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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01022
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 03-27-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:01022
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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NEWS-SUN Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 www.newssun .com HighLow 89 65Complete Forecast PAGE 8A Very warm with plenty of sunshine Forecast Question: Will the teacher tenure and merit pay plan improve the education system? Next question: Do you think a Republican will win next year's presidential election? www.newssun .com Make your voice heard at Online Obituaries Johnny Flynn Ervin Age 80, of Frostproof Ruby Faye (Meek) Rance Renn Age 95, of Knightston, Ind. James Arthur Roland Age 81, of Sebring Audre P. Schmidt Age 89, of Sebring Obituaries, Page 6A Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453O nline: www.newssun.com Yes 31.9% No 68.1% 099099401007 Total votes: 91 Arts & Entertainment3D Books7D Business1B Classifieds5C Community Briefs2A Community Calendar5D Crossword Puzzle2D Dear Abby2D Editorial & Opinion3A Lottery Numbers2A March Madness4B Movie Times2D Sports 1C Index locally owned community mindedHeartlandNational Bank Avon Park800 West Main St.863.453.6000Lake Placid600 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.699.1300Sebring327 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1300Sun n Lake North5033 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1322www.heartlandnb.com What a snapshot can tell you about your child's health 1D What's behind our conflicted feeling about nukes 8D Sunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 36 | 75 cents New biz offers kids a chance to ride 1B Reflections celebrates silver anniversary 2A Nuclear NervesPanthers get onerun win to halt losing streak 1C Stopping The Skid Signs of Spring News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMON S Passenger Michael Woods is removed from a Ford Explorer after it collided with a bus loaded with students Thursday afternoon in Sebring. Woods was released from the hospital after being treated for minor injuries. By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Two people in a Ford Explorer were injured when they ran into a school bus loaded with students shortly before 3:45 p.m. on Thursday. No students were injured. "He ran the stop sign," driver Whitney Spiers told the News-Sun, speaking of the bus driver. The Explorer hit the bus at the intersection of Grand Prix Avenue and Citroen Aven ue and ended up with the d river's side pinned against a utility pole. Damage to t he other side prevented the do or from opening, and rescue rs had to use the Jaws of Life to extract Spiers and the passe nger, her boyfriend Micha el Woods. Concerned parents, la w enforcement and resc ue workers flocked to the sce ne of the accident. "There were kids and cam eras everywhere and I'm gl ad none of the kids were hu rt. What I don't get though is Two hurt when SUV, loaded bus collide Bus driver ticketed for running stop sign See BUS, page 7A News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Thelma Powers, born on March 25, 1908, makes a wish on her 103rd birthday. By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comLAKE PLACID People are living longer now, and for most of them that is a good thing. It certainly is for Thelma Powers, who celebrated her 103rd birthday Friday at the Placid Lakes Baptist Church. In addition to fellow congregants and friends, Powers was surrounded by four generations of family, her daughter, her granddaughter and her 14-year-old great-grandson. Originally from Ontario, Canada, Powers moved with her family to Miami Beach when she was a teenager. Her daughter and granddaughter both swear Powers was 15 when the family moved, and 16 when she married Alvin Powers. Powers herself, however, swears equally as vigorously that she was 17 when she arrived in Miami and 18 when she married her husband. Everyone agrees the couple met at a dance hall where it was a dim e a dance. Powers said her husban d swept her off her feet, and th at they danced their entire lives. "Sometimes we'd go to Nor th Carolina just so we could squa re dance," she said, "but, the wal tz was our favorite." Still sharp, though a little ha rd of hearing, Powers has seen a l ot of history. Theodore Rooseve lt was president when she was bor n, At 103, she's older than Coca-Cola See POWERS, page 7A By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Sebring High School students met living history Friday afternoon when Abraham Gold, a survivor of the Auschwitz concentration camp, visited the campus and gave witness to a dark and terrible time in history. Even after a lifetime, a good marriage, children and grandchildren, Gold had to stop and collect himself several times as he spoke. His emotions were as raw as they had been then. From a large family, he had two sisters and eight brothers one of whom, Martin, was his twin. The family was Jewish and lived in Transylvania, where local German supporters were the people to fear. In school when Romania fell into the German sphere in 1939, his family was not seriously threatened until 1944, when Jews were forced to wear yelStudents listen to living history News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLE Y Abe Gold, who survived a year at the Auschwitz concentration and extermination camp during WW II spoke to Sebring High School students Friday. Holocaust survivor speaks to SHS students See GOLD, page 7A More photosPAGE5A News-Sun photos by KATARASIMMONSWarm weather is here to stay, and events that mark the arrival of spring are filling the local calendar. Three-year-old twins Rachel and Richard Ellington keptcool Saturday with snow cones during the Springtime on the Mall in Avon Park. Spring was also in bloom at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agricultural Center in Sebring at the annual Orchids in the Heartland Show, where Phyllis Klepser of Sebring bought a petite sized orchid from Quest Orchids owner Segundo Cuesta of Miami.

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By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comAVON PARK Hundreds of residents and family members spend Thursday enjoying the 25th anniversary of Reflections on Silver Lake. The 55-plus community opened its doors in late 1985, and has been in business ever since. The residents enjoyed a day of fun games, refreshments and memories with their neighbors. Throughout the day, the residents were able to have an "old-time" feel to their day by purchasing 25 cent hot dogs, sodas and other goodies. The seniors also enjoyed tons of games and activities leading up to the evening's entertainment, when the residents enjoyed the local band Groovus and danced the night away. Activities coordinator Pam Fafeita was thrilled to see so many residents turn out to enjoy the evening. "We have 590 residents here and there are a handful that have been here since the very first year," said Fafeita. The "25-year Survivors," as they were called throughout the evening, enjoyed the attention. Many of the survivors were couples from all over the country, including Al and Donna Roberts. "We come down here in mid-November and stay until the end of April," Donna Roberts said. "We're from way north Illinois. Its a small city real close to the Wisconsin line." The Roberts sported "I survived" pins along with the other survivors. "We just love it here," said Donna Roberts. The Sachseumaker family purchased the land that Reflections currently sits on, along with the adjacent citrus groves, in 1928. Eileen Sachseumaker and her daughter, Toni, are currently the owners of the property. "My great grandfather bought this and the groves, it's been in our family ever since," Eileen Sachseumaker said. The family is happy with the way the business has been running for the quarter of the century it has been in existence. "We saw the most growth in the first few years the late '80s and early '90s. We don't plan to be making any changes, we will be keeping everything the same," Sachseumaker said. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South € Sebring, Florida 33870 A Harbor Point Media Company OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday PHONE: 863-385-6155 MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954 NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453 POSTMASTER: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870 USPS … ISSN 0163-3988 Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry office(s)CIRCULATION SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before 11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after the times mentioned will receive credit to their account. Please call 385-6155.SUBSCRIPTION RATES12 mo.7% FL taxTotal HOME DELIVERY$60.46$4.23$64.69 IN FLORIDA MAIL92.236.4698.69 OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL105.99105.99 Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date. Romona Washington … Publisher and Executive Editor863-385-6155, ext. 515 Kaylor & Kaylor P.A.Social Security Disability LawNew Claims € Hearing Before A Judge Reconsiderations € Appeals Court 8 6 3 3 8 2 1 9 0 0 Mark Kaylor March 23 71021333941x:5Next jackpot $7 millionMarch 19 52931385253x:3 March 16 125414950x:4 March 25 14111436 March 24 519343536 March 23 1519212332 March 22 39272829 March 25 (n) 1805 March 25 (d) 6473 March 24 (n) 4164 March 24 (d) 6442 March 25(n) 75 9 March 25 (d) 48 1 March 24 (n) 74 6 March 24(d) 14 4 March 25 623323618 March 22 619213618 March 18 1115233213 March 15 71522303 March 23 515262832 PB: 9 PP: 2Next jackpot $125 millionMarch 19 311202746 PB: 8 PP: 2 March 16 2839404853 PB: 9 PP: 3 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center When future U.S. Navy p ilot Miroslav Zilberman l ost his grandfather, a R ussian World War II a viator who spent almost a full year as a prisoner o f war, he searched for t he right words to honor h is hero. "I will always rememb er him as a loving and c aring grandfather," Z ilberman, then training t o become a pilot, said at t he cemetery. "The next t ime I come here, I will p roudly be wearing my u niform, and with honor, s alute my grandfather and r emember his life." Zilberman, known as Steven" by many of his r elatives and friends, w orked incredibly hard to t urn his dreams into realit y, becoming a Navy lieut enant. He grew up in K iev, Ukraine, but quickl y became endeared to A merica after moving h ere in elementary s chool, eventually even r eferring to Columbus, O hio, as home. Yet other t han his family, including a wife and two children, t here is one thing he a dored above all else. "He loved to fly," Z ilberman's mother, Anna S okolov, told The U nknown Soldiers. "One t ime, I remember I called h im, and he was in Texas, a nd he was not in a good m ood, which was unusua l. I asked him, Did s omething happen?'" Zilberman told his m om that bad weather c onditions would prevent h im from flying that day. "I said, So what, y ou'll fly tomorrow,'and h e said, Mom, you don't u nderstand,'" Sokolov r ecalled. "He breathed a viation." Assigned to Carrier A irborne Early Warning S quadron (VAW-21), Z ilberman soared into the s kies, earning numerous e ducational and training a chievements as a naval a viator. But as a dear f riend who once helped a y oung Steven learn E nglish noted, he did not m ake these sacrifices at h is family's expense. "At the same time, ( Zilberman) fulfilled the l ofty personal goals of r emaining a loving son to h is devoted parents, Anna a nd Boris (Zilberman), a l oving husband to K atrina, the love of his l ife since age 18, and lovi ng father to their two b eautiful children, Daniel a nd Sarah," Marylin Top Gun COMMUNITYBRIEFS By BARRYFOSTER Special to the News-SunAVON PARK For the third year in a row, the Avon Park Jaycees will see the p rofits from its operation of Club Patron d uring the 12 Hours of Sebring go up in s moke. That's because the money raised b y the group goes to the annual I ndependence Day celebration in the City o f Charm. "We made about $1,000 more than we d id last year," said Avon Park Jaycees P resident Ian Belanger. "That's because o ur Thursday night was so much better t his year." In fact, Belanger said the club is so p opular that they have reached the maximum levels of productivity for Friday and Saturday evenings. There were long lines at the facility and his group of volunteers were producing at peak levels while the club was open. The fully contained mobile entertainment facility made its debut at the 12 Hours last year and since has made appearances at several races in the American Le Mans Series. "Club Patron was designed with race fans in mind," said Patron's Chief Marketing Officer Matt Carroll. "It's an open-air lounge located in the center of the action." This year proved to be a melding of two race sponsors, with drinks combining Patron, a sponsor of the American Le Mans Series, and Real Florida orange juice. Fresh from Florida is the presenting sponsor of this year's Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring. In addition to the hundreds of Race fans, Belanger said members of Scott Sharp's Extreme Speed Motorsports crew stopped by, including Ed Brown, who not only drives for the Patron team, but also is the CEO of Patron Spirits company. "This is the only race that a service group runs Club Patron and we cannot thank them enough," Belanger said. "We make about 80 percent of our fireworks budget from this one event. They have no idea how much it helps the community." AP Jaycees find 12 Hours a money maker The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Thursday, March 24: Cody Adam Bateman, 22, of Sebring, was charged with four counts of violation of probation reference grand theft, burglary of structure, false information to pawn broker. Sofia Guadalupe Chong, 23, of Avon Park, was charged with operating a motor vehicle without a valid license. Larissa Marie DemersFloyd, 27, of Frostproof, was charged with violation of probation reference g rand theft. Jessica Michele Downs, 24, of Sebring, was charged with battery and resisting an officer without violence. James Paul Griswold, 20, of Sebring, was charged with possession of drug equipment. Julian Eric Johnson, 32, of Naples, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference grand theft and interfere with railroad track or equipment. Rigoberto Najarra, 28, of Lake Wales, was arrested on an out-of-county warrant reference grand theft auto. Jesus Nolasco Ortiz, 30, of Avon Park, was charged with violation of municipal ordinance. Kevin Francis Risch, 20, of Lake Placid, was charged with driving with license suspended and DUI. Tony Curtis Rouse, 33, of Avon Park, was charged with driving while license suspended. Evelyn Laquilla White, 32, of Sebring, was charged with driving while license suspended. POLICEBLOTTER News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Al and Donna Roberts, John Tracey, Leon and Anita Miller, Frank and Lucille Corbett and Jerry and Anne Burke all celebrate 25 years of residency at Reflections at Silver Lake in Avon Park on Thursday evening. Reflections celebrates quarter of a century We just love it here.'DONNAROBERTS 25-year resident See PILOT, page 7A Frontage Road closed for workSEBRING Frontage Road will be closed from the Heartland National Bank south to Tanglewood beginning Monday for construction operations. Detour routes will be posted. For further information, call the Highlands County Engineering Department at 402-6877.Water Conservation Workshop setSEBRING Water Conservation Workshop will be offered from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, April 16 at Highlands County Extension Service, Bert J. Harris Agriculture Center, 4509 George Blvd. Registration is $15 before April 8; $20 at the door (make all checks payable to Horticulture Advisory Committee). Learn how to adjust and retrofit your irrigation system; water shortages are impacting your water supply; to build your own rainbarrel (extra $25 fee for barrel and supplies, need to pre-register); to exchange your shower head for a low-flow shower head; to sign up for the Mobile Irrigation Lab; and to select and grow "Floridafriendly" plant material. There will be workshops and vendors present. Lunch will be provided. For more information, call Dee Dee Jacobson, Urban Horticulture agent at 402-7140.Habitat plans home tourSEBRING Learn more about Habitat's work in Highlands County through a tour and lunch. See the untenable conditions in which applicant families are living. Tour Habitat homes, ongoing construction at Mason's Ridge and be welcomed by a Habitat family into their home. The tour will be at 10 a.m. Monday, April 11. All tours begin and end at the office, 159 S. Commerce Ave. Reservations are needed and can be made by contacting Sarah Pallone at 402-2913 or spallone@habitathighlands.org. Tour transportation provided by Annett Bus Line s. Seating is limited to 45 passengers.SFCC closes for Spring BreakAVON PARK South Florida Community College will be closed for spring break, March 28April 2. The college will reopen Monday, April 4. During spring break, adult education and GED classes will continue at th e Teacherage from 7:30 a.m to noon and 12:30-3:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. SFC C University Center classes will be held in accordance with the schedules of part nering universities. For more information, call 453-6661, 773-3081, 494-5300, or 465-5300. Caladium Co-op Open House features BehlerLAKE PLACID Mary Behler has been a part-tim e resident of Lake Placid fo r the past 17 years. When she first arrived, Behler discovered the Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative as she becam e familiar with her surround ings. She had always enjoyed being a crafter an d soon signed up for classes in acrylic fabric painting under the super direction of Mary Gephart. After 14 years, she discovered Pergamano (Parchment Craft). This art/craft has become her passion. It is a unique for m of artwork and Behler use s fabric, flowers, and other Continued on page 6A

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Page 3ANews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.comTODAY'SEDITORIALTODAY'SLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION In December of 2009, I w rote a column called Compassion is Individual." I n it I opined that instead of e xpecting the federal gove rnment to help out the poor, w e should consider rolling u p our sleeves, getting our h ands dirty and doing our p art. I suggested that if we a s individuals were to d emonstrate compassion i nstead of leaving it to the g overnment, maybe the gove rnment wouldn't have to do i t. At least one person wasn't v ery happy with the column, e specially when I suggested t hat the government needing t o step in to help the poor d emonstrated a lack of comp assion on our part. There a re those who see the gove rnment's role in helping out t he less fortunate as somet hing to be preserved at all c ost. Dare to disagree and y ou are accused of not cari ng about the poor. Let me speak for myself. I d o care about the poor. T hat's why I'm willing to q uestion how we do it. Is the f ederal government truly the b est avenue available to a ssist those with needs? Let's say you were someo ne who had a need. If I g ave you a dollar, you would r eceive a dollar. If I give the g overnment a dollar to give t o you, by the time it gets d own to you you'll get penn ies. The government is a b ureaucracy, and by their n ature bureaucracies are p rone to inefficiency. This is not to say I think t he government's help of the p oor is evil. It may or may n ot be constitutional (anothe r argument for another t ime), but yes, wanting to h elp out the less fortunate is a good thing. I do believe there are a lot o f us who shove our persona l, God-given call to help t he poor onto the shoulders o f the government, and then g o on our way feeling we h ave no obligations. There are all kinds of w ays we can do things as i ndividuals. I'm not talking about being careless with our money or our safety. But that doesn't mean that there aren't things we can do. There are a number of programs here in Highlands County that work to help those in need. I'm going to mention one that I'm involved in. My congregation, Sebring Parkway Church of Christ, has a clothing room that we open up once a week. It has grown over the years to take over a building located on our property. We collect clothing, household items, even furniture from time to time. And on Thursday mornings, from 9-11 (except on the last Thursday of the month, when we're open from 4-6 p.m.), we give the stuff away. We do ask that people provide identification and limit visits to once a month. This hopefully discourages the few who would take advantage of our generosity and use us to, for example, add to their garage sale (yes, sadly, it does happen). People seem to appreciate what we provide. I often am thanked as they leave us, bags full of clothing. Some even come back and donate clothes their children have outgrown, or clothes that they can't use anymore. It is perhaps a small thing that we're doing. But it is something. And we're not the only ones. If you really want to do something yourself to help those in need, there are ways. Check them out. By the way, this Thursday we're opening the clothing room from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. If you know someone with a need, send them our way. Need more information? Call the church at 385-7443. Laura Ware is a Sebring resident. She can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady@ embarqmail.com People helping people Laura's Look Laura Ware It is hard to understand how this sorry state of affairs developed over the years, because America has always been a place where individuals, by working hard and learning more, were able to improve their lives. The traditional American success story is built around the selfmade man armed only with a public school education and ambition. At the same time, however, schools are often viewed as an enemy camp not a launching pad; teachers as prison wardens instead of guides to new worlds; and recess considered the only worthwhile period of the day. Summers are seen as wonderful no more pencils, no more books, no more teacher's dirty looks and going back to school in the fall the equivalent of a sentence to a salt mine. Too many parents today consider teachers the enemy and teach their children to believe it too. Too many taxpayers whose children are grown, or who never had children in the first place, refuse to see how quality schools improve everyone's quality of life. Too many politicians listen to only the most strident voices, and seek only the short term solutions requiring the fewest dollars. Too many school administrators are not standing up for their faculty members. And too many teachers are simply giving up. It is fair to ask, now that it is too late and HB 736 h as passed and will be sign ed into law, why raise a fuss? Because HB 736 is goin g to have lasting consequence s; and because, fortunately in America, laws can be changed when people reali ze they have made a mistake. Undervaluing educatio n, refusing to respect teache rs as professionals, denyin g learning is a group activi ty that takes place over tim e, and acting as if children a re data to be collected n ot living, breathing hum an beings will hurt us all, an d our nation. We predict the state of Florida will live to regret t he passage of HB 736. We hope that regret com es quickly, and brings with it a return to more sensible po licies. We are losing the love of learning We Americans have always had a love-hate relationship with our schools and teachers. Pool Safety is still important E ditor: "Toddler nearly drowns in pool" ( News-Sun, March 16), about the n ear-drowning of a child at the p ool raises the important issue of p ool safety. It is vital for everyone u sing pools and spas to stay safe w hile having fun and cooling off. The U.S. Consumer Product S afety Commission (CPSC) last y ear launched a public safety camp aign, Pool Safely, to provide pare nts and children with simple, lifes aving steps to follow in and a round pools and spas. Why is it i mportant to keep the conversation g oing in 2011? Because there was m ore than 500 drownings and neard rownings reported by the media n ationwide in 2010. Drowning is a leading cause of d eath for children younger than 5. C PSC estimates that each year n early 300 children drown and m ore than 3,200 end up in hospital e mergency rooms because of pool s ubmersion injuries. When we e ncourage everyone to Pool Safely, w e mean stay close to children in a p ool or spa, constantly watch child ren in and around the water, know l ife-saving skills like how to swim a nd C.P.R., and install safety e quipment in and around the pool. V isit PoolSafely.gov to learn more. Inez M. Tenenbaum U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission ChairmanCurrent situation works for personal agendaEditor: Patricia Austin, a local activist who doesn't live within the city limits, is organizing a rally to recall the city council based on the council's decision to remove the city manager. This is not her motive. She couldn't care less about that decision. Three or four years ago Austin was denied the permission to plant a tree in the Mall to celebrate the defeat of an attack on an illegal immigration ordinance proposed by Tom Macklin, the mayor at that time. She has been back and denied a second time. In her own words at the council meeting when denied she said this was not acceptable. She has an ax to grind and it's that simple. In the words of Rom Emanuel don't let a good crisis go to waste. Beware, she is using this current situation for her own agenda. People of Avon Park, don't be fooled by this approach Patricia Austin is using solely to get back at the city council. She is always trying to divide the city. We need unity. Axel Diaz Sebring Editor's note: The rally mentioned here was held last week. If you don't like the city, moveEditor: What Avon Park really needs is less people like Tom Macklin and Patricia Austin and more people like our city council. When you have blowhards who do nothing for the city but cause problems, you get just that, nothing. When you have people willin g to stand up for their city and a responsible budget, that is when you get our city council. "City of Hell". Ashamed. Please, if you fe el this way, move. John Paul Hesto n Avon Pa rk BouquetSebring Woman's Club appreciates donationsEditor: The GFWC Woman's Club of Sebring thanks our members, Lind a Baine, and the community for the ir generous donations to our recent flea market. The event was a huge success, because of these kind con tributors. Events like the flea market enables us to fund the programs w e support including: The Peace Riv er Safe House, Adopt-a-Highway Program, Salvation Army, The Hugh O'Brian Youth Leadership (HOBY) Program, Woodlawn Elementary School RIF Program (Reading is Fundamental), give scholarships for women at SFCC, create and make items needed by local hospitals, Hospice centers, and nursing homes. Toni Go ff Flea Market Chairma n GFWC Woman's Club of Sebrin g Make sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. We have to make room for everybody. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; or e-mail editor@newssun.com. To make sure the editorial pages aren't dominated by the same writers, letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months. Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the opinion of that author and not necessarily the opinion of the staff or editors of the News-Sun. EDITORIALPAGEPOLICY EXPRESSIONSOFFREESPEECH If a person goes to a country and finds the newspapers filled with nothing but good news, there are good men in jail.'DANIELPATRICK MOYNIHAN U.S. Senator, D-N.Y., 1976

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011Page 5A SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. EXPIRES 4/2/11PLUS TAX, TAG, & STATE FEES. www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644 LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 NO DEALER FEES Since 1931 #X0164 2008 SATURN VUE#CY021A #CX107A1 2007 CHEVY 3500 LT#X0166 #CX146A 2008 JEEP COMPASS #X0167 2007 DODGE RAM 3500 MEGA CAB DIESEL#TY041B #DX050A 2010 DODGE JOURNEY SXT#X0156 2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERTIBLE2010 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 2005 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT #JY043A $ 32888 $ 19888 2008 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4 $ 32988 $ 16888 $ 12888 $ 15888 $ 18299 $ 16888 2010 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY LX2008 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED $ 18888CERTIFIED $ 12888 $ 14888 $ 18599 #JY004B #X0161 ONE OWNER READY TO TOW CERTIFIED CERTIFIED LOW MILES XTRA CLEAN LEATHER ONE OWNER CREAM PUFF NICE CERTIFIED CERTIFIED CERTIFIED 2008 DODGE AVENGER RT By BILLKACZOR Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Florida's unemployment rate dropped by 0.4 of a percentage point to 11.5 percent in February, the second consecutive month it's declined, state labor officials said Friday. That's the lowest it's been since last July, when Florida also was at 11.5 percent, but nearly 1.1 million Floridians remain out of work. Highlands County's rate was an even 11 percent, a drop from the 11.9 percent rate in January. "This decrease in Florida's unemployment rate, combined with continued job growth, is welcome news and provides additional evidence that our economy is getting back on track," said Cynthia R. Lorenzo, director of the state Agency for Workforce Innovation. The agency reported Florida added 22,700 jobs in February and now has 32,700 more jobs than it did in February 2010, an increase of 0.5 percent. That's the strongest annual growth rate recorded since May 2007, when it was 0.7 percent. February also is the fifth consecutive month of annual job growth. The leisure and hospitality industry has led the way by adding 26,100 jobs over 12months through February, a 2.9 percent growth rate. Other industries adding jobs include education and health services; professional and business services; and trade, transportation and utilities. Those gains have be en partly offset by continu ed shrinkage in other sectors l ed by construction, which w as down 15,800 jobs, or 4.5 pe rcent. Also losing jobs we re financial activities, manufa cturing, information and go vernment. While down from Januar y, Florida's 11.5 percent rate in February still is higher th an the 11.3 percent recorded f or the same month last year. I t's also 2.6 percentage poin ts above the 8.9 percent natio nal figure for February. Florida's jobless rat e, though, is dropping fast er than expected. State economists had pr edicted just a month ago th at Florida would remain sligh tly above 12 percent t he rate for December throug h the second quarter of th is year and not fall below 11 .7 percent until 2012. There's a bit more goo d news in a Manpow er Employment Outlook Surv ey showing 14 percent of Florida employers expect to hire more workers betwe en April and June while 76 pe rcent plan to maintain existin g staffing levels. That's a slight improv ement over a similar surv ey taken for the first quarter of the year. Monroe County had t he state's lowest unemployme nt rate at 6.9 percent, follow ed by Liberty County at 7.1 pe rcent and Alachua County at 7.7 percent. Flagler County had t he highest rate at 14.9 percen t, followed by Hernand o County at 13.9 percent an d Hendry County at 13.4 pe rcent. View the report at http://www.floridajobs.org/ Florida unemployment drops to 11.5 percent Local rate drops from 11.9 to 11.0 News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Lucy Miller of Sebring watches people as they browse the Springtime on the Mall Festival. News Sun photo by ROBYN BAKALUS Cohen Marin, 5, plays on an inflatable slide on Saturday at Springtime on the Mall in Avon Park. News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Jay'len Lough, 2, faces off with Scrappy the dog about whose turn it is to ride in the stroller. News Sun photo by ROBYN BAKALUS Dot Biros of Sebring admires a necklace. News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Bob Wantland of Winter Haven demonstrates a marshmallow blow gun Saturday during the Springtime on the Mall Festival. Avon Park welcomes spring with annual Mall Festival

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Page 6ANews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com GUARANTEED WEIGHT LOSS! CALL TODAY (863) 471-2500 LOSE YOUR WEIGHT FOR THE LAST TIME! 13 Ryant Blvd. SebringCorner of 27 & Ryant Blvd.SAVE 50% OFF ENROLLMENT FEES Hurry! Offer Ends Soon! Would Dad have wanted it that way?ŽServing our community since 1925. Locally owned & operated. www.stephensonnelsonfh.comSebring, FL 33870 385-0125 Avon Park, FL 33825 453-3101Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home & CrematoryPreplanning a funeral is not something you do for yourselfƒ Its something you do for your family. It spares them from making emotional decisions … decisions that may not be consistent with your own wishes. We specialize in prearrangementsƒ for your familys sake.Proud to serve Sebring, Lake Placid & Avon Park embellishments to make her creations interesting. Pictures, cards and free standing art forms can be done with beautiful results. Behler's teacher is originally from Cuba where she became a certified Pergamano parchment artist. Behler's work will be on display and available for purchase with a portion of the proceeds going to the Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative. The Open House will be held at 1:30 p.m. today in the Co-op, 132 E. Interlake Blvd. Light refreshments will be served. Call 6995940 or visit the Web site at www.caladiumarts.or for further information. FHREDI meets MondayLAKE PLACID A public meeting of the board of directors for Florida's Heartland Rural Economic Development Initiative Inc. and Florida's Freshwater Frontier Inc. will be at 10 a.m. Monday at The Heartland Education Consortium, 1096 U.S. 27 North. The topic will be FHREDI/FFF and other related board issues. All interested persons are invited to attend. One or more county commissioners may be present at the meeting. Contact Gina Reynolds at 385-4900. Palms of Sebring plans spaghetti dinnerSEBRING The Palms of Sebring is selling tickets for a spaghetti dinner to benefit community education outreach. All tickets will be presold before Tuesday. Tickets can be purchased at the reception desk at the Palms of Sebring or for ticket delivery contact Peggy Patton at 385-0161, ext. 3160. Dinners will be available for pick up from 4-6:30 p.m. on Thursday. The dinner includes spaghetti with or without meat sauce, mixed vegetables, and garlic breadstick. There will also be sodas, cookies and apple dumplings on sale the night of the meal pick up. For any questions regarding the dinner, contact Patton.Opportunity knocks for Highlands County bandsSEBRING The Heartland Cultural Alliance (HCA) will have an open mike for Highlands County bands (two or more musicians) at the Kenilworth Lodge from 8-10 p.m. Saturday, April 2. This will be an ongoing, first Saturday of the month, qualifying event for the upcoming "May the Best Band Win Star Search." This opportunity for exposure and possible rumination/prizes is open to all forms of music. The qualifying judging will be by peoples choice. The HCAwants to give local musical talent a venue and chance to be discovered. To get in the lineup for this high profile event and/or more information contact Fred Leavitt at 4028238 or e-mail info@heartlandculturalalliance.org. For more information on HCAvisit, www.heartlandculturalalliance.org.Atlantic City Boys to perform at TanglewoodSEBRING At 7 p.m. today, Tanglewood's Special Events will present "ATribute to the Jersey Boys" as performed by the Atlantic City Boys. Their stage show performance features hits from The Four Seasons: "Big Girls Don't Cry," "Can't Take My Eyes Off You," "Let's Hang On," "My Eyes Adored You," "Oh What A Night!," "Sherry" "Walk Like AMan," "Who Loves You," "Workin'My Way Back to You," plus many more hits. Great voices with precision harmony will make this an evening of musical enjoyment. Doors and snack bar opens at 6 p.m.; show is at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at the Activities Director's office or at the door for $12. Tanglewood is one-half mile north of Walmart on U.S. 27.Events planned at lodges, postsAVON PARK The American Legion Post 69 will host karaoke by Naomi at 4 p.m. today. Bingo is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. For more information, call 453-4553. The Combat Veterans Memorial VFWPost 9853 will have NASCAR on the screen today. Call for time. The Ladies Auxiliary Initiation is at 2 p.m. From 4-5 p.m. Tuesday will be karaoke by Phil. For more information, call 452-9853 LAKE PLACID American Legion Placid Post 25 will host music by Steve and Peggy from 5-8 p.m. today. ABoy Scout meeting is set for 7 p.m. Monday. Atrip to the casino will begin at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday. Free blood pressure checks will be offered from 1-3 p.m. and bingo is set to begin at 6:30 p.m. For details, call 465-7940. Placid Lodge No. 282 will serve its pork loin din ner at the lodge, 102 N. Main, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. today. The dinner is open to the public and the cost is an $8 donation. Ca ll 243-1356. The Lake Placid Moose 2374 will have NASCAR Bristol on the screen at 1 p.m. today. Karaoke will follow with Bama Jam. Th e meat raffle is set for 4 p.m Tuesday. For more inform ation, call 465-0131.Orchid Hill Stables offers day campLORIDASpring Brea k Horsemanship Day Camp at Orchid Hill Stables will be March 28 through April 1, from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m Lunch, snacks, and wate r provided. Lear games on horseback as well as show manship and horsemanship practice. Cost for Orchid Hill Stables students and Lunc h Club Wednesday members is just $75 per day. Ask about half/day rates Orchid Society meets MondaySEBRING The Orchid Society of Highlands County will hold its month ly meeting at 7 p.m. Monday. Meetings are hel d at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agricultural Center, 4509 George Blvd. The speaker this month will be Kellie Kelley, owner of Kelley's Florist in Lake Placid. She will give a demonstration on making orchid corsages Guests are always welcome and participants do not have to be knowledgeable of orchids to attend. For additional information call 465-2830 or by e-mai l at orchidman124@ yahoo.com or go to the W eb site http://orchidsocietyhighlands.org/. Recreation Club plans eventsSEBRING The Sebring Recreation Club, 333 Pomegranate Ave., wi ll host the following events: Monday Ladies soci al club, 1 p.m.; shuffleboard scrambles, 1:15 p.m. Tuesday County tour nament, 9 a.m. Wednesday Nickel scrambles, 1:15 p.m.; line dancing lessons, 5:15 p.m. ; line dancing, 6:15 p.m. Thursday Hosscollar 9:30 a.m.; bingo, 7 p.m. For more information, call 385-2966. Continued from page 2A JOHNNYFLYNN ERVIN Johnny Flynn Ervin, 80, of Frostproof passed away Wednesday, M arch 23, 2011 at the Florida H ospital Heartland Medical C enter in Sebring. He was b orn June 4, 1930 in R ossville, Ga., to the late C laud Crawford and Mary O ttie Lee (Parrish) Ervin, he m oved to Frostproof from A von Park in 1982. He was a v eteran of Korea and V ietnam, and retired after 30 years from the U.S. Air Force as a chief master sergeant radar technician. He had been a member of the F irst Baptist Church in F rostproof for the last 18 y ears. Johnny was preceded in d eath by his son, Johnny F lynn Ervin Jr. Survivors include his wife o f 56 years, Billie Sue Ervin; d aughter, Elaina Brennan of A bilene, Texas; sons, Greg E rvin of St. Cloud, James E rvin of Cameron, N.C., and T imothy Ervin of Orlando; 1 0 grandchildren and 10 g reat-grandchildren. Visitation will be held f rom 2 p.m. until the funeral s ervice at 3 p.m. Saturday, M arch 26, 2011 at the First B aptist Church in Frostproof w ith Rev. Darrol Hood officia ting. Interment will be held 1 p.m. Tuesday, March 29, 2 011 at the Florida National C emetery in Bushnell. C ondolences may be sent to t he family and the webcast of t he service can be viewed at w ww.marionnelsonfuneralh ome.com. Marion Nelson Funeral Home Lake Wales, Florida 33853 863-676-2541 JACK RUFFIN FARMER Jack Ruffin Farmer, 77, of Tampa, passed away March 19, 2011. He was b orn March 7, 1934, in T aylorsville, Miss. He was a retired Baptist m inister who served as pastor o f First Baptist Church of A von Park from 1982-1996. H e also served churches in M ississippi and Alabama. J ack graduated from M ississippi College in 1956 a nd received his Master of D ivinity degree in 1959 from S outhern Baptist Theological S eminary in Louisville, Ky. H e received his Doctor of M inistry degree from New O rleans Baptist Theological S eminary in 1978. He was a f ounding member of the C ooperative Baptist F ellowship. He is survived by his wife o f 54 years, Ann Hudson ( Ragland) Farmer; four child ren, Debra (Tom) Tschopp of Orlando, Fla.; Jon (Holly) Farmer of Birmingham, Ala.; Leigh (Tim) Hunt and Laurie (Duncan) Elliott of Tampa, Fla.; 11 grandchildren and sister Amanda Fisher of Jackson, Miis. He was preceded in death by his parents, Jack L. and Mildred Ruffin Farmer. Amemorial service to celebrate his life will take place at 4 p.m. Saturday, March 26, 2011 at Bayshore Baptist Church in Tampa. In lieu of flowers please make memorial contributions to Hannah's Buddies/ Fight SMA; PO Box 320528; Tampa, FL 33679. RUBYFAYE (MEEK) RANCE RENN Ruby Faye (Meek) Rance Renn, 95, of Knightstown, Ind., passed away Thursday, March 24, 2011 at her son's home in Knightstown. She was born on July 31, 1915 in Darlington, Boone County, Ind., to the late Perry and Lulu Bowen Meek. She was a seamstress for many years and had worked at RCAfor 28 years. She was a member of Sewing Guild in Florida and did taxes for AARP. Survivors include two sons, Everett Rance of Knightstown and Denis Rance of Jennings, Fla.; one daughter, Doris Sachs of Waverly, Ind.; 11 grandchildren, Pam Shull, Michelle Rance, Kenneth Rance, Denis Rance, Dawn Holder, Dianne Dunn, Marsha Bean, Deborah Sachs, Susie Davenport, Leslee Schneiders and Bradley Sachs; eight step-grandchldren, 17 great-grandchildren, 14 great-great-grandchildren. She was proceeded in death by her first husband, Leslie Rance and second husband, Leo Renn, son Franklin Rance, two brothers and six sisters. Afuneral service will be held Monday at 11 a.m. at Condo & Son Funeral Home in Wilkinson with Paul Enyart officiating, Friends may call Sunday from 2-6 p.m. at the funeral home. Burial will be at Glen Cove Cemetery in Knightstown. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society. Online condolences may be made at www.condoandson.com Condo & Son Funeral Home Wilkinson, Indiana 46186 JAMES ARTHUR ROLAND James Arthur Roland, 81, of Sebring, passed away gently at home on the morning of Thursday, March 24, 2011. AGeorgia native, most of his later years were spent in Florida with his loving wife, Patricia. He was born at home in Warsaw, Ga., in the late 1920s, one of eight children born to Minnie Mae and Marion Roland. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; bother, Horace; sister, Sarah; and children, Michael and Elizabeth. Three grandchildren and five greatgrandchildren live in Georgia. His son Jim passed away earlier, as did his first wife, Kelly. James served in the Air Force during the Korean War. He became an aerospace engineer and held an A&P license with Inspection Authorization. He also had a private pilot license with rotorcraft endorsement. His early career focused on fixed wing aircraft, rotorcraft and eventually components for the space shuttle, retiring from the Defense Logistics Agency after 30 years. His later activities were construction/remodeling related. AFreemason, Shriner and VFWmember, James led a full and blessed life passing on a legacy of honesty, integrity and determination to his children and grandchildren. There will be a homecoming at the family plot in Warsaw Cemetery near Johns Creek, Ga., for James this spring so family members can attend. The family is sincerely grateful to the staff and volunteers of Hope Hospice for his care in the last weeks of his life. Donations to them would be greatly appreciated. Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home Sebring, Florida 863-385-0125 www.stephensonnelsonfh.com AUDRE P. SCHMIDT Audre P. Schmidt, 89 of Sebring, died Thursday at Good Shepherd Hospice. She was born Jan. 20, 1922, in Plainville, Kan. She was preceded in death by husband, Gilbert J. Schmidt and son, Ronald Schmidt. She moved to Sebring in 1989 from Battle Creek, Mich., and was a member of St. Catherine Catholic Church and a past president of the Columbiettes. She was an avid golfer, a voracious reader, and enjoyed playing cards with friends. She is survived by her son, Edward and his wife, Anne Schmidt of Mason, Mich.; and daughter, Theresa Mori, Corvallis, Ore.; daughter-inlaw, Rebecca Schmidt, St. Petersburg; and six grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be sent to Good Shepherd Hospice, 4818 Sun 'n Lake Blvd., Sebring, FL 33872. The family will receive friends, 10-11 a.m., Monday, March 28, 2011 with a prayer service at 11 a.m. at Morris Funeral Chapel with Fr. J. Peter Sheehan. Following the service, a luncheon will be held at Homers. Further services and burial will be held in Battle Creek, Mich. Condolences may be expressed at www.morrisfuneralchapel.co m. MORRIS FUNERAL CHAPEL, Sebring. OBITUARIES COMMUNITYBRIEFS Ervin Farmer The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Did YouKNOW?EMERGENCY VEHICLESUpon the immediate approach of an authorized emergency vehicle,while en route to meet an existing emergency,the driver of every other vehicle shall,when such emergency vehicle is giving audible signals by siren,exhaust whistle, or other adequate device,or visible signals by the use of displayed blue or red lights,yield the right-of-way to the emergency vehicle and shall immediately proceed to a position parallel to,and as close as reasonable to the closest edge of the curb of the roadway,clear of any intersection and shall stop and remain in position until the authorized emergency vehicle has passed,unless otherwise directed by any law enforcement officer.YOUCANBETICKETEDFORFAILINGTOPULL OVERANDSTOPWHENANAMBULANCE, POLICE, FIREOROTHEREMERGENCYVEHICLEIS TRAVELLINGTOMEETANEMERGENCY. BELOWISTHEFLORIDALAW.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011Page 7A LIMITED SPACE … CALLTODAY! 5 DAYS a week$ 30 Get In Shape Learn Self Defense Improve Self Esteem Make Better Grades MARTIAL ARTS AMERICA471-2467 Best After School Program in SebringFREEPICKUP from: Kindergarten Learning Center, Cracker Trail, Sun-N-Lakes, Woodlawn, Fred Wild, Memorial, Hill Gustat, Sebring Middle/High Located on Kenilworth Sebring*Some Restrictions Apply Life Care, Not Day Care € Keep FULL ACCUMULATED VALUE € Keep Any Cash Bonus € Receive A Large Tax Deduction € Eliminate All Surrender Charges € Receive Cash Back € Receive a Tax Favored Income StreamI WANT TO HELP YOU GET OUTŽ OF YOUR ANNUITY AND SAVE TAXES!!! Call Today For A FREE Illustration Rofsky said. Tragically, those touching remarks were made at a memorial service for Zilberman at Naval Station Norfolk, Va., on April 8, 2010. The 31-year-old pilot's E-2C Hawkeye crashed in the Arabian Gulf on March 31 while returning to the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower from a mission over Afghanistan. Despite a frantic and extensive search, his body was never recovered. "I thought that it could not be because I only had one child and I brought him to America for a better life," an emotional Sokolov told me. "Everything was all right in our family, even though my father was in two wars before he died at 92. It was horrible." Zilberman's selfless actions in the moments before the crash earned him the Distinguished Flying Cross. According to numerous accounts, the pilot urged his three crewmembers to bail out as he battled a mechanical failure, keeping the plane steady just long enough to save their lives. "Without his courageous actions, the entire crew would have perished," a Navy citation reads. Zilberman's parents were unaware of many of their son's accomplishments until his memorial service. "He was a top pilot, but we didn't know," his proud mother explained. "He was very modest and would never brag about his own accomplishments. To him, it didn't matter." When we think of American military pilots, many of us still recall Maverick and Goose gliding around the skies in the classic 80s film "Top Gun," with roaring engines and rock music in the background. Yet as we are reminded by Zilberman's call sign of "Abrek," which means "valiant man" in Russian, the real protectors of the sky are in danger at this very hour, flying perilous missions over combat zones in Afghanistan and Libya. Today, we find ourselves set where Lt. Miroslav "Steven" Zilberman once stood, searching for the right way to honor our heroes. Maybe we can start by living a little bit more like them: making our country better and following our dreams, while at the same time always putting our loved ones first. To find out more about Tom Sileo, or to read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com. Continued from page 2A why the bus driver didn't get off the bus. It was his fault. He just sat there," said Spiers. The recently purchased Explorer was totaled according to Spiers. The driver of the bus, whose name has yet to be released, was reportedly issued a citation for failing to stop. "He seemed okay. Then again he was in a huge bus and me and Michael were in a little truck," Spiers said. Spiers suffered many bumps and bruises all over her body and plans to see a bone physician on Monday due to major pains in her neck, shoulder, and chest. The recently purchased Explorer was totaled according to Spiers. The Florida Highway Patrol did not have an accident report available on Friday. Continued from 1A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Students and concerned parents seek each other out following Thursday's crash involving a Highlands County school bus. Bus driver cited in crash with SUV Pilot gave life to save others Lt. Miroslav Steven' Zilberman and William Howard Taft was elected that November. Kurts Vanarbogast, one of her friends who was on hand for her party, put it this way: "She was 4 years old when the Titanic sank and she is a year older than Coca-Cola. That should put it in perspective. I'm not even as old as Tupperwear." Powers, in addition to raising two daughters wi th her husband, became a highly regarded seamstres s, creating custom clothing. As Miami Beach deve loped and the small tow n turned into a city, and th en into a major city, the fami ly made its way north and se ttled in Highlands Coun ty almost 20 years ago. Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Julia Van Fleet, 12, shows a resident at the Southern Lifestyle a cochin hen. Julia is a member of the Sunny Hop 4-H Club, which visited the assisted living center Saturday. 4-H bring feathered friends to Southern Lifestyle News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Elisabeth Van Fleet, 8, holds a Rhode Island Red chick. Powers celebrates 103 l ow stars. Gold was 18 years old at t he time. In June of that year, G old told the students, w ho were silent and leani ng forward in their seats, t he Germans told his comm unity they needed worke rs and people should prep are themselves to travel. T hey were told to pack up e verything they needed, b ut only as much as they c ould carry by themselves. Taken by truck into a J ewish ghetto, the next day t hey were marched down t he street to the railroad s tation and stuffed into c attle cars for the trip to A uschwitz. They reached the camp a t midnight, and even at t hat time of day, the camp w as well lit and busy. Gold d escribed how the family w as torn apart immediatel y upon arrival, the women a nd his father being directe d to the right, he and his b rothers to the right. "We all knew what happ ened to the people who w ent to the right," he said. They went immediately t o the gas chamber." Gold said he would not h ave survived except he w as given work inside a f actory, out of the weather a nd relatively away from S S eyes. Even so, survivi ng was very hard. He talked about one f orced march where 27 out o f 100 prisoners were k illed because they could n ot keep up. Much more p ainful was the fact he was a lone through all of this. M ost of his family he n ever saw again. He talked about thin p otato soup, black coffee, m arching to work, being c ounted over and over e very day, and two young m en who tried to escape. They were caught, Gold s aid, and hung in front of e veryone as a warning. Gold had a special less on he wanted the students t o learn. "Don't generalize," he s aid. "Take one person as n o good, don't hate everyo ne." As an example, Gold r eminded the students that i n 1939 the United States h ad refused to let a ship l oaded with Jewish r efugees land in the count ry. It was sent back to G ermany, where everyone w as taken into custody. He described the eerie s ilence the day the camp w as liberated he had b een moved away from A uschwitz as the war a pproached. He told the students that s ome of the prisoners died a fter the liberation because t hey were so hungry they a te too much. He said he made his way t o his home town, driven b y a need to find his twin b rother, only to discover M artin had not survived. He took to the road a gain, unable to live with s o many memories and w ound up in Boston in 1 949. Eventually he marr ied, started his own busin ess and volunteered with a n ambulance corps as way o f giving back. Gold was asked by a s tudent how he kept his f aith in God. At first, Gold admitted, h e had anger. "You didn't d o anything," he said he t old God. But, as time passed he s aw that "God doesn't do t hings; people do things to e ach other. Don't blame G od. I have faith in God. Y ou have to have faith in s omething." Continued from page 1A Gold tells story of survival Associated PressDAYTONABEACH A3-year-old has died after drowning in her grandmother's pool in Daytona Beach. Police say Laela McGlothren asked her grandmother if she could play in the yard. The grandmother consented but asked the toddl er to stay away from the poo l. The grandmother w as also watching an infant si bling at the time. She later found Lae la floating in the pool. Laela was pronounc ed dead at a local hospit al Friday evening. 3-year-old girl drowns in Daytona Beach pool

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Page 8ANews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com Call 385-6155 and a Sales Representative will be glad to assist you! TODAYVery warm with plenty of sunshine89 / 65Winds: SSW at 7-14 mphClouds and sun with a t-storm; warm86 / 65Winds: SW at 6-12 mphMONDAYPartly sunny, a t-storm possible87 / 67Winds: S at 7-14 mphTUESDAYPartly sunny and breezy88 / 69Winds: S at 10-20 mphWEDNESDAYSome sun, t-storms possible; breezy87 / 74Winds: S at 12-25 mphTHURSDAY City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. Washington Washington 40/26 40/26 New York NewYork 42/26 42/26 Miami Miami 88/70 88/70 Atlanta Atlanta 65/46 65/46 Detroit Detroit 33/18 33/18 Houston Houston 76/62 76/62 Chicago Chicago 36/20 36/20 Minneapolis Minneapolis 35/19 35/19 Kansas City KansasCity 36/26 36/26 El Paso ElPaso 77/48 77/48 Denver Denver 57/29 57/29 Billings Billings 43/24 43/24 Los Angeles LosAngeles 62/50 62/50 San Francisco SanFrancisco 58/48 58/48 Seattle Seattle 50/39 50/39 Washington 40/26 New York 42/26 Miami 88/70 Atlanta 65/46 Detroit 33/18 Houston 76/62 Chicago 36/20 Minneapolis 35/19 Kansas City 36/26 El Paso 77/48 Denver 57/29 Billings 43/24 Los Angeles 62/50 San Francisco 58/48 Seattle 50/39 A storm system charging across the Southeast today will spark scattered showers and thunderstorms from Louisiana to South Carolina, with a few gusty thunderstorms possible. Rain will douse areas farther north in the Carolinas, while a mix of rain and snow makes roads a slushy mess in Virginia, Maryland and Delaware. High pressure will keep the Northeast and Midwest dry. However, it will allow cold air to remain entrenched over the area. Another storm will bring showers and mountain snow to the central Rockies. U.S. Cities National Forecast for March 27Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. World Cities National SummaryCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. Weather (W):ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Albuquerque 64/40/s 70/39/s 63/39/s Atlanta 65/46/t 66/48/pc 66/54/pc Baltimore 37/25/sn 45/27/s 50/33/pc Birmingham 66/44/t 70/53/pc 75/58/c Boston 41/23/s 41/28/s 45/31/s Charlotte 46/41/r 61/40/r 62/50/pc Cheyenne 50/28/c 47/24/sf 48/27/c Chicago 36/20/sf 38/26/s 39/27/sn Cleveland 35/18/pc 34/21/s 40/31/pc Columbus 40/22/pc 43/23/s 49/36/pc Dallas 67/47/c 71/64/pc 77/47/pc Denver 57/29/c 56/26/c 54/29/c Detroit 33/18/s 37/19/s 39/27/pc Harrisburg 40/21/pc 46/24/s 49/34/pc Honolulu 82/70/pc 84/71/s 84/70/s Houston 76/62/pc 81/65/pc 81/54/pc Indianapolis 42/23/pc 46/28/s 48/34/r Jackson, MS 68/49/c 72/57/pc 81/54/c Kansas City 36/26/pc 48/35/c 43/25/r Lexington 44/26/c 46/31/s 55/43/c Little Rock 52/37/c 62/48/pc 66/42/t Los Angeles 62/50/pc 66/50/pc 72/54/s Louisville 46/29/pc 53/33/s 58/42/r Memphis 51/37/c 61/47/s 69/44/t Milwaukee 36/22/sf 38/26/s 41/26/sn Minneapolis 35/19/pc 37/26/pc 39/27/c Nashville 50/35/c 61/40/s 68/50/c New Orleans 79/66/pc 78/65/pc 82/67/pc New York City 42/26/pc 44/30/s 48/34/s Norfolk 39/33/i 47/34/r 53/40/pc Oklahoma City 54/38/c 59/52/pc 63/37/pc Philadelphia 43/24/pc 45/30/s 48/32/s Phoenix 80/56/s 82/59/s 84/60/s Pittsburgh 36/19/pc 39/21/s 46/33/pc Portland, ME 37/17/s 38/21/pc 43/26/s Portland, OR 51/40/r 53/44/c 55/45/sh Raleigh 42/29/r 57/34/r 57/48/pc Rochester 32/15/s 33/21/pc 39/28/s St. Louis 41/27/pc 50/34/pc 47/31/r San Francisco 58/48/c 60/46/pc 62/49/pc Seattle 50/39/r 52/41/sh 51/42/sh Wash., DC 40/26/sn 48/32/s 53/39/pc Cape Coral 87/67/s 87/66/t 88/68/pc Clearwater 85/67/pc 83/66/t 85/69/pc Coral Springs 88/67/s 89/71/t 86/71/pc Daytona Beach 85/66/pc 80/64/t 82/65/pc Ft. Laud. Bch 88/70/s 88/72/pc 85/73/pc Fort Myers 87/69/s 88/67/t 88/69/pc Gainesville 84/63/pc 81/60/t 81/63/pc Hollywood 89/68/s 89/71/s 88/71/pc Homestead AFB 86/69/s 88/68/pc 84/71/pc Jacksonville 86/63/pc 73/61/t 74/62/pc Key West 82/74/s 83/74/s 84/75/pc Miami 88/70/s 90/71/pc 86/71/pc Okeechobee 87/60/s 84/64/t 86/67/pc Orlando 87/65/pc 84/65/t 85/67/pc Pembroke Pines 89/68/s 89/71/pc 88/71/pc St. Augustine 82/64/pc 74/64/t 75/66/pc St. Petersburg 85/67/pc 83/66/t 83/69/pc Sarasota 82/67/s 81/65/t 82/67/pc Tallahassee 84/64/pc 82/62/t 78/63/pc Tampa 82/68/pc 79/66/t 82/69/pc W. Palm Bch 87/65/s 88/69/t 86/71/pc Winter Haven 89/65/pc 87/65/t 87/67/pc Acapulco 88/71/s 88/71/s 88/71/s Athens 66/54/pc 69/56/s 66/58/r Beirut 66/53/pc 64/53/s 67/58/s Berlin 47/32/s 49/32/pc 53/38/s Bermuda 71/64/pc 70/58/r 66/60/pc Calgary 36/24/pc 36/23/c 41/33/c Dublin 51/37/s 49/37/s 50/41/c Edmonton 33/23/pc 33/23/c 38/24/s Freeport 84/71/s 82/73/pc 81/71/pc Geneva 59/47/r 51/45/r 61/47/r Havana 88/72/s 89/69/t 88/70/s Hong Kong 63/55/c 71/59/s 74/62/c Jerusalem 61/42/s 59/40/s 62/44/s Johannesburg 69/55/t 73/54/t 78/54/pc Kiev 41/22/pc 37/34/sn 45/27/s London 55/37/pc 57/37/s 59/41/s Montreal 32/12/s 28/18/c 39/23/pc Moscow 32/22/sn 35/27/c 36/21/sn Nice 61/49/r 63/52/sh 62/51/sh Ottawa 33/10/s 31/21/pc 38/17/s Quebec 25/14/sf 27/18/sf 34/19/sf Rio de Janeiro 90/78/s 89/77/pc 88/77/pc Seoul 48/30/c 50/30/sh 52/36/s Singapore 87/77/r 85/77/t 84/77/t Sydney 74/61/c 77/61/pc 79/61/pc Toronto 32/16/s 38/23/pc 41/21/pc Vancouver 52/42/r 52/41/sh 51/41/sh Vienna 50/48/c 54/42/r 56/42/s Warsaw 44/29/pc 49/27/pc 42/30/s Winnipeg 27/9/s 31/14/pc 34/17/pc A lmanac Readings at Palm Beach High .............................................. 3:55 a.m. Low ............................................... 9:57 a.m. High .............................................. 4:13 p.m. Low ............................................. 10:26 p.m. Very warm today with plenty of sunshine. Partly cloudy tonight. Sun and clouds tomorrow with a shower or thunderstorm; warm. Tuesday: times of clouds and sun with a shower or thunderstorm possible. A great storm buried the Dakotas under knee-deep snow on March 27, 1950. Dumont, S.D., received 38 inches, the greatest 24-hour snowfall in South Dakota history. Very warm today with plenty of sunshine. Winds southwest 7-14 mph. Expect a full day of sunshine with relative humidity 75% early, 35% in the afternoon. € Even addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday. € Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and Saturday. € All watering should take place before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. LastNewFirstFull Mar 26Apr 3Apr 11Apr 17 Today Monday Sunrise 7:23 a.m. 7:22 a.m. Sunset 7:40 p.m. 7:41 p.m. Moonrise 2:59 a.m. 3:41 a.m. Moonset 1:57 p.m. 2:52 p.m. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2011Jacksonville 86/63 Gainesville 84/63 Ocala 86/65 Daytona Beach 85/66 Orlando 87/65 Winter Haven 89/65 Tampa 82/68 Clearwater 85/67 St. Petersburg 85/67 Sarasota 82/67 Fort Myers 87/69 Naples 83/67 Okeechobee 87/60 West Palm Beach 87/65 Fort Lauderdale 88/70 Miami 88/70 Tallahassee 84/64 Apalachicola 77/67 Pensacola 77/66 Key West Avon Park 89/65 Sebring 89/65 Lorida 87/62 Lake Placid 88/64 Venus 88/64 Brighton 87/61 TidesReadings at St. Petersburg High .............................................. 9:01 p.m. Low ............................................... 4:25 a.m. High .....................................................none Low ......................................................none UV Index TodayThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m. 5 9 9 5 Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional SummaryShown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Five-Day forecast for Highlands County 82/74 Lake Levels Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 11.59 Normal ...............................................14.51 Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterdayTemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHigh Tuesday ......................................... 85 Low Tuesday .......................................... 46 High Wednesday .................................... 87 Low Wednesday .................................... 49 High Thursday ....................................... 87 Low Thursday ........................................ 58Heat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayRelative humidity .................................. 35% Expected air temperature ....................... 86 Makes it feel like .................................... 85BarometerTuesday ...............................................30.09 Wednesday .........................................30.01 Thursday .............................................29.95PrecipitationTuesday ...............................................0.00Ž Wednesday .........................................0.00Ž Thursday .............................................0.00Ž Month to date ..................................... 1.58Ž Year to date ......................................... 4.45Ž

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By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Kids now h ave a new option when it c omes to fun and play in S ebring. Me-Go Raceway is a new establishment d esigned with kids and fun i n mind. The "racetrack" is located a t center court, directly in f ront of Beall's in the L akeshore Mall. The track h as been up and running for a week. Owner/operator, John M ertzlufft, had been thinki ng about doing the racet rack for sometime and f inally decided to dive head f irst into the idea. Mertzlufft i s a former teacher and also s pent some years in the r estaurant business. "I wanted to do something d ifferent, wanted to change m y career but still be around c hildren," explained M ertzlufft. Me-Go Raceway is a m ock racetrack that houses e ight motorized cars for c hildren to jump in and e njoy. Kids can drive everyt hing from a police car to r ace car. The raceway also o ffers remote controlled cars t hat allows parents to drive" the car for their c hild. There are no age restrict ions, however, the cars are d esigned to hold children 1 00 pounds or less. The cost i s $3 per ride. "Age doesn't really matter. It's up to the parents, but obviously an infant can't get in there. "There was a 10-monthold in one this weekend. Her mom used the controller to drive her around and she had the biggest smile on her face. She loved it," Mertzlufft said. The establishment is small and modest, which adds to its charm. Mertzlufft and his two employees spend many hours throughout the week making sure the establishment runs smoothly. On its opening weekend, Mertzlufft was surprised and elated to see nearly 80 riders come and go to the track. "There's not a whole lot to do around here for children, so I thought this would be a good idea. It's not only good for the children, but for the seniors as well. I've seen a crowd of shoppers just stop and hang out around here and just watch the kids enjoy themselves. The seniors are entertained; it gives everyone something to stop and enjoy," Mertzlufft said. Mertzlufft is content with his one track for the moment, but has plans to expand Me-Go Raceway in the future. "I am hoping to get one up in Eagle Ridge (Mall) in the future. I think that is something I'd eventually get to, but I'm focused on this one for now," he said. BUSINESS B SECTION News-Sun Sunday, March 27, 2011 www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644€LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 NEW 2011 NEW 2011 NEW 2011 NEW 2011 NEW 2011 NEW 2011 NEW 2011 NEW 2011 NEW 2011 NO DEALER FEE, PLUS TAX & TAG, STATE FEE, O% withALLY, SEBC RULES APPLY. NO DEALER FEESExpires 4/2/111500RAMREGCABSLT NO DEALER FEES $AVE$5620#TY072 FREE HEMI 1500 CREW CAB SLT OUTDOORSMAN $AVE$8860#TY013 FREE HEMI 2500/3500 $AVE$9000#TY013 HEAVY DUTY DODGEAVENGER 0% Available for 60 mos. OR up to $2250 REBATEDepending on model #TY043 CHRYSLER 200 IMPORTED FROM DETROIT JEEPPATRIOTSJEEP LIBERTYDODGE DAKOTAS $5000OFF DODGEJOURNEY UP TO$2500 REBATE Depending on model 7 PASSENGER SEATING AVAILABLE1.9% Available OR up to $1500 RebateDepending on model $1000 REBATE Double Your REBATE $2000 $AVE UP TO$4000 $AVE Kiddie racetrack a new place for fun Racing through the mall News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR John Metrzlufft (3) and Mason Massey (5) enjoy the new "racecars" at Me-Go Raceway in Lakeshore Mall. The new establishment has been up and running for a week and caters to children of all ages looking to speed around a miniature raceway. I wanted to do something different ... to change my career but still be around children.'JOHNMERTZLUFFT owner Talk about a stampede: The first wave of Baby Boomers begins turning 65 in 2011, which means they'll soon be tapping Social Security retirement benefits, if they haven't already. If you're a Boomer and haven't yet investigated how this program works, this may be a good time to learn the ropes. When you work and pay Social Security taxes, you earn up to four "credits" per year based on net income. In 2011, it takes $1,120 in income to earn one credit. You must accumulate at least 40 credits over your lifetim e to qualify for a benefit; however, those who haven' t earned sufficient credits sometimes qualify based on their spouse's work record. Retirement ben efits are calculate d based on earnings during 40 years of work. The five lowest-earning years are dropped and each year not worked counts as zero. "Full retirement age" increases gradually from 6 5 Social Security looms for Baby Boomers Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) will host its next "What's Up Downtown" meeting at 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday at the Palms of Sebring (725 S. Pine Street). Will Bennett of Management Experts will provide a presentation of the strategic plan his firm did for Downtown Sebring's Highlands Little Theater (HLT). The meeting will also address the merchant store hours of operation and provide updates on t he CRA's new business ince ntive programs, Downtow n Sebring events and CR A marketing initiatives. "We encourage anyo ne who has an interest in Downtown Sebring is encouraged to attend the se informative meetings th at are well attended by me rchants, government off icials, residents, potenti al business owners, realto rs and media," said Pe te Pollard, CRAexecuti ve director. What's Up Downtown?' meeting Tuesday Personal Finance Jason Alderman See SOCIAL, page 6B

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Special to the News-SunProviding financial assist ance to relatives is something m any people do. For the mill ions of Mexican-Americans s ending money to family in M exico, this could yield tax b reaks in the United States. Taxpayers must claim the p eople being supported as d ependents to be eligible for t he $3,650 dependent exempt ion. Generally, a dependent m ust be a U.S. citizen, U.S. r esident alien, U.S. national, o r a resident of Canada or M exico. Exceptions are made f or certain adopted children. Eligible expenses that may b e claimed include food, l odging, clothing, education, m edical and dental care, r ecreation and transportation. A ll qualified expenses must b e verified with the appropria te receipts and documentat ion. To claim dependents in M exico, specific qualificat ions must be met: Taxpayer must provide m ore than 50 percent of the d ependent's eligible living e xpenses The dependent must be a: Child, stepchild, foster child or their descendant Sibling, stepsibling or half sibling Parent, grandparent or their direct ancestor Step-parent Niece, nephew, aunt or uncle Son-in-law, daughter-inlaw, father-in-law, mother-inlaw, brother-in-law or sisterin-law The dependent's gross income from U.S. sources may not exceed $3,650 for 2010, unless disabled Adependent must not file a joint return for the year unless to claim a refund of taxes withheld. "Because so many Mexican-Americans provide for their loved ones in Mexico, more people could take advantage of this dependency exemption than already do," said Lisa Berish, Area Manager, at H&R Block. In addition to meeting basic exemption qualifications, the taxpayer must submit a form W-7 to get an Individual Tax Identification Number from the IRS for the dependent. Taxpayers and dependents who are not eligible for Social Security Numbers must have an ITIN to submit a tax return in the United States. An ITIN is a tax processing number that is issued to individuals, regardless of immigration status, who have a tax reporting obligation but do not qualify for a Social Security Number. For more information, call 1-800-HRBLOCK to find a nearby tax professional who can explain the laws. Special to the News-SunQuestions about debt, s tarting businesses and multip le-generation households m ake it clear the economy is s haping how people think a bout taxes and how they are l iving. The first-half of tax season i s done and H&R Block is h earing some questions much m ore than others from the m illions of taxpayers in its n early 11,000 retail tax o ffices, through H&R Block A t Home do-it-yourself tax p reparation tools and the Get I t Right Community tax f orum. "With more than 23 mill ion clients coming through o ur doors, using our DIY p roducts and visiting our tax f orum every year we hear m any recurring themes and g et a pretty good idea about w hat is on the minds of taxp ayers," said Lisa Berish, a rea manager at H&R Block. The following questions ( and answers) were among t he top searched by taxpayers a nd tax professionals on the H &R Block At Home online c ommunity and The Tax I nstitute at H&R Block webs ite. 1. My parents are older a nd they live with me. Can I d educt theirexpenses? The tough economy is taki ng a big bite out of the sandw ich generation; 16 percent o f U.S. families have at least t wo adult generations living i n their household, a 33 perc ent increase from 19801. T his increase of multipleg eneration households is p rompting more taxpayers to a sk when they can claim their p arents or adult children for t he $3,650 qualifying relative e xemption. To be eligible for t he benefit, elderly parents a nd adult children must have l ess than $3,650 in taxable i ncome. Also, half of all elig ible expenses of the parent o r adult child must be paid by t he taxpayer seeking the d eduction. 2. The bank foreclosed on m y house. Is the gain taxa ble? With foreclosures rising 72 p ercent overall among the 2 06 metro areas covered by R ealtyTrac2, taxpayers are a sking about the resulting tax i mplications. Any gain on a foreclosed p roperty is taxable and must b e reported. But, the M ortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act of 2007 may allow the gain to be excluded when the foreclosed home was the taxpayer's primary residence and the gain occurred between Jan. 1, 2007 and Dec. 31, 2012. 3. My credit card debt has been forgiven. Will it be taxed? When monthly credit card payments go unpaid, a debt collector may offer settlement for 30-40 percent of the original sum. If the settlement is accepted and paid, or when the creditor determines it cannot be recovered, the creditor will issue a 1099-C to the IRS. Taxpayers who don't include the unpaid debt or the forgiven portion of the debt as income on their tax returns may get an IRS bill that includes penalties and interest. 4. I took the First-time HomebuyerTax Credit in 2008. Do I have to re-pay it? Homeownership may have declined in 20103, but the First-time Homebuyer Tax Credit is a hot topic for taxpayers wanting to know who's eligible and who has to pay it back. Taxpayers who claimed the credit in 2008 must start repaying it this year in annual installments over 15 years. However, taxpayers who claimed the credit in 2009 and 2010 do not repay the credit unless they sell the house or stop using it as their primary residence within three years of purchase. 5. I bought energy efficient windows formy home. Can I claim the home energy credit? Worth up to a $1,500 lifetime credit in 2009 and 2010 combined, eligible improvements include external windows and doors, insulation, roofing, HVAC and non-solar water heaters meeting specific energy guidelines. Taxpayers who missed the credit in an earlier year can still claim it in 2011 but only up to $500 lifetime limit. 6. Are my property taxes and mortgage interest tax deductible? Homeowners can deduct property taxes and mortgage interest as itemized tax deductions. Homeowners whose itemized deductions are less than their standard deduction should use the standard deduction, as that will result in lower federal income tax liability. Though called the "standard deduction," it varies based on age, filing status and other factors. 7. I'm an entrepreneur who started a business in 2010. Are my start-up costs deductible? With unemployment hovering at 9.5 percent for much of 2010, many created their own jobs by starting their own businesses. Taxpayers who opened a business in 2010 can deduct up to $10,000 of eligible start-up costs, up from $5,000 in 2009. Qualifying expenses include advertising, business property rent, supplies, taxes and licenses. 8. I have a full-time consulting assignment. How is my income tracked? Form 1099-MISC is sent to the IRS to report income, royalties and other types of income paid to independent contractors. For independent contractors who work from home, often freelancing or consulting, Form 1099-MISC commonly is used to report contractor compensation. 9. Are my college tuition costs reported to the IRS? Eligible educational institutions submit Form 1098-T to report information about their students to the IRS as required by the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997. The 1098-Tincludes the student's enrollment status, qualified tuition and related expenses, scholarships and grants taxable or not. 10. I was married in the summerof 2010. Do I file as a single oras married? Marriage, re-marriage and the times before and in between can make taxpayers ponder their IRS tax filing status, which determines tax rates and standard deduction amounts. Filing status for the entire year is determined by the status as of Dec. 31 of the current tax year. The options are single, married filing jointly, married filing separately, head of household or qualifying widow(er). H&R Block provides guaranteed, income tax return preparation services through its company-owned and franchise offices, and the H&R Block At Home online and desktop solutions. For an online tutorial, join H&R Block's Get It Right Community tax forum, and visit its Facebook and Twitter pages. The advice provided in this release is for general reference purposes. Tax situations vary based on individual circumstances. Atax professional should be consulted for specific tax advice. Page 2BNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com Lakeview Christian School503 Kent Avenue, Lake Placid, FL 33852(863) 465-0313Website: www.LakeviewChristianSchool.orgENROLLNOW FOR FALLPre-kindergarten through 5th GradeLVCS admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin. SALES SERVICE SALES SERVICE SALES SERVICE FREEDELIVERY WITH MOST PURCHASES SALES SERVICE SALES SERVICE SALES SERVICE SALES SERVICE SALES SERVICE SALES SERVICE PLUG INTO LOWER PRICES! OVER 500 APPLIANCES IN STOCK! 13611 Hwy 98 € Sebring € 655-4995Store Hours Mon.-Fri. 8-5 Sat. 9-4 GEConvertible/Portable DishwasherONLY $429.88 MUST GO IN STOCK!FREEDELIVERY WITH MOST PURCHASES DO YOU HATE YOUR CPAP?If you have been diagnosed with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and are unable to use your CPAP machine, Dental Sleep Medicine may help. Failure to treat your Obstructive Sleep Apnea can result in High Blood Pressure, Congestive Heart Failure, Atrial Fibrillation, Attention De“cit Disorder, Attention De“cit Hyperactivity Disorder, Migraine Headaches, Restless Leg Syndrome, Depression, Insulin Resistance, Fibromyalgia, Stroke and Death. There are a number of FDA approved Oral Appliances that open the airway and keep it open while you sleep. We are here to help you with Oral Appliance Therapy to treat your Obstructive Sleep Apnea. BUTƒyou must have a referral to me from your Physician at which time I will do an exam for you (D0140), submit to your medical insurance for you and fabricate the appropriate Oral Appliance Therapy for you (D7880), working co-therapeutically with your physician. For more information, visit www.designerdentallp.com, then click on Sleep Apnea.Ž Yours for a healthier life, Dr. Oliver ChipŽ Kinnunen, DN14875 Designer Dental 330 US Hwy 27 North € Lake Placid, FL863. 465.9090 BUSINESS Top 10 tax questions Metro Doing your taxes can lead to some difficult questions. Supporting family in Mexico yields U.S. tax savings Special to the News-SunARCADIA Casey Williams of Heartland Broadcasting Corp. has moved up to the position of station manager. Williams, originally from the Ft. Lauderdale area, is a resident of Arcadia with Mike and daughter Cristal, 9. After working in radio sales for Renda Communications in Ft. Myers, Williamsgrabbed her first job at the management level in December 2005 as Sales Manager for WZZS-FM 106.9 The Bull. Less than two years later, she was promoted to Sales Manager for both stations at Heartland Broadcasting, adding the responsibilities of WZSP-FM 105.3 La Zeta. Simultaneously the recession hit the advertising industry first and for the ensuing three years, her people skills were both tested and amplified. "It was Casey's ability to keep focused on the big picture that kept our boat afloat," Jan Kneller added. "She turned our competitive sales staff into a team, which has amazed us. She rolled up her sleeves and procured more visibility for the stations at community events. She's always tw o steps ahead of me on pr omotion planning. She h as instilled an attitude of working for the great er good in our staff and com munity. These are awesom e accomplishments and w e are very proud of Cas ey Williams." For the present, William s will add her station mana ger responsibilities to h er well-established routine as sales manager. Both statio ns play the music our comm unities love and provide t he personality and informatio n the audiences need. The music on 106.9 T he Bull is Heartland count ry favorites and 105.3, whi le La Zeta serves the Spani sh community playing region al Mexican music. Both st ations are provided "in livin g color" by announcers an yone would feel comfortab le inviting into their livin g room. Heartlan d Broadcasting was esta blished in 1996 when t he Knellers purchased WZZ S and in 1998 built WZSPas a new service to the comm unity. Studios for both rad io stations are located at 789 1 U.S. Highway 17 Sout h, next to the Bluffs go lf course. Williams wins promotion at Heartland Broadcasting Associated PressSAN DIEGO Target Corp. is suing a San Diego pro-gay marriage group to get it to stop canvassing outside its San Diego County stores, alleging its activists are driving away customers. Rights advocates say the trial between Target and Canvass For ACause that begins Friday could further strain relations with the gay and lesbian community after controversy over its $150,000 donation to a business group backing a Minnesota Republican candidate opposed to gay marriage. Minnesota-based Target insists it remains committed to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community and its lawsuit has nothing to do with the political agenda of the organization. "Our legal action was in no way related to the cau se of the organization and w as done so to be consiste nt with our long-standing po licy of providing a distra ction-free shopping exper ience by not permittin g solicitors at our stores," t he company said in a stateme nt sent to The Associat ed Press. Target says it has tak en similar action against a number of organizatio ns representing a variety of causes. It alleges in the law suit that the San Dieg o group's activists harass cu stomers by cornering the m near its stores'fro nt entrances and debating wi th them about their views o n gay marriage. The group says it ca nvasses at shopping mal ls, college campus and stor es like Target to collect sign atures and donations in su pport of gay marriage. Target sues San Diego gay rights group

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011Page 3B All-Around Restaurant. . . . . (1)____________ Seafood Restaurant . . . . . (2)____________ Italian Restaurant . . . . . . (3)____________ Oriental Restaurant . . . . . . (4)____________ Steak in Town . . . . . . . . (5)____________ Mexican Restaurant (not fast food). . . . . . . (6)____________ Pizza . . . . . . . . . . . (7)____________ Pizza (delivered) . . . . . . . (8)____________ Breakfast . . . . . . . . . (9)____________ Brunch . . . . . . . . . . (10)____________ Salad Bar . . . . . . . . . (11)____________ Early Bird Special . . . . . . (12)____________ Cup of Coffee . . . . . . . (13)____________ Chicken Wings . . . . . . . (14)____________ Burger in Town (not fast food) . . . . . . (15)____________ Restaurant with a View . . . . (16)____________ Sub Sandwich . . . . . . . (17)____________ Happy Hour . . . . . . . . (18)____________ Sports Bar/Pub. . . . . . . (19)____________ Bakery . . . . . . . . . . (20)____________ Deli . . . . . . . . . . . (21)____________ Romantic Restaurant . . . . (22)____________ New Restaurant (open less than 1 year). . . (23)____________ Dinner Under $10 . . . . . . (24)____________ Caterer . . . . . . . . . . (25)____________ BBQ . . . . . . . . . . . (26)____________ Fast Food Restaurant. . . . . (27)____________ Doctor. . . . . . . . . . . (28)____________ Pediatrician. . . . . . . . . (29)____________ Dentist. . . . . . . . . . . (30)____________ Optometrist. . . . . . . . . (31)____________ Surgeon. . . . . . . . . . (32)____________ Chiropractor. . . . . . . . . (33)____________ Physical Therapist. . . . . . (34)____________ Hearing Aid Center. . . . . . (35)____________ Pharmacy. . . . . . . . . (36)____________ Medical Equipment Store. . . . (37)____________ Nursing Home. . . . . . . . (38)____________ Assisted Living Facility. . . . . (39)____________ Retirement Community. . . . (40)____________ Veterinarian. . . . . . . . . (41)____________ Dog Grooming. . . . . . . . (42)____________ Golf Course. . . . . . . . . (43)____________ Driving Range . . . . . . . (44)____________ Golf Pro. . . . . . . . . . (45)____________ Tennis Courts. . . . . . . . (46)____________ Health Club . . . . . . . . (47)____________ Martial Arts Studio. . . . . . (48)____________ Sporting Goods. . . . . . . (49)____________ Boat Dealer. . . . . . . . . (50)____________ Boat Sales & Service. . . . . (51)____________ Weight Loss Center. . . . . . (52)____________ Supermarket. . . . . . . . (53)____________ Discount Store. . . . . . . . (54)____________ Shoe Store. . . . . . . . . (55)____________ Gift Shop. . . . . . . . . . (56)____________ Hardware Store. . . . . . . (57)____________ Furniture Store. . . . . . . . (58)____________ Garden Nursery. . . . . . . (59)____________ Computer Sales & Service. . . (60)____________ Carpet/Floor-Covering Store. . . (61)____________ Patio Furniture Store. . . . . (62)____________ Rental Store. . . . . . . . . (63)____________ Custom Tee Shirt Store. . . . (64)____________ Quilt Store. . . . . . . . . (65)____________ Electronics Dealer. . . . . . (66)____________ Barber Shop. . . . . . . . (67)____________ Frame Shop. . . . . . . . . (68)____________ Print Shop. . . . . . . . . (69)____________ Beauty Salon. . . . . . . . (70)____________ Nail Salon. . . . . . . . . (71)____________ Tanning Salon. . . . . . . . (72)____________ Home builder. . . . . . . . (73)____________ Plumber. . . . . . . . . . (74)____________ Electrician . . . . . . . . . (75)____________ Roofer. . . . . . . . . . . (76)____________ Lumber Co.. . . . . . . . . (77)____________ Pool Builder. . . . . . . . . (78)____________ Appliance Dealer. . . . . . . (79)____________ Lawn Care. . . . . . . . . (80)____________ Remodeler. . . . . . . . . (81)____________ Heating & Air Company. . . . (82)____________ Home Security Company. . . . (83)____________ Pest Control Company. . . . . (84)____________ Carpet Cleaner. . . . . . . . (85)____________ Appliance Service. . . . . . (86)____________ Dry Cleaners. . . . . . . . (87)____________ Cellular Sales & Service. . . . (88)____________ Florist. . . . . . . . . . . (89)____________ Self Storage. . . . . . . . . (90)____________ Cabinetry (kitchen,bathroom). . . . . (91)____________ Real Estate Agent. . . . . . (92)____________ Real Estate Office. . . . . . (93)____________ Mortgage Company. . . . . . (94)____________ Accountant. . . . . . . . . (95)____________ Stock Broker. . . . . . . . (96)____________ Insurance Agency. . . . . . (97)____________ Bank. . . . . . . . . . . (98)____________ Investment Firm. . . . . . . (99)____________ Attorney. . . . . . . . . . (100)____________ Fast Oil Change. . . . . . . (101)____________ Auto Service. . . . . . . . (102)____________ Car Wash. . . . . . . . . (103)____________ Auto Body Repair Shop. . . . (104)____________ Tire Store. . . . . . . . . (105)____________ Local Radio Station . . . . . (106)____________ Place to Play Bingo. . . . . (107)____________ Boss. . . . . . . . . . . (108)____________ Funeral Home. . . . . . . (109)____________ Photographer. . . . . . . . (110)____________ Employment Agency. . . . . (111)____________ Disc Jockey. . . . . . . . (112)____________ Customer Service. . . . . . (113)____________ Hotel/Motel. . . . . . . . (114)____________ Master of Ceremonies. . . . (115)____________ Used Car Dealer. . . . . . . (116)____________ New Car Dealer. . . . . . . (117)____________ 30 CATEGORIESMUSTBEFILLEDINFORBALLOTTOCOUNT.The Best of Highlands CountyŽ 18th Annual News-SunReadersChoice Awards A special section announcing the winner of each category will run in the on Friday, April 29,2011 Print Legibly Please:Name:__________________________ Address:_______________________ City:___________________________ State:_________ Zip:____________ Phone:_________________________Must be 18 or older to participate.Are you a current subscriber to the News-Sun? Yes No I N S T R U C T I O N S S & O F F I C I A L L R U L E S Entries must be submitted on official entry ballot. Photocopies, carbon copies and illegible entries not acceptable. At least 30 of the categories must be filled out. Only one entry per person. One entry per envelope.Ballots not meeting these criteria will not be counted. Entries must be postmarked by April 5, 2011. Mail or Drop by to Readers Choice Contest, News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. No purchase necessary. Decision of the judges is final. All entries become the property of the News-Sun. The News-Sun will not be responsible for entries lost or delayed in the mail for any reason.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011Page 5B Page 4BNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com MARCH MARKETING MADNESSAt the March Marketing Madness party hosted by the News-Sun earlier this month, Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Greg Harris acted as emcee. He was tall enough to hold the basket full of team names high enough for fellow county commissioner Don Elwell to dig into. Don was choosing a team for the Alan Jay Automotive Network. Unfortunately, the team he has selected has already been eliminated. The 8 advertisers on these two pages have been paired (by random drawing) with one of the 64 NCAA Basketball Teams playing in the Mens Basketball Championship. The team name is in each ad. If an advertisers team wins, the team and the advertiser advance on up to the Championship game as long as the team is winning. If they lose theyre out the team & the advertiser.WHOLL MAKE IT TO THE FINAL FOUR? WA TCH FOR THE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30 ISSUE OF THE NEWS-SUN TO SEE WHOS STILL IN FOR THE FINAL FOUR! 2011 DIVISION I MENS BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP EAST WEST SOUTHWEST Champion Kentucky Kansas VCU Butler Florida North Carolina Arizona Connecticut SOUTHEASTNew Orleans San Antonio Anaheim April 2 April 2 April 4 Newark U. KANSAS ARIZONA BUTLER U FL O RIDAAmerican Golf Cart2833 Hwy 27 S. € Avon Park 453-CART (2278) Email us at: ezgotxt@aol.com N. CAROLINA U. CONNECTICUT VCU3310 Hwy 27 South Sebring, FL 33870863-402-2786 KENTUCKY

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Page 6BNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com ELECT WHO?This is a campaign against Melanoma. One in 72 people will contract the disease. You must elect yourself to lead against it. It is a potential matter of life and death.Melanoma*Usually a non-symptomatic growth on the skin with multiple colors and irregular edges.We can protect you against this silent killer. We are your skin police. Call now, elect a proactive preventative skin team.American Institute of Dermatology, P.A.Darrin A. Rotman, M.D. Julie Iellimo, P.A.-C Jennifer Wolf, P.A.-C Medicare and all major insurances accepted in network* New Patients Welcome863-386-0786*individual must call for veri“cation of bene“ts. This is not a guarantee. First Presbyterian Church of SebringFor youth 11-14 years old June 13th … August 12thMonday … Friday € 8am … 3pmThis day camp will include sports, activities, Bible lessons, and field trips like MOSI, Ringling Museum, and airport.Lunch will be provided Limited Space Donations welcomed 319 Poinsettia Ave. Sebring, FL 33870863-385-0107 BUSINESS for those born before 1938 to 67 if born after 1959. If eligible, you may begin drawing benefits at 62; however, doing so may reduce your benefit by up to 30 percent. The percentage reduction gradually lessens as you approach full retirement age. Alternatively, if you postpone participating until after reaching full retirement age, your benefit increases by 7 to 8 percent per year, up to age 70. You can use the Retirement Planner tools at www.socialsecurity.gov/reti re2 to estimate your retirement benefit under different earnings, age and lifeexpectancy scenarios. If you're married and your earned benefit is less than 50 percent of your spouse's, you're eligible for a benefit equal to half of theirs. Spousal benefits also are available if you're divorced, provided: your marriage lasted at least 10 years; you remained unmarried before age 60 (or that marriage also ended); and you're at least 62. If you remarried after age 60 (or 50, if disabled), you can still collect benefits based on your former spouse's record. If your spouse dies and was benefits-eligible, you and your children may be eligible for survivor benefits. Amounts vary depending on age, disability status and other factors. Read the Survivors Planner at www.ssa.gov/survivorplan/i fyou.htm for details. Know that if you begin collecting Social Security before full retirement age yet continue to work, your benefit may be reduced. In 2011, you'll lose one dollar in benefits for every two dollars you earn over $14,160. (Note: Investment income doesn't count.) However, if you reach full retirement age in 2011, the formula changes: $1 will be deducted from your benefits for each $3 you earn above $37,680 until the month you reach full retirement age. After that, no further reductions. Thus, if you think you'll need to continue working, it might be wiser to hold off collecting Social Security until reaching full retirement age. These benefit reductions are not completely lost, however: Your Social Security benefit will be increased upon reaching full retirement age to account for benefits withheld due to earlier earnings. And finally, although Social Security benefits aren't taxed by many states, they are considered taxable income by the federal government. So, depending on your income, you may owe federal income tax on a portion of your benefit. For more details, read IRS Tax Topic 423 and Publication 915 at www.irs.gov. Jason Alderman directs Visa's financial education programs. To participate in a free, online Financial Literacy and Education Summit on April 4, 2011, go to www.practicalmoneyskills.com/summit2011. Continued from page 1B Social Security about to get swamped Special to the News-SunSEBRING During the m onth of April, Curves g yms in the Sebring area w ill participate in the 13th A nnual Curves Food Drive t o collect non-perishable f ood and cash donations to b enefit area food banks. Current members who m ake a $30 donation or an e quivalent donation of food a re eligible to receive a C urves reusable Food Drive g rocery bag. And, from April 4-17, C urves will waive the memb ership fee for new memb ers who donate a bag of n on-perishable food or m ake a minimum donation o f $30. "Our goal is to top the d onation that we made last y ear," said Curves founder D iane Heavin. "This is a great opportun ity for the members of our C urves community to help s trengthen the Sebring-area c ommunity, too. "Everything that our m embers donate at their l ocal clubs will benefit l ocal families in need." In addition to the food a nd monetary donations t hat each gym collects, C urves International is o ffering gyms the opportun ity to win cash prizes for t heir local food banks. Prizes will be awarded to c lubs with the most food c ollected, clubs who beat t heir 2010 donation level by t he largest amount and to t wo randomly selected c lubs drawn from all the c lubs who enter the contest. Curves clubs have donate d more than 61 million p ounds of food in the U.S. a nd Canada since 2004. This year's Food Drive will get off to a strong start when Curves International founders Gary and Diane Heavin are featured on ABC Television's inspirational new show "Secret Millionaire" airing Sunday, April 3 at 8 p.m. The Curves founders moving episode will help Curves members understand how the Curves Food Drive is the perfect opportunity for each of them to give back to their own communities. "The past few years have been difficult for many families," said Heavin. "Curves annual Food Drive is one way that everyone in the Sebring area can make a real difference for a community family that is struggling. "We encourage everyone, not just our members or those who are thinking about joining one of our gyms, to make a cash donation or drop off a bag of non-perishable food items in April." For more information about Curves women's gyms in the Sebring area and the 2011 Curves Food Drive, please contact one of the following Curves locations: Curves of Avon Park located at 1011 U.S. Highway 27 S, at 863-4529963 or 97P3E4N@curvesmail.com; Curves of Sebring located at 901 US Hwy 27 N, Suite 58, at 863-385-1070 or sebringcurvesl@earthlink.n et. For more information about Curves, please visit www.curves.com. 13th annual Curves Food Drive kicks off in April Special to the News-SunWAUCHULA Tw o 11th-grade students fro m local high schools will parti cipate in the week-long, a llexpense-paid "Youth Tour to Washington, DC" event, ne xt June. Every year since 200 7, Peace River Electr ic Cooperative (PRECO ), Wauchula, FL, has sponsor ed students in the national You th Tour program, making it available to students at 1 6 selected schools in their 1 0county service territo ry (Brevard, DeSoto, Harde e, Highlands, Hillsboroug h, Indian River, Manate e, Osceola, Polk and Sarasota ). Matthew Davis of Southeast High School in Manatee County and Harl ey Russum of Mulberry Hig h School in Polk County w ill attend Youth Tour along wi th 1,500 fellow students fro m electric cooperatives aroun d the nation. Student applicants we re required to write a sho rt essay and submit an applic ation. The faculty of each hig h school chose one student to represent their respecti ve school as a semi-finalis t. Final judging was conduct ed at an out-of-state electr ic cooperative. The National Rur al Electric Cooperati ve Association (NRECA), hea dquartered in Arlington, V a., has coordinated the You th Tour program for over 4 0 years, sending high scho ol students to visit the nation 's capitol. PRECO selects winners o f D.C. trip Metro Services The first wave of Baby Boomers will turn 65 this year.

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Jan. 13Bankunited to David P. Bragg, L25 Blk 212 Leisure Lakes Sec. 14, $4,500. James M. Ruester to Jason A. Grant, PT Tract 10 Blk 14 River Ridge Ranches Unrec, $112,000. Citimortgage Inc. to Noel Durrance, L17 Blk 17 Sebring Country Est. Sec. 1, $26,000. Wilmington Trust Co. to Family Traditions Property, L5 Blk 233 East Palmhurst, $26,200. Tony Kim to Grover M. Manheim, L20 Pine & Lake Sub, $274,000. Gregory D. Luce to Steven Paul Corbin, PT Secs. 30/3136-30, $62,000. Thea M. Donohue to Michael J. Niskala, L54 Blk A Spring Lake Sec. 1, $33,000. Jack Grant Zendt to Bernadine Graham, L32 Grayces Mobile Est. Unit 2, $52,000. Wanda Henry-Patterson to Lynn R. Myers, PT Sec. 35-3428/Easement, $27,000.Jan. 14Bank of New York Mellon to Robert A. Plunkett, L7 Blk A Avon Lakes Add, $70,500. Margaret A. Ruggieri to W. Edward Rice, L19 Blk 71 Placid Lakes Sec. 7, $160,000. Suncoast Schools Federal Credit Union to Maria Vazquez, L29 Blk 1 Placid Lakes Sec. 4, $39,000. Chael Soler to Kun-Min Yang, L6 Blk 232 East Palmhurst Sub, $28,000. Betty J. Douglas to David M. Lamb, L269 Fairmount Mobile Est., $37,000. William J. Carroll to Roger Sewell, L3 Blk 9 Harder Hall Country Club II, $147,900. Dennis P. Flynn to Robert E. Weeks, L2 Villages of Highlands Ridge Phase VII-A Sec. 1, $191,000. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Ralph Demers, Parcel 101 Highlands Homes Sub, $10,000. Howard Chad Pritchett to Adam Martin, PT Sec. 4-33-29, $15,000. Catherine C. Bolatto to Donald Joe Tudor, L12 Blk K Spring Lake Sec. 1, $62,500.Jan. 18Carmelita M. Morris to John G. Goble, L25/26 Blk 35 Sebring Lakes Unit 2, $2,000. Todd R. Harlow to Robert M. Harlow, L12 Blk 11 Lake Letta Est. Sub, $50,000. Basema Inc. to Maloss, PT Sec. 15-35-29, $1,000,000. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to MJJ & Link Inc., Unit 3-C The Manors, $13,000. Selene Rmof Reo Acquisition II to Terri Bayer, L25 Blk 197 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 11, $79,500. Suntrust Bank to Abderrahim McHatet, L9 Blk 265 Placid Lakes Sec. 20, $3,500. Suntrust Bank to Hazieda Modikhan, L20 Blk 147 Sun 'N Lakes Est. Sec. 15, $1,800. Nancy C. Wood to Anthony Thompson, PT Sec. 35-3428/Easement, $15,000. Arthur W. MacMillan to United States of America, L20 Blk 13 Flamingo Gardens, $7,000. Betty J. Ostlund to Abderrahim McHatet, PT Parcel E Spring Lake Village VI, $25,000. Roxann Lee Jordan to Beverly A. Coatney, L12 Blk 27 Sun 'N Lakes Est. Acres Tract 1, $10,000. Randolph Gilde to Edward Koornneef, L2 Blk N Sun 'N Lakes Est. Sec. 4, $59,500. Robert Johnston to Debbie Piggott, L669/670 Sylvan Shores Est. Sec. D, $24,000. Henry W. Mohrfeld Jr. to Keith Clark, PT L11 Blk C Serenity Sub, $27,000. Richard P. Wille to Carl E. Anderson, L14 Watersedge Sub, $295,000. DFC Loan Funding Co. to Udean A. Greaves, L41 Blk 205 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 11, $12,900.Jan. 19Alberto Blanco to Betty J. Watson, L16 Blk 153 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sec. 18, $9,000. Romeo Domingo to Wilma P. Domingo, PT L6 Blk 230 Placid Lakes Sec. 20, $5,000. Bank of New York Mellon to Kenneth E. Lucas, L3 Blk 4 Grand Prix Hts., $55,000. HSBC Bank USA to E. James King, Unit 5 Maplewood Villas Condo, $12,000. Harold H. Artz Jr. to Margaret Hughes, L30 Blk 108 Placid Lakes Sec. 15, $2,400. James Hurst to Juan C. Rubio, L62 Holiday Hills Sub, $80,000. Roger Dale Tindell to Joseph F. Hughes, L62 Kissimmee River Shores Unrec, $10,000. Highlands Independent Bank to Damon Laser, L13/14 Blk 40 Leisure Lakes Sec. 11, $155,000. Desperado 123 Corp. to Lukasz K. Janeczek, L49 Blk 260 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 13, $294,100. Richard R. McCutchan to Marcia D. Cordeiro, L33/34 Blk 3 Erin Park Sub, $79,900. Roger L. Sewell to George A. Ippolito, L1 Blk E Lake Jackson Heights, $137,900. Barbara A. Ward to Robert Douglas, L78 Pine & Lake Sub, $130,000. Clair W. Weekley to Curtis R. Roy, L80 Blk 1 Venetian Village, $35,000.Jan. 20DFC Funding Co. to Carmen M. Crisostomo Cruz, L12 Blk 196 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 11/Other, $25,800. Claudine Ragbir to Earl W. Ommen, L5 Blk 3 Orange Blossom Est. Unit 9, $8,000. Neva M. Crosby to Gary Russell Crosby, L23 Blk 398 Leisure Lakes Sec. 17, $10,000. Duckwood Holdings to Jose Torres, L4 Blk N Sun 'N Lakes Est. Sub Sec. 4, $10,000. Federal National Mortgage Assn. to David P. Bragg, L20 Blk 26 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 2, $24,500. Federal National Mortgage Assn. to Esther Brashares, L1 Blk 6 Vacation Est., $75,500. William Richard Justice to Brent L. Julian, L21 Blk 147 Lakewood Terrace Add, $57,500.Jan. 21John Jado to Jackie R. Johnson, L2 Blk RR Spring Lake Village V, $4,500. Keith M. Chandler to Maria Nelia Ibalarosa, L20 Blk 265 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 13, $80,000. Romeo Domingo to Wilbert P. Domingo, L14 Blk 44 Placid Lakes Sec. 19, $5,000. Madeline Harris to Thomas P. Patterson, Unit 309 Lakeview Towers Condo, $42,000. Patricia K. Gase to Andrew Alexander IV, L13694/13695 Avon Park Lakes Unit 43, $45,000.Jan. 24Jack R. Grissinger to Charles Kenneth Foster, L40 Brunner's Mobile Est., $25,000. Eghbal Jalali to Hewrald E. Humes, See Instrument, $20,000. Darcille W. Hill to Franklin D. Cooper, L10523-10525 Avon Park Lakes Unit 33, $85,500. George B. Palmer to Debbie D. Balog, L10 Blk 2 Country Walk, $95,000. Margaret Kenney to Patricia Drake Hynes, L10 Blk 12 Venetian Village, $66,000. Charles C. Yates to Dennis Ball, L370 Fairmount Mobile Est., $65,000. Aurora Loan Services to Frank Pennisi, L9 Blk 5 Highlands Park Est. Sec. C, $100,000. Michael Miller to Christine Alley Mannon, L3 Blk 22 Orange Blossom Country Club Community Unit 14, $3,000. Santa Diorio to Tiffany Misiano, L1 Blk 5 Orange Blossom Est. Unit 4, $1,000. GMAC Mortgage to Baja Investments, L24/25 Blk 4 Highlands Park Est. Sec. L, $8,400. Ruth K. David to J. Ross MacBeth, PT Sec. 4-3529/Others, $486,800.Jan. 25Fifth Third Mortgage Co. to Nina M. Pollard, L8 Blk 285 Placid Lakes Sec. 20, $89,900. John D. Fiorito to Helena Roland, L13/14 Blk 35 Avon Park Lakes Red Hill Farms Add Unit K, $75,000. Frederick R. Terrell to 2635 N. Hewlett Road Property Trust, L8943/8944 PT L8942 Avon Park Lakes Unit 27/Corrective, $53,500. Donald Gonzalez to Jesus M. Hernaiz, L8943/8944 PT L8942 Avon Park Lakes Unit 27, $62,500. Calvin F. Lowe to Susan R. Place, L368 Villages of Highlands Ridge Phase IV, $287,500. Fannie Mae to Denver Klinge, Unit 500 Interlake Condo, $42,000. Peter Butterworth to M.V. Burzesi Jr., L24 Blk 119 Leisure Lakes Sec. 11, $25,000. Donald Gonzalez to David M. Alexander, PT L8 Blk 9 Avon Park Est. Unit II, $60,000.Jan. 26Kathleen D. Swain to Kathleen D. Swain, L12A Hidden Creek Villas, $12,500. June S. Alberts to Alicia J. Cook, L4/30 Blk 1 Citrus Lakes Colony Sub, $25,000. Rachel Wright to William R. Celentano, L19/20 PT L21 Blk 183 Woodlawn Terrace, $21,500. Wauchula State Bank to Lynette Fleetwood, L5 H D Martin Sub, $10,000. Fannie Mae to Richard Soluta, L4401/4402 Avon Park Lakes Unit 14, $51,000. Bank of America to Donald R. Childress, L19 Blk 342 Sun N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 16, $6,200. John T. Parry to Louie M. Roberts, PT L6 Blk 20 Town of Avon Park, $140,000. HSBC Bank USA to Jeremiah's International Trading Co. Inc., L7/8 Blk 30 Placid Lakes Sec. 2, $30,500. Thomas Jay Smith to AOK Company Inc., Unit C-23 Bluffs of Sebring Condo Phase II, $79,000.Jan. 27Edwin Johnson to Ronald H. Cobert, L5 Blk 4 Venetian Village Revised, $82,000. Angela Alverine White to Jeffrey Nottebaum, L2/9/16 Blk 278 Placid Lakes Sec. 20, $2,200. Khalmack of South Florida Inc. to Paula Eisenhart, L35/36 Blk 167 Leisure Lakes Sec. 4, $5,600. Rodney R. Coolman to John F. Soares, L6-10 Blk 22 DeSoto City 2nd Sub, $30,000. Aurora Loan Services to Kenneth Innes, Unit 3-C Jackson Shores Townhouses, $45,000. Donna J. Sheaffer to Jack J. Mescher, L9 Blk 6 Golfview Est., $85,000. HSBC Bank USA to Jason A. Hirsh, PT L5 Blk 16 Town of Avon Park/Other, $12,000. Hazieda Modikhan to Kamini Bissram, L32 Blk 64 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sec. 2, $6,000. Margaret E. Doane to Donald L. Wildish, L3 Heirings Sub, $5,000.Jan. 28Gerald B. Fangman to Edward J. Millie, L1 Blk 1 Mary Jane Manor, $17,000. Avis L. Meyer to Donald L. Wildasin, L9 Brunner's Mobile Est., $31,000. Marilyn J. Giroux to Barbara Halmi-Grundler, L6 Blk 526 Sebring Shores Add, $70,000. N. Thomas to Anais Oris, L9/10 Blk D Asa Lewis Sub, $10,000. Carmen L. Elliott to Walter R. Large, L23 Ashley Oaks, $122,900. Robert Moore to Robert E. Wyatt, L59 Blk 1 Venetian Village, $47,500. American General Home Equity Inc. to John T. Benson, L21 Blk 134 Northside Sub, $6,500. Gerald R. Hollon to Mary Lewis, L30 Brunners Mobile Est., $25,000. Federal National Mortgage Assn. to Greg Gluck, L19 Blk 14 Lake Haven Est. Sec. 1, $85,000. Ricardo L. Zurita to Azalia Caridad Clero, L22 Blk 98 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sec. 10, $10,500. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Marianne Meitz, L28 Blk B Silver Fox Ranch, $68,900. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Kwabena Boateng, L1 Blk 742 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 15R1, $146,900. John D. Ford to Miles E. Cullom, L3 Blk B PT Lake Placid Camp Florida Resort Replat, $34,800. Bill Anderson to Shane Liskey,L1 Blk A Horseshoe Sub, $15,000. Peggy D. Crosby to Abderrahim McHatet, L24 Highland Lakes Reserve, $28,000. Joseph H. Rose to Larry L. Davis, Unit 2B Building 2 Lake Park Village Condo Phase II, $93,000. U.S. Bank to Adalberto Vazquez, L8908-8910 Avon Park Lakes Unit 27, $39,900. Federal National Mortgage Assn. to Montz Builders Inc., PT L3 Blk 37 Downer Place, $62,000.Jan. 31Fannie Mae to Anita Inman, L232 Sylvan Shores Est. Sec. D, $41,000. Harold Kay to Jack L. Crandall, L545 Sylvan Shores Est. Sec. D, $80,300. Juan J. Lopez to Lynda K. Bellinder, L40 Blk 290 Placid Lakes Sec. 20, $143,000. John D. Bruce to Ruth Q. McNelis, L189 Sylvan Shores Est. Sec. D, $47,000. Fredy Wiles to Rosendo Arceo, PT L33 Blk 250 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 13, $38,000. Mary Ann Ramsey to Frederick Eicker, L9 Blk 14 Orange Blossom Est. Unit 7, $80,000. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Russell Isaacs Sr., L81 Blk 143 PT Placid Lakes Sec. 11, $100,100. Felime R. Kemink to Christopher M. Gonzalez, L5833-5835 Avon Park Lakes Unit 18, $100,800. John C. Benedict Jr. to Kerry D. Meeker, L11 Blk D Avon Lakes, $15,000. John C. Benedict Jr. to Rodney A. Davis, L12 Blk D Avon Lakes, $15,000. Highlands Independent Bank to Wayne M. Buckingham, L19 Blk 7 Sebring Ridge Sec. G, $119,000. James Edward Winebarger to Jonathan R. Patton, L1 Blk 3 Lake Josephine Heights, $55,000. Roger W. Grebing to Erin M. Duffy, L5300-5304 Avon Park Lakes Unit 17, $122,300. Roger W. Grebing to Corey F. Henderson, 5298 Avon Park Lakes Unit 7/Others, $9,000. Highlands Independent Bank to South West District Florida Annual Conference United Methodist Church Inc., PT Sec. 9-35-29/Other, $650,000. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011Page 7B 24 HOUR ROAD SERVICE 1109 W. MAIN STREET AVON PARK452-2031€ Complete Car Care € Brakes € Shocks € Alignments € Oil Service € Tune-Ups Mon -Fri. 9am-4pm Closed Wed.863-385-3497130 S. Commerce Ave. Sebring, FL 33870 Your Ear Care StoreŽHelping Highlands County HearŽ Better For Over 40 Years 3310 Hwy 27 South Sebring, FL 33870863-402-2786 For information about supporting your Chamber of Commerce on this page, contact us at: 863-385-6155Thank You to the following businesses for supporting the Avon Park and Sebring Chambers of Commerce. Forrest H. Hilton, CPA, PACertified Public Accountant702 US 27 North Avon Park, FL 33825 Phone: (863) 452-2906 Fax: (863) 452-1147 E-Mail: hiltoncpa@embarqmail.com Warren’s Auto Sales“A Good Car At A Fair Price”SINCE 1977811 U.S. Hwy. 27 South • Avon Park, FL(863) 452-2931  FAX (863) 453-7698E-mail: warrens@strato.net www.warrensautosales.com UPCOMINGEVENTS April 7SFCCTheatreforthePerforming ArtsOpenHouseApril 8 Gallery & Downtown Walk April 9Touch a Truck/Touch a PlaneŽ Rotary EAA Chapter April 9Saturday Night Cruise Car Show April 14Chamber Luncheon April 16Kokomo April 16Music in the Park Concert Series Highlands Hammock Park April 19Highlands Countys 90th Anniversary April 21Chamber Mixer April 1-2The Story of JesusŽ a Florida passion play … Wauchula, FL April 8-9The Story of JesusŽ a Florida passion play … Wauchula, FL April 9Highlands County 5th Annual Military Ball … Chateau Elan April 16David DocŽ Owen Memorial Golf Tourney April 16Easter Egg Hunt … Heartlan Horses & Handicapped April 22-23The Story of JesusŽ a Florida passion play … Wauchula, FL AVON PARK SEBRING DEEDTRANSFERS

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Page 8BNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com

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By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comLAKE PLACID The one thing Green Dragon baseball coach Dan Coomes had hoped wouldn't happen had. After his squad's longawaited for, extra-inning win over county rival Sebring Tuesday, March 15, Coomes said, "I hope they realize that this wasn't the ultimate." For, after all, while a big win emotionally, as far as the district race, it mattered little. But in elevating their intensity and effort in the win over the Streaks, the Dragons then hit that figurative wall and went on to take staggering losses to district front-runners McKeel, 12-2, and Frostproof, 13-3. "We just didn't have the same edge that we had going into the Sebring game," Coomes said. "We had been doing things the way we needed to, and then we just got lax." That flatness carried over Friday night, but the edge returned just in the nick of time as Lake Placid came back late for a 7-2 win over visiting Tenoroc. Dylan Weber-Callahan took the mound for the Dragons and got through the first two innings and he helped his own cause with an RBI single in the second, scoring Nevada Weaver, for a 1-0 lead. But that lack of edge and doing things right allowed the Titans to score twice in the third on just one hit. Two walks and an error loaded the bases with two out before lefty Joseph Bass sliced one down the leftfield line to bring two home and take the lead. Further damage was avoided when Brody Carr made a sliding catch of a Kendel Deeson drive to short right to end th e inning. But Lake Placid's offen se couldn't get anything goin g as a Terry Coyne single in the third and a Rick Mill er walk in the fifth were th e only runners to reach ba se over the next three inning s. "When you don't swin g the bat, it's easy for th e SPORTS C SECTION News-Sun Sunday, March 27, 2011 News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHN E Nevada Weaver gets a faceful of dirt as he slides in safely with Lake Placid's first run in Friday's 7-2 win over the visiting Titans of Tenoroc. Dragons slide past Titans Lake Placid7Tenoroc2 See LP, page 3C By FWC Chairman Rodney BarretoDuring spring and summer months, as temperatures warm up, nocturnal creatures that are usually quite secretive become more active and easier to locate. This is the perfect time of year to go out with children for a night prowl. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) and the Wildlife Foundation of Florida are working to reverse the growing trend of our youth spending too much time inside. One way you can interest your children in nature is to take them on a night walk. We often overlook the wildlife that come out at night, and this is a great way to get your children excited about conservation. Insects are particularly active on warm nights. Try looking for fireflies, moths and crickets. An easy way to look at them closely without causing injury is to capture the insect in a clear jar and cover the top with cheesecloth held down by a large rubber band around the rim. (Remember to release the insects once you are done). Cicadas are a favorite with kids, as they are strange looking, make very loud sounds and are fun to handle. Owls, such as barred, great horned and eastern screech, are often quite vocal at night. Learning the calls with your children and listening for them i s a lot of fun, especially if you learn to call back. Chuck-will's-widows also cal l actively on moonlit nights. They sing loudly, mimicking their name. During the spring, you may also hear our state bird, the northern mockingbird, singing h is heart out to attract a mate. These birds learn more than 100 songs over the course of their lifetime. Bats are also a favorite with children. Watch for bats feeding on insects near streetlights, along woodland edges or over water. They are active from sunset to sunrise, although you are more likely to see them just at dusk when there is still a little ambie nt light. Flying squirrels are also nocturnal. Though they don't really fly, they can glide up to 150 feet an d are adept at sneaking seeds at bird feeders. They are more difficult to see than bats, as they require forests with tall trees from which to glide. Skunks and armadillos are us ually more active during the nigh t Night prowls a fun way to involve kids in conservation See PROWLS, page 4C Courtesy photo A bove: The Highlands Merchants won the 70 and over Sebring Softball League 2011 Championship with a record of 17-3. They had good defense and offense and enjoyed playing together as a team. Top row, left to right: John Schmidt, Bob Buley, John Ladersnck, Harold Baucom, Charles Quinn, Ron Lewis and Larry A mbuel. Bottom row, left to right: Mike Jurmu, Harold Dinel, Ed Carroll, Cal Bready, Don Ward, Mgr. Harry Bell, Shawn Kildoff and Glenn Minick. Below: Reflections Orange Crush won the 2011 "50 and over" Sebring Senior Softball League Championship with a 15-5 record on the season. Back row, left to right: Harold Baucom, Lester Osbeck, Jim Radcliff, Bob Poulan, Dick Schultz and Barry Hurlbut. Middle row, left to right: Doug Ebeling, Mgr. Harry Bell, Andy Timeramis and Jim Holmes. Front row, left to right: Bill Todd, Brian Pluta, John Beilman, Sal Sabota, Ron Reiches. Spring Softball Champions Photo courtesy of CFL-Sports.com Devin Clarke cleared 6-feet, 4-inches in Thursday's high j ump at Frostproof, helping the Streaks to a third-place finish at the meet. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comThe Frostproof Bulldogs p roved rude hosts Thursday, w ell, the boys anyway, rompi ng to a lopsided win in the f ive-team track and field m eet. The Dogs totaled 164 p oints to outdistance Avon P ark's 89, Sebring's 78, M ulberry's 47 and Fort M eade's 19. Though, while Frostproof r an away with the overall, a rea performers did have s ome impressive moments, s uch as Blue Streak Devin C larke clearing 6-feet, 4i nches to win the high jump b y nearly a foot. Elsewhere, Travious K night cruised to a win for Avon Park, finishing the 100meter dash in a blinding 10.65 and took the 200 meters as well in 22.7. Knight earned his third win of the day by landing at 40-feet, 7-inches in, appropriately, the triple jump. Elias Salgado won the 1,600 for Sebring in 5:05 and Colton Dillon cleared 11feet, 6-inches to win the pole vault. On the girls side of the meet, the Lady Blue Streaks came away with the team win, totaling 154 points to top Frostproof's 102 and Avon Park's 81. Sebring's 4X800 team of Hannah Schroeder, Taylor Lady Streaks first, AP Boys second at Frostproof See TRACK, page 4C By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSouth Florida baseball got off their recent slide, winning at Hillsborough Friday night in a 2-1 pitcher's duel. But it was Andres "Pops" Lopez that won the duel, going eight and one-third innings while striking out 10. And while the offense had its'struggles, Cody Higgins went 3-for-4 and Brett Clements 2-for-4 to break t he six-game skid the team h ad been on since winning t he conference opener Saturda y, March 12. The win came aft er Wednesday's dishea rtening loss to Hillsborough at hom e that saw the Panthe rs battle back from a 6 -2 deficit before fallin g 9-8. "We played soft," he ad coach Rick Hitt said after h is Panthers eke one out News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Though he made this fine fielding play up the middle Wednesday, it was Cody Higgins three hits Friday that helped the Panthers end their six-game losing streak. SFCC2HCC1 See SFCC, page 3C 5C PAGECLASSIFIEDS

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HOPE 3-on-3SEBRING The First Annual Mary Toney HOPE Foundation Community 3on-3 basketball tournament will take place Saturday, April 2 at the Sebring High School gym from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at a cost of $5 per player. The tournament will have male and female brackets consisting of threeorfour player teams from ages 7-18-years old. Registration forms can be found in the front office at Sebring High School and must be turned in by Friday, March 25. For more information, contact Lavaar Scott at 214-3880 or email LaV39@yahoo.com .Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING Wings of Faith Worship Center presents the First Annual Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one team of four golfers, one tee sign and two green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includes one team of four golfers, one green sign; Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $100 includes one green sign. Individual player $60 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26). Team of Four Golfers $240 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after March 26). Make checks payable to: Wings of Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL 33871, or register online at wingsoffaithchristianworshipcenter.com Proceeds to be donated to scholarship program for graduates attending Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center. For more information, call Jason Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhankerson@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at 381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com ."Doc Owen" Golf TourneyAVON PARK The Avon Park Noon Rotary Club will host its Second Annual David "Doc Owen" Golf tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Highlands Ridge North. The two-person scramble-format entry fee is $60 per person with prizes in flight groups, lunch, goodie bag and refreshments on the course. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Entry information and check payable to Avon Park Noon Rotary mailed to Chet Brojek, 3310 Par Rd, Sebring, FL 33872. Golfers should include their names and handicaps along with their check. Those needing a form may email Brojek at cbrojek@comcast.net or call at 385-4736. Business entry of two-persons plus a hole sign for a total of $200 is available for the first time this year. All Rotary club members are urged to support participate in the event that benefits local Rotary charity projects. Business hole signs for $100 are also available by contacting Chet via email or phone.SHSBasketball CampSEBRING The SHS basketball program will be hosting a basketball camp for boys and girls, in 2nd-6th grade, on Monday, March 28, and Tuesday, March 29, from 8 a.m.4 p.m. The cost of the camp is $20 and is appropriate for players of all skill levels and experience. Current and former Streaks will be on hand to help with the camp, which will also feature contests, competitions and prizes. Campers can either bring their own lunch or purchase lunch there for a reasonable price. Please contact Coach Lee at 441-122 1, or by email at leem@highlands.k12.fl.u s Sandy Foster MemorialSEBRING NU-HOPE Elder Care Services annual golf tournament is just around the corner. The NU-HOPE Board of Directors ha s chosen to rename the golf tournament this year in memory of Sandy Foster, fo rmer Executive Director of NU-HOPE Elder Care Services. Sandy passed away very unexpectedl y in September of last year. Sandy loved golf and ran a very successful golf tournament for 13 years; in his memory the tournament will be renamed the "Sandy Foster Memorial/NU-HOPE golf tournament." This year we are continuing with Sandy's passion for the tournament with flight, raffle and door prizes. In the last three years the field was full, with a wait list, so sign up soon! The first annual Sandy Foster Memorial/NU-HOPE golf tournament will be held on Saturday, April 9, with a n 8:30 a.m. shotgun start, at the Country Club of Sebring. The tournament will be a two-person scramble format. Entry fee will be $60 per person ($12 0 per team) which includes lunch afterwards and refreshments during the tournament. Registration forms are availab le at the Country Club of Sebring Pro Sho p (John Vickers) or can be obtained via mail or fax by calling Debbie Slade at 382-2134. Business sponsorships are also available for this event. The revenue from this event is used for the local match'amount this organi zation needs each year to secure federal and state grant funds in our effort to co ntinue providing home and communitybased services to the frail and needy eld erly residents of Highlands and Hardee Counties. Barefoot Waterski TourneyFORTMYERS The 10th annual Deuceapalooza Barefoot Endurance Tournament is set for April 9 in Fort Myers. This tournament is open to waterski enthusiasts of all ages. Trophies and cash prizes will be hand ed out. Participants will receive a free T shirt. For information, call Deuce at (239) 693-1975.SYF Softball BBQ and RegistrationSEBRING Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is hosting our 2nd Annual BBQ Fundraiser and Tournament on Saturday April 30 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.The BBQ Lunch is $7 and will include a Pulled Pork Sandwich, Baked Beans, Coleslaw, Cookies and a glass of tea. Pick up your meal to go or stay and watch our girls play while you eat. Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is also conducting registrations for girls ages 10 to 15 now through April 1. Registration is $65 for the first child / $45 for any siblings. For further information, please visit u s on Facebook, check out our website at www.eteamz.com/sebringyouthfastpitchsoftball email us at dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201. EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB y-Boston5021.704 Philadelphia3735.5141312New York3537.4861512New Jersey2348.32427 Toronto2052.2783012Southeast Division WLPctGB x-Miami5022.694 x-Orlando4726.644312Atlanta4032.55610 Charlotte2942.4082012Washington1754.2393212Central Division WLPctGB y-Chicago5219.732 Indiana3241.43821 Milwaukee2942.40823 Detroit2547.3472712Cleveland1457.19738WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB x-San Antonio5715.792 x-Dallas5121.7086 New Orleans4331.58115 Memphis4033.5481712Houston3834.52819 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City4724.662 Denver4429.6034 Portland4230.583512Utah3638.4861212Minnesota1757.2303112Pacific Division WLPctGB y-L.A. Lakers5220.722 Phoenix3635.5071512Golden State3142.4252112L.A. Clippers2845.3842412Sacramento1952.2683212x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division ___ Thursday's Games Dallas 104, Minnesota 96 New Orleans 121, Utah 117, OT Friday's Games Sacramento 110, Indiana 93 Orlando 95, New Jersey 85 Charlotte 83, Boston 81 Cleveland 97, Detroit 91 Miami 111, Philadelphia 99 Milwaukee 102, New York 96 Chicago 99, Memphis 96 Oklahoma City 111, Minnesota 103 Denver 114, Washington 94 New Orleans 106, Phoenix 100 Portland 98, San Antonio 96 Golden State 138, Toronto 100 L.A. Lakers 112, L.A. Clippers 104 Saturday's Games New Jersey at Atlanta, late New York at Charlotte, late Indiana at Detroit, late Chicago at Milwaukee, late Dallas at Utah, late Toronto at L.A. Clippers, late Sunday's Games Sacramento at Philadelphia, 12 p.m. San Antonio at Memphis, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Cleveland, 6 p.m. Houston at Miami, 6 p.m. Boston at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Portland at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Washington at Golden State, 9 p.m. New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Dallas at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA x-Philadelphia44191098233197 Pittsburgh4423896216182 N.Y. Rangers4030585217181 New Jersey3435573155187 N.Y. Islanders29341270209237 Northeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Boston41221092224176 Montreal4028787200194 Buffalo3728983220210 Toronto34311078199228 Ottawa2937967171228 Southeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA x-Washington43221096203182 Tampa Bay39241189219226 Carolina35291080209220 Atlanta31311274205242 Florida29361068184207WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA Detroit4322995238211 Nashville40251090198177 Chicago4025888238202 Columbus33301177199226 St. Louis3332975206216 Northwest Division WLOTPtsGFGA y-Vancouver49179107243174 Calgary37281185230222 Minnesota3531878185207 Colorado2837864206258 Edmonton23411056176244 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA San Jose4323995220198 Phoenix41241193218208 Los Angeles4226690203180 Anaheim4128587212216 Dallas38251086206206 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division ___ Thursday's Games Ottawa 2, N.Y. Rangers 1, SO Pittsburgh 2, Philadelphia 1, SO Los Angeles 4, San Jose 3, SO Boston 7, Montreal 0 Atlanta 2, N.Y. Islanders 1 St. Louis 4, Edmonton 0 Nashville 5, Anaheim 4 Toronto 4, Colorado 3 Phoenix 3, Columbus 0 Friday's Games Pittsburgh 1, New Jersey 0, SO Buffalo 4, Florida 2 Ottawa 2, Washington 0 Vancouver 3, Atlanta 1 Carolina 4, Tampa Bay 3 Saturday's Games N.Y. Rangers at Boston, late Colorado at Los Angeles, late New Jersey at Buffalo, late Washington at Montreal, late Philadelphia at N.Y. Islanders, late Tampa Bay at Carolina, late Toronto at Detroit, late Dallas at Nashville, late St. Louis at Minnesota, late Anaheim at Chicago, late San Jose at Phoenix, late Calgary at Edmonton, late Sunday's Games Florida at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Ottawa at Atlanta, 2 p.m. Vancouver at Columbus, 5 p.m. Boston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUEWLPct Kansas City1610.615 Detroit1812.600 Minnesota1611.593 Seattle1410.583 Tampa Bay1412.538 Cleveland1312.520 Toronto1312.520 Los Angeles1413.519 Baltimore1213.480 New York1114.440 Oakland1216.429 Texas1115.423 Boston1217.414 Chicago1017.370NATIONAL LEAGUEWLPct Colorado179.654 Milwaukee169.640 Philadelphia1811.621 San Francisco1811.621 Atlanta1610.615 Washington1412.538 Cincinnati1413.519 New York1414.500 San Diego1313.500 St. Louis1313.500 Chicago1316.448 Florida1114.440 Los Angeles1218.400 Pittsburgh1018.357 Houston1120.355 Arizona1122.333 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. ___ Thursday's Games Tampa Bay 11, Houston 3 Minnesota 7, Philadelphia 3 Florida 15, Boston 7 Atlanta 5, Toronto 3 N.Y. Mets 16, St. Louis 3 Milwaukee 11, L.A. Angels 8 L.A. Dodgers 7, Colorado 5 Texas (ss) 15, Cincinnati 13 Kansas City 9, Seattle 8 Oakland 15, Arizona 7 Chicago Cubs 8, Chicago White Sox 7 Washington 5, Detroit 2 Baltimore 11, Pittsburgh 7 San Diego 7, Texas (ss) 4, 10 innings Cleveland 7, San Francisco 1 Friday's Games Florida 6, N.Y. Mets 5 Minnesota 6, Baltimore 5 Tampa Bay 9, Pittsburgh 5 Philadelphia 3, Atlanta (ss) 1 Arizona (ss) 6, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 3 Milwaukee 7, Cleveland 4 San Diego 10, Cincinnati 4 L.A. Angels 10, Oakland 3 Chicago Cubs 6, Seattle (ss) 3 Atlanta (ss) 5, Detroit 3 Washington 3, St. Louis 2 Toronto 11, Boston 8 N.Y. Yankees 6, Houston 4 Kansas City 15, San Francisco 3 Colorado 10, Texas 3 Seattle (ss) 6, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 0 Chicago White Sox 7, Arizona (ss) 3 Saturday's Games St. Louis vs. Florida, late Philadelphia (ss) vs. Detroit, late Baltimore vs. Tampa Bay, late Pittsburgh vs. N.Y. Yankees, late Washington vs. Houston, late Toronto vs. Philadelphia (ss), late Atlanta vs. N.Y. Mets, late L.A. Dodgers vs. San Diego, late Chicago Cubs vs. Texas, late L.A. Angels vs. Chicago White Sox, late Seattle vs. Milwaukee, late Kansas City vs. Arizona, late Cincinnati vs. San Francisco (ss), late Minnesota vs. Boston, late Colorado vs. Oakland, late San Francisco (ss) vs. Cleveland, late Sunday's Games Detroit vs. Houston at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. Florida vs. Washington at Viera, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. Baltimore (ss) at Sarasota, 1:05 p.m. Baltimore (ss) vs. Toronto at Dunedin, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m. Arizona vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Texas vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Colorado (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Oakland vs. Colorado (ss) at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10 p.m. San Diego at L.A. Angels, 5:05 p.m.BASEBALLNational League CHICAGO CUBSAnnounced the retirement of RHP Braden Looper. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid TUESDAY: Baseball hosts Spring Break Tournament,vs.Clewiston,7:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball hosts Spring Break Tournament,vs.Jensen Beach,11 a.m.,vs. LaBelle,2 p.m. Sebring MONDAY: Basball at Lake Placid Spring Break Tournament,vs.Jensen Beach,7:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball vs.Ridge,7 p.m. THURSDAY: Baseball vs.Bartow,7 p.m.; Softball at Kissimmee Klassic,TBA SFCC MONDAY: Baseball at Polk State College,6 p.m. TUESDAY: Softball at Polk State College,5 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball vs.St.Petersburg,6 p.m. THURSDAY: Softball at Hillsborough,5 p.m. Avon Park MONDAY: Baseball vs.Sonrise Christian,7 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball vs.Fort Meade,7 p.m THURSDAY: Baseball vs.DeSoto,7 p.m. A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . IndyCar Izod Series at St. Petersburg . . A A B B C C 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NASCAR Auto Club 400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X XN N H H L L T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Ottawa at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NM M L L B B P P R R E E S S E E A A S S O O N N S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . Colorado at Chicago Cubs . . . . . . . . . . . . W W G G N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Detroit at N.Y. Yankees, Tampa . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NC C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 2 2 : : 1 1 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 4 4 : : 5 5 5 5 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . C C B B S ST TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NIT Tournament Semifinal . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 9 9 p p . m m . NIT Tournament Semifinal . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2W W O O M M E E N N ' S S C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 4 4 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 7 7 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NTimes, games, channels all subject to change G G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Andalucia Open . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Arnold Palmer Invitational . . . . . G G O O L L F F 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Arnold Palmer Invitational . . . . . . N N B B C C 7 7 p p . m m . LPGA Kia Classic .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F FN N B B A A S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . Portland at Oklahoma City . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Dallas at Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Orlando at N.Y. Knicks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NB B O O W W L L I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PBA Dick Weber Playoffs . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N LIVESPORTSONTV NBA NHL MLB Preseason Transactions Page 2CNews-Sun Sunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.co m

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By CLIFFBRUNT Associated PressINDIANAPOLIS D wight Howard isn't worried a bout getting another suspens ion for drawing too many t echnical fouls. The Orlando center already h as missed a game for accum ulating too many and two m ore will cost him a game d uring the regular-season s tretch run. Howard insists h e'll be the "same guy" as the p layoffs approach meani ng he'll continue to hold anim ated conversations with o fficials when he feels he's b een wronged. "Somebody fouls, and a fter the foul they continue to f oul me," Howard said before a game in New York. "I get u pset at the refs because they a llow it to happen, so my t eammates are trying to do a b etter job of coming to cons ole me so I won't say anyt hing else." Playoff seeding, and even p layoff berths, could be dram atically affected by a wrong w ord, a shove or an errant e lbow in the heat of the m oment. The NBA's rule regarding t echnical fouls has come into p lay as teams jockey for p ostseason position. If a player reaches 16, it's a one-game suspension, with a dditional suspensions for e very two technicals therea fter for the rest of the regul ar season. Howard, New York's A mare Stoudemire and C harlotte's Stephen Jackson, a ll leading scorers for their t eams, are dangerously close t o missing a game during the c rucial final games of the r egular season. Orlando is in fourth place i n the East and within reach o f Miami for the Atlantic D ivision title. New York and Philadelphia a re battling for the No. 6 p osition in the East, and C harlotte is chasing Indiana for the No. 8 spot in the conference. Homecourt advantage in the playoffs is determined by a team's regular-season record. Even if a game doesn't affect conference seeding, it could determine whether a team gets homecourt advantage in the NBAfinals. The possibility of missing a key game with so much at stake would seem to be enough to make even surly players try to mind their manners. Their pocketbooks, their reputations, their roles as team leaders are all theoretically at stake. Howard leads the league with 16 technicals as of Friday. New York has a trio of players with double-digit technicals Stoudemire has 15, Carmelo Anthony 13 and Chauncey Billups 10. Anthony, in fact, averages a technical foul every 6.5 games over his career. Jackson has 14. New York coach Mike D'Antoni knows Stoudemire must walk a tightrope, trying to avoid technicals while still playing with emotion. "I think he'll handle himself, and if he can't, then we'll deal with whatever happens," D'Antoni said after Stoudemire drew his 15th back in February. "So I'm going to leave it at that. He's a guy that took us where we are, and I'm not going to go and scrutinize too much because he's a little bit too emotional and plays too hard." Stoudemire received his 16th technical on March 10 against Dallas, but it was later rescinded. Jackson missed a game for Golden State in 2009 for drawing too many technicals. He feels his role in the infamous Pacers-Pistons brawl in 2004 is a significant factor in how he's treated by the referees. He has always spoken his mind and has for the most part, been unapologetic for his behavior. "I get techs because I want to," Jackson said recently. "I don't care. I'm not getting techs for no reason. It happens." www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011Page 3C AVON PARK 452-5800 € SEBRING 382-3363 LAKE PLACID 465-1530When having a talk with your pet doesnt work! 3 ROOMS AND HALLA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 03/31/11.$9900 E.O. Koch Construction1417 Swank Avenue € Sebring, FL 33870(863) 385-8649COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTIONLet our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property, build your dream home,or do your remodeling.For all of your Aluminum,Steel,and Conventional construction needsŽEmail: kochcon@strato.netState Certified License #CGC1515338 € ENGINEERED STEEL BUILDINGS € RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL DESIGN € REMODELING € ALUMINUM € ROOFING€ Carports, Patios, Siding, Fascia€ SEAMLESS GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS p itcher," Coomes said. You've got to swing the b ats. If it's a close pitch, you d on't know what's going to b e called, so you've got to p ut the ball in play." Weber-Callahan, meanw hile, was getting by, though h e gave up another walk in t he fourth and two singles in t he fifth. He was aided, however, in t he fifth when Kyle Barber p icked up a hard grounder to t hird, stepped on the bag and f ired across for a 5-3 double p lay to end the frame. The defense turned another t wo-for-one in the sixth after W eber-Callahan hit a batter w ith one out and Tyler Carr s nared a grounder at short a nd flipped to Miller at seco nd who turned the pivot and f ired to Colby Delaney at f irst to retire the side. "Dylan didn't pitch well," C oomes said. "In fact, that m ight have been his worst g ame of the year. But I give h im credit for gutting it out a nd getting it done." And the offense finally got i t's edge back, helped out by s ome poor fielding and decis ion making by Tenoroc. Barber started things off b y reaching on an error and m oving to second on a wild p itch. With one out, Weaver beat o ut a bunt to put runners on t he corners. Weaver soon stole second a nd Barber came in on a W eber-Callahan ground out. Brandon Wells then foll owed with a single through t he right side to score Weaver b efore Brody Carr reached on a n error. Miller got plunked by a p itch to load the bases with t wo out and Coyne hit one back to the pitcher that looked as if it would end the inning. Perhaps wary of the shoddy fielding during the inning, Titan pitcher Dusty McClain looked to take it himself, racing toward first. But with Coyne hustling down the line, McClain soon saw he wasn't going to win the foot race and flipped the ball toward first baseman Dakota Whigham.. But the flip took an unusually high arc, over the lastminute leap of Whigham and Coyne was safe while two more runs came in. Delaney then bounced one through the right side to score two more. And while Carlos Melo reached on an infield single and Weber-Callahan hit another batter, things soon ended with a comebacker to the mound to get the Dragons back on the winning track. "Even when we were winning, it's not like we were hitting the ball all over the place or playing really well," Coomes said. "But we were doing what we needed and doing the right things at the right time. That's why we keep telling the guys that we need to get better, and we will." They'll have that opportunity this week, with three games in two days as the Dragons host the Spring Break Classic. Lake Placid faces Clewiston Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. and then takes a doubledip Wednesday, facing Jensen Beach at 11 a.m. and turning right around to play LaBelle at 2 p.m. Continued from 1C News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHN E Tyler Carr reaches back to snare this pop-up in short left field as Nevada Weaver stays close by for backup. LP back on winning track News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Kyle Barber battles the setting sun while fielding this onehopper Friday night in Lake Placid's 7-2 win over Tenoroc. squad came up short. "I could attempt to sugar coat it, but can't find the words. Grabbed a 2-0 lead early only to pitch passively again and provide them momentum. "Down 6-2, we got a few runs to get back to even, but in the late innings, when the bats really mattered, we could not get the job done," he continued. "Toughness is very important in key spots in the game and we displayed very little of it tonight." South Florida was back at it Saturday afternoon, hos ting the Hawks and trying to take the rubber-game of t he series before facing Po lk State College on the ro ad Monday and hosting S t. Petersburg Colle ge Wednesday. Continued from 1C SFCC hopes to toughen up News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHN E The Panthers have been squaring it up most of the season, like Pete Williams getting his bat on this pitch, but the timely hits hadn't been coming in their recent six-game slide. Top East players risk suspensions Classified Ads € 385-6155 NEWS-SUN

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Page 4CNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com TO ADVERTISE ON THIS PAGE CALL ANGI 386-5626 Located Inside Inn On The Lakes Hotel € 3100 Golfview Rd. € Sebring, FL863-314-0348 FREE BEERWith Purchase of Appetizer or Entree! Great Golf Value Par 72 Championship Golf Course Golf Instruction & Practice Facility Full-service Caddyshack Restaurant & Bar Sebring GolfClub call 863-314-5919 or online at www.mysebring.com Located off Hwy 27 in Sebring 3118 Golfview Rd., Sebring, FL 33875 To schedule a tee time OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 6 MONTH MEMBERSHIPS NOW AVAILABLE (863) 382-0500 € 3201 Golfview Rd. € Sebring(863) 382-0744for 9 Hole Executive RatesPrices good thru 3/31/10 Incl. Tax & CartMonday thru Friday:8am … 1pm $36By 8, After 1 $29 Saturday & Sunday: $25 RATES YOUVE BEEN DREAMING ABOUT GOLF SEBRINGS FRIENDLIEST GOLF COURSE VOTED #1 LOCAL COURSE 2010 2222 GOLF HAMMOCK DR., SEBRING863-382-2151golfhammockcc@embarqmail.com Coupon Required FRIDAY1:00 pmSHOTGUN SPECIAL $ 24CALL FOR TEE TIMESExpires 03-31-11 18 HOLES7am-8am....$27008am-Noon..$3300Noon-2pm..$2700After 2pm...$2000All Rates Includes Tax 9 HOLES7am-3pm....$1800After 3pm...$1200Weekend Rates7am-2pm....$25002pm Close..$2000 471-ZENO (9366)4325 Sun N Lake Blvd. SebringMon 3 9 Tues-Thurs 11 9 € Fri 11-10 Sat 3-10 € Closed Sunday402-22222934 US 27 S. (Publix Shopping Center) € Sebring Tues -Thur 3 9 € Fri Sat 3 10 Closed Sunday & MondaySERVING HIGHLANDS FOR MORETHAN 25 YEARS 16" Large One Topping PizzaNot valid with any other offer. Expires 03/31/11Monday & Tuesday ONLY $ 10 99 ZENOS WE DELIVER! Special to the News-SunAVON PARK SFCC Athleticswill host a Two Day Fun Sport Selection camp on Thursday and Friday, June 9 and 10 for girls and boys aged 6-16. Each day the camp runs from 9 a.m.-3 p.m., with campers choosing their own sport, whether it is Beach Volleyball, Basketball, Baseball, Softball or Soccer. During the morning portion each day, campers will stretch, do plyometrics, agility drills, work on strength and flexibility, learn arm and body care and get introduced to the Fitness Center. Lunch is then provided with the campers then delving into the sport they chose and wrapping it up with activities in the SFCC pool. Registration and check-in from 8:158:55 a.m., and pre-registration is not necessary as walk-ups are accepted. The rate for one day is $50 and $95 for both days. The camp will be aministered by SFCC head and assistant coaches, with help from SFCC student-athletes. For questions or more information, contact Camp Director and SFCC Athletic Director Rick Hitt at 784-7036. SFCC Panther Fun Camps Special to the News-SunLAKEPLAICD Lake P lacid Youth Baseball and S oftball is accepting registrat ion forms forBaseball ages 1 1-12 Ozone, 13-14and S oftball,ages10-12, 13-15. Forms are available atthe w ebsite www.lpyb.net or call S heri Griffin at 441-1955 for B aseball and Linette Wells at 4 41-2320 for Softball. Registration deadline is Thursday, April 7 for baseball and softball. Player evaluation and draft will be Saturday, April 9 at 1 p.m. no registrations will be accepted after the draft. Player evaluation is mandatory players not present will be randomly assigned to a team. Lake Placid Baseball, Softball sign-ups HOUSEWORK DODGERS High Games Carol Dodzian . . . . . . .189 Barbara Fletcher . . . . . .169 Judy Baggerly . . . . . . .161 Joan Siegel . . . . . . . .161 High Series Shirley Hyzer . . . . . . .530 Kayleen Gray . . . . . . . .484 Jo Shook . . . . . . . . .449 HIGHLANDS WOMEN High Games Lis Hodgson . . . . . . . .202 Pauline Price . . . . . . . .189 Lora Kelly . . . . . . . . .184 High Series Lora Kelly . . . . . . . . .498 Donna Carlson . . . . . . .486 Sylvia Lewis . . . . . . . .485 Pauline Price . . . . . . . .485 HEARTLAND MIXED High Games with handicap Wayne Daffron . . . . . . .281 Anthony Smith . . . . . . .274 Glenn McCullom . . . . . .262 Ronnie Wescott . . . . . .262 Mychelle Deshazo . . . . . .262 Crystal Pagan-Plamann . . .252 Carlis LeBlanc . . . . . . .241 High Series with handicap George Corcoran . . . . . .754 Tim O'Leary . . . . . . . .736 Dewey Lehman . . . . . . .720 Norma Vezina . . . . . . .700 Donna Smith . . . . . . .695 Cindy Darling . . . . . . .676 MIXED NUTS High Games Ted Watson . . . . . . . .204 Gil Bass . . . . . . . . .204 Valerie Brodbeck . . . . . .183 Bobby Taylor . . . . . . . .170 Maria Castilow . . . . . . .145 Judy Bateman . . . . . . .144 High Series Roger Swanson . . . . . .658 Kay Gray . . . . . . . . .493 Willie McGowan . . . . . .488 Tim O'Leary . . . . . . . .485 Joan Siegel . . . . . . . .446 Jo Shook . . . . . . . . .419R R o o y y a a l l P P a a l l m m s s B B o o w w l l i i n n g g C C e e n n t t e e r r L L e e a a g g u u e e S S c c o o r r e e s s a nd are fun to watch as t hey forage for food. Armadillos can't see v ery well, so you can sneak u p fairly close if you are q uiet. Frogs and toads fascinate k ids, and there are more t han 25 native species in F lorida. These amphibians sing o n spring and summer n ights, especially if there h as been a recent rain. Learning their calls can b e challenging, but fun. If there is a source of w ater nearby, you're likely t o find some. If you catch any, don't f orget to wash your hands w ell after letting them go. Remember to be respectful of the animals you observe. Always handle insects and amphibians gently and return them where you found them. Also, white or bright lights at night can disturb wildlife, so try to minimize the amount of light you use. The best method is to use a red filter for your flashlight. Red lights don't bother wildlife as much, so you are likely to see more animals scurrying around. In addition, if you want to attract more nocturnal animals to your backyard, consider installing owl boxes, bat houses or a shelter for tree frogs. Learn about the animals yourself, so that when you do run across one, you'll have some fun facts to pass along to your kids when they ask questions. Or, look up any animals you find with your children when you get back inside; go to MyFWC.com/Wildlife Cornell University Lab of Ornithology has a good bird guide, and the University of Florida's Florida Wildlife Extension lists frogs and toads. Also, your child might enjoy combing through BugGuide.net for moths and other insects, using the clickable guide. Make your nature adventures a regular feature, and your children or grandchildren will begin looking forward to getting outdoors. This is quality family time. Remember to make it fun and a hands-on experience. Soon your children will be telling you about the critters, and you will have helped create a future conservationist. For other ideas how you can preserve Florida's natural heritage and get children outside, go to MyFWC.com/Youth. Continued from 1C Prowls can discover a littany of night life Tubbs, Emily Smith and Cassandra Marentes won in a time of 12:20, with Tubbs then also going on to win the 1,600 in 6:18. The Streaks also got a win in both hurdles events from Destiny McCartney and Christina Gourley won the 3,200-meter run in 16:11. Sebring then got three wins in field events, with Shalantay Rose wining the triple jump with a leap of 30-feet, 10-inches, Emily Helterhoff winning the high jump by clearing 4feet, 6-inches and in shot p ut with Keaundra Bowens puttin g the shot 28-feet, 11-inches. The Lady Red Devils sa w four wins on the day wi th Angelique Ligon taking two of them individually in the 10 0 (11.93) and 200 (25.05). Avon Park's 4X100 rel ay team then raced to a win in 51.85 and Zakia Hart flung t he discus 81-feet, 4-inches for t he top mark in the event. Both teams now can rel ax with spring break before th ey return to action, heading to Lake Placid Tuesday, April 5 Continued from 1C Track at LP April 5 By TIM REYNOLDS Associated PressMIAMI Like any coach, M iami's Erik Spoelstra has p lenty of things to say they're j ust not always overly original. It's one of the top challenges f or any coach as a season u nfolds, finding the balance b etween preaching a certain way of doing things and not making it sound like you're saying the same thing every day. Spoelstra acknowledges that it's sometimes difficult to keep the dialogue fresh. He has been known to use buzzwords for many weeks, if not months, at a time but clearly, the Heat are listening. Spoelstra's message to Heat rarely varies Associated PressKISSIMMEE Houston Astros shortstop Clint Barmes has a broken left hand and is expected to miss four to six weeks. Barmes had X-rays Saturday morning that revealed the injury. He was hit just abo ve the wrist by a pitch from t he Yankees'Ivan Nova in Frid ay night's exhibition game. Tommy Manzella was call ed back up from the Triple-Aro ster just two days after bein g sent down. Astros SS Barmes breaks hand

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, March 27, 2011Page 5C 3310 Hwy. 27 South Sebring, FL33870 EOE E-mail: resumesebring@crosscountry-auto.comFor more information about Cross Country Automotive Services,we encourage you to visit our website at: www.CrossCountry-Auto.co mNow Hiring Full & Part Time Customer Service AssociatesStarting at $9.00 per hourPlus Bilingual English/Spanish DifferentialComprehensive Benefit Package Michael Babington Associate of the MonthI love the feelng of helping people around the country when they are in need after having car troubles or accidentsŽ … Michael Babington Be a HERO like Michael Babington863-402-2786Cross Country is a great employer, and I feel privileged to work here!Ž… Michael BabingtonSupervisor positions available 2227 U.S. 27 SOUTH SEBRING, FL 33870The News-Sun has openings for newspaper carriers in Avon Park, and Sebring. Reliable transportation, valid driver's license and insurance a must. Interested parties should stop in our Sebring office and complete an application or call 385-6155 ext. 522.Make Money While Everyone Else Sleeps! WITH A DELIVERY ROUTE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. GC-10-403 RIVERSIDE NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA, Plaintiff, vs. ANDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, INC. N/K/A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company; and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S), WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR LIVING, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND/OR JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 14, 2011, in Case No. GC-10-402, in the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which TD BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and ANDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, INC. N/K/A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Highlands County Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room located in the basement of the Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on April 14, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: LOT 6, IN BLOCK 52, OF ORANGE BLOSSOM COUNTRY CLUB COMMUNITY UNITS 13 THROUGH 19 INCLUSIVE UNIT 15, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA The Real Property Address is: 10200 South Orange Blossom Boulevard, Sebring, Florida 33875 The Parcel ID Number is: C-24-35-28-150-0520-0060 Anyone claiming interest in the surplus from the sale, other than the person who was the record property owner when the Lis Pendens was filed, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of March, 2011. Highlands County Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA The Real Property Address is: 10448 South Orange Blossom Boulevard, Sebring, Florida 33875 The Parcel ID Number is: C-24-35-28-160-0590-0030 Anyone claiming interest in the surplus from the sale, other than the person who was the record property owner when the Lis Pendens was filed, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of March, 2011. Highlands County Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk March 27; April 3, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. GC-10-402 RIVERSIDE NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA, Plaintiff, vs. ANDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, INC. N/K/A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company; and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S), WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR LIVING, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND/OR JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 14, 2011, in Case No. GC-10-402, in the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which TD BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and ANDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, INC. N/K/A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Highlands County Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room located in the basement of the Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on April 14, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: LOT 3, IN BLOCK 59, OF ORANGE BLOSSOM COUNTRY CLUB COMMUNITY UNITS 13 THROUGH 19 INCLUSIVE UNIT 16, ACCORDING IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA Case #: GCS 10-1019 CARLA RENEE BENNETT, Personal Representative ESTATE OF DAVID L. MARSH, Deceased Plaintiff(s), vs. GREGORY LEON CORRELL, a/k/a Gregory Correll, DENNIS ALLEN CONNERS, a/k/a Dennis A. Conners II, DANIELLE MARIE CONNERS, a/k/a Danielle Conners, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Department of Justice, JOSE QUINONES, GERARD SERVICES INC., COMMONWEALTH FINANCIAL SYSTEMS, INC., and CITY OF AVON PARK, FLORIDA, et al Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final decree of foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Highlands County, Florida, described as: Lot 1, LESS the West 75 feet in Block 2, of H E COYS SUBDIVISION, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 9, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Commerce Street Entrance of the Highlands County Courthouse in Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 18th day of April, A.D. 2011. WITNESS my hand and official seal of this Honorable Court, this 15th day of March A.D. 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of said Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk March 20, 27, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. GC-10-401 RIVERSIDE NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA, Plaintiff, vs. ANDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, INC. N/K/A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company; and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S), WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR LIVING, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND/OR JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 14, 2011, in Case No. GC-10-401, in the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which TD BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and ANDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, INC. N/K/ A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC, the Cler k of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Highlands County Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room located in the basement of the Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on April 14, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: LOT 2, IN BLOCK 59, OF ORANGE BLOSSOM COUNTRY CLUB COMMUNITY UNITS 13 THROUGH 19 INCLUSIVE UNIT 16, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA The Real Property Address is: 10452 South Orange Blossom Boulevard, Sebring, Florida 33875 The Parcel ID Number is: C-24-35-28-160-0590-0020 Anyone claiming interest in the surplus from the sale, other than the person who was the record property owner when the Lis Pendens was filed, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of March, 2011. Highlands County Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michala k Deputy Cler k March 27; April 3, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 19th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR SAINT LUCIE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 562011CA000074 OCULINA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. BAILEY WATSON, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company; LLOYD WATSON and PAULA WATSON, his wife; GARY L. WATSON; ERROL S. WATSON; CRAIG WATSON; Unknown Spouse of CRAIG WATSON; et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment Of Foreclosure dated March 10th, 2011, in Case No. 562011CA000074, in the Circuit Court of the Nineteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Saint Lucie County, Florida, in which OCULINA BANK is the Plaintiff and BAILEY WATSON, LLC, LLOYD WATSON, PAULA WATSON, GARY L. WATSON, ERROL S. WATSON, CRAIG WATSON, and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CRAIG WATSON are the Defendants, Auctioneer, Frederick W. Baker of Indian River Auctions & Appraisals, Florida License #FL AU 1526, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash the following described parcels of property set forth in the Final Judgment Of Foreclosure, to-wit: Parcel I Tract "Q", PORT ST. LUCIE SECTION THIRTY-ONE, a subdivision, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 14, Page(s) 22, 22A through 22G, Public Records of St. Lucie County, Florida, shall be auctioned on Wednesday, April 27, 2011, at 10:00 A.M. at the property site in Saint Lucie County, Florida, which is 1775 S.W. Gatlin Boulevard, Port St. Lucie, Florida 34972 Parcel II A part of Section 17, Township 35 South, Range 40 East, described as follows: The East Half of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter, and the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter, less the North 75 feet and less the East 40 feet thereof. This property is located at the Southwest corner of Peterson Road and South 37th Street, Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Florida,shall be auctioned on Wednesday, April 27, 2011, at 4:00 P.M. at the property site in Saint Lucie County, Florida; and Parcel III Lots 1 to 39, inclusive, Block 48 and closed street contiguous thereto, Lots 1 to 41, inclusive, Block52 and all of Block 51 and contiguous closed alley less road right of way and less Lots 53 through 58 and less the South 10 feet of Lot 59, UNIT ONE, LAKE LILLIAN SECTION HIGHLAND LAKES SUBDIVISION, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 77, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida, shall be auctioned on Thursday, April 28, 2011, at 11:00 A.M. at the property site in Highlands County, Florida. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN a distance of 34.60 feet to the Point of Beginning. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room located in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes (2010), at 11:00 o'clock A.M. on the 4th day of April, 2011. NOTICE: Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. SIGNED this 8th day of April, 2011. ROBERT GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk March 20, 27, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NUMBER: GCS10-1217 BAY STREET VILLAS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Plaintiff, -vsSAMUEL R. CARR and WILLIAM C. THOMPSON, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final decree of foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida, described as: BAY STREET VILLAS #3, Being a portion of Lot 18, Block 89-A, TOWN OF SEBRING, according tothe plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 24, of the Public Recordsof Highlands County, Florida, more fully described as follows: Commencing at the Southeast corner of Lot 18, Block 89-A, Town of Sebring, as per plat recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 24, of the Public Recordsof Highlands County, Florida; thence North 15 degrees 10'00'' West, along the Easterly line of Lot 18, for a distance of 19.00 feet; thence South 75 degrees 00'00'' West, for a distanceof 5.32 feet; thence North 15 degrees 00'00'' West, for a distance of 41.60 feet for Point of Beginning; thence continue North 15 degrees 00'00'' West, for a distance of 20.80 feet; thence South 75 degrees 00'00'' West, for a distance of 34.60 feet; thence South 15 degrees 00' 00'' East, for a distance of 20.80 feet; thence North 75 degrees 00'00'' East, for IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 10-1363 GCS CITY OF AVON PARK, a Florida Municipal Corporation, Plaintiff, vs. JOSE H. GOMES DeFREITAS, Defendant. NOTICE OF SUIT-PROPERTY TO: Jose H. Gomes DeFreitas, and all other parties or persons claiming by or through him, P.O. Box 3540 Curacao Korsou in Papiamentu YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose on the following property in Highlands County, Florida: Lot 4 and the East 1/2 of Lot 5, Block 6, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Transcript Book, Page 19, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to Loretta J. Thompson, Esquire, MCCLURE & LOBOZZO, 211 South Ridgewood Drive, Sebring, FL 33870, the Plaintiff's attorney, and file the original with the Clerk of the above styled court on or before April 20, 2011; otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 23rd day of March, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: /s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator 255 N. Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863)534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 27; April 3, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-89 IN RE: ESTATE OF GRACE LEONA RUTT A/K/A GRACE L. RUTT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of GRACE LEONA RUTT A/K/A GRACE L. RUTT, deceased, whose date of death was December 5, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 18, 2011. Personal Representatives: /s/ Carol M. Farkash 2200 Keiper Road Quakertown, Pennsylvania 18951 /s/ Hannah M. Eppel 2740 Nautilus Drive Avon Park, Florida 333825 A ttorney for Personal Representatives: / s/ Clifford M. Ables III A TTORNEY for CAROL M. FARKASH Florida Bar Number: 178379 CLIFFORD M. ABLES, III, P.A. 551 SOUTH COMMERCE AVE. SEBRING, FL 33870 Telephone: (863) 385-0112 Fax: (863) 385-1284 March 27; April 3, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-114 IN RE: ESTATE OF DAVID CARL AMBURN a.k.a. DAVID C. AMBURN a.k.a. DAVID AMBURN NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of DAVID CARL AMBURN a.k.a. DAVID C. AMBURN a.k.a. DAVID AMBURN, deceased, whose date of death was March 3, 2011, and whose social security number is xxx-xx-2994, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce A venue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) Y EARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 27, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Forrest H. Hilton P.O. Box 1850 Avon Park, Florida 33826 A ttorney for Personal Representative: / s/ David F. Lanier E-Mail Address: lanier@embarqmail.com Florida Bar No. 045399 DAVID F. LANIER P.O. Box 400 A von Park, Florida 33826-0400 Telephone: (863)453-4457 March 27; April 3, 2011 1050Legals 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Sebring, as per plat recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 24, of the Public Recordsof Highlands County, Florida; thence North 15 degrees 10'00'' West, along the Easterly line of Lot 18, for a distance of 19.00 feet; thence South 75 degrees 00'00'' West, for a distanceof 5.32 feet; thence North 15 degrees 00'00'' West, for a distance of 41.60 feet for Point of Beginning; thence continue North 15 degrees 00'00'' West, for a distance of 20.80 feet; thence South 75 degrees 00'00'' West, for a distance of 34.60 feet; thence South 15 degrees 00' 00'' East, for a distance of 20.80 feet; thence North 75 degrees 00'00'' East, for adistance of 34.60 feet to the Point of Beginning. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room located in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes (2010), at 11:00 o'clock A.M. on the 4th day of April, 2011. NOTICE: Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. SIGNED this 8th day of April, 2011. ROBERT GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk March 20, 27, 2011 Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 Classified ads get fast results Highlands County Sheriffs OfficeSusan Benton Sheriff 434 Fernleaf Avenue Sebring, Florida 33870Integrity € Quality Service € ProfessionalismCOMPUTER TECHNICIAN Apply at 434 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring, FL 33870 (863) 402-7218 Drug Free Workplace/E.O.E./A.D.E.A./Veterans Preference BACKGROUND CHECKS WILL BE CONDUCTED (Civilian Position)Starting Salary: $14.71 hourlyCLOSING D A TE: 04/01/11 JOIN OUR TEAM OF DEDICA TED PROFESSIONALS The Computer Technician responsibilities include maintaining a large 24 hour a day network and mobile computer operation. € High school diploma or G.E.D. € Dell certification or ability to attain within 6 months of hire. € Certification Pr efer ences : Cisco CCNA Certificate, CompTia A+ Certificate, CompTia Network+ Certificate, Microsoft Certifications.Paid benefits include State of Florida Retirement, health/dental/life insurance, paid vacation and sick leave. CLASSIFIED

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Page 6CNews-Sun Sunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.co m IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. GC-10-405 RIVERSIDE NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA, Plaintiff, vs. A NDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTA NTS, INC. N/K/A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTA NTS, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company; and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S), WHO A RE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR LIVING, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM A N INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE A ND/OR JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO A CCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 14, 2011, in Case No. GC-10-402, in the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which TD BANK, NATIONAL A SSOCIATION is Plaintiff and ANDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, INC. N/K/A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Highlands County Courthouse, Jury A ssembly Room located in the basement of the Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on April 14, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: LOT 2, IN BLOCK 52, OF ORANGE BLOSSOM COUNTRY CLUB COMMUNITY UNITS 13 THROUGH 19 INCLUSIVE UNIT 15, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA The Real Property Address is: 10216 South Orange Blossom Boulevard, Sebring, Florida 33875 The Parcel ID Number is: C-24-35-28-150-0500-0020 A nyone claiming interest in the surplus from the sale, other than the person who was the record property owner when the Lis Pendens was filed, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of March, 2011. Highlands County Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk March 27; April 3, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. GC-10-404 RIVERSIDE NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA, Plaintiff, vs. A NDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTA NTS, INC. N/K/A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTA NTS, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company; and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S), WHO A RE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR LIVING, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM A N INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE A ND/OR JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO A CCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 14, 2011, in Case No. GC-10-402, in the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which TD BANK, NATIONAL A SSOCIATION is Plaintiff and ANDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, INC. N/K/A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Highlands County Courthouse, Jury A ssembly Room located in the basement of the Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on April 14, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: LOT 1, IN BLOCK 59, OF ORANGE BLOSSOM COUNTRY CLUB COMMUNITY UNITS 13 THROUGH 19 INCLUSIVE UNIT 16, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA The Real Property Address is: 10456 South Orange Blossom Boulevard, Sebring, Florida 33875 The Parcel ID Number is: C-24-35-28-160-0590-0010 A nyone claiming interest in the surplus from the sale, other than the person who was the record property owner when the Lis Pendens was filed, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of March, 2011. Highlands County Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk March 27; April 3, 2011 1050Legals Spring Lake Improvement District Personnel Policies Workshop The Board of Supervisors of the Spring Lake Improvement District will conduct a Personnel Policies workshop on Wednesday, April 13, 2011, 12:30 p.m. at the District Office, 115 Spring Lake Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33876 and will be attended by Supervisors, Management Personnel, and District Advisors; it is open to the Public. The purpose of the workshop is to review and update personnel policies and procedures. EACH PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION BY THE BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THE MEETING IS ADVISED THAT PERSON MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, INCLUDING THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH SUCH APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. Joe DeCerbo District Manager March 27, 2011 DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 385-6155 PROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORYPROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY Install doors, windows, flooring, plumbing & more!Licensed & InsuredLic# HM0096HANDYMAN BOBCall 863-452-5201 or 863-449-1744 Service € Repair € Supplies € Equipment Delivered Right to your DoorPool Service & Mobile Retail(863) 382-7728Fax (863) 402-2200 poolparadise101@aol.com www.poolparadiseonline.com Brad & Julie Kurtz Phone (863) 382-7551 FAX (863) 382-2750 1405 US 27 North Sebring, FL33870 C A M P B E L L  S S C O L L I S I O N C E N T E R , I N C Jim Campbell Owner DID YOU KNOW?THENEWSSUNPROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY ISONEOFTHEMOSTECONOMICAL&EFFECTIVEMEANSOFADVERTISINGTODAY? CALLANITA@ 863-385-6155OREMAIL: amarsella@newssun.com FORDETAILS!! WANDA KLINE WEIGHT LOSS & WELLNESSSee what one drop of your blood indicates as to YOUR nutritional health and well-being. By appointment only863-414-4066 LIVEBLOODANALYSISŽ &WILLIAMSJANITORIALCARPETCLEANING$1095 Per Room3 Rooms Minimum € Upholstery Cleaning € All Types of Flooring € Free EstimatesLic € Bonded € Ins(863) 214-1940 863-465-7491TREE SERVICE,INC.Joe Johnsons TRIMMING € REMOVAL SOD INSTALLATION € STUMP GRINDING LOT CLEARING € PRESSURE CLEANING Will Beat Any Written Estimate!Peoples Choice Award Free Estimates Licensed & Insured Avon Park (863) 453-2525 Lake Placid (863) 699-2525 Lake Wales (863) 679-9200 Sebring (863) 382-1515 Wauchula (863) 767-1515Sebring Fax (863) 382-9939 W al-Mart Loca tions: Lake Wales (863) 676-0569 Sebring (863) 385-5371 Avon Park (863) 452-7010 INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED No job is too small. We can take care of all your home repairs and maintenance needs.€ Small Flooring Jobs € Some Electric & Plumbing863-381-6677 Free Estimates Rogers Handyman ServicesRoger McCartney JRlicensed and insured 20 Years experience Excellent References Daily Weekly BiweeklyMonthly Janitorial Service Recently Relocated to Lake Placid Sebring Looking To Build New Clientele 863-243-1801 / Shelly A long$1000per hour Fair and Honest Service Based on Christian ValuesAre You or a Loved One Living Alone?€ Safety/Wellness Visitations € Life Management Assistance € Nursing Home Visitation & Reporting € Errand/Concierge ServicesPersonal Concierge Services€ item pick-up/delivery € grocery shopping € courier/delivery € petsitting € pet transport to vet or groomer € home security checks € meal pick-up/delivery € plus much,much more!!! (863) 382-8825www .kbcar eandconcier ge.com Trustworthy, Insured & Experienced Freedom Lawn CareGet the freedom you deserveCarl Horton ~OwnerVet. & Sr. Discount € Lawn Maintenance € Landscaping € Small Tree Work € Clean Ups € Free Estimates863-655-2526 W e d d i n g g C h a p e l o f f L o v e Romantic Weddings Renewal Of Vows Commitment Ceremonies Designs For Your Cherished Moments Will Come To Your Location 4 Ministers on Staff863-385-5673 Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 Nest Egg Bookeeping, Inc.Why pay accounting fees for bookkeeping? € Monthly Bill Pay € Bank Reconciliations € Correspondence € Insurance/Medicare AssistanceCall to see how we can help youƒ863-385-0888NESTEGGBOOK@YAHOO.COMSpecializing in individuals Ser vice A vailable 7 Days A W eek Website: extraordinaireairconditioning.com EXTRAORDINAIRE HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING LLC 863-451-2399Mike & Kandy Sheldone CEO/Owner Lic# CAC 1816569All Service Calls $40 € Free Estimates € Licensed & Insured € Will Meet or Beat Any Price Family Owned &Operated with over 6 years experience Addison Lawn Care 863-441-0055 A Precise CutYARDCLEANUP, FULLLAWNCARE, HEDGETRIMMING& MORECOMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIALFor all your lawn needs,call Larry at381-0584for a Free Estimate & Great Service! Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 Serving Highlands & Hardee County 10 Years Experience … PC Repair Service Software Installation Custom Built Computers Virus & Ad Ware Removal Home & Small Business Networking Free Estimates … Pickup … DeliverySAW ComputersCall Stephen at 863-832-9556 Email: Stephen.wingo@yahoo.com Artisans€ Home & Drywall Repairs € Painting (Interior & Exterior) € Pressure Washing € Free Estimates € Licensed & Insured 863-368-0774REMODELING

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun March 27, 2011Page 7C 2009 TOYOTACAMRY LE 4-door, low mileage, excellent conditon. Aloe green w/beige interior, $13,900. 863-465-5262 9450Automotive for Sale 9000 TransportationCONCEALED WEAPONSCLASS JIM'S PISTOLARROW 12135 US Hwy 98 April 15th, 6 p.m. Call for Info: 863-655-4505 8350Sporting Goods 8000 RecreationSCOOTER -Like new Guardian 3 TEK scooter & Harmar lift for inside vehicle. New would be $1200. Will sell both for $600 863-655-6212 7560Medical Supplies& Equipment PIT BULL8 months old, all shots, sweet & loving, gray and white, good with children. For more information Call 305-490-5399NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states tha t all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & Supplies AVON PARKLAKES Sunday Mar. 27th, 8am 3pm. Furniture, clothes, household items. Much Much More! No Early Birds!! AVON PARKMulti Family Sale! 2603 N Rochester Rd. Fri Sat Sun 3/25 -26-27, 8am ? Hobby tools, stove, motorcycle, clothing & shoes, Household items. Too Much To List! 7320Garage &Yard Sales WOODEN WHITEspiral reupholstered padded chairs (2) both for $40 863-382-6006 VACUUM -Upright, excellent condition, clean as a whistle! $20 863-402-2285 TYPEWRITER -SHARP electric $30 863-471-2502 TIRES -Goodyear Assurance, (4) 195 / 60R15. $100 863-385-3988 RACING GOCART, brand new motor 5.hp, needs seat and throttle cable and some brake work. $100 863-451-2886 MICHELIN TIRES4 14inch. all for $50 obo 863-214-6697 GLASSWARE -Name brand collectible, $75 obo. 863-214-6697 DESK CHAIRBlack / chrome / arms / casters. Black upholstery, ex. cond. $25 863-446-0972 BOOKS WESTERNS,20 for $12. CALL 863-385-1563 ANTIQU CHAIRBrown upholstery, very good cond. $25 obo 863-446-0972 7310Bargain Buys PROFORM CROSSWALK treadmill. Excellent condition. $150 863-453-3079 GENERATORS (2)4000 watt, $200; 4300 watt, $250. Both Good Condition. 863-453-3032 7300Miscellaneous 7180Furniture 7000 Merchandise SEBRING (2)Available 3926 Kenilworth Blvd, 1500 sq ft, $550/mo : A/C, office, BA, lg overhead door, near Sebring High School. 640 Park St, 6400 sq ft, $2500/mo : A/C, office, BA, 8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric, fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway. 941-416-2813 AVON PARKLarge Retail/Office Building, 100 E. Main St. A MUST SEE! 863-295-9272 6750Commercial RentalHISTORIC DOWNTOWNSEBRING SECURE workshop /warehouse units 500 800 sq. ft. 8' & 12' rollup doors. Small deposit, No lease required. $200 to $400 per month. Lights included. 863-414-7174 or 863-458-9020 6550Warehousesfor RentSEBRING HILLSAREA Looking for single individual to share homes with full use of house. No deposit. All ages may apply. 863-3857771 6450Roommates WantedSEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, W/D, Satellite, full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for Rent SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 LAKE PLACID3/BR, 1 1/2 BA, Carport, 1011 Jonquil St. 1st and Last Security deposit. $600 Monthly. 863-465-3959 LAKE PLACIDPet Friendly! Near Lake Placid Boat Ramp with lake access. Unfurnished 1BR, 1BA with appliances and A/C. $500/mo. + $500 security deposit. 863-465-1354 6300Unfurnished Houses SEBRING -Small nicely furnished house 1BR, 1BA. Deposit $100. Monthly $375 with 6 month lease. Pay own electric. 863-385-1806 SEBRING -Country Club of Sebring. 2BR, 2BA, den, lanai, pool, beautifully furnished/decorated. Available April 1st. Call 863-386-0340. 6250Furnished Houses LAKE PLACIDNewly remodled! 2/BR, 2/BA Apt/Duplex, Washer / Dryer, Excellent Conditio n. Includes water. $500 monthly plus 1 mo. security. 954-695-8348 LAKE PLACID1BR, 1BA, furnished or unfurnished. GREAT LOCATION! in quiet adult community. $450/mo. + security. 863-465-5262 AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; Washer/Dryer, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook ups. Students/Seniors Discount Call 863-452-0469. 6200UnfurnishedApartments AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL : $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 SEBRING -2BR, 2BA. Tile floors, fresh paint. Includes water. $600/mo. Call Gary Johnson, 863-381-1861. 6200UnfurnishedApartments 6000 RentalsWHISPERING PINESVILLAGE 55 plus. 3BR, 3BA, partially furnished. Must see to appreciate. Pay own utilities. Call Mary 863-385-8806 5150Mobile HomesFor RentPALM HARBORHOMES has closed 2 Model Centers. Save up to 60K on select models. Call 1-800-622-2832. 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesATTENTION: CASH for your Home, Duplex, Apartment, Commercial Property. Rapid Closing, "As Is Condition. 863-441-2689 STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL 4320Real Estate WantedESTERO, FLLIKE NEW 3BR, 2BA, 2CG Duplex in gated community with clubhouse and heated pool. Quiet area, yet convenient to shopping, entertainment, etc. Asking $195,000. Will consider trade for home in Sebring/Highlands County, FL area. Call 239-498-1183. 4300Out-of-TownPropertyOPEN HOUSE Saturday, March 26, 13 PM, Sunday, March 27, 13 PM. Charming 3BR, 2BA, like new, lakefront home, completely furnished. Make offer. 3233 Lake Hill Dr. Lake Placid 954-684-3058 4100Homes for SaleLake Placid SEBRING -VANTAGE Pte. single 2/BR, 2/BA, split plan, 16'X20' LR, dining area, fam. rm., screened patio, ample garage. Walk to club house / pool. Asking $115,000 w/ major furnishings. Call 863-471-3769 for info. SEBRING -Quiet Neighborhood on great fishing lake; 2,000 sf, 3BR, 2.5BA remodeled home with large garage & boat house. $219,000. 863-655-2278 MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE! SEBRING NO NEED FOR A BANK! Owner Financing 3BR, 1BA remodeled, NICE HOME! Woodlawn Elem. area. 1243 Fernvale Ave. 863-227-2717 4080Homes for SaleSebringSEBRING -RURAL LIVING adjacent to great fishing lake close to Sebring. 3BR, 2BA home, pole barn, 5 acres fenced, zoned agriculture $150,000. 863-655-2278 Make Offer! 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 FinancialJEWELRY SALESat Lakeshore Mall. Exciting job for right person with positive attitude people person out going personable friendly! Apply at 3$ cart, next to Food Court. 2100Help Wanted TRUCK DRIVEROver-the-Road. Must be able to stay out 3 + weeks at a time. Verifiable experience necessary. Clean driving record a must! Mechanical knowledge a plus. For application or information Call 863-452-5959. SUNRISE COMMUNITYINC is currently accepting applications for the position of: Direct Support Staff. Qualified applicants must meet the following: 18 yrs. old, High school diploma or equivalent, 1 yr. experience medical, or childcare setting, must be able to pass law enforcement background screening and drug test. All interested can call for appt. and application informaton: Sunrise Community Inc. 1014 6th Ave. S., Wauchula, Fl. 33873. 863-773-0434 ext. 305 EOE / DFWP SALES /ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Central Florida Ag News Magazine, Highlands County Edition. Advertising experience required. Email resume to: nelson@centralfloridamediagroup.com "WAUCHULA CHURCHSeeking Part Time Worship leader. Call 863-773-4267, 8am 12:30 pm, hourly and travel comp." 2100Help WantedPAGE DESIGNERIf you enjoy Page Design, this is for you. The News Sun is looking for the right person to help design its news page. Candidates must be exp'd in Quark and Photoshop, as well as have good news judgment. Able to work quickly with min. supervision is necessary. Exp. in Illustrator and In Design is a plus. This position is 20 hrs. hrs. may be flexible. Send sample of work with resume to: humanresources@new ssun.com or Fax to: 352-365-1951 Attn. Human Resources Director, or drop off at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL. Drug test and background check required. EOE 2100Help WantedHIRING: PRNMEDICAL ASSISTANT (w/Phlebotomy skills) Details @ www.flcancer.com 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentLILLIE HILTON'SFamily Home Child Care now taking applications for NIGHT CARE, ages 0-12 yrs accepted. Eve shift 6:00 pm to 6:00 am. Over 30 years exp. 863-453-6439. Lic #F10HI0515 1500Child Care ServicesCHECK YOUR ADPlease check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day y our ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:314-9876 News-Sun Classified 1100AnnouncementsHaving something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what you're doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 385-6155. WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 385-6155. Then shop till you drop! If you enjoy page design, this job is for you. The News-Sun is looking for the right person to help design its news pages. The right candidate must be experienced in Quark and Photoshop, as well as have good news judgment. The ability to work fast with minimal supervision is also necessary. Experience in Illustrator and InDesign is a plus. This position is for 20 hours hours may be flexible. Send sample of work with resume to humanresources@newssun.com or fax to 3852.365.1951 Attention: HumanResources Director, or drop off at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring. Drug test and background check required. EOE Royal Care of Avon ParkAre you tired of being under appreciated, under trained and over worked? What if there was someplace different? At Royal Care you will “nd that place. We currently have the following positions open: Nurses Full Time Restorative Nurse (RN) C.N.A.s Full Time All Shifts Dietary Full Time Dietary Aid Full Time Cook 1213 W Stratford Rd. Avon Park, FL 33825(863) 453-6674EOE M/F DFWP its not just about making the sale anymoreƒ ƒits about building trustƒits about being a part of the communityƒits about helping businesses grow Do you love selling a product you believe in? Are you committed to excellence? If so, were interested in talking to you!The News-Sun is actively seeking a dynamic sales professional that knows the difference between just making a saleŽ and building a solid and dependable relationship with a client.Ž If you are a sales oriented individual who is self-motivated, customer oriented and possess exceptional communication and organizational skills, consider joining our team. Candidates will be required to maintain established accounts while developing new clientele and working closely with area business organizations. Transportation required. Base salary plus commission, mileage, paid time off, health insurance, 401K & more. Email resumes to humanresources@newssun.com or fax to 352.365.1951 Attention: Human Resources Director or drop off at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring its about finding the right person The Avon Park Housing Authority is now taking applications for North Central Heights Homes, a new Rent RestrictedŽ single family home development in Avon Park consisting of 20 Two Bedroom, 46 Three Bedroom and 4 Four Bedroom homes. Rents will average in the low $400s for 2 br. homes and low to mid $500 & $600s for the 3 & 4 Br. homes. Applications open for Avon Park residents only; February 14 … March 11, 2011 and all other applicants after March 11, 2011. For further information, contact: Avon Park Housing Authority at 863-452-4432, Ext. 2220 AVON PARKAFFORDABLE RENTRidgedale Apartments1, 2, 3 & 4 Br Apts Central Location, water & trash included Rent subsidized „ Based on household income. No Application Fee Call 863-452-4432 TTY 800-955-8771 EQUAL HOUSINGOPPORTUNITY NEW FURNITURE FOR LESS! HIGHPOINT FURNITURE OUTLET STORE 2346 U.S. 27 N, SEBRINGNorthofLowes&acrossfrom HomeDepot

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Page 8CNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com WHATS HOPPIN AROUND TOWN?Subscribe today and “nd out! Call 863-385-6155 for home deliverywww.newssun.com

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LIVING D SECTION Inside This Section Arts & Entertainment3D Books7D Community Calendar5D Crossword Puzzle2D Dear Abby2D Horoscope2D News-Sun Sunday, March 27, 2011FAMILYFEATURES W hen Megan Webber downloaded family photos off her digital camera, she found the usual problems that need touching up some were too dark, some were a little grainy, and some needed a little red-eye removal. Some of the pictures of her 5-year-old son, B enjamin, had a golden glow in his left eye. "Benjamin has always had a freckle in his left eye," said Megan, so I thought the flash was just a difference due to the coloring of his e ye and ignored it I even did red-eye correction to remove it from p hotos." But when her sister noticed that same glow in some family v acation pictures she had taken, she gave Megan a concerned call. "She said it was probably nothing. But she had seen on a television s how that this could be a sign of a tumor in the eye and recommended I have him seen," said Megan. Benjamin's pediatrician didn't find anything, but he sent them to a s pecialist who urged them to come in right away. They were stunned t o learn he was legally blind in his left eye. "He'd never bumped into walls or rubbed his eyes he'd even j ust passed the paddle eye test in the doctor's office," said Megan. His left eye could not see a letter E the size of a full computer screen e ight feet away." Scans of his eye showed a white mass, which had been causing the r eflection in the photograph. After testing and a tense few days, they d iscovered that Benjamin had Coats'Disease, a life-long disease that c an damage the eye to the point where eye removal is necessary. Fortunately, Benjamin's problem was caught early enough for treatm ent. "While Benjamin has had three eye surgeries, we were very lucky t o have caught his disease in time," said Megan. "Had it been more a dvanced Ben could have immediately lost his eye. We are so grateful t o Dr. Tom Lee and the doctors at The Vision Center at Children's H ospital Los Angeles. Without the work that they do so many families w ould not have access to the quality and caliber of care that is prov ided there." Benjamin is doing well, and is a happy, thriving first-grader. "He w ears protective Nike shatterproof glasses which the other kids think a re pretty cool," said Megan. "The glasses are primarily to keep his u naffected eye safe, for without that eye he would be blind." A vision to help otherchildren M egan said that she doesn't want any more parents to miss t he signs of potentially life-threatening eye diseases. "We are amazed that something so simple, just the glow i n a photo, was all that was needed to spot this disease," s he said. "If there is a way through our family's experience w e are able to get the message out about the glow, we are a nxious to do so. We've created a campaign to raise awaren ess." The Know the Glow campaign is combining the e fforts of concerned individuals, corporations and physic ians who are pioneers in the field of pediatric diseases of t he eye. "I can't tell you how many kids come in with advanced e ye diseases; it's a tragedy," said Dr. Tom Lee, director o f the Retina Institute in The Vision Center at Children's H ospital Los Angeles. "Parents don't realize they are a n important part of the diagnosis. They will see this s ignbeforedoctorswill.Everychildhashadthisscreeni ngprocess all it takes is for parents to open up the p hoto album." The website, www.KnowTheGlow.org, has information o n the diseases that can be indicated by the glow. "Had I k nown about the glow earlier, Dr. Lee could have saved m ore of Ben's vision," said Megan. "Knowing what it felt l ike to possibly face a fatal outcome and knowing that I i gnored such a huge red flag that was right there in front o f me, I don't want another parent to have to suffer through t hat or another child to needlessly lose their sight or their e yes due to a lack of awareness of the glow!" Photo courtesy of Getty Images and Know the Glo w Cluestochildhood eyediseasescouldbe hidinginplainsightKnowtheFactsn1 in 80 children are at risk of getting The Glow.n80 percent of childhood blindness is preventable.n80 percent of Retinoblastoma and Coats' Disease cases are diagnosed initially by a parent through a photograph.nThe Glow is an indicator of 15 eye diseases and cancers.nIn some cases, The Glow can lead to the removal of the eye, blindness, and, in extreme cases, death. Text GLOWto 90999 to donate $10.DisordersRelated totheGlowAbnormalities perceived through the red reflex test can indicate several types of diseases, such as: nAmblyopia nCataract nChoroidal nCoats'Disease nCongenital Cataract nColoboma nNorrie's Disease nPHPVnRefractive ErrornRetinal Detachment nRetinal Dysplasia nRetinopathy of Prematurity (ROP)nRetinoblastoma nStrabismus nToxocariasis nTrauma If you believe you have seen a glow, you should obtain a referral immediately to a pediatric ophthalmologist for diagnosis and treatment. RetinoblastomaRetinoblastoma ( reh-tin-oh-blast-oma ) is a malignant cancer of early childhood that arises from immature retinal cells in one or both eyes. Retinoblastoma can start growing at any time before birth up until about 3 years of age. Occasionally, it is not detected until ages 7 or 8. Coats'DiseaseCoats'disease is a rare eye disorder involving abnormal development of the blood vessels of the retina, which line the interior chamber of the eye. As various components of blood leak into the retina, fluid accumulates under the retina. The result may be loss of vision, particularly central vision, and detachment of the retina from other layers of the eye. Scan this code with your smartphone to watch a video with more of Benjamin's story, or visit http://bit.ly/EyeGlow. Benjamin with his fatherBrian Webberin The Vision Centerat Children's Hospital Los Angeles Reason to worry?Probing what's behind our fear of nukes PAGE8D

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The waves rolled in with f ury for a West Coast locat ion.For me, such conditions w ould surely keep me at a d istance from the water. But, t hat's not so for everyone. Avid surfers drawn to such c onditions amazed me. I'd n ever seen so many surfers i n one place. As my husb and, Ken, and I watched, I f ound myself counting the s urfers (and losing track as t hey would slip into a wave a nd reappear in a different s pot). Wearing my hooded s weatshirt and several layers o f clothing to protect me f rom the frigid wind, I c ouldn't imagine entering t he water even though the s urfers were clad in wet s uits. I was mesmerized by their p ersistent attempts to catch t he waves and ride them. S ometimes they succeeded. O ther times, all they could d o was try, seemingly findi ng enjoyment in the a ttempt. Of course when they actually rode the waves standing on their surf boards, their triumph was evident. And we thrilled in the moment with them. Life throws us many waves and it is easy to succumb to the pounding force and not attempt to ride it out. Why bother if we're only going to get knocked down again?But, that is the point. Getting knocked down means developing the stamina and persistence to get up again and try even harder. In the process, we learn many things to which I believe our surfing friends can probably attest. As Christian believers, I think sometimes we trust that as long as we have enough faith nothing can knock us down or keep us down for long. Though faith in God through Jesus Christ is the bedrock (for we are to be partakers of the divine nature within us), there is more. In 2 Peter 1:5, NKJV, we are reminded that because we have been so blessed, there is reason to be actively engaged. It says, "But also for this very reason, giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue, to virtue, knowledge, to knowledge self-control, to self-control perseverance, to perseverance godliness, to godliness brotherly kindness, and to brotherly kindness love." Sometimes, it simply means not giving up in the struggles of life no matter how small or how large they may be.Others will faithfully endure along side us. Like fellow surfers, they, too, persist and infuse us with courage. As each of us overcomes his crisis, catching the wave and standing up to ride it, many others will join in the triumph. Selah Jan Merop of Sebring is a NewsSun correspondent. Page 2DNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com Witford Reid M.D.Board Certified Anesthesiologist in Pain Management863-385-9333 Sebring Pain Management And Rehabilitation Center, Inc. 9 Ryant Blvd. Westshore Plaza, Sebring(1 Mile South of Lakeshore Mall on the Right)The ONLY JACHO ACCREDITEDPain Management Unit in Highlands CountySPECIALIZING IN:€ Back Pain € Auto Accidents € Neck Pain € Work Related Injuries VOTED 2009 Doctor of the Year THE LINCOLN LAWYERR(Matt Damon,Emily Blunt)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU PG13(Matt Damon,Emily Blunt)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30RANGOPG(Animated Voices by Johnny Depp,Abigail Breslin)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30HALL PASSR(Owen Wilson)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15GNOMEO & JULIET 2DG(Animated)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15THE KINGS SPEECHR(Geoffrey Rush,Colin Firth)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30 The NewFAIRMOUNTCINEMA63750 US 27 N. Sebring NOW SHOWINGFriday 03/11 Thursday 03/17 Suick CinemasInformation 385-9980 Office 385-9908New Dolby Digital SoundAll Seats $6.00for Matinee COMING SOON We will be featuring:Mar 25 SUCKER PUNCH DIARY OF A WIMPY KID 2 DIVERSIONS ROWDYBUNCHBy M. SKOCZEN & V. FLEMING ACROSS 1 Move to a larger container, say 6 Office exchanges 11 Put a dent in 14 "Woe __!" 18 In any way 19 Aromatic resin 20 "QuiŽn __?" 21 Where the Pecos R. begins 22 *Old library aid 24 Gadget, for one: Abbr. 25 Water turbidity cause 26 Book after Neh. 27 "Midnight Cowboy" con man 28 Two-time N.L. batting champ Lefty 29 Motorcade VIP 30 Hit a lot of high notes 32 *Soda fountain choice 34 Societal ideals 36 What obsolete things fall into 38 Bananas 39 "Marley & Me" actress 41 React to boredom, perhaps 43 Defeats 47 Port of Crete 48 Cockney toast starter 50 Souvenirs at the park, usually 52 Controversial "gift" 53 Fresno-to-Bakersfield dir. 54 Not __ Town: antihate-crime movement 56 Procter & Gamble toothpaste 58 Salad cheese 59 Sail motions 60 Not of the cloth 61 Bombed 64 Maurice Sendak kids' book, and the starts of starred answers 69 One way to anticipate 70 8 x 10 phots., e.g. 71 "... but maybe I'm wrong" 72 "The Dark at the Top of the Stairs" dramatist 73 Job jar items 75 Thomas Paine's belief 76 __ band: school rally performers 79 "Golden Age" Hollywood studio 80 Kept awake, maybe 82 Bruce of "The Astronaut Farmer" 83 "There is __ in the affairs of men ...": Brutus 85 Eager beaver 87 '70s-'80s FBI sting 90 Like some markers 92 Swedish tennis great 94 Japanese mushrooms 96 Chops up 97 *Ragtime dance 100 Spa service 102 Big name in pineapples 103 First toothbrush to go to the moon 104 One leading a charmed life? 105 The first one was founded in 1824 Eng. to protect carriage horses 108 James or Jones of jazz 109 __-mutuel 110 *'60s HaightAshbury type 112 Lent organs? 113 Harrow rival 114 Saintly qualities 115 Utah's state gem 116 Make a chart of, as land 117 Safety feature for some walkers 118 Conforms 119 Stieg Larsson was one DOWN 1 Regatta 2 H-like letters 3 *Political mantra 4 Fixer-upper, often 5 Dr. Mom's forte 6 Heavy __ 7 Made joyous 8 Alice's restaurant? 9 1847 novel based on its author's time in the Society Islands 10 Milano Mr. 11 Impressive house 12 Inane relative? 13 E-mail option 14 Popular restaurants 15 Smug grin 16 A beanball might lead to one 17 Personal organizer nos. 20 *Drug problem 23 Part of a playground exchange 28 Very 31 One who spiffs up your wheels 32 It's chewed in leas 33 Corp. fiscal VIPs 34 Little suckers? 35 Santa __: West Coast winds 37 Popular pad 40 Abecedarian 42 One of them? 44 "I'm outta here!" 45 Perfume compound 46 One in a black suit 49 Scammer's ploy 51 Calling strikes, e.g. 55 NFL part: Abbr. 56 Maddens 57 Eye shades 58 Suffix with song 59 Lacking dates 60 Patty alternative 62 Getaway places 63 Typical Bond villain's malady 64 Uncanny 65 Good thing to have at a tearjerker 66 Prod 67 *One side of a defunct wall 68 Weed whacker 74 Battery spec 75 "Disclosure" co-star 76 *A cappella leader's gadget 77 Falco of "Nurse Jackie" 78 Push-up targets 80 Unrestrainedly 81 Unwrapped excitedly 82 U.S. terr., 1861-'89 84 Circus 86 Keep __ of: stay current with 88 Persnickety sort 89 Collapsible bed 91 Put in a cell 93 Pirouette 95 Seller of the $5 FOOTLONG 97 Add up to 98 Extreme 99 Occult medium 101 Kind of shoes or blues 102 Sea, with "the" 104 Country place? 106 Not in one's birthday suit 107 Cutter with a bent blade 110 __ Schwarz: NYC toy store 111 Small change? Solution on page 3D Special to the News-SunAries (March 21-April 20) Aries, a lthough it may seem like you can't go o n without someone, you will take care o f what you need to do alone. There will b e someone new in your life. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Taurus, t he difficult conversations are always t he toughest to begin, but take some t ime this week to get these words said or t hey may haunt you for months. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Gemini, c hances are you won't see something c oming this week. If something catches y ou off-guard, recover as quickly and as g racefully as you can. Cancer(June 22-July 22) Cancer, y ou may want to take inventory of your i ncome and expenses and try to curb s pending for the next few weeks. You w ill need the funds for a big project l ater on. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Leo, you p lay an instrumental role in many peop le's lives, and that is why you can expect to be called on in an important way this week. Don't worry, you're up to it. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Virgo, there's not much more you can say so don't waste your voice or your effort. Move on or you will just get frustrated. Romance seems likely this week. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Libra, you can't put your finger on it, but something seems to be off-kilter. Once you determine the source of the disturbance, you will be able to resolve the issue. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Scorpio, once you analyze a tricky situation, you will figure out that there's not much more that you can do about things without a little help. Start recruiting. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Sagittarius, when placing too much emphasis on the financial, you can lose the true meaning behind the effort. Your priorities lie elsewhere this week. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) Capricorn, if you don't like your situation, change it. You control your destiny, and all it takes is some work on your part to make a fresh start. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) Aquarius, trivial things seem to affect you this week. Focus on the larger picture, and you will discover things are much better than you had originally imagined. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Pisces, pamper yourself now because if you don't there will be little time for it next week. Thursday is looking like a good day. Famous birthdaysMarch 27 Mariah Carey, singer, 41; March 28 Lady Gaga, singer, 25; March 29 Elle Macpherson, model, 47; March 30 Celine Dion, singer, 42; March 31 Ewan McGregor, actor, 40; April 1 Susan Boyle, singer, 50; April 2 Ron Palillo, actor, 57. Something seems off-kilter this week, Libra DearAbby: My wife of 16 years, "Barb," and I argue constantly. We can't seem to agree on anything, have few common interests and don't enjoy our time together. Our love life is nonexistent. We have gone to three marriage counselors and it hasn't helped. We now "get along" by avoiding each other. I think it's time we faced the fact that we're never going to be happy together. When I bring this up with Barb, she gets angry and launches into the same old tirade, saying if I want a divorce I'll have to get a lawyer. Divorce will be difficult and costly enough without having to drag lawyers into it. I'd like us to agree that it's time to split and use a mediator to work out the details. It will save us a lot of money and, hopefully, make the divorce less acrimonious. I don't understand why Barb wants to stay together when she's so unhappy and we're unable to make things better. How can I make her see that separating in as kind a way as possible will be best for us and the kids included? "Former" Husband in Longmont, Colo. Dear"Former" Husband: Your wife may prefer the evils she's living with to the unknown of being a divorcee with children. However, when a marriage is over it's over. And when it reaches the stage that yours has, what both parties need to be most concerned about is preservation of assets, so they aren't dissipated in attorney's fees. I have seen both kinds of divorces one in which the warring spouses spent so much money in litigation there was little left for each of them when it was over; and the other, in which the couple agreed their marriage was broken beyond repair and arranged their divorce with as little cost as possible. I don't have to tell you which people are doing well now. So clip this and share it with your wife. DearAbby: If no one answers the phone when my mother calls, she shouts on the answering machine for my children (ages 18 and 12) to "pic k up!" Then she'll tr y my cell phone onc e or twice in quick succession before calling back on the house phone and leaving a cranky message. It's neve r an emergency; she just wants to chat. I understand that Mom is frustrated, but sometimes w e are resting, eating dinner or are otherwise indisposed. And yes, there are times when we're not in the mood to talk. She lectures me con stantly about how my husband and I are teaching our children to be disrespectful by ignoring her calls. (Thei r teachers and other adults regularly comment about how polite they are.) I see nothing wrong with letting a call go to voicema il if I can't or don't want to talk at that moment, and I always return Mom's call. I also encourage my kids to call her, but she doesn't make it easy when she begins a conversation with, "Didn't anyone ever tell yo u it's rude not to answer the phone?" Do I owe her an apology, or does she need t o be more patient? "Please Leave a Message .. ." DearPlease Leave a Message ...: Your mother apparently feels that her needs and wishes automatically take precedence over whatever else may be happening in your lives. You d o not owe her any apologies, and yes, she does need to b e more patient. But she won' t get that message until you are able to communicate it clearly and directly to her. You are no longer a child, and you should not be expected to drop everything anytime your mother wants to "chat." Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Good advice for everyone teens to seniors is in The Anger in All of Us and How to Deal With It.' To order, send a business-size, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds only) to: Dear Abby Anger Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.) Unhappy couple can't agree on best way to break up Dear Abby Catching and riding the waves Pause And Consider Jan Merop Horoscope Get the paper delivered to you! NEWS-SUN€385-6155

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Associated PressNEWYORK An Andy W arhol portrait of Elizabeth T aylor is heading to a New Y ork City auction. It's estim ated to bring $20 million. The Wall Street Journal r eports that "Liz #5" is o wned by hedge-fund manage r Steven Cohen. The 1963 s ilkscreen will be sold at P hillips de Pury at its cont emporary art sale on May 1 2. The actress died on W ednesday at age 79. The portrait shows the s creen siren smiling and her e yelids covered in blue eye s hadow. It comes from W arhol's 1960s series of pop culture icons like Jacqueline Kennedy and Marilyn Monroe. The Journal says Cohen bought the portrait for an undisclosed sum from the estate of a major New York dealer. He declined to comment. The current Warhol auction record is $71.7 million for "Green Car Crash." Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The new p roduction of the Pulitzer P rize and Tony Award-winn ing musical "AChorus L ine" is taking the stage at S outh Florida Community C ollege's Theatre for the P erforming Arts, Highlands C ampus, at 7:30 p.m. W ednesday, April 13 as the f inal performance of the 2 010-11 Artist Series. In an empty theatre, on a b are stage, casting for a new B roadway musical is almost c omplete. For 17 dancers, t his audition is the chance of a lifetime. It's what they've w orked for with every drop o f sweat, every hour of traini ng, every day of their lives. I t's the one opportunity to do w hat they've always dreamed to have the chance to d ance. This is "AChorus Line," t he musical for everyone w ho's ever had a dream and p ut it all on the line. Winner o f nine Tony Awards, includi ng "Best Musical" and the P ulitzer Prize for drama, this s ingular sensation is the l ongest-running American B roadway musical ever. Now "AChorus Line" returns. Come meet the new generation of Broadway's best. The original production of "AChorus Line" opened at the Public Theater's Newman Theatre in 1975 and transferred to Broadway's Shubert Theatre in that same year. It ran for nearly 15 years, closing in 1990 after 6,137 performances. "AChorus Line" reclaimed its place in the heart of Broadway at the Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre where it re-opened to rave reviews in 2006. The New York Daily News exclaims "There's nothing better! The show thrills from the opening number to the glittering finale." This performance is a part of the national tour, which is visiting more than 75 markets across the country. The performance may contain some adult content; viewer discretion is advised. The performance is sponsored by Sevigny and Johnson Eye Care, Drs. Ashok and Raji Sonni, and MidFlorida Credit Union. Tickets range from $39 to $46 and may be purchased online 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at http://performances.southflorida.edu. Tickets may also be purchased by calling the SFCC Box Office at 784-7178 or by visiting the SFCC Box Office in the front of the Theatre for the Performing Arts, 600 W. College Drive, from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. MondayFriday. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011Page 3D ROOFING SPECIALIST SERVING HIGHLANDS COUNTY SINCE 1989 Shingles Flat Roofs Roof Repairs Mobile Home Roofovers -FULLYLICENSED & INSURED385-4690State Lic # RC 0066817 QUALITY WORK AT A REASONABLE PRICE FREEESTIMATES Newborns € Children € AdolescentsOFFICE HOURS: Rajeswari Sonni, M.D., F.A.A.P. Praveen Krishnadas, M.D., F.A.A.P. Anoop Palta, M.D., F.A.A.P. Maria B. Asis, M.D., F.A.A.P Maria C. Perez, M.D. David Kleczek, P.A.-C. Amy Grimes, P.A.-C. Megan Neff, ARNP Mercy L. Seralde, M.D., F.A.A.P.Avon Park Pediatrics,P.A. & Sebring Pediatrics,LLCWe accept most Major Insurance and Medicaid SEBRING382-0770AVON PARK453-7337 Specializing in the treatment of € Allergies € Asthma € Attention Deficit Disorder Immunizations € Check-ups €Obesity Counciling SEBRING: MON. … FRI. … 8:30AM … 5:00PMSATURDAY … 8:30AM … 12:00 NOON … SEBRING ONLYAVON PARK: MON. & WED. … 8:30AM … 7:00PM TUES., THURS., & FRI. … 8:30AM … 5:00PM LAKE PLACID699-1414 ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Courtesy photo The new production of the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Awardwinning musical A Chorus Line' is the final performance of the South Florida Community College 2010-11 Artist Series. It takes the stage on Wednesday, April 13. A Chorus Line' national tour to perform at SFCC Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Author L es Standiford continues the S outh Florida Community C ollege Humanities Reading S eries, at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, A pril 5 in Building H, Room 1 12, SFCC Highlands C ampus. Standiford is the author of t he critically acclaimed "Last T rain to Paradise," "Meet Y ou in Hell," and Washington Burning," as w ell as 10 other novels. R ecipient of the Frank O 'Connor Award for Short F iction, he is director of the c reative writing program at F lorida International U niversity in Miami. His latest book, "Bringing A dam Home," tells the story o f the Adam Walsh 1981 a bduction and murder case, i n Hollywood, Fla., and how t he case was finally solved, 2 7 years later, by Miami B each detective Joe M atthews. Son of America's Most Wanted creator John Walsh, Adam Walsh's abduction changed the way parents watched over their children. "Bringing Adam Home" is the definitive account of this harrowing crime and its aftermath, a true story of tragedy, love, faith and dedication. It reveals the pain and tenacity of a family determined to find justice, the failed police work that allowed a killer to remain uncharged, and the determined efforts of one cop who accomplished what an entire system of law enforcement could not. The Humanities Department Reading Series features fiction and nonfiction writers who focus on regional themes. An open mic night will be held April 14. The series is free and open to the public. It is funded by a grant from Anne Reynolds. For more information, call Dr. Charlotte Pressler, professor, philosophy and SFCC Honors Program coordinator, at 784-7247. Reading Series continues with Florida author Courtesy photo Author Les Standiford, author of Last Train in Paradise' and 12 other novels, continues the South Florida Community College Humanities Reading Series on Tuesday, April 5. Special to the News-SunSEBRING Auditions for Highlands Little Theatre's production of "Little Women" will be at 6:30 p.m. Monday, April 4 and Tuesday, April 5 in the Drs. Thakkar Pavilion and 5:30 p.m. Thursday, April 7 in the Lakeside Playhouse. Call backs, if needed, will be in the pavilion at 10 a.m. Saturday April 9. Meg is the eldest daughter. Jo, the tomboy of the family, is about a year younger than Meg. Beth, the gentlest and shyest of the four, is younger than Jo. If Beth can play the piano this is a plus, but not essential. Amy is the youngest daughter. It is preferred but not required, that the four daughters have some stage experience. The four male roles are: Laurie Laurence, the boy next door to the March family; Grandfather Laurence, a kind, wealthy gentleman; John Brooke, Laurie's tutor who is a little older than Laurie; and Mr. March, father of the four little women. The three older wom en include: Aunt March, al so wealthy and somewh at crotchety; Hannah, who h as been "part of the famil y" since Meg was born; an d Marmee, mother to the litt le women. Atentative rehears al schedule will be availab le at auditions. The First Nighters'pe rformance of "Litt le Women" is Wednesda y, June 1 and the final pe rformance is Father's Da y, June 19. Tickets may be purchased in the Box Offi ce at 356 W. Center Ave ., Sebring; by phone at 38 22525; or online at www.highlandslittleth eatre.org. The Box Office is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m Monday-Friday. "Little Women" is wr itten by Peter Clapham an d sponsored by the New sSun. Director S ue McCollum previous ly directed "Vanities," "T he Fantasticks," "Godspel l" and "Bye, Bye, Birdie." F or more information, conta ct hlt.comments@yahoo.com Auditions set for Little Women' Special to the News-SunSEBRING The very talented Clara Carroll will teach a workshop on the Japanese art of Shibori dyeing from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, April 4 in the Highlands Art League's Visual Arts Center. Each participant will be able to dye two scarves, and have the option to choose from a number of different techniques that will be demonstrated. Carroll will also talk about the history of this art, as well as the techniques practiced in Japan. The cost of this worksho p is $69 plus tax, and suppli es are all included. This is going to be a fantast ic workshop for a great pric e, but space is limited. The re are 10 spots and six a re anticipated to be filled, so if you are interested then it is definitely advisable to sig n up as soon as possible. If you would like to s ee examples of Carroll's wor k, just stop by the Yello w House Gallery and G ift Shop. Workshop set to learn Shibori dyeing CROSSWORDSOLUTION Got something to buy,sell or trade? News-Sun classified ads get results! Call 314-9876 Warhol's Elizabeth Taylor to sell at auction Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and

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By ALAN SCHER ZAGIER and HOPE YEN Associated PressPLATO, Mo. In a nation o f nearly 310 million people, A merica's new population c enter rests not in a M idwestern skyline of St. L ouis or Chicago, but in a t iny Missouri village named a fter an ancient Greek p hilosopher. The Census Bureau a nnounced Thursday what t he 109 residents of Plato had s uspected for weeks: Shifting p opulation patterns and geog raphical chance converged t o make this town on the edge o f Mark Twain National F orest the center of the U.S. p opulation distribution based o n 2010 census data. The announcement also s ignifies larger trends A merica's population is m arching westward from the M idwest, pulled by migration t o the Sun Belt. And in a surp rising show of growth, H ispanics now account for m ore than half of the U.S. p opulation increase over the l ast decade. Such designations aren't n ew to Missouri. The 2000 p opulation center was Edgar S prings, about 30 miles to the n ortheast. Thirty more miles t o the northeast is Steelville, t he 1990 population center. That doesn't mean locals a ren't downright thrilled with t he recognition and a chance t o be noticed. "It is putting a spotlight on a corner of the world that d oesn't get much attention," s aid Brad Gentry, 48, publ isher of the weekly Houston H erald newspaper 30 miles u p the road. "Most residents a re proud of our region and l ike the idea that others will l earn our story through this r ecognition." The Census Bureau's first s et of national-level findings f rom 2010 on race and migrat ion show a decade in which r apid minority growth, aging w hites and the housing boom a nd bust were the predomin ant themes. The final count: 196.8 mill ion whites, 37.7 million b lacks, 50.5 million H ispanics and 14.5 million A sians. Hispanics and Asians were t he two fastest growing d emographic groups, increasi ng about 42 percent from 2 000. Hispanics, now comp rise 1 in 6 Americans; a mong U.S. children, H ispanics are roughly 1 in 4. More than 9 million A mericans checked more t han one race category on t heir 2010 census form, up 32 p ercent from 2000, a sign of b urgeoning multiracial g rowth in an increasingly m inority nation. "This really is a transform ational decade for the n ation," said William H. F rey, a demographer at the B rookings Institution who h as analyzed most of the 2010 data. "The 2010 census shows vividly how these new minorities are both leading growth in the nation's most dynamic regions and stemming decline in others." For the first time, Asians had a larger numeric gain than African-Americans, who remained the second-largest minority group at roughly 37 million. The number of nonHispanic whites, whose median age is now 41, edged up slightly to 197 million. Declining birth rates meant their share of the total U.S. population dropped over the last decade from 69 percent to about 64 percent. The Census Bureau calculates the mean U.S. population center every 10 years based on its national head count. The center represents the middle point of the nation's population distribution the geographic point at which the country would balance if each of its 308.7 million residents weighed the same. Based on current U.S. growth, which is occurring mostly in the South and West, the population center is expected to cross into Arkansas or Oklahoma by the middle of this century. The last time the U.S. center fell outside the Midwest was 1850, in the eastern territory now known as West Virginia. Its later move to the Midwest bolstered the region as the nation's heartland in the 20th century, central to farming and manufacturing. But Plato, about 170 miles southwest of St. Louis, doesn't reflect the population changes that have brought it special attention. The town and its surroundings have few blacks and even fewer Hispanics, though there are more minorities in three or four larger cities about 20 to 30 miles away. Rumblings of Plato's newfound fame have stirred for weeks, only to be confirmed Tuesday when a pair of census officials came to town to plot the precise midpoint, which is located in a rolling pasture in an area dominated by beef and dairy farms. Acommemorative plaque noting the distinction will be unveiled in April on a monument carved from Missouri red granite, said Elizabeth Frisch, vice president of the local bank. The plaque will be next to the post office, adjacent to the marker noting the town's 1858 founding. For most in town, it was business as usual Thursday. The sign outside Plato Christian Church offered "Today's forecast: God reigns and the Son shines." Diners at Weber's Cafe enjoyed $3 hamburgers and $5.99 pork chop dinner plates. Students in the entrepreneurial business class at Plato R-VHigh School hatched ideas to sell T-shirts and other paraphernalia celebrating the town's new distinction. Despite or perhaps because of its isolation, Plato attracts a mix of lifelong locals and those eager to escape the rat race. Frisch, a New Jersey native who moved to central California, discovered the region on cross-country trips to visit family on the East Coast. She noted that the number of town residents had increased by nearly 50 percent from 74 to 109 since the previous census, attributing the growth to military retirees and active-duty military stationed at the sprawling Fort Leonard Wood, 10 miles away. "We've had a population explosion in 10 years," she joked. Online: www.census.gov Page 4DNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com Save$25 … $300 per unit on select Hunter Douglas window fashions. Hunter Douglas offers an array of attractive colors, fabrics and styles for creating inviting living spaces. With their enduring craftsmanship and energy-ef“cient designs, they present exceptional value „ smart style thats energy smart, too. And, now you can enjoy smart savings from January 14 through April 29, 2011 with mail-in rebates on select styles. Ask us for details. *Manufacturers rebate offer valid for purchases made January 14 through April 29, 2011. Limitations and restrictions apply. As k for details. 2011 Hunter Douglas. and TM are trademarks of Hunter Douglas. Family owned & operated since 1978 American Golf Cart 2833 Hwy 27 S. € Avon Park (863) 453-CART(2278)2007S Starting at $1595includes top, window & charger, NEW & USED TIRES & BATTERIES BATTERIES:Trojan PowerTron American Over 75 New & Used Carts To Choose From ONTHEWIRE Tiny Plato, Mo., sits at center of nation's population MCTpho to Plato, Mo., with 109 residents, is the center of the United States population distribution, according to the 2010 census. Based on current U.S. growth, which is occurring mostly in the South and West, the population center is expected to cross into Arkansas or Oklahoma by the middle of this century. Associated PressDENVER With the c lick of a mouse, Sandy F reund Kasper sent a comm and to NASA's comet-hunti ng Stardust space probe to b urn all its fuel, starting a s equence that would shut the s pacecraft down after a 12y ear run. "Like saying goodbye to a f riend," said Allan C heuvront, the Stardust prog ram manager for Lockheed M artin, who has worked on t he probe since 1996, when it w as still in the design stage. "It's been an amazing s pacecraft," he said T hursday. "It's done everyt hing we asked, it's done it p erfectly." Launched in 1999, Stardust finished its main mission in 2006, sending a tiny sample of particles from the Wild 2 comet to Earth via a parachute-equipped canister. NASAthen recycled the probe, sending it past a comet last month to photograph a crater left by a projectile launched by another space probe. It accomplished one last experiment on Thursday, firing its thrusters until its last hydrazine fuel was gone. The length of that burn, a little under 2 1/2 minutes, will tell engineers exactly how much fuel was left so they can see how accurate their calculations were. Comet-hunting spacecraft shuts down after 12 years

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T he Community Calendar prov ides a brief listing of local c lubs and organizations who m eet on a regular basis. It is t he responsibility of the group t o update the News-Sunon a ny changes in this listing by c alling 385-6155, ext. 516; s end any changes by e-mail to e ditor@newssun.com;or mail t hem to News-SunCommunity C alendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, S ebring, FL33870. S UNDAY American Legion Post 25 L ake Placid has lounge hours f rom 1-9 p.m. Live music is f rom 5-8 p.m. For details, call 4 65-7940. American Legion Post 74 o pen 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p .m. Members and guests o nly. Post is at 528 N. Pine S t., Sebring. Call 471-1448. Inerstate chapter of A .B.A.T.E. meets the last S unday of every month at The B lue Crab, 825 Ridgewood D r., Sebring at 11 a.m. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2 661 lounge is open from 1-7 p .m. Card games start at 1:30 p .m. The lodge is open to m embers and their guests. For d etails, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has k araoke in the pavilion. H orseshoes played at 9:30 a .m. Food available at 4 p.m. O pen to members and qualif ied guests only. Loyal Order of Moose H ighlands County Lodge No. 2 494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon P ark. Cards start at 4 p.m. M usic outside Tiki Hut at 3 p .m. Lodge phone number 4 52-0579. Overeaters Anonymous, m eets from 4-5 p.m. in second f loor conference roomNo. 3 at F lorida Hospital Heartland M edical Center, 4200 Sun N L ake Blvd., Sebring. For d etails, call 382-7731. No d ues, fees or weigh-ins. For d etails on the organization, go t o www.oa.org. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 s erves lunch at 2 p.m. at the c lub, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. F or details, call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2 259 offers NASCAR racing in t he pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar o pen and kitchen open from 25 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S. 9 8, Sebring. For details, call 6 55-3920. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 3880 serves hamburgers f rom 4-5:30 p.m. and plays p oker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1 224 County Road 621 East, L ake Placid. For details, call 6 99-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 4300 Karaoke is from 5-8 p .m. at the post, 2011 SE L akeview Drive, Sebring. For d etails, call 385-8902. MONDAY Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN W ITH ME family group meets a t 10:30 a.m. every Monday at t he Heartland Christian Church o n Alt. 27 in Sebring. The c hurch is behind Southgate S hopping Center where Publix i s. F or more information call 3855 714. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal C hurch, Lakeshore Drive, S ebring. For more details, call 3 85-8807. Alcoholics Anonymous O ne Day At ATime group m eets for a closed discussion a t 9:30 a.m. Monday and F riday at Covenant P resbyterian Church, 4500 S un N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. F or details, call 314-0891. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 6:30 p.m. at R osewood Center, 517 U.S. 2 7 South, Lake Placid. Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at S t. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. F or details, call 202-0647. American Legion Placid P ost 25Lake Placid has shuff leboard at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 12-9 p.m. For details, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. Call 4711448. AmVets Post 21 plays darts at 7:30 p.m. for members and guests. For details, call 3850234. Avon Park Lakes Association has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m. The clubhouse is at 2714 Nautilus Drive in Avon Park. Boy Scout Troop 482 meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave., Lake Placid. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. For details, call 385-8118. Diabetes Support Group meets the second and fourth Monday from 1-2:30 p.m. in Florida Hospital Conference Room 3 in Sebring. Call 4020177 for guest speaker list. Dual Diagnosed (Addiction and Mental Health) Support Group meets from 7-8:30 p.m. the fourth Monday at 4023 Sun 'N Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 386-5687. Florida Association Home and Community Education meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly on Mondays at The AgriCenter. The group of sewers and crafters make items for residents of adult congregate living facilities. Call Penny Bucher at 385-0949. Garden Club of Sebring meets noon, fourth Monday, Sebring Civic Center. Grand Prix Cloggers EZ Intermediate and Intermediate Clogging class are held at 9 a.m. every Monday at Reflections on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club meets the second and fourth Monday at the Sebring Country Estates Civic Association clubhouse, 3240 Grand Prix Drive (down the street from Wal-Mart). Dancing will be held every month until April 2008. Classes are being started now in the Sebring and Lake Placid area. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or visit the Web site at www.samdun.net.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September.Heartland Pops rehearses at 7 p.m. Mondays at Avon Park High School Band Room, 700 E. Main St., under the direction of Anthony Jones. Musicians of all ages are welcome. For information, call 314-8877. Highlands County Concert Band rehearses 7-9 p.m. every Monday at Sebring High School band room. All musicians are welcome. Vic Anderson, musical director. Call Bill Varner at 386-0855. Highlands County Democratic Executive Committee meets 7 p.m. fourth Monday in the Democratic Party Headquarters, 4216 Sebring Parkway, Sebring. For details, call 699-6052. Highlands County Sewing Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Highlands County AgriCivic Center in the 4-H laboratory, Sebring. For details, call 402-6540. Highlands Sertoma Club meets noon, Takis Family Restaurant, Sebring. Highlands County Senior Squadron, Civil Air Patrol the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary meets the second and fourth Monday nights at the Sebring Airport Terminal Building. All are welcome. For further information, call 471-1433 between 4 and 7 p.m. Lake Placid American Legion Post 25 meets 8 p.m., Legion hall. Lake Placid Art League will have classes in Drawing and Painting, conducted by Anne Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart will teach Fabric Painting at the center. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2 p.m. Sign up for darts is at 6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m. It is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m. Let It Begin With Me Alanon Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Monday at Heartland Christian Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South, Sebring. For details about Alanon, a self-help group for families and friends of alcoholics, call 385-5714. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. National Association for the Advancement of the Colored People, Highlands County Branch meets 7:30 p.m., 401 Tulane, Avon Park. Orchid Society of Highlands County meets 7 p.m. on the fourth Monday at the Highlands County AgriCivic Center, 4509 George Blvd., Sebring. Call Ed Fabik at 465-2830 for details. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 12-4:30 p.m. second and fourth Monday in Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. No meetings from end of May to October. For details, call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Highlands County meets at 6:15 p.m. at Beef O Brady's, Sebring. Sebring AARP meets 1:30 p.m., The Palms, Pine Street, Sebring. Sebring Bridge Club has Bridge, ACBLDuplicate at the clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Mondays. For details or info on lessons, call 385-8118. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 has pizza and darts at 7:30 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has the lounge open from 12-7 p.m. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Historical Society open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Located in back side of Sebring Public Library building on Lake Jackson. For information, call 471-2522. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 plays Texas Hold em at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Monday at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing. For details, call 6553920. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL632, Sebring meets at 3:30 p.m. at the fellowship hall at the First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, Sebring. For details, call Judy O'Boyle at 260-0831. Veterans of Foreign Wars Ladies Auxiliary Post 4300 meets 2 p.m. fourth Monday, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Volunteers of America of Florida is a nonprofit organization in Sebring that specializes in assisting person's with mental illness. We are pleased to announce our Drop in Center is open to individuals with a mental illness 6 days a week from 11am to 3 pm. The center offers a welcoming environment where individuals are accepted and feel comfortable. For more information please contact Wendy at 863382-2022.TUESDAY Al-Anon Family Groups meet for discussion and Twelve Step study at noon, Union Congregational Church, 105 N. Forest Ave., AvonPark. Parking available south of old church. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard and euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For details, call 4657940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Boy Scout Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30 p.m. in the Scout Lodge, 202 Robert Britt St., AvonPark. Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to join. For details, call 452-2385. AvonPark Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Busy Bee Craft Club meets 9-11 a.m., Fairway Pines, Sun N Lakes Boulevard, Sebring. Everyone is welcome. For more details, call 382-8431. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday night at "The Rock," Union Congregational Church, 28 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park. Abarbecue meal is served at 6 p.m. for a donation. At 6:45 p.m., members meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group breaks up into small groups for men and women. The program is designed for drug and alcohol addiction, divorce, death or illness grief, low or lost selfesteem or identity due to dysfunctional relationships, depression/anxiety, or any other need for healing. For details, contact Celebrate Recovery coordinator Pam Sim by calling 453-3345, ext. 106. Fletcher Music Club meets every Thursday and Tuesday at Fletcher Music Center in Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. For more details, call 385-3288. Heartland Harmonizers Barbershop Chorus meets from 7-9:30 p.m. in the Sebring High School Music Room, Sebring. All men who enjoy singing are invited. Reading music is not required. Call 471-2294 or 386-5098. Heartland Symphony Orchestra rehearsals from 5:30-7 p.m. Tuesdays in the Green Room in the South Florida Community College auditorium building. Bring music and instruments. New members welcome. Call conductor Bryan Johnson at 800949-7248, ext. 7231. Highlands County Community Orchestra rehearses each Tuesday in the Green Room of the South Florida Community College Performing Arts Theater, 5:307:30 p.m. Entrance is at the rear of the building. String players especially needed. Strings call Eugene Longo at 699-1975; winds call Kim Houser at 453-6049 for more information. Highlands County Quilt Guild meets first and third Tuesday, St. Agnes Episcopal Church, Sebring. Call Lynn Ullinn for meeting times at 314-0557 or e-mail luckyduck@mymailstation.com. Highlands Tea Party has an educational and informational meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Quality Inn, 6525 U.S. 27 in Sebring. Call 699-0743. Hope Hospice grief support group meets at 11 a.m. at 319 W. Center Ave., Sebring; and 4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle ALF, across U.S. 27 from Florida Hospital Lake Placid. Call 382-0312. Lake Placid Art League has classes in Parchment Embossing from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant. For information, call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Happy hour is from 2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Grief Support (Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, with Charlie Stroup. Refreshments served. Door prize given. Call 465-0568. Lake Placid Moose has euchre at 7 p.m. Food available. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lorida Community Club meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Lorida Community Center to plan events. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 W. Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup.c om. For details, call 382-7731. Visit www.oa.org for more information on OA. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday and has blood pressure screening from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. first and third Tuesday at Placid Lakes Tow n Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. For details, call 465-4888. Nar-Anon Support Group for family members or friends of someone with a drug problem or addiction. Nar-Anon helps attain serenity and a more normal life for those affected by the addictions of loved ones, regardless of whether or not he/she has stopped using. 6 p.m. every Tuesday at First Baptist Chuc h of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Churc h, 1410 W. Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup. c om. For details, call 382-7731 Rotary Club of Sebring (Noon) meets at noon at the Sebring Civic Center, near th e library in downtown Sebring. For information, call 385-3829 or 471-9900.. Sebring Bridge Club will have Duplicate Bridge games every Tuesday evening. If interested in playing Duplicate Bridge, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 plays darts, beginning with sign in at 6 p.m. Games start at 6:30 p.m. No experience necessary. Cost is $2. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves soft shell tacos 5 7 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing. Euchre is played at 6:30 p.m. For details, call 655 3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. an d table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. For details, call 385-2966 or leave a name, number and message. SertomaClub meets at 7 a.m. at Dee's Restaurant, Sebring. For details, call Scot t Albritton at 402-1819. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL99 meets from 6 -7 p.m. at the Atonement Lutheran Church, 1744 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL618 has weigh in from 4-430 p.m. at Communit y Bible Church, 1400 CR-17A N., AvonPark. Meeting is at 4:45 p.m. For details, call 452 1093. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, plays darts 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 has sandwiches a t 5 p.m. and Franke from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 385-8902. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011Page 5D Established 19311600 US 27 South € Avon Park Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home4001 Sebring Parkway Sebring, 385-0125 111 E. Circle St. Avon Park, 453-3101 Chris T.Nelson Craig M. Nelson Darin S. MacNeil W .W LUMBER CO. 465-3331Hwy. 27 S. Lake Placid"We're More Than Just Lumber" COMPLETE Building SuppliesPlease support the above businesses. They have made this page possible. Inspirational Thoughtsby Patricia Valentine THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502 Residential Commercial Mobile Homes"Small Enough to Know You Large Enough to Serve You"500 South Lake Avenue 382-8300 453-3019 THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502St.Luke 5:5-6,And Simon answering said unto him, Master,we have toiled all the night,and have taken nothing:nevertheless at thy word I will let down the net. And when they had this done,they inclosed a great multitude of fishes:and their net brake.ŽIn the above scriptures,Peter chose to obey Jesus and as a result he experienced a stunning display of divine power.In our obedience to God and His word it may sometime require doing some things that appear to be unreasonable.Our obedience to God should never be based on whether something seems fitting to our way of thinking.That is not to say God always bypasses common sense,but oftentimes what He requires of us may not appear reasonable or match our preconceived ideas. Disobedience will cause us to miss out on what God has in stored for us.Nothing pleases a parent more than to have their children walking in obedience.God is even more pleased when His children are walking in obedience.Be Blessed! Attend the Church of Your Choice! COMMUNITYCALENDAR NEWS-SUN€ 385-6155

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Page 6DNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. children's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. children's mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing God's Heart and Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and women's prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the "Place to discover God's love." For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mother's Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) "Where the old fashion gospel is preached." Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the "Son" always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. JosŽ Gonz‡lez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 3:30 and 5 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Friday 5-7 p.m., every Saturday 9-11 a.m. and 2:30-3:15 p.m., first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lord's Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building God's Kingdom for Everyone." "Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!" Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is "Jesus is First at First Christian Church."Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures'by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP The term Florida Mouse in the state of Florida, may conjure up visions of Mickey Mouse and other creatures from a nearby fantasy world. And while the Sunshine State may be known partially f or that particular mouse, there is a nother critter that is the real deal. T he true, factual Florida mouse is a s pecies of rodent in the Cricetidae f amily. The Latin name for the c reature is Podomys floridanus. T he amazing thing about this m ouse is that it is the only one e ndemic to Florida. It is found only i n limited areas and certainly doesn 't live in a make believe world w here everything is magical, but i nhabits some of the hottest, driest a nd highest areas in our state. Like many other species, this m ouse relies on other critters to p rovide its home and nesting area. I n fact, the Florida mouse is somet imes called the gopher mouse b ecause it finds its abode within t he long, deep burrow of the g opher tortoise. The mouse will s curry into the dark tunnel and m ake nest chambers out of small s ide passages. Because predators of t he mouse may also reside within t he burrow, the critter makes small openings in the roof of the burrow to use as an exit for a quick get a way if needed. The mouse grows to about 7 12 inches in length and has large ears without fur and a short tail. It has brown-orange upperparts and is white underneath. When young, the mice are gray in color. They don't smell very good and have been said to have a skunk-like odor. Florida mice can be distinguished from other mice by the five pads on each of their hind feet. Other mice have six or seven pads, which are called plantar tubercles. Like other mice, the Florida Mouse is an omnivore, eating seeds, plants, some insects, nuts and fungi. Acorns are their favorite food. They are ground dwellers and do not generally dig their own holes. If the rodent can't find a convenient gopher tortoise hole, they are not picky and will utilize burrows of the armadillo, other mice, cotton rats and even in pocket gopher mounds. They are nocturnal and generally hunt at night. Predators include spotted skunks, bobcats, birds of prey, raccoons and various snakes such as indigo and pine snakes. Florida mice breed all year long but mostly between July and December. Gestation usually lasts about 24 days. When she is ready to have her young, the female will line a side pocket of the burrow she is living in with shredded plant material to use for her nest. Average litter size is three babies, which weigh about .10 ounces and measure about 1 12 inches. The young develop teeth by the fourth day and become active around day 10, although their eyes do not open until they are about 2 weeks old. The mother nurses her young constantly for the first two weeks. After only about three to four weeks the young are weaned and begin to display adult behavior. Their life expectancy is about one year. The unique thing about the Florida mouse is that it is the only Podomys mouse that is endemic to Florida. It can be found coast to coast in central peninsular Florida. There is a population of these mice in the panhandle at Franklin County. The mouse can be found from north-central Florida south to Highlands County and Sarasota County. It is found on the Atlantic coast from St. Johns County south to Miami-Dade County. This creature resides in some of the state's driest locations such as scrubby areas. It has been found in sand pine scrub, high pinelands of turkey oak and longleaf pine, slash pine flatwoods, southern ridge sandhills, scrubby flatlands and coastal scrub. Florida mice require about 1 acre for their territory. The largest populations of Florida mic e are found in the Ocala National Forest and the Lake Wales Ridge. The species has been deemed Threatened by the Florida Committee on Rare and Endangered Plants and Animals and has been named a Species of Special Concern by the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission. The reason this tiny creature is in peril is because of habitat loss. Development and agr iculture have taken much of the rodents'limited habitat. Fire suppression is another major problem for the mouse. Without fire to kee p its habitat healthy, continual habitat decline is expected. Another major problem for the mouse is gopher tortoise population decline As stated above, the mouse depends on this creature for its home and gopher tortoises are dis appearing because of disease and habitat loss. Fortunately the Florida mouse i s protected in some areas such as Archbold Biological Station and the Ocala National Forest. Hopefully, scientists will be able to study and learn more about this sh y creature and find ways to help it survive. Corine Burgess is the Natural Resources Specialist for the Highlands County Natural Resources Department assistin g the Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District (www.highlandsswcd.org). The Florida Mouse is the only mouse endemic to Florida News From The Watershed Corine Burgess Courtesy photo The Florida Mouse, sometimes called the Gopher Mouse, is found only in limited areas and inhabits some of the hottest, driest and highest areas in Florida.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011Page 7D EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer .Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun 'N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid C ity" Children's Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, "prime-timers," and Bible s tudies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Children's Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and children's church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Children's & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kid's World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturer's Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Children's Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of God's Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and children's church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Women's Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30 a.m.; and contemporary worship is at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Children's Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on life's journey, you're we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP Publishers Weekly best-sellersHARDCOVER FICTION 1. "Toys" by James Patterson and Neil McMahon (Little, Brown) 2. "Sing You Home: A Novel" by Jodi Picoult (Atria) 3. "The Jungle" by Clive Cussler and Jack Du Brul (Putnam Adult) 4. "The Wise Man's Fear" by Patrick Rothfuss (DAW) 5. "The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest" by Stieg Larsson (Knopf) 6. "The Tiger's Wife: A Novel" by Tea Obreht (Random House) 7. "A Discovery of Witches" by Deborah Harkness (Viking) 8. "The Paris Wife: A Novel" by Paula McLain (Ballantine Books) 9. "Minding Frankie" by Maeve Binchy (Knopf) 10. "Tick Tock" by James Patterson, Michael Ledwidge (Little, Brown) 11. "Love You More: A Novel" by Lisa Gardner (Bantam) 12. "River Marked" by Patricia Briggs (Ace) 13. "The Help" by Kathryn Stockett (Putnam/Amy Einhorn) 14. "Treachery in Death" by J.D. Robb (Putnam Adult) 15. "The Informationist: A thriller" by Taylor Stevens (Crown Publishing) HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. "Red: My Uncensored Life in Rock" by Sammy Hagar (It Books) 2. "The 17 Day Diet: A Doctor's Plan Design for Rapid Results" by Dr. Mike Moreno (Free Press) 3. "Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption" by Laura Hillenbrand (Random House) 4. "Love Wins: A Book About Heaven, Hell, and the Fate of Every Person Who Ever Lived" by Rob Bell (HarperOne) 5. "The Money Class: Learn to Create Your New American Dream" by Suze Orman (Spiegel & Grau) 6. "Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything" by Joshua Foer (The Penguin Press) 7. "The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement" by David Brooks (Random House) 8. "Jesus of Nazareth: Holy Week: From the Entrance Into Jerusalem To The Resurrection" by Pope Benedict XVI (Ignatius Press) 9. "Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100" by Michio Kaku (Doubleday) 10. "Decision Points" by George W. Bush (Crown) 11. "The Amen Solution: The Brain Healthy Way to Lose Weight and Keep It Off" by Danile G. Amen MD (Crown) 12. "The 4-Hour Body: An Uncommon Guide to Rapid Fat-Loss, Incredible Sex, and Becoming Superhuman" by Timothy Ferriss (Crown) 13. "Cleopatra: A Life" by Stacy Schiff (Little, Brown) 14. "Blood, Bones & Butter: The Inadvertant Education of a Reluctant Chef" by Gabrielle Hamilton (Random House) 15. "Infinite Quest: Develop Your Psychic Intuition to Take Charge of Your Life" by John Edward (Sterling, Ethos) MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS 1. "Water for Elephants: A Novel" by Sara Gruen (Algonquin) 2. "The Lincoln Lawyer" by Michael Connelly (Grand Central Publishing) 3. 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By SETH BORENSTEIN APScience WriterWASHINGTON N uclear radiation, invisible a nd insidious, gives us the c reeps. Even before the Japanese n uclear crisis, Americans w ere bombarded with contrad ictory images and messages t hat frighten even when they t ry to reassure. It started with t he awesome and deadly m ushroom cloud rising from t he atomic bomb, which led t o fallout shelters and school d uck-and-cover drills. On screen, Bert, the evera lert turtle of the government c ivil-defense cartoons, told u s all we needed to do was s hield our eyes when the b omb exploded and duck u nder our desks. Jane Fonda i n "The China Syndrome" t old us to be worried about n uclear power accidents, and j ust days later, Three Mile I sland seemed to prove her r ight. Now bumbling nuclear p lant worker Homer S impson, Blinky, the radiat ion-mutated, three-eyed fish, a nd evil nuclear power plant o wner Montgomery Burns m ake us giggle and wince. The experts tell us to be l ogical and not to worry, that n uclear power is safer than m ost technologies we readily a ccept. Producing and burni ng coal, oil and gas kill far m ore people through accid ents and pollution each year. But our perception of n uclear issues isn't about l ogic. It's about dread, magn ified by arrogance in the n uclear industry, experts in r isk and nuclear energy say. "Whereas science is about a nalysis, risk resides in most o f us as a gut feeling," said U niversity of Oregon psyc hology professor and risk e xpert Paul Slovic. Radiation really creates very s trong feelings of fear not r eally fear, I would say more a nxiety and unease." Some experts contend that w hen a disaster has potentiall y profound repercussions, w e should pay attention to e motions as much as logic. Nuclear energy hits all our h ot buttons when we judge h ow risky something is: It's i nvisible. It's out of our cont rol. It's manmade, high-tech a nd hard to understand. It's i mposed on us, instead of s omething we choose. It's a ssociated with major catast rophes, not small problems. A nd if something goes w rong, it can cause cancer a n illness we fear far more t han a bigger killer like heart d isease. Thirty years ago, before t he 1986 Chernobyl nuclear d isaster, Slovic took four g roups of people and asked t hem to rate 30 risks. Two g roups the League of W omen Voters and college s tudents put nuclear p ower as the biggest risk, a head of things that are deadl ier, such as cars, handguns a nd cigarettes. Business club m embers ranked nuclear p ower as the eighth risk out o f 30. Risk experts put it at 2 0. The only fear that Slovic h as seen as comparable in his s tudies to nuclear power is t errorism. APew Research Center p oll after the Japanese n uclear crisis found support f or increased nuclear power m elting down. Last October t he American public was e venly split over an expans ion of nuclear power; now i t's 39 percent in favor and 5 2 percent opposed. "Nuclear radiation carries a very powerful stigma. It has automatic negative associations: cancer, bombs, catastrophes," said David Ropeik who teaches risk communications at Harvard University. You can't separate personal feelings from the discussion of actual risks, said Ropeik, author of the book "How Risky Is it, Really?" But Ropeik, who has consulted for the nuclear industry, said those fears aren't nearly as justified as other public health concerns. He worries that the public will turn to other choices, such as fossil fuels, which are linked to more death and climate change than the nuclear industry is. He cites one government study that says 24,000 Americans die each year from air pollution and another that says fossil fuel power plants are responsible for about one-seventh of that. At the same time, health researchers have not tied any U.S. deaths to 1979's Three Mile Island accident. United Nations agencies put the death toll from Chernobyl at 4,000 to 9,000, with antinuclear groups contending the number is much higher. Since 2000, more than 1,300 American workers have died in coal, oil and natural gas industry accidents, according to federal records. Radiological accidents have killed no one at U.S. nuclear plants during that time, and nuclear power has one of the lowest industrial accident rates in the country, said Nuclear Energy Institute spokesman Steve Kerekes. Alan Kolaczkowski, a retired nuclear engineer, consulted with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on specific probabilities of accidents at nuclear plants. He estimates the risk of a disaster at a given plant at 1 in 100,000 about the same as your chance of being killed by lightning over your lifetime. For comparison, an American's odds of dying in a car crash are 1 in 88; being shot to death, 1 in 306; and dying from bee stings, 1 in 71,623, according to the National Safety Council. The council couldn't come up with the odds of dying from radiation because it lists zero people dying in the United States from radiation in 2007, the most recent year for which these cause-of-death figures are available. Ropeik calls this mismatch between statistics and feelings "a classic example of how public policy gets made not about the numbers alone, but how we feel about them, and it ends up doing us more harm." Kolaczkowski faulted his own industry. "Those in the industry believe it is so complex it cannot be explained to the general public, so as a result, the industry has a trust-me attitude and that only goes so far," he said. "We're all afraid of the unknown, the ghosts under the bed." David Lochbaum of the Union of Concerned Scientists, a group that presses for safer nuclear plants, is a former plant engineer. He likens the public's fears to unjustified worries about shark attacks: The risks and deaths are small, but the attention and fears are big. "It may be an irrational fear, but I don't think it's one that can be educated away," Lochbaum said. However, calling these fears irrational isn't justified, said Georgetown University law professor and former Environmental Protection Agency associate administrator Lisa Heinzerling. She said people's concerns have been unjustly trivialized. People have been trained to think about and prepare for low-probability, catastrophic events like the earthquake and tsunami that caused the Japanese nuclear disaster, Heinzerling said. She pointed to homeowner's insurance. Most people won't have a fire that destroys their home, but "we worry about really big things even if they are improbable because we will be wiped out." Americans also have long had an ambivalence toward new technology, going back to worries about the introduction of electric lights in homes 130 years ago, said University of Detroit Mercy history professor John Staudenmaier, "Americans overreact with adulation and awe, then overreact with fear and anxiety," said Staudenmaier, editor emeritus of the academic journal Technology and Culture. Trying to explain the fears, nuclear industry spokesman Kerekes said, "There's a perception gap that exists." But he adds: "Other industries haven't had to do deal with an animated cartoon series that lasted, what, 25 years?" That would be "The Simpsons." Producer Al Jean said the show, which has been on the air since 1989, reflects America's real feelings. "There is something that taps into people's view of big business, and in particular, nuclear power, which is giving profit-minded people complete control over life and death. It is a scary thought, and I think that is a topic for satire," Jean said. Jean recognizes that nuclear plant workers aren't really like Homer Simpson and radiation doesn't "put a cute third eye on a fish." Bu t he thinks his show is accura te with its portrayal of the greedy, conniving nuclear power plant owner Montgomery Burns: "Mr. Burns may be representative of some people in the nucle ar industry not just nuclear, but all industries who seem like they're more inter ested in getting the money rather than doing what's saf e. I think that's what resonates in the public." Yet, Jean takes pride in noting that the Springfield nuclear power plant has never blown up. The lack of transparency in the nuclear industry including Tokyo Electric Power Co. has caused some of the problems, said Baruch Fischhoff, a profess or of decision sciences at Carnegie Mellon University It is a charge Kerekes disputes. "The nuclear industry has behaved in a way that is untrustworthy, both in the sense of not telling people the truth and not having the competence to manage their own affairs," Fischhoff said He added that industry is too quick to brush off people's fears: "Telling the pub lic that they are idiots is cer tainly not a way of making friends." Page 8DNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com $199999 $109999 $139999 SCIENCE What's behind our conflicted feelings on nukes? Perception isn't about logic, it's about dread MCTphoto The Salem nuclear plant's cooling tower forms a backdrop as a tanker cruises south on the Delaware River near Port Penn, Del.



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NEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 www.newssun.com HighLow 89 65Complete Forecast PAGE 8A Very warm with plenty of sunshine Forecast Question: Will the teacher tenure and merit pay plan improve the education system? Next question: Do you think a Republican will win next years presidential election? www.newssun.comMake your voice heard at Online Obituaries Johnny Flynn Ervin Age 80, of Frostproof Ruby Faye (Meek) Rance Renn Age 95, of Knightston, Ind. James Arthur Roland Age 81, of Sebring Audre P Schmidt Age 89, of Sebring Obituaries, Page 6A Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453O nline: www.newssun.com Yes 31.9% No 68.1% 099099401007 Total votes: 91 Arts & Entertainment3D Books 7D Business 1B Classifieds 5C Community Briefs2A Community Calendar5D Crossword Puzzle2D Dear Abby 2D Editorial & Opinion3A Lottery Numbers2A March Madness 4B Movie Times 2D Sports 1C Index locally owned community mindedHeartlandNational Bank Avon Park800 West Main St.863.453.6000Lake Placid600 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.699.1300Sebring327 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1300Sun n Lake North5033 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1322www.heartlandnb.com What a snapshot can tell you about your childs health 1D Whats behind our conflicted feeling about nukes 8D Sunday, March 27, 2011 www.newssun.com Volume 92/Number 36 | 75 cents New biz offers kids a chance to ride 1B Reflections celebrates silver anniversary 2A Nuclear NervesPanthers get onerun win to halt losing streak 1C Stopping The Skid Signs of Spring News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMON S Passenger Michael Woods is removed from a Ford Explorer after it collided with a bus loaded with students Thursday afternoon in Sebring. Woods was released from the hospital after being treated for minor injuries. By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Two people in a Ford Explorer were injured when they ran into a school bus loaded with students shortly before 3:45 p.m. on Thursday. No students were injured. He ran the stop sign, driver Whitney Spiers told the News-Sun, speaking of the bus driver. The Explorer hit the bus at the intersection of Grand Prix Avenue and Citroen Aven ue and ended up with the d rivers side pinned against a utility pole. Damage to t he other side prevented the do or from opening, and rescue rs had to use the Jaws of Life to extract Spiers and the passe nger, her boyfriend Micha el Woods. Concerned parents, la w enforcement and resc ue workers flocked to the sce ne of the accident. There were kids and cam eras everywhere and Im gl ad none of the kids were hu rt. What I dont get though is Two hurt when SUV, loaded bus collide Bus driver ticketed for running stop sign See BUS, page 7A News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Thelma Powers, born on March 25, 1908, makes a wish on her 103rd birthday. By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comLAKE PLACID People are living longer now, and for most of them that is a good thing. It certainly is for Thelma Powers, who celebrated her 103rd birthday Friday at the Placid Lakes Baptist Church. In addition to fellow congregants and friends, Powers was surrounded by four generations of family, her daughter, her granddaughter and her 14-year-old great-grandson. Originally from Ontario, Canada, Powers moved with her family to Miami Beach when she was a teenager. Her daughter and granddaughter both swear Powers was 15 when the family moved, and 16 when she married Alvin Powers. Powers herself, however, swears equally as vigorously that she was 17 when she arrived in Miami and 18 when she married her husband. Everyone agrees the couple met at a dance hall where it was a dim e a dance. Powers said her husban d swept her off her feet, and th at they danced their entire lives. Sometimes wed go to Nor th Carolina just so we could squa re dance, she said, but, the wal tz was our favorite. Still sharp, though a little ha rd of hearing, Powers has seen a l ot of history. Theodore Rooseve lt was president when she was bor n, At 103, shes older than Coca-Cola See POWERS, page 7A By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Sebring High School students met living history Friday afternoon when Abraham Gold, a survivor of the Auschwitz concentration camp, visited the campus and gave witness to a dark and terrible time in history. Even after a lifetime, a good marriage, children and grandchildren, Gold had to stop and collect himself several times as he spoke. His emotions were as raw as they had been then. From a large family, he had two sisters and eight brothers one of whom, Martin, was his twin. The family was Jewish and lived in Transylvania, where local German supporters were the people to fear. In school when Romania fell into the German sphere in 1939, his family was not seriously threatened until 1944, when Jews were forced to wear yelStudents listen to living history News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLE Y Abe Gold, who survived a year at the Auschwitz concentration and extermination camp during WW II spoke to Sebring High School students Friday. Holocaust survivor speaks to SHS students See GOLD, page 7A More photosPAGE5A News-Sun photos by KATARASIMMONSWarm weather is here to stay, and events that mark the arrival of spring are filling the local calendar. Three-year-old twins Rachel and Richard Ellington keptcool Saturday with snow cones during the Springtime on the Mall in Avon Park. Spring was also in bloom at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agricultural Center in Sebring at the annual Orchids in the Heartland Show, where Phyllis Klepser of Sebring bought a petite sized orchid from Quest Orchids owner Segundo Cuesta of Miami.

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By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comAVON PARK Hundreds of residents and family members spend Thursday enjoying the 25th anniversary of Reflections on Silver Lake. The 55-plus community opened its doors in late 1985, and has been in business ever since. The residents enjoyed a day of fun games, refreshments and memories with their neighbors. Throughout the day, the residents were able to have an old-time feel to their day by purchasing 25 cent hot dogs, sodas and other goodies. The seniors also enjoyed tons of games and activities leading up to the evenings entertainment, when the residents enjoyed the local band Groovus and danced the night away. Activities coordinator Pam Fafeita was thrilled to see so many residents turn out to enjoy the evening. We have 590 residents here and there are a handful that have been here since the very first year, said Fafeita. The -year Survivors, as they were called throughout the evening, enjoyed the attention. Many of the survivors were couples from all over the country, including Al and Donna Roberts. We come down here in mid-November and stay until the end of April, Donna Roberts said. Were from way north Illinois. Its a small city real close to the Wisconsin line. The Roberts sported I survived pins along with the other survivors. We just love it here, said Donna Roberts. The Sachseumaker family purchased the land that Reflections currently sits on, along with the adjacent citrus groves, in 1928. Eileen Sachseumaker and her daughter, Toni, are currently the owners of the property. My great grandfather bought this and the groves, its been in our family ever since, Eileen Sachseumaker said. The family is happy with the way the business has been running for the quarter of the century it has been in existence. We saw the most growth in the first few years the late s and early s. We dont plan to be making any changes, we will be keeping everything the same, Sachseumaker said. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, Florida 33870 A Harbor Point Media Company OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday PHONE: 863-385-6155 MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954 NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453 POSTMASTER: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870 USPS ISSN 0163-3988 Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry office(s)CIRCULATION SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before 11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after the times mentioned will receive credit to their account. Please call 385-6155.SUBSCRIPTION RATES12 mo.7% FL taxTotal HOME DELIVERY$60.46$4.23$64.69 IN FLORIDA MAIL92.236.4698.69 OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL105.99105.99 Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date. Romona Washington Publisher and Executive Editor863-385-6155, ext. 515 Kaylor & Kaylor P.A.Social Security Disability LawNew Claims Hearing Before A Judge Reconsiderations Appeals Court 863-382-1900 Mark Kaylor March 23 71021333941x:5Next jackpot $7 millionMarch 19 52931385253x:3 March 16 125414950x:4 March 25 14111436 March 24 519343536 March 23 1519212332 March 22 39272829 March 25 (n) 1805 March 25 (d) 6473 March 24 (n) 4164 March 24 (d) 6442 March 25(n) 75 9 March 25 (d) 48 1 March 24 (n) 74 6 March 24(d) 14 4 March 25 623323618 March 22 619213618 March 18 1115233213 March 15 71522303 March 23 515262832 PB: 9 PP: 2Next jackpot $125 millionMarch 19 311202746 PB: 8 PP: 2 March 16 2839404853 PB: 9 PP: 3 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center When future U.S. Navy p ilot Miroslav Zilberman l ost his grandfather, a R ussian World War II a viator who spent almost a full year as a prisoner o f war, he searched for t he right words to honor h is hero. I will always rememb er him as a loving and c aring grandfather, Z ilberman, then training t o become a pilot, said at t he cemetery. The next t ime I come here, I will p roudly be wearing my u niform, and with honor, s alute my grandfather and r emember his life. Zilberman, known as Steven by many of his r elatives and friends, w orked incredibly hard to t urn his dreams into realit y, becoming a Navy lieut enant. He grew up in K iev, Ukraine, but quickl y became endeared to A merica after moving h ere in elementary s chool, eventually even r eferring to Columbus, O hio, as home. Yet other t han his family, including a wife and two children, t here is one thing he a dored above all else. He loved to fly, Z ilbermans mother, Anna S okolov, told The U nknown Soldiers. One t ime, I remember I called h im, and he was in Texas, a nd he was not in a good m ood, which was unusua l. I asked him, Did s omething happen? Zilberman told his m om that bad weather c onditions would prevent h im from flying that day. I said, So what, y oull fly tomorrow,and h e said, Mom, you dont u nderstand, Sokolov r ecalled. He breathed a viation. Assigned to Carrier A irborne Early Warning S quadron (VAW-21), Z ilberman soared into the s kies, earning numerous e ducational and training a chievements as a naval a viator. But as a dear f riend who once helped a y oung Steven learn E nglish noted, he did not m ake these sacrifices at h is familys expense. At the same time, ( Zilberman) fulfilled the l ofty personal goals of r emaining a loving son to h is devoted parents, Anna a nd Boris (Zilberman), a l oving husband to K atrina, the love of his l ife since age 18, and lovi ng father to their two b eautiful children, Daniel a nd Sarah, Marylin Top Gun COMMUNITYBRIEFS By BARRYFOSTER Special to the News-SunAVON PARK For the third year in a row, the Avon Park Jaycees will see the p rofits from its operation of Club Patron d uring the 12 Hours of Sebring go up in s moke. Thats because the money raised b y the group goes to the annual I ndependence Day celebration in the City o f Charm. We made about $1,000 more than we d id last year, said Avon Park Jaycees P resident Ian Belanger. Thats because o ur Thursday night was so much better t his year. In fact, Belanger said the club is so p opular that they have reached the maximum levels of productivity for Friday and Saturday evenings. There were long lines at the facility and his group of volunteers were producing at peak levels while the club was open. The fully contained mobile entertainment facility made its debut at the 12 Hours last year and since has made appearances at several races in the American Le Mans Series. Club Patron was designed with race fans in mind, said Patrons Chief Marketing Officer Matt Carroll. Its an open-air lounge located in the center of the action. This year proved to be a melding of two race sponsors, with drinks combining Patron, a sponsor of the American Le Mans Series, and Real Florida orange juice. Fresh from Florida is the presenting sponsor of this years Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring. In addition to the hundreds of Race fans, Belanger said members of Scott Sharps Extreme Speed Motorsports crew stopped by, including Ed Brown, who not only drives for the Patron team, but also is the CEO of Patron Spirits company. This is the only race that a service group runs Club Patron and we cannot thank them enough, Belanger said. We make about 80 percent of our fireworks budget from this one event. They have no idea how much it helps the community. AP Jaycees find 12 Hours a money maker The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Thursday, March 24: Cody Adam Bateman, 22, of Sebring, was charged with four counts of violation of probation reference grand theft, burglary of structure, false information to pawn broker. Sofia Guadalupe Chong, 23, of Avon Park, was charged with operating a motor vehicle without a valid license. Larissa Marie DemersFloyd, 27, of Frostproof, was charged with violation of probation reference g rand theft. Jessica Michele Downs, 24, of Sebring, was charged with battery and resisting an officer without violence. James Paul Griswold, 20, of Sebring, was charged with possession of drug equipment. Julian Eric Johnson, 32, of Naples, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference grand theft and interfere with railroad track or equipment. Rigoberto Najarra, 28, of Lake Wales, was arrested on an out-of-county warrant reference grand theft auto. Jesus Nolasco Ortiz, 30, of Avon Park, was charged with violation of municipal ordinance. Kevin Francis Risch, 20, of Lake Placid, was charged with driving with license suspended and DUI. Tony Curtis Rouse, 33, of Avon Park, was charged with driving while license suspended. Evelyn Laquilla White, 32, of Sebring, was charged with driving while license suspended. POLICEBLOTTER News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR Al and Donna Roberts, John Tracey, Leon and Anita Miller, Frank and Lucille Corbett and Jerry and Anne Burke all celebrate 25 years of residency at Reflections at Silver Lake in Avon Park on Thursday evening. Reflections celebrates quarter of a century We just love it here.DONNAROBERTS 25-year resident See PILOT, page 7A Frontage Road closed for workSEBRING Frontage Road will be closed from the Heartland National Bank south to Tanglewood beginning Monday for construction operations. Detour routes will be posted. For further information, call the Highlands County Engineering Department at 402-6877.Water Conservation Workshop setSEBRING Water Conservation Workshop will be offered from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, April 16 at Highlands County Extension Service, Bert J. Harris Agriculture Center, 4509 George Blvd. Registration is $15 before April 8; $20 at the door (make all checks payable to Horticulture Advisory Committee). Learn how to adjust and retrofit your irrigation system; water shortages are impacting your water supply; to build your own rainbarrel (extra $25 fee for barrel and supplies, need to pre-register); to exchange your shower head for a low-flow shower head; to sign up for the Mobile Irrigation Lab; and to select and grow Floridafriendly plant material. There will be workshops and vendors present. Lunch will be provided. For more information, call Dee Dee Jacobson, Urban Horticulture agent at 402-7140.Habitat plans home tourSEBRING Learn more about Habitats work in Highlands County through a tour and lunch. See the untenable conditions in which applicant families are living. Tour Habitat homes, ongoing construction at Masons Ridge and be welcomed by a Habitat family into their home. The tour will be at 10 a.m. Monday, April 11. All tours begin and end at the office, 159 S. Commerce Ave. Reservations are needed and can be made by contacting Sarah Pallone at 402-2913 or spallone@habitathighlands.org. Tour transportation provided by Annett Bus Line s. Seating is limited to 45 passengers.SFCC closes for Spring BreakAVON PARK South Florida Community College will be closed for spring break, March 28April 2. The college will reopen Monday, April 4. During spring break, adult education and GED classes will continue at th e Teacherage from 7:30 a.m to noon and 12:30-3:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. SFC C University Center classes will be held in accordance with the schedules of part nering universities. For more information, call 453-6661, 773-3081, 494-5300, or 465-5300. Caladium Co-op Open House features BehlerLAKE PLACID Mary Behler has been a part-tim e resident of Lake Placid fo r the past 17 years. When she first arrived, Behler discovered the Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative as she becam e familiar with her surround ings. She had always enjoyed being a crafter an d soon signed up for classes in acrylic fabric painting under the super direction of Mary Gephart. After 14 years, she discovered Pergamano (Parchment Craft). This art/craft has become her passion. It is a unique for m of artwork and Behler use s fabric, flowers, and other Continued on page 6A

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Page 3ANews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.comTODAYSEDITORIALTODAYSLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION In December of 2009, I w rote a column called Compassion is Individual. I n it I opined that instead of e xpecting the federal gove rnment to help out the poor, w e should consider rolling u p our sleeves, getting our h ands dirty and doing our p art. I suggested that if we a s individuals were to d emonstrate compassion i nstead of leaving it to the g overnment, maybe the gove rnment wouldnt have to do i t. At least one person wasnt v ery happy with the column, e specially when I suggested t hat the government needing t o step in to help the poor d emonstrated a lack of comp assion on our part. There a re those who see the gove rnments role in helping out t he less fortunate as somet hing to be preserved at all c ost. Dare to disagree and y ou are accused of not cari ng about the poor. Let me speak for myself. I d o care about the poor. T hats why Im willing to q uestion how we do it. Is the f ederal government truly the b est avenue available to a ssist those with needs? Lets say you were someo ne who had a need. If I g ave you a dollar, you would r eceive a dollar. If I give the g overnment a dollar to give t o you, by the time it gets d own to you youll get penn ies. The government is a b ureaucracy, and by their n ature bureaucracies are p rone to inefficiency. This is not to say I think t he governments help of the p oor is evil. It may or may n ot be constitutional (anothe r argument for another t ime), but yes, wanting to h elp out the less fortunate is a good thing. I do believe there are a lot o f us who shove our persona l, God-given call to help t he poor onto the shoulders o f the government, and then g o on our way feeling we h ave no obligations. There are all kinds of w ays we can do things as i ndividuals. Im not talking about being careless with our money or our safety. But that doesnt mean that there arent things we can do. There are a number of programs here in Highlands County that work to help those in need. Im going to mention one that Im involved in. My congregation, Sebring Parkway Church of Christ, has a clothing room that we open up once a week. It has grown over the years to take over a building located on our property. We collect clothing, household items, even furniture from time to time. And on Thursday mornings, from 9-11 (except on the last Thursday of the month, when were open from 4-6 p.m.), we give the stuff away. We do ask that people provide identification and limit visits to once a month. This hopefully discourages the few who would take advantage of our generosity and use us to, for example, add to their garage sale (yes, sadly, it does happen). People seem to appreciate what we provide. I often am thanked as they leave us, bags full of clothing. Some even come back and donate clothes their children have outgrown, or clothes that they cant use anymore. It is perhaps a small thing that were doing. But it is something. And were not the only ones. If you really want to do something yourself to help those in need, there are ways. Check them out. By the way, this Thursday were opening the clothing room from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. If you know someone with a need, send them our way. Need more information? Call the church at 385-7443. Laura Ware is a Sebring resident. She can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady@ embarqmail.com People helping people Lauras Look Laura Ware It is hard to understand how this sorry state of affairs developed over the years, because America has always been a place where individuals, by working hard and learning more, were able to improve their lives. The traditional American success story is built around the selfmade man armed only with a public school education and ambition. At the same time, however, schools are often viewed as an enemy camp not a launching pad; teachers as prison wardens instead of guides to new worlds; and recess considered the only worthwhile period of the day. Summers are seen as wonderful no more pencils, no more books, no more teachers dirty looks and going back to school in the fall the equivalent of a sentence to a salt mine. Too many parents today consider teachers the enemy and teach their children to believe it too. Too many taxpayers whose children are grown, or who never had children in the first place, refuse to see how quality schools improve everyones quality of life. Too many politicians listen to only the most strident voices, and seek only the short term solutions requiring the fewest dollars. Too many school administrators are not standing up for their faculty members. And too many teachers are simply giving up. It is fair to ask, now that it is too late and HB 736 h as passed and will be sign ed into law, why raise a fuss? Because HB 736 is goin g to have lasting consequence s; and because, fortunately in America, laws can be changed when people reali ze they have made a mistake. Undervaluing educatio n, refusing to respect teache rs as professionals, denyin g learning is a group activi ty that takes place over tim e, and acting as if children a re data to be collected n ot living, breathing hum an beings will hurt us all, an d our nation. We predict the state of Florida will live to regret t he passage of HB 736. We hope that regret com es quickly, and brings with it a return to more sensible po licies. We are losing the love of learning We Americans have always had a love-hate relationship with our schools and teachers. Pool Safety is still important E ditor: Toddler nearly drowns in pool ( News-Sun, March 16), about the n ear-drowning of a child at the p ool raises the important issue of p ool safety. It is vital for everyone u sing pools and spas to stay safe w hile having fun and cooling off. The U.S. Consumer Product S afety Commission (CPSC) last y ear launched a public safety camp aign, Pool Safely, to provide pare nts and children with simple, lifes aving steps to follow in and a round pools and spas. Why is it i mportant to keep the conversation g oing in 2011? Because there was m ore than 500 drownings and neard rownings reported by the media n ationwide in 2010. Drowning is a leading cause of d eath for children younger than 5. C PSC estimates that each year n early 300 children drown and m ore than 3,200 end up in hospital e mergency rooms because of pool s ubmersion injuries. When we e ncourage everyone to Pool Safely, w e mean stay close to children in a p ool or spa, constantly watch child ren in and around the water, know l ife-saving skills like how to swim a nd C.P.R., and install safety e quipment in and around the pool. V isit PoolSafely.gov to learn more. Inez M. Tenenbaum U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission ChairmanCurrent situation works for personal agendaEditor: Patricia Austin, a local activist who doesnt live within the city limits, is organizing a rally to recall the city council based on the councils decision to remove the city manager. This is not her motive. She couldnt care less about that decision. Three or four years ago Austin was denied the permission to plant a tree in the Mall to celebrate the defeat of an attack on an illegal immigration ordinance proposed by Tom Macklin, the mayor at that time. She has been back and denied a second time. In her own words at the council meeting when denied she said this was not acceptable. She has an ax to grind and its that simple. In the words of Rom Emanuel dont let a good crisis go to waste. Beware, she is using this current situation for her own agenda. People of Avon Park, dont be fooled by this approach Patricia Austin is using solely to get back at the city council. She is always trying to divide the city. We need unity. Axel Diaz Sebring Editors note: The rally mentioned here was held last week. If you dont like the city, moveEditor: What Avon Park really needs is less people like Tom Macklin and Patricia Austin and more people like our city council. When you have blowhards who do nothing for the city but cause problems, you get just that, nothing. When you have people willin g to stand up for their city and a responsible budget, that is when you get our city council. City of Hell. Ashamed. Please, if you fe el this way, move. John Paul Hesto n Avon Pa rk BouquetSebring Womans Club appreciates donationsEditor: The GFWC Womans Club of Sebring thanks our members, Lind a Baine, and the community for the ir generous donations to our recent flea market. The event was a huge success, because of these kind con tributors. Events like the flea market enables us to fund the programs w e support including: The Peace Riv er Safe House, Adopt-a-Highway Program, Salvation Army, The Hugh OBrian Youth Leadership (HOBY) Program, Woodlawn Elementary School RIF Program (Reading is Fundamental), give scholarships for women at SFCC, create and make items needed by local hospitals, Hospice centers, and nursing homes. Toni Go ff Flea Market Chairma n GFWC Womans Club of Sebrin g Make sure to sign your letter and include your address and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automatically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum of 400 words. We have to make room for everybody. Letters of local concern take priority. Send your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL33870; drop it off at the same address; fax 385-1954; or e-mail editor@newssun.com. To make sure the editorial pages arent dominated by the same writers, letters are limited to two per month and a guest column can be submitted once every three months. Opinions expressed in letters or columns are solely the opinion of that author and not necessarily the opinion of the staff or editors of the News-Sun. EDITORIALPAGEPOLICY EXPRESSIONSOFFREESPEECH If a person goes to a country and finds the newspapers filled with nothing but good news, there are good men in jail.DANIELPATRICK MOYNIHAN U.S. Senator, D-N.Y., 1976

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011Page 5A SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. EXPIRES 4/2/11PLUS TAX, TAG, & STATE FEES. www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644 LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 NO DEALER FEES Since 1931 #X0164 2008 SATURN VUE#CY021A #CX107A1 2007 CHEVY 3500 LT#X0166 #CX146A 2008 JEEP COMPASS #X0167 2007 DODGE RAM 3500 MEGA CAB DIESEL#TY041B #DX050A 2010 DODGE JOURNEY SXT#X0156 2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERTIBLE2010 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 2005 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT #JY043A $ 32888 $ 198882008 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4 $ 32988 $ 16888 $ 12888 $ 15888 $ 18299 $ 168882010 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY LX2008 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED $ 18888CERTIFIED $ 12888 $ 14888 $ 18599#JY004B #X0161 ONE OWNER READY TO TOW CERTIFIED CERTIFIED LOW MILES XTRA CLEAN LEATHER ONE OWNER CREAM PUFF NICE CERTIFIED CERTIFIED CERTIFIED 2008 DODGE AVENGER RT By BILLKACZOR Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Floridas unemployment rate dropped by 0.4 of a percentage point to 11.5 percent in February, the second consecutive month its declined, state labor officials said Friday. Thats the lowest its been since last July, when Florida also was at 11.5 percent, but nearly 1.1 million Floridians remain out of work. Highlands Countys rate was an even 11 percent, a drop from the 11.9 percent rate in January. This decrease in Floridas unemployment rate, combined with continued job growth, is welcome news and provides additional evidence that our economy is getting back on track, said Cynthia R. Lorenzo, director of the state Agency for Workforce Innovation. The agency reported Florida added 22,700 jobs in February and now has 32,700 more jobs than it did in February 2010, an increase of 0.5 percent. Thats the strongest annual growth rate recorded since May 2007, when it was 0.7 percent. February also is the fifth consecutive month of annual job growth. The leisure and hospitality industry has led the way by adding 26,100 jobs over 12months through February, a 2.9 percent growth rate. Other industries adding jobs include education and health services; professional and business services; and trade, transportation and utilities. Those gains have be en partly offset by continu ed shrinkage in other sectors l ed by construction, which w as down 15,800 jobs, or 4.5 pe rcent. Also losing jobs we re financial activities, manufa cturing, information and go vernment. While down from Januar y, Floridas 11.5 percent rate in February still is higher th an the 11.3 percent recorded f or the same month last year. I ts also 2.6 percentage poin ts above the 8.9 percent natio nal figure for February. Floridas jobless rat e, though, is dropping fast er than expected. State economists had pr edicted just a month ago th at Florida would remain sligh tly above 12 percent t he rate for December throug h the second quarter of th is year and not fall below 11 .7 percent until 2012. Theres a bit more goo d news in a Manpow er Employment Outlook Surv ey showing 14 percent of Florida employers expect to hire more workers betwe en April and June while 76 pe rcent plan to maintain existin g staffing levels. Thats a slight improv ement over a similar surv ey taken for the first quarter of the year. Monroe County had t he states lowest unemployme nt rate at 6.9 percent, follow ed by Liberty County at 7.1 pe rcent and Alachua County at 7.7 percent. Flagler County had t he highest rate at 14.9 percen t, followed by Hernand o County at 13.9 percent an d Hendry County at 13.4 pe rcent. View the report at http://www.floridajobs.org/ Florida unemployment drops to 11.5 percent Local rate drops from 11.9 to 11.0 News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Lucy Miller of Sebring watches people as they browse the Springtime on the Mall Festival. News Sun photo by ROBYN BAKALUS Cohen Marin, 5, plays on an inflatable slide on Saturday at Springtime on the Mall in Avon Park. News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Jaylen Lough, 2, faces off with Scrappy the dog about whose turn it is to ride in the stroller. News Sun photo by ROBYN BAKALUS Dot Biros of Sebring admires a necklace. News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Bob Wantland of Winter Haven demonstrates a marshmallow blow gun Saturday during the Springtime on the Mall Festival. Avon Park welcomes spring with annual Mall Festival

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Page 6ANews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com GUARANTEED WEIGHT LOSS!CALL TODAY (863) 471-2500 LOSE YOUR WEIGHT FOR THE LAST TIME!13 Ryant Blvd. SebringCorner of 27 & Ryant Blvd.SAVE 50% OFF ENROLLMENT FEES Hurry! Offer Ends Soon! Would Dad have wanted it that way?Serving our community since 1925. Locally owned & operated. www.stephensonnelsonfh.comSebring, FL 33870 385-0125 Avon Park, FL 33825 453-3101Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home & CrematoryPreplanning a funeral is not something you do for yourself Its something you do for your family. It spares them from making emotional decisions decisions that may not be consistent with your own wishes. We specialize in prearrangements for your familys sake.Proud to serve Sebring, Lake Placid & Avon Park embellishments to make her creations interesting. Pictures, cards and free standing art forms can be done with beautiful results. Behlers teacher is originally from Cuba where she became a certified Pergamano parchment artist. Behlers work will be on display and available for purchase with a portion of the proceeds going to the Caladium Arts and Crafts Cooperative. The Open House will be held at 1:30 p.m. today in the Co-op, 132 E. Interlake Blvd. Light refreshments will be served. Call 6995940 or visit the Web site at www.caladiumarts.or for further information. FHREDI meets MondayLAKE PLACID A public meeting of the board of directors for Floridas Heartland Rural Economic Development Initiative Inc. and Floridas Freshwater Frontier Inc. will be at 10 a.m. Monday at The Heartland Education Consortium, 1096 U.S. 27 North. The topic will be FHREDI/FFF and other related board issues. All interested persons are invited to attend. One or more county commissioners may be present at the meeting. Contact Gina Reynolds at 385-4900. Palms of Sebring plans spaghetti dinnerSEBRING The Palms of Sebring is selling tickets for a spaghetti dinner to benefit community education outreach. All tickets will be presold before Tuesday. Tickets can be purchased at the reception desk at the Palms of Sebring or for ticket delivery contact Peggy Patton at 385-0161, ext. 3160. Dinners will be available for pick up from 4-6:30 p.m. on Thursday. The dinner includes spaghetti with or without meat sauce, mixed vegetables, and garlic breadstick. There will also be sodas, cookies and apple dumplings on sale the night of the meal pick up. For any questions regarding the dinner, contact Patton.Opportunity knocks for Highlands County bandsSEBRING The Heartland Cultural Alliance (HCA) will have an open mike for Highlands County bands (two or more musicians) at the Kenilworth Lodge from 8-10 p.m. Saturday, April 2. This will be an ongoing, first Saturday of the month, qualifying event for the upcoming May the Best Band Win Star Search. This opportunity for exposure and possible rumination/prizes is open to all forms of music. The qualifying judging will be by peoples choice. The HCAwants to give local musical talent a venue and chance to be discovered. To get in the lineup for this high profile event and/or more information contact Fred Leavitt at 4028238 or e-mail info@heartlandculturalalliance.org. For more information on HCAvisit, www.heartlandculturalalliance.org.Atlantic City Boys to perform at TanglewoodSEBRING At 7 p.m. today, Tanglewoods Special Events will present ATribute to the Jersey Boys as performed by the Atlantic City Boys. Their stage show performance features hits from The Four Seasons: Big Girls Dont Cry, Cant Take My Eyes Off You, Lets Hang On, My Eyes Adored You, Oh What A Night!, Sherry Walk Like AMan, Who Loves You, WorkinMy Way Back to You, plus many more hits. Great voices with precision harmony will make this an evening of musical enjoyment. Doors and snack bar opens at 6 p.m.; show is at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at the Activities Directors office or at the door for $12. Tanglewood is one-half mile north of Walmart on U.S. 27.Events planned at lodges, postsAVON PARK The American Legion Post 69 will host karaoke by Naomi at 4 p.m. today. Bingo is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. For more information, call 453-4553. The Combat Veterans Memorial VFWPost 9853 will have NASCAR on the screen today. Call for time. The Ladies Auxiliary Initiation is at 2 p.m. From 4-5 p.m. Tuesday will be karaoke by Phil. For more information, call 452-9853 LAKE PLACID American Legion Placid Post 25 will host music by Steve and Peggy from 5-8 p.m. today. ABoy Scout meeting is set for 7 p.m. Monday. Atrip to the casino will begin at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday. Free blood pressure checks will be offered from 1-3 p.m. and bingo is set to begin at 6:30 p.m. For details, call 465-7940. Placid Lodge No. 282 will serve its pork loin din ner at the lodge, 102 N. Main, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. today. The dinner is open to the public and the cost is an $8 donation. Ca ll 243-1356. The Lake Placid Moose 2374 will have NASCAR Bristol on the screen at 1 p.m. today. Karaoke will follow with Bama Jam. Th e meat raffle is set for 4 p.m Tuesday. For more inform ation, call 465-0131.Orchid Hill Stables offers day campLORIDASpring Brea k Horsemanship Day Camp at Orchid Hill Stables will be March 28 through April 1, from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m Lunch, snacks, and wate r provided. Lear games on horseback as well as show manship and horsemanship practice. Cost for Orchid Hill Stables students and Lunc h Club Wednesday members is just $75 per day. Ask about half/day rates Orchid Society meets MondaySEBRING The Orchid Society of Highlands County will hold its month ly meeting at 7 p.m. Monday. Meetings are hel d at the Bert J. Harris Jr. Agricultural Center, 4509 George Blvd. The speaker this month will be Kellie Kelley, owner of Kelleys Florist in Lake Placid. She will give a demonstration on making orchid corsages Guests are always welcome and participants do not have to be knowledgeable of orchids to attend. For additional information call 465-2830 or by e-mai l at orchidman124@ yahoo.com or go to the W eb site http://orchidsocietyhighlands.org/. Recreation Club plans eventsSEBRING The Sebring Recreation Club, 333 Pomegranate Ave., wi ll host the following events: Monday Ladies soci al club, 1 p.m.; shuffleboard scrambles, 1:15 p.m. Tuesday County tour nament, 9 a.m. Wednesday Nickel scrambles, 1:15 p.m.; line dancing lessons, 5:15 p.m. ; line dancing, 6:15 p.m. Thursday Hosscollar 9:30 a.m.; bingo, 7 p.m. For more information, call 385-2966. Continued from page 2A JOHNNYFLYNN ERVIN Johnny Flynn Ervin, 80, of Frostproof passed away Wednesday, M arch 23, 2011 at the Florida H ospital Heartland Medical C enter in Sebring. He was b orn June 4, 1930 in R ossville, Ga., to the late C laud Crawford and Mary O ttie Lee (Parrish) Ervin, he m oved to Frostproof from A von Park in 1982. He was a v eteran of Korea and V ietnam, and retired after 30 years from the U.S. Air Force as a chief master sergeant radar technician. He had been a member of the F irst Baptist Church in F rostproof for the last 18 y ears. Johnny was preceded in d eath by his son, Johnny F lynn Ervin Jr. Survivors include his wife o f 56 years, Billie Sue Ervin; d aughter, Elaina Brennan of A bilene, Texas; sons, Greg E rvin of St. Cloud, James E rvin of Cameron, N.C., and T imothy Ervin of Orlando; 1 0 grandchildren and 10 g reat-grandchildren. Visitation will be held f rom 2 p.m. until the funeral s ervice at 3 p.m. Saturday, M arch 26, 2011 at the First B aptist Church in Frostproof w ith Rev. Darrol Hood officia ting. Interment will be held 1 p.m. Tuesday, March 29, 2 011 at the Florida National C emetery in Bushnell. C ondolences may be sent to t he family and the webcast of t he service can be viewed at w ww.marionnelsonfuneralh ome.com. Marion Nelson Funeral Home Lake Wales, Florida 33853 863-676-2541 JACK RUFFIN FARMER Jack Ruffin Farmer, 77, of Tampa, passed away March 19, 2011. He was b orn March 7, 1934, in T aylorsville, Miss. He was a retired Baptist m inister who served as pastor o f First Baptist Church of A von Park from 1982-1996. H e also served churches in M ississippi and Alabama. J ack graduated from M ississippi College in 1956 a nd received his Master of D ivinity degree in 1959 from S outhern Baptist Theological S eminary in Louisville, Ky. H e received his Doctor of M inistry degree from New O rleans Baptist Theological S eminary in 1978. He was a f ounding member of the C ooperative Baptist F ellowship. He is survived by his wife o f 54 years, Ann Hudson ( Ragland) Farmer; four child ren, Debra (Tom) Tschopp of Orlando, Fla.; Jon (Holly) Farmer of Birmingham, Ala.; Leigh (Tim) Hunt and Laurie (Duncan) Elliott of Tampa, Fla.; 11 grandchildren and sister Amanda Fisher of Jackson, Miis. He was preceded in death by his parents, Jack L. and Mildred Ruffin Farmer. Amemorial service to celebrate his life will take place at 4 p.m. Saturday, March 26, 2011 at Bayshore Baptist Church in Tampa. In lieu of flowers please make memorial contributions to Hannah's Buddies/ Fight SMA; PO Box 320528; Tampa, FL 33679. RUBYFAYE (MEEK) RANCE RENN Ruby Faye (Meek) Rance Renn, 95, of Knightstown, Ind., passed away Thursday, March 24, 2011 at her sons home in Knightstown. She was born on July 31, 1915 in Darlington, Boone County, Ind., to the late Perry and Lulu Bowen Meek. She was a seamstress for many years and had worked at RCAfor 28 years. She was a member of Sewing Guild in Florida and did taxes for AARP. Survivors include two sons, Everett Rance of Knightstown and Denis Rance of Jennings, Fla.; one daughter, Doris Sachs of Waverly, Ind.; 11 grandchildren, Pam Shull, Michelle Rance, Kenneth Rance, Denis Rance, Dawn Holder, Dianne Dunn, Marsha Bean, Deborah Sachs, Susie Davenport, Leslee Schneiders and Bradley Sachs; eight step-grandchldren, 17 great-grandchildren, 14 great-great-grandchildren. She was proceeded in death by her first husband, Leslie Rance and second husband, Leo Renn, son Franklin Rance, two brothers and six sisters. Afuneral service will be held Monday at 11 a.m. at Condo & Son Funeral Home in Wilkinson with Paul Enyart officiating, Friends may call Sunday from 2-6 p.m. at the funeral home. Burial will be at Glen Cove Cemetery in Knightstown. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society. Online condolences may be made at www.condoandson.com Condo & Son Funeral Home Wilkinson, Indiana 46186 JAMES ARTHUR ROLAND James Arthur Roland, 81, of Sebring, passed away gently at home on the morning of Thursday, March 24, 2011. AGeorgia native, most of his later years were spent in Florida with his loving wife, Patricia. He was born at home in Warsaw, Ga., in the late 1920s, one of eight children born to Minnie Mae and Marion Roland. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; bother, Horace; sister, Sarah; and children, Michael and Elizabeth. Three grandchildren and five greatgrandchildren live in Georgia. His son Jim passed away earlier, as did his first wife, Kelly. James served in the Air Force during the Korean War. He became an aerospace engineer and held an A&P license with Inspection Authorization. He also had a private pilot license with rotorcraft endorsement. His early career focused on fixed wing aircraft, rotorcraft and eventually components for the space shuttle, retiring from the Defense Logistics Agency after 30 years. His later activities were construction/remodeling related. AFreemason, Shriner and VFWmember, James led a full and blessed life passing on a legacy of honesty, integrity and determination to his children and grandchildren. There will be a homecoming at the family plot in Warsaw Cemetery near Johns Creek, Ga., for James this spring so family members can attend. The family is sincerely grateful to the staff and volunteers of Hope Hospice for his care in the last weeks of his life. Donations to them would be greatly appreciated. Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home Sebring, Florida 863-385-0125 www.stephensonnelsonfh.com AUDRE P. SCHMIDT Audre P. Schmidt, 89 of Sebring, died Thursday at Good Shepherd Hospice. She was born Jan. 20, 1922, in Plainville, Kan. She was preceded in death by husband, Gilbert J. Schmidt and son, Ronald Schmidt. She moved to Sebring in 1989 from Battle Creek, Mich., and was a member of St. Catherine Catholic Church and a past president of the Columbiettes. She was an avid golfer, a voracious reader, and enjoyed playing cards with friends. She is survived by her son, Edward and his wife, Anne Schmidt of Mason, Mich.; and daughter, Theresa Mori, Corvallis, Ore.; daughter-inlaw, Rebecca Schmidt, St. Petersburg; and six grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be sent to Good Shepherd Hospice, 4818 Sun n Lake Blvd., Sebring, FL 33872. The family will receive friends, 10-11 a.m., Monday, March 28, 2011 with a prayer service at 11 a.m. at Morris Funeral Chapel with Fr. J. Peter Sheehan. Following the service, a luncheon will be held at Homers. Further services and burial will be held in Battle Creek, Mich. Condolences may be expressed at www.morrisfuneralchapel.co m. MORRIS FUNERAL CHAPEL, Sebring. OBITUARIES COMMUNITYBRIEFS Ervin Farmer The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Did YouKNOW?EMERGENCY VEHICLESUpon the immediate approach of an authorized emergency vehicle,while en route to meet an existing emergency,the driver of every other vehicle shall,when such emergency vehicle is giving audible signals by siren,exhaust whistle, or other adequate device,or visible signals by the use of displayed blue or red lights,yield the right-of-way to the emergency vehicle and shall immediately proceed to a position parallel to,and as close as reasonable to the closest edge of the curb of the roadway,clear of any intersection and shall stop and remain in position until the authorized emergency vehicle has passed,unless otherwise directed by any law enforcement officer.YOUCANBETICKETEDFORFAILINGTOPULL OVERANDSTOPWHENANAMBULANCE, POLICE, FIREOROTHEREMERGENCYVEHICLEIS TRAVELLINGTOMEETANEMERGENCY. BELOWISTHEFLORIDALAW.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011Page 7A LIMITED SPACE CALLTODAY! 5 DAYS a week$ 30 Get In Shape Learn Self Defense Improve Self Esteem Make Better GradesMARTIAL ARTS AMERICA471-2467Best After School Program in SebringFREEPICKUP from: Kindergarten Learning Center, Cracker Trail, Sun-N-Lakes, Woodlawn, Fred Wild, Memorial, Hill Gustat, Sebring Middle/High Located on Kenilworth Sebring*Some Restrictions Apply Life Care, Not Day Care Keep FULL ACCUMULATED VALUE Keep Any Cash Bonus Receive A Large Tax Deduction Eliminate All Surrender Charges Receive Cash Back Receive a Tax Favored Income StreamI WANT TO HELP YOU GET OUT OF YOUR ANNUITY AND SAVE TAXES!!! Call Today For A FREE Illustration Rofsky said. Tragically, those touching remarks were made at a memorial service for Zilberman at Naval Station Norfolk, Va., on April 8, 2010. The 31-year-old pilots E-2C Hawkeye crashed in the Arabian Gulf on March 31 while returning to the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower from a mission over Afghanistan. Despite a frantic and extensive search, his body was never recovered. I thought that it could not be because I only had one child and I brought him to America for a better life, an emotional Sokolov told me. Everything was all right in our family, even though my father was in two wars before he died at 92. It was horrible. Zilbermans selfless actions in the moments before the crash earned him the Distinguished Flying Cross. According to numerous accounts, the pilot urged his three crewmembers to bail out as he battled a mechanical failure, keeping the plane steady just long enough to save their lives. Without his courageous actions, the entire crew would have perished, a Navy citation reads. Zilbermans parents were unaware of many of their sons accomplishments until his memorial service. He was a top pilot, but we didnt know, his proud mother explained. He was very modest and would never brag about his own accomplishments. To him, it didnt matter. When we think of American military pilots, many of us still recall Maverick and Goose gliding around the skies in the classic s film Top Gun, with roaring engines and rock music in the background. Yet as we are reminded by Zilbermans call sign of Abrek, which means valiant man in Russian, the real protectors of the sky are in danger at this very hour, flying perilous missions over combat zones in Afghanistan and Libya. Today, we find ourselves set where Lt. Miroslav Steven Zilberman once stood, searching for the right way to honor our heroes. Maybe we can start by living a little bit more like them: making our country better and following our dreams, while at the same time always putting our loved ones first. To find out more about Tom Sileo, or to read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com. Continued from page 2A why the bus driver didnt get off the bus. It was his fault. He just sat there, said Spiers. The recently purchased Explorer was totaled according to Spiers. The driver of the bus, whose name has yet to be released, was reportedly issued a citation for failing to stop. He seemed okay. Then again he was in a huge bus and me and Michael were in a little truck, Spiers said. Spiers suffered many bumps and bruises all over her body and plans to see a bone physician on Monday due to major pains in her neck, shoulder, and chest. The recently purchased Explorer was totaled according to Spiers. The Florida Highway Patrol did not have an accident report available on Friday. Continued from 1A News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Students and concerned parents seek each other out following Thursdays crash involving a Highlands County school bus. Bus driver cited in crash with SUV Pilot gave life to save others Lt. Miroslav Steven Zilberman and William Howard Taft was elected that November. Kurts Vanarbogast, one of her friends who was on hand for her party, put it this way: She was 4 years old when the Titanic sank and she is a year older than Coca-Cola. That should put it in perspective. Im not even as old as Tupperwear. Powers, in addition to raising two daughters wi th her husband, became a highly regarded seamstres s, creating custom clothing. As Miami Beach deve loped and the small tow n turned into a city, and th en into a major city, the fami ly made its way north and se ttled in Highlands Coun ty almost 20 years ago. Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Julia Van Fleet, 12, shows a resident at the Southern Lifestyle a cochin hen. Julia is a member of the Sunny Hop 4-H Club, which visited the assisted living center Saturday. 4-H bring feathered friends to Southern Lifestyle News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Elisabeth Van Fleet, 8, holds a Rhode Island Red chick. Powers celebrates 103 l ow stars. Gold was 18 years old at t he time. In June of that year, G old told the students, w ho were silent and leani ng forward in their seats, t he Germans told his comm unity they needed worke rs and people should prep are themselves to travel. T hey were told to pack up e verything they needed, b ut only as much as they c ould carry by themselves. Taken by truck into a J ewish ghetto, the next day t hey were marched down t he street to the railroad s tation and stuffed into c attle cars for the trip to A uschwitz. They reached the camp a t midnight, and even at t hat time of day, the camp w as well lit and busy. Gold d escribed how the family w as torn apart immediatel y upon arrival, the women a nd his father being directe d to the right, he and his b rothers to the right. We all knew what happ ened to the people who w ent to the right, he said. They went immediately t o the gas chamber. Gold said he would not h ave survived except he w as given work inside a f actory, out of the weather a nd relatively away from S S eyes. Even so, survivi ng was very hard. He talked about one f orced march where 27 out o f 100 prisoners were k illed because they could n ot keep up. Much more p ainful was the fact he was a lone through all of this. M ost of his family he n ever saw again. He talked about thin p otato soup, black coffee, m arching to work, being c ounted over and over e very day, and two young m en who tried to escape. They were caught, Gold s aid, and hung in front of e veryone as a warning. Gold had a special less on he wanted the students t o learn. Dont generalize, he s aid. Take one person as n o good, dont hate everyo ne. As an example, Gold r eminded the students that i n 1939 the United States h ad refused to let a ship l oaded with Jewish r efugees land in the count ry. It was sent back to G ermany, where everyone w as taken into custody. He described the eerie s ilence the day the camp w as liberated he had b een moved away from A uschwitz as the war a pproached. He told the students that s ome of the prisoners died a fter the liberation because t hey were so hungry they a te too much. He said he made his way t o his home town, driven b y a need to find his twin b rother, only to discover M artin had not survived. He took to the road a gain, unable to live with s o many memories and w ound up in Boston in 1 949. Eventually he marr ied, started his own busin ess and volunteered with a n ambulance corps as way o f giving back. Gold was asked by a s tudent how he kept his f aith in God. At first, Gold admitted, h e had anger. You didnt d o anything, he said he t old God. But, as time passed he s aw that God doesnt do t hings; people do things to e ach other. Dont blame G od. I have faith in God. Y ou have to have faith in s omething. Continued from page 1A Gold tells story of survival Associated PressDAYTONABEACH A3-year-old has died after drowning in her grandmothers pool in Daytona Beach. Police say Laela McGlothren asked her grandmother if she could play in the yard. The grandmother consented but asked the toddl er to stay away from the poo l. The grandmother w as also watching an infant si bling at the time. She later found Lae la floating in the pool. Laela was pronounc ed dead at a local hospit al Friday evening. 3-year-old girl drowns in Daytona Beach pool

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Page 8ANews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com Call 385-6155 and a Sales Representative will be glad to assist you! TODAYVery warm with plenty of sunshine89 / 65Winds: SSW at 7-14 mphClouds and sun with a t-storm; warm86 / 65Winds: SW at 6-12 mphMONDAYPartly sunny, a t-storm possible87 / 67Winds: S at 7-14 mphTUESDAYPartly sunny and breezy88 / 69Winds: S at 10-20 mphWEDNESDAYSome sun, t-storms possible; breezy87 / 74Winds: S at 12-25 mphTHURSDAY City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. Washington Washington 40/26 40/26 New York NewYork 42/26 42/26 Miami Miami 88/70 88/70 Atlanta Atlanta 65/46 65/46 Detroit Detroit 33/18 33/18 Houston Houston 76/62 76/62 Chicago Chicago 36/20 36/20 Minneapolis Minneapolis 35/19 35/19 Kansas City KansasCity 36/26 36/26 El Paso ElPaso 77/48 77/48 Denver Denver 57/29 57/29 Billings Billings 43/24 43/24 Los Angeles LosAngeles 62/50 62/50 San Francisco SanFrancisco 58/48 58/48 Seattle Seattle 50/39 50/39 Washington 40/26 New York 42/26 Miami 88/70 Atlanta 65/46 Detroit 33/18 Houston 76/62 Chicago 36/20 Minneapolis 35/19 Kansas City 36/26 El Paso 77/48 Denver 57/29 Billings 43/24 Los Angeles 62/50 San Francisco 58/48 Seattle 50/39 A storm system charging across the Southeast today will spark scattered showers and thunderstorms from Louisiana to South Carolina, with a few gusty thunderstorms possible. Rain will douse areas farther north in the Carolinas, while a mix of rain and snow makes roads a slushy mess in Virginia, Maryland and Delaware. High pressure will keep the Northeast and Midwest dry. However, it will allow cold air to remain entrenched over the area. Another storm will bring showers and mountain snow to the central Rockies. U.S. Cities National Forecast for March 27Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. World Cities National SummaryCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue. Today Mon. Tue. Weather (W):s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rrain, sf-snow urries, sn-snow, i-ice. Albuquerque 64/40/s 70/39/s 63/39/s Atlanta 65/46/t 66/48/pc 66/54/pc Baltimore 37/25/sn 45/27/s 50/33/pc Birmingham 66/44/t 70/53/pc 75/58/c Boston 41/23/s 41/28/s 45/31/s Charlotte 46/41/r 61/40/r 62/50/pc Cheyenne 50/28/c 47/24/sf 48/27/c Chicago 36/20/sf 38/26/s 39/27/sn Cleveland 35/18/pc 34/21/s 40/31/pc Columbus 40/22/pc 43/23/s 49/36/pc Dallas 67/47/c 71/64/pc 77/47/pc Denver 57/29/c 56/26/c 54/29/c Detroit 33/18/s 37/19/s 39/27/pc Harrisburg 40/21/pc 46/24/s 49/34/pc Honolulu 82/70/pc 84/71/s 84/70/s Houston 76/62/pc 81/65/pc 81/54/pc Indianapolis 42/23/pc 46/28/s 48/34/r Jackson, MS 68/49/c 72/57/pc 81/54/c Kansas City 36/26/pc 48/35/c 43/25/r Lexington 44/26/c 46/31/s 55/43/c Little Rock 52/37/c 62/48/pc 66/42/t Los Angeles 62/50/pc 66/50/pc 72/54/s Louisville 46/29/pc 53/33/s 58/42/r Memphis 51/37/c 61/47/s 69/44/t Milwaukee 36/22/sf 38/26/s 41/26/sn Minneapolis 35/19/pc 37/26/pc 39/27/c Nashville 50/35/c 61/40/s 68/50/c New Orleans 79/66/pc 78/65/pc 82/67/pc New York City 42/26/pc 44/30/s 48/34/s Norfolk 39/33/i 47/34/r 53/40/pc Oklahoma City 54/38/c 59/52/pc 63/37/pc Philadelphia 43/24/pc 45/30/s 48/32/s Phoenix 80/56/s 82/59/s 84/60/s Pittsburgh 36/19/pc 39/21/s 46/33/pc Portland, ME 37/17/s 38/21/pc 43/26/s Portland, OR 51/40/r 53/44/c 55/45/sh Raleigh 42/29/r 57/34/r 57/48/pc Rochester 32/15/s 33/21/pc 39/28/s St. Louis 41/27/pc 50/34/pc 47/31/r San Francisco 58/48/c 60/46/pc 62/49/pc Seattle 50/39/r 52/41/sh 51/42/sh Wash., DC 40/26/sn 48/32/s 53/39/pc Cape Coral 87/67/s 87/66/t 88/68/pc Clearwater 85/67/pc 83/66/t 85/69/pc Coral Springs 88/67/s 89/71/t 86/71/pc Daytona Beach 85/66/pc 80/64/t 82/65/pc Ft. Laud. Bch 88/70/s 88/72/pc 85/73/pc Fort Myers 87/69/s 88/67/t 88/69/pc Gainesville 84/63/pc 81/60/t 81/63/pc Hollywood 89/68/s 89/71/s 88/71/pc Homestead AFB 86/69/s 88/68/pc 84/71/pc Jacksonville 86/63/pc 73/61/t 74/62/pc Key West 82/74/s 83/74/s 84/75/pc Miami 88/70/s 90/71/pc 86/71/pc Okeechobee 87/60/s 84/64/t 86/67/pc Orlando 87/65/pc 84/65/t 85/67/pc Pembroke Pines 89/68/s 89/71/pc 88/71/pc St. Augustine 82/64/pc 74/64/t 75/66/pc St. Petersburg 85/67/pc 83/66/t 83/69/pc Sarasota 82/67/s 81/65/t 82/67/pc Tallahassee 84/64/pc 82/62/t 78/63/pc Tampa 82/68/pc 79/66/t 82/69/pc W. Palm Bch 87/65/s 88/69/t 86/71/pc Winter Haven 89/65/pc 87/65/t 87/67/pc Acapulco 88/71/s 88/71/s 88/71/s Athens 66/54/pc 69/56/s 66/58/r Beirut 66/53/pc 64/53/s 67/58/s Berlin 47/32/s 49/32/pc 53/38/s Bermuda 71/64/pc 70/58/r 66/60/pc Calgary 36/24/pc 36/23/c 41/33/c Dublin 51/37/s 49/37/s 50/41/c Edmonton 33/23/pc 33/23/c 38/24/s Freeport 84/71/s 82/73/pc 81/71/pc Geneva 59/47/r 51/45/r 61/47/r Havana 88/72/s 89/69/t 88/70/s Hong Kong 63/55/c 71/59/s 74/62/c Jerusalem 61/42/s 59/40/s 62/44/s Johannesburg 69/55/t 73/54/t 78/54/pc Kiev 41/22/pc 37/34/sn 45/27/s London 55/37/pc 57/37/s 59/41/s Montreal 32/12/s 28/18/c 39/23/pc Moscow 32/22/sn 35/27/c 36/21/sn Nice 61/49/r 63/52/sh 62/51/sh Ottawa 33/10/s 31/21/pc 38/17/s Quebec 25/14/sf 27/18/sf 34/19/sf Rio de Janeiro 90/78/s 89/77/pc 88/77/pc Seoul 48/30/c 50/30/sh 52/36/s Singapore 87/77/r 85/77/t 84/77/t Sydney 74/61/c 77/61/pc 79/61/pc Toronto 32/16/s 38/23/pc 41/21/pc Vancouver 52/42/r 52/41/sh 51/41/sh Vienna 50/48/c 54/42/r 56/42/s Warsaw 44/29/pc 49/27/pc 42/30/s Winnipeg 27/9/s 31/14/pc 34/17/pc A lmanac Readings at Palm Beach High .............................................. 3:55 a.m. Low ............................................... 9:57 a.m. High .............................................. 4:13 p.m. Low ............................................. 10:26 p.m. Very warm today with plenty of sunshine. Partly cloudy tonight. Sun and clouds tomorrow with a shower or thunderstorm; warm. Tuesday: times of clouds and sun with a shower or thunderstorm possible. A great storm buried the Dakotas under knee-deep snow on March 27, 1950. Dumont, S.D., received 38 inches, the greatest 24-hour snowfall in South Dakota history. Very warm today with plenty of sunshine. Winds southwest 7-14 mph. Expect a full day of sunshine with relative humidity 75% early, 35% in the afternoon. Even addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday. Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and Saturday. All watering should take place before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. LastNewFirstFull Mar 26Apr 3Apr 11Apr 17 Today Monday Sunrise 7:23 a.m. 7:22 a.m. Sunset 7:40 p.m. 7:41 p.m. Moonrise 2:59 a.m. 3:41 a.m. Moonset 1:57 p.m. 2:52 p.m. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Jacksonville 86/63 Gainesville 84/63 Ocala 86/65 Daytona Beach 85/66 Orlando 87/65 Winter Haven 89/65 Tampa 82/68 Clearwater 85/67 St. Petersburg 85/67 Sarasota 82/67 Fort Myers 87/69 Naples 83/67 Okeechobee 87/60 West Palm Beach 87/65 Fort Lauderdale 88/70 Miami 88/70 Tallahassee 84/64 Apalachicola 77/67 Pensacola 77/66 Key West Avon Park 89/65 Sebring 89/65 Lorida 87/62 Lake Placid 88/64 Venus 88/64 Brighton 87/61 TidesReadings at St. Petersburg High .............................................. 9:01 p.m. Low ............................................... 4:25 a.m. High .....................................................none Low ......................................................none UV Index TodayThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m. 5 9 9 5 Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional SummaryShown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Five-Day forecast for Highlands County 82/74 Lake Levels Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 11.59 Normal ...............................................14.51 Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterdayTemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHigh Tuesday ......................................... 85 Low Tuesday .......................................... 46 High Wednesday .................................... 87 Low Wednesday .................................... 49 High Thursday ....................................... 87 Low Thursday ........................................ 58Heat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayRelative humidity .................................. 35% Expected air temperature ....................... 86 Makes it feel like .................................... 85BarometerTuesday ...............................................30.09 Wednesday .........................................30.01 Thursday .............................................29.95PrecipitationTuesday ...............................................0.00 Wednesday .........................................0.00 Thursday .............................................0.00 Month to date ..................................... 1.58 Year to date ......................................... 4.45

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By SAMANTHAGHOLAR sgholar@newssun.comSEBRING Kids now h ave a new option when it c omes to fun and play in S ebring. Me-Go Raceway is a new establishment d esigned with kids and fun i n mind. The racetrack is located a t center court, directly in f ront of Bealls in the L akeshore Mall. The track h as been up and running for a week. Owner/operator, John M ertzlufft, had been thinki ng about doing the racet rack for sometime and f inally decided to dive head f irst into the idea. Mertzlufft i s a former teacher and also s pent some years in the r estaurant business. I wanted to do something d ifferent, wanted to change m y career but still be around c hildren, explained M ertzlufft. Me-Go Raceway is a m ock racetrack that houses e ight motorized cars for c hildren to jump in and e njoy. Kids can drive everyt hing from a police car to r ace car. The raceway also o ffers remote controlled cars t hat allows parents to drive the car for their c hild. There are no age restrict ions, however, the cars are d esigned to hold children 1 00 pounds or less. The cost i s $3 per ride. Age doesnt really matter. Its up to the parents, but obviously an infant cant get in there. There was a 10-monthold in one this weekend. Her mom used the controller to drive her around and she had the biggest smile on her face. She loved it, Mertzlufft said. The establishment is small and modest, which adds to its charm. Mertzlufft and his two employees spend many hours throughout the week making sure the establishment runs smoothly. On its opening weekend, Mertzlufft was surprised and elated to see nearly 80 riders come and go to the track. Theres not a whole lot to do around here for children, so I thought this would be a good idea. Its not only good for the children, but for the seniors as well. Ive seen a crowd of shoppers just stop and hang out around here and just watch the kids enjoy themselves. The seniors are entertained; it gives everyone something to stop and enjoy, Mertzlufft said. Mertzlufft is content with his one track for the moment, but has plans to expand Me-Go Raceway in the future. I am hoping to get one up in Eagle Ridge (Mall) in the future. I think that is something Id eventually get to, but Im focused on this one for now, he said. BUSINESS B SECTION News-Sun Sunday, March 27, 2011 www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 NEW 2011 NEW 2011 NEW 2011 NEW 2011 NEW 2011 NEW 2011 NEW 2011 NEW 2011 NEW 2011 NO DEALER FEE, PLUS TAX & TAG, STATE FEE, O% withALLY, SEBC RULES APPLY. NO DEALER FEESExpires 4/2/111500RAMREGCABSLT NO DEALER FEES $AVE$5620#TY072 FREE HEMI1500 CREW CAB SLT OUTDOORSMAN $AVE$8860#TY013 FREE HEMI2500/3500 $AVE$9000#TY013 HEAVY DUTYDODGEAVENGER 0% Available for 60 mos.OR up to $2250 REBATEDepending on model#TY043CHRYSLER 200 IMPORTED FROM DETROITJEEPPATRIOTSJEEP LIBERTYDODGE DAKOTAS $5000OFFDODGEJOURNEY UP TO$2500 REBATEDepending on model 7 PASSENGER SEATING AVAILABLE1.9% AvailableOR up to $1500 RebateDepending on model $1000 REBATEDouble Your REBATE$2000 $AVE UP TO$4000 $AVE Kiddie racetrack a new place for fun Racing through the mall News-Sun photo by SAMANTHAGHOLAR John Metrzlufft (3) and Mason Massey (5) enjoy the new racecars at Me-Go Raceway in Lakeshore Mall. The new establishment has been up and running for a week and caters to children of all ages looking to speed around a miniature raceway. I wanted to do something different ... to change my career but still be around children.JOHNMERTZLUFFT owner Talk about a stampede: The first wave of Baby Boomers begins turning 65 in 2011, which means theyll soon be tapping Social Security retirement benefits, if they havent already. If youre a Boomer and havent yet investigated how this program works, this may be a good time to learn the ropes. When you work and pay Social Security taxes, you earn up to four credits per year based on net income. In 2011, it takes $1,120 in income to earn one credit. You must accumulate at least 40 credits over your lifetim e to qualify for a benefit; however, those who haven t earned sufficient credits sometimes qualify based on their spouses work record. Retirement ben efits are calculate d based on earnings during 40 years of work. The five lowest-earning years are dropped and each year not worked counts as zero. Full retirement age increases gradually from 6 5 Social Security looms for Baby Boomers Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) will host its next Whats Up Downtown meeting at 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday at the Palms of Sebring (725 S. Pine Street). Will Bennett of Management Experts will provide a presentation of the strategic plan his firm did for Downtown Sebrings Highlands Little Theater (HLT). The meeting will also address the merchant store hours of operation and provide updates on t he CRAs new business ince ntive programs, Downtow n Sebring events and CR A marketing initiatives. We encourage anyo ne who has an interest in Downtown Sebring is encouraged to attend the se informative meetings th at are well attended by me rchants, government off icials, residents, potenti al business owners, realto rs and media, said Pe te Pollard, CRAexecuti ve director. Whats Up Downtown? meeting Tuesday Personal Finance Jason Alderman See SOCIAL, page 6B

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Special to the News-SunProviding financial assist ance to relatives is something m any people do. For the mill ions of Mexican-Americans s ending money to family in M exico, this could yield tax b reaks in the United States. Taxpayers must claim the p eople being supported as d ependents to be eligible for t he $3,650 dependent exempt ion. Generally, a dependent m ust be a U.S. citizen, U.S. r esident alien, U.S. national, o r a resident of Canada or M exico. Exceptions are made f or certain adopted children. Eligible expenses that may b e claimed include food, l odging, clothing, education, m edical and dental care, r ecreation and transportation. A ll qualified expenses must b e verified with the appropria te receipts and documentat ion. To claim dependents in M exico, specific qualificat ions must be met: Taxpayer must provide m ore than 50 percent of the d ependents eligible living e xpenses The dependent must be a: Child, stepchild, foster child or their descendant Sibling, stepsibling or half sibling Parent, grandparent or their direct ancestor Step-parent Niece, nephew, aunt or uncle Son-in-law, daughter-inlaw, father-in-law, mother-inlaw, brother-in-law or sisterin-law The dependents gross income from U.S. sources may not exceed $3,650 for 2010, unless disabled Adependent must not file a joint return for the year unless to claim a refund of taxes withheld. Because so many Mexican-Americans provide for their loved ones in Mexico, more people could take advantage of this dependency exemption than already do, said Lisa Berish, Area Manager, at H&R Block. In addition to meeting basic exemption qualifications, the taxpayer must submit a form W-7 to get an Individual Tax Identification Number from the IRS for the dependent. Taxpayers and dependents who are not eligible for Social Security Numbers must have an ITIN to submit a tax return in the United States. An ITIN is a tax processing number that is issued to individuals, regardless of immigration status, who have a tax reporting obligation but do not qualify for a Social Security Number. For more information, call 1-800-HRBLOCK to find a nearby tax professional who can explain the laws. Special to the News-SunQuestions about debt, s tarting businesses and multip le-generation households m ake it clear the economy is s haping how people think a bout taxes and how they are l iving. The first-half of tax season i s done and H&R Block is h earing some questions much m ore than others from the m illions of taxpayers in its n early 11,000 retail tax o ffices, through H&R Block A t Home do-it-yourself tax p reparation tools and the Get I t Right Community tax f orum. With more than 23 mill ion clients coming through o ur doors, using our DIY p roducts and visiting our tax f orum every year we hear m any recurring themes and g et a pretty good idea about w hat is on the minds of taxp ayers, said Lisa Berish, a rea manager at H&R Block. The following questions ( and answers) were among t he top searched by taxpayers a nd tax professionals on the H &R Block At Home online c ommunity and The Tax I nstitute at H&R Block webs ite. 1. My parents are older a nd they live with me. Can I d educt theirexpenses? The tough economy is taki ng a big bite out of the sandw ich generation; 16 percent o f U.S. families have at least t wo adult generations living i n their household, a 33 perc ent increase from 19801. T his increase of multipleg eneration households is p rompting more taxpayers to a sk when they can claim their p arents or adult children for t he $3,650 qualifying relative e xemption. To be eligible for t he benefit, elderly parents a nd adult children must have l ess than $3,650 in taxable i ncome. Also, half of all elig ible expenses of the parent o r adult child must be paid by t he taxpayer seeking the d eduction. 2. The bank foreclosed on m y house. Is the gain taxa ble? With foreclosures rising 72 p ercent overall among the 2 06 metro areas covered by R ealtyTrac2, taxpayers are a sking about the resulting tax i mplications. Any gain on a foreclosed p roperty is taxable and must b e reported. But, the M ortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act of 2007 may allow the gain to be excluded when the foreclosed home was the taxpayers primary residence and the gain occurred between Jan. 1, 2007 and Dec. 31, 2012. 3. My credit card debt has been forgiven. Will it be taxed? When monthly credit card payments go unpaid, a debt collector may offer settlement for 30-40 percent of the original sum. If the settlement is accepted and paid, or when the creditor determines it cannot be recovered, the creditor will issue a 1099-C to the IRS. Taxpayers who dont include the unpaid debt or the forgiven portion of the debt as income on their tax returns may get an IRS bill that includes penalties and interest. 4. I took the First-time HomebuyerTax Credit in 2008. Do I have to re-pay it? Homeownership may have declined in 20103, but the First-time Homebuyer Tax Credit is a hot topic for taxpayers wanting to know whos eligible and who has to pay it back. Taxpayers who claimed the credit in 2008 must start repaying it this year in annual installments over 15 years. However, taxpayers who claimed the credit in 2009 and 2010 do not repay the credit unless they sell the house or stop using it as their primary residence within three years of purchase. 5. I bought energy efficient windows formy home. Can I claim the home energy credit? Worth up to a $1,500 lifetime credit in 2009 and 2010 combined, eligible improvements include external windows and doors, insulation, roofing, HVAC and non-solar water heaters meeting specific energy guidelines. Taxpayers who missed the credit in an earlier year can still claim it in 2011 but only up to $500 lifetime limit. 6. Are my property taxes and mortgage interest tax deductible? Homeowners can deduct property taxes and mortgage interest as itemized tax deductions. Homeowners whose itemized deductions are less than their standard deduction should use the standard deduction, as that will result in lower federal income tax liability. Though called the standard deduction, it varies based on age, filing status and other factors. 7. Im an entrepreneur who started a business in 2010. Are my start-up costs deductible? With unemployment hovering at 9.5 percent for much of 2010, many created their own jobs by starting their own businesses. Taxpayers who opened a business in 2010 can deduct up to $10,000 of eligible start-up costs, up from $5,000 in 2009. Qualifying expenses include advertising, business property rent, supplies, taxes and licenses. 8. I have a full-time consulting assignment. How is my income tracked? Form 1099-MISC is sent to the IRS to report income, royalties and other types of income paid to independent contractors. For independent contractors who work from home, often freelancing or consulting, Form 1099-MISC commonly is used to report contractor compensation. 9. Are my college tuition costs reported to the IRS? Eligible educational institutions submit Form 1098-T to report information about their students to the IRS as required by the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997. The 1098-Tincludes the students enrollment status, qualified tuition and related expenses, scholarships and grants taxable or not. 10. I was married in the summerof 2010. Do I file as a single oras married? Marriage, re-marriage and the times before and in between can make taxpayers ponder their IRS tax filing status, which determines tax rates and standard deduction amounts. Filing status for the entire year is determined by the status as of Dec. 31 of the current tax year. The options are single, married filing jointly, married filing separately, head of household or qualifying widow(er). H&R Block provides guaranteed, income tax return preparation services through its company-owned and franchise offices, and the H&R Block At Home online and desktop solutions. For an online tutorial, join H&R Blocks Get It Right Community tax forum, and visit its Facebook and Twitter pages. The advice provided in this release is for general reference purposes. Tax situations vary based on individual circumstances. Atax professional should be consulted for specific tax advice. Page 2BNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com Lakeview Christian School503 Kent Avenue, Lake Placid, FL 33852(863) 465-0313Website: www.LakeviewChristianSchool.orgENROLLNOW FOR FALLPre-kindergarten through 5th GradeLVCS admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin. SALES SERVICE SALES SERVICE SALES SERVICE FREEDELIVERY WITH MOST PURCHASES SALES SERVICE SALES SERVICE SALES SERVICE SALES SERVICE SALES SERVICE SALES SERVICE PLUG INTO LOWER PRICES! OVER 500 APPLIANCES IN STOCK! 13611 Hwy 98 Sebring 655-4995Store Hours Mon.-Fri. 8-5 Sat. 9-4 GEConvertible/Portable DishwasherONLY $429.88 MUST GO IN STOCK!FREEDELIVERY WITH MOST PURCHASES DO YOU HATE YOUR CPAP?If you have been diagnosed with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and are unable to use your CPAP machine, Dental Sleep Medicine may help. Failure to treat your Obstructive Sleep Apnea can result in High Blood Pressure, Congestive Heart Failure, Atrial Fibrillation, Attention Decit Disorder, Attention Decit Hyperactivity Disorder, Migraine Headaches, Restless Leg Syndrome, Depression, Insulin Resistance, Fibromyalgia, Stroke and Death. There are a number of FDA approved Oral Appliances that open the airway and keep it open while you sleep. We are here to help you with Oral Appliance Therapy to treat your Obstructive Sleep Apnea. BUTyou must have a referral to me from your Physician at which time I will do an exam for you (D0140), submit to your medical insurance for you and fabricate the appropriate Oral Appliance Therapy for you (D7880), working co-therapeutically with your physician. For more information, visit www.designerdentallp.com, then click on Sleep Apnea. Yours for a healthier life, Dr. Oliver Chip Kinnunen, DN14875 Designer Dental 330 US Hwy 27 North Lake Placid, FL863. 465.9090 BUSINESS Top 10 tax questions Metro Doing your taxes can lead to some difficult questions. Supporting family in Mexico yields U.S. tax savings Special to the News-SunARCADIA Casey Williams of Heartland Broadcasting Corp. has moved up to the position of station manager. Williams, originally from the Ft. Lauderdale area, is a resident of Arcadia with Mike and daughter Cristal, 9. After working in radio sales for Renda Communications in Ft. Myers, Williamsgrabbed her first job at the management level in December 2005 as Sales Manager for WZZS-FM 106.9 The Bull. Less than two years later, she was promoted to Sales Manager for both stations at Heartland Broadcasting, adding the responsibilities of WZSP-FM 105.3 La Zeta. Simultaneously the recession hit the advertising industry first and for the ensuing three years, her people skills were both tested and amplified. It was Caseys ability to keep focused on the big picture that kept our boat afloat, Jan Kneller added. She turned our competitive sales staff into a team, which has amazed us. She rolled up her sleeves and procured more visibility for the stations at community events. Shes always tw o steps ahead of me on pr omotion planning. She h as instilled an attitude of working for the great er good in our staff and com munity. These are awesom e accomplishments and w e are very proud of Cas ey Williams. For the present, William s will add her station mana ger responsibilities to h er well-established routine as sales manager. Both statio ns play the music our comm unities love and provide t he personality and informatio n the audiences need. The music on 106.9 T he Bull is Heartland count ry favorites and 105.3, whi le La Zeta serves the Spani sh community playing region al Mexican music. Both st ations are provided in livin g color by announcers an yone would feel comfortab le inviting into their livin g room. Heartlan d Broadcasting was esta blished in 1996 when t he Knellers purchased WZZ S and in 1998 built WZSPas a new service to the comm unity. Studios for both rad io stations are located at 789 1 U.S. Highway 17 Sout h, next to the Bluffs go lf course. Williams wins promotion at Heartland Broadcasting Associated PressSAN DIEGO Target Corp. is suing a San Diego pro-gay marriage group to get it to stop canvassing outside its San Diego County stores, alleging its activists are driving away customers. Rights advocates say the trial between Target and Canvass For ACause that begins Friday could further strain relations with the gay and lesbian community after controversy over its $150,000 donation to a business group backing a Minnesota Republican candidate opposed to gay marriage. Minnesota-based Target insists it remains committed to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community and its lawsuit has nothing to do with the political agenda of the organization. Our legal action was in no way related to the cau se of the organization and w as done so to be consiste nt with our long-standing po licy of providing a distra ction-free shopping exper ience by not permittin g solicitors at our stores, t he company said in a stateme nt sent to The Associat ed Press. Target says it has tak en similar action against a number of organizatio ns representing a variety of causes. It alleges in the law suit that the San Dieg o groups activists harass cu stomers by cornering the m near its storesfro nt entrances and debating wi th them about their views o n gay marriage. The group says it ca nvasses at shopping mal ls, college campus and stor es like Target to collect sign atures and donations in su pport of gay marriage. Target sues San Diego gay rights group

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011Page 3B All-Around Restaurant. . . . . (1)____________ Seafood Restaurant . . . . . (2)____________ Italian Restaurant . . . . . . (3)____________ Oriental Restaurant . . . . . . (4)____________ Steak in Town . . . . . . . . (5)____________ Mexican Restaurant (not fast food). . . . . . . (6)____________ Pizza . . . . . . . . . . . (7)____________ Pizza (delivered) . . . . . . . (8)____________ Breakfast . . . . . . . . . (9)____________ Brunch . . . . . . . . . . (10)____________ Salad Bar . . . . . . . . . (11)____________ Early Bird Special . . . . . . (12)____________ Cup of Coffee . . . . . . . (13)____________ Chicken Wings . . . . . . . (14)____________ Burger in Town (not fast food) . . . . . . (15)____________ Restaurant with a View . . . . (16)____________ Sub Sandwich . . . . . . . (17)____________ Happy Hour . . . . . . . . (18)____________ Sports Bar/Pub. . . . . . . (19)____________ Bakery . . . . . . . . . . (20)____________ Deli . . . . . . . . . . . (21)____________ Romantic Restaurant . . . . (22)____________ New Restaurant (open less than 1 year). . . (23)____________ Dinner Under $10 . . . . . . (24)____________ Caterer . . . . . . . . . . (25)____________ BBQ . . . . . . . . . . . (26)____________ Fast Food Restaurant. . . . . (27)____________ Doctor. . . . . . . . . . . (28)____________ Pediatrician. . . . . . . . . (29)____________ Dentist. . . . . . . . . . . (30)____________ Optometrist. . . . . . . . . (31)____________ Surgeon. . . . . . . . . . (32)____________ Chiropractor. . . . . . . . . (33)____________ Physical Therapist. . . . . . (34)____________ Hearing Aid Center. . . . . . (35)____________ Pharmacy. . . . . . . . . (36)____________ Medical Equipment Store. . . . (37)____________ Nursing Home. . . . . . . . (38)____________ Assisted Living Facility. . . . . (39)____________ Retirement Community. . . . (40)____________ Veterinarian. . . . . . . . . (41)____________ Dog Grooming. . . . . . . . (42)____________ Golf Course. . . . . . . . . (43)____________ Driving Range . . . . . . . (44)____________ Golf Pro. . . . . . . . . . (45)____________ Tennis Courts. . . . . . . . (46)____________ Health Club . . . . . . . . (47)____________ Martial Arts Studio. . . . . . (48)____________ Sporting Goods. . . . . . . (49)____________ Boat Dealer. . . . . . . . . (50)____________ Boat Sales & Service. . . . . (51)____________ Weight Loss Center. . . . . . (52)____________ Supermarket. . . . . . . . (53)____________ Discount Store. . . . . . . . (54)____________ Shoe Store. . . . . . . . . (55)____________ Gift Shop. . . . . . . . . . (56)____________ Hardware Store. . . . . . . (57)____________ Furniture Store. . . . . . . . (58)____________ Garden Nursery. . . . . . . (59)____________ Computer Sales & Service. . . (60)____________ Carpet/Floor-Covering Store. . . (61)____________ Patio Furniture Store. . . . . (62)____________ Rental Store. . . . . . . . . (63)____________ Custom Tee Shirt Store. . . . (64)____________ Quilt Store. . . . . . . . . (65)____________ Electronics Dealer. . . . . . (66)____________ Barber Shop. . . . . . . . (67)____________ Frame Shop. . . . . . . . . (68)____________ Print Shop. . . . . . . . . (69)____________ Beauty Salon. . . . . . . . (70)____________ Nail Salon. . . . . . . . . (71)____________ Tanning Salon. . . . . . . . (72)____________ Home builder. . . . . . . . (73)____________ Plumber. . . . . . . . . . (74)____________ Electrician . . . . . . . . . (75)____________ Roofer. . . . . . . . . . . (76)____________ Lumber Co.. . . . . . . . . (77)____________ Pool Builder. . . . . . . . . (78)____________ Appliance Dealer. . . . . . . (79)____________ Lawn Care. . . . . . . . . (80)____________ Remodeler. . . . . . . . . (81)____________ Heating & Air Company. . . . (82)____________ Home Security Company. . . . (83)____________ Pest Control Company. . . . . (84)____________ Carpet Cleaner. . . . . . . . (85)____________ Appliance Service. . . . . . (86)____________ Dry Cleaners. . . . . . . . (87)____________ Cellular Sales & Service. . . . (88)____________ Florist. . . . . . . . . . . (89)____________ Self Storage. . . . . . . . . (90)____________ Cabinetry (kitchen,bathroom). . . . . (91)____________ Real Estate Agent. . . . . . (92)____________ Real Estate Office. . . . . . (93)____________ Mortgage Company. . . . . . (94)____________ Accountant. . . . . . . . . (95)____________ Stock Broker. . . . . . . . (96)____________ Insurance Agency. . . . . . (97)____________ Bank. . . . . . . . . . . (98)____________ Investment Firm. . . . . . . (99)____________ Attorney. . . . . . . . . . (100)____________ Fast Oil Change. . . . . . . (101)____________ Auto Service. . . . . . . . (102)____________ Car Wash. . . . . . . . . (103)____________ Auto Body Repair Shop. . . . (104)____________ Tire Store. . . . . . . . . (105)____________ Local Radio Station . . . . . (106)____________ Place to Play Bingo. . . . . (107)____________ Boss. . . . . . . . . . . (108)____________ Funeral Home. . . . . . . (109)____________ Photographer. . . . . . . . (110)____________ Employment Agency. . . . . (111)____________ Disc Jockey. . . . . . . . (112)____________ Customer Service. . . . . . (113)____________ Hotel/Motel. . . . . . . . (114)____________ Master of Ceremonies. . . . (115)____________ Used Car Dealer. . . . . . . (116)____________ New Car Dealer. . . . . . . (117)____________ 30 CATEGORIESMUSTBEFILLEDINFORBALLOTTOCOUNT.The Best of Highlands County 18th Annual News-SunReadersChoice Awards A special section announcing the winner of each category will run in the on Friday, April 29,2011 Print Legibly Please:Name:__________________________ Address:_______________________ City:___________________________ State:_________ Zip:____________ Phone:_________________________Must be 18 or older to participate.Are you a current subscriber to the News-Sun? Yes No INSTRUCTION S S & OFFICIA L L RULES Entries must be submitted on official entry ballot. Photocopies, carbon copies and illegible entries not acceptable. At least 30 of the categories must be filled out. Only one entry per person. One entry per envelope.Ballots not meeting these criteria will not be counted. Entries must be postmarked by April 5, 2011. Mail or Drop by to Readers Choice Contest, News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. No purchase necessary. Decision of the judges is final. All entries become the property of the News-Sun. The News-Sun will not be responsible for entries lost or delayed in the mail for any reason.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011Page 5B Page 4BNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com MARCH MARKETING MADNESSAt the March Marketing Madness party hosted by the News-Sun earlier this month, Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Greg Harris acted as emcee. He was tall enough to hold the basket full of team names high enough for fellow county commissioner Don Elwell to dig into. Don was choosing a team for the Alan Jay Automotive Network. Unfortunately, the team he has selected has already been eliminated. The 8 advertisers on these two pages have been paired (by random drawing) with one of the 64 NCAA Basketball Teams playing in the Mens Basketball Championship. The team name is in each ad. If an advertisers team wins, the team and the advertiser advance on up to the Championship game as long as the team is winning. If they lose theyre out the team & the advertiser.WHOLL MAKE IT TO THE FINAL FOUR? WA TCH FOR THE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30 ISSUE OF THE NEWS-SUN TO SEE WHOS STILL IN FOR THE FINAL FOUR! 2011 DIVISION I MENS BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP EAST WEST SOUTHWEST Champion Kentucky Kansas VCU Butler Florida North Carolina Arizona Connecticut SOUTHEASTNew Orleans San Antonio Anaheim April 2 April 2 April 4 Newark U. KANSAS ARIZONA BUTLER U FL O RIDAAmerican Golf Cart2833 Hwy 27 S. Avon Park 453-CART (2278) Email us at: ezgotxt@aol.com N. CAROLINA U. CONNECTICUT VCU3310 Hwy 27 South Sebring, FL 33870863-402-2786 KENTUCKY

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Page 6BNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com ELECT WHO?This is a campaign against Melanoma. One in 72 people will contract the disease. You must elect yourself to lead against it. It is a potential matter of life and death.Melanoma*Usually a non-symptomatic growth on the skin with multiple colors and irregular edges.We can protect you against this silent killer. We are your skin police. Call now, elect a proactive preventative skin team.American Institute of Dermatology, P.A.Darrin A. Rotman, M.D. Julie Iellimo, P.A.-C Jennifer Wolf, P.A.-C Medicare and all major insurances accepted in network* New Patients Welcome863-386-0786*individual must call for verication of benets. This is not a guarantee. First Presbyterian Church of SebringFor youth 11-14 years old June 13th August 12thMonday Friday 8am 3pmThis day camp will include sports, activities, Bible lessons, and field trips like MOSI, Ringling Museum, and airport.Lunch will be provided Limited Space Donations welcomed 319 Poinsettia Ave. Sebring, FL 33870863-385-0107 BUSINESS for those born before 1938 to 67 if born after 1959. If eligible, you may begin drawing benefits at 62; however, doing so may reduce your benefit by up to 30 percent. The percentage reduction gradually lessens as you approach full retirement age. Alternatively, if you postpone participating until after reaching full retirement age, your benefit increases by 7 to 8 percent per year, up to age 70. You can use the Retirement Planner tools at www.socialsecurity.gov/reti re2 to estimate your retirement benefit under different earnings, age and lifeexpectancy scenarios. If youre married and your earned benefit is less than 50 percent of your spouses, youre eligible for a benefit equal to half of theirs. Spousal benefits also are available if youre divorced, provided: your marriage lasted at least 10 years; you remained unmarried before age 60 (or that marriage also ended); and youre at least 62. If you remarried after age 60 (or 50, if disabled), you can still collect benefits based on your former spouses record. If your spouse dies and was benefits-eligible, you and your children may be eligible for survivor benefits. Amounts vary depending on age, disability status and other factors. Read the Survivors Planner at www.ssa.gov/survivorplan/i fyou.htm for details. Know that if you begin collecting Social Security before full retirement age yet continue to work, your benefit may be reduced. In 2011, youll lose one dollar in benefits for every two dollars you earn over $14,160. (Note: Investment income doesnt count.) However, if you reach full retirement age in 2011, the formula changes: $1 will be deducted from your benefits for each $3 you earn above $37,680 until the month you reach full retirement age. After that, no further reductions. Thus, if you think youll need to continue working, it might be wiser to hold off collecting Social Security until reaching full retirement age. These benefit reductions are not completely lost, however: Your Social Security benefit will be increased upon reaching full retirement age to account for benefits withheld due to earlier earnings. And finally, although Social Security benefits arent taxed by many states, they are considered taxable income by the federal government. So, depending on your income, you may owe federal income tax on a portion of your benefit. For more details, read IRS Tax Topic 423 and Publication 915 at www.irs.gov. Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. To participate in a free, online Financial Literacy and Education Summit on April 4, 2011, go to www.practicalmoneyskills.com/summit2011. Continued from page 1B Social Security about to get swamped Special to the News-SunSEBRING During the m onth of April, Curves g yms in the Sebring area w ill participate in the 13th A nnual Curves Food Drive t o collect non-perishable f ood and cash donations to b enefit area food banks. Current members who m ake a $30 donation or an e quivalent donation of food a re eligible to receive a C urves reusable Food Drive g rocery bag. And, from April 4-17, C urves will waive the memb ership fee for new memb ers who donate a bag of n on-perishable food or m ake a minimum donation o f $30. Our goal is to top the d onation that we made last y ear, said Curves founder D iane Heavin. This is a great opportun ity for the members of our C urves community to help s trengthen the Sebring-area c ommunity, too. Everything that our m embers donate at their l ocal clubs will benefit l ocal families in need. In addition to the food a nd monetary donations t hat each gym collects, C urves International is o ffering gyms the opportun ity to win cash prizes for t heir local food banks. Prizes will be awarded to c lubs with the most food c ollected, clubs who beat t heir 2010 donation level by t he largest amount and to t wo randomly selected c lubs drawn from all the c lubs who enter the contest. Curves clubs have donate d more than 61 million p ounds of food in the U.S. a nd Canada since 2004. This years Food Drive will get off to a strong start when Curves International founders Gary and Diane Heavin are featured on ABC Televisions inspirational new show Secret Millionaire airing Sunday, April 3 at 8 p.m. The Curves founders moving episode will help Curves members understand how the Curves Food Drive is the perfect opportunity for each of them to give back to their own communities. The past few years have been difficult for many families, said Heavin. Curves annual Food Drive is one way that everyone in the Sebring area can make a real difference for a community family that is struggling. We encourage everyone, not just our members or those who are thinking about joining one of our gyms, to make a cash donation or drop off a bag of non-perishable food items in April. For more information about Curves womens gyms in the Sebring area and the 2011 Curves Food Drive, please contact one of the following Curves locations: Curves of Avon Park located at 1011 U.S. Highway 27 S, at 863-4529963 or 97P3E4N@curvesmail.com; Curves of Sebring located at 901 US Hwy 27 N, Suite 58, at 863-385-1070 or sebringcurvesl@earthlink.n et. For more information about Curves, please visit www.curves.com. 13th annual Curves Food Drive kicks off in April Special to the News-SunWAUCHULA Tw o 11th-grade students fro m local high schools will parti cipate in the week-long, a llexpense-paid Youth Tour to Washington, DC event, ne xt June. Every year since 200 7, Peace River Electr ic Cooperative (PRECO ), Wauchula, FL, has sponsor ed students in the national You th Tour program, making it available to students at 1 6 selected schools in their 1 0county service territo ry (Brevard, DeSoto, Harde e, Highlands, Hillsboroug h, Indian River, Manate e, Osceola, Polk and Sarasota ). Matthew Davis of Southeast High School in Manatee County and Harl ey Russum of Mulberry Hig h School in Polk County w ill attend Youth Tour along wi th 1,500 fellow students fro m electric cooperatives aroun d the nation. Student applicants we re required to write a sho rt essay and submit an applic ation. The faculty of each hig h school chose one student to represent their respecti ve school as a semi-finalis t. Final judging was conduct ed at an out-of-state electr ic cooperative. The National Rur al Electric Cooperati ve Association (NRECA), hea dquartered in Arlington, V a., has coordinated the You th Tour program for over 4 0 years, sending high scho ol students to visit the nation s capitol. PRECO selects winners o f D.C. trip Metro Services The first wave of Baby Boomers will turn 65 this year.

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Jan. 13Bankunited to David P. Bragg, L25 Blk 212 Leisure Lakes Sec. 14, $4,500. James M. Ruester to Jason A. Grant, PT Tract 10 Blk 14 River Ridge Ranches Unrec, $112,000. Citimortgage Inc. to Noel Durrance, L17 Blk 17 Sebring Country Est. Sec. 1, $26,000. Wilmington Trust Co. to Family Traditions Property, L5 Blk 233 East Palmhurst, $26,200. Tony Kim to Grover M. Manheim, L20 Pine & Lake Sub, $274,000. Gregory D. Luce to Steven Paul Corbin, PT Secs. 30/3136-30, $62,000. Thea M. Donohue to Michael J. Niskala, L54 Blk A Spring Lake Sec. 1, $33,000. Jack Grant Zendt to Bernadine Graham, L32 Grayces Mobile Est. Unit 2, $52,000. Wanda Henry-Patterson to Lynn R. Myers, PT Sec. 35-3428/Easement, $27,000.Jan. 14Bank of New York Mellon to Robert A. Plunkett, L7 Blk A Avon Lakes Add, $70,500. Margaret A. Ruggieri to W. Edward Rice, L19 Blk 71 Placid Lakes Sec. 7, $160,000. Suncoast Schools Federal Credit Union to Maria Vazquez, L29 Blk 1 Placid Lakes Sec. 4, $39,000. Chael Soler to Kun-Min Yang, L6 Blk 232 East Palmhurst Sub, $28,000. Betty J. Douglas to David M. Lamb, L269 Fairmount Mobile Est., $37,000. William J. Carroll to Roger Sewell, L3 Blk 9 Harder Hall Country Club II, $147,900. Dennis P. Flynn to Robert E. Weeks, L2 Villages of Highlands Ridge Phase VII-A Sec. 1, $191,000. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Ralph Demers, Parcel 101 Highlands Homes Sub, $10,000. Howard Chad Pritchett to Adam Martin, PT Sec. 4-33-29, $15,000. Catherine C. Bolatto to Donald Joe Tudor, L12 Blk K Spring Lake Sec. 1, $62,500.Jan. 18Carmelita M. Morris to John G. Goble, L25/26 Blk 35 Sebring Lakes Unit 2, $2,000. Todd R. Harlow to Robert M. Harlow, L12 Blk 11 Lake Letta Est. Sub, $50,000. Basema Inc. to Maloss, PT Sec. 15-35-29, $1,000,000. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to MJJ & Link Inc., Unit 3-C The Manors, $13,000. Selene Rmof Reo Acquisition II to Terri Bayer, L25 Blk 197 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 11, $79,500. Suntrust Bank to Abderrahim McHatet, L9 Blk 265 Placid Lakes Sec. 20, $3,500. Suntrust Bank to Hazieda Modikhan, L20 Blk 147 Sun 'N Lakes Est. Sec. 15, $1,800. Nancy C. Wood to Anthony Thompson, PT Sec. 35-3428/Easement, $15,000. Arthur W. MacMillan to United States of America, L20 Blk 13 Flamingo Gardens, $7,000. Betty J. Ostlund to Abderrahim McHatet, PT Parcel E Spring Lake Village VI, $25,000. Roxann Lee Jordan to Beverly A. Coatney, L12 Blk 27 Sun 'N Lakes Est. Acres Tract 1, $10,000. Randolph Gilde to Edward Koornneef, L2 Blk N Sun 'N Lakes Est. Sec. 4, $59,500. Robert Johnston to Debbie Piggott, L669/670 Sylvan Shores Est. Sec. D, $24,000. Henry W. Mohrfeld Jr. to Keith Clark, PT L11 Blk C Serenity Sub, $27,000. Richard P. Wille to Carl E. Anderson, L14 Watersedge Sub, $295,000. DFC Loan Funding Co. to Udean A. Greaves, L41 Blk 205 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 11, $12,900.Jan. 19Alberto Blanco to Betty J. Watson, L16 Blk 153 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sec. 18, $9,000. Romeo Domingo to Wilma P. Domingo, PT L6 Blk 230 Placid Lakes Sec. 20, $5,000. Bank of New York Mellon to Kenneth E. Lucas, L3 Blk 4 Grand Prix Hts., $55,000. HSBC Bank USA to E. James King, Unit 5 Maplewood Villas Condo, $12,000. Harold H. Artz Jr. to Margaret Hughes, L30 Blk 108 Placid Lakes Sec. 15, $2,400. James Hurst to Juan C. Rubio, L62 Holiday Hills Sub, $80,000. Roger Dale Tindell to Joseph F. Hughes, L62 Kissimmee River Shores Unrec, $10,000. Highlands Independent Bank to Damon Laser, L13/14 Blk 40 Leisure Lakes Sec. 11, $155,000. Desperado 123 Corp. to Lukasz K. Janeczek, L49 Blk 260 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 13, $294,100. Richard R. McCutchan to Marcia D. Cordeiro, L33/34 Blk 3 Erin Park Sub, $79,900. Roger L. Sewell to George A. Ippolito, L1 Blk E Lake Jackson Heights, $137,900. Barbara A. Ward to Robert Douglas, L78 Pine & Lake Sub, $130,000. Clair W. Weekley to Curtis R. Roy, L80 Blk 1 Venetian Village, $35,000.Jan. 20DFC Funding Co. to Carmen M. Crisostomo Cruz, L12 Blk 196 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 11/Other, $25,800. Claudine Ragbir to Earl W. Ommen, L5 Blk 3 Orange Blossom Est. Unit 9, $8,000. Neva M. Crosby to Gary Russell Crosby, L23 Blk 398 Leisure Lakes Sec. 17, $10,000. Duckwood Holdings to Jose Torres, L4 Blk N Sun 'N Lakes Est. Sub Sec. 4, $10,000. Federal National Mortgage Assn. to David P. Bragg, L20 Blk 26 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 2, $24,500. Federal National Mortgage Assn. to Esther Brashares, L1 Blk 6 Vacation Est., $75,500. William Richard Justice to Brent L. Julian, L21 Blk 147 Lakewood Terrace Add, $57,500.Jan. 21John Jado to Jackie R. Johnson, L2 Blk RR Spring Lake Village V, $4,500. Keith M. Chandler to Maria Nelia Ibalarosa, L20 Blk 265 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 13, $80,000. Romeo Domingo to Wilbert P. Domingo, L14 Blk 44 Placid Lakes Sec. 19, $5,000. Madeline Harris to Thomas P. Patterson, Unit 309 Lakeview Towers Condo, $42,000. Patricia K. Gase to Andrew Alexander IV, L13694/13695 Avon Park Lakes Unit 43, $45,000.Jan. 24Jack R. Grissinger to Charles Kenneth Foster, L40 Brunners Mobile Est., $25,000. Eghbal Jalali to Hewrald E. Humes, See Instrument, $20,000. Darcille W. Hill to Franklin D. Cooper, L10523-10525 Avon Park Lakes Unit 33, $85,500. George B. Palmer to Debbie D. Balog, L10 Blk 2 Country Walk, $95,000. Margaret Kenney to Patricia Drake Hynes, L10 Blk 12 Venetian Village, $66,000. Charles C. Yates to Dennis Ball, L370 Fairmount Mobile Est., $65,000. Aurora Loan Services to Frank Pennisi, L9 Blk 5 Highlands Park Est. Sec. C, $100,000. Michael Miller to Christine Alley Mannon, L3 Blk 22 Orange Blossom Country Club Community Unit 14, $3,000. Santa Diorio to Tiffany Misiano, L1 Blk 5 Orange Blossom Est. Unit 4, $1,000. GMAC Mortgage to Baja Investments, L24/25 Blk 4 Highlands Park Est. Sec. L, $8,400. Ruth K. David to J. Ross MacBeth, PT Sec. 4-3529/Others, $486,800.Jan. 25Fifth Third Mortgage Co. to Nina M. Pollard, L8 Blk 285 Placid Lakes Sec. 20, $89,900. John D. Fiorito to Helena Roland, L13/14 Blk 35 Avon Park Lakes Red Hill Farms Add Unit K, $75,000. Frederick R. Terrell to 2635 N. Hewlett Road Property Trust, L8943/8944 PT L8942 Avon Park Lakes Unit 27/Corrective, $53,500. Donald Gonzalez to Jesus M. Hernaiz, L8943/8944 PT L8942 Avon Park Lakes Unit 27, $62,500. Calvin F. Lowe to Susan R. Place, L368 Villages of Highlands Ridge Phase IV, $287,500. Fannie Mae to Denver Klinge, Unit 500 Interlake Condo, $42,000. Peter Butterworth to M.V. Burzesi Jr., L24 Blk 119 Leisure Lakes Sec. 11, $25,000. Donald Gonzalez to David M. Alexander, PT L8 Blk 9 Avon Park Est. Unit II, $60,000.Jan. 26Kathleen D. Swain to Kathleen D. Swain, L12A Hidden Creek Villas, $12,500. June S. Alberts to Alicia J. Cook, L4/30 Blk 1 Citrus Lakes Colony Sub, $25,000. Rachel Wright to William R. Celentano, L19/20 PT L21 Blk 183 Woodlawn Terrace, $21,500. Wauchula State Bank to Lynette Fleetwood, L5 H D Martin Sub, $10,000. Fannie Mae to Richard Soluta, L4401/4402 Avon Park Lakes Unit 14, $51,000. Bank of America to Donald R. Childress, L19 Blk 342 Sun N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 16, $6,200. John T. Parry to Louie M. Roberts, PT L6 Blk 20 Town of Avon Park, $140,000. HSBC Bank USA to Jeremiahs International Trading Co. Inc., L7/8 Blk 30 Placid Lakes Sec. 2, $30,500. Thomas Jay Smith to AOK Company Inc., Unit C-23 Bluffs of Sebring Condo Phase II, $79,000.Jan. 27Edwin Johnson to Ronald H. Cobert, L5 Blk 4 Venetian Village Revised, $82,000. Angela Alverine White to Jeffrey Nottebaum, L2/9/16 Blk 278 Placid Lakes Sec. 20, $2,200. Khalmack of South Florida Inc. to Paula Eisenhart, L35/36 Blk 167 Leisure Lakes Sec. 4, $5,600. Rodney R. Coolman to John F. Soares, L6-10 Blk 22 DeSoto City 2nd Sub, $30,000. Aurora Loan Services to Kenneth Innes, Unit 3-C Jackson Shores Townhouses, $45,000. Donna J. Sheaffer to Jack J. Mescher, L9 Blk 6 Golfview Est., $85,000. HSBC Bank USA to Jason A. Hirsh, PT L5 Blk 16 Town of Avon Park/Other, $12,000. Hazieda Modikhan to Kamini Bissram, L32 Blk 64 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sec. 2, $6,000. Margaret E. Doane to Donald L. Wildish, L3 Heirings Sub, $5,000.Jan. 28Gerald B. Fangman to Edward J. Millie, L1 Blk 1 Mary Jane Manor, $17,000. Avis L. Meyer to Donald L. Wildasin, L9 Brunners Mobile Est., $31,000. Marilyn J. Giroux to Barbara Halmi-Grundler, L6 Blk 526 Sebring Shores Add, $70,000. N. Thomas to Anais Oris, L9/10 Blk D Asa Lewis Sub, $10,000. Carmen L. Elliott to Walter R. Large, L23 Ashley Oaks, $122,900. Robert Moore to Robert E. Wyatt, L59 Blk 1 Venetian Village, $47,500. American General Home Equity Inc. to John T. Benson, L21 Blk 134 Northside Sub, $6,500. Gerald R. Hollon to Mary Lewis, L30 Brunners Mobile Est., $25,000. Federal National Mortgage Assn. to Greg Gluck, L19 Blk 14 Lake Haven Est. Sec. 1, $85,000. Ricardo L. Zurita to Azalia Caridad Clero, L22 Blk 98 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sec. 10, $10,500. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Marianne Meitz, L28 Blk B Silver Fox Ranch, $68,900. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Kwabena Boateng, L1 Blk 742 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 15R1, $146,900. John D. Ford to Miles E. Cullom, L3 Blk B PT Lake Placid Camp Florida Resort Replat, $34,800. Bill Anderson to Shane Liskey,L1 Blk A Horseshoe Sub, $15,000. Peggy D. Crosby to Abderrahim McHatet, L24 Highland Lakes Reserve, $28,000. Joseph H. Rose to Larry L. Davis, Unit 2B Building 2 Lake Park Village Condo Phase II, $93,000. U.S. Bank to Adalberto Vazquez, L8908-8910 Avon Park Lakes Unit 27, $39,900. Federal National Mortgage Assn. to Montz Builders Inc., PT L3 Blk 37 Downer Place, $62,000.Jan. 31Fannie Mae to Anita Inman, L232 Sylvan Shores Est. Sec. D, $41,000. Harold Kay to Jack L. Crandall, L545 Sylvan Shores Est. Sec. D, $80,300. Juan J. Lopez to Lynda K. Bellinder, L40 Blk 290 Placid Lakes Sec. 20, $143,000. John D. Bruce to Ruth Q. McNelis, L189 Sylvan Shores Est. Sec. D, $47,000. Fredy Wiles to Rosendo Arceo, PT L33 Blk 250 Sun 'N Lake Est. Sebring Unit 13, $38,000. Mary Ann Ramsey to Frederick Eicker, L9 Blk 14 Orange Blossom Est. Unit 7, $80,000. Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Russell Isaacs Sr., L81 Blk 143 PT Placid Lakes Sec. 11, $100,100. Felime R. Kemink to Christopher M. Gonzalez, L5833-5835 Avon Park Lakes Unit 18, $100,800. John C. Benedict Jr. to Kerry D. Meeker, L11 Blk D Avon Lakes, $15,000. John C. Benedict Jr. to Rodney A. Davis, L12 Blk D Avon Lakes, $15,000. Highlands Independent Bank to Wayne M. Buckingham, L19 Blk 7 Sebring Ridge Sec. G, $119,000. James Edward Winebarger to Jonathan R. Patton, L1 Blk 3 Lake Josephine Heights, $55,000. Roger W. Grebing to Erin M. Duffy, L5300-5304 Avon Park Lakes Unit 17, $122,300. Roger W. Grebing to Corey F. Henderson, 5298 Avon Park Lakes Unit 7/Others, $9,000. Highlands Independent Bank to South West District Florida Annual Conference United Methodist Church Inc., PT Sec. 9-35-29/Other, $650,000. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011Page 7B 24 HOUR ROAD SERVICE 1109 W. MAIN STREET AVON PARK452-2031 Complete Car Care Brakes Shocks Alignments Oil Service Tune-Ups Mon -Fri. 9am-4pm Closed Wed.863-385-3497130 S. Commerce Ave. Sebring, FL 33870 Your Ear Care StoreHelping Highlands County Hear Better For Over 40 Years 3310 Hwy 27 South Sebring, FL 33870863-402-2786 For information about supporting your Chamber of Commerce on this page, contact us at: 863-385-6155Thank You to the following businesses for supporting the Avon Park and Sebring Chambers of Commerce. Forrest H. Hilton, CPA, PACertified Public Accountant702 US 27 North Avon Park, FL 33825 Phone: (863) 452-2906 Fax: (863) 452-1147 E-Mail: hiltoncpa@embarqmail.com Warrens Auto SalesA Good Car At A Fair PriceSINCE 1977811 U.S. Hwy. 27 South Avon Park, FL(863) 452-2931 FAX (863) 453-7698E-mail: warrens@strato.net www.warrensautosales.com UPCOMINGEVENTSApril 7SFCCTheatreforthePerforming ArtsOpenHouseApril 8 Gallery & Downtown Walk April 9Touch a Truck/Touch a Plane Rotary EAA Chapter April 9Saturday Night Cruise Car Show April 14Chamber Luncheon April 16Kokomo April 16Music in the Park Concert Series Highlands Hammock Park April 19Highlands Countys 90th Anniversary April 21Chamber Mixer April 1-2The Story of Jesus a Florida passion play Wauchula, FL April 8-9The Story of Jesus a Florida passion play Wauchula, FL April 9Highlands County 5th Annual Military Ball Chateau Elan April 16David Doc Owen Memorial Golf Tourney April 16Easter Egg Hunt Heartlan Horses & Handicapped April 22-23The Story of Jesus a Florida passion play Wauchula, FL AVON PARK SEBRING DEEDTRANSFERS

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Page 8BNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com

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By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comLAKE PLACID The one thing Green Dragon baseball coach Dan Coomes had hoped wouldnt happen had. After his squads longawaited for, extra-inning win over county rival Sebring Tuesday, March 15, Coomes said, I hope they realize that this wasnt the ultimate. For, after all, while a big win emotionally, as far as the district race, it mattered little. But in elevating their intensity and effort in the win over the Streaks, the Dragons then hit that figurative wall and went on to take staggering losses to district front-runners McKeel, 12-2, and Frostproof, 13-3. We just didnt have the same edge that we had going into the Sebring game, Coomes said. We had been doing things the way we needed to, and then we just got lax. That flatness carried over Friday night, but the edge returned just in the nick of time as Lake Placid came back late for a 7-2 win over visiting Tenoroc. Dylan Weber-Callahan took the mound for the Dragons and got through the first two innings and he helped his own cause with an RBI single in the second, scoring Nevada Weaver, for a 1-0 lead. But that lack of edge and doing things right allowed the Titans to score twice in the third on just one hit. Two walks and an error loaded the bases with two out before lefty Joseph Bass sliced one down the leftfield line to bring two home and take the lead. Further damage was avoided when Brody Carr made a sliding catch of a Kendel Deeson drive to short right to end th e inning. But Lake Placids offen se couldnt get anything goin g as a Terry Coyne single in the third and a Rick Mill er walk in the fifth were th e only runners to reach ba se over the next three inning s. When you dont swin g the bat, its easy for th e SPORTS C SECTION News-Sun Sunday, March 27, 2011 News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHN E Nevada Weaver gets a faceful of dirt as he slides in safely with Lake Placids first run in Fridays 7-2 win over the visiting Titans of Tenoroc. Dragons slide past Titans Lake Placid7Tenoroc2 See LP, page 3C By FWC Chairman Rodney BarretoDuring spring and summer months, as temperatures warm up, nocturnal creatures that are usually quite secretive become more active and easier to locate. This is the perfect time of year to go out with children for a night prowl. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) and the Wildlife Foundation of Florida are working to reverse the growing trend of our youth spending too much time inside. One way you can interest your children in nature is to take them on a night walk. We often overlook the wildlife that come out at night, and this is a great way to get your children excited about conservation. Insects are particularly active on warm nights. Try looking for fireflies, moths and crickets. An easy way to look at them closely without causing injury is to capture the insect in a clear jar and cover the top with cheesecloth held down by a large rubber band around the rim. (Remember to release the insects once you are done). Cicadas are a favorite with kids, as they are strange looking, make very loud sounds and are fun to handle. Owls, such as barred, great horned and eastern screech, are often quite vocal at night. Learning the calls with your children and listening for them i s a lot of fun, especially if you learn to call back. Chuck-wills-widows also cal l actively on moonlit nights. They sing loudly, mimicking their name. During the spring, you may also hear our state bird, the northern mockingbird, singing h is heart out to attract a mate. These birds learn more than 100 songs over the course of their lifetime. Bats are also a favorite with children. Watch for bats feeding on insects near streetlights, along woodland edges or over water. They are active from sunset to sunrise, although you are more likely to see them just at dusk when there is still a little ambie nt light. Flying squirrels are also nocturnal. Though they dont really fly, they can glide up to 150 feet an d are adept at sneaking seeds at bird feeders. They are more difficult to see than bats, as they require forests with tall trees from which to glide. Skunks and armadillos are us ually more active during the nigh t Night prowls a fun way to involve kids in conservation See PROWLS, page 4C Courtesy photo A bove: The Highlands Merchants won the 70 and over Sebring Softball League 2011 Championship with a record of 17-3. They had good defense and offense and enjoyed playing together as a team. Top row, left to right: John Schmidt, Bob Buley, John Ladersnck, Harold Baucom, Charles Quinn, Ron Lewis and Larry A mbuel. Bottom row, left to right: Mike Jurmu, Harold Dinel, Ed Carroll, Cal Bready, Don Ward, Mgr. Harry Bell, Shawn Kildoff and Glenn Minick. Below: Reflections Orange Crush won the 2011 and over Sebring Senior Softball League Championship with a 15-5 record on the season. Back row, left to right: Harold Baucom, Lester Osbeck, Jim Radcliff, Bob Poulan, Dick Schultz and Barry Hurlbut. Middle row, left to right: Doug Ebeling, Mgr. Harry Bell, Andy Timeramis and Jim Holmes. Front row, left to right: Bill Todd, Brian Pluta, John Beilman, Sal Sabota, Ron Reiches. Spring Softball Champions Photo courtesy of CFL-Sports.com Devin Clarke cleared 6-feet, 4-inches in Thursdays high j ump at Frostproof, helping the Streaks to a third-place finish at the meet. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comThe Frostproof Bulldogs p roved rude hosts Thursday, w ell, the boys anyway, rompi ng to a lopsided win in the f ive-team track and field m eet. The Dogs totaled 164 p oints to outdistance Avon P arks 89, Sebrings 78, M ulberrys 47 and Fort M eades 19. Though, while Frostproof r an away with the overall, a rea performers did have s ome impressive moments, s uch as Blue Streak Devin C larke clearing 6-feet, 4i nches to win the high jump b y nearly a foot. Elsewhere, Travious K night cruised to a win for Avon Park, finishing the 100meter dash in a blinding 10.65 and took the 200 meters as well in 22.7. Knight earned his third win of the day by landing at 40-feet, 7-inches in, appropriately, the triple jump. Elias Salgado won the 1,600 for Sebring in 5:05 and Colton Dillon cleared 11feet, 6-inches to win the pole vault. On the girls side of the meet, the Lady Blue Streaks came away with the team win, totaling 154 points to top Frostproofs 102 and Avon Parks 81. Sebrings 4X800 team of Hannah Schroeder, Taylor Lady Streaks first, AP Boys second at Frostproof See TRACK, page 4C By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSouth Florida baseball got off their recent slide, winning at Hillsborough Friday night in a 2-1 pitchers duel. But it was Andres Pops Lopez that won the duel, going eight and one-third innings while striking out 10. And while the offense had itsstruggles, Cody Higgins went 3-for-4 and Brett Clements 2-for-4 to break t he six-game skid the team h ad been on since winning t he conference opener Saturda y, March 12. The win came aft er Wednesdays dishea rtening loss to Hillsborough at hom e that saw the Panthe rs battle back from a 6 -2 deficit before fallin g 9-8. We played soft, he ad coach Rick Hitt said after h is Panthers eke one out News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Though he made this fine fielding play up the middle Wednesday, it was Cody Higgins three hits Friday that helped the Panthers end their six-game losing streak. SFCC2HCC1 See SFCC, page 3C 5C PAGECLASSIFIEDS

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HOPE 3-on-3SEBRING The First Annual Mary Toney HOPE Foundation Community 3on-3 basketball tournament will take place Saturday, April 2 at the Sebring High School gym from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at a cost of $5 per player. The tournament will have male and female brackets consisting of threeorfour player teams from ages 7-18-years old. Registration forms can be found in the front office at Sebring High School and must be turned in by Friday, March 25. For more information, contact Lavaar Scott at 214-3880 or email LaV39@yahoo.com .Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING Wings of Faith Worship Center presents the First Annual Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one team of four golfers, one tee sign and two green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includes one team of four golfers, one green sign; Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $100 includes one green sign. Individual player $60 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26). Team of Four Golfers $240 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after March 26). Make checks payable to: Wings of Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL 33871, or register online at wingsoffaithchristianworshipcenter.com. Proceeds to be donated to scholarship program for graduates attending Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center. For more information, call Jason Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhankerson@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at 381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com.Doc Owen Golf TourneyAVON PARK The Avon Park Noon Rotary Club will host its Second Annual David Doc Owen Golf tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Highlands Ridge North. The two-person scramble-format entry fee is $60 per person with prizes in flight groups, lunch, goodie bag and refreshments on the course. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Entry information and check payable to Avon Park Noon Rotary mailed to Chet Brojek, 3310 Par Rd, Sebring, FL 33872. Golfers should include their names and handicaps along with their check. Those needing a form may email Brojek at cbrojek@comcast.net or call at 385-4736. Business entry of two-persons plus a hole sign for a total of $200 is available for the first time this year. All Rotary club members are urged to support participate in the event that benefits local Rotary charity projects. Business hole signs for $100 are also available by contacting Chet via email or phone.SHSBasketball CampSEBRING The SHS basketball program will be hosting a basketball camp for boys and girls, in 2nd-6th grade, on Monday, March 28, and Tuesday, March 29, from 8 a.m.4 p.m. The cost of the camp is $20 and is appropriate for players of all skill levels and experience. Current and former Streaks will be on hand to help with the camp, which will also feature contests, competitions and prizes. Campers can either bring their own lunch or purchase lunch there for a reasonable price. Please contact Coach Lee at 441-122 1, or by email at leem@highlands.k12.fl.u s Sandy Foster MemorialSEBRING NU-HOPE Elder Care Services annual golf tournament is just around the corner. The NU-HOPE Board of Directors ha s chosen to rename the golf tournament this year in memory of Sandy Foster, fo rmer Executive Director of NU-HOPE Elder Care Services. Sandy passed away very unexpectedl y in September of last year. Sandy loved golf and ran a very successful golf tournament for 13 years; in his memory the tournament will be renamed the Sandy Foster Memorial/NU-HOPE golf tournament. This year we are continuing with Sandys passion for the tournament with flight, raffle and door prizes. In the last three years the field was full, with a wait list, so sign up soon! The first annual Sandy Foster Memorial/NU-HOPE golf tournament will be held on Saturday, April 9, with a n 8:30 a.m. shotgun start, at the Country Club of Sebring. The tournament will be a two-person scramble format. Entry fee will be $60 per person ($12 0 per team) which includes lunch afterwards and refreshments during the tournament. Registration forms are availab le at the Country Club of Sebring Pro Sho p (John Vickers) or can be obtained via mail or fax by calling Debbie Slade at 382-2134. Business sponsorships are also available for this event. The revenue from this event is used for the local matchamount this organi zation needs each year to secure federal and state grant funds in our effort to co ntinue providing home and communitybased services to the frail and needy eld erly residents of Highlands and Hardee Counties. Barefoot Waterski TourneyFORTMYERS The 10th annual Deuceapalooza Barefoot Endurance Tournament is set for April 9 in Fort Myers. This tournament is open to waterski enthusiasts of all ages. Trophies and cash prizes will be hand ed out. Participants will receive a free T shirt. For information, call Deuce at (239) 693-1975.SYF Softball BBQ and RegistrationSEBRING Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is hosting our 2nd Annual BBQ Fundraiser and Tournament on Saturday April 30 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.The BBQ Lunch is $7 and will include a Pulled Pork Sandwich, Baked Beans, Coleslaw, Cookies and a glass of tea. Pick up your meal to go or stay and watch our girls play while you eat. Sebring Youth Fastpitch Softball is also conducting registrations for girls ages 10 to 15 now through April 1. Registration is $65 for the first child / $45 for any siblings. For further information, please visit u s on Facebook, check out our website at www.eteamz.com/sebringyouthfastpitchsoftball, email us at dmcmanus64@embarqmail.com or call (863) 546-0201. EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB y-Boston5021.704 Philadelphia3735.5141312New York3537.4861512New Jersey2348.32427 Toronto2052.2783012Southeast Division WLPctGB x-Miami5022.694 x-Orlando4726.644312Atlanta 4032.55610 Charlotte2942.4082012Washington1754.2393212Central Division WLPctGB y-Chicago5219.732 Indiana3241.43821 Milwaukee2942.40823 Detroit2547.3472712Cleveland1457.19738WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB x-San Antonio5715.792 x-Dallas5121.7086 New Orleans4331.58115 Memphis4033.5481712Houston3834.52819 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City4724.662 Denver4429.6034 Portland4230.583512Utah 3638.4861212Minnesota1757.2303112Pacific Division WLPctGB y-L.A. Lakers5220.722 Phoenix3635.5071512Golden State3142.4252112L.A. Clippers2845.3842412Sacramento1952.2683212x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division ___ Thursdays Games Dallas 104, Minnesota 96 New Orleans 121, Utah 117, OT Fridays Games Sacramento 110, Indiana 93 Orlando 95, New Jersey 85 Charlotte 83, Boston 81 Cleveland 97, Detroit 91 Miami 111, Philadelphia 99 Milwaukee 102, New York 96 Chicago 99, Memphis 96 Oklahoma City 111, Minnesota 103 Denver 114, Washington 94 New Orleans 106, Phoenix 100 Portland 98, San Antonio 96 Golden State 138, Toronto 100 L.A. Lakers 112, L.A. Clippers 104 Saturdays Games New Jersey at Atlanta, late New York at Charlotte, late Indiana at Detroit, late Chicago at Milwaukee, late Dallas at Utah, late Toronto at L.A. Clippers, late Sundays Games Sacramento at Philadelphia, 12 p.m. San Antonio at Memphis, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Cleveland, 6 p.m. Houston at Miami, 6 p.m. Boston at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Portland at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Washington at Golden State, 9 p.m. New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Dallas at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA x-Philadelphia44191098233197 Pittsburgh4423896216182 N.Y. Rangers4030585217181 New Jersey3435573155187 N.Y. Islanders29341270209237 Northeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Boston41221092224176 Montreal4028787200194 Buffalo3728983220210 Toronto34311078199228 Ottawa2937967171228 Southeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA x-Washington43221096203182 Tampa Bay39241189219226 Carolina35291080209220 Atlanta31311274205242 Florida29361068184207WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA Detroit4322995238211 Nashville40251090198177 Chicago4025888238202 Columbus33301177199226 St. Louis3332975206216 Northwest Division WLOTPtsGFGA y-Vancouver49179107243174 Calgary37281185230222 Minnesota3531878185207 Colorado2837864206258 Edmonton23411056176244 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA San Jose4323995220198 Phoenix41241193218208 Los Angeles4226690203180 Anaheim4128587212216 Dallas38251086206206 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division ___ Thursdays Games Ottawa 2, N.Y. Rangers 1, SO Pittsburgh 2, Philadelphia 1, SO Los Angeles 4, San Jose 3, SO Boston 7, Montreal 0 Atlanta 2, N.Y. Islanders 1 St. Louis 4, Edmonton 0 Nashville 5, Anaheim 4 Toronto 4, Colorado 3 Phoenix 3, Columbus 0 Fridays Games Pittsburgh 1, New Jersey 0, SO Buffalo 4, Florida 2 Ottawa 2, Washington 0 Vancouver 3, Atlanta 1 Carolina 4, Tampa Bay 3 Saturdays Games N.Y. Rangers at Boston, late Colorado at Los Angeles, late New Jersey at Buffalo, late Washington at Montreal, late Philadelphia at N.Y. Islanders, late Tampa Bay at Carolina, late Toronto at Detroit, late Dallas at Nashville, late St. Louis at Minnesota, late Anaheim at Chicago, late San Jose at Phoenix, late Calgary at Edmonton, late Sundays Games Florida at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Ottawa at Atlanta, 2 p.m. Vancouver at Columbus, 5 p.m. Boston at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUEWLPct Kansas City1610.615 Detroit1812.600 Minnesota1611.593 Seattle1410.583 Tampa Bay1412.538 Cleveland1312.520 Toronto1312.520 Los Angeles1413.519 Baltimore1213.480 New York1114.440 Oakland1216.429 Texas1115.423 Boston1217.414 Chicago1017.370NATIONAL LEAGUEWLPct Colorado179.654 Milwaukee169.640 Philadelphia1811.621 San Francisco1811.621 Atlanta1610.615 Washington1412.538 Cincinnati1413.519 New York1414.500 San Diego1313.500 St. Louis1313.500 Chicago1316.448 Florida1114.440 Los Angeles1218.400 Pittsburgh1018.357 Houston1120.355 Arizona1122.333 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. ___ Thursdays Games Tampa Bay 11, Houston 3 Minnesota 7, Philadelphia 3 Florida 15, Boston 7 Atlanta 5, Toronto 3 N.Y. Mets 16, St. Louis 3 Milwaukee 11, L.A. Angels 8 L.A. Dodgers 7, Colorado 5 Texas (ss) 15, Cincinnati 13 Kansas City 9, Seattle 8 Oakland 15, Arizona 7 Chicago Cubs 8, Chicago White Sox 7 Washington 5, Detroit 2 Baltimore 11, Pittsburgh 7 San Diego 7, Texas (ss) 4, 10 innings Cleveland 7, San Francisco 1 Fridays Games Florida 6, N.Y. Mets 5 Minnesota 6, Baltimore 5 Tampa Bay 9, Pittsburgh 5 Philadelphia 3, Atlanta (ss) 1 Arizona (ss) 6, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 3 Milwaukee 7, Cleveland 4 San Diego 10, Cincinnati 4 L.A. Angels 10, Oakland 3 Chicago Cubs 6, Seattle (ss) 3 Atlanta (ss) 5, Detroit 3 Washington 3, St. Louis 2 Toronto 11, Boston 8 N.Y. Yankees 6, Houston 4 Kansas City 15, San Francisco 3 Colorado 10, Texas 3 Seattle (ss) 6, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 0 Chicago White Sox 7, Arizona (ss) 3 Saturdays Games St. Louis vs. Florida, late Philadelphia (ss) vs. Detroit, late Baltimore vs. Tampa Bay, late Pittsburgh vs. N.Y. Yankees, late Washington vs. Houston, late Toronto vs. Philadelphia (ss), late Atlanta vs. N.Y. Mets, late L.A. Dodgers vs. San Diego, late Chicago Cubs vs. Texas, late L.A. Angels vs. Chicago White Sox, late Seattle vs. Milwaukee, late Kansas City vs. Arizona, late Cincinnati vs. San Francisco (ss), late Minnesota vs. Boston, late Colorado vs. Oakland, late San Francisco (ss) vs. Cleveland, late Sundays Games Detroit vs. Houston at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m. Florida vs. Washington at Viera, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. Baltimore (ss) at Sarasota, 1:05 p.m. Baltimore (ss) vs. Toronto at Dunedin, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m. Arizona vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Texas vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Colorado (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Oakland vs. Colorado (ss) at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10 p.m. San Diego at L.A. Angels, 5:05 p.m.BASEBALLNational League CHICAGO CUBSAnnounced the retirement of RHP Braden Looper. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid TUESDAY: Baseball hosts Spring Break Tournament,vs.Clewiston,7:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball hosts Spring Break Tournament,vs.Jensen Beach,11 a.m.,vs. LaBelle,2 p.m. Sebring MONDAY: Basball at Lake Placid Spring Break Tournament,vs.Jensen Beach,7:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball vs.Ridge,7 p.m. THURSDAY: Baseball vs.Bartow,7 p.m.; Softball at Kissimmee Klassic,TBA SFCC MONDAY: Baseball at Polk State College,6 p.m. TUESDAY: Softball at Polk State College,5 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball vs.St.Petersburg,6 p.m. THURSDAY: Softball at Hillsborough,5 p.m. Avon Park MONDAY: Baseball vs.Sonrise Christian,7 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball vs.Fort Meade,7 p.m THURSDAY: Baseball vs.DeSoto,7 p.m. A A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . IndyCar Izod Series at St. Petersburg . . A A B B C C 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NASCAR Auto Club 400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X XN N H H L L T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Ottawa at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NM M L L B B P P R R E E S S E E A A S S O O N N S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . Colorado at Chicago Cubs . . . . . . . . . . . . W W G G N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Detroit at N.Y. Yankees, Tampa . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NC C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 2 2 : : 1 1 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 4 4 : : 5 5 5 5 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S ST TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NIT Tournament Semifinal . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 9 9 p p . m m . NIT Tournament Semifinal . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2W W O O M M E E N N S S C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 4 4 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 7 7 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NTimes, games, channels all subject to change G G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Andalucia Open . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Arnold Palmer Invitational . . . . . G G O O L L F F 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PGA Arnold Palmer Invitational . . . . . . N N B B C C 7 7 p p . m m . LPGA Kia Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F FN N B B A A S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . Portland at Oklahoma City . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Dallas at Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Orlando at N.Y. Knicks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NB B O O W W L L I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . PBA Dick Weber Playoffs . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N LIVESPORTSONTV NBA NHL MLB Preseason Transactions Page 2CNews-Sun Sunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.co m

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By CLIFFBRUNT Associated PressINDIANAPOLIS D wight Howard isnt worried a bout getting another suspens ion for drawing too many t echnical fouls. The Orlando center already h as missed a game for accum ulating too many and two m ore will cost him a game d uring the regular-season s tretch run. Howard insists h ell be the same guy as the p layoffs approach meani ng hell continue to hold anim ated conversations with o fficials when he feels hes b een wronged. Somebody fouls, and a fter the foul they continue to f oul me, Howard said before a game in New York. I get u pset at the refs because they a llow it to happen, so my t eammates are trying to do a b etter job of coming to cons ole me so I wont say anyt hing else. Playoff seeding, and even p layoff berths, could be dram atically affected by a wrong w ord, a shove or an errant e lbow in the heat of the m oment. The NBAs rule regarding t echnical fouls has come into p lay as teams jockey for p ostseason position. If a player reaches 16, its a one-game suspension, with a dditional suspensions for e very two technicals therea fter for the rest of the regul ar season. Howard, New Yorks A mare Stoudemire and C harlottes Stephen Jackson, a ll leading scorers for their t eams, are dangerously close t o missing a game during the c rucial final games of the r egular season. Orlando is in fourth place i n the East and within reach o f Miami for the Atlantic D ivision title. New York and Philadelphia a re battling for the No. 6 p osition in the East, and C harlotte is chasing Indiana for the No. 8 spot in the conference. Homecourt advantage in the playoffs is determined by a teams regular-season record. Even if a game doesnt affect conference seeding, it could determine whether a team gets homecourt advantage in the NBAfinals. The possibility of missing a key game with so much at stake would seem to be enough to make even surly players try to mind their manners. Their pocketbooks, their reputations, their roles as team leaders are all theoretically at stake. Howard leads the league with 16 technicals as of Friday. New York has a trio of players with double-digit technicals Stoudemire has 15, Carmelo Anthony 13 and Chauncey Billups 10. Anthony, in fact, averages a technical foul every 6.5 games over his career. Jackson has 14. New York coach Mike DAntoni knows Stoudemire must walk a tightrope, trying to avoid technicals while still playing with emotion. I think hell handle himself, and if he cant, then well deal with whatever happens, DAntoni said after Stoudemire drew his 15th back in February. So Im going to leave it at that. Hes a guy that took us where we are, and Im not going to go and scrutinize too much because hes a little bit too emotional and plays too hard. Stoudemire received his 16th technical on March 10 against Dallas, but it was later rescinded. Jackson missed a game for Golden State in 2009 for drawing too many technicals. He feels his role in the infamous Pacers-Pistons brawl in 2004 is a significant factor in how hes treated by the referees. He has always spoken his mind and has for the most part, been unapologetic for his behavior. I get techs because I want to, Jackson said recently. I dont care. Im not getting techs for no reason. It happens. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011Page 3C AVON PARK 452-5800 SEBRING 382-3363 LAKE PLACID 465-1530When having a talk with your pet doesnt work! 3 ROOMS AND HALLA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 03/31/11.$9900 E.O. Koch Construction1417 Swank Avenue Sebring, FL 33870(863) 385-8649COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTIONLet our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property, build your dream home,or do your remodeling.For all of your Aluminum,Steel,and Conventional construction needsEmail: kochcon@strato.net State Certified License #CGC1515338 ENGINEERED STEEL BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL DESIGN REMODELING ALUMINUM ROOFING Carports, Patios, Siding, Fascia SEAMLESS GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS p itcher, Coomes said. Youve got to swing the b ats. If its a close pitch, you d ont know whats going to b e called, so youve got to p ut the ball in play. Weber-Callahan, meanw hile, was getting by, though h e gave up another walk in t he fourth and two singles in t he fifth. He was aided, however, in t he fifth when Kyle Barber p icked up a hard grounder to t hird, stepped on the bag and f ired across for a 5-3 double p lay to end the frame. The defense turned another t wo-for-one in the sixth after W eber-Callahan hit a batter w ith one out and Tyler Carr s nared a grounder at short a nd flipped to Miller at seco nd who turned the pivot and f ired to Colby Delaney at f irst to retire the side. Dylan didnt pitch well, C oomes said. In fact, that m ight have been his worst g ame of the year. But I give h im credit for gutting it out a nd getting it done. And the offense finally got i ts edge back, helped out by s ome poor fielding and decis ion making by Tenoroc. Barber started things off b y reaching on an error and m oving to second on a wild p itch. With one out, Weaver beat o ut a bunt to put runners on t he corners. Weaver soon stole second a nd Barber came in on a W eber-Callahan ground out. Brandon Wells then foll owed with a single through t he right side to score Weaver b efore Brody Carr reached on a n error. Miller got plunked by a p itch to load the bases with t wo out and Coyne hit one back to the pitcher that looked as if it would end the inning. Perhaps wary of the shoddy fielding during the inning, Titan pitcher Dusty McClain looked to take it himself, racing toward first. But with Coyne hustling down the line, McClain soon saw he wasnt going to win the foot race and flipped the ball toward first baseman Dakota Whigham.. But the flip took an unusually high arc, over the lastminute leap of Whigham and Coyne was safe while two more runs came in. Delaney then bounced one through the right side to score two more. And while Carlos Melo reached on an infield single and Weber-Callahan hit another batter, things soon ended with a comebacker to the mound to get the Dragons back on the winning track. Even when we were winning, its not like we were hitting the ball all over the place or playing really well, Coomes said. But we were doing what we needed and doing the right things at the right time. Thats why we keep telling the guys that we need to get better, and we will. Theyll have that opportunity this week, with three games in two days as the Dragons host the Spring Break Classic. Lake Placid faces Clewiston Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. and then takes a doubledip Wednesday, facing Jensen Beach at 11 a.m. and turning right around to play LaBelle at 2 p.m. Continued from 1C News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHN E Tyler Carr reaches back to snare this pop-up in short left field as Nevada Weaver stays close by for backup. LP back on winning track News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Kyle Barber battles the setting sun while fielding this onehopper Friday night in Lake Placids 7-2 win over Tenoroc. squad came up short. I could attempt to sugar coat it, but cant find the words. Grabbed a 2-0 lead early only to pitch passively again and provide them momentum. Down 6-2, we got a few runs to get back to even, but in the late innings, when the bats really mattered, we could not get the job done, he continued. Toughness is very important in key spots in the game and we displayed very little of it tonight. South Florida was back at it Saturday afternoon, hos ting the Hawks and trying to take the rubber-game of t he series before facing Po lk State College on the ro ad Monday and hosting S t. Petersburg Colle ge Wednesday. Continued from 1C SFCC hopes to toughen up News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHN E The Panthers have been squaring it up most of the season, like Pete Williams getting his bat on this pitch, but the timely hits hadnt been coming in their recent six-game slide. Top East players risk suspensions Classified Ads 385-6155 NEWS-SUN

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Page 4CNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com TO ADVERTISE ON THIS PAGE CALL ANGI 386-5626 Located Inside Inn On The Lakes Hotel 3100 Golfview Rd. Sebring, FL863-314-0348 FREE BEERWith Purchase of Appetizer or Entree! Great Golf ValuePar 72 Championship Golf Course Golf Instruction & Practice Facility Full-service Caddyshack Restaurant & Bar Sebring GolfClubcall 863-314-5919 or online at www.mysebring.com Located off Hwy 27 in Sebring 3118 Golfview Rd., Sebring, FL 33875 To schedule a tee time OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 6 MONTH MEMBERSHIPS NOW AVAILABLE(863) 382-0500 3201 Golfview Rd. Sebring(863) 382-0744for 9 Hole Executive RatesPrices good thru 3/31/10 Incl. Tax & CartMonday thru Friday:8am 1pm $36By 8, After 1 $29 Saturday & Sunday: $25 RATES YOUVE BEEN DREAMING ABOUT GOLF SEBRINGS FRIENDLIEST GOLF COURSE VO TED #1 LOCAL COURSE 2010 2222 GOLF HAMMOCK DR., SEBRING863-382-2151golfhammockcc@embarqmail.com Coupon RequiredFRIDAY1:00 pmSHOTGUN SPECIAL $ 24CALL FOR TEE TIMESExpires 03-31-11 18 HOLES7am-8am....$27008am-Noon..$3300Noon-2pm..$2700After 2pm...$2000All Rates Includes Tax 9 HOLES7am-3pm....$1800After 3pm...$1200Weekend Rates7am-2pm....$25002pm Close..$2000 471-ZENO (9366)4325 Sun N Lake Blvd. SebringMon 3 9 Tues-Thurs 11 9 Fri 11-10 Sat 3-10 Closed Sunday402-22222934 US 27 S. (Publix Shopping Center) Sebring Tues -Thur 3 9 Fri Sat 3 10 Closed Sunday & MondaySERVING HIGHLANDS FOR MORETHAN 25 YEARS 16" Large One Topping PizzaNot valid with any other offer. Expires 03/31/11Monday & Tuesday ONLY $ 10 99 ZENOS WE DELIVER! Special to the News-SunAVON PARK SFCC Athleticswill host a Two Day Fun Sport Selection camp on Thursday and Friday, June 9 and 10 for girls and boys aged 6-16. Each day the camp runs from 9 a.m.-3 p.m., with campers choosing their own sport, whether it is Beach Volleyball, Basketball, Baseball, Softball or Soccer. During the morning portion each day, campers will stretch, do plyometrics, agility drills, work on strength and flexibility, learn arm and body care and get introduced to the Fitness Center. Lunch is then provided with the campers then delving into the sport they chose and wrapping it up with activities in the SFCC pool. Registration and check-in from 8:158:55 a.m., and pre-registration is not necessary as walk-ups are accepted. The rate for one day is $50 and $95 for both days. The camp will be aministered by SFCC head and assistant coaches, with help from SFCC student-athletes. For questions or more information, contact Camp Director and SFCC Athletic Director Rick Hitt at 784-7036. SFCC Panther Fun Camps Special to the News-SunLAKEPLAICD Lake P lacid Youth Baseball and S oftball is accepting registrat ion forms forBaseball ages 1 1-12 Ozone, 13-14and S oftball,ages10-12, 13-15. Forms are available atthe w ebsite www.lpyb.net or call S heri Griffin at 441-1955 for B aseball and Linette Wells at 4 41-2320 for Softball. Registration deadline is Thursday, April 7 for baseball and softball. Player evaluation and draft will be Saturday, April 9 at 1 p.m. no registrations will be accepted after the draft. Player evaluation is mandatory players not present will be randomly assigned to a team. Lake Placid Baseball, Softball sign-ups HOUSEWORK DODGERS High Games Carol Dodzian . . . . . . .189 Barbara Fletcher . . . . . .169 Judy Baggerly . . . . . . .161 Joan Siegel . . . . . . . .161 High Series Shirley Hyzer . . . . . . .530 Kayleen Gray . . . . . . . .484 Jo Shook . . . . . . . . .449 HIGHLANDS WOMEN High Games Lis Hodgson . . . . . . . .202 Pauline Price . . . . . . . .189 Lora Kelly . . . . . . . . .184 High Series Lora Kelly . . . . . . . . .498 Donna Carlson . . . . . . .486 Sylvia Lewis . . . . . . . .485 Pauline Price . . . . . . . .485 HEARTLAND MIXED High Games with handicap Wayne Daffron . . . . . . .281 Anthony Smith . . . . . . .274 Glenn McCullom . . . . . .262 Ronnie Wescott . . . . . .262 Mychelle Deshazo . . . . . .262 Crystal Pagan-Plamann . . .252 Carlis LeBlanc . . . . . . .241 High Series with handicap George Corcoran . . . . . .754 Tim OLeary . . . . . . . .736 Dewey Lehman . . . . . . .720 Norma Vezina . . . . . . .700 Donna Smith . . . . . . .695 Cindy Darling . . . . . . .676 MIXED NUTS High Games Ted Watson . . . . . . . .204 Gil Bass . . . . . . . . .204 Valerie Brodbeck . . . . . .183 Bobby Taylor . . . . . . . .170 Maria Castilow . . . . . . .145 Judy Bateman . . . . . . .144 High Series Roger Swanson . . . . . .658 Kay Gray . . . . . . . . .493 Willie McGowan . . . . . .488 Tim OLeary . . . . . . . .485 Joan Siegel . . . . . . . .446 Jo Shook . . . . . . . . .419R R o o y y a a l l P P a a l l m m s s B B o o w w l l i i n n g g C C e e n n t t e e r r L L e e a a g g u u e e S S c c o o r r e e s s a nd are fun to watch as t hey forage for food. Armadillos cant see v ery well, so you can sneak u p fairly close if you are q uiet. Frogs and toads fascinate k ids, and there are more t han 25 native species in F lorida. These amphibians sing o n spring and summer n ights, especially if there h as been a recent rain. Learning their calls can b e challenging, but fun. If there is a source of w ater nearby, youre likely t o find some. If you catch any, dont f orget to wash your hands w ell after letting them go. Remember to be respectful of the animals you observe. Always handle insects and amphibians gently and return them where you found them. Also, white or bright lights at night can disturb wildlife, so try to minimize the amount of light you use. The best method is to use a red filter for your flashlight. Red lights dont bother wildlife as much, so you are likely to see more animals scurrying around. In addition, if you want to attract more nocturnal animals to your backyard, consider installing owl boxes, bat houses or a shelter for tree frogs. Learn about the animals yourself, so that when you do run across one, youll have some fun facts to pass along to your kids when they ask questions. Or, look up any animals you find with your children when you get back inside; go to MyFWC.com/Wildlife Cornell University Lab of Ornithology has a good bird guide, and the University of Floridas Florida Wildlife Extension lists frogs and toads. Also, your child might enjoy combing through BugGuide.net for moths and other insects, using the clickable guide. Make your nature adventures a regular feature, and your children or grandchildren will begin looking forward to getting outdoors. This is quality family time. Remember to make it fun and a hands-on experience. Soon your children will be telling you about the critters, and you will have helped create a future conservationist. For other ideas how you can preserve Floridas natural heritage and get children outside, go to MyFWC.com/Youth. Continued from 1C Prowls can discover a littany of night life Tubbs, Emily Smith and Cassandra Marentes won in a time of 12:20, with Tubbs then also going on to win the 1,600 in 6:18. The Streaks also got a win in both hurdles events from Destiny McCartney and Christina Gourley won the 3,200-meter run in 16:11. Sebring then got three wins in field events, with Shalantay Rose wining the triple jump with a leap of 30-feet, 10-inches, Emily Helterhoff winning the high jump by clearing 4feet, 6-inches and in shot p ut with Keaundra Bowens puttin g the shot 28-feet, 11-inches. The Lady Red Devils sa w four wins on the day wi th Angelique Ligon taking two of them individually in the 10 0 (11.93) and 200 (25.05). Avon Parks 4X100 rel ay team then raced to a win in 51.85 and Zakia Hart flung t he discus 81-feet, 4-inches for t he top mark in the event. Both teams now can rel ax with spring break before th ey return to action, heading to Lake Placid Tuesday, April 5 Continued from 1C Track at LP April 5 By TIM REYNOLDS Associated PressMIAMI Like any coach, M iamis Erik Spoelstra has p lenty of things to say theyre j ust not always overly original. Its one of the top challenges f or any coach as a season u nfolds, finding the balance b etween preaching a certain way of doing things and not making it sound like youre saying the same thing every day. Spoelstra acknowledges that its sometimes difficult to keep the dialogue fresh. He has been known to use buzzwords for many weeks, if not months, at a time but clearly, the Heat are listening. Spoelstras message to Heat rarely varies Associated PressKISSIMMEE Houston Astros shortstop Clint Barmes has a broken left hand and is expected to miss four to six weeks. Barmes had X-rays Saturday morning that revealed the injury. He was hit just abo ve the wrist by a pitch from t he YankeesIvan Nova in Frid ay nights exhibition game. Tommy Manzella was call ed back up from the Triple-Aro ster just two days after bein g sent down. Astros SS Barmes breaks hand

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, March 27, 2011Page 5C 3310 Hwy. 27 South Sebring, FL33870EOEE-mail: resumesebring@crosscountry-auto.comFor more information about Cross Country Automotive Services,we encourage you to visit our website at: www.CrossCountry-Auto.co mNow Hiring Full & Part Time Customer Service AssociatesStarting at $9.00 per hourPlus Bilingual English/Spanish DifferentialComprehensive Benefit Package Michael Babington Associate of the MonthI love the feelng of helping people around the country when they are in need after having car troubles or accidents Michael Babington Be a HERO like Michael Babington863-402-2786Cross Country is a great employer, and I feel privileged to work here! Michael BabingtonSupervisor positions available 2227 U.S. 27 SOUTH SEBRING, FL 33870The News-Sun has openings for newspaper carriers in Avon Park, and Sebring. Reliable transportation, valid drivers license and insurance a must. Interested parties should stop in our Sebring office and complete an application or call 385-6155 ext. 522.Make Money While Everyone Else Sleeps! WITH A DELIVERY ROUTE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. GC-10-403 RIVERSIDE NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA, Plaintiff, vs. ANDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, INC. N/K/A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company; and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S), WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR LIVING, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND/OR JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 14, 2011, in Case No. GC-10-402, in the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which TD BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and ANDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, INC. N/K/A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Highlands County Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room located in the basement of the Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on April 14, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: LOT 6, IN BLOCK 52, OF ORANGE BLOSSOM COUNTRY CLUB COMMUNITY UNITS 13 THROUGH 19 INCLUSIVE UNIT 15, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA The Real Property Address is: 10200 South Orange Blossom Boulevard, Sebring, Florida 33875 The Parcel ID Number is: C-24-35-28-150-0520-0060 Anyone claiming interest in the surplus from the sale, other than the person who was the record property owner when the Lis Pendens was filed, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of March, 2011. Highlands County Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA The Real Property Address is: 10448 South Orange Blossom Boulevard, Sebring, Florida 33875 The Parcel ID Number is: C-24-35-28-160-0590-0030 Anyone claiming interest in the surplus from the sale, other than the person who was the record property owner when the Lis Pendens was filed, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of March, 2011. Highlands County Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk March 27; April 3, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. GC-10-402 RIVERSIDE NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA, Plaintiff, vs. ANDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, INC. N/K/A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company; and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S), WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR LIVING, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND/OR JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 14, 2011, in Case No. GC-10-402, in the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which TD BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and ANDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, INC. N/K/A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Highlands County Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room located in the basement of the Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on April 14, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: LOT 3, IN BLOCK 59, OF ORANGE BLOSSOM COUNTRY CLUB COMMUNITY UNITS 13 THROUGH 19 INCLUSIVE UNIT 16, ACCORDING IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA Case #: GCS 10-1019 CARLA RENEE BENNETT, Personal Representative ESTATE OF DAVID L. MARSH, Deceased Plaintiff(s), vs. GREGORY LEON CORRELL, a/k/a Gregory Correll, DENNIS ALLEN CONNERS, a/k/a Dennis A. Conners II, DANIELLE MARIE CONNERS, a/k/a Danielle Conners, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Department of Justice, JOSE QUINONES, GERARD SERVICES INC., COMMONWEALTH FINANCIAL SYSTEMS, INC., and CITY OF AVON PARK, FLORIDA, et al Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final decree of foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Highlands County, Florida, described as: Lot 1, LESS the West 75 feet in Block 2, of H E COYS SUBDIVISION, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 9, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Commerce Street Entrance of the Highlands County Courthouse in Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 18th day of April, A.D. 2011. WITNESS my hand and official seal of this Honorable Court, this 15th day of March A.D. 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of said Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk March 20, 27, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. GC-10-401 RIVERSIDE NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA, Plaintiff, vs. ANDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, INC. N/K/A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company; and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S), WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR LIVING, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND/OR JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 14, 2011, in Case No. GC-10-401, in the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which TD BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and ANDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, INC. N/K/ A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC, the Cler k of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Highlands County Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room located in the basement of the Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on April 14, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: LOT 2, IN BLOCK 59, OF ORANGE BLOSSOM COUNTRY CLUB COMMUNITY UNITS 13 THROUGH 19 INCLUSIVE UNIT 16, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA The Real Property Address is: 10452 South Orange Blossom Boulevard, Sebring, Florida 33875 The Parcel ID Number is: C-24-35-28-160-0590-0020 Anyone claiming interest in the surplus from the sale, other than the person who was the record property owner when the Lis Pendens was filed, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of March, 2011. Highlands County Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michala k Deputy Cler k March 27; April 3, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 19th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR SAINT LUCIE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 562011CA000074 OCULINA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. BAILEY WATSON, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company; LLOYD WATSON and PAULA WATSON, his wife; GARY L. WATSON; ERROL S. WATSON; CRAIG WATSON; Unknown Spouse of CRAIG WATSON; et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment Of Foreclosure dated March 10th, 2011, in Case No. 562011CA000074, in the Circuit Court of the Nineteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Saint Lucie County, Florida, in which OCULINA BANK is the Plaintiff and BAILEY WATSON, LLC, LLOYD WATSON, PAULA WATSON, GARY L. WATSON, ERROL S. WATSON, CRAIG WATSON, and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CRAIG WATSON are the Defendants, Auctioneer, Frederick W. Baker of Indian River Auctions & Appraisals, Florida License #FL AU 1526, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash the following described parcels of property set forth in the Final Judgment Of Foreclosure, to-wit: Parcel I Tract Q, PORT ST. LUCIE SECTION THIRTY-ONE, a subdivision, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 14, Page(s) 22, 22A through 22G, Public Records of St. Lucie County, Florida, shall be auctioned on Wednesday, April 27, 2011, at 10:00 A.M. at the property site in Saint Lucie County, Florida, which is 1775 S.W. Gatlin Boulevard, Port St. Lucie, Florida 34972 Parcel II A part of Section 17, Township 35 South, Range 40 East, described as follows: The East Half of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter, and the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter, less the North 75 feet and less the East 40 feet thereof. This property is located at the Southwest corner of Peterson Road and South 37th Street, Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Florida,shall be auctioned on Wednesday, April 27, 2011, at 4:00 P.M. at the property site in Saint Lucie County, Florida; and Parcel III Lots 1 to 39, inclusive, Block 48 and closed street contiguous thereto, Lots 1 to 41, inclusive, Block52 and all of Block 51 and contiguous closed alley less road right of way and less Lots 53 through 58 and less the South 10 feet of Lot 59, UNIT ONE, LAKE LILLIAN SECTION HIGHLAND LAKES SUBDIVISION, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 77, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida, shall be auctioned on Thursday, April 28, 2011, at 11:00 A.M. at the property site in Highlands County, Florida. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN a distance of 34.60 feet to the Point of Beginning. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room located in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes (2010), at 11:00 oclock A.M. on the 4th day of April, 2011. NOTICE: Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. SIGNED this 8th day of April, 2011. ROBERT GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk March 20, 27, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NUMBER: GCS10-1217 BAY STREET VILLAS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Plaintiff, -vsSAMUEL R. CARR and WILLIAM C. THOMPSON, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final decree of foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida, described as: BAY STREET VILLAS #3, Being a portion of Lot 18, Block 89-A, TOWN OF SEBRING, according tothe plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 24, of the Public Recordsof Highlands County, Florida, more fully described as follows: Commencing at the Southeast corner of Lot 18, Block 89-A, Town of Sebring, as per plat recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 24, of the Public Recordsof Highlands County, Florida; thence North 15 degrees 10 West, along the Easterly line of Lot 18, for a distance of 19.00 feet; thence South 75 degrees 00 West, for a distanceof 5.32 feet; thence North 15 degrees 00 West, for a distance of 41.60 feet for Point of Beginning; thence continue North 15 degrees 00 West, for a distance of 20.80 feet; thence South 75 degrees 00 West, for a distance of 34.60 feet; thence South 15 degrees 00 00 East, for a distance of 20.80 feet; thence North 75 degrees 00 East, for IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 10-1363 GCS CITY OF AVON PARK, a Florida Municipal Corporation, Plaintiff, vs. JOSE H. GOMES DeFREITAS, Defendant. NOTICE OF SUIT-PROPERTY TO: Jose H. Gomes DeFreitas, and all other parties or persons claiming by or through him, P.O. Box 3540 Curacao Korsou in Papiamentu YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose on the following property in Highlands County, Florida: Lot 4 and the East 1/2 of Lot 5, Block 6, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Transcript Book, Page 19, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to Loretta J. Thompson, Esquire, MCCLURE & LOBOZZO, 211 South Ridgewood Drive, Sebring, FL 33870, the Plaintiff's attorney, and file the original with the Clerk of the above styled court on or before April 20, 2011; otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 23rd day of March, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: /s/ Toni Kopp Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Administrator 255 N. Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863)534-4686, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 27; April 3, 2011 1050Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-89 IN RE: ESTATE OF GRACE LEONA RUTT A/K/A GRACE L. RUTT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of GRACE LEONA RUTT A/K/A GRACE L. RUTT, deceased, whose date of death was December 5, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands Court, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OF MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 18, 2011. Personal Representatives: /s/ Carol M. Farkash 2200 Keiper Road Quakertown, Pennsylvania 18951 /s/ Hannah M. Eppel 2740 Nautilus Drive Avon Park, Florida 333825 A ttorney for Personal Representatives: / s/ Clifford M. Ables III A TTORNEY for CAROL M. FARKASH Florida Bar Number: 178379 CLIFFORD M. ABLES, III, P.A. 551 SOUTH COMMERCE AVE. SEBRING, FL 33870 Telephone: (863) 385-0112 Fax: (863) 385-1284 March 27; April 3, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. PC 11-114 IN RE: ESTATE OF DAVID CARL AMBURN a.k.a. DAVID C. AMBURN a.k.a. DAVID AMBURN NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of DAVID CARL AMBURN a.k.a. DAVID C. AMBURN a.k.a. DAVID AMBURN, deceased, whose date of death was March 3, 2011, and whose social security number is xxx-xx-2994, is pending in the Circuit Court for Highlands County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 590 S. Commerce A venue, Sebring, FL 33870. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) Y EARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 27, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Forrest H. Hilton P.O. Box 1850 Avon Park, Florida 33826 A ttorney for Personal Representative: / s/ David F. Lanier E-Mail Address: lanier@embarqmail.com Florida Bar No. 045399 DAVID F. LANIER P.O. Box 400 A von Park, Florida 33826-0400 Telephone: (863)453-4457 March 27; April 3, 2011 1050Legals 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Sebring, as per plat recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 24, of the Public Recordsof Highlands County, Florida; thence North 15 degrees 10 West, along the Easterly line of Lot 18, for a distance of 19.00 feet; thence South 75 degrees 00 West, for a distanceof 5.32 feet; thence North 15 degrees 00 West, for a distance of 41.60 feet for Point of Beginning; thence continue North 15 degrees 00 West, for a distance of 20.80 feet; thence South 75 degrees 00 West, for a distance of 34.60 feet; thence South 15 degrees 00 00 East, for a distance of 20.80 feet; thence North 75 degrees 00 East, for adistance of 34.60 feet to the Point of Beginning. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room located in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes (2010), at 11:00 oclock A.M. on the 4th day of April, 2011. NOTICE: Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. SIGNED this 8th day of April, 2011. ROBERT GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk March 20, 27, 2011 Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 Classified ads get fast results Highlands County Sheriffs OfficeSusan Benton Sheriff 434 Fernleaf Avenue Sebring, Florida 33870Integrity Quality Service ProfessionalismCOMPUTER TECHNICIAN Apply at 434 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring, FL 33870 (863) 402-7218 Drug Free Workplace/E.O.E./A.D.E.A./Veterans Preference BACKGROUND CHECKS WILL BE CONDUCTED (Civilian Position)Starting Salary: $14.71 hourlyCLOSING D A TE: 04/01/11 JOIN OUR TEAM OF DEDICA TED PROFESSIONALS The Computer Technician responsibilities include maintaining a large 24 hour a day network and mobile computer operation. High school diploma or G.E.D. Dell certification or ability to attain within 6 months of hire. Certification Pr efer ences : Cisco CCNA Certificate, CompTia A+ Certificate, CompTia Network+ Certificate, Microsoft Certifications.Paid benefits include State of Florida Retirement, health/dental/life insurance, paid vacation and sick leave. CLASSIFIED

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Page 6CNews-Sun Sunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.co m IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. GC-10-405 RIVERSIDE NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA, Plaintiff, vs. A NDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTA NTS, INC. N/K/A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTA NTS, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company; and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S), WHO A RE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR LIVING, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM A N INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE A ND/OR JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO A CCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 14, 2011, in Case No. GC-10-402, in the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which TD BANK, NATIONAL A SSOCIATION is Plaintiff and ANDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, INC. N/K/A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Highlands County Courthouse, Jury A ssembly Room located in the basement of the Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on April 14, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: LOT 2, IN BLOCK 52, OF ORANGE BLOSSOM COUNTRY CLUB COMMUNITY UNITS 13 THROUGH 19 INCLUSIVE UNIT 15, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA The Real Property Address is: 10216 South Orange Blossom Boulevard, Sebring, Florida 33875 The Parcel ID Number is: C-24-35-28-150-0500-0020 A nyone claiming interest in the surplus from the sale, other than the person who was the record property owner when the Lis Pendens was filed, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of March, 2011. Highlands County Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk March 27; April 3, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. GC-10-404 RIVERSIDE NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA, Plaintiff, vs. A NDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTA NTS, INC. N/K/A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTA NTS, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company; and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S), WHO A RE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR LIVING, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM A N INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE A ND/OR JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO A CCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 14, 2011, in Case No. GC-10-402, in the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Highlands County, Florida, in which TD BANK, NATIONAL A SSOCIATION is Plaintiff and ANDREW VIEDRAH; HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, INC. N/K/A HOLISTIC HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Highlands County Courthouse, Jury A ssembly Room located in the basement of the Courthouse, 430 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida at 11:00 A.M., on April 14, 2011 the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: LOT 1, IN BLOCK 59, OF ORANGE BLOSSOM COUNTRY CLUB COMMUNITY UNITS 13 THROUGH 19 INCLUSIVE UNIT 16, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA The Real Property Address is: 10456 South Orange Blossom Boulevard, Sebring, Florida 33875 The Parcel ID Number is: C-24-35-28-160-0590-0010 A nyone claiming interest in the surplus from the sale, other than the person who was the record property owner when the Lis Pendens was filed, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of March, 2011. Highlands County Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk March 27; April 3, 2011 1050Legals Spring Lake Improvement District Personnel Policies Workshop The Board of Supervisors of the Spring Lake Improvement District will conduct a Personnel Policies workshop on Wednesday, April 13, 2011, 12:30 p.m. at the District Office, 115 Spring Lake Blvd., Sebring, Florida 33876 and will be attended by Supervisors, Management Personnel, and District Advisors; it is open to the Public. The purpose of the workshop is to review and update personnel policies and procedures. EACH PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION BY THE BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THE MEETING IS ADVISED THAT PERSON MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, INCLUDING THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH SUCH APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. Joe DeCerbo District Manager March 27, 2011 DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 385-6155 PROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORYPROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY Install doors, windows, flooring, plumbing & more!Licensed & InsuredLic# HM0096HANDYMAN BOBCall 863-452-5201 or 863-449-1744 Service Repair Supplies Equipment Delivered Right to your DoorPool Service & Mobile Retail(863) 382-7728Fax (863) 402-2200 poolparadise101@aol.com www.poolparadiseonline.com Brad & Julie Kurtz Phone (863) 382-7551 FAX (863) 382-2750 1405 US 27 North Sebring, FL33870 CAMPBELL S S COLLISION CENTER , INC. Jim Campbell Owner DID YOU KNOW?THENEWSSUNPROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY ISONEOFTHEMOSTECONOMICAL&EFFECTIVEMEANSOFADVERTISINGTODAY? CALLANITA@ 863-385-6155OREMAIL: amarsella@newssun.com FORDETAILS!! WANDA KLINE WEIGHT LOSS & WELLNESSSee what one drop of your blood indicates as to YOUR nutritional health and well-being. By appointment only863-414-4066 LIVEBLOODANALYSIS &WILLIAMSJANITORIALCARPETCLEANING$1095 Per Room3 Rooms Minimum Upholstery Cleaning All Types of Flooring Free EstimatesLic Bonded Ins(863) 214-1940 863-465-7491TREE SERVICE,INC.Joe Johnsons TRIMMING REMOVAL SOD INSTALLATION STUMP GRINDING LOT CLEARING PRESSURE CLEANING Will Beat Any Written Estimate!Peoples Choice Award Free Estimates Licensed & Insured Avon Park (863) 453-2525 Lake Placid (863) 699-2525 Lake Wales (863) 679-9200 Sebring (863) 382-1515 Wauchula (863) 767-1515Sebring Fax (863) 382-9939 W al-Mart Loca tions: Lake Wales (863) 676-0569 Sebring (863) 385-5371 Avon Park (863) 452-7010 INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED No job is too small. We can take care of all your home repairs and maintenance needs. Small Flooring Jobs Some Electric & Plumbing863-381-6677 Free Estimates Rogers Handyman ServicesRoger McCartney JRlicensed and insured 20 Years experience Excellent References Daily Weekly BiweeklyMonthly Janitorial Service Recently Relocated to Lake Placid Sebring Looking To Build New Clientele 863-243-1801 / Shelly A long$1000per hour Fair and Honest Service Based on Christian ValuesAre You or a Loved One Living Alone? Safety/Wellness Visitations Life Management Assistance Nursing Home Visitation & Reporting Errand/Concierge ServicesPersonal Concierge Services item pick-up/delivery grocery shopping courier/delivery petsitting pet transport to vet or groomer home security checks meal pick-up/delivery plus much,much more!!! (863) 382-8825www .kbcar eandconcier ge.com Trustworthy, Insured & Experienced Freedom Lawn CareGet the freedom you deserveCarl Horton ~OwnerVet. & Sr. Discount Lawn Maintenance Landscaping Small Tree Work Clean Ups Free Estimates863-655-2526 Weddin g g Chapel o f f Love Romantic Weddings Renewal Of Vows Commitment Ceremonies Designs For Your Cherished Moments Will Come To Your Location 4 Ministers on Staff863-385-5673 Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 Nest Egg Bookeeping, Inc.Why pay accounting fees for bookkeeping? Monthly Bill Pay Bank Reconciliations Correspondence Insurance/Medicare AssistanceCall to see how we can help you863-385-0888NESTEGGBOOK@YAHOO.COMSpecializing in individuals Ser vice A vailable 7 Days A W eek Website: extraordinaireairconditioning.com EXTRAORDINAIRE HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING LLC 863-451-2399Mike & Kandy Sheldone CEO/Owner Lic# CAC 1816569All Service Calls $40 Free Estimates Licensed & Insured Will Meet or Beat Any Price Family Owned &Operated with over 6 years experience Addison Lawn Care 863-441-0055 A Precise CutYARDCLEANUP, FULLLAWNCARE, HEDGETRIMMING& MORECOMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIALFor all your lawn needs,call Larry at381-0584for a Free Estimate & Great Service! Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 Serving Highlands & Hardee County 10 Years Experience PC Repair Service Software Installation Custom Built Computers Virus & Ad Ware Removal Home & Small Business Networking Free Estimates Pickup DeliverySAW ComputersCall Stephen at 863-832-9556 Email: Stephen.wingo@yahoo.com Artisans Home & Drywall Repairs Painting (Interior & Exterior) Pressure Washing Free Estimates Licensed & Insured 863-368-0774REMODELING

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun March 27, 2011Page 7C 2009 TOYOTACAMRY LE 4-door, low mileage, excellent conditon. Aloe green w/beige interior, $13,900. 863-465-5262 9450Automotive for Sale 9000 TransportationCONCEALED WEAPONSCLASS JIM'S PISTOLARROW 12135 US Hwy 98 April 15th, 6 p.m. Call for Info: 863-655-4505 8350Sporting Goods 8000 RecreationSCOOTER -Like new Guardian 3 TEK scooter & Harmar lift for inside vehicle. New would be $1200. Will sell both for $600 863-655-6212 7560Medical Supplies& Equipment PIT BULL8 months old, all shots, sweet & loving, gray and white, good with children. For more information Call 305-490-5399NOTICEFlorida statute 585.195 states tha t all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & Supplies AVON PARKLAKES Sunday Mar. 27th, 8am 3pm. Furniture, clothes, household items. Much Much More! No Early Birds!! AVON PARKMulti Family Sale! 2603 N Rochester Rd. Fri Sat Sun 3/25 -26-27, 8am ? Hobby tools, stove, motorcycle, clothing & shoes, Household items. Too Much To List! 7320Garage &Yard Sales WOODEN WHITEspiral reupholstered padded chairs (2) both for $40 863-382-6006 VACUUM -Upright, excellent condition, clean as a whistle! $20 863-402-2285 TYPEWRITER -SHARP electric $30 863-471-2502 TIRES -Goodyear Assurance, (4) 195 / 60R15. $100 863-385-3988 RACING GOCART, brand new motor 5.hp, needs seat and throttle cable and some brake work. $100 863-451-2886 MICHELIN TIRES4 14inch. all for $50 obo 863-214-6697 GLASSWARE -Name brand collectible, $75 obo. 863-214-6697 DESK CHAIRBlack / chrome / arms / casters. Black upholstery, ex. cond. $25 863-446-0972 BOOKS WESTERNS,20 for $12. CALL 863-385-1563 ANTIQU CHAIRBrown upholstery, very good cond. $25 obo 863-446-0972 7310Bargain Buys PROFORM CROSSWALK treadmill. Excellent condition. $150 863-453-3079 GENERATORS (2)4000 watt, $200; 4300 watt, $250. Both Good Condition. 863-453-3032 7300Miscellaneous 7180Furniture 7000 Merchandise SEBRING (2)Available 3926 Kenilworth Blvd, 1500 sq ft, $550/mo : A/C, office, BA, lg overhead door, near Sebring High School. 640 Park St, 6400 sq ft, $2500/mo : A/C, office, BA, 8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric, fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway. 941-416-2813 AVON PARKLarge Retail/Office Building, 100 E. Main St. A MUST SEE! 863-295-9272 6750Commercial RentalHISTORIC DOWNTOWNSEBRING SECURE workshop /warehouse units 500 800 sq. ft. 8' & 12' rollup doors. Small deposit, No lease required. $200 to $400 per month. Lights included. 863-414-7174 or 863-458-9020 6550Warehousesfor RentSEBRING HILLSAREA Looking for single individual to share homes with full use of house. No deposit. All ages may apply. 863-3857771 6450Roommates WantedSEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, W/D, Satellite, full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for Rent SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 LAKE PLACID3/BR, 1 1/2 BA, Carport, 1011 Jonquil St. 1st and Last Security deposit. $600 Monthly. 863-465-3959 LAKE PLACIDPet Friendly! Near Lake Placid Boat Ramp with lake access. Unfurnished 1BR, 1BA with appliances and A/C. $500/mo. + $500 security deposit. 863-465-1354 6300Unfurnished Houses SEBRING -Small nicely furnished house 1BR, 1BA. Deposit $100. Monthly $375 with 6 month lease. Pay own electric. 863-385-1806 SEBRING -Country Club of Sebring. 2BR, 2BA, den, lanai, pool, beautifully furnished/decorated. Available April 1st. Call 863-386-0340. 6250Furnished Houses LAKE PLACIDNewly remodled! 2/BR, 2/BA Apt/Duplex, Washer / Dryer, Excellent Conditio n. Includes water. $500 monthly plus 1 mo. security. 954-695-8348 LAKE PLACID1BR, 1BA, furnished or unfurnished. GREAT LOCATION! in quiet adult community. $450/mo. + security. 863-465-5262 AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; Washer/Dryer, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook ups. Students/Seniors Discount Call 863-452-0469. 6200UnfurnishedApartments AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL: $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 SEBRING -2BR, 2BA. Tile floors, fresh paint. Includes water. $600/mo. Call Gary Johnson, 863-381-1861. 6200UnfurnishedApartments 6000 RentalsWHISPERING PINESVILLAGE 55 plus. 3BR, 3BA, partially furnished. Must see to appreciate. Pay own utilities. Call Mary 863-385-8806 5150Mobile HomesFor RentPALM HARBORHOMES has closed 2 Model Centers. Save up to 60K on select models. Call 1-800-622-2832. 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesATTENTION: CASH for your Home, Duplex, Apartment, Commercial Property. Rapid Closing, "As Is Condition. 863-441-2689 STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL 4320Real Estate WantedESTERO, FLLIKE NEW 3BR, 2BA, 2CG Duplex in gated community with clubhouse and heated pool. Quiet area, yet convenient to shopping, entertainment, etc. Asking $195,000. Will consider trade for home in Sebring/Highlands County, FL area. Call 239-498-1183. 4300Out-of-TownPropertyOPEN HOUSE Saturday, March 26, 13 PM, Sunday, March 27, 13 PM. Charming 3BR, 2BA, like new, lakefront home, completely furnished. Make offer. 3233 Lake Hill Dr. Lake Placid 954-684-3058 4100Homes for SaleLake Placid SEBRING -VANTAGE Pte. single 2/BR, 2/BA, split plan, 16'X20' LR, dining area, fam. rm., screened patio, ample garage. Walk to club house / pool. Asking $115,000 w/ major furnishings. Call 863-471-3769 for info. SEBRING -Quiet Neighborhood on great fishing lake; 2,000 sf, 3BR, 2.5BA remodeled home with large garage & boat house. $219,000. 863-655-2278 MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE! SEBRING NO NEED FOR A BANK! Owner Financing 3BR, 1BA remodeled, NICE HOME! Woodlawn Elem. area. 1243 Fernvale Ave. 863-227-2717 4080Homes for SaleSebringSEBRING -RURAL LIVING adjacent to great fishing lake close to Sebring. 3BR, 2BA home, pole barn, 5 acres fenced, zoned agriculture $150,000. 863-655-2278 Make Offer! 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 FinancialJEWELRY SALESat Lakeshore Mall. Exciting job for right person with positive attitude people person out going personable friendly! Apply at 3$ cart, next to Food Court. 2100Help Wanted TRUCK DRIVEROver-the-Road. Must be able to stay out 3 + weeks at a time. Verifiable experience necessary. Clean driving record a must! Mechanical knowledge a plus. For application or information Call 863-452-5959. SUNRISE COMMUNITYINC is currently accepting applications for the position of: Direct Support Staff. Qualified applicants must meet the following: 18 yrs. old, High school diploma or equivalent, 1 yr. experience medical, or childcare setting, must be able to pass law enforcement background screening and drug test. All interested can call for appt. and application informaton: Sunrise Community Inc. 1014 6th Ave. S., Wauchula, Fl. 33873. 863-773-0434 ext. 305 EOE / DFWP SALES /ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Central Florida Ag News Magazine, Highlands County Edition. Advertising experience required. Email resume to: nelson@centralfloridamediagroup.com "WAUCHULA CHURCHSeeking Part Time Worship leader. Call 863-773-4267, 8am 12:30 pm, hourly and travel comp." 2100Help WantedPAGE DESIGNERIf you enjoy Page Design, this is for you. The News Sun is looking for the right person to help design its news page. Candidates must be expd in Quark and Photoshop, as well as have good news judgment. Able to work quickly with min. supervision is necessary. Exp. in Illustrator and In Design is a plus. This position is 20 hrs. hrs. may be flexible. Send sample of work with resume to: humanresources@new ssun.com or Fax to: 352-365-1951 Attn. Human Resources Director, or drop off at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL. Drug test and background check required. EOE 2100Help WantedHIRING: PRNMEDICAL ASSISTANT (w/Phlebotomy skills) Details @ www.flcancer.com 2100Help Wanted 2000 EmploymentLILLIE HILTON'SFamily Home Child Care now taking applications for NIGHT CARE, ages 0-12 yrs accepted. Eve shift 6:00 pm to 6:00 am. Over 30 years exp. 863-453-6439. Lic #F10HI0515 1500Child Care ServicesCHECK YOUR ADPlease check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day y our ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us:314-9876 News-Sun Classified 1100AnnouncementsHaving something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what youre doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 385-6155. WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 385-6155. Then shop till you drop! If you enjoy page design, this job is for you. The News-Sun is looking for the right person to help design its news pages. The right candidate must be experienced in Quark and Photoshop, as well as have good news judgment. The ability to work fast with minimal supervision is also necessary. Experience in Illustrator and InDesign is a plus. This position is for 20 hours hours may be flexible. Send sample of work with resume to humanresources@newssun.com or fax to 3852.365.1951 Attention: HumanResources Director, or drop off at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring. Drug test and background check required. EOE Royal Care of Avon ParkAre you tired of being under appreciated, under trained and over worked? What if there was someplace different? At Royal Care you will nd that place. We currently have the following positions open: Nurses Full Time Restorative Nurse (RN) C.N.A.s Full Time All Shifts Dietary Full Time Dietary Aid Full Time Cook 1213 W Stratford Rd. Avon Park, FL 33825(863) 453-6674EOE M/F DFWP its not just about making the sale anymore its about building trustits about being a part of the communityits about helping businesses grow Do you love selling a product you believe in? Are you committed to excellence? If so, were interested in talking to you!The News-Sun is actively seeking a dynamic sales professional that knows the difference between just making a sale and building a solid and dependable relationship with a client. If you are a sales oriented individual who is self-motivated, customer oriented and possess exceptional communication and organizational skills, consider joining our team. Candidates will be required to maintain established accounts while developing new clientele and working closely with area business organizations. Transportation required. Base salary plus commission, mileage, paid time off, health insurance, 401K & more. Email resumes to humanresources@newssun.com or fax to 352.365.1951 Attention: Human Resources Director or drop off at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring its about finding the right person The Avon Park Housing Authority is now taking applications for North Central Heights Homes, a new Rent Restricted single family home development in Avon Park consisting of 20 Two Bedroom, 46 Three Bedroom and 4 Four Bedroom homes. Rents will average in the low $400s for 2 br. homes and low to mid $500 & $600s for the 3 & 4 Br. homes. Applications open for Avon Park residents only; February 14 March 11, 2011 and all other applicants after March 11, 2011. For further information, contact: Avon Park Housing Authority at 863-452-4432, Ext. 2220 AVON PARKAFFORDABLE RENTRidgedale Apartments1, 2, 3 & 4 Br Apts Central Location, water & trash included Rent subsidized Based on household income. No Application Fee Call 863-452-4432 TTY 800-955-8771 EQUAL HOUSINGOPPORTUNITY NEW FURNITURE FOR LESS! HIGHPOINT FURNITURE OUTLET STORE 2346 U.S. 27 N, SEBRINGNorthofLowes&acrossfrom HomeDepot

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Page 8CNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com WHATS HOPPIN AROUND TOWN?Subscribe today and nd out! Call 863-385-6155 for home deliverywww.newssun.com

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LIVING D SECTION Inside This Section Arts & Entertainment3D Books 7D Community Calendar5D Crossword Puzzle2D Dear Abby2D Horoscope2D News-Sun Sunday, March 27, 2011FAMILYFEATURES W hen Megan Webber downloaded family photos off her digital camera, she found the usual problems that need touching up some were too dark, some were a little grainy, and some needed a little red-eye removal. Some of the pictures of her 5-year-old son, B enjamin, had a golden glow in his left eye. Benjamin has always had a freckle in his left eye, said Megan, so I thought the flash was just a difference due to the coloring of his e ye and ignored it I even did red-eye correction to remove it from p hotos. But when her sister noticed that same glow in some family v acation pictures she had taken, she gave Megan a concerned call. She said it was probably nothing. But she had seen on a television s how that this could be a sign of a tumor in the eye and recommended I have him seen, said Megan. Benjamins pediatrician didnt find anything, but he sent them to a s pecialist who urged them to come in right away. They were stunned t o learn he was legally blind in his left eye. Hed never bumped into walls or rubbed his eyes hed even j ust passed the paddle eye test in the doctors office, said Megan. His left eye could not see a letter E the size of a full computer screen e ight feet away. Scans of his eye showed a white mass, which had been causing the r eflection in the photograph. After testing and a tense few days, they d iscovered that Benjamin had CoatsDisease, a life-long disease that c an damage the eye to the point where eye removal is necessary. Fortunately, Benjamins problem was caught early enough for treatm ent. While Benjamin has had three eye surgeries, we were very lucky t o have caught his disease in time, said Megan. Had it been more a dvanced Ben could have immediately lost his eye. We are so grateful t o Dr. Tom Lee and the doctors at The Vision Center at Childrens H ospital Los Angeles. Without the work that they do so many families w ould not have access to the quality and caliber of care that is prov ided there. Benjamin is doing well, and is a happy, thriving first-grader. He w ears protective Nike shatterproof glasses which the other kids think a re pretty cool, said Megan. The glasses are primarily to keep his u naffected eye safe, for without that eye he would be blind. A vision to help otherchildren M egan said that she doesnt want any more parents to miss t he signs of potentially life-threatening eye diseases. We are amazed that something so simple, just the glow i n a photo, was all that was needed to spot this disease, s he said. If there is a way through our familys experience w e are able to get the message out about the glow, we are a nxious to do so. Weve created a campaign to raise awaren ess. The Know the Glow campaign is combining the e fforts of concerned individuals, corporations and physic ians who are pioneers in the field of pediatric diseases of t he eye. I cant tell you how many kids come in with advanced e ye diseases; its a tragedy, said Dr. Tom Lee, director o f the Retina Institute in The Vision Center at Childrens H ospital Los Angeles. Parents dont realize they are a n important part of the diagnosis. They will see this s ignbeforedoctorswill.Everychildhashadthisscreeni ngprocess all it takes is for parents to open up the p hoto album. The website, www.KnowTheGlow.org, has information o n the diseases that can be indicated by the glow. Had I k nown about the glow earlier, Dr. Lee could have saved m ore of Bens vision, said Megan. Knowing what it felt l ike to possibly face a fatal outcome and knowing that I i gnored such a huge red flag that was right there in front o f me, I dont want another parent to have to suffer through t hat or another child to needlessly lose their sight or their e yes due to a lack of awareness of the glow! Photo courtesy of Getty Images and Know the Glo w Cluestochildhood eyediseasescouldbe hidinginplainsightKnowtheFactsn1 in 80 children are at risk of getting The Glow.n80 percent of childhood blindness is preventable.n80 percent of Retinoblastoma and Coats Disease cases are diagnosed initially by a parent through a photograph.nThe Glow is an indicator of 15 eye diseases and cancers.nIn some cases, The Glow can lead to the removal of the eye, blindness, and, in extreme cases, death. Text GLOWto 90999 to donate $10.DisordersRelated totheGlowAbnormalities perceived through the red reflex test can indicate several types of diseases, such as: nAmblyopia nCataract nChoroidal nCoatsDisease nCongenital Cataract nColoboma nNorries Disease nPHPVnRefractive ErrornRetinal Detachment nRetinal Dysplasia nRetinopathy of Prematurity (ROP)nRetinoblastoma nStrabismus nToxocariasis nTrauma If you believe you have seen a glow, you should obtain a referral immediately to a pediatric ophthalmologist for diagnosis and treatment. RetinoblastomaRetinoblastoma (reh-tin-oh-blast-oma) is a malignant cancer of early childhood that arises from immature retinal cells in one or both eyes. Retinoblastoma can start growing at any time before birth up until about 3 years of age. Occasionally, it is not detected until ages 7 or 8. CoatsDiseaseCoatsdisease is a rare eye disorder involving abnormal development of the blood vessels of the retina, which line the interior chamber of the eye. As various components of blood leak into the retina, fluid accumulates under the retina. The result may be loss of vision, particularly central vision, and detachment of the retina from other layers of the eye. Scan this code with your smartphone to watch a video with more of Benjamins story, or visit http://bit.ly/EyeGlow. Benjamin with his fatherBrian Webberin The Vision Centerat Childrens Hospital Los Angeles Reason to worry?Probing whats behind our fear of nukes PAGE8D

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The waves rolled in with f ury for a West Coast locat ion.For me, such conditions w ould surely keep me at a d istance from the water. But, t hats not so for everyone. Avid surfers drawn to such c onditions amazed me. Id n ever seen so many surfers i n one place. As my husb and, Ken, and I watched, I f ound myself counting the s urfers (and losing track as t hey would slip into a wave a nd reappear in a different s pot). Wearing my hooded s weatshirt and several layers o f clothing to protect me f rom the frigid wind, I c ouldnt imagine entering t he water even though the s urfers were clad in wet s uits. I was mesmerized by their p ersistent attempts to catch t he waves and ride them. S ometimes they succeeded. O ther times, all they could d o was try, seemingly findi ng enjoyment in the a ttempt. Of course when they actually rode the waves standing on their surf boards, their triumph was evident. And we thrilled in the moment with them. Life throws us many waves and it is easy to succumb to the pounding force and not attempt to ride it out. Why bother if were only going to get knocked down again?But, that is the point. Getting knocked down means developing the stamina and persistence to get up again and try even harder. In the process, we learn many things to which I believe our surfing friends can probably attest. As Christian believers, I think sometimes we trust that as long as we have enough faith nothing can knock us down or keep us down for long. Though faith in God through Jesus Christ is the bedrock (for we are to be partakers of the divine nature within us), there is more. In 2 Peter 1:5, NKJV, we are reminded that because we have been so blessed, there is reason to be actively engaged. It says, But also for this very reason, giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue, to virtue, knowledge, to knowledge self-control, to self-control perseverance, to perseverance godliness, to godliness brotherly kindness, and to brotherly kindness love. Sometimes, it simply means not giving up in the struggles of life no matter how small or how large they may be.Others will faithfully endure along side us. Like fellow surfers, they, too, persist and infuse us with courage. As each of us overcomes his crisis, catching the wave and standing up to ride it, many others will join in the triumph. Selah Jan Merop of Sebring is a NewsSun correspondent. Page 2DNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com Witford Reid M.D.Board Certified Anesthesiologist in Pain Management863-385-9333 Sebring Pain Management And Rehabilitation Center, Inc. 9 Ryant Blvd. Westshore Plaza, Sebring(1 Mile South of Lakeshore Mall on the Right)The ONLY JACHO ACCREDITEDPain Management Unit in Highlands CountySPECIALIZING IN: Back Pain Auto Accidents Neck Pain Work Related Injuries VOTED 2009 Doctor of the Year THE LINCOLN LAWYERR(Matt Damon,Emily Blunt)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU PG13(Matt Damon,Emily Blunt)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30RANGO PG(Animated Voices by Johnny Depp,Abigail Breslin)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30HALL PASSR(Owen Wilson)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15GNOMEO & JULIET 2DG(Animated)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15THE KINGS SPEECHR(Geoffrey Rush,Colin Firth)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30 The NewFAIRMOUNTCINEMA63750 US 27 N. Sebring NOW SHOWINGFriday 03/11 Thursday 03/17 Suick CinemasInformation 385-9980 Office 385-9908New Dolby Digital SoundAll Seats $6.00for Matinee COMING SOON We will be featuring:Mar 25 SUCKER PUNCH DIARY OF A WIMPY KID 2 DIVERSIONS ROWDYBUNCHBy M. SKOCZEN & V. FLEMING ACROSS 1 Move to a larger container, say 6 Office exchanges 11 Put a dent in 14 Woe __! 18 In any way 19 Aromatic resin 20 Quin __? 21 Where the Pecos R. begins 22 *Old library aid 24 Gadget, for one: Abbr. 25 Water turbidity cause 26 Book after Neh. 27 Midnight Cowboy con man 28 Two-time N.L. batting champ Lefty 29 Motorcade VIP 30 Hit a lot of high notes 32 *Soda fountain choice 34 Societal ideals 36 What obsolete things fall into 38 Bananas 39 Marley & Me actress 41 React to boredom, perhaps 43 Defeats 47 Port of Crete 48 Cockney toast starter 50 Souvenirs at the park, usually 52 Controversial gift 53 Fresno-to-Bakersfield dir. 54 Not __ Town: antihate-crime movement 56 Procter & Gamble toothpaste 58 Salad cheese 59 Sail motions 60 Not of the cloth 61 Bombed 64 Maurice Sendak kids book, and the starts of starred answers 69 One way to anticipate 70 8 x 10 phots., e.g. 71 ... but maybe Im wrong 72 The Dark at the Top of the Stairs dramatist 73 Job jar items 75 Thomas Paines belief 76 __ band: school rally performers 79 Golden Age Hollywood studio 80 Kept awake, maybe 82 Bruce of The Astronaut Farmer 83 There is __ in the affairs of men ...: Brutus 85 Eager beaver 87 s-s FBI sting 90 Like some markers 92 Swedish tennis great 94 Japanese mushrooms 96 Chops up 97 *Ragtime dance 100 Spa service 102 Big name in pineapples 103 First toothbrush to go to the moon 104 One leading a charmed life? 105 The first one was founded in 1824 Eng. to protect carriage horses 108 James or Jones of jazz 109 __-mutuel 110 *s HaightAshbury type 112 Lent organs? 113 Harrow rival 114 Saintly qualities 115 Utahs state gem 116 Make a chart of, as land 117 Safety feature for some walkers 118 Conforms 119 Stieg Larsson was one DOWN 1 Regatta 2 H-like letters 3 *Political mantra 4 Fixer-upper, often 5 Dr. Moms forte 6 Heavy __ 7 Made joyous 8 Alices restaurant? 9 1847 novel based on its authors time in the Society Islands 10 Milano Mr. 11 Impressive house 12 Inane relative? 13 E-mail option 14 Popular restaurants 15 Smug grin 16 A beanball might lead to one 17 Personal organizer nos. 20 *Drug problem 23 Part of a playground exchange 28 Very 31 One who spiffs up your wheels 32 Its chewed in leas 33 Corp. fiscal VIPs 34 Little suckers? 35 Santa __: West Coast winds 37 Popular pad 40 Abecedarian 42 One of them? 44 Im outta here! 45 Perfume compound 46 One in a black suit 49 Scammers ploy 51 Calling strikes, e.g. 55 NFL part: Abbr. 56 Maddens 57 Eye shades 58 Suffix with song 59 Lacking dates 60 Patty alternative 62 Getaway places 63 Typical Bond villains malady 64 Uncanny 65 Good thing to have at a tearjerker 66 Prod 67 *One side of a defunct wall 68 Weed whacker 74 Battery spec 75 Disclosure co-star 76 *A cappella leaders gadget 77 Falco of Nurse Jackie 78 Push-up targets 80 Unrestrainedly 81 Unwrapped excitedly 82 U.S. terr., 186184 Circus 86 Keep __ of: stay current with 88 Persnickety sort 89 Collapsible bed 91 Put in a cell 93 Pirouette 95 Seller of the $5 FOOTLONG 97 Add up to 98 Extreme 99 Occult medium 101 Kind of shoes or blues 102 Sea, with the 104 Country place? 106 Not in ones birthday suit 107 Cutter with a bent blade 110 __ Schwarz: NYC toy store 111 Small change? Solution on page 3D Special to the News-SunAries (March 21-April 20) Aries, a lthough it may seem like you cant go o n without someone, you will take care o f what you need to do alone. There will b e someone new in your life. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Taurus, t he difficult conversations are always t he toughest to begin, but take some t ime this week to get these words said or t hey may haunt you for months. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Gemini, c hances are you wont see something c oming this week. If something catches y ou off-guard, recover as quickly and as g racefully as you can. Cancer(June 22-July 22) Cancer, y ou may want to take inventory of your i ncome and expenses and try to curb s pending for the next few weeks. You w ill need the funds for a big project l ater on. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Leo, you p lay an instrumental role in many peop les lives, and that is why you can expect to be called on in an important way this week. Dont worry, youre up to it. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Virgo, theres not much more you can say so dont waste your voice or your effort. Move on or you will just get frustrated. Romance seems likely this week. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Libra, you cant put your finger on it, but something seems to be off-kilter. Once you determine the source of the disturbance, you will be able to resolve the issue. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Scorpio, once you analyze a tricky situation, you will figure out that theres not much more that you can do about things without a little help. Start recruiting. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Sagittarius, when placing too much emphasis on the financial, you can lose the true meaning behind the effort. Your priorities lie elsewhere this week. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) Capricorn, if you dont like your situation, change it. You control your destiny, and all it takes is some work on your part to make a fresh start. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) Aquarius, trivial things seem to affect you this week. Focus on the larger picture, and you will discover things are much better than you had originally imagined. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Pisces, pamper yourself now because if you dont there will be little time for it next week. Thursday is looking like a good day. Famous birthdaysMarch 27 Mariah Carey, singer, 41; March 28 Lady Gaga, singer, 25; March 29 Elle Macpherson, model, 47; March 30 Celine Dion, singer, 42; March 31 Ewan McGregor, actor, 40; April 1 Susan Boyle, singer, 50; April 2 Ron Palillo, actor, 57. Something seems off-kilter this week, Libra DearAbby: My wife of 16 years, Barb, and I argue constantly. We cant seem to agree on anything, have few common interests and dont enjoy our time together. Our love life is nonexistent. We have gone to three marriage counselors and it hasnt helped. We now get along by avoiding each other. I think its time we faced the fact that were never going to be happy together. When I bring this up with Barb, she gets angry and launches into the same old tirade, saying if I want a divorce Ill have to get a lawyer. Divorce will be difficult and costly enough without having to drag lawyers into it. Id like us to agree that its time to split and use a mediator to work out the details. It will save us a lot of money and, hopefully, make the divorce less acrimonious. I dont understand why Barb wants to stay together when shes so unhappy and were unable to make things better. How can I make her see that separating in as kind a way as possible will be best for us and the kids included? Former Husband in Longmont, Colo. DearFormer Husband: Your wife may prefer the evils shes living with to the unknown of being a divorcee with children. However, when a marriage is over its over. And when it reaches the stage that yours has, what both parties need to be most concerned about is preservation of assets, so they arent dissipated in attorneys fees. I have seen both kinds of divorces one in which the warring spouses spent so much money in litigation there was little left for each of them when it was over; and the other, in which the couple agreed their marriage was broken beyond repair and arranged their divorce with as little cost as possible. I dont have to tell you which people are doing well now. So clip this and share it with your wife. DearAbby: If no one answers the phone when my mother calls, she shouts on the answering machine for my children (ages 18 and 12) to pic k up! Then shell tr y my cell phone onc e or twice in quick succession before calling back on the house phone and leaving a cranky message. Its neve r an emergency; she just wants to chat. I understand that Mom is frustrated, but sometimes w e are resting, eating dinner or are otherwise indisposed. And yes, there are times when were not in the mood to talk. She lectures me con stantly about how my husband and I are teaching our children to be disrespectful by ignoring her calls. (Thei r teachers and other adults regularly comment about how polite they are.) I see nothing wrong with letting a call go to voicema il if I cant or dont want to talk at that moment, and I always return Moms call. I also encourage my kids to call her, but she doesnt make it easy when she begins a conversation with, Didnt anyone ever tell yo u its rude not to answer the phone? Do I owe her an apology, or does she need t o be more patient? Please Leave a Message .. . DearPlease Leave a Message ...: Your mother apparently feels that her needs and wishes automatically take precedence over whatever else may be happening in your lives. You d o not owe her any apologies, and yes, she does need to b e more patient. But she won t get that message until you are able to communicate it clearly and directly to her. You are no longer a child, and you should not be expected to drop everything anytime your mother wants to chat. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Good advice for everyone teens to seniors is in The Anger in All of Us and How to Deal With It. To order, send a business-size, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds only) to: Dear Abby Anger Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.) Unhappy couple cant agree on best way to break up Dear Abby Catching and riding the waves Pause And Consider Jan Merop Horoscope Get the paper delivered to you! NEWS-SUN-6155

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Associated PressNEWYORK An Andy W arhol portrait of Elizabeth T aylor is heading to a New Y ork City auction. Its estim ated to bring $20 million. The Wall Street Journal r eports that Liz #5 is o wned by hedge-fund manage r Steven Cohen. The 1963 s ilkscreen will be sold at P hillips de Pury at its cont emporary art sale on May 1 2. The actress died on W ednesday at age 79. The portrait shows the s creen siren smiling and her e yelids covered in blue eye s hadow. It comes from W arhols 1960s series of pop culture icons like Jacqueline Kennedy and Marilyn Monroe. The Journal says Cohen bought the portrait for an undisclosed sum from the estate of a major New York dealer. He declined to comment. The current Warhol auction record is $71.7 million for Green Car Crash. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The new p roduction of the Pulitzer P rize and Tony Award-winn ing musical AChorus L ine is taking the stage at S outh Florida Community C olleges Theatre for the P erforming Arts, Highlands C ampus, at 7:30 p.m. W ednesday, April 13 as the f inal performance of the 2 010-11 Artist Series. In an empty theatre, on a b are stage, casting for a new B roadway musical is almost c omplete. For 17 dancers, t his audition is the chance of a lifetime. Its what theyve w orked for with every drop o f sweat, every hour of traini ng, every day of their lives. I ts the one opportunity to do w hat theyve always dreamed to have the chance to d ance. This is AChorus Line, t he musical for everyone w hos ever had a dream and p ut it all on the line. Winner o f nine Tony Awards, includi ng Best Musical and the P ulitzer Prize for drama, this s ingular sensation is the l ongest-running American B roadway musical ever. Now AChorus Line returns. Come meet the new generation of Broadways best. The original production of AChorus Line opened at the Public Theaters Newman Theatre in 1975 and transferred to Broadways Shubert Theatre in that same year. It ran for nearly 15 years, closing in 1990 after 6,137 performances. AChorus Line reclaimed its place in the heart of Broadway at the Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre where it re-opened to rave reviews in 2006. The New York Daily News exclaims Theres nothing better! The show thrills from the opening number to the glittering finale. This performance is a part of the national tour, which is visiting more than 75 markets across the country. The performance may contain some adult content; viewer discretion is advised. The performance is sponsored by Sevigny and Johnson Eye Care, Drs. Ashok and Raji Sonni, and MidFlorida Credit Union. Tickets range from $39 to $46 and may be purchased online 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at http://performances.southflorida.edu. Tickets may also be purchased by calling the SFCC Box Office at 784-7178 or by visiting the SFCC Box Office in the front of the Theatre for the Performing Arts, 600 W. College Drive, from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. MondayFriday. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011Page 3D ROOFING SPECIALIST SERVING HIGHLANDS COUNTY SINCE 1989Shingles Flat Roofs Roof Repairs Mobile Home Roofovers -FULLYLICENSED & INSURED385-4690State Lic # RC 0066817 QUALITY WORK AT A REASONABLE PRICE FREEESTIMATES Newborns Children AdolescentsOFFICE HOURS: Rajeswari Sonni, M.D., F.A.A.P. Praveen Krishnadas, M.D., F.A.A.P. Anoop Palta, M.D., F.A.A.P. Maria B. Asis, M.D., F.A.A.P Maria C. Perez, M.D. David Kleczek, P.A.-C. Amy Grimes, P.A.-C. Megan Neff, ARNP Mercy L. Seralde, M.D., F.A.A.P.Avon Park Pediatrics,P.A. & Sebring Pediatrics,LLCWe accept most Major Insurance and Medicaid SEBRING382-0770AVON PARK453-7337 Specializing in the treatment of Allergies Asthma Attention Deficit Disorder Immunizations Check-ups Obesity Counciling SEBRING: MON. FRI. 8:30AM 5:00PMSATURDAY 8:30AM 12:00 NOON SEBRING ONLYAVON PARK: MON. & WED. 8:30AM 7:00PM TUES., THURS., & FRI. 8:30AM 5:00PM LAKE PLACID699-1414 ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Courtesy photo The new production of the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Awardwinning musical A Chorus Line is the final performance of the South Florida Community College 2010-11 Artist Series. It takes the stage on Wednesday, April 13. A Chorus Line national tour to perform at SFCC Special to the News-SunAVON PARK Author L es Standiford continues the S outh Florida Community C ollege Humanities Reading S eries, at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, A pril 5 in Building H, Room 1 12, SFCC Highlands C ampus. Standiford is the author of t he critically acclaimed Last T rain to Paradise, Meet Y ou in Hell, and Washington Burning, as w ell as 10 other novels. R ecipient of the Frank O Connor Award for Short F iction, he is director of the c reative writing program at F lorida International U niversity in Miami. His latest book, Bringing A dam Home, tells the story o f the Adam Walsh 1981 a bduction and murder case, i n Hollywood, Fla., and how t he case was finally solved, 2 7 years later, by Miami B each detective Joe M atthews. Son of Americas Most Wanted creator John Walsh, Adam Walshs abduction changed the way parents watched over their children. Bringing Adam Home is the definitive account of this harrowing crime and its aftermath, a true story of tragedy, love, faith and dedication. It reveals the pain and tenacity of a family determined to find justice, the failed police work that allowed a killer to remain uncharged, and the determined efforts of one cop who accomplished what an entire system of law enforcement could not. The Humanities Department Reading Series features fiction and nonfiction writers who focus on regional themes. An open mic night will be held April 14. The series is free and open to the public. It is funded by a grant from Anne Reynolds. For more information, call Dr. Charlotte Pressler, professor, philosophy and SFCC Honors Program coordinator, at 784-7247. Reading Series continues with Florida author Courtesy photo Author Les Standiford, author of Last Train in Paradise and 12 other novels, continues the South Florida Community College Humanities Reading Series on Tuesday, April 5. Special to the News-SunSEBRING Auditions for Highlands Little Theatres production of Little Women will be at 6:30 p.m. Monday, April 4 and Tuesday, April 5 in the Drs. Thakkar Pavilion and 5:30 p.m. Thursday, April 7 in the Lakeside Playhouse. Call backs, if needed, will be in the pavilion at 10 a.m. Saturday April 9. Meg is the eldest daughter. Jo, the tomboy of the family, is about a year younger than Meg. Beth, the gentlest and shyest of the four, is younger than Jo. If Beth can play the piano this is a plus, but not essential. Amy is the youngest daughter. It is preferred but not required, that the four daughters have some stage experience. The four male roles are: Laurie Laurence, the boy next door to the March family; Grandfather Laurence, a kind, wealthy gentleman; John Brooke, Lauries tutor who is a little older than Laurie; and Mr. March, father of the four little women. The three older wom en include: Aunt March, al so wealthy and somewh at crotchety; Hannah, who h as been part of the famil y since Meg was born; an d Marmee, mother to the litt le women. Atentative rehears al schedule will be availab le at auditions. The First Nighterspe rformance of Litt le Women is Wednesda y, June 1 and the final pe rformance is Fathers Da y, June 19. Tickets may be purchased in the Box Offi ce at 356 W. Center Ave ., Sebring; by phone at 38 22525; or online at www.highlandslittleth eatre.org. The Box Office is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m Monday-Friday. Little Women is wr itten by Peter Clapham an d sponsored by the New sSun. Director S ue McCollum previous ly directed Vanities, T he Fantasticks, Godspel l and Bye, Bye, Birdie. F or more information, conta ct hlt.comments@yahoo.com Auditions set for Little Women Special to the News-SunSEBRING The very talented Clara Carroll will teach a workshop on the Japanese art of Shibori dyeing from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, April 4 in the Highlands Art Leagues Visual Arts Center. Each participant will be able to dye two scarves, and have the option to choose from a number of different techniques that will be demonstrated. Carroll will also talk about the history of this art, as well as the techniques practiced in Japan. The cost of this worksho p is $69 plus tax, and suppli es are all included. This is going to be a fantast ic workshop for a great pric e, but space is limited. The re are 10 spots and six a re anticipated to be filled, so if you are interested then it is definitely advisable to sig n up as soon as possible. If you would like to s ee examples of Carrolls wor k, just stop by the Yello w House Gallery and G ift Shop. Workshop set to learn Shibori dyeing CROSSWORDSOLUTION Got something to buy,sell or trade? News-Sun classified ads get results! Call 314-9876 Warhols Elizabeth Taylor to sell at auction Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and

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By ALAN SCHER ZAGIER and HOPE YEN Associated PressPLATO, Mo. In a nation o f nearly 310 million people, A mericas new population c enter rests not in a M idwestern skyline of St. L ouis or Chicago, but in a t iny Missouri village named a fter an ancient Greek p hilosopher. The Census Bureau a nnounced Thursday what t he 109 residents of Plato had s uspected for weeks: Shifting p opulation patterns and geog raphical chance converged t o make this town on the edge o f Mark Twain National F orest the center of the U.S. p opulation distribution based o n 2010 census data. The announcement also s ignifies larger trends A mericas population is m arching westward from the M idwest, pulled by migration t o the Sun Belt. And in a surp rising show of growth, H ispanics now account for m ore than half of the U.S. p opulation increase over the l ast decade. Such designations arent n ew to Missouri. The 2000 p opulation center was Edgar S prings, about 30 miles to the n ortheast. Thirty more miles t o the northeast is Steelville, t he 1990 population center. That doesnt mean locals a rent downright thrilled with t he recognition and a chance t o be noticed. It is putting a spotlight on a corner of the world that d oesnt get much attention, s aid Brad Gentry, 48, publ isher of the weekly Houston H erald newspaper 30 miles u p the road. Most residents a re proud of our region and l ike the idea that others will l earn our story through this r ecognition. The Census Bureaus first s et of national-level findings f rom 2010 on race and migrat ion show a decade in which r apid minority growth, aging w hites and the housing boom a nd bust were the predomin ant themes. The final count: 196.8 mill ion whites, 37.7 million b lacks, 50.5 million H ispanics and 14.5 million A sians. Hispanics and Asians were t he two fastest growing d emographic groups, increasi ng about 42 percent from 2 000. Hispanics, now comp rise 1 in 6 Americans; a mong U.S. children, H ispanics are roughly 1 in 4. More than 9 million A mericans checked more t han one race category on t heir 2010 census form, up 32 p ercent from 2000, a sign of b urgeoning multiracial g rowth in an increasingly m inority nation. This really is a transform ational decade for the n ation, said William H. F rey, a demographer at the B rookings Institution who h as analyzed most of the 2010 data. The 2010 census shows vividly how these new minorities are both leading growth in the nations most dynamic regions and stemming decline in others. For the first time, Asians had a larger numeric gain than African-Americans, who remained the second-largest minority group at roughly 37 million. The number of nonHispanic whites, whose median age is now 41, edged up slightly to 197 million. Declining birth rates meant their share of the total U.S. population dropped over the last decade from 69 percent to about 64 percent. The Census Bureau calculates the mean U.S. population center every 10 years based on its national head count. The center represents the middle point of the nations population distribution the geographic point at which the country would balance if each of its 308.7 million residents weighed the same. Based on current U.S. growth, which is occurring mostly in the South and West, the population center is expected to cross into Arkansas or Oklahoma by the middle of this century. The last time the U.S. center fell outside the Midwest was 1850, in the eastern territory now known as West Virginia. Its later move to the Midwest bolstered the region as the nations heartland in the 20th century, central to farming and manufacturing. But Plato, about 170 miles southwest of St. Louis, doesnt reflect the population changes that have brought it special attention. The town and its surroundings have few blacks and even fewer Hispanics, though there are more minorities in three or four larger cities about 20 to 30 miles away. Rumblings of Platos newfound fame have stirred for weeks, only to be confirmed Tuesday when a pair of census officials came to town to plot the precise midpoint, which is located in a rolling pasture in an area dominated by beef and dairy farms. Acommemorative plaque noting the distinction will be unveiled in April on a monument carved from Missouri red granite, said Elizabeth Frisch, vice president of the local bank. The plaque will be next to the post office, adjacent to the marker noting the towns 1858 founding. For most in town, it was business as usual Thursday. The sign outside Plato Christian Church offered Todays forecast: God reigns and the Son shines. Diners at Webers Cafe enjoyed $3 hamburgers and $5.99 pork chop dinner plates. Students in the entrepreneurial business class at Plato R-VHigh School hatched ideas to sell T-shirts and other paraphernalia celebrating the towns new distinction. Despite or perhaps because of its isolation, Plato attracts a mix of lifelong locals and those eager to escape the rat race. Frisch, a New Jersey native who moved to central California, discovered the region on cross-country trips to visit family on the East Coast. She noted that the number of town residents had increased by nearly 50 percent from 74 to 109 since the previous census, attributing the growth to military retirees and active-duty military stationed at the sprawling Fort Leonard Wood, 10 miles away. Weve had a population explosion in 10 years, she joked. Online: www.census.gov Page 4DNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com Save$25 $300 per unit on select Hunter Douglas window fashions. Hunter Douglas offers an array of attractive colors, fabrics and styles for creating inviting living spaces. With their enduring craftsmanship and energy-efcient designs, they present exceptional value smart style thats energy smart, too. And, now you can enjoy smart savings from January 14 through April 29, 2011 with mail-in rebates on select styles. Ask us for details. *Manufacturers rebate offer valid for purchases made January 14 through April 29, 2011. Limitations and restrictions apply. Ask for details. 2011 Hunter Douglas. and TM are trademarks of Hunter Douglas. Family owned & operated since 1978 American Golf Cart 2833 Hwy 27 S. Avon Park (863) 453-CART(2278)2007S Starting at $1595includes top, window & charger, NEW & USED TIRES & BATTERIES BATTERIES:Trojan PowerTron AmericanOver 75 New & Used Carts To Choose From ONTHEWIRE Tiny Plato, Mo., sits at center of nations population MCTpho to Plato, Mo., with 109 residents, is the center of the United States population distribution, according to the 2010 census. Based on current U.S. growth, which is occurring mostly in the South and West, the population center is expected to cross into Arkansas or Oklahoma by the middle of this century. Associated PressDENVER With the c lick of a mouse, Sandy F reund Kasper sent a comm and to NASAs comet-hunti ng Stardust space probe to b urn all its fuel, starting a s equence that would shut the s pacecraft down after a 12y ear run. Like saying goodbye to a f riend, said Allan C heuvront, the Stardust prog ram manager for Lockheed M artin, who has worked on t he probe since 1996, when it w as still in the design stage. Its been an amazing s pacecraft, he said T hursday. Its done everyt hing we asked, its done it p erfectly. Launched in 1999, Stardust finished its main mission in 2006, sending a tiny sample of particles from the Wild 2 comet to Earth via a parachute-equipped canister. NASAthen recycled the probe, sending it past a comet last month to photograph a crater left by a projectile launched by another space probe. It accomplished one last experiment on Thursday, firing its thrusters until its last hydrazine fuel was gone. The length of that burn, a little under 2 1/2 minutes, will tell engineers exactly how much fuel was left so they can see how accurate their calculations were. Comet-hunting spacecraft shuts down after 12 years

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T he Community Calendar prov ides a brief listing of local c lubs and organizations who m eet on a regular basis. It is t he responsibility of the group t o update the News-Sunon a ny changes in this listing by c alling 385-6155, ext. 516; s end any changes by e-mail to e ditor@newssun.com;or mail t hem to News-SunCommunity C alendar, 2227 U.S. 27 South, S ebring, FL33870. S UNDAY American Legion Post 25 L ake Placid has lounge hours f rom 1-9 p.m. Live music is f rom 5-8 p.m. For details, call 4 65-7940. American Legion Post 74 o pen 1-8 p.m. Happy Hour 4-6 p .m. Members and guests o nly. Post is at 528 N. Pine S t., Sebring. Call 471-1448. Inerstate chapter of A .B.A.T.E. meets the last S unday of every month at The B lue Crab, 825 Ridgewood D r., Sebring at 11 a.m. Lake Placid Elks Lodge 2 661 lounge is open from 1-7 p .m. Card games start at 1:30 p .m. The lodge is open to m embers and their guests. For d etails, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Moose has k araoke in the pavilion. H orseshoes played at 9:30 a .m. Food available at 4 p.m. O pen to members and qualif ied guests only. Loyal Order of Moose H ighlands County Lodge No. 2 494, 1318 W Bell St., Avon P ark. Cards start at 4 p.m. M usic outside Tiki Hut at 3 p .m. Lodge phone number 4 52-0579. Overeaters Anonymous, m eets from 4-5 p.m. in second f loor conference roomNo. 3 at F lorida Hospital Heartland M edical Center, 4200 Sun N L ake Blvd., Sebring. For d etails, call 382-7731. No d ues, fees or weigh-ins. For d etails on the organization, go t o www.oa.org. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 s erves lunch at 2 p.m. at the c lub, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. F or details, call 655-4007. Sebring Moose Lodge 2 259 offers NASCAR racing in t he pavilion at 1:30 p.m. Bar o pen and kitchen open from 25 p.m. Lodge is at 11675 U.S. 9 8, Sebring. For details, call 6 55-3920. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 3880 serves hamburgers f rom 4-5:30 p.m. and plays p oker at 5:30 p.m. at the post, 1 224 County Road 621 East, L ake Placid. For details, call 6 99-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars P ost 4300 Karaoke is from 5-8 p .m. at the post, 2011 SE L akeview Drive, Sebring. For d etails, call 385-8902. MONDAY Al-Anon LET IT BEGIN W ITH ME family group meets a t 10:30 a.m. every Monday at t he Heartland Christian Church o n Alt. 27 in Sebring. The c hurch is behind Southgate S hopping Center where Publix i s. F or more information call 3855 714. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 8-9 p.m. at Episcopal C hurch, Lakeshore Drive, S ebring. For more details, call 3 85-8807. Alcoholics Anonymous O ne Day At ATime group m eets for a closed discussion a t 9:30 a.m. Monday and F riday at Covenant P resbyterian Church, 4500 S un N Lakes Blvd., Sebring. F or details, call 314-0891. Alcoholics Anonymous m eeting, 6:30 p.m. at R osewood Center, 517 U.S. 2 7 South, Lake Placid. Alanon meets at 8 p.m. at S t. Agnes Episcopal Church, 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. F or details, call 202-0647. American Legion Placid P ost 25Lake Placid has shuff leboard at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 12-9 p.m. For details, call 465-7940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. Call 4711448. AmVets Post 21 plays darts at 7:30 p.m. for members and guests. For details, call 3850234. Avon Park Lakes Association has shuffleboard at 1 p.m. and bingo at 7 p.m. The clubhouse is at 2714 Nautilus Drive in Avon Park. Boy Scout Troop 482 meets 7 p.m., 34 Central Ave., Lake Placid. Bridge Club of Sebring (American Contract Bridge Club)plays duplicate games at 12:30 p.m. at 347 Fernleaf Ave., Sebring. For details, call 385-8118. Diabetes Support Group meets the second and fourth Monday from 1-2:30 p.m. in Florida Hospital Conference Room 3 in Sebring. Call 4020177 for guest speaker list. Dual Diagnosed (Addiction and Mental Health) Support Group meets from 7-8:30 p.m. the fourth Monday at 4023 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring. Call 386-5687. Florida Association Home and Community Education meets from 9-11 a.m. weekly on Mondays at The AgriCenter. The group of sewers and crafters make items for residents of adult congregate living facilities. Call Penny Bucher at 385-0949. Garden Club of Sebring meets noon, fourth Monday, Sebring Civic Center. Grand Prix Cloggers EZ Intermediate and Intermediate Clogging class are held at 9 a.m. every Monday at Reflections on Silver Lake, Avon Park. Call Julie for further information at 386-0434. Harmony Hoedowners Square Dance Club meets the second and fourth Monday at the Sebring Country Estates Civic Association clubhouse, 3240 Grand Prix Drive (down the street from Wal-Mart). Dancing will be held every month until April 2008. Classes are being started now in the Sebring and Lake Placid area. For more information, call Sam Dunn at 382-6792 or visit the Web site at www.samdun.net.Heartland Horses & Handicapped Inc. is offering pony rides every Monday and Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 p.m., weather permitting. $5 donation per child. Call 4520006 for more information. All proceeds raised support our free equine assisted riding program for adults and children with special needs, which resumes in September.Heartland Pops rehearses at 7 p.m. Mondays at Avon Park High School Band Room, 700 E. Main St., under the direction of Anthony Jones. Musicians of all ages are welcome. For information, call 314-8877. Highlands County Concert Band rehearses 7-9 p.m. every Monday at Sebring High School band room. All musicians are welcome. Vic Anderson, musical director. Call Bill Varner at 386-0855. Highlands County Democratic Executive Committee meets 7 p.m. fourth Monday in the Democratic Party Headquarters, 4216 Sebring Parkway, Sebring. For details, call 699-6052. Highlands County Sewing Group meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Highlands County AgriCivic Center in the 4-H laboratory, Sebring. For details, call 402-6540. Highlands Sertoma Club meets noon, Takis Family Restaurant, Sebring. Highlands County Senior Squadron, Civil Air Patrol the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary meets the second and fourth Monday nights at the Sebring Airport Terminal Building. All are welcome. For further information, call 471-1433 between 4 and 7 p.m. Lake Placid American Legion Post 25 meets 8 p.m., Legion hall. Lake Placid Art League will have classes in Drawing and Painting, conducted by Anne Watson, from from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd. From 1-4 p.m., Mary Gebhart will teach Fabric Painting at the center. For information call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Ladies crafts at 2 p.m. Sign up for darts is at 6:30 p.m.Music from 5-8 p.m. It is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Lake Placid Moose plays cards at 2 p.m. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lodge closes at 6 p.m. Let It Begin With Me Alanon Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon every Monday at Heartland Christian Church, 2705 Alt. 27 South, Sebring. For details about Alanon, a self-help group for families and friends of alcoholics, call 385-5714. Narcotics Anonymous Never Alone Candlelight meets at 8 p.m. at 133 N. Butler Ave. in Avon Park, near the First Congregational Church. For information call Heartland area helpline (863) 683-0630. More information on other meetings and events at www.naflheartland.org. National Association for the Advancement of the Colored People, Highlands County Branch meets 7:30 p.m., 401 Tulane, Avon Park. Orchid Society of Highlands County meets 7 p.m. on the fourth Monday at the Highlands County AgriCivic Center, 4509 George Blvd., Sebring. Call Ed Fabik at 465-2830 for details. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 12-4:30 p.m. second and fourth Monday in Placid Lakes Town Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. No meetings from end of May to October. For details, call 465-4888. Rotary Club of Highlands County meets at 6:15 p.m. at Beef O Bradys, Sebring. Sebring AARP meets 1:30 p.m., The Palms, Pine Street, Sebring. Sebring Bridge Club has Bridge, ACBLDuplicate at the clubhouse, 347 N. Fernleaf, Sebring at 12:30 Mondays. For details or info on lessons, call 385-8118. Sebring Eagles Club 4240 has pizza and darts at 7:30 p.m. at the club, 12921 U.S. 98, Sebring. For details, call 655-4007. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 has the lounge open from 12-7 p.m. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Historical Society open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Located in back side of Sebring Public Library building on Lake Jackson. For information, call 471-2522. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 plays Texas Hold em at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Monday at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing. For details, call 6553920. Take Off Pounds Sensibly FL632, Sebring meets at 3:30 p.m. at the fellowship hall at the First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, Sebring. For details, call Judy OBoyle at 260-0831. Veterans of Foreign Wars Ladies Auxiliary Post 4300 meets 2 p.m. fourth Monday, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880 euchre, 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 East, Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Volunteers of America of Florida is a nonprofit organization in Sebring that specializes in assisting person's with mental illness. We are pleased to announce our Drop in Center is open to individuals with a mental illness 6 days a week from 11am to 3 pm. The center offers a welcoming environment where individuals are accepted and feel comfortable. For more information please contact Wendy at 863382-2022.TUESDAY Al-Anon Family Groups meet for discussion and Twelve Step study at noon, Union Congregational Church, 105 N. Forest Ave., AvonPark. Parking available south of old church. American Legion Placid Post 25Lake Placid has shuffleboard and euchre, both at 1 p.m. Lounge hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. For details, call 4657940. American Legion Post 74 open noon to 8 p.m. Hot dogs served. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. Call 471-1448. Avon Park Boy Scout Troop 156 meets from 7-8:30 p.m. in the Scout Lodge, 202 Robert Britt St., AvonPark. Boys ages 11-17 are eligible to join. For details, call 452-2385. AvonPark Library has storytime at 10 a.m. for ages 3-5 except during holidays. Busy Bee Craft Club meets 9-11 a.m., Fairway Pines, Sun N Lakes Boulevard, Sebring. Everyone is welcome. For more details, call 382-8431. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday night at The Rock, Union Congregational Church, 28 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park. Abarbecue meal is served at 6 p.m. for a donation. At 6:45 p.m., members meet. At 7:30 p.m., the group breaks up into small groups for men and women. The program is designed for drug and alcohol addiction, divorce, death or illness grief, low or lost selfesteem or identity due to dysfunctional relationships, depression/anxiety, or any other need for healing. For details, contact Celebrate Recovery coordinator Pam Sim by calling 453-3345, ext. 106. Fletcher Music Club meets every Thursday and Tuesday at Fletcher Music Center in Lakeshore Mall, Sebring. For more details, call 385-3288. Heartland Harmonizers Barbershop Chorus meets from 7-9:30 p.m. in the Sebring High School Music Room, Sebring. All men who enjoy singing are invited. Reading music is not required. Call 471-2294 or 386-5098. Heartland Symphony Orchestra rehearsals from 5:30-7 p.m. Tuesdays in the Green Room in the South Florida Community College auditorium building. Bring music and instruments. New members welcome. Call conductor Bryan Johnson at 800949-7248, ext. 7231. Highlands County Community Orchestra rehearses each Tuesday in the Green Room of the South Florida Community College Performing Arts Theater, 5:307:30 p.m. Entrance is at the rear of the building. String players especially needed. Strings call Eugene Longo at 699-1975; winds call Kim Houser at 453-6049 for more information. Highlands County Quilt Guild meets first and third Tuesday, St. Agnes Episcopal Church, Sebring. Call Lynn Ullinn for meeting times at 314-0557 or e-mail luckyduck@mymailstation.com. Highlands Tea Party has an educational and informational meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Quality Inn, 6525 U.S. 27 in Sebring. Call 699-0743. Hope Hospice grief support group meets at 11 a.m. at 319 W. Center Ave., Sebring; and 4:30 p.m. at Southern Lifestyle ALF, across U.S. 27 from Florida Hospital Lake Placid. Call 382-0312. Lake Placid Art League has classes in Parchment Embossing from 8 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. at the Cultural Center, 127 Dal Hall Blvd., taught by Maria Lorant. For information, call Dan Daszek at 465-7730. Lake Placid Elks 2661 opens its lounge at 1 p.m. at the lodge. Happy hour is from 2-5 p.m. Card games at 1:30 p.m. The lodge is open to members and their guests. For details, call 465-2661. Lake Placid Grief Support (Hope Hospice) meets at 4:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Southern Lifestyle, 1297 U.S. 27 North, Lake Placid, with Charlie Stroup. Refreshments served. Door prize given. Call 465-0568. Lake Placid Moose has euchre at 7 p.m. Food available. Open to members and qualified guests only. Lorida Community Club meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Lorida Community Center to plan events. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 W. Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup.c om. For details, call 382-7731. Visit www.oa.org for more information on OA. Placid Lakes Bridge Club meets 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Tuesday and has blood pressure screening from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. first and third Tuesday at Placid Lakes Tow n Hall, 2010 Placid Lakes Blvd. For details, call 465-4888. Nar-Anon Support Group for family members or friends of someone with a drug problem or addiction. Nar-Anon helps attain serenity and a more normal life for those affected by the addictions of loved ones, regardless of whether or not he/she has stopped using. 6 p.m. every Tuesday at First Baptist Chuc h of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 9-10 a.m. every Tuesday at Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Churc h, 1410 W. Avon Blvd. No dues, fees or weigh-ins. Visit www.FloridaRidgeIntergroup. c om. For details, call 382-7731 Rotary Club of Sebring (Noon) meets at noon at the Sebring Civic Center, near th e library in downtown Sebring. For information, call 385-3829 or 471-9900.. Sebring Bridge Club will have Duplicate Bridge games every Tuesday evening. If interested in playing Duplicate Bridge, call 385-8118. Sebring Elks Lodge 1529 plays darts, beginning with sign in at 6 p.m. Games start at 6:30 p.m. No experience necessary. Cost is $2. For more details, call 471-3557. Sebring Moose Lodge 2259 serves soft shell tacos 5 7 p.m. at 11675 U.S. 98, Sebring. Beef franks and Italian sausages from 1 p.m. to closing. Euchre is played at 6:30 p.m. For details, call 655 3920. Sebring Recreation Club plays bridge at 12:30 p.m. an d table tennis at 4 p.m. at 333 Pomegranate Ave., Sebring. For details, call 385-2966 or leave a name, number and message. SertomaClub meets at 7 a.m. at Dees Restaurant, Sebring. For details, call Scot t Albritton at 402-1819. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL99 meets from 6 -7 p.m. at the Atonement Lutheran Church, 1744 Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter FL618 has weigh in from 4-430 p.m. at Communit y Bible Church, 1400 CR-17A N., AvonPark. Meeting is at 4:45 p.m. For details, call 452 1093. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3880, plays darts 6:30 p.m., 1224 County Road 621 E., Lake Placid. For more details, call 699-5444. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4300 has sandwiches a t 5 p.m. and Franke from 6-9 p.m. at the post, 2011 SE Lakeview Drive, Sebring. For details, call 385-8902. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011Page 5D Established 19311600 US 27 South Avon Park Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home4001 Sebring Parkway Sebring, 385-0125 111 E. Circle St. Avon Park, 453-3101 Chris T.Nelson Craig M. Nelson Darin S. MacNeil W .W LUMBER CO. 465-3331Hwy. 27 S. Lake PlacidWere More Than Just Lumber COMPLETE Building SuppliesPlease support the above businesses. They have made this page possible. Inspirational Thoughtsby Patricia Valentine THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502 Residential Commercial Mobile HomesSmall Enough to Know You Large Enough to Serve You500 South Lake Avenue 382-8300 453-3019 THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502St.Luke 5:5-6,And Simon answering said unto him, Master,we have toiled all the night,and have taken nothing:nevertheless at thy word I will let down the net. And when they had this done,they inclosed a great multitude of fishes:and their net brake.In the above scriptures,Peter chose to obey Jesus and as a result he experienced a stunning display of divine power.In our obedience to God and His word it may sometime require doing some things that appear to be unreasonable.Our obedience to God should never be based on whether something seems fitting to our way of thinking.That is not to say God always bypasses common sense,but oftentimes what He requires of us may not appear reasonable or match our preconceived ideas. Disobedience will cause us to miss out on what God has in stored for us.Nothing pleases a parent more than to have their children walking in obedience.God is even more pleased when His children are walking in obedience.Be Blessed! Attend the Church of Your Choice! COMMUNITYCALENDAR NEWS-SUN 385-6155

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Page 6DNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. childrens choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. childrens mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and womens prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 3:30 and 5 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Friday 5-7 p.m., every Saturday 9-11 a.m. and 2:30-3:15 p.m., first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life! Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church.Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP The term Florida Mouse in the state of Florida, may conjure up visions of Mickey Mouse and other creatures from a nearby fantasy world. And while the Sunshine State may be known partially f or that particular mouse, there is a nother critter that is the real deal. T he true, factual Florida mouse is a s pecies of rodent in the Cricetidae f amily. The Latin name for the c reature is Podomys floridanus. T he amazing thing about this m ouse is that it is the only one e ndemic to Florida. It is found only i n limited areas and certainly doesn t live in a make believe world w here everything is magical, but i nhabits some of the hottest, driest a nd highest areas in our state. Like many other species, this m ouse relies on other critters to p rovide its home and nesting area. I n fact, the Florida mouse is somet imes called the gopher mouse b ecause it finds its abode within t he long, deep burrow of the g opher tortoise. The mouse will s curry into the dark tunnel and m ake nest chambers out of small s ide passages. Because predators of t he mouse may also reside within t he burrow, the critter makes small openings in the roof of the burrow to use as an exit for a quick get a way if needed. The mouse grows to about 7 1 inches in length and has large ears without fur and a short tail. It has brown-orange upperparts and is white underneath. When young, the mice are gray in color. They dont smell very good and have been said to have a skunk-like odor. Florida mice can be distinguished from other mice by the five pads on each of their hind feet. Other mice have six or seven pads, which are called plantar tubercles. Like other mice, the Florida Mouse is an omnivore, eating seeds, plants, some insects, nuts and fungi. Acorns are their favorite food. They are ground dwellers and do not generally dig their own holes. If the rodent cant find a convenient gopher tortoise hole, they are not picky and will utilize burrows of the armadillo, other mice, cotton rats and even in pocket gopher mounds. They are nocturnal and generally hunt at night. Predators include spotted skunks, bobcats, birds of prey, raccoons and various snakes such as indigo and pine snakes. Florida mice breed all year long but mostly between July and December. Gestation usually lasts about 24 days. When she is ready to have her young, the female will line a side pocket of the burrow she is living in with shredded plant material to use for her nest. Average litter size is three babies, which weigh about .10 ounces and measure about 1 1 inches. The young develop teeth by the fourth day and become active around day 10, although their eyes do not open until they are about 2 weeks old. The mother nurses her young constantly for the first two weeks. After only about three to four weeks the young are weaned and begin to display adult behavior. Their life expectancy is about one year. The unique thing about the Florida mouse is that it is the only Podomys mouse that is endemic to Florida. It can be found coast to coast in central peninsular Florida. There is a population of these mice in the panhandle at Franklin County. The mouse can be found from north-central Florida south to Highlands County and Sarasota County. It is found on the Atlantic coast from St. Johns County south to Miami-Dade County. This creature resides in some of the states driest locations such as scrubby areas. It has been found in sand pine scrub, high pinelands of turkey oak and longleaf pine, slash pine flatwoods, southern ridge sandhills, scrubby flatlands and coastal scrub. Florida mice require about 1 acre for their territory. The largest populations of Florida mic e are found in the Ocala National Forest and the Lake Wales Ridge. The species has been deemed Threatened by the Florida Committee on Rare and Endangered Plants and Animals and has been named a Species of Special Concern by the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission. The reason this tiny creature is in peril is because of habitat loss. Development and agr iculture have taken much of the rodentslimited habitat. Fire suppression is another major problem for the mouse. Without fire to kee p its habitat healthy, continual habitat decline is expected. Another major problem for the mouse is gopher tortoise population decline As stated above, the mouse depends on this creature for its home and gopher tortoises are dis appearing because of disease and habitat loss. Fortunately the Florida mouse i s protected in some areas such as Archbold Biological Station and the Ocala National Forest. Hopefully, scientists will be able to study and learn more about this sh y creature and find ways to help it survive. Corine Burgess is the Natural Resources Specialist for the Highlands County Natural Resources Department assistin g the Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District (www.highlandsswcd.org). The Florida Mouse is the only mouse endemic to Florida News From The Watershed Corine Burgess Courtesy photo The Florida Mouse, sometimes called the Gopher Mouse, is found only in limited areas and inhabits some of the hottest, driest and highest areas in Florida.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011Page 7D EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer.Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howes Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer Kid C ity Childrens Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, prime-timers, and Bible s tudies in Spanish. Kid City Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Childrens Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 10 a.m.; Bible study, 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturers Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30 a.m.; and contemporary worship is at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Childrens Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on lifes journey, youre we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP Publishers Weekly best-sellersHARDCOVER FICTION 1. Toys by James Patterson and Neil McMahon (Little, Brown) 2. Sing You Home: A Novel by Jodi Picoult (Atria) 3. The Jungle by Clive Cussler and Jack Du Brul (Putnam Adult) 4. The Wise Mans Fear by Patrick Rothfuss (DAW) 5. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets Nest by Stieg Larsson (Knopf) 6. The Tigers Wife: A Novel by Tea Obreht (Random House) 7. A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness (Viking) 8. The Paris Wife: A Novel by Paula McLain (Ballantine Books) 9. Minding Frankie by Maeve Binchy (Knopf) 10. Tick Tock by James Patterson, Michael Ledwidge (Little, Brown) 11. Love You More: A Novel by Lisa Gardner (Bantam) 12. River Marked by Patricia Briggs (Ace) 13. The Help by Kathryn Stockett (Putnam/Amy Einhorn) 14. Treachery in Death by J.D. Robb (Putnam Adult) 15. The Informationist: A thriller by Taylor Stevens (Crown Publishing) HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. Red: My Uncensored Life in Rock by Sammy Hagar (It Books) 2. The 17 Day Diet: A Doctors Plan Design for Rapid Results by Dr. Mike Moreno (Free Press) 3. Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand (Random House) 4. Love Wins: A Book About Heaven, Hell, and the Fate of Every Person Who Ever Lived by Rob Bell (HarperOne) 5. The Money Class: Learn to Create Your New American Dream by Suze Orman (Spiegel & Grau) 6. Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer (The Penguin Press) 7. The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement by David Brooks (Random House) 8. Jesus of Nazareth: Holy Week: From the Entrance Into Jerusalem To The Resurrection by Pope Benedict XVI (Ignatius Press) 9. Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 by Michio Kaku (Doubleday) 10. Decision Points by George W. Bush (Crown) 11. The Amen Solution: The Brain Healthy Way to Lose Weight and Keep It Off by Danile G. Amen MD (Crown) 12. The 4-Hour Body: An Uncommon Guide to Rapid Fat-Loss, Incredible Sex, and Becoming Superhuman by Timothy Ferriss (Crown) 13. Cleopatra: A Life by Stacy Schiff (Little, Brown) 14. Blood, Bones & Butter: The Inadvertant Education of a Reluctant Chef by Gabrielle Hamilton (Random House) 15. Infinite Quest: Develop Your Psychic Intuition to Take Charge of Your Life by John Edward (Sterling, Ethos) MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS 1. Water for Elephants: A Novel by Sara Gruen (Algonquin) 2. The Lincoln Lawyer by Michael Connelly (Grand Central Publishing) 3. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson (Vintage) 4. The Silent Sea by Clive Cussler and Jack Du Brul (Berkley) 5. Deception: An Alex Delaware Novel by Jonathan Kellerman (Ballantine Books) 6. An Engagement in Seattle: Groom Wanted, Bride Wanted by Debbie Macomber (Mira) 7. Without Mercy by Lisa Jackson (Zebra) 8. The Girl Who Played with Fire by Stieg Larsson (Vintage) 9. A Creed in Stone Creek by Linda Lael Miller (HQN) 10. Last Snow by Eric Van Lustbader (Forge) 11. Changes: A Novel of the Dresden Files by Jim Butcher (Roc.) 12. An Unlikely Countess: A Novel of the Malloren World by Jo Beverley (Signet) 13. Swimsuit by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro (Grand Central Publishing) 14. Harvest Moon by Robyn Carr (Mira) 15. A Dark Matter by Peter Straub (Anchor) TRADE PAPERBACKS 1. Water for Elephants: A Novel by Sara Gruen (Algonquin) 2. Heaven is for Real: A Little Boys Astounding Story of His Trip to Heaven and Back by Todd Burpo, Sonja Burpo, Colton Burpo and Lynn Vincent (Thomas Nelson) 3. Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese (Vintage) 4. Private by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro (Grand Central Publishing) 5. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot (Broadway) 6. Heart of the Matter by Emily Griffin (St. Martin s Griffin) 7. Inside of a Dog by Alexandra Horowitz (Scribner) 8. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson (Vintage) 9. The Art of Racing in the Rain: A Novel by Garth Stein (Harper) 10. The Big Short by Michael Lewis (Norton) 11. The Postmistress by Sarah Blake (Berkley) 12. The Glass Castle: A Memoir by Jeannette Walls (Scribner) 13. The Kings Speech: How One Man Saved the British Monarchy by Mark Logue and Peter Conradi (Sterling) 14. Little Bee by Chris Cleave (Simon & Schuster) 15. The Girl Who Played with Fire by Stieg Larsson (Vintage) BOOKS

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By SETH BORENSTEIN APScience WriterWASHINGTON N uclear radiation, invisible a nd insidious, gives us the c reeps. Even before the Japanese n uclear crisis, Americans w ere bombarded with contrad ictory images and messages t hat frighten even when they t ry to reassure. It started with t he awesome and deadly m ushroom cloud rising from t he atomic bomb, which led t o fallout shelters and school d uck-and-cover drills. On screen, Bert, the evera lert turtle of the government c ivil-defense cartoons, told u s all we needed to do was s hield our eyes when the b omb exploded and duck u nder our desks. Jane Fonda i n The China Syndrome t old us to be worried about n uclear power accidents, and j ust days later, Three Mile I sland seemed to prove her r ight. Now bumbling nuclear p lant worker Homer S impson, Blinky, the radiat ion-mutated, three-eyed fish, a nd evil nuclear power plant o wner Montgomery Burns m ake us giggle and wince. The experts tell us to be l ogical and not to worry, that n uclear power is safer than m ost technologies we readily a ccept. Producing and burni ng coal, oil and gas kill far m ore people through accid ents and pollution each year. But our perception of n uclear issues isnt about l ogic. Its about dread, magn ified by arrogance in the n uclear industry, experts in r isk and nuclear energy say. Whereas science is about a nalysis, risk resides in most o f us as a gut feeling, said U niversity of Oregon psyc hology professor and risk e xpert Paul Slovic. Radiation really creates very s trong feelings of fear not r eally fear, I would say more a nxiety and unease. Some experts contend that w hen a disaster has potentiall y profound repercussions, w e should pay attention to e motions as much as logic. Nuclear energy hits all our h ot buttons when we judge h ow risky something is: Its i nvisible. Its out of our cont rol. Its manmade, high-tech a nd hard to understand. Its i mposed on us, instead of s omething we choose. Its a ssociated with major catast rophes, not small problems. A nd if something goes w rong, it can cause cancer a n illness we fear far more t han a bigger killer like heart d isease. Thirty years ago, before t he 1986 Chernobyl nuclear d isaster, Slovic took four g roups of people and asked t hem to rate 30 risks. Two g roups the League of W omen Voters and college s tudents put nuclear p ower as the biggest risk, a head of things that are deadl ier, such as cars, handguns a nd cigarettes. Business club m embers ranked nuclear p ower as the eighth risk out o f 30. Risk experts put it at 2 0. The only fear that Slovic h as seen as comparable in his s tudies to nuclear power is t errorism. APew Research Center p oll after the Japanese n uclear crisis found support f or increased nuclear power m elting down. Last October t he American public was e venly split over an expans ion of nuclear power; now i ts 39 percent in favor and 5 2 percent opposed. Nuclear radiation carries a very powerful stigma. It has automatic negative associations: cancer, bombs, catastrophes, said David Ropeik who teaches risk communications at Harvard University. You cant separate personal feelings from the discussion of actual risks, said Ropeik, author of the book How Risky Is it, Really? But Ropeik, who has consulted for the nuclear industry, said those fears arent nearly as justified as other public health concerns. He worries that the public will turn to other choices, such as fossil fuels, which are linked to more death and climate change than the nuclear industry is. He cites one government study that says 24,000 Americans die each year from air pollution and another that says fossil fuel power plants are responsible for about one-seventh of that. At the same time, health researchers have not tied any U.S. deaths to 1979s Three Mile Island accident. United Nations agencies put the death toll from Chernobyl at 4,000 to 9,000, with antinuclear groups contending the number is much higher. Since 2000, more than 1,300 American workers have died in coal, oil and natural gas industry accidents, according to federal records. Radiological accidents have killed no one at U.S. nuclear plants during that time, and nuclear power has one of the lowest industrial accident rates in the country, said Nuclear Energy Institute spokesman Steve Kerekes. Alan Kolaczkowski, a retired nuclear engineer, consulted with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on specific probabilities of accidents at nuclear plants. He estimates the risk of a disaster at a given plant at 1 in 100,000 about the same as your chance of being killed by lightning over your lifetime. For comparison, an Americans odds of dying in a car crash are 1 in 88; being shot to death, 1 in 306; and dying from bee stings, 1 in 71,623, according to the National Safety Council. The council couldnt come up with the odds of dying from radiation because it lists zero people dying in the United States from radiation in 2007, the most recent year for which these cause-of-death figures are available. Ropeik calls this mismatch between statistics and feelings a classic example of how public policy gets made not about the numbers alone, but how we feel about them, and it ends up doing us more harm. Kolaczkowski faulted his own industry. Those in the industry believe it is so complex it cannot be explained to the general public, so as a result, the industry has a trust-me attitude and that only goes so far, he said. Were all afraid of the unknown, the ghosts under the bed. David Lochbaum of the Union of Concerned Scientists, a group that presses for safer nuclear plants, is a former plant engineer. He likens the publics fears to unjustified worries about shark attacks: The risks and deaths are small, but the attention and fears are big. It may be an irrational fear, but I dont think its one that can be educated away, Lochbaum said. However, calling these fears irrational isnt justified, said Georgetown University law professor and former Environmental Protection Agency associate administrator Lisa Heinzerling. She said peoples concerns have been unjustly trivialized. People have been trained to think about and prepare for low-probability, catastrophic events like the earthquake and tsunami that caused the Japanese nuclear disaster, Heinzerling said. She pointed to homeowners insurance. Most people wont have a fire that destroys their home, but we worry about really big things even if they are improbable because we will be wiped out. Americans also have long had an ambivalence toward new technology, going back to worries about the introduction of electric lights in homes 130 years ago, said University of Detroit Mercy history professor John Staudenmaier, Americans overreact with adulation and awe, then overreact with fear and anxiety, said Staudenmaier, editor emeritus of the academic journal Technology and Culture. Trying to explain the fears, nuclear industry spokesman Kerekes said, Theres a perception gap that exists. But he adds: Other industries havent had to do deal with an animated cartoon series that lasted, what, 25 years? That would be The Simpsons. Producer Al Jean said the show, which has been on the air since 1989, reflects Americas real feelings. There is something that taps into peoples view of big business, and in particular, nuclear power, which is giving profit-minded people complete control over life and death. It is a scary thought, and I think that is a topic for satire, Jean said. Jean recognizes that nuclear plant workers arent really like Homer Simpson and radiation doesnt put a cute third eye on a fish. Bu t he thinks his show is accura te with its portrayal of the greedy, conniving nuclear power plant owner Montgomery Burns: Mr. Burns may be representative of some people in the nucle ar industry not just nuclear, but all industries who seem like theyre more inter ested in getting the money rather than doing whats saf e. I think thats what resonates in the public. Yet, Jean takes pride in noting that the Springfield nuclear power plant has never blown up. The lack of transparency in the nuclear industry including Tokyo Electric Power Co. has caused some of the problems, said Baruch Fischhoff, a profess or of decision sciences at Carnegie Mellon University It is a charge Kerekes disputes. The nuclear industry has behaved in a way that is untrustworthy, both in the sense of not telling people the truth and not having the competence to manage their own affairs, Fischhoff said He added that industry is too quick to brush off peoples fears: Telling the pub lic that they are idiots is cer tainly not a way of making friends. Page 8DNews-SunSunday, March 27, 2011www.newssun.com $199999 $109999 $139999 SCIENCE Whats behind our conflicted feelings on nukes? Perception isnt about logic, its about dread MCTphoto The Salem nuclear plant's cooling tower forms a backdrop as a tanker cruises south on the Delaware River near Port Penn, Del.