plus. This position is for 20 hours hours may be flexible. Send sample of work with resume to humanresources@newssun.com or fax to 3852.365.1951 Attention: HumanResources Director, or drop off at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring. Drug test and background check required. EOE 1993 CHEVYS10 Blazer 4dr, 2wd, 104k, V6, loaded, leather, CD, new brakes & tires. Many new arts with receipts. Must see! 22mpg $2600 obo 863-202-6394 9450Automotive for Sale TOOL BOXFits Ford F-150 Trucks $100. 863-382-4722 CHEST -All aluminum with locking lid. 48" long, fits in pickup bed or on a trailer. Very Nice! $140. 863-453-7027 9350Automotive Parts& AccessoriesENCLOSED TRAILER6 x 15. Almost new tires. Single axle. $1,800. Call 863-699-5517 9220Utility Trailers1973 NORTON850 COMMANDO A-1, low miles, *Owner's Manual, One Owner,* RareFind Will Accept reasonable offer. 863-382-8985 or 863-465-9100 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation2002 EZGOCustom Golf Cart, gas, lots of extras, new mag wheels & tires. Must See Nice! $2700 obo or will trade for an on / off Road Dirt Bike. 863-202-6394 8500Golf Carts R.V. COVERNEW fits trailes 28' 7" to 31' 6". Never opened! A Bargain at $170. 863-453-7027 2001 JAYCOEAGLE 26' 5th Wheeler. Good Shape $6400. 863-381-9159 8400RecreationalVehiclesCONCEALED WEAPONSCLASS JIM'S PISTOLARROW 12135 US Hwy 98 April 15th, 6 p.m. Call for Info: 863-655-4505 8350Sporting Goods16 FT.Flat Bottom Flats type aluminum with console, 35hp Yamaha motor plus trailer, needs spring service. $1600 obo 863-202-6394 8050Boats & Motors 8000 RecreationSCOOTER -Like new Guardian 3 TEK scooter & Harmar lift for inside vehicle. New would be $1200. Will sell both for $600 863-655-6212 7560Medical Supplies& EquipmentNOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & Supplies MOWER DIXONSpeedztr 36" cut, electric clutch, rear wheels independently driven, by Hydro Gear, 14.5 B&S overhead. valve vertical shaft w/ cast iron cyl. $1450 obo 863-452-5607 LAWN MOWERSnapper / Rider. Runs Good! $200 863-471-9509 JOHN DEERE'05 4310 w/loader & mower, 4 x 4. $4800. details @ desmdw1@msn.com or 386-246-7461 2009 -Cub Cadet Enforcer commercial 48" Cut, Zero Turn, 300 hrs. Good Shape. $3000 obo 863-202-6394 7400Lawn & GardenPOWER WASHERDeWalt Commercial DP 3750. Perfect cond. on a 4 wheel trailer $1,100. Call 863-452-0393 7380Machinery & ToolsSEBRNG -CHARITY EVENT! 1810 Jackson Heights, Fri & Sat 4/8 & 4/9 8am-1pm. Furn, electronics, Lowrey organ, household items, children's clothes & toys, exercise equip., plants. SEBRING-ESTATE MOVINGSALE! 5040 Oak Cir. (opposite Raintree Antique Mall) Sat & Sun 4/9 & 4/10, 8am-4pm. Sofas, trundle bed, lamps, antique chairs, drop leaf table & gate leg table, burlap advertising sacks, books, tackle & tools, live plants and bicycles. SEBRING 4321Maserati St. behind Wal-Mart, Fri & Sat, Apr. 8 & 9, 8am 4pm. Something for everyone. Too much to list. Priced to sell! SEBRING 526Spoonbill Dr. Buttonwood Bay. Moving Sale. Fri. Apr.8th. 7am-2pm. & Sat. Apr. 9th. 9 am -3pm. Computer desk, 3 televisions w/remotes, television stand, buffet cookware, glassware, chairs, lamps, lawn mower, trimmer, edger, floral. Lots of housewares, clothes & more. SEBRING -Multi Fanily Sale! 4201 Thompson Ave. Sat. Apr 9th, 8am ? Something For Everyone!! SEBRING -MOVING SALE! 3704 Sunbird Cir. off Thunderbird Rd. Thur. Fri Sat, 4/7-8-9, 8am ? Everything Must Go! SEBRING -Large Church Sale! 1660 Vicki Dr ( My Jewelry Box) Fri & Sat 4/8 & 9, 8am ? Mirrors stove, refrigerator, King bed, furn.. Too Much To List! SEBRING -Joint Sale! 2505 Sunset Dr. Fri 4/8 8am 12pm & Sat 4/9 8am -1pm. OUTSIDE & INSIDE HOME, bicycles, furn., tools, household items. Much Much Morel! SEBRING -4026 Skipper Rd, Fri & sat 4/8 & 4/9, 9am 2pm. Crib clothes (adult & baby),household items, Much More! 7320Garage &Yard Sales SEBRING -1910 Jackson Heights Dr. Thr Fri Sat 4/7-8-9, 8am -4pm. Tools, sm appliances, household items, new ball caps, pocket knives bird, bird cages, pop up canopy. Much More! SBRING -Multi Family Sale! 2620 Karen Blvd Fri & Sat Apr. 8 & 9 8am -? Tools, adult & children's clothes, toys, small appliances, household items. Too Much To List! LAKE PLACIDMulti Family Sale! 512 W. Interlake Blvd., Sat Apr. 9th 8am3pm. Entertainment center, freezer, clothes, electronics. Much More! AVON PARKORANGEWOOD ACRES 1628 W Orangewood Ct. Sun. Apr. 10, 8am-? Computer furn, Good quality Miscellaneous Items!! Toys & stuffed Animals. Too Much To List! AVON PARKMulti Family Sale! 1116 S Carolina Ave., Sat 4/10 Something For Everyone! AVON PARKMOVING SALE! Everything Must Go! Fri-Sat-Sun, April 6,7,8, 8am-? AVON PARKLarge Yard Sale! Fri & Sat 4/8 & 9, 8am 2pm. Antique mirrors, crystal, silver, furniture. Everything from Nuts To Bolts! Hwy 27 to Main, to N Lake Ave to Jackson St. R & follow signs OR Hwy 27 N to Stryker Rd. E to Oak Park Ave. follow signs to field. 7320Garage &Yard Sales TYPEWRITER -Olympica with case. $20 863-655-0342 LUGGAGE -Swiss Air / many compartments 27". $15. 863-4471-2502 FLOOR LAMP/ Modern style / white. $20 863-471-2502 FISHING REELNew Baitrunner, 10 BB-$42.00 Call 863-273-1846. CALCULATOR XL-121.Good Cond.! $20. 863-655-0342 7310Bargain Buys WORKBENCH (FULL) DP ALPHA FLEX. Excellent condition. $75 863-382-4722 WASHER &DRYER / WHIRLPOOL Stack, electric 220. Excellent Condition, $425 863-257-1402 STAINED GLASSequipment & materials, patterns, books, tools, various size glass & colors, grinder, cutter, foil etc. $275 obo. 863-382-8198 7300MiscellaneousPIANOBOSTON5'1 Baby Grand w/bench. Model GP-156. Ebony Polish finish. Excel. cond. $11,000. Call 863-449-0243 7180Furniture 7000 Merchandise SEBRING (2)Available 3926 Kenilworth Blvd, 1500 sq ft, $550/mo : A/C, office, BA, lg overhead door, near Sebring High School. 640 Park St, 6400 sq ft, $2500/mo : A/C, office, BA, 8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric, fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway. 941-416-2813 AVON PARKLarge Retail/Office Building, 100 E. Main St. A MUST SEE! 863-295-9272 6750Commercial Rental SPRING LAKE3BR, 2BA, 2CG, CHA, patio, ceramic tiled liv. room, din. room, kitchen, bath & halls, SS appliances, refrigerator has water on door, micro., W/D hook up. No pets. 863-655-0136 SEBRING -SPRING LAKE AREA. 3/BR, 2/BA on Golf Course. $850 monthly. 1st / last / security / references. Call anytime. 863-273-3704 SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 LAKE PLACIDNEAT & CLEAN 2BR, 2BA $475 2BR, 1BA $450 863-465-2924 6300Unfurnished HousesSEBRING 2240Avalon Rd. 3/2 furn. Small animals ok. Near Shopping Center & Senior Club. References $700. first/last. Call 305-387-6863 after 4pm. or 863-237-3129. 6250Furnished Houses AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; Washer/Dryer, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL: $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 6200UnfurnishedApartments SEBRING -2BR, 2BA. Tile floors, fresh paint. Includes water. $600/mo. Call Gary Johnson, 863-381-1861. RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartments SEBRING -Downtown on the Circle. Monthy rates starting at $400. payable wkly. Includes elec. & water. No Pets. 306 circle. 863-386-9100 or 954-295-7194. Or go to Bldg. and ask for John. 863-414-7535 A PFURNISHED APT FOR RENT Avon Mobile Home Park 1350 N Lake Ave 55 Plus Park Sorry No Pets 863-453-3415 6150FurnishedApartmentsSEBRING VILLA3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage. Wood floors, vaulted ceilings, screened porch. Convenient location near Hospital. Gated community, Clubhouse & pool, lawn maint. incl. $900. mo. Call 863-840-1083. Carole Polk 6100Villas & CondosFor Rent 6000 RentalsA PPARK MODEL FOR SALE Low Lot Rent 55 Plus Park Sorry No Pets 863-449-1072 5100Mobile HomeLots for Sale SEBRING VILLAGE55 + PARK Must Sell! 2BR, 2BA, furnished, new furniture, enclosed sun room w/ shed & outside patio, $25,000 for more info. Call 863-402-0565. PALM HARBORHOMES Has 3 Modular Homes Available at HUGE Savings Over 40K Off Call Today! 800-622-2832 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesSEBRING -Quiet Neighborhood on great fishing lake; 2,000 sf, 3BR, 2.5BA remodeled home with large garage & boat house. $219,000. 863-655-2278 MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE! 4080Homes for SaleSebring SEBRING -RURAL LIVING adjacent to great fishing lake close to Sebring. 3BR, 2BA home, pole barn, 5 acres fenced, zoned agriculture $150,000. 863-655-2278 Make Offer! A VON PARK3BR, 2BA, 1CG 1400 sq ft home. $72,000. Available after Feb. 28, 2011. Owner Financing possible w/ at least 10% down, good credit report and work record. 863-453-5631 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 Financial SALES/ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Central Florida Ag News Magazine, Highlands County Edition. Advertising experience required. Email resume to: nelson@centralfloridamediagroup.com RESIDENTIAL CLEANINGCo. Needs part time help, 15-25 hrs., week days only. Must be reliable, outgoing & highly motivated. Call 863-414-2244. PAGE DESIGNERIf you enjoy Page Design, this is for you. The News Sun is looking for the right person to help design its news page. Candidates must be expd in Quark and Photoshop, as well as have good news judgment. Able to work quickly with min. supervision is necessary. Exp. in Illustrator and In Design is a plus. This position is 20 hrs. hrs. may be flexible. Send sample of work with resume to: humanresources@new ssun.com or Fax to: 352-365-1951 Attn. Human Resources Director, or drop off at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL. Drug test and background check required. EOE MATH INSTRUCTORS PT positions to teach developmental math (daytime classes). Bachelor's degree in math or related field required. Open until filled. V isit www.southflorida.edu/hr for details. 863-784-7132. EA/EO A MMUNITION RELOADINGF/T. submit resume & current photo to sales@anderson-arms.com or fax 863-453-7454 2100Help Wanted

PAGE 14

Page 14ANews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com

PAGE 15

ALMS.com 2012 Chevrolet Centennial E dition Corvette celebrates r acing heritage Chevrolet, founded by a r acing pioneer 100 years ago, c elebrates its performance h eritage with the 2012 C hevrolet Centennial Edition C orvette, which features a s leek black color scheme, u nique design elements and C orvettes trademark sports c ar technology. The 2012 Centennial E dition package will be a vailable on all Corvette m odels including Grand S port, Z06 and ZR1 starti ng this summer. In a very special gesture, C hevrolet chooses to debut t he Centennial Edition C orvette at the BarrettJ ackson car auction in West P alm Beach on Saturday n ight. The manufacturer will auct ion a Corvette Z06 Centennial Edition with proceeds going to the Austin Hatcher Foundation for Pediatric Cancer, the official charity of the American Le Mans Series presented by Tequila Patrn. This foundation supporting children and families dealing with cancer is a key partner with the American Le Mans Series, in which Corvette Racing is an integral participant. The Austin Hatcher Foundation is honored to be a part of Chevrolets 100th anniversary celebration said Dr. James M. Osborn, cofounder and Chairman of the Board at the Austin Hatcher Foundation, and we look forward to using this generous donation to make a difference in the lives of pediatric cancer patients and their families. The model will be the 100th 2012 Corvette off the assembly line with a vehicle identification number ending in . The sale of the car, lot number 654.1, will air live on SPEED in primetime. Lot details can be found online through the BarrettJackson Web site. The special Centennial Corvette package was inspired by Chevrolets racing-bred foundation, which continues with Corvettes international racing excellence and production sports car prominence. Racing and performance are the roots of Chevrolet, a tradition carried forward today by Corvette, said Rick Scheidt, vice president of Chevrolet marketing. The Centennial Edition not only celebrates our 100 years, it once again pushes Corvette forward for a new generation of sports car fans. The Chevrolet Centennial Edition Corvette expresses racing heritage, but does so with a sleek, modern, even sinister-looking appearance. The Centennial Edition package comes exclusively in Carbon Flash Metallic, with satin-black graphics and unique Centennial Satin Black wheels and red brake calipers. The wheels are constructed of lightweight cast-spun aluminum and include a thin red outline around the perimet er of its surface on the Z06. The wheels are specific to the respective Corvette mo dels, including 18-inch/1 9inch for Coupe, Convertib le SPORTS B SECTION News-Sun Friday, April 8, 2011 Page 3B By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comAVON PARK It wasnt c learly evident under his b lack cap, but there would be l ittle reason to wonder why S outh Florida Community C ollege head coach Rick Hitt w as getting a few extra gray h airs. Wednesdays 8-7 win over v isiting Pasco-Hernando w as, after all, the ninth oner un game his Panther squad h ad been involved in during the last 11 games of their schedule. Its be nice if we could just put someone away early for a change, Hitt s aid. So I wont have to add t o my gray hair. And adding more worry t his night was the fact that it w as the Conquistadors who s eemed to put SFCC away e arly, courtesy of a seven-run s econd inning. The fashion in which those r uns were scored was sure to c ause some anxiety as well, g iven that it took just three h its to do so. Three hits, all singles, t hree walks, one hit batter, one error and one sacrifice fly were what got the job done and had South Florida looking up at a big, early deficit. We just played very poorly those first couple innings, Hitt said. I dont think we even got our first hit until the fourth inning. But it was in that fourth inning that the clawing comeback began. Brett Clements started it with a single to left before Kyle Jackson hit what would have been a fielders choice, but a moment of hesitation by the defense and hustle by the Panthers saw everyone safe. Kyle Newton then made the most of the opportunity by belting a three-run tater over the fence. Sam Morgan followed with a double and two outs later would score on a Cody Higgins single to cut the lead South Florida squeaks out another one News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Angel Vargas laces this RBI double down the first-base line in SFCCs 8-7 win over visiting Pasco-Hernando Wednesday night. SFCC8Pasco7 See PANTHERS, page 4B Photo courtesy of ALMS.co m A Centennial Edition 2012 Chevy Corvette will be auctioned of Saturday in WestPalm Beach to benefit the Austin Hatcher Foundation for Pediatric Cancer. Chevrolet to auction special Corvette See VETTE, page 4B By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comTuesdays torrents may have pushed things back a day, but in the end it just meant that the Sebring baseball squad would notch its sixth in a row Wednesday night. Though the extra days wait did seem to dampen the Blue Streak scoring a bit, though the pitching and defense were in strong form in the 4-3 win over visiting Osceola. The scoring started, in fact, without the benefit of a hit when Sebring plated two in the first. Seth Abeln walked and was bunted over to second by Matt Randall. Evan Lewis reached when his grounder couldnt be handled, moving Abeln to third and a passed ball soon moved both runners up for the first run. Jesse Baker then hit a hard grounder which the Kowboys tried to get a force on, but the hustling Lewis beat the play and now there were runners on the corners. Lewis soon came home on a Nate Greene sacrifice fly and it was 2-0 Sebring after one inning of play. While Aaron Hart cruised through a one, two, three first, the southpaw ran into some trouble in the second, hitting the first batter of the inning to somewhat set the tone. Hart walked the next batter and they moved to second and third on a passed ball before a single brought one in. Hart soon induced a double play grounder to Randall at short, though the tying run came in on the play. Sebring would break the tie in their half of the second with Gunnar Westergom doubling, stealing third and scoring on a wild pitch, but then both offenses would be held in check over the next three innings with the slim margin seeming even slimmer as the innings went by. It was then, in the top of the sixth, the Osceola evened things up again on a single, walk, passed ball and sacrifice fly. But the Streaks answered right back when Lewis walked, Baker singled and Corbin Hoffner drove Lewis home with a ground-ball single through the left side of the infield. Hart then got the first tw o outs of the top of the sevent h, but put the tying run on wi th a walk, leading to a pitchin g change before Hoffner fi nished things up, getting a grounder for the final out. The win is the sixth in a row for the Streaks, after t he shocking March 15, extr ainning loss to Lake Plac id and has the team on a h ot streak at an opportune time For coming up are gam es against the teams that ma rk Sebrings only district loss es of the season, Winter Hav en at home tonight and on t he road at Lake Wales Thursda y, April 14. The Blue Devils topped t he Streaks 5-2 on March 8 an d the Highlanders held off a furious comeback for a 9 -8 win three days later. Streaks take sixth straight Sebring4Osceola3 By TIM REYNOLDS Associated PressMIAMI The final sliver of postseason hope for the Milwaukee Bucks went away Wednesday night, that long-expected word coming while they played the Miami Heat. They were undeterred and wound up dealing Miami a fairly severe blow. John Salmons scored 17 points before leaving late in the game with a head gash that needed 12 stitches, Luc Richard Mbah a Moute added 14 points and 12 rebounds, and the Bucks beat the Heat 90-85 about an hour or so after they were eliminated from playoff contention. We knew sooner or later that was going to come, but that lets you know where we stand as a team as competitors also, Bucks forward Drew Gooden said. The Bucks only trailed for 9 minutes, 46 seconds against the Heat, who were 3-0 against Milwaukee this season. They knocked the Heat a half-game back of Boston in the chase for the No. 2 seed in the Easte rn Conference. Nobody said this w as going to be easy, He at coach Erik Spoelstra sai d. Even if Miami (54-2 4) wins its final four game s, it will need the Celtics to lose at least twice in ord er to pass them in the stan dings. Boston holds t he tiebreaker over the He at by having won all thr ee meetings this season; t he fourth is Sunday in Miam i. Carlos Delfinos 3pointer with 24 secon ds left helped seal it for t he Bucks, who got 14 poin ts from Corey Maggette an d 10 from Keyon Dooling. LeBron James scored 2 9 points for Miami, whi ch played without injur ed guard Dwyane Wade, t he NBAs No. 3 scorer. Chris Bosh added 18 f or the Heat, who had no o ne else reach double figures Miami shot only 41 pe rcent, and its 16 turnove rs led to 18 Milwauk ee points. Every time you pl ay them, its going to be o ne Bucks beat Heat, hurting Miami in East chase See HEAT, page 4B News-Sun file photo by DAN HOEHNE Corbin Hoffner drove in the go-ahead run and then recorded the final out in relief in Sebrings 4-3 win Wednesday.

PAGE 16

SYFS BBQ and registrationSEBRING Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is hosting our 2nd Annual BBQ Fundraiser and Tournament on Saturday, April 30 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The BBQ Lunch is $7 and will include a Pulled Pork Sandwich, Baked Beans, Coleslaw, Cookies and a glass of tea. Pick up your meal to go or stay and watch our girls play while you eat. For further information, please email dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201. Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is also conducting registrations for girls ages 10 to 15 now through April 1. Registration is $65 for the first child / $45 for any siblings. For further information, please visit us on Facebook, check out our website at www.eteamz.com/sebringyouthfastpitchsoftball, email us at dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING Wings of Faith Worship Center presents the First Annual Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one team of four golfers, one tee sign and two green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includes one team of four golfers, one green sign; Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $100 includes one green sign. Individual player $60 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26). Team of Four Golfers $240 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after March 26). Make checks payable to: Wings of Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL 33871, or register online at wingsoffaithchristianworshipcenter.com. Proceeds to be donated to scholarship program for graduates attending Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center. For more information, call Jason Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhankerson@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at 381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com.Doc Owen Golf TourneyAVON PARK The Avon Park Noon Rotary Club will host its Second Annual David Doc Owen Golf tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Highlands Ridge North. The two-person scramble-format entry fee is $60 per person with prizes in flight groups, lunch, goodie bag and refreshments on the course. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Entry information and check payable to Avon Park Noon Rotary mailed to Chet Brojek, 3310 Par Rd, Sebring, FL 33872. Golfers should include their names and handicaps along with their check. Those needing a form may email Brojek at cbrojek@comcast.net or call at 385-4736. Business entry of two-persons plus a hole sign for a total of $200 is available for the first time this year. All Rotary club members are urged to support participate in the event that benefits local Rotary charity projects. Business hole signs for $100 are also available by contacting Chet via email o r phone.Sandy Foster MemorialSEBRING NU-HOPE Elder Care Services annual golf tournament is just around the corner. The NU-HOPE Board of Directors ha s chosen to rename the golf tournament this year in memory of Sandy Foster, fo rmer Executive Director of NU-HOPE Elder Care Services. Sandy passed away very unexpectedl y in September of last year. Sandy loved golf and ran a very successful golf tournament for 13 years; in his memory the tournament will be renamed the Sandy Foster Memorial/NU-HOPE golf tournament. This year we are continuing with Sandys passion for the tournament with flight, raffle and door prizes. In the last three years the field was full, with a wait list, so sign up soon! The first annual Sandy Foster Memorial/NU-HOPE golf tournament will be held on Saturday, April 9, with a n 8:30 a.m. shotgun start, at the Country Club of Sebring. The tournament will be a two-person scramble format. Entry fee will be $60 per person ($12 0 per team) which includes lunch afterwards and refreshments during the tournament. Registration forms are availab le at the Country Club of Sebring Pro Sho p (John Vickers) or can be obtained via mail or fax by calling Debbie Slade at 382-2134. Business sponsorships are also available for this event. The revenue from this event is used for the local matchamount this organi zation needs each year to secure federal and state grant funds in our effort to co ntinue providing home and communitybased services to the frail and needy eld erly residents of Highlands and Hardee Counties. Elks Lodge Golf TourneySEBRING This months Elks go lf tournament will be held on Monday Ap ril 4th at Harder Hall Country Club. Cost for the 8 a.m. shotgun start is $2 6 per player. To register either your team or as an individual player, contact Ja ck McLaughlin at 471-3295 or by email at jacknjudy33872@gmail.com Check in not later than 7:40 a.m. in t he Harder Hall Golf Course restaurant area Barefoot Waterski TourneyFORTMYERS The 10th annual Deuceapalooza Barefoot Endurance Tournament is set for Saturday, April 9 in Fort Myers. This tournament is open to waterski enthusiasts of all ages. Trophies and cash prizes will be hand ed out. Participants will receive a free T shirt. For information, call Deuce at (239) 693-1975.YMCA Sign-UpsSEBRING The Highlands County YMCAand Eagles Football is doing sign-ups for Youth Flag Football ages 5 14. Healthy Kids Day is Saturday, April 1 6 from 9am to 1pm. Lifeguard Certification Class sign-up s are taking place now for an April 25-30 class. EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB y-Boston5423.701 x-New York4038.5131412x-Philadelphia4039.50615 New Jersey2454.3083012Toronto2157.2693312Southeast Division WLPctGB y-Miami5424.692 x-Orlando5029.633412x-Atlanta4434.56410 Charlotte3246.41022 Washington2157.26933 Central Division WLPctGB y-Chicago5720.740 x-Indiana3643.45622 Milwaukee3246.4102512Detroit 2751.3463012Cleveland1761.2184012WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB z-San Antonio6019.759 x-Dallas5325.679612x-New Orleans4533.5771412Memphis4434.5641512Houston4138.51919 Northwest Division WLPctGB y-Oklahoma City5226.667 x-Denver4830.6154 x-Portland4533.5777 Utah3741.47415 Minnesota1762.2153512Pacific Division WLPctGB y-L.A. Lakers5523.705 Phoenix3840.48717 Golden State3544.4432012L.A. Clippers3148.3922412Sacramento2355.29532 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division ___ Tuesdays Games San Antonio 97, Atlanta 90 Cleveland 99, Charlotte 89 New Jersey 107, Minnesota 105 Orlando 78, Milwaukee 72 Washington 107, Detroit 105 Boston 99, Philadelphia 82 New York 131, Toronto 118 Chicago 97, Phoenix 94 L.A. Clippers 82, Memphis 81 Sacramento 104, Houston 101 Oklahoma City 101, Denver 94 Golden State 108, Portland 87 Utah 86, L.A. Lakers 85 Wednesdays Games Orlando 111, Charlotte 102, OT Indiana 136, Washington 112 New York 97, Philadelphia 92 Cleveland 104, Toronto 96 Detroit 116, New Jersey 109 Phoenix 108, Minnesota 98 New Orleans 101, Houston 93 Oklahoma City 112, L.A. Clippers 108 Milwaukee 90, Miami 85 San Antonio 124, Sacramento 92 Denver 104, Dallas 96 Golden State 95, L.A. Lakers 87 Thursdays Games Boston at Chicago, late Portland at Utah, late Fridays Games Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m. New York at New Jersey, 7 p.m. Toronto at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Washington at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Chicago at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Charlotte at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Sacramento at Memphis, 8 p.m. Phoenix at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Portland, 10 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA x-Philadelphia462311103249215 x-Pittsburgh47258102229194 N.Y. Rangers4332591228193 New Jersey3738579169202 N.Y. Islanders30381272222253 Northeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA y-Boston452411101241191 x-Montreal4330793210205 Buffalo41291092236222 Toronto37331185217247 Ottawa31391072188245 Southeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA y-Washington482211107224196 x-Tampa Bay44251199237236 Carolina39301189228232 Atlanta33341278217258 Florida29391270192225WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA y-Detroit462410102255234 Nashville43261197215191 Chicago4328995251219 St. Louis37331185238234 Columbus34331381210249 Northwest Division WLOTPtsGFGA z-Vancouver52199113254183 Calgary41291193248234 Minnesota3734882198224 Colorado2942866219278 Edmonton25441161189262 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA y-San Jose47249103242208 x-Los Angeles4628698217193 Phoenix42251397226220 Anaheim4530595234233 Dallas40281191217224 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot z-clinched conference ___ Tuesdays Games Washington 3, Toronto 2, SO Buffalo 4, Tampa Bay 2 Pittsburgh 4, New Jersey 2 Montreal 2, Chicago 1, OT Ottawa 5, Philadelphia 2 St. Louis 3, Colorado 1 Nashville 6, Atlanta 3 Dallas 3, Columbus 0 Edmonton 2, Vancouver 0 Wednesdays Games Los Angeles 3, Phoenix 2, SO Boston 3, N.Y. Islanders 2 New Jersey 4, Toronto 2 Washington 5, Florida 2 Carolina 3, Detroit 0 Chicago 4, St. Louis 3, OT Calgary 6, Edmonton 1 Anaheim 6, San Jose 2 Thursdays Games Atlanta at N.Y. Rangers, late Montreal at Ottawa, late Colorado at Dallas, late Minnesota at Vancouver, late Fridays Games Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m. Carolina at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Florida at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Columbus at Nashville, 8 p.m. Dallas at Colorado, 9 p.m. Minnesota at Edmonton, 9 p.m. San Jose at Phoenix, 10 p.m. Los Angeles at Anaheim, 10 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB Baltimore41.800 Toronto41.800 New York32.6001 Boston05.0004 Tampa Bay05.0004 Central Division WLPctGB Kansas City42.667 Chicago32.60012Cleveland32.60012Detroit 23.400112Minnesota23.400112West Division WLPctGB Texas601.000 Los Angeles33.5003 Seattle24.3334 Oakland14.200412___ Tuesdays Games L.A. Angels 5, Tampa Bay 3 Cleveland 3, Boston 1 Minnesota 5, N.Y. Yankees 4, 10 innings Toronto 7, Oakland 6, 10 innings Texas 3, Seattle 2 Kansas City 7, Chicago White Sox 6, 12 innings Wednesdays Games L.A. Angels 5, Tampa Bay 1 Texas 7, Seattle 3 Chicago White Sox 10, Kansas City 7, 12 innings Cleveland 8, Boston 4 Detroit 7, Baltimore 3 Minnesota at New York, ppd., rain Toronto 5, Oakland 3 Thursdays Games Boston at Cleveland, late Oakland at Toronto, late Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, late Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, late Detroit at Baltimore, late Fridays Games N.Y. Yankees at Boston, 2:05 p.m. Kansas City at Detroit, 3:05 p.m. Oakland at Minnesota, 4:10 p.m. Texas at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Toronto at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Cleveland at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEEast Division WLPctGB Philadelphia41.800 Florida32.6001 New York32.6001 Atlanta33.500112Washington14.2003 Central Division WLPctGB Cincinnati501.000 Pittsburgh42.667112Chicago 33.500212Milwaukee24.333312St. Louis24.333312Houston05.0005 West Division WLPctGB Colorado31.750 San Diego32.60012Los Angeles33.5001 Arizona23.400112San Francisco24.3332 ___ Tuesdays Games Chicago Cubs 6, Arizona 5 San Diego 3, San Francisco 1 N.Y. Mets 7, Philadelphia 1 Cincinnati 8, Houston 2 Florida 3, Washington 2, 10 innings Milwaukee 1, Atlanta 0 St. Louis 3, Pittsburgh 2 Colorado 3, L.A. Dodgers 0 Wednesdays Games Pittsburgh 3, St. Louis 1 Arizona 6, Chicago Cubs 4 Colorado 7, L.A. Dodgers 5 San Francisco 8, San Diego 4 Philadelphia 10, N.Y. Mets 7 Cincinnati 12, Houston 4 Florida 7, Washington 4 Milwaukee 5, Atlanta 4 Thursdays Games Houston at Cincinnati, late Colorado at Pittsburgh, late Atlanta at Milwaukee, late N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, late Washington at Florida, late Fridays Games Washington at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m. St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:35 p.m. Colorado at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Florida at Houston, 7:05 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Cincinnati at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.BASEBALLAmerican League OAKLAND ATHLETICSPlaced RHP Michael Wuertz on 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Tyler Ross from Sacramento (PCL). National League COLORADO ROCKIES Placed RHP Ubaldo Jimenez on 15-day DL, retroactive to April 2. Recalled RHP Grag Reynolds from Colorado Springs (PCL). LOS ANGELES DODGERSActivated 3B Casey Blake from 15-day DL. Optioned INF Ivan De Jesus to Albuquerque (PCL). SAN FRANCISCO GIANTSActivated RHP Brian Wilson. Placed RHP Santiago Casillo on 15-day DL, retroactive to April 1.BASKETBALLNational Basketball Association LOS ANGELES LAKERSAssigned F Derrick Caracter to Bakersfield (NBADL). WASHINGTON WIZARDSSigned F Larry Owens. Re-signed F Othyus Jeffers. Waived G/F Cartier Martin.HOCKEYNational Hockey League BOSTON BRUINSAssigned D Steven Kampfer to Providence (AHL). CHICAGO BLACK HAWKSRecalled F Ben Smith from Rockford (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS Reassigned D Andre Benoit, D David Hale, D Patrick Wiercioch, F Erik Condra and F Roman Wick to Binghamton (AHL). PHILADELPHIA FLYERSRecalled G Michael Leighton from Adirondack (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTESSigned G Mark Visentin to an entry-level contract. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid TODAY: Baseball vs.Avon Park,7 p.m.; Softball at Tenoroc,6:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Softball at Clewiston,6 p.m. THURSDAY,April 14: Baseball at Mulberry,7 p.m. FRIDAY,April 15: Baseball vs.Frostproof,7 p.m.; Softball at Moore Haven,5/7 p.m.; Track and Field at Districts,Poincianna,TBA Sebring TODAY: Baseball vs.Winter Haven,7 p.m.; Softball at Liberty,7 p.m. THURSDAY,April 14: Baseball at Lake Wales,7 p.m. FRIDAY,April 15: Baseball at Haines City,7 p.m.; Softball vs.Frostproof,6:30 p.m. SFCC SATURDAY: Baseball vs.State College of Florida,2 p.m. MONDAY: Baseball at State College of Florida,6 p.m. TUESDAY: Softball vs.State College of Florida,5 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball vs.State College of Florida,6 p.m. Avon Park TODAY: Baseball at Lake Placid,7 p.m.; Softball vs.Mulberry,5/7 p.m. THURSDAY,April 14: Baseball at Frostproof,7 p.m. FRIDAY,April 15: Baseball at Tenoroc,7 p.m.; Softball vs.Hardee,5:30/7:30 p.m. A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 5 5 p p . m m . NASCAR OReilly 300, Qualifying. . E E S S P P N N 2 2 8 8 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NASCAR OReilly Auto Parts 300 . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NASCAR Samsung Mobile 500. . . . F F O O X XN N H H L L F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Florida at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NM M A A J J O O R R L L E E A A G G U U E E B B A A S S E E B B A A L L L L F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox . . . . . . S S U U N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Regional N.Y. Yankees at Boston or . . . Philadelphia at Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X X 4 4 p p . m m . Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox . . S S U U N N / / W W G G N NC C O O L L L L E E G G E E H H O O C C K K E E Y Y S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament Final . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NT T E E N N N N I I S S F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . WTA Family Circle Cup, Quarterfinal E E S S P P N N 2 2S SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . WTA Family Circle Cup, Semifinal . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2Times, games, channels all subject to change G G O O L L F F F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 3 3 p p . m m . 2011 Masters Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NS SA A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y 3 3 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . 2011 Masters Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S SB B O O X X I I N N G G F FR R I I D D A A Y Y 1 1 1 1 p p . m m . David Lemieux vs. Marco Rubio . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 1 1 1 1 p p . m m . Marcus Johnson vs. Dyah Davis . . . . . . S S H H O O W W LIVESPORTSONTV Major League Baseball NHL Major League Baseball Transactions Page 2BNews-Sun Friday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.co m The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

PAGE 17

Golf HammockThe Ladies played their Farewell Tournament Wednesday, April 6, a Step Aside Scramble. First place went to the foursome of Ruth Harris. Millie Grime, Jo Thornburg and Cindy Dall. Finishing in second were Laura Kebberly, Mary Bond, Trudy Stowe and Marge Pederson, while Jeanne Fivecoat, Betty Clarke, Nancy Porcari and MaryLindsay took third. Last Monday, April 4, the Mezza group played Pro-Am Individual Points at Golf Hammock Country Club. Doug Haire played an outstanding game and aced the 129 yard 17th hole using a seven-iron making his first hole-in-one. Playing with Haire was Billy Parr,Joe Hyzny and Jerry Patterson CongratulationsDoug. Mike Lajiness had a minus 3 to take first place in A group and there was a three way tie for second at minus 4 with Jim Gulick, Harvey Kecskes and Bobby Culbert. Pat Dell made plus 3 to take first place in B group and second place was Mike Winchester at plus 2. Doug Haire made plus 6 for first place ingroup and Mike anselm had a plus 4 for second place. Billy Parr tyook first place in D group with a plus 5 and second place went to Sal Sboto with even. Janet Regan had plus 4 to take first place in E group while Doc Thomas had a plus 3 for second place. In f group Jim Reed had plus 3 for firat place and Mac McKenzie was plus 1 for second place. Pete Mezza made plus 2 for first place in G group and Johnnie Labarge in second at even. In H groupLee Stark had plus 8 for first place while Don Tiemens was second with plus 3. Next Monday will be a shotgun start at Golf Hammock CC beginning at 8:30 a.m. Please arrive early to register. For more information, call Pete Mezza at 382-1280 The Golf Hammock Club Championship was completed Monday, April 4 as part of a three-day, Low Gross, Low Net tournament. Crowned the Club Champion with a score of 257 was Marian Passafume, while the runner-up was Laura Kebberly with a 258. Winning Low Gross in First Flight was Ruth Kirk at 270 with Ruth Harris in second at 279. Taking Low Net in the flight was Carol Troup with a 198 total while Florence Towell was second at 205. In Second Flight action, Trudy Stowe went low in the gross with a 294 for first, staying ahead of Eleanor Shorts 307, and Jo Thornburg won Low Net with a 204 while Mary Lindsay was second at 212.Lake June West Golf ClubA scramble was played on Thursday, March 31. Winning first place was the team of Ron and Sylvia West, Dick and Nancy Reaney, Margaret Schultz and Bill Brouhle with 48; second place, John and Virginia Simmons, Cal Billingsley, Don Boulton, Charlotte Mathew and Jane Roush with 49; and third place, Doyan and Wayne Eades, Bob and Verna Knishka, Joe and Joyce Swartz with 51. Closest to the pin: (Ladies), No. 2, Sylvia West, 2-feet-7-inches; and Nancy Reaney, 6-feet-10-inches. (Men), No. 4, Don Boulton, 10-feet-2inches. The mens association played a Best Ball on Wednesday, March 30. Winning first place was the team of Orville Huffman, Art Schmeltz, Fred Neer and Larry Angell with 39; second place, John Byron, Sonny Shelton, Bob Williams and Pat Houlihan with 40; and third place, Bill Hintz, Pete McNamee, Rex Simmons, Dave Colvin and Walt Nagel with 41. Closest to the pin: No. 2, Dave Colvin, 4-feet-3-inches; No. 4, Larry Angell, 7-feet-9-inches; and No. 8, Bill Hintz, 7-feet-6-inches.PinecrestThe Ladies Association played the Club Championship Tourrnament Tuesday and Thursday, March 15 and 17, with Sammie Long winning the A Division with a two-day total of 174 and Lois Kistler taking second with 178. Brad Kurek took B Division with a 190, with Betty Ulrich finishing in second with a 198 total. Beckie Gillies got a hole in one on the 10th hole Tuesday, Feb. 15 and Barb Hall got an ace of her own at #12 on Thursday, March 24.Placid LakesThe Mens Association played a One Best Ball plus all Net Birdies event Wednesday, April 6. The quartet of Jim Hays, John Rosettis, John Goble and Al Verhage won the days play with a -32, three ahead of the -29 brought in by Bruce Miseno, Bob McMillian, Chuck Fortunato and David Raciti. Taft Green, Ed Bartusch, Bill Lockwood and Gene Ransom finished third with a -28 with Raciti getting closest to the pin on #13 at 17-feet, 2-inches. The Mens Association played a scramble fundraiser for Manna Ministries. Winning first place was the team of Bob McMillian, Dick Wellman, Charlie Allen and Pat Haas with minus-13; second place, Ed Bartusch, Betty Near, Russ Isaacs and Russ Isaacs Jr. with minus-12; and third place, Frank Fisher, Tony Toma, David Moiles and Taft Green with minus-10. Closest to the pin: Women, No. 2, Von Lacy, 13-feet-2-inches; and Men, No. 13, Bruce Miseno, 16-inches. PLCC Womens Golf Association not only made a generous donation, they also raised more money from the sale of Mulligans. Individual donations and 50/50 added to the total which will top $1,000 after expenses.River GreensA morning scramble was played Friday, April 1. Tying for first/second/third places were Romy Febre, Jack Sayre and Bernie with 56 each. The Friday afternoon scramble was played April 1. Winning first place was the team of Austin Smith, Jim Sizemore, Danny Pelfrey, Tom Stewart, Dr. C. Seralde and Aurel Mack with 17-under. The Morrison Group played a game on Thursday, March 31. The winners were: First place, Russ Rudd and Gil Heier with 56; second place, Ed Moser and Hank Wunderlich with 57; and Butch Smith and Gerry Page with 59. The ladies association played a pro am tournament on Thursday, March 31. Winning first place was the team of Michele Koon, Rita Nestor, Linda Therrien and Gerri Leslie with plus-8; and second place, Anne Purcell, Peggy Wehunt and Laura Smutnick with plus7. Individual winners were: First place, Laura Smutnick with plus-5.5; second place, Rita Nestor with plus-4; and third place, Michele Koon with plus3.5. The mens association played a pro am tournament on Wednesday, March 30. Winning first place was the team of Harold Plagens, Al Farrell, Romy Febre and Jim Cercy with plus-15; second place, Tom Morway, Peter March, Ed Mosser and Neil Purcell with plus-11; and third place, Johnny Wehunt, Ken Koon, Greg Nestor and Lefty St. Pierre with plus-3.5. Individual winners were: A Flight (29-over): First place, Romy Febre with plus-12; and second place, Russ Rudd with plus-1.5. B Flight (24-28): First place, Butch Smith; and second place, Stan Griffis. C Flight (19-23): First place, Greg Nestor with plus-10; and second place, Bill Mountford with plus-5. D Flight (18-under): First place, Neil Purcell with plus-6.5; and second place, Fred Evans with plus-1.5. The Golfettes played a game on March 29. The winners were: First place, Jeannine Persails with 49. Tying for second/third/fourth places were Carol Roy, Mary Beth Carby and Michele Koon with 43 each. The Morrison Group played a game on Tuesday, March 29. Winning first place was the team of Ken Brunswick, Bob Stevens, Dave Kelly and Bob Biever with minus-34; second place, Don McDonald, Gerry Page, Romy Febre and Lefty St. Pierre with minus-31; and third place, Cliff Aubin, Auclair, Vince Boeverand Hank Wunderlich with minus-30. A Limited Member event was played on Monday, March 28. Winning first place was the team of Tom and Janeste Brouwer, Ed and Judy Ward. Individual winners were: Tying for www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 3B See GOLF, page 4B

PAGE 18

and Grand Sport; and 19inch/20-inch for Z06 and ZR1. Magnetic Selective Ride Control, the worlds fastestreacting suspension and a technology advance initiated by Corvette, is included on all Chevrolet Centennial Edition Corvette models. The Centennial Edition also features special badges that signify Chevrolets racing history. Agraphic logo featuring an iconic image of Louis Chevrolet appears on the B-pillars, the center caps of the wheels, and the center of the steering wheel. The seat headrests also carry an embossed centennial logo. Aficionados will note one other small detail: The historic crossed flags badge contains a small adaptation, with in place of the traditional fleur-de-lis symbol, only for the Centennial Edition. The exterior color scheme is reinforced inside the car, with the Ebony leather-wrapped instrument panel and doors complimented by red stitching also on the steering wheel, seats, console and shifter. The seats feature microfiber suede accents on seats, steering wheel, shifter and armrests, which were first used on the 2011 Z06 Carbon Limited Edition. The Chevrolet Centennial Edition will be available on all Corvette models via order code ZLC. Pricing will be released this summer prior to the start of availability. Louis Chevrolet was a fearless racing pioneer who also designed our first car, Scheidt said. Corvette is a natural fit to honor that legacy, while creating a compelling new package for sports car drivers. Before being auctioned, this special-edition vehicle will be featured in the Chevrolet 100th Anniversary display within the GM booth from today through Saturday. Chevrolet will be utilizing a new social media technology called TimeSplice, which will enable guests to take a stop action photograph of themselves with the vehicle and immediately share it with friends via text, email, Twitter or Facebook. The winning bidder will also receive the Corvette Engine Build Experience program whichallows Z06 or ZR1 buyers to build their own engine alongside expert technicians as well as the opportunity to take delivery of the car at the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Ky. The American Le Ma ns Series presented by Tequi la Patrn heads west for its next round the Tequi la Patrn American Le Ma ns Series at Long Beach o n Saturday, April 16. The race will be show n live and in its entirety o n ESPN3.com in the Unit ed States and international ly on americanlemans.co m starting at 7:15 p.m. ET. ESPN2 will provide tel evision coverage from 5 to 7 p.m. ETon Sunday, April 1 7. Visit the American L e Mans Series` schedule pa ge for information on ticke ts and area accommodations You can follow t he Series on Twitter (alm snotes), on our Faceboo k page and the offici al YouTube channel. Page 4BNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Highlands Youth Football and Cheer Organization (HYF) will be having a Car Wash fundraiser at Advanced Auto Parts at the corner of US 27 and the Sebring Parkway on the following Saturdays, April 9 and April 23, from 9 am-3 pm. All monies earned or donated will be used to purchase equipment and uniforms for the boys and girls. HYF is a new league to Sebring and is looking forward to providing a rewarding youth sports program to foster these boys and girls to develop sportsmanship, physical fitness and build their self esteem as well as provide them an opportunity to be part of a team. The team name is the Highlands Eagles and team colors are black, yellow and white. Come on down and get registered while your car is being washed. HYF will also be offering registration during our car wash for cheerleaders and football players. Any registered player that needs to turn in registration information or payment can come to the car wash to do so. Several of our coaches and board members will be there to meet or answer any questions you may have. Available for Ages 5 15 years old (8th Grade maximum). Registration fees are $75 each for Football and Cheer or $65 each if you are signing up multiple children, Limited spots are available for Mighty-Mite, Pee Wee and Junior Varsity Divisions Flag and Varsity players are needed. All divisions are open for Cheerleading Please come on down to support your youth football organization. For football, please call Tim Hooks at 414-2873, Cliff Howell at 253-7070 or Becky Grippo at 381-9760 for Cheerleading. HYFC Car Wash Special to the News-SunSEBRING Aleague m eeting for Highlands C ounty softball teams has b een scheduled for T uesday, April 19, at 6:30 p .m. The meeting will be h eld at the Highlands C ounty Sports Complex o ff Sheriffs Tower Road. Leagues will begin p laying again on Monday, M ay 9. Open registration for all adult softball players, men and women, is ongoing until April 26. The charge is $350 and a $15 sanction fee. If you are interested in playing organized softball, please sign up at the Highlands County Sports Complex. For more information, please contact Dan Jamison at the Highlands County Sports Complex (863) 402-6755. County Softball Meeting first/second places were Tom Brouwer and Don Sherman. SpringLakeThe SpringLake Womens Golf Association played an Individual Low Net, Flighted Tournament on Wednesday, April 6, on the Panther Creek course. The winners in Flight A were: Marsi Benson 64, Marilyn Redenbarger 67 and Dotti Blackwell 68. Judy Dunn, 64, won a tiebreaker over Linda Pfleger to take first place in Flight B and Shirley Olnhausen was third with a 66. Flight C winner had a 66 and was determined by a tiebreaker between Mary Cebula and Ann McWilliams. Third place was won by Sharon Warner who had a 71. Margaret Mazzola won first place in Flight D with a 62 and Carole Frederick was second with 65. A 66 gave third place to Carolyn Irvine. Continued from 3B Golf Scores Recap News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Richard Whiteleather delivers to a Conquistador batter Wednesday night. The lefty would prove effective in relief, holding Pasco-Hernando down before the Panthers could rally for the win. t o 7-4. Things stayed that way u ntil the bottom of the sixth w hen Brad Harrison singled t o right with one out and s cored on an Angel Vargas d ouble down the first-base l ine. David Samperi sent a fly d eep enough to right to move V argas to third and Higgins b ounced one through the m iddle for an RBI single. Higgins then stole second a nd when the throw down s ailed into center, he hustled a ll the way in to knot things a t 7-7. Richard Whiteleather, on i n relief since the fifth, w orked through the top of the s eventh, retiring one batter o n a wicked, knee-buckling c urve for a called third strike, b ut the SFCC offense couldn t carry the momentum in t heir half of the inning. Whiteleather got the first out in the eighth before surrendering a single. He bounced back for a strike out, but when he walked the next batter, Layton Mack was called in and got the final out on a called third strike fastball. The Panthers then were able to break the tie in their half of the eighth when Morgan singled to left and Harrison sent a shot through the right side to put runners on the corners. Vargas then came up with a drawn-in infield and pushed a perfect squeeze bunt toward first that easily brought Morgan in. From there, Mack struck out the opening batter of the ninth before walking the next Conquistador to put the tying run on. But it was quickly settled when a grounder to Newton at short was shoveled to Higgins at second and relayed to Jackson at first for the game-ending double play. What do you know, another one-run game, Hitt said. We did a better job with runners in scoring position today and I give the guys credit for continuing to fight. They know what they need to do to be successful and they know what they dont need to do from the times they havent succeeded, he continued. Well just hope they come to play every day and go about the second half of the conference schedule. That conference schedule picks back up Saturday with the start of a three-game series at home against the State College of Florida Manatees. Continued from 1B Panthers battle back for win Continued from 1B Vette celebrates 100th anniversary o f those grind-it-out tough g ames, James said. They m ake it very physical. ... Ive p layed against Scott Skiles t eams when he was in C hicago and now in M ilwaukee, and its always t he same effort. The Bucks were officially eliminated when Indiana beat Washington. So the Bucks became spoilers, and played the role to perfection. The fifth and final lead change came with 2:27 left, when Delfino hit a 3-pointer for an 81-79 lead. With the Milwaukee lead at four, James scored the next three Miami points, but the Heat lost a chance to take the lead when Mike Bibby was called for an illegal screen with 41 seconds left. Delfinos third 3-pointer came 17 seconds later, dooming Miami. Miami shot 7 for 21, in the fourth, with Bosh missing six of his nine shots, James four of his six. You have to give credit to their defense, Bosh said. They play good defense. ... Things are going to happen like that sometimes. Continued from 1B Heat hurt playoff seeding with loss

PAGE 19

www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 5B RELIGION By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comFORTMEADE Athens Baptist Church is preparing for its 100-year anniversary. The church will celebrate its 100 years of ministry in the Bereah community, located just north of Avon Park. The celebration will begin on April 10 at 10:30 a.m. with normal services but will have a special music performance during the service. The Gulf State Quartet will be present during Athens Pastor Rev. J.L. Howard ministry. Following the traditional service, the Athens Baptist Church family invites members, friends and guests to the social hall for a barbecue chicken and pulled pork lunch. Members and guests are then invited to enjoy the Gospel sounds of the Gulf State Quartet in the sanct uary beginning at 1 p.m. Its not just for the co ngregation; the public is invited, said Jo Barne s, member and coordinator of the 100 years celebratio n. We want everyone to be a part of something that s been a part of the commun ity for so long. Barnes, along with Deb ra Crews, has been workin g diligently to make the cel ebration a success. T he morning church servic e, lunch, and afternoon mus ic entertainment are sure to be something for the comm unity to enjoy. Athens Baptist Church is at 6510 W. Bereah Ro ad just off of Avon Park Cuto ff Road. Howard, Barne s, Crews and the church fam ily hope to see the comm unity out and joining in t he celebration. Athens Baptist to celebrate 100 years of worship Special to the News-SunOn March 19, the Avon Park Florida Avenue Baptist Churchs Women On Mission held a shower for The Potters House in Lake Placid. The women were served a delicious lunch prepared by some of the residents and volunteers of The Potters House. The Potters House was founded in 1981 as a refuge for abused, abandoned, troubled pregnant and non-pregnant girls. It is a sanctuary for girls who need acceptance and love in an environment of Christian values. The girls are exposed to activities in the community that train them as service providers. The Scripture behind The Potters House is ...there I will cause thee to hear my words... Jeremiah 18:2. Several other ministries have come from the start of The Potters House include The Alpha Omega Crisis Center, Galatians 6:2; Children of Promise Baby Ministry, Psalms 68:5; American Heritage Private School, II Timothy 2:15; and New Beginnings, Jeremiah 16:3-6. There is a great need for volunteers and donations of supplies and most of all prayers in each of the respective programs. Contact Sandy Lopes at 140 Dunty Road, Lake Placid, FL33852 or call 465-7707. Women on Mission have shower for Potters House Courtesy photo Women On Mission from Florida Avenue Baptist Church with in-house babies and babies that are in Christian foster care. Atonement Lutheran ChurchSEBRING The Fifth Sunday in Lent worship service will be led by the Rev. Jefferson Cox at the 9:30 a.m. service with Holy Eucharist. Midweek Lenten Service starts with soup, sandwich and pie supper at 5:30 p.m. Service of the Word at 6:15 p.m. led by Lois Hess, Ed Graff and Ron Fitzpatrick. Jim Helwig will be the organist. The Litanies will be titled Affirming The Ash Heap, a series comparing Jesus with Job. Why do bad things happen to good people?Avon Park Church of ChristAVON PARK Believe Gods Facts (Romans 10:17), will be the message presented by Larry Roberts, minister. The Sunday evening service will be a Bible study from the book of Psalms. The Youth Group will have a Fellowship Gathering on Sunday night. Avon Park Church of Christ is at 200 S. Forest Ave. For information, call 453-4692.Christian Science ChurchSEBRING The lesson sermon on Sunday morning is titled Are Sin, Disease, and Death Real? The keynote is from Deuteronomy 4:39, Know, recognize, and understand therefore this day and turn your (mind and) heart to it that the Lord is God in the heavens above and upon the earth beneath; there is no other. The church is at 146 N. Franklin St.Christian Training Church SEBRING Associate Minister Casey L. Downing will bring the message titled Possessed By Vision: Part 3 at the Sunday morning service. The Wednesday night Bible study will continue the book of Hebrews. Emmanuel United Church of ChristSEBRING The Rev. George Miller will deliver the sermon, Stages, with Scripture taken from John 2:1-45. Bunny Hop on April 24 after the Easter celebration service. There will be an Easter Egg Hunt following the Easter service. The church is 1.7 miles west of U.S. 27 on County Road 634 (Hammock Road). Call 471-1999 or visit sebringemmanuelucc.com.First Baptist Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK Rev. Jon Beck will speak at the 11 a.m. service and the 6 p.m. service. The church is at 100 N. Lake Ave. For more information, call 453-6681 or email infor@fbcap.net.First Baptist Church of Placid LakesLAKE PLACID Pastor Darryl George will preach the sermon titled The Example of Growing In Grace! with regards to Luke 2:41-48. The church is at the corner of Washington and Kemper Avenues in Placid Lakes. For more information, call 465-5126 from 8 a.m. to noon Monday through Thursday or e-mail placidlakes@hotmail.com.First Christian ChurchAVON PARK Running on Empty is the title of the pastors sermon this week. Scripture will come from Luke 24:1-12 as he discusses the theme that No Running no longer applies, building to the Easter message on April 24. First Christian Church of Avon Park is at 1016 W. Camphor (behind the Wachovia Bank). Call 4535334 or e-mail firstchristianap@embarqmail.com. The church Web site is www.firstchristianap.com.First Presbyterian Church of Avon ParkAVON PARK On Sunday morning, the pastors sermon is titled Declared Righteous based on Luke 19:1-10. The choirs anthem will be Thy Will Be Done with solo by David Blackmon. Maxine Johnson, adult Sunday school teacher, continues the study of David in II Samuel chapter 11 in which David has Uriah (Bathshedas husband) placed in the battlefield where he knows he will be killed). Wendy Garcia teaches the youth class. At Wednesday Bible study the pastor continues the study on Revelation. Mary Circle meets at 1 p.m. On Thursday, Sarah Circle meets at 4 p.m. The Deacons meet at 6 p.m. On Saturday, April 16 there will be a Church Work Day from 9 a.m. until noon. The church is at 215 E. Circle St. (with two entrances on Lagrande Street). Call 453-3242. Church News In the Scriptures there are many verses that admonish us to help others who are in need. I was about 12 years old in 1933, when Mr. Green, a member of our church, was killed in a farm accident. Mr. Green was preparing the fields for the spring planting when he apparently had a heart attack. He fell from the tractor and was run over by the disc barrow. This tragic event left Mrs. Green a widow with two young girls and no means of support. Ours was a small country church with an attendance of 35-40 members. The church members immediately rallied around Mrs. Green after the funeral, determined to help. The men decided to plant the whole farm to corn. They descended on the farm with tractors, horses, plows, discs and planters. The women came and prepared to feed everybody. In one big day, the whole farm was planted in corn. Now a schedule was set up so that all summer long the men took turns cultivating the corn. The whole project culminated one day in October. Again the whole church membership showed up to help. From the looks of th e table at noon, you would have thought it was Thanksgiving. That day the whole cro p was harvested and delivered to the local grain ele vator. When the bills for seed and fertilizer were paid, the whole crop nette d about $900. Mr. Green wa s a tenant farmer, so one-ha lf of this went to the landlord. Mrs. Green, with tears streaming down her cheek s, was presented a check for $450. In the depression year of 1933, this was the equivalent of about one an d a half yearswages for a working man, if he had a job. Mrs. Green then moved to town, rented a small house and eventually foun d work to help support herself and the girls. Did I mention that Mrs. Green was my Sunday school teacher? What a blessing it is to be a part of a body of believers. Floyd Rider is a Lake Placid resident and a long time Sunday school teacher. Helping one another Breylinger walks for ministry workAVON PARK Pastor B ill Breylinger once more h as put on his walking shoes a nd did a 125-mile walk t hrough many areas of this b eautiful county. The pastor s tarted in Lake Placid and w alked to Avon Park, not to m ention the times around L ake Jackson and throughout t he beautiful Hammock. His goal was to raise m oney for the important m inistries at Union C ongregational Church. T hese ministries help so m any in the county.Kids Club comes to Calvary ChurchSEBRING Calvary C hurch on Hammock Road w ill have Kids Club at 6 p .m. today. Fun, games, Bible study a nd refreshments for ages 51 1. Everyone is welcome. Afun-filled time from 6-8 p .m.Knights plan fish bakeAVON PARK Knights o f Columbus will host a fish b ake from 5:30-7 p.m. today a t Our Lady of Grace, 595 E. M ain St., in the Grogan C enter. Come and bring your f riends, or come and make n ew friends. The dinner c osts $8 per person. For more information, call 4 53-4757.Solid Grounds serves breakfastAVON PARK Starting o n Saturday, and every seco nd Saturday of the months f ollowing, there will be a p ancake breakfast in Solid G rounds (of Union C ongregational Church) f rom 7-10 a.m. consisting of p ancakes, sausage, scramb led eggs, juice and coffee, f or the low price of $5 per p erson. Plan on attending.First Baptist has week of eventsLAKE PLACID First B aptist Church of Lake P lacid, 119 E. Royal Palm S t., will host the following e vents this week: Saturday From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., in support of youth s ummer programs, church m embers will clean vehicles i n the parking lot of the c hurch. Donations are greatl y appreciated. Monday At noon in fell owship hall will be the P rimetimers Covered Dish l uncheon. Bring a covered d ish and a friend. Speaker w ill be Bill Lewis M inistries. Tuesday At 6:30 p.m., C onfection Connection, a w omens Bible study in the s anctuary, will meet. The s peaker will be Jennifer R eser.First Baptist Sebring revival services setSEBRING New morni ng worship schedule for Snapshots Guest Column Floyd Rider RELIGION GUIDELINES: The News-Sunpublishes religion news on Fridays. The submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday to be considered for publication in the following Fridays paper. Submit items to the News-Sunsfrom 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays; fax to 385-2453; send email to editor@newssun.com; or mail to Lifestyle Editor,News-Sun,2227 U.S. 27 South,Sebring,FL 33870. For information,call 385-6155,ext. 516. Continued on page 8B Continued on page 8B

PAGE 20

www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 7B Page 6BNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com MARCH MARKETINGMADNESS The NEWS-SUNstaff would like to thank all of those who participated in the 2011 March Marketing Madness advertising special. We had a great time and look forward to next year.

PAGE 21

Page 8BNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. childrens choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. childrens mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and womens prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Friday 5-7 p.m., every Saturday 9-11 a.m. and 3-3:45 p.m., first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life! Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church.Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP RELIGION First Baptist, Sebring is Bible Study for all ages 9:15 a.m., blended worship service at 10:30 a.m. Revival services with Dr. Condy Richardson will be held Sunday through Wednesday with noon luncheon devotionals at 12:15 p.m. Monday through Wednesday. Richardsons theme for the services will be Gods Church Back to the Basics.Spaghetti dinner at St. John UMCSEBRING St. John United Methodist Church will have a spaghetti dinner at 4, 5 and 6 p.m. Tuesday. The cost is $7 per person. Take-outs and walk-ins are welcome. The church is at 3214 Grand Prix Drive. Call 382-1736 for information.Cantata at St. John UMCSEBRING At 7 p.m. Wednesday the Chancel Choir of St. John United Methodist Church with narration and actors in costume will present Come, Touch the Robe (encounters with the Healer, the Servant, the Lord of Easter), a cantata for voices and piano written by Pepper Choplin. The cantata will be followed by a Healing Service. St. John United Methodist Church is at 3214 Grand Prix Drive. Call the church at 382-1736 for information.Passover SederSEBRING Temple Israel of Highlands County is having a traditional Seder at 6 p.m. Monday, April 18 at the synagogue at 1305 Temple Israel Drive. Passover receives its name from the last plague inflicted upon the Egyptians the killing of the first born. The Israelites were instructed to mark their doors with the blood of a spring lamb so that the angel of the Lord would pass over their homes. While Passover is remembered mainly for unleavened bread, Matzo, more importantly, it commemorates freedom from slavery and the beginning of people hood for the Jews. This mass of wanderers shrugged off slavery and ultimately elected to bind themselves to an invisible, single Deity Afour-course meal including choice of brisket or chicken, gefilte fish, matzo ball soup and all the trim mings will be served. Everyone is welcome. For more information and reservations, call 382-7744.Special service set for April 21LORIDA An In Remembranc e of Me service will be held at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21. Join members as they look back at the upper room. Jesus washed the disciples fe et and communion was established. In Remembrance of Me at First Baptist Church Lorida, 1927 Blessings Ave. Call 655-1878.Fellowship Baptist plans sunrise serviceAVON PARK Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell Stree t, is extending an invitation to the pub lic for its sunrise service at 8 a.m. and worship service at 9:30 a.m., fe aturing Allison and Spencer in concert, on Sunday, April 24. Coffee an d doughnuts will be offered after the sunrise service. Continued from page 5B Remember what is was like w hen you first fell in love? It s eemed your every thought w as filled with the one you l oved. Just thinking about him m ade you smile. You used to l augh together, play together, g o places together, just have a l ot of fun. Did you write notes to him? D id you write poetry or verses o f your favorite love songs to s how him? Were you cons tantly thinking of ways to p lease him, to make him h appy? If youve lost that, ask y ourself what happened? W hen did it change? Would y ou like to get it back? Love comes from thinking p ositive things about someo ne. You love their smile, or t he way they interact with o ther people, putting others f irst. You can still do that. Write y our husband a love note and p ut it in his lunch or his pants p ocket. Call him in the middle o f the day (if you can) just to a sk how his day is going. Tell h im you cant wait to see him w hen he gets home. Flirt with h im a little. Give him somet hing good to look forward to. Plan a special treat. Clean t he house super neat and dress u p for him. Be sure to put on his favorite perfume and style your hair just the way he likes it. Let him sit down and relax. Rub his back, neck and shoulders. If his feet usually hurt when he gets home have a pan of warm water with Epsom salts to soak his feet. After about 20 minutes or so dry them off and put some soothing lotion on them. Pamper your man and he will treat you like a queen. But do it because you love him, not just to manipulate. No one likes to be manipulated. If you dont get the response you expected, dont allow yourself to get frustrated or angry. After all, you dont know what the last half of his day has been like, and he may just be too tired to respond. Cut him some slack. Be patient. Keep trying. The sweeter you are every day, the better your marriage will be. Let me know how its going at themarriagementor@yahoo.co m or on my blog findingmywaycounseling.blogspot.com. I care. Love is thoughtful The Marriage Mentor Aleta Kay Snapshots GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCE

PAGE 22

www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 9B EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer.Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howes Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer Kid C ity Childrens Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, prime-timers, and Bible s tudies in Spanish. Kid City Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Childrens Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturers Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15, 9:30 and 11 a.m. in the sanctuary. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Childrens Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on lifes journey, youre we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP First Presbyterian ChurchSEBRING The Folly o f the Galatians by the Rev. D arrell A. Peer is Sundays s ermon. Grief Support Group m eets at 3 p.m. Tuedsay in t he adult classroom. Youth G roup (ages 11-18) meets f rom 4-7 p.m. in fellowship h all. Communicants Class is f rom 3:45-4:45 p.m. T hursday in the adult classr oom.First United Methodist Church of SebringSEBRING The Rev. A .C. Bryant will bring the m essage Betrayal and A rrest with the Scripture t aken from John 18:1-40. Fine Food and Fellowship D inner is Sunday after the c hurch services. United Methodist Women circles will meet Tuesday. The Growing with God family night continues Wednesday in the Family Life Center. Plan to attend the Easter Celebration and Egg Hunt for children Saturday, April 23. Call the church office for information at 385-5184. The church is downtown at 126 S. Pine St. Visit the Web site at www.sebringfirstumc.com.Grace Pointe MinistriesSEBRING Grace Pointe Ministries is at 200 Lark Ave., Sebring Hills Association Clubhouse. The Future Revealed Whats on the Revelation timeline? The Unholy Three will be the lesson Tuesday. Class provided for the children. Call 447-3431 for directions. Special services will be held for Palm Sunday, April 17 and on Resurrection Sunday April 24. All sermons and Bible studies are now available. Live ustream now available at ustreamtv, then enter gracepointetv in the search box.Heartland Christian SEBRING Pastor Ted Moores sermon this week will be Only Hope For America with Scripture from Psalms 121:1-2. Service will also include Walter Malinowski singing Were You There, Roland Bates singing Consider the Lilies, and The Heartland Singers will sing In This Very Room. Palm Sunday will be a reenactment of The Last Supper. Easter Sunday will be a special program. The church is at 2705 Alternate Route 17 South in Sebring (behind Publix). Call 314-9693.Memorial United Methodist ChurchLAKE PLACID Memorial will have a team at Relay For Life at Scarborough Field from noon Saturday until 5 a.m. Sunday. Claude Burnett will preach at the Heritage Worship Service and Celebration Worship Service. Rev. Fred Ball will preach at the New Song Contemporary Service in Rob Reynolds Hall. The church is at 500 Kent Ave. Call 465-2422.Parkway Free Will Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Sunday morning Bible lesson, Praise Builds Us Up, is taken from the book of Jude. Pastor Jim Scaggs will bring the message. Parkway FWB will host the Central Florida Association of Free Will Baptists in May.St. John United Methodist ChurchSEBRING Rev. Ronald De Genaros sermon Sunday will be Song of Redemption taken from Psalm 130.Sebring Church of the BrethrenSEBRING This is the Fifth Sunday of Lent. Pastor Keith Simmons will preach on Natural to Supernatural. The Scripture reading will be from Romans 8:6-11. Sunday school will study Praise Builds Us Up. The class will also be looking at Jude 17:25.Southside Baptist ChurchSEBRING The Rev. David Altman will speak in the morning worship service on What Were You Thinking? from Colossians 3:1-11. The pastor will continue speaking on AHouse of Prayer for All Nations in the evening service. The church is at 379 S. Commerce Ave. Call 3850752.Spring Lake Presbyterian ChurchSEBRING Staying Connected is the title of Sunday mornings sermon (from the Scripture John 15:1-10), given by the Rev. Barbara Laucks.Spring Lake United Methodist ChurchSEBRING Spring Lak e United Methodist Church is at 8170 Cozumel Lane. The Rev. Clyde Weavers sermo n is Ambassadors of Love and Reconciliation. The Way ChurchSEBRING Dr. Arden Gilmer will be the guest speaker. April 17 at 6:30 p.m. wil l be Movie Night. The Way Church is at 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive. The church phone is 4716140; the pastors cell is 214-6190. For the pastors messages go to www.thewaychurch.org. Continued from page 5B RELIGION Church News

PAGE 23

Page 10BNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com HEALTHYLIVING As a child you may have been told warts were caused by kissing frogs. They are actually caused by a virus that invades the skin through very small cuts and abrasions. Since the virus is lurking on the ground it can be contracted by barefoot walking. Like any other infectious lesion, plantar warts spread by touching, scratching, or even by contact with skin shed from another wart. Warts on the bottom of feet are called plantar warts. Many times they are confused with a corn or callous. Plantar warts tend to be hard, flat, with a rough surface, well-defined boundaries and have pinpoint black areas. On top of the foot they appear fleshier and raised. Although rare, malignant lesions such as carcinomas and melanomas can sometimes be confused as a wart. Plantar warts can cause sharp, burning pain.Tips for wart prevention Avoid barefoot walking. Change shoes and socks daily. Keep feet dry and clean. Check your childs feet regularly. Dont touch warts on other people. Use flip-flops in public showers.If you get a wart Avoid over-the-counter preparations because may contain salycylic acid. See your podiatrist before the wart becomes larger and spreads. Diabetics and people with circulatory or neurological problems should only seek professional care. This year, make your goal to keep your feet virus free by following these suggestions. And remember, dont blame the frogs. Dr. Olga Garcia Luepschen and the Gentle Foot Care Center are at 2 Ryant Blvd. (on U.S. 27). For further information call 314-9255 or www.gentlefootcarecenter.com. Frogs dont cause warts Footprints Dr. Olga GarciaLuepschen Metro Services Contrary to popular myth, handling frogs and toads will not give you warts. DearPharmacist: Confession, Im a germaphobe, and now avoid power hand dryers in public restrooms because of your recent article. Any other advice to keep pesky germs off my clean body. L.V., Tulsa, Okla. Answer: Sorry to create more concern about germs for you, but those handsfree water faucets may be pouring more bacteria on your hands than old-fashioned tap water faucets. Researchers at Johns Hopkins Hospital tested water samples from their hospital (including patient rooms) and half the samples from hands-free electric faucets tested positive for a bug called legionella, and other bacteria. The water samples from oldfashioned tap faucets tested positive only 15 percent of the time. Engineering may be the problem. Apparently, plumbing for the handsfree automatic models have numerous valves, screens and filters, which provide a nesting camp for bacteria. I have three thoughts about this. One, Im not sure the research extrapolates to public restrooms, after all, the samples were collected from a hospital where dangerous germs run amok. Two, if you have a strong immune system, your less likely to get sick. Your skin harbors germs on it at all times. The average office desk harbors 400 times more bacteria than a toilet seat. So even though germs are literally everywhere, you have immunity to most germs. And finally, the study didnt account for touching any faucet handles. They only tested water samples. If you think about it, people step out of their personal stall, and then touch the hot or cold handles with their bare fingers. Like you, Id rather stick my hands under automatic faucets than actually touch the handles other people have touched before me. Some bacteria are beneficial. The good bugs protect you from the bad ones. You have this beautiful garden of bacteria in your gastrointestinal tract which protects you from bacterial/fungal infection, gives you energy, makes B vitamins and helps you lose weight. Most people refer to beneficial bacteria as probiotics. Dont fre ak out, but youre growing them as we speak. You ca n buy them as supplements in health food stores. Listen carefully, this is huge and impacts your health tremendously. Every person manufactures their own probiotics and it becomes a fingerprint for you. Your gut microflora is different tha n mine, is different than you r childs, and so on. I call it your flora fingerprint. This is why taking billions of organisms, from many different strains is not so good. With probiotics, the more, the messier. Your body doesn t recognize all the foreign strains in some of those supplements, and could launch an attack on the bugs if you dont naturally make them. Taking probiotics that arent part of your flora fingerprint can make you sick. I discuss this on my Facebook fan page, and in chapter 17 of Drug Muggers. You should nurture your own flora finger print with the right supple ment. Then you can stick your hands under those electric faucets, or in a Dumpster for that matter, and your immune system will be strong enough to protect you. Suzy Cohen is a registered pharmacist and the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and Real Solutions. For more information, visit www. DearPharmacist. com. This information is not intended to treat, diagnose or cure your condition. Your flora fingerprint protects you from germs Dear Pharmacist Suzy Cohen Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun Community Outreach events Ace Homecare community outreach e vents for April include: Today 7 a.m., Health Fair, Arc r esidence, Pleasant Street, Avon Park. Monday 8 a.m., Health Fair, H ammock Estates, Hammock Road, S ebring; and 1 p.m., Caregivers S upport Group, Crown Pointe Assisted L iving Community, Sun N Lake B lvd., Sebring. Tuesday 7:30 a.m., Health Fair, L akeside Gardens, County Road 621, L ake Placid; 9 a.m., Health Fair, H erons Landing, Herons Landing L ane, Lake Placid; 10 a.m., Health F air, Lake Placid Meal Site, Interlake B oulevard, Lake Placid; and 1 p.m., H ealth Fair, Groves, behind Sebring D iner, U.S. 27, Sebring. Wednesday 8 a.m., Health Fair, N eiberts, U.S. 98, Lake Placid; and 9 a .m., Health Fair, Palm Estates, U.s. 9 8, Lorida.Parkinsons support group meets MondaySEBRING The Parkinsons dise ase support group for the Highlands C ounty area will meet at 10 a.m. M onday at First Baptist Church of S ebring, corner of Lemon and Pine S treet. The program this month will be a s peaker from Florida Hospital H eartland Division with the latest u pdates on Parkinsons treatments. All persons with Parkinsons disease a nd their families are welcome to a ttend. There is no charge. For more i nformation, call 453-6589 or 4536 419. The Highlands County Parkinsons S upport Group is part of the national n etwork of support groups affiliated w ith the American Parkinsons Disease A ssociation. More than one million A mericans have Parkinsons Disease. T oday people with Parkinsons disease a nd their families can find help and i nformation from their local support g roup.MS Support Group meets TuesdaySEBRING The Multiple Sclerosis S upport Group meets at 7 p.m. T uesday at Highlands Regional M edical Group. The meeting will be h eld in the Doctors Board Room, first f loor. Friends and family are welcome. F or more information, call 465-3138. Snapshots WASHINGTON (AP) Asimple t reatment a hormone-containing v aginal gel significantly reduces p remature births among pregnant w omen who are at high risk because of a problem with the cervix, government r esearchers reported Wednesday. Many factors can lead to premature b irth, but Wednesdays study targets o ne subset: the thousands of women w ho develop an unusually shortened c ervix, the gateway to the uterus. The f indings may prompt more doctors to b egin routinely measuring cervical l ength, using an easy and fairly inexp ensive ultrasound scan, midway t hrough pregnancy. There will never be thesolution to p reterm birth, cautions lead researcher D r. Roberto Romero of the National I nstitutes of Health. There will be m ultiple solutions, and we believe this i s one important solution. This treatment is not related to an i njection called Makena, a synthetic h ormone that is controversial because o f its high price tag. That drug is aimed a t women whove already had one pree mie and now are pregnant again. Gel reduces preterm births in some women WASHINGTON (AP) Downing five or more alcoholic drinks nearly every day isnt seen as a big problem for many of the nations teens, says a new report. When asked if they see great risk in drinking that much, almost half the teens questioned 45 percent didnt see it as a big deal. The study released Wednesday by The Partnership at Drugfree.org also showed upward trends in marijuana and Ecstasy use among young people in grades 9 through 12. Youre seeing this weakness in this generation of teensattitudes around drug and alcohol use, says Steve Pasierb, president of the partnership. Its not like this generation of kids thinks theyre more bulletproof than others, but they really dont see any harm in that heavy drinking. And while the numbers suggest many teens do not perceive significant harm in heavy drinking, the percentage of teens drinking is down. Its important that we not lose sight of the progress our country has made in fighting underage drinking, says Dr. Raymond Scalettar, former chairman of the American Medical Association and a medical adviser to the Washington-based Distilled Spirits Council. U.S. government data shows underage drinking and binge drinking are at record low levels. The partnership study also shows the percentage of teens drinking alcohol in the past month declining, down to 35 percent last year from a high of 50 percent in 1998. Study: Teens say 5 drinks a day OK

PAGE 24

StatePoint MediaNo matter if you are grabbing a snack from the convenience store, attending a family party or dining out, we all eat away from home. But your favorite restaurant meals or fast foods can be hazardous to your waistline if youre not careful. We are the most overfed and under-nourished population in the world. So obviously, we have to make smarter choices if we want to lose weight and be healthy, says Jane Percy, author of the new book, Lighten Up! Win at Losing. Not eating out isnt possible these days, especially if you dont want to stop seeing friends or sharing meals with family. But by making smart choices and sticking to healthy habits, its possible to enjoy the company of loved ones without gaining weight. Percy offers several tips to help you eat out and stay on the health track: Plan it out Before attending a party or big dinner, eat wisely in the days preceding it. That day, plan breakfast and lunch so that you dont consume too many calories. Dont start a party hungry, as youre likely to overeat. Have a small snack beforehand, such as fruit, nuts and raw vegetables. And drink a glass of water upon arriving, to keep you feeling fuller. Most of all, dont feel like you have to finish everything on your plate. Taking home leftovers will flatter the cook and save you from overeating. Make smart choices When eating out, dont be afraid to exercise your right to choose. Afew smart substitutions can help create a healthy meal at almost any restaurant. Or ask your waiter if the restaurant serves half portions. Most restaurant owners and waiters really do want customers to have the meal they need and desire, so its your absolute right to ask for menu adaptations, says Percy. Try to choose restaurants that prepare fresh fish really well. If you add a salad and vegetables and forego starchy potatoes, you can create a healthy meal while enjoying the company of friends and family. Step it up If youve got a big meal or vacation planned, dont forget to exercise! In fact, add a little extra activity if you can, such as walking, to burn off extra calories. Other metabolism-increasing activities are also great for overall weight loss, like eating breakfast every morning. Green tea has also been shown to heat up your metabolism and, given its caffeine content, is a good substitute for coffee. Lastly, things like proper breathing or self-hypnosis can help. Stress hormones like cortisol have been shown to increase belly fat, but slow deep breaths can help lower blood pressure and cortisol levels. And relaxation through self-hypnosis can help reduce stress levels, as well. More tips on healthy living are available in Lighten Up! and online at www.RiverLightCenter.com. Remember, food is fuel, says Percy. The right choices will give you energy to follow your dreams and live life to the fullest. How to avoid gaining weight when eating out www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 11B HEALTHYLIVING StatePoint Media Dont be afraid to ask for healthy substitutions when eating out. Associated PressINDIANOLA, Iowa S ynthetic substances that m imic marijuana, cocaine a nd other illegal drugs are m aking users across the n ation seriously ill, causing s eizures and hallucinations a nd even killing some peop le. The products are often p ackaged as incense or b ath salts and can be o btained for as little as $10 a t many head shops. As m ore people experiment w ith them, the results are b ecoming evident at hospit als: a sharp spike in the n umber of users who show u p with problems ranging f rom labored breathing and r apid heartbeats to extreme p aranoia and delusions. T he symptoms can persist f or days. At the request of The A ssociated Press, the A merican Association of P oison Control Centers a nalyzed nationwide figu res on calls related to s ynthetic drugs. The findi ngs showed an alarming i ncrease in the number of p eople seeking medical a ttention. At least 2,700 people h ave fallen ill since J anuary, compared with f ewer than 3,200 cases in a ll of 2010. At that pace, m edical emergencies relate d to synthetic drugs could g o up nearly fivefold by t he end of the year. Many of the users d escribe extreme paran oia, said Dr. Mark Ryan, d irector of the Louisiana P oison Center. The recurr ing theme is monsters, d emons and aliens. Alot of t hem had suicidal t houghts. The chemicals are susp ected in at least nine U.S. d eaths since last year, i ncluding that of Mike R ozgas 18-year-old son, D avid, an athlete and band s tandout from Indianola. The young man got high l ast June on a marijuana l ook-alike product called K2 and complained to a f riend that he felt like he w as in hell, his father s aid. Though the teen had n ever suffered from d epression, he went home, f ound a shotgun and killed h imself. These kids werent looking for anything bad to happen, Mike Rozga said. The truth is they didnt know what they had gotten themselves into. The recent surge in activity has not gone unnoticed by authorities. The Drug Enforcement Administration recently used emergency powers to outlaw five chemicals found in synthetic pot, placing them in the same category as heroin and cocaine. But manufacturers are quick to adapt, often cranking out new formulas that are only a single molecule apart from the illegal ones. In the United States, fake marijuana was last years big seller, marketed under brands such as K2 or Spice. This year, the trend is bath salts with names like Purple Wave and Bliss. Besides being cheap and easily obtained, they do not show up in common drug tests. Synthetic marijuana typically involves dried plant material sprayed with one of several chemical compounds, most of which were created by a Clemson University scientist for research purposes in the 1990s. The compounds were never tested on humans. Its packaged to look like pot, and users typically smoke it, but experts say the high is more comparable to cocaine or LSD. The bath salts are not water-softening products at all but crystalized chemicals that are snorted, swallowed or smoked. So far in 2011, poison control centers have received nearly 1,300 calls about synthetic pot, compared with 2,874 calls for all of last year, according to the poison control center data. Poison calls for bath salts rose at an even greater rate. The centers took 301 calls in all of 2010, but had more than 1,400 for the first three months of 2011. Most of the calls came from doctors and nurses reporting patients in emergency rooms. Synthetic drugs send thousands to ER Associated PressNEWYORK Recently, worke rs at the stricken Japanese nuclear p lant dumped radioactive water into t he ocean to make room for storing e ven more highly contaminated w ater on the site. The water dumpi ng came after earlier leaks of r adioactive water that had already r aised concerns about its effects in t he ocean, raising questions about h ealth and safety. Here are answers t o some of those questions. Q. How dangerous is radiation? A. We live in a world of radiat ion. It is in the water we drink, the f ood we eat, the very air we breathe. M ost of the radiation we are e xposed to comes from outer space, t he decaying of uranium in the earth, and medical procedures like X-rays and CTscans. Q. How can radiation hurt us? A. Too much radiation in a short time can cause deadly radiation sickness, with its signature symptoms of nausea, dizziness and hair loss. High doses can also cause cancer decades later. It can lead to congenital defects in future children of exposed adults. Q. Can the radioactive water leaking from the Japanese nuclearplant eventually reach the U.S. and be hazardous? A. Its hard to say how that water will move, because it will spread not only on the surface but downward in deep layers of the Pacific Ocean. If it does reach the West Coast, it would probably take at least 18 months to three years, by one estimate. In any case, nobody expects it would pose a radiation hazard upon arrival because of tremendous dilution along the way. Airborne radioactive particles have already reached the United States, but federal authorities say the measured levels arent dangerous. Q. Werent the workers at the nuclearplant treated forburns aftercoming into contact with radioactive water? What if someone swam in the ocean off the coast of Japan? A. The kind of radiation levels the workers experienced cause sunburn-like burns in about a half-hour to an hour. But swimming near the plant is banned, and radiation levels of water dumped in the ocean decline quickly with distance from the complex. Q. What radioactive elements are leaking and what are the risks? A. Measurements so far have focused mostly on iodine and cesium, which were responsible for most of the radiation dose to the public at the Chernobyl disaster. Radiation from iodine-131 dissipates quickly, falling by half every eight days, so that its virtually gone in 80 days. Its danger is that if inhaled or swallowed, it can concentrate in the thyroid and cause cancer. Cesium radiation sticks aroun d much longer, taking 30 years to decline by half and 300 years to v irtually disappear. Cesium can bui ld up in the body and high levels a re thought to be a risk for vario us other cancers. Still, researchers wh o studied Chernobyl could not find an increase in cancers that might be linked to cesium. Q. Will ocean creatures b e harmed by the discharges of th e radioactive water? A. Experts say animals very ne ar the plant may face problems li ke higher rates of genetic mutation s, but that this would probably happ en within only maybe a half a mile or so. Worried about a radioactive ocean? A reality check MIAMI (AP) Mu ch critical information is lacking about Florida s Medicaid privatizatio n experiment, includin g whether it has sav ed money or if patient ca re has suffered, according to a Georgetown Universi ty study released Tuesday. The study comes as Florida lawmakers a re poised to expand the co ntroversial Medicaid priv atization progra m statewide. The Republic an led House approved a b ill to do so last week, despi te opposition fro m Democrats who voic ed concern at the lack of da ta gauging a five-coun ty pilot program. Proponen ts warn Medicaid must be overhauled or it will co nsume the state budget an d estimate managed ca re will save about $1 billio n a year, but those savin gs would not be immediate There was n o encounter data, at lea st none publicly availabl e, and that had been prom ised and really no up to date data on cost savings , said Joan Alker, who c owrote the report. Encounter data mea sures what services an d medications patients a re receiving and which on es are being denied accountability that heal th advocates say is critical to ensure for-profit HMO s arent lining their pocke ts at patientsexpense. Study warns data missing in Medicaid pilot program

PAGE 25

B y NEKESAMUMBI MOODY APMusic WriterNEWYORK Men and w omen will compete headt o-head, some of the more e xotic awards like best N ative American album and b est spoken-word childrens r ecord have been eliminated, a nd the number of categories h as been reduced by more t han 30 in the biggest overh aul in the 53-year history of t he Grammys. While no musical genres w ill be excluded from G rammy contention, the c hanges will make the a wards a lot more competit ive. It ups the game in terms o f what it takes to receive a G rammy and preserves the g reat esteem of with its held i n the creative community, w hich is the most important e lement, Recording A cademy President and CEO N eil Portnow said in a telep hone interview Wednesday. While the Academy has a djusted its rules and adapted t o industry changes over the y ears, these changes follow i ts first major examination of t he awards structure, a p rocess that took more than a y ear. The biggest change will c ome in the number of categ ories, cut from 109 to 78. A wards will no longer be g iven in such categories as r ap performance by a duo or g roup; some of the instrum ental categories in pop, r ock and country; traditional g ospel; childrens spokenword album; Zydeco or Cajun music album; and best classical crossover album. That doesnt mean that those types of music are ineligible; they will simply compete within larger fields. Portnow said the changes will make the awards process more rigorous. Thats appropriate. We are talking about the most prestigious, coveted award and it should be a high bar in terms of the measurement of receiving that, he said. Separate male and female vocal categories in fields like pop, R&B and country are among those being dropped. Men and women will now compete in each overall field. That is already the case in the field of rock, which does not have male and female vocal categories. Agreat singer is a great singer is a great singer, and somebody that has a gift in terms of their voice, and is at the top of their game in terms of their delivery and emotion, really isnt necessarily defined by gender, Portnow said. The changes would appear to make it more difficult for artists in lesser-known and less mainstream categories. Tia Carrere wont be taking home any more Grammys for best Hawaiian music album, for example. But she could still win in the new best regional roots music album category, which comprises more genres. Other changes will require each category to have at least 40 entries instead of 25, and categories that receive between 25 and 39 will have only three nominations instead of four or five. If a category gets fewer than 25 entries, it will be removed for that year, and if it happens three years in a row, the category will be discontinued and the material will find a new home in a related genre. Online: http://www.grammy.com T he Community Calendar prov ides a brief listing of local c lubs and organizations who m eet on a regular basis. It is t he responsibility of the group t o update the News-Sunon a ny changes in this listing by c alling 385-6155, ext. 516; s end any changes by e-mail to e ditor@newssun.com;or mail t hem to News-SunCommunity C alendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, S ebring, FL33870.FRIDAY Alcoholics Anonymous O ne Day At ATime group m eets for a closed discussion a t 9:30 a.m. Monday and F riday at Covenant P resbyterian Church, 4500 S un N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. F or details, call 314-0891. Alzheimers Association S upport Group meets at 6 p .m. second Friday at the O aks of Avon in AvonPark. F or details, call 385-3444. American Legion Post 25 h osts a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. a t the post, 1490 U.S. 27, L ake Placid. Cost is $6. S hrimp also is available for s ame price. Open to the publ ic. Tickets in the lounge on F riday night. Lounge hours are f rom 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For d etails, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 h as karaoke from 7 p.m. until f inal call at the post, 528 N. P ine St., Sebring. Post open at n oon. Happy Hour from 4-6 p .m. Members and guests o nly. For details, call 4711 448. Avon Park Breakfast R otary Club meets 7 a.m., R otary Club building. Bridge Club of Sebring ( American Contract Bridge C lub)plays duplicate games at 1 2:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf A ve., Sebring. For details, call 3 85-8118. Grand Prix Cloggers B eginner classes are at 9 a .m., EZ Intermediate classes a re at 10 a.m., and I ntermediate classes are at 11 a .m. every Friday at Reflection o n Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call J ulie for further information at 3 86-0434. Harmony Hoedowners S quare Dance Club offers a c lass in Lake Placid at the S unshine RV Resort from 9-11 a .m. Friday. For more informat ion, call Sam Dunn at 3826792 or e-mail him at samdunn@samdunn.net. Heartland AIDS Network meets 9 a.m., second Friday, Heartland Professional Plaza Learning Center, Sebring. Heartland Clubs meet at 3:30 p.m. on the second Friday of each month at Placid Lakes Town Hall Building, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. Call 699-6773. Highlands Social Dance Club hosts ballroom dancing every Friday, October through March from 7-9:30 p.m. at the Senior Center on Sebring Parkway. Dance the night away to the music of the areas Big Bands. All club dances are open to the public. Appropriate dress required. Admission is $5 for members and $7 for non-members. Call 385-6671. Lake Country Cruisers has a car show from 5-8 p.m. second Friday at Woodys Bar-BQ parking lot, Lake Placid. There is a live disc jockey and door prizes. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 has lounge hours beginning at 1 p.m. There is a fish fry from 5-7 p.m. Cost is $8.50 per person. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose serves wings, fish and burgers at 6 p.m. Music provided from 7-11 p.m. Pool tournament is at 8 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Loyal Order of Moose Highlands County Lodge No. 2494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon Park. Karaoke from 7-10 p.m. Lodge phone number 4520579. Narcotics Anonymous New Day Group meets at 6 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave, Sebring. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. S.A.L.T. Council (Seniors and Law Enforcement Together) meets the second Friday each month at 10 a.m. in the conference room of Florida Hospital Home Care Services located at 4005 Sun 'n Lake Blvd. For more information contact Grace Plants at 273-1421. Sebring Bridge Club has Bridge, ACBLDuplicate at the clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Fridays. For details or info on lessons, call 385-8118. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves chicken or fish baskets from 5-7 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring, for a $4 donation. Blind darts is played at 7 p.m. For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 serving buffet dinner at 5-7 p.m. Elks and guests invited. Dance music in ballroom at 7 p.m. Dinner and dance is $10 donation. For reservations, call 385-8647 or 471-3557. Smoke-free environment. Lounge is open from 3-10 p.m. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves beef franks and Italian sausages served from 1 p.m. to closing at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 655-3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. and table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave. For details, call 385-2966 or leave a name, number and message. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3800 serves steak by the ounce from 5:30-7 p.m. every fourth Friday at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. Texas Hold em lessons, 2 p.m. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 serves pizza from 5:30-7 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 385-8902. SATURDAY American Legion Post 25 serves sirloin burgers from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the post, 1490 U.S. 27, Lake Placid. Jam session is from 24 p.m. The lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Members and guests invited. For details, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 69 in AvonPark serves dinner at 5 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Public Library has a free Adult Film Series at noon. For details, call 4523803. Cancer Support Group meets from 10-11:30 a.m. at Christ Fellowship Church, 2935 New Life Way, Sebring, hosted by Sue and Kristi Olsen. Call 446-1284 or 3852974.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. provides free assisted riding sessions for adults and children with special needs from 9-11 a.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday at 118 W. College Drive, AvonPark. For details or to volunteer, call Mary McClelland, coordinator, 4520006. Highlands Shrine Club, 2606 State Road 17 South, Avon Park (between Avon Park and Sebring) has a flea market from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., country store open from 8 a.m. to noon and pancake breakfast served from 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Vendors are welcome. No setup fee is charged for the summer months. Plenty of off road parking. Amonthly social is planned at 6:30 p.m. on the second Saturday at the club. There will be dinner and music provided for dancing. Reservations are required by calling 382-2208. Highlands Woodcarvers meet from 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays at 825 Sunbird Terr. (Community Center off Thunderbird Road). Call Bob Seybolt at 471-6077. Lake Placid Art League has a class in Pastels/Acrylics taught by Llewellyn Rinald from from 9 a.m. to noon at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 opens the lounge at 1 p.m. Card games are played at 1 p.m., and Bar Bingo is at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Narcotics Anonymous New Day Group meets at 7 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 319 Poinsettia Ave, Sebring. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. Overeaters Anonymous meets at 10:30 a.m. at First Presbyterian Church, Oak Street, Lake Placid. For more details, call 382-1821. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves dinner from 5-7 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. Music is from 7-10 p.m. For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Hills Association has a pancake breakfast from 8-10 a.m. the second Saturday of each month at the clubhouse, 200 Lark Ave. All the pancakes, sausage, OJ, coffee or tea you can eat or drink for $3 for members and $3.50 for non-members. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3800 serves breakfast from 8-11 a.m. and horse racing at 5:30 p.m. every second and fourth Saturday at the post, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 serves a meal for $6 from 5:30-7 p.m. and music is from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 3858902. SUNDAY American Legion Post 25 Lake Placid has lounge hours from 1-9 p.m. Live music is from 5-8 p.m. For details, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Members and guests only. Post is at 528 N. Pine St., Sebring. Call 471-1448. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2661 lounge is open from 1-7 p.m. Card games start at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. Fo r details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has karaoke in the pavilion. Horseshoes played at 9:30 a.m. Food available at 4 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Overeaters Anonymous, meets from 4-5 p.m. in secon d floor conference roomNo. 3 a t Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center, 4200 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring. For details, call 382-7731. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. For details on the organization, g o to www.oa.org. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 serves lunch at 2 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 offers NASCAR racing i n the pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar open and kitchen open from 2 5 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S 98, Sebring. For details, call 655-3920. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 serves hamburger s from 4-5:30 p.m. and plays poker at 5:30 p.m. at the pos t, 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 Karaoke is from 5 -8 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For Page 12BNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011www.newssun.com COMMUNITYCALENDAR Grammys drop more than 30 categories, get more competitive www.newssun.com

PAGE 26

By CHRISTYLEMIRE Associated PressHanna is the girl-power m ovie Sucker Punch wante d to be or at least should h ave wanted to be and the t hriller that Angelina Jolies Salt only was at times. Director Joe Wright keeps t his story of revenge and surv ival moving in stylish, puls ating fashion. And of course h e has one long, breathtaking t racking shot, which has b ecome a signature for the d irector of such films as 2 007s Atonement. But at i ts core, this is actually a c oming-of-age drama, and t he fact that it features such g reat performances from s uch a strong cast makes you c are whether these people l ive or die. Saoirse Ronan, who was n ominated for a supportinga ctress Oscar for her portraya l of a sneaky little girl with a secret in Atonement, r eteams with Wright in a role t hat could not be more differe nt, or more challenging. She s tars as the title character, a b londe-haired, blue-eyed, 16y ear-old killing machine. Hanna lives with her f ather, Erik (Eric Bana), in a r ustic cabin in a remote and u nforgiving forest just below t he Arctic Circle. Blanketed i n snow and bathed in bleak, w intry sunlight, the place has t he magical and frightening f eel of something youd see i n a fairy tale and the s creenplay from Seth L ochhead and David Farr g oes back to notion of Hanna a s fairy-tale heroine again a nd again. Erik teaches Hanna to h unt, fight and speak in vario us languages. Their handto-hand combat scenes are quick, intense, visceral until one day she tells him, Im ready. But who she is and what hes training her for are a tantalizing mystery. Turns out her father is a former CIAman, and the two have been living in isolation for most of her life. Once he leaves her with plans to reunite with her in Berlin, she must embark on the journey that is her destiny. Hanna is captured by government agents who think shes a shy and sheltered little girl. But, uh ... theyre wrong. And this sequence, in which she annihilates everyone in her path, is one of many that are punctuated perfectly by an electronic score from The Chemical Brothers. Wright trusts his actors and the choreography, and lets these fight scenes play out without a lot of unnecessary edits. Hannas purpose is to track down veteran intelligence operative Marissa Wiegler, played by Cate Blanchett in a coldly devious way thats almost over the top, but always fun to watch. Blanchett is all honeyed menace as a ruthless Texan who can turn on the charm when she has to; shes also inordinately adept at running in Prada heels. Shes looking for Hanna herself and has a vested interest in keeping her alive. But before they can meet up, Hanna must travel through Morocco and Spain and finally to Germany. That she does this alone, and with no money, is a fact you will have to suspend disbelief to accept. Along the way she gets some help from a British family on holiday. Olivia Williams is lovely, and a rare source of warmth, as the New-Agey mother, while Jessica Barden steals all her scenes here, as she did in Tamara Drewe, as the sassy teenager who becomes Hannas first real friend. Hanna responds with a mixture of fascination and fear to the normal elements of our daily life electricity, television, phones and watching her open up is as satisfying as watching her take down armed men. Ronans face can be placid or it can flash with emotion, and because shes so centered and confident, it helps make some of the more implausible parts of Hanna more acceptable. The fact that Ronan is this good at this young age is whats truly frightening here. www.newssun.comNews-SunFriday, April 8, 2011Page 13B By DAVIDGERMAINE Associated PressThe knights-errant s trong emphasize on the e rrant behind the advent ure comedy Your H ighness spend more time w allowing in medieval filth t han weaving clever laughs a nd engaging action. Reuniting key players from Pineapple Express J ames Franco, Danny M cBride, director David G ordon Green Your H ighness plays like a M iddle Ages role-playing f antasy dreamed up by the g iggly stoners of that earlier c omedy. Co-writer McBride and his c ollaborators apparently set o ut on a quest to ram as much c oarse language and as many a dolescent sexual gags into a m ovie as possible, maybe to c over the fact that the movie d oesnt contain much else. Ahealthy dose of modern f rat-boy crudeness might h ave been refreshing in this s tory of two princes out to r escue a damsel from an evil w izard. Sort of The Princess B ride as retold in colorful s ailors vernacular. Crassness overwhelms Your Highness, though, the v ulgar language losing all f orce by incessant repetition, d eadening the lingo so that e ven the occasional witty w isecracks arent funny. This is McBrides show, e xplaining why he has top b illing over Franco and cos tars Natalie Portman and Z ooey Deschanel. McBride, who shares s creenplay credit with longt ime writing partner Ben B est, plays slacker Prince T hadeous, defiler of dwarf q ueens, partaker of illicit a pothecary herbs and allaround palace loser. Older brother Fabious (Franco) is heir to the throne and the kingdoms golden boy, newly returned from a heroic quest with ravishing bride-to-be Belladonna (Deschanel) in tow. After sorcerer Leezar (Justin Theroux) abducts Belladonna as part of his scheme to gain unstoppable powers, Thadeous must reluctantly accompany his brother to fetch her back. On the road, they team with the mysterious Isabel (Portman), a lethal warrior with her own grudge against Leezar. Despite the colorful costumes, mythological beasties and salty language, Your Highness is a tired tale whose scattered laughs fail to liven up the lumbering action. Green shows no greater poise directing action here than he did with the repetitive gunplay in Pineapple Express, only now he adds some humdrum specialeffects pyrotechnics to the mix. Much of the supporting cast, among them Damian Lewis, Toby Jones and Rasmus Hardiker, barely register, even though theyre integral to the action. With even a little pep, any one of them could have upstaged the lead players, who are monotonous throughout. McBride sticks to boorish-oaf mode, Portman plays the stoic hero with blandness reminiscent of her Star Wars days, and Franco shows about as much verve as he did as co-host of the Academy Awards. If there was a show to steal, Theroux would make off with it, yet even his hammy villain, surrounded as he is by dull heroes, barely raises the pulse of Your Highness. Theres a delightful sense of bawdiness in Chaucer and other medieval literature, but vulgarity seems the main intent of Your Highness. The movie chokes on its own dreary discourtesies. Heres one of the milder ones: You smell like the underside of a sheeps scrotum. DIVERSIONS Dear Abby: My son has refused to speak to me ever again because his girlfriend asked me if he had another child from a previous relationship. I didnt think it was right to lie to her, so I told her the truth about his daughter. My son called me yesterday and told me I was dead to him and he never wants to see me again. I feel so guilty having betrayed him. Im not sure how to make amends with my son. Abby, can you help me? Sad Mom in Ohio DearMom: Your son may have preferred his girlfriend be kept in the dark about his daughter, but if the girlfriend didnt have some strong suspicions, she would not have raised the subject with you. Frankly, I admire you for telling the truth and not going along with your sons deception. Im not sure how you should make amends with your son. He is the one who should be making amends with you. His lack of character is lamentable. DearAbby: My wife has been out of work for four months. Last week she applied for a job at a loan office. During the interview, she learned it was a payday loan operation, and she would be expected to get people to sign up for loans they could not afford. This goes against our principles. We have seen family members caught in payday loan schemes that buried them in debt, and we find the whole industry to be immoral and abhorrent. My wife is currently receiving unemployment compensation. One of the rules of unemployment is, if a company offers you work, you must accept it. She said if she knew what the position entailed, she would not have applied. Now she is terrified she may be offered a position in a business she finds repugnant, but she may not be able to decline the offer. What can she do? Please answer fast! Stuck for an Answer in Kansas City DearStuck foran Answer: Your wife should contact the payday loan company an d tell them she is not interested in the position befo re she gets an offer. That way, she wont be breakin g any rules, and th e company can hire a willin g applicant. DearAbby: I have an issue regarding my 18year-old son, Jake. His father and I divorced seve ral years ago amicably fo r the most part. Since then, and even before, Jake has had emotional problems. My son makes up storie s about himself. On one of his online social network sites he has been talking about a vehicle he doesn t own. He even invited a friend to go four-wheeling with him in his nonexisten t vehicle. This is only one o f many lies Jake has told. When I call him on it, he admits it but says its no big deal. Abby, people believe what my son is telling them. What is going on, and what can I do? Caring Paren t, Littleton, Col o. DearCaring Parent: Your son may lie in order to impress others, or be so emotionally troubled that he cant tell the difference between what he fantasize s and what is real. I assume that because Jake has had emotional difficulties for some time that he has bee n under the care of a therapist. If so, contact the the rapist and explain whats going on. If Jake doesnt have a therapist, find one. Perhaps an intervention will help Jake. If the lying persists, your son will become increasingly isola ted as it gets out that no on e can believe a word he say s. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. To order How to Write Letters for All Occasions, send a business-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby Letter Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. Mother spills sons secret and is renounced in return Dear Abby Your Highness drowns in lowbrow humor Universal Pictures James Franco, Zooey Deschanel and Danny McBride star in Your Highness. Focus Features Saoirse Ronan stars as Hanna. Movie Review Your Highness Rating: R (strong crude and sexual content, pervasive language, nudity, violence and some drug use) Running time: 102 minutes Movie Review Hanna Rating: PG-13 (intense sequences of violence and action, some sexual material, and language) Running time: 114 minutes Ronan rocks in stylish Hanna Classified ads get results! Call 314-9876

PAGE 27

LIVING 14B PAGE News-Sun Friday, April 8, 2011 BYMARYBETHBRECKENRIDGEAkron Beacon Journaln this age of clean-burning fuels, vacuum cleaners and Scotchgard, youd think the house-scouring ritual of spring cleaning would have been left in the dust. Yet it hangs on as tenaciously as grime to a miniblind. More than three-quarters of Americans still engage in spring cleaning, according to a survey by the Soap and Detergent Association. That surprised the association, which expected the figure to be a little lower, spokesman Brian Sansoni said. Nevertheless, he thinks he understands why. Springtime evokes freshness, getting outdoors, being active after being cooped up all winter, Sansoni said. You want to open the windows. You want your whole house or apartment to be fresh. If the practice of spring cleaning hasnt changed much, the way we approach it has. Cleaning products work more effectively and efficiently than ever. More homeowners have the means to hire out the big jobs. And couples are more likely to share the work rather than relegating it to the woman of the house, said Linda Hallam, editor of the Better Homes and Gardens book Making a Home: Housekeeping for Real Life. Hallam does her seasonal cleaning with her husband, and she likes the renewal associated with it. Especially in areas with cold winters, where houses are closed up for months, people seem to enjoy greeting spring with a thorough cleaning and freshening, she said. Still, that doesnt mean you have to clean the house from top to bottom just because the calendar says you should, said Jeff Campbell, owner of a San Francisco cleaning company called The Clean Team and author of the book Spring Cleaning. He advocates cleaning as its needed instead, and defines spring cleaning as the stuff that you dont do every week but that you cant ignore forever big chores like cleaning windows and walls, stripping floors, cleaning carpets and polishing metals. Theres something about a clean house, a clean room, Sansoni said. It does wonders for the psyche. So, you think your psyche could use a lift? Then dive right in but dont grab the Pine-Sol and the sponge mop just yet. Youll get a lot more done with less energy if you plan your cleaning strategy, the experts said. Hallams book recommends making the rounds of your house, inside and out, and jotting down every project that needs to be done. Write those chores on three sheets of paper, one for large projects that require a half-day or more, one for projects that require two to three hours, and one for small projects. Then prioritize the projects according to what needs to be done most or, as Campbell suggested, what makes you the craziest. Succeeding at the most odious task will motivate you to tackle others, he said. Once youve decided what youre going to do, make a list of the cleaning supplies you need, the association suggested. When you make your regular trip to the grocery store or drugstore, stock up. But before you even pick up a dust rag, cleaning experts recommend getting rid of clutter and organizing the house. Give away, sell or throw away anything you no longer need. If youre not sure, Ward suggested asking yourself three questions: When did I use it last? Do I really need it? and Where will I put it? If youre still not sure, box the stuff up and seal the carton. After a year, pitch the whole thing if you havent opened it yet, cleaningcompany owner and author Schar Ward said. When its time to start cleaning, the experts recommend limiting your steps by finishing an entire room and an entire floor before moving on. Take all your supplies with you, so you dont have to make extra trips back and forth or up and down stairs. Cleaning the whole house will be exercise enough. But just think how good youll feel when its done. THE RIGHT SUPPLIESCleaning pros typically recommend carrying most of your supplies with you, which means you need something to carry them in. Some prefer an apron designed to hold cleaning implements, similar to a tool belt. Others prefer a plastic bucket or a caddy with a handle. The pros also differ somewhat about which cleaning supplies should be put in that carrier, but these are commonly recommended: All-purpose cleaner. Glass cleaner. Nonabrasive cleanserfor the bathroom. Disinfectant cleaner. Sponge. Cleaning cloths(heavy-duty cloths for floors and lightweight ones for dusting). Old toothbrush. In addition to the things you carry with you, youll need supplies for bigger jobs, such as a bucket, a mop (if you dont want to wash floors on your hands and knees), a squeegee for windows and either a vacuum cleaner with attachments or an upright vacuum and a separate portable vacuum with attachments. Other nice-to-have items are a lambs wool duster on a telescopic pole, a plastic spatula or other scraping tool, a safety razor in a holder for scraping off really stubborn gunk, oil soap, a nylon scrubber, a whisk broom and a dustpan. Even if you carry your supplies in a tote, wear an apron with pockets while you clean. Itll give you a place to stash the things you pick up as you go. WHEN TO HIRESometimes the best approach to spring cleaning is knowing what to do yourself and what to hire out. If youre short on time and helpers, it might be worth the expense to turn some of the big jobs over to professionals. They have the know-how and equipment to tackle the jobs faster and more efficiently than most homeowners can, notes Better Homes and GardensMaking a Home: Housekeeping for Real Life. Specifically, the book recommends that you consider hiring out window cleaning, especially if you have a two-story house or storm windows; gutter and/or roof cleaning; and carpet cleaning. Dont overlook neighborhood kids or college students as cheap sources of labor, either. You might hire them to do simple yet labor-intensive tasks, such as helping you move seasonal clothes in or out of storage. 10 CHORES TO DOTake care of these 10 cleaning chores and youll give your house a fresh start for the warm season.1. Wash windows:Clean storm windows before you store them for the summer, and dont forget to clean screens before you install them.2. Freshen bedding:Strip the beds and launder all the washable bedding, including blankets, mattress pads and pillow protectors. Dry clean the things that cant be washed. Freshen pillows by having them professionally cleaned, hanging them outside or tumbling them in the clothes dryer on the air cycle.3. Clean window treatments:Launder washable curtains, or just tumble them in the dryer to freshen them. Vacuum nonwashable draperies with an upholstery brush, or have them cleaned. Clean blinds and shutters (disposable wipes that fit over a hand are useful for this), or take down blinds and wash them.4. Clean carpets, rugs and floors:Launder washable throw rugs, and have the other rugs professionally cleaned. Clean hard floors using the best method for the finish.5. Clean light fixtures and ceiling fans:Remove and wash glass globes. Wipe light bulbs with a damp cloth, then dry. If a bulb has burned out in a hard-toreach chandelier, change all the bulbs at the same time because the others probably are about to burn out, too.6. Declutter closets and storage areas:Sort out the things you no longer want and the items that dont belong. Store winter tools such as shovels and scrapers, and store out-of-season clothing after attending to garments that need to be cleaned or repaired. Bring out spring clothes and seasonal equipment. Sweep garage and shed floors.7. Wash baseboards:Use a household cleaner and water for painted baseboards. For wood baseboards, use a cleaner designed for wood, such as oil soap. Wipe in the direction of the grain and dry immediately.8. Clean vents and refrigerator coils:Remove the grilles from heating and cooling vents so you can vacuum the vent openings. Clean lint from the dryer vent and the pipe leading to the outside. Vacuum refrigerator coils.9. Declutter and wipe out cabinets, drawers:Get rid of equipment you dont use, and store seldom-used items in less accessible spots. Pitch stale spices, outdated food and old medications.10. Spot-clean or wash walls:Take everything off the walls, then dust or vacuum the ceilings and walls. Remove spots with all-purpose cleaner and water, or by gently rubbing on a thick paste of baking soda and water with a cloth or sponge. (Test in an inconspicuous place first.) Use a commercial putty cleaner to remove spots from nonwashable wallpaper. If necessary, most painted walls can be washed with an all-purpose cleaner or ammonia and water. Walls covered in flat paint, however, often cant be washed successfully.Greet the season with some serious scrubbing ILLUSTRATIONS BY CHRIS WARE/LEXINGTON HERALD-LEADER/MCT