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The news-sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028423/01019
 Material Information
Title: The news-sun
Uniform Title: News-sun (Sebring, Fla.)
Alternate title: Sunday news-sun
News sun
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sebring News-Sun, Inc.
Place of Publication: Sebring Fla
Publication Date: 03-20-2011
Frequency: triweekly (wednesday, friday, and sunday)[1996-<1997>]
semiweekly[ former 1988-1996]
three times a week
regular
Edition: Sebring/Lake Placid ed.
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sebring (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lake Placid (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Avon Park (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Highlands County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Sebring
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Lake Placid
United States -- Florida -- Highlands -- Avon Park
Coordinates: 27.495556 x -81.444444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 62, no. 21 (Nov. 9, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Each day's issues carry distinct numbering schemes, <1997>.
General Note: Also published for Avon Park.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579631
oclc - 29858590
notis - ADA7478
lccn - sn 94003669
issn - 1074-8342
System ID: UF00028423:01019
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sebring news (Sebring, Fla.)
Preceded by: Avon Park sun

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PAGE 1

By BARRYFOSTER Special to the News-SunSEBRING Great weather and a large field of competitors proved to be irresistible to thousands of fans as it appears attendance records were shattered Saturday for the 59th running of the Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring presented by Fresh from Florida. Although no numbers have yet been released, track officials say there was a record crowd recorded on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, with a steady stream of cars, trucks, trailers and motor homes making their way through the front gates. In fact, even past the 10:30 start of the race Saturday morning, traffic was stacked up down Airport Road and well down U.S. 98 as fans looked to get in for an exciting event. Those who came to stay also found crowded conditions. Campers had to pitch their tents side to side, with some even sharing pegs with their neighbors because the quarters were so tight. The situation was worsened to a degree by the increase in the number By BARRYFOSTER Special to the News-SunSEBRING It may seem like a long time away, but 2012 is actually right around the corner for a number of those preparing to celebrate landmark anniversaries in Sebring. Next year represents the centennial anniversary for the City of Sebring, the 75th year for the Highlands County Fair, the 70th anniversary of the Sebring Regional Airport and the 60th anniversary for the 12 Hours of Sebring. Members of the Sebring Hall of Fame Committee unveiled their plans for the Race celebration as well as the new logo for the event on Friday. The 60th anniversary year will also mark the induction of new members of the Sebring Hall of Fame. Over the past eight years, 21 competitors, five race promoters, five race officials and four manufacturers have been inducted. Plaques in their honor have been mounted in the Gallery of Legends building in the Raceway's Paddock area. In fact, work has already started to have a display of Lady Streaks drill rival DevilsPAGE1CSee who's still alive in March Marketing MadnessPAGE4BRecycling on county's agendaPAGE2ACounty, LPmeet about utilitiesPAGE4ANEWS-SUN Highlands County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.comVolume 92/Number 33 | 75 cents www.newssun .com HighLow 82 58Complete Forecast PAGE 8A Sunny, warm and breezy in the afternoon Forecast Question: Will you attend the 12 Hours of Sebring? Next question: Should the county start a curbside recycling program? www.newssun .com Make your voice heard at Online Inside Phone ... 385-6155Fax ... 385-2453Online: www.newssun.com Yes 16.9% No 83.1% 099099401007 Total votes: 89 Arts & Entertainment3D Business1B Chalk Talk6B Classifieds5C Community Briefs2A Crossword Puzzle2D Dear Abby2D Editorial & Opinion3A Lottery Numbers2A March Madness4B Movie Times2D Police Blotter2A Sports1C Index locally owned community mindedHeartlandNational Bank Avon Park800 West Main St.863.453.6000Lake Placid600 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.699.1300Sebring327 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1300Sun n Lake North5033 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1322www.heartlandnb.com 59th running of the 12 Hours of Sebring Benefits of a homegrown kitchen garden PAGE1D By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK Citize ns upset with the Avon Pa rk council decision to termina te City Manager Bruce Behre ns have begun an active cam paign to let elected officia ls know their feelings and are in the process of forming a recall committee. Asource within the acti ve recall group, who wished to remain anonymous becau se of fears of retaliation, to ld the News-Sun that the com mittee members were mee ting this weekend. "Next week, the committ ee plans to go public, but did n ot wish to be known until t he proper paperwork was fil ed the Highlands Coun ty Supervisor of Elections," t he source said. "We need to make sure th at we do this right before w e announce who we are. This is a legitimate governme nt process, but some involv ed are afraid of the backlash th at might occur if they announ ce before the paperwork is in properly." The web site addre ss www.recallapcouncil.co m was registered on Wednesd ay with Internet ho st godaddy.com but the conta ct information is listed as p rivate. The web site's home pa ge on Friday just showed a r ed British-style telepho ne booth, but the News-Sun w as told those seeking to kno w more about the recall wou ld be able to get meeting sche dules, petition and conta ct information of the committ ee members at the site. Although not yet associa ted with a recall committe e, Avon Park Citizen Ton ya Marshall has already start ed to contact groups within t he city to inform them of t he action. "No, I am not a part of t he committee yet, but I want to Recall effort started in AP Web site started in move to oust city council members See RECALL, page 7A News-Sun photo by SCOTTDRESSEL Action was heavy at Turn 10 in the opening laps of Saturday's 59th running of the Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring presented by Fresh from Florida. Plans for 60th anniversary Race unveiled See PLANS, page 5A News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHE R TUFFLE Y Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam spent the day in Highlands County touring local farms growing biofeed crops and talking to local growers at the Bert J. Harris Ag-Center. By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Highlands County is well positioned to benefit from the new push toward alternative fuels, local growers and investors were told Friday during a visit to the county by Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam. The shift to biofeed crops that can be processed into fuel, in addition to helping the nation free itself from the need for foreign oil, will help save the local agricultural industry. "This program helps keep farmers farming," said Bradley Krohn, president of United States EnviroFuels Putnam: Highlands County is cradle of innovation' in biofuels Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and Big field = big crowd Fans fill Raceway to nearly overflowing See BIG, page 5A See PUTNAM, page 7A www.newssun .com For results of the 12 Hours of Sebring, look online at News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS The track is packed Saturday morning during the start of the 59th Annual Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring.

PAGE 2

By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING County Commissioners will take another look at which direction the county needs to take in regards to recycling at their Tuesday meeting. At the direction of the board, County Engineer Ramon D. Gavarrete asked Kessler Consulting Inc., a small Tampa firm that specializes in waste management and recycling, to give a preliminary assessment of the county's privatization options for recycling. In a letter dated March 14, Kessler informed Gavarrete that the county would be required to "dramatically increase its recycling rat," and that the county would not "recover sufficient quantities of recyclables to attract vendors to develop and/or operate a Material Recovery Facility to serve only Highlands County." Kessler is recommending that the county work with the municipalities to include them in the process and to look at a recycling transfer facility where material would be consolidated and transferred to an already existing service plant somewhere else in the state. Kessler is also recommending that the county conduct further discussions with Choice Environmental, which currently holds the solid waste contract, and to get written statements on what Choice can offer before proceeding. Choice offered on Feb. 18 to provide the containers needed for curbside recycling free of charge and to pick-up single stream recycled materials under the current contract by adjusting regular garbage collection. The Kessler letter further advised the county to take a close look on how changes could effect existing business, government and school recycling programs. Overall, Kessler's preliminary assessment opened even more questions than answers and advised that the county do a much deeper analysis of all the different aspects before making a decision. Gavarrete is recommending in his agenda summary that commissioners execute a Consulting Service Agreement before moving forward with any request for proposal for recycling, and stated in a recent e-mail that he would brief each of the commissioners individually before the board's Tuesday meeting. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South € Sebring, Florida 33870 A Harbor Point Media Company OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday PHONE: 863-385-6155 MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954 NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453 POSTMASTER: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870 USPS … ISSN 0163-3988 Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry office(s)CIRCULATION SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before 11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after the times mentioned will receive credit to their account. Please call 385-6155.SUBSCRIPTION RATES12 mo.7% FL taxTotal HOME DELIVERY$60.46$4.23$64.69 IN FLORIDA MAIL92.236.4698.69 OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL105.99105.99 Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date. Romona Washington … Publisher and Executive Editor863-385-6155, ext. 515 Personal Injury & Wrongful Death Medical & Nursing Home Malpractice Workers'Compensatioin Social Security Disability Automobile Accidents K A Y L O R R & & K A Y L O R R P A M A R K K K A Y L O R Lawyers, Past and Present. Helping the Injured Since 1968205 S. Commerce Ave € Sebring, Florida 863-382-1900 SEBRING DISCOUNT BEVERAGES3750 U.S. 27 North, Unit C1 € 471-2277Next to Fairmount Cinema 6 € Open Mon-Sat 9-6 Tobacco Products, Candy, Cold Beer, Housewares, Gifts & MORE!LOW PRICES € MANY GOOD BARGAINS € CLOSEOUTS!*Prices do not include tax. Natural Light & Ice € Old Milwaukees Best12 Pack Can$6.99Budweiser & Bud Light12 Pack $10.99 Smoke Odor EliminatorCandles$6.79 € Can$5.79 DVDs Entire Stock each $3 305s & Romy3 Packs$10.30 MistyCarton$45.99 Galaxy Natural CigaretteCarton$29.49 NewportCarton $50.49 € 3 Packs $15.57 SenecaCarton$31.69 March 16 125414950x:4Next jackpot $4 millionMarch 12 91023243738x:4 March 9 6917384352x:5 March 18 112183034 March 17 625263031 March 16 410111823 March 15 911131525 March 18 (n) 8622 March 18 (d) 9918 March 17 (n) 4958 March 17 (d) 9541 March 18(n) 03 5 March 18 (d) 49 4 March 17 (n) 33 9 March 17(d) 31 9 March 18 1115233213 March 15 71522303 March 11 1617273613 March 8 252731359 March 16 2839404853 PB: 9 PP: 3Next jackpot $85 millionMarch 12 14124147 PB: 3 PP: 4 March 9 1220284048 PB: 8 PP: 2 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Tuesday was Margie Rhoades' last meeting as a member of the Sebring City Council. Mayor George Hensley presented Rhoades a proclamation thanking her for her many contributions and dedicated service over the years. Andrew Fells will be sworn in as council member on April 5. Council president John Clark applauds. Council says farewell to Rhoades The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Thursday, March 17: Adrian Louise Adams, 21, of Tampa, was charged with failure to appear reference knowingly driving with license suspended or revoked. Darius Lamar Blackmon, 24, of Avon Park, was charged with operating a motor vehicle without a valid license. John Junior Fedd, 48, of Sebring, was charged with driving while license suspended. Gregory Gentile, 20, of Lake Placid, was charged with possession and or use of drug equipment, and possession of marijuana. Scott Donald Hirschberg, 55, of Bradenton, was charged with possession and or use of drug equipment, and possession of marijuana. Jaquesta Shamyca Myers, 23, of Avon Park, was charged with grand theft. Dwaine Elmer Poole, 41, of Lake City, was charged with three counts of violation of probation reference forgery, three counts of violation of probation reference utter forged instrument, violation of probation reference grand theft and probation of violation reference possession of fraudulent/unlawfully issued driver's license. Ricky Shane Pridgen, 26, of Dover, was charged with violation of municipal ordinance. Rose Marie Ralston, 20, of Avon Park, was charged with neglect of a child without great harm. Chauncey Anthony Sewell, 29, of Okahumpka, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference issue/obtain property by worthless check. Joseph Eugene Stambaugh, 29, of Sebring, was charged with violation of probation reference dealing in stolen property, violation of probation reference burglary of a conveyance, and grand theft (vehicle). Daytwon Tyrie Tate, 18, of Avon Park, was charged with resisting an officer without violence and loitering or prowling. Hector Luis Velazquez, 51, of Palm Bay, was charged with three violations of municipal ordinance. POLICEBLOTTER By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Members of the S ebring City Council agreed to further e xplore a proposed concept offered to t hem Tuesday night by Ricky Hayes o f Highlands Fitness Inc. Hayes wants to start a rental busin ess at Veteran's Beach where indiv iduals would have access to things l ike kayaks and stand-up paddle b oards. He would also provide guided t ours of parts of Lake Jackson. Hayes said he would need about 1 50 square feet of space and would be o pen only on weekends. He would provide the portable shelter, the staff and the items to be rented and wanted to test market during May, June, July and August. The council's immediate reaction was positive. "It's a good concept," said council member Scott Stanley. "We should encourage it and find a way to make it happen." There were, however, some concerns. Because of the deep trench right off of the City Pier Beach, the council felt it would be too dangerous to set up a rental site there, making it clear the business would be restricted to Veteran's Beach. The council also felt it should send out for bids, even though members doubted other businesses had even considered the idea. Hayes researched the concept after seeing rental vendors on the east cost while on vacation in Volusia County. He had a copy of that county's agreement with a vendor, and a quote from an insurance company for equivalent coverage. Initially Hayes will rent beach chairs and stand-up paddle boards. If the community and tourists come out to take advantage of the rentals, Hayes will expand the choices. He envisions renting small sailboats down the line. "Stand-up paddle boards are the hottest item in beach rentals right now," he said. "There is a trend in the surf culture to move to flat water." Learning how to use the board is almost as much fun as mastering it, he added. He feels rentals would benefit the county's tourism, providing an activity that is fun for all ages. Local residents would have an additional place to take their visitors. He said playing in Lake Jacks on has the added advantage that peop le would have places to paddle to li ke the Don Jose Restaurant or the Suns et Grill. Mike Swaine was filling in for t he city attorney, his son Robert Swain e, who was ill. While also interested in the idea, he said he would have to check into what kind of taxes a ren tal business on a public beach wou ld incur. It was agreed that Hayes shou ld meet with Swaine to work out an agreement to bring back to the cou ncil. Council hears proposal to rent paddle boards at Veteran's Beach Sebring Chamber hosts blood driveSEBRING The Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce will host a blood drive from 12:304:30 p.m. Tuesday. All blood types are needed and the public is encouraged to donate blood. Call 382-4499.Ohio Night set for March 28SEBRING Ohio Night is set for Monday, March 28. For details on golf and/or dinner and the location, call Sandy Imes at 386-4351 by Wednesday.Retirement party set for Fan WellsSEBRING Aretirement party for Fan Wells, marketing director for the CrownPointe Assisted Living Residence for the past 11 years, will be held from 4-6 p.m. Friday, April 1. RSVPby calling 3861060. The new marketing director will be in attendance.Drum Circle is set for todaySEBRING The Community Drum Circle will take place behind the Sebring Civic Center, 355 W. Center Ave., overlooking Lake Jackson, from 35 p.m. today. Everybody is welcome. Bring a chair or blanke t. Bring an instrument if you have one. Bring somethin g to drink. Bring a friend (a ll ages). Some percussion instruments will be available for the public to use. This is a fun event for the whole family. Join the Primal Connection and make a joyous sound. No experience necessary. Play alon g, dance or just enjoy the music. For more information, call Fred Leavitt, Primal Connection, at 402-8238, or e-mail fred@primalcon nection.org.Events planned at lodges, postsAVON PARK The American Legion Post 69 will have karaoke by Naomi at 4 p.m. today Bingo is set for 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. For more information, call 453-4553. The Combat Veterans Memorial VFWPost 9853 will have NASCAR on th e screen today. Call for tim e. Karaoke will be by Peg an d Perry from 5-8 p.m. Tuesday. For more information, call 452-9853 COMMUNITYBRIEFS Continued on page 6A www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun Follow us on: County still looking at recycling options Study to be discussed at Tuesday meeting Classified ads get results!

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The special joint meeting w as held so elected officials c ould listen to citizen comm ents regarding Lake Placid's p roposed plan for a regional u tility. Part of that plan calls f or the town to take over Placid U tilities and Highway Park U tilities, both currently mana ged by the county. The goal is t o join the separate systems i nto one interconnected whole. While citizens were allowed f our minutes apiece to speak, a nd about 16 did, the bulk of t he meeting was a presentation b y the members of the Lake P lacid Town Council and g uests they brought with them. Essentially, the citizens from T omoka Heights and Highway P ark expressed opposition to t he idea, while the council presented their case in favor. The News-Sun understands how a unified utility system can benefit the entire community. There are long-term savings to be found and economies of scale. We have no objections to a municipal regional utility. We do, however, have strong objections to the development the regional utility is being designed to serve development we feel will benefit only a few at the expense of the vast majority. Lois Krebbs, a Tomoka Heights resident who spoke in opposition to Lake Placid taking over Placid Utilities, spoke truth when she said, "Good planning is everything." In fact, her opposition agreed, quoting the phrase back to her twice in the course of the three-hour meeting. But she was not referring to good planning in relation to a regional utility. She was talking about the proposed plans for sprawling subdivisions immediately north and south of the town as well as at Bluehead Ranch. These plans call for almost 50,000 new housing units before there has been any meaningful discussion about let alone planning for public transportation, emergency services, schools and sources of clean water. We think Krebbs is wise to point to the weak economy, and to the glut of houses and lots already on the market. We worry, along with others, that rushing to extend water lines and install fire hydrants into agricultural areas will only drain taxpayer pockets and in the end create the same eerie wasteland of bankrupted development that already exists east of Henscratch Road and north of Placid Lakes. Beyond the financial risk, however, is the more important question what do the people of Highlands County want for themselves in the long run? Are we going to choose to become yet another urban area in a state already crowded with them? Do we really want to trade away all the natural wonders that make Highlands County such a delightful a place to live for a sea of barrel tile roofs and ever more streets and traffic? Several supporters of the regional utility spoke of the fear factor. Sheila Byatt, who owns undeveloped property in Tomoka Heights, said, "Older people don't like change. We're comfortable in our little rut." What citizens expressed Thursday night, however, was not fear. It was anger; and even more, it was a loss of faith. Citizens no longer trust their elected officials or the people who work for them. And no wonder, what with the shenanigans in Avon Pa rk on Monday, and the dog a nd pony show in Lake Plac id Thursday. Lately all our elected of ficials have done is indulge in political theater on their way to done deals. Table skirts may look pret ty, but all they really do is cov er up a tangled web of hidd en agendas. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 3ATODAY'SEDITORIALTODAY'SLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION Opposing ideas falling on deaf ears D espite tight budgets, the county found enough money to drape skirts on the tables used by county commissioners and Lake Placid town council members during their meeti ng Thursday night at Lake Placid High School. If you've been following the news, you know that we are looking at the possibility of a government shutdown if Congress and President Obama don't get their acts together and hammer out some way to keep funding things. One of the frustrating parts of this is we're not even talking about the budget. All this talk is about putting something in place so Congress can keep spending money for a few weeks while they work on the budget. Unless they pass another continuing resolution to keep spending so they have more time to work on the budget. Confused? That's because what they're doing is something you and I can't do in real life. The whole government budget situation is very far removed from reality. In my house, we work with a budget. We figure out how much money is coming in, and how much is going out. Don, bless his heart, has worked our budget so that we take in more then we pay out. Given we are still putting a child through college, this is a major feat. Now, if something happened and we wound up bringing in less money then we were paying out, we would have several choices. We could max out our credit cards. We could choose not to pay certain bills. Or, we could cut our budget to match the money we were bringing in. Knowing Don, we would cut our budget. It would hurt. We'd probably wind up giving up something we enjoyed, like eating out less or giving up our cable. If things were very bad, maybe we'd give up the Internet, though I would hate that. Think of it as one of my pet programs that I don't want taken away from me. Right now, our federal government is taking in less money than it is spending. This has been going on for a while, and the way it's been dealt with is by going into debt. We owe a frightening amount of money to various countries. The whole debt situation bothers me. I keep going back to Proverbs 22:7: "Th e rich ruleth over the poor, an d the borrower is servant to the lender." I worry we're setting ourselves up for hur t down the line with these nations, because we're so bound and determined to spend more than we have. So, what should the government do? We could try t o bring more money in by wa y of taxes. But no one agrees whether cutting taxes or rai sing taxes increases revenue While the debate might be entertaining, also gets confusing. Even if we did tweak the tax code, it would take time to take effect. And meanwhile we'd still spending more than we take in. It seems to me the governmen t has to cut spending to a cer tain extent, at least to the point where we're only spending the amount of money we're taking in. The question is, where to cut? That's what Republicans and Democrats argue and yell about. And almost no one wants to cut the budget to the extent we 'd have to in order that we're not adding to the debt. I understand why. To make cuts that deep, some pet programs are going to suffer. And people will be unhappy about it, like I would be if Don decided to cut the Internet. Politicians do not like making people unhappy. It usually costs them votes. Someone is going to hav e to take the lead in this. And we Americans are going to have to take a deep breath and accept that at least for now, the federal governmen t can't afford everything we want it to pay for. In reality, when you're spending more then you're making, a wise person cuts their spending. It's time for the federal government to smarten up and join reality. Before we become servants Laura Ware is a Sebring re sident. She can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady @ embarqmail.com Budget battle Laura's Look Laura Ware Remember and protect our heritage E ditor: I have received several c orrespondences where m embers of our military h ave been court martialed, l ost their benefits, disc harged and imprisoned for d oing their jobs. Most of it h as to do with taking the s ide of the enemy. Sending our young to f ight the enemy and being p ersecuted for doing your j ob is not the right or the A merican way. There are t hose who are working dilig ently to insert Sharia law i nto our legal system. There i s no justice in that law. My definition is just a nother word for C ommunism. When our military is t reated so unfairly that they r efrain from joining and our d efense system is weakened t o the point we have no d efense, we will be ripe for g overnment takeover. That i s the direction we've been g oing for some time. When o ur freedom of worship is t aken away, our children not t aught the history of our c ountry the truth is distorte d, all kinds of evil introd uced, with no respect for e ach other, parents or anyo ne, we are losing the very f oundation our country was f ounded on. Being taught t hat it is the government's r esponsibility to take care o f our every need is certainl y not preparing them for a h appy independent life. We did make progress in t he last election; let's keep p addling, even if it is u pstream. As long as we're h eaded in the right direct ion, we will arrive at some p oint. Freedom is not free; i t was bought with a huge p rice. May we remember o ur heritage and protect it d iligently; with the help of o ur Lord, we will succeed. Willie Clyde (Toole) Cloud SebringSpeed rail should be from state to state E ditor: In my opinion, here is the d eal: I don't presume to s peak for Gov. Scott nor a nyone else for that matter. Y et there is a major imperat ive at hand here that supers edes localized travel. In f act I mean, Speed Rail s hould not be based upon j ust getting from Tampa to O rlando or secondarily from e ither of those to Miami. Of course, there should a lways be an element of s tate sovereignties (turwise) but I see and have long dreamed (or eluded if you will) about the importance of National Intrastate Transportation of this sort. So now let's cut to the chase. I've seen this proposed route as somewhat skewed when it comes to the greater benefit to all and no best resolve to the preservation or conservation of our natural resources, or the concept of green policy for the future of our nation. I feel there should be adjacent states unity in planning and development of a speed rail system, with centralized focus on interstate long-distance travel and inter-connectivity. Along with truncated shuttle systems to serve boarding at approximately every 100to 125-mile junctures. Just shoot me now, but I'm going for broke. Just to get things started (conversation-wise), let's just say a southernmost starter hub at say Palmdale or Moore Haven with branch shuttling from all of southeast and southwest Florida. Then, up through the Heartland with minimal juncture-stops (or you kill the speed idea): Along the way, perhaps splitting or "why-ing" about Gainesville or Lake City, branching northwest through Alabama and northeast through Georgia. OK I'll stop for now, but this is the beginning of a major opportunity for Florida to lead the nation along with other great states of the south and northeast to set a standard like never before; (well, except maybe by Ole'Ike). The Magnetron or Magnitrain! (Possibly huh)? Hughston F. Hall Avon Park BouquetsProwl's 1st season ends with prideEditor: Let me start off by saying thank you to the folks that have supported the Heartland Prowl Basketball Team from our inception. Thank you to the fans that have attended each and every home game. Thank you to the family and friends that have traveled just to give their support to the players. This inaugural season has been extremely trying for the team but we have managed to trudge through it, quite successfully I might add. The Heartland Prowl basketball team has survived a major shift in management and came out shining. We have endured the negativity that, unfortunately, comes with introducing anything new and different into a community. The Heartland Prowl started out as a fledgling, struggling, brand-new ABA team and has finished this season with a playoff berth and a high power ranking, which is a phenomenal achievement for a first-time team. We hold our heads high and stand with pride to have accomplished this feat while undergoing much disappointment, such as numerous game cancellations due to teams folding within the league. We are excited about continuing to bring affordable, family-friendly entertainment to Highlands County. We are also happy to continue our community involvement by actively engaging the players within the school systems. We look forward to our continued involvement in the many events and happenings around town. We, The Heartland Prowl Basketball Team, again thank you for believing in us and we ask that you continue to do so with this upcoming season. The Heartland Prowl Basketball Team The Staff of the Heartland Prowl The Fabulous Felines Dance TeamThanks extended to Florida friends of ThorsenEditor: To our many friends in Sebring and Highlands County, thank you for the love, compassion and caring ways shared with our loved one, Carol (Sunshine) Thorsen, during her life. Carol went to her eternal reward March 9, 2011 at Mountain View Manor in Bryson City, N.C. The family thanks you and may God continue to bless you. Dennis Ramsey Murphy, N.C LETTERSPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your addres s and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automat ically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum o f 400 words. end your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL33870; drop it off at the same address; fa x

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Page 4ANews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com PREMIER EVENT PRICING NOW THROUGH MARCH 23 DONT MISS OUT! B y CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comLAKE PLACID By the e nd of a three-hour meeting T hursday night, members of t he Board of County C ommissioners indicated t hey would be supporting the t own of Lake Placid in its w ish to create a regional utili ty system by letting the town t ake over Placid Utilities and H ighway Park Utilities from t he county. In fact, Chairperson B arbara Stewart said municip al regional utilities were e ssential to the county's f uture growth. While many citizens from t he Tomoka Heights subdivis ion and Highway Park e xpressed opposition to the p lan, the Lake Placid Town C ouncil organized a present ation that included personal t estimony from a diverse r ange of individuals, includi ng every member of the council and John Smoak III, Lonnie Wells, the Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce, the Lake Placid Merchants Association, Bill Brantley (the area's school board member speaking on behalf of the school board) and Julie Fowler, with the NTC Group, who came forward to say that based on the most recent audit, the town had the financial stability to take on the utility. Issues still exist. County staff in particular are concerned there is not enough specificity in the proposed interlocal agreement. "Not everything has been addressed," said County Attorney Ross Macbeth. "There are real service issues." Stewart agreed, so meetings between Macbeth and Lake Placid's attorney, Bert Harris III will be scheduled to work out details after county staff input. Lake Placid officials indicated a desire to move quickly. "To put this off is a disservice," said Lake Placid Mayor John Holbrook. "If it's going to happen we have to do it quickly, not put it on the back burner." "I am convinced we've addressed the issues," Harris said. "Let's knock it out and put this thing to bed." County indicates approval of regional utilities in LP News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY T hursday night the Board of County Commissioners and the Lake Placid Town Council had a joint meeting to hear public comment on transferring a county managed wastewater utility to Lake Placid. I am convinced we've addressed the issues. Let's knock it out and put this thing to bed.'BERTHARRISIII Lake Placid town attorney Get your subscription to the News-Sun! Call 385-6155

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w inning cars of the past in t he Gallery of Legends duri ng the 2012 Race Week. The 60th annual 12 Hours o f Sebring will take the green f lag on March 17 of next y ear. Officials of the I ntercontinental Le Mans C up already have indicated t hey plan to be back for the o pening of their series next y ear. The addition of the series w ithin the 12 Hours has i nflated the field to nearly 60 t op teams from around the w orld and more are expected n ext year. The actual observance of S ebring's 60th begins later t his year with the second a nnual presentation of the B obby Rahal signature event T he Legends of Motorsports D ec. 2-4. Rahal's vintage and hist oric racing series was well r eceived in its first time out b oth by fans and competitors w ith many historic racing f igures including Rahal, a f ormer Sebring winner t aking to the track for anothe r run at the storied circuit. January of 2012 will see S ebring racers paying homa ge to the airport roots of the c ircuit at the Sebring R egional Air Expo. The R aceway originally was c arved out of runways and a irport access roads of the o ld Hendricks Field. Over the y ears it has morphed into a f or-purpose racing facilities t hat play host to one of the w orld's premier endurance r aces. February again will see the a nnual Sebring 12/24 bicyc ling event. Like the 12-hour r ace, it draws competitors f rom all over the world. It a lso involves a "race within a r ace" as some of the cyclists p articipate for a 12-hour c ycle, while others pedal a f ull 24. In the past the cyclists h ave started on the Raceway t hen gone to a course involvi ng Airport Road and US 98. N ext year, plans are to run t he event on the Raceway f lag to flag. Additionally, an art and p hoto contest for elementary s chool students and a tennis t ournament have been schedu led. March always means raci ng at Sebring. In 2012, the m onth will begin with a w eekend of events hosted by t he Sportscar Vintage Racing A ssociation. That event will b e titled "Champions of S ebring" with a special e mphasis on both cars and d rivers who have competed a nd won the 12 Hours over t he past six decades. As always, the second w eek in March will see the G rand Prix Ball at the C hateau Elan and the annual C hamber of Commerce Ride t he Racetrack event where p eople have an opportunity to r ide with instructors from the S kip Barber Racing School. For 2012, the March Chamber of Commerce mixer will be held at the track inside the Gallery of Legends building. Shortly after the opening of the front gates on Race Week next year, hundreds of people will gather at the Chateau Elan for the Hairpin Spin. One-tenth as old as the Race, the event again will allow people to wager chips for prizes. Money collected will be distributed to local charities. It is always accompanied by a smorgasbord prepared by the Chateau Elan and appearances by some of the top teams and race notables. The events announced at the Friday press conference already are in the works, but organizers have allowed other events and observances may still be created. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 5A Continued from page 1A of car corrals for this year's Race. Anew spot was carved out along the Big Bend, sending many folks including the longtime Sarasota Racing and Drinking Enthusiasts contingent to another area of the field. Dozens of motor homes had poured into the Raceway's holding area outside the track beginning March 1, the first day they were allowed in. Some of them arrived on the last weekend in February, camping alongside the road until the were allowed access. All were in search of an early spot in line when the gates opened on Wednesday of Race Week. The Chateau Elan had sold out their Race packages early in the week, with the hotel packed with guests watching the Race at the famous Hairpin Turn. Saturday's scheduled events such as the bikini contest, were swamped as were the Gallery of Legends, Corvette display and vendo rs both on the Midway and in the Paddock. Sales were said to be brisk. On track it was crowded as well. There were 56 cars that took the green flag wit h an early show by the Peugeot and Audi reminiscent of the 2007 fender touching GTdivision finish involving the Risi Competizone Ferrari and th e Flying Lizard Porsche. Continued from page 1A Big crowd for 12 Hours Plans unveiled for 2012 Race News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMON S Not sure if Jackson Protus or his beads weigh more Saturday morning during the Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring event. News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS A car-load of spectators gets ready to drive over the bridge to Green Park on Saturday morning at the Sebring International Raceway.

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LAKE PLACID American Legion Placid P ost 25 will have music by T homas from 5-8 p.m. today. A family meeting will be h eld at 6:30 p.m. Monday, f ollowed by a Boy Scouts m eeting at 7 p.m. On T uesday, get free blood press ure checks from 1-3 p.m., t hen play bingo at 6:30 p.m. F or details, call 465-7940. The Lake Placid Moose 2 374 will have NASCAR B ristol on the screen at 1 p .m. today. Karaoke with B ama Jam will follow. Loyal O rder of the Moose officers a nd the House Committee w ill meet at 6:30 p.m. M onday. Women of the M oose meet at 7 p.m. and L OOM general meeting is at 7 :30 a.m. For more informat ion, call 465-0131.Caladium Co-op plans breakfastLAKE PLACID The C aladium Arts and Crafts C ooperative will hold an All You Can Eat Pancake B reakfast" today. The breakf ast will be all you can eat p ancakes with two sausage p atties or a veggie-egg c asserole with two pancakes. B reakfast will be served with orange juice and coffee or tea. The cost is $5 for adults and $3 for children under 12. The Co-op is at 132 E. Interlake Blvd. Call 6995940 or visit the Web site www.caladiumarts.org for further information.Meals on Wheels meet MondaySEBRING The annual meeting of Sebring Meals on Wheels will be held at 2 p.m. Monday. The place of the meeting is the board room at Sebring Church of the Brethren, 700 S. Pine St. The agenda for the meeting is the election of officers and board members along with the annual report.Recreation Club plans eventsSEBRING The Sebring Recreation Club, at 333 Pomegranate Ave., will host the following events this week: Monday Ladies social club, 1 p.m.; shuffleboard scrambles, 1:15 p.m. Wednesday Nickel scrambles, 1:15 p.m.; line dancing lessons, 5:15 p.m.; line dancing, 6:15 p.m. Thursday Hosscollar, 9:30 a.m.; bingo, 7 p.m. Friday Mini-shuffleboard tournament, 1:15 p.m. Saturday Ice cream shuffleboard, 1:15 p.m.; board meeting, 3 p.m. For more information, call 385-2966.Shrine Ladies play BuncoAVON PARK The public is invited to play Bunco at the Highlands Shrine Club, 2604 State Road 17 South at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday. The event is open to new or experienced players; cost is $2 per person. Continued from page 2A Page 6ANews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com GUARANTEED WEIGHT LOSS! CALL TODAY (863) 471-2500 LOSE YOUR WEIGHT FOR THE LAST TIME! 13 Ryant Blvd. SebringCorner of 27 & Ryant Blvd.SAVE 50% OFF ENROLLMENT FEES Hurry! Offer Ends Soon! COMMUNITYBRIEFS The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Courtesy phot os Desiree Leedy (left) and Morgan Tomlinson of the De Packas team compete in the Blind Picasso painting contest. College Week fun at SFCC South Florida Community College (SFCC) kicked off the 25th Annual Community College Week, March 1417, at the SFCC Highlands Campus. Community College Week is an annual event at SFCC, where teams of SFCC students and employees compete in activities and demonstrate their SFCC pride. Logan Hunter of the De Packas team shows off his balancing ability during the Egg Relay Race. Associated PressMIAMI Afederal prosecutor said Friday investigators are working to link oxycodone overdose deaths to the operators of South Florida pain clinics already charged with illegally dispensing hundreds of thousands of doses of the powerful painkiller. Assistant U.S. Attorney Scott Benhke said at a hearing that if deaths can be conclusively traced to the clinics, primary owner Vincent Colangelo could face a mandatory prison sentence of no less than 20 years if convicted. Colangelo, 42, was arrested along with at least 20 others last month in a series of pain clinic raids led by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Investigators are examining overdose deaths in Florida, Kentucky, Tennessee and elsewhere for links to the half-dozen pain clinics Colangelo either owned or in which he had a controlling interest. All have been shut down since the Feb. 23 raids. "We believe we are going to find individuals who have died as a result of the oxycodone," Behnke said. At the hearing Friday, U.S. Magistrate Judge Ted Bandstra denied bail for Colangelo on grounds that the potentially lengthy prison sentence was a strong incentive for him to flee. Colangelo did not speak at the hearing and has not yet entered a plea, mainly because he's not sure he has money for a lawyer. The government has frozen his substantial assets and moved to seize property including real estate, dozens of exotic and vintage cars and $22 million in cash. "Anyone in your circumstances, that is an incentive not to appear in court," Bandstra told Colangelo. "The allegations here are strong and detailed." If Colangelo cannot pay for his own lawyer, a judge will appoint one at taxpayer expense. According to a grand ju ry indictment, Colangelo us ed some 1,600 Internet doma in names that captured search es for pain medications to dire ct people to his Florida clinic s. Between Jan. 1, 2009 an d Dec. 31, 2010, those clini cs dispensed at least 660,00 0 oxycodone units, the indic tment says. The February "pill mil l" raids came after undercov er agents made at least 340 pu rchases painkillers at 40 cli nics over the past year. Flori da is the epicenter of a mus hrooming prescription dru g problem, providing 85 pe rcent of all oxycodone sold in the U.S., state law enforc ement officials say. According to new DE A data, between January an d June 2010 medical practitio ners in Florida purchas ed nearly 41 million oxycodo ne doses, dwarfing the 927,00 0 sold to practitioners in Ohi o, which had the second-highe st number. US trying to link overdoses to Florida pain clinics By Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Jared E. Walker 438th Air Expeditionary Wing Public AffairsSHINDAND, A fghanistan Four Afghan A ir Force Airmen attached t o the Kandahar Air Wing r ecently flew their first f lights as part of the inaugur al Flying Air Crew Chiefs c ourse in Shindand. The month-long course p airs United States Air F orce Flying Air Crew C hiefs and Afghan Crew C hief trainees and focuses o n the operational capabilit y of the MI-17 transport h elicopter. Classroom i nstruction includes discuss ions about crew resource m anagement, general purp ose machine gun and M2 40 training and pre-flight a nd post-flight briefs. The g oal of the course is for A fghans to become indep endent flying crew chiefs a board operational flights. Staff Sergeant C hristopher A. Morford, a N ATO Air Training C ommand-Afghanistan F lying Crew Chief Air A dvisor, stressed the import ance of the first flight. "This is a huge milestone f or the Afghan Air Force b ecause they can now build p ictures for the pilots and d escribe what's going in the b ack of the helicopter, keepi ng everyone in place a board the aircraft," S ergeant Morford said. "For e xample, if they have comm andos onboard, they w ould give them calls such a s we're 20 minutes out, be r eady; we're 10 minutes o ut, be ready.'The tail of t he helicopter would then o pen up and they would c lear the commandos off the a ircraft. Once the command os are off, they would e nsure the commandos are c lear of the landing zone." To prepare themselves for t he first flight, the group f ocused on academics and a lso used essential equipm ent such as headsets, g lasses, gloves and gunner's b elts for the first time. "Every time the aircraft m oves left or right, the crew c hiefs clear the aircraft b ecause the pilots can't see b ehind them. This is import ant because when in a patt ern it's critical the crew c hiefs are always looking o ut for other aircraft," Sergeant Morford said. AAF Staff Sgt. Mohammad Shafi, one of the students, spoke about the significance of the flight. "This was our first flight and we all felt good about it. We did very well and our advisors thought so too. It is important for us to know about this job so when we go to Kandahar we can do it properly. We will need to pass on this information because one day we might be instructing others about how to be flight crew chiefs," said Sergeant Shafi. Sergeant Shafi went on to explain how the training was informative while describing how he looks forward to the rest of the training where the team will learn other things like firing weapons and how to defend the aircraft. He said that he and his fellow students are ready to learn so they can become flying crew chiefs. Sergeant Morford explained that normally there are weapons on the aircraft, which are the first defense when flying, but because they don't have weapons presently the students are instructed on professional military knowledge until weapon mounts arrive. "Part of the job for these future flying air crew chiefs is to take care of the people on their flight. They ensure everybody is safe and secure during the duration of the flight" said Sergeant Morford. "The crew chiefs act as the conduit between the pilots and passengers. Once you get past the line between the flight engineers and the door, the flying crew chiefs own the back of the aircraft." The importance of the flying air crew chief is also critical during times of natural disaster. Flooding is a concern in Afghanistan because of heavy monsoon rains and flying air crew chiefs are critical in providing aid. "If flooding occurs, these professionals would be stacking food, water and clothing for the people affected by the flood. They would deal with medical evacuations and would also go to points of injury, pick up people, load them onboard and make sure they are secure. Again, they take care of the defense of the aircraft in and out of the zone so everyone gets out of the area safely," said Sergeant Morford. Recently, the hard work paid off as the flying crew chiefs participated in a training exercise that saw an Afghan pilot at the controls of the aircraft, an Afghan flight engineer maintaining the aircraft as well as the flight crew chiefs adding to that team. "My partner, Staff Sgt. Justin Shults, and I were doing high-fives because the flying crew chiefs are doing the job themselves," explained Sergeant Morfod. "This is phenomenal for us because this is what they are here for. This is the first step to make Shindand look similar to Kirtland, Air Force Base. What occurred today was very big." First flight a success for future Afghan flying air crew chiefs U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Jared E. Walker Afghan Air Force Staff Sgt. Mohammad Shafi, one of the Afghan flying crew chief students, make sure the Mi-17 is clear while Tech. Sgt. Travis Willingham, a flying crew chief air advisor, helps advise Staff Sgt. Shafi during his first flight mission at Shindand, Afghanistan. Willingham is from Sebring.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 7A LIMITED SPACE … CALLTODAY! 5 DAYS a week$ 30 Get In Shape Learn Self Defense Improve Self Esteem Make Better Grades MARTIAL ARTS AMERICA471-2467 Best After School Program in SebringFREEPICKUP from: Kindergarten Learning Center, Cracker Trail, Sun-N-Lakes, Woodlawn, Fred Wild, Memorial, Hill Gustat, Sebring Middle/High Located on Kenilworth Sebring*Some Restrictions Apply Life Care, Not Day Care b e. Something has to be done a bout this, and it has to be d one before they cause any m ore damage to the city," M arshall said Friday. "There is a meeting this w eekend, and when I find out w hen, I plan on being there. R ight now I am just contacti ng church groups, civic o rganizations and other a ctivist groups to raise a wareness that something n eeds to be done." Marshall did not think that c ouncil member Paul Miller w ould be on the recall list b ecause of his no vote to term inate Behrens on Monday, b ut those not targeted should b e asked to resign, Marshall s aid. "There are a lot of people v ery upset about this, and I d o not think it will be a probl em getting 500 signatures r ight away," said Marshall. "I feel like I was deceived a nd the trust in this council is g one. What they did to Bruce ( Behrens) was ridiculous. I h ate it when they do things in t he dark like they did and m ake it seem that it was all s pontaneous and on the spot. C ome on, that was planned." The process for a recall of an elected official in a municipality is outlined in Florida Statute 100.36, and the target of the recall has to have been in office for at least 25 percent of their term. In Avon Park, deputy mayor Brenda Gray, councilmen Terry Heston and Paul Miller are eligible for recall. Mayor Sharon Schuler and councilman Parke Sutherland were seated in the last election, and will not be eligible until September, according to the anonymous source. According to the statute, "Any member of the governing body of a municipality or charter county, hereinafter referred to in this section as municipality,'may be removed from office by the electors of the municipality." The process is straightforward, but does require some deadlines. From the time that the recall petition is approved for circulation, required signatures must be collected within 30 days. Once signatures are collected, the designated chair of the recall committee that collected the signatures must present them to "the auditor or clerk of the municipality or charter county, or his or her equivalent," which would be Cheryl Tietjen in Avon Park. The clerk who received the signatures must then "immediately" convey the signatures to the Supervisor of Elections for the county within which the recall is taking place. The Supervisor of Elections has 30 days to inspect the signatures at a cost of 10 cents for each signature, according to the law. The number of signatures required varies, but in the case of Avon Park, 500 names of registered voters is the minimum required. Those being recalled then must be served by the city clerk, and have five days to offer a defense of less than 200 words. Once the defense is collected, the recall committee has 60 days to get signatures of 15 percent of the voters in the last election, and again has to have them verified. Once verified, the target of the recall has five days to resign or a municipal judge sets a date for the recall elecContinued from page 1A Recall movement in Avon Park By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Bradley Krohn, presid ent of U. S. EnviroFuels LLC, brought l ocal growers and investors up to date F riday on his company's processing p lant project, currently under way in H ighlands County. The goal is to be up and running in 2 013. The processing plant is planned for t he corner of U.S. 27 and State Road 70, w here Georgia Pacific used to have a f acility. The site is ideal, Krohn said. It's a lready zoned for heavy industrial, is on t wo major highways and is close to a r ailroad. The permitting process is well under w ay, and all the necessary environmental surveys have been successfully completed. Ten local growers have already committed to provide raw plant material, so the company already has 40 percent of the required crop acreage. Agroup of another 25 growers have signed letters of intent to provide product as well. Krohn told the audience the processing plant was being designed with "conventional, traditional, well-proven commercial processing technology developed over 30 years." Brazil provides proven models. Right now sugar cane and sweet sorghum are leading candidates for the plant material, but farmers are experimenting with a wide variety of crops. The price of feedstock will be tied to the price of ethanol. The processing plant will provide harvesting and trucking services and will be run with 100 percent renewable energy, with an 80 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. There will be minimal water consumption most of the needed liquid arriving in the plant stalks and "zero liquid waste effluent." After a one-time construction benefit, when the plant is built, Krohn anticipates the creation of 60 permanent, high-paying jobs and an improved tax base for the county. Akey to successful biofuel production is having processing plants near the growers. Krohn hopes the new plant will serve as a model for more down the road. L LC, a company in the p rocess of building a biofeed p rocessing plant at the corner o f U.S. 27 and State Road 70 i n south Highlands County. That's why we believe we a re core in helping to keep f armers selling out to develo pers." Originally corn was the e xclusive crop used in maki ng ethanol, but that raised s everal significant issues, not t he least of which was a spike i n livestock feed prices as w ell as taking acreage out of f ood production. The federal and state gove rnments, as well as the U niversity of Florida, are n ow involved in finding a lternative crops that are bett er suited to Florida's growi ng conditions, more efficient a s fuel bases and don't comp ete with food crops. An effort is being made to p ick plants that can be grown between food crops, in abandoned groves, or in muck fields otherwise lying fallow. "Highlands County is the cradle of innovation," Putnam told his audience, adding he wants to help stabilize the newly emerging industry of alternative energy. "After every election the policy changes," Putnam said. "It creates an unstable environment for investors. We want farmers to be able to go to bankers without the worry of having the rug pulled out from under them." Putnam said government should invest to create robust higher education, creating experts, and let private business take it from there. Government should not be making the choices between, for example, solar and wind power, or biofeed fuels, he said. That should be left to market and other practical forces. This early in the evolution it is impossible to tell what plant material and what type of processing will prove to be the most viable. But there are dozens of visionary farmers, Putnam said, "willing to put in a wide variety of crops. It will be a game-changer here in Florida." By providing a new ag based revenue stream, "you maintain the quality of life, and keep young people here. It's a win-win situation," Putnam said. Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam has lunch with local growers and investors in biofeed crops at the Bert J. Harris Ag-Center Friday. He also toured farms growing crops like sweet sorghum. Putnam talks about biofuels with farmers Processing plant moving past planning stage Facility at US 27 and SR70 plans to bring 60 jobs to county Associated PressBOSTON A Pennsylvania woman who admitted cheating advertisers and exhibitors out of thousands of dollars through a fake Boston bridal show was sentenced Friday to nearly 5 1/2 years in prison. Karen Tucker, 47, of Pittsburgh, also was ordered to pay $117,000 restitution to victims. She pleaded guilty in October to wire fraud and identity theft. U.S. District Judge Richard Stearns rejected a request for leniency from Tucker's lawyer, who asked for a 3-year sentence. Elaine Barker, who owns Paper Potpourri, a Haverhill business that specializes in custom-designed wedding invitations, said she was drawn in by a professionallooking website Tucker set up to lure exhibitors. "I have been doing shows for 30 years and not once did I suspect that this was not a legitimate show," Barker said. She said she felt "violated and cheated" after sending Tucker $675 for an exhibit table an d telling other wedding ve ndors about her, only to fin d out months later that the re was no show. Prosecutors describ ed Tucker as a longtime co n woman who conducted sim ilar scams in Ohio, Florid a, Maryland, Nevada an d Texas. Michael Shields, own er of a marble and grani te company in Columbu s, Ohio, said he drove 1 3 hours so he could be in court Friday for Tucker 's sentencing. "You personally look ed me in the eye and took m y money from my hand ," Shields said, looking rig ht at Tucker. "I don't think five yea rs is enough for you," he sai d. Prosecutors said Tuck er and an uncharged co-co nspirator posed as represe ntatives of a business know n as The Boston 411, then l ed the Massachusetts Conve ntion Center Authority to believe they would hold an extravagant home an d bridal show at the Hyn es Convention Center. Pennyslvania woman gets prison in Boston bridal show scam Associated PressWASHINGTON Hurricanes Igor and T omas are no longer a threat. The World Meteorological Organization h as retired the two names from those used in 2 010 because of the damage they caused. N ames are retired from time to time to avoid c onfusion. There are six lists of hurricane names used i n rotation in the Atlantic and Caribbean r egion. When the 2010 list comes around a gain in 2016, Igor and Tomas will be r eplaced by Ian and Tobias. Last year was a busy season with 19 named s torms, but only two of them entered the United States. Bonnie crossed the southern tip of Florida as a tropical storm and then weakened to a depression before reaching Louisiana in July. Hermine made landfall in Texas as a tropical storm in September. Igor struck Bermuda on Sept. 19 and then veered north, striking Cape Race, Newfoundland, on Sept. 21 where it killed three people and was the most damaging hurricane to strike there in 75 years. Tomas became a hurricane on Oct. 30 after striking Barbados. It went on to affect Haiti where 35 died in flooding and landslides Jamaica, the Turks and Caicos Islands and St. Lucia, where 14 people were killed. Hurricane names Igor, Tomas retired

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Page 8ANews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com GettingYouBack onYourFeetIsJust theFirstStep! GettingYouBack onYourFeetIsJust theFirstStep!Keith A. Bowyer, Jr., PTBest Physical Therapist2006 € 2007 € 2008 € 2009 € 2010License FL PT 16172Herdman Certifiedin Vestibular Rehabilitation If youre injured or facing surgery, we provide personalized physical therapy care to help you recover quickly and safely. From hands-on therapy to pain management techniques and therapeutic exercise, our expert team will put their extensive training and experience to work for you. Call us today to schedule an appointment at your convenience.Shoulder, Hip, Knee & Back Therapy.Most Insurance Plans Accepted100 YMCA Ln. Sebring, Fl 33875863-382-2949 visit us on the web at www.bowyerpt.com Also treating dizziness & balance BOWYERPHYSICALTHERAPY BOWYERPHYSICALTHERAPY TODAYSunny; breezy in the afternoon82 / 58Winds: ENE at 10-20 mphSunny and pleasant81 / 53Winds: E at 7-14 mphMONDAYPleasant with plenty of sunshine83 / 58Winds: E at 6-12 mphTUESDAYA full day of sunshine85 / 61Winds: SSW at 8-16 mphWEDNESDAYSunny and pleasant83 / 62Winds: WSW at 8-16 mphTHURSDAY City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. Washington Washington 54/39 54/39 New York NewYork 51/36 51/36 Miami Miami 83/69 83/69 Atlanta Atlanta 69/53 69/53 Detroit Detroit 46/40 46/40 Houston Houston 80/64 80/64 Chicago Chicago 51/46 51/46 Minneapolis Minneapolis 56/38 56/38 Kansas City KansasCity 76/55 76/55 El Paso ElPaso 82/51 82/51 Denver Denver 70/35 70/35 Billings Billings 54/31 54/31 Los Angeles LosAngeles 60/48 60/48 San San Francisco Francisco 58/45 58/45 Seattle Seattle 52/39 52/39 Washington 54/39 New York 51/36 Miami 83/69 Atlanta 69/53 Detroit 46/40 Houston 80/64 Chicago 51/46 Minneapolis 56/38 Kansas City 76/55 El Paso 82/51 Denver 70/35 Billings 54/31 Los Angeles 60/48 San Francisco 58/45 Seattle 52/39 High pressure will afford the Northeast one more dry and sunny day today with temperatures remaining seasonably cool. Meanwhile, dry and mild conditions will persist across the Southeast, making for a beautiful day along the beaches of Florida. A storm system pushing east across the central part of the nation will ignite thunderstorms from Nebraska to Illinois, with a chilly rain expected across the Upper Midwest. Along the southern edge of the storm, a few showers will dampen travel around the Ohio Valley. U.S. Cities National Forecast for March 20Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. World Cities National SummaryCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. Weather (W):ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Albuquerque 70/43/pc 75/44/pc 63/33/pc Atlanta 69/53/s 73/56/pc 77/57/pc Baltimore 52/36/s 60/45/t 58/39/c Birmingham 76/57/s 75/55/s 75/59/c Boston 44/30/s 41/36/sn 47/30/pc Charlotte 64/43/c 70/50/pc 81/53/pc Cheyenne 62/32/c 66/34/pc 56/25/pc Chicago 51/46/r 60/37/c 45/33/r Cleveland 52/47/pc 61/36/c 41/29/r Columbus 54/52/r 69/44/t 50/41/c Dallas 79/59/c 79/61/c 88/60/pc Denver 70/35/pc 69/37/pc 62/24/pc Detroit 46/40/r 61/34/c 42/25/sn Harrisburg 52/37/s 59/42/r 55/35/r Honolulu 83/71/s 85/72/s 84/72/s Houston 80/64/pc 80/64/pc 82/64/pc Indianapolis 64/55/c 71/49/t 57/50/r Jackson, MS 85/52/s 82/59/s 76/58/c Kansas City 76/55/c 71/54/c 71/46/c Lexington 68/55/c 71/54/pc 67/53/c Little Rock 82/55/pc 77/57/pc 76/57/c Los Angeles 60/48/r 62/48/sh 64/48/s Louisville 70/57/c 74/56/pc 70/58/c Memphis 82/59/pc 80/61/pc 74/59/c Milwaukee 48/43/r 59/35/c 42/27/sn Minneapolis 56/38/r 53/33/pc 41/25/sn Nashville 74/57/pc 79/55/pc 74/57/c New Orleans 78/59/s 78/63/s 80/63/pc New York City 51/36/s 49/40/r 50/32/c Norfolk 50/38/pc 65/54/pc 65/47/pc Oklahoma City 78/56/c 78/56/c 80/49/s Philadelphia 52/36/s 52/44/r 56/34/r Phoenix 81/59/pc 71/51/c 69/50/s Pittsburgh 53/43/pc 65/40/r 49/32/r Portland, ME 44/26/s 40/29/sn 45/25/c Portland, OR 55/39/sh 54/39/sh 53/37/pc Raleigh 62/41/c 71/54/pc 78/55/pc Rochester 46/36/s 46/31/r 40/21/c St. Louis 76/58/c 76/57/c 70/56/r San Francisco 58/45/r 56/45/sh 57/46/c Seattle 52/39/s 48/38/sh 50/36/pc Wash., DC 54/39/s 62/50/t 63/39/c Cape Coral 84/60/s 83/55/s 84/60/s Clearwater 83/63/s 81/60/s 81/61/s Coral Springs 81/69/s 78/62/s 80/63/s Daytona Beach 75/58/s 76/52/s 79/58/s Ft. Laud. Bch 81/70/s 80/65/s 79/67/s Fort Myers 84/61/s 83/57/s 85/62/s Gainesville 77/51/s 80/49/s 82/53/s Hollywood 83/67/s 79/61/s 81/63/s Homestead AFB 79/67/s 78/62/s 77/64/s Jacksonville 74/52/s 78/51/s 80/54/s Key West 79/70/s 79/69/s 78/70/s Miami 83/69/s 79/64/s 80/67/s Okeechobee 81/63/s 78/52/s 78/56/s Orlando 80/59/s 82/53/s 83/58/s Pembroke Pines 83/67/s 79/61/s 81/63/s St. Augustine 72/58/s 72/53/s 75/57/s St. Petersburg 83/63/s 82/63/s 82/63/s Sarasota 82/62/s 82/55/s 78/58/s Tallahassee 80/51/s 81/49/s 81/54/s Tampa 82/62/s 82/63/s 83/63/s W. Palm Bch 81/67/s 78/61/s 80/64/s Winter Haven 81/58/s 81/55/s 83/59/s Acapulco 88/74/s 89/74/s 88/73/s Athens 58/49/sh 55/45/r 55/42/r Beirut 68/60/sh 68/56/s 66/53/pc Berlin 46/33/pc 50/38/pc 57/39/s Bermuda 62/55/pc 59/54/pc 65/62/sh Calgary 34/15/sf 27/15/sn 25/19/sn Dublin 53/41/pc 54/39/pc 52/42/s Edmonton 31/19/sf 27/10/sn 25/15/pc Freeport 78/60/pc 77/61/pc 79/63/s Geneva 53/34/s 55/36/s 57/40/s Havana 84/61/s 83/65/sh 85/63/s Hong Kong 73/70/sh 81/64/pc 72/61/r Jerusalem 68/53/c 67/46/s 64/44/pc Johannesburg 68/54/t 75/54/t 79/56/s Kiev 37/22/sf 45/29/pc 46/36/pc London 54/39/pc 55/41/pc 57/39/s Montreal 37/25/s 34/30/sn 34/25/sf Moscow 34/24/c 37/21/sn 37/31/s Nice 65/47/s 63/48/s 62/49/pc Ottawa 42/30/s 41/30/sn 38/14/c Quebec 34/14/s 36/28/sn 36/23/sf Rio de Janeiro 81/73/s 82/73/sh 82/74/s Seoul 54/39/r 55/30/c 46/27/s Singapore 86/79/t 90/77/t 86/77/r Sydney 79/68/sh 77/68/r 81/66/sh Toronto 46/37/s 53/32/r 38/23/c Vancouver 54/39/pc 54/42/pc 51/39/pc Vienna 48/34/c 49/38/s 55/44/s Warsaw 43/32/pc 45/38/pc 48/36/s Winnipeg 43/27/sn 30/18/sn 27/9/c A lmanac Readings at Palm Beach High .............................................. 9:48 a.m. Low ............................................... 3:20 a.m. High ............................................ 10:21 p.m. Low ............................................... 3:42 p.m. Plenty of sunshine today; breezy during the afternoon. Clear tonight. Sunny and pleasant tomorrow and Tuesday. Wednesday: a full day of sunshine. Thursday: pleasant with a full day of sunshine. On March 20, 1948, Juneau, Alaska, received almost 33 inches of snow. This was the heaviest snow ever to fall in Alaskas capital. Sunny today; breezy in the afternoon. Winds east-northeast 10-20 mph. Expect a full day of sunshine with average relative humidity 60% and good drying conditions. € Even addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday. € Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and Saturday. € All watering should take place before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. FullLastNewFirst Mar 19Mar 26Apr 3Apr 11 Today Monday Sunrise 7:30 a.m. 7:29 a.m. Sunset 7:37 p.m. 7:37 p.m. Moonrise 9:00 p.m. 10:08 p.m. Moonset 7:48 a.m. 8:33 a.m. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2011Jacksonville 74/52 Gainesville 77/51 Ocala 80/52 Daytona Beach 75/58 Orlando 80/59 Winter Haven 81/58 Tampa 82/62 Clearwater 83/63 St. Petersburg 83/63 Sarasota 82/62 Fort Myers 84/61 Naples 86/64 Okeechobee 81/63 West Palm Beach 81/67 Fort Lauderdale 81/70 Miami 83/69 Tallahassee 80/51 Apalachicola 75/55 Pensacola 76/59 Key West Avon Park 82/58 Sebring 82/58 Lorida 80/61 Lake Placid 84/58 Venus 84/58 Brighton 82/62 TidesReadings at St. Petersburg High .............................................. 3:16 a.m. Low ............................................... 9:05 a.m. High .............................................. 2:57 p.m. Low ............................................... 9:44 p.m. UV Index TodayThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m. 4 8 8 4 Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional SummaryShown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Five-Day forecast for Highlands County 79/70 Lake Levels Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 11.79 Normal ...............................................14.51 Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterdayTemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHigh Tuesday ......................................... 80 Low Tuesday .......................................... 49 High Wednesday .................................... 83 Low Wednesday .................................... 49 High Thursday ....................................... 86 Low Thursday ........................................ 48Heat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayRelative humidity .................................. 45% Expected air temperature ....................... 80 Makes it feel like .................................... 80BarometerTuesday ...............................................30.21 Wednesday .........................................30.21 Thursday .............................................30.25PrecipitationTuesday ...............................................0.00Ž Wednesday .........................................0.00Ž Thursday .............................................0.00Ž Month to date ..................................... 1.58Ž Year to date ......................................... 4.45Ž

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Special to the News-SunWAUCHULAAgorg eous day, food, fun, prizes, a nd a parachute demonstrat ion combined to draw in the l argest crowd to ever attend a Peace River Electric C ooperative (PRECO) annua l membership meeting, at P RECO Park in Wauchula. Headquartered in rural H ardee County, PRECO e xtends electric service a cross 10 central Florida c ounties, coast-to-coast. F ormed by local residents in 1 940, the cooperative has b een in business for 71 y ears, and, for the past 71 y ears has conducted annual m eetings for member-owne rs. On March 12, 823 regist ered members, topping 2 010's record of 797, and t heir families celebrated the d ay with free hotdogs, ice c ream, snow cones, soft d rinks and more. Children's a ctivities included a climbi ng wall, bounce house, i nflatable slide, and horse r ides. Attendance figures are e stimated upward to nearly 3 ,000. "ASalute to the Military," P RECO's first themed annua l meeting event, featured a W all of Honor with photos o f veterans supplied by the m embership. The highlight o f the event featured a live p arachute demonstration p rovided by US Special O peration Command's ParaC ommandos, from MacDill A ir Force Base in Tampa. "Two paratroopers, backed by a support team, thrilled the crowd with in-air maneuvers before landing at PRECO Park," said Meter Reader Supervisor Mike Rouse, who worked closely with the group to bring them to Wauchula. "Children and adults shouted and applauded as they tracked the parachutes and smoke trails across the sky." Rouse worked for months with MacDill AFB and the Pentagon in order to complete the paperwork required to book the ParaCommandos. For the second time in as many years, the meeting's grand prize was a retired PRECO vehicle. "Last year's truck giveaway got a lot of attention," said Chief Marketing and Member Services Officer Nell McCauley. "At the end of the day, we gave away a 97 Ford F-150 pickup truck to one of our members. Dennis Brown, a seasonal Lake Wales resident, was the lucky winner. Abrief business meeting allowed members to hear from Bill Mulcay, CEO, and Board Officers regarding the state of the cooperative. During the meeting, PRECO's board of directors was officially seated and coop members participated in a friendly question-andanswer session. At the conclusion of the business meeting, more than 200 door prizes, including vacation packages, TVs, appliances, power tools, and much more were awarded to members by a ticket drawing. PRECO serves nearly 35,000 member/consumers in Brevard, DeSoto, Hardee, Highlands, Hillsborough, Indian River, Manatee, Osceola, Polk and Sarasota Counties, through almost 4,000 miles of power lines. BUSINESS B SECTION News-Sun Sunday, March 20, 2011 SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. EXPIRES 3/26/11PLUS TAX, TAG, & STATE FEES. www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644 LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 NO DEALER FEES Since 1931 #X0164 2008 SATURN VUE#CY021A #TY076A 2007 CHEVY 3500 LT#X0166 #TY032A 2008 JEEP COMPASS #CX130A 2007 DODGE RAM 3500 MEGA CAB DIESEL#TY041B #TX131A 2010 DODGE JOURNEY SXT#X0156 2007 DODGE CHARGER SXT2010 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 2005 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT #JY043A $ 32888 $ 19888 2006 CHRYSLER 300C $ 32988 $ 16888 $ 17888 $ 15888 $ 18299 $ 16888 2010 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY LX2008 TOYOTA TUNDRA $ 25888ONE OWNER $ 12888 $ 18888 $ 18599 #JY004B #X0161 ONE OWNER READY TO TOW CERTIFIED CERTIFIED LOW MILES CREAM PUFF ONE OWNER ONE OWNER CREAM PUFF NICE CERTIFIED CERTIFIED LEATHER 2009 NISSAN ALTIMA Courtesy photo Dennis Brown, left, accepts grand prize truck from CEO Bill Mulcay at the PRECO annual meeting. How often are you asked to sign something? I don't mean autographs or birthday cards, but legally and financially binding documents everything from endorsing a check to signing a sales receipt to buying a house. Either way, they're all contracts. In broad terms, contracts are mutually binding agreements between two or more parties to do or not do something. Once a contract is in force, it generally cannot be altered unless all parties agree. And, with very few exceptions they cannot easily be broken. Sometimes contracts are formal, signed documents that outline specific conditions and penalties if those conditions are not met: For example, if you don't make your mortgage payments, the lender can foreclose on your house. Other times they are verbal or implied agreements: If you buy spoiled milk, you can ask for a refund. Before you enter into a contractual agreement, try to anticipate what could go wrong. For example: You sign a lease but later decide you can't afford the rent or don't like the neighborhoo d. You buy a car you can't afford, but when you try to sell it, the car is worth less tha n your outstanding loan balance. You buy some thing on sale and don't notice the store's "No returns on sal e items" policy. You co-sign a lease wit h a roommate who later backs out, leaving you responsible for the rent. You rent a car and late r learn you accidentally agreed to optional insurance coverage or other fe atures you didn't want or need. You agree to cosign a loan and the other person stops making payments, leaving you responsible f or the full amount otherwise your credit will suffer. You buy a car and later notice that the sales agree ment includes an extende d warranty or other features you didn't verbally autho rize. You buy a two-year cel l phone plan, but after the grace period ends, discov er Read contracts carefully before you sign them Personal Finance Jason Alderman See READ, page 3B PRECO packs record crowd at military-themed annual meeting See PRECO, page 3B

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Page 2BNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com 205 US 27 South, Sebring 382-1515 801 US 27 North, Avon Park 453-2525 WAL-MART, SEBRING 385-5371 WAL-MART, AVON PARK 452-7010 WAL-MART, LAKE WALES 676-0569

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 3B Custom DesignerVALUE VERTICAL BLINDS72x80" $115.99Select Styles. Installation not included. LIFETIME TRACK WARRANTY Custom Exact Fit2" HORIZONTAL BLINDS$3.99 … $5.49 Square Foot (4 sq. ft. minimum)Available in White, Off-White & Wood Tones Family owned & operated since 1978 FREEIn-Home Estimates! FRIDAYMarch 25thLake Placid Community Church 735 S. Sun N Lakes Blvd.TUESDAYMarch 29thLakeshore Mall Meeting Room AVON PARK 452-5800 € SEBRING 382-3363 LAKE PLACID 465-1530When having a talk with your pet doesnt work! 3 ROOMS AND HALLA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 03/31/11.$9900 t hat you have spotty recept ion. Financially inexperienced t eenagers and young adults o ften make such mistakes, so b e sure to discuss the implic ations of signing contracts w ith your kids before they t urn 18. Afew additional tips: Make sure anything you s ign contains no unfilled b lank spaces, even if the o ther party promises to fill t hem in a certain way. Don't be afraid to ask to t ake a contract aside or bring i t home for more careful a nalysis or to get a second o pinion. Alawyer or financ ial advisor can help. Don't be pressured into s igning anything: If salesp eople try that tactic, walk a way. Make sure everything you w ere promised verbally a ppears in writing. This is p articularly important for t erms and conditions such as i nterest rates, down payments, discounts and penalties. Keep a copy of every document you sign. This will be especially important in cases of contested rental deposits, damaged merchandise, insurance claims, extended warranties, etc. Pay attention to prechecked boxes in online offers before submitting payment information for an order; they could bind you to terms you don't want. Take along a "wingman" when renting an apartment or buying a car. Remember, contracts are designed to protect both parties. Just make sure you fully understand all details before signing on the dotted line. Jason Alderman directs Visa's financial education programs. To participate in a free, online Financial Literacy and Education Summit on April 4, 2011, go to www.practicalmoneyskills.com/summit2011 Continued from page 1B Peace River Electric C ooperative (PRECO), a T ouchstone Energy distribut ion electric cooperative h eadquartered in Wauchula, F lorida, provides electric s ervice and energy solutions t o nearly 35,000 m ember/consumers in 10 Florida counties in central Florida: Brevard, DeSoto, Hardee, Highlands, Hillsborough, Indian River, Manatee, Osceola, Polk and Sarasota Counties. Through almost 4,000 miles of power lines, the electric cooperative has been in business since 1940 as a member-owned, not-for-profit. Continued from page 1B PRECOhas big crowd at annual meeting Courtesy photo Displaying Touchstone Energy Cooperatives banner, ParaCommando comes in for a landing at PRECO Park Read contracts closely Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155 BUSINESS SAN FRANCISCO (AP) The w orld's biggest maker of data stora ge computers on Thursday said t hat its security division has been h acked, and that the intruders comp romised a widely used technology f or preventing computer break-ins. The breach is an embarrassment f or EMC Corp., also a premier secur ity vendor, and potentially threate ns highly sensitive computer syst ems. The incident is a rare public acknowledgement by a security company that its internal anti-hacking technologies have been hacked. It is especially troubling because the technology sold by EMC's security division, RSA, plays an important role in making sure unauthorized people aren't allowed to log into heavily guarded networks. The scope of the attack wasn't immediately known, but the potential fallout could be widespread. RSA's customers include the military, governments, various banks and medical facilities and health insurance outfits. EMC, which is based Hopkinton, Mass., itself is an RSAcustomer. EMC said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that RSAwas the victim of what is known as an "advanced persistent threat," industry jargon for a sophisticated computer attack. The term is often associated with corporate espionage, nation-state attacks, or high-level cybercriminal gangs. EMC didn't offer clues about the suspected origin of the attack. It said it recently discovered an "extremely sophisticated" attack in progress against its networks and discovered that the infiltrators had made off with confidential data on RSA's SecurID products. The technology underpins the ubiquitous RSA-branded keychain "dongles" and other products that blanket important computer networks wi th an additional layer of protection. The products make it harder f or someone to break into a comput er even if a password is stolen, f or example. The RSAdevice, workin g in concert with back-end softwar e, generates an additional passwo rd that only the holder of the devi ce would know. But if a criminal c an figure out how those addition al passwords are generated, the syste m is at risk. Data storage company's anti-hacking division hacked

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 5B Page 4BNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com MARCH MARKETING MADNESS News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Universal Center was the lucky winner during the News-Suns March Marketing Madness event last week. They won a free advertisement by being the last team to make a basket. The advertisers on these two pages represent the 32 remaining teams playing in the NCAA Mens Basketball Championship this week. Team names are in each ad. Watch for the March 23 issue of the News-Sun to see which advertisers advance to the next rounds. Phone (863) 382-7551 FAX (863) 382-27501405 US 27 North Sebring, FL33870 C A M P B E L L  S S C O L L I S I O N C E N T E R , I N C Jim Campbell Owner MARQUETTE Is it time to get rid of some items in your home that you no longer want? Closing your business and need some cash? Need to liquidate an estate?Its easier than you think. Nows the time to make $$$ on stuff thats just sitting around!330 US 27 N € Suite I € Sebring (863) 235-0190 GEORGE MASON 10001 US Hwy 27S Sebring,FL 33876(888) 859-5501 KANSAS STATE PITTSBURGH ARIZONA WASHINGTON CALL ABOUT OUR SPECIALS www.stanleysteemer.comIICRC Certified TechniciansAVON PARK € 452-5800 SEBRING € 382-3363 LAKE PLACID € 465-1530 WAUCHULA € 773-2002 TEMPLE ILLINOIS CINCINNATI WISCONSIN(863) 386-98592521 US 27 N. Sebring(Next to Home Depot) Sebring s Own U. FLORIDAAmerican Golf Cart2833 Hwy 27 S. € Avon Park 453-CART (2278) Email us at: ezgotxt@aol.com Mon -Fri. 9am-4pm Closed Wed. 863-385-3497130 S. Commerce Ave. Sebring, FL 33870 HIGHLANDSCOUNTYSOLDESTESTABLISHEDHEARINGAIDOFFICEKeep your earsOpen BYU ADVANTAGEFLOOR COVERING385-1224LAKEVIEW PLAZA€ 207 U.S. 27 SOUTH € SEBRING FINANCING AVAILABLE GONZAGA We build strong kids, strong families, strong communities UCLA FLORIDA STATE3310 Hwy 27 South Sebring, FL 33870863-402-2786 RICHMONDYohanna Olivo, MD Internal Medicine 3319 Medical Hill Road Sebring, FL 33870 (863) 382-2429 BUTLER PURDUE U. CONNECTICUT U. KANSAS (863) 655-0030 € Toll Free (877) 605-3204 Fully Licensed & InsuredMember of Sebring, Avon Park, Lake Placid, Hardee DeSoto & LaBell Chambers of Commerce TEXASNeed Medical Transport?Local & Long DistanceTHINK POSITIVEŽ ALS-BLS Ambulance & Wheelchair Transport Providing Quality, Compassionate Care since 19653600 Highlands Ave. Sebring, FL 863.385.6101 SYRACUSE Phone (863) 382-7551 FAX (863) 382-2750 1405 US 27 North Sebring, FL33870 C A M P B E L L  S S C O L L I S I O N C E N T E R , I N C Jim Campbell Owner MOREHEAD DUKE NOTRE DAME800-ALAN-JAY ROTARY CLUB OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY We have a lot of funƒ and still get the job doneŽ Join Us!Meets Monday Evenings 6:15 pm Beef OBradys € Sebring Plaza OHIO STATE VCU3310 Hwy 27 South Sebring, FL 33870863-402-2786 KENTUCKY W. VIRGINIA ADVANTAGEFLOOR COVERING385-1224LAKEVIEW PLAZA€ 207 U.S. 27 SOUTH € SEBRING FINANCING AVAILABLE SAN DIEGO STATE Mon -Fri. 9am-4pm Closed Wed. 863-385-3497130 S. Commerce Ave. Sebring, FL 33870 HIGHLANDSCOUNTYSOLDESTESTABLISHEDHEARINGAIDOFFICEKeep your earsOpen MICHIGAN STATE N. CAROLINA

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Special to the News-SunAVON PARK College is a time for students to not o nly learn the skills they n eed for their chosen careers i n the classroom, but to also g ain experience and work w ith others in their career f ield. The service-learning prog ram at South Florida C ommunity College allows s tudents to do just this. Through a grant with F lorida Campus Compact, a n ational coalition of more t han 1,100 college and univ ersity presidents who are c ommitted to fulfilling the c ivic purposes of higher educ ation, a variety of servicel earning opportunities are a vailable to SFCC students w ho are focused on a STEM f ield (science, technology, e ngineering, and mathemati cs.) "There are many benefits o f participating in servicel earning," said Dr. Charlotte P ressler, SFCC Honors P rogram and Service-learni ng coordinator. "It provides first-hand f ield experience, networking o pportunities, and the chance t o work with professionals w ho do the same things stud ents are interested in as c areers. "Service-learning also h elps the community by prov iding local agencies with v olunteer help they might n ot have received otherw ise." SFCC sophomore Christy D avis chose to participate in s ervice-learning so she could g ain job experience and help t he community. Davis volunt eers at the Avon Park Depot M useum and the Center for G reat Apes in Wauchula w here she performs a variety o f functions including putt ing together their meals and c leaning out the enclosures. Through her experiences, D avis has realized she wants t o help people and plans to b ecome an anesthesiologist. Service-learning is worth t he time and experience," D avis said. "I've learned where I w ant to focus my career g oals, and how to network w ith people. You don't walk a way from it empty-handed, a nd it gives you a really g ood feeling." SFCC student Chris J ennings began participating i n service-learning because it g ave him the opportunity to b e more involved in his community. Formerly a contractor of his own interlock brickpaving company, Jennings enrolled in SFCC when the economy declined. "I saw it as an opportunity to change my life," he said. He had already been volunteering on his own. Jennings does his servicelearning at Archbold Biological Station, where he works on plant restoration, documents the Cuban tree frogs an invasive species in the area, and cleans up the road along the facility; the Highlands County biofuels extension office where he tends to the biofuels crops and studies what will grow best in the area; and the SFCC Museum of Art and Culture (MOFAC) where he works as a liaison between the museum, Archbold Biological Station, and the Highlands County Audobon Society creating a list of species found on SFCC MOFAC's Wildflower Wayside Shrine walking trail. "Owning your own business is self-serving," he said. "Now I realize that I want to do what I can to leave a place better than when I found it." Another benefit servicelearning students receive from the program is the opportunity to earn scholarships. Davis and Jennings, along with five other SFCC service-learning students, were recently selected to receive scholarships through the AmeriCorps Vista program, Students in Service. The federal program will help service-learning students earn a voucher for $1,132 that can be used toward education related expenses if they complete 300 hours of service learning by July 2011. SFCC's recipients were selected by Pressler and had a history of service learning participation. Other SFCC students who were chosen for the scholarship were Shea Young, Kyle Halvorsen, Shane Donglasan, Laura Salisbury, and John Vincent III. "Many times, service learning opens up careers and fields of study students didn't even know existed," Pressler said. "Any students taking a course from arts and sciences can participate in service learning." For more information on SFCC's service learning opportunities, call Pressler at 784-7247. Page 6BNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com Newborns € Children € AdolescentsOFFICE HOURS: Rajeswari Sonni, M.D., F.A.A.P. Praveen Krishnadas, M.D., F.A.A.P. Anoop Palta, M.D., F.A.A.P. Maria B. Asis, M.D., F.A.A.P Maria C. Perez, M.D. David Kleczek, P.A.-C. Amy Grimes, P.A.-C. Megan Neff, ARNP Mercy L. Seralde, M.D., F.A.A.P.Avon Park Pediatrics,P.A. & Sebring Pediatrics,LLCWe accept most Major Insurance and Medicaid SEBRING382-0770AVON PARK453-7337 Specializing in the treatment of € Allergies € Asthma € Attention Deficit Disorder Immunizations € Check-ups €Obesity Counseling SEBRING: MON. … FRI. … 8:30AM … 5:00PMSATURDAY … 8:30AM … 12:00 NOON … SEBRING ONLYAVON PARK: MON. & WED. … 8:30AM … 7:00PM TUES., THURS., & FRI. … 8:30AM … 5:00PM LAKE PLACID699-1414 American Golf Cart 2833 Hwy 27 S. € Avon Park (863) 453-CART(2278)2007S Starting at $1595includes top, window & charger, NEW & USED TIRES & BATTERIES BATTERIES:Trojan PowerTron American Over 75 New & Used Carts To Choose From Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155 CHALKTALK SFCC's students see the benefit in service-learning Courtesy photo Student Chris Jennings began participating in service-learning because it gave him the opportunity to be more involved in his community. He does his service-learning at Archbold Biological Station, where he works on plant restoration. Courtesy photo South Florida Community College sophomore Christy Davis chose to participate in service-learning so she could gain job experience and help the community. Davis volunteers at the Avon Park Depot Museum and the Center for Great Apes in Wauchula. SFCC Community Education offers driving classesSouth Florida Community College's Community Education Department is offering a series of Alcohol Drug Accident Prevention Training (ADAPT) courses for first-time driver’s license applicants. The four-hour courses will be held 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Saturday, April 16, at the SFCC Highlands Campus, 600 W. College Drive, Avon Park; and 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Saturday, April 30, at the SFCC Hardee Campus, 2968 U.S. 17 N., Bowling Green. Pre-registration is required. The fee is $32 and may be paid by cash, check, or credit card. Participants may register in Building B on the Highlands Campus or at any SFCC campus or center. The Communi ty Education Department is also offering a series of Safe Driving Accide nt Prevention Progra m (SPAPP) courses for drive rs who have received a traff ic citation. The four-hour cours es will be held Wednesda y, April 13, 5:30-9:30 p.m., at the SFCC DeSoto Campu s; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m ., Saturday, April 16, at t he SFCC Highlands Campu s; and Saturday, April 30, 8:3 0 a.m.-12:30 p.m., at t he SFCC Hardee Campus. Pre-registration is required. The fee is $37 an d may be paid by cash, chec k, or credit card. For more informatio n, contact the Communi ty Education Department at 453-6661, 465-5300, 49 47500, 773-2252, or 38 26900, ext. 7388. Snapshots Courtesy pho to South Florida Community College Painting I and II students completed a series of paintings and murals as service learning projects this spring. One of the service learning projects was a mural for the Florida Hospital Child Learning Center. We really appreciate all of the time and hard work that these students put into the project,' said Mabel Aylward, director, Florida Hospital Child Learning Center. Students paint mural WHATS HOPPIN AROUND TOWN?Subscribe today and “nd out! Call 863-385-6155 for home deliverywww.newssun.com

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 7B ELECT WHO?This is a campaign against Melanoma. One in 72 people will contract the disease. You must elect yourself to lead against it. It is a potential matter of life and death.Melanoma*Usually a non-symptomatic growth on the skin with multiple colors and irregular edges.We can protect you against this silent killer. We are your skin police. Call now, elect a proactive preventative skin team.American Institute of Dermatology, P.A.Darrin A. Rotman, M.D. Julie Iellimo, P.A.-C Jennifer Wolf, P.A.-C Medicare and all major insurances accepted in network* New Patients Welcome863-386-0786*individual must call for veri“cation of bene“ts. This is not a guarantee. Arts & Crafts FoodEntertainmentMajor SponsorsMuseum DisplayRotary Club Pancake Breakfast5K Run/Walk CHALKTALK Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South F lorida Community College H onors students Christopher J ennings and Pablo Mingrino w ere chosen to represent S FCC as a member of the Phi T heta Kappa (PTK) 2011 AllF lorida Academic Team. Students named to the acad emic team represent the best i n state," said Dr. Charlotte P ressler, SFCC Honors P rogram coordinator and phil osophy instructor. "PTK a dvisors nominate students b ased on their academic m erit and community service w ork." They will each receive s cholarships for being named to the team. Jennings was nominated for the team because of his success in SFCC's Honors Program and his servicelearning record. He volunteers at Archbold Biological Station, the Highlands County biofuels extension office, and the SFCC Museum of Art and Culture (MOFAC). Jennings was also chosen by PTK to receive the Guistwhite Scholarship. The $5,000 scholarship award is based on a student's scholastic achievement and participation in Phi Theta Kappa. He plans to attend the University of Florida where he will major in geomatics engineering. Mingrino's academic record and participation in numerous college-related and community service activities with SFCC's Student Government Association, PTK, Relay for Life, and the Oaks of Avon earned him a nomination. "Alot of students apply for this, so it's a great honor they chose me," Mingrino said. "It tells me I have succeeded in everything I have been working toward." He plans to attend college in New York where he will major in accounting. This year, 108 students from Florida's 28 public community colleges were appointed to the All-Florida Academic Team based on their outstanding academic performance and community service. Phi Theta Kappa is the international honor society of two-year colleges. The SFCC Honors Program is designed for those students who want to take on the full intellectual challenge of a college education. Students in the program gain intellectual development and cultural enrichment; are taught by qualified and experienced faculty; are eligible for scholarships; and receive recognition at SFCC's graduation ceremony. Call Pressler at 784-7247. Students represent SFCC on All-Florida Academic Team Courtesy pho to Pablo Mingrino, South Florida Community College president Dr. Norm Stephens, and Chris Jennings will represent SFCC on the All-Florida Academic Team. Special to the News-SunThe Early Learning Coalition of Florida's Heartland Inc. is promoting awareness of the 16th Annual Florida's Children's Week celebrates which is from Sunday to Saturday, April 3-9. Thousands of parents, children, professionals, advocates, community leaders and concerned citizens across Florida will come together to focus their attention on issues that affect the health and well being of children and families in the state. The purpose of Children's Week is to create a shared vision of the state of Florida's commitment to its children and families and to engage a long-term process to develop and implement strategies for moving the shared visio n forward. Child care providers in Highlands, Charlott e, DeSoto and Hardee cou nties are creating pap er hands with the children th ey serve these hands will be among the tens of tho usands hung in the Capit ol Rotunda during Children 's Week. The mission of the Ear ly Learning Coalition of Florida's Heartland Inc., is to support families and ch ildren in accessing high qua lity early care and educatio n services through Scho ol Readiness and Volunta ry Pre-kindergarten program s. The ELCFH also serv es as a point of access to resources and referrals f or health care and family su pport services. Florida's Children's Week begins April 3 Courtesy photo J odi McWaters, a dental assistant student at South Florida Community College, works w ith Ridge Area A rc consumer Tim J ohnson on how to do proper dental hygiene. Several students in the dental program came to Ridge A rea Arc in Avon Park on March 10 to demonstrate proper dental hygiene as well as the college students received a sensitivity training on how to communicate with people w ith disabilities. SFCCdental assistant students learn how to communicate with people with disabilities

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Page 8BNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com

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BYBARRYFOSTER Special to the News-SunSEBRING Each year at S ebring International R aceway, fans are treated to a f ull slate of racing action l eading up to the Mobil 1 T welve Hours of Sebring pres ented by Fresh from Florida. This year, there were no f ewer than four doubleheade rs slated as season openers i ncluding both open wheel a nd closed wheel cars. RJ Lopez, of Santo D omingo, made it look easy i n the 2011 SCCAPro Racing T rans-Am Seriesinaugural c ompetitionFriday with a f lag-to-flag victory. Driving the Disco 106 C orvette, the Dominican R epublic drivertook t hepole, set the fast lap and l ead every lap. It was Lopez's third career T rans-Am victory, outdist ancing Cliff Ebben, from A ppleton, Wis., by 13 seco nds in the 28-lap affair. In the BF Goodrich Barber N ational presented by M azda,Canadian Thomas M cGregor lead the pack for m ost ofThursday's half hour a ffair to grab theinitial victor y of his season. Rounding out the podium w as Brandon Newey in seco nd andDanilo Estrela who grabbed third, Newey came back Friday to take a win inthe second round of the Barber Natioinal twin bill. It washis first win of theyear and second podium appearance. Sebastian Ordonez worked his way up from a sixth-place start to take second. Thomas McGregor also earned his second podium in as many races, taking third place honors. The Cooper Tires USF2000 National Championship powered by Mazdaalso began their season at Sebring Thursday afternoon. Zach Veachnabbed the season's first racewith a convincing win. The 15-year-oldOhio driver bested the field going away, PetriSuvanto was second on the podium with Spencer Piggot third. InFriday'ssecond round, Luke Ellery ran the JDC Motorsports Mazda to his first win of the new season. Spencer Piggot and Petri Suvantotraded places from the first race with Piggot taking the second step on the podium andSuvanto third. The first of the two Cooper Tire Prototype Lites Championship races proved to be a contentious competitionas Daniel Goldburg held off a persistent Tristan Nunez to win that series first2011 competion, Thursday afternoon. Lucas Downs followed theNunez across the start/finish linefor a third place spot on the podium. Downs came back Friday to capture the second race of the season. The Butterfield Minn. driver led the way followed SPORTS C SECTION Inside This Section Sebring 70s Finals . . .3C Kayak Tours . . .3C Track Meet correction . . .4C News-Sun Sunday, March 20, 2011 News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHN E After collecting the deflection of Jayme Faircloth's dive, Amanda Grimaldo fires to first for a 4-6-3 ground out in Sebring's win over Avon Park Friday night. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING The rivalry m ay not be at the peak its' s een in recent years, but w hen Avon Park and Sebring f ind themselves on opposite s ides of the field, expectation l evels always rise up just a b it more. And while the Red D evil softball bats did s how some offensive s park, it was the Lady B lue Streaks who b ashed their way to an 1 8-5 win Friday night. Sebring starter H aley Pack, making j ust her second appearance of t he season after returning f rom a foot injury and an i nning of work in Monday's w in at Hardee, looked good i n setting the side down in o rder in the first. Sarah Hunnicutt, however, d idn't have as much luck a gainst the hard-hitting S treaks. Tayla DaSilva rapped one to left for a lead-off single before Jayme Faircloth and Amanda Grimaldo worked their counts to draw walks and load the bases. Dino Lower then took one for the team, taking a pitch in the leg and forcing home DaSilva. Pack's ground-out brought home a run and two runs came in when a grounder off of Carly Hoffner's bat couldn't be handled. After Lauren Welborn drew a walk, a Taryn O'Bannon shot caused an error and two more runs came in. Allie Mann beat out an infield single and DaSilva ripped an RBI double before one more fielding error brought home the eighth run of the inning. Kaycee Mercer then came on in relief to get out of the inning. But the Lady Devils answered back, showing patience at the plate as Pack struggled to find her control. An irregular landing spot on the mound was making things uncomfortable for the hurler's still-recovering foot and three consecutive walks, to Cheyenne Mills, Brittany Gates and Angela Bateman, opened the inning. Pack induced a pop-up for the first out, but Tykeria Wiley's base on balls brought home a run and Pack was pulled. Hoffner took over and didn't have her best control to start as she plunked Mercer to bring Gates in and a wild pitch allowed Bateman to scamper home. But Sebring got out of it when Katelynn Stoll's hardhit fly to center was snared by Faircloth and the relay in nabbed Wiley at the plate. Lady Streaks take county clash Sebring18Avon Park5 See SEBRING, page 4C Special to the News-SunLAKEPLACID On Wednesday, March 16, Yates (14-6) maintained their three game lead by defeating Central Security (8-11) 16-8 in Lake Placid Senior Softball action. Dick Cook had four hits for the winners and Barry Hurlbut (home run) and Dusty Hensley had three hits each. Seminole Tire (11-9) remained within striking distance of Yates by squeaking past Lake Placid Marine (9-10) 1413. Manager Charlie Quinn had five hits and Bob Richards had four to pace the Noles attack. The Three Hit Club included Kyle Saunders, John Kloet, and Mo Pier (double). For the Mariners, Andy Timermanis had four hits while Gary Tankersley and Richard Rivera chipped in with three hits each. In a battle of last place teams, Schooni's (8-12) fell to Lockhart Service (9-11) 35-16. It was the third time in the last six games the Lockhart bashers topped 30 runs, a prodigio us accomplishment even b y senior softball standards Dave Reed found a w ay to beat the Williams Sh ift by going over it and in to the orange groves thr ee times. Billy Todd had five hi ts, while Casey Carlso n, Doug Hammond, Manag er Doran Quigg and Harv ey Jones had four hits each For Schooni's, Bo b Poulin had five hits an d launched two round-tri ppers of his own over t he fence. Bob Roth also had fi ve hits (double), Jeff Stanl ey had four hits (triple) an d Gary Steeves and I an McCuaig had three hi ts each in the losing effort. In Monday, March 1 4, action, the Centr al Security team pulled o ff one of baseball's rare st feats. In the sixth innin g, Seminole Tire had runne rs on first and second wi th no outs when the infie ld fly rule was called on a pop-up. In the confusion th at followed, the batter w as automatically out and t he Triple play seen in LP Senior play See LP, page 3C News-Sun photo by KIM GAUGER J esse Baker takes one for the team in protecting home plate from Hardee's Terrel Wintz in Friday's 5-1 win over the Wildcats. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newsssun.com and ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING After going 10-0 to start the season, the Sebring Blue Streak baseball squad was tripped up in a recent three-game losing streak, including a rare loss to county rival Lake Placid in an extrainning affair Tuesday. But the team would break out of it with consecutive wins over two other long-time rivals. With the 11-inning game against the Dragons creating some pitching rotation scrambling, the Streaks got a great effort Friday from Zach Osha in a 5-1 win at Hardee. Osha went the full seven innings, surrendering just two hits, one run and one walk while striking out six. And the Sebring offense got all it would need in the first as lead-off man Seth Abeln singled to start the game and moved to third on a Matt Randall single up the middle. After Randall stole second to put runners on second and third, Jesse Baker grounded one through the left side to bring Abeln home and Randall soon came in on an error. Osha cruised through the bottom of the frame, one, two, three, but would have his bit of trouble in the second. After plunking the lead-o ff batter with a pitch, scatter ed singles brought home a Wildcat run. But that would be all th ey would muster as Osha g ot back on form and retired t he side in order in three of t he next five innings, with only a walk and an error marring h is effort the rest of the way. The offense, meanwhil e, added to the lead in t he fourth with a Johnny Knig ht triple bringing Corb in Hoffner in, who had singled Knight would soon com e in on a wild pitch for a 4 -1 lead. The final run came in t he sixth when Gunn ar Streaks whip Wildcats, down Red Devils Sebring5Hardee1 See STREAKS, page 4C Support Series races warm up SIR Courtesy photo RJ Lopez drove the Disco 106 Corvette to a wire-to-wire win in the 2011 SCCAA Pro Racing Trans-Am Series race Friday. Go to w w w w w w . n n e e w w s s s s u u n n . c c o o m m for coverage of the Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring presented by Fresh from Florida. See RACES, page 4C

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HOPE 3-on-3SEBRING The First Annual Mary Toney HOPE Foundation Community 3on-3 basketball tournament will take place Saturday, April 2 at the Sebring High School gym from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at a cost of $5 per player. The tournament will have male and female brackets consisting of threeorfour player teams from ages 7-18-years old. Registration forms can be found in the front office at Sebring High School and must be turned in by Friday, March 25. For more information, contact Lavaar Scott at 214-3880 or email LaV39@yahoo.com .Avon Park Mall Festival 5KAVON PARK The 26th Annual Avon Park Mall Festival 5K Run/Walk is set for Friday night, March 25, at the Old Armory Building at 6:00 p.m. Registration will begin at 5:00 p.m. in the building across from the tennis courts in Donaldson Park. Entry fee is $15 through March 21 and $20 from March 22 thru race day sign up. Tee shirts guaranteed to only the first 100 entrants, so sign up early. Those desiring an entry form may email cbrojek@comcast.net or call Chet at 385-4736. Mail your checks payable to Central Florida Striders, along with the signed application to Central Florida Striders, 3310 Par Road, Sebring, FL33872. The race benefits the boys and girls track teams at Avon Park High School.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING Wings of Faith Worship Center presents the First Annual Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one team of four golfers, one tee sign and two green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includes one team of four golfers, one green sign; Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $100 includes one green sign. Individual player $60 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26). Team of Four Golfers $240 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after March 26). Make checks payable to: Wings of Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL 33871, or register online at wingsoffaithchristianworshipcenter.com Proceeds to be donated to scholarship program for graduates attending Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center. For more information, call Jason Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhankerson@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at 381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com ."Doc Owen" Golf TourneyAVON PARK The Avon Park Noon Rotary Club will host its Second Annual David "Doc Owen" Golf tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Highlands Ridge North. The two-person scramble-format entry fee is $60 per person with prizes in flight groups, lunch, goodie bag and refreshments on the course. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Entry information and check payable to Avon Park Noon Rotary mailed to Chet Brojek, 3310 Par Rd, Sebring, FL 33872. Golfers should include their names and handicaps along with their check. Those needing a form may email Brojek at cbrojek@comcast.net or call a t 385-4736. Business entry of two-persons plus a hole sign for a total of $200 is available for the first time this year. All Rotary club members are urged to support participate in the event that ben efits local Rotary charity projects. Business hole signs for $100 are also available by contacting Chet via email o r phone.SHSBasketball CampSEBRING The SHS basketball program will be hosting a basketball camp for boys and girls, in 2nd-6th grade, on Monday, March 28, and Tuesday, March 29, from 8 a.m.4 p.m. The cost of the camp is $20 and is appropriate for players of all skill level s and experience. Current and former Streaks will be on hand to help with the camp, which will also feature contests, competitions and prizes. Campers can either bring their own lunch or purchase lunch there for a reasonable price. Please contact Coach Lee at 441-122 1, or by email at leem@highlands.k12.fl.u s Sandy Foster MemorialSEBRING NU-HOPE Elder Care Services annual golf tournament is just around the corner. The NU-HOPE Board of Directors ha s chosen to rename the golf tournament this year in memory of Sandy Foster, fo rmer Executive Director of NU-HOPE Elder Care Services. Sandy passed away very unexpectedl y in September of last year. Sandy loved golf and ran a very successful golf tournament for 13 years; in his memory the tournament will be renamed the "Sandy Foster Memorial/NU-HOPE golf tournament." This year we are continuing with Sandy's passion for the tournament with flight, raffle and door prizes. In the last three years the field was full, with a wait list, so sign up soon! The first annual Sandy Foster Memorial/NU-HOPE golf tournament will be held on Saturday, April 9, with a n 8:30 a.m. shotgun start, at the Country Club of Sebring. The tournament will be a two-person scramble format. Entry fee will be $60 per person ($12 0 per team) which includes lunch afterwards and refreshments during the tournament. Registration forms are availab le at the Country Club of Sebring Pro Sho p (John Vickers) or can be obtained via mail or fax by calling Debbie Slade at 382-2134. Business sponsorships are also available for this event. The revenue from this event is used for the local match'amount this organi zation needs each year to secure federal and state grant funds in our effort to co ntinue providing home and communitybased services to the frail and needy eld erly residents of Highlands and Hardee Counties. Barefoot Waterski TourneyFORTMYERS The 10th annual Deuceapalooza Barefoot Endurance Tournament is set for April 9 in Fort Myers. This tournament is open to waterski enthusiasts of all ages. Trophies and cash prizes will be hand ed out. Participants will receive a free T shirt. For information, call Deuce at (239) 693-1975. EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB x-Boston4819.716 Philadelphia3633.52213 New York3533.5151312New Jersey2245.32826 Toronto1949.2792912Southeast Division WLPctGB x-Miami4722.681 x-Orlando4426.629312Atlanta3930.5658 Charlotte2840.4121812Washington1651.23930 Central Division WLPctGB y-Chicago4919.721 Indiana3039.4351912Milwaukee2741.39722 Detroit2544.3622412Cleveland1354.1943512WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB x-San Antonio5513.809 Dallas4821.696712New Orleans4030.57116 Memphis3732.5361812Houston3634.51420 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City4523.662 Denver4128.594412Portland3929.5746 Utah3633.522912Minnesota1753.24329 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Lakers4920.710 Phoenix3433.50714 Golden State3039.43519 L.A. Clippers2643.37723 Sacramento1651.23932 x-clinched playoff spot ___ Friday's Games Indiana 115, Chicago 108, OT Orlando 85, Denver 82 Toronto 116, Washington 107 Miami 106, Atlanta 85 Detroit 99, New York 95 Oklahoma City 99, Charlotte 82 San Antonio 97, Dallas 91 Houston 93, Boston 77 Milwaukee 110, New Jersey 95 Phoenix 108, Golden State 97 Philadelphia 102, Sacramento 80 L.A. Lakers 106, Minnesota 98 Saturday's Games Cleveland at L.A. Clippers, late Denver at Miami, late Indiana at Memphis, late Boston at New Orleans, late Charlotte at San Antonio, late Philadelphia at Portland, late Sunday's Games New Jersey at Washington, 1 p.m. Detroit at Atlanta, 2 p.m. New York at Milwaukee, 3 p.m. Phoenix at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m. Sacramento at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m. Utah at Houston, 7 p.m. Toronto at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Golden State at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Portland at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA Philadelphia4319894225188 Pittsburgh4122890206172 N.Y. Rangers3830480210177 New Jersey3334470151182 N.Y. Islanders27331266199230 Northeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Boston39211088211170 Montreal3926785192184 Buffalo3428876203202 Toronto31311072187223 Ottawa2636961161221 Southeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Washington42211094198176 Tampa Bay39221088212214 Carolina33291076201214 Atlanta30291272200230 Florida2933967179194WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA Detroit4320894232201 Chicago3825884232201 Nashville36251082183168 Columbus32281074190211 St. Louis3230973198209 Northwest Division WLOTPtsGFGA y-Vancouver47179103238172 Calgary3727983222209 Minnesota3529777180191 Colorado2636860195248 Edmonton2339955173234 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA San Jose4123890206188 Phoenix39231189212205 Los Angeles4026585196174 Dallas3825884201199 Anaheim3827581197203 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. ___ Friday's Games Washington 3, New Jersey 0 N.Y. Rangers 6, Montreal 3 Carolina 3, N.Y. Islanders 2, OT Phoenix 3, Vancouver 1 Saturday's Games Columbus at Minnesota, late Atlanta at Buffalo, late Boston at Toronto, late Tampa Bay at Ottawa, late N.Y. Islanders at Florida, late Detroit at Nashville, late Philadelphia at Dallas, late Colorado at Edmonton, late Anaheim at Los Angeles, late St. Louis at San Jose, late Sunday's Games N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, 12:30 p.m. Nashville at Buffalo, 5 p.m. New Jersey at Columbus, 5 p.m. Montreal at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Chicago at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Calgary at Anaheim, 8 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUEWLPct Kansas City146.700 Detroit159.625 Seattle107.588 Minnesota119.550 Toronto119.550 Boston1211.522 Los Angeles1111.500 Baltimore910.474 Tampa Bay910.474 Texas911.450 Cleveland811.421 Chicago812.400 New York812.400 Oakland813.381NATIONAL LEAGUEWLPct San Francisco176.739 Colorado157.682 Atlanta137.650 Philadelphia148.636 Milwaukee138.619 Cincinnati128.600 St. Louis118.579 Washington1010.500 New York1011.476 San Diego910.474 Chicago914.391 Houston914.391 Pittsburgh814.364 Los Angeles815.348 Florida614.300 Arizona618.250 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. ___ Friday's Games Houston 9, Florida 2 Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 2 St. Louis 10, Washington 4 Detroit 8, Boston (ss) 3 Toronto 6, N.Y. Yankees 5 N.Y. Mets 3, Atlanta 0 L.A. Dodgers 6, San Francisco 3 Arizona 8, Seattle 5 L.A. Angels 7, San Diego 6 Kansas City 6, Cleveland (ss) 5 Cincinnati 14, Chicago Cubs 13 Colorado 9, Milwaukee 7 Minnesota 3, Baltimore 2 Tampa Bay 7, Boston (ss) 3 Chicago White Sox 18, Oakland 1 Cleveland (ss) 12, Texas 6 Saturday's Games Toronto vs. N.Y. Yankees, late Philadelphia vs. Baltimore, late N.Y. Mets (ss) vs. Atlanta (ss), late Florida vs. St. Louis (ss), late Boston vs. Pittsburgh, late St. Louis (ss) vs. Houston, late Tampa Bay vs. Minnesota, late Atlanta (ss) vs. Detroit, late Washington vs. N.Y. Mets (ss), late Chicago Cubs vs. San Diego, late Milwaukee vs. L.A. Dodgers, late Colorado vs. Cincinnati (ss), late Kansas City vs. San Francisco, late Seattle vs. Texas, late Cleveland vs. L.A. Angels, late Chicago White Sox vs. Oakland, late Cincinnati (ss) vs. Arizona, late Sunday's Games Pittsburgh vs. Houston (ss) at Kissimmee, 1 p.m. Minnesota vs. Toronto at Dunedin, 1 p.m. Detroit vs. Washington at Viera, 1 p.m. N.Y. Yankees vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, 1 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. Florida at Jupiter, 1 p.m. Houston (ss) vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1 p.m. Baltimore vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, 1 p.m. St. Louis vs. Boston at Ft Myers, 1 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 4 p.m. Arizona (ss) vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 4 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4 p.m. Oakland (ss) vs. San Francisco (ss) at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4 p.m. San Diego vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4 p.m. Arizona (ss) vs. Oakland (ss) at Phoenix, 4 p.m. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid MONDAY: Softball vs.Clewiston,5/7 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball at Frostproof,7 p.m.; Softball vs.Avon Park,5:30/7:30 p.m.; Boys Tennis vs.LaBelle,4:30 p.m.; Girls Tennis at LaBelle,4:30 p.m. Sebring MONDAY: Boys/Girls Tennis vs.Tenoroc,4:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball vs.Haines City,7 p.m.; Softball vs.Ridge,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Tennis at Clewiston,4 p.m.; Girls Tennis at Auburndale,4 p.m.; Track and Field at Avon Park, 4:30 p.m. SFCC MONDAY: Baseball at Polk State College,6 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball vs.Hillsborough,6 p.m. THURSDAY: Softball at State College of Florida,5 p.m. Avon Park MONDAY: Baseball vs.Hardee,7 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball vs.Tenoroc,7 p.m.; Softball at Lake Placid,5:30/7:30 p.m.; Track and Field hosts meet,4:30 p.m. T T E E N N N N I I S S S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 2 2 p p . m m . BNP Paribas Open, Finals . . . . . . . . . . . . A A B B C CA A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . ALMS 12 Hours of Sebring . . . . . . . . . . A A B B C C 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NASCAR Jeff Byrd 500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X XN N H H L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . N.Y. Islanders at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NM M L L B B P P R R E E S S E E A A S S O O N N S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . L.A. Dodgers at Chicago White Sox . . . . W W G G N NM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Boston at Philadelphia, Clearwater . . . . E E S S P P N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, Sarasota . . . E E S S P P N NC C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 1 1 a a . m m . NIT Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N N N o o o o n n NCAA Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CC B B S S 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 5 5 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C BB S S 6 6 p p . m m . NCAATournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 7 7 p p . m m . NCAATournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T B B S S 8 8 :: 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T B B S SM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NITTournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 p p . m m . NITTournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NIT Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 p p . m m . NIT Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . E E S S P P N NC C O O L L L L E E G G E E S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 2 2 p p . m m . Arkansas at Mississippi State . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NW W O O M M E E N N ' S S C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 5 5 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 9 9 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 9 9 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2Times, games, channels all subject to change G G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Sicilian Cup . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 1 1 p p . m m . PGA Transitions Championship . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA Transitions Championship . . . . . . . N N B B C C 7 7 p p . mm . LPGA RR Donnelly Founders Cup . . . . G G O O L L F FN N B B A A M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Orlando at Cleveland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . Chicago at Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Phoenix at L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T LIVESPORTSONTV NBA NHL MLBPreseason Page 2CNews-Sun Sunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.co m

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 3C TO ADVERTISE ON THIS PAGE CALL ANGI 386-5626 Located Inside Inn On The Lakes Hotel € 3100 Golfview Rd. € Sebring, FL863-314-0348 FREE BEERWith Purchase of Appetizer or Entree! Great Golf Value Par 72 Championship Golf Course Golf Instruction & Practice Facility Full-service Caddyshack Restaurant & Bar Sebring GolfClub call 863-314-5919 or online at www.mysebring.com Located off Hwy 27 in Sebring 3118 Golfview Rd., Sebring, FL 33875 To schedule a tee time OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 6 MONTH MEMBERSHIPS NOW AVAILABLE (863) 382-0500 € 3201 Golfview Rd. € Sebring(863) 382-0744for 9 Hole Executive RatesPrices good thru 3/31/10 Incl. Tax & CartMonday thru Friday:8am … 1pm $36By 8, After 1 $29 Saturday & Sunday: $25 RATES YOUVE BEEN DREAMING ABOUT GOLF SEBRINGS FRIENDLIEST GOLF COURSE VOTED #1 LOCAL COURSE 2010 2222 GOLF HAMMOCK DR., SEBRING863-382-2151golfhammockcc@embarqmail.com Coupon Required FRIDAY1:00 pmSHOTGUN SPECIAL $ 24CALL FOR TEE TIMESExpires 03-31-11 18 HOLES7am-8am....$27008am-Noon..$3300Noon-2pm..$2700After 2pm...$2000All Rates Includes Tax 9 HOLES7am-3pm....$1800After 3pm...$1200Weekend Rates7am-2pm....$25002pm Close..$2000 471-ZENO (9366)4325 Sun N Lake Blvd. SebringMon 3 9 Tues-Thurs 11 9 € Fri 11-10 Sat 3-10 € Closed Sunday402-22222934 US 27 S. (Publix Shopping Center) € Sebring Tues -Thur 3 9 € Fri Sat 3 10 Closed Sunday & MondaySERVING HIGHLANDS FOR MORETHAN 25 YEARS 16" Large One Topping PizzaNot valid with any other offer. Expires 03/31/11Monday & Tuesday ONLY $ 10 99 ZENOS WE DELIVER! Saturday March 26, 10 a.m. Alafia River Lithia S prings Park The Alafia River is a narr ow, twisting trail with large o ak, cypress and cedar trees t hat line the banks and form a c anopy overhead. The Alafia is a fairly swift r iver, especially for central F lorida, and some small s hoals are exposed in low water creating small rapids. We will meet at Lithia Springs Park and shuttle you to the launch site at Alderman Ford Park. This is a full day trip with approximately 3 1/2 4 hrs of paddling time including a break for lunch. Sunday March 27, 4 p.m. Sunset Tour Arbuckle Creek/ Istokpoga Park We will meet and launch from the boat ramp on Lake Istokpoga Park off of Hwy 98 in Sebring. This is a late afternoon (sunset) trip with approximately 2 1/2 hours of paddling. Ideal for beginners and first-timers as well as seasoned paddlers. All trips are $39 per person (single or tandem), $19 for those bringing their own kayaks. All reservations must be confirmed via phone or email no later than 24 hrs prior to the trip. Sebring Kayak Tours reserves the right to cancel tours that don't have the minimum amount of participants. Two more Kayak Tours trips on tap Special to the News-SunLAKEPLAICD Lake Placid Youth Baseball and Softball is accepting registration forms forBaseball ages 11-12 Ozone, 13-14 and Softball,ages10-12, 13-15. Forms are available at the website www.lpyb.net or call Sheri Griffin at 441-1955 for Baseball and Linette Wells at 441-2320 for Softball. Registration deadline is Thursday, April 7 f or baseball and softball. Player evaluation an d draft will be Saturda y, April 9 at 1 p.m. no re gistrations will be accept ed after the day of the draft Player evaluation is mandatory players n ot present will be random ly assigned to a team. Lake Placid Baseball, Softball sign-ups runners were out as they tried to advance. One play, three outs a triple play. "In all the years I have playedball, I was never involved in a triple play," boasted manager Duke Hensley, the centerpiece of the defensive gem that carried The Securitymen to a 15-13 win. Paul Brand homered for Central while Don Cunningham and Kyle Saunders (double) had four hits each for the Tiremen. Jim Morgan (double), Tom Walsh and Pete Mathews had three hits each in the loss. Lake Placid Marine won a nail-biter over Lockhart Service Center 14-13. The Mariners employed a Ted Williams shift on lefty slugger Dave Reed with two out and one on in the last inning. Reed's smash to left was hauled in by Howard Carney near the fence to seal the win. Larry Lane had four hits and a number of fi ne defensive catches to thwart the Lockhart team Carney, And y Timermanis and Ji m Hensley had three hi ts each in the win. For Lockhart, Billy Tod d had four hits, while Ree d, Dick Cook, Cliff Blum l and Paul Stephenson h ad three hits each. Yates Insurance held o ff a late rally by Schooni's to defeat The Restauranteu rs 14-11. Barry Hurlbut led t he way with four hits (do uble). Jim Morgan (triple ), Bill Gallagher and mana ger Dusty Hensley h ad three hits each with Ji m Radcliff adding a doub le and triple. For Schooni's, Bo b Roth had three hits. Continued from 1C LP Seniors see nail-biters Monday Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Sebring S eventy and Over Softball L eague played its'final two g ames of the season Tuesday a nd Thursday, March 15 and 1 7,in warmFlorida weather. On Thursday the Silent S alesman met the first place H ighlands Merchantsfor the f inal game of the season. The Salesman came ready t o play, hoping to be the only t eam to beat the Merchants t wice in the season. The 16-2 record of the M erchants did not faze the S alesman as they kept it a b ack-and-forth game. Leading 15-14 going into t he last inning, the Salesman p ut the gameaway by batting a roundand scoring eight t imes for the 23-14 win. Doing their share in the 37h it attack were Bob Roth, 5f or-5 with a double, Gene H anford, 4-for-5having four r uns scored, JimLongman, 4f or-6 (double) and Bob F ahnestock, 4-6. Having three hits each were L es Smith, Fred Moore,Stu H ayner and Ray Concepcion. Rapping out two hitseach w ere Al Taratuta, "Spider" M cMinn,Ken Filppula and R uss Moody. The Merchants held their g round withCharlie Quinn g oing 2-for-4 with a home r un. Don Ward also had a homer with his 2-for-5. Ron Lewis 4-for-4 (triple) and Glenn Minic 3-for-4 with a double. John Laysack and Harold Dinel each were 3-for-4. Millers went over the Rebels with a final score of 19-10. Jim Hensley came close to thecycle with a single, double and home run, going 3-or-4. Each hitting inthe doubleparade were Rod Palmer,Don Sheets, Pete Mathews and Dale DeMar. Syd Collins, Bob Foxand Jerry Kauffman each hit two singles. Allstate topped the Blue Jays8-4. Allstate's manager Rudy Pribble reported that their team put forth a strong defensive effort. Outstanding in both offense and defensive plays was Moe Pier. The Blue Jays had two doubles by Richard Godfrey and Bill. John Penna went 2-for-3 and Chester was 3-for-4. In Tuesday's actiona tooclose-to-call game between Allstate Insurance and Millers Heating and Air Conditioning went to Allstate, 16-15. Allstates Marvin Knutilla, Don Day and Ken Crandall eachhad 3-for-4 while Bob Warren went3-for-3 with a walk and was credited with scoring the winning run. Millers'high at bat was Bob Fox's three hits, including two singles and a home run, and Kyle Saunders whoalmost cycled wiith a single, double and triple. Jerry Kauffmanwas 3-for3 and Syd Collins had 3-for-4. The Silent Salesman played the Rebels in what started off as a battle of evenly-matched teams, with the Rebels taking a 9-4 lead. In the bottom of the fourth inning, the lower half of the Salesman batting order scored six runs to take the lead 10-9. But the Rebels'bats then went limp and managed only one run the rest of the way for a 20-10 Salesman win. Smacking the ball well for the Salesman were Al Taratuta 4-for-4, Ray Concecpion had a double and two singles and Les Smith had three hits, including a triple. Banging out three hits each were Bob Roth, "Spider" McMinn, Jerry Murphy and Fred Moore. Highlands Merchants toppled the Blue Jays 12-8. Their Don Ward had a triple in his 2-for-4, Ron Lewis went 4-for-4 and Cal Bready was 3-for-4. All having two hits were Mike Jurmu, Harry Bell, Glenn Minic, Shawn Kildoff, Harold Dinel and John Laysack (their oldest player). The Blue Jays gave it a valiant try with Richard Godfrey going 3-for-4 includinga triple. Doran Quigg and Jimmy Johnsoneach were 4-for 4and others getting hitswere Don Cunningham, Bill, Chester and John Penna. The teams appreciate all the support they have been given and for the privelege of playingat the Highlands County Sports Complex. Highlands Merchants top Senior standings Final 2011 Sebring 70-OverLeague Standings TeamW-L Highlands Merchants16-3 Allstate Insurance 12-7 Millers Heating and Air Conditioning 11-8 Silent Salesman 9-10 Rebels6-13 Blue Jays3-16 I was never involved in a triple play.'DUKEHENSLEY Central Security manage r

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Page 4CNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com 4:00pm-6:00pm Friday March 25th Five more runs came in for t he Lady Streaks in the bott om of the second as a variety o f hits and errors kept the a ction moving with Mann, F aircloth and Grimaldo each b ringing runs across. Now up 13-3, the Streaks w ere just a few innings away f rom ending it early on the t en-run rule, but the Lady D evils weren't going to let it b e quite that easy. Hunnicutt reached on an e rror and Johntavia Perry l aced a single to center to s tart the third. With one out, Gates loaded t he bases on a hit-by-pitch a nd Bateman worked the c ount for a walk to bring a r un home. Mackenzie Myers then a lso "wore" a pitch to force P erry home. But while Avon Park s howed they were game, S ebring soon proved to just b e too much, plating five m ore runs in the bottom of t he inning. Mann bunted home a run, F aircloth knocked in two, G rimaldo tripled home a run a nd Lower collected an RBI s ingle. From there, things went quickly with Hoffner holding off any further scoring chances for the Devils and ending it in the fifth.. "We struggled a bit pitching tonight and allowed for more walks then we would have hoped for," Sebring head coach Joe Sinness said. "Our defense still played a very tight game. Avon Park lent us a couple of errors that were to our benefit, but we were also hitting the ball much harder tonight. When you hit the ball hard, good things happen." Both teams return to action Tuesday, with the Devils traveling to Lake Placid for a county and district contest, while the Streaks host Ridge in district play. Continued from 1C News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Though it went for an out, this hard-hit fly ball off the bat of Katelynn Stoll showed the Avon Park offense has some spark. Sebring delivers versus Devils Westergom walked, stole second, moved to third on a Randall ground out to the right side and came in on a passed ball. Anight earlier, the Streaks broke their slide with a 7-1 win at home against Avon Park. Neither team would score until the third when Avon Park's Ty Jackson drove in Matt Roberts before Sebring pitcher Hoffner buckled down to strike out three in a row. Sebring would score when Abeln doubled, stole third and then was grounded in by Randall during the bottom half of the inning. The Streaks would get a passed ball to score Nate Green in the fourth who was followed home by Knight, giving the Streaks a 3-1 lead. The Big Blue batting machine would score three more in the fifth as Avon Park shuffled through their pitching staff to try and give their arms a rest for upcoming district play, according to coach Whit Cornell. "We have to have someone ready for our upcoming district games," he said. "We start playing three games a week next week and we will need everyone rested. Hopefully, we can give them a rest and come back and be ready." "We are still a young team, but I am seeing some things I like out there," Cornell added. "We swung the bats well and we played hard. We made some mistakes and hopefully we have learned from it." Sebring's Hoffner would continue to hold the Devils bats at bay, allowing just three hits over four innings and finishing the game strong. Sebring would ring one more in the sixth, pushing the score to 7-1, and Hoffner retired the last three Avon Park batters to cap the gam e. "Corbin did a great job ," said Sebring coach Hopp y Rewis. "He is our Frid ay night pitcher, but we used so many the other night, w e had to move him up." The Devils look to improve on their 7-6 reco rd with a non-district gam e Monday at home again st Hardee before continuin g their district slate with a home date against Tenor oc Tuesday. The Steaks, meanwhil e, have until Tuesday befo re the host Haines City in di strict play. Continued from 1C News-Sun photo by KIM GAUGE R Matt Randall was in the right place at the right time as this pop-up glanced off Seth Abeln's glove before Randall snared it Friday night at Hardee. Streaks get back to winning ways Sebring7Avon Park1 Special to the News-Sun It was a technical error c orrection that pushed the S ebring boys to a narrow win a t Tuesday's Quad Track and F ield meet at Firemen's F ield, as reported in the F riday, March 18 edition of t he News-Sun. But a later correction gave s ix more points to the Red D evils, giving them the top total for the day. It had been incorrectly listed in the computer that Avon Park runner Travious Knight would run in four events, one over the allowable number for one meet. Knight's track-record 10.74 time to win the 100meter dash, then, was disallowed and those six points taken off the Devil total. But one of the events, the 4X400 relay, was not an event for Knight, thus pushing his number of events back to three and reinstituting his event win and six points. With the correction, the Avon Park boys total for the day came to 87.83 to Sebring's 83.16. Track meet correction across the line by Jon Brownson and Jonathan Gore. The final competitionboth days came from the IMSAGT2 Challenge by Yokohama. Henrique Cisneros and Cooper MacNeil had 1-2 finishes in both the first and second rounds of that series. Thursdayit was Ma rk Bullitt bringing the Musci le Milk Porsche in for a thir dplace finish while Friday it was Fernando Pena wh o was third on the podium. Continued from 1C Races get weekend started

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, March 20, 2011Page 5C 3310 Hwy. 27 South Sebring, FL33870EOEE-mail: resumesebring@crosscountry-auto.comFor more information about Cross Country Automotive Services,we encourage you to visit our website at: www.CrossCountry-Auto.co mComprehensive Benefit PackageNow Hiring Full & Part Time Customer Service AssociatesStarting at $9.00 an hourBilingual English/Spanish Differential Candace Weldon Associate of the MonthI love being able to help someone. My co-workers and supervisors are great!Ž … Candace WeldonBe a HERO like Candace Weldon863-402-2786AGreatPlaceto Work!Ž… Candace Weldon € Tuition Reimbursement € Life Insurance € Vacation Time € Holiday Pay € Medical € Dental Supervisors Positions Available IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA Case #: GCS 10-1019 CARLA RENEE BENNETT, Personal Representative ESTATE OF DAVID L. MARSH, Deceased Plaintiff(s), vs. GREGORY LEON CORRELL, a/k/a Gregory Correll, DENNIS ALLEN CONNERS, a/k/a Dennis A. Conners II, DANIELLE MARIE CONNERS, a/k/a Danielle Conners, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Department of Justice, JOSE QUINONES, GERARD SERVICES INC., COMMONWEALTH FINANCIAL SYSTEMS, INC., and CITY OF AVON PARK, FLORIDA, et al Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final decree of foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Highlands County, Florida, described as: Lot 1, LESS the West 75 feet in Block 2, of H E COYS SUBDIVISION, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 9, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Commerce Street Entrance of the Highlands County Courthouse in Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 18th day of April, A.D. 2011. WITNESS my hand and official seal of this Honorable Court, this 15th day of March A.D. 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of said Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk March 20, 27, 2011 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 19th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR SAINT LUCIE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 562011CA000074 OCULINA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. BAILEY WATSON, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company; LLOYD WATSON and PAULA WATSON, his wife; GARY L. WATSON; ERROL S. WATSON; CRAIG WATSON; Unknown Spouse of CRAIG WATSON ;et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment Of Foreclosure dated March 10th, 2011, in Case No. 562011CA000074, in the Circuit Court of the Nineteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Saint Lucie County, Florida, in which OCULINA BANK is the Plaintiff and BAILEY WATSON, LLC, LLOYD WATSON, PAULA WATSON, GARY L. WATSON, ERROL S. WATSON, CRAIG WATSON, and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CRAIG WATSON are the Defendants, Auctioneer, Frederick W. Baker of Indian River Auctions & Appraisals, Florida License #FL A U 1526, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash the following described parcels of property set forth in the Final Judgment Of Foreclosure, to-wit: Parcel I Tract "Q", PORT ST. LUCIE SECTION THIRTYONE, a subdivision, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 14, Page(s) 22, 22A through 22G, Public Records of St. Lucie County, Florida, shall be auctioned on Wednesday, April 27, 2011, at 10:00 A.M. at the property site in Saint Lucie County, Florida, which is 1775 S.W. Gatlin Boulevard, Port St. Lucie, Florida 34972 Parcel II A part of Section 17, Township 35 South, Range 40 East, described as follows: The East Half of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter,and the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter, less the North 75 feet and less the East 40 feet thereof. This property is located at the Southwest corner of Peterson Road and South 37th Street, Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Florida, shall be auctioned on Wednesday, A pril 27, 2011, at 4:00 P.M. at the property site in Saint Lucie County, Florida; and Parcel III Lots 1 to 39, inclusive, Block 48 and closed street contiguous thereto, Lots 1 to 41, inclusive, Block 52 and all of Block 51 and contiguous closed alley less road right of way and less Lots 53 through 58 and less the South 10 feet of Lot 59, UNIT ONE, LAKE LILLIAN SECTION HIGHLAND LAKES SUBDIVISION, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 77, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida, shall be auctioned on Thursday, April 28, 2011, at 11:00A.M. at the property site in Highlands County, Florida. A NY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED this 14th day of March, 2011. COLLINS, BROWN, CALDWELL, BARKETT, & GARAVAGLIA, CHARTERED 756 Beachland Boulevard Vero Beach, FL 32963 Telephone: (772)231-4343 Facsimile: (772)234-5213 /s/ Calvin B. Brown Calvin B. Brown, Esquire Florida Bar No. 110465 Attorney for the Plaintiff IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administrator, ADA Coordinator, 250 NW Country Club Drive, Suite 17, Port St. Lucie, FL 34986, (772) 807-4370, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711, or 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. March 20, 27, 2011 1050Legals 1050Legals Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or le ss. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads p laced under the Bargain BuysŽ discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom se t ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad st ating Each,Ž the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open RateŽ pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain BuysŽ specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home,Ž are allowed to be pla ced under the Bargain BuyŽ category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS € Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 385-6155. € The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 IN THE CIRCUITCOURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NUMBER: GCS10-1217 BAY STREET VILLAS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Plaintiff, -vsSAMUEL R. CARR and WILLIAM C. THOMPSON, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final decree of foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida, described as: BAY STREET VILLAS #3, Being a portion of Lot 18, Block 89-A, TOWN OF SEBRING, according tothe plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 24, of the Public Recordsof Highlands County, Florida, more fully described as follows: Commencing at the Southeast corner of Lot 18, Block 89-A, Town of Sebring, as per plat recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 24, of the Public Recordsof Highlands County, Florida; thence North 15 degrees 10'00'' West, along the Easterly line of Lot 18, for a distance of 19.00 feet; thence South 75 degrees 00'00'' West, for a distanceof 5.32 feet; thence North 15 degrees 00'00'' West, for a distance of 41.60 feet for Point of Beginning; thence continue North 15 degrees 00'00'' West, for a distance of 20.80 feet; thence South 75 degrees 00'00'' West, for a distance of 34.60 feet; thence South 15 degrees 00' 00'' East, for a distance of 20.80 feet; thence North 75 degrees 00'00'' East, for adistance of 34.60 feet to the Point of Beginning. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room located in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes (2010), at 11:00 o'clock A.M. on the 4th day of April, 2011. NOTICE: Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. SIGNED this 8th day of April, 2011. ROBERT GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk March 20, 27, 2011Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 Classified ads get fast results Having something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what you're doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 385-6155

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Page 6CNews-Sun Sunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.co m PROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORYPROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY Install doors, windows, flooring, plumbing & more!Licensed & InsuredLic# HM0096HANDYMAN BOBCall 863-452-5201 or 863-449-1744 Service € Repair € Supplies € Equipment Delivered Right to your DoorPool Service & Mobile Retail(863) 382-7728Fax (863) 402-2200 poolparadise101@aol.com www.poolparadiseonline.com Brad & Julie Kurtz Phone (863) 382-7551 FAX (863) 382-2750 1405 US 27 North Sebring, FL 33870 C A M P B E L L  S S C O L L I S I O N C E N T E R , I N C Jim Campbell Owner DID YOU KNOW?THENEWSSUNPROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY ISONEOFTHEMOSTECONOMICAL&EFFECTIVEMEANSOFADVERTISINGTODAY? CALLJOYCE@ 863-385-6155OREMAIL: joyce.fettinger@newssun.com FORDETAILS!! WANDA KLINE WEIGHT LOSS & WELLNESSSee what one drop of your blood indicates as to YOUR nutritional health and well-being. By appointment only863-414-4066 LIVEBLOODANALYSISŽ &WILLIAMSJANITORIALCARPETCLEANING$1095 Per Room3 Rooms Minimum € Upholstery Cleaning € All Types of Flooring € Free EstimatesLic € Bonded € Ins(863) 214-1940 863-465-7491TREE SERVICE,INC.Joe Johnsons TRIMMING € REMOVAL SOD INSTALLATION € STUMP GRINDING LOT CLEARING € PRESSURE CLEANING Will Beat Any Written Estimate!Peoples Choice Award Free Estimates Licensed & Insured Avon Park (863) 453-2525 Lake Placid (863) 699-2525 Lake Wales (863) 679-9200 Sebring (863) 382-1515 Wauchula (863) 767-1515Sebring Fax (863) 382-9939 W al-Mart Loca tions: Lake Wales (863) 676-0569 Sebring (863) 385-5371 Avon Park (863) 452-7010 INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED No job is too small. We can take care of all your home repairs and maintenance needs.€ Small Flooring Jobs € Some Electric & Plumbing863-381-6677 Free Estimates Rogers Handyman ServicesRoger McCartney JRlicensed and insured Rockys Tree Service LLC863-382-239724 Hour Emergency ServiceServing All Central Florida Area€ Fully Insured € Tree Removal € Tree Trimming € Free Estimates € Tree Topping € Stump GrindingSebring,FL 33870 20 Years experience Excellent References Daily Weekly BiweeklyMonthly Janitorial Service Recently Relocated to Lake Placid Sebring Looking To Build New Clientele 863-243-1801 / Shelly A long$1000per hour Fair and Honest Service Based on Christian ValuesAre You or a Loved One Living Alone?€ Safety/Wellness Visitations € Life Management Assistance € Nursing Home Visitation & Reporting € Errand/Concierge ServicesPersonal Concierge Services€ item pick-up/delivery € grocery shopping € courier/delivery € petsitting € pet transport to vet or groomer € home security checks € meal pick-up/delivery € plus much,much more!!! (863) 382-8825www .kbcar eandconcier ge.com Trustworthy, Insured & Experienced Freedom Lawn CareGet the freedom you deserveCarl Horton ~OwnerVet. & Sr. Discount € Lawn Maintenance € Landscaping € Small Tree Work € Clean Ups € Free Estimates863-655-2526 W e d d i n g g C h a p e l o f f L o v e Romantic Weddings Renewal Of Vows Commitment Ceremonies Designs For Your Cherished Moments Will Come To Your Location 4 Ministers on Staff863-385-5673 Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 Nest Egg Bookeeping, Inc.Why pay accounting fees for bookkeeping? € Monthly Bill Pay € Bank Reconciliations € Correspondence € Insurance/Medicare AssistanceCall to see how we can help youƒ863-385-0888NESTEGGBOOK@YAHOO.COMSpecializing in individuals Ser vice A vailable 7 Days A W eek Website: extraordinaireairconditioning.com EXTRAORDINAIRE HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING LLC 863-451-2399Mike & Kandy Sheldone CEO/Owner Lic# CAC 1816569All Service Calls $40 € Free Estimates € Licensed & Insured € Will Meet or Beat Any Price Family Owned &Operated with over 6 years experience Addison Lawn Care 863-441-0055 A Precise CutYARDCLEANUP, FULLLAWNCARE, HEDGETRIMMING& MORECOMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIALFor all your lawn needs,call Larry at381-0584for a Free Estimate & Great Service! Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 Serving Highlands & Hardee County 10 Years Experience … PC Repair Service Software Installation Custom Built Computers Virus & Ad Ware Removal Home & Small Business Networking Free Estimates … Pickup … DeliverySAW ComputersCall Stephen at 863-832-9556 Email: Stephen.wingo@yahoo.com"WAUCHULA CHURCHSeeking Part Time Worship leader. Call 863-773-4267, 8am 12:30 pm, hourly and travel comp." 2100Help Wanted 2000 Employment LOST MAN'SWALLET @ Sweetbay Parking Lot, Sebring on Saturday, 3/12/11. 863-385-6630 REWARD. FOUND -DOG, white male, 40-50 lbs. Found Mar 15th on Bluebird in Leisure Lakes, Lake Placid, FL. 863-465-6688. 1200Lost & FoundCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day y our ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us: 385-6155 News-Sun Classified 1100Announcements Highlands County Sheriff's Office Request for Proposals (RFP)RFP 11-01 Enterprise-Wide Document Imaging Software The Highlands County Sheriff's Office is seeking RFP's from vendors to provide a fully developed, integrated, and implemented solution, along with technical support/services, for an ENTERPRISE-WIDE DOCUMENT IMAGING SOFTWARE. A ll requests for copies of this RFP should be directed to: Deb J. Olson, General Services Manager, Highlands County Sheriff's Office, 434 Fernleaf Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 (863) 402-7266, Facsimile (863) 402-7344.All technical questions may be forwarded to Rob Jordon, A dministrator of Information Services, Highlands County Sheriff's Office Law Enforcement Bureau, 434 Fernleaf Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 (863) 402-7257Proposals must be submitted in a sealed envelope and marked with the bid number and name to identify the enclosed bid. Bids must be delivered to the Highlands County Sheriff's Office, 434 Fernleaf Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M. March 31, 2011 at which time they will be opened. March 13, 20, 2011 1055HighlandsCounty Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2008-CA-000209 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE, Plaintiff, vs. ORLANDO MARRERO, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated March 07, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2008-CA-000209 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE, is the Plaintiff and ORLANDO MARRERO; JACQUELINE MARRERO; TENA NT #1 N/K/A BRANDI SCHNEIDER are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 30th day of March, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 11 AND 12, BLOCK 2, LAKE SIRENA SHORES RESUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 11, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 315 SIRENA DRIVE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on March 7, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAIN Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F08008937 GMAC-CONV-Team 2 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. March 13, 20, 2011 NOTICE OF SALE Notice of Public Sale of a 1998 Key West Stealth boat, HIN #KWEST143L798, trailer VIN #1ZJBB19128C007786, Yamaha motor C115TLRW ID# 332423. Owners: Kenneth Lambert and/or Donald Chancey of Wauchula, FL. Sale to be held to satisfy repair and storage lien on April 21, 2011, 8 a.m., at Gone Fishin' Marine, 236 Commercial Way, Sebring, FL. March 13, 20, 2011 PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE The Heartland Workforce Business Enhancement Committee will hold a teleconference meeting at 2:30 pm on Wednesday, March 23, 2011, originating at the Heartland Workforce A dministrative office, 5901 US Hwy 27 S, Sebring, FL 33870. Interested individuals should arrive no later than 2:25 pm. Topics of the meeting are various. For more information see agenda posted on the Heartland Workforce website at www.hwib.org March 20, 2011 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the ficitious name of HEARTLAND VITAL CARE located at 6360 U.S. 27 North, in the County of Highlands, in the City of Sebring, Florida 33870 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Sebring, Florida, this 17th day of March, 2011. Heartland Pharmacy Inc. March 20, 2011 1050Legals

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, March 20, 2011Page 7C Highlands County Board of County Commissioners For minimum qualifications and a full job description visit us on our website at www .hcbcc.net You must complete our electronic job application or submit a completed paper application in order to be considered for employment with Highlands County BCC.The following position closes on 03/25/2011 Library Assistant I … 423 PG 8 $9.57/hour … $15.39/hour.EOE/Vet Pref/Drug Free Workplace2010 ENCLOSEDtrailer 24'X 8'X 7' escape door GW 10,000 lb. $6900; 2005 20'X8' flat GW10,000 $3500, 863-260-1709 9220Utility Trailers ATV KAWASAKIBAYOU 220 Low Hours! Adult Driven! Garage Kept! Very Good Condition! $1300 OBO. 863-381-2414 1973 NORTON850 COMMANDO Restored, very low miles includes Owner's Manual. One Owner Rare Find Great Price. $9,000, Make Offer! 863-382-8985 or 863-465-9100 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation1996 TRAVELMASTER MOTOR HOME Good condition. Awnings, generator, lots of extras. Good tires. $11,000. 863-314-8557. 8450Motor Homes RV 38'2010 5TH Wheel. EAGLE RIDGE by HEARTLAND, 2BR, 1BA, 2 slides, fiberglass, W/D, awning. All options. $29,000 obo. Immediate Sale! 321-437-5887 CAMPER -1999 PROWLER LS Excellent Condition, Super Slide-out, Queen Bed, Many Extras. $7500 OBO. 570-352-7766 2011 39FT. Monte Carlo 2 slides, 2BR, sleeps 8, CHA, washer / dryer, self contained, microwave and awning. Every option. Limited Edition. $23,500. MUST SELL! 630-631-1795 2010 38'HY-LINE Travel Trailer Park Model. Very Clean. 2 Slide outs, W/D, Bayfront, non-smoke, no pets. Will Deliver. Lake Josephine RV Resort area. $21,000. 941-518-4040 8400RecreationalVehiclesPOOL SUPPLIES:Pump, Filter, Pool Cleaner (Barracuda) & Chlorine Tablets for above ground pool. All for $300. Call 863-453-7663. 8300Pools & SuppliesPONTOON BOAT20 foot Bass Tracker, New deck, 50hp. Mercury, with trailer. $3500 715-573-8889 or come by at 150 Jade Way, Lake Placid. 8050Boats & Motors 8000 RecreationNOTICE Florida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & SuppliesLAKE PLACID GARDEN CLUB ATTIC SALE 342 Bottlebrush Ave., Highlands Park Est., Sat, 3/26, 8:00am 2:00pm. Furniture, lawn equip., plants, household items, bric-a-brac, clothing, jewelry, baked goods & LOTS MORE!! AVON PARKMoving Out Sale! 137 W Lake Damon Dr. River Green Golf area. Sun-Mon-Tue, Mar 20-21-22, 7am 4pm. Furn., household items. Too Much To List! AVON PARK2075 N. Berkley Rd, off Stryker, Sat, Mar 19th, 8am-4pm. Furniture, children's clothes, & misc. SEB. -FRI. 3/25, SAT. 3/26, 8AM-5PM GIANT MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE ALL PROCEEDS TO BENEFIT THE FLORIDA SHERIFF'S YOUTH RANCH 4001 EILAND DR., SEBRING, FL 33875 OFF S.R. 66 & PAYNE RD. 7320Garage &Yard Sales VACUUM -Hoover 12 amp w/ Hepa filter. $30 863-873-3801 TIRES 4205X50 ZR16 $25 863-382-6741 TIRE 1P235X65RX16 $10 863-382-6741 MARINE BATTERYMarine Trolling Battery, new MCA750, RC180. $70 863-273-1846 JEWELRY ARMOIREcorner 39 1/2" high,7 lined drawers, 2 chain cabinets. Excl cond.$100 firm. 863-382-6360 GOLF CLUBSPower built, excellent condition. $30 863-385-2605 FREEZER -Upright, 18 ft. $75. 863-453-3032 or 863-873-7360. FISHING RODS& REELS. 4 new Shakespeare Ugly Stick with reels $90 863-273-1846 4 DRAWERchest of drawers. White. $15 863-873-3801 7310Bargain Buys TOOL MAN'SDELIGHT 10" Delta table saw w/ access., Craftsman 10" radial saw, 15 1/2 drill press & 10" band saw, 8" Tradesman 5 sp. bench drill press. Call 863-471-6794 4-8 pm. PROFORM CROSSWALK treadmill. Excellent condition. $150 863-453-3079 BED FRAME-wood full size, excel. cond., 36" Sony TV w/ media stand, entertainment tower, twin matress, Craftsman lawn mower. 863-471-6674 7300Miscellaneous NEW FURNITURE FOR LESS! HIGHPOINT FURNITURE OUTLET STORE 2346 U.S. 27 N, SEBRINGNorthofLowes&acrossfrom HomeDepot 7180Furniture 7000 MerchandiseSEBRING (2)Available 3926 Kenilworth Blvd, 1500 sq ft, $550/mo : A/C, office, BA, lg overhead door, near Sebring High School. 640 Park St, 6400 sq ft, $2500/mo : A/C, office, BA, 8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric, fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway. 941-416-2813 6750Commercial Rental LOOKING FORSEASONAL RENTAL 2BR, 2BA Condo or House for Jan-Feb-Mar 2012. In Sebring Preferred Call 863-658-1564, before 10 am or after 8 pm, or email: eliskagantert@rogers.com HOG/TURKEY LEASE2 Ethical Bowhunters seeking hog/turkey lease. No dogs, guns, ATV's, or mess. Contact: Irv, 608-516-8615 or irv.xpress@gmail.com 6650Wanted to RentSEBRING 20'X40'Warehouse, 12' overhead door, on busy Highway 27 across from Lakeshore Mall. 863-385-3474 6550Warehousesfor Rent SEBRING -Furnished, 1BR with private bath, in Senior RV Resort. Washer/Dryer, Cable, full use of house. No Pets, No Smoking. For more information call Gloria, 863-257-1577 SEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, W/D, Satellite, full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for RentSEBRING -Weekly/Multi-Week Condo Rentals Avail. Now. Located on Little Lake Jackson across from Harder Hall Golf Club. Lots of ammenities. Starting @ $500/wk. 863-385-5005, ext. 0 6320Seasonal Property SEBRING -3BR, 2BA, Lawn Care included. $675/mo. + security deposit. 863-253-1029 or 863-381-7967 SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 RENTALS2/BR,2/BA Central heat & air $595 3/BR, 2/BA CHA wall to wall carpet, screened room $750 3/BR, 3/BA Loaded,w/ garage $995 Low Security Deposit. 863-638-1516 The Avon Park Housing Authority is now taking applications for North Central Heights Homes, a new Rent RestrictedŽ single family home development in Avon Park consisting of 20 Two Bedroom, 46 Three Bedroom and 4 Four Bedroom homes. Rents will average in the low $400s for 2 br. homes and low to mid $500 & $600s for the 3 & 4 Br. homes. Applications open for Avon Park residents only; February 14 … March 11, 2011 and all other applicants after March 11, 2011. For further information, contact: Avon Park Housing Authority at 863-452-4432, Ext. 2220 LAKE PLACIDSun 'n Lake, 2BR, 1BA, 1CG, large scrn'd porch on back. New paint & carpet. $550mo, + 1st/last/sec. Or For Sale By Owner, Owner Financing. 863-464-8555 or 863-465-6091 6300Unfurnished Houses SEBRING -Small nicely furnished house 1BR, 1BA. Deposit $100. Monthly $375 with 6 month lease. Pay own electric. 863-385-1806 SEBRING -Fully Furnished2BR with fenced yard & concrete utility room w/Washer/Dryer. Will consider pets. $550/mo + $400 security deposit. Extra pet deposit. 863-243-4580 SEBRING -Country Club of Sebring. 2BR, 2BA, den, lanai, pool, beautifully furnished/decorated. Available April 1st. Call 863-386-0340. LAKE PLACIDNewer 3BR, 2BA, seasonal or monthly. Excellent furniture & appliances, near lake & boat ramp, No smoking or dogs. $1450/mo. After season, rent reduced. 863-699-1119 6250Furnished Houses SEBRING FREE 1/2 mo rent, free cable, lg clean 1/1 tile floors. quiet / safe. No dogs 863-385-1999 AVON PARKAFFORDABLE RENTRidgedale Apartments1, 2, 3 & 4 Br Apts Central Location, water & trash included Rent subsidized „ Based on household income. No Application Fee Call 863-452-4432 TTY 800-955-8771 EQUAL HOUSINGOPPORTUNITY KEY LAKEVILLASLAKEFRONT LIVING IN SEBRING 2 Bedroom townhouse unit. Clean & quiet, Screen porch, Outside patio, Central air, Washer/Dryer hookup, $585/mo., first & security. No Pets. 863-465-2740 AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; Washer/Dryer, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook ups. Students/Seniors Discount Call 863-452-0469. AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL : $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartments 6000 Rentals WHISPERING PINESVILLAGE 55 plus. 3BR, 2BA. Fully furnished & 3BR, 3BA, Partially furnished. Must see to appreciate. Call Mary 863-385-8806 VENUS -3/BR, 2/BA, large deck with pool & hot tub, 2 1/2 acres, Pole barn and fenced yard. Appliances stay. Rent or Leas w/ option to buy, considered. 863-441-5038 5050Mobile HomesFor SalePALM HARBORHOMES Factory Liquidation Sale 2009 Model Homes MUST GO! Call for FREE color brochures. 800-622-2832 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesATTENTION: CASH for your Home, Duplex, Apartment, Commercial Property. Rapid Closing, "As Is Condition. 863-441-2689 STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL 4320Real Estate WantedESTERO, FLLIKE NEW 3BR, 2BA, 2CG Duplex in gated community with clubhouse and heated pool. Quiet area, yet convenient to shopping, entertainment, etc. Asking $195,000. Will consider trade for home in Sebring/Highlands County, FL area. Call 239-498-1183. 4300Out-of-TownPropertyLAKE PLACID3/BR, 1 1/2 BA, Carport, 1011 Jonquil St. 1st and Last Security deposit. $600 Monthly. 863-465-3959 L.P. -OPEN HOUSE! FRI SAT-SUN 1 5PM. "Adorable" Love At First Sight! Like New. 2/BR, 2BA, 1 1/2 garage. New paint in & out.Great room with wood burning or electric fire place. Catheral ceiling, Dining room. Lovely kitchen with eating island. Dishwasher, garbage disposal, microwave, self cleaning oven, lazy susan, pantry ad refrigerator. Guest bedroom and large closet. Linen closet. Lovely ceramic bath. Lots of nice large windows throughout Master suite with huge walk in closet. Full bath, ceramic tile, walk in shower, New all season porch. Party room with covered deck. Perfect entertainment center. (A must see) New roof '04, new sir '05. Whole house generator. Lake Clay access. Furniture optional. Owner financing. $91,000. 1640 Oak St. Sylvan Shores. 4100Homes for SaleLake Placid SEBRING -VANTAGE Pte. single 2/BR, 2/BA, split plan, 16'X20' LR, dining area, fam. rm., screened patio, ample garage. Walk to club house / pool. A sking $115,00 w/ major furnishings. Call 863-471-3769 for info. OPEN HOUSE: Sun. 3/20 from 1-5 pm. SEBRING -Quiet Neighborhood on great fishing lake; 2,000 sf, 3BR, 2.5BA remodeled home with large garage & boat house. $219,000. 863-655-2278 MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE! SEBRING NO NEED FOR A BANK! Owner Financing 3BR, 1BA remodeled, NICE HOME! Woodlawn Elem. area. 1243 Fernvale Ave. 863-227-2717 4080Homes for SaleSebringSEBRING -RURAL LIVING adjacent to great fishing lake close to Sebring. 3BR, 2BA home, pole barn, 5 acres fenced, zoned agriculture $150,000. 863-655-2278 Make Offer! 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 FinancialOFFICE ASSISTANT A FullTime position has become available for an Office Assistant at Royal Care of Avon Park. The candidate must highly organized, self starter and detailed in their work performance. Excellent computer skills and documentation skills are a must. Apply in person at Royal Care of Avon Park, 1213 W Stratford Rd., Avon Park. (863) 453-6674 EOE/M/F, DFWP MERCHANDISERQUARTERday per monthGDS seeks a dependable individual to merchandise magazines, books and handle special projects in Sebring. Must own a late model vehicle with valid drivers license and auto insurance. Must also be computer literate with access to both email and the Internet. E.mail resume to: recuruiter@slobalinstore.com LPN'S WANTED Avon Park Intermediate Care Facility serving adults with developmental disabilities is seeking Licensed Practical Nurses P/T and PRN. We offer a casual work environment, competitive wage and benefits package. For details call Barb at 863-452-5141 JEWELRY SALESat Lakeshore Mall. Exciting job for right person with positive attitude people person out going personable friendly! Apply at 3$ cart, next to Food Court. JANITORIAL/RESTAURANT CLEANING Immediate opening for F/T Professional Sub Contractor to clean restaurant. Experience preferred, will train if necessary. Flexible hours. Call M-F, 9-5 1-800-577-1318 HIRING NAILTECH Pedicure, Manicure, Acrylic Nails. Full or Part Time. Paid on Commission. Call Tommy at 727-512-9335 or 863-873-2527.RESTAURANT HIRINGSERVERS, COOKS, & BEVERAGE CART SERVERS Needed at Springlake Golf Resort. Apply Monday through Saturday10am 5pm. For directions only, call 863-655-0900 2100Help Wanted DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 385-6155 Contact Usƒ By Phone (863) 385-6155 By Mail 2227 US Hwy 27S Sebring, FL 33870 By E-Mail www.newssun.com/contact/ WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 385-6155. Then shop till you drop! Classified Ads € 385-6155 NEWS-SUN

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Page 8CNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com EARLY BISTROServed 3:00 PM „ 6:00 PM Daily Sundays 12:00 PM „ 6:00 PM Best Early Bird SpecialsMINISTARTERSTire Treads $3.00 Skillet Mussels $5.00 Crab Oval $6.00 Asian Shrimp $6.00ENTREESDill Salmon $16.00Fresh Atlantic salmon grilled and finished with a fresh dill cream sauce served with rice pilaf and fresh green beansChicken Schnitzel $10.00Breast of chicken rolled in breadcrumbs pan fried German style in peanut oil finished with lemon butter and served with mashed potatoes and green beansCognac Peppercorn Steak $12.00Angus beef medallion grilled and finished with a peppercorn cognac sauce served with mashed potatoes and fresh green beansMussels Roma $10.00Prince Edward Island mussels steamed in an Italian tomato sauce served over linguine with shaved parmesan and toasted bruschettaGreek Spanakopita $10.00Hand crafted spinach pie, phyllo dough stuffed with fresh spinach Feta and select herbs and spices served with a Macedonian saladRustic French Onion Steak $10.00Half pound certified Angus ground beef in a French onion style brown sauce served on grilled rustic cheese bread with mashed potatoes and fresh green beansTilapia Pepperonata $12.00Fresh Tilapia pan sauteed with bell peppers and red onions in a brown butter lemon sauce served with rice pilaf and fresh green beansGuava Glazed Pork Loin $11.00Started on the grill and finished in oven with an Island style guava glaze served with jalapeno cilantro salsa, mashed potatoes and fresh green beansEggplant Stack $10.00Fresh eggplant in Italian seasoned breadcrumbs layered with mozzarella and marinara served with a side of linguine marinaraShrimp Allimon $13.00Gulf shrimp sauteed in a lemon cream italian cheese sauce tossed with linguineChicken Piccata $10.00Boneless breast of chicken pan sauteed with capers in a white wine butter and lemon sauce served with linguine and fresh green beans 3100 Golfview Rd. SebringLocated in Inn on the Lakes314-0348 Enjoy a Complimentary glass of house wine or draft beer.

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LIVING D SECTION News-Sun Sunday, March 20, 2011 By Kim Ossi, McClatchy-Tribune Information ServicesNo matter the reason you've been itching to dig up some earth from saving money to "going local" or even getting to know your neighbors through a community garden we've sussed out the details to get you from digging dirt to harvesting your bounty.One of the most important parts of the garden e quation is the quality of your soil. Jon Traunfeld, extension specialist with the U niversity of Maryland Extension, said to examine t he soil where you have chosen to grow your garden a nd look closely at the top 4 to 6 inches: Hospitable soil will be dark, crumbly and drain e asily. It also will be filled with soil critters like w orms and high in organic matter. Inhospitable soil will be compacted and drain p oorly. It will have few worms and will be low in o rganic matter. "If you put your seeds into the ground, chances a re they're going to grow," said Jessica Babcock, s eed technician for Seed Savers Exchange ( www.seedsavers. org). But if the soil is more on the inhospitable side, s ome options include: Bringing in quality gardening soil from your l ocal garden center and mixing it with your existing s oil. Having your soil tested to determine what nutrients are missing and then adding those nutrients in through soil amendments, like compost or lime (found at garden centers), while tilling the hard, compacted ground. Starting a garden right on top of the grass, through a raised bed, or by using pots.BONNIE WELLER/PHILADELPHIAINQUIRER/MCTGood garden soil should be dark, crumbly and drain easily.Remember: "Starting small is the key thing," Traunfeld said. "Small" might mean container gardening. "You could start just trying to grow some things in flower pots on your front porch," Babcock said. But if you're ready for a ground-based garden, Traunfeld said the easiest way to get started is, before the grass starts to come in, "cover the area with whole sections of newspaper, and then put down something like compost, shredded leaves or any kind of organic material." That will kill the grass so you don't have to dig it up or rent a tiller. "If you put compost on top, in the spring you can plant right in the compost," he said. "If you plant tomato transplants you can take a trowel and cut through the paper and plant it right in the ground." Raised beds also work, but it will be more expensive since you'll have to pay for the surrounds of the bed and bring in quality soil. But the benefit is an "instant garden," Traunfeld said, which is really good if you have "cruddy" soil or it doesn't drain properly. He also warned gardeners choosing this method to be wary of the soil you're getting from your local supplier: "Look at it and smell it. If it smells bad you don't want it; if it smells earthy, it's good to use. You also can ask the company if they have any test results they can share. See if they know if it's really acidic or alkaline." Too much, too soon:"The big one is biting o ff more than you can chew trying to do a big gard en the first year," Traunfeld said. Pest control:Not just insects, but deer, birds, g roundhogs and rabbits. As far as insects go, the M aryland extension office only recommends organic p est control on vegetable gardens. "The first thing y ou can do is sweep them off into a bucket of s oapy water or go through squishing them," T raunfeld said. But he suggested getting to know o ther gardeners in your area to learn what insects are t ruly pests and which are beneficial. Weeding and feeding:"The second (most c ommon mistake) is weeds," Traunfeld said. These c an crowd your plants and compete for soil nutrie nts. And "you've gotta fertilize; you've gotta w ater," Traunfeld said. Improper spacing:Both Babcock and T raunfeld agree plant spacing is another very comm on error. "Really pay attention to what the plant t ag says or you read (online)," Traunfeld said. Giving up too soon:"Everything is different every season," Babcock said. "Just because something doesn't work this year, doesn't mean it won't work next year." Try a different location next year. Water more, water less. Or, try a different variety of the same plant. Consider your garden an experiment, and just savor every bite you're able to harvest. MANNYCRISOSOTOMO/SACRAMENTO BEE/MCTThe goal of every kitchen garden is to grow foods you enjoy eating. MARLIN LEVISON/MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE/MCTRaised garden beds can be costly to construct but have benefits. "One general thing (about gardening) is don't be intimidated," Babcock said. "Lots of times people say I'd like to garden, but I don't really know how,'so they don't do anything." Here are some guidelines: Evaluate what you eat:Agarden is of no use to you if you end up growing foods you don't enjoy. "If you know you like to eat carrots, plant carrots don't plant radishes," Babcock said. Examine the light at your potential plot:Vegetables and herbs usually need "full sun," which, according to Traunfeld, means 6 to 8 hours a day of direct sunlight. That's not to say you can't plant a vegetable in partial shade. "Less sun means that plants reach for light and can become spindly; individual leaves may be larger; fruit production will be lower; and overall plant health is reduced," he said. If your garden has partial shade 3 to 6 hours of sun a day Traunfeld suggests growing leafy greens of all types, like lettuce, spinach, radish and Asian greens. "It also depends on your climate," Babcock said. "If you're in a really warm area, some things might benefit from a little shade, especially in the heat of the day." If you don't have enough light or space in your yard for an in-ground garden, you could try container gardening. Many plants grow well in containers, which can be placed in the spot where light is available or you have room. Research what will grow well in your area:Some plants will not thrive where you live, or grow at all. Find your gardening zone atwww.garden.org/zipzone/. Your local cooperative extension may offer guides for gardeners as well. Seeds vs. transplants:Traunfeld recommended starting with both seeds and transplants, depending on the plant. "Things like tomatoes, peppers and eggplant, if you want to grow those things, you really have to use a transplant," he said. "Go to a good garden center to buy them. With herbs, you pretty much want to go with transplants." These types of plants need to go in the ground when the soil is warm. So if you plant from seed in the ground, you'll end up about six weeks behind plants grown from transplants. "But for all the other things, like lettuce, beans, cucumbers, squash then starting with seeds is the way to go," Traunfeld said. And "greens, kale, lettuce, spinach these things should go in as soon as you prepare your garden. Onions, Swiss chard," too, as these are all coolweather plants or have a long growing season. Hybrids vs. heirlooms:Hybrids are plants that have been bred to have certain characteristics (flavor, heavy yields, heat tolerance, etc.). Heirlooms are plants that have been passed down through families for generations, so they're particularly suited to where they originated. "Hybrids are good because they're pretty good standbys. And chances are they'll grow pretty well for you," Babcock said. "And there really is a lot more variety in (heirlooms) green, black, purple, orange, white; you can have all sorts of colors and flavors." Compost this, not that:You always can buy compost, which may be the best option if you're a rookie, Traunfeld said. But you also can create a small chicken wire enclosure or dig a pit in the garden and dump in herbicide-free lawn or kitchen waste. What shouldn't you put in the compost pile? "Dairy, meat, cooked foods, stuff like that. No pet waste," Traunfeld said. Occasionally turn your compost pile with a garden fork. Your compost is ready to be added back to your garden as a fertilizer when it looks and smells like soil, and you can't identify any of the individual items you added to your pile. RESOURCES Find your cooperative extension:www.csrees.usda.gov/extension Find your zone: www.garden.org/zipzone/ "Starting a Vegetable Garden," step-bystep instructions: http://growit.umd.edu/ GardeningBasics/index.cfm National Gardening Association: www. garden.org American Community Garden Association:www. communitygarden.orgPeppers are best grown from transplants. BO RADER / WICHITAEAGLE/MC T Reap the benefits of a homegrown kitchen garden

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DearAbby: I have been m arried for many years to a m an who is a good husband a nd father in many respects. H owever, he is obsessed w ith professional sports, e specially football. It is a ffecting our home and s ocial life. Over the years, "Louie" h as punched holes in walls a nd broken the bones in his h ands because he became so a ngry when his favorite t eam lost. He also has strong h atred toward rival teams. H is arguments with people w ith opposing opinions have c ost him friendships. His behavior is so annoyi ng and embarrassing the k ids and I don't want to be a round him on Sundays duri ng games. What's worse is t hat some of Louie's friends a re amused by his tantrums a nd egg him on, making him e ven angrier. Fortunately, he n ever hits anyone. I don't want a divorce, b ut I don't want to be a round Louie, either. Louie's problem" makes him u npleasant to be around. W hen I visit friends and f amily without him, they w onder if we're separated. I f he could shrug off peop le's comments and realize t he outcome of a game s houldn't affect him, we c ould be happier. What s hould I do? Bad Sport in New Jersey DearBad Sport: It's time y ou, your children and anyo ne else who cares at all a bout your husband stage an i ntervention and point out to L ouie that there are more i mportant things in life than h is favorite football team. C hief among them is learni ng impulse control so he d oesn't do further harm to h is body and his relations hips. It's one thing to feel p assion for a sport, but he is creating a situation where he doesn't enjoy it. What you have described is not normal, or healthy. He has crossed the line and is risking harm to his family, his relationships and his reputation. This is beyond "kooky" it's a little bit sick, and the person who needs to step in is you. DearAbby: I went through a difficult depression during the time I was pregnant with my daughter. As a result, I seriously considered placing her for adoption and kept the pregnancy hidden from friends and coworkers. During my third trimester I took a leave of absence and cut off contact with my friends completely. Now, two years later, I'm happy to report that I received therapy and treatment for my depression and anxiety. I am living a happy life with my baby girl. The problem is, I told no one outside my family about my daughter or the situation, even though everyone noticed my abrupt change in behavior. How do I begin to share my story? Will people be able to forgive me for cutting them out of my life during a difficult time? Beginning Again with a Baby in Texas DearBeginning Again: Because of extreme cases in the news, most of us are familiar with the hormonal imbalance that causes postpartum depression. Acondition called pre-partum depression is not as well known, but is also well-documented. I'm pleased you were able to get treatment and resolve yours. Share your story and end your isolation by telling your closest friends about your experience. If they are truly friends and care about you, they will embrace and accept you and your daughter and give you the support you need after your illness. And if they don't then you will have to accept they are not true friends and go on with your life. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Special to the News-SunAries (March 21-April 20) Aries, a night out on the town with friends is just what you need right now. After a series of days where it has been work, work, work, some recreation is necessary. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Taurus, take a breather because you will need to rest up for the week ahead. A supervisor is watching you like a hawk so there will be no chance for goofing off. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Gemini, a momentary lapse of judgement could cause a ripple effect. Think through all of your choices quite thoroughly to avoid a potential problem down the line. Cancer(June 22-July 22) Cancer, nobody can guess what you're thinking so you have to give some clues as to what you want. Indecision will leave others confused, and you don't want that now. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Leo, if only you could snap your fingers and everything would be taken care of. Unfortunately, things don't work like that and you have to put forth some effort to solve a problem. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Virgo, ease up on your social schedule because others cannot keep up with the mania. It's time for some quiet reflection and moments to yourself. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Aspecial moment that you were counting on hasn't arrived just yet. Libra. You may be wondering if it's ever going to happen. Don't worry, soon you will get the answer. S corpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Scorpio, instead of focusing on all the things you have to get done, figure out a way to help others. Tasks won't seem so monotonous if they're for the greater good. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Sagittarius, be the bigger person and end an argument. Where is this confrontation getting you anyway? Once this occurs many other things will fall into place. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) Matters of money are your utmost concern, Capricorn. With the tax filing deadline looming, you may realize some good news is coming your way that will fatten your wallet. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18 ) Make the most of a situation at work, Aquarius. Networking with the right people can open up opport unities in the future that m ay be just what you're lookin g for. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 2 0) Pisces, expect to be t he shoulder to cry on when a friend needs some urge nt advice. It's a role you do we ll. BirthdaysMarch 20 Holly Hunte r, actress, 53; March 21 Matthew Broderick, actor, 4 9; March 22 Ree se Witherspoon, actress, 3 5; March 23 Chaka Kha n, singer, 58; March 24 Alyso n Hannigan, actress, 37; Mar ch 25 Elton John, singer, 6 4; March 26 Kenny Chesne y, singer, 43. Page 2DNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com ROOFING SPECIALIST SERVING HIGHLANDS COUNTY SINCE 1989 Shingles Flat Roofs Roof Repairs Mobile Home Roofovers -FULLYLICENSED & INSURED385-4690State Lic # RC 0066817 QUALITY WORK AT A REASONABLE PRICE FREEESTIMATES THE LINCOLN LAWYERR(Matt Damon,Emily Blunt)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU PG13(Matt Damon,Emily Blunt)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30RANGOPG(Animated Voices by Johnny Depp,Abigail Breslin)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30HALL PASSR(Owen Wilson)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15GNOMEO & JULIET 2DG(Animated)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15THE KINGS SPEECHR(Geoffrey Rush,Colin Firth)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30 The NewFAIRMOUNTCINEMA63750 US 27 N. Sebring NOW SHOWINGFriday 03/11 Thursday 03/17 Suick CinemasInformation 385-9980 Office 385-9908New Dolby Digital SoundAll Seats $6.00for Matinee COMING SOON We will be featuring:Mar 25 SUCKER PUNCH DIARY OF A WIMPY KID 2 DIVERSIONS NEWB-GINNINGSBy ED SESSA ACROSS 1 Fly trap 7 Like CD-RW discs 15 Challenge opener 20 Dahl of "Here Come the Girls" 21 Viking weapon 22 Salsa queen Cruz 23 Knights' chargers 24 Result of a cock's crow? 26 1958 creature feature originally entitled "The Molten Meteor" 28 WWII GI, e.g. 29 "La Danse" painter 30 Bread, for gravy 31 Idiom ending? 33 At one time, once 35 Fastball, in slang 36 NYC commuter svc. that includes the Flushing Line 38 "Bungling for Dummies," e.g.? 42 Whammies 45 Colleague of Boris 46 "Voice of Israel" author 47 Shot from an air gun 50 Humpty Dumpty et al. 51 Very spicy fare 55 Compulsive speeder 58 G, in the key of C 59 Shindig for Swahili VIPs? 61 Sporty Toyota Camry 62 Sch. whose mascot is Rhody the Ram 63 Name on a cognac bottle 64 Hydroplaning results 66 Pulitzer poet Mark Van __ 67 '70s-'90s Angola neighbor 69 Syrian leader 71 Beeped 73 Toothbrush option 75 Olympics balance beam gold medalist after Olga 77 Sponge opening 78 Child expert LeShan 81 "Post __": No‘l Coward play 83 Bedbugs on the Orient Express? 86 Toon Chihuahua 87 Elusive golden city 89 Use ignobly 90 Skedaddle 91 Discouraging words 92 Roman god 94 Bounty initials 95 Drawing room event? 97 Bird with a tan? 102 Map abbreviation 103 What doers take 106 Early seventh-century date 107 Emeril's aptly named French Quarter restaurant 109 Gives birth to 112 Ancient threesided harps 114 Let out, as hogs 117 Hire an assistant, say 119 Hibernation luxuries? 122 It's in the groove 123 Trapped, after "up" 124 Strains, as a muscle 125 Knock off the track 126 Double-check 127 Travel document 128 "But still ..." DOWN 1 Credits lines? 2 Garden products brand 3 "$#%^*& geckos!"? 4 Ewbank who coached Namath in Super Bowl III 5 Run over 6 Confuse with booze 7 Tidal movement 8 Avis adjective 9 Concern for Edward Teller 10 Candy maker Russell 11 Catkin bearers 12 "Not a clue!" 13 Barrister's bailiwick 14 Bar, in 13-Down 15 It's mixed with lemonade in an Arnold Palmer 16 Negative state 17 Elite company 18 Wash sans soap 19 Like some beavers 25 Maui medicine men 27 Red Lobster freebie 32 Georgia, once 34 Shelved 37 Dr.'s orders 39 "This is __ toy" 40 Oklahoma's "Wheat Capital" 41 Lassie's refusal 42 Savior in a Bach work 43 "Young Frankenstein" role 44 Culvert 47 Prize for an inn's best guest? 48 Produced, as fruit 49 Jazzman Getz 52 Japanese noodles 53 Artist known for her mother-and-child works 54 "My Way" lyricist56 Evasive maneuvers 57 Icy mass 59 Payola payer 60 Spanish hero El __ 65 Good-time Charlie 68 Like some saxes 69 Gator follower? 70 Dubbing creations 72 Knight wear 73 Sign of things to come 74 Caramel candy brand 76 Teem (with) 77 Drops by 79 Farmer's place? 80 Pot part 82 Self-titled top-ten 1983 album 84 Hostess snack 85 Baby carrier? 88 Morning moisture 90 Curator's deg. 93 Makes fast 96 Youth support group 97 Cinnamon gum brand 98 Shared a place (with) 99 Some railroad cars 100 Rejects dramatically, as a contract 101 Frothy seasonal beverage 103 Like a case being tried 104 Minos' realm 105 Bridal accessory 108 __ hand: assist 110 Jane Curtin title role 111 Read letters? 113 Bus route component 115 Canadian gas 116 At no time, in verse 118 Head of the ranch? 120 New Deal dam org. 121 Past fast flier Solution on page 3D Gemini should watch out for momentary lapse of judgment Family flees in face of man's angry obsession with sports Fluttering wings call my attention to the activity at our bird feeder. Papa and mama birds are eagerly preparing for their offspring. The beauty of the cardinals, blue jays, doves, red-winged black birds, redheaded woodpeckers and even some finches brings delight and life to our backyard. They are examples of industriousness without a worry or care. Do you think they know the verse in Matthew 6: 26, NKJVthat uses them as an example for us not to worry? "Look at the birds of the air, for they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns; yet your heavenly Father feeds them." Trusting their God-given instincts, they take care of the moment not worrying about provision for the next season of baby birds. With the arrival of springtime, trees bud, delicate flower petals open and bright new shoots of green grass take over winter's dry browns. I'm always eager to watch the flowers'springtime fashion show. Bright daffodils, tulips, lilies, roses and more varieties than can be mentioned vie for our attention as they display colors, textures and scents that dazzle. There's no scurrying around wondering how they may be more fashionable than the year before. Do you think they know the verse in Matthew 6: 28 that highlight them as a model of humble, unconcerned beauty? "Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they neither toil no r spin; and yet I say to you that even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these." That's quite a comparison consid ering the riches and adornments at Solomon's fingertips. He could choose any robe, crown, sandals, jewels you name it to wow anyone. Yet, Jesus chose to compare him to the simple perfection of a flower of the field. Flowers bring beauty and color into our world just by being. Ah!Maybe that's the secret. They know how to be;'while we seem to always be doingrushing here and there and trying to please everyone. Perhaps it's time for us to embrace the rest of those verses (31a, 32b, and 33). "Therefore do not worry, saying What shall we eat?' or What shall we drink?'or What shall we wear?'Fo r your heavenly Father knows that you need all these thing s. But seek first the kingdom o f God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you." Does that mean not to be responsible? Of course not. But, it does mean to exchange worry for trust. Be like feathers and petal s. Trust in God's care. Selah Jan Merop of Sebring is a News-Sun correspondent and an award-winning writer. Feathers and petals are reminders of God's care Pause And Consider Jan Merop Horoscope Dear Abby

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By ANGIE WEAVER Special to the News-SunThe retirement place had i t all smart, manufactured h omes, well-laid-out streets, a tidy golf course and a sturd y clubhouse with a s parkling pool. Well, almost a ll. There was nary a note of v ocal music anywhere, n otwithstanding the occas ional program or touring s how-until that magic year w hen it all changed. Small pockets of folks w ho had enjoyed singing in v arious choirs and schools b efore their own retirement m oves to this tropic paradise w ere beginning to emerge, f rustrated and ready to create a n outlet just for them. In the summer of 1999, a h andful of musicians put all t heir hopes into one man, L inden McIlvaine. He had b ravely volunteered to direct t his fledgling company of a d ozen or so. Rehearsals were c alled, a hat passed to defray m usic costs and, as Sherlock H olmes would say, "the g ame was afoot!" More and more brave s ouls came to practice and b y the time they performed t heir first concert, the numb er of singers jumped to the 2 0s. That inauspicious b eginning was over 10 years a go and the clutch of voices h as risen to more than 60 a vid men and women who l ove to sing, and have d emonstrated this several t imes a year to enthusiastic a udiences at Highlands R idge and elsewhere. Ahandful of hopefuls met a t Anne Marie Eckelman's, w ho was their first accompan ist, and linked together this m usical group. With Linden as their g uide, they dreamed up their f irst concert. Doris M orenzoni was there and r emembers one of their first p rograms, entertaining at c ocktail hour during a p otluck supper. Both Doris a nd Anne recollect the Rock P ar-Tee spaghetti supper, c omplete with "Richie Rich" o n a motorcycle. It was their f irst fundraiser. On a more refined occas ion, Erma Morgan, another f ervent pioneer, recalls that after their first bonafide show, an Andrew Lloyd Webber medley, an audience member remarked how proud they all were of the group. She said it was just like their own kids'shows years ago, when the parents were puffed up with pride. Joan Landis, treasurer for 10 years, met with Linden and his talented wife, Bev, in 1999 to discuss having some music appreciation-type group at Highlands Ridge. She jumped at the opportunity, saying they really needed some culture around there. She also remembered a show where she and Mary Ann Wick were perched on ladders and sang one of the numbers from "Bye Bye Birdie". Karen Bohn recollects a show in which she was costumed to represent a nun from "Sound of Music", complete with a wimple, for "Climb Every Mountain," then changed quickly to a sailor suit for HoneyBun from "South Pacific". Judy Bowman, a devoted pioneer who recently had to bow out of Chorale, fondly remembers standing next to Clara Stadler, her bosom buddy, who kept her laughing for many years. Now a prolific author, Sunny Serafino recalls Beverly eagerly telling her about a new vocal group. She sang beside her friend, loved it, and urged Lenny, her husband to join. Male voices were then at a premium. They had a lot of fun the first year or so, then moved some time later; but they still recall fondly their years here. Pam Smart, another brave soul, remembers how nervous she was when she and Gil Wick were asked to sing a duet. Costumed in American Gothic farm clothes, they were a smash with "Anything You Can Do, I Can Do Better" during one of their spaghetti suppers. Researching copyrights and non-profit status was the aegis of Lynne Warman, who fondly remembers first rehearsals in individual singers'homes with pianos. Lynne had sung with Jim Thompson and a band called the RidgeRunners, but they decided to focus on Chorale. Lynne is still singing, but Jim has left for his first love, barbershop harmonies. The man in which the fledgling group put its trust, Linden McIlvaine, was almost destined to retire here and lead this special clutch of voices. His southern Delaware background seems to have centered him a talented music man who would instruct young students for 30-odd years, not only wrote curricula for music programs, but was selected to serve on the illustrious tate of Maryland education committee-quite an honor. He met his equally gifted life's partner, Beverly, at Lebanon Valley College and they have harmonized for the past 50 years. Close to retirement, they noticed a magazine ad touting Highlands Ridge in Florida and, after some mulling over, moved lock, stock, barrel and music, built their dream home here and prepared to settle down. Like other folks here longing to sing, Linden and Bev helped formed the nucleus for an ambitious chorale. Linden recalls fondly the casual summer concerts, but then singers would leave due to graduations, weddings, reunions and their absences would leave gaps of voice parts. His resolve kept it all together, however, and the stubborn handful of singers presented the Webber concert in the spring. More musicians moved here and soon there were two concerts a year, plus fund raisers, then sales people were eager to market the Chorale to perform at malls and other venues. Reason, or rather golf, prevailed and the Chorale has now settled down to the two annual concerts plus a wildly popular spaghetti supper. To say that birthing the Highlands Ridge Chorale was a "labor of love" is to speak the truth. All of the willing participants had to devote many hours of time spent away from their first love golfing and try to recapture the results of years of schooling, choirs, and, yes, the discipline it took to get ready to perform the concerts. From what this relative "newbie" has experienced, the result has been nothing short of miraculous. Remember, most everybody is mid-60's to 80's, and unbounded energy just does n't come as easily or stay a s long as it used to. I plan to remain a Choral e member until they carry me away, as do most of my newly-acquainted colleagues. The reason for this articl e is bittersweet. Our beloved director has decided to step down from his podium afte r this concert. We will miss him, but he'll still be here and Bev, his wife, will keep contributing her vivid sopra no for years to come. Three of our own very experienced director/members have agreed to split th e duties, which are legion, among them. Connie Carter Bob Thiel and Sue Shellhammer have gracious ly volunteered to steer our Chorale to ever higher accomplishments. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 3D Established 19311600 US 27 South € Avon Park Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home4001 Sebring Parkway Sebring, 385-0125 111 E. Circle St. Avon Park, 453-3101 Chris T.Nelson Craig M. Nelson Darin S. MacNeil W .W LUMBER CO. 465-3331Hwy. 27 S. Lake Placid"We're More Than Just Lumber" COMPLETE Building SuppliesPlease support the above businesses. They have made this page possible. Inspirational Thoughtsby Patricia Valentine THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502 Residential Commercial Mobile Homes"Small Enough to Know You Large Enough to Serve You"500 South Lake Avenue 382-8300 453-3019 THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502St.Luke 5:5-6,And Simon answering said unto him, Master,we have toiled all the night,and have taken nothing:nevertheless at thy word I will let down the net. And when they had this done,they inclosed a great multitude of fishes:and their net brake.ŽIn the above scriptures,Peter chose to obey Jesus and as a result he experienced a stunning display of divine power.In our obedience to God and His word it may sometime require doing some things that appear to be unreasonable.Our obedience to God should never be based on whether something seems fitting to our way of thinking.That is not to say God always bypasses common sense,but oftentimes what He requires of us may not appear reasonable or match our preconceived ideas. Disobedience will cause us to miss out on what God has in stored for us.Nothing pleases a parent more than to have their children walking in obedience.God is even more pleased when His children are walking in obedience.Be Blessed! Attend the Church of Your Choice! Tickets on sale now at the box of“ce 10 AM … 2 PM 382-2525 or online at www.highlandslittletheatre.org. Musical by Matthew Sklar, Chad Bequelin and Tim Herlihy. Based on the film, its 1985 and rock-star wannabe Robbie is Jerseys favorite wedding singer. Hes the life of the party, until his own fiancee leaves him at the altar. Shot through the heart, Robbie hilariously makes every wedding as disastrous as his own. ADULT LANGUAGESpecial Preview Wed. March 23 March 25 … April 10, 2011 ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Courtesy photo Members of the Highlands Ridge Chorale pose with retiring director Linden McIlvaine (seated front row, center). Thanks for the memories: McIlvane leaving Highlands Ridge Chorale CROSSWORDSOLUTION The man in which the fledgling group put its trust, Linden McIlvaine, was almost destined to retire here and lead this special clutch of voices. GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCEƒ

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Page 4DNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com 130 S. Commerce Ave. Sebring, Florida863-385-3497Mon. Fri. 9am 4pm Closed WednesdaysHighlands Countys Oldest Established Hearing Aid Of“ceSet it and forget it.Wi Series works with Starkeys SurfLink’ Media streamer, our set-and-forget wireless transmitter.With SurfLink, theres no manual pairing involved. Once you plug it into your TV or stereo, youre done! € It automatically streams sound directly to your hearing aids when your in range. € You can transition from one device to another simply by moving from room to room. € It lets other in the room listen to the TV or stereo at the volume they prefer.No matter where you are or what youre doing,Wi Series is designed to make listening easier. Its the ideal hearing aid for people who are active and on the go, enjoy spending relaxing time at home „ or both.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 5D E.O. Koch Construction1417 Swank Avenue € Sebring, FL 33870(863) 385-8649COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTIONLet our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property, build your dream home,or do your remodeling.For all of your Aluminum,Steel,and Conventional construction needsŽEmail: kochcon@strato.netState Certified License #CGC1515338 SEAMLESS GUTTERS … Specials5 INCH GUTTERS$2.99PER LINEAR FOOT6 INCH GUTTERS$3.99PER LINEAR FOOTMany Colors Available ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Courtesy photo T he voices of Crystal Gayle, Larry Gatlin and Andy Cooney (right) will celebrate country, heritage, faith and friendship on Monday during South Florida Community College's Artist Series. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The voices o f Crystal Gayle and Larry G atlin have proven to be u nbeatable over their long, G rammy Award-winning c areers. Now these great A merican voices are teaming u p with Irish America's f avorite son, Andy Cooney, f or a stirring evening of patrio tism honoring the Great A merican Songbook and cele brating country, heritage, f aith and friendship during S outh Florida Community C ollege's Artist Series at 7 :30 p.m. Monday at the S FCC Theatre for the P erforming Arts, Highlands C ampus. Larry Gatlin led the Gatlin B rothers through the course o f a four-decade career that h as taken them from dusty T exas stages to White House p erformances, to Broadway a nd the Grammy Awards, s traight to the top of the c ountry charts. Through it a ll, there has been one unifyi ng element music. After m any years of touring with h is brothers, Gatlin starred o n Broadway taking the lead r ole in the Tony award winn ing musical The Will R ogers Follies. Combining h is love of music and theater, Gatlin recently scored an entire musical using only his songs, both old and new. Gayle's warm, resonant vocal style created a country crossover phenomenon as timeless as the beautiful music in her repertoire. Country, folk, pop, rock n' roll, Broadway show tunes, and gospel all found equal place in her heart. Like her sister Loretta Lynn, Gayle too was a coal miner's daughter before she was a platinum selling singer and a world-class entertainer. Her Grammy Award-winning hit, "Don't It Make My Brown Eyes Blue" is recognized as one of the 10 most performed songs of the 20th century. Her 21 other Top 10 singles and 16 No. 1 hits helped to make Gayle one of the most popular singers of her era. Cooney's dynamic stage presence and outstanding voice keeps him one of the busiest entertainers in America. Direct from his sold out appearance at Carnegie Hall in 2008, and christened by The New York Times as "Irish America's Favorite Son," his repertoire spans from sea to shining sea, singing songs from Dublin, Ireland to Dublin, Calif. and everywhere in between. Cooney's talent and versatility provide the ability to deliver a song directly to the hearts of his listeners. The unique voices of Gayle, Gatlin and Cooney join flawlessly together in patriotism to honor America's Songbook and celebrate in celebration of country, heritage, faith and friendship. Combined with their own compositions, these American Voices are sure to bring the house down every time. The performance is sponsored by Quality Inn Conference Center of Avon Park/Sebring, Highlands Regional Medical Center, and Affordable Air by John and Carol Giordano. Tickets range from $39 to $46 and may be purchased online 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at http://performances.southflorida.edu. Tickets may also be purchased by calling the SFCC Box Office at 784-7178 or by visiting the SFCC Box Office in the front of the Theatre for the Performing Arts, 600 W. College Drive from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. MondayFriday. American Voices' perform in SFCC Artist Series Monday By ANNE WATSON Special to the News-SunMy parents, especially my mom, gave me art. They had tried music, specifically piano, but clearly it was not my forte. A year later, at 8, I found myself in private art lessons with a classical style teacher, and throughout my life, this is where I continue to find more of myself more of the best of whom God made me to be. It was in my mother's heart, if not always in her abilities, to give us the best, the most inspiring things of life that could draw us to the beautiful possibilities of life. When I think of each of the arts, I can think of my mom's inspiration, in some way ... Saturday morning house cleaning was accompanied by Camelot and The Sound of Music, Toscanini and Harry Belefonte on the record player. Her weekly trips to the library drew me to Victor Hugo ("Les Miserables") and the "Man of La Mancha." Her Spanish heritage and animated family gave me a knowledge of the rich value of each person and all peoples. And my parents'lives painted a portrait of the art'of giving, working in whatever small way they could for the poor where they lived in Miami, and then in St. Petersburg. And so, when I look at my work, I can see wonderful things that I know did not come solely from the stuff of me' and when I look at my children and husband, my students, and my family and friends or those new people I haven't had a chance to meet just yet, I am very thankful to be able to see them as a not yet completely known gift, just waiting to be opened. There is a painting in my studio that represents the spirit I received from my mom. It is of an old gentleman, looking up, into the distance, inspired and carried to the highest and best. My mom passed away Wednesday evening, but I don't believe the spark wen t out of her, as some say, but that her brigh test flame burns inexhaustibly now. "Art Sparks!" for me because of the gifts of m y parents. Please join me this Tuesday night in an artistic "toast" to all those who gave each of us our creative and joyful spirits. 6 p.m Try to be on time. At the Highlands Art League's Yellow House Glalery at 1989 Lakeview Drive. Anne Watson teaches painting in oils and acrylics, drawing and digital media at the Highlands Art League in Sebring, as well as in Avon Park and Lake Placid, and features a broad range of commercial and personal artwork. She may be reached at anne@annewatsonstudio.com and 449-0822. Parents light the first sparks A portrait of inspiration: Coventry Patmore by Anne Watson after John Singer Sargent. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South F lorida Community College p resents an evening of songs a nd stories about the Civilian C onservation Corps (CCC) w hen historian, musician and s inger Bill Jamerson takes t he stage at 7:30 p.m. W ednesday in the intimate 2 45-seat SFCC University C enter Auditorium, H ighlands Campus. The Civilian Conservation C orps was a depression-era w ork program that ran from 1 933-1942. Three and a half million t eenagers enlisted in the w ork camps to restore A merica's damaged natural r esources. The CCC planted more t han 5 billion trees, cons tructed thousands of miles o f roads, built dozens of n ational parks, fought forest f ires, and participated in soil c onservation projects. The CCC boys learned s kills on the job sites, took a cademic classes at night in c amp, and participated in v ocational courses such as e ngine repair and welding. In the process, the CCC t urned boys into men, teachi ng them good work habits a nd responsibility. Learn how teenagers got a long in camp, what foods they ate, what their work projects were, and the practical jokes they played on each other. Most of the boys came into camp without a dime to their names. Find out why, 70 years later, many enrollees call it the "best year of their lives." Since 1992, Jamerson has interviewed hundreds of former CCC enrollees and used their stories in his PBS Documentary "Camp Forgotten," his historical novel "Big Shoulders," and his CD of songs, "Dollar-ADay Boys." He shares many of these stories about the men and the projects they completed across the country. He takes his audience on a rollicking journey back to the days when Benny Goodman was the king of swing and a soda cost a nickel. He performs half a dozen original songs in each program, reads from his novel, and shows a short clip from his video. The stories are sometimes hilarious, and often heartwarming, his presentation is a must for anyone who enjoys 1930's history. This event is a partnership with the Friends of Highlands Hammock. Tickets are $10 general admission and may be purchased online 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at http://performances.southflorida.edu. Tickets may also be purchased by calling the SFCC Box Office at 784-7178 or by visiting the SFCC Box Office in the front of the Theatre for the Performing Arts, 600 W. College Drive from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. MondayFriday. A musical tribute to the Civilian Conservation Corps at SFCC Courtesy photo Historian, musician and singer Bill Jamerson will take the stage on Wednesday to pay tribute through songs and stories about the Civilian Conservation Corps. The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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Page 6DNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. "Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth." Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Children's Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. children's choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. children's mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Children's Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing God's Heart and Sharing God's Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and women's prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the "Place to discover God's love." For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mother's Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Children's Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) "Where the old fashion gospel is preached." Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the "Son" always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. JosŽ Gonz‡lez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 3:30 and 5 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Friday 5-7 p.m., every Saturday 9-11 a.m. and 2:30-3:15 p.m., first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lord's Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; "Building God's Kingdom for Everyone." "Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life!" "Alive and Worth the Drive!" Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is "Jesus is First at First Christian Church."Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Children's Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures'by Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP The Friends of Highlands H ammock is a diverse group o f individuals that have a s pecial love for the park, w hich inspires them to volunt eer their time, talents and a bilities to enhance the park's o fferings to the public. W hether they are working on p rojects, fund raising or simp ly providing a voice of supp ort, these local citizens w ork to ensure the park r emains the pristine jewel of H ighlands County. Friends projects are varied a nd numerous. The board and v olunteers provide the Music i n the Park annual concert s eries, which began in 2002 a nd has since raised $50,000 w hile providing an inexpens ive, outdoor experience with t he arts for the community. Another big fund raiser for t he Friends is the annual T urkey Trot 5K run. This p opular race, held on T hanksgiving morning each y ear, provides a reunion-like a tmosphere for more than 5 00 participants, many who h ave run this race for years. D oug Morton, 2010's overall w inner, is also the son-in-law o f the late Dick Brown, origin al founder of the Friends of H ighlands Hammock and a lso the inspiration for this a nnual race. Doug's wife, Arin Brown Morton, is also the vice president of the Friends organization as well as the daughter of Brown. Another avid runner is Friends President Chet Brojek. Chet is responsible for the organization of numerous runs at the park, as well as the Hammock Half Marathon. This is no surprise to those who know him. Chet retired following 35 years with the Highlands County school system serving as a teacher, track coach and athletic director. Chet continues his legacy coaching runners and is also the founder/president of the Central Florida Striders Running Club. Chet's civic duties and affiliations are too numerous to list, but his efforts for the park show in his ongoing dedication to improving all aspects of our operations. "The Friends of Highlands Hammock enjoy a great relationship with park manager Steven Dale and his goal of keeping the park our "Jewel of Highlands County," says Chet. The Friends assist with clean-up projects and facility improvements too. The donation of a former Highlands County School Board portable was one recent project, providing the park administration with much needed meeting and office space. "We are always happy to support the park's needs and requests," says Chet. The Friends help fill budgets gaps in numerous ways. They have rented equipment for resource management projects and purchased twoway radio equipment ensuring staff communication during events, emergencies or fires. Arecent major purchase was a four-wheel drive Kubota vehicle. This all-terrain vehicle is used for daily park operations and allows great fuel savings over operating a full size truck. Park Manager Steven Dale says, "I am very proud and fortunate to be able to work with the Friends of Highlands Hammock. In my 25-year Florida Park Service career, I have never worked with such a dedicated group. They are always supporting the park either financially with needed equipment and repairs or supporting us by physically working fund raising and events." "With cut-backs that most agencies are experiencing, it is even more vital than ever that we give an extra measure of support to our beloved Highlands Hammock State Park," says Brojek. "I urge the community to come out and experience the Real Florida." Want to join?The Friends of Highlands Hammock are always looking for new members. Annual membership is $15 for individuals and $25 for a family; both include 12 free visits to the park. Join the Friends by picking up an application at the Ranger Station or by emailing Dorothy.l.harris@dep.state.f l. us. Phone the Friends at 385 4736. Dorothy L. Harris is a park services specialist with Higlands Hammock State Park. Kudos for the Kubota Courtesy pho to The Friends of Highlands Hammock recently bought a four-wheel drive Kubota vehicle. This all-terrain vehicle is used for daily park operations and allows fuel savings over operating a full size truck. Park Manager Steven Dale (left) gets a ride from Friends President Chet Brojek. Guest Column Dorothy L. Harris

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 7D EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer .Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howe's Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun 'N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer "Kid C ity" Children's Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, "prime-timers," and Bible s tudies in Spanish. "Kid City" Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faith's Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Children's Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 8:15 and 10 a.m.; Bible study, 10 and 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and children's church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Children's & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kid's World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturer's Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Children's Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of God's Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and children's church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA) 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Women's Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30 a.m.; and contemporary worship is at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Children's Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacon's meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Women's Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on life's journey, you're we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP Did you know that this p ast Tuesday, March 15, was N ational Ag Day? In fact, the w eek of March 13-19 is cons idered National Ag Week. T his important day was d esigned to help folks recogn ize and celebrate the import ance of agriculture. But, the r eality is that agriculture is so v ital that it should be apprec iated all year long. Did you know that agric ulture provides almost e verything we consume and w ear? And as important as o ur food and clothes are, a griculture is so much more. M any people, especially our y outh, may not be aware of t he many benefits that we all d erive from agriculture. One o f the goals of this important d ay is to build awareness in t oday's youth. By unders tanding its importance, the A griculture Council of A merica hopes to encourage k ids to seek career opportunit ies in agriculture related f ields. As the global population c ontinues to increase, agric ulture is more important than ever. Products we use every day come from the plant and animal byproducts produced by America's farmers and ranchers. Medical supplies such as pharmaceuticals, ointments, latex gloves, x-ray film and gelatin for capsules are products that stem from agriculture. In addition, plant and animal biotechnology have resulted in new antibodies for immunizations. Some of the other assets we receive from our friendly producers include lumber, paints, brushes, fuel, lubricants, tires, upholstery, adhesives, solvents, paper, ink, shampoo, cosmetics, lotions, toothpaste, crayons, textbooks, baseball bats, and shoes. Not only does agriculture benefit humans, farmers and ranchers provide food and habitat for about 75 percent of the nation's wildlife. So if you missed National Agriculture Day this year, make sure to mark your calendars for next year. But we can celebrate all year long by showing our appreciation to our local producers. Next time you meet up with a producer, thank him or her for all the hard work they do to make sure we have the necessities and the luxuries we all enjoy. Teach your kids about the importance of agriculture and make sure they know that milk doesn't come from the grocery store. Here are some fun facts to get you on your way: Americans today consume 17.3 billion quarts of popped popcorn each year. Lettuce is a member of the sunflower family. The egg shell may have as many as 17,000 tiny pores over its surface. Through them, the egg can absorb flavors and odors. Storing them in cartons helps keep them fresh. There are more than 500 different types of bananas. Pumpkins are 90 percent water. The United States grows about one fourth of the world's total supply of fresh peaches. Americans eat approximately 100 acres of pizza each day, or 350 slices per second. Americans eat 900 percent more broccoli than they did 20 years ago. In one day a honey bee can fly 12 miles and pollinate up to 10,000 flowers. Soy crayons have been created to replace toxic petroleum-wax crayons. Soy crayons are safer to use, brighter in color and less expensive to produce. One bale of cotton can produce 1,217 men's T-shirts or 313,600 $100 bills. An acre of trees can remove about 13 tons of dust and gases every year from the surrounding environment. Every year in the U.S. each person uses the equivalent of one tree, 100 feet tall and 16 inches in diameter to fulfill their wood and paper needs. Cows have four stomachs. Adairy cow consumes 35 gallons of water, 20 pounds of grain and concentrated feed and 35 pounds of hay or silage in just one day. Onions contain a mild antibiotic that fight infections, soothes burns, tames bee stings and relieves the itch of athlete's foot. There are 340 million M&M's produced daily. There are about 600 kernels on each ear of corn. Each American consumes about 53 pounds of bread per year. Apig can run a sevenminute mile. Each American farmer feeds more than 144 people Corine Burgess is the Natural Resources Specialist for the Highlands County Natural Resources Department assisting the Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District Some interesting facts about agriculture Courtesy pho to A dairy cow consumes 35 gallons of water, 20 pounds of grain and concentrated feed and 35 pounds of hay or silage in just one day. In a year's time a dairy cow produces about 1,500 gallons of milk. News From The Watershed Corine Burgess

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By BARRYFOSTER Special to the News-SunSEBRING Great weather and a large field of competitors proved to be irresistible to thousands of fans as it appears attendance records were shattered Saturday for the 59th running of the Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring presented by Fresh from Florida. Although no numbers have yet been released, track officials say there was a record crowd recorded on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, with a steady stream of cars, trucks, trailers and motor homes making their way through the front gates. In fact, even past the 10:30 start of the race Saturday morning, traffic was stacked up down Airport Road and well down U.S. 98 as fans looked to get in for an exciting event. Those who came to stay also found crowded conditions. Campers had to pitch their tents side to side, with some even sharing pegs with their neighbors because the quarters were so tight. The situation was worsened to a degree by the increase in the number By BARRYFOSTER Special to the News-SunSEBRING It may seem like a long time away, but 2012 is actually right around the corner for a number of those preparing to celebrate landmark anniversaries in Sebring. Next year represents the centennial anniversary for the City of Sebring, the 75th year for the Highlands County Fair, the 70th anniversary of the Sebring Regional Airport and the 60th anniversary for the 12 Hours of Sebring. Members of the Sebring Hall of Fame Committee unveiled their plans for the Race celebration as well as the new logo for the event on Friday. The 60th anniversary year will also mark the induction of new members of the Sebring Hall of Fame. Over the past eight years, 21 competitors, five race promoters, five race officials and four manufacturers have been inducted. Plaques in their honor have been mounted in the Gallery of Legends building in the Raceways Paddock area. In fact, work has already started to have a display of Lady Streaks drill rival DevilsPAGE1CSee whos still alive in March Marketing MadnessPAGE4BRecycling on countys agendaPAGE2ACounty, LPmeet about utilitiesPAGE4ANEWS-SUN Highlands Countys Hometown Newspaper Since 1927 Sunday, March 20, 2011 www.newssun.com Volume 92/Number 33 | 75 cents www.newssun.com HighLow 82 58Complete Forecast PAGE 8A Sunny, warm and breezy in the afternoon Forecast Question: Will you attend the 12 Hours of Sebring? Next question: Should the county start a curbside recycling program? www.newssun.comMake your voice heard at Online Inside Phone ... 385-6155 Fax ... 385-2453 Online: www.newssun.com Yes 16.9% No 83.1% 099099401007 Total votes: 89 Arts & Entertainment3D Business 1B Chalk Talk 6B Classifieds 5C Community Briefs2A Crossword Puzzle2D Dear Abby 2D Editorial & Opinion3A Lottery Numbers2A March Madness 4B Movie Times 2D Police Blotter 2A Sports 1C Index locally owned community mindedHeartlandNational Bank Avon Park800 West Main St.863.453.6000Lake Placid600 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.699.1300Sebring327 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1300Sun n Lake North5033 U.S. Hwy 27 N.863.386.1322www.heartlandnb.com 59th running of the 12 Hours of Sebring Benefits of a homegrown kitchen garden PAGE1D By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comAVON PARK Citize ns upset with the Avon Pa rk council decision to termina te City Manager Bruce Behre ns have begun an active cam paign to let elected officia ls know their feelings and are in the process of forming a recall committee. Asource within the acti ve recall group, who wished to remain anonymous becau se of fears of retaliation, to ld the News-Sun that the com mittee members were mee ting this weekend. Next week, the committ ee plans to go public, but did n ot wish to be known until t he proper paperwork was fil ed the Highlands Coun ty Supervisor of Elections, t he source said. We need to make sure th at we do this right before w e announce who we are. This is a legitimate governme nt process, but some involv ed are afraid of the backlash th at might occur if they announ ce before the paperwork is in properly. The web site addre ss www.recallapcouncil.co m was registered on Wednesd ay with Internet ho st godaddy.com, but the conta ct information is listed as p rivate. The web sites home pa ge on Friday just showed a r ed British-style telepho ne booth, but the News-Sun w as told those seeking to kno w more about the recall wou ld be able to get meeting sche dules, petition and conta ct information of the committ ee members at the site. Although not yet associa ted with a recall committe e, Avon Park Citizen Ton ya Marshall has already start ed to contact groups within t he city to inform them of t he action. No, I am not a part of t he committee yet, but I want to Recall effort started in AP Web site started in move to oust city council members See RECALL, page 7A News-Sun photo by SCOTTDRESSEL Action was heavy at Turn 10 in the opening laps of Saturdays 59th running of the Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring presented by Fresh from Florida. Plans for 60th anniversary Race unveiled See PLANS, page 5A News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHE R TUFFLE Y Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam spent the day in Highlands County touring local farms growing biofeed crops and talking to local growers at the Bert J. Harris Ag-Center. By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Highlands County is well positioned to benefit from the new push toward alternative fuels, local growers and investors were told Friday during a visit to the county by Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam. The shift to biofeed crops that can be processed into fuel, in addition to helping the nation free itself from the need for foreign oil, will help save the local agricultural industry. This program helps keep farmers farming, said Bradley Krohn, president of United States EnviroFuels Putnam: Highlands County is cradle of innovation in biofuels Follow the News-Sun on www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun and Big field = big crowd Fans fill Raceway to nearly overflowing See BIG, page 5A See PUTNAM, page 7A www.newssun.comFor results of the 12 Hours of Sebring, look online at News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS The track is packed Saturday morning during the start of the 59th Annual Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring.

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By ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING County Commissioners will take another look at which direction the county needs to take in regards to recycling at their Tuesday meeting. At the direction of the board, County Engineer Ramon D. Gavarrete asked Kessler Consulting Inc., a small Tampa firm that specializes in waste management and recycling, to give a preliminary assessment of the countys privatization options for recycling. In a letter dated March 14, Kessler informed Gavarrete that the county would be required to dramatically increase its recycling rat, and that the county would not recover sufficient quantities of recyclables to attract vendors to develop and/or operate a Material Recovery Facility to serve only Highlands County. Kessler is recommending that the county work with the municipalities to include them in the process and to look at a recycling transfer facility where material would be consolidated and transferred to an already existing service plant somewhere else in the state. Kessler is also recommending that the county conduct further discussions with Choice Environmental, which currently holds the solid waste contract, and to get written statements on what Choice can offer before proceeding. Choice offered on Feb. 18 to provide the containers needed for curbside recycling free of charge and to pick-up single stream recycled materials under the current contract by adjusting regular garbage collection. The Kessler letter further advised the county to take a close look on how changes could effect existing business, government and school recycling programs. Overall, Kesslers preliminary assessment opened even more questions than answers and advised that the county do a much deeper analysis of all the different aspects before making a decision. Gavarrete is recommending in his agenda summary that commissioners execute a Consulting Service Agreement before moving forward with any request for proposal for recycling, and stated in a recent e-mail that he would brief each of the commissioners individually before the boards Tuesday meeting. Page 2ANews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com Published every Sunday, Wednesday & Friday at 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, Florida 33870 A Harbor Point Media Company OFFICE: 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870 OFFICE HOURS: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, Monday-Friday PHONE: 863-385-6155 MAIN FAX NUMBER: 863-385-1954 NEWSROOM FAX NUMBER: 863-385-2453 POSTMASTER: Send address change to: News-Sun, 2227 U.S. 27 S., Sebring, FL 33870 USPS ISSN 0163-3988 Periodical postage paid at Sebring, FL and additional entry office(s)CIRCULATION SUNDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY EDITIONS: If you do not receive your home delivered newspaper by 6 a.m., please phone the circulation department before 10 a.m. on Wednesday and Friday publication days, and before 11 a.m. on Sunday publication days and a replacement copy will be delivered to you. Subscribers who notify us after the times mentioned will receive credit to their account. Please call 385-6155.SUBSCRIPTION RATES12 mo.7% FL taxTotal HOME DELIVERY$60.46$4.23$64.69 IN FLORIDA MAIL92.236.4698.69 OUT OF FLORIDA MAIL105.99105.99 Deadlines for subscription changes are noon on Tuesday for the Wednesday edition, noon on Thursday for the Friday edition, and noon on Friday for the Sunday edition. Changes received after the times stated will be processed on the following publication date. Romona Washington Publisher and Executive Editor863-385-6155, ext. 515 Personal Injury & Wrongful Death Medical & Nursing Home Malpractice WorkersCompensatioin Social Security Disability Automobile Accidents KAYLO R R & & KAYLO R R P.A. MAR K K KAYLOR Lawyers, Past and Present. Helping the Injured Since 1968205 S. Commerce Ave Sebring, Florida 863-382-1900 SEBRING DISCOUNT BEVERAGES3750 U.S. 27 North, Unit C1 471-2277Next to Fairmount Cinema 6 Open Mon-Sat 9-6 Tobacco Products, Candy, Cold Beer, Housewares, Gifts & MORE!LOW PRICES MANY GOOD BARGAINS CLOSEOUTS!*Prices do not include tax.Natural Light & Ice Old Milwaukees Best12 Pack Can$6.99Budweiser & Bud Light12 Pack $10.99 Smoke Odor EliminatorCandles$6.79 Can$5.79 DVDs Entire Stock each $3 305s & Romy3 Packs$10.30 MistyCarton$45.99 Galaxy Natural CigaretteCarton$29.49 NewportCarton $50.49 3 Packs $15.57 SenecaCarton$31.69 March 16 125414950x:4Next jackpot $4 millionMarch 12 91023243738x:4 March 9 6917384352x:5 March 18 112183034 March 17 625263031 March 16 410111823 March 15 911131525 March 18 (n) 8622 March 18 (d) 9918 March 17 (n) 4958 March 17 (d) 9541 March 18(n) 03 5 March 18 (d) 49 4 March 17 (n) 33 9 March 17(d) 31 9 March 18 1115233213 March 15 71522303 March 11 1617273613 March 8 252731359 March 16 2839404853 PB: 9 PP: 3Next jackpot $85 millionMarch 12 14124147 PB: 3 PP: 4 March 9 1220284048 PB: 8 PP: 2 Note: Cash 3 and Play 4 drawing s are twice per day: (d) is the daytime drawing, (n) is the nighttime drawing. PB: Power Ball PP: Power Pla y Lottery Center News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Tuesday was Margie Rhoades last meeting as a member of the Sebring City Council. Mayor George Hensley presented Rhoades a proclamation thanking her for her many contributions and dedicated service over the years. Andrew Fells will be sworn in as council member on April 5. Council president John Clark applauds. Council says farewell to Rhoades The News-Sun would like to remind the readers that the names listed below reflect those who have been charged with a crime, but they are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law. If anyone listed here is acquitted or has charges dropped, they can bring in proof of such decision or mail a copy to the paper and the News-Sun will be happy to report that information. The News-Sun is at 2227 U.S. 27 South, Sebring, FL 33870. The following people were booked into the Highlands County Jail on Thursday, March 17: Adrian Louise Adams, 21, of Tampa, was charged with failure to appear reference knowingly driving with license suspended or revoked. Darius Lamar Blackmon, 24, of Avon Park, was charged with operating a motor vehicle without a valid license. John Junior Fedd, 48, of Sebring, was charged with driving while license suspended. Gregory Gentile, 20, of Lake Placid, was charged with possession and or use of drug equipment, and possession of marijuana. Scott Donald Hirschberg, 55, of Bradenton, was charged with possession and or use of drug equipment, and possession of marijuana. Jaquesta Shamyca Myers, 23, of Avon Park, was charged with grand theft. Dwaine Elmer Poole, 41, of Lake City, was charged with three counts of violation of probation reference forgery, three counts of violation of probation reference utter forged instrument, violation of probation reference grand theft and probation of violation reference possession of fraudulent/unlawfully issued drivers license. Ricky Shane Pridgen, 26, of Dover, was charged with violation of municipal ordinance. Rose Marie Ralston, 20, of Avon Park, was charged with neglect of a child without great harm. Chauncey Anthony Sewell, 29, of Okahumpka, was charged with two counts of violation of probation reference issue/obtain property by worthless check. Joseph Eugene Stambaugh, 29, of Sebring, was charged with violation of probation reference dealing in stolen property, violation of probation reference burglary of a conveyance, and grand theft (vehicle). Daytwon Tyrie Tate, 18, of Avon Park, was charged with resisting an officer without violence and loitering or prowling. Hector Luis Velazquez, 51, of Palm Bay, was charged with three violations of municipal ordinance. POLICEBLOTTER By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Members of the S ebring City Council agreed to further e xplore a proposed concept offered to t hem Tuesday night by Ricky Hayes o f Highlands Fitness Inc. Hayes wants to start a rental busin ess at Veterans Beach where indiv iduals would have access to things l ike kayaks and stand-up paddle b oards. He would also provide guided t ours of parts of Lake Jackson. Hayes said he would need about 1 50 square feet of space and would be o pen only on weekends. He would provide the portable shelter, the staff and the items to be rented and wanted to test market during May, June, July and August. The councils immediate reaction was positive. Its a good concept, said council member Scott Stanley. We should encourage it and find a way to make it happen. There were, however, some concerns. Because of the deep trench right off of the City Pier Beach, the council felt it would be too dangerous to set up a rental site there, making it clear the business would be restricted to Veterans Beach. The council also felt it should send out for bids, even though members doubted other businesses had even considered the idea. Hayes researched the concept after seeing rental vendors on the east cost while on vacation in Volusia County. He had a copy of that countys agreement with a vendor, and a quote from an insurance company for equivalent coverage. Initially Hayes will rent beach chairs and stand-up paddle boards. If the community and tourists come out to take advantage of the rentals, Hayes will expand the choices. He envisions renting small sailboats down the line. Stand-up paddle boards are the hottest item in beach rentals right now, he said. There is a trend in the surf culture to move to flat water. Learning how to use the board is almost as much fun as mastering it, he added. He feels rentals would benefit the countys tourism, providing an activity that is fun for all ages. Local residents would have an additional place to take their visitors. He said playing in Lake Jacks on has the added advantage that peop le would have places to paddle to li ke the Don Jose Restaurant or the Suns et Grill. Mike Swaine was filling in for t he city attorney, his son Robert Swain e, who was ill. While also interested in the idea, he said he would have to check into what kind of taxes a ren tal business on a public beach wou ld incur. It was agreed that Hayes shou ld meet with Swaine to work out an agreement to bring back to the cou ncil. Council hears proposal to rent paddle boards at Veterans Beach Sebring Chamber hosts blood driveSEBRING The Greater Sebring Chamber of Commerce will host a blood drive from 12:304:30 p.m. Tuesday. All blood types are needed and the public is encouraged to donate blood. Call 382-4499.Ohio Night set for March 28SEBRING Ohio Night is set for Monday, March 28. For details on golf and/or dinner and the location, call Sandy Imes at 386-4351 by Wednesday.Retirement party set for Fan WellsSEBRING Aretirement party for Fan Wells, marketing director for the CrownPointe Assisted Living Residence for the past 11 years, will be held from 4-6 p.m. Friday, April 1. RSVPby calling 3861060. The new marketing director will be in attendance.Drum Circle is set for todaySEBRING The Community Drum Circle will take place behind the Sebring Civic Center, 355 W. Center Ave., overlooking Lake Jackson, from 35 p.m. today. Everybody is welcome. Bring a chair or blanke t. Bring an instrument if you have one. Bring somethin g to drink. Bring a friend (a ll ages). Some percussion instruments will be available for the public to use. This is a fun event for the whole family. Join the Primal Connection and make a joyous sound. No experience necessary. Play alon g, dance or just enjoy the music. For more information, call Fred Leavitt, Primal Connection, at 402-8238, or e-mail fred@primalcon nection.org.Events planned at lodges, postsAVON PARK The American Legion Post 69 will have karaoke by Naomi at 4 p.m. today Bingo is set for 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. For more information, call 453-4553. The Combat Veterans Memorial VFWPost 9853 will have NASCAR on th e screen today. Call for tim e. Karaoke will be by Peg an d Perry from 5-8 p.m. Tuesday. For more information, call 452-9853 COMMUNITYBRIEFS Continued on page 6A www.twitter.com/thenewssun www.facebook.com/newssun Follow us on: County still looking at recycling options Study to be discussed at Tuesday meeting Classified ads get results!

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The special joint meeting w as held so elected officials c ould listen to citizen comm ents regarding Lake Placids p roposed plan for a regional u tility. Part of that plan calls f or the town to take over Placid U tilities and Highway Park U tilities, both currently mana ged by the county. The goal is t o join the separate systems i nto one interconnected whole. While citizens were allowed f our minutes apiece to speak, a nd about 16 did, the bulk of t he meeting was a presentation b y the members of the Lake P lacid Town Council and g uests they brought with them. Essentially, the citizens from T omoka Heights and Highway P ark expressed opposition to t he idea, while the council presented their case in favor. The News-Sun understands how a unified utility system can benefit the entire community. There are long-term savings to be found and economies of scale. We have no objections to a municipal regional utility. We do, however, have strong objections to the development the regional utility is being designed to serve development we feel will benefit only a few at the expense of the vast majority. Lois Krebbs, a Tomoka Heights resident who spoke in opposition to Lake Placid taking over Placid Utilities, spoke truth when she said, Good planning is everything. In fact, her opposition agreed, quoting the phrase back to her twice in the course of the three-hour meeting. But she was not referring to good planning in relation to a regional utility. She was talking about the proposed plans for sprawling subdivisions immediately north and south of the town as well as at Bluehead Ranch. These plans call for almost 50,000 new housing units before there has been any meaningful discussion about let alone planning for public transportation, emergency services, schools and sources of clean water. We think Krebbs is wise to point to the weak economy, and to the glut of houses and lots already on the market. We worry, along with others, that rushing to extend water lines and install fire hydrants into agricultural areas will only drain taxpayer pockets and in the end create the same eerie wasteland of bankrupted development that already exists east of Henscratch Road and north of Placid Lakes. Beyond the financial risk, however, is the more important question what do the people of Highlands County want for themselves in the long run? Are we going to choose to become yet another urban area in a state already crowded with them? Do we really want to trade away all the natural wonders that make Highlands County such a delightful a place to live for a sea of barrel tile roofs and ever more streets and traffic? Several supporters of the regional utility spoke of the fear factor. Sheila Byatt, who owns undeveloped property in Tomoka Heights, said, Older people dont like change. Were comfortable in our little rut. What citizens expressed Thursday night, however, was not fear. It was anger; and even more, it was a loss of faith. Citizens no longer trust their elected officials or the people who work for them. And no wonder, what with the shenanigans in Avon Pa rk on Monday, and the dog a nd pony show in Lake Plac id Thursday. Lately all our elected of ficials have done is indulge in political theater on their way to done deals. Table skirts may look pret ty, but all they really do is cov er up a tangled web of hidd en agendas. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 3ATODAYSEDITORIALTODAYSLETTERS 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL 33870 863-385-6155 NEWSROOMROMONA WASHINGTONPublisher/Executive Editor Ext. 515editor@newssun.com SCOTT DRESSELEditor Ext. 516scott.dressel@newssun.comDAN HOEHNESports Editor Ext. 528daniel.hoehne@newssun.com ADVERTISINGVICKIE JONESExt. 518vickie.jones@newssun.com CIRCULATIONTONY MCCOWANExt. 522anthony.mccowan@newssun.com PRE-PRESSKEN BAREFIELDProduction Coordinator Ext. 594prepress@newssun.com BUSINESS OFFICEJANET EMERSONExt. 596legals@newssun.com EDITORIAL& OPINION Opposing ideas falling on deaf ears D espite tight budgets, the county found enough money to drape skirts on the tables used by county commissioners and Lake Placid town council members during their meeti ng Thursday night at Lake Placid High School. If youve been following the news, you know that we are looking at the possibility of a government shutdown if Congress and President Obama dont get their acts together and hammer out some way to keep funding things. One of the frustrating parts of this is were not even talking about the budget. All this talk is about putting something in place so Congress can keep spending money for a few weeks while they work on the budget. Unless they pass another continuing resolution to keep spending so they have more time to work on the budget. Confused? Thats because what theyre doing is something you and I cant do in real life. The whole government budget situation is very far removed from reality. In my house, we work with a budget. We figure out how much money is coming in, and how much is going out. Don, bless his heart, has worked our budget so that we take in more then we pay out. Given we are still putting a child through college, this is a major feat. Now, if something happened and we wound up bringing in less money then we were paying out, we would have several choices. We could max out our credit cards. We could choose not to pay certain bills. Or, we could cut our budget to match the money we were bringing in. Knowing Don, we would cut our budget. It would hurt. Wed probably wind up giving up something we enjoyed, like eating out less or giving up our cable. If things were very bad, maybe wed give up the Internet, though I would hate that. Think of it as one of my pet programs that I dont want taken away from me. Right now, our federal government is taking in less money than it is spending. This has been going on for a while, and the way its been dealt with is by going into debt. We owe a frightening amount of money to various countries. The whole debt situation bothers me. I keep going back to Proverbs 22:7: Th e rich ruleth over the poor, an d the borrower is servant to the lender. I worry were setting ourselves up for hur t down the line with these nations, because were so bound and determined to spend more than we have. So, what should the government do? We could try t o bring more money in by wa y of taxes. But no one agrees whether cutting taxes or rai sing taxes increases revenue While the debate might be entertaining, also gets confusing. Even if we did tweak the tax code, it would take time to take effect. And meanwhile wed still spending more than we take in. It seems to me the governmen t has to cut spending to a cer tain extent, at least to the point where were only spending the amount of money were taking in. The question is, where to cut? Thats what Republicans and Democrats argue and yell about. And almost no one wants to cut the budget to the extent we d have to in order that were not adding to the debt. I understand why. To make cuts that deep, some pet programs are going to suffer. And people will be unhappy about it, like I would be if Don decided to cut the Internet. Politicians do not like making people unhappy. It usually costs them votes. Someone is going to hav e to take the lead in this. And we Americans are going to have to take a deep breath and accept that at least for now, the federal governmen t cant afford everything we want it to pay for. In reality, when youre spending more then youre making, a wise person cuts their spending. Its time for the federal government to smarten up and join reality. Before we become servants Laura Ware is a Sebring re sident. She can be contacted by e-mail at bookwormlady @ embarqmail.com Budget battle Lauras Look Laura Ware Remember and protect our heritage E ditor: I have received several c orrespondences where m embers of our military h ave been court martialed, l ost their benefits, disc harged and imprisoned for d oing their jobs. Most of it h as to do with taking the s ide of the enemy. Sending our young to f ight the enemy and being p ersecuted for doing your j ob is not the right or the A merican way. There are t hose who are working dilig ently to insert Sharia law i nto our legal system. There i s no justice in that law. My definition is just a nother word for C ommunism. When our military is t reated so unfairly that they r efrain from joining and our d efense system is weakened t o the point we have no d efense, we will be ripe for g overnment takeover. That i s the direction weve been g oing for some time. When o ur freedom of worship is t aken away, our children not t aught the history of our c ountry the truth is distorte d, all kinds of evil introd uced, with no respect for e ach other, parents or anyo ne, we are losing the very f oundation our country was f ounded on. Being taught t hat it is the governments r esponsibility to take care o f our every need is certainl y not preparing them for a h appy independent life. We did make progress in t he last election; lets keep p addling, even if it is u pstream. As long as were h eaded in the right direct ion, we will arrive at some p oint. Freedom is not free; i t was bought with a huge p rice. May we remember o ur heritage and protect it d iligently; with the help of o ur Lord, we will succeed. Willie Clyde (Toole) Cloud SebringSpeed rail should be from state to state E ditor: In my opinion, here is the d eal: I dont presume to s peak for Gov. Scott nor a nyone else for that matter. Y et there is a major imperat ive at hand here that supers edes localized travel. In f act I mean, Speed Rail s hould not be based upon j ust getting from Tampa to O rlando or secondarily from e ither of those to Miami. Of course, there should a lways be an element of s tate sovereignties (turwise) but I see and have long dreamed (or eluded if you will) about the importance of National Intrastate Transportation of this sort. So now lets cut to the chase. Ive seen this proposed route as somewhat skewed when it comes to the greater benefit to all and no best resolve to the preservation or conservation of our natural resources, or the concept of green policy for the future of our nation. I feel there should be adjacent states unity in planning and development of a speed rail system, with centralized focus on interstate long-distance travel and inter-connectivity. Along with truncated shuttle systems to serve boarding at approximately every 100to 125-mile junctures. Just shoot me now, but Im going for broke. Just to get things started (conversation-wise), lets just say a southernmost starter hub at say Palmdale or Moore Haven with branch shuttling from all of southeast and southwest Florida. Then, up through the Heartland with minimal juncture-stops (or you kill the speed idea): Along the way, perhaps splitting or why-ing about Gainesville or Lake City, branching northwest through Alabama and northeast through Georgia. OK Ill stop for now, but this is the beginning of a major opportunity for Florida to lead the nation along with other great states of the south and northeast to set a standard like never before; (well, except maybe by OleIke). The Magnetron or Magnitrain! (Possibly huh)? Hughston F. Hall Avon Park BouquetsProwls 1st season ends with prideEditor: Let me start off by saying thank you to the folks that have supported the Heartland Prowl Basketball Team from our inception. Thank you to the fans that have attended each and every home game. Thank you to the family and friends that have traveled just to give their support to the players. This inaugural season has been extremely trying for the team but we have managed to trudge through it, quite successfully I might add. The Heartland Prowl basketball team has survived a major shift in management and came out shining. We have endured the negativity that, unfortunately, comes with introducing anything new and different into a community. The Heartland Prowl started out as a fledgling, struggling, brand-new ABA team and has finished this season with a playoff berth and a high power ranking, which is a phenomenal achievement for a first-time team. We hold our heads high and stand with pride to have accomplished this feat while undergoing much disappointment, such as numerous game cancellations due to teams folding within the league. We are excited about continuing to bring affordable, family-friendly entertainment to Highlands County. We are also happy to continue our community involvement by actively engaging the players within the school systems. We look forward to our continued involvement in the many events and happenings around town. We, The Heartland Prowl Basketball Team, again thank you for believing in us and we ask that you continue to do so with this upcoming season. The Heartland Prowl Basketball Team The Staff of the Heartland Prowl The Fabulous Felines Dance TeamThanks extended to Florida friends of ThorsenEditor: To our many friends in Sebring and Highlands County, thank you for the love, compassion and caring ways shared with our loved one, Carol (Sunshine) Thorsen, during her life. Carol went to her eternal reward March 9, 2011 at Mountain View Manor in Bryson City, N.C. The family thanks you and may God continue to bless you. Dennis Ramsey Murphy, N.C LETTERSPOLICYMake sure to sign your letter and include your addres s and phone number. Anonymous letters will be automat ically rejected. Please keep your letters to a maximum o f 400 words. end your letter to 2227 U.S. 27 South Sebring, FL33870; drop it off at the same address; fa x

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Page 4ANews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com PREMIER EVENT PRICING NOW THROUGH MARCH 23 DONT MISS OUT! B y CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comLAKE PLACID By the e nd of a three-hour meeting T hursday night, members of t he Board of County C ommissioners indicated t hey would be supporting the t own of Lake Placid in its w ish to create a regional utili ty system by letting the town t ake over Placid Utilities and H ighway Park Utilities from t he county. In fact, Chairperson B arbara Stewart said municip al regional utilities were e ssential to the countys f uture growth. While many citizens from t he Tomoka Heights subdivis ion and Highway Park e xpressed opposition to the p lan, the Lake Placid Town C ouncil organized a present ation that included personal t estimony from a diverse r ange of individuals, includi ng every member of the council and John Smoak III, Lonnie Wells, the Lake Placid Chamber of Commerce, the Lake Placid Merchants Association, Bill Brantley (the areas school board member speaking on behalf of the school board) and Julie Fowler, with the NTC Group, who came forward to say that based on the most recent audit, the town had the financial stability to take on the utility. Issues still exist. County staff in particular are concerned there is not enough specificity in the proposed interlocal agreement. Not everything has been addressed, said County Attorney Ross Macbeth. There are real service issues. Stewart agreed, so meetings between Macbeth and Lake Placids attorney, Bert Harris III will be scheduled to work out details after county staff input. Lake Placid officials indicated a desire to move quickly. To put this off is a disservice, said Lake Placid Mayor John Holbrook. If its going to happen we have to do it quickly, not put it on the back burner. I am convinced weve addressed the issues, Harris said. Lets knock it out and put this thing to bed. County indicates approval of regional utilities in LP News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY T hursday night the Board of County Commissioners and the Lake Placid Town Council had a joint meeting to hear public comment on transferring a county managed wastewater utility to Lake Placid. I am convinced weve addressed the issues. Lets knock it out and put this thing to bed.BERTHARRISIII Lake Placid town attorney Get your subscription to the News-Sun! Call 385-6155

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w inning cars of the past in t he Gallery of Legends duri ng the 2012 Race Week. The 60th annual 12 Hours o f Sebring will take the green f lag on March 17 of next y ear. Officials of the I ntercontinental Le Mans C up already have indicated t hey plan to be back for the o pening of their series next y ear. The addition of the series w ithin the 12 Hours has i nflated the field to nearly 60 t op teams from around the w orld and more are expected n ext year. The actual observance of S ebrings 60th begins later t his year with the second a nnual presentation of the B obby Rahal signature event T he Legends of Motorsports D ec. 2-4. Rahals vintage and hist oric racing series was well r eceived in its first time out b oth by fans and competitors w ith many historic racing f igures including Rahal, a f ormer Sebring winner t aking to the track for anothe r run at the storied circuit. January of 2012 will see S ebring racers paying homa ge to the airport roots of the c ircuit at the Sebring R egional Air Expo. The R aceway originally was c arved out of runways and a irport access roads of the o ld Hendricks Field. Over the y ears it has morphed into a f or-purpose racing facilities t hat play host to one of the w orlds premier endurance r aces. February again will see the a nnual Sebring 12/24 bicyc ling event. Like the 12-hour r ace, it draws competitors f rom all over the world. It a lso involves a race within a r ace as some of the cyclists p articipate for a 12-hour c ycle, while others pedal a f ull 24. In the past the cyclists h ave started on the Raceway t hen gone to a course involvi ng Airport Road and US 98. N ext year, plans are to run t he event on the Raceway f lag to flag. Additionally, an art and p hoto contest for elementary s chool students and a tennis t ournament have been schedu led. March always means raci ng at Sebring. In 2012, the m onth will begin with a w eekend of events hosted by t he Sportscar Vintage Racing A ssociation. That event will b e titled Champions of S ebring with a special e mphasis on both cars and d rivers who have competed a nd won the 12 Hours over t he past six decades. As always, the second w eek in March will see the G rand Prix Ball at the C hateau Elan and the annual C hamber of Commerce Ride t he Racetrack event where p eople have an opportunity to r ide with instructors from the S kip Barber Racing School. For 2012, the March Chamber of Commerce mixer will be held at the track inside the Gallery of Legends building. Shortly after the opening of the front gates on Race Week next year, hundreds of people will gather at the Chateau Elan for the Hairpin Spin. One-tenth as old as the Race, the event again will allow people to wager chips for prizes. Money collected will be distributed to local charities. It is always accompanied by a smorgasbord prepared by the Chateau Elan and appearances by some of the top teams and race notables. The events announced at the Friday press conference already are in the works, but organizers have allowed other events and observances may still be created. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 5A Continued from page 1A of car corrals for this years Race. Anew spot was carved out along the Big Bend, sending many folks including the longtime Sarasota Racing and Drinking Enthusiasts contingent to another area of the field. Dozens of motor homes had poured into the Raceways holding area outside the track beginning March 1, the first day they were allowed in. Some of them arrived on the last weekend in February, camping alongside the road until the were allowed access. All were in search of an early spot in line when the gates opened on Wednesday of Race Week. The Chateau Elan had sold out their Race packages early in the week, with the hotel packed with guests watching the Race at the famous Hairpin Turn. Saturdays scheduled events such as the bikini contest, were swamped as were the Gallery of Legends, Corvette display and vendo rs both on the Midway and in the Paddock. Sales were said to be brisk. On track it was crowded as well. There were 56 cars that took the green flag wit h an early show by the Peugeot and Audi reminiscent of the 2007 fender touching GTdivision finish involving the Risi Competizone Ferrari and th e Flying Lizard Porsche. Continued from page 1A Big crowd for 12 Hours Plans unveiled for 2012 Race News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMON S Not sure if Jackson Protus or his beads weigh more Saturday morning during the Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring event. News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS A car-load of spectators gets ready to drive over the bridge to Green Park on Saturday morning at the Sebring International Raceway.

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LAKE PLACID American Legion Placid P ost 25 will have music by T homas from 5-8 p.m. today. A family meeting will be h eld at 6:30 p.m. Monday, f ollowed by a Boy Scouts m eeting at 7 p.m. On T uesday, get free blood press ure checks from 1-3 p.m., t hen play bingo at 6:30 p.m. F or details, call 465-7940. The Lake Placid Moose 2 374 will have NASCAR B ristol on the screen at 1 p .m. today. Karaoke with B ama Jam will follow. Loyal O rder of the Moose officers a nd the House Committee w ill meet at 6:30 p.m. M onday. Women of the M oose meet at 7 p.m. and L OOM general meeting is at 7 :30 a.m. For more informat ion, call 465-0131.Caladium Co-op plans breakfastLAKE PLACID The C aladium Arts and Crafts C ooperative will hold an All You Can Eat Pancake B reakfast today. The breakf ast will be all you can eat p ancakes with two sausage p atties or a veggie-egg c asserole with two pancakes. B reakfast will be served with orange juice and coffee or tea. The cost is $5 for adults and $3 for children under 12. The Co-op is at 132 E. Interlake Blvd. Call 6995940 or visit the Web site www.caladiumarts.org for further information.Meals on Wheels meet MondaySEBRING The annual meeting of Sebring Meals on Wheels will be held at 2 p.m. Monday. The place of the meeting is the board room at Sebring Church of the Brethren, 700 S. Pine St. The agenda for the meeting is the election of officers and board members along with the annual report.Recreation Club plans eventsSEBRING The Sebring Recreation Club, at 333 Pomegranate Ave., will host the following events this week: Monday Ladies social club, 1 p.m.; shuffleboard scrambles, 1:15 p.m. Wednesday Nickel scrambles, 1:15 p.m.; line dancing lessons, 5:15 p.m.; line dancing, 6:15 p.m. Thursday Hosscollar, 9:30 a.m.; bingo, 7 p.m. Friday Mini-shuffleboard tournament, 1:15 p.m. Saturday Ice cream shuffleboard, 1:15 p.m.; board meeting, 3 p.m. For more information, call 385-2966.Shrine Ladies play BuncoAVON PARK The public is invited to play Bunco at the Highlands Shrine Club, 2604 State Road 17 South at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday. The event is open to new or experienced players; cost is $2 per person. Continued from page 2A Page 6ANews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com GUARANTEED WEIGHT LOSS!CALL TODAY (863) 471-2500 LOSE YOUR WEIGHT FOR THE LAST TIME!13 Ryant Blvd. SebringCorner of 27 & Ryant Blvd.SAVE 50% OFF ENROLLMENT FEES Hurry! Offer Ends Soon! COMMUNITYBRIEFS The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN Courtesy phot os Desiree Leedy (left) and Morgan Tomlinson of the De Packas team compete in the Blind Picasso painting contest. College Week fun at SFCC South Florida Community College (SFCC) kicked off the 25th Annual Community College Week, March 1417, at the SFCC Highlands Campus. Community College Week is an annual event at SFCC, where teams of SFCC students and employees compete in activities and demonstrate their SFCC pride. Logan Hunter of the De Packas team shows off his balancing ability during the Egg Relay Race. Associated PressMIAMI Afederal prosecutor said Friday investigators are working to link oxycodone overdose deaths to the operators of South Florida pain clinics already charged with illegally dispensing hundreds of thousands of doses of the powerful painkiller. Assistant U.S. Attorney Scott Benhke said at a hearing that if deaths can be conclusively traced to the clinics, primary owner Vincent Colangelo could face a mandatory prison sentence of no less than 20 years if convicted. Colangelo, 42, was arrested along with at least 20 others last month in a series of pain clinic raids led by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Investigators are examining overdose deaths in Florida, Kentucky, Tennessee and elsewhere for links to the half-dozen pain clinics Colangelo either owned or in which he had a controlling interest. All have been shut down since the Feb. 23 raids. We believe we are going to find individuals who have died as a result of the oxycodone, Behnke said. At the hearing Friday, U.S. Magistrate Judge Ted Bandstra denied bail for Colangelo on grounds that the potentially lengthy prison sentence was a strong incentive for him to flee. Colangelo did not speak at the hearing and has not yet entered a plea, mainly because hes not sure he has money for a lawyer. The government has frozen his substantial assets and moved to seize property including real estate, dozens of exotic and vintage cars and $22 million in cash. Anyone in your circumstances, that is an incentive not to appear in court, Bandstra told Colangelo. The allegations here are strong and detailed. If Colangelo cannot pay for his own lawyer, a judge will appoint one at taxpayer expense. According to a grand ju ry indictment, Colangelo us ed some 1,600 Internet doma in names that captured search es for pain medications to dire ct people to his Florida clinic s. Between Jan. 1, 2009 an d Dec. 31, 2010, those clini cs dispensed at least 660,00 0 oxycodone units, the indic tment says. The February pill mil l raids came after undercov er agents made at least 340 pu rchases painkillers at 40 cli nics over the past year. Flori da is the epicenter of a mus hrooming prescription dru g problem, providing 85 pe rcent of all oxycodone sold in the U.S., state law enforc ement officials say. According to new DE A data, between January an d June 2010 medical practitio ners in Florida purchas ed nearly 41 million oxycodo ne doses, dwarfing the 927,00 0 sold to practitioners in Ohi o, which had the second-highe st number. US trying to link overdoses to Florida pain clinics By Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Jared E. Walker 438th Air Expeditionary Wing Public AffairsSHINDAND, A fghanistan Four Afghan A ir Force Airmen attached t o the Kandahar Air Wing r ecently flew their first f lights as part of the inaugur al Flying Air Crew Chiefs c ourse in Shindand. The month-long course p airs United States Air F orce Flying Air Crew C hiefs and Afghan Crew C hief trainees and focuses o n the operational capabilit y of the MI-17 transport h elicopter. Classroom i nstruction includes discuss ions about crew resource m anagement, general purp ose machine gun and M2 40 training and pre-flight a nd post-flight briefs. The g oal of the course is for A fghans to become indep endent flying crew chiefs a board operational flights. Staff Sergeant C hristopher A. Morford, a N ATO Air Training C ommand-Afghanistan F lying Crew Chief Air A dvisor, stressed the import ance of the first flight. This is a huge milestone f or the Afghan Air Force b ecause they can now build p ictures for the pilots and d escribe whats going in the b ack of the helicopter, keepi ng everyone in place a board the aircraft, S ergeant Morford said. "For e xample, if they have comm andos onboard, they w ould give them calls such a s were minutes out, be r eady; were 10 minutes o ut, be ready.The tail of t he helicopter would then o pen up and they would c lear the commandos off the a ircraft. Once the command os are off, they would e nsure the commandos are c lear of the landing zone. To prepare themselves for t he first flight, the group f ocused on academics and a lso used essential equipm ent such as headsets, g lasses, gloves and gunners b elts for the first time. Every time the aircraft m oves left or right, the crew c hiefs clear the aircraft b ecause the pilots cant see b ehind them. This is import ant because when in a patt ern its critical the crew c hiefs are always looking o ut for other aircraft, Sergeant Morford said. AAF Staff Sgt. Mohammad Shafi, one of the students, spoke about the significance of the flight. This was our first flight and we all felt good about it. We did very well and our advisors thought so too. It is important for us to know about this job so when we go to Kandahar we can do it properly. We will need to pass on this information because one day we might be instructing others about how to be flight crew chiefs, said Sergeant Shafi. Sergeant Shafi went on to explain how the training was informative while describing how he looks forward to the rest of the training where the team will learn other things like firing weapons and how to defend the aircraft. He said that he and his fellow students are ready to learn so they can become flying crew chiefs. Sergeant Morford explained that normally there are weapons on the aircraft, which are the first defense when flying, but because they dont have weapons presently the students are instructed on professional military knowledge until weapon mounts arrive. Part of the job for these future flying air crew chiefs is to take care of the people on their flight. They ensure everybody is safe and secure during the duration of the flight said Sergeant Morford. The crew chiefs act as the conduit between the pilots and passengers. Once you get past the line between the flight engineers and the door, the flying crew chiefs own the back of the aircraft. The importance of the flying air crew chief is also critical during times of natural disaster. Flooding is a concern in Afghanistan because of heavy monsoon rains and flying air crew chiefs are critical in providing aid. If flooding occurs, these professionals would be stacking food, water and clothing for the people affected by the flood. They would deal with medical evacuations and would also go to points of injury, pick up people, load them onboard and make sure they are secure. Again, they take care of the defense of the aircraft in and out of the zone so everyone gets out of the area safely, said Sergeant Morford. Recently, the hard work paid off as the flying crew chiefs participated in a training exercise that saw an Afghan pilot at the controls of the aircraft, an Afghan flight engineer maintaining the aircraft as well as the flight crew chiefs adding to that team. My partner, Staff Sgt. Justin Shults, and I were doing high-fives because the flying crew chiefs are doing the job themselves, explained Sergeant Morfod. This is phenomenal for us because this is what they are here for. This is the first step to make Shindand look similar to Kirtland, Air Force Base. What occurred today was very big. First flight a success for future Afghan flying air crew chiefs U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Jared E. Walker Afghan Air Force Staff Sgt. Mohammad Shafi, one of the Afghan flying crew chief students, make sure the Mi-17 is clear while Tech. Sgt. Travis Willingham, a flying crew chief air advisor, helps advise Staff Sgt. Shafi during his first flight mission at Shindand, Afghanistan. Willingham is from Sebring.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 7A LIMITED SPACE CALLTODAY! 5 DAYS a week$ 30 Get In Shape Learn Self Defense Improve Self Esteem Make Better GradesMARTIAL ARTS AMERICA471-2467Best After School Program in SebringFREEPICKUP from: Kindergarten Learning Center, Cracker Trail, Sun-N-Lakes, Woodlawn, Fred Wild, Memorial, Hill Gustat, Sebring Middle/High Located on Kenilworth Sebring*Some Restrictions Apply Life Care, Not Day Care b e. Something has to be done a bout this, and it has to be d one before they cause any m ore damage to the city, M arshall said Friday. There is a meeting this w eekend, and when I find out w hen, I plan on being there. R ight now I am just contacti ng church groups, civic o rganizations and other a ctivist groups to raise a wareness that something n eeds to be done. Marshall did not think that c ouncil member Paul Miller w ould be on the recall list b ecause of his no vote to term inate Behrens on Monday, b ut those not targeted should b e asked to resign, Marshall s aid. There are a lot of people v ery upset about this, and I d o not think it will be a probl em getting 500 signatures r ight away, said Marshall. I feel like I was deceived a nd the trust in this council is g one. What they did to Bruce ( Behrens) was ridiculous. I h ate it when they do things in t he dark like they did and m ake it seem that it was all s pontaneous and on the spot. C ome on, that was planned. The process for a recall of an elected official in a municipality is outlined in Florida Statute 100.36, and the target of the recall has to have been in office for at least 25 percent of their term. In Avon Park, deputy mayor Brenda Gray, councilmen Terry Heston and Paul Miller are eligible for recall. Mayor Sharon Schuler and councilman Parke Sutherland were seated in the last election, and will not be eligible until September, according to the anonymous source. According to the statute, Any member of the governing body of a municipality or charter county, hereinafter referred to in this section as municipality,may be removed from office by the electors of the municipality." The process is straightforward, but does require some deadlines. From the time that the recall petition is approved for circulation, required signatures must be collected within 30 days. Once signatures are collected, the designated chair of the recall committee that collected the signatures must present them to the auditor or clerk of the municipality or charter county, or his or her equivalent, which would be Cheryl Tietjen in Avon Park. The clerk who received the signatures must then immediately convey the signatures to the Supervisor of Elections for the county within which the recall is taking place. The Supervisor of Elections has 30 days to inspect the signatures at a cost of 10 cents for each signature, according to the law. The number of signatures required varies, but in the case of Avon Park, 500 names of registered voters is the minimum required. Those being recalled then must be served by the city clerk, and have five days to offer a defense of less than 200 words. Once the defense is collected, the recall committee has 60 days to get signatures of 15 percent of the voters in the last election, and again has to have them verified. Once verified, the target of the recall has five days to resign or a municipal judge sets a date for the recall elecContinued from page 1A Recall movement in Avon Park By CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY christopher.tuffley@newssun.comSEBRING Bradley Krohn, presid ent of U. S. EnviroFuels LLC, brought l ocal growers and investors up to date F riday on his companys processing p lant project, currently under way in H ighlands County. The goal is to be up and running in 2 013. The processing plant is planned for t he corner of U.S. 27 and State Road 70, w here Georgia Pacific used to have a f acility. The site is ideal, Krohn said. Its a lready zoned for heavy industrial, is on t wo major highways and is close to a r ailroad. The permitting process is well under w ay, and all the necessary environmental surveys have been successfully completed. Ten local growers have already committed to provide raw plant material, so the company already has 40 percent of the required crop acreage. Agroup of another 25 growers have signed letters of intent to provide product as well. Krohn told the audience the processing plant was being designed with conventional, traditional, well-proven commercial processing technology developed over 30 years. Brazil provides proven models. Right now sugar cane and sweet sorghum are leading candidates for the plant material, but farmers are experimenting with a wide variety of crops. The price of feedstock will be tied to the price of ethanol. The processing plant will provide harvesting and trucking services and will be run with 100 percent renewable energy, with an 80 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. There will be minimal water consumption most of the needed liquid arriving in the plant stalks and zero liquid waste effluent. After a one-time construction benefit, when the plant is built, Krohn anticipates the creation of 60 permanent, high-paying jobs and an improved tax base for the county. Akey to successful biofuel production is having processing plants near the growers. Krohn hopes the new plant will serve as a model for more down the road. L LC, a company in the p rocess of building a biofeed p rocessing plant at the corner o f U.S. 27 and State Road 70 i n south Highlands County. Thats why we believe we a re core in helping to keep f armers selling out to develo pers. Originally corn was the e xclusive crop used in maki ng ethanol, but that raised s everal significant issues, not t he least of which was a spike i n livestock feed prices as w ell as taking acreage out of f ood production. The federal and state gove rnments, as well as the U niversity of Florida, are n ow involved in finding a lternative crops that are bett er suited to Floridas growi ng conditions, more efficient a s fuel bases and dont comp ete with food crops. An effort is being made to p ick plants that can be grown between food crops, in abandoned groves, or in muck fields otherwise lying fallow. Highlands County is the cradle of innovation, Putnam told his audience, adding he wants to help stabilize the newly emerging industry of alternative energy. After every election the policy changes, Putnam said. It creates an unstable environment for investors. We want farmers to be able to go to bankers without the worry of having the rug pulled out from under them. Putnam said government should invest to create robust higher education, creating experts, and let private business take it from there. Government should not be making the choices between, for example, solar and wind power, or biofeed fuels, he said. That should be left to market and other practical forces. This early in the evolution it is impossible to tell what plant material and what type of processing will prove to be the most viable. But there are dozens of visionary farmers, Putnam said, willing to put in a wide variety of crops. It will be a game-changer here in Florida. By providing a new ag based revenue stream, you maintain the quality of life, and keep young people here. Its a win-win situation, Putnam said. Continued from page 1A News-Sun photo by CHRISTOPHER TUFFLEY Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam has lunch with local growers and investors in biofeed crops at the Bert J. Harris Ag-Center Friday. He also toured farms growing crops like sweet sorghum. Putnam talks about biofuels with farmers Processing plant moving past planning stage Facility at US 27 and SR70 plans to bring 60 jobs to county Associated PressBOSTON A Pennsylvania woman who admitted cheating advertisers and exhibitors out of thousands of dollars through a fake Boston bridal show was sentenced Friday to nearly 5 1/2 years in prison. Karen Tucker, 47, of Pittsburgh, also was ordered to pay $117,000 restitution to victims. She pleaded guilty in October to wire fraud and identity theft. U.S. District Judge Richard Stearns rejected a request for leniency from Tuckers lawyer, who asked for a 3-year sentence. Elaine Barker, who owns Paper Potpourri, a Haverhill business that specializes in custom-designed wedding invitations, said she was drawn in by a professionallooking website Tucker set up to lure exhibitors. I have been doing shows for 30 years and not once did I suspect that this was not a legitimate show, Barker said. She said she felt violated and cheated after sending Tucker $675 for an exhibit table an d telling other wedding ve ndors about her, only to fin d out months later that the re was no show. Prosecutors describ ed Tucker as a longtime co n woman who conducted sim ilar scams in Ohio, Florid a, Maryland, Nevada an d Texas. Michael Shields, own er of a marble and grani te company in Columbu s, Ohio, said he drove 1 3 hours so he could be in court Friday for Tucker s sentencing. You personally look ed me in the eye and took m y money from my hand , Shields said, looking rig ht at Tucker. I dont think five yea rs is enough for you, he sai d. Prosecutors said Tuck er and an uncharged co-co nspirator posed as represe ntatives of a business know n as The Boston 411, then l ed the Massachusetts Conve ntion Center Authority to believe they would hold an extravagant home an d bridal show at the Hyn es Convention Center. Pennyslvania woman gets prison in Boston bridal show scam Associated PressWASHINGTON Hurricanes Igor and T omas are no longer a threat. The World Meteorological Organization h as retired the two names from those used in 2 010 because of the damage they caused. N ames are retired from time to time to avoid c onfusion. There are six lists of hurricane names used i n rotation in the Atlantic and Caribbean r egion. When the 2010 list comes around a gain in 2016, Igor and Tomas will be r eplaced by Ian and Tobias. Last year was a busy season with 19 named s torms, but only two of them entered the United States. Bonnie crossed the southern tip of Florida as a tropical storm and then weakened to a depression before reaching Louisiana in July. Hermine made landfall in Texas as a tropical storm in September. Igor struck Bermuda on Sept. 19 and then veered north, striking Cape Race, Newfoundland, on Sept. 21 where it killed three people and was the most damaging hurricane to strike there in 75 years. Tomas became a hurricane on Oct. 30 after striking Barbados. It went on to affect Haiti where 35 died in flooding and landslides Jamaica, the Turks and Caicos Islands and St. Lucia, where 14 people were killed. Hurricane names Igor, Tomas retired

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Page 8ANews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com GettingYouBack onYourFeetIsJust theFirstStep! GettingYouBack onYourFeetIsJust theFirstStep!Keith A. Bowyer, Jr., PTBest Physical Therapist2006 2007 2008 2009 2010License FL PT 16172Herdman Certifiedin Vestibular Rehabilitation If youre injured or facing surgery, we provide personalized physical therapy care to help you recover quickly and safely. From hands-on therapy to pain management techniques and therapeutic exercise, our expert team will put their extensive training and experience to work for you. Call us today to schedule an appointment at your convenience.Shoulder, Hip, Knee & Back Therapy.Most Insurance Plans Accepted100 YMCA Ln. Sebring, Fl 33875863-382-2949 visit us on the web at www.bowyerpt.com Also treating dizziness & balanceBOWYERPHYSICALTHERAPYBOWYERPHYSICALTHERAPY TODAYSunny; breezy in the afternoon82 / 58Winds: ENE at 10-20 mphSunny and pleasant81 / 53Winds: E at 7-14 mphMONDAYPleasant with plenty of sunshine83 / 58Winds: E at 6-12 mphTUESDAYA full day of sunshine85 / 61Winds: SSW at 8-16 mphWEDNESDAYSunny and pleasant83 / 62Winds: WSW at 8-16 mphTHURSDAY City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. Washington Washington 54/39 54/39 New York NewYork 51/36 51/36 Miami Miami 83/69 83/69 Atlanta Atlanta 69/53 69/53 Detroit Detroit 46/40 46/40 Houston Houston 80/64 80/64 Chicago Chicago 51/46 51/46 Minneapolis Minneapolis 56/38 56/38 Kansas City KansasCity 76/55 76/55 El Paso ElPaso 82/51 82/51 Denver Denver 70/35 70/35 Billings Billings 54/31 54/31 Los Angeles LosAngeles 60/48 60/48 San San Francisco Francisco 58/45 58/45 Seattle Seattle 52/39 52/39 Washington 54/39 New York 51/36 Miami 83/69 Atlanta 69/53 Detroit 46/40 Houston 80/64 Chicago 51/46 Minneapolis 56/38 Kansas City 76/55 El Paso 82/51 Denver 70/35 Billings 54/31 Los Angeles 60/48 San Francisco 58/45 Seattle 52/39 High pressure will afford the Northeast one more dry and sunny day today with temperatures remaining seasonably cool. Meanwhile, dry and mild conditions will persist across the Southeast, making for a beautiful day along the beaches of Florida. A storm system pushing east across the central part of the nation will ignite thunderstorms from Nebraska to Illinois, with a chilly rain expected across the Upper Midwest. Along the southern edge of the storm, a few showers will dampen travel around the Ohio Valley. U.S. Cities National Forecast for March 20Shown are noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue.Today Mon. Tue. World Cities National SummaryCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/WCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Today Mon. Tue. Today Mon. Tue. Weather (W):s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rrain, sf-snow urries, sn-snow, i-ice. Albuquerque 70/43/pc 75/44/pc 63/33/pc Atlanta 69/53/s 73/56/pc 77/57/pc Baltimore 52/36/s 60/45/t 58/39/c Birmingham 76/57/s 75/55/s 75/59/c Boston 44/30/s 41/36/sn 47/30/pc Charlotte 64/43/c 70/50/pc 81/53/pc Cheyenne 62/32/c 66/34/pc 56/25/pc Chicago 51/46/r 60/37/c 45/33/r Cleveland 52/47/pc 61/36/c 41/29/r Columbus 54/52/r 69/44/t 50/41/c Dallas 79/59/c 79/61/c 88/60/pc Denver 70/35/pc 69/37/pc 62/24/pc Detroit 46/40/r 61/34/c 42/25/sn Harrisburg 52/37/s 59/42/r 55/35/r Honolulu 83/71/s 85/72/s 84/72/s Houston 80/64/pc 80/64/pc 82/64/pc Indianapolis 64/55/c 71/49/t 57/50/r Jackson, MS 85/52/s 82/59/s 76/58/c Kansas City 76/55/c 71/54/c 71/46/c Lexington 68/55/c 71/54/pc 67/53/c Little Rock 82/55/pc 77/57/pc 76/57/c Los Angeles 60/48/r 62/48/sh 64/48/s Louisville 70/57/c 74/56/pc 70/58/c Memphis 82/59/pc 80/61/pc 74/59/c Milwaukee 48/43/r 59/35/c 42/27/sn Minneapolis 56/38/r 53/33/pc 41/25/sn Nashville 74/57/pc 79/55/pc 74/57/c New Orleans 78/59/s 78/63/s 80/63/pc New York City 51/36/s 49/40/r 50/32/c Norfolk 50/38/pc 65/54/pc 65/47/pc Oklahoma City 78/56/c 78/56/c 80/49/s Philadelphia 52/36/s 52/44/r 56/34/r Phoenix 81/59/pc 71/51/c 69/50/s Pittsburgh 53/43/pc 65/40/r 49/32/r Portland, ME 44/26/s 40/29/sn 45/25/c Portland, OR 55/39/sh 54/39/sh 53/37/pc Raleigh 62/41/c 71/54/pc 78/55/pc Rochester 46/36/s 46/31/r 40/21/c St. Louis 76/58/c 76/57/c 70/56/r San Francisco 58/45/r 56/45/sh 57/46/c Seattle 52/39/s 48/38/sh 50/36/pc Wash., DC 54/39/s 62/50/t 63/39/c Cape Coral 84/60/s 83/55/s 84/60/s Clearwater 83/63/s 81/60/s 81/61/s Coral Springs 81/69/s 78/62/s 80/63/s Daytona Beach 75/58/s 76/52/s 79/58/s Ft. Laud. Bch 81/70/s 80/65/s 79/67/s Fort Myers 84/61/s 83/57/s 85/62/s Gainesville 77/51/s 80/49/s 82/53/s Hollywood 83/67/s 79/61/s 81/63/s Homestead AFB 79/67/s 78/62/s 77/64/s Jacksonville 74/52/s 78/51/s 80/54/s Key West 79/70/s 79/69/s 78/70/s Miami 83/69/s 79/64/s 80/67/s Okeechobee 81/63/s 78/52/s 78/56/s Orlando 80/59/s 82/53/s 83/58/s Pembroke Pines 83/67/s 79/61/s 81/63/s St. Augustine 72/58/s 72/53/s 75/57/s St. Petersburg 83/63/s 82/63/s 82/63/s Sarasota 82/62/s 82/55/s 78/58/s Tallahassee 80/51/s 81/49/s 81/54/s Tampa 82/62/s 82/63/s 83/63/s W. Palm Bch 81/67/s 78/61/s 80/64/s Winter Haven 81/58/s 81/55/s 83/59/s Acapulco 88/74/s 89/74/s 88/73/s Athens 58/49/sh 55/45/r 55/42/r Beirut 68/60/sh 68/56/s 66/53/pc Berlin 46/33/pc 50/38/pc 57/39/s Bermuda 62/55/pc 59/54/pc 65/62/sh Calgary 34/15/sf 27/15/sn 25/19/sn Dublin 53/41/pc 54/39/pc 52/42/s Edmonton 31/19/sf 27/10/sn 25/15/pc Freeport 78/60/pc 77/61/pc 79/63/s Geneva 53/34/s 55/36/s 57/40/s Havana 84/61/s 83/65/sh 85/63/s Hong Kong 73/70/sh 81/64/pc 72/61/r Jerusalem 68/53/c 67/46/s 64/44/pc Johannesburg 68/54/t 75/54/t 79/56/s Kiev 37/22/sf 45/29/pc 46/36/pc London 54/39/pc 55/41/pc 57/39/s Montreal 37/25/s 34/30/sn 34/25/sf Moscow 34/24/c 37/21/sn 37/31/s Nice 65/47/s 63/48/s 62/49/pc Ottawa 42/30/s 41/30/sn 38/14/c Quebec 34/14/s 36/28/sn 36/23/sf Rio de Janeiro 81/73/s 82/73/sh 82/74/s Seoul 54/39/r 55/30/c 46/27/s Singapore 86/79/t 90/77/t 86/77/r Sydney 79/68/sh 77/68/r 81/66/sh Toronto 46/37/s 53/32/r 38/23/c Vancouver 54/39/pc 54/42/pc 51/39/pc Vienna 48/34/c 49/38/s 55/44/s Warsaw 43/32/pc 45/38/pc 48/36/s Winnipeg 43/27/sn 30/18/sn 27/9/c A lmanac Readings at Palm Beach High .............................................. 9:48 a.m. Low ............................................... 3:20 a.m. High ............................................ 10:21 p.m. Low ............................................... 3:42 p.m. Plenty of sunshine today; breezy during the afternoon. Clear tonight. Sunny and pleasant tomorrow and Tuesday. Wednesday: a full day of sunshine. Thursday: pleasant with a full day of sunshine. On March 20, 1948, Juneau, Alaska, received almost 33 inches of snow. This was the heaviest snow ever to fall in Alaskas capital. Sunny today; breezy in the afternoon. Winds east-northeast 10-20 mph. Expect a full day of sunshine with average relative humidity 60% and good drying conditions. Even addresses may water on Thursday and Sunday. Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and Saturday. All watering should take place before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. FullLastNewFirst Mar 19Mar 26Apr 3Apr 11 Today Monday Sunrise 7:30 a.m. 7:29 a.m. Sunset 7:37 p.m. 7:37 p.m. Moonrise 9:00 p.m. 10:08 p.m. Moonset 7:48 a.m. 8:33 a.m. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Jacksonville 74/52 Gainesville 77/51 Ocala 80/52 Daytona Beach 75/58 Orlando 80/59 Winter Haven 81/58 Tampa 82/62 Clearwater 83/63 St. Petersburg 83/63 Sarasota 82/62 Fort Myers 84/61 Naples 86/64 Okeechobee 81/63 West Palm Beach 81/67 Fort Lauderdale 81/70 Miami 83/69 Tallahassee 80/51 Apalachicola 75/55 Pensacola 76/59 Key West Avon Park 82/58 Sebring 82/58 Lorida 80/61 Lake Placid 84/58 Venus 84/58 Brighton 82/62 TidesReadings at St. Petersburg High .............................................. 3:16 a.m. Low ............................................... 9:05 a.m. High .............................................. 2:57 p.m. Low ............................................... 9:44 p.m. UV Index TodayThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m. 4 8 8 4 Weather History Farm Report Sun and Moon Florida Cities Water Restrictions Regional SummaryShown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Five-Day forecast for Highlands County 79/70 Lake Levels Lake Jackson ..................................... 78.36 Lake Okeechobee ............................... 11.79 Normal ...............................................14.51 Readings as of 7 a.m. yesterdayTemperatureReadings at Archbold Biological Station in Lake PlacidHigh Tuesday ......................................... 80 Low Tuesday .......................................... 49 High Wednesday .................................... 83 Low Wednesday .................................... 49 High Thursday ....................................... 86 Low Thursday ........................................ 48Heat IndexFor 3 p.m. todayRelative humidity .................................. 45% Expected air temperature ....................... 80 Makes it feel like .................................... 80BarometerTuesday ...............................................30.21 Wednesday .........................................30.21 Thursday .............................................30.25PrecipitationTuesday ...............................................0.00 Wednesday .........................................0.00 Thursday .............................................0.00 Month to date ..................................... 1.58 Year to date ......................................... 4.45

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Special to the News-SunWAUCHULAAgorg eous day, food, fun, prizes, a nd a parachute demonstrat ion combined to draw in the l argest crowd to ever attend a Peace River Electric C ooperative (PRECO) annua l membership meeting, at P RECO Park in Wauchula. Headquartered in rural H ardee County, PRECO e xtends electric service a cross 10 central Florida c ounties, coast-to-coast. F ormed by local residents in 1 940, the cooperative has b een in business for 71 y ears, and, for the past 71 y ears has conducted annual m eetings for member-owne rs. On March 12, 823 regist ered members, topping 2 010s record of 797, and t heir families celebrated the d ay with free hotdogs, ice c ream, snow cones, soft d rinks and more. Childrens a ctivities included a climbi ng wall, bounce house, i nflatable slide, and horse r ides. Attendance figures are e stimated upward to nearly 3 ,000. ASalute to the Military, P RECOs first themed annua l meeting event, featured a W all of Honor with photos o f veterans supplied by the m embership. The highlight o f the event featured a live p arachute demonstration p rovided by US Special O peration Commands ParaC ommandos, from MacDill A ir Force Base in Tampa. Two paratroopers, backed by a support team, thrilled the crowd with in-air maneuvers before landing at PRECO Park, said Meter Reader Supervisor Mike Rouse, who worked closely with the group to bring them to Wauchula. Children and adults shouted and applauded as they tracked the parachutes and smoke trails across the sky. Rouse worked for months with MacDill AFB and the Pentagon in order to complete the paperwork required to book the ParaCommandos. For the second time in as many years, the meetings grand prize was a retired PRECO vehicle. Last years truck giveaway got a lot of attention, said Chief Marketing and Member Services Officer Nell McCauley. At the end of the day, we gave away a Ford F-150 pickup truck to one of our members. Dennis Brown, a seasonal Lake Wales resident, was the lucky winner. Abrief business meeting allowed members to hear from Bill Mulcay, CEO, and Board Officers regarding the state of the cooperative. During the meeting, PRECOs board of directors was officially seated and coop members participated in a friendly question-andanswer session. At the conclusion of the business meeting, more than 200 door prizes, including vacation packages, TVs, appliances, power tools, and much more were awarded to members by a ticket drawing. PRECO serves nearly 35,000 member/consumers in Brevard, DeSoto, Hardee, Highlands, Hillsborough, Indian River, Manatee, Osceola, Polk and Sarasota Counties, through almost 4,000 miles of power lines. BUSINESS B SECTION News-Sun Sunday, March 20, 2011 SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. EXPIRES 3/26/11PLUS TAX, TAG, & STATE FEES. www.WellsMC.com RAMUS 27 between Avon Park and SebringAVONPARK&SEBRING453-6644 LAKEPLACID&OTHERCITIESTOLLFREE1-888-453-6644 NO DEALER FEES Since 1931 #X0164 2008 SATURN VUE#CY021A #TY076A 2007 CHEVY 3500 LT#X0166 #TY032A 2008 JEEP COMPASS #CX130A 2007 DODGE RAM 3500 MEGA CAB DIESEL#TY041B #TX131A 2010 DODGE JOURNEY SXT#X0156 2007 DODGE CHARGER SXT2010 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 2005 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT #JY043A $ 32888 $ 198882006 CHRYSLER 300C $ 32988 $ 16888 $ 17888 $ 15888 $ 18299 $ 168882010 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY LX2008 TOYOTA TUNDRA $ 25888ONE OWNER $ 12888 $ 18888 $ 18599#JY004B #X0161 ONE OWNER READY TO TOW CERTIFIED CERTIFIED LOW MILES CREAM PUFF ONE OWNER ONE OWNER CREAM PUFF NICE CERTIFIED CERTIFIED LEATHER 2009 NISSAN ALTIMA Courtesy photo Dennis Brown, left, accepts grand prize truck from CEO Bill Mulcay at the PRECO annual meeting. How often are you asked to sign something? I dont mean autographs or birthday cards, but legally and financially binding documents everything from endorsing a check to signing a sales receipt to buying a house. Either way, theyre all contracts. In broad terms, contracts are mutually binding agreements between two or more parties to do or not do something. Once a contract is in force, it generally cannot be altered unless all parties agree. And, with very few exceptions they cannot easily be broken. Sometimes contracts are formal, signed documents that outline specific conditions and penalties if those conditions are not met: For example, if you dont make your mortgage payments, the lender can foreclose on your house. Other times they are verbal or implied agreements: If you buy spoiled milk, you can ask for a refund. Before you enter into a contractual agreement, try to anticipate what could go wrong. For example: You sign a lease but later decide you cant afford the rent or dont like the neighborhoo d. You buy a car you cant afford, but when you try to sell it, the car is worth less tha n your outstanding loan balance. You buy some thing on sale and dont notice the stores No returns on sal e items policy. You co-sign a lease wit h a roommate who later backs out, leaving you responsible for the rent. You rent a car and late r learn you accidentally agreed to optional insurance coverage or other fe atures you didnt want or need. You agree to cosign a loan and the other person stops making payments, leaving you responsible f or the full amount otherwise your credit will suffer. You buy a car and later notice that the sales agree ment includes an extende d warranty or other features you didnt verbally autho rize. You buy a two-year cel l phone plan, but after the grace period ends, discov er Read contracts carefully before you sign them Personal Finance Jason Alderman See READ, page 3B PRECO packs record crowd at military-themed annual meeting See PRECO, page 3B

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Page 2BNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com 205 US 27 South, Sebring 382-1515 801 US 27 North, Avon Park 453-2525 WAL-MART, SEBRING 385-5371 WAL-MART, AVON PARK 452-7010 WAL-MART, LAKE WALES 676-0569

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 3B Custom DesignerVALUE VERTICAL BLINDS72x80" $115.99Select Styles. Installation not included. LIFETIME TRACK WARRANTY Custom Exact Fit2" HORIZONTAL BLINDS$3.99 $5.49 Square Foot (4 sq. ft. minimum)Available in White, Off-White & Wood Tones Family owned & operated since 1978 FREEIn-Home Estimates! FRIDAYMarch 25thLake Placid Community Church 735 S. Sun N Lakes Blvd.TUESDAYMarch 29thLakeshore Mall Meeting Room AVON PARK 452-5800 SEBRING 382-3363 LAKE PLACID 465-1530When having a talk with your pet doesnt work! 3 ROOMS AND HALLA room or an area up to 250 sq. ft. living/ dining room combos or great rooms count as two rooms. Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Stanley Steemer residential only. Certain restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 03/31/11.$9900 t hat you have spotty recept ion. Financially inexperienced t eenagers and young adults o ften make such mistakes, so b e sure to discuss the implic ations of signing contracts w ith your kids before they t urn 18. Afew additional tips: Make sure anything you s ign contains no unfilled b lank spaces, even if the o ther party promises to fill t hem in a certain way. Dont be afraid to ask to t ake a contract aside or bring i t home for more careful a nalysis or to get a second o pinion. Alawyer or financ ial advisor can help. Dont be pressured into s igning anything: If salesp eople try that tactic, walk a way. Make sure everything you w ere promised verbally a ppears in writing. This is p articularly important for t erms and conditions such as i nterest rates, down payments, discounts and penalties. Keep a copy of every document you sign. This will be especially important in cases of contested rental deposits, damaged merchandise, insurance claims, extended warranties, etc. Pay attention to prechecked boxes in online offers before submitting payment information for an order; they could bind you to terms you dont want. Take along a wingman when renting an apartment or buying a car. Remember, contracts are designed to protect both parties. Just make sure you fully understand all details before signing on the dotted line. Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. To participate in a free, online Financial Literacy and Education Summit on April 4, 2011, go to www.practicalmoneyskills.com/summit2011 Continued from page 1B Peace River Electric C ooperative (PRECO), a T ouchstone Energy distribut ion electric cooperative h eadquartered in Wauchula, F lorida, provides electric s ervice and energy solutions t o nearly 35,000 m ember/consumers in 10 Florida counties in central Florida: Brevard, DeSoto, Hardee, Highlands, Hillsborough, Indian River, Manatee, Osceola, Polk and Sarasota Counties. Through almost 4,000 miles of power lines, the electric cooperative has been in business since 1940 as a member-owned, not-for-profit. Continued from page 1B PRECOhas big crowd at annual meeting Courtesy photo Displaying Touchstone Energy Cooperatives banner, ParaCommando comes in for a landing at PRECO Park Read contracts closely Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155 BUSINESS SAN FRANCISCO (AP) The w orlds biggest maker of data stora ge computers on Thursday said t hat its security division has been h acked, and that the intruders comp romised a widely used technology f or preventing computer break-ins. The breach is an embarrassment f or EMC Corp., also a premier secur ity vendor, and potentially threate ns highly sensitive computer syst ems. The incident is a rare public acknowledgement by a security company that its internal anti-hacking technologies have been hacked. It is especially troubling because the technology sold by EMCs security division, RSA, plays an important role in making sure unauthorized people arent allowed to log into heavily guarded networks. The scope of the attack wasnt immediately known, but the potential fallout could be widespread. RSAs customers include the military, governments, various banks and medical facilities and health insurance outfits. EMC, which is based Hopkinton, Mass., itself is an RSAcustomer. EMC said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that RSAwas the victim of what is known as an advanced persistent threat, industry jargon for a sophisticated computer attack. The term is often associated with corporate espionage, nation-state attacks, or high-level cybercriminal gangs. EMC didnt offer clues about the suspected origin of the attack. It said it recently discovered an extremely sophisticated attack in progress against its networks and discovered that the infiltrators had made off with confidential data on RSAs SecurID products. The technology underpins the ubiquitous RSA-branded keychain dongles and other products that blanket important computer networks wi th an additional layer of protection. The products make it harder f or someone to break into a comput er even if a password is stolen, f or example. The RSAdevice, workin g in concert with back-end softwar e, generates an additional passwo rd that only the holder of the devi ce would know. But if a criminal c an figure out how those addition al passwords are generated, the syste m is at risk. Data storage companys anti-hacking division hacked

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 5B Page 4BNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com MARCH MARKETING MADNESS News-Sun photo by KATARASIMMONS Universal Center was the lucky winner during the News-Suns March Marketing Madness event last week. They won a free advertisement by being the last team to make a basket. The advertisers on these two pages represent the 32 remaining teams playing in the NCAA Mens Basketball Championship this week. Team names are in each ad. Watch for the March 23 issue of the News-Sun to see which advertisers advance to the next rounds. Phone (863) 382-7551 FAX (863) 382-27501405 US 27 North Sebring, FL33870 CAMPBELL S S COLLISION CENTER , INC. Jim Campbell Owner MARQUETTE Is it time to get rid of some items in your home that you no longer want? Closing your business and need some cash? Need to liquidate an estate?Its easier than you think. Nows the time to make $$$ on stuff thats just sitting around!330 US 27 N Suite I Sebring (863) 235-0190 GEORGE MASON 10001 US Hwy 27S Sebring,FL 33876(888) 859-5501 KANSAS STATE PITTSBURGH ARIZONA WASHINGTON CALL ABOUT OUR SPECIALS www.stanleysteemer.comIICRC Certified TechniciansAVON PARK 452-5800 SEBRING 382-3363 LAKE PLACID 465-1530 WAUCHULA 773-2002 TEMPLE ILLINOIS CINCINNATI WISCONSIN(863) 386-98592521 US 27 N. Sebring(Next to Home Depot) Sebring s Own U. FLORIDAAmerican Golf Cart2833 Hwy 27 S. Avon Park 453-CART (2278) Email us at: ezgotxt@aol.com Mon -Fri. 9am-4pm Closed Wed. 863-385-3497130 S. Commerce Ave. Sebring, FL 33870 HIGHLANDSCOUNTYSOLDESTESTABLISHEDHEARINGAIDOFFICEKeep your earsOpen BYU ADVANTAGEFLOOR COVERING385-1224LAKEVIEW PLAZA 207 U.S. 27 SOUTH SEBRING FINANCING AVAILABLE GONZAGA We build strong kids, strong families, strong communities UCLA FLORIDA STATE3310 Hwy 27 South Sebring, FL 33870863-402-2786 RICHMONDYohanna Olivo, MD Internal Medicine 3319 Medical Hill Road Sebring, FL 33870 (863) 382-2429 BUTLER PURDUE U. CONNECTICUT U. KANSAS (863) 655-0030 Toll Free (877) 605-3204 Fully Licensed & InsuredMember of Sebring, Avon Park, Lake Placid, Hardee DeSoto & LaBell Chambers of Commerce TEXASNeed Medical Transport?Local & Long DistanceTHINK POSITIVE ALS-BLS Ambulance & Wheelchair Transport Providing Quality, Compassionate Care since 19653600 Highlands Ave. Sebring, FL 863.385.6101 SYRACUSE Phone (863) 382-7551 FAX (863) 382-2750 1405 US 27 North Sebring, FL33870 CAMPBELL S S COLLISION CENTER , INC. Jim Campbell Owner MOREHEAD DUKE NOTRE DAME800-ALAN-JAY ROTARY CLUB OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY We have a lot of fun and still get the job done Join Us!Meets Monday Evenings 6:15 pm Beef OBradys Sebring Plaza OHIO STATE VCU3310 Hwy 27 South Sebring, FL 33870863-402-2786 KENTUCKY W. VIRGINIA ADVANTAGEFLOOR COVERING385-1224LAKEVIEW PLAZA 207 U.S. 27 SOUTH SEBRING FINANCING AVAILABLE SAN DIEGO STATE Mon -Fri. 9am-4pm Closed Wed. 863-385-3497130 S. Commerce Ave. Sebring, FL 33870 HIGHLANDSCOUNTYSOLDESTESTABLISHEDHEARINGAIDOFFICEKeep your earsOpen MICHIGAN STATE N. CAROLINA

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Special to the News-SunAVON PARK College is a time for students to not o nly learn the skills they n eed for their chosen careers i n the classroom, but to also g ain experience and work w ith others in their career f ield. The service-learning prog ram at South Florida C ommunity College allows s tudents to do just this. Through a grant with F lorida Campus Compact, a n ational coalition of more t han 1,100 college and univ ersity presidents who are c ommitted to fulfilling the c ivic purposes of higher educ ation, a variety of servicel earning opportunities are a vailable to SFCC students w ho are focused on a STEM f ield (science, technology, e ngineering, and mathemati cs.) There are many benefits o f participating in servicel earning, said Dr. Charlotte P ressler, SFCC Honors P rogram and Service-learni ng coordinator. It provides first-hand f ield experience, networking o pportunities, and the chance t o work with professionals w ho do the same things stud ents are interested in as c areers. Service-learning also h elps the community by prov iding local agencies with v olunteer help they might n ot have received otherw ise. SFCC sophomore Christy D avis chose to participate in s ervice-learning so she could g ain job experience and help t he community. Davis volunt eers at the Avon Park Depot M useum and the Center for G reat Apes in Wauchula w here she performs a variety o f functions including putt ing together their meals and c leaning out the enclosures. Through her experiences, D avis has realized she wants t o help people and plans to b ecome an anesthesiologist. Service-learning is worth t he time and experience, D avis said. Ive learned where I w ant to focus my career g oals, and how to network w ith people. You dont walk a way from it empty-handed, a nd it gives you a really g ood feeling. SFCC student Chris J ennings began participating i n service-learning because it g ave him the opportunity to b e more involved in his community. Formerly a contractor of his own interlock brickpaving company, Jennings enrolled in SFCC when the economy declined. I saw it as an opportunity to change my life, he said. He had already been volunteering on his own. Jennings does his servicelearning at Archbold Biological Station, where he works on plant restoration, documents the Cuban tree frogs an invasive species in the area, and cleans up the road along the facility; the Highlands County biofuels extension office where he tends to the biofuels crops and studies what will grow best in the area; and the SFCC Museum of Art and Culture (MOFAC) where he works as a liaison between the museum, Archbold Biological Station, and the Highlands County Audobon Society creating a list of species found on SFCC MOFACs Wildflower Wayside Shrine walking trail. Owning your own business is self-serving, he said. Now I realize that I want to do what I can to leave a place better than when I found it. Another benefit servicelearning students receive from the program is the opportunity to earn scholarships. Davis and Jennings, along with five other SFCC service-learning students, were recently selected to receive scholarships through the AmeriCorps Vista program, Students in Service. The federal program will help service-learning students earn a voucher for $1,132 that can be used toward education related expenses if they complete 300 hours of service learning by July 2011. SFCCs recipients were selected by Pressler and had a history of service learning participation. Other SFCC students who were chosen for the scholarship were Shea Young, Kyle Halvorsen, Shane Donglasan, Laura Salisbury, and John Vincent III. Many times, service learning opens up careers and fields of study students didnt even know existed, Pressler said. Any students taking a course from arts and sciences can participate in service learning. For more information on SFCCs service learning opportunities, call Pressler at 784-7247. Page 6BNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com Newborns Children AdolescentsOFFICE HOURS: Rajeswari Sonni, M.D., F.A.A.P. Praveen Krishnadas, M.D., F.A.A.P. Anoop Palta, M.D., F.A.A.P. Maria B. Asis, M.D., F.A.A.P Maria C. Perez, M.D. David Kleczek, P.A.-C. Amy Grimes, P.A.-C. Megan Neff, ARNP Mercy L. Seralde, M.D., F.A.A.P.Avon Park Pediatrics,P.A. & Sebring Pediatrics,LLCWe accept most Major Insurance and Medicaid SEBRING382-0770AVON PARK453-7337 Specializing in the treatment of Allergies Asthma Attention Deficit Disorder Immunizations Check-ups Obesity Counseling SEBRING: MON. FRI. 8:30AM 5:00PMSATURDAY 8:30AM 12:00 NOON SEBRING ONLYAVON PARK: MON. & WED. 8:30AM 7:00PM TUES., THURS., & FRI. 8:30AM 5:00PM LAKE PLACID699-1414 American Golf Cart 2833 Hwy 27 S. Avon Park (863) 453-CART(2278)2007S Starting at $1595includes top, window & charger, NEW & USED TIRES & BATTERIES BATTERIES:Trojan PowerTron AmericanOver 75 New & Used Carts To Choose From Classified ads get results! Call 385-6155 CHALKTALK SFCCs students see the benefit in service-learning Courtesy photo Student Chris Jennings began participating in service-learning because it gave him the opportunity to be more involved in his community. He does his service-learning at Archbold Biological Station, where he works on plant restoration. Courtesy photo South Florida Community College sophomore Christy Davis chose to participate in service-learning so she could gain job experience and help the community. Davis volunteers at the Avon Park Depot Museum and the Center for Great Apes in Wauchula. SFCC Community Education offers driving classesSouth Florida Community Colleges Community Education Department is offering a series of Alcohol Drug Accident Prevention Training (ADAPT) courses for first-time drivers license applicants. The four-hour courses will be held 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Saturday, April 16, at the SFCC Highlands Campus, 600 W. College Drive, Avon Park; and 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Saturday, April 30, at the SFCC Hardee Campus, 2968 U.S. 17 N., Bowling Green. Pre-registration is required. The fee is $32 and may be paid by cash, check, or credit card. Participants may register in Building B on the Highlands Campus or at any SFCC campus or center. The Communi ty Education Department is also offering a series of Safe Driving Accide nt Prevention Progra m (SPAPP) courses for drive rs who have received a traff ic citation. The four-hour cours es will be held Wednesda y, April 13, 5:30-9:30 p.m., at the SFCC DeSoto Campu s; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m ., Saturday, April 16, at t he SFCC Highlands Campu s; and Saturday, April 30, 8:3 0 a.m.-12:30 p.m., at t he SFCC Hardee Campus. Pre-registration is required. The fee is $37 an d may be paid by cash, chec k, or credit card. For more informatio n, contact the Communi ty Education Department at 453-6661, 465-5300, 49 47500, 773-2252, or 38 26900, ext. 7388. Snapshots Courtesy pho to South Florida Community College Painting I and II students completed a series of paintings and murals as service learning projects this spring. One of the service learning projects was a mural for the Florida Hospital Child Learning Center. We really appreciate all of the time and hard work that these students put into the project, said Mabel Aylward, director, Florida Hospital Child Learning Center. Students paint mural WHATS HOPPIN AROUND TOWN?Subscribe today and nd out! Call 863-385-6155 for home deliverywww.newssun.com

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 7B ELECT WHO?This is a campaign against Melanoma. One in 72 people will contract the disease. You must elect yourself to lead against it. It is a potential matter of life and death.Melanoma*Usually a non-symptomatic growth on the skin with multiple colors and irregular edges.We can protect you against this silent killer. We are your skin police. Call now, elect a proactive preventative skin team.American Institute of Dermatology, P.A.Darrin A. Rotman, M.D. Julie Iellimo, P.A.-C Jennifer Wolf, P.A.-C Medicare and all major insurances accepted in network* New Patients Welcome863-386-0786*individual must call for verication of benets. This is not a guarantee. Arts & Crafts FoodEntertainmentMajor SponsorsMuseum DisplayRotary Club Pancake Breakfast5K Run/Walk CHALKTALK Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South F lorida Community College H onors students Christopher J ennings and Pablo Mingrino w ere chosen to represent S FCC as a member of the Phi T heta Kappa (PTK) 2011 AllF lorida Academic Team. Students named to the acad emic team represent the best i n state, said Dr. Charlotte P ressler, SFCC Honors P rogram coordinator and phil osophy instructor. PTK a dvisors nominate students b ased on their academic m erit and community service w ork. They will each receive s cholarships for being named to the team. Jennings was nominated for the team because of his success in SFCCs Honors Program and his servicelearning record. He volunteers at Archbold Biological Station, the Highlands County biofuels extension office, and the SFCC Museum of Art and Culture (MOFAC). Jennings was also chosen by PTK to receive the Guistwhite Scholarship. The $5,000 scholarship award is based on a students scholastic achievement and participation in Phi Theta Kappa. He plans to attend the University of Florida where he will major in geomatics engineering. Mingrinos academic record and participation in numerous college-related and community service activities with SFCCs Student Government Association, PTK, Relay for Life, and the Oaks of Avon earned him a nomination. Alot of students apply for this, so its a great honor they chose me, Mingrino said. It tells me I have succeeded in everything I have been working toward. He plans to attend college in New York where he will major in accounting. This year, 108 students from Floridas 28 public community colleges were appointed to the All-Florida Academic Team based on their outstanding academic performance and community service. Phi Theta Kappa is the international honor society of two-year colleges. The SFCC Honors Program is designed for those students who want to take on the full intellectual challenge of a college education. Students in the program gain intellectual development and cultural enrichment; are taught by qualified and experienced faculty; are eligible for scholarships; and receive recognition at SFCCs graduation ceremony. Call Pressler at 784-7247. Students represent SFCC on All-Florida Academic Team Courtesy pho to Pablo Mingrino, South Florida Community College president Dr. Norm Stephens, and Chris Jennings will represent SFCC on the All-Florida Academic Team. Special to the News-SunThe Early Learning Coalition of Floridas Heartland Inc. is promoting awareness of the 16th Annual Floridas Childrens Week celebrates which is from Sunday to Saturday, April 3-9. Thousands of parents, children, professionals, advocates, community leaders and concerned citizens across Florida will come together to focus their attention on issues that affect the health and well being of children and families in the state. The purpose of Childrens Week is to create a shared vision of the state of Floridas commitment to its children and families and to engage a long-term process to develop and implement strategies for moving the shared visio n forward. Child care providers in Highlands, Charlott e, DeSoto and Hardee cou nties are creating pap er hands with the children th ey serve these hands will be among the tens of tho usands hung in the Capit ol Rotunda during Children s Week. The mission of the Ear ly Learning Coalition of Floridas Heartland Inc., is to support families and ch ildren in accessing high qua lity early care and educatio n services through Scho ol Readiness and Volunta ry Pre-kindergarten program s. The ELCFH also serv es as a point of access to resources and referrals f or health care and family su pport services. Floridas Childrens Week begins April 3 Courtesy photo J odi McWaters, a dental assistant student at South Florida Community College, works w ith Ridge Area A rc consumer Tim J ohnson on how to do proper dental hygiene. Several students in the dental program came to Ridge A rea Arc in Avon Park on March 10 to demonstrate proper dental hygiene as well as the college students received a sensitivity training on how to communicate with people w ith disabilities. SFCCdental assistant students learn how to communicate with people with disabilities

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Page 8BNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com

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BYBARRYFOSTER Special to the News-SunSEBRING Each year at S ebring International R aceway, fans are treated to a f ull slate of racing action l eading up to the Mobil 1 T welve Hours of Sebring pres ented by Fresh from Florida. This year, there were no f ewer than four doubleheade rs slated as season openers i ncluding both open wheel a nd closed wheel cars. RJ Lopez, of Santo D omingo, made it look easy i n the 2011 SCCAPro Racing T rans-Am Seriesinaugural c ompetitionFriday with a f lag-to-flag victory. Driving the Disco 106 C orvette, the Dominican R epublic drivertook t hepole, set the fast lap and l ead every lap. It was Lopezs third career T rans-Am victory, outdist ancing Cliff Ebben, from A ppleton, Wis., by 13 seco nds in the 28-lap affair. In the BF Goodrich Barber N ational presented by M azda,Canadian Thomas M cGregor lead the pack for m ost ofThursdays half hour a ffair to grab theinitial victor y of his season. Rounding out the podium w as Brandon Newey in seco nd andDanilo Estrela who grabbed third, Newey came back Friday to take a win inthe second round of the Barber Natioinal twin bill. It washis first win of theyear and second podium appearance. Sebastian Ordonez worked his way up from a sixth-place start to take second. Thomas McGregor also earned his second podium in as many races, taking third place honors. The Cooper Tires USF2000 National Championship powered by Mazdaalso began their season at Sebring Thursday afternoon. Zach Veachnabbed the seasons first racewith a convincing win. The 15-year-oldOhio driver bested the field going away, PetriSuvanto was second on the podium with Spencer Piggot third. InFridayssecond round, Luke Ellery ran the JDC Motorsports Mazda to his first win of the new season. Spencer Piggot and Petri Suvantotraded places from the first race with Piggot taking the second step on the podium andSuvanto third. The first of the two Cooper Tire Prototype Lites Championship races proved to be a contentious competitionas Daniel Goldburg held off a persistent Tristan Nunez to win that series first2011 competion, Thursday afternoon. Lucas Downs followed theNunez across the start/finish linefor a third place spot on the podium. Downs came back Friday to capture the second race of the season. The Butterfield Minn. driver led the way followed SPORTS C SECTION Inside This Section Sebring 70s Finals . . .3C Kayak Tours . . .3C Track Meet correction . . .4C News-Sun Sunday, March 20, 2011 News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHN E After collecting the deflection of Jayme Faircloths dive, Amanda Grimaldo fires to first for a 4-6-3 ground out in Sebrings win over Avon Park Friday night. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newssun.comSEBRING The rivalry m ay not be at the peak its s een in recent years, but w hen Avon Park and Sebring f ind themselves on opposite s ides of the field, expectation l evels always rise up just a b it more. And while the Red D evil softball bats did s how some offensive s park, it was the Lady B lue Streaks who b ashed their way to an 1 8-5 win Friday night. Sebring starter H aley Pack, making j ust her second appearance of t he season after returning f rom a foot injury and an i nning of work in Mondays w in at Hardee, looked good i n setting the side down in o rder in the first. Sarah Hunnicutt, however, d idnt have as much luck a gainst the hard-hitting S treaks. Tayla DaSilva rapped one to left for a lead-off single before Jayme Faircloth and Amanda Grimaldo worked their counts to draw walks and load the bases. Dino Lower then took one for the team, taking a pitch in the leg and forcing home DaSilva. Packs ground-out brought home a run and two runs came in when a grounder off of Carly Hoffners bat couldnt be handled. After Lauren Welborn drew a walk, a Taryn OBannon shot caused an error and two more runs came in. Allie Mann beat out an infield single and DaSilva ripped an RBI double before one more fielding error brought home the eighth run of the inning. Kaycee Mercer then came on in relief to get out of the inning. But the Lady Devils answered back, showing patience at the plate as Pack struggled to find her control. An irregular landing spot on the mound was making things uncomfortable for the hurlers still-recovering foot and three consecutive walks, to Cheyenne Mills, Brittany Gates and Angela Bateman, opened the inning. Pack induced a pop-up for the first out, but Tykeria Wileys base on balls brought home a run and Pack was pulled. Hoffner took over and didnt have her best control to start as she plunked Mercer to bring Gates in and a wild pitch allowed Bateman to scamper home. But Sebring got out of it when Katelynn Stolls hardhit fly to center was snared by Faircloth and the relay in nabbed Wiley at the plate. Lady Streaks take county clash Sebring18Avon Park5 See SEBRING, page 4C Special to the News-SunLAKEPLACID On Wednesday, March 16, Yates (14-6) maintained their three game lead by defeating Central Security (8-11) 16-8 in Lake Placid Senior Softball action. Dick Cook had four hits for the winners and Barry Hurlbut (home run) and Dusty Hensley had three hits each. Seminole Tire (11-9) remained within striking distance of Yates by squeaking past Lake Placid Marine (9-10) 1413. Manager Charlie Quinn had five hits and Bob Richards had four to pace the Noles attack. The Three Hit Club included Kyle Saunders, John Kloet, and Mo Pier (double). For the Mariners, Andy Timermanis had four hits while Gary Tankersley and Richard Rivera chipped in with three hits each. In a battle of last place teams, Schoonis (8-12) fell to Lockhart Service (9-11) 35-16. It was the third time in the last six games the Lockhart bashers topped 30 runs, a prodigio us accomplishment even b y senior softball standards Dave Reed found a w ay to beat the Williams Sh ift by going over it and in to the orange groves thr ee times. Billy Todd had five hi ts, while Casey Carlso n, Doug Hammond, Manag er Doran Quigg and Harv ey Jones had four hits each For Schoonis, Bo b Poulin had five hits an d launched two round-tri ppers of his own over t he fence. Bob Roth also had fi ve hits (double), Jeff Stanl ey had four hits (triple) an d Gary Steeves and I an McCuaig had three hi ts each in the losing effort. In Monday, March 1 4, action, the Centr al Security team pulled o ff one of baseballs rare st feats. In the sixth innin g, Seminole Tire had runne rs on first and second wi th no outs when the infie ld fly rule was called on a pop-up. In the confusion th at followed, the batter w as automatically out and t he Triple play seen in LP Senior play See LP, page 3C News-Sun photo by KIM GAUGER J esse Baker takes one for the team in protecting home plate from Hardees Terrel Wintz in Fridays 5-1 win over the Wildcats. By DAN HOEHNE daniel.hoehne@newsssun.com and ED BALDRIDGE ed.baldridge@newssun.comSEBRING After going 10-0 to start the season, the Sebring Blue Streak baseball squad was tripped up in a recent three-game losing streak, including a rare loss to county rival Lake Placid in an extrainning affair Tuesday. But the team would break out of it with consecutive wins over two other long-time rivals. With the 11-inning game against the Dragons creating some pitching rotation scrambling, the Streaks got a great effort Friday from Zach Osha in a 5-1 win at Hardee. Osha went the full seven innings, surrendering just two hits, one run and one walk while striking out six. And the Sebring offense got all it would need in the first as lead-off man Seth Abeln singled to start the game and moved to third on a Matt Randall single up the middle. After Randall stole second to put runners on second and third, Jesse Baker grounded one through the left side to bring Abeln home and Randall soon came in on an error. Osha cruised through the bottom of the frame, one, two, three, but would have his bit of trouble in the second. After plunking the lead-o ff batter with a pitch, scatter ed singles brought home a Wildcat run. But that would be all th ey would muster as Osha g ot back on form and retired t he side in order in three of t he next five innings, with only a walk and an error marring h is effort the rest of the way. The offense, meanwhil e, added to the lead in t he fourth with a Johnny Knig ht triple bringing Corb in Hoffner in, who had singled Knight would soon com e in on a wild pitch for a 4 -1 lead. The final run came in t he sixth when Gunn ar Streaks whip Wildcats, down Red Devils Sebring5Hardee1 See STREAKS, page 4C Support Series races warm up SIR Courtesy photo RJ Lopez drove the Disco 106 Corvette to a wire-to-wire win in the 2011 SCCAA Pro Racing Trans-Am Series race Friday. Go to w w w w w w . n n e e w w s s s s u u n n . c c o o m m for coverage of the Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring presented by Fresh from Florida. See RACES, page 4C

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HOPE 3-on-3SEBRING The First Annual Mary Toney HOPE Foundation Community 3on-3 basketball tournament will take place Saturday, April 2 at the Sebring High School gym from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at a cost of $5 per player. The tournament will have male and female brackets consisting of threeorfour player teams from ages 7-18-years old. Registration forms can be found in the front office at Sebring High School and must be turned in by Friday, March 25. For more information, contact Lavaar Scott at 214-3880 or email LaV39@yahoo.com .Avon Park Mall Festival 5KAVON PARK The 26th Annual Avon Park Mall Festival 5K Run/Walk is set for Friday night, March 25, at the Old Armory Building at 6:00 p.m. Registration will begin at 5:00 p.m. in the building across from the tennis courts in Donaldson Park. Entry fee is $15 through March 21 and $20 from March 22 thru race day sign up. Tee shirts guaranteed to only the first 100 entrants, so sign up early. Those desiring an entry form may email cbrojek@comcast.net or call Chet at 385-4736. Mail your checks payable to Central Florida Striders, along with the signed application to Central Florida Striders, 3310 Par Road, Sebring, FL33872. The race benefits the boys and girls track teams at Avon Park High School.Wings of Faith GolfSEBRING Wings of Faith Worship Center presents the First Annual Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Country Club of Sebring. Check-in is from 7:30-8:15 a.m. with a Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Platinum Sponsor $500 includes one team of four golfers, one tee sign and two green signs; Gold Sponsor $300 includes one team of four golfers, one green sign; Silver Sponsor $150 includes one green sign, one tee sign; Bronze Sponsor $100 includes one green sign. Individual player $60 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($70 after March 26). Team of Four Golfers $240 includes green fees, cart and lunch ($280 after March 26). Make checks payable to: Wings of Faith CWC, P.O. Box 1227, Sebring, FL 33871, or register online at wingsoffaithchristianworshipcenter.com. Proceeds to be donated to scholarship program for graduates attending Wings of Faith Christian Worship Center. For more information, call Jason Hankerson at 253-2234; jasonhankerson@gmail.com or Alvin Walters Sr. at 381-5706, alvinwalterssr@yahoo.com.Doc Owen Golf TourneyAVON PARK The Avon Park Noon Rotary Club will host its Second Annual David Doc Owen Golf tournament on Saturday, April 16 at Highlands Ridge North. The two-person scramble-format entry fee is $60 per person with prizes in flight groups, lunch, goodie bag and refreshments on the course. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Entry information and check payable to Avon Park Noon Rotary mailed to Chet Brojek, 3310 Par Rd, Sebring, FL 33872. Golfers should include their names and handicaps along with their check. Those needing a form may email Brojek at cbrojek@comcast.net or call a t 385-4736. Business entry of two-persons plus a hole sign for a total of $200 is available for the first time this year. All Rotary club members are urged to support participate in the event that ben efits local Rotary charity projects. Business hole signs for $100 are also available by contacting Chet via email o r phone.SHSBasketball CampSEBRING The SHS basketball program will be hosting a basketball camp for boys and girls, in 2nd-6th grade, on Monday, March 28, and Tuesday, March 29, from 8 a.m.4 p.m. The cost of the camp is $20 and is appropriate for players of all skill level s and experience. Current and former Streaks will be on hand to help with the camp, which will also feature contests, competitions and prizes. Campers can either bring their own lunch or purchase lunch there for a reasonable price. Please contact Coach Lee at 441-122 1, or by email at leem@highlands.k12.fl.u s Sandy Foster MemorialSEBRING NU-HOPE Elder Care Services annual golf tournament is just around the corner. The NU-HOPE Board of Directors ha s chosen to rename the golf tournament this year in memory of Sandy Foster, fo rmer Executive Director of NU-HOPE Elder Care Services. Sandy passed away very unexpectedl y in September of last year. Sandy loved golf and ran a very successful golf tournament for 13 years; in his memory the tournament will be renamed the Sandy Foster Memorial/NU-HOPE golf tournament. This year we are continuing with Sandys passion for the tournament with flight, raffle and door prizes. In the last three years the field was full, with a wait list, so sign up soon! The first annual Sandy Foster Memorial/NU-HOPE golf tournament will be held on Saturday, April 9, with a n 8:30 a.m. shotgun start, at the Country Club of Sebring. The tournament will be a two-person scramble format. Entry fee will be $60 per person ($12 0 per team) which includes lunch afterwards and refreshments during the tournament. Registration forms are availab le at the Country Club of Sebring Pro Sho p (John Vickers) or can be obtained via mail or fax by calling Debbie Slade at 382-2134. Business sponsorships are also available for this event. The revenue from this event is used for the local matchamount this organi zation needs each year to secure federal and state grant funds in our effort to co ntinue providing home and communitybased services to the frail and needy eld erly residents of Highlands and Hardee Counties. Barefoot Waterski TourneyFORTMYERS The 10th annual Deuceapalooza Barefoot Endurance Tournament is set for April 9 in Fort Myers. This tournament is open to waterski enthusiasts of all ages. Trophies and cash prizes will be hand ed out. Participants will receive a free T shirt. For information, call Deuce at (239) 693-1975. EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLPctGB x-Boston4819.716 Philadelphia3633.52213 New York3533.5151312New Jersey2245.32826 Toronto1949.2792912Southeast Division WLPctGB x-Miami4722.681 x-Orlando4426.629312Atlanta 3930.5658 Charlotte2840.4121812Washington1651.23930 Central Division WLPctGB y-Chicago4919.721 Indiana3039.4351912Milwaukee2741.39722 Detroit2544.3622412Cleveland1354.1943512WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division WLPctGB x-San Antonio5513.809 Dallas4821.696712New Orleans4030.57116 Memphis3732.5361812Houston3634.51420 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City4523.662 Denver4128.594412Portland3929.5746 Utah3633.522912Minnesota1753.24329 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Lakers4920.710 Phoenix3433.50714 Golden State3039.43519 L.A. Clippers2643.37723 Sacramento1651.23932 x-clinched playoff spot ___ Fridays Games Indiana 115, Chicago 108, OT Orlando 85, Denver 82 Toronto 116, Washington 107 Miami 106, Atlanta 85 Detroit 99, New York 95 Oklahoma City 99, Charlotte 82 San Antonio 97, Dallas 91 Houston 93, Boston 77 Milwaukee 110, New Jersey 95 Phoenix 108, Golden State 97 Philadelphia 102, Sacramento 80 L.A. Lakers 106, Minnesota 98 Saturdays Games Cleveland at L.A. Clippers, late Denver at Miami, late Indiana at Memphis, late Boston at New Orleans, late Charlotte at San Antonio, late Philadelphia at Portland, late Sundays Games New Jersey at Washington, 1 p.m. Detroit at Atlanta, 2 p.m. New York at Milwaukee, 3 p.m. Phoenix at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m. Sacramento at Minnesota, 3:30 p.m. Utah at Houston, 7 p.m. Toronto at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Golden State at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Portland at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.EASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division WLOTPtsGFGA Philadelphia4319894225188 Pittsburgh4122890206172 N.Y. Rangers3830480210177 New Jersey3334470151182 N.Y. Islanders27331266199230 Northeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Boston39211088211170 Montreal3926785192184 Buffalo3428876203202 Toronto31311072187223 Ottawa2636961161221 Southeast Division WLOTPtsGFGA Washington42211094198176 Tampa Bay39221088212214 Carolina33291076201214 Atlanta30291272200230 Florida2933967179194WESTERN CONFERENCECentral Division WLOTPtsGFGA Detroit4320894232201 Chicago3825884232201 Nashville36251082183168 Columbus32281074190211 St. Louis3230973198209 Northwest Division WLOTPtsGFGA y-Vancouver47179103238172 Calgary3727983222209 Minnesota3529777180191 Colorado2636860195248 Edmonton2339955173234 Pacific Division WLOTPtsGFGA San Jose4123890206188 Phoenix39231189212205 Los Angeles4026585196174 Dallas3825884201199 Anaheim3827581197203 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. ___ Fridays Games Washington 3, New Jersey 0 N.Y. Rangers 6, Montreal 3 Carolina 3, N.Y. Islanders 2, OT Phoenix 3, Vancouver 1 Saturdays Games Columbus at Minnesota, late Atlanta at Buffalo, late Boston at Toronto, late Tampa Bay at Ottawa, late N.Y. Islanders at Florida, late Detroit at Nashville, late Philadelphia at Dallas, late Colorado at Edmonton, late Anaheim at Los Angeles, late St. Louis at San Jose, late Sundays Games N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, 12:30 p.m. Nashville at Buffalo, 5 p.m. New Jersey at Columbus, 5 p.m. Montreal at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Chicago at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Calgary at Anaheim, 8 p.m.AMERICAN LEAGUEWLPct Kansas City146.700 Detroit159.625 Seattle107.588 Minnesota119.550 Toronto119.550 Boston1211.522 Los Angeles1111.500 Baltimore910.474 Tampa Bay910.474 Texas911.450 Cleveland811.421 Chicago812.400 New York812.400 Oakland813.381NATIONAL LEAGUEWLPct San Francisco176.739 Colorado157.682 Atlanta137.650 Philadelphia148.636 Milwaukee138.619 Cincinnati128.600 St. Louis118.579 Washington1010.500 New York1011.476 San Diego910.474 Chicago914.391 Houston914.391 Pittsburgh814.364 Los Angeles815.348 Florida614.300 Arizona618.250 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. ___ Fridays Games Houston 9, Florida 2 Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 2 St. Louis 10, Washington 4 Detroit 8, Boston (ss) 3 Toronto 6, N.Y. Yankees 5 N.Y. Mets 3, Atlanta 0 L.A. Dodgers 6, San Francisco 3 Arizona 8, Seattle 5 L.A. Angels 7, San Diego 6 Kansas City 6, Cleveland (ss) 5 Cincinnati 14, Chicago Cubs 13 Colorado 9, Milwaukee 7 Minnesota 3, Baltimore 2 Tampa Bay 7, Boston (ss) 3 Chicago White Sox 18, Oakland 1 Cleveland (ss) 12, Texas 6 Saturdays Games Toronto vs. N.Y. Yankees, late Philadelphia vs. Baltimore, late N.Y. Mets (ss) vs. Atlanta (ss), late Florida vs. St. Louis (ss), late Boston vs. Pittsburgh, late St. Louis (ss) vs. Houston, late Tampa Bay vs. Minnesota, late Atlanta (ss) vs. Detroit, late Washington vs. N.Y. Mets (ss), late Chicago Cubs vs. San Diego, late Milwaukee vs. L.A. Dodgers, late Colorado vs. Cincinnati (ss), late Kansas City vs. San Francisco, late Seattle vs. Texas, late Cleveland vs. L.A. Angels, late Chicago White Sox vs. Oakland, late Cincinnati (ss) vs. Arizona, late Sundays Games Pittsburgh vs. Houston (ss) at Kissimmee, 1 p.m. Minnesota vs. Toronto at Dunedin, 1 p.m. Detroit vs. Washington at Viera, 1 p.m. N.Y. Yankees vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, 1 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. Florida at Jupiter, 1 p.m. Houston (ss) vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1 p.m. Baltimore vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, 1 p.m. St. Louis vs. Boston at Ft Myers, 1 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 4 p.m. Arizona (ss) vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 4 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4 p.m. Oakland (ss) vs. San Francisco (ss) at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4 p.m. San Diego vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4 p.m. Arizona (ss) vs. Oakland (ss) at Phoenix, 4 p.m. LOCALSCHEDULE SPORTSSNAPSHOTS THESCOREBOARD Lake Placid MONDAY: Softball vs.Clewiston,5/7 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball at Frostproof,7 p.m.; Softball vs.Avon Park,5:30/7:30 p.m.; Boys Tennis vs.LaBelle,4:30 p.m.; Girls Tennis at LaBelle,4:30 p.m. Sebring MONDAY: Boys/Girls Tennis vs.Tenoroc,4:30 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball vs.Haines City,7 p.m.; Softball vs.Ridge,6/7:30 p.m.; Boys Tennis at Clewiston,4 p.m.; Girls Tennis at Auburndale,4 p.m.; Track and Field at Avon Park, 4:30 p.m. SFCC MONDAY: Baseball at Polk State College,6 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Baseball vs.Hillsborough,6 p.m. THURSDAY: Softball at State College of Florida,5 p.m. Avon Park MONDAY: Baseball vs.Hardee,7 p.m. TUESDAY: Baseball vs.Tenoroc,7 p.m.; Softball at Lake Placid,5:30/7:30 p.m.; Track and Field hosts meet,4:30 p.m. T T E E N N N N I I S S S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 2 2 p p . m m . BNP Paribas Open, Finals . . . . . . . . . . . . A A B B C CA A U U T T O O R R A A C C I I N N G G S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . ALMS 12 Hours of Sebring . . . . . . . . . . A A B B C C 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NASCAR Jeff Byrd 500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . F F O O X XN N H H L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . . . . N N B B C CT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . N.Y. Islanders at Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NM M L L B B P P R R E E S S E E A A S S O O N N S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 4 4 p p . m m . L.A. Dodgers at Chicago White Sox . . . . W W G G N NM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . Boston at Philadelphia, Clearwater . . . . E E S S P P N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 1 1 p p . m m . N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, Sarasota . . . E E S S P P N NC C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 1 1 1 1 a a . m m . NIT Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N N N o o o o n n NCAA Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA T ournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 5 5 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C C B B S S 6 6 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 7 7 p p . m m . NCAATournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T B B S S 8 8 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA T ournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 9 9 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T B B S SM MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NITTournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 p p . m m . NITTournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NIT Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 9 9 p p . m m . NIT Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E E S S P P N NC C O O L L L L E E G G E E S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 2 2 p p . m m . Arkansas at Mississippi State . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NW W O O M M E E N N S S C C O O L L L L E E G G E E B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L S SU U N N D D A A Y Y N N o o o o n n NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 2 2 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 5 5 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 7 7 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 9 9 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2T TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2 9 9 p p . m m . NCAA Tournament. . . . . . . . E E S S P P N N 2 2Times, games, channels all subject to change G G O O L L F F S SU U N N D D A A Y Y 9 9 a a . m m . EuroPGA Sicilian Cup . . . . . . . . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 1 1 p p . m m . PGA Transitions Championship . . . . . . G G O O L L F F 3 3 p p . m m . PGA Transitions Championship . . . . . . . N N B B C C 7 7 p p . m m . LPGA RR Donnelly Founders Cup . . . . G G O O L L F FN N B B A A M MO O N N D D A A Y Y 7 7 p p . m m . Orlando at Cleveland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S U U N NT TU U E E S S D D A A Y Y 8 8 p p . m m . Chicago at Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T 1 1 0 0 : : 3 3 0 0 p p . m m . Phoenix at L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T T N N T T LIVESPORTSONTV NBA NHL MLBPreseason Page 2CNews-Sun Sunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.co m

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 3C TO ADVERTISE ON THIS PAGE CALL ANGI 386-5626 Located Inside Inn On The Lakes Hotel 3100 Golfview Rd. Sebring, FL863-314-0348 FREE BEERWith Purchase of Appetizer or Entree! Great Golf ValuePar 72 Championship Golf Course Golf Instruction & Practice Facility Full-service Caddyshack Restaurant & Bar Sebring GolfClubcall 863-314-5919 or online at www.mysebring.com Located off Hwy 27 in Sebring 3118 Golfview Rd., Sebring, FL 33875 To schedule a tee time OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 6 MONTH MEMBERSHIPS NOW AVAILABLE(863) 382-0500 3201 Golfview Rd. Sebring(863) 382-0744for 9 Hole Executive RatesPrices good thru 3/31/10 Incl. Tax & CartMonday thru Friday:8am 1pm $36By 8, After 1 $29 Saturday & Sunday: $25 RATES YOUVE BEEN DREAMING ABOUT GOLF SEBRINGS FRIENDLIEST GOLF COURSE VO TED #1 LOCAL COURSE 2010 2222 GOLF HAMMOCK DR., SEBRING863-382-2151golfhammockcc@embarqmail.com Coupon RequiredFRIDAY1:00 pmSHOTGUN SPECIAL $ 24CALL FOR TEE TIMESExpires 03-31-11 18 HOLES7am-8am....$27008am-Noon..$3300Noon-2pm..$2700After 2pm...$2000All Rates Includes Tax 9 HOLES7am-3pm....$1800After 3pm...$1200Weekend Rates7am-2pm....$25002pm Close..$2000 471-ZENO (9366)4325 Sun N Lake Blvd. SebringMon 3 9 Tues-Thurs 11 9 Fri 11-10 Sat 3-10 Closed Sunday402-22222934 US 27 S. (Publix Shopping Center) Sebring Tues -Thur 3 9 Fri Sat 3 10 Closed Sunday & MondaySERVING HIGHLANDS FOR MORETHAN 25 YEARS 16" Large One Topping PizzaNot valid with any other offer. Expires 03/31/11Monday & Tuesday ONLY $ 10 99 ZENOS WE DELIVER! Saturday March 26, 10 a.m. Alafia River Lithia S prings Park The Alafia River is a narr ow, twisting trail with large o ak, cypress and cedar trees t hat line the banks and form a c anopy overhead. The Alafia is a fairly swift r iver, especially for central F lorida, and some small s hoals are exposed in low water creating small rapids. We will meet at Lithia Springs Park and shuttle you to the launch site at Alderman Ford Park. This is a full day trip with approximately 3 1/2 4 hrs of paddling time including a break for lunch. Sunday March 27, 4 p.m. Sunset Tour Arbuckle Creek/ Istokpoga Park We will meet and launch from the boat ramp on Lake Istokpoga Park off of Hwy 98 in Sebring. This is a late afternoon (sunset) trip with approximately 2 1/2 hours of paddling. Ideal for beginners and first-timers as well as seasoned paddlers. All trips are $39 per person (single or tandem), $19 for those bringing their own kayaks. All reservations must be confirmed via phone or email no later than 24 hrs prior to the trip. Sebring Kayak Tours reserves the right to cancel tours that dont have the minimum amount of participants. Two more Kayak Tours trips on tap Special to the News-SunLAKEPLAICD Lake Placid Youth Baseball and Softball is accepting registration forms forBaseball ages 11-12 Ozone, 13-14 and Softball,ages10-12, 13-15. Forms are available at the website www.lpyb.net, or call Sheri Griffin at 441-1955 for Baseball and Linette Wells at 441-2320 for Softball. Registration deadline is Thursday, April 7 f or baseball and softball. Player evaluation an d draft will be Saturda y, April 9 at 1 p.m. no re gistrations will be accept ed after the day of the draft Player evaluation is mandatory players n ot present will be random ly assigned to a team. Lake Placid Baseball, Softball sign-ups runners were out as they tried to advance. One play, three outs a triple play. In all the years I have playedball, I was never involved in a triple play, boasted manager Duke Hensley, the centerpiece of the defensive gem that carried The Securitymen to a 15-13 win. Paul Brand homered for Central while Don Cunningham and Kyle Saunders (double) had four hits each for the Tiremen. Jim Morgan (double), Tom Walsh and Pete Mathews had three hits each in the loss. Lake Placid Marine won a nail-biter over Lockhart Service Center 14-13. The Mariners employed a Ted Williams shift on lefty slugger Dave Reed with two out and one on in the last inning. Reeds smash to left was hauled in by Howard Carney near the fence to seal the win. Larry Lane had four hits and a number of fi ne defensive catches to thwart the Lockhart team Carney, And y Timermanis and Ji m Hensley had three hi ts each in the win. For Lockhart, Billy Tod d had four hits, while Ree d, Dick Cook, Cliff Blum l and Paul Stephenson h ad three hits each. Yates Insurance held o ff a late rally by Schoonis to defeat The Restauranteu rs 14-11. Barry Hurlbut led t he way with four hits (do uble). Jim Morgan (triple ), Bill Gallagher and mana ger Dusty Hensley h ad three hits each with Ji m Radcliff adding a doub le and triple. For Schoonis, Bo b Roth had three hits. Continued from 1C LP Seniors see nail-biters Monday Special to the News-SunSEBRING The Sebring S eventy and Over Softball L eague played itsfinal two g ames of the season Tuesday a nd Thursday, March 15 and 1 7,in warmFlorida weather. On Thursday the Silent S alesman met the first place H ighlands Merchantsfor the f inal game of the season. The Salesman came ready t o play, hoping to be the only t eam to beat the Merchants t wice in the season. The 16-2 record of the M erchants did not faze the S alesman as they kept it a b ack-and-forth game. Leading 15-14 going into t he last inning, the Salesman p ut the gameaway by batting a roundand scoring eight t imes for the 23-14 win. Doing their share in the 37h it attack were Bob Roth, 5f or-5 with a double, Gene H anford, 4-for-5having four r uns scored, JimLongman, 4f or-6 (double) and Bob F ahnestock, 4-6. Having three hits each were L es Smith, Fred Moore,Stu H ayner and Ray Concepcion. Rapping out two hitseach w ere Al Taratuta, Spider M cMinn,Ken Filppula and R uss Moody. The Merchants held their g round withCharlie Quinn g oing 2-for-4 with a home r un. Don Ward also had a homer with his 2-for-5. Ron Lewis 4-for-4 (triple) and Glenn Minic 3-for-4 with a double. John Laysack and Harold Dinel each were 3-for-4. Millers went over the Rebels with a final score of 19-10. Jim Hensley came close to thecycle with a single, double and home run, going 3-or-4. Each hitting inthe doubleparade were Rod Palmer,Don Sheets, Pete Mathews and Dale DeMar. Syd Collins, Bob Foxand Jerry Kauffman each hit two singles. Allstate topped the Blue Jays8-4. Allstates manager Rudy Pribble reported that their team put forth a strong defensive effort. Outstanding in both offense and defensive plays was Moe Pier. The Blue Jays had two doubles by Richard Godfrey and Bill. John Penna went 2-for-3 and Chester was 3-for-4. In Tuesdays actiona tooclose-to-call game between Allstate Insurance and Millers Heating and Air Conditioning went to Allstate, 16-15. Allstates Marvin Knutilla, Don Day and Ken Crandall eachhad 3-for-4 while Bob Warren went3-for-3 with a walk and was credited with scoring the winning run. Millershigh at bat was Bob Foxs three hits, including two singles and a home run, and Kyle Saunders whoalmost cycled wiith a single, double and triple. Jerry Kauffmanwas 3-for3 and Syd Collins had 3-for-4. The Silent Salesman played the Rebels in what started off as a battle of evenly-matched teams, with the Rebels taking a 9-4 lead. In the bottom of the fourth inning, the lower half of the Salesman batting order scored six runs to take the lead 10-9. But the Rebelsbats then went limp and managed only one run the rest of the way for a 20-10 Salesman win. Smacking the ball well for the Salesman were Al Taratuta 4-for-4, Ray Concecpion had a double and two singles and Les Smith had three hits, including a triple. Banging out three hits each were Bob Roth, Spider McMinn, Jerry Murphy and Fred Moore. Highlands Merchants toppled the Blue Jays 12-8. Their Don Ward had a triple in his 2-for-4, Ron Lewis went 4-for-4 and Cal Bready was 3-for-4. All having two hits were Mike Jurmu, Harry Bell, Glenn Minic, Shawn Kildoff, Harold Dinel and John Laysack (their oldest player). The Blue Jays gave it a valiant try with Richard Godfrey going 3-for-4 includinga triple. Doran Quigg and Jimmy Johnsoneach were 4-for 4and others getting hitswere Don Cunningham, Bill, Chester and John Penna. The teams appreciate all the support they have been given and for the privelege of playingat the Highlands County Sports Complex. Highlands Merchants top Senior standings Final 2011 Sebring 70-OverLeague Standings TeamW-L Highlands Merchants16-3 Allstate Insurance 12-7 Millers Heating and Air Conditioning 11-8 Silent Salesman 9-10 Rebels6-13 Blue Jays3-16 I was never involved in a triple play.DUKEHENSLEY Central Security manage r

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Page 4CNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com 4:00pm-6:00pm Friday March 25th Five more runs came in for t he Lady Streaks in the bott om of the second as a variety o f hits and errors kept the a ction moving with Mann, F aircloth and Grimaldo each b ringing runs across. Now up 13-3, the Streaks w ere just a few innings away f rom ending it early on the t en-run rule, but the Lady D evils werent going to let it b e quite that easy. Hunnicutt reached on an e rror and Johntavia Perry l aced a single to center to s tart the third. With one out, Gates loaded t he bases on a hit-by-pitch a nd Bateman worked the c ount for a walk to bring a r un home. Mackenzie Myers then a lso wore a pitch to force P erry home. But while Avon Park s howed they were game, S ebring soon proved to just b e too much, plating five m ore runs in the bottom of t he inning. Mann bunted home a run, F aircloth knocked in two, G rimaldo tripled home a run a nd Lower collected an RBI s ingle. From there, things went quickly with Hoffner holding off any further scoring chances for the Devils and ending it in the fifth.. We struggled a bit pitching tonight and allowed for more walks then we would have hoped for, Sebring head coach Joe Sinness said. Our defense still played a very tight game. Avon Park lent us a couple of errors that were to our benefit, but we were also hitting the ball much harder tonight. When you hit the ball hard, good things happen. Both teams return to action Tuesday, with the Devils traveling to Lake Placid for a county and district contest, while the Streaks host Ridge in district play. Continued from 1C News-Sun photo by DAN HOEHNE Though it went for an out, this hard-hit fly ball off the bat of Katelynn Stoll showed the Avon Park offense has some spark. Sebring delivers versus Devils Westergom walked, stole second, moved to third on a Randall ground out to the right side and came in on a passed ball. Anight earlier, the Streaks broke their slide with a 7-1 win at home against Avon Park. Neither team would score until the third when Avon Parks Ty Jackson drove in Matt Roberts before Sebring pitcher Hoffner buckled down to strike out three in a row. Sebring would score when Abeln doubled, stole third and then was grounded in by Randall during the bottom half of the inning. The Streaks would get a passed ball to score Nate Green in the fourth who was followed home by Knight, giving the Streaks a 3-1 lead. The Big Blue batting machine would score three more in the fifth as Avon Park shuffled through their pitching staff to try and give their arms a rest for upcoming district play, according to coach Whit Cornell. We have to have someone ready for our upcoming district games, he said. We start playing three games a week next week and we will need everyone rested. Hopefully, we can give them a rest and come back and be ready. We are still a young team, but I am seeing some things I like out there, Cornell added. We swung the bats well and we played hard. We made some mistakes and hopefully we have learned from it. Sebrings Hoffner would continue to hold the Devils bats at bay, allowing just three hits over four innings and finishing the game strong. Sebring would ring one more in the sixth, pushing the score to 7-1, and Hoffner retired the last three Avon Park batters to cap the gam e. Corbin did a great job , said Sebring coach Hopp y Rewis. He is our Frid ay night pitcher, but we used so many the other night, w e had to move him up. The Devils look to improve on their 7-6 reco rd with a non-district gam e Monday at home again st Hardee before continuin g their district slate with a home date against Tenor oc Tuesday. The Steaks, meanwhil e, have until Tuesday befo re the host Haines City in di strict play. Continued from 1C News-Sun photo by KIM GAUGE R Matt Randall was in the right place at the right time as this pop-up glanced off Seth Abelns glove before Randall snared it Friday night at Hardee. Streaks get back to winning ways Sebring7Avon Park1 Special to the News-Sun It was a technical error c orrection that pushed the S ebring boys to a narrow win a t Tuesdays Quad Track and F ield meet at Firemens F ield, as reported in the F riday, March 18 edition of t he News-Sun. But a later correction gave s ix more points to the Red D evils, giving them the top total for the day. It had been incorrectly listed in the computer that Avon Park runner Travious Knight would run in four events, one over the allowable number for one meet. Knights track-record 10.74 time to win the 100meter dash, then, was disallowed and those six points taken off the Devil total. But one of the events, the 4X400 relay, was not an event for Knight, thus pushing his number of events back to three and reinstituting his event win and six points. With the correction, the Avon Park boys total for the day came to 87.83 to Sebrings 83.16. Track meet correction across the line by Jon Brownson and Jonathan Gore. The final competitionboth days came from the IMSAGT2 Challenge by Yokohama. Henrique Cisneros and Cooper MacNeil had 1-2 finishes in both the first and second rounds of that series. Thursdayit was Ma rk Bullitt bringing the Musci le Milk Porsche in for a thir dplace finish while Friday it was Fernando Pena wh o was third on the podium. Continued from 1C Races get weekend started

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, March 20, 2011Page 5C 3310 Hwy. 27 South Sebring, FL33870EOEE-mail: resumesebring@crosscountry-auto.comFor more information about Cross Country Automotive Services,we encourage you to visit our website at: www.CrossCountry-Auto.co mComprehensive Benefit PackageNow Hiring Full & Part Time Customer Service AssociatesStarting at $9.00 an hourBilingual English/Spanish Differential Candace Weldon Associate of the MonthI love being able to help someone. My co-workers and supervisors are great! Candace WeldonBe a HERO like Candace Weldon863-402-2786AGreatPlaceto Work! Candace Weldon Tuition Reimbursement Life Insurance Vacation Time Holiday Pay Medical Dental Supervisors Positions Available IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA Case #: GCS 10-1019 CARLA RENEE BENNETT, Personal Representative ESTATE OF DAVID L. MARSH, Deceased Plaintiff(s), vs. GREGORY LEON CORRELL, a/k/a Gregory Correll, DENNIS ALLEN CONNERS, a/k/a Dennis A. Conners II, DANIELLE MARIE CONNERS, a/k/a Danielle Conners, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Department of Justice, JOSE QUINONES, GERARD SERVICES INC., COMMONWEALTH FINANCIAL SYSTEMS, INC., and CITY OF AVON PARK, FLORIDA, et al Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final decree of foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Highlands County, Florida, described as: Lot 1, LESS the West 75 feet in Block 2, of H E COYS SUBDIVISION, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 9, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Commerce Street Entrance of the Highlands County Courthouse in Sebring, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 18th day of April, A.D. 2011. WITNESS my hand and official seal of this Honorable Court, this 15th day of March A.D. 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAINE As Clerk of said Circuit Court By: /s/ Priscilla Michalak Deputy Clerk March 20, 27, 2011 1050LegalsIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 19th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR SAINT LUCIE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 562011CA000074 OCULINA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. BAILEY WATSON, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company; LLOYD WATSON and PAULA WATSON, his wife; GARY L. WATSON; ERROL S. WATSON; CRAIG WATSON; Unknown Spouse of CRAIG WATSON ;et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment Of Foreclosure dated March 10th, 2011, in Case No. 562011CA000074, in the Circuit Court of the Nineteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Saint Lucie County, Florida, in which OCULINA BANK is the Plaintiff and BAILEY WATSON, LLC, LLOYD WATSON, PAULA WATSON, GARY L. WATSON, ERROL S. WATSON, CRAIG WATSON, and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CRAIG WATSON are the Defendants, Auctioneer, Frederick W. Baker of Indian River Auctions & Appraisals, Florida License #FL A U 1526, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash the following described parcels of property set forth in the Final Judgment Of Foreclosure, to-wit: Parcel I Tract Q, PORT ST. LUCIE SECTION THIRTYONE, a subdivision, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 14, Page(s) 22, 22A through 22G, Public Records of St. Lucie County, Florida, shall be auctioned on Wednesday, April 27, 2011, at 10:00 A.M. at the property site in Saint Lucie County, Florida, which is 1775 S.W. Gatlin Boulevard, Port St. Lucie, Florida 34972 Parcel II A part of Section 17, Township 35 South, Range 40 East, described as follows: The East Half of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter,and the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter, less the North 75 feet and less the East 40 feet thereof. This property is located at the Southwest corner of Peterson Road and South 37th Street, Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Florida, shall be auctioned on Wednesday, A pril 27, 2011, at 4:00 P.M. at the property site in Saint Lucie County, Florida; and Parcel III Lots 1 to 39, inclusive, Block 48 and closed street contiguous thereto, Lots 1 to 41, inclusive, Block 52 and all of Block 51 and contiguous closed alley less road right of way and less Lots 53 through 58 and less the South 10 feet of Lot 59, UNIT ONE, LAKE LILLIAN SECTION HIGHLAND LAKES SUBDIVISION, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 77, Public Records of Highlands County, Florida, shall be auctioned on Thursday, April 28, 2011, at 11:00A.M. at the property site in Highlands County, Florida. A NY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED this 14th day of March, 2011. COLLINS, BROWN, CALDWELL, BARKETT, & GARAVAGLIA, CHARTERED 756 Beachland Boulevard Vero Beach, FL 32963 Telephone: (772)231-4343 Facsimile: (772)234-5213 /s/ Calvin B. Brown Calvin B. Brown, Esquire Florida Bar No. 110465 Attorney for the Plaintiff IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administrator, ADA Coordinator, 250 NW Country Club Drive, Suite 17, Port St. Lucie, FL 34986, (772) 807-4370, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711, or 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. March 20, 27, 2011 1050Legals 1050Legals Free ad is limited to a 4-line ad that runs for 3 consecutive issues. Must be a non-commercial item. Asking price is $100 or less. We offer 2 ads per month and can rerun the same ad 2 times in 30 days, only if its the same ad. The price is allowed to change. All ads placed under the Bargain Buys discount rate must have 1 item with 1 asking price. The customer can list a set for 1 price, i.e. Bedroom set ... $100 is allowed; Chairs (2) ... $20 each is NOT allowed. The customer can list the ads as Chairs (2) ... $40 for both. To list an ad stating Each, the ad must be charged at the non-discounted rate, using the Open Rate pricing. No commercial items are allowed to be placed unde r our Bargain Buys specials. Items must be common household items. Ads for Pets, stating Free to Good Home, are allowed to be placed under the Bargain Buy category. Index1000 Announcements 2000 Employment 3000 Financial 4000 Real Estate 5000 Mobile Homes 6000 Rentals 7000 Merchandise 8000 Recreation 9000 TransportationVISIT OUR WEBSITE AT: newssun.com DEADLINES Publication Place by: Wednesday. . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Monday Friday . . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Wednesday Sunday. . . . . . . . . 4 p.m. Friday All fax deadlines are 1 hour earlier. Important: The publisher reserves the right to censor, reclassify, revise, edit or reject any classified advertisement not meeting our standards. We accept only standard abbreviations and required proper punctuation. ClassifiedADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since the News-Sun will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error. call the classified department immediately at 385-6155. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error. Cancellations: When a cancellation is called in, a KILL number will be given to you. This number is very important and must be used if ad failed to cancel. All ads cancelled prior to scheduled expiration date will be billed for complete run unless a KILL number can be provided. ADD A BORDER ATTENTION GETTER LOGO For Just A Little More And Make Your Ad Pop! AD RATESGARAGE SALE6 lines 2 days $11503 days$14(additional lines $1 each)MISCELLANEOUSmerchandise over $1005 lines 6 pubs$1750(additional lines $3 each)REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORTATION5 lines 6 pubs $31506 lines 14 pubs$71 IN THE CIRCUITCOURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NUMBER: GCS10-1217 BAY STREET VILLAS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Plaintiff, -vsSAMUEL R. CARR and WILLIAM C. THOMPSON, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a final decree of foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause in the Circuit Court of Highlands County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Highlands County, Florida, described as: BAY STREET VILLAS #3, Being a portion of Lot 18, Block 89-A, TOWN OF SEBRING, according tothe plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 24, of the Public Recordsof Highlands County, Florida, more fully described as follows: Commencing at the Southeast corner of Lot 18, Block 89-A, Town of Sebring, as per plat recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 24, of the Public Recordsof Highlands County, Florida; thence North 15 degrees 10 West, along the Easterly line of Lot 18, for a distance of 19.00 feet; thence South 75 degrees 00 West, for a distanceof 5.32 feet; thence North 15 degrees 00 West, for a distance of 41.60 feet for Point of Beginning; thence continue North 15 degrees 00 West, for a distance of 20.80 feet; thence South 75 degrees 00 West, for a distance of 34.60 feet; thence South 15 degrees 00 00 East, for a distance of 20.80 feet; thence North 75 degrees 00 East, for adistance of 34.60 feet to the Point of Beginning. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room located in the basement of the Highlands County Courthouse located at 590 South Commerce Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes (2010), at 11:00 oclock A.M. on the 4th day of April, 2011. NOTICE: Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. SIGNED this 8th day of April, 2011. ROBERT GERMAINE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk March 20, 27, 2011Subscribe to the News-Sun Call 385-6155 Classified ads get fast results Having something to sell and not advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what youre doing, but no one else does. Call News-Sun classifieds today! 385-6155

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Page 6CNews-Sun Sunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.co m PROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORYPROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY Install doors, windows, flooring, plumbing & more!Licensed & InsuredLic# HM0096HANDYMAN BOBCall 863-452-5201 or 863-449-1744 Service Repair Supplies Equipment Delivered Right to your DoorPool Service & Mobile Retail(863) 382-7728Fax (863) 402-2200 poolparadise101@aol.com www.poolparadiseonline.com Brad & Julie Kurtz Phone (863) 382-7551 FAX (863) 382-2750 1405 US 27 North Sebring, FL 33870 CAMPBELL S S COLLISION CENTER , INC. Jim Campbell Owner DID YOU KNOW?THENEWSSUNPROFESSIONALSERVICEDIRECTORY ISONEOFTHEMOSTECONOMICAL&EFFECTIVEMEANSOFADVERTISINGTODAY? CALLJOYCE@ 863-385-6155OREMAIL: joyce.fettinger@newssun.com FORDETAILS!! WANDA KLINE WEIGHT LOSS & WELLNESSSee what one drop of your blood indicates as to YOUR nutritional health and well-being. By appointment only863-414-4066 LIVEBLOODANALYSIS &WILLIAMSJANITORIALCARPETCLEANING$1095 Per Room3 Rooms Minimum Upholstery Cleaning All Types of Flooring Free EstimatesLic Bonded Ins(863) 214-1940 863-465-7491TREE SERVICE,INC.Joe Johnsons TRIMMING REMOVAL SOD INSTALLATION STUMP GRINDING LOT CLEARING PRESSURE CLEANING Will Beat Any Written Estimate!Peoples Choice Award Free Estimates Licensed & Insured Avon Park (863) 453-2525 Lake Placid (863) 699-2525 Lake Wales (863) 679-9200 Sebring (863) 382-1515 Wauchula (863) 767-1515Sebring Fax (863) 382-9939 W al-Mart Loca tions: Lake Wales (863) 676-0569 Sebring (863) 385-5371 Avon Park (863) 452-7010 INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED No job is too small. We can take care of all your home repairs and maintenance needs. Small Flooring Jobs Some Electric & Plumbing863-381-6677 Free Estimates Rogers Handyman ServicesRoger McCartney JRlicensed and insured Rockys Tree Service LLC863-382-239724 Hour Emergency ServiceServing All Central Florida Area Fully Insured Tree Removal Tree Trimming Free Estimates Tree Topping Stump GrindingSebring,FL 33870 20 Years experience Excellent References Daily Weekly BiweeklyMonthly Janitorial Service Recently Relocated to Lake Placid Sebring Looking To Build New Clientele 863-243-1801 / Shelly A long$1000per hour Fair and Honest Service Based on Christian ValuesAre You or a Loved One Living Alone? Safety/Wellness Visitations Life Management Assistance Nursing Home Visitation & Reporting Errand/Concierge ServicesPersonal Concierge Services item pick-up/delivery grocery shopping courier/delivery petsitting pet transport to vet or groomer home security checks meal pick-up/delivery plus much,much more!!! (863) 382-8825www .kbcar eandconcier ge.com Trustworthy, Insured & Experienced Freedom Lawn CareGet the freedom you deserveCarl Horton ~OwnerVet. & Sr. Discount Lawn Maintenance Landscaping Small Tree Work Clean Ups Free Estimates863-655-2526 Weddin g g Chapel o f f Love Romantic Weddings Renewal Of Vows Commitment Ceremonies Designs For Your Cherished Moments Will Come To Your Location 4 Ministers on Staff863-385-5673 Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 Nest Egg Bookeeping, Inc.Why pay accounting fees for bookkeeping? Monthly Bill Pay Bank Reconciliations Correspondence Insurance/Medicare AssistanceCall to see how we can help you863-385-0888NESTEGGBOOK@YAHOO.COMSpecializing in individuals Ser vice A vailable 7 Days A W eek Website: extraordinaireairconditioning.com EXTRAORDINAIRE HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING LLC 863-451-2399Mike & Kandy Sheldone CEO/Owner Lic# CAC 1816569All Service Calls $40 Free Estimates Licensed & Insured Will Meet or Beat Any Price Family Owned &Operated with over 6 years experience Addison Lawn Care 863-441-0055 A Precise CutYARDCLEANUP, FULLLAWNCARE, HEDGETRIMMING& MORECOMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIALFor all your lawn needs,call Larry at381-0584for a Free Estimate & Great Service! Advertise Your Business Here!Call 385-6155 Serving Highlands & Hardee County 10 Years Experience PC Repair Service Software Installation Custom Built Computers Virus & Ad Ware Removal Home & Small Business Networking Free Estimates Pickup DeliverySAW ComputersCall Stephen at 863-832-9556 Email: Stephen.wingo@yahoo.com"WAUCHULA CHURCHSeeking Part Time Worship leader. Call 863-773-4267, 8am 12:30 pm, hourly and travel comp." 2100Help Wanted 2000 Employment LOST MAN'SWALLET @ Sweetbay Parking Lot, Sebring on Saturday, 3/12/11. 863-385-6630 REWARD. FOUND -DOG, white male, 40-50 lbs. Found Mar 15th on Bluebird in Leisure Lakes, Lake Placid, FL. 863-465-6688. 1200Lost & FoundCHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur. If this happens to you, please call us the first day y our ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. If We can assist you, please call us: 385-6155 News-Sun Classified 1100Announcements Highlands County Sheriffs Office Request for Proposals (RFP)RFP 11-01 Enterprise-Wide Document Imaging Software The Highlands County Sheriffs Office is seeking RFPs from vendors to provide a fully developed, integrated, and implemented solution, along with technical support/services, for an ENTERPRISE-WIDE DOCUMENT IMAGING SOFTWARE. A ll requests for copies of this RFP should be directed to: Deb J. Olson, General Services Manager, Highlands County Sheriffs Office, 434 Fernleaf Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 (863) 402-7266, Facsimile (863) 402-7344.All technical questions may be forwarded to Rob Jordon, A dministrator of Information Services, Highlands County Sheriffs Office Law Enforcement Bureau, 434 Fernleaf Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 (863) 402-7257Proposals must be submitted in a sealed envelope and marked with the bid number and name to identify the enclosed bid. Bids must be delivered to the Highlands County Sheriffs Office, 434 Fernleaf Avenue, Sebring, Florida 33870 so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M. March 31, 2011 at which time they will be opened. March 13, 20, 2011 1055HighlandsCounty Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 28-2008-CA-000209 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE, Plaintiff, vs. ORLANDO MARRERO, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated March 07, 2011 and entered in Case No. 28-2008-CA-000209 of the Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HIGHLANDS County, Florida wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE, is the Plaintiff and ORLANDO MARRERO; JACQUELINE MARRERO; TENA NT #1 N/K/A BRANDI SCHNEIDER are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HIGHLANDS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 430 SOUTH COMMERCE AVENUE at 11:00 AM, on the 30th day of March, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 11 AND 12, BLOCK 2, LAKE SIRENA SHORES RESUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 11, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HIGHLANDS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 315 SIRENA DRIVE, LAKE PLACID, FL 33852 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on March 7, 2011. ROBERT W. GERMAIN Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Annette E. Daff Deputy Clerk Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F08008937 GMAC-CONV-Team 2 **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or agency sending the notice at Echevarria & Associates, P.A., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, FL 33622-5018, telephone (813) 251-4766, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. March 13, 20, 2011 NOTICE OF SALE Notice of Public Sale of a 1998 Key West Stealth boat, HIN #KWEST143L798, trailer VIN #1ZJBB19128C007786, Yamaha motor C115TLRW ID# 332423. Owners: Kenneth Lambert and/or Donald Chancey of Wauchula, FL. Sale to be held to satisfy repair and storage lien on April 21, 2011, 8 a.m., at Gone Fishin' Marine, 236 Commercial Way, Sebring, FL. March 13, 20, 2011 PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE The Heartland Workforce Business Enhancement Committee will hold a teleconference meeting at 2:30 pm on Wednesday, March 23, 2011, originating at the Heartland Workforce A dministrative office, 5901 US Hwy 27 S, Sebring, FL 33870. Interested individuals should arrive no later than 2:25 pm. Topics of the meeting are various. For more information see agenda posted on the Heartland Workforce website at www.hwib.org March 20, 2011 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the ficitious name of HEARTLAND VITAL CARE located at 6360 U.S. 27 North, in the County of Highlands, in the City of Sebring, Florida 33870 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Sebring, Florida, this 17th day of March, 2011. Heartland Pharmacy Inc. March 20, 2011 1050Legals

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www.newssun.comNews-Sun Sunday, March 20, 2011Page 7C Highlands County Board of County Commissioners For minimum qualifications and a full job description visit us on our website at www .hcbcc.net You must complete our electronic job application or submit a completed paper application in order to be considered for employment with Highlands County BCC.The following position closes on 03/25/2011 Library Assistant I 423 PG 8 $9.57/hour $15.39/hour.EOE/Vet Pref/Drug Free Workplace2010 ENCLOSEDtrailer 24'X 8'X 7' escape door GW 10,000 lb. $6900; 2005 20'X8' flat GW10,000 $3500, 863-260-1709 9220Utility Trailers ATV KAWASAKIBAYOU 220 Low Hours! Adult Driven! Garage Kept! Very Good Condition! $1300 OBO. 863-381-2414 1973 NORTON850 COMMANDO Restored, very low miles includes Owner's Manual. One Owner Rare Find Great Price. $9,000, Make Offer! 863-382-8985 or 863-465-9100 9100Motorcycles& ATVs 9000 Transportation1996 TRAVELMASTER MOTOR HOME Good condition. Awnings, generator, lots of extras. Good tires. $11,000. 863-314-8557. 8450Motor Homes RV 38'2010 5TH Wheel. EAGLE RIDGE by HEARTLAND, 2BR, 1BA, 2 slides, fiberglass, W/D, awning. All options. $29,000 obo. Immediate Sale! 321-437-5887 CAMPER -1999 PROWLER LS Excellent Condition, Super Slide-out, Queen Bed, Many Extras. $7500 OBO. 570-352-7766 2011 39FT. Monte Carlo 2 slides, 2BR, sleeps 8, CHA, washer / dryer, self contained, microwave and awning. Every option. Limited Edition. $23,500. MUST SELL! 630-631-1795 2010 38'HY-LINE Travel Trailer Park Model. Very Clean. 2 Slide outs, W/D, Bayfront, non-smoke, no pets. Will Deliver. Lake Josephine RV Resort area. $21,000. 941-518-4040 8400RecreationalVehiclesPOOL SUPPLIES:Pump, Filter, Pool Cleaner (Barracuda) & Chlorine Tablets for above ground pool. All for $300. Call 863-453-7663. 8300Pools & SuppliesPONTOON BOAT20 foot Bass Tracker, New deck, 50hp. Mercury, with trailer. $3500 715-573-8889 or come by at 150 Jade Way, Lake Placid. 8050Boats & Motors 8000 RecreationNOTICE Florida statute 585.195 states that all dogs and cats sold in Florida must be at least eight weeks old, have an official health certificate and proper shots and be free of intestinal and external parasites. 7520Pets & SuppliesLAKE PLACID GARDEN CLUB ATTIC SALE 342 Bottlebrush Ave., Highlands Park Est., Sat, 3/26, 8:00am 2:00pm. Furniture, lawn equip., plants, household items, bric-a-brac, clothing, jewelry, baked goods & LOTS MORE!! AVON PARKMoving Out Sale! 137 W Lake Damon Dr. River Green Golf area. Sun-Mon-Tue, Mar 20-21-22, 7am 4pm. Furn., household items. Too Much To List! AVON PARK2075 N. Berkley Rd, off Stryker, Sat, Mar 19th, 8am-4pm. Furniture, children's clothes, & misc. SEB. -FRI. 3/25, SAT. 3/26, 8AM-5PM GIANT MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE ALL PROCEEDS TO BENEFIT THE FLORIDA SHERIFF'S YOUTH RANCH 4001 EILAND DR., SEBRING, FL 33875 OFF S.R. 66 & PAYNE RD. 7320Garage &Yard Sales VACUUM -Hoover 12 amp w/ Hepa filter. $30 863-873-3801 TIRES 4205X50 ZR16 $25 863-382-6741 TIRE 1P235X65RX16 $10 863-382-6741 MARINE BATTERYMarine Trolling Battery, new MCA750, RC180. $70 863-273-1846 JEWELRY ARMOIREcorner 39 1/2" high,7 lined drawers, 2 chain cabinets. Excl cond.$100 firm. 863-382-6360 GOLF CLUBSPower built, excellent condition. $30 863-385-2605 FREEZER -Upright, 18 ft. $75. 863-453-3032 or 863-873-7360. FISHING RODS& REELS. 4 new Shakespeare Ugly Stick with reels $90 863-273-1846 4 DRAWERchest of drawers. White. $15 863-873-3801 7310Bargain Buys TOOL MAN'SDELIGHT 10" Delta table saw w/ access., Craftsman 10" radial saw, 15 1/2 drill press & 10" band saw, 8" Tradesman 5 sp. bench drill press. Call 863-471-6794 4-8 pm. PROFORM CROSSWALK treadmill. Excellent condition. $150 863-453-3079 BED FRAME-wood full size, excel. cond., 36" Sony TV w/ media stand, entertainment tower, twin matress, Craftsman lawn mower. 863-471-6674 7300Miscellaneous NEW FURNITURE FOR LESS! HIGHPOINT FURNITURE OUTLET STORE 2346 U.S. 27 N, SEBRINGNorthofLowes&acrossfrom HomeDepot 7180Furniture 7000 MerchandiseSEBRING (2)Available. 3926 Kenilworth Blvd, 1500 sq ft, $550/mo : A/C, office, BA, lg overhead door, near Sebring High School. 640 Park St, 6400 sq ft, $2500/mo : A/C, office, BA, 8 overhead doors, 3 phase electric, fenced yard, near Sebring Parkway. 941-416-2813 6750Commercial Rental LOOKING FORSEASONAL RENTAL 2BR, 2BA Condo or House for Jan-Feb-Mar 2012. In Sebring Preferred Call 863-658-1564, before 10 am or after 8 pm, or email: eliskagantert@rogers.com HOG/TURKEY LEASE2 Ethical Bowhunters seeking hog/turkey lease. No dogs, guns, ATV's, or mess. Contact: Irv, 608-516-8615 or irv.xpress@gmail.com 6650Wanted to RentSEBRING 20'X40'Warehouse, 12' overhead door, on busy Highway 27 across from Lakeshore Mall. 863-385-3474 6550Warehousesfor Rent SEBRING -Furnished, 1BR with private bath, in Senior RV Resort. Washer/Dryer, Cable, full use of house. No Pets, No Smoking. For more information call Gloria, 863-257-1577 SEBRING -1BR w/bath, furn/unfurn, W/D, Satellite, full use of home. $400/mo. or $100/wk + dep. 863-304-2849 6400Rooms for RentSEBRING -Weekly/Multi-Week Condo Rentals Avail. Now. Located on Little Lake Jackson across from Harder Hall Golf Club. Lots of ammenities. Starting @ $500/wk. 863-385-5005, ext. 0 6320Seasonal Property SEBRING -3BR, 2BA, Lawn Care included. $675/mo. + security deposit. 863-253-1029 or 863-381-7967 SEBRING -2 STORY TOWN HOME 3BR, 2.5BA, 1CG $800/mo. No Smoking, no pets. 863-655-0311 RENTALS2/BR,2/BA Central heat & air $595 3/BR, 2/BA CHA wall to wall carpet, screened room $750 3/BR, 3/BA Loaded,w/ garage $995 Low Security Deposit. 863-638-1516 The Avon Park Housing Authority is now taking applications for North Central Heights Homes, a new Rent Restricted single family home development in Avon Park consisting of 20 Two Bedroom, 46 Three Bedroom and 4 Four Bedroom homes. Rents will average in the low $400s for 2 br. homes and low to mid $500 & $600s for the 3 & 4 Br. homes. Applications open for Avon Park residents only; February 14 March 11, 2011 and all other applicants after March 11, 2011. For further information, contact: Avon Park Housing Authority at 863-452-4432, Ext. 2220LAKE PLACIDSun 'n Lake, 2BR, 1BA, 1CG, large scrn'd porch on back. New paint & carpet. $550mo, + 1st/last/sec. Or For Sale By Owner, Owner Financing. 863-464-8555 or 863-465-6091 6300Unfurnished Houses SEBRING -Small nicely furnished house 1BR, 1BA. Deposit $100. Monthly $375 with 6 month lease. Pay own electric. 863-385-1806 SEBRING -Fully Furnished2BR with fenced yard & concrete utility room w/Washer/Dryer. Will consider pets. $550/mo + $400 security deposit. Extra pet deposit. 863-243-4580 SEBRING -Country Club of Sebring. 2BR, 2BA, den, lanai, pool, beautifully furnished/decorated. Available April 1st. Call 863-386-0340. LAKE PLACIDNewer 3BR, 2BA, seasonal or monthly. Excellent furniture & appliances, near lake & boat ramp, No smoking or dogs. $1450/mo. After season, rent reduced. 863-699-1119 6250Furnished Houses SEBRING FREE 1/2 mo rent, free cable, lg clean 1/1 tile floors. quiet / safe. No dogs 863-385-1999 AVON PARKAFFORDABLE RENTRidgedale Apartments1, 2, 3 & 4 Br Apts Central Location, water & trash included Rent subsidized Based on household income. No Application Fee Call 863-452-4432 TTY 800-955-8771 EQUAL HOUSINGOPPORTUNITY KEY LAKEVILLASLAKEFRONT LIVING IN SEBRING 2 Bedroom townhouse unit. Clean & quiet, Screen porch, Outside patio, Central air, Washer/Dryer hookup, $585/mo., first & security. No Pets. 863-465-2740 AVON PARKLEMONTREE APTS: 1BR, 1BA $495/mo +$200 security; Washer/Dryer, Microwave, WSG included. Pets Wlcome. Call Alan, 386-503-8953 AVON PARKClean, Quiet; Studios / 1BR. 1BA / 2BR, 2BA Apts., from $375/mo. New tile & appliances, screened patios & W/D hook ups. Students/Seniors Discount Call 863-452-0469. AVON PARKApartment with balcony overlooking Lake Verona and City Park 100 E. Main St. Laundry Facilities. SPECIAL: $325/mo. 863-453-8598 AVON PARK**** Highlands Apartments 1680 North Delaware 1BR, 1BA & 2BR, 2BA Available. Central Heat & Air. Extra insulation. 1st & Sec. Call 863-449-0195 RELAX ATLake Isis VillasLuxurious 2BR Apartment. Clean & Quiet Setting. Call 863-453-2669 6200UnfurnishedApartments 6000 Rentals WHISPERING PINESVILLAGE 55 plus. 3BR, 2BA. Fully furnished & 3BR, 3BA, Partially furnished. Must see to appreciate. Call Mary 863-385-8806 VENUS -3/BR, 2/BA, large deck with pool & hot tub, 2 1/2 acres, Pole barn and fenced yard. Appliances stay. Rent or Leas w/ option to buy, considered. 863-441-5038 5050Mobile HomesFor SalePALM HARBORHOMES Factory Liquidation Sale 2009 Model Homes MUST GO! Call for FREE color brochures. 800-622-2832 5050Mobile HomesFor Sale 5000 Mobile HomesATTENTION: CASH for your Home, Duplex, Apartment, Commercial Property. Rapid Closing, "As Is Condition. 863-441-2689 STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL 4320Real Estate WantedESTERO, FLLIKE NEW 3BR, 2BA, 2CG Duplex in gated community with clubhouse and heated pool. Quiet area, yet convenient to shopping, entertainment, etc. Asking $195,000. Will consider trade for home in Sebring/Highlands County, FL area. Call 239-498-1183. 4300Out-of-TownPropertyLAKE PLACID3/BR, 1 1/2 BA, Carport, 1011 Jonquil St. 1st and Last Security deposit. $600 Monthly. 863-465-3959 L.P. -OPEN HOUSE! FRI SAT-SUN 1 5PM. "Adorable" Love At First Sight! Like New. 2/BR, 2BA, 1 1/2 garage. New paint in & out.Great room with wood burning or electric fire place. Catheral ceiling, Dining room. Lovely kitchen with eating island. Dishwasher, garbage disposal, microwave, self cleaning oven, lazy susan, pantry ad refrigerator. Guest bedroom and large closet. Linen closet. Lovely ceramic bath. Lots of nice large windows throughout Master suite with huge walk in closet. Full bath, ceramic tile, walk in shower, New all season porch. Party room with covered deck. Perfect entertainment center. (A must see) New roof '04, new sir '05. Whole house generator. Lake Clay access. Furniture optional. Owner financing. $91,000. 1640 Oak St. Sylvan Shores. 4100Homes for SaleLake Placid SEBRING -VANTAGE Pte. single 2/BR, 2/BA, split plan, 16'X20' LR, dining area, fam. rm., screened patio, ample garage. Walk to club house / pool. A sking $115,00 w/ major furnishings. Call 863-471-3769 for info. OPEN HOUSE: Sun. 3/20 from 1-5 pm. SEBRING -Quiet Neighborhood on great fishing lake; 2,000 sf, 3BR, 2.5BA remodeled home with large garage & boat house. $219,000. 863-655-2278 MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE! SEBRING NO NEED FOR A BANK! Owner Financing 3BR, 1BA remodeled, NICE HOME! Woodlawn Elem. area. 1243 Fernvale Ave. 863-227-2717 4080Homes for SaleSebringSEBRING -RURAL LIVING adjacent to great fishing lake close to Sebring. 3BR, 2BA home, pole barn, 5 acres fenced, zoned agriculture $150,000. 863-655-2278 Make Offer! 4040Homes For Sale 4000 Real Estate 3000 FinancialOFFICE ASSISTANT A FullTime position has become available for an Office Assistant at Royal Care of Avon Park. The candidate must highly organized, self starter and detailed in their work performance. Excellent computer skills and documentation skills are a must. Apply in person at Royal Care of Avon Park, 1213 W Stratford Rd., Avon Park. (863) 453-6674 EOE/M/F, DFWP MERCHANDISERQUARTERday per monthGDS seeks a dependable individual to merchandise magazines, books and handle special projects in Sebring. Must own a late model vehicle with valid drivers license and auto insurance. Must also be computer literate with access to both email and the Internet. E.mail resume to: recuruiter@slobalinstore.com LPN'S WANTED Avon Park Intermediate Care Facility serving adults with developmental disabilities is seeking Licensed Practical Nurses P/T and PRN. We offer a casual work environment, competitive wage and benefits package. For details call Barb at 863-452-5141 JEWELRY SALESat Lakeshore Mall. Exciting job for right person with positive attitude people person out going personable friendly! Apply at 3$ cart, next to Food Court. JANITORIAL/RESTAURANT CLEANING Immediate opening for F/T Professional Sub Contractor to clean restaurant. Experience preferred, will train if necessary. Flexible hours. Call M-F, 9-5 1-800-577-1318 HIRING NAILTECH Pedicure, Manicure, Acrylic Nails. Full or Part Time. Paid on Commission. Call Tommy at 727-512-9335 or 863-873-2527.RESTAURANT HIRINGSERVERS, COOKS, & BEVERAGE CART SERVERS Needed at Springlake Golf Resort. Apply Monday through Saturday10am 5pm. For directions only, call 863-655-0900 2100Help Wanted DOES MAKING MONEY MAKE YOU HAPPY? Sell your used appliance with a News-Sun classified ad. Call today, gone tomorrow! 385-6155 Contact UsBy Phone(863) 385-6155By Mail2227 US Hwy 27S Sebring, FL 33870By E-Mailwww.newssun.com/contact/ WANT NEW FURNITURE? Need to sell the old furniture first? Call News-Sun classifieds, 385-6155. Then shop till you drop! Classified Ads 385-6155 NEWS-SUN

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Page 8CNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com EARLY BISTROServed 3:00 PM 6:00 PM Daily Sundays 12:00 PM 6:00 PM Best Early Bird SpecialsMINISTARTERSTire Treads $3.00 Skillet Mussels $5.00 Crab Oval $6.00 Asian Shrimp $6.00ENTREESDill Salmon $16.00Fresh Atlantic salmon grilled and finished with a fresh dill cream sauce served with rice pilaf and fresh green beansChicken Schnitzel $10.00Breast of chicken rolled in breadcrumbs pan fried German style in peanut oil finished with lemon butter and served with mashed potatoes and green beansCognac Peppercorn Steak $12.00Angus beef medallion grilled and finished with a peppercorn cognac sauce served with mashed potatoes and fresh green beansMussels Roma $10.00Prince Edward Island mussels steamed in an Italian tomato sauce served over linguine with shaved parmesan and toasted bruschettaGreek Spanakopita $10.00Hand crafted spinach pie, phyllo dough stuffed with fresh spinach Feta and select herbs and spices served with a Macedonian saladRustic French Onion Steak $10.00Half pound certified Angus ground beef in a French onion style brown sauce served on grilled rustic cheese bread with mashed potatoes and fresh green beansTilapia Pepperonata $12.00Fresh Tilapia pan sauteed with bell peppers and red onions in a brown butter lemon sauce served with rice pilaf and fresh green beansGuava Glazed Pork Loin $11.00Started on the grill and finished in oven with an Island style guava glaze served with jalapeno cilantro salsa, mashed potatoes and fresh green beansEggplant Stack $10.00Fresh eggplant in Italian seasoned breadcrumbs layered with mozzarella and marinara served with a side of linguine marinaraShrimp Allimon $13.00Gulf shrimp sauteed in a lemon cream italian cheese sauce tossed with linguineChicken Piccata $10.00Boneless breast of chicken pan sauteed with capers in a white wine butter and lemon sauce served with linguine and fresh green beans3100 Golfview Rd. SebringLocated in Inn on the Lakes314-0348Enjoy a Complimentary glass of house wine or draft beer.

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LIVING D SECTION News-Sun Sunday, March 20, 2011 By Kim Ossi, McClatchy-Tribune Information ServicesNo matter the reason youve been itching to dig up some earth from saving money to going local or even getting to know your neighbors through a community garden weve sussed out the details to get you from digging dirt to harvesting your bounty.One of the most important parts of the garden e quation is the quality of your soil. Jon Traunfeld, extension specialist with the U niversity of Maryland Extension, said to examine t he soil where you have chosen to grow your garden a nd look closely at the top 4 to 6 inches: Hospitable soil will be dark, crumbly and drain e asily. It also will be filled with soil critters like w orms and high in organic matter. Inhospitable soil will be compacted and drain p oorly. It will have few worms and will be low in o rganic matter. If you put your seeds into the ground, chances a re theyre going to grow, said Jessica Babcock, s eed technician for Seed Savers Exchange ( www.seedsavers. org). But if the soil is more on the inhospitable side, s ome options include: Bringing in quality gardening soil from your l ocal garden center and mixing it with your existing s oil. Having your soil tested to determine what nutrients are missing and then adding those nutrients in through soil amendments, like compost or lime (found at garden centers), while tilling the hard, compacted ground. Starting a garden right on top of the grass, through a raised bed, or by using pots.BONNIE WELLER/PHILADELPHIAINQUIRER/MCTGood garden soil should be dark, crumbly and drain easily.Remember: Starting small is the key thing, Traunfeld said. Small might mean container gardening. You could start just trying to grow some things in flower pots on your front porch, Babcock said. But if youre ready for a ground-based garden, Traunfeld said the easiest way to get started is, before the grass starts to come in, cover the area with whole sections of newspaper, and then put down something like compost, shredded leaves or any kind of organic material. That will kill the grass so you dont have to dig it up or rent a tiller. If you put compost on top, in the spring you can plant right in the compost, he said. If you plant tomato transplants you can take a trowel and cut through the paper and plant it right in the ground. Raised beds also work, but it will be more expensive since youll have to pay for the surrounds of the bed and bring in quality soil. But the benefit is an instant garden, Traunfeld said, which is really good if you have cruddy soil or it doesnt drain properly. He also warned gardeners choosing this method to be wary of the soil youre getting from your local supplier: Look at it and smell it. If it smells bad you dont want it; if it smells earthy, its good to use. You also can ask the company if they have any test results they can share. See if they know if its really acidic or alkaline. Too much, too soon:The big one is biting o ff more than you can chew trying to do a big gard en the first year, Traunfeld said. Pest control:Not just insects, but deer, birds, g roundhogs and rabbits. As far as insects go, the M aryland extension office only recommends organic p est control on vegetable gardens. The first thing y ou can do is sweep them off into a bucket of s oapy water or go through squishing them, T raunfeld said. But he suggested getting to know o ther gardeners in your area to learn what insects are t ruly pests and which are beneficial. Weeding and feeding:The second (most c ommon mistake) is weeds, Traunfeld said. These c an crowd your plants and compete for soil nutrie nts. And youve gotta fertilize; youve gotta w ater, Traunfeld said. Improper spacing:Both Babcock and T raunfeld agree plant spacing is another very comm on error. Really pay attention to what the plant t ag says or you read (online), Traunfeld said. Giving up too soon:Everything is different every season, Babcock said. Just because something doesnt work this year, doesnt mean it wont work next year. Try a different location next year. Water more, water less. Or, try a different variety of the same plant. Consider your garden an experiment, and just savor every bite youre able to harvest. MANNYCRISOSOTOMO/SACRAMENTO BEE/MCTThe goal of every kitchen garden is to grow foods you enjoy eating. MARLIN LEVISON/MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE/MCTRaised garden beds can be costly to construct but have benefits. One general thing (about gardening) is dont be intimidated, Babcock said. Lots of times people say Id like to garden, but I dont really know how,so they dont do anything. Here are some guidelines: Evaluate what you eat:Agarden is of no use to you if you end up growing foods you dont enjoy. If you know you like to eat carrots, plant carrots dont plant radishes, Babcock said. Examine the light at your potential plot:Vegetables and herbs usually need full sun, which, according to Traunfeld, means 6 to 8 hours a day of direct sunlight. Thats not to say you cant plant a vegetable in partial shade. Less sun means that plants reach for light and can become spindly; individual leaves may be larger; fruit production will be lower; and overall plant health is reduced, he said. If your garden has partial shade 3 to 6 hours of sun a day Traunfeld suggests growing leafy greens of all types, like lettuce, spinach, radish and Asian greens. It also depends on your climate, Babcock said. If youre in a really warm area, some things might benefit from a little shade, especially in the heat of the day. If you dont have enough light or space in your yard for an in-ground garden, you could try container gardening. Many plants grow well in containers, which can be placed in the spot where light is available or you have room. Research what will grow well in your area:Some plants will not thrive where you live, or grow at all. Find your gardening zone atwww.garden.org/zipzone/. Your local cooperative extension may offer guides for gardeners as well. Seeds vs. transplants:Traunfeld recommended starting with both seeds and transplants, depending on the plant. Things like tomatoes, peppers and eggplant, if you want to grow those things, you really have to use a transplant, he said. Go to a good garden center to buy them. With herbs, you pretty much want to go with transplants. These types of plants need to go in the ground when the soil is warm. So if you plant from seed in the ground, youll end up about six weeks behind plants grown from transplants. But for all the other things, like lettuce, beans, cucumbers, squash then starting with seeds is the way to go, Traunfeld said. And greens, kale, lettuce, spinach these things should go in as soon as you prepare your garden. Onions, Swiss chard, too, as these are all coolweather plants or have a long growing season. Hybrids vs. heirlooms:Hybrids are plants that have been bred to have certain characteristics (flavor, heavy yields, heat tolerance, etc.). Heirlooms are plants that have been passed down through families for generations, so theyre particularly suited to where they originated. Hybrids are good because theyre pretty good standbys. And chances are theyll grow pretty well for you, Babcock said. And there really is a lot more variety in (heirlooms) green, black, purple, orange, white; you can have all sorts of colors and flavors. Compost this, not that:You always can buy compost, which may be the best option if youre a rookie, Traunfeld said. But you also can create a small chicken wire enclosure or dig a pit in the garden and dump in herbicide-free lawn or kitchen waste. What shouldnt you put in the compost pile? Dairy, meat, cooked foods, stuff like that. No pet waste, Traunfeld said. Occasionally turn your compost pile with a garden fork. Your compost is ready to be added back to your garden as a fertilizer when it looks and smells like soil, and you cant identify any of the individual items you added to your pile. RESOURCES Find your cooperative extension:www.csrees.usda.gov/extension Find your zone: www.garden.org/zipzone/ Starting a Vegetable Garden, step-bystep instructions: http://growit.umd.edu/ GardeningBasics/index.cfm National Gardening Association: www. garden.org American Community Garden Association:www. communitygarden.orgPeppers are best grown from transplants. BO RADER / WICHITAEAGLE/MC T Reap the benefits of a homegrown kitchen garden

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DearAbby: I have been m arried for many years to a m an who is a good husband a nd father in many respects. H owever, he is obsessed w ith professional sports, e specially football. It is a ffecting our home and s ocial life. Over the years, Louie h as punched holes in walls a nd broken the bones in his h ands because he became so a ngry when his favorite t eam lost. He also has strong h atred toward rival teams. H is arguments with people w ith opposing opinions have c ost him friendships. His behavior is so annoyi ng and embarrassing the k ids and I dont want to be a round him on Sundays duri ng games. Whats worse is t hat some of Louies friends a re amused by his tantrums a nd egg him on, making him e ven angrier. Fortunately, he n ever hits anyone. I dont want a divorce, b ut I dont want to be a round Louie, either. Louies problem makes him u npleasant to be around. W hen I visit friends and f amily without him, they w onder if were separated. I f he could shrug off peop les comments and realize t he outcome of a game s houldnt affect him, we c ould be happier. What s hould I do? Bad Sport in New Jersey DearBad Sport: Its time y ou, your children and anyo ne else who cares at all a bout your husband stage an i ntervention and point out to L ouie that there are more i mportant things in life than h is favorite football team. C hief among them is learni ng impulse control so he d oesnt do further harm to h is body and his relations hips. Its one thing to feel p assion for a sport, but he is creating a situation where he doesnt enjoy it. What you have described is not normal, or healthy. He has crossed the line and is risking harm to his family, his relationships and his reputation. This is beyond kooky its a little bit sick, and the person who needs to step in is you. DearAbby: I went through a difficult depression during the time I was pregnant with my daughter. As a result, I seriously considered placing her for adoption and kept the pregnancy hidden from friends and coworkers. During my third trimester I took a leave of absence and cut off contact with my friends completely. Now, two years later, Im happy to report that I received therapy and treatment for my depression and anxiety. I am living a happy life with my baby girl. The problem is, I told no one outside my family about my daughter or the situation, even though everyone noticed my abrupt change in behavior. How do I begin to share my story? Will people be able to forgive me for cutting them out of my life during a difficult time? Beginning Again with a Baby in Texas DearBeginning Again: Because of extreme cases in the news, most of us are familiar with the hormonal imbalance that causes postpartum depression. Acondition called pre-partum depression is not as well known, but is also well-documented. Im pleased you were able to get treatment and resolve yours. Share your story and end your isolation by telling your closest friends about your experience. If they are truly friends and care about you, they will embrace and accept you and your daughter and give you the support you need after your illness. And if they dont then you will have to accept they are not true friends and go on with your life. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Special to the News-SunAries (March 21-April 20) Aries, a night out on the town with friends is just what you need right now. After a series of days where it has been work, work, work, some recreation is necessary. Taurus (April 21-May 21) Taurus, take a breather because you will need to rest up for the week ahead. A supervisor is watching you like a hawk so there will be no chance for goofing off. Gemini (May 22-June 21) Gemini, a momentary lapse of judgement could cause a ripple effect. Think through all of your choices quite thoroughly to avoid a potential problem down the line. Cancer(June 22-July 22) Cancer, nobody can guess what youre thinking so you have to give some clues as to what you want. Indecision will leave others confused, and you dont want that now. Leo (July 23-Aug. 23) Leo, if only you could snap your fingers and everything would be taken care of. Unfortunately, things dont work like that and you have to put forth some effort to solve a problem. Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 22) Virgo, ease up on your social schedule because others cannot keep up with the mania. Its time for some quiet reflection and moments to yourself. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Aspecial moment that you were counting on hasnt arrived just yet. Libra. You may be wondering if its ever going to happen. Dont worry, soon you will get the answer. S corpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Scorpio, instead of focusing on all the things you have to get done, figure out a way to help others. Tasks wont seem so monotonous if theyre for the greater good. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Sagittarius, be the bigger person and end an argument. Where is this confrontation getting you anyway? Once this occurs many other things will fall into place. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) Matters of money are your utmost concern, Capricorn. With the tax filing deadline looming, you may realize some good news is coming your way that will fatten your wallet. Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 18) Make the most of a situation at work, Aquarius. Networking with the right people can open up opport unities in the future that m ay be just what youre lookin g for. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 2 0) Pisces, expect to be t he shoulder to cry on when a friend needs some urge nt advice. Its a role you do we ll. BirthdaysMarch 20 Holly Hunte r, actress, 53; March 21 Matthew Broderick, actor, 4 9; March 22 Ree se Witherspoon, actress, 3 5; March 23 Chaka Kha n, singer, 58; March 24 Alyso n Hannigan, actress, 37; Mar ch 25 Elton John, singer, 6 4; March 26 Kenny Chesne y, singer, 43. Page 2DNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com ROOFING SPECIALIST SERVING HIGHLANDS COUNTY SINCE 1989Shingles Flat Roofs Roof Repairs Mobile Home Roofovers -FULLYLICENSED & INSURED385-4690State Lic # RC 0066817 QUALITY WORK AT A REASONABLE PRICE FREEESTIMATES THE LINCOLN LAWYERR(Matt Damon,Emily Blunt)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU PG13(Matt Damon,Emily Blunt)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30RANGO PG(Animated Voices by Johnny Depp,Abigail Breslin)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30HALL PASSR(Owen Wilson)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15GNOMEO & JULIET 2DG(Animated)2:15 4:15 7:15 9:15THE KINGS SPEECHR(Geoffrey Rush,Colin Firth)2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30 The NewFAIRMOUNTCINEMA63750 US 27 N. Sebring NOW SHOWINGFriday 03/11 Thursday 03/17 Suick CinemasInformation 385-9980 Office 385-9908New Dolby Digital SoundAll Seats $6.00for Matinee COMING SOON We will be featuring:Mar 25 SUCKER PUNCH DIARY OF A WIMPY KID 2 DIVERSIONS NEWB-GINNINGSBy ED SESSA ACROSS 1 Fly trap 7 Like CD-RW discs 15 Challenge opener 20 Dahl of Here Come the Girls 21 Viking weapon 22 Salsa queen Cruz 23 Knights chargers 24 Result of a cocks crow? 26 1958 creature feature originally entitled The Molten Meteor 28 WWII GI, e.g. 29 La Danse painter 30 Bread, for gravy 31 Idiom ending? 33 At one time, once 35 Fastball, in slang 36 NYC commuter svc. that includes the Flushing Line 38 Bungling for Dummies, e.g.? 42 Whammies 45 Colleague of Boris 46 Voice of Israel author 47 Shot from an air gun 50 Humpty Dumpty et al. 51 Very spicy fare 55 Compulsive speeder 58 G, in the key of C 59 Shindig for Swahili VIPs? 61 Sporty Toyota Camry 62 Sch. whose mascot is Rhody the Ram 63 Name on a cognac bottle 64 Hydroplaning results 66 Pulitzer poet Mark Van __ 67 s-s Angola neighbor 69 Syrian leader 71 Beeped 73 Toothbrush option 75 Olympics balance beam gold medalist after Olga 77 Sponge opening 78 Child expert LeShan 81 Post __: Nol Coward play 83 Bedbugs on the Orient Express? 86 Toon Chihuahua 87 Elusive golden city 89 Use ignobly 90 Skedaddle 91 Discouraging words 92 Roman god 94 Bounty initials 95 Drawing room event? 97 Bird with a tan? 102 Map abbreviation 103 What doers take 106 Early seventh-century date 107 Emerils aptly named French Quarter restaurant 109 Gives birth to 112 Ancient threesided harps 114 Let out, as hogs 117 Hire an assistant, say 119 Hibernation luxuries? 122 Its in the groove 123 Trapped, after up 124 Strains, as a muscle 125 Knock off the track 126 Double-check 127 Travel document 128 But still ... DOWN 1 Credits lines? 2 Garden products brand 3 $#%^*& geckos!? 4 Ewbank who coached Namath in Super Bowl III 5 Run over 6 Confuse with booze 7 Tidal movement 8 Avis adjective 9 Concern for Edward Teller 10 Candy maker Russell 11 Catkin bearers 12 Not a clue! 13 Barristers bailiwick 14 Bar, in 13-Down 15 Its mixed with lemonade in an Arnold Palmer 16 Negative state 17 Elite company 18 Wash sans soap 19 Like some beavers 25 Maui medicine men 27 Red Lobster freebie 32 Georgia, once 34 Shelved 37 Dr.s orders 39 This is __ toy 40 Oklahomas Wheat Capital 41 Lassies refusal 42 Savior in a Bach work 43 Young Frankenstein role 44 Culvert 47 Prize for an inns best guest? 48 Produced, as fruit 49 Jazzman Getz 52 Japanese noodles 53 Artist known for her mother-and-child works 54 My Way lyricist 56 Evasive maneuvers 57 Icy mass 59 Payola payer 60 Spanish hero El __ 65 Good-time Charlie 68 Like some saxes 69 Gator follower? 70 Dubbing creations 72 Knight wear 73 Sign of things to come 74 Caramel candy brand 76 T eem (with) 77 Drops by 79 Farmers place? 80 Pot part 82 Self-titled top-ten 1983 album 84 Hostess snack 85 Baby carrier? 88 Morning moisture 90 Curators deg. 93 Makes fast 96 Youth support group 97 Cinnamon gum brand 98 Shared a place (with) 99 Some railroad cars 100 Rejects dramatically, as a contract 101 Frothy seasonal beverage 103 Like a case being tried 104 Minos realm 105 Bridal accessory 108 __ hand: assist 110 Jane Curtin title role 111 Read letters? 113 Bus route component 115 Canadian gas 116 At no time, in verse 118 Head of the ranch? 120 New Deal dam org. 121 Past fast flier Solution on page 3D Gemini should watch out for momentary lapse of judgment Family flees in face of mans angry obsession with sports Fluttering wings call my attention to the activity at our bird feeder. Papa and mama birds are eagerly preparing for their offspring. The beauty of the cardinals, blue jays, doves, red-winged black birds, redheaded woodpeckers and even some finches brings delight and life to our backyard. They are examples of industriousness without a worry or care. Do you think they know the verse in Matthew 6: 26, NKJVthat uses them as an example for us not to worry? Look at the birds of the air, for they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns; yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Trusting their God-given instincts, they take care of the moment not worrying about provision for the next season of baby birds. With the arrival of springtime, trees bud, delicate flower petals open and bright new shoots of green grass take over winters dry browns. Im always eager to watch the flowersspringtime fashion show. Bright daffodils, tulips, lilies, roses and more varieties than can be mentioned vie for our attention as they display colors, textures and scents that dazzle. Theres no scurrying around wondering how they may be more fashionable than the year before. Do you think they know the verse in Matthew 6: 28 that highlight them as a model of humble, unconcerned beauty? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they neither toil no r spin; and yet I say to you that even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these. Thats quite a comparison consid ering the riches and adornments at Solomons fingertips. He could choose any robe, crown, sandals, jewels you name it to wow anyone. Yet, Jesus chose to compare him to the simple perfection of a flower of the field. Flowers bring beauty and color into our world just by being. Ah!Maybe thats the secret. They know how to be;while we seem to always be doingrushing here and there and trying to please everyone. Perhaps its time for us to embrace the rest of those verses (31a, 32b, and 33). Therefore do not worry, saying What shall we eat? or What shall we drink?or What shall we wear?Fo r your heavenly Father knows that you need all these thing s. But seek first the kingdom o f God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you. Does that mean not to be responsible? Of course not. But, it does mean to exchange worry for trust. Be like feathers and petal s. Trust in Gods care. Selah Jan Merop of Sebring is a News-Sun correspondent and an award-winning writer. Feathers and petals are reminders of Gods care Pause And Consider Jan Merop Horoscope Dear Abby

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By ANGIE WEAVER Special to the News-SunThe retirement place had i t all smart, manufactured h omes, well-laid-out streets, a tidy golf course and a sturd y clubhouse with a s parkling pool. Well, almost a ll. There was nary a note of v ocal music anywhere, n otwithstanding the occas ional program or touring s how-until that magic year w hen it all changed. Small pockets of folks w ho had enjoyed singing in v arious choirs and schools b efore their own retirement m oves to this tropic paradise w ere beginning to emerge, f rustrated and ready to create a n outlet just for them. In the summer of 1999, a h andful of musicians put all t heir hopes into one man, L inden McIlvaine. He had b ravely volunteered to direct t his fledgling company of a d ozen or so. Rehearsals were c alled, a hat passed to defray m usic costs and, as Sherlock H olmes would say, the g ame was afoot! More and more brave s ouls came to practice and b y the time they performed t heir first concert, the numb er of singers jumped to the 2 0s. That inauspicious b eginning was over 10 years a go and the clutch of voices h as risen to more than 60 a vid men and women who l ove to sing, and have d emonstrated this several t imes a year to enthusiastic a udiences at Highlands R idge and elsewhere. Ahandful of hopefuls met a t Anne Marie Eckelmans, w ho was their first accompan ist, and linked together this m usical group. With Linden as their g uide, they dreamed up their f irst concert. Doris M orenzoni was there and r emembers one of their first p rograms, entertaining at c ocktail hour during a p otluck supper. Both Doris a nd Anne recollect the Rock P ar-Tee spaghetti supper, c omplete with Richie Rich o n a motorcycle. It was their f irst fundraiser. On a more refined occas ion, Erma Morgan, another f ervent pioneer, recalls that after their first bonafide show, an Andrew Lloyd Webber medley, an audience member remarked how proud they all were of the group. She said it was just like their own kidsshows years ago, when the parents were puffed up with pride. Joan Landis, treasurer for 10 years, met with Linden and his talented wife, Bev, in 1999 to discuss having some music appreciation-type group at Highlands Ridge. She jumped at the opportunity, saying they really needed some culture around there. She also remembered a show where she and Mary Ann Wick were perched on ladders and sang one of the numbers from Bye Bye Birdie. Karen Bohn recollects a show in which she was costumed to represent a nun from Sound of Music, complete with a wimple, for Climb Every Mountain, then changed quickly to a sailor suit for HoneyBun from South Pacific. Judy Bowman, a devoted pioneer who recently had to bow out of Chorale, fondly remembers standing next to Clara Stadler, her bosom buddy, who kept her laughing for many years. Now a prolific author, Sunny Serafino recalls Beverly eagerly telling her about a new vocal group. She sang beside her friend, loved it, and urged Lenny, her husband to join. Male voices were then at a premium. They had a lot of fun the first year or so, then moved some time later; but they still recall fondly their years here. Pam Smart, another brave soul, remembers how nervous she was when she and Gil Wick were asked to sing a duet. Costumed in American Gothic farm clothes, they were a smash with Anything You Can Do, I Can Do Better during one of their spaghetti suppers. Researching copyrights and non-profit status was the aegis of Lynne Warman, who fondly remembers first rehearsals in individual singershomes with pianos. Lynne had sung with Jim Thompson and a band called the RidgeRunners, but they decided to focus on Chorale. Lynne is still singing, but Jim has left for his first love, barbershop harmonies. The man in which the fledgling group put its trust, Linden McIlvaine, was almost destined to retire here and lead this special clutch of voices. His southern Delaware background seems to have centered him a talented music man who would instruct young students for 30-odd years, not only wrote curricula for music programs, but was selected to serve on the illustrious tate of Maryland education committee-quite an honor. He met his equally gifted lifes partner, Beverly, at Lebanon Valley College and they have harmonized for the past 50 years. Close to retirement, they noticed a magazine ad touting Highlands Ridge in Florida and, after some mulling over, moved lock, stock, barrel and music, built their dream home here and prepared to settle down. Like other folks here longing to sing, Linden and Bev helped formed the nucleus for an ambitious chorale. Linden recalls fondly the casual summer concerts, but then singers would leave due to graduations, weddings, reunions and their absences would leave gaps of voice parts. His resolve kept it all together, however, and the stubborn handful of singers presented the Webber concert in the spring. More musicians moved here and soon there were two concerts a year, plus fund raisers, then sales people were eager to market the Chorale to perform at malls and other venues. Reason, or rather golf, prevailed and the Chorale has now settled down to the two annual concerts plus a wildly popular spaghetti supper. To say that birthing the Highlands Ridge Chorale was a labor of love is to speak the truth. All of the willing participants had to devote many hours of time spent away from their first love golfing and try to recapture the results of years of schooling, choirs, and, yes, the discipline it took to get ready to perform the concerts. From what this relative newbie has experienced, the result has been nothing short of miraculous. Remember, most everybody is mid-60s to 80s, and unbounded energy just does nt come as easily or stay a s long as it used to. I plan to remain a Choral e member until they carry me away, as do most of my newly-acquainted colleagues. The reason for this articl e is bittersweet. Our beloved director has decided to step down from his podium afte r this concert. We will miss him, but hell still be here and Bev, his wife, will keep contributing her vivid sopra no for years to come. Three of our own very experienced director/members have agreed to split th e duties, which are legion, among them. Connie Carter Bob Thiel and Sue Shellhammer have gracious ly volunteered to steer our Chorale to ever higher accomplishments. www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 3D Established 19311600 US 27 South Avon Park Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home4001 Sebring Parkway Sebring, 385-0125 111 E. Circle St. Avon Park, 453-3101 Chris T.Nelson Craig M. Nelson Darin S. MacNeil W .W LUMBER CO. 465-3331Hwy. 27 S. Lake PlacidWere More Than Just Lumber COMPLETE Building SuppliesPlease support the above businesses. They have made this page possible. Inspirational Thoughtsby Patricia Valentine THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502 Residential Commercial Mobile HomesSmall Enough to Know You Large Enough to Serve You500 South Lake Avenue 382-8300 453-3019 THIS SPACE AVAILABLECALL 385-6155, Ext. 502St.Luke 5:5-6,And Simon answering said unto him, Master,we have toiled all the night,and have taken nothing:nevertheless at thy word I will let down the net. And when they had this done,they inclosed a great multitude of fishes:and their net brake.In the above scriptures,Peter chose to obey Jesus and as a result he experienced a stunning display of divine power.In our obedience to God and His word it may sometime require doing some things that appear to be unreasonable.Our obedience to God should never be based on whether something seems fitting to our way of thinking.That is not to say God always bypasses common sense,but oftentimes what He requires of us may not appear reasonable or match our preconceived ideas. Disobedience will cause us to miss out on what God has in stored for us.Nothing pleases a parent more than to have their children walking in obedience.God is even more pleased when His children are walking in obedience.Be Blessed! Attend the Church of Your Choice! Tickets on sale now at the box ofce 10 AM 2 PM, 382-2525 or online at www.highlandslittletheatre.org.Musical by Matthew Sklar, Chad Bequelin and Tim Herlihy. Based on the film, its 1985 and rock-star wannabe Robbie is Jerseys favorite wedding singer. Hes the life of the party, until his own fiancee leaves him at the altar. Shot through the heart, Robbie hilariously makes every wedding as disastrous as his own. ADULT LANGUAGESpecial Preview Wed. March 23 March 25 April 10, 2011 ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Courtesy photo Members of the Highlands Ridge Chorale pose with retiring director Linden McIlvaine (seated front row, center). Thanks for the memories: McIlvane leaving Highlands Ridge Chorale CROSSWORDSOLUTION The man in which the fledgling group put its trust, Linden McIlvaine, was almost destined to retire here and lead this special clutch of voices. GET YOUR LOCAL NEWS STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCE

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Page 4DNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com 130 S. Commerce Ave. Sebring, Florida863-385-3497Mon. Fri. 9am 4pm Closed WednesdaysHighlands Countys Oldest Established Hearing Aid OfceSet it and forget it.Wi Series works with Starkeys SurfLink Media streamer, our set-and-forget wireless transmitter.With SurfLink, theres no manual pairing involved. Once you plug it into your TV or stereo, youre done! It automatically streams sound directly to your hearing aids when your in range. You can transition from one device to another simply by moving from room to room. It lets other in the room listen to the TV or stereo at the volume they prefer.No matter where you are or what youre doing,Wi Series is designed to make listening easier. Its the ideal hearing aid for people who are active and on the go, enjoy spending relaxing time at home or both.

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 5D E.O. Koch Construction1417 Swank Avenue Sebring, FL 33870(863) 385-8649COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTIONLet our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property, build your dream home,or do your remodeling.For all of your Aluminum,Steel,and Conventional construction needsEmail: kochcon@strato.net State Certified License #CGC1515338 SEAMLESS GUTTERS Specials5 INCH GUTTERS$2.99PER LINEAR FOOT6 INCH GUTTERS$3.99PER LINEAR FOOTMany Colors Available ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT Courtesy photo T he voices of Crystal Gayle, Larry Gatlin and Andy Cooney (right) will celebrate country, heritage, faith and friendship on Monday during South Florida Community Colleges Artist Series. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK The voices o f Crystal Gayle and Larry G atlin have proven to be u nbeatable over their long, G rammy Award-winning c areers. Now these great A merican voices are teaming u p with Irish Americas f avorite son, Andy Cooney, f or a stirring evening of patrio tism honoring the Great A merican Songbook and cele brating country, heritage, f aith and friendship during S outh Florida Community C olleges Artist Series at 7 :30 p.m. Monday at the S FCC Theatre for the P erforming Arts, Highlands C ampus. Larry Gatlin led the Gatlin B rothers through the course o f a four-decade career that h as taken them from dusty T exas stages to White House p erformances, to Broadway a nd the Grammy Awards, s traight to the top of the c ountry charts. Through it a ll, there has been one unifyi ng element music. After m any years of touring with h is brothers, Gatlin starred o n Broadway taking the lead r ole in the Tony award winn ing musical The Will R ogers Follies. Combining h is love of music and theater, Gatlin recently scored an entire musical using only his songs, both old and new. Gayles warm, resonant vocal style created a country crossover phenomenon as timeless as the beautiful music in her repertoire. Country, folk, pop, rock n roll, Broadway show tunes, and gospel all found equal place in her heart. Like her sister Loretta Lynn, Gayle too was a coal miners daughter before she was a platinum selling singer and a world-class entertainer. Her Grammy Award-winning hit, Dont It Make My Brown Eyes Blue is recognized as one of the 10 most performed songs of the 20th century. Her 21 other Top 10 singles and 16 No. 1 hits helped to make Gayle one of the most popular singers of her era. Cooneys dynamic stage presence and outstanding voice keeps him one of the busiest entertainers in America. Direct from his sold out appearance at Carnegie Hall in 2008, and christened by The New York Times as Irish Americas Favorite Son, his repertoire spans from sea to shining sea, singing songs from Dublin, Ireland to Dublin, Calif. and everywhere in between. Cooneys talent and versatility provide the ability to deliver a song directly to the hearts of his listeners. The unique voices of Gayle, Gatlin and Cooney join flawlessly together in patriotism to honor Americas Songbook and celebrate in celebration of country, heritage, faith and friendship. Combined with their own compositions, these American Voices are sure to bring the house down every time. The performance is sponsored by Quality Inn Conference Center of Avon Park/Sebring, Highlands Regional Medical Center, and Affordable Air by John and Carol Giordano. Tickets range from $39 to $46 and may be purchased online 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at http://performances.southflorida.edu. Tickets may also be purchased by calling the SFCC Box Office at 784-7178 or by visiting the SFCC Box Office in the front of the Theatre for the Performing Arts, 600 W. College Drive from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. MondayFriday. American Voices perform in SFCC Artist Series Monday By ANNE WATSON Special to the News-SunMy parents, especially my mom, gave me art. They had tried music, specifically piano, but clearly it was not my forte. A year later, at 8, I found myself in private art lessons with a classical style teacher, and throughout my life, this is where I continue to find more of myself more of the best of whom God made me to be. It was in my mothers heart, if not always in her abilities, to give us the best, the most inspiring things of life that could draw us to the beautiful possibilities of life. When I think of each of the arts, I can think of my moms inspiration, in some way ... Saturday morning house cleaning was accompanied by Camelot and The Sound of Music, Toscanini and Harry Belefonte on the record player. Her weekly trips to the library drew me to Victor Hugo (Les Miserables) and the Man of La Mancha. Her Spanish heritage and animated family gave me a knowledge of the rich value of each person and all peoples. And my parentslives painted a portrait of the artof giving, working in whatever small way they could for the poor where they lived in Miami, and then in St. Petersburg. And so, when I look at my work, I can see wonderful things that I know did not come solely from the stuff of me and when I look at my children and husband, my students, and my family and friends or those new people I havent had a chance to meet just yet, I am very thankful to be able to see them as a not yet completely known gift, just waiting to be opened. There is a painting in my studio that represents the spirit I received from my mom. It is of an old gentleman, looking up, into the distance, inspired and carried to the highest and best. My mom passed away Wednesday evening, but I dont believe the spark wen t out of her, as some say, but that her brigh test flame burns inexhaustibly now. Art Sparks! for me because of the gifts of m y parents. Please join me this Tuesday night in an artistic toast to all those who gave each of us our creative and joyful spirits. 6 p.m Try to be on time. At the Highlands Art Leagues Yellow House Glalery at 1989 Lakeview Drive. Anne Watson teaches painting in oils and acrylics, drawing and digital media at the Highlands Art League in Sebring, as well as in Avon Park and Lake Placid, and features a broad range of commercial and personal artwork. She may be reached at anne@annewatsonstudio.com and 449-0822. Parents light the first sparks A portrait of inspiration: Coventry Patmore by Anne Watson after John Singer Sargent. Special to the News-SunAVON PARK South F lorida Community College p resents an evening of songs a nd stories about the Civilian C onservation Corps (CCC) w hen historian, musician and s inger Bill Jamerson takes t he stage at 7:30 p.m. W ednesday in the intimate 2 45-seat SFCC University C enter Auditorium, H ighlands Campus. The Civilian Conservation C orps was a depression-era w ork program that ran from 1 933-1942. Three and a half million t eenagers enlisted in the w ork camps to restore A mericas damaged natural r esources. The CCC planted more t han 5 billion trees, cons tructed thousands of miles o f roads, built dozens of n ational parks, fought forest f ires, and participated in soil c onservation projects. The CCC boys learned s kills on the job sites, took a cademic classes at night in c amp, and participated in v ocational courses such as e ngine repair and welding. In the process, the CCC t urned boys into men, teachi ng them good work habits a nd responsibility. Learn how teenagers got a long in camp, what foods they ate, what their work projects were, and the practical jokes they played on each other. Most of the boys came into camp without a dime to their names. Find out why, 70 years later, many enrollees call it the best year of their lives. Since 1992, Jamerson has interviewed hundreds of former CCC enrollees and used their stories in his PBS Documentary Camp Forgotten, his historical novel Big Shoulders, and his CD of songs, Dollar-ADay Boys. He shares many of these stories about the men and the projects they completed across the country. He takes his audience on a rollicking journey back to the days when Benny Goodman was the king of swing and a soda cost a nickel. He performs half a dozen original songs in each program, reads from his novel, and shows a short clip from his video. The stories are sometimes hilarious, and often heartwarming, his presentation is a must for anyone who enjoys 1930s history. This event is a partnership with the Friends of Highlands Hammock. Tickets are $10 general admission and may be purchased online 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at http://performances.southflorida.edu. Tickets may also be purchased by calling the SFCC Box Office at 784-7178 or by visiting the SFCC Box Office in the front of the Theatre for the Performing Arts, 600 W. College Drive from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. MondayFriday. A musical tribute to the Civilian Conservation Corps at SFCC Courtesy photo Historian, musician and singer Bill Jamerson will take the stage on Wednesday to pay tribute through songs and stories about the Civilian Conservation Corps. The news is just a click away!www.newssun.com NEWS-SUN

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Page 6DNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011www.newssun.com Places to Worship is a paid advertisement in the News-Sunthat is published Friday and Sunday. To find out more information on how to place a listing in this directory, call the NewsSunat 385-6155, ext. 502. APOSTOLIC Greater Faith Apostolic Church, 24 Rainer Drive, Lake Placid, FL33852. invites you to come worship with us in spirit and truth at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday, and at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. For information contact 840-0152. Pastor Larry Carmody. ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christ Fellowship Church (Assembly of God), 2935 New Life Way. Bearing His Name; Preaching His Doctrine; and Awaiting His Coming. Worshiping God in Spirit and in Truth. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10 a.m.; Evening Worship, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Worship, 7 p.m. Pastor Eugene Haas. Phone 4710924. First Assembly of God, 4301 Kenilworth Blvd., Sebring. The Rev. Wilmont McCrary, pastor. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship and KIDS Church, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 7 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, (Adult Bible Study), LIFE Youth Group, Royal Rangers, Missionettes, 7:30 p.m. Phone 385-6431. BAPTIST Avon Park Lakes Baptist Church, 2600 N. Highlands Blvd., AvonPark, FL33825. George Hall, Pastor. Christ centered and biblically based. Sunday worship services, 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilities are available. Bible studies at 9:45 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Prayer Time 6 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible classes at 9:45 a.m. are centered for all ages. Choir practice at 5 p.m. Sunday. Church phone: 452-6556. Bethany Baptist Church (GARBC) We are located at the corner of SR17 and C-17A(truck route) in Avon Park. Join us Sunday morning at 9:00 AM for coffee and doughnuts, followed with Sunday School for all ages at 9:30. Sunday morning worship service begins at 10:30 a.m., andevening worship service is at 6 p.m.On Wednesdays, the Word of Life teen ministry and the Catylist class (20's+) begin at 6:30 PM. The adult Bible and Prayer Time begins at 7 p.m. For more information go to www.bethanybaptistap.com or call the church office at 863-452-1136. Faith Missionary Baptist Church, off State Road 17 North of Sebring at 1708 LaGrange Ave. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday Service, 7 p.m. Deaf interpretation available. Ken Lambert, Pastor. Phone 386-5055. Fellowship Baptist Church, 1000 Maxwell St., AvonPark, FL 33825. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday: Evening Service, 7 p.m.; Children/Youth, 7 p.m. Telephone: 453-4256. Fax: 453-6986. E-mail: office@apfellow ship.org; Web site,www.apfellow ship.org. First Baptist Church ofAvon Park, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park. Rev. Jon Beck, pastor; Jared Hewitt, youth minister; and Joy Loomis, music director. Regular Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Orchestra rehearsal; 9 a.m. Library open; 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; 4 p.m. Evening Service. Tuesday schedule: 8-10 a.m., basic computer class/Sonshine House; 7-9 p.m. conversational English and citizenship classes/Sonshine House. Regular Wednesday schedule: 5:15 p.m. Family Night Supper; 6 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer; 6 p.m. Adult Choir Practice; 6:30 p.m. childrens choir rehearsals; 7 p.m. childrens mission groups. Call 4536681 for details. Primera Mision Bautista, 100 N. Lake Ave., Avon Park, Johnattan Soltero, Pastor. Regular Sunday schedule: 10 a.m., Bible Study; 11 a.m., Worship Service. Wednesday schedule: 7 p.m., Bible study. First Baptist Church of Lake Josephine, 111 Lake Josephine Drive, Sebring (just off U.S. 27 midway between Sebring and Lake Placid). Your place for family, friends and faith. Sunday morning worship service is 11 a.m. Nursery is provided for both services with Childrens Church at 11 a.m. Life changing Bible Study for all ages starts at 9:45 a.m. Associate Pastor Allen Altvater leads the youth in their quest to become more like Christ. Sunday night worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer meeting at 7 p.m. along with youth worship in the youth facility, and missions training for all children. Call the church at 655-1524. First Baptist Church of Lake Placid, Knowing Gods Heart and Sharing Gods Hope, 119 E. Royal Palm Street. (2 blocks south of Interlake Blvd) Lake Placid, FL 33852 (863) 465-3721, Email: www.fbclp.com. Pastor Brett Morey, senior pastor. Sunday services Traditional Service 9 a.m., Contemporary Service 10:30 a.m. Link Groups at 9 and 10:30 a..m., Senior Sunday Night and Sunday Evening Bible study at 6 p.m. Wednesday Activities: Family dinner at 5 p.m. ($4 per person, reservations required). Adult-LifeSource classes, prayer meeting, Youth Intersections, and Kids K-5MaxKidz Extreme meet at 6:15 p.m. Men meet at 8 a.m. every Tuesday for prayer breakfast and womens prayer breakfast is at 8 a.m. every Wednesday, both at the Family Restaurant. First Baptist Church of Lorida located right on U.S. 98 in Lorida. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m. for all ages. Sunday worship services are at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Preschool care is provided at the 11 a.m. worship service. Wednesday evening Bible Study and Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m., followed by adult choir rehearsal. From September the AWANA groups meet. First Lorida is the Place to discover Gods love. For more information about the church or the ministries offered, call 6551878. First Baptist Church, Sebring, 200 East Center Ave., Sebring, FL 33870. Telephone: 385-5154. Dr. David E. Richardson, senior pastor; Rev. Joe Delph, minister of youth and activities. Contemporary Service, 8:30 a.m.; Group Bible Studies, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship, 11 a.m.; Mision Buatista Hispana, 2 p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs at the ROC begin 5:30 p.m., at church begin 6:30 p.m. Preschool and Mothers Day Out for children age 6 weeks to 5 years old. Becky Gotsch, director. Call 385-4704. Florida Avenue Baptist Church, 401 S. Florida Ave., Avon Park. Mailing address is 710 W. Bell St., AvonPark, FL33825. Telephone, 453-5339. Rev. John D. Girdley, pastor. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.; 11 a.m. Childrens Church; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night programs for children, youth and adults at 7 p.m. Independent Baptist Church 5704 County Road 17 South, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening, 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Fundamental, soul-winning, mission-minded, King James Bible Church. Larry Ruse, pastor. Phone 655-1899. Bus transportation. Leisure Lakes Baptist Church 808 Gardenia St., Lake Placid (just off of Miller at the west end of Lake June) Where the old fashion gospel is preached. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Worship service at 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at 7 p.m. Call the church at 699-0671 for more information. Maranatha Baptist Church (GARBC), 35 Maranatha Blvd., Sebring, FL33870 (Ahalf mile east of Highlands Avenue on Arbuckle Creek Road.) Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m.; Evening Service, 6 p.m. Mid-week service, Wednesday, 6 p.m. Daily Prayer and Bible Study, 8 a.m., Hamman Hall. Pastor Gerald Webber and Associate Pastors Don Messenger and Ted Ertle. Phone 382-4301. Parkway Free Will Baptist Church, 3413 Sebring Parkway, Sebring, FL33870. Welcome to the church where the Son always shines. Sunday School, 10 a.m.; Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m.; and Wednesday Evening Worship, 7 p.m. End-of-the-Month-Sing at 6 p.m. on the last Sunday of each month. The Rev. J.S. Scaggs, pastor. Church phone: 382-3552. Home phone: 214-3025. Affiliated with the National Association of Free Will Baptists, Nashville, Tenn. Sparta Road Baptist Church, (SBC) 4400 Sparta Road. Rev. Ken Geren, interim pastor. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer/Bible Study, 6 p.m. Nursery provided. For information, call 3820869. Southside Baptist Church (GARBC), 379 S. Commerce Ave., Sebring. David C. Altman, Pastor; Aaron Snider, Youth Pastor. Sunday School for all ages, 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship Service, 10:45 a.m.; Awana kindergarten through fifth grade, 5:30 p.m.; Evening Worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Student ministry, 6:30 p.m.; Adult Midweek Prayer and Bible Study, 7 p.m. Anursery for under age 3 is available at all services. Provisions for handicapped and hard-of-hearing. Office phone, 385-0752. Sunridge Baptist Church, (SBC) 3704 Valerie Blvd. (U.S. 27 and Valerie, across from Florida Hospital), Sebring. Tim Finch, pastor. Sunday School, 9;30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.; and Sunday Evening Service, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Prayer, Bible Study, and Youth, 6:30 p.m.Nursery provided. For information, call 382-3695. CATHOLIC Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 595 East Main St., Avon Park, 453-4757. Father Nicholas McLoughlin, pastor. Saturday Vigil Mass is 4 p.m. in English and 7 p.m. in Spanish; Sunday mass 8 and 10:30 a.m. in English; 6 p.m., Life Teen Mass. Weekday mass at 8 a.m. Confessions are at 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Religious Education Classes are 9-10:20 a.m. Sunday for grades K through 8th. Confirmation class is from 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. Youth Nights grades 6th and up, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday. St. Catherine Catholic Church, 820 Hickory St., Sebring. Mailing address: 882 Bay St., Sebring, FL 33870, 385-0049. www.stcathe. com. Very Rev. Jos Gonzlez, V.F. Masses Saturday Vigil, 3:30 and 5 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10:30 a.m.; Spanish Mass, noon; Sunday Family Mass, 5 p.m. (Holy Family Youth Center). Daily Masses 8 a.m. and noon Monday-Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Confession: every Friday 5-7 p.m., every Saturday 9-11 a.m. and 2:30-3:15 p.m., first Friday of the month 7:15-7:45 a.m., or by appointment. Enroll your students today for Catholic School grades Pre-K3 through 5th grade. St. James Catholic Church, 3380 Placidview Drive, Lake Placid, 465-3215. Father Michael J. Cannon. Mass schedule: Summer (May 1 to Oct. 31) Saturday Vigil, 4 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Weekdays, 9 a.m. December thru Easter Saturday, 4 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Weekdays 9 a.m.; and Holy Days 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., first Saturday at 9 a.m. CHRISTIAN Eastside Christian Church, 101 Peace Ave., Lake Placid, FL 33852 (two miles east of U.S. 27 on County Road 621), 465-7065. Ray Culpepper, senior pastor. Sunday: Bible classes, 9 a.m.; Worship Celebration with the Lords Supper each week 10:15 a.m. Thelma Hall, organist; and Pat Hjort, pianist. Wednesday: Praise and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Building Gods Kingdom for Everyone. Jesus Christ, the Way, Truth and Life! Alive and Worth the Drive! Sebring Christian Church, 4514 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Tod Schwingel, Preacher; Marco Gallardo, Youth Pastor. Sunday Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School, 11 a.m.; Sunday Youth Service, 6 p.m; Evening service at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday night meals, 5:30 p.m. followed by classes at 6:30 p.m. Office hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Phone 382-6676. First Christian Church, 1016 W. Camphor St., Avon Park, FL 33825; (863) 453-5334; on the Web at www.firstchristianap.com. Our motto is Jesus is First at First Christian Church.Greg Ratliff, Senior Minister; Ray Culpepper, Family Life Minister; Jon Carter, Music Director. Bible School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 6 p.m.; Wednesdaystudies for all ages, 6 p.m. Nursery provided for all events. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 510 Poinsettia Avenue, (corner of Poinsettia and Eucalyptus), Sebring, FL33870. Phone: 3850358 or 385-3435. The Rev. Ronald Norton, Pastor; Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Praise Breakfast, 10 a..m., Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Childrens Church, 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Praise and Worship, 6:45 p.m. Youth Fellowship, 7:15 p.m.; Midweek Bible Study, 7:15 p.m. CHRISTIAN & MISSIONARY ALLIANCE The Alliance Church of Sebring, 4451 Sparta Road, Sebring, FL33875. Call 382-1343. Rev. Steve Hagen, pastor. Sunday services: Sunday School meets at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship Service meets at 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening Bible Study meets at 6 p.m. (off site); Wednesday Prayer Gathering meets at 6 p.m. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Church, 146 N. Franklin St. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. morning worship and Sunday school. Testimonial meetings at 4 p.m. each second and fourth Wednesday. Afree public reading room/bookstore, located in the church, is open before and after church services. The Bible and the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scripturesby Mary Baker Eddy are our only preachers. All are welcome to come and partake of the comfort, guidance, support and healing found in the lesson-sermons. CHURCH OF BRETHREN Church of the Brethren 700 S Pine St., Sebring, FL33870 Sunday: Church School, 9 a.m .; Morning Worship, 10:15 a.m Wednesday: Temple Choir, 7:3 0 p.m. Phone 385-1597. CHURCH OF CHRIST Avon Park Church of Chris t, 200 S. Forest Ave.,Avon Park, F L 33825. Minister: Larry Roberts Sunday Worship Services, 10:3 0 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nursery facilitie s are available at every service. Bibl e Study: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. an d Wednesday, 7 p.m. Bible centere d classes for all ages. Church phone : 453-4692. Sebring Parkway Church o f Christ, 3800 Sebring Parkwa y, Sebring, FL33870; 385-7443. W e would like to extend an invitatio n for you and your family to visit wit h us here at Sebring Parkway. Ou r hours of service are: Sunday Bibl e Class, 9 a.m.; Sunday Worshi p Service, 10 a.m.; Sunday Evenin g Service, 6 p.m.; Wednesda y Service, 7 p.m. CHURCH OF NAZARENE First Church of the Nazaren e of AvonPark, P.O. Box 1118 ., AvonPark, FL33825-1118. 707 W Main St. Randall Rupert, Pasto r. Sunday: Sunday school begins a t 9:45 a.m. for all ages; morning wo rship at 10:45 a.m.; and evenin g service at 6 p.m. Wednesda y evening service is at 7 p.m. wit h special services for children an d adults. Special services once a month for seniors (Prime Time) an d Ladies ministries. If you need an y more information, call 453-4851. First Church of the Nazaren e of Lake Placid, 512 W. Interlak e Blvd., Lake Placid, FL33852 Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Mornin g worship, 10:45 a.m.; Evening serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evening, 7 p.m. Classes for adult children an d youth. Call 465-6916. Pastor Tim Taylor. CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN CHRISTIAN UNION Community Bible Church Churches of Christ in Christia n Union, (Orange Blossom Conference Center) 1400 C-17 A North (truck route), AvonPark Presenting Jesus Christ as th e answer for time and eternit y. Sunday morning worship service 10:30 a.m. Nursery provided Junior Church activities at sam e time for K-6 grade. Sunday Schoo l Bible hour (all ages), 9:30 a.m (Transportation available.) Sunda y evening praise and worship serv ice, 6 p.m. Wednesday evenin g prayer service, 7 p.m. Children an d youth activities at 7 p.m Wednesday. Everyone is welcome please come worship with us. Do n Seymour, Senior Pastor. Phon e 452-0088.PLACESTOWORSHIP The Friends of Highlands H ammock is a diverse group o f individuals that have a s pecial love for the park, w hich inspires them to volunt eer their time, talents and a bilities to enhance the parks o fferings to the public. W hether they are working on p rojects, fund raising or simp ly providing a voice of supp ort, these local citizens w ork to ensure the park r emains the pristine jewel of H ighlands County. Friends projects are varied a nd numerous. The board and v olunteers provide the Music i n the Park annual concert s eries, which began in 2002 a nd has since raised $50,000 w hile providing an inexpens ive, outdoor experience with t he arts for the community. Another big fund raiser for t he Friends is the annual T urkey Trot 5K run. This p opular race, held on T hanksgiving morning each y ear, provides a reunion-like a tmosphere for more than 5 00 participants, many who h ave run this race for years. D oug Morton, 2010s overall w inner, is also the son-in-law o f the late Dick Brown, origin al founder of the Friends of H ighlands Hammock and a lso the inspiration for this a nnual race. Dougs wife, Arin Brown Morton, is also the vice president of the Friends organization as well as the daughter of Brown. Another avid runner is Friends President Chet Brojek. Chet is responsible for the organization of numerous runs at the park, as well as the Hammock Half Marathon. This is no surprise to those who know him. Chet retired following 35 years with the Highlands County school system serving as a teacher, track coach and athletic director. Chet continues his legacy coaching runners and is also the founder/president of the Central Florida Striders Running Club. Chets civic duties and affiliations are too numerous to list, but his efforts for the park show in his ongoing dedication to improving all aspects of our operations. The Friends of Highlands Hammock enjoy a great relationship with park manager Steven Dale and his goal of keeping the park our Jewel of Highlands County, says Chet. The Friends assist with clean-up projects and facility improvements too. The donation of a former Highlands County School Board portable was one recent project, providing the park administration with much needed meeting and office space. We are always happy to support the parks needs and requests, says Chet. The Friends help fill budgets gaps in numerous ways. They have rented equipment for resource management projects and purchased twoway radio equipment ensuring staff communication during events, emergencies or fires. Arecent major purchase was a four-wheel drive Kubota vehicle. This all-terrain vehicle is used for daily park operations and allows great fuel savings over operating a full size truck. Park Manager Steven Dale says, I am very proud and fortunate to be able to work with the Friends of Highlands Hammock. In my 25-year Florida Park Service career, I have never worked with such a dedicated group. They are always supporting the park either financially with needed equipment and repairs or supporting us by physically working fund raising and events. With cut-backs that most agencies are experiencing, it is even more vital than ever that we give an extra measure of support to our beloved Highlands Hammock State Park, says Brojek. I urge the community to come out and experience the Real Florida. Want to join?The Friends of Highlands Hammock are always looking for new members. Annual membership is $15 for individuals and $25 for a family; both include 12 free visits to the park. Join the Friends by picking up an application at the Ranger Station or by emailing Dorothy.l.harris@dep.state.f l. us. Phone the Friends at 385 4736. Dorothy L. Harris is a park services specialist with Higlands Hammock State Park. Kudos for the Kubota Courtesy pho to The Friends of Highlands Hammock recently bought a four-wheel drive Kubota vehicle. This all-terrain vehicle is used for daily park operations and allows fuel savings over operating a full size truck. Park Manager Steven Dale (left) gets a ride from Friends President Chet Brojek. Guest Column Dorothy L. Harris

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www.newssun.comNews-SunSunday, March 20, 2011Page 7D EPISCOPAL The Episcopal Church of the R edeemer.Service time is 9:30 w ith Holy Communion. Coffee hour f ollowing services. Newcomers w elcome. Call 453-5664 or e-mail r edeemer1895@aol.com Web site: r edeemeravon.com. The church is a t 839 Howes Way, Avon Park ( two miles north of Sun N Lake B oulevard, across from Wells D odge.) St. Agnes Episcopal Church 3 840 Lakeview Drive, Sebring, FL 3 3870. Sunday Services: Holy E ucharist Rite I 7:45 a.m., Holy E ucharist Rite II 10 a.m. Midweek s ervice on Wednesday at 6 p.m. S unday School for all ages at 9 a .m. The nursery is open 8:45 a.m. u ntil 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. s ervice ends. Wednesday: Adult B ible study, 9:30 a.m. Visitors are a lways welcome. The Rev. Jim K urtz, rector. Church office 3857 649, for more information. St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal C hurch, 43 Lake June Road, Lake P lacid, FL33852. Phone: 4650 051. Rev. Elizabeth L. Myers, R ector. Sunday Worship, 8 a.m., 1 0:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday e vening: Holy Communion with H ealing Service, 6:15 p.m. Child c are available at the 8 a.m. and 1 0:30 a.m. Sunday service. Come s ee what makes us different. GRACE BRETHREN Grace Brethren Church, 3626 T hunderbird Road, (863) 8350 869. Dr. Randall Smith, senior p astor. Sunday services at 9 a.m., 1 0:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday s ervices at 7 p.m. We offer Kid C ity Childrens Ministry throughout a ll services, and there are variosu o ther classes for teens, married c ouples, prime-timers, and Bible s tudies in Spanish. Kid City Day C are, Preschool and After-School M onday-Friday: 7 a.m.-6 p.m. (For r egistration call: 385-3111). Check u s out on the Web atwww.sebringg race.org. INTERDENOMINATIONAL World Harvest and Restoration M inistries, (non-denominational) 2 200 N. Avon Blvd., AvonPark, FL 3 3825. Phone: 452-9777 or 4533 771. Sunday service: Sunday S chool, 10 a.m. and worship, 11 a .m. Wednesday services: 7 p.m. p rayer meeting/Bible study. Pastor: W .H. Rogers. LUTHERAN Atonement Lutheran Church ( ELCA), 1178 S.E. Lakeview D rive., Sebring. David Thoresen, D eacon, Spiritual Leader, on first, t hird and fifth Sunday each month, a nd Rev. Jefferson Cox on the seco nd and fourth Sunday of each m onth. Jim Helwig, organist/choir d irector. Worship service at 9:30 a .m.; Holy Eucharist is every S unday. Coffee hour on the first a nd third Sunday of each month. C ouncil meeting on the first M onday of month; Ladies Group W ELCAmeets at noon second M onday of month with lunch. Bring a dish to pass. Church Vegetable G arden Club meets as needed. L abyrinth Prayer Garden open s even days a week to congretation a nd community. Like to sing? C ome join the choir. Visitors always welcome. Come grow with us. Phone 385-0797. Christ Lutheran Church Avon Park, 1320 County Road 64, 1/2 mile east of Avon Park High School. Sunday Divine Worship is at 10 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated every week with traditional Lutheran Liturgy, hymns and songs of praise. Fellowship time with coffee and refreshments follows worship. Come worship and fellowship with us. For information call Pastor Scott McLean at 471-2663 or seechristlutheranavonpark.org. Faith Lutheran Church LCMS, 2740Lakeview Drive, Sebring. Church phone: 385-7848, Faith Child Development Center, 385-3232. Gary Kindle, Pastor; Lea Ann Curry, Parish Nurse. Worship services: 8 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school for children and adult Bible classes is 9:15 a.m.; and Praise worship service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Communion is served the first and third and fifth Sunday of the month. Sunday worship service is broadcast on WITS 1340 AM at 8 a.m. each Sunday. Educational opportunities include weekly adult Bible studies. Faiths Closet Thrift Store (385-2782) is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. All are warmly welcome in the Family of Faith. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (AALC) American Association of Lutheran Churches, 4348 Schumacher Road, Sebring, one mile west of Wal-Mart. James Weed, pastor. Worship Service, 9 a.m. Sunday. Bible Study, 11 a.m. Nursery provided. Social activities: Choir, Missions, Evangelism. Phone 3851163. New Life Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3725 Hammock Road, a Congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (ELS) in fellowship with the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS). Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.; Bible Study, 9 a.m. For more information, call Pastor Brian Klebig at 385-2293 or visit the Web site at www.newlife sebring.com. ResurrectionLutheran Church ELCA, 324 E. Main St., Avon Park. Pastor: Rev. John C. Grodzinski. Early Sunday service, 8 a.., Sunday school at 9:10 a.m. and the second service at 10:30 a.m. Coffee and fellowship hour follow the service. Midweek Fragrance Free Wednesday worship, (year round) 7 p.m. Office phone number is 453-6858. Trinity Lutheran Church LCMS, 25 Lakeview St., Lake Placid, FL33852; 465-5253. The Rev. Richard A. Norris, pastor; and Noel Johnson, youth and family life. Worship schedule for December through Easter: Worship service 8 and 11 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; (Childrens Church, 11 a.m. only); and Education Hour, 9:30 a.m. Worship schedule for summer through fall: Worship service, 9 a.m.; Communion services, first and third Sundays; Education Hour 10:30 a.m. Additional services: Lent and Advent season, 6 p.m.; Maundy Thursday and Good Friday, 7 p.m.; Easter Sunday, 7 and 10 a.m.; Christmas Eve, 7 p.m.; Christmas Day, 10 a.m.; Thanksgiving Eve, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Fellowship activities: Youth Group, Senior Citizens, Younger Side Adults, Ladies Missionary League, Ladies Guild, Small group studies as scheduled. Music: Choir and hand chimes. Trinity Tots Preschool (3-5 years old): 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. License: C14H10020: Susan Norris, director. Visit us online at: www.vchurches.com/trinitylutheranlp. NON-DENOMINATIONAL Bible Fellowship Church, 3750 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872. Sunday: American Sign Language: First Worship sermon, songs signed first and second Worship services. First Worship service, 9 a.m.; Second Worship service, 10:45 a.m. Nursery (up to 2 years old) and Sunday school classes both hours. BFC Youth, 6 p.m.; Evening Service, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: Children, ages 4 years to fifth grade, 6 p.m.; Youth, 6-7:30 p.m.; Prayer time, 6:15 p.m. Todd Patterson, pastor; Andy McQuaid, associate pastor. Web site www.bfcsebring.com. Church office 385-1024. Calvary Church, 1825 Hammock Road, Sebring, FL 33872; 386-4900. An independent community church. Sunday morning worship, 8:15 and 10 a.m.; Bible study, 10 and 11:15 a.m.; Sunday evening worship, 6 p.m. Pastor Lester Osbeck. Asmall friendly church waiting for your visit. Christian Training Ministries Inc., on Sebring Parkway. Enter off County Road 17 on Simpson Avenue. Sunday service is at 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Anursery and childrens church are provided. The church is part of Christian International Ministries Network, a full gospel, non-denominational ministry. Linda M. Downing, minister: Phone, 3140482, lindadowning@live.com.Casey L. Downing, associate minister: Phone, 385-8171, caseydown ing@hotmail.com. Web site is www.christiantrainingministries.net Grace Bible Church, 4541 Thunderbird Road, (second church on left) Sebring, FL33872. Phone, 382-1085. Andrew Katsanis, senior pastor. Saturday Worship, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Grace Bible Academy Adult Investigating Truth; first and third Tuesday, Prayer Gathering, 7:15 p.m.; Wednesday, Childrens & Youth Programs, 6 p.m.; Wednesday, 8:30 p.m., College Ministry.www.GBCconnected.org Highlands Community Church a casual contemporary church, meets at 3005 New Life Way. Coffee at 9:30 a.m.; Worship at 10 a.m. Nursery and Kids World classes. Small groups meet throughout the week. Church phone is 402-1684; Pastor Bruce A. Linhart. Union Congregational Church 106 N. Butler Ave., Avon Park, FL 33825. Sunday worship services are at 7:45 a.m. (informal), 9:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) in the main sanctuary. Sunday school for all ages is at 9:15 a.m. We also offer Wednesday and Saturday services at 6;15 a.m. and 6 p.m., respectively. Nursery/child care is available for all services. Senior Pastor is Bill Breylinger. Office: 453-3345. Web page at www.weareunion.org. All teachings are taken from the Manufacturers Handbook The Holy Bible. Come join us. Unity Life Enrichment Centre, new location, 10417 Orange Blossom Blvd. S., Sebring, FL 33875; 471-1122; e-mail unity@vistanet.net. Web site, www.unityofsebring.org. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Celebration Service, Nursery and Childrens Church. Weekly Classes, Christian Bookstore and Cafe, Prayer Ministry, Life Enrichment Groups. Rev. Andrew C. Conyer, senior minister transforming lives from ordinary to extraordinary. The Way Church, 1005 N. Ridgewood Drive, Sebring. Sunday school and worship service at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Youth activities, 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. The Way is a church family who gathers for contemporary worship, teaching of Gods Word, prayer and fellowship. Come early and stay after for fellowship time. Child care and childrens church are provided. Reinhold Buxbaum is pastor. The Way Aplace for you. Office Phone:471-6140, Church Cell Phone:381-6190. Email: theway church@hotmail.com. Web site:www.TheWayChurch.org PRESBYTERIAN Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA), 4500 Sun N Lake Blvd., Sebring, 33872-2113. A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America. Worship services: Sunday morning worship, informal, 8 a.m.; regular, 10:30 a.m. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday evening, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday evening Prayer Meeting, 6 p.m.; Youth Group and Kids Quest, 5:307 p.m.; choir practice, 7:15 p.m. Phone: 385-3234; Fax: 385-2759; e-mail: covpres@strato.net; Web site: www.cpcsebring.org. Rev. W. Darrell Arnold, pastor. Office hours: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday. First Presbyterian Church ARP, 215 E. Circle St., (two entrances on LaGrande), Avon Park, FL33825. Phone: 453-3242. The Rev. Robert Johnson is the pastor. Sunday School, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 10:30 a.m.; Potluck dinner, 6 p.m. third Wednesday; choir practice, 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday; Mary Circle business meeting, 1 p.m. second Wednesday; Sarah Circle business meeting, 4 p.m. second Thursday; Womens Ministries Combined Bible study, 4 p.m. third Thursday. Be a part of a warm, caring church family with traditional services, following biblical truth. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, 319 Poinsettia Ave., Sebring, FL33870. 385-0107. Sunday School, adult and college age, 9:30 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.; Tuesday: Youth Group (ages 1118), 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: Adult Bible Study, 10:30 a.m.; choir rehearsal, 5:30 p.m. Nursery available for Sunday worship. Call the church office for more information and other classes. Rev. Darrell A. Peer, pastor. Gail Sparks, director of youth ministry. First Presbyterian Church, ARP, www.fpclp.com,118 N. Oak Ave., Lake Placid, 465-2742. The Rev. Ray Cameron, senior pastor; the Rev. Drew Severance, associate pastor. Sunday morning traditional worship is at 8:15 and 9:30 a.m.; and contemporary worship is at 11 a.m. in Friendship Hall. Avariety of Sunday school classes for adults and children are at 9:45 and 11 a.m. in the educational building. Call the church office for more information about the classes offered. Nursery is provided for babies and toddlers; while young children up to second grade have a special Childrens Church offered during the worship service to help them grow in their spiritual knowledge. Spring Lake Presbyterian Church (USA), 5887 U.S. 98, Sebring, FL33876. Sunday School, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m. Session meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month, September throughJune. Board of Deacons meet at 5:30 p.m. first Monday of the month. Choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, September through April. Presbyterian Women meet at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of the month. Organist: Richard Wedig. Choir Director: Suzan Wedig. Church phone, 655-0713; e-mail,springlakepc@embarqmail.com,Web site, http://slpc.embarq space.com. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Avon Park Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1410 West Avon Blvd., AvonPark. Phone: 453-6641 or e-mail: avonparksda@embarqmail.com,Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m Saturday. Church Service 10:45 a.m. Saturday. Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Community Service hours on Tuesday and Thursday is from 9:00 a.m. till 2 p.m. Asale takes place the first Sunday of each month. Senior Pastor Paul Boling; and Associate Pastor Kameron DeVasher. Walker Memorial Academy Christian School offering education for kindergarten through 12th grades. ALLARE WELCOME. Website is www.discoverjesus.org Sebring Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 2106 N. State Road 17, Sebring; 385-2438. Worship Services: 9:15 a.m. Worship hour, 11 a.m. Prayer meeting, Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Community service: every Monday 9-11 a.m. Health Seminar with Dr. Seralde, every Friday, 10:00 a.m. Pastor Amado Luzbet. THE CHURCH OF LATTER DAY SAINTS The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3235 Grand Prix Dr., Sebring, Fl 33872; (863) 382-9092 Steve Austin, Bishop; Mark Swift, 1st Counselor; Del Murphy, 2nd Counselor. Family History Center (863) 382-1822. Sunday Services: Sacrament Meeting, 10-11:10 a.m.; Gospel Doctrine, 11:20 a.m. to noon; Priesthood/Relief Society, 12:101p.m.; Primary for children, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Youth Activities: Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. Scouts: first and third Wednesday, 7-8:20 p.m. Activity Days: 8-11 yr old Boys and Girls, second and fourth Wednesdays, 7-8:20 p.m. THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army Center for Worship. Sunday: Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Holiness meeting, 11 a.m.; and Praise meeting and lunch, noon. Tuesday: Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; and Womens Ministries, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Youth Ministries, 4 p.m. All meetings are at 120 N. Ridgewood Ave., Sebring. For more information, visit the Web site www.salvationarmysebring.com or call Major Bruce Stefanik at 385-7548, ext. 110. UNITED METHODIST First United Methodist Church 105 S. Pine St., Sebring,FL3387 0. The Rev. A.C. Bryant, pasto r. Traditional Worship Service at 8:1 0 and 10:50 a.m. in the sanctuar y, Contemporary Worship in the FL C at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School at 9:3 0 and 10:30 a.m. Methodist You th Fellowship at 5:30 p.m. Sunday s with Rick Heilig, youth directo r. The 10:55 a.m. Sunday worsh ip service is broadcast over WIT S 1340 on AM dial. There is a nurse ry available at all services. First United Methodist Church 200 South Lake Avenue, Avo n Park, FL33825. (863) 453-3759, R James Weiss, Pastor, Sunda y School 9 a.m., Worship 10:3 0 a.m. Bible study third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Praye r Shawl Ministry on the second an d fourth Friday of the month at 2 p.m for women who love God and cro cheting. Visit us at our church We b site: www.fumcap.org. Memorial United Methodis t Church, 500 Kent Ave., (overloo king Lake Clay) Lake Placid, F L, 33852. The Rev. Fred Ball. pasto r. Claude H.L. Burnett, pastor al assistant. Sunday schedul e: Heritage Worship Service, 8:3 0 a.m. (October-May only); Scho ol School for all ages, 9:30 a.m .; Celebration Worship Service at 10:45 a.m.; New Song worsh ip service at 10:45 a.m. Loving nur sery care provided every Sunda y morning. Youth Fellowship, 5 p.m Bible Fellowship Class, 6 p.m (October-May only). We offe r Christ-centered Sunday scho ol classes, youth programs, Bib le studies, book studies and Christia n fellowship. We are a congregatio n that want to know Christ and mak e Him known. Call the church offic e at 465-2422 or check out ou r church Web site at www.memo rialumc.com. St. John United Methodis t Church, 3214 Grand Prix Driv e, Sebring, FL33872. The Re v. Ronald De Genaro Jr., Pasto r. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; Sunda y Morning Worship, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m and 11 a.m. Nursery provided for a ll services. Phone 382-173 6. www.stjohnsebring.org Spring Lake United Methodis t Church, 8170 Cozumel Lan e, (Hwy 98) Sebring. The Rev. Clyd e Weaver Jr., Pastor. Worship ser vice starts at 9:55 a.m. Bible Stud y meets at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesda y. Choir Practice at 4:00 p.m. o n Thursday. Church office phon e: 655-0040. UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Emmanuel United Church o f Christ, where God is still speaking. 3115 Hope Street, Sebring, F L 33875 (1.8 miles west of U.S. 2 7 and Hammock Road). Sunday wo rship, 9:30 a.m.; Communion wi th worship first Sunday of mont h; Chapel Communion, 8:45 a.m. a ll other Sundays. All are welcome to receive the sacrament. For mor e information, call the church office at 471-1999 or e-mail eucc@ea rth link.net or check theWeb si te sebringemmanuelucc.com. N o matter who you are or where yo u are on lifes journey, youre we lcome here.PLACESTOWORSHIP Did you know that this p ast Tuesday, March 15, was N ational Ag Day? In fact, the w eek of March 13-19 is cons idered National Ag Week. T his important day was d esigned to help folks recogn ize and celebrate the import ance of agriculture. But, the r eality is that agriculture is so v ital that it should be apprec iated all year long. Did you know that agric ulture provides almost e verything we consume and w ear? And as important as o ur food and clothes are, a griculture is so much more. M any people, especially our y outh, may not be aware of t he many benefits that we all d erive from agriculture. One o f the goals of this important d ay is to build awareness in t odays youth. By unders tanding its importance, the A griculture Council of A merica hopes to encourage k ids to seek career opportunit ies in agriculture related f ields. As the global population c ontinues to increase, agric ulture is more important than ever. Products we use every day come from the plant and animal byproducts produced by Americas farmers and ranchers. Medical supplies such as pharmaceuticals, ointments, latex gloves, x-ray film and gelatin for capsules are products that stem from agriculture. In addition, plant and animal biotechnology have resulted in new antibodies for immunizations. Some of the other assets we receive from our friendly producers include lumber, paints, brushes, fuel, lubricants, tires, upholstery, adhesives, solvents, paper, ink, shampoo, cosmetics, lotions, toothpaste, crayons, textbooks, baseball bats, and shoes. Not only does agriculture benefit humans, farmers and ranchers provide food and habitat for about 75 percent of the nations wildlife. So if you missed National Agriculture Day this year, make sure to mark your calendars for next year. But we can celebrate all year long by showing our appreciation to our local producers. Next time you meet up with a producer, thank him or her for all the hard work they do to make sure we have the necessities and the luxuries we all enjoy. Teach your kids about the importance of agriculture and make sure they know that milk doesnt come from the grocery store. Here are some fun facts to get you on your way: Americans today consume 17.3 billion quarts of popped popcorn each year. Lettuce is a member of the sunflower family. The egg shell may have as many as 17,000 tiny pores over its surface. Through them, the egg can absorb flavors and odors. Storing them in cartons helps keep them fresh. There are more than 500 different types of bananas. Pumpkins are 90 percent water. The United States grows about one fourth of the worlds total supply of fresh peaches. Americans eat approximately 100 acres of pizza each day, or 350 slices per second. Americans eat 900 percent more broccoli than they did 20 years ago. In one day a honey bee can fly 12 miles and pollinate up to 10,000 flowers. Soy crayons have been created to replace toxic petroleum-wax crayons. Soy crayons are safer to use, brighter in color and less expensive to produce. One bale of cotton can produce 1,217 mens T-shirts or 313,600 $100 bills. An acre of trees can remove about 13 tons of dust and gases every year from the surrounding environment. Every year in the U.S. each person uses the equivalent of one tree, 100 feet tall and 16 inches in diameter to fulfill their wood and paper needs. Cows have four stomachs. Adairy cow consumes 35 gallons of water, 20 pounds of grain and concentrated feed and 35 pounds of hay or silage in just one day. Onions contain a mild antibiotic that fight infections, soothes burns, tames bee stings and relieves the itch of athletes foot. There are 340 million M&Ms produced daily. There are about 600 kernels on each ear of corn. Each American consumes about 53 pounds of bread per year. Apig can run a sevenminute mile. Each American farmer feeds more than 144 people Corine Burgess is the Natural Resources Specialist for the Highlands County Natural Resources Department assisting the Highlands Soil & Water Conservation District Some interesting facts about agriculture Courtesy pho to A dairy cow consumes 35 gallons of water, 20 pounds of grain and concentrated feed and 35 pounds of hay or silage in just one day. In a years time a dairy cow produces about 1,500 gallons of milk. News From The Watershed Corine Burgess

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